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Sample records for autoregressive spectral estimation

  1. The Marple algorithm for the autoregressive spectral estimates of the SMMW fourier transform spectroscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guangzhao, Zhang; Guangqun, Zhou

    1989-02-01

    The Marple algorthm for the autoregressive spectral estimates has been applied to the SMMW Fourier transform spectrum analysis. The experimental results have shown that this method yields AR spectra with three times higher resolution than the FFT method does. The improvements obtained from the Marple algorithm over the maximum entropy algorithm include higher resolution, less bias in the spectral peak frequency estimation and absence of observed spectral line splitting. The effects of the structure of the spectral lines and the noise on the resolution are discussed.

  2. Influence of autoregressive model parameter uncertainty on spectral estimates of heart rate dynamics.

    PubMed

    Christini, D J; Kulkarni, A; Rao, S; Stutman, E R; Bennett, F M; Hausdorff, J M; Oriol, N; Lutchen, K R

    1995-01-01

    Linear autoregressive (AR) model-based heart rate (HR) spectral analysis has been widely used to study HR dynamics. Owing to system and measurement noise, the parameters of an AR model have intrinsic statistical uncertainty. In this study, we evaluate how this AR parameter uncertainty can translate to uncertainty in HR power spectra. HR time series, obtained from seven subjects in supine and standing positions, were fitted to AR models by least squares minimization via singular value decomposition. Spectral uncertainty due to inexact parameter estimation was assessed through a Monte Carlo study in which the AR model parameters were varied randomly according to their Gaussian distributions. Histogram techniques were used to evaluate the distribution of 50,000 AR spectral estimates of each HR time series. These Monte Carlo uncertainties were found to exceed those predicted by previous theoretical approximations. It was determined that the uncertainty of AR HR spectral estimates, particularly the locations and magnitudes of spectral peaks, can often be large. The same Monte Carlo analysis was applied to synthetic AR time series and found levels of spectral uncertainty similar to that of the HR data, thus suggesting that the results of this study are not specific to experimental HR data. Therefore, AR spectra may be unreliable, and one must be careful in assigning pathophysiological origins to specific spectral features of any one spectrum.

  3. Autoregressive moving average modeling for spectral parameter estimation from a multigradient echo chemical shift acquisition.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Brian A; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Hazle, John D; Stafford, R Jason

    2009-03-01

    The authors investigated the performance of the iterative Steiglitz-McBride (SM) algorithm on an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model of signals from a fast, sparsely sampled, multiecho, chemical shift imaging (CSI) acquisition using simulation, phantom, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments with a focus on its potential usage in magnetic resonance (MR)-guided interventions. The ARMA signal model facilitated a rapid calculation of the chemical shift, apparent spin-spin relaxation time (T2*), and complex amplitudes of a multipeak system from a limited number of echoes (< or equal 16). Numerical simulations of one- and two-peak systems were used to assess the accuracy and uncertainty in the calculated spectral parameters as a function of acquisition and tissue parameters. The measured uncertainties from simulation were compared to the theoretical Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) for the acquisition. Measurements made in phantoms were used to validate the T2* estimates and to validate uncertainty estimates made from the CRLB. We demonstrated application to real-time MR-guided interventions ex vivo by using the technique to monitor a percutaneous ethanol injection into a bovine liver and in vivo to monitor a laser-induced thermal therapy treatment in a canine brain. Simulation results showed that the chemical shift and amplitude uncertainties reached their respective CRLB at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) > or =5 for echo train lengths (ETLs) > or =4 using a fixed echo spacing of 3.3 ms. T2* estimates from the signal model possessed higher uncertainties but reached the CRLB at larger SNRs and/or ETLs. Highly accurate estimates for the chemical shift (<0.01 ppm) and amplitude (<1.0%) were obtained with > or =4 echoes and for T2*(<1.0%) with > or =7 echoes. We conclude that, over a reasonable range of SNR, the SM algorithm is a robust estimator of spectral parameters from fast CSI acquisitions that acquire < or =16 echoes for one- and two-peak systems. Preliminary ex vivo

  4. Autoregressive models of singular spectral matrices☆

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Brian D.O.; Deistler, Manfred; Chen, Weitian; Filler, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with autoregressive (AR) models of singular spectra, whose corresponding transfer function matrices can be expressed in a stable AR matrix fraction description D−1(q)B with B a tall constant matrix of full column rank and with the determinantal zeros of D(q) all stable, i.e. in |q|>1,q∈C. To obtain a parsimonious AR model, a canonical form is derived and a number of advantageous properties are demonstrated. First, the maximum lag of the canonical AR model is shown to be minimal in the equivalence class of AR models of the same transfer function matrix. Second, the canonical form model is shown to display a nesting property under natural conditions. Finally, an upper bound is provided for the total number of real parameters in the obtained canonical AR model, which demonstrates that the total number of real parameters grows linearly with the number of rows in W(q). PMID:23483210

  5. Reduced-order autoregressive modeling for center-frequency estimation.

    PubMed

    Kuc, R; Li, H

    1985-07-01

    The center frequency of a narrowband, discrete-time random process, such as a reflected ultrasound signal, is estimated from the parameter values of a reduced, second-order autoregressive (AR) model. This approach is proposed as a fast estimator that performs better than the zero-crossing count estimate for determining the center-frequency location. The parameter values are obtained through a linear prediction analysis on the correlated random process, which in this case is identical to the maximum entropy method for spectral estimation. The frequency of the maximum of the second-order model spectrum is determined from these parameters and is used as the center-frequency estimate. This estimate can be computed very efficiently, requiring only the estimates of the first three terms of the process autocorrelation function. The bias and variance properties of this estimator are determined for a random process having a Gaussian-shaped spectrum and compared to those of the ideal FM frequency discriminator, zero-crossing count estimator and a correlation estimator. It is found that the variance values for the reduced-order AR model center-frequency estimator lie between those for the ideal FM frequency discriminator and the zero-crossing count estimator.

  6. Autoregressive modeling for the spectral analysis of oceanographic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangopadhyay, Avijit; Cornillon, Peter; Jackson, Leland B.

    1989-01-01

    Over the last decade there has been a dramatic increase in the number and volume of data sets useful for oceanographic studies. Many of these data sets consist of long temporal or spatial series derived from satellites and large-scale oceanographic experiments. These data sets are, however, often 'gappy' in space, irregular in time, and always of finite length. The conventional Fourier transform (FT) approach to the spectral analysis is thus often inapplicable, or where applicable, it provides questionable results. Here, through comparative analysis with the FT for different oceanographic data sets, the possibilities offered by autoregressive (AR) modeling to perform spectral analysis of gappy, finite-length series, are discussed. The applications demonstrate that as the length of the time series becomes shorter, the resolving power of the AR approach as compared with that of the FT improves. For the longest data sets examined here, 98 points, the AR method performed only slightly better than the FT, but for the very short ones, 17 points, the AR method showed a dramatic improvement over the FT. The application of the AR method to a gappy time series, although a secondary concern of this manuscript, further underlines the value of this approach.

  7. Sensorimotor rhythm-based brain computer interface (BCI): model order selection for autoregressive spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, Dennis J.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.

    2008-06-01

    People can learn to control EEG features consisting of sensorimotor rhythm amplitudes and can use this control to move a cursor in one or two dimensions to a target on a screen. Cursor movement depends on the estimate of the amplitudes of sensorimotor rhythms. Autoregressive models are often used to provide these estimates. The order of the autoregressive model has varied widely among studies. Through analyses of both simulated and actual EEG data, the present study examines the effects of model order on sensorimotor rhythm measurements and BCI performance. The results show that resolution of lower frequency signals requires higher model orders and that this requirement reflects the temporal span of the model coefficients. This is true for both simulated EEG data and actual EEG data during brain-computer interface (BCI) operation. Increasing model order, and decimating the signal were similarly effective in increasing spectral resolution. Furthermore, for BCI control of two-dimensional cursor movement, higher model orders produced better performance in each dimension and greater independence between horizontal and vertical movements. In sum, these results show that autoregressive model order selection is an important determinant of BCI performance and should be based on criteria that reflect system performance.

  8. Computing the Periods of Light Variation of Blazar Objects 3C279 and OJ 287 with Autoregressive Spectral Analysis Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jie; Zhang, Xiao-juan; Pang, Qiao; Zhang, Hao-Jing; Zheng, Yong-Gang; Zhang, Xiong

    2010-04-01

    The light variability is one of the main characteristics of blazar objects. Because of the complexity of their light curves, the present periodicity analysis methods are not yet perfect. Based on the modern spectral estimate theory, this paper has described in details the principles of the maximum entropy spectral estimate and autoregressive (AR) spectral estimate, analyzed the effect of the order number selection on the resultant model. Applying these methods to the periodicity analysis of the quasar 3C 279 and BL Lac object OJ 287, their light periods are obtained to be 7.14 and 11.76 yr, respectively. As is verified by experiments, the AR spectral estimate has a high resolution and is a rather good periodicity analysis method. Finally, the items noteworthy for the application of these spectrum estimation methods to the periodicity analysis of the light variations of blazars are mentioned.

  9. Maximum likelihood estimation for periodic autoregressive moving average models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vecchia, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    A useful class of models for seasonal time series that cannot be filtered or standardized to achieve second-order stationarity is that of periodic autoregressive moving average (PARMA) models, which are extensions of ARMA models that allow periodic (seasonal) parameters. An approximation to the exact likelihood for Gaussian PARMA processes is developed, and a straightforward algorithm for its maximization is presented. The algorithm is tested on several periodic ARMA(1, 1) models through simulation studies and is compared to moment estimation via the seasonal Yule-Walker equations. Applicability of the technique is demonstrated through an analysis of a seasonal stream-flow series from the Rio Caroni River in Venezuela.

  10. [Modern spectral estimation of ICP-AES].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Jia, Q; Liu, S; Guo, L; Chen, H; Zeng, X

    2000-06-01

    The inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and its signal characteristics were discussed using modern spectral estimation technique. The power spectra density (PSD) was calculated using the auto-regression (AR) model of modern spectra estimation. The Levinson-Durbin recursion method was used to estimate the model parameters which were used for the PSD computation. The results obtained with actual ICP-AES spectra and measurements showed that the spectral estimation technique was helpful for the better understanding about spectral composition and signal characteristics.

  11. Compressive Estimation and Imaging Based on Autoregressive Models.

    PubMed

    Testa, Matteo; Magli, Enrico

    2016-11-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) is a fast and efficient way to obtain compact signal representations. Oftentimes, one wishes to extract some information from the available compressed signal. Since CS signal recovery is typically expensive from a computational point of view, it is inconvenient to first recover the signal and then extract the information. A much more effective approach consists in estimating the information directly from the signal's linear measurements. In this paper, we propose a novel framework for compressive estimation of autoregressive (AR) process parameters based on ad hoc sensing matrix construction. More in detail, we introduce a compressive least square estimator for AR(p) parameters and a specific AR(1) compressive Bayesian estimator. We exploit the proposed techniques to address two important practical problems. The first is compressive covariance estimation for Toeplitz structured covariance matrices where we tackle the problem with a novel parametric approach based on the estimated AR parameters. The second is a block-based compressive imaging system, where we introduce an algorithm that adaptively calculates the number of measurements to be acquired for each block from a set of initial measurements based on its degree of compressibility. We show that the proposed techniques outperform the state-of-the-art methods for these two problems.

  12. Probability Distribution Estimation for Autoregressive Pixel-Predictive Image Coding.

    PubMed

    Weinlich, Andreas; Amon, Peter; Hutter, Andreas; Kaup, André

    2016-03-01

    Pixelwise linear prediction using backward-adaptive least-squares or weighted least-squares estimation of prediction coefficients is currently among the state-of-the-art methods for lossless image compression. While current research is focused on mean intensity prediction of the pixel to be transmitted, best compression requires occurrence probability estimates for all possible intensity values. Apart from common heuristic approaches, we show how prediction error variance estimates can be derived from the (weighted) least-squares training region and how a complete probability distribution can be built based on an autoregressive image model. The analysis of image stationarity properties further allows deriving a novel formula for weight computation in weighted least-squares proofing and generalizing ad hoc equations from the literature. For sparse intensity distributions in non-natural images, a modified image model is presented. Evaluations were done in the newly developed C++ framework volumetric, artificial, and natural image lossless coder (Vanilc), which can compress a wide range of images, including 16-bit medical 3D volumes or multichannel data. A comparison with several of the best available lossless image codecs proofs that the method can achieve very competitive compression ratios. In terms of reproducible research, the source code of Vanilc has been made public.

  13. Adaptive spectral doppler estimation.

    PubMed

    Gran, Fredrik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, 2 adaptive spectral estimation techniques are analyzed for spectral Doppler ultrasound. The purpose is to minimize the observation window needed to estimate the spectrogram to provide a better temporal resolution and gain more flexibility when designing the data acquisition sequence. The methods can also provide better quality of the estimated power spectral density (PSD) of the blood signal. Adaptive spectral estimation techniques are known to provide good spectral resolution and contrast even when the observation window is very short. The 2 adaptive techniques are tested and compared with the averaged periodogram (Welch's method). The blood power spectral capon (BPC) method is based on a standard minimum variance technique adapted to account for both averaging over slow-time and depth. The blood amplitude and phase estimation technique (BAPES) is based on finding a set of matched filters (one for each velocity component of interest) and filtering the blood process over slow-time and averaging over depth to find the PSD. The methods are tested using various experiments and simulations. First, controlled flow-rig experiments with steady laminar flow are carried out. Simulations in Field II for pulsating flow resembling the femoral artery are also analyzed. The simulations are followed by in vivo measurement on the common carotid artery. In all simulations and experiments it was concluded that the adaptive methods display superior performance for short observation windows compared with the averaged periodogram. Computational costs and implementation details are also discussed.

  14. Time-varying autoregressive model for spectral analysis of microseismic experiments and long-period volcanic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tary, J. B.; Herrera, R. H.; van der Baan, M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies show that the frequency content of continuous passive recordings contains useful information for the study of hydraulic fracturing experiments as well as longstanding applications in volcano and global seismology. The short-time Fourier transform (STFT) is usually used to obtain the time-frequency representation of a seismic trace. Yet, this transform has two main disadvantages, namely its fixed time-frequency resolution and spectral leakage. Here, we describe two methods based on autoregressive (AR) models: the short-time autoregressive method (ST-AR) and the Kalman smoother (KS). These two methods allow for the AR coefficients to vary over time in order to follow time-varying frequency contents. The outcome of AR methods depends mainly on the number of AR coefficients. We use a robust approach to estimate the optimum order of the AR methods that best matches the spectral comparison between Fourier and AR spectra. Comparing the outcomes of the three methods on a synthetic signal, a long-period volcanic event, and microseismic data, we show that the STFT and both AR methods are able to track fast changes in frequency content. The STFT provides reasonable results even for noisy data using a simple and effective algorithm. The coefficients of the AR filter are defined at all time in the case of the KS. However, its better time resolution is slightly offset by a lower frequency resolution and its computational complexity. The ST-AR has a high spectral resolution and the lowest sensitivity to background noises, facilitating the identification of the various frequency components. The estimated AR coefficients can also be used to extract parts of the signal. The study of long-term phenomena, such as resonance frequencies, or transient events, such as long-period events, could help to gain further insight on reservoir deformation during hydraulic fracturing experiments as well as global or volcano seismological signals.

  15. Power spectral estimation algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Manjit S.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms to estimate the power spectrum using Maximum Entropy Methods were developed. These algorithms were coded in FORTRAN 77 and were implemented on the VAX 780. The important considerations in this analysis are: (1) resolution, i.e., how close in frequency two spectral components can be spaced and still be identified; (2) dynamic range, i.e., how small a spectral peak can be, relative to the largest, and still be observed in the spectra; and (3) variance, i.e., how accurate the estimate of the spectra is to the actual spectra. The application of the algorithms based on Maximum Entropy Methods to a variety of data shows that these criteria are met quite well. Additional work in this direction would help confirm the findings. All of the software developed was turned over to the technical monitor. A copy of a typical program is included. Some of the actual data and graphs used on this data are also included.

  16. Heart rate variability in passive tilt test: comparative evaluation of autoregressive and FFT spectral analyses.

    PubMed

    Badilini, F; Maison-Blanche, P; Coumel, P

    1998-05-01

    The dynamic response of the autonomic nervous system during tilting is assessed by changes in the low (LF) and high frequency (HF) components of the RR series power spectral density (PSD). Although results of many studies are consistent, some doubts related to different methodologies remain. Specifically, the respective relevance of autoregressive (AR) and fast Fourier transform (FFT) methods is often questioned. Beat-to-beat RR series were recorded during 90 degrees passive tilt in 18 healthy subjects (29 +/- 5 years, eight females). FFT-based (50% overlap, Hanning window) and AR-based (Levinson-Durbin algorithm) PSDs were calculated on the same RR intervals. Powers in very low frequency (VLF: < 0.04 Hz), LF (0.04-0.15 Hz), and HF (0.15-0.40 Hz) bands were calculated either by spectrum integration (FFT and ARIN), by considering the highest AR component in each band (ARHP), or by summation of all AR components (ARAP). LF and HF raw powers (ms2) were normalized by total power (%P) and by total power after removal of the VLF component (nu). AR and FFT total powers were not different, regardless of body position. In supine condition, when compared to ARHP and ARAP, FFT underestimated VLF and overestimated LF, whereas in tilt position FFT overestimated HF and underestimated LF. However, supine/tilt trends were consistent in all methods showing a clear reduction of HF and a less marked increase of LF. Both normalization procedures provided a significant LF increase and further magnified the HF decrease. Results obtained with ARIN were remarkably close to those obtained with FFT. In conclusion, significant differences between AR and FFT spectral analyses do exist, particularly in supine position. Nevertheless, dynamic trends provided by the two approaches are consistent. Normalization is necessary to evidence the LF increase during tilt.

  17. Modulation of electroencephalograph activity by manual acupuncture stimulation in healthy subjects: An autoregressive spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xi-Le; Han, Chun-Xiao

    2013-02-01

    To investigate whether and how manual acupuncture (MA) modulates brain activities, we design an experiment where acupuncture at acupoint ST36 of the right leg is used to obtain electroencephalograph (EEG) signals in healthy subjects. We adopt the autoregressive (AR) Burg method to estimate the power spectrum of EEG signals and analyze the relative powers in delta (0 Hz-4 Hz), theta (4 Hz-8 Hz), alpha (8 Hz-13 Hz), and beta (13 Hz-30 Hz) bands. Our results show that MA at ST36 can significantly increase the EEG slow wave relative power (delta band) and reduce the fast wave relative powers (alpha and beta bands), while there are no statistical differences in theta band relative power between different acupuncture states. In order to quantify the ratio of slow to fast wave EEG activity, we compute the power ratio index. It is found that the MA can significantly increase the power ratio index, especially in frontal and central lobes. All the results highlight the modulation of brain activities with MA and may provide potential help for the clinical use of acupuncture. The proposed quantitative method of acupuncture signals may be further used to make MA more standardized.

  18. Alternative robust estimators for autoregressive models with outliers using differential evolution algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addawe, Rizavel C.; Addawe, Joel M.; Magadia, Joselito C.

    2016-11-01

    The Least Squares (LS), Least Median Squares (LMdS), Reweighted Least Squares (RLS) and Trimmed Least Squares (TLS) estimators are used to obtain parameter estimates of AR models using DE algorithm. The empirical study indicated that, the RLS estimator seems to be very reasonable because of having smaller root mean square error (RMSE), particularly for the Gaussian AR(1) process with unknown drift and additive outliers. Moreover, while LS performs well on shorter processes with less percentage and smaller magnitude of additive outliers (AOS); RLS and TLS compare favorably with respect to LS for longer AR processes. Thus, this study recommends the Reweighted Least Squares estimator as an alternative to the LS estimator in the case of autoregressive processes with additive outliers. The experiment also demonstrates that Differential Evolution (DE) algorithm obtains optimal solutions for fitting first-order autoregressive processes with outliers using the estimators. At the request of all authors of the paper, and with the agreement of the Proceedings Editor, an updated version of this article was published on 15 December 2016. The original version supplied to AIP Publishing contained errors in some of the mathematical equations and in Table 2. The errors have been corrected in the updated and re-published article.

  19. The G-Spectral Estimator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    correlation function and is equivalent to an en-transformation [11] of the same function. Gray, Houston and Morgan ( GHM ) noted the estimator to have some...satis- factory way of selecting the proper value n in the en-transform. GHM went on to conclude that an ARMA spectral estimator would probably have...which will be seen to avoid the difficulties noted by GHM , and will in fact, be shown to be equivalent to a method of moments ARMA spectral estimator

  20. Estimating parameters of a multiple autoregressive model by the modified maximum likelihood method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrak, Özlem Türker; Akkaya, Aysen D.

    2010-02-01

    We consider a multiple autoregressive model with non-normal error distributions, the latter being more prevalent in practice than the usually assumed normal distribution. Since the maximum likelihood equations have convergence problems (Puthenpura and Sinha, 1986) [11], we work out modified maximum likelihood equations by expressing the maximum likelihood equations in terms of ordered residuals and linearizing intractable nonlinear functions (Tiku and Suresh, 1992) [8]. The solutions, called modified maximum estimators, are explicit functions of sample observations and therefore easy to compute. They are under some very general regularity conditions asymptotically unbiased and efficient (Vaughan and Tiku, 2000) [4]. We show that for small sample sizes, they have negligible bias and are considerably more efficient than the traditional least squares estimators. We show that our estimators are robust to plausible deviations from an assumed distribution and are therefore enormously advantageous as compared to the least squares estimators. We give a real life example.

  1. Robust Estimation of Transition Matrices in High Dimensional Heavy-tailed Vector Autoregressive Processes

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Huitong; Xu, Sheng; Han, Fang; Liu, Han; Caffo, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Gaussian vector autoregressive (VAR) processes have been extensively studied in the literature. However, Gaussian assumptions are stringent for heavy-tailed time series that frequently arises in finance and economics. In this paper, we develop a unified framework for modeling and estimating heavy-tailed VAR processes. In particular, we generalize the Gaussian VAR model by an elliptical VAR model that naturally accommodates heavy-tailed time series. Under this model, we develop a quantile-based robust estimator for the transition matrix of the VAR process. We show that the proposed estimator achieves parametric rates of convergence in high dimensions. This is the first work in analyzing heavy-tailed high dimensional VAR processes. As an application of the proposed framework, we investigate Granger causality in the elliptical VAR process, and show that the robust transition matrix estimator induces sign-consistent estimators of Granger causality. The empirical performance of the proposed methodology is demonstrated by both synthetic and real data. We show that the proposed estimator is robust to heavy tails, and exhibit superior performance in stock price prediction. PMID:28133642

  2. Heterogeneous autoregressive model with structural break using nearest neighbor truncation volatility estimators for DAX.

    PubMed

    Chin, Wen Cheong; Lee, Min Cherng; Yap, Grace Lee Ching

    2016-01-01

    High frequency financial data modelling has become one of the important research areas in the field of financial econometrics. However, the possible structural break in volatile financial time series often trigger inconsistency issue in volatility estimation. In this study, we propose a structural break heavy-tailed heterogeneous autoregressive (HAR) volatility econometric model with the enhancement of jump-robust estimators. The breakpoints in the volatility are captured by dummy variables after the detection by Bai-Perron sequential multi breakpoints procedure. In order to further deal with possible abrupt jump in the volatility, the jump-robust volatility estimators are composed by using the nearest neighbor truncation approach, namely the minimum and median realized volatility. Under the structural break improvements in both the models and volatility estimators, the empirical findings show that the modified HAR model provides the best performing in-sample and out-of-sample forecast evaluations as compared with the standard HAR models. Accurate volatility forecasts have direct influential to the application of risk management and investment portfolio analysis.

  3. Autoregression of Quasi-Stationary Time Series (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, T. M.; Küperkoch, L.

    2009-12-01

    Autoregression is a model based tool for spectral analysis and prediction of time series. It has the potential to increase the resolution of spectral estimates. However, the validity of the assumed model has to be tested. Here we review shortly methods for the determination of the parameters of autoregression and summarize properties of autoregressive prediction and autoregressive spectral analysis. Time series with a limited number of dominant frequencies varying slowly in time (quasi-stationary time series) may well be described by a time-dependent autoregressive model of low order. An algorithm for the estimation of the autoregression parameters in a moving window is presented. Time-varying dominant frequencies are estimated. The comparison to results obtained by Fourier transform based methods and the visualization of the time dependent normalized prediction error are essential for quality assessment of the results. The algorithm is applied to synthetic examples as well as to mircoseism and tremor. The sensitivity of the results to the choice of model and filter parameters is discussed. Autoregressive forward prediction offers the opportunity to detect body wave phases in seismograms and to determine arrival times automatically. Examples are shown for P- and S-phases at local and regional distances. In order to determine S-wave arrival times the autoregressive model is extended to multi-component recordings. For the detection of significant temporal changes in waveforms, the choice of the model appears to be less crucial compared to spectral analysis. Temporal changes in frequency, amplitude, phase, and polarisation are detectable by autoregressive prediction. Quality estimates of automatically determined onset times may be obtained from the slope of the absolute prediction error as a function of time and the signal-to-noise ratio. Results are compared to manual readings.

  4. Estimation of rotor effective wind speeds using autoregressive models on Lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giyanani, A.; Bierbooms, W. A. A. M.; van Bussel, G. J. W.

    2016-09-01

    Lidars have become increasingly useful for providing accurate wind speed measurements in front of the wind turbine. The wind field measured at distant meteorological masts changes its structure or was too distorted before it reaches the turbine. Thus, one cannot simply apply Taylor's frozen turbulence for representing this distant flow field at the rotor. Wind turbine controllers can optimize the energy output and reduce the loads significantly, if the wind speed estimates were known in advance with high accuracy and low uncertainty. The current method to derive wind speed estimations from aerodynamic torque, pitch angle and tip speed ratio after the wind field flows past the turbine and have their limitations, e.g. in predicting gusts. Therefore, an estimation model coupled with the measuring capability of nacelle based Lidars was necessary for detecting extreme events and for estimating accurate wind speeds at the rotor disc. Nacelle-mounted Lidars measure the oncoming wind field from utpo 400m(5D) in front of the turbine and appropriate models could be used for deriving the rotor effective wind speed from these measurements. This article proposes an auto-regressive model combined with a method to include the blockage factor in order to estimate the wind speeds accurately using Lidar measurements. An Armax model was used to determine the transfer function that models the physical evolution of wind towards the wind turbine, incorporating the effect of surface roughness, wind shear and wind variability at the site. The model could incorporate local as well as global effects and was able to predict the rotor effective wind speeds with adequate accuracy for wind turbine control actions. A high correlation of 0.86 was achieved as the Armax modelled signal was compared to a reference signal. The model could also be extended to estimate the damage potential during high wind speeds, gusts or abrupt change in wind directions, allowing the controller to act appropriately

  5. Neural networks with periodogram and autoregressive spectral analysis methods in detection of epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Kiymik, M Kemal; Subasi, Abdulhamit; Ozcalik, H Riza

    2004-12-01

    Approximately 1% of the people in the world suffer from epilepsy. Careful analyses of the electroencephalograph (EEG) records can provide valuable insight and improved understanding of the mechanisms causing epileptic disorders. Predicting the onset of epileptic seizure is an important and difficult biomedical problem, which has attracted substantial attention of the intelligent computing community over the past two decades. The purpose of this work was to investigate the performance of the periodogram and autoregressive (AR) power spectrum methods to extract classifiable features from human electroencephalogram (EEG) by using artificial neural networks (ANN). The feedforward ANN system was trained and tested with the backpropagation algorithm using a large data set of exemplars. We present a method for the automatic comparison of epileptic seizures in EEG, allowing the grouping of seizures having similar overall patterns. Each channel of the EEG is first broken down into segments having relatively stationary characteristics. Features are then calculated for each segment, and all segments of all channels of the seizures of a patient are grouped into clusters of similar morphology. This clustering allows labeling of every EEG segment. Examples from 5 patients with scalp electrodes illustrate the ability of the method to group seizures of similar morphology. It was observed that ANN classification of EEG signals with AR preprocessing gives better results, and these results can also be used for the deduction of epileptic seizure.

  6. Methods of dynamic spectral analysis by self-exciting autoregressive moving average models and their application to analysing biosignals.

    PubMed

    Schack, B; Bareshova, E; Grieszbach, G; Witte, H

    1995-05-01

    Dynamic methods in the spectral domain are necessary to analyse biological signals because of the frequently nonstationary character of the signals. The paper presents an adaptive procedure of fitting time-dependent ARMA models to nonstationary signals, which is suitable for on-line calculations. The properties of the model parameter estimations are examined, and in the stationary case are compared with the results of convergent estimation methods. On this basis time-varying spectral parameters with high temporal and spectral resolution are calculated, and the possibility of their application is shown in EEG analysis and laser-Doppler-flowmetry.

  7. Adaptive modeling and spectral estimation of nonstationary biomedical signals based on Kalman filtering.

    PubMed

    Aboy, Mateo; Márquez, Oscar W; McNames, James; Hornero, Roberto; Trong, Tran; Goldstein, Brahm

    2005-08-01

    We describe an algorithm to estimate the instantaneous power spectral density (PSD) of nonstationary signals. The algorithm is based on a dual Kalman filter that adaptively generates an estimate of the autoregressive model parameters at each time instant. The algorithm exhibits superior PSD tracking performance in nonstationary signals than classical nonparametric methodologies, and does not assume local stationarity of the data. Furthermore, it provides better time-frequency resolution, and is robust to model mismatches. We demonstrate its usefulness by a sample application involving PSD estimation of intracranial pressure signals (ICP) from patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI).

  8. Spectral procedures for estimating crop biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Wanjura, D.F.; Hatfield, J.L.

    1985-05-01

    Spectral reflectance was measured semi-weekly and used to estimate leaf area and plant dry weight accumulation in cotton, soybeans, and sunflower. Integration of spectral crop growth cycle curves explained up to 95 and 91%, respectively, of the variation in cotton lint yield and dry weight. A theoretical relationship for dry weight accumulation, in which only intercepted radiation or intercepted radiation and solar energy to biomass conversion efficiency were spectrally estimated, explained 99 and 96%, respectively, of the observed plant dry weight variation of the three crops. These results demonstrate the feasibility of predicting crop biomass from spectral measurements collected frequently during the growing season. 15 references.

  9. Standard methods for spectral estimation and prewhitening

    SciTech Connect

    Stearns, S.D.

    1986-07-01

    A standard FFT periodogram-averaging method for power spectral estimation is described in detail, with examples that the reader can use to verify his own software. The parameters that must be specified in order to repeat a given spectral estimate are listed. A standard technique for prewhitening is also described, again with repeatable examples and a summary of the parameters that must be specified.

  10. Comparison of spectral estimation methods in reconstruction of parametric ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, Pawan; Insana, Michael F.; Hall, Timothy J.

    1996-04-01

    The application of inverse scattering methods to diagnostic ultrasound echo signals has provided us with detailed information about renal microstructure and function. In particular, the average scatterer size has been used to follow changes in microvascular perfusion that occur early in many renal disease processes. This paper shows that by introducing prior knowledge of the tissue state into the process, uncertainty in the spectral estimate is reduced for low SNR situations, and the contrast and range-resolution in scatterer size images can be improved without increasing the noise. Prior information used in the estimation technique is obtained from the histology of biological tissue. Maximum a posteriori and constrained least squares estimators are designed to obtain images for different levels of noise and for different gate-durations. Prior knowledge about the noise properties and the nature of the echo spectrum is used to obtain the order of an autoregressive model for estimating the power spectral density.

  11. TP89 - SIRZ Decomposition Spectral Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Seetho, Isacc M.; Azevedo, Steve; Smith, Jerel; Brown, William D.; Martz, Jr., Harry E.

    2016-12-08

    The primary objective of this test plan is to provide X-ray CT measurements of known materials for the purposes of generating and testing MicroCT and EDS spectral estimates. These estimates are to be used in subsequent Ze/RhoE decomposition analyses of acquired data.

  12. Fisher Consistency of AM-Estimates of the Autoregression Parameter Using Hard Rejection Filter Cleaners

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-01

    Washington USA 98195 • Professor of Statistics at the Departmento de Matematica , Facultad de C. Exactas Y Naturales, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon...classes of such estimates are: (i) GM-estimates (Denby and Martin, 1979; Martin, 1980; Bustos, 1982, Kunsch, 1984), ( ii ) AM-estimates (Martin, 1980...given after ( ii ) above, see also Kleiner, Martin and Thomson, 1979, and Martin and Thomson, 1982). On the other hand, the AM-estimates are

  13. AR (Autoregressive) Modeling of Coherence in Time Delay and Doppler Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    Authoriy 3 Distribution Availabilhtv of Report 2b Declassifica’ion Downgrading Schedule Approved for public release: distribution is unlimited. 4 Performira...2 C. COHERENCE ESTIMATION ................................. 3 D. COHERENCE OF NARROW BAND SIGNALS WITH DIFFERENTIAL TIME DELAY AND DIFFERENTIAL...5 Figure 2. Coherence estimation block diagram (reinterpretation) ............. 5 Figure 3 . Coherence estimation block diagram using the FFT

  14. Multivariate Granger causality: an estimation framework based on factorization of the spectral density matrix.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiaotong; Rangarajan, Govindan; Ding, Mingzhou

    2013-08-28

    Granger causality is increasingly being applied to multi-electrode neurophysiological and functional imaging data to characterize directional interactions between neurons and brain regions. For a multivariate dataset, one might be interested in different subsets of the recorded neurons or brain regions. According to the current estimation framework, for each subset, one conducts a separate autoregressive model fitting process, introducing the potential for unwanted variability and uncertainty. In this paper, we propose a multivariate framework for estimating Granger causality. It is based on spectral density matrix factorization and offers the advantage that the estimation of such a matrix needs to be done only once for the entire multivariate dataset. For any subset of recorded data, Granger causality can be calculated through factorizing the appropriate submatrix of the overall spectral density matrix.

  15. Improved gene prediction by principal component analysis based autoregressive Yule-Walker method.

    PubMed

    Roy, Manidipa; Barman, Soma

    2016-01-10

    Spectral analysis using Fourier techniques is popular with gene prediction because of its simplicity. Model-based autoregressive (AR) spectral estimation gives better resolution even for small DNA segments but selection of appropriate model order is a critical issue. In this article a technique has been proposed where Yule-Walker autoregressive (YW-AR) process is combined with principal component analysis (PCA) for reduction in dimensionality. The spectral peaks of DNA signal are used to detect protein-coding regions based on the 1/3 frequency component. Here optimal model order selection is no more critical as noise is removed by PCA prior to power spectral density (PSD) estimation. Eigenvalue-ratio is used to find the threshold between signal and noise subspaces for data reduction. Superiority of proposed method over fast Fourier Transform (FFT) method and autoregressive method combined with wavelet packet transform (WPT) is established with the help of receiver operating characteristics (ROC) and discrimination measure (DM) respectively.

  16. Fisher Consistency of AM-Estimates of the Autoregression Parameter Using Hard Rejection Filter Cleaners

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-04

    Depuitmeato de Matematica , Facultad de C. Exactas Y Natuales, Ciudad Univenitahia, Pabelion 1, 1428 Buenos Aims, Areatina, and Senior Reseanher at CEMA, Viey...Martin, 1980; Bustos, 1982, Kunsch, 1984), ( ii ) AM-estimates (Martin, 1980; Martin, Samarov an4 Vandaele, 1983), and (iii) RA-estimates (Bustos, Fraiman...quite useful in a variety of application(in addition to the references given after ( ii ) above, see also Kleiner, Martin and Thomson, 1979, and Martin

  17. Adaptive Spectral Envelope Estimation for Doppler Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kathpalia, Aditi; Karabiyik, Yucel; Eik-Nes, Sturla; Tegnander, Eva; Ekroll, Ingvild; Kiss, Gabriel; Torp, Hans

    2016-07-07

    Estimation of accurate maximum velocities and spectral envelope in ultrasound Doppler blood flow spectrograms are both essential for clinical diagnostic purposes. However, obtaining accurate maximum velocity is not straightforward due to intrinsic spectral broadening and variance in the power spectrum estimate. The method proposed in this work for maximum velocity point detection has been developed by modifying an existing method - Signal Noise Slope Intersection (SNSI), incorporating in it steps from an altered version of another method called Geometric Method (GM). Adaptive noise estimation from the spectrogram ensures that a smooth spectral envelope is obtained post detection of these maximum velocity points. The method has been tested on simulated Doppler signal with scatterers possessing a parabolic flow velocity profile constant in time, steady and pulsatile string phantom recordings as well as in vivo recordings from uterine, umbilical, carotid and subclavian arteries. Results from simulation experiments indicate a bias of less than 2.5% in maximum velocities when estimated for a range of peak velocities, Doppler angles and SNR levels. Standard deviation in the envelope is low - less than 2% in case of experiments done by varying the peak velocity and Doppler angle for steady phantom and simulated flow; and also less than 2% in case of experiments done by varying SNR but keeping constant flow conditions for in vivo and simulated flow. Low variability in the envelope makes the prospect of using the envelope for automated blood flow measurements possible and is illustrated for the case of Pulsatility Index estimation in uterine and umbilical arteries.

  18. Adaptive autoregressive identification with spectral power decomposition for studying movement-related activity in scalp EEG signals and basal ganglia local field potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foffani, Guglielmo; Bianchi, Anna M.; Priori, Alberto; Baselli, Giuseppe

    2004-09-01

    We propose a method that combines adaptive autoregressive (AAR) identification and spectral power decomposition for the study of movement-related spectral changes in scalp EEG signals and basal ganglia local field potentials (LFPs). This approach introduces the concept of movement-related poles, allowing one to study not only the classical event-related desynchronizations (ERD) and synchronizations (ERS), which correspond to modulations of power, but also event-related modulations of frequency. We applied the method to analyze movement-related EEG signals and LFPs contemporarily recorded from the sensorimotor cortex, the globus pallidus internus (GPi) and the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in a patient with Parkinson's disease who underwent stereotactic neurosurgery for the implant of deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes. In the AAR identification we compared the whale and the exponential forgetting factors, showing that the whale forgetting provides a better disturbance rejection and it is therefore more suitable to investigate movement-related brain activity. Movement-related power modulations were consistent with previous studies. In addition, movement-related frequency modulations were observed from both scalp EEG signals and basal ganglia LFPs. The method therefore represents an effective approach to the study of movement-related brain activity.

  19. Trend estimation and univariate forecast of the sunspot numbers: Development and comparison of ARMA, ARIMA and Autoregressive Neural Network models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Jhajharia, Deepak; Chattopadhyay, Goutami

    2011-07-01

    In the present study, a prominent 11-year cycle, supported by the pattern of the autocorrelation function and measures of Euclidean distances, in the mean annual sunspot number time series has been observed by considering the sunspot series for the duration of 1749 to 2007. The trend in the yearly sunspot series, which is found to be non-normally distributed, is examined through the Mann-Kendall non-parametric test. A statistically significant increasing trend is observed in the sunspot series in annual duration. The results indicate that the performance of the autoregressive neural network-based model is much better than the autoregressive moving average and autoregressive integrated moving average-based models for the univariate forecast of the yearly mean sunspot numbers.

  20. Optimized spectral estimation for nonlinear synchronizing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommerlade, Linda; Mader, Malenka; Mader, Wolfgang; Timmer, Jens; Thiel, Marco; Grebogi, Celso; Schelter, Björn

    2014-03-01

    In many fields of research nonlinear dynamical systems are investigated. When more than one process is measured, besides the distinct properties of the individual processes, their interactions are of interest. Often linear methods such as coherence are used for the analysis. The estimation of coherence can lead to false conclusions when applied without fulfilling several key assumptions. We introduce a data driven method to optimize the choice of the parameters for spectral estimation. Its applicability is demonstrated based on analytical calculations and exemplified in a simulation study. We complete our investigation with an application to nonlinear tremor signals in Parkinson's disease. In particular, we analyze electroencephalogram and electromyogram data.

  1. Estimating time-varying nonlinear autoregressive model parameters by minimizing hypersurface distance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bufan; Chon, Ki H

    2010-08-01

    A nonleast-squares (non-LS) based method is presented for modeling time-varying (TV) nonlinear systems. The proposed method combines basis function technique and minimization of hypersurface distance (MHD) to combat TV and nonlinear dynamics, respectively. The performance of TVMHD is compared to the LS and total LS methods using simulation examples as well as human heart rate data recorded during different body positions. With all data, TVMHD significantly outperforms the two other methods by a factor of one order of magnitude; the LS-based methods require double the number of parameters than TVMHD requires to obtain similar residual error values. The significance of TVMHD is that due to its accurate parameter estimates concomitant with a fewer number of parameters, we now have the possibility of pinpointing parameters that may be of physiological importance, where such application will be especially useful in discriminating diseased conditions. Furthermore, our algorithm allows discrimination of model terms, which are TV or time invariant, by examining those basis function coefficients that are designed to capture TV dynamics. However, it should be noted that the main disadvantage of TVMHD is that it requires significantly greater computational time than the LS-based methods.

  2. Adaptive Spectral Envelope Estimation for Doppler Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kathpalia, Aditi; Karabiyik, Yucel; Eik-Nes, Sturla H; Tegnander, Eva; Ekroll, Ingvild Kinn; Kiss, Gabriel; Torp, Hans

    2016-11-01

    Estimation of accurate maximum velocities and spectral envelope in ultrasound Doppler blood flow spectrograms are both essential for clinical diagnostic purposes. However, obtaining accurate maximum velocity is not straightforward due to intrinsic spectral broadening and variance in the power spectrum estimate. The method proposed in this paper for maximum velocity point detection has been developed by modifying an existing method-signal noise slope intersection, incorporating in it steps from an altered version of another method called geometric method. Adaptive noise estimation from the spectrogram ensures that a smooth spectral envelope is obtained postdetection of these maximum velocity points. The method has been tested on simulated Doppler signal with scatterers possessing a parabolic flow velocity profile constant in time, steady and pulsatile string phantom recordings, as well as in vivo recordings from uterine, umbilical, carotid, and subclavian arteries. The results from simulation experiments indicate a bias of less than 2.5% in maximum velocities when estimated for a range of peak velocities, Doppler angles, and SNR levels. Standard deviation in the envelope is low-less than 2% in the case of experiments done by varying the peak velocity and Doppler angle for steady phantom and simulated flow, and also less than 2% in the case of experiments done by varying SNR but keeping constant flow conditions for in vivo and simulated flow. Low variability in the envelope makes the prospect of using the envelope for automated blood flow measurements possible and is illustrated for the case of pulsatility index estimation in uterine and umbilical arteries.

  3. A two dimensional power spectral estimate for some nonstationary processes. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gregory L.

    1989-01-01

    A two dimensional estimate for the power spectral density of a nonstationary process is being developed. The estimate will be applied to helicopter noise data which is clearly nonstationary. The acoustic pressure from the isolated main rotor and isolated tail rotor is known to be periodically correlated (PC) and the combined noise from the main and tail rotors is assumed to be correlation autoregressive (CAR). The results of this nonstationary analysis will be compared with the current method of assuming that the data is stationary and analyzing it as such. Another method of analysis is to introduce a random phase shift into the data as shown by Papoulis to produce a time history which can then be accurately modeled as stationary. This method will also be investigated for the helicopter data. A method used to determine the period of a PC process when the period is not know is discussed. The period of a PC process must be known in order to produce an accurate spectral representation for the process. The spectral estimate is developed. The bias and variability of the estimate are also discussed. Finally, the current method for analyzing nonstationary data is compared to that of using a two dimensional spectral representation. In addition, the method of phase shifting the data is examined.

  4. An efficient quantum algorithm for spectral estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffens, Adrian; Rebentrost, Patrick; Marvian, Iman; Eisert, Jens; Lloyd, Seth

    2017-03-01

    We develop an efficient quantum implementation of an important signal processing algorithm for line spectral estimation: the matrix pencil method, which determines the frequencies and damping factors of signals consisting of finite sums of exponentially damped sinusoids. Our algorithm provides a quantum speedup in a natural regime where the sampling rate is much higher than the number of sinusoid components. Along the way, we develop techniques that are expected to be useful for other quantum algorithms as well—consecutive phase estimations to efficiently make products of asymmetric low rank matrices classically accessible and an alternative method to efficiently exponentiate non-Hermitian matrices. Our algorithm features an efficient quantum–classical division of labor: the time-critical steps are implemented in quantum superposition, while an interjacent step, requiring much fewer parameters, can operate classically. We show that frequencies and damping factors can be obtained in time logarithmic in the number of sampling points, exponentially faster than known classical algorithms.

  5. Aortic endothelium detection using spectral estimation optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Si; Luo, Yuemei; Bo, En; Wang, Nanshuo; Yu, Xiaojun; Liu, Linbo

    2016-02-01

    The evaluation of the endothelium coverage on the vessel wall is most wanted by cardiologists. Arterial endothelial cells play a crucial role in keeping low-density lipoprotein and leukocytes from entering into the intima. The damage of endothelial cells is considered as the first step of atherosclerosis development and the presence of endothelial cells is an indicator of arterial healing after stent implantation. Intravascular OCT (IVOCT) is the highest-resolution coronary imaging modality, but it is still limited by an axial resolution of 10-15 µm. This limitation in axial resolution hinders our ability to visualize cellular level details associated with coronary atherosclerosis. Spectral estimation optical coherence tomography (SE-OCT) uses modern spectral estimation techniques and may help reveal the microstructures underlying the resolution limit. In this presentation, we conduct an ex vivo study using SE-OCT to image the endothelium cells on the fresh swine aorta. We find that in OCT images with an axial resolution of 10 µm, we may gain the visibility of individual endothelium cells by applying the autoregressive spectral estimation techniques to enhance the axial resolution. We believe the SE-OCT can provide a potential to evaluate the coverage of endothelium cells using current IVOCT with a 10-µm axial resolution.

  6. Small Sample Properties of Bayesian Multivariate Autoregressive Time Series Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Larry R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the small sample (N = 1, 3, 5, 10, 15) performance of a Bayesian multivariate vector autoregressive (BVAR-SEM) time series model relative to frequentist power and parameter estimation bias. A multivariate autoregressive model was developed based on correlated autoregressive time series vectors of varying…

  7. Comparison of two non-convex mixed-integer nonlinear programming algorithms applied to autoregressive moving average model structure and parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uilhoorn, F. E.

    2016-10-01

    In this article, the stochastic modelling approach proposed by Box and Jenkins is treated as a mixed-integer nonlinear programming (MINLP) problem solved with a mesh adaptive direct search and a real-coded genetic class of algorithms. The aim is to estimate the real-valued parameters and non-negative integer, correlated structure of stationary autoregressive moving average (ARMA) processes. The maximum likelihood function of the stationary ARMA process is embedded in Akaike's information criterion and the Bayesian information criterion, whereas the estimation procedure is based on Kalman filter recursions. The constraints imposed on the objective function enforce stability and invertibility. The best ARMA model is regarded as the global minimum of the non-convex MINLP problem. The robustness and computational performance of the MINLP solvers are compared with brute-force enumeration. Numerical experiments are done for existing time series and one new data set.

  8. Estimation of malaria incidence in northern Namibia in 2009 using Bayesian conditional-autoregressive spatial–temporal models☆

    PubMed Central

    Alegana, Victor A.; Atkinson, Peter M.; Wright, Jim A.; Kamwi, Richard; Uusiku, Petrina; Katokele, Stark; Snow, Robert W.; Noor, Abdisalan M.

    2013-01-01

    As malaria transmission declines, it becomes increasingly important to monitor changes in malaria incidence rather than prevalence. Here, a spatio-temporal model was used to identify constituencies with high malaria incidence to guide malaria control. Malaria cases were assembled across all age groups along with several environmental covariates. A Bayesian conditional-autoregressive model was used to model the spatial and temporal variation of incidence after adjusting for test positivity rates and health facility utilisation. Of the 144,744 malaria cases recorded in Namibia in 2009, 134,851 were suspected and 9893 were parasitologically confirmed. The mean annual incidence based on the Bayesian model predictions was 13 cases per 1000 population with the highest incidence predicted for constituencies bordering Angola and Zambia. The smoothed maps of incidence highlight trends in disease incidence. For Namibia, the 2009 maps provide a baseline for monitoring the targets of pre-elimination. PMID:24238079

  9. Estimation of malaria incidence in northern Namibia in 2009 using Bayesian conditional-autoregressive spatial-temporal models.

    PubMed

    Alegana, Victor A; Atkinson, Peter M; Wright, Jim A; Kamwi, Richard; Uusiku, Petrina; Katokele, Stark; Snow, Robert W; Noor, Abdisalan M

    2013-12-01

    As malaria transmission declines, it becomes increasingly important to monitor changes in malaria incidence rather than prevalence. Here, a spatio-temporal model was used to identify constituencies with high malaria incidence to guide malaria control. Malaria cases were assembled across all age groups along with several environmental covariates. A Bayesian conditional-autoregressive model was used to model the spatial and temporal variation of incidence after adjusting for test positivity rates and health facility utilisation. Of the 144,744 malaria cases recorded in Namibia in 2009, 134,851 were suspected and 9893 were parasitologically confirmed. The mean annual incidence based on the Bayesian model predictions was 13 cases per 1000 population with the highest incidence predicted for constituencies bordering Angola and Zambia. The smoothed maps of incidence highlight trends in disease incidence. For Namibia, the 2009 maps provide a baseline for monitoring the targets of pre-elimination.

  10. Parallel phase-shifting digital holography using spectral estimation technique.

    PubMed

    Xia, Peng; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro; Nishio, Kenzo; Ura, Shogo; Matoba, Osamu

    2014-09-20

    We propose a parallel phase-shifting digital holography using a spectral estimation technique, which enables the instantaneous acquisition of spectral information and three-dimensional (3D) information of a moving object. In this technique, an interference fringe image that contains six holograms with two phase shifts for three laser lines, such as red, green, and blue, is recorded by a space-division multiplexing method with single-shot exposure. The 3D monochrome images of these three laser lines are numerically reconstructed by a computer and used to estimate the spectral reflectance distribution of object using a spectral estimation technique. Preliminary experiments demonstrate the validity of the proposed technique.

  11. Spectral estimation optical coherence tomography for axial super-resolution (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinyu; Yu, Xiaojun; Wang, Nanshuo; Bo, En; Luo, Yuemei; Chen, Si; Cui, Dongyao; Liu, Linbo

    2016-03-01

    The sample depth reflectivity profile of Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) is estimated from the inverse Fourier transform of the spectral interference signals (interferograms). As a result, the axial resolution is fundamentally limited by the coherence length of the light source. We demonstrate an axial resolution improvement method by using the autoregressive spectral estimation technique to instead of the inverse Fourier transform to analyze the spectral interferograms, which is named as spectral estimation OCT (SE-OCT). SE-OCT improves the axial resolution by a factor of up to 4.7 compared with the corresponding FD-OCT. Furthermore, SE-OCT provides a complete sidelobe suppression in the point-spread function. Using phantoms such as an air wedge and micro particles, we prove the ability of resolution improvement. To test SE-OCT for real biological tissue, we image the rat cornea and demonstrate that SE-OCT enables clear identification of corneal endothelium anatomical details ex vivo. We also find that the performance of SE-OCT is depended on SNR of the feature object. To evaluate the potential usage and define the application scope of SE-OCT, we further investigate the property of SNR dependence and the artifacts that may be caused. We find SE-OCT may be uniquely suited for viewing high SNR layer structures, such as the epithelium and endothelium in cornea, retina and aorta. Given that SE-OCT can be implemented in the FD-OCT devices easily, the new capabilities provided by SE-OCT are likely to offer immediate improvements to the diagnosis and management of diseases based on OCT imaging.

  12. Multispectral Photoacoustic Imaging Artifact Removal and Denoising Using Time Series Model-Based Spectral Noise Estimation.

    PubMed

    Kazakeviciute, Agne; Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Olivo, Malini

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to solve a problem of denoising and artifact removal from in vivo multispectral photoacoustic imaging when the level of noise is not known a priori. The study analyzes Wiener filtering in Fourier domain when a family of anisotropic shape filters is considered. The unknown noise and signal power spectral densities are estimated using spectral information of images and the autoregressive of the power 1 ( AR(1)) model. Edge preservation is achieved by detecting image edges in the original and the denoised image and superimposing a weighted contribution of the two edge images to the resulting denoised image. The method is tested on multispectral photoacoustic images from simulations, a tissue-mimicking phantom, as well as in vivo imaging of the mouse, with its performance compared against that of the standard Wiener filtering in Fourier domain. The results reveal better denoising and fine details preservation capabilities of the proposed method when compared to that of the standard Wiener filtering in Fourier domain, suggesting that this could be a useful denoising technique for other multispectral photoacoustic studies.

  13. Spectral reflectance estimation using a six-color scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, Shoji; Kohno, Satoshi; Kakinuma, Hirokazu; Nohara, Fuminori; Horiuchi, Takahiko

    2009-01-01

    A method is proposed for estimating the spectral reflectance function of an object surface by using a six-color scanner. The scanner is regarded as a six-band spectral imaging system, since it captures six color channels in total from two separate scans using two difference lamps. First, we describe the basic characteristics of the imaging systems for a HP color scanner and a multiband camera used for comparison. Second, we describe a computational method for recovering surface-spectral reflectances from the noisy sensor outputs. A LMMSE estimator is presented as an optimal estimator. We discuss the reflectance estimation for non-flat surfaces with shading effect. A solution method is presented for the reliable reflectance estimation. Finally, the performance of the proposed method is examined in detail on experiments using the Macbeth Color Checker and non-flat objects.

  14. Evaluation of techniques for estimating the power spectral density of RR-intervals under paced respiration conditions.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Thorsten; Hensel, Bernhard; Weigand, Christian; Schüttler, Jürgen; Jeleazcov, Christian

    2014-10-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is increasingly used in anaesthesia and intensive care monitoring of spontaneous breathing and mechanical ventilated patients. In the frequency domain, different estimation methods of the power spectral density (PSD) of RR-intervals lead to different results. Therefore, we investigated the PSD estimates of fast Fourier transform (FFT), autoregressive modeling (AR) and Lomb-Scargle periodogram (LSP) for 25 young healthy subjects subjected to metronomic breathing. The optimum method for determination of HRV spectral parameters under paced respiration was identified by evaluating the relative error (RE) and the root mean square relative error (RMSRE) for each breathing frequency (BF) and spectral estimation method. Additionally, the sympathovagal balance was investigated by calculating the low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) ratio. Above 7 breaths per minute, all methods showed a significant increase in LF/HF ratio with increasing BF. On average, the RMSRE of FFT was lower than for LSP and AR. Therefore, under paced respiration conditions, estimating RR-interval PSD using FFT is recommend.

  15. Combined spectral estimator for phase velocities of multimode Lamb waves in multilayer plates.

    PubMed

    Ta, De-an; Liu, Zhen-qing; Liu, Xiao

    2006-12-22

    A novel combined spectral estimate (CSE) method for differentiation and estimation the phase velocities of multimode Lamb waves whose wave numbers are much close or overlap one another in multiplayer plates is presented in this paper, which based on auto-regressive (AR) model and 2-D FFT. Simulated signals in brass plate were processed by 2-D FFT and CSE. And experiments are performed by using two conventional angle probes as emitter and receiver on the same surface of three-layered aluminum/xpoxy/aluminum plates, which include symmetrical and unsymmetrical plates. The multimode Lamb waves are excited in these laminates, and the received signal is processed by 2-D FFT and CSE, respectively. The results showed that the phase velocities of multimode signals whose wave numbers are much closed cannot be differentiated by 2-D FFT, but CSE has strong spatial resolution. Compared the measured phase velocities with the theoretical values, the error is smaller than 2% on the whole. It promises to be a useful method in experimental signals processing of multimode Lamb waves.

  16. A parametric estimation approach to instantaneous spectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Oktem, Figen S; Kamalabadi, Farzad; Davila, Joseph M

    2014-12-01

    Spectral imaging, the simultaneous imaging and spectroscopy of a radiating scene, is a fundamental diagnostic technique in the physical sciences with widespread application. Due to the intrinsic limitation of two-dimensional (2D) detectors in capturing inherently three-dimensional (3D) data, spectral imaging techniques conventionally rely on a spatial or spectral scanning process, which renders them unsuitable for dynamic scenes. In this paper, we present a nonscanning (instantaneous) spectral imaging technique that estimates the physical parameters of interest by combining measurements with a parametric model and solving the resultant inverse problem computationally. The associated inverse problem, which can be viewed as a multiframe semiblind deblurring problem (with shift-variant blur), is formulated as a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation problem since in many such experiments prior statistical knowledge of the physical parameters can be well estimated. Subsequently, an efficient dynamic programming algorithm is developed to find the global optimum of the nonconvex MAP problem. Finally, the algorithm and the effectiveness of the spectral imaging technique are illustrated for an application in solar spectral imaging. Numerical simulation results indicate that the physical parameters can be estimated with the same order of accuracy as state-of-the-art slit spectroscopy but with the added benefit of an instantaneous, 2D field-of-view. This technique will be particularly useful for studying the spectra of dynamic scenes encountered in space remote sensing.

  17. Value at risk estimation using independent component analysis-generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (ICA-GARCH) models.

    PubMed

    Wu, Edmond H C; Yu, Philip L H; Li, W K

    2006-10-01

    We suggest using independent component analysis (ICA) to decompose multivariate time series into statistically independent time series. Then, we propose to use ICA-GARCH models which are computationally efficient to estimate the multivariate volatilities. The experimental results show that the ICA-GARCH models are more effective than existing methods, including DCC, PCA-GARCH, and EWMA. We also apply the proposed models to compute value at risk (VaR) for risk management applications. The backtesting and the out-of-sample tests validate the performance of ICA-GARCH models for value at risk estimation.

  18. Spectral estimates of solar radiation intercepted by corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, M. E. (Principal Investigator); Daughtry, C. S. T.; Gallo, K. P.

    1982-01-01

    Reflectance factor data were acquired with a Landsat band radiometer throughout two growing seasons for corn (Zea mays L.) canopies differing in planting dates, populations, and soil types. Agronomic data collected included leaf area index (LAI), biomass, development stage, and final grain yields. The spectral variable, greenness, was associated with 78 percent of the variation in LAI over all treatments. Single observations of LAI or greenness have limited value in predicting corn yields. The proportions of solar radiation intercepted (SRI) by these canopies were estimated using either measured LAI or greenness. Both SRI estimates, when accumulated over the growing season, accounted for approximately 65 percent of the variation in yields. Models which simulated the daily effects of weather and intercepted solar radiation on growth had the highest correlations to grain yields. This concept of estimating intercepted solar radiation using spectral data represents a viable approach for merging spectral and meteorological data for crop yield models.

  19. Optimal estimation of spectral reflectance based on metamerism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Tzren-Ru; Lin, Wei-Ju

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we proposed an accurate estimation method for spectral reflectance of objects captured in an image. The spectral reflectance is simply modeled by a linear combination of three basic spectrums of R, G, and B colors respectively, named as spectral reflective bases of objects, which are acquired by solving a linear system based on the principle of color metamerism. Some experiments were performed to evaluate the accuracy of the estimated spectral reflectance of objects. The average mean square error of 24 colors in Macbeth checker between we simulated and the measured is 0.0866, and the maximum is 0.310. In addition, the average color difference of the 24 colors is less than 1.5 under the D65 illuminant. There are 13 colors having their color difference values less than 1, and other 8 colors having the values during the range of 1 and 2. Only three colors are relatively larger, with the differences of 2.558, 4.130 and 2.569, from the colors of No. 2, No. 13, and No. 18 in Macbeth checker respectively. Furthermore, the computational cost of this spectral estimation is very low and suitable for many practical applications in real time.

  20. [Optimized Spectral Indices Based Estimation of Forage Grass Biomass].

    PubMed

    An, Hai-bo; Li, Fei; Zhao, Meng-li; Liu, Ya-jun

    2015-11-01

    As an important indicator of forage production, aboveground biomass will directly illustrate the growth of forage grass. Therefore, Real-time monitoring biomass of forage grass play a crucial role in performing suitable grazing and management in artificial and natural grassland. However, traditional sampling and measuring are time-consuming and labor-intensive. Recently, development of hyperspectral remote sensing provides the feasibility in timely and nondestructive deriving biomass of forage grass. In the present study, the main objectives were to explore the robustness of published and optimized spectral indices in estimating biomass of forage grass in natural and artificial pasture. The natural pasture with four grazing density (control, light grazing, moderate grazing and high grazing) was designed in desert steppe, and different forage cultivars with different N rate were conducted in artificial forage fields in Inner Mongolia. The canopy reflectance and biomass in each plot were measured during critical stages. The result showed that, due to the influence in canopy structure and biomass, the canopy reflectance have a great difference in different type of forage grass. The best performing spectral index varied in different species of forage grass with different treatments (R² = 0.00-0.69). The predictive ability of spectral indices decreased under low biomass of desert steppe, while red band based spectral indices lost sensitivity under moderate-high biomass of forage maize. When band combinations of simple ratio and normalized difference spectral indices were optimized in combined datasets of natural and artificial grassland, optimized spectral indices significant increased predictive ability and the model between biomass and optimized spectral indices had the highest R² (R² = 0.72) compared to published spectral indices. Sensitive analysis further confirmed that the optimized index had the lowest noise equivalent and were the best performing index in

  1. A Spectral Estimate of Average Slip in Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatwright, J.; Hanks, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate that the high-frequency acceleration spectral level ao of an ω-square source spectrum is directly proportional to the average slip of the earthquake ∆u divided by the travel time to the station r/βao = 1.37 Fs (β/r) ∆uand multiplied by the radiation pattern Fs. This simple relation is robust but depends implicitly on the assumed relation between the corner frequency and source radius, which we take from the Brune (1970, JGR) model. We use this relation to estimate average slip by fitting spectral ratios with smaller earthquakes as empirical Green's functions. For a pair of Mw = 1.8 and 1.2 earthquakes in Parkfield, we fit the spectral ratios published by Nadeau et al. (1994, BSSA) to obtain 0.39 and 0.10 cm. For the Mw= 3.9 earthquake that occurred on Oct 29, 2012, at the Pinnacles, we fit spectral ratios formed with respect to an Md = 2.4 aftershock to obtain 4.4 cm. Using the Sato and Hirasawa (1973, JPE) model instead of the Brune model increases the estimates of average slip by 75%. These estimates of average slip are factors of 5-40 (or 3-23) times less than the average slips of 3.89 cm and 23.3 cm estimated by Nadeau and Johnson (1998, BSSA) from the slip rates, average seismic moments and recurrence intervals for the two sequences to which they associate these earthquakes. The most reasonable explanation for this discrepancy is that the stress release and rupture processes of these earthquakes is strongly heterogeneous. However, the fits to the spectral ratios do not indicate that the spectral shapes are distorted in the first two octaves above the corner frequency.

  2. Estimating neugebauer primaries for multi-channel spectral printing modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavuj, Radovan; Coppel, Ludovic G.; Olen, Melissa; Hardeberg, Jon Yngve

    2014-02-01

    Multichannel printer modeling has been an active area of research in the field of spectral printing. The most commonly used models for characterization of such systems are the spectral Neugebauer (SN) and its extensions. This work addresses issues that can arise during calibration and testing of the SN model when modelling a 7-colorant printer. Since most substrates are limited in their capacity to take in large amount of ink, it is not always possible to print all colorant combinations necessary to determine the Neugebauer primaries (NP). A common solution is to estimate the nonprintable Neugebauer primaries from the single colorant primaries using the Kubelka-Munk (KM) optical model. In this work we test whether a better estimate can be obtained using general radiative transfer theory, which better represents the angular variation of the reflectance from highly absorbing media, and takes surface scattering into account. For this purpose we use the DORT2002 model. We conclude DORT2002 does not offer significant improvements over KM in the estimation of the NPs, but a significant improvement is obtained when using a simple surface scattering model. When the estimated primaries are used as inputs to the SN model instead of measured ones, it is found the SN model performs the same or better in terms of color difference and spectral error. If the mixed measured and estimated primaries are used as inputs to the SN model, it performs better than using either measured or estimated.

  3. Image-based spectral transmission estimation using "sensitivity comparison".

    PubMed

    Nahavandi, Alireza Mahmoudi; Tehran, Mohammad Amani

    2017-01-20

    Although digital cameras have been used for spectral reflectance estimation, transmission measurement has rarely been considered in studies. This study presents a method named sensitivity comparison (SC) for spectral transmission estimation. The method needs neither a priori knowledge from the samples nor statistical information of a given reflectance dataset. As with spectrophotometers, the SC method needs one shot for calibration and another shot for measurement. The method exploits the sensitivity of the camera in the absence and presence of transparent colored objects for transmission estimation. 138 Kodak Wratten Gelatin filter transmissions were used for controlling the proposed method. Using modeling of the imaging system in different levels of noise, the performance of the proposed method was compared with a training-based Matrix R method. For checking the performance of the SC method in practice, 33 manmade colored transparent films were used in a conventional three-channel camera. The method generated promising results using different error metrics.

  4. Yield estimation of sugarcane based on agrometeorological-spectral models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudorff, Bernardo Friedrich Theodor; Batista, Getulio Teixeira

    1990-01-01

    This work has the objective to assess the performance of a yield estimation model for sugarcane (Succharum officinarum). The model uses orbital gathered spectral data along with yield estimated from an agrometeorological model. The test site includes the sugarcane plantations of the Barra Grande Plant located in Lencois Paulista municipality in Sao Paulo State. Production data of four crop years were analyzed. Yield data observed in the first crop year (1983/84) were regressed against spectral and agrometeorological data of that same year. This provided the model to predict the yield for the following crop year i.e., 1984/85. The model to predict the yield of subsequent years (up to 1987/88) were developed similarly, incorporating all previous years data. The yield estimations obtained from these models explained 69, 54, and 50 percent of the yield variation in the 1984/85, 1985/86, and 1986/87 crop years, respectively. The accuracy of yield estimations based on spectral data only (vegetation index model) and on agrometeorological data only (agrometeorological model) were also investigated.

  5. Infinite Order Autoregressive Representations of Multivariate Stationary Stochastic Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    FIL -T7 -- SBS Autoregressive and moving average representation; q-variate stationary processes; spectral density matrix; Abel and 1] Cesaro ...has a mean Abel n summable or mean--compounded Cesaro summable autoregressive representation. *20 OISTRISUTION AvAILABILiTy O~F ABSTRACT 121...different reason (motivated by a computational problem in prediction theory) for the feasibility of the compounded Cesaro %%,’..,.: -7- summability method

  6. Spectral estimation of plasma fluctuations. I. Comparison of methods

    SciTech Connect

    Riedel, K.S.; Sidorenko, A. ); Thomson, D.J. )

    1994-03-01

    The relative root mean squared errors (RMSE) of nonparametric methods for spectral estimation is compared for microwave scattering data of plasma fluctuations. These methods reduce the variance of the periodogram estimate by averaging the spectrum over a frequency bandwidth. As the bandwidth increases, the variance decreases, but the bias error increases. The plasma spectra vary by over four orders of magnitude, and therefore, using a spectral window is necessary. The smoothed tapered periodogram is compared with the adaptive multiple taper methods and hybrid methods. It is found that a hybrid method, which uses four orthogonal tapers and then applies a kernel smoother, performs best. For 300 point data segments, even an optimized smoothed tapered periodogram has a 24% larger relative RMSE than the hybrid method. Two new adaptive multitaper weightings which outperform Thomson's original adaptive weighting are presented.

  7. Spectral estimation of green leaf area index of oats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Best, R. G.; Harlan, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Green leaf area index (LAI) is a measure of vegetative growth and development and is frequently used as an input parameter in yield estimation and evapotranspiration models. Extensive destructive sampling is usually required to achieve accurate estimates of green LAI in natural situations. In this investigation, a statistical modeling approach was used to predict the green LAI of oats from bidirectional reflectance data collected with multiband radiometers. Stepwise multiple regression models based on two sets of spectral reflectance factors accounted for 73 percent and 65 percent of the variance in green LAI of oats. Exponential models of spectral data transformations of greenness, normalized difference, and near-infrared/red ratio accounted for more of the variance in green LAI than the multiple regression models.

  8. Constrained Spectral Conditioning for spatial sound level estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalt, Taylor B.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Fuller, Christopher R.

    2016-11-01

    Microphone arrays are utilized in aeroacoustic testing to spatially map the sound emitted from an article under study. Whereas a single microphone allows only the total sound level to be estimated at the measurement location, an array permits differentiation between the contributions of distinct components. The accuracy of these spatial sound estimates produced by post-processing the array outputs is continuously being improved. One way of increasing the estimation accuracy is to filter the array outputs before they become inputs to a post-processor. This work presents a constrained method of linear filtering for microphone arrays which minimizes the total signal present on the array channels while preserving the signal from a targeted spatial location. Thus, each single-channel, filtered output for a given targeted location estimates only the signal from that location, even when multiple and/or distributed sources have been measured simultaneously. The method is based on Conditioned Spectral Analysis and modifies the Wiener-Hopf equation in a manner similar to the Generalized Sidelobe Canceller. This modified form of Conditioned Spectral Analysis is embedded within an iterative loop and termed Constrained Spectral Conditioning. Linear constraints are derived which prevent the cancellation of targeted signal due to random statistical error as well as location error in the sensor and/or source positions. The increased spatial mapping accuracy of Constrained Spectral Conditioning is shown for a simulated dataset of point sources which vary in strength. An experimental point source is used to validate the efficacy of the constraints which yield preservation of the targeted signal at the expense of reduced filtering ability. The beamforming results of a cold, supersonic jet demonstrate the qualitative and quantitative improvement obtained when using this technique to map a spatially-distributed, complex, and possibly coherent sound source.

  9. Breast density estimation from high spectral and spatial resolution MRI.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Weiss, William A; Medved, Milica; Abe, Hiroyuki; Newstead, Gillian M; Karczmar, Gregory S; Giger, Maryellen L

    2016-10-01

    A three-dimensional breast density estimation method is presented for high spectral and spatial resolution (HiSS) MR imaging. Twenty-two patients were recruited (under an Institutional Review Board--approved Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant protocol) for high-risk breast cancer screening. Each patient received standard-of-care clinical digital x-ray mammograms and MR scans, as well as HiSS scans. The algorithm for breast density estimation includes breast mask generating, breast skin removal, and breast percentage density calculation. The inter- and intra-user variabilities of the HiSS-based density estimation were determined using correlation analysis and limits of agreement. Correlation analysis was also performed between the HiSS-based density estimation and radiologists' breast imaging-reporting and data system (BI-RADS) density ratings. A correlation coefficient of 0.91 ([Formula: see text]) was obtained between left and right breast density estimations. An interclass correlation coefficient of 0.99 ([Formula: see text]) indicated high reliability for the inter-user variability of the HiSS-based breast density estimations. A moderate correlation coefficient of 0.55 ([Formula: see text]) was observed between HiSS-based breast density estimations and radiologists' BI-RADS. In summary, an objective density estimation method using HiSS spectral data from breast MRI was developed. The high reproducibility with low inter- and low intra-user variabilities shown in this preliminary study suggest that such a HiSS-based density metric may be potentially beneficial in programs requiring breast density such as in breast cancer risk assessment and monitoring effects of therapy.

  10. Spectral estimators of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation in corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, K. P.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Bauer, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Most models of crop growth and yield require an estimate of canopy leaf area index (LAI) or absorption of radiation. Relationships between photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by corn canopies and the spectral reflectance of the canopies were investigated. Reflectance factor data were acquired with a Landsat MSS band radiometer. From planting to silking, the three spectrally predicted vegetation indices examined were associated with more than 95 percent of the variability in absorbed PAR. The relationships developed between absorbed PAR and the three indices were evaluated with reflectance factor data acquired from corn canopies planted in 1979 through 1982. Seasonal cumulations of measured LAI and each of the three indices were associated with greater than 50 percent of the variation in final grain yields from the test years. Seasonal cumulations of daily absorbed PAR were associated with up to 73 percent of the variation in final grain yields. Absorbed PAR, cumulated through the growing season, is a better indicator of yield than cumulated leaf area index. Absorbed PAR may be estimated reliably from spectral reflectance data of crop canopies.

  11. Spectral estimators of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation in corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, K. P.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Bauer, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Most models of crop growth and yield require an estimate of canopy leaf area index (LAI) or absorption of radiation. Relationships between photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by corn canopies and the spectral reflectance of the canopies were investigated. Reflectance factor data were acquired with a LANDSAT MSS band radiometer. From planting to silking, the three spectrally predicted vegetation indices examined were associated with more than 95% of the variability in absorbed PAR. The relationships developed between absorbed PAR and the three indices were evaluated with reflectance factor data acquired from corn canopies planted in 1979 through 1982. Seasonal cumulations of measured LAI and each of the three indices were associated with greater than 50% of the variation in final grain yields from the test years. Seasonal cumulations of daily absorbed PAR were associated with up to 73% of the variation in final grain yields. Absorbed PAR, cumulated through the growing season, is a better indicator of yield than cumulated leaf area index. Absorbed PAR may be estimated reliably from spectral reflectance data of crop canopies.

  12. Convergence of oscillator spectral estimators for counted-frequency measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    A common intermediary connecting frequency-noise calibration or testing of an oscillator to useful applications is the spectral density of the frequency-deviating process. In attempting to turn test data into predicts of performance characteristics, one is naturally led to estimation of statistical values by sample-mean and sample-variance techniques. However, sample means and sample variances themselves are statistical quantities that do not necessarily converge (in the mean-square sense) to actual ensemble-average means and variances, except perhaps for excessively large sample sizes. This is especially true for the flicker noise component of oscillators. This article shows, for the various types of noises found in oscillators, how sample averages converge (or do not converge) to their statistical counterparts. The convergence rate is shown to be the same for all oscillators of a given spectral type.

  13. Alternative techniques for high-resolution spectral estimation of spectrally encoded endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, Mahta; Duan, Lian; Javidi, Tara; Ellerbee, Audrey K.

    2015-09-01

    Spectrally encoded endoscopy (SEE) is a minimally invasive optical imaging modality capable of fast confocal imaging of internal tissue structures. Modern SEE systems use coherent sources to image deep within the tissue and data are processed similar to optical coherence tomography (OCT); however, standard processing of SEE data via the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) leads to degradation of the axial resolution as the bandwidth of the source shrinks, resulting in a well-known trade-off between speed and axial resolution. Recognizing the limitation of FFT as a general spectral estimation algorithm to only take into account samples collected by the detector, in this work we investigate alternative high-resolution spectral estimation algorithms that exploit information such as sparsity and the general region position of the bulk sample to improve the axial resolution of processed SEE data. We validate the performance of these algorithms using bothMATLAB simulations and analysis of experimental results generated from a home-built OCT system to simulate an SEE system with variable scan rates. Our results open a new door towards using non-FFT algorithms to generate higher quality (i.e., higher resolution) SEE images at correspondingly fast scan rates, resulting in systems that are more accurate and more comfortable for patients due to the reduced image time.

  14. Spectral estimates of net radiation and soil heat flux

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daughtry, C.S.T.; Kustas, W.P.; Moran, M.S.; Pinter, P. J.; Jackson, R. D.; Brown, P.W.; Nichols, W.D.; Gay, L.W.

    1990-01-01

    Conventional methods of measuring surface energy balance are point measurements and represent only a small area. Remote sensing offers a potential means of measuring outgoing fluxes over large areas at the spatial resolution of the sensor. The objective of this study was to estimate net radiation (Rn) and soil heat flux (G) using remotely sensed multispectral data acquired from an aircraft over large agricultural fields. Ground-based instruments measured Rn and G at nine locations along the flight lines. Incoming fluxes were also measured by ground-based instruments. Outgoing fluxes were estimated using remotely sensed data. Remote Rn, estimated as the algebraic sum of incoming and outgoing fluxes, slightly underestimated Rn measured by the ground-based net radiometers. The mean absolute errors for remote Rn minus measured Rn were less than 7%. Remote G, estimated as a function of a spectral vegetation index and remote Rn, slightly overestimated measured G; however, the mean absolute error for remote G was 13%. Some of the differences between measured and remote values of Rn and G are associated with differences in instrument designs and measurement techniques. The root mean square error for available energy (Rn - G) was 12%. Thus, methods using both ground-based and remotely sensed data can provide reliable estimates of the available energy which can be partitioned into sensible and latent heat under nonadvective conditions. ?? 1990.

  15. Optimizing spectral wave estimates with adjoint-based sensitivity maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzech, Mark; Veeramony, Jay; Flampouris, Stylianos

    2014-04-01

    A discrete numerical adjoint has recently been developed for the stochastic wave model SWAN. In the present study, this adjoint code is used to construct spectral sensitivity maps for two nearshore domains. The maps display the correlations of spectral energy levels throughout the domain with the observed energy levels at a selected location or region of interest (LOI/ROI), providing a full spectrum of values at all locations in the domain. We investigate the effectiveness of sensitivity maps based on significant wave height ( H s ) in determining alternate offshore instrument deployment sites when a chosen nearshore location or region is inaccessible. Wave and bathymetry datasets are employed from one shallower, small-scale domain (Duck, NC) and one deeper, larger-scale domain (San Diego, CA). The effects of seasonal changes in wave climate, errors in bathymetry, and multiple assimilation points on sensitivity map shapes and model performance are investigated. Model accuracy is evaluated by comparing spectral statistics as well as with an RMS skill score, which estimates a mean model-data error across all spectral bins. Results indicate that data assimilation from identified high-sensitivity alternate locations consistently improves model performance at nearshore LOIs, while assimilation from low-sensitivity locations results in lesser or no improvement. Use of sub-sampled or alongshore-averaged bathymetry has a domain-specific effect on model performance when assimilating from a high-sensitivity alternate location. When multiple alternate assimilation locations are used from areas of lower sensitivity, model performance may be worse than with a single, high-sensitivity assimilation point.

  16. Power Spectral Analysis of Simultaneous VLBI and GPS Tropospheric Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, J.; Boehm, J.

    2004-12-01

    Observations by space geodetic techniques experience refraction and signal delay due to passage through the Earth's atmosphere. For high-accuracy positioning results, data analysts must account for these effects. Since independent path delay values of sufficient accuracy are not usually available, nuisance parameters are commonly added in the geodetic analysis. The general validity of such zenith path delay (ZPD) estimates as true atmospheric measures has been confirmed by comparison of results from independent radiometric and other techniques over many years. Biases and standard deviations in the sub-cm range are normally found, which is expected to be adequate as inputs to improve the forecast performance of numerical weather models. To better understand the noise characteristics of ZPD estimates from VLBI and GPS, we have examined the power spectra of simultaneous observations during a 15-day period in October 2002. The official combined ZPD products from the technique services have been used primarily, but series from individual analysis centers have also been included. For the seven sites studied, the power-law spectral indices over sub-daily intervals are close to -8/3, consistent with fully developed Kolmogorov turbulence, and flatten over longer periods. The VLBI series, sampled hourly, show white noise at levels of 0.7 to 1.5 mm for frequencies above 5 cycles per day. The simultaneous GPS series, sampled every 2 hours, display no indication of white noise except for one receiver with poor data analysis. The spectra of VLBI-GPS differences are generally flat but show possible signs of excess noise in some spectral bands. Based on these results, estimating VLBI ZPD values more often than every few hours should be reconsidered, especially if changes would strengthen other parameters. On the other hand, GPS-based ZPD estimates should be determined more frequently, at least hourly. Considering the greater reliability of the VLBI scale and the corresponding

  17. Informed spectral analysis: audio signal parameter estimation using side information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourer, Dominique; Marchand, Sylvain

    2013-12-01

    Parametric models are of great interest for representing and manipulating sounds. However, the quality of the resulting signals depends on the precision of the parameters. When the signals are available, these parameters can be estimated, but the presence of noise decreases the resulting precision of the estimation. Furthermore, the Cramér-Rao bound shows the minimal error reachable with the best estimator, which can be insufficient for demanding applications. These limitations can be overcome by using the coding approach which consists in directly transmitting the parameters with the best precision using the minimal bitrate. However, this approach does not take advantage of the information provided by the estimation from the signal and may require a larger bitrate and a loss of compatibility with existing file formats. The purpose of this article is to propose a compromised approach, called the 'informed approach,' which combines analysis with (coded) side information in order to increase the precision of parameter estimation using a lower bitrate than pure coding approaches, the audio signal being known. Thus, the analysis problem is presented in a coder/decoder configuration where the side information is computed and inaudibly embedded into the mixture signal at the coder. At the decoder, the extra information is extracted and is used to assist the analysis process. This study proposes applying this approach to audio spectral analysis using sinusoidal modeling which is a well-known model with practical applications and where theoretical bounds have been calculated. This work aims at uncovering new approaches for audio quality-based applications. It provides a solution for challenging problems like active listening of music, source separation, and realistic sound transformations.

  18. SPECTRAL data-based estimation of soil heat flux

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singh, R.K.; Irmak, A.; Walter-Shea, Elizabeth; Verma, S.B.; Suyker, A.E.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous existing spectral-based soil heat flux (G) models have shown wide variation in performance for maize and soybean cropping systems in Nebraska, indicating the need for localized calibration and model development. The objectives of this article are to develop a semi-empirical model to estimate G from a normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and net radiation (Rn) for maize (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Glycine max L.) fields in the Great Plains, and present the suitability of the developed model to estimate G under similar and different soil and management conditions. Soil heat fluxes measured in both irrigated and rainfed fields in eastern and south-central Nebraska were used for model development and validation. An exponential model that uses NDVI and Rn was found to be the best to estimate G based on r2 values. The effect of geographic location, crop, and water management practices were used to develop semi-empirical models under four case studies. Each case study has the same exponential model structure but a different set of coefficients and exponents to represent the crop, soil, and management practices. Results showed that the semi-empirical models can be used effectively for G estimation for nearby fields with similar soil properties for independent years, regardless of differences in crop type, crop rotation, and irrigation practices, provided that the crop residue from the previous year is more than 4000 kg ha-1. The coefficients calibrated from particular fields can be used at nearby fields in order to capture temporal variation in G. However, there is a need for further investigation of the models to account for the interaction effects of crop rotation and irrigation. Validation at an independent site having different soil and crop management practices showed the limitation of the semi-empirical model in estimating G under different soil and environment conditions.

  19. Artificial decoy spectral libraries for false discovery rate estimation in spectral library searching in proteomics.

    PubMed

    Lam, Henry; Deutsch, Eric W; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2010-01-01

    The challenge of estimating false discovery rates (FDR) in peptide identification from MS/MS spectra has received increased attention in proteomics. The simple approach of target-decoy searching has become popular with traditional sequence (database) searching methods, but has yet to be practiced in spectral (library) searching, an emerging alternative to sequence searching. We extended this target-decoy searching approach to spectral searching by developing and validating a robust method to generate realistic, but unnatural, decoy spectra. Our method involves randomly shuffling the peptide identification of each reference spectrum in the library, and repositioning each fragment ion peak along the m/z axis to match the fragment ions expected from the shuffled sequence. We show that this method produces decoy spectra that are sufficiently realistic, such that incorrect identifications are equally likely to match real and decoy spectra, a key assumption necessary for decoy counting. This approach has been implemented in the open-source library building software, SpectraST.

  20. Chain binomial models and binomial autoregressive processes.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Christian H; Pollett, Philip K

    2012-09-01

    We establish a connection between a class of chain-binomial models of use in ecology and epidemiology and binomial autoregressive (AR) processes. New results are obtained for the latter, including expressions for the lag-conditional distribution and related quantities. We focus on two types of chain-binomial model, extinction-colonization and colonization-extinction models, and present two approaches to parameter estimation. The asymptotic distributions of the resulting estimators are studied, as well as their finite-sample performance, and we give an application to real data. A connection is made with standard AR models, which also has implications for parameter estimation.

  1. In-vivo validation of fast spectral velocity estimation techniques.

    PubMed

    Hansen, K L; Gran, F; Pedersen, M M; Holfort, I K; Jensen, J A; Nielsen, M B

    2010-01-01

    Spectrograms in medical ultrasound are usually estimated with Welch's method (WM). WM is dependent on an observation window (OW) of up to 256 emissions per estimate to achieve sufficient spectral resolution and contrast. Two adaptive filterbank methods have been suggested to reduce the OW: Blood spectral Power Capon (BPC) and the Blood Amplitude and Phase EStimation method (BAPES). Ten volunteers were scanned over the carotid artery. From each data set, 28 spectrograms were produced by combining four approaches (WM with a Hanning window (W.HAN), WM with a boxcar window (W.BOX), BPC and BAPES) and seven OWs (128, 64, 32, 16, 8, 4, 2). The full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) and the ratio between main and side-lobe levels were calculated at end-diastole for each spectrogram. Furthermore, all 280 spectrograms were randomized and presented to nine radiologists for visual evaluation: useful/not useful. BAPES and BPC compared to WM had better resolution (lower FWHM) for all OW<128 while only BAPES compared to WM had improved contrast (higher ratio). According to the scores given by the radiologists, BAPES, BPC and W.HAN performed equally well (p>0.05) at OW 128 and 64, while W.BOX scored less (p<0.05). At OW 32, BAPES and BPC performed better than WM (p<0.0001) and BAPES was significantly superior to BPC at OW 16 (p=0.0002) and 8 (p<0.0001). BPC at OW 32 performed as well as BPC at OW 128 (p=0.29) and BAPES at OW 16 as BAPES at OW 128 (p=0.55). WM at OW 16 and 8 failed as all four methods at OW 4 and 2. The intra-observer variability tested for three radiologist showed on average good agreement (90%, kappa=0.79) and inter-observer variability showed moderate agreement (78%, kappa=0.56). The results indicated that BPC and BAPES had better resolution and BAPES better contrast than WM, and that OW can be reduced to 32 using BPC and 16 using BAPES without reducing the usefulness of the spectrogram. This could potentially increase the temporal resolution of the spectrogram or

  2. Carrier Estimation Using Classic Spectral Estimation Techniques for the Proposed Demand Assignment Multiple Access Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scaife, Bradley James

    1999-01-01

    In any satellite communication, the Doppler shift associated with the satellite's position and velocity must be calculated in order to determine the carrier frequency. If the satellite state vector is unknown then some estimate must be formed of the Doppler-shifted carrier frequency. One elementary technique is to examine the signal spectrum and base the estimate on the dominant spectral component. If, however, the carrier is spread (as in most satellite communications) this technique may fail unless the chip rate-to-data rate ratio (processing gain) associated with the carrier is small. In this case, there may be enough spectral energy to allow peak detection against a noise background. In this thesis, we present a method to estimate the frequency (without knowledge of the Doppler shift) of a spread-spectrum carrier assuming a small processing gain and binary-phase shift keying (BPSK) modulation. Our method relies on an averaged discrete Fourier transform along with peak detection on spectral match filtered data. We provide theory and simulation results indicating the accuracy of this method. In addition, we will describe an all-digital hardware design based around a Motorola DSP56303 and high-speed A/D which implements this technique in real-time. The hardware design is to be used in NMSU's implementation of NASA's demand assignment, multiple access (DAMA) service.

  3. A Reweighted ℓ1-Minimization Based Compressed Sensing for the Spectral Estimation of Heart Rate Variability Using the Unevenly Sampled Data

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Szi-Wen; Chao, Shih-Chieh

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a reweighted ℓ1-minimization based Compressed Sensing (CS) algorithm incorporating the Integral Pulse Frequency Modulation (IPFM) model for spectral estimation of HRV is introduced. Knowing as a novel sensing/sampling paradigm, the theory of CS asserts certain signals that are considered sparse or compressible can be possibly reconstructed from substantially fewer measurements than those required by traditional methods. Our study aims to employ a novel reweighted ℓ1-minimization CS method for deriving the spectrum of the modulating signal of IPFM model from incomplete RR measurements for HRV assessments. To evaluate the performance of HRV spectral estimation, a quantitative measure, referred to as the Percent Error Power (PEP) that measures the percentage of difference between the true spectrum and the spectrum derived from the incomplete RR dataset, was used. We studied the performance of spectral reconstruction from incomplete simulated and real HRV signals by experimentally truncating a number of RR data accordingly in the top portion, in the bottom portion, and in a random order from the original RR column vector. As a result, for up to 20% data truncation/loss the proposed reweighted ℓ1-minimization CS method produced, on average, 2.34%, 2.27%, and 4.55% PEP in the top, bottom, and random data-truncation cases, respectively, on Autoregressive (AR) model derived simulated HRV signals. Similarly, for up to 20% data loss the proposed method produced 5.15%, 4.33%, and 0.39% PEP in the top, bottom, and random data-truncation cases, respectively, on a real HRV database drawn from PhysioNet. Moreover, results generated by a number of intensive numerical experiments all indicated that the reweighted ℓ1-minimization CS method always achieved the most accurate and high-fidelity HRV spectral estimates in every aspect, compared with the ℓ1-minimization based method and Lomb's method used for estimating the spectrum of HRV from unevenly sampled RR

  4. Multifractality and autoregressive processes of dry spell lengths in Europe: an approach to their complexity and predictability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lana, X.; Burgueño, A.; Serra, C.; Martínez, M. D.

    2017-01-01

    Dry spell lengths, DSL, defined as the number of consecutive days with daily rain amounts below a given threshold, may provide relevant information about drought regimes. Taking advantage of a daily pluviometric database covering a great extension of Europe, a detailed analysis of the multifractality of the dry spell regimes is achieved. At the same time, an autoregressive process is applied with the aim of predicting DSL. A set of parameters, namely Hurst exponent, H, estimated from multifractal spectrum, f( α), critical Hölder exponent, α 0, for which f( α) reaches its maximum value, spectral width, W, and spectral asymmetry, B, permits a first clustering of European rain gauges in terms of the complexity of their DSL series. This set of parameters also allows distinguishing between time series describing fine- or smooth-structure of the DSL regime by using the complexity index, CI. Results of previous monofractal analyses also permits establishing comparisons between smooth-structures, relatively low correlation dimensions, notable predictive instability and anti-persistence of DSL for European areas, sometimes submitted to long droughts. Relationships are also found between the CI and the mean absolute deviation, MAD, and the optimum autoregressive order, OAO, of an ARIMA( p, d,0) autoregressive process applied to the DSL series. The detailed analysis of the discrepancies between empiric and predicted DSL underlines the uncertainty over predictability of long DSL, particularly for the Mediterranean region.

  5. Biomass estimator for NIR image with a few additional spectral band images taken from light UAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pölönen, Ilkka; Salo, Heikki; Saari, Heikki; Kaivosoja, Jere; Pesonen, Liisa; Honkavaara, Eija

    2012-05-01

    A novel way to produce biomass estimation will offer possibilities for precision farming. Fertilizer prediction maps can be made based on accurate biomass estimation generated by a novel biomass estimator. By using this knowledge, a variable rate amount of fertilizers can be applied during the growing season. The innovation consists of light UAS, a high spatial resolution camera, and VTT's novel spectral camera. A few properly selected spectral wavelengths with NIR images and point clouds extracted by automatic image matching have been used in the estimation. The spectral wavelengths were chosen from green, red, and NIR channels.

  6. Auroral spectral estimation with wide-band color mosaic CCDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackel, B. J.; Unick, C.; Syrjäsuo, M. T.; Partamies, N.; Wild, J. A.; Woodfield, E. E.; McWhirter, I.; Kendall, E.; Spanswick, E.

    2014-06-01

    Optical aurora can be structured over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales with spectral features that depend on the energy of precipitating particles. Scientific studies typically combine data from multiple instruments that are individually optimized for spatial, spectral, or temporal resolution. One recent addition combines all-sky optics with color mosaic CCD (charge-coupled device) detectors that use a matrix of different wide-band micro-filters to produce an image with several (often three) color channels. These devices provide sequences of two dimensional multispectral luminosity with simultaneous exposure of all color channels allowing interchannel comparison even during periods with rapidly varying aurora. At present color auroral image data are primarily used for qualitative analysis. In this study a quantitative approach based on Backus-Gilbert linear inversion was used to better understand the effective spectral resolution of existing and proposed instruments. Two spectrally calibrated commercial detectors (Sony ICX285AQ and ICX429AKL) with very different color mosaics (RGB (red, green, blue) vs. CYGM (cyan, yellow, green, magenta)) were found to have very similar spectral resolution: three channels with FWHM (full-width half-maximum) ≈100 nm; a NIR (near infrared) blocking filter is important for stabilizing inversion of both three-channel configurations. Operating the ICX429AKL in a noninterlaced mode would improve spectral resolution and provide an additional near infrared channel. Transformations from arbitrary device channels to RGB are easily obtained through inversion. Simultaneous imaging of multiple auroral emissions may be achieved using a single-color camera with a triple-pass filter. Combinations of multiple cameras with simple filters should provide ~50 nm resolution across most of the visible spectrum. Performance of other instrument designs could be explored and compared using the same quantitative framework.

  7. Estimation of spectral distribution of sky radiance using a commercial digital camera.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masanori; Iwabuchi, Hironobu; Murata, Isao

    2016-01-10

    Methods for estimating spectral distribution of sky radiance from images captured by a digital camera and for accurately estimating spectral responses of the camera are proposed. Spectral distribution of sky radiance is represented as a polynomial of the wavelength, with coefficients obtained from digital RGB counts by linear transformation. The spectral distribution of radiance as measured is consistent with that obtained by spectrometer and radiative transfer simulation for wavelengths of 430-680 nm, with standard deviation below 1%. Preliminary applications suggest this method is useful for detecting clouds and studying the relation between irradiance at the ground and cloud distribution.

  8. Assessment of spectral indicies for crop residue cover estimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The quantification of surficial crop residue cover is important for assessing agricultural tillage practices, rangeland health, and brush fire hazards. The Cellulose Absorption Index (CAI) and the Shortwave Infrared Normalized Difference Residue Index (SINDRI) are two spectral indices that have show...

  9. Estimation of Canopy Foliar Biomass with Spectral Reflectance Measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Canopy foliar biomass, defined as the product of leaf dry matter content and leaf area index, is an important measurement for global biogeochemical cycles. This study explores the potential for retrieving foliar biomass in green canopies using a spectral index, the Normalized Dry Matter Index (NDMI)...

  10. Effect of method and parameters of spectral analysis on selected indices of simulated Doppler spectra.

    PubMed

    Kaluzynski, K; Palko, T

    1993-05-01

    The sensitivity of Doppler spectral indices (mean frequency, maximum frequency, spectral broadening index and turbulence intensity) to the conditions of spectral analysis (estimation method, data window, smoothing window or model order) increases with decreasing signal bandwidth and growing index complexity. The bias of spectral estimate has a more important effect on these indices than its variance. A too low order, in the case of autoregressive modeling and minimum variance methods, and excessive smoothing, in the case of the FFT method, result in increased errors of Doppler spectral indices. There is a trade-off between the errors resulting from a short data window and those due to insufficient temporal resolution.

  11. Auroral spectral estimation with wide-band color mosaic CCDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackel, B. J.; Unick, C.; Syrjäsuo, M. T.; Partamies, N.; Wild, J. A.; Woodfield, E. E.; McWhirter, I.; Kendall, E.; Spanswick, E.

    2013-12-01

    Color mosaic CCDs use a matrix of different wide-band micro-filters in order to produce images with several (often three) color channels. These devices are increasingly employed in auroral studies to provide time sequences of two dimensional luminosity maps, but the color information is typically only used for qualitative analysis. In this study we use Backus-Gilbert linear inversion techniques to obtain quantitative measures of effective spectral resolution for multi-channel color mosaic CCDs. These techniques also allow us to explore the possibility of further improvements by modifying or combining multiple detectors. We consider two spectrally calibrated commercial color CCDs (Sony ICX285AQ and ICX429AKL) in order to determine effective wavelength resolution of each device individually, together, and with additional filters. From these results we develop methods to enhance the utility of existing data sets, and propose ways to improve the next generation of low-cost color auroral imaging systems.

  12. Signal Estimation from Short-Time Spectral Magnitude.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    reconstrutions when the short-time spectral magnitude is purposely modified for accomplishing signal processing tasks such as noise reduction and time-sale...complexity. It gen- erally requires sophisticated indexing and rather large memory space for its implementation. For example, Portnoff b. .,i to introduce...significant memory management to implement the teanique on a PDP 11150. On the other hand, Holtzman 115] aas developed an alternative implementation that

  13. Confidence estimates in simulation of phase noise or spectral density.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Neil

    2017-02-13

    In this paper we apply the method of discrete simulation of power law noise, developed in [1],[3],[4], to the problem of simulating phase noise for a combination of power law noises. We derive analytic expressions for the probability of observing a value of phase noise L(f) or of any of the onesided spectral densities S(f); Sy(f), or Sx(f), for arbitrary superpositions of power law noise.

  14. ESTIMATION OF RESPONSE-SPECTRAL VALUES AS FUNCTIONS OF MAGNITUDE, DISTANCE, AND SITE CONDITIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joyner, W.B.; Boore, D.M.; ,

    1983-01-01

    Horizontal pseudo-velocity response was analyzed for twelve shallow earthquakes in western North America. Estimation of response-spectral values was related to magnitude, distance and site conditions. Errors in the methods are analyzed.

  15. An investigation into robust spectral indices for leaf chlorophyll estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Main, Russell; Cho, Moses Azong; Mathieu, Renaud; O'Kennedy, Martha M.; Ramoelo, Abel; Koch, Susan

    2011-11-01

    Quantifying photosynthetic activity at the regional scale can provide important information to resource managers, planners and global ecosystem modelling efforts. With increasing availability of both hyperspectral and narrow band multispectral remote sensing data, new users are faced with a plethora of options when choosing an optical index to relate to their chosen or canopy parameter. The literature base regarding optical indices (particularly chlorophyll indices) is wide ranging and extensive, however it is without much consensus regarding robust indices. The wider spectral community could benefit from studies that apply a variety of published indices to differing sets of species data. The consistency and robustness of 73 published chlorophyll spectral indices have been assessed, using leaf level hyperspectral data collected from three crop species and a variety of savanna tree species. Linear regression between total leaf chlorophyll content and bootstrapping were used to determine the leafpredictive capabilities of the various indices. The indices were then ranked based on the prediction error (the average root mean square error (RMSE)) derived from the bootstrapping process involving 1000 iterative resampling with replacement. The results show two red-edge derivative based indices (red-edge position via linear extrapolation index and the modified red-edge inflection point index) as the most consistent and robust, and that the majority of the top performing indices (in spite of species variability) were simple ratio or normalised difference indices that are based on off-chlorophyll absorption centre wavebands (690-730 nm).

  16. Texture classification using autoregressive filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, W. M.; Lee, M.

    1984-01-01

    A general theory of image texture models is proposed and its applicability to the problem of scene segmentation using texture classification is discussed. An algorithm, based on half-plane autoregressive filtering, which optimally utilizes second order statistics to discriminate between texture classes represented by arbitrary wide sense stationary random fields is described. Empirical results of applying this algorithm to natural and sysnthesized scenes are presented and future research is outlined.

  17. Multi-Scale Autoregressive Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    rationnelles et leurs langages," Mas- son 1984, Collection "Etudes et Recherches en Informatique". [12] J.L. DUNAU, "Etude d’une classe de marches...June 1989 LIDS-P-1880 Multi-Scale Autoregressive Processes Michele Basseville’ Albert Benveniste’ Institut de Recherche en Informatique et Systemes...Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and A.B. is also with Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique (INRIA). The

  18. Stepwise method based on Wiener estimation for spectral reconstruction in spectroscopic Raman imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuo; Wang, Gang; Cui, Xiaoyu; Liu, Quan

    2017-01-23

    Raman spectroscopy has demonstrated great potential in biomedical applications. However, spectroscopic Raman imaging is limited in the investigation of fast changing phenomena because of slow data acquisition. Our previous studies have indicated that spectroscopic Raman imaging can be significantly sped up using the approach of narrow-band imaging followed by spectral reconstruction. A multi-channel system was built to demonstrate the feasibility of fast wide-field spectroscopic Raman imaging using the approach of simultaneous narrow-band image acquisition followed by spectral reconstruction based on Wiener estimation in phantoms. To further improve the accuracy of reconstructed Raman spectra, we propose a stepwise spectral reconstruction method in this study, which can be combined with the earlier developed sequential weighted Wiener estimation to improve spectral reconstruction accuracy. The stepwise spectral reconstruction method first reconstructs the fluorescence background spectrum from narrow-band measurements and then the pure Raman narrow-band measurements can be estimated by subtracting the estimated fluorescence background from the overall narrow-band measurements. Thereafter, the pure Raman spectrum can be reconstructed from the estimated pure Raman narrow-band measurements. The result indicates that the stepwise spectral reconstruction method can improve spectral reconstruction accuracy significantly when combined with sequential weighted Wiener estimation, compared with the traditional Wiener estimation. In addition, qualitatively accurate cell Raman spectra were successfully reconstructed using the stepwise spectral reconstruction method from the narrow-band measurements acquired by a four-channel wide-field Raman spectroscopic imaging system. This method can potentially facilitate the adoption of spectroscopic Raman imaging to the investigation of fast changing phenomena.

  19. Spectral estimation of human skin color using the Kubelka-Munk theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, Motonori; Tominaga, Shoji

    2003-01-01

    The present paper describes a method for modeling human skin coloring and estimating the surface-spectral reflectance by using the Kubelka-Munk theory. First, human skin is modeled as two layers of turbid materials. Second, we describe the reflectance estimation problem as the Kubelka-Munk equations with unknown six parameters. These parameters are the regular reflectance at skin surface and the five weights for spectral absorption of such different pigments as melanin, carotene, oxy-hemoglobin, deoxy-hemoglobin, and bilirubin. Moreover, the optical coefficients of spectral absorption and scattering for the two skin layers and the thickness values of these layers are used for the solution. Finally, experiments are done for estimating the skin surface-spectral reflectance on some body parts, such as the cheeks of human face, the palm, the backs of hand, the inside of arm, and the outside of arm. It is confirmed that the proposed method is more reliable in all cases.

  20. Spectral estimation of global levels of atmospheric pollutants.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Macho, Javier

    2011-10-01

    Underlying levels of atmospheric pollutants, assumed to be governed by smoothing mechanisms due to atmospheric dispersion, can be estimated from global emissions source databases on greenhouse gases and ozone-depleting compounds. However, spatial data may be contaminated with noise or even missing or zero-valued at many locations. Therefore, a problem that arises is how to extract the underlying smooth levels. This paper sets out a structural spatial model that assumes data evolve across a global grid constrained by second-order smoothing restrictions. The frequency-domain approach is particularly suitable for global datasets, reduces the computational burden associated with two-dimensional models and avoids cumbersome zero-inflated skewed distributions. Confidence intervals of the underlying levels are also obtained. An application to the estimation of global levels of atmospheric pollutants from anthropogenic emissions illustrates the technique which may also be useful in the analysis of other environmental datasets of similar characteristics.

  1. Similarity law in spectral estimation of a time series. V.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terebizh, V. Yu.

    1998-04-01

    A continuation of [V. Yu. Terebizh, Astrofizika, 40, 139, 273, 413 (1997); 41, 113 (1998)]. When following recommendations based on a similarity law, a least-squares estimate is justified. Ockham’s approach is free of assumptions, but more complicated; it leads to results close to those for the least-squares method in conjunction with a similarity law and the condition of nonnegativity of the solution. The theoretical conclusions are illustrated by calculations for an AR-1 process.

  2. Spectral Dark Subtraction: A MODTRAN-Based Algorithm for Estimating Ground Reflectance without Atmospheric Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Ellis; Ryan, Robert; Pagnutti, Mary; Holekamp, Kara; Gasser, Gerald; Carver, David; Greer, Randy

    2007-01-01

    Spectral Dark Subtraction (SDS) provides good ground reflectance estimates across a variety of atmospheric conditions with no knowledge of those conditions. The algorithm may be sensitive to errors from stray light, calibration, and excessive haze/water vapor. SDS seems to provide better estimates than traditional algorithms using on-site atmospheric measurements much of the time.

  3. Autoregressive and bispectral analysis techniques: EEG applications.

    PubMed

    Ning, T; Bronzino, J D

    1990-01-01

    Some basic properties of autoregressive (AR) modeling and bispectral analysis are reviewed, and examples of their application in electroencephalography (EEG) research are provided. A second-order AR model was used to score cortical EEGs in order. In tests performed on five adult rats to distinguish between different vigilance states such a quiet-waking (QW), rapid-eye-movement (REM), and slow-wave sleep (SWS), SWS activity was correctly identified over 96% of the time, and a 95% agreement rate was achieved in recognizing the REM sleep stage. In a bispectral analysis of the rat EEG, third-order cumulant (TOC) sequences of 32 epochs belonging to the same vigilance state were estimated and then averaged. Preliminary results have shown that bispectra of hippocampal EEGs during REM Sleep exhibit significant quadratic phase couplings between frequencies in the 6-8-Hz range, associated with the theta rhythm.

  4. Spectral estimates of intercepted solar radiation by corn and soybean canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, K. P.; Brooks, C. C.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Bauer, M. E.; Vanderbilt, V. C.

    1982-01-01

    Attention is given to the development of methods for combining spectral and meteorological data in crop yield models which are capable of providing accurate estimates of crop condition and yields throughout the growing season. The present investigation is concerned with initial tests of these concepts using spectral and agronomic data acquired in controlled experiments. The data were acquired at the Purdue University Agronomy Farm, 10 km northwest of West Lafayette, Indiana. Data were obtained throughout several growing seasons for corn and soybeans. Five methods or models for predicting yields were examined. On the basis of the obtained results, it is concluded that estimating intercepted solar radiation using spectral data is a viable approach for merging spectral and meteorological data in crop yield models.

  5. Reconstructing Spectral Scenes Using Statistical Estimation to Enhance Space Situational Awareness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    spectrally deblurring then the previously investigated methods. This algorithm expands on a method used for increasing the spectral resolution in gamma - ray ...ing system such as ASIS. A variation on the fourth technique used for gamma - ray spectroscopy and chromotomographic system shows much more promise to...statistical method based on a maximum like- lihood (ML) estimator has been used to improve the resolution of the spectra in gamma - ray spectroscopy and of

  6. Efficient, Non-Iterative Estimator for Imaging Contrast Agents With Spectral X-Ray Detectors.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    An estimator to image contrast agents and body materials with x-ray spectral measurements is described. The estimator is usable with the three or more basis functions that are required to represent the attenuation coefficient of high atomic number materials. The estimator variance is equal to the Cramèr-Rao lower bound (CRLB) and it is unbiased. Its parameters are computed from measurements of a calibration phantom with the clinical x-ray system and it is non-iterative. The estimator is compared with an iterative maximum likelihood estimator. The estimator first computes a linearized maximum likelihood estimate of the line integrals of the basis set coefficients. Corrections for errors in the initial estimates are computed by interpolation with calibration phantom data. The final estimate is the initial estimate plus the correction. The performance of the estimator is measured using a Monte Carlo simulation. Random photon counting with pulse height analysis data are generated. The mean squared errors of the estimates are compared to the CRLB. The random data are also processed with an iterative maximum likelihood estimator. Previous implementations of iterative estimators required advanced physics instruments not usually available in clinical institutions. The estimator mean squared error is essentially equal to the CRLB. The estimator outputs are close to those of the iterative estimator but the computation time is approximately 180 times shorter. The estimator is efficient and has advantages over alternate approaches such as iterative estimators.

  7. Non-destructive estimation of foliar chlorophyll and carotenoid contents: Focus on informative spectral bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kira, Oz; Linker, Raphael; Gitelson, Anatoly

    2015-06-01

    Leaf pigment content provides valuable insight into the productivity, physiological and phenological status of vegetation. Measurement of spectral reflectance offers a fast, nondestructive method for pigment estimation. A number of methods were used previously for estimation of leaf pigment content, however, spectral bands employed varied widely among the models and data used. Our objective was to find informative spectral bands in three types of models, vegetation indices (VI), neural network (NN) and partial least squares (PLS) regression, for estimating leaf chlorophyll (Chl) and carotenoids (Car) contents of three unrelated tree species and to assess the accuracy of the models using a minimal number of bands. The bands selected by PLS, NN and VIs were in close agreement and did not depend on the data used. The results of the uninformative variable elimination PLS approach, where the reliability parameter was used as an indicator of the information contained in the spectral bands, confirmed the bands selected by the VIs, NN, and PLS models. All three types of models were able to accurately estimate Chl content with coefficient of variation below 12% for all three species with VI showing the best performance. NN and PLS using reflectance in four spectral bands were able to estimate accurately Car content with coefficient of variation below 14%. The quantitative framework presented here offers a new way of estimating foliar pigment content not requiring model re-parameterization for different species. The approach was tested using the spectral bands of the future Sentinel-2 satellite and the results of these simulations showed that accurate pigment estimation from satellite would be possible.

  8. Source depth estimation of self-potential anomalies by spectral methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Maio, Rosa; Piegari, Ester; Rani, Payal

    2017-01-01

    Spectral analysis of the self-potential (SP) field for geometrically simple anomalous bodies is studied. In particular, three spectral techniques, i.e. Periodogram (PM), Multi Taper (MTM) and Maximum Entropy (MEM) methods, are proposed to derive the depth of the anomalous bodies. An extensive numerical analysis at varying the source parameters outlines that MEM is successful in determining the source depth with a percent error less than 5%. The application of the proposed spectral approach to the interpretation of field datasets has provided depth estimations of the SP anomaly sources in very good agreement with those obtained by other numerical methods.

  9. Preliminary evaluation of spectral, normal and meteorological crop stage estimation approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cate, R. B.; Artley, J. A.; Doraiswamy, P. C.; Hodges, T.; Kinsler, M. C.; Phinney, D. E.; Sestak, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Several of the projects in the AgRISTARS program require crop phenology information, including classification, acreage and yield estimation, and detection of episodal events. This study evaluates several crop calendar estimation techniques for their potential use in the program. The techniques, although generic in approach, were developed and tested on spring wheat data collected in 1978. There are three basic approaches to crop stage estimation: historical averages for an area (normal crop calendars), agrometeorological modeling of known crop-weather relationships agrometeorological (agromet) crop calendars, and interpretation of spectral signatures (spectral crop calendars). In all, 10 combinations of planting and biostage estimation models were evaluated. Dates of stage occurrence are estimated with biases between -4 and +4 days while root mean square errors range from 10 to 15 days. Results are inconclusive as to the superiority of any of the models and further evaluation of the models with the 1979 data set is recommended.

  10. Estimating photoreceptor excitations from spectral outputs of a personal light exposure measurement device.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dingcai; Barrionuevo, Pablo A

    2015-03-01

    The intrinsic circadian clock requires photoentrainment to synchronize the 24-hour solar day. Therefore, light stimulation is an important component of chronobiological research. Currently, the chronobiological research field overwhelmingly uses photopic illuminance that is based on the luminous efficiency function, V(λ), to quantify light levels. However, recent discovery of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), which are activated by self-contained melanopsin photopigment and also by inputs from rods and cones, makes light specification using a one-dimensional unit inadequate. Since the current understanding of how different photoreceptor inputs contribute to the circadian system through ipRGCs is limited, it is recommended to specify light in terms of the excitations of five photoreceptors (S-, M-, L-cones, rods and ipRGCs; Lucas et al., 2014). In the current study, we assessed whether the spectral outputs from a commercially available spectral watch (i.e. Actiwatch Spectrum) could be used to estimate photoreceptor excitations. Based on the color sensor spectral sensitivity functions from a previously published work, as well as from our measurements, we computed spectral outputs in the long-wavelength range (R), middle-wavelength range (G), short-wavelength range (B) and broadband range (W) under 52 CIE illuminants (25 daylight illuminants, 27 fluorescent lights). We also computed the photoreceptor excitations for each illuminant using human photoreceptor spectral sensitivity functions. Linear regression analyses indicated that the Actiwatch spectral outputs could predict photoreceptor excitations reliably, under the assumption of linear responses of the Actiwatch color sensors. In addition, R, G, B outputs could classify illuminant types (fluorescent versus daylight illuminants) satisfactorily. However, the assessment of actual Actiwatch recording under several testing light sources showed that the spectral outputs were subject to

  11. Preservation of Mexican ancient Codices: color reproduction from spectral attributes estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, Jorge; Uchiyama, Toshio; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Haneishi, Hideaki; Ohyama, Nagaaki

    2003-11-01

    Mexican Codices are an ancient reading and writing system, part of this cultural legacy date from the 16th and 17th century. For preservation reasons, the collection known as "Collection of Original Mexican Codices" under the custody of the National Library of Anthropology and History in Mexico City is kept under limited access and controlled illumination conditions. It is presented an accurate color reproduction of Codices under simulated average daylight based on spectral reflectance estimation from statistical spectral data using the Wiener estimator, removing the original capture environment illumination. We compare the achieved results between both, a 16 bands multispectral camera and a RGB Nikon D1 camera.

  12. Spectral estimation of gapped data and SAR imaging with angular diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Erik G.; Li, Jian; Stoica, Peter; Liu, Guoqing; Williams, Robert L.

    2001-08-01

    The Amplitude and Phase EStimation (APES) approach to amplitude spectrum estimation has been receiving considerably attention recently. We develop an extension of APES for the spectral estimation of gapped (incomplete) data and apply it to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging with angular diversity. It has recently been shown that APES minimizes a certain least-squares criterion with respect to the estimate of the spectrum. Our new algorithm is called gapped-data APES and is based on minimizing this criterion with respect to the missing data as well. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm and its applicability to SAR imaging with angular diversity.

  13. Efficient, non-iterative estimator for imaging contrast agents with spectral x-ray detectors.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Robert E

    2015-12-22

    This paper describes an estimator to image contrast agents and body materials with x-ray spectral measurements. Previous implementations were limited to a two function basis set but the new implementation is usable with the three or more basis functions that are required with high atomic number contrast materials. The estimator variance is equal to the Cramèr-Rao lower bound (CRLB) and it is unbiased. Its parameters can be computed from measurements of a calibration phantom with the clinical x-ray system and it is non-iterative. The estimator is compared with an iterative maximum likelihood estimator.

  14. Real-time system for robust spectral parameter estimation in Doppler signal analysis.

    PubMed

    Di Giuliomaria, C; Capponi, M; D'Alessio, T; Sacco, R; Zanette, E

    1990-01-01

    In assessing the level of stenosis in extracranial Doppler analysis, spectral analysis has until now been used qualitatively, for the most part. Owing to the many variables affecting the measurements (mainly noise level and instrument setting made subjectively by the operator), the reliability of the inferences on the degree of stenosis is not clearly definable. Under such conditions the need arises for algorithms and systems that can estimate spectral parameters with a higher degree of accuracy, to verify whether reliable inferences can indeed by made or if this technique is only a qualitative one. In the paper a real-time spectral analysis system is described. The system relies on a new spectral estimation algorithm which gives estimates with good robustness with respect to noise. Moreover, a clear measurement procedure which eliminates the many subjective factors affecting the estimates has also been proposed and used. The system has been evaluated with simulated signals and in clinical trials and has shown better performance than the commonly used commercial analysers.

  15. Study on Raman spectral imaging method for simultaneous estimation of ingredients concentration in food powder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the potential of point scan Raman spectral imaging method for estimation of different ingredients and chemical contaminant concentration in food powder. Food powder sample was prepared by mixing sugar, vanillin, melamine and non-dairy cream at 5 different concentrations in a ...

  16. Autoregressive smoothing of GOMOS transmittances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fussen, D.; Vanhellemont, F.; Bingen, C.; Kyrölä, B.; Tamminen, J.; Sofieva, V.; Hassinen, S.; Seppälä, A.; Verronen, P. T.; Bertaux, J. L.; Hauchecorne, A.; Dalaudier, F.; d'Andon, O. Fanton; Barrot, G.; Mangin, A.; Theodore, B.; Guirlet, M.; Renard, J. B.; Fraisse, R.; Snoeij, P.; Koopman, R.; Saavedra, L.

    GOMOS is a stellar occultation instrument onboard ENVISAT. It has already measured several hundreds of thousands occultations since March 2002. In some circumstances, the obliqueness of the star setting causes the remote sounding of possible horizontal turbulence that cannot be adequately corrected by using the fast photometer signals, leading to the presence of residual scintillation in the atmospheric transmittance. We investigate the mechanism that produces this spurious signal that may cause the retrieval of wavy constituent profiles. A special algorithm of vertical autoregressive smoothing (VAS) is proposed that takes into account the physical correlation between adjacent measurements at different tangent altitudes. A regularization parameter of the method may be optimized on basis of the minimal correlation between the residuals as prescribed by the Durbin-Watson statistics. The improvements obtained in the retrieval of both O 3 and NO 2 number density profiles is presented and discussed with respect to the results of the official data processing model.

  17. Spectral Estimation Model Construction of Heavy Metals in Mining Reclamation Areas

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jihong; Dai, Wenting; Xu, Jiren; Li, Songnian

    2016-01-01

    The study reported here examined, as the research subject, surface soils in the Liuxin mining area of Xuzhou, and explored the heavy metal content and spectral data by establishing quantitative models with Multivariable Linear Regression (MLR), Generalized Regression Neural Network (GRNN) and Sequential Minimal Optimization for Support Vector Machine (SMO-SVM) methods. The study results are as follows: (1) the estimations of the spectral inversion models established based on MLR, GRNN and SMO-SVM are satisfactory, and the MLR model provides the worst estimation, with R2 of more than 0.46. This result suggests that the stress sensitive bands of heavy metal pollution contain enough effective spectral information; (2) the GRNN model can simulate the data from small samples more effectively than the MLR model, and the R2 between the contents of the five heavy metals estimated by the GRNN model and the measured values are approximately 0.7; (3) the stability and accuracy of the spectral estimation using the SMO-SVM model are obviously better than that of the GRNN and MLR models. Among all five types of heavy metals, the estimation for cadmium (Cd) is the best when using the SMO-SVM model, and its R2 value reaches 0.8628; (4) using the optimal model to invert the Cd content in wheat that are planted on mine reclamation soil, the R2 and RMSE between the measured and the estimated values are 0.6683 and 0.0489, respectively. This result suggests that the method using the SMO-SVM model to estimate the contents of heavy metals in wheat samples is feasible. PMID:27367708

  18. Spectral Estimation Model Construction of Heavy Metals in Mining Reclamation Areas.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jihong; Dai, Wenting; Xu, Jiren; Li, Songnian

    2016-06-28

    The study reported here examined, as the research subject, surface soils in the Liuxin mining area of Xuzhou, and explored the heavy metal content and spectral data by establishing quantitative models with Multivariable Linear Regression (MLR), Generalized Regression Neural Network (GRNN) and Sequential Minimal Optimization for Support Vector Machine (SMO-SVM) methods. The study results are as follows: (1) the estimations of the spectral inversion models established based on MLR, GRNN and SMO-SVM are satisfactory, and the MLR model provides the worst estimation, with R² of more than 0.46. This result suggests that the stress sensitive bands of heavy metal pollution contain enough effective spectral information; (2) the GRNN model can simulate the data from small samples more effectively than the MLR model, and the R² between the contents of the five heavy metals estimated by the GRNN model and the measured values are approximately 0.7; (3) the stability and accuracy of the spectral estimation using the SMO-SVM model are obviously better than that of the GRNN and MLR models. Among all five types of heavy metals, the estimation for cadmium (Cd) is the best when using the SMO-SVM model, and its R² value reaches 0.8628; (4) using the optimal model to invert the Cd content in wheat that are planted on mine reclamation soil, the R² and RMSE between the measured and the estimated values are 0.6683 and 0.0489, respectively. This result suggests that the method using the SMO-SVM model to estimate the contents of heavy metals in wheat samples is feasible.

  19. An Overdetermined System for Improved Autocorrelation Based Spectral Moment Estimator Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keel, Byron M.

    1996-01-01

    Autocorrelation based spectral moment estimators are typically derived using the Fourier transform relationship between the power spectrum and the autocorrelation function along with using either an assumed form of the autocorrelation function, e.g., Gaussian, or a generic complex form and applying properties of the characteristic function. Passarelli has used a series expansion of the general complex autocorrelation function and has expressed the coefficients in terms of central moments of the power spectrum. A truncation of this series will produce a closed system of equations which can be solved for the central moments of interest. The autocorrelation function at various lags is estimated from samples of the random process under observation. These estimates themselves are random variables and exhibit a bias and variance that is a function of the number of samples used in the estimates and the operational signal-to-noise ratio. This contributes to a degradation in performance of the moment estimators. This dissertation investigates the use autocorrelation function estimates at higher order lags to reduce the bias and standard deviation in spectral moment estimates. In particular, Passarelli's series expansion is cast in terms of an overdetermined system to form a framework under which the application of additional autocorrelation function estimates at higher order lags can be defined and assessed. The solution of the overdetermined system is the least squares solution. Furthermore, an overdetermined system can be solved for any moment or moments of interest and is not tied to a particular form of the power spectrum or corresponding autocorrelation function. As an application of this approach, autocorrelation based variance estimators are defined by a truncation of Passarelli's series expansion and applied to simulated Doppler weather radar returns which are characterized by a Gaussian shaped power spectrum. The performance of the variance estimators determined

  20. Estimation of phytoplankton size fractions based on spectral features of remote sensing ocean color data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zuchuan; Li, Lin; Song, Kaishan; Cassar, Nicolas

    2013-03-01

    Through its influence on the structure of pelagic ecosystems, phytoplankton size distribution (pico-, nano-, and micro-plankton) is believed to play a key role in "the biological pump." In this paper, an algorithm is proposed to estimate phytoplankton size fractions (PSF) for micro-, nano-, and pico-plankton (fm, fn, and fp, respectively) from the spectral features of remote-sensing data. From remote-sensing reflectance spectrum (Rrs(λ)), the algorithm constructs four types of spectral features: a normalized Rrs(λ), band ratios, continuum-removed spectra, and spectral curvatures. Using support vector machine recursive feature elimination, the algorithm ranks the constructed spectral features and Rrs(λ) according to their sensitivities to PSF which is then regressed against the sensitive spectral features through support vector regression. The algorithm is validated with (1) simulated Rrs(λ) and PSF, and (2) Rrs(λ) obtained by Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and PSF determined from High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) pigments. The validation results show the overall effectiveness of the algorithm in estimating PSF, with R2 of (1) 0.938 (fm) for the simulated SeaWiFS data set; and (2) 0.617 (fm), 0.475 (fn), and 0.587 (fp) for the SeaWiFS satellite data set. The validation results also indicate that continuum-removed spectra and spectral curvatures are the dominant spectral features sensitive to PSF with their wavelengths mainly centered on the pigment-absorption domain. Global spatial distributions of fm, fn, and fp were mapped with monthly SeaWiFS images. Overall, their biogeographical distributions are consistent with our current understanding that pico-plankton account for a large proportion of total phytoplankton biomass in oligotrophic regions, nano-plankton in transitional areas, and micro-plankton in high-productivity regions.

  1. Maximum Likelihood Estimation of the Broken Power Law Spectral Parameters with Detector Design Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Leonard W.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The maximum likelihood procedure is developed for estimating the three spectral parameters of an assumed broken power law energy spectrum from simulated detector responses and their statistical properties investigated. The estimation procedure is then generalized for application to real cosmic-ray data. To illustrate the procedure and its utility, analytical methods were developed in conjunction with a Monte Carlo simulation to explore the combination of the expected cosmic-ray environment with a generic space-based detector and its planned life cycle, allowing us to explore various detector features and their subsequent influence on estimating the spectral parameters. This study permits instrument developers to make important trade studies in design parameters as a function of the science objectives, which is particularly important for space-based detectors where physical parameters, such as dimension and weight, impose rigorous practical limits to the design envelope.

  2. Estimation of soil water content in Mongolian grasslands using a spectral radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiyama, Ayako; Shimada, Sawahiko; Toyoda, Hiromichi; Yokohama, Michinari

    Harsh winter conditions, called dzud, experienced in Mongolia in recent years have caused significant damage to their livestock. Grassland deterioration resulting from soil water shortage coupled with the lack of precipitation during summer is one of the causative factors of this damage. Collecting grassland information over a wide area by satellite remote sensing is useful for spatial prediction of dzud. In this study, we conducted a fundamental experiment to estimate soil water content using a spectral radiometer (observed wavelength range, 302.9-1145.8 nm), which uses the same sensor as a satellite. Soil spectral reflectance was measured under open-air conditions using a spectral radiometer at the experiment station. The soil water content was controlled in several samples by adding water, and the spectral reflectance of the sample surface was measured. Four spectral bands were selected under the observed wavelength for application to the satellite data. The soil spectral reflectance was normalized by the sum of the reflectance values of each band. It was found that a normalized soil reflectance pattern changed to a flat pattern with a decrease in soil water content. Fujiwara et al. (1996) proposed a pattern decomposition method to decompose a mixed spectral reflectance pattern, e.g., land cover of soil and vegetation, into its respective parts. The decomposition coefficient for each pattern was calculated based on the mixed content of the reflectance patterns. In this study, a new spectral pattern, observed as a flat shape in the reflectance curve, was derived to extract the components of soil water content. Pattern decomposition was conducted using soil and flat model patterns, and their decomposition coefficients were calculated. The correlation between soil water content and the flat model pattern decomposition coefficient was calculated by regression analysis. To apply this method to field data, we conducted site investigations in Mongolian grasslands

  3. Application of Autoregressive processing to the analysis of seismograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Mark

    The application of Autoregressive processing to the analysis of seismograms has been of value to seismologists for several decades. Work in the 1960s and 1970s focused primarily on using Autoregressive (AR) filtering and other error predictive filters for improving the signal to noise ratio of small seismic signals. In the eighties and nineties most interest has been in the application of AR filtering to onset time estimation. Onset time pickers which utilise AR filtering have proved to be very effective for a wide range of seismic signals including, local and teleseismic events. A key advantage of them over other methods is that they are robust even for phases with a small signal to noise ratio. The accuracy of automatic AR picks compare well with those of experienced seismic analysts. *** DIRECT SUPPORT *** A04BD016 00003

  4. Improving Spectral Crop Coefficient Approach with Raw Image Digital Count Data to Estimate Crop Water Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafian, S.; Maas, S. J.; Rajan, N.

    2014-12-01

    Water resources and agricultural applications require knowledge of crop water use (CWU) over a range of spatial and temporal scales. Due to the spatial density of meteorological stations, the resolution of CWU estimates based on these data is fairly coarse and not particularly suitable or reliable for water resources planning, irrigation scheduling and decision making. Various methods have been developed for quantifying CWU of agricultural crops. In this study, an improved version of the spectral crop coefficient which includes the effects of stomatal closure is applied. Raw digital count (DC) data in the red, near-infrared, and thermal infrared (TIR) spectral bands of Landsat-7 and Landsat-8 imaging sensors are used to construct the TIR-ground cover (GC) pixel data distribution and estimate the effects of stomatal closure. CWU is then estimated by combining results of the spectral crop coefficient approach and the stomatal closer effect. To test this approach, evapotranspiration was measured in 5 agricultural fields in the semi-arid Texas High Plains during the 2013 and 2014 growing seasons and compared to corresponding estimated values of CWU determined using this approach. The results showed that the estimated CWU from this approach was strongly correlated (R2 = 0.79) with observed evapotranspiration. In addition, the results showed that considering the stomatal closer effect in the proposed approach can improve the accuracy of the spectral crop coefficient method. These results suggest that the proposed approach is suitable for operational estimation of evapotranspiration and irrigation scheduling where irrigation is used to replace the daily CWU of a crop.

  5. On the use of the noncentral chi-square density function for the distribution of helicopter spectral estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garber, Donald P.

    1993-01-01

    A probability density function for the variability of ensemble averaged spectral estimates from helicopter acoustic signals in Gaussian background noise was evaluated. Numerical methods for calculating the density function and for determining confidence limits were explored. Density functions were predicted for both synthesized and experimental data and compared with observed spectral estimate variability.

  6. Estimation of Chlorophyll-a Concentration in Turbid Lake Using Spectral Smoothing and Derivative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chunmei; Wei, Yuchun; Sun, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Yu

    2013-01-01

    As a major indicator of lake eutrophication that is harmful to human health, the chlorophyll-a concentration (Chl-a) is often estimated using remote sensing, and one method often used is the spectral derivative algorithm. Direct derivative processing may magnify the noise, thus making spectral smoothing necessary. This study aims to use spectral smoothing as a pretreatment and to test the applicability of the spectral derivative algorithm for Chl-a estimation in Taihu Lake, China, based on the in situ hyperspectral reflectance. Data from July–August of 2004 were used to build the model, and data from July–August of 2005 and March of 2011 were used to validate the model, with Chl-a ranges of 5.0–156.0 mg/m3, 4.0–98.0 mg/m3 and 11.4–35.8 mg/m3, respectively. The derivative model was first used and then compared with the band ratio, three-band and four-band models. The results show that the first-order derivative model at 699 nm had satisfactory accuracy (R2 = 0.75) after kernel regression smoothing and had smaller validation root mean square errors of 15.21 mg/m3 in 2005 and 5.85 mg/m3 in 2011. The distribution map of Chl-a in Taihu Lake based on the HJ1/HSI image showed the actualdistribution trend, indicating that the first-order derivative model after spectral smoothing can be used for Chl-a estimation in turbid lake. PMID:23880727

  7. Estimation of chlorophyll-a concentration in Turbid Lake using spectral smoothing and derivative analysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chunmei; Wei, Yuchun; Sun, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Yu

    2013-07-16

    As a major indicator of lake eutrophication that is harmful to human health, the chlorophyll-a concentration (Chl-a) is often estimated using remote sensing, and one method often used is the spectral derivative algorithm. Direct derivative processing may magnify the noise, thus making spectral smoothing necessary. This study aims to use spectral smoothing as a pretreatment and to test the applicability of the spectral derivative algorithm for Chl-a estimation in Taihu Lake, China, based on the in situ hyperspectral reflectance. Data from July-August of 2004 were used to build the model, and data from July-August of 2005 and March of 2011 were used to validate the model, with Chl-a ranges of 5.0-156.0 mg/m3, 4.0-98.0 mg/m3 and 11.4-35.8 mg/m3, respectively. The derivative model was first used and then compared with the band ratio, three-band and four-band models. The results show that the first-order derivative model at 699 nm had satisfactory accuracy (R2 = 0.75) after kernel regression smoothing and had smaller validation root mean square errors of 15.21 mg/m3 in 2005 and 5.85 mg/m3 in 2011. The distribution map of Chl-a in Taihu Lake based on the HJ1/HSI image showed the actual distribution trend, indicating that the first-order derivative model after spectral smoothing can be used for Chl-a estimation in turbid lake.

  8. A Fundamental Study on Spectrum Center Estimation of Solar Spectral Irradiation by the Statistical Pattern Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, Aya; Suzuki, Kazumi; Wakao, Shinji; Kawasaki, Norihiro; Usami, Akira

    With a background of environmental problems and energy issues, it is expected that PV systems will be introduced rapidly and connected with power grids on a large scale in the future. For this reason, the concern to which PV power generation will affect supply and demand adjustment in electric power in the future arises and the technique of correctly grasping the PV power generation becomes increasingly important. The PV power generation depends on solar irradiance, temperature of a module and solar spectral irradiance. Solar spectral irradiance is distribution of the strength of the light for every wavelength. As the spectrum sensitivity of solar cell depends on kind of solar cell, it becomes important for exact grasp of PV power generation. Especially the preparation of solar spectral irradiance is, however, not easy because the observational instrument of solar spectral irradiance is expensive. With this background, in this paper, we propose a new method based on statistical pattern recognition for estimating the spectrum center which is representative index of solar spectral irradiance. Some numerical examples obtained by the proposed method are also presented.

  9. Adaptive Parametric Spectral Estimation with Kalman Smoothing for Online Early Seizure Detection

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yun S.; Hochberg, Leigh R.; Eskandar, Emad N.; Cash, Sydney S.; Truccolo, Wilson

    2014-01-01

    Tracking spectral changes in neural signals, such as local field potentials (LFPs) and scalp or intracranial electroencephalograms (EEG, iEEG), is an important problem in early detection and prediction of seizures. Most approaches have focused on either parametric or nonparametric spectral estimation methods based on moving time windows. Here, we explore an adaptive (time-varying) parametric ARMA approach for tracking spectral changes in neural signals based on the fixed-interval Kalman smoother. We apply the method to seizure detection based on spectral features of intracortical LFPs recorded from a person with pharmacologically intractable focal epilepsy. We also devise and test an approach for real-time tracking of spectra based on the adaptive parametric method with the fixed-interval Kalman smoother. The order of ARMA models is determined via the AIC computed in moving time windows. We quantitatively demonstrate the advantages of using the adaptive parametric estimation method in seizure detection over nonparametric alternatives based exclusively on moving time windows. Overall, the adaptive parametric approach significantly improves the statistical separability of interictal and ictal epochs. PMID:24663686

  10. Model-based spectral estimation of Doppler signals using parallel genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Solano González, J; Rodríguez Vázquez, K; García Nocetti, D F

    2000-05-01

    Conventional spectral analysis methods use a fast Fourier transform (FFT) on consecutive or overlapping windowed data segments. For Doppler ultrasound signals, this approach suffers from an inadequate frequency resolution due to the time segment duration and the non-stationarity characteristics of the signals. Parametric or model-based estimators can give significant improvements in the time-frequency resolution at the expense of a higher computational complexity. This work describes an approach which implements in real-time a parametric spectral estimator method using genetic algorithms (GAs) in order to find the optimum set of parameters for the adaptive filter that minimises the error function. The aim is to reduce the computational complexity of the conventional algorithm by using the simplicity associated to GAs and exploiting its parallel characteristics. This will allow the implementation of higher order filters, increasing the spectrum resolution, and opening a greater scope for using more complex methods.

  11. Fractional vegetation cover estimation based on an improved selective endmember spectral mixture model.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Wang, Hong; Li, Xiao Bing

    2015-01-01

    Vegetation is an important part of ecosystem and estimation of fractional vegetation cover is of significant meaning to monitoring of vegetation growth in a certain region. With Landsat TM images and HJ-1B images as data source, an improved selective endmember linear spectral mixture model (SELSMM) was put forward in this research to estimate the fractional vegetation cover in Huangfuchuan watershed in China. We compared the result with the vegetation coverage estimated with linear spectral mixture model (LSMM) and conducted accuracy test on the two results with field survey data to study the effectiveness of different models in estimation of vegetation coverage. Results indicated that: (1) the RMSE of the estimation result of SELSMM based on TM images is the lowest, which is 0.044. The RMSEs of the estimation results of LSMM based on TM images, SELSMM based on HJ-1B images and LSMM based on HJ-1B images are respectively 0.052, 0.077 and 0.082, which are all higher than that of SELSMM based on TM images; (2) the R2 of SELSMM based on TM images, LSMM based on TM images, SELSMM based on HJ-1B images and LSMM based on HJ-1B images are respectively 0.668, 0.531, 0.342 and 0.336. Among these models, SELSMM based on TM images has the highest estimation accuracy and also the highest correlation with measured vegetation coverage. Of the two methods tested, SELSMM is superior to LSMM in estimation of vegetation coverage and it is also better at unmixing mixed pixels of TM images than pixels of HJ-1B images. So, the SELSMM based on TM images is comparatively accurate and reliable in the research of regional fractional vegetation cover estimation.

  12. A Steady-State Kalman Predictor-Based Filtering Strategy for Non-Overlapping Sub-Band Spectral Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zenghui; Xu, Bin; Yang, Jian; Song, Jianshe

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on suppressing spectral overlap for sub-band spectral estimation, with which we can greatly decrease the computational complexity of existing spectral estimation algorithms, such as nonlinear least squares spectral analysis and non-quadratic regularized sparse representation. Firstly, our study shows that the nominal ability of the high-order analysis filter to suppress spectral overlap is greatly weakened when filtering a finite-length sequence, because many meaningless zeros are used as samples in convolution operations. Next, an extrapolation-based filtering strategy is proposed to produce a series of estimates as the substitutions of the zeros and to recover the suppression ability. Meanwhile, a steady-state Kalman predictor is applied to perform a linearly-optimal extrapolation. Finally, several typical methods for spectral analysis are applied to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed strategy. PMID:25609038

  13. A steady-state Kalman predictor-based filtering strategy for non-overlapping sub-band spectral estimation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zenghui; Xu, Bin; Yang, Jian; Song, Jianshe

    2014-12-24

    This paper focuses on suppressing spectral overlap for sub-band spectral estimation, with which we can greatly decrease the computational complexity of existing spectral estimation algorithms, such as nonlinear least squares spectral analysis and non-quadratic regularized sparse representation. Firstly, our study shows that the nominal ability of the high-order analysis filter to suppress spectral overlap is greatly weakened when filtering a finite-length sequence, because many meaningless zeros are used as samples in convolution operations. Next, an extrapolation-based filtering strategy is proposed to produce a series of estimates as the substitutions of the zeros and to recover the suppression ability. Meanwhile, a steady-state Kalman predictor is applied to perform a linearly-optimal extrapolation. Finally, several typical methods for spectral analysis are applied to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed strategy.

  14. Error estimate of Taylor's frozen-in flow hypothesis in the spectral domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Yasuhito

    2017-03-01

    The quality of Taylor's frozen-in flow hypothesis can be measured by estimating the amount of the fluctuation energy mapped from the streamwise wavenumbers onto the Doppler-shifted frequencies in the spectral domain. For a random sweeping case with a Gaussian variation of the large-scale flow, the mapping quality is expressed by the error function which depends on the mean flow speed, the sweeping velocity, the frequency bin, and the frequency of interest. Both hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic treatments are presented on the error estimate of Taylor's hypothesis with examples from the solar wind measurements.

  15. Spectral estimation from laser scanner data for accurate color rendering of objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baribeau, Rejean

    2002-06-01

    Estimation methods are studied for the recovery of the spectral reflectance across the visible range from the sensing at just three discrete laser wavelengths. Methods based on principal component analysis and on spline interpolation are judged based on the CIE94 color differences for some reference data sets. These include the Macbeth color checker, the OSA-UCS color charts, some artist pigments, and a collection of miscellaneous surface colors. The optimal three sampling wavelengths are also investigated. It is found that color can be estimated with average accuracy ΔE94 = 2.3 when optimal wavelengths 455 nm, 540 n, and 610 nm are used.

  16. Senegalese land surface change analysis and biophysical parameter estimation using NOAA AVHRR spectral data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukovich, Fred M.; Toll, David L.; Kennard, Ruth L.

    1989-01-01

    Surface biophysical estimates were derived from analysis of NOAA Advanced Very High Spectral Resolution (AVHRR) spectral data of the Senegalese area of west Africa. The parameters derived were of solar albedo, spectral visible and near-infrared band reflectance, spectral vegetative index, and ground temperature. Wet and dry linked AVHRR scenes from 1981 through 1985 in Senegal were analyzed for a semi-wet southerly site near Tambacounda and a predominantly dry northerly site near Podor. Related problems were studied to convert satellite derived radiance to biophysical estimates of the land surface. Problems studied were associated with sensor miscalibration, atmospheric and aerosol spatial variability, surface anisotropy of reflected radiation, narrow satellite band reflectance to broad solar band conversion, and ground emissivity correction. The middle-infrared reflectance was approximated with a visible AVHRR reflectance for improving solar albedo estimates. In addition, the spectral composition of solar irradiance (direct and diffuse radiation) between major spectral regions (i.e., ultraviolet, visible, near-infrared, and middle-infrared) was found to be insensitive to changes in the clear sky atmospheric optical depth in the narrow band to solar band conversion procedure. Solar albedo derived estimates for both sites were not found to change markedly with significant antecedent precipitation events or correspondingly from increases in green leaf vegetation density. The bright soil/substrate contributed to a high albedo for the dry related scenes, whereas the high internal leaf reflectance in green vegetation canopies in the near-infrared contributed to high solar albedo for the wet related scenes. The relationship between solar albedo and ground temperature was poor, indicating the solar albedo has little control of the ground temperature. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the derived visible reflectance were more sensitive to antecedent

  17. [Vegetation index estimation by chlorophyll content of grassland based on spectral analysis].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Han; Chen, Xiu-Wan; Yang, Zhen-Yu; Li, Huai-Yu; Zhu, Han

    2014-11-01

    Comparing the methods of existing remote sensing research on the estimation of chlorophyll content, the present paper confirms that the vegetation index is one of the most practical and popular research methods. In recent years, the increasingly serious problem of grassland degradation. This paper, firstly, analyzes the measured reflectance spectral curve and its first derivative curve in the grasslands of Songpan, Sichuan and Gongger, Inner Mongolia, conducts correlation analysis between these two spectral curves and chlorophyll content, and finds out the regulation between REP (red edge position) and grassland chlorophyll content, that is, the higher the chlorophyll content is, the higher the REIP (red-edge inflection point) value would be. Then, this paper constructs GCI (grassland chlorophyll index) and selects the most suitable band for retrieval. Finally, this paper calculates the GCI by the use of satellite hyperspectral image, conducts the verification and accuracy analysis of the calculation results compared with chlorophyll content data collected from field of twice experiments. The result shows that for grassland chlorophyll content, GCI has stronger sensitivity than other indices of chlorophyll, and has higher estimation accuracy. GCI is the first proposed to estimate the grassland chlorophyll content, and has wide application potential for the remote sensing retrieval of grassland chlorophyll content. In addition, the grassland chlorophyll content estimation method based on remote sensing retrieval in this paper provides new research ideas for other vegetation biochemical parameters' estimation, vegetation growth status' evaluation and grassland ecological environment change's monitoring.

  18. Improved global high resolution precipitation estimation using multi-satellite multi-spectral information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrangi, Ali

    In respond to the community demands, combining microwave (MW) and infrared (IR) estimates of precipitation has been an active area of research since past two decades. The anticipated launching of NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission and the increasing number of spectral bands in recently launched geostationary platforms will provide greater opportunities for investigating new approaches to combine multi-source information towards improved global high resolution precipitation retrievals. After years of the communities' efforts the limitations of the existing techniques are: (1) Drawbacks of IR-only techniques to capture warm rainfall and screen out no-rain thin cirrus clouds; (2) Grid-box- only dependency of many algorithms with not much effort to capture the cloud textures whether in local or cloud patch scale; (3) Assumption of indirect relationship between rain rate and cloud-top temperature that force high intensity precipitation to any cold cloud; (4) Neglecting the dynamics and evolution of cloud in time; (5) Inconsistent combination of MW and IR-based precipitation estimations due to the combination strategies and as a result of above described shortcomings. This PhD dissertation attempts to improve the combination of data from Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) and Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites in manners that will allow consistent high resolution integration of the more accurate precipitation estimates, directly observed through LEO's PMW sensors, into the short-term cloud evolution process, which can be inferred from GEO images. A set of novel approaches are introduced to cope with the listed limitations and is consist of the following four consecutive components: (1) starting with the GEO part and by using an artificial-neural network based method it is demonstrated that inclusion of multi-spectral data can ameliorate existing problems associated with IR-only precipitating retrievals; (2) through development of Precipitation Estimation

  19. An investigation of spectral change as influenced by irrigation and evapotranspiration volume estimation in western Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seevers, P.M.; Sadowski, F.C.; Lauer, D.T.

    1990-01-01

    Retrospective satellite image data were evaluated for their ability to demonstrate the influence of center-pivot irrigation development in western Nebraska on spectral change and climate-related factors for the region. Periodic images of an albedo index and a normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) were generated from calibrated Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) data and used to monitor spectral changes associated with irrigation development from 1972 through 1986. The albedo index was not useful for monitoring irrigation development. For the NDVI, it was found that proportions of counties in irrigated agriculture, as discriminated by a threshold, were more highly correlated with reported ground estimates of irrigated agriculture than were county mean greenness values. A similar result was achieved when using coarse resolution Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) image data for estimating irrigated agriculture. The NDVI images were used to evaluate a procedure for making areal estimates of actual evapotranspiration (ET) volumes. Estimates of ET volumes for test counties, using reported ground acreages and corresponding standard crop coefficients, were correlated with the estimates of ET volume using crop coefficients scaled to NDVI values and pixel counts of crop areas. These county estimates were made under the assumption that soil water availability was unlimited. For nonirrigated vegetation, this may result in over-estimation of ET volumes. Ground information regarding crop types and acreages are required to derive the NDVI scaling factor. Potential ET, estimated with the Jensen-Haise model, is common to both methods. These results, achieved with both MSS and AVHRR data, show promise for providing climatologically important land surface information for regional and global climate models. ?? 1990 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  20. Modern spectral analysis techniques for blood flow velocity and spectral measurements with pulsed Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    David, J Y; Jones, S A; Giddens, D P

    1991-06-01

    Four spectral analysis techniques were applied to pulsed Doppler ultrasonic quadrature signals to compare the relative merits of each technique for estimation of flow velocity and Doppler spectra. The four techniques were 1) the fast Fourier transform method, 2) the maximum likelihood method, 3) the Burg autoregressive algorithm, and 4) the modified covariance approach to autoregressive modeling. Both simulated signals and signals obtained from an in vitro flow system were studied. Optimal parameter values (e.g., model orders) were determined for each method, and the effects of signal-to-noise ratio and signal bandwidth were investigated. The modern spectral analysis techniques were shown to be superior to Fourier techniques in most circumstances, provided the model order was chosen appropriately. Robustness considerations tended to recommend the maximum likelihood method for both velocity and spectral estimation. Despite the restrictions of steady laminar flow, the results provide important basic information concerning the applicability of modern spectral analysis techniques to Doppler ultrasonic evaluation of arterial disease.

  1. Moisture estimation in power transformer oil using acoustic signals and spectral kurtosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leite, Valéria C. M. N.; Veloso, Giscard F. C.; Borges da Silva, Luiz Eduardo; Lambert-Torres, Germano; Borges da Silva, Jonas G.; Onofre Pereira Pinto, João

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a new technique for estimating the contamination by moisture in power transformer insulating oil based on the spectral kurtosis analysis of the acoustic signals of partial discharges (PDs). Basically, in this approach, the spectral kurtosis of the PD acoustic signal is calculated and the correlation between its maximum value and the moisture percentage is explored to find a function that calculates the moisture percentage. The function can be easily implemented in DSP, FPGA, or any other type of embedded system for online moisture monitoring. To evaluate the proposed approach, an experiment is assembled with a piezoelectric sensor attached to a tank, which is filled with insulating oil samples contaminated by different levels of moisture. A device generating electrical discharges is submerged into the oil to simulate the occurrence of PDs. Detected acoustic signals are processed using fast kurtogram algorithm to extract spectral kurtosis values. The obtained data are used to find the fitting function that relates the water contamination to the maximum value of the spectral kurtosis. Experimental results show that the proposed method is suitable for online monitoring system of power transformers.

  2. The use of high spectral resolution bands for estimating absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (A par)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Moon S.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Chappelle, E. W.; Mcmurtrey, J. E.; Walthall, C. L.

    1994-01-01

    Most remote sensing estimations of vegetation variables such as Leaf Area Index (LAI), Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (APAR), and phytomass are made using broad band sensors with a bandwidth of approximately 100 nm. However, high resolution spectrometers are available and have not been fully exploited for the purpose of improving estimates of vegetation variables. A study directed to investigate the use of high spectral resolution spectroscopy for remote sensing estimates of APAR in vegetation canopies in the presence of nonphotosynthetic background materials such as soil and leaf litter is presented. A high spectral resolution method defined as the Chlorophyll Absorption Ratio Index (CARI) was developed for minimizing the effects of nonphotosynthetic materials in the remote estimates of APAR. CARI utilizes three bands at 550, 670, and 700 nm with bandwidth of 10 nm. Simulated canopy reflectance of a range of LAI were generated with the SAIL model using measurements of 42 different soil types as canopy background. CARI obtained from the simulated canopy reflectance was compared with the broad band vegetation indices (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), and Simple Ratio (SR)). CARI reduced the effect of nonphotosynthetic background materials in the assessment of vegetation canopy APAR more effectively than broad band vegetation indices.

  3. Maximum orthogonal subspace projection approach to estimating the number of spectral signal sources in hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Wei; Tsai, Ching Tsorng; Yang, Ching Wen; Chang, Chein-I.

    2010-08-01

    Estimating the number of spectral signal sources, denoted by p, in hyperspectral imagery is very challenging due to the fact that many unknown material substances can be uncovered by very high spectral resolution hyperspectral sensors. This paper investigates a recent approach, called maximum orthogonal complement algorithm (MOCA), for this purpose. The MOCA was originally developed by Kuybeda et al. for estimating the rank of a rare vector space in a highdimensional noisy data space. Interestingly, the idea of the MOCA is essentially derived from the automatic target generation process (ATGP) developed by Ren and Chang. By appropriately interpreting the MOCA in context of the ATGP a potentially useful technique, called maximum orthogonal subspace projection (MOSP) can be further developed where determining a stopping rule for the ATGP turns out to be equivalent to estimating the rank of a rare vector space by the MOCA and the number of targets determined by the stopping rule for the ATGP to generate is the desired value of the parameter p. Furthermore, a Neyman-Pearson detector version of MOCA, NPD-MOCA can be also derived by the MOSP as opposed to the MOCA considered as a Bayes detector. Surprisingly, the MOCA-NPD has very similar design rationale to that of a technique referred to as Harsanyi-Farrand-Chang method that was developed to estimate the virtual dimensionality (VD) which is defined as the p.

  4. Using dark current data to estimate AVIRIS noise covariance and improve spectral analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boardman, Joseph W.

    1995-01-01

    Starting in 1994, all AVIRIS data distributions include a new product useful for quantification and modeling of the noise in the reported radiance data. The 'postcal' file contains approximately 100 lines of dark current data collected at the end of each data acquisition run. In essence this is a regular spectral-image cube, with 614 samples, 100 lines and 224 channels, collected with a closed shutter. Since there is no incident radiance signal, the recorded DN measure only the DC signal level and the noise in the system. Similar dark current measurements, made at the end of each line are used, with a 100 line moving average, to remove the DC signal offset. Therefore, the pixel-by-pixel fluctuations about the mean of this dark current image provide an excellent model for the additive noise that is present in AVIRIS reported radiance data. The 61,400 dark current spectra can be used to calculate the noise levels in each channel and the noise covariance matrix. Both of these noise parameters should be used to improve spectral processing techniques. Some processing techniques, such as spectral curve fitting, will benefit from a robust estimate of the channel-dependent noise levels. Other techniques, such as automated unmixing and classification, will be improved by the stable and scene-independence noise covariance estimate. Future imaging spectrometry systems should have a similar ability to record dark current data, permitting this noise characterization and modeling.

  5. Techniques for estimating the unknown functions of incomplete experimental spectral and correlation response matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, Jose; Borsoi, Laurent; Delaune, Xavier; Piteau, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we propose analytical and numerical straightforward approximate methods to estimate the unknown terms of incomplete spectral or correlation matrices, when the cross-spectra or cross-correlations available from multiple measurements do not cover all pairs of transducer locations. The proposed techniques may be applied whenever the available data includes the auto-spectra at all measurement locations, as well as selected cross-spectra which implicates all measurement locations. The suggested methods can also be used for checking the consistency between the spectral or correlation functions pertaining to measurement matrices, in cases of suspicious data. After presenting the proposed spectral estimation formulations, we discuss their merits and limitations. Then we illustrate their use on a realistic simulation of a multi-supported tube subjected to turbulence excitation from cross-flow. Finally, we show the effectiveness of the proposed techniques by extracting the modal responses of the simulated flow-excited tube, using the SOBI (Second Order Blind Identification) method, from an incomplete response matrix 1

  6. Estimating Cosmic-Ray Spectral Parameters from Simulated Detector Responses with Detector Design Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, L. W.

    2001-01-01

    A simple power law model consisting of a single spectral index (alpha-1) is believed to be an adequate description of the galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) proton flux at energies below 10(exp 13) eV, with a transition at knee energy (E(sub k)) to a steeper spectral index alpha-2 > alpha-1 above E(sub k). The maximum likelihood procedure is developed for estimating these three spectral parameters of the broken power law energy spectrum from simulated detector responses. These estimates and their surrounding statistical uncertainty are being used to derive the requirements in energy resolution, calorimeter size, and energy response of a proposed sampling calorimeter for the Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for the Space Station (ACCESS). This study thereby permits instrument developers to make important trade studies in design parameters as a function of the science objectives, which is particularly important for space-based detectors where physical parameters, such as dimension and weight, impose rigorous practical limits to the design envelope.

  7. Evaluation of laser Doppler flowmetry system with fast signal processing using an autoregressive process model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elter, Peter; Stork, Wilhelm; Mueller-Glaser, Klaus-Dieter; Lutter, Norbert O.

    1999-05-01

    This report describes the evaluation of a noninvasive laser Doppler system comprising a sensor, a digital signal processor (DSP) unit and a visualizing PC for continuous blood flow measurements. The first weighted moment of the power spectrum density of the laser Doppler sensor signal is a linear measure for blood flow. In order to estimate the power spectrum densities in real time, a first order autoregressive process model was developed. Due to this very fast signal processing, the system allows measurements both in microcirculation and of higher blood flows in larger vessels with a signal bandwidth of up to 200 kHz, e.g. in superficial arteries. Since the analytical dependency of blood flow and first spectral moment is only valid for tissue perfusion, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate this dependency also for higher blood flow velocities in larger vessels. A multilayered, semi- infinite tissue model essentially comprising epidermis, dermis and a blood vessel with a parabolic profile of constant blood flow was used varying different parameter like vessel diameter and skin thickness. Furthermore, model measurements were performed using a Delrine slab with a drilling through which constant flow of whole blood was provided. Both the Monte Carlo simulations and model measurements prove very high linear correlations between the calculated spectral moments and flow velocities.

  8. [Estimation of rice LAI by using NDVI at different spectral bandwidths].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fu-min; Huang, Jing-feng; Tang, Yan-lin; Wang, Xiu-zhen

    2007-11-01

    The canopy hyperspectral reflectance data of rice at its different development stages were collected from field measurement, and the corresponding NDVIs as well as the correlation coefficients of NDVIs and LAI were computed at extending bandwidth of TM red and near-infrared (NIR) spectra. According to the variation characteristics of best fitted R2 with spectral bandwidth, the optimal bandwidth was determined. The results showed that the correlation coefficients of LAI and ND-VI and the maximum R2 of the best fitted functions at different spectral bandwidths had the same variation trend, i.e., decreased with increasing bandwidth when the bandwidth was less than 60 nm. However, when the bandwidth was beyond 60 nm, the maximum R2 somewhat fluctuated due to the effect of NIR. The analysis of R2 variation with bandwidth indicated that 15 nm was the optimal bandwidth for the estimation of rice LAI by using NDVI.

  9. Colorimetric Analysis and Spectral Transformation of Soil-Vegetation Mixture Reflectance for Canopy Coverage Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kancheva, R.; Borisova, D.; Mishev, D.

    Vegetation monitoring is one of the essential applications of remote sensing techniques in practice. Concerning agricultural plants an important task is crop state assessment during the growing period. Vegetation status and physiological development are defined by a set of bioparameters such as biomass amount, leaf area index, chlorophyll content, etc. Various methods of spectral data processing are used for their stimulation aiming mainly at the establishment of quantitative relationships between crop biophysical and reflectance properties. Canopy coverage is of a particular interest here because it is an important indicator of plant growth and is closely related with other bioparameters being at the same time a factor of soil-vegetation mixtures reflectance. This paper has the following objectives: - to study the colorimetric characteristics (color coordinates, trichromatic coefficients, excitation purity, dominant wavelength) of different soil types and species as well as their potential for canopy coverage estimation; - to compare and test the correspondence between coverage values evaluated through colorimetric analysis and by using various spectral data transformations (ratio indices, contrasts, normalized differences, linear combinations); - to demonstrate the joint application of both methods for increasing the accuracy and the reliability of canopy coverage assessment. Ground-based reflectance data from peas, spring barley and winter wheat grown on chernozem, alluvial-medow and grey forest soils were gathered. The measurements were performed with a multichannel radiometer in the 400-820 nm spectral band with a 10 nm step. Correlation and regression analysis of plot coverage, color features and spectral indices was carried out. Statistical relationships were derived and used later for canopy coverage estimation on independent data sets. The colorimetric analysis of the reflectance characteristics permited reliable and quite satisfactory coverage evaluations

  10. Cloud discrimination and spectral radiance estimation from a digital sky images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, M.; Iwabuchi, H.; Murata, I.

    2015-12-01

    Clouds cover more than 60% of the globe with high impacts on incoming solar irradiance on the ground as well as the radiative energy transfer in the Earth-atmosphere system. Several method for detecting clouds from sky images have been developed, and digital signals available from the JPEG image have nonlinear relationship with the corresponding spectral radiances, which may lead to cloud misclassifications. In this work, a method for cloud discrimination from sky images in RAW format taken from a commercial digital camera is developed. The method uses the clear sky index (CSI). In order to take into account the spectral response in red-green-blue (RGB) channels of the camera as well as lens characteristics, these characteristics are first inferred very accurately with a laboratory experiment. Spectral radiance is represented in a simple form with spectra of incoming solar radiation at the top of atmosphere and ozone transmittance and a polynominal with three coefficients that include the intensity index, the molecular index (MI) and the small particle index (SPI). These coefficients can be obtained from the digital RGB RAW counts by linear transformation. The MI and the SPI can be converted to the CSI, which takes different value from that at clear sky and cloudy pixels. Simultaneous observations with the lidar and the digital camera at Tohoku University show that the CSI can discriminate cloud and clear sky at every pixel with correct discrimination rate more than 90%. Furthermore, spectral distribution of sky radiance can also be estimated at every pixel, and estimated ones are consistent with those from spectrometer and those from radiative transfer simulations under various sky conditions in a wavelength range of 430-680 nm with mean biases lower than 3% and bias standard deviations smaller than 1%.

  11. Aboveground Biomass Estimation in a Tidal Brackish Marsh Using Simulated Thematic Mapper Spectral Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardisky, M.; Klemas, V.

    1984-01-01

    Spectral radiance data were collected from the ground and from a low altitude aircraft in an attempt to gain some insight into the potential utility of actual Thematic Mapper data for biomass estimation in wetland plant communities. No attempt was made to distinguish individual plant species within brackish marsh plant associations. Rather, it was decided to lump plant species with similar canopy morphologies and then estimate from spectral radiance data the biomass of the group. The rationale for such an approach is that plants with a similar morphology will produce a similar reflecting or absorping surface (i.e., canopy) for incoming electromagnetic radiation. Variations in observed reflectance from different plant communities with a similar canopy morphology are more likely to be a result of biomass differences than a result of differences in canopy architecture. If the hypothesis that plants with a similar morphology exhibit similar reflectance characteristics is true, then biomass can be estimated based on a model for the dominant plant morphology within a plant association and the need for species discrimination has effectively been eliminated.

  12. Nonlinear Bayesian Algorithms for Gas Plume Detection and Estimation from Hyper-spectral Thermal Image Data

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, Patrick G.; Posse, Christian; Hylden, Jeff L.; Anderson, Kevin K.

    2007-06-13

    This paper presents a nonlinear Bayesian regression algorithm for the purpose of detecting and estimating gas plume content from hyper-spectral data. Remote sensing data, by its very nature, is collected under less controlled conditions than laboratory data. As a result, the physics-based model that is used to describe the relationship between the observed remotesensing spectra, and the terrestrial (or atmospheric) parameters that we desire to estimate, is typically littered with many unknown "nuisance" parameters (parameters that we are not interested in estimating, but also appear in the model). Bayesian methods are well-suited for this context as they automatically incorporate the uncertainties associated with all nuisance parameters into the error estimates of the parameters of interest. The nonlinear Bayesian regression methodology is illustrated on realistic simulated data from a three-layer model for longwave infrared (LWIR) measurements from a passive instrument. This shows that this approach should permit more accurate estimation as well as a more reasonable description of estimate uncertainty.

  13. A Comparison of Inverse-Wishart Prior Specifications for Covariance Matrices in Multilevel Autoregressive Models.

    PubMed

    Schuurman, N K; Grasman, R P P P; Hamaker, E L

    2016-01-01

    Multilevel autoregressive models are especially suited for modeling between-person differences in within-person processes. Fitting these models with Bayesian techniques requires the specification of prior distributions for all parameters. Often it is desirable to specify prior distributions that have negligible effects on the resulting parameter estimates. However, the conjugate prior distribution for covariance matrices-the Inverse-Wishart distribution-tends to be informative when variances are close to zero. This is problematic for multilevel autoregressive models, because autoregressive parameters are usually small for each individual, so that the variance of these parameters will be small. We performed a simulation study to compare the performance of three Inverse-Wishart prior specifications suggested in the literature, when one or more variances for the random effects in the multilevel autoregressive model are small. Our results show that the prior specification that uses plug-in ML estimates of the variances performs best. We advise to always include a sensitivity analysis for the prior specification for covariance matrices of random parameters, especially in autoregressive models, and to include a data-based prior specification in this analysis. We illustrate such an analysis by means of an empirical application on repeated measures data on worrying and positive affect.

  14. Application of autoregressive distributed lag model to thermal error compensation of machine tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Enming; Niu, Pengcheng; Fei, Yetai; Yan, Yan

    2011-12-01

    Since Thermal error in precision CNC machine tools cannot be ignored, it is essential to construct a simple and effective thermal error compensation mathematical model. In this paper, three modeling methods are introduced in detail. The first is multiple linear regression model; the second is congruence model, which combines multiple linear regression model with AR model of its residual error; and the third is autoregressive distributed lag model(ADL), which is compared and analyzed. Multiple linear regression analysis is used most commonly in thermal error compensation, since it is a simple and quick modeling method. But thermal error is nonlinear and interactive, so it is difficult to model a precise least squares model of thermal error. The congruence model and autoregressive distributed lag model belong to time series analysis method which has the advantage of establishing a precise mathematical model. The distinctions between the two models are that: the congruence model divides the parameter into two parts to estimate them respectively, but autoregressive distributed lag model estimates parameter uniformly, so congruence model is less accurate than autoregressive distributed lag model in modeling. This paper, based upon an actual example, concludes that autoregressive distributed lag model for thermal error of precision CNC machine tools is a good way to improve modeling accuracy.

  15. A comparative study of the performance of different spectral estimation methods for classification of mental tasks.

    PubMed

    Diez, Pablo F; Laciar, Eric; Mut, Vicente; Avila, Enrique; Torres, Abel

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we compare three different spectral estimation techniques for the classification of mental tasks. These techniques are the standard periodogram, the Welch periodogram and the Burg method, applied to electroencephalographic (EEG) signals. For each one of these methods we compute two parameters: the mean power and the root mean square (RMS), in various frequency bands. The classification of the mental tasks was conducted with a linear discriminate analysis. The Welch periodogram and the Burg method performed better than the standard periodogram. The use of the RMS allows better classification accuracy than the obtained with the power of EEG signals.

  16. Bayesian Estimations of Peak Ground Acceleration and 5% Damped Spectral Acceleration from Modified Mercalli Intensity Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ebel, J.E.; Wald, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a new probabilistic method that uses observations of modified Mercalli intensity (MMI) from past earthquakes to make quantitative estimates of ground shaking parameters (i.e., peak ground acceleration, peak ground velocity, 5% damped spectral acceleration values, etc.). The method uses a Bayesian approach to make quantitative estimates of the probabilities of different levels of ground motions from intensity data given an earthquake of known location and magnitude. The method utilizes probability distributions from an intensity/ground motion data set along with a ground motion attenuation relation to estimate the ground motion from intensity. The ground motions with the highest probabilities are the ones most likely experienced at the site of the MMI observation. We test the method using MMI/ground motion data from California and published ground motion attenuation relations to estimate the ground motions for several earthquakes: 1999 Hector Mine, California (M7.1); 1988 Saguenay, Quebec (M5.9); and 1982 Gaza, New Hampshire (M4.4). In an example where the method is applied to a historic earthquake, we estimate that the peak ground accelerations associated with the 1727 (M???5.2) earthquake at Newbury, Massachusetts, ranged from 0.23 g at Newbury to 0.06 g at Boston.

  17. Stochastic spectral projection of electrochemical thermal model for lithium-ion cell state estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagade, Piyush; Hariharan, Krishnan S.; Kolake, Subramanya Mayya; Song, Taewon; Oh, Dukjin

    2017-03-01

    A novel approach for integrating a pseudo-two dimensional electrochemical thermal (P2D-ECT) model and data assimilation algorithm is presented for lithium-ion cell state estimation. This approach refrains from making any simplifications in the P2D-ECT model while making it amenable for online state estimation. Though deterministic, uncertainty in the initial states induces stochasticity in the P2D-ECT model. This stochasticity is resolved by spectrally projecting the stochastic P2D-ECT model on a set of orthogonal multivariate Hermite polynomials. Volume averaging in the stochastic dimensions is proposed for efficient numerical solution of the resultant model. A state estimation framework is developed using a transformation of the orthogonal basis to assimilate the measurables with this system of equations. Effectiveness of the proposed method is first demonstrated by assimilating the cell voltage and temperature data generated using a synthetic test bed. This validated method is used with the experimentally observed cell voltage and temperature data for state estimation at different operating conditions and drive cycle protocols. The results show increased prediction accuracy when the data is assimilated every 30s. High accuracy of the estimated states is exploited to infer temperature dependent behavior of the lithium-ion cell.

  18. A Real Valued Neural Network Based Autoregressive Energy Detector for Cognitive Radio Application.

    PubMed

    Onumanyi, A J; Onwuka, E N; Aibinu, A M; Ugweje, O C; Salami, M J E

    2014-01-01

    A real valued neural network (RVNN) based energy detector (ED) is proposed and analyzed for cognitive radio (CR) application. This was developed using a known two-layered RVNN model to estimate the model coefficients of an autoregressive (AR) system. By using appropriate modules and a well-designed detector, the power spectral density (PSD) of the AR system transfer function was estimated and subsequent receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of the detector generated and analyzed. A high detection performance with low false alarm rate was observed for varying signal to noise ratio (SNR), sample number, and model order conditions. The proposed RVNN based ED was then compared to the simple periodogram (SP), Welch periodogram (WP), multitaper (MT), Yule-Walker (YW), Burg (BG), and covariance (CV) based ED techniques. The proposed detector showed better performance than the SP, WP, and MT while providing better false alarm performance than the YW, BG, and CV. Data provided here support the effectiveness of the proposed RVNN based ED for CR application.

  19. Spectral reflectance of Kelantan Estuary with ALOS data to estimate transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syahreza, S.; MatJafri, M. Z.; Lim, H. S.

    2012-09-01

    The Kelantan estuary, located in the northeastern part of Peninsular Malaysia, is characterized by high levels of suspended sediments. Kuala Besar is the estuary of the river directly opposite South China Sea. Spectral reflectance (Rr) and transparency measurements were carried out in the Kelantan estuary. The objective in this study is to establish empirical relationships between spectral remote sensing reflectance in ALOS satellite imagery and water column transparency, i.e. nephelometric turbidity unit (NTU) and Secchi disc depth (SDD) through these numerous in situ measurements. We detected that remote sensing reflectance are linear and power regression functions against NTU and SDD. The results of this sampling show that the wavelengths range from 500-620 nm is the most suitable band for measuring water column transparency. The calibrated reflectance of ALOS AVNIR-2 bands was also regressed against NTU and SDD field data to derive two empirical equations for water transparency estimation. These equations were calculated using ALOS images data on June 12, 2010. The result obtained indicated that reliable estimates of turbidity and transparency values for the Kelantan Estuary, Malaysia, could be retrieved using this method.

  20. Maximum Likelihood Estimation of the Broken Power Law Spectral Parameters with Detector Design Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Leonard W.

    2002-01-01

    The method of Maximum Likelihood (ML) is used to estimate the spectral parameters of an assumed broken power law energy spectrum from simulated detector responses. This methodology, which requires the complete specificity of all cosmic-ray detector design parameters, is shown to provide approximately unbiased, minimum variance, and normally distributed spectra information for events detected by an instrument having a wide range of commonly used detector response functions. The ML procedure, coupled with the simulated performance of a proposed space-based detector and its planned life cycle, has proved to be of significant value in the design phase of a new science instrument. The procedure helped make important trade studies in design parameters as a function of the science objectives, which is particularly important for space-based detectors where physical parameters, such as dimension and weight, impose rigorous practical limits to the design envelope. This ML methodology is then generalized to estimate broken power law spectral parameters from real cosmic-ray data sets.

  1. Geostatistical estimation of signal-to-noise ratios for spectral vegetation indices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ji, Lei; Zhang, Li; Rover, Jennifer R.; Wylie, Bruce K.; Chen, Xuexia

    2014-01-01

    In the past 40 years, many spectral vegetation indices have been developed to quantify vegetation biophysical parameters. An ideal vegetation index should contain the maximum level of signal related to specific biophysical characteristics and the minimum level of noise such as background soil influences and atmospheric effects. However, accurate quantification of signal and noise in a vegetation index remains a challenge, because it requires a large number of field measurements or laboratory experiments. In this study, we applied a geostatistical method to estimate signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for spectral vegetation indices. Based on the sample semivariogram of vegetation index images, we used the standardized noise to quantify the noise component of vegetation indices. In a case study in the grasslands and shrublands of the western United States, we demonstrated the geostatistical method for evaluating S/N for a series of soil-adjusted vegetation indices derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. The soil-adjusted vegetation indices were found to have higher S/N values than the traditional normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and simple ratio (SR) in the sparsely vegetated areas. This study shows that the proposed geostatistical analysis can constitute an efficient technique for estimating signal and noise components in vegetation indices.

  2. Geostatistical estimation of signal-to-noise ratios for spectral vegetation indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Lei; Zhang, Li; Rover, Jennifer; Wylie, Bruce K.; Chen, Xuexia

    2014-10-01

    In the past 40 years, many spectral vegetation indices have been developed to quantify vegetation biophysical parameters. An ideal vegetation index should contain the maximum level of signal related to specific biophysical characteristics and the minimum level of noise such as background soil influences and atmospheric effects. However, accurate quantification of signal and noise in a vegetation index remains a challenge, because it requires a large number of field measurements or laboratory experiments. In this study, we applied a geostatistical method to estimate signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for spectral vegetation indices. Based on the sample semivariogram of vegetation index images, we used the standardized noise to quantify the noise component of vegetation indices. In a case study in the grasslands and shrublands of the western United States, we demonstrated the geostatistical method for evaluating S/N for a series of soil-adjusted vegetation indices derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. The soil-adjusted vegetation indices were found to have higher S/N values than the traditional normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and simple ratio (SR) in the sparsely vegetated areas. This study shows that the proposed geostatistical analysis can constitute an efficient technique for estimating signal and noise components in vegetation indices.

  3. An Evaluation of Total Solar Reflectance and Spectral Band Ratioing Techniques for Estimating Soil Water Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reginato, R. J.; Vedder, J. F.; Idso, S. B.; Jackson, R. D.; Blanchard, M. B.; Goettelman, R.

    1977-01-01

    For several days in March of 1975, reflected solar radiation measurements were obtained from smooth and rough surfaces of wet, drying, and continually dry Avondale loam at Phoenix, Arizona, with pyranometers located 50 cm above the ground surface and a multispectral scanner flown at a 300-m height. The simple summation of the different band radiances measured by the multispectral scanner proved equally as good as the pyranometer data for estimating surface soil water content if the multispectral scanner data were standardized with respect to the intensity of incoming solar radiation or the reflected radiance from a reference surface, such as the continually dry soil. Without this means of standardization, multispectral scanner data are most useful in a spectral band ratioing context. Our results indicated that, for the bands used, no significant information on soil water content could be obtained by band ratioing. Thus the variability in soil water content should insignificantly affect soil-type discrimination based on identification of type-specific spectral signatures. Therefore remote sensing, conducted in the 0.4- to 1.0-micron wavelength region of the solar spectrum, would seem to be much More suited to identifying crop and soil types than to estimating of soil water content.

  4. Influence of aerosols on surface reaching spectral irradiance and introduction to a new technique for estimating aerosol radiative forcing from spectral flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol radiative forcing estimates with high certainty are required in climate change studies. The approach in estimating the aerosol radiative forcing by using the chemical composition of aerosols is not effective as the chemical composition data with radiative properties are not widely available. In this study we look into the approach where ground based spectral radiation flux measurements along with an RT model is used to estimate radiative forcing. Measurements of spectral flux were made using an ASD spectroradiometer with 350 - 1050 nm wavelength range and 3nm resolution for around 54 clear-sky days during which AOD range was around 0.1 to 0.7. Simultaneous measurements of black carbon were also made using Aethalometer (Magee Scientific) which ranged from around 1.5 ug/m3 to 8 ug/m3. All the measurements were made in the campus of Indian Institute of Science which is in the heart of Bangalore city. The primary study involved in understanding the sensitivity of spectral flux to change in the mass concentration of individual aerosol species (Optical properties of Aerosols and Clouds -OPAC classified aerosol species) using the SBDART RT model. This made us clearly distinguish the region of influence of different aerosol species on the spectral flux. Following this, a new technique has been introduced to estimate an optically equivalent mixture of aerosol species for the given location. The new method involves an iterative process where the mixture of aerosol species are changed in OPAC model and RT model is run as long as the mixture which mimics the measured spectral flux within 2-3% deviation from measured spectral flux is obtained. Using the optically equivalent aerosol mixture and RT model aerosol radiative forcing is estimated. The new method is limited to clear sky scenes and its accuracy to derive an optically equivalent aerosol mixture reduces when diffuse component of flux increases. Our analysis also showed that direct component of spectral flux is

  5. Estimating workload using EEG spectral power and ERPs in the n-back task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwer, Anne-Marie; Hogervorst, Maarten A.; van Erp, Jan B. F.; Heffelaar, Tobias; Zimmerman, Patrick H.; Oostenveld, Robert

    2012-08-01

    Previous studies indicate that both electroencephalogram (EEG) spectral power (in particular the alpha and theta band) and event-related potentials (ERPs) (in particular the P300) can be used as a measure of mental work or memory load. We compare their ability to estimate workload level in a well-controlled task. In addition, we combine both types of measures in a single classification model to examine whether this results in higher classification accuracy than either one alone. Participants watched a sequence of visually presented letters and indicated whether or not the current letter was the same as the one (n instances) before. Workload was varied by varying n. We developed different classification models using ERP features, frequency power features or a combination (fusion). Training and testing of the models simulated an online workload estimation situation. All our ERP, power and fusion models provide classification accuracies between 80% and 90% when distinguishing between the highest and the lowest workload condition after 2 min. For 32 out of 35 participants, classification was significantly higher than chance level after 2.5 s (or one letter) as estimated by the fusion model. Differences between the models are rather small, though the fusion model performs better than the other models when only short data segments are available for estimating workload.

  6. Estimating workload using EEG spectral power and ERPs in the n-back task.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Anne-Marie; Hogervorst, Maarten A; van Erp, Jan B F; Heffelaar, Tobias; Zimmerman, Patrick H; Oostenveld, Robert

    2012-08-01

    Previous studies indicate that both electroencephalogram (EEG) spectral power (in particular the alpha and theta band) and event-related potentials (ERPs) (in particular the P300) can be used as a measure of mental work or memory load. We compare their ability to estimate workload level in a well-controlled task. In addition, we combine both types of measures in a single classification model to examine whether this results in higher classification accuracy than either one alone. Participants watched a sequence of visually presented letters and indicated whether or not the current letter was the same as the one (n instances) before. Workload was varied by varying n. We developed different classification models using ERP features, frequency power features or a combination (fusion). Training and testing of the models simulated an online workload estimation situation. All our ERP, power and fusion models provide classification accuracies between 80% and 90% when distinguishing between the highest and the lowest workload condition after 2 min. For 32 out of 35 participants, classification was significantly higher than chance level after 2.5 s (or one letter) as estimated by the fusion model. Differences between the models are rather small, though the fusion model performs better than the other models when only short data segments are available for estimating workload.

  7. Estimation of glottal source features from the spectral envelope of the acoustic speech signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Juan Felix

    Speech communication encompasses diverse types of information, including phonetics, affective state, voice quality, and speaker identity. From a speech production standpoint, the acoustic speech signal can be mainly divided into glottal source and vocal tract components, which play distinct roles in rendering the various types of information it contains. Most deployed speech analysis systems, however, do not explicitly represent these two components as distinct entities, as their joint estimation from the acoustic speech signal becomes an ill-defined blind deconvolution problem. Nevertheless, because of the desire to understand glottal behavior and how it relates to perceived voice quality, there has been continued interest in explicitly estimating the glottal component of the speech signal. To this end, several inverse filtering (IF) algorithms have been proposed, but they are unreliable in practice because of the blind formulation of the separation problem. In an effort to develop a method that can bypass the challenging IF process, this thesis proposes a new glottal source information extraction method that relies on supervised machine learning to transform smoothed spectral representations of speech, which are already used in some of the most widely deployed and successful speech analysis applications, into a set of glottal source features. A transformation method based on Gaussian mixture regression (GMR) is presented and compared to current IF methods in terms of feature similarity, reliability, and speaker discrimination capability on a large speech corpus, and potential representations of the spectral envelope of speech are investigated for their ability represent glottal source variation in a predictable manner. The proposed system was found to produce glottal source features that reasonably matched their IF counterparts in many cases, while being less susceptible to spurious errors. The development of the proposed method entailed a study into the aspects

  8. Spectral Estimation Techniques for time series with Long Gaps: Applications to Paleomagnetism and Geomagnetic Depth Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith-Boughner, Lindsay

    Many Earth systems cannot be studied directly. One cannot measure the velocities of convecting fluid in the Earth's core but can measure the magnetic field generated by these motions on the surface. Examining how the magnetic field changes over long periods of time, using power spectral density estimation provides insight into the dynamics driving the system. The changes in the magnetic field can also be used to study Earth properties - variations in magnetic fields outside of Earth like the ring-current induce currents to flow in the Earth, generating magnetic fields. Estimating the transfer function between the external changes and the induced response characterizes the electromagnetic response of the Earth. From this response inferences can be made about the electrical conductivity of the Earth. However, these types of time series, and many others have long breaks in the record with no samples available and limit the analysis. Standard methods require interpolation or section averaging, with associated problems of introducing bias or reducing the frequency resolution. Extending the methods of Fodor and Stark (2000), who adapt a set of orthogonal multi-tapers to compensate for breaks in sampling- an algorithm and software package for applying these techniques is developed. Methods of empirically estimating the average transfer function of a set of tapers and confidence intervals are also tested. These methods are extended for cross-spectral, coherence and transfer function estimation in the presence of noise. With these methods, new analysis of a highly interrupted ocean sediment core from the Oligocene (Hartl et al., 1993) reveals a quasi-periodic signal in the calibrated paleointensity time series at 2.5 cpMy. The power in the magnetic field during this period appears to be dominated by reversal rate processes with less overall power than the early Oligocene. Previous analysis of the early Oligocene by Constable et al. (1998) detected a signal near 8 cp

  9. Quantifying the influences of spectral resolution on uncertainty in leaf trait estimates through a Bayesian approach to RTM inversion

    DOE PAGES

    Shiklomanov, Alexey N.; Dietze, Michael C.; Viskari, Toni; ...

    2016-06-09

    The remote monitoring of plant canopies is critically needed for understanding of terrestrial ecosystem mechanics and biodiversity as well as capturing the short- to long-term responses of vegetation to disturbance and climate change. A variety of orbital, sub-orbital, and field instruments have been used to retrieve optical spectral signals and to study different vegetation properties such as plant biochemistry, nutrient cycling, physiology, water status, and stress. Radiative transfer models (RTMs) provide a mechanistic link between vegetation properties and observed spectral features, and RTM spectral inversion is a useful framework for estimating these properties from spectral data. However, existing approaches tomore » RTM spectral inversion are typically limited by the inability to characterize uncertainty in parameter estimates. Here, we introduce a Bayesian algorithm for the spectral inversion of the PROSPECT 5 leaf RTM that is distinct from past approaches in two important ways: First, the algorithm only uses reflectance and does not require transmittance observations, which have been plagued by a variety of measurement and equipment challenges. Second, the output is not a point estimate for each parameter but rather the joint probability distribution that includes estimates of parameter uncertainties and covariance structure. We validated our inversion approach using a database of leaf spectra together with measurements of equivalent water thickness (EWT) and leaf dry mass per unit area (LMA). The parameters estimated by our inversion were able to accurately reproduce the observed reflectance (RMSEVIS = 0.0063, RMSENIR-SWIR = 0.0098) and transmittance (RMSEVIS = 0.0404, RMSENIR-SWIR = 0.0551) for both broadleaved and conifer species. Inversion estimates of EWT and LMA for broadleaved species agreed well with direct measurements (CVEWT = 18.8%, CVLMA = 24.5%), while estimates for conifer species were less accurate (CVEWT = 53.2%, CVLMA = 63.3%). To

  10. Quantifying the influences of spectral resolution on uncertainty in leaf trait estimates through a Bayesian approach to RTM inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Shiklomanov, Alexey N.; Dietze, Michael C.; Viskari, Toni; Townsend, Philip A.; Serbin, Shawn P.

    2016-06-09

    The remote monitoring of plant canopies is critically needed for understanding of terrestrial ecosystem mechanics and biodiversity as well as capturing the short- to long-term responses of vegetation to disturbance and climate change. A variety of orbital, sub-orbital, and field instruments have been used to retrieve optical spectral signals and to study different vegetation properties such as plant biochemistry, nutrient cycling, physiology, water status, and stress. Radiative transfer models (RTMs) provide a mechanistic link between vegetation properties and observed spectral features, and RTM spectral inversion is a useful framework for estimating these properties from spectral data. However, existing approaches to RTM spectral inversion are typically limited by the inability to characterize uncertainty in parameter estimates. Here, we introduce a Bayesian algorithm for the spectral inversion of the PROSPECT 5 leaf RTM that is distinct from past approaches in two important ways: First, the algorithm only uses reflectance and does not require transmittance observations, which have been plagued by a variety of measurement and equipment challenges. Second, the output is not a point estimate for each parameter but rather the joint probability distribution that includes estimates of parameter uncertainties and covariance structure. We validated our inversion approach using a database of leaf spectra together with measurements of equivalent water thickness (EWT) and leaf dry mass per unit area (LMA). The parameters estimated by our inversion were able to accurately reproduce the observed reflectance (RMSEVIS = 0.0063, RMSENIR-SWIR = 0.0098) and transmittance (RMSEVIS = 0.0404, RMSENIR-SWIR = 0.0551) for both broadleaved and conifer species. Inversion estimates of EWT and LMA for broadleaved species agreed well with direct measurements (CVEWT = 18.8%, CVLMA = 24.5%), while estimates for conifer species

  11. A Linear Spatial Spectral Mixture Model for the Improved Estimation of Subpixel Saltcedar Cover along the Forgotten River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, C.; Wang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Spectral unmixing is the process of decomposing the measured spectrum of a mixed pixel into a set of pure spectral signatures called endmembers and their corresponding abundances indicating the fractional area coverage of each endmember present in the pixel. A substantial number of spectral unmixing studies rely on a spectral mixture model which assumes that spectral mixing only occurs within the extent of a pixel. However, due to adjacency effect, the spectral measurement of the pixel may be contaminated by spatial interactions from materials that are present in its spatial neighborhood. In this paper, a linear spatial spectral mixture model is developed to improve the accuracy of the estimated abundance of invasive saltcedar along the Forgotten River reach of the Rio Grande. A spatial weights matrix which specifies for each pixel the locations and the weights of its neighborhood set is used to summarize the spatial relationships among pixels in the Landsat data. A spatial lag operator, defined as a weighted average of the values at neighboring locations, is adopted as an expression of spectral contribution from nearby pixels and added to the classic linear mixture model. The fractional abundances are iteratively estimated using the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) algorithm. With the incorporation of adjacency effect, RMSEs of the fractional cover of ground classes were reduced. The derived sub-pixel abundances of saltcedar are beneficial for ecological management.

  12. Autoregressive smoothing of GOMOS transmittances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fussen, D.; Gomos Team

    The nominal processing chain of the GOMOS star occultation data follows a two-stage inversion scheme: firstly, the transmittances are spectrally inverted to derive the slant path optical thicknesses of different absorbing species; secondly, the latter quantities are vertically inverted for retrieving number density profiles. Although this algorithm is cheaper than reverting the order of inversions, it neglects the use of the high correlation between successive tangent altitudes. As GOMOS may suffer from residual scintillation effects from oblique occultations, we propose to filter the transmittances along the vertical direction by using the optical segment kernel coupled to a standard regularization operator. The tuning parameter of the filtering operator is optimized by minimizing the Durbin-Watson statistics which ensures a maximal decorrelation of residuals. The results will be compared with the generic data processing model and also with a global inversion scheme.

  13. Estimation of the spectral parameter kappa in the region of the Gulf of California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Raúl R.; Ávila-Barrientos, Lenin

    2015-10-01

    We analyzed records from the Broadband Seismological Network of the Gulf of California (RESBAN) and from stations of the NARS-Baja array, operated by CICESE, Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico, to make estimates of the spectral decay parameter kappa ( κ). This attenuation parameter is important for evaluating the seismic risk and hazard of this region. Thirteen shallow earthquakes with focal depths less than 20 km and magnitudes between 5.1 and 6.6 were selected to calculate κ and the near-site attenuation κ 0. We used three different approaches to estimate κ 0: (a) with individual measurements of κ from vector modulus of three-component spectral amplitudes at different epicentral distances and extrapolating to zero distance to estimate κ 0, (b) with individual measurements using vertical component spectra, and (c) measuring from the high-frequency part of the site transfer function determined calculating the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) method. For most stations, the three methods give similar results. At short distances (50-60 km), κ takes values close to 0.04 s at NE76, the station located in the middle of the array. κ increases with distance taking an average value of up to 0.18 s for distances close to 500 km. κ 0 at most sites is close to 0.03 s, except for GUYB (Guaymas) that has a κ 0 = 0.05 s and NE83 (Navolato) with κ 0 = 0.065 s, both stations located in the continent, on the eastern side of the gulf, where the soils are less consolidated. Finally, we analyze if κ 0 correlates with magnitude and back azimuth, and we found that for most stations, κ 0 does not correlate with either one. However, station TOPB, located on basalt, shows a moderate correlation with magnitude, with κ 0 increasing with increasing M W in a short back-azimuth range. We also found that for station NE74, located on soft soil, κ 0 correlates with back azimuth, having lower values for azimuths near 120°.

  14. The Performance of Multilevel Growth Curve Models under an Autoregressive Moving Average Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Daniel L.; Pituch, Keenan A.

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the robustness of multilevel linear growth curve modeling to misspecification of an autoregressive moving average process. As previous research has shown (J. Ferron, R. Dailey, & Q. Yi, 2002; O. Kwok, S. G. West, & S. B. Green, 2007; S. Sivo, X. Fan, & L. Witta, 2005), estimates of the fixed effects were unbiased, and Type I…

  15. A Recommended Procedure for Estimating the Cosmic Ray Spectral Parameter of a Simple Power Law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Leonard W.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A simple power law model consisting of a single spectral index a(f(sub i)) is believed to be an adequate description of the galactic cosmic ray (GQ proton flux at energies below 1013 eV. Two procedures for estimating a(f(sub i)), referred as (1) the method of moments, and (2) maximum likelihood, are developed and their statistical performance compared. I concluded that the maximum likelihood procedure attains the most desirable statistical properties and is hence the recommended statistic estimation procedure for estimating a1. The maximum likelihood procedure is then generalized for application to a set of real cosmic ray data and thereby makes this approach applicable to existing cosmic ray data sets. Several other important results, such as the relationship between collecting power and detector energy resolution, as well as inclusion of a non-Gaussian detector response function, are presented. These results have many practical benefits in the design phase of a cosmic ray detector because they permit instrument developers to make important trade studies in design parameters as a function of one of the science objectives, which is particularly important for space-based detectors where physical parameters, such as dimension and weight, impose practical limits to the design envelope.

  16. Spectral parameter estimation of CAT radar echoes in the presence of fading clutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, T.; Woodman, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    The analysis technique and a part of the results obtained from CAT radar echoes from higher troposphere and lower stratosphere are presented. First, the effect of processing distortion caused by the periodogram method using FFT algorithm on the slowly fading ground clutter echo is discussed. It is shown that an extremely narrow clutter spectrum can spill over the entire frequency range if the data are truncated at a tie sorter than their correlation time affecting largely the estimation of the CAT spectrum contribution, especially when the latter is a few tens of dB weaker than the former. A nonlinear least squares fitting procedure is used to parameterize the observed power spectrum in terms of CAT echo power, Doppler shift, spectral width, and the parameters which specify the shape of the clutter component.

  17. Spectral analysis of GEOS-3 altimeter data and frequency domain collocation. [to estimate gravity anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eren, K.

    1980-01-01

    The mathematical background in spectral analysis as applied to geodetic applications is summarized. The resolution (cut-off frequency) of the GEOS 3 altimeter data is examined by determining the shortest wavelength (corresponding to the cut-off frequency) recoverable. The data from some 18 profiles are used. The total power (variance) in the sea surface topography with respect to the reference ellipsoid as well as with respect to the GEM-9 surface is computed. A fast inversion algorithm for matrices of simple and block Toeplitz matrices and its application to least squares collocation is explained. This algorithm yields a considerable gain in computer time and storage in comparison with conventional least squares collocation. Frequency domain least squares collocation techniques are also introduced and applied to estimating gravity anomalies from GEOS 3 altimeter data. These techniques substantially reduce the computer time and requirements in storage associated with the conventional least squares collocation. Numerical examples given demonstrate the efficiency and speed of these techniques.

  18. Super-resolution spectral estimation in short-time non-contact vital sign measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li; Li, Yusheng; Hong, Hong; Xi, Feng; Cai, Weidong; Zhu, Xiaohua

    2015-04-01

    Non-contact techniques for measuring vital signs attract great interest due to the benefits shown in medical monitoring, military application, etc. However, the presence of respiration harmonics caused by nonlinear phase modulation will result in performance degradation. Suffering from smearing and leakage problems, conventional discrete Fourier transform (DFT) based methods cannot distinguish the heartbeat component from closely located respiration harmonics in frequency domain, especially in short-time processing. In this paper, the theory of sparse reconstruction is merged with an extended harmonic model of vital signals, aiming at achieving a super-resolution spectral estimation of vital signals by additionally exploiting the inherent sparse prior information. Both simulated and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has superior performance to DFT-based methods and the recently applied multiple signal classification algorithm, and the required processing window length has been shortened to 5.12 s.

  19. Estimation of sub-pixel water area on Tibet plateau using multiple endmembers spectral mixture spectral analysis from MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Qian; Shi, Jiancheng; Xu, Yuanliu

    2011-12-01

    Water is the basic needs for human society, and the determining factor of stability of ecosystem as well. There are lots of lakes on Tibet Plateau, which will lead to flood and mudslide when the water expands sharply. At present, water area is extracted from TM or SPOT data for their high spatial resolution; however, their temporal resolution is insufficient. MODIS data have high temporal resolution and broad coverage. So it is valuable resource for detecting the change of water area. Because of its low spatial resolution, mixed-pixels are common. In this paper, four spectral libraries are built using MOD09A1 product, based on that, water body is extracted in sub-pixels utilizing Multiple Endmembers Spectral Mixture Analysis (MESMA) using MODIS daily reflectance data MOD09GA. The unmixed result is comparing with contemporaneous TM data and it is proved that this method has high accuracy.

  20. Signal Processing of Ground Penetrating Radar Using Spectral Estimation Techniques to Estimate the Position of Buried Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Shanker Man; Arai, Ikuo

    2003-12-01

    Super-resolution is very important for the signal processing of GPR (ground penetration radar) to resolve closely buried targets. However, it is not easy to get high resolution as GPR signals are very weak and enveloped by the noise. The MUSIC (multiple signal classification) algorithm, which is well known for its super-resolution capacity, has been implemented for signal and image processing of GPR. In addition, conventional spectral estimation technique, FFT (fast Fourier transform), has also been implemented for high-precision receiving signal level. In this paper, we propose CPM (combined processing method), which combines time domain response of MUSIC algorithm and conventional IFFT (inverse fast Fourier transform) to obtain a super-resolution and high-precision signal level. In order to support the proposal, detailed simulation was performed analyzing SNR (signal-to-noise ratio). Moreover, a field experiment at a research field and a laboratory experiment at the University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo, were also performed for thorough investigation and supported the proposed method. All the simulation and experimental results are presented.

  1. Use of a Remote Sensing Method to Estimate the Influence of Anthropogenic Factors on the Spectral Reflectance of Plant Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezhova, Dora D.; Yanev, Tony K.

    2007-04-01

    Results from a remote sensing study of the influence of stress factors on the leaf spectral reflectance of wheat and tomato plants contaminated by viruses and pea plants treated with herbicides are presented and discussed. The changes arising in the spectral reflectance characteristics of control and treated plants are estimated through statistical methods as well as through derivative analysis to determine specific reflectance features in the red edge region.

  2. Design of a Monocular Multi-Spectral Skin Detection, Melanin Estimation, and False-Alarm Suppression System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Design of a Monocular Multi-Spectral Skin Detection, Melanin Estimation, and False-Alarm Suppression System THESIS Keith R. Peskosky, Second...Skin Detection, Melanin Estimation, and False-Alarm Suppression System THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering...alarm reduction, and melanin estimation system is designed targeting search and rescue (SAR) with application to special operations for manhunting and

  3. Spectral Feature Analysis for Quantitative Estimation of Cyanobacteria Chlorophyll-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi; Ye, Zhanglin; Zhang, Yugan; Yu, Jie

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, lake eutrophication caused a large of Cyanobacteria bloom which not only brought serious ecological disaster but also restricted the sustainable development of regional economy in our country. Chlorophyll-a is a very important environmental factor to monitor water quality, especially for lake eutrophication. Remote sensed technique has been widely utilized in estimating the concentration of chlorophyll-a by different kind of vegetation indices and monitoring its distribution in lakes, rivers or along coastline. For each vegetation index, its quantitative estimation accuracy for different satellite data might change since there might be a discrepancy of spectral resolution and channel center between different satellites. The purpose this paper is to analyze the spectral feature of chlorophyll-a with hyperspectral data (totally 651 bands) and use the result to choose the optimal band combination for different satellites. The analysis method developed here in this study could be useful to recognize and monitor cyanobacteria bloom automatically and accrately. In our experiment, the reflectance (from 350nm to 1000nm) of wild cyanobacteria in different consistency (from 0 to 1362.11ug/L) and the corresponding chlorophyll-a concentration were measured simultaneously. Two kinds of hyperspectral vegetation indices were applied in this study: simple ratio (SR) and narrow band normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), both of which consists of any two bands in the entire 651 narrow bands. Then multivariate statistical analysis was used to construct the linear, power and exponential models. After analyzing the correlation between chlorophyll-a and single band reflectance, SR, NDVI respetively, the optimal spectral index for quantitative estimation of cyanobacteria chlorophyll-a, as well corresponding central wavelength and band width were extracted. Results show that: Under the condition of water disturbance, SR and NDVI are both suitable for quantitative

  4. Simultaneous Confidence Bands for Autoregressive Spectra.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    CONFIDENCE BANDS FOR AUTOREGRESSIVE SPECTRA H. Joseph Newton Marcello Pagano Institute of Statistics Department of Biostatistics Texas A&M University...AUTHOR(4) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMIUER(a) H. Joseph Newton and Marcello Pagano ONR N00014-82-MP-2001 ARU DAAG 29-80-C-0070 0. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME...Parzen (1974), Uirych and Bishop (1975), and Beamish and Priestley (1981), for example) despite 1) a continuing discussion of the problems of order

  5. Genetic and least squares algorithms for estimating spectral EIS parameters of prostatic tissues.

    PubMed

    Halter, Ryan J; Hartov, Alex; Paulsen, Keith D; Schned, Alan; Heaney, John

    2008-06-01

    We employed electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to evaluate the electrical properties of prostatic tissues. We collected freshly excised prostates from 23 men immediately following radical prostatectomy. The prostates were sectioned into 3 mm slices and electrical property measurements of complex resistivity were recorded from each of the slices using an impedance probe over the frequency range of 100 Hz to 100 kHz. The area probed was marked so that following tissue fixation and slide preparation, histological assessment could be correlated directly with the recorded EIS spectra. Prostate cancer (CaP), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), non-hyperplastic glandular tissue and stroma were the primary prostatic tissue types probed. Genetic and least squares parameter estimation algorithms were implemented for fitting a Cole-type resistivity model to the measured data. The four multi-frequency-based spectral parameters defining the recorded spectrum (rho(infinity), Deltarho, f(c) and alpha) were determined using these algorithms and statistically analyzed with respect to the tissue type. Both algorithms fit the measured data well, with the least squares algorithm having a better average goodness of fit (95.2 mOmega m versus 109.8 mOmega m) and a faster execution time (80.9 ms versus 13 637 ms) than the genetic algorithm. The mean parameters, from all tissue samples, estimated using the genetic algorithm ranged from 4.44 to 5.55 Omega m, 2.42 to 7.14 Omega m, 3.26 to 6.07 kHz and 0.565 to 0.654 for rho(infinity), Deltarho, f(c) and alpha, respectively. These same parameters estimated using the least squares algorithm ranged from 4.58 to 5.79 Omega m, 2.18 to 6.98 Omega m, 2.97 to 5.06 kHz and 0.621 to 0.742 for rho(infinity), Deltarho, f(c) and alpha, respectively. The ranges of these parameters were similar to those reported in the literature. Further, significant differences (p < 0.01) were observed between CaP and BPH for the spectral parameters Deltarho and f

  6. Spectral modelling near the 1.6 μm window for satellite based estimation of CO2.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Prabhunath; Rastogi, Shantanu; Singh, R P; Panigrahy, S

    2014-01-03

    Measurements of inter annual CO2 variability are important inputs for modelling global carbon cycle. Satellite observations play important role in quantification and modelling of CO2 fluxes in the atmosphere, where observed radiances in narrow spectral channels are used to estimate the trace gas concentration using spectroscopic principles. The 1.6 μm spectral window is important for CO2 detection and study of the two CO2 bands in this region is performed at different spectral resolutions. In order to select the optimum spectral resolution and wavelength positions, suitable for CO2 estimation from satellite platform, sensitivities of different spectral lines to changes in CO2 concentration are studied. Analysis is carried out using a line by line FASCOD radiative transfer model in tropical atmospheric and rural aerosol conditions. The CO2 concentration is varied from 200 to 1000 ppmv and spectral resolution is varied from 0.025 nm to 10 nm. It is observed that atmospheric transmittances reduce sharply with increase in CO2 concentration. With decrease in resolution initially the sensitivity steeply reduces but at resolutions lower than 0.15 nm the sensitivity remains nearly constant. The Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio method is used for inverse concentration retrieval. Based on the study it is evaluated that 0.2 nm is the optimum limit for resolution.

  7. On the maximum-entropy/autoregressive modeling of time series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. F.

    1984-01-01

    The autoregressive (AR) model of a random process is interpreted in the light of the Prony's relation which relates a complex conjugate pair of poles of the AR process in the z-plane (or the z domain) on the one hand, to the complex frequency of one complex harmonic function in the time domain on the other. Thus the AR model of a time series is one that models the time series as a linear combination of complex harmonic functions, which include pure sinusoids and real exponentials as special cases. An AR model is completely determined by its z-domain pole configuration. The maximum-entropy/autogressive (ME/AR) spectrum, defined on the unit circle of the z-plane (or the frequency domain), is nothing but a convenient, but ambiguous visual representation. It is asserted that the position and shape of a spectral peak is determined by the corresponding complex frequency, and the height of the spectral peak contains little information about the complex amplitude of the complex harmonic functions.

  8. Applications methods of spectral ratios in the estimation of site effects: Case Damien (Haiti)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, B. J.; ST Fleur, S.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of H/V type were carried out on the Damien site with Tromino hardware an « all in one » station which includes both the sensor and the integrated digitizer. A total of 32 measurements of seismic noise have been completed on this site in order to see if lithological site effects are detectable with this H/V method. After checking the H/V curve reliability criteria (length of the window to be analyzed, the number of windows analyzed, standard deviation) and the criteria for clear peaks in H/V (conditions for the amplitude, conditions for stability) found in the SESAME project in 2004, the results of the H/V spectra obtained are generally very consistent and clearly indicate site effects with peak resonance frequencies between 3 and 14 Hz. The presence of these well defined frequency peaks in the H/V spectral ratio indicates that the ground motion can be amplified by geomorphological site effects. Comparative analyzes of these H/V measurements with Grilla and Geopsy software were made in this paper to estimate the amplification magnitude of these effects. Graphical comparisons between the Grilla and Geopsy H/V maps were completed in this study and allow us to identify typical areas and their associated fundamental resonance frequencies.

  9. Kepler AutoRegressive Planet Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, Eric

    NASA's Kepler mission is the source of more exoplanets than any other instrument, but the discovery depends on complex statistical analysis procedures embedded in the Kepler pipeline. A particular challenge is mitigating irregular stellar variability without loss of sensitivity to faint periodic planetary transits. This proposal presents a two-stage alternative analysis procedure. First, parametric autoregressive ARFIMA models, commonly used in econometrics, remove most of the stellar variations. Second, a novel matched filter is used to create a periodogram from which transit-like periodicities are identified. This analysis procedure, the Kepler AutoRegressive Planet Search (KARPS), is confirming most of the Kepler Objects of Interest and is expected to identify additional planetary candidates. The proposed research will complete application of the KARPS methodology to the prime Kepler mission light curves of 200,000: stars, and compare the results with Kepler Objects of Interest obtained with the Kepler pipeline. We will then conduct a variety of astronomical studies based on the KARPS results. Important subsamples will be extracted including Habitable Zone planets, hot super-Earths, grazing-transit hot Jupiters, and multi-planet systems. Groundbased spectroscopy of poorly studied candidates will be performed to better characterize the host stars. Studies of stellar variability will then be pursued based on KARPS analysis. The autocorrelation function and nonstationarity measures will be used to identify spotted stars at different stages of autoregressive modeling. Periodic variables with folded light curves inconsistent with planetary transits will be identified; they may be eclipsing or mutually-illuminating binary star systems. Classification of stellar variables with KARPS-derived statistical properties will be attempted. KARPS procedures will then be applied to archived K2 data to identify planetary transits and characterize stellar variability.

  10. Autoregressive model-based gear shaft fault diagnosis using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiyang; Makis, Viliam

    2009-11-01

    Vibration behavior induced by gear shaft crack is different from that induced by gear tooth crack. Hence, a fault indicator used to detect tooth damage may not be effective for monitoring shaft condition. This paper proposes an autoregressive model-based technique to detect the occurrence and advancement of gear shaft cracks. An autoregressive model is fitted to the time synchronously averaged signal of the gear shaft in its healthy state. The order of the autoregressive model is selected using Akaike information criterion and the coefficient estimates are obtained by solving the Yule-Walker equations with the Levinson-Durbin recursion algorithm. The established autoregressive model is then used as a linear prediction filter to process the future signal. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test is applied on line for the prediction of error signals. The calculated distance is used as a fault indicator and its capability to diagnose shaft crack effectively is demonstrated using a full lifetime gear shaft vibration data history. The other frequently used statistical measures such as kurtosis and variance are also calculated and the results are compared with the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test.

  11. Pursuing atmospheric water vapor retrieval through NDSA measurements between two LEO satellites: evaluation of estimation errors in spectral sensitivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facheris, L.; Cuccoli, F.; Argenti, F.

    2008-10-01

    NDSA (Normalized Differential Spectral Absorption) is a novel differential measurement method to estimate the total content of water vapor (IWV, Integrated Water Vapor) along a tropospheric propagation path between two Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites. A transmitter onboard the first LEO satellite and a receiver onboard the second one are required. The NDSA approach is based on the simultaneous estimate of the total attenuations at two relatively close frequencies in the Ku/K bands and of a "spectral sensitivity parameter" that can be directly converted into IWV. The spectral sensitivity has the potential to emphasize the water vapor contribution, to cancel out all spectrally flat unwanted contributions and to limit the impairments due to tropospheric scintillation. Based on a previous Monte Carlo simulation approach, through which we analyzed the measurement accuracy of the spectral sensitivity parameter at three different and complementary frequencies, in this work we examine such accuracy for a particularly critical atmospheric status as simulated through the pressure, temperature and water vapor profiles measured by a high resolution radiosonde. We confirm the validity of an approximate expression of the accuracy and discuss the problems that may arise when tropospheric water vapor concentration is lower than expected.

  12. Segmentation of textured images using a multiresolution Gaussian autoregressive model.

    PubMed

    Comer, M L; Delp, E J

    1999-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for segmentation of textured images using a multiresolution Bayesian approach. The new algorithm uses a multiresolution Gaussian autoregressive (MGAR) model for the pyramid representation of the observed image, and assumes a multiscale Markov random field model for the class label pyramid. The models used in this paper incorporate correlations between different levels of both the observed image pyramid and the class label pyramid. The criterion used for segmentation is the minimization of the expected value of the number of misclassified nodes in the multiresolution lattice. The estimate which satisfies this criterion is referred to as the "multiresolution maximization of the posterior marginals" (MMPM) estimate, and is a natural extension of the single-resolution "maximization of the posterior marginals" (MPM) estimate. Previous multiresolution segmentation techniques have been based on the maximum a posterior (MAP) estimation criterion, which has been shown to be less appropriate for segmentation than the MPM criterion. It is assumed that the number of distinct textures in the observed image is known. The parameters of the MGAR model-the means, prediction coefficients, and prediction error variances of the different textures-are unknown. A modified version of the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm is used to estimate these parameters. The parameters of the Gibbs distribution for the label pyramid are assumed to be known. Experimental results demonstrating the performance of the algorithm are presented.

  13. Airborne in-situ spectral characterization and concentration estimates of fluorescent organics as a function of depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tittle, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    The primary purpose of many in-situ airborne light scattering experiments in natural waters is to spectrally characterize the subsurface fluorescent organics and estimate their relative concentrations. This is often done by shining a laser beam into the water and monitoring its subsurface return signal. To do this with the proper interpretation, depth must be taken into account. If one disregards depth dependence when taking such estimates, both their spectral characteristics and their concentrations estimates can be rather ambiguous. A simple airborne lidar configuration is used to detect the subsurface return signal from a particular depth and wavelength. Underwater scatterometer were employed to show that in-situ subsurface organics are very sensitive to depth, but they also require the use of slow moving boats to cover large sample areas. Also, their very entry into the water disturbs the sample it is measuring. The method described is superior and simplest to any employed thus far.

  14. Composition of the lunar upper crust estimated from Kaguya spectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtake, M.; Matsunaga, T.; Takeda, H.; Yokota, Y.; Yamamoto, S.; Moroda, T.; Ogawa, Y.; Hiroi, T.; Nakamura, R.; Haruyama, J.

    2010-12-01

    The magma ocean hypothesis has been the most widely accepted mechanism explaining the generation of the lunar highland crust. This hypothesis is based on analyses of returned samples [1] and an assumption that Fe-bearing, plagioclase-rich rocks exist globally as the major component of the lunar crust. However, no crystalline plagioclase had been detected by remote sensing before SELENE [2], except for some ambiguous or indirect indications of the existence of plagioclase. Subsequently, a global distribution of rocks of extremely high plagioclase abundance (approaching 100 vol%; called purest anorthosite (PAN)) was reported using an unambiguous plagioclase absorption band around 1250 nm found by the SELENE Multiband Imager (MI) [3]. The estimated plagioclase abundance is significantly higher than previous estimates of 82 to 92 vol% [1], providing a valuable constraint on models for lunar magma ocean evolution. Further study using continuous reflectance spectra derived by the SELENE Spectral Profiler (SP) [4] revealed a global and common distribution of the PAN over the entire lunar surface, supporting the high abundance of PAN rocks within the upper crust. In this study, we investigated a vertical compositional (modal abundance and/or mineral composition) trend of the PAN rocks within the crust using their reflectance spectra derived from SP and MI. Knowing the compositional trend of the lunar upper crust may enable us to understand the mechanism of the lunar crustal growth. All of the SP data observed throughout SELENE mission periods were used in this study (about 7,000 orbits and roughly 10,000 spectra for each orbit). The absorption depth at each wavelength was calculated after a linear continuum was removed. Spectra with the deepest absorption depth, around 1250 nm, which is caused by a minor amount of Fe2+ (in the order of 0.1 wt% FeO) contained in the plagioclase, were selected to detect the PAN rocks. The original burial depth of each PAN rock outcrop was

  15. Estimating Interstellar Medium Dust Temperature And Spectral Index In The Far-infrared And Submillimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veneziani, Marcella; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Piacentini, F.; Paladini, R.

    2012-01-01

    Dust temperature and spectral index are evidenced to be anti-correlated from observations in the far-infrared and millimeter wavelengths and from laboratory experiments. However, uncertainties in flux measurements combined with calibration errors and other source of systematic errors, affect the results of the spectral energy distribution (SED) fit. An inverse correlation between dust temperature and spectral index naturally arises from the spectral model assumed for the fit combined with data noise and systematic uncertainties. When the spectral coverage do not sample the whole SED but only a limited range of it, it is even more difficult to get reliable results on dust physical properties. We developed a method to fit the inverse relationship between the temperature and spectral index with Bayesian statistics taking properly into account both the statistics and the systematic errors. We simulate observations of one-component Interstellar Medium (15 K < T < 25 K), and of two-components sources both warm (HII regions) and cold (cold cores) in the Herschel PACS and SPIRE spectral bands (70-500 um). We also include some ancillary simulated data from Planck-HFI, IRAS and MIPS to better sample the SEDs.

  16. Statistical moments of autoregressive model residuals for damage localisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattson, Steven G.; Pandit, Sudhakar M.

    2006-04-01

    Monitoring structural health is a problem with significant importance in the world today. Aging civil infrastructure and aircraft fleets have made non-destructive evaluation an important research topic. Non-destructive techniques based on dynamic signatures have struggled to gain widespread acceptance due to the perceived difficulty in applying these methods, as well as the mixed results they can produce. A simple and reliable method that is useful without in-depth knowledge of the structure is necessary to transition dynamic response-based health monitoring into the industrial mainstream. Modal parameters, including shifting frequencies, damping ratios, and mode shapes have received considerable attention as damage indicators. The results have been mixed and require an expert to carry out the testing and interpretation. Detailed knowledge of the structure before it becomes damaged is required, either in the form of experimental data or an analytical model. A method based on vector autoregressive (ARV) models is proposed. These models accurately capture the predictable dynamics present in the response. They leave the unpredictable portion, including the component resulting from unmeasured input shocks, in the residual. An estimate of the autoregressive model residual series standard deviation provides an accurate diagnosis of damage conditions. Additionally, a repeatable threshold level that separates damaged from undamaged is identified, indicating the possibility of damage identification and localisation without explicit knowledge of the undamaged structure. Similar statistical analysis applied to the raw data necessitates the use of higher-order moments that are more sensitive to disguised outliers, but are also prone to false indications resulting from overemphasising rarely occurring extreme values. Results are included from data collected using an eight-degree of freedom damage simulation test-bed, built and tested at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL

  17. Potential of the Sentinel-2 Red Edge Spectral Bands for Estimation of Eco-Physiological Plant Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malenovsky, Zbynek; Homolova, Lucie; Janoutova, Ruzena; Landier, Lucas; Gastellu-Etchegorry, Jean-Philippe; Berthelot, Beatrice; Huck, Alexis

    2016-08-01

    In this study we investigated importance of the space- borne instrument Sentinel-2 red edge spectral bands and reconstructed red edge position (REP) for retrieval of the three eco-physiological plant parameters, leaf and canopy chlorophyll content and leaf area index (LAI), in case of maize agricultural fields and beech and spruce forest stands. Sentinel-2 spectral bands and REP of the investigated vegetation canopies were simulated in the Discrete Anisotropic Radiative Transfer (DART) model. Their potential for estimation of the plant parameters was assessed through training support vector regressions (SVR) and examining their P-vector matrices indicating significance of each input. The trained SVR were then applied on Sentinel-2 simulated images and the acquired estimates were cross-compared with results from high spatial resolution airborne retrievals. Results showed that contribution of REP was significant for canopy chlorophyll content, but less significant for leaf chlorophyll content and insignificant for leaf area index estimations. However, the red edge spectral bands contributed strongly to the retrievals of all parameters, especially canopy and leaf chlorophyll content. Application of SVR on Sentinel-2 simulated images demonstrated, in general, an overestimation of leaf chlorophyll content and an underestimation of LAI when compared to the reciprocal airborne estimates. In the follow-up investigation, we will apply the trained SVR algorithms on real Sentinel-2 multispectral images acquired during vegetation seasons 2015 and 2016.

  18. Evaluating logarithmic kernel for spectral reflectance estimation-effects on model parametrization, training set size, and number of sensor spectral channels.

    PubMed

    Eckhard, Timo; Valero, Eva M; Hernández-Andrés, Javier; Heikkinen, Ville

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we evaluate the conditionally positive definite logarithmic kernel in kernel-based estimation of reflectance spectra. Reflectance spectra are estimated from responses of a 12-channel multispectral imaging system. We demonstrate the performance of the logarithmic kernel in comparison with the linear and Gaussian kernel using simulated and measured camera responses for the Pantone and HKS color charts. Especially, we focus on the estimation model evaluations in case the selection of model parameters is optimized using a cross-validation technique. In experiments, it was found that the Gaussian and logarithmic kernel outperformed the linear kernel in almost all evaluation cases (training set size, response channel number) for both sets. Furthermore, the spectral and color estimation accuracies of the Gaussian and logarithmic kernel were found to be similar in several evaluation cases for real and simulated responses. However, results suggest that for a relatively small training set size, the accuracy of the logarithmic kernel can be markedly lower when compared to the Gaussian kernel. Further it was found from our data that the parameter of the logarithmic kernel could be fixed, which simplified the use of this kernel when compared with the Gaussian kernel.

  19. Kepler AutoRegressive Planet Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caceres, Gabriel Antonio; Feigelson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Kepler AutoRegressive Planet Search (KARPS) project uses statistical methodology associated with autoregressive (AR) processes to model Kepler lightcurves in order to improve exoplanet transit detection in systems with high stellar variability. We also introduce a planet-search algorithm to detect transits in time-series residuals after application of the AR models. One of the main obstacles in detecting faint planetary transits is the intrinsic stellar variability of the host star. The variability displayed by many stars may have autoregressive properties, wherein later flux values are correlated with previous ones in some manner. Our analysis procedure consisting of three steps: pre-processing of the data to remove discontinuities, gaps and outliers; AR-type model selection and fitting; and transit signal search of the residuals using a new Transit Comb Filter (TCF) that replaces traditional box-finding algorithms. The analysis procedures of the project are applied to a portion of the publicly available Kepler light curve data for the full 4-year mission duration. Tests of the methods have been made on a subset of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) systems, classified both as planetary `candidates' and `false positives' by the Kepler Team, as well as a random sample of unclassified systems. We find that the ARMA-type modeling successfully reduces the stellar variability, by a factor of 10 or more in active stars and by smaller factors in more quiescent stars. A typical quiescent Kepler star has an interquartile range (IQR) of ~10 e-/sec, which may improve slightly after modeling, while those with IQR ranging from 20 to 50 e-/sec, have improvements from 20% up to 70%. High activity stars (IQR exceeding 100) markedly improve. A periodogram based on the TCF is constructed to concentrate the signal of these periodic spikes. When a periodic transit is found, the model is displayed on a standard period-folded averaged light curve. Our findings to date on real

  20. Estimation of site-dependent spectral decay parameter from seismic array data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seon Jeong; Lee, Jung Mo; Baag, Chang-Eob; Choi, Hoseon; Noh, Myunghyun

    2016-04-01

    The kappa (κ), attenuation of acceleration amplitude at high frequencies, is one of the most important parameters in ground motion evaluation and seismic hazard analysis at sites. κ simply indicates the high frequency decay of the acceleration spectrum in log-linear space. The decay trend can be considered as linear for frequencies higher than a specific frequency, fe which is starting point of the linear regression at the acceleration spectrum. The κ has been investigated using the data from seismic arrays in the south-eastern part of Korea in which nuclear facilities such as power plant and radiological waste depository are located. The seismic array consists of 20 seismic stations and it was operated from October in 2010 through March in 2013. A classical method by Anderson and Hough (1984) and a standard procedure recently suggested by Ktenidou et al. (2013) were applied for computation of κ. There have been just a few studies on spectral attenuation characteristics for Korean Peninsula so far and even those studies utilized small amount of earthquake events whose frequency range was lower than 25 Hz. In this study, the available frequency range is up to 60 Hz based on the sampling rate of 200 and instrument response. This allows us to use a large range of frequencies for κ computations. It is outstanding advantage that we couldn't obtain from earlier κ studies in Korea. In addition, we investigate the regional κ characteristics through calculating the κ using data of 20 seismic stations which are highly extensive seismic array. It allows us to find the more specific attenuation characteristics of high frequencies in study area. Distance and magnitude dependence of κ has also been investigated. Before calculating the κ, the corner frequency (f_c) has been checked so that the fe can lie to the right of fc to exclude source effects in the computation. Manually picked fe is generally in the range of 10 to 25 Hz. The resulting κR is 9.2e-06 and κ0 is 0

  1. Improving the Curie depth estimation through optimizing the spectral block dimensions of the aeromagnetic data in the Sabalan geothermal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Somaieh; Fathianpour, Nader

    2016-12-01

    The Curie point depth is of great importance in characterizing geothermal resources. In this study, the Curie iso-depth map was provided using the well-known method of dividing the aeromagnetic dataset into overlapping blocks and analyzing the power spectral density of each block separately. Determining the optimum block dimension is vital in improving the resolution and accuracy of estimating Curie point depth. To investigate the relation between the optimal block size and power spectral density, a forward magnetic modeling was implemented on an artificial prismatic body with specified characteristics. The top, centroid, and bottom depths of the body were estimated by the spectral analysis method for different block dimensions. The result showed that the optimal block size could be considered as the smallest possible block size whose corresponding power spectrum represents an absolute maximum in small wavenumbers. The Curie depth map of the Sabalan geothermal field and its surrounding areas, in the northwestern Iran, was produced using a grid of 37 blocks with different dimensions from 10 × 10 to 50 × 50 km2, which showed at least 50% overlapping with adjacent blocks. The Curie point depth was estimated in the range of 5 to 21 km. The promising areas with the Curie point depths less than 8.5 km are located around Mountain Sabalan encompassing more than 90% of known geothermal resources in the study area. Moreover, the Curie point depth estimated by the improved spectral analysis is in good agreement with the depth calculated from the thermal gradient data measured in one of the exploratory wells in the region.

  2. Optimization of spectral sensitivities of mosaic five-band camera for estimating chromophore densities from skin images including shading and surface reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Misa; Akaho, Rina; Maita, Chikashi; Sugawara, Mai; Tsumura, Norimichi

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the spectral sensitivities of a mosaic five-band camera were optimized using a numerical skin phantom to perform the separation of chromophore densities, shading and surface reflection. To simulate the numerical skin phantom, the spectral reflectance of skin was first calculated by Monte Carlo simulation of photon migration for different concentrations of melanin, blood and oxygen saturation levels. The melanin and hemoglobin concentration distributions used in the numerical skin phantom were obtained from actual skin images by independent component analysis. The calculated components were assigned as concentration distributions. The spectral sensitivities of the camera were then optimized using a nonlinear technique to estimate the spectral reflectance for skin separation. In this optimization, the spectral sensitivities were assumed to be normally distributed, and the sensor arrangement was identical to that of a conventional mosaic five-band camera. Our findings demonstrated that spectral estimation could be significantly improved by optimizing the spectral sensitivities.

  3. Synergistic angular and spectral estimation of aerosol properties using CHRIS/PROBA-1 and simulated Sentinel-3 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, W. H.; North, P. R. J.

    2015-04-01

    We develop a method to derive aerosol properties over land surfaces using combined spectral and angular information, such as available from ESA Sentinel-3 mission, to be launched in 2015. A method of estimating aerosol optical depth (AOD) using only angular retrieval has previously been demonstrated on data from the ENVISAT and PROBA-1 satellite instruments, and is extended here to the synergistic spectral and angular sampling of Sentinel-3. The method aims to improve the estimation of AOD, and to explore the estimation of fine mode fraction (FMF) and single scattering albedo (SSA) over land surfaces by inversion of a coupled surface/atmosphere radiative transfer model. The surface model includes a general physical model of angular and spectral surface reflectance. An iterative process is used to determine the optimum value of the aerosol properties providing the best fit of the corrected reflectance values to the physical model. The method is tested using hyperspectral, multi-angle Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (CHRIS) images. The values obtained from these CHRIS observations are validated using ground-based sun photometer measurements. Results from 22 image sets using the synergistic retrieval and improved aerosol models show an RMSE of 0.06 in AOD, reduced to 0.03 over vegetated targets.

  4. Evaluation of Various Spectral Inputs for Estimation of Forest Biochemical and Structural Properties from Airborne Imaging Spectroscopy Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homolová, L.; Janoutová, R.; Malenovský, Z.

    2016-06-01

    In this study we evaluated various spectral inputs for retrieval of forest chlorophyll content (Cab) and leaf area index (LAI) from high spectral and spatial resolution airborne imaging spectroscopy data collected for two forest study sites in the Czech Republic (beech forest at Štítná nad Vláří and spruce forest at Bílý Kříž). The retrieval algorithm was based on a machine learning method - support vector regression (SVR). Performance of the four spectral inputs used to train SVR was evaluated: a) all available hyperspectral bands, b) continuum removal (CR) 645 - 710 nm, c) CR 705 - 780 nm, and d) CR 680 - 800 nm. Spectral inputs and corresponding SVR models were first assessed at the level of spectral databases simulated by combined leaf-canopy radiative transfer models PROSPECT and DART. At this stage, SVR models using all spectral inputs provided good performance (RMSE for Cab < 10 μg cm-2 and for LAI < 1.5), with consistently better performance for beech over spruce site. Since application of trained SVRs on airborne hyperspectral images of the spruce site produced unacceptably overestimated values, only the beech site results were analysed. The best performance for the Cab estimation was found for CR bands in range of 645 - 710 nm, whereas CR bands in range of 680 - 800 nm were the most suitable for LAI retrieval. The CR transformation reduced the across-track bidirectional reflectance effect present in airborne images due to large sensor field of view.

  5. Assessing dynamic spectral causality by lagged adaptive directed transfer function and instantaneous effect factor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haojie; Lu, Yunfeng; Zhu, Shanan; He, Bin

    2014-07-01

    It is of significance to assess the dynamic spectral causality among physiological signals. Several practical estimators adapted from spectral Granger causality have been exploited to track dynamic causality based on the framework of time-varying multivariate autoregressive (tvMVAR) models. The nonzero covariance of the model's residuals has been used to describe the instantaneous effect phenomenon in some causality estimators. However, for the situations with Gaussian residuals in some autoregressive models, it is challenging to distinguish the directed instantaneous causality if the sufficient prior information about the "causal ordering" is missing. Here, we propose a new algorithm to assess the time-varying causal ordering of tvMVAR model under the assumption that the signals follow the same acyclic causal ordering for all time lags and to estimate the instantaneous effect factor (IEF) value in order to track the dynamic directed instantaneous connectivity. The time-lagged adaptive directed transfer function (ADTF) is also estimated to assess the lagged causality after removing the instantaneous effect. In this study, we first investigated the performance of the causal-ordering estimation algorithm and the accuracy of IEF value. Then, we presented the results of IEF and time-lagged ADTF method by comparing with the conventional ADTF method through simulations of various propagation models. Statistical analysis results suggest that the new algorithm could accurately estimate the causal ordering and give a good estimation of the IEF values in the Gaussian residual conditions. Meanwhile, the time-lagged ADTF approach is also more accurate in estimating the time-lagged dynamic interactions in a complex nervous system after extracting the instantaneous effect. In addition to the simulation studies, we applied the proposed method to estimate the dynamic spectral causality on real visual evoked potential (VEP) data in a human subject. Its usefulness in time

  6. Assessing Dynamic Spectral Causality by Lagged Adaptive Directed Transfer Function and Instantaneous Effect Factor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haojie; Lu, Yunfeng; Zhu, Shanan

    2014-01-01

    It is of significance to assess the dynamic spectral causality among physiological signals. Several practical estimators adapted from spectral Granger causality have been exploited to track dynamic causality based on the framework of time-varying multivariate autoregressive (tvMVAR) models. The non-zero covariance of the model’s residuals has been used to describe the instantaneous effect phenomenon in some causality estimators. However, for the situations with Gaussian residuals in some autoregressive models, it is challenging to distinguish the directed instantaneous causality if the sufficient prior information about the “causal ordering” is missing. Here, we propose a new algorithm to assess the time-varying causal ordering of tvMVAR model under the assumption that the signals follow the same acyclic causal ordering for all time lags and to estimate the instantaneous effect factor (IEF) value in order to track the dynamic directed instantaneous connectivity. The time-lagged adaptive directed transfer function (ADTF) is also estimated to assess the lagged causality after removing the instantaneous effect. In the present study, we firstly investigated the performance of the causal-ordering estimation algorithm and the accuracy of IEF value. Then, we presented the results of IEF and time-lagged ADTF method by comparing with the conventional ADTF method through simulations of various propagation models. Statistical analysis results suggest that the new algorithm could accurately estimate the causal ordering and give a good estimation of the IEF values in the Gaussian residual conditions. Meanwhile, the time-lagged ADTF approach is also more accurate in estimating the time-lagged dynamic interactions in a complex nervous system after extracting the instantaneous effect. In addition to the simulation studies, we applied the proposed method to estimate the dynamic spectral causality on real visual evoked potential (VEP) data in a human subject. Its usefulness in

  7. Representation Method for Spectrally Overlapping Signals in Flow Cytometry Based on Fluorescence Pulse Time-Delay Estimation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenchang; Lou, Xiaoping; Meng, Xiaochen; Zhu, Lianqing

    2016-11-23

    Flow cytometry is being applied more extensively because of the outstanding advantages of multicolor fluorescence analysis. However, the intensity measurement is susceptible to the nonlinearity of the detection method. Moreover, in multicolor analysis, it is impossible to discriminate between fluorophores that spectrally overlap; this influences the accuracy of the fluorescence pulse signal representation. Here, we focus on spectral overlap in two-color analysis, and assume that the fluorescence follows the single exponential decay model. We overcome these problems by analyzing the influence of the spectral overlap quantitatively, which enables us to propose a method of fluorescence pulse signal representation based on time-delay estimation (between fluorescence and scattered pulse signals). First, the time delays are estimated using a modified chirp Z-transform (MCZT) algorithm and a fine interpolation of the correlation peak (FICP) algorithm. Second, the influence of hardware is removed via calibration, in order to acquire the original fluorescence lifetimes. Finally, modulated signals containing phase shifts associated with these lifetimes are created artificially, using a digital signal processing method, and reference signals are introduced in order to eliminate the influence of spectral overlap. Time-delay estimation simulation and fluorescence signal representation experiments are conducted on fluorescently labeled cells. With taking the potentially overlap of autofluorescence as part of the observed fluorescence spectrum, rather than distinguishing the individual influence, the results show that the calculated lifetimes with spectral overlap can be rectified from 8.28 and 4.86 ns to 8.51 and 4.63 ns, respectively, using the comprehensive approach presented in this work. These values agree well with the lifetimes (8.48 and 4.67 ns) acquired for cells stained with single-color fluorochrome. Further, these results indicate that the influence of spectral

  8. Representation Method for Spectrally Overlapping Signals in Flow Cytometry Based on Fluorescence Pulse Time-Delay Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenchang; Lou, Xiaoping; Meng, Xiaochen; Zhu, Lianqing

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry is being applied more extensively because of the outstanding advantages of multicolor fluorescence analysis. However, the intensity measurement is susceptible to the nonlinearity of the detection method. Moreover, in multicolor analysis, it is impossible to discriminate between fluorophores that spectrally overlap; this influences the accuracy of the fluorescence pulse signal representation. Here, we focus on spectral overlap in two-color analysis, and assume that the fluorescence follows the single exponential decay model. We overcome these problems by analyzing the influence of the spectral overlap quantitatively, which enables us to propose a method of fluorescence pulse signal representation based on time-delay estimation (between fluorescence and scattered pulse signals). First, the time delays are estimated using a modified chirp Z-transform (MCZT) algorithm and a fine interpolation of the correlation peak (FICP) algorithm. Second, the influence of hardware is removed via calibration, in order to acquire the original fluorescence lifetimes. Finally, modulated signals containing phase shifts associated with these lifetimes are created artificially, using a digital signal processing method, and reference signals are introduced in order to eliminate the influence of spectral overlap. Time-delay estimation simulation and fluorescence signal representation experiments are conducted on fluorescently labeled cells. With taking the potentially overlap of autofluorescence as part of the observed fluorescence spectrum, rather than distinguishing the individual influence, the results show that the calculated lifetimes with spectral overlap can be rectified from 8.28 and 4.86 ns to 8.51 and 4.63 ns, respectively, using the comprehensive approach presented in this work. These values agree well with the lifetimes (8.48 and 4.67 ns) acquired for cells stained with single-color fluorochrome. Further, these results indicate that the influence of spectral

  9. An approach to estimate spatial distribution of analyte within cells using spectrally-resolved fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Dharmendar Kumar; Irfanullah, Mir; Basu, Santanu Kumar; Madhu, Sheri; De, Suman; Jadhav, Sameer; Ravikanth, Mangalampalli; Chowdhury, Arindam

    2017-03-01

    While fluorescence microscopy has become an essential tool amongst chemists and biologists for the detection of various analyte within cellular environments, non-uniform spatial distribution of sensors within cells often restricts extraction of reliable information on relative abundance of analytes in different subcellular regions. As an alternative to existing sensing methodologies such as ratiometric or FRET imaging, where relative proportion of analyte with respect to the sensor can be obtained within cells, we propose a methodology using spectrally-resolved fluorescence microscopy, via which both the relative abundance of sensor as well as their relative proportion with respect to the analyte can be simultaneously extracted for local subcellular regions. This method is exemplified using a BODIPY sensor, capable of detecting mercury ions within cellular environments, characterized by spectral blue-shift and concurrent enhancement of emission intensity. Spectral emission envelopes collected from sub-microscopic regions allowed us to compare the shift in transition energies as well as integrated emission intensities within various intracellular regions. Construction of a 2D scatter plot using spectral shifts and emission intensities, which depend on the relative amount of analyte with respect to sensor and the approximate local amounts of the probe, respectively, enabled qualitative extraction of relative abundance of analyte in various local regions within a single cell as well as amongst different cells. Although the comparisons remain semi-quantitative, this approach involving analysis of multiple spectral parameters opens up an alternative way to extract spatial distribution of analyte in heterogeneous systems. The proposed method would be especially relevant for fluorescent probes that undergo relatively nominal shift in transition energies compared to their emission bandwidths, which often restricts their usage for quantitative ratiometric imaging in

  10. Seasonal Patterns and Remote Spectral Estimation of Canopy Chemistry Across the Oregon Transect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, Pamela; Johnson, Lee; Billow, Christine; Miller, John; Pu, Ruiliang

    1994-01-01

    We examined seasonal changes in canopy chemical concentrations and content in conifer forests growing along a climate gradient in western Oregon, as part of the Oregon Transect Ecosystem Research (OTTER) study. The chemical variables were related to seasonal patterns of growth and production. Statistical comparisons of chemical variables with data collected from two different airborne remote-sensing platforms were also carried out. Total nitrogen (N) concentrations in foliage varied significantly both seasonally and among sites; when expressed as content in the forest canopy, nitrogen varied to a much greater extent and was significantly related to aboveground net primary production (r = 0.99). Chlorophyll and free amino acid concentrations varied more strongly than did total N and may have reflected changes in physiological demands for N. Large variations in starch concentrations were measured from pre- to post-budbreak in all conifer sites. Examination of remote-sensing data from two different airborne instruments suggests the potential for remote measurement of some canopy chemicals. Multivariate analysis of high-resolution spectral data in the near infrared region indicated significant correlations between spectral signals and N concentration and canopy N content; the correlation with canopy N content was stronger and was probably associated in part with water absorption features of the forest canopy. The spectral bands that were significantly correlated with lignin concentration and content were similar to bands selected in the other laboratory and airborne studies; starch concentrations were not significantly related to spectral reflectance data. Strong relationships between the spectral position of specific reflectance features in the visible region and chlorophyll were also found.

  11. On the appropriateness of applying chi-square distribution based confidence intervals to spectral estimates of helicopter flyover data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Charles K.

    1988-01-01

    The validity of applying chi-square based confidence intervals to far-field acoustic flyover spectral estimates was investigated. Simulated data, using a Kendall series and experimental acoustic data from the NASA/McDonnell Douglas 500E acoustics test, were analyzed. Statistical significance tests to determine the equality of distributions of the simulated and experimental data relative to theoretical chi-square distributions were performed. Bias and uncertainty errors associated with the spectral estimates were easily identified from the data sets. A model relating the uncertainty and bias errors to the estimates resulted, which aided in determining the appropriateness of the chi-square distribution based confidence intervals. Such confidence intervals were appropriate for nontonally associated frequencies of the experimental data but were inappropriate for tonally associated estimate distributions. The appropriateness at the tonally associated frequencies was indicated by the presence of bias error and noncomformity of the distributions to the theoretical chi-square distribution. A technique for determining appropriate confidence intervals at the tonally associated frequencies was suggested.

  12. Doppler Velocity Estimation Based on Spectral Characteristics of M-Sequence-Modulated Signals in Ultrasonic Measurement for Moving Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Shinnosuke; Hachiya, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-01

    Pulse compression using maximum-length sequence (M-sequence) can improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the reflected echo and distance resolution in the pulse-echo method. In the case of a moving object, however, the echo is modulated due to the Doppler effect. The Doppler-shifted M-sequence-modulated signal cannot be correlated with the reference signal, which corresponds to the transmitted M-sequence-modulated signal. Therefore, Doppler velocity estimation before the correlation and cross correlation of the received signal with Doppler-shifted reference signals has been proposed. In this paper, the proposed Doppler velocity estimation based on spectral characteristics of cyclic M-sequence-modulated signals is described. Then, the Doppler velocity estimation is evaluated based on computer simulations. The Doppler velocity can be estimated from the Fourier-transformed spectral density of cycles of the M-sequence-modulated signal with high resolution even in noisy environments. According to the evaluation, furthermore, the cycle number and the number of carrier waves in 1 digit of the M-sequence-modulated signal should be decreased to improve the resolution and accuracy when the length of the transmitted signal is determined.

  13. Shear wave attenuation estimated from the spectral decay rate in the vicinity of the Petropavlovsk station, Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. A.; Guseva, E. M.

    2016-07-01

    The parameters of S-wave attenuation (the total effect of absorption and scattering) near the Petropavlovsk (PET) station in Kamchatka were estimated by means of the spectral method through an original procedure. The spectral method typically analyzes the changes with distance of the shape of spectra of the acceleration records assuming that the acceleration spectrum at the earthquake source is flat. In reality, this assumption is violated: the source acceleration spectra often have a high-frequency cutoff (the source-controlled f max) which limits the spectral working bandwidth. Ignoring this phenomenon not only leads to a broad scatter of the individual estimates but also causes systematic errors in the form of overestimation of losses. In the approach applied in the present study, we primarily estimated the frequency of the mentioned high-frequency cutoff and then constructed the loss estimates only within the frequency range where the source spectrum is approximately flat. The shape of the source spectrum was preliminarily assessed by the approximate loss compensation technique. For this purpose, we used the tentative attenuation estimates which are close to the final ones. The difference in the logarithms of the spectral amplitudes at the edges of the working bandwidth is the input for calculating the attenuation. We used the digital accelerograms from the PET station, with 80 samples per second digitization rate, and based on them, we calculated the averaged spectrum of the S-waves as the root mean square along two horizontal components. Our analysis incorporates 384 spectra from the local earthquakes with M = 4-6.5 at the hypocentral distances ranging from 80 to 220 km. By applying the nonlinear least-square method, we found the following parameters of the loss model: the Q-factor Q 0 = 156 ± 33 at frequency f = 1 Hz for the distance interval r = 0-100 km; the exponent in the power-law relationship describing the growth of the Q-factor with frequency,

  14. Detecting harmonic signals in a noisy time-series: the z-domain Autoregressive (AR-z) spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hao; Chao, Benjamin F.

    2015-06-01

    We develop a new method referred to as the AR-z spectrum for detecting harmonic signals with exponential decay/growth contained in a noisy time-series by extending the autoregressive (AR) method of Chao & Gilbert. The method consists of (i) `blindly' forcing one 2nd-order AR fit to the signal content in the frequency domain for any chosen frequency whether or not there is truly a signal; (ii) finding the corresponding AR (complex-conjugate pair of) poles in the complex z-domain; (iii) converting the pole locations into the corresponding complex frequencies of the harmonic signals via the Prony's relation and (iv) constructing the Lorentzian power spectrum in the z-domain, conceptually constituting the analytical continuation of the spectrum from the (real) frequency domain to the complex z-domain, where a true harmonic signal is manifested as a Lorentzian peak. The AR-z spectrum can be further enhanced by forming the product spectrum from multiple records as available. We apply the AR-z spectral method to detect and to estimate the complex frequencies of the Earth's normal-modes of free oscillation using superconducting gravimeter records after recent large earthquakes. Specifically we show examples of detection and precise estimation of the frequencies and Q values of the split singlets of the spheroidal modes 0S2, 2S1, 1S2 and 0S0, and report the mode couplings manifested by the gravimeter recording of the toroidal modes 0T2, 0T3 and 0T4. The AR-z spectrum proves to be highly sensitive for harmonic signal of decaying sinusoids in comparison to the conventional Fourier-based spectrum, particularly when the signal in question is weak and where high spectral resolution is desired.

  15. Estimates of leaf area index from spectral reflectance of wheat under different cultural practices and solar angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asrar, G.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Yoshida, M.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of management practices and solar illumination angle on the leaf area index (LAI) was estimated from measurements of wheat canopy reflectance evaluated by two methods, a regression formula and an indirect technique. The date of planting and the time of irrigation in relation to the stage of plant growth were found to have significant effects on the development of leaves in spring wheat. A reduction in soil moisture adversely affected both the duration and magnitude of the maximum LAI for late planting dates. In general, water stress during vegetative stages resulted in a reduction in maximum LAI, while water stress during the reproductive period shortened the duration of green LAI in spring wheat. Canopy geometry and solar angle also affected the spectral properties of the canopies, and hence the estimated LAI. Increase in solar zenith angles resulted in a general increase in estimated LAI obtained from both methods.

  16. Experimental Estimation of CLASP Spatial and Spectral Resolutions: Results of the Instrument's Optical Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giono, G.; Katsukawa, Y.; Ishikawa, R.; Narukage, N.; Bando, T.; Kano, R.; Suematsu, Y.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Auchere, F.

    2015-01-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter is a sounding rocket experiment design to measure for the first time the polarization signal of the Lyman-Alpha line (121.6nm), emitted in the solar upper-chromosphere and transition region. This instrument aims to detect the Hanle effect's signature hidden in the Ly-alpha polarization, as a tool to probe the chromospheric magnetic field. Hence, an unprecedented polarization accuracy is needed ((is) less than 10 (exp -3). Nevertheless, spatial and spectral resolutions are also crucial to observe chhromospheric feature such as spicules, and to have precise measurement of the Ly-alpha line core and wings. Hence, this poster will present how the telescope and the spectrograph were separately aligned, and their combined spatial and spectral resolutions.

  17. Numerical estimation of the total phase shift in complex spectral OCT in vivo imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyganek, Marta; Wojtkowski, Maciej; Targowski, Piotr; Kowalczyk, Andrzej

    2004-07-01

    Complex Spectral Optical Tomography (CSOCT) in comparison to ordinary SOCT produces images free of parasitic mirror terms which results in double extension of the measurement range. This technique, however, requires the exact knowledge about the values of the introduced phase shifts in consecutive measurements. Involuntary object movements, which shift the phase from one measurement to another are always present in in vivo experiments. This introduces residual ghosts in cross-sectional images. Here we present a new method of data analysis, which allows determining the real phase shifts introduced during the measurement, and which helps to reduce the ghost effect. Two-dimensional cross-sectional in vivo images of human eye and skin obtained with the aid of this improved complex spectral OCT technique are shown. The method is free of polychromatic phase error originating from the wavelength dependence of the phase shift introduced by the reference mirror translation.

  18. Estimation of the effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere using inverse spectral methods: The state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Jon F.

    2014-09-01

    The effective elastic thickness (Te) is a geometric measure of the flexural rigidity of the lithosphere, which describes the resistance to bending under the application of applied, vertical loads. As such, it is likely that its magnitude has a major role in governing the tectonic evolution of both continental and oceanic plates. Of the several ways to estimate Te, one has gained popularity in the 40 years since its development because it only requires gravity and topography data, both of which are now readily available and provide excellent coverage over the Earth and even the rocky planets and moons of the solar system. This method, the ‘inverse spectral method’, develops measures of the relationship between observed gravity and topography data in the spatial frequency (wavenumber) domain, namely the admittance and coherence. The observed measures are subsequently inverted against the predictions of thin, elastic plate models, giving estimates of Te and other lithospheric parameters. This article provides a review of inverse spectral methodology and the studies that have used it. It is not, however, concerned with the geological or geodynamic significance or interpretation of Te, nor does it discuss and compare Te results from different methods in different provinces. Since the three main aspects of the subject are thin elastic plate flexure, spectral analysis, and inversion methods, the article broadly follows developments in these. The review also covers synthetic plate modelling, and concludes with a summary of the controversy currently surrounding inverse spectral methods, whether or not the large Te values returned in cratonic regions are artefacts of the method, or genuine observations.

  19. Estimation of Biomass and Canopy Height in Bermudagrass, Alfalfa, and Wheat Using Ultrasonic, Laser, and Spectral Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Pittman, Jeremy Joshua; Arnall, Daryl Brian; Interrante, Sindy M.; Moffet, Corey A.; Butler, Twain J.

    2015-01-01

    Non-destructive biomass estimation of vegetation has been performed via remote sensing as well as physical measurements. An effective method for estimating biomass must have accuracy comparable to the accepted standard of destructive removal. Estimation or measurement of height is commonly employed to create a relationship between height and mass. This study examined several types of ground-based mobile sensing strategies for forage biomass estimation. Forage production experiments consisting of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.], and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) were employed to examine sensor biomass estimation (laser, ultrasonic, and spectral) as compared to physical measurements (plate meter and meter stick) and the traditional harvest method (clipping). Predictive models were constructed via partial least squares regression and modeled estimates were compared to the physically measured biomass. Least significant difference separated mean estimates were examined to evaluate differences in the physical measurements and sensor estimates for canopy height and biomass. Differences between methods were minimal (average percent error of 11.2% for difference between predicted values versus machine and quadrat harvested biomass values (1.64 and 4.91 t·ha−1, respectively), except at the lowest measured biomass (average percent error of 89% for harvester and quad harvested biomass < 0.79 t·ha−1) and greatest measured biomass (average percent error of 18% for harvester and quad harvested biomass >6.4 t·ha−1). These data suggest that using mobile sensor-based biomass estimation models could be an effective alternative to the traditional clipping method for rapid, accurate in-field biomass estimation. PMID:25635415

  20. In vivo tear film thickness measurement and tear film dynamics visualization using spectral domain OCT and an efficient delay estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranha dos Santos, Valentin; Schmetterer, Leopold; Gröschl, Martin; Garhofer, Gerhard; Werkmeister, René M.

    2016-03-01

    Dry eye syndrome is a highly prevalent disease of the ocular surface characterized by an instability of the tear film. Traditional methods used for the evaluation of tear film stability are invasive or show limited repeatability. Here we propose a new noninvasive approach to measure tear film thickness using an efficient delay estimator and ultrahigh resolution spectral domain OCT. Silicon wafer phantoms with layers of known thickness and group index were used to validate the estimator-based thickness measurement. A theoretical analysis of the fundamental limit of the precision of the estimator is presented and the analytical expression of the Cramér-Rao lower bound (CRLB), which is the minimum variance that may be achieved by any unbiased estimator, is derived. The performance of the estimator against noise was investigated using simulations. We found that the proposed estimator reaches the CRLB associated with the OCT amplitude signal. The technique was applied in vivo in healthy subjects and dry eye patients. Series of tear film thickness maps were generated, allowing for the visualization of tear film dynamics. Our results show that the central tear film thickness precisely measured in vivo with a coefficient of variation of about 0.65% and that repeatable tear film dynamics can be observed. The presented method has the potential of being an alternative to breakup time measurements (BUT) and could be used in clinical setting to study patients with dry eye disease and monitor their treatments.

  1. Circular Conditional Autoregressive Modeling of Vector Fields.

    PubMed

    Modlin, Danny; Fuentes, Montse; Reich, Brian

    2012-02-01

    As hurricanes approach landfall, there are several hazards for which coastal populations must be prepared. Damaging winds, torrential rains, and tornadoes play havoc with both the coast and inland areas; but, the biggest seaside menace to life and property is the storm surge. Wind fields are used as the primary forcing for the numerical forecasts of the coastal ocean response to hurricane force winds, such as the height of the storm surge and the degree of coastal flooding. Unfortunately, developments in deterministic modeling of these forcings have been hindered by computational expenses. In this paper, we present a multivariate spatial model for vector fields, that we apply to hurricane winds. We parameterize the wind vector at each site in polar coordinates and specify a circular conditional autoregressive (CCAR) model for the vector direction, and a spatial CAR model for speed. We apply our framework for vector fields to hurricane surface wind fields for Hurricane Floyd of 1999 and compare our CCAR model to prior methods that decompose wind speed and direction into its N-S and W-E cardinal components.

  2. Circular Conditional Autoregressive Modeling of Vector Fields*

    PubMed Central

    Modlin, Danny; Fuentes, Montse; Reich, Brian

    2013-01-01

    As hurricanes approach landfall, there are several hazards for which coastal populations must be prepared. Damaging winds, torrential rains, and tornadoes play havoc with both the coast and inland areas; but, the biggest seaside menace to life and property is the storm surge. Wind fields are used as the primary forcing for the numerical forecasts of the coastal ocean response to hurricane force winds, such as the height of the storm surge and the degree of coastal flooding. Unfortunately, developments in deterministic modeling of these forcings have been hindered by computational expenses. In this paper, we present a multivariate spatial model for vector fields, that we apply to hurricane winds. We parameterize the wind vector at each site in polar coordinates and specify a circular conditional autoregressive (CCAR) model for the vector direction, and a spatial CAR model for speed. We apply our framework for vector fields to hurricane surface wind fields for Hurricane Floyd of 1999 and compare our CCAR model to prior methods that decompose wind speed and direction into its N-S and W-E cardinal components. PMID:24353452

  3. Application of maximum-entropy spectral estimation to deconvolution of XPS data. [X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, R. P.; Klein, J. D.; Barton, J. J.; Grunthaner, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    A comparison is made between maximum-entropy spectral estimation and traditional methods of deconvolution used in electron spectroscopy. The maximum-entropy method is found to have higher resolution-enhancement capabilities and, if the broadening function is known, can be used with no adjustable parameters with a high degree of reliability. The method and its use in practice are briefly described, and a criterion is given for choosing the optimal order for the prediction filter based on the prediction-error power sequence. The method is demonstrated on a test case and applied to X-ray photoelectron spectra.

  4. Linear Spectral Mixture Analysis of SPOT-7 for Tea Yield Estimation in Pagilaran Estate, Batang Central Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauziana, F.; Danoedoro, P.; Heru Murti, S.

    2016-11-01

    Remote sensing has been utilized especially for agriculture yield estimation. Tea yield is effected by biology characteristic including crown density. The challenge of tea yield estimation uses multispectral remote sensing data is the presence of object beside tea. This mixed pixel problem can disturb spectrally to recognize tea tree, so it is necessary to use pixel approach. The aims of this research are (1) to determine fraction of tea and non-tea; (2) to estimate crown density percentage based on tea Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI); (3) to estimate tea yield based on crown density. SPOT-7 was utilized for this application. Linear Spectral Mixture Analysis (LSMA) has applied to determination fraction percentage each pixel. Each pure endmember was read the NDVI value. NDVI of tea tree has sensitivity with crown density. Counting tea NDVI was applied for NDVI mixed pixel. Linear regression analysis has applied for estimating crown density and tea yield. The results of this research are SPOT -7 which can recognize tea, tree shade, impervious and soil each pixel with accuracy 99,84%. Although it produced high accuracy, it has overestimate at certain tea estate because of the attendance of impervious. Regression analysis of crown density and NDVI showed coeffisien determination 52%. This model result 4-100% crown density percentage, where crown density 4-55% were located beside tea tree or pruned-tea block. Regression analysis of crown density and tea yield relation showed coeffisien determination 45%. This model produced 161,34-1296,8 kg/ha. Each this model resulted Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) 14,27% and 551,52 kg/ha.

  5. Estimation of Tissue Optical Parameters with Hyperspectral Imaging and Spectral Unmixing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guolan; Qin, Xulei; Wang, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2015-03-17

    Early detection of oral cancer and its curable precursors can improve patient survival and quality of life. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) holds the potential for noninvasive early detection of oral cancer. The quantification of tissue chromophores by spectral unmixing of hyperspectral images could provide insights for evaluating cancer progression. In this study, non-negative matrix factorization has been applied for decomposing hyperspectral images into physiologically meaningful chromophore concentration maps. The approach has been validated by computer-simulated hyperspectral images and in vivo tumor hyperspectral images from a head and neck cancer animal model.

  6. Estimation of tissue optical parameters with hyperspectral imaging and spectral unmixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guolan; Qin, Xulei; Wang, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhuo G.; Fei, Baowei

    2015-03-01

    Early detection of oral cancer and its curable precursors can improve patient survival and quality of life. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) holds the potential for noninvasive early detection of oral cancer. The quantification of tissue chromophores by spectral unmixing of hyperspectral images could provide insights for evaluating cancer progression. In this study, non-negative matrix factorization has been applied for decomposing hyperspectral images into physiologically meaningful chromophore concentration maps. The approach has been validated by computer-simulated hyperspectral images and in vivo tumor hyperspectral images from a head and neck cancer animal model.

  7. Estimation of Tissue Optical Parameters with Hyperspectral Imaging and Spectral Unmixing

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Guolan; Qin, Xulei; Wang, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    Early detection of oral cancer and its curable precursors can improve patient survival and quality of life. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) holds the potential for noninvasive early detection of oral cancer. The quantification of tissue chromophores by spectral unmixing of hyperspectral images could provide insights for evaluating cancer progression. In this study, non-negative matrix factorization has been applied for decomposing hyperspectral images into physiologically meaningful chromophore concentration maps. The approach has been validated by computer-simulated hyperspectral images and in vivo tumor hyperspectral images from a head and neck cancer animal model. PMID:26855467

  8. A fuzzy-autoregressive model of daily river flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Roberto

    2012-06-01

    A model for the identification of daily river flows has been developed, consisting of the combination of an autoregressive model with a fuzzy inference system. The AR model is devoted to the identification of base flow, supposed to be described by linear laws. The fuzzy model identifies the surface runoff, by applying a small set of linguistic statements, deriving from the knowledge of the physical features of the nonlinear rainfall-runoff transformation, to the inflow entering the river basin. The model has been applied to the identification of the daily flow series of river Volturno at Cancello-Arnone (Southern Italy), with a drainage basin of around 5560 km2, observed between 1970 and 1974. The inflow was estimated on the basis of daily precipitations registered during the same years at six rain gauges located throughout the basin. The first two years were used for model training, the remaining three for the validation. The obtained results show that the proposed model provides good predictions of either low river flows or high floods, although the analysis of residuals, which do not turn out to be a white noise, indicates that the cause and effect relationship between rainfall and runoff is not completely identified by the model.

  9. A fuzzy-autoregressive model of daily river flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, R.

    2012-04-01

    A model for the identification of daily river flows has been developed, consisting of the combination of an autoregressive model with a fuzzy inference system. The AR model is devoted to the identification of base flow, supposed to be described by linear laws. The fuzzy model identifies the surface runoff, by applying a small set of linguistic statements, deriving from the knowledge of the physical features of the non linear rainfall-runoff transformation, to the inflow entering the river basin. The model has been applied to the identification of the daily flow series of river Volturno at Cancello-Arnone (Southern Italy), with a drainage basin of around 5560 km2, observed between 1970 and 1974. The inflow was estimated on the basis of daily precipitations registered during the same years at six rain gauges located throughout the basin. The first two years were used for model training, the remaining three for the validation. The obtained results show that the proposed model provides good predictions of either low river flows or high floods, although the analysis of residuals, which do not turn out to be a white noise, indicates that the cause and effect relationship between rainfall and runoff is not completely identified by the model.

  10. Maximum Likelihood Estimation of Multivariate Autoregressive-Moving Average Models.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    maximizing the same have been proposed i) in time domain by Box and Jenkins [41. Astrom [3J, Wilson [23 1, and Phadke [161, and ii) in frequency domain by...moving average residuals and other convariance matrices with linear structure ”, Anna/s of Staustics, 3. 3. Astrom , K. J. (1970), Introduction to

  11. NORTHSTAR: A Parameter Estimation Method for the Spatial Autoregression Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-09

    Department, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 55455. E-mail: mcelik@cs.umn.edu B. M. Kazar is with the Oracle Corporation, Nashua, NH . E...Numerical Linear Algebra. SIAM, 1997. [14] J. Egan. Signal Detection Theory and ROC Analysis. Academic Press, New York, 1975. [15] J. Freund and R. Walpole

  12. Estimation of dimensions and orientation of multiple riverine dune generations using spectral moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisimenka, Aliaksandr; Kubicki, Adam

    2017-02-01

    A new spectral analysis technique is proposed for rhythmic bedform quantification, based on the 2D Fourier transform involving the calculation of a set of low-order spectral moments. The approach provides a tool for efficient quantification of bedform length and height as well as spatial crest-line alignment. Contrary to the conventional method, it not only describes the most energetic component of an undulating seabed surface but also retrieves information on its secondary structure without application of any band-pass filter of which the upper and lower cut-off frequencies are a priori unknown. Validation is based on bathymetric data collected in the main Vistula River mouth area (Przekop Wisły), Poland. This revealed two generations (distinct groups) of dunes which are migrating seawards along distinct paths, probably related to the hydrological regime of the river. The data enable the identification of dune divergence and convergence zones. The approach proved successful in the parameterisation of topographic roughness, an essential aspect in numerical modelling studies.

  13. Calibrating spectral estimation for the LISA Technology Package with multichannel synthetic noise generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraioli, Luigi; Hueller, Mauro; Vitale, Stefano; Heinzel, Gerhard; Hewitson, Martin; Monsky, Anneke; Nofrarias, Miquel

    2010-08-01

    The scientific objectives of the LISA Technology Package experiment on board of the LISA Pathfinder mission demand accurate calibration and validation of the data analysis tools in advance of the mission launch. The level of confidence required in the mission outcomes can be reached only by intensively testing the tools on synthetically generated data. A flexible procedure allowing the generation of a cross-correlated stationary noise time series was set up. A multichannel time series with the desired cross-correlation behavior can be generated once a model for a multichannel cross-spectral matrix is provided. The core of the procedure comprises a noise coloring, multichannel filter designed via a frequency-by-frequency eigendecomposition of the model cross-spectral matrix and a subsequent fit in the Z domain. The common problem of initial transients in a filtered time series is solved with a proper initialization of the filter recursion equations. The noise generator performance was tested in a two-dimensional case study of the closed-loop LISA Technology Package dynamics along the two principal degrees of freedom.

  14. Spectral analysis of aeromagnetic profiles for depth estimation principles, software, and practical application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sadek, H.S.; Rashad, S.M.; Blank, H.R.

    1984-01-01

    If proper account is taken of the constraints of the method, it is capable of providing depth estimates to within an accuracy of about 10 percent under suitable circumstances. The estimates are unaffected by source magnetization and are relatively insensitive to assumptions as to source shape or distribution. The validity of the method is demonstrated by analyses of synthetic profiles and profiles recorded over Harrat Rahat, Saudi Arabia, and Diyur, Egypt, where source depths have been proved by drilling.

  15. The sensitivity based estimation of leaf area index from spectral vegetation indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonsamo, Alemu; Pellikka, Petri

    2012-06-01

    The performances of seven spectral vegetation indices (SVIs) were investigated for their sensitivity to a varying range of LAI. The evaluation was carried out for a dataset collected using SPOT 5 HRG 10 m imagery and simulated spectra using PROSPECT + SAIL reflectance models with varying soil reflectance backgrounds. The aim was to evaluate the applicability of multiple SVIs for LAI mapping based on the sensitivity analysis. The main sensitivity function was the first derivative of the regression function divided by the standard errors of the SVIs. In addition, the sensitivity of individual band and SVI with LAI was carried out using the ordinary least squares regressions. A new SVI, reduced infrared simple ratio (RISR) was developed based on an empirical red modification to infrared simple ratio (ISR) SVI. The new SVI was demonstrated which has significantly reduced the effect of soil background reflectance while maintaining high sensitivity to a wide range of LAI.

  16. Multifractality and autoregressive processes of dry spell lengths in Europe: an approach to their complexity and predictability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Maria-Dolors; Lana, Xavier; Burgueño, Augusto; Serra, Carina

    2015-04-01

    Dry spell lengths, DSL, defined as the number of consecutive days with daily rain amounts below a given threshold, may provide relevant information about drought regimes. Taking advantage of a daily pluviometric database covering a great extension of Europe, a detailed analysis of the multifractality of the dry spell regimes is achieved. An autoregressive process is applied with the aim of predicting DSL. A set of parameters, namely Hurst exponent, H, critical Hölder exponent, α0, spectral width, W , and spectral asymmetry, B, permit a first clustering of European rain gauges in terms of the complexity of their DSL series. This set of parameters also allows distinguishing between time series describing fine- or smooth-structure of the DSL regime by using the Complexity Index, CI. Results of previous monofractal analyses also permit establishing comparisons between fine and smooth-structures, correlation dimensions, predictive instability and anti-persistence of DSL for European areas. Relationships are also found between the CI and the mean absolute deviation, MAD, and the optimum autoregressive order, OAO, of an AR(p) autoregressive process applied to the DSL series. The detailed analysis of the discrepancies between empiric and predicted DSL underlines the uncertainty over predictability of long DSL, particularly for the Mediterranean region.

  17. Combined Spectral Index to Improve Ground-Based Estimates of Nitrogen Status in Dryland Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies have demonstrated the usefulness of the single ratio Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and ground-based remote sensing for estimating crop yield potential and basing in-season nitrogen (N) fertilizer application. The NDVI is positively related to crop N status and leaf ar...

  18. Comparison of Adaptive Spectral Estimation for Vehicle Speed Measurement with Radar Sensors.

    PubMed

    Shariff, Khairul Khaizi Mohd; Hoare, Edward; Daniel, Liam; Antoniou, Michail; Cherniakov, Mikhail

    2017-04-02

    Vehicle speed-over-ground (SoG) radar offers significant advantages over conventional speed measurement systems. Radar sensors enable contactless speed measurement, which is free from wheel slip. One of the key issues in SoG radar is the development of the Doppler shift estimation algorithm. In this paper, we compared two algorithms to estimate a mean Doppler frequency accurately. The first is the center-of-mass algorithm, which based on spectrum center-of-mass estimation with a bandwidth-limiting technique. The second is the cross-correlation algorithm, which is based on a cross-correlation technique by cross-correlating Doppler spectrum with a theoretical Gaussian curve. Analysis shows that both algorithms are computationally efficient and suitable for real-time SoG systems. Our extensive simulated and experimental results show both methods achieved low estimation error between 0.5% and 1.5% for flat road conditions. In terms of reliability, the cross-correlation method shows good performance under low Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) while the center-of-mass method failed in this condition.

  19. Fusion of spectral and electrochemical sensor data for estimating soil macronutrients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid and efficient quantification of plant-available soil phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) is needed to support variable-rate fertilization strategies. Two methods that have been used for estimating these soil macronutrients are diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in visible and near-infrared (VNIR) w...

  20. Estimation of higher chlorophylla concentrations using field spectral measurement and HJ-1A hyperspectral satellite data in Dianshan Lake, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Liguo; Roberts, Dar A.; Ma, Weichun; Zhang, Hao; Tang, Lin

    2014-02-01

    Based on in situ water sampling and field spectral measurements in Dianshan Lake, a semi-analytical three-band algorithm was used to estimate Chlorophylla (Chla) content in case II waters. The three bands selected to estimate Chla for high concentrations included 653, 691 and 748 nm. An equation, based on the difference in reciprocal reflectance between 653 and 691 nm, multiplied by reflectance at 748 nm as [Rrs-1(653) - Rrs-1 (691)] Rrs(748), explained 85.57% of variance in Chla concentration with a root mean square error (RMSE) of <6.56 mg/m3. In order to test the utility of this model with satellite data, HJ-1A Hyperspectral Imager (HSI) data were analyzed using comparable wavelengths selected from the in situ data [B67-1(656) - B80-1(716)] B87(753). This model accounted for 84.3% of Chla variation, estimating Chla concentrations with an RMSE of <4.23 mg/m3. The results illustrate that, based on the determined wavelengths, the spectrum-based model can achieve a high estimation accuracy and can be applied to hyperspectral satellite imagery especially for higher Chla concentration waters.

  1. Equilibrating errors: reliable estimation of information transmission rates in biological systems with spectral analysis-based methods.

    PubMed

    Ignatova, Irina; French, Andrew S; Immonen, Esa-Ville; Frolov, Roman; Weckström, Matti

    2014-06-01

    Shannon's seminal approach to estimating information capacity is widely used to quantify information processing by biological systems. However, the Shannon information theory, which is based on power spectrum estimation, necessarily contains two sources of error: time delay bias error and random error. These errors are particularly important for systems with relatively large time delay values and for responses of limited duration, as is often the case in experimental work. The window function type and size chosen, as well as the values of inherent delays cause changes in both the delay bias and random errors, with possibly strong effect on the estimates of system properties. Here, we investigated the properties of these errors using white-noise simulations and analysis of experimental photoreceptor responses to naturalistic and white-noise light contrasts. Photoreceptors were used from several insect species, each characterized by different visual performance, behavior, and ecology. We show that the effect of random error on the spectral estimates of photoreceptor performance (gain, coherence, signal-to-noise ratio, Shannon information rate) is opposite to that of the time delay bias error: the former overestimates information rate, while the latter underestimates it. We propose a new algorithm for reducing the impact of time delay bias error and random error, based on discovering, and then using that size of window, at which the absolute values of these errors are equal and opposite, thus cancelling each other, allowing minimally biased measurement of neural coding.

  2. Spatially and spectrally resolved particle swarm optimization for precise optical property estimation using diffuse-reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kholodtsova, Maria N; Daul, Christian; Loschenov, Victor B; Blondel, Walter C P M

    2016-06-13

    This paper presents a new approach to estimate optical properties (absorption and scattering coefficients µa and µs) of biological tissues from spatially-resolved spectroscopy measurements. A Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO)-based algorithm was implemented and firstly modified to deal with spatial and spectral resolutions of the data, and to solve the corresponding inverse problem. Secondly, the optimization was improved by fitting exponential decays to the two best points among all clusters of the "particles" randomly distributed all over the parameter space (µs, µa) of possible solutions. The consequent acceleration of all the groups of particles to the "best" curve leads to significant error decrease in the optical property estimation. The study analyzes the estimated optical property error as a function of the various PSO parameter combinations, and several performance criteria such as the cost-function error and the number of iterations in the algorithms proposed. The final one led to error values between ground truth and estimated values of µs and µa less than 6%.

  3. SDSS/SEGUE spectral feature analysis for stellar atmospheric parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiangru; Lu, Yu; Yang, Tan; Wang, Yongjun; Wu, Q. M. Jonathan; Luo, Ali; Zhao, Yongheng; Zuo, Fang

    2014-08-01

    Large-scale and deep sky survey missions are rapidly collecting a large amount of stellar spectra, which necessitate the estimation of atmospheric parameters directly from spectra and make it feasible to statistically investigate latent principles in a large data set. We present a technique for estimating parameters T{sub eff}, log g, and [Fe/H] from stellar spectra. With this technique, we first extract features from stellar spectra using the LASSO algorithm; then, the parameters are estimated from the extracted features using the support vector regression. On a subsample of 20,000 stellar spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with reference parameters provided by the SDSS/SEGUE Spectroscopic Parameter Pipeline, estimation consistency are 0.007458 dex for log T{sub eff} (101.609921 K for T{sub eff}), 0.189557 dex for log g, and 0.182060 for [Fe/H], where the consistency is evaluated by mean absolute error. Prominent characteristics of the proposed scheme are sparseness, locality, and physical interpretability. In this work, each spectrum consists of 3821 fluxes, and 10, 19, and 14 typical wavelength positions are detected, respectively, for estimating T{sub eff}, log g, and [Fe/H]. It is shown that the positions are related to typical lines of stellar spectra. This characteristic is important in investigating physical indications from analysis results. Then, stellar spectra can be described by the individual fluxes on the detected positions (PD) or local integration of fluxes near them (LI). The aforementioned consistency is the result based on features described by LI. If features are described by PD, consistency is 0.009092 dex for log T{sub eff} (124.545075 K for T{sub eff}), 0.198928 dex for log g, and 0.206814 dex for [Fe/H].

  4. Estimating high mosquito-producing rice fields using spectral and spatial data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, B. L.; Beck, L. R.; Washino, R. K.; Hibbard, K. A.; Salute, J. S.

    1992-01-01

    The cultivation of irrigated rice provides ideal larval habitat for a number of anopheline vectors of malaria throughout the world. Anopheles freeborni, a potential vector of human malaria, is associated with the nearly 240,000 hectares of irrigated rice grown annually in Northern and Central California; therefore, this species can serve as a model for the study of rice field anopheline population dynamics. Analysis of field data revealed that rice fields with early season canopy development, that are located near bloodmeal sources (i.e., pastures with livestock) were more likely to produce anopheline larvae than fields with less developed canopies located further from pastures. Remote sensing reflectance measurements of early-season canopy development and geographic information system (GIS) measurements of distanes between rice fields and pastures with livestock were combined to distinguish between high and low mosquito-producing rice fields. Using spectral and distance measures in either a discriminant or Bayesian analysis, the identification of high mosquito-producing fields was made with 85 percent accuracy nearly two months before anopheline larval populations peaked. Since omission errors were also minimized by these approaches, they could provide a new basis for directing abatement techniques for the control of malaria vectors.

  5. Beyond histograms: Efficiently estimating radial distribution functions via spectral Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrone, Paul N.; Rosch, Thomas W.

    2017-03-01

    Despite more than 40 years of research in condensed-matter physics, state-of-the-art approaches for simulating the radial distribution function (RDF) g(r) still rely on binning pair-separations into a histogram. Such methods suffer from undesirable properties, including subjectivity, high uncertainty, and slow rates of convergence. Moreover, such problems go undetected by the metrics often used to assess RDFs. To address these issues, we propose (I) a spectral Monte Carlo (SMC) quadrature method that yields g(r) as an analytical series expansion and (II) a Sobolev norm that assesses the quality of RDFs by quantifying their fluctuations. Using the latter, we show that, relative to histogram-based approaches, SMC reduces by orders of magnitude both the noise in g(r) and the number of pair separations needed for acceptable convergence. Moreover, SMC reduces subjectivity and yields simple, differentiable formulas for the RDF, which are useful for tasks such as coarse-grained force-field calibration via iterative Boltzmann inversion.

  6. Spectral and parameter estimation problems arising in the metrology of high performance mirror surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Church, E.L.; Takacs, P.Z.

    1986-04-01

    The accurate characterization of mirror surfaces requires the estimation of two-dimensional distribution functions and power spectra from trend-contaminated profile measurements. The rationale behind this, and our measurement and processing procedures, are described. The distinction between profile and area spectra is indicated, and since measurements often suggest inverse-power-law forms, a discussion of classical and fractal models of processes leading to these forms is included. 9 refs.

  7. Speaker height estimation from speech: Fusing spectral regression and statistical acoustic models.

    PubMed

    Hansen, John H L; Williams, Keri; Bořil, Hynek

    2015-08-01

    Estimating speaker height can assist in voice forensic analysis and provide additional side knowledge to benefit automatic speaker identification or acoustic model selection for automatic speech recognition. In this study, a statistical approach to height estimation that incorporates acoustic models within a non-uniform height bin width Gaussian mixture model structure as well as a formant analysis approach that employs linear regression on selected phones are presented. The accuracy and trade-offs of these systems are explored by examining the consistency of the results, location, and causes of error as well a combined fusion of the two systems using data from the TIMIT corpus. Open set testing is also presented using the Multi-session Audio Research Project corpus and publicly available YouTube audio to examine the effect of channel mismatch between training and testing data and provide a realistic open domain testing scenario. The proposed algorithms achieve a highly competitive performance to previously published literature. Although the different data partitioning in the literature and this study may prevent performance comparisons in absolute terms, the mean average error of 4.89 cm for males and 4.55 cm for females provided by the proposed algorithm on TIMIT utterances containing selected phones suggest a considerable estimation error decrease compared to past efforts.

  8. [Estimation of Winter Wheat Biomass Using Visible Spectral and BP Based Artificial Neural Networks].

    PubMed

    Cui, Ri-xian; Liu, Ya-dong; Fu, Jin-dong

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using color digital image analysis and back propagation (BP) based artificial neural networks (ANN) method to estimate above ground biomass at the canopy level of winter wheat field. Digital color images of winter wheat canopies grown under six levels of nitrogen treatments were taken with a digital camera for four times during the elongation stage and at the same time wheat plants were sampled to measure above ground biomass. Canopy cover (CC) and 10 color indices were calculated from winter wheat canopy images by using image analysis program (developed in Microsoft Visual Basic). Correlation analysis was carried out to identify the relationship between CC, 10 color indices and winter wheat above ground biomass. Stepwise multiple linear regression and BP based ANN methods were used to establish the models to estimate winter wheat above ground biomass. The results showed that CC, and two color indices had a significant cor- relation with above ground biomass. CC revealed the highest correlation with winter wheat above ground biomass. Stepwise multiple linear regression model constituting CC and color indices of NDI and b, and BP based ANN model with four variables (CC, g, b and NDI) for input was constructed to estimate winter wheat above ground biomass. The validation results indicate that the model using BP based ANN method has a better performance with higher R2 (0.903) and lower RMSE (61.706) and RRMSE (18.876) in comparation with the stepwise regression model.

  9. Simultaneous Estimation of Noise Variance and Number of Peaks in Bayesian Spectral Deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuda, Satoru; Nagata, Kenji; Okada, Masato

    2017-02-01

    The heuristic identification of peaks from noisy complex spectra often leads to misunderstanding of the physical and chemical properties of matter. In this paper, we propose a framework based on Bayesian inference, which enables us to separate multipeak spectra into single peaks statistically and consists of two steps. The first step is estimating both the noise variance and the number of peaks as hyperparameters based on Bayes free energy, which generally is not analytically tractable. The second step is fitting the parameters of each peak function to the given spectrum by calculating the posterior density, which has a problem of local minima and saddles since multipeak models are nonlinear and hierarchical. Our framework enables the escape from local minima or saddles by using the exchange Monte Carlo method and calculates Bayes free energy via the multiple histogram method. We discuss a simulation demonstrating how efficient our framework is and show that estimating both the noise variance and the number of peaks prevents overfitting, overpenalizing, and misunderstanding the precision of parameter estimation.

  10. Comparing Satellite Rainfall Estimates with Rain-Gauge Data: Optimal Strategies Suggested by a Spectral Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Thomas L.; Kundu, Prasun K.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Validation of satellite remote-sensing methods for estimating rainfall against rain-gauge data is attractive because of the direct nature of the rain-gauge measurements. Comparisons of satellite estimates to rain-gauge data are difficult, however, because of the extreme variability of rain and the fact that satellites view large areas over a short time while rain gauges monitor small areas continuously. In this paper, a statistical model of rainfall variability developed for studies of sampling error in averages of satellite data is used to examine the impact of spatial and temporal averaging of satellite and gauge data on intercomparison results. The model parameters were derived from radar observations of rain, but the model appears to capture many of the characteristics of rain-gauge data as well. The model predicts that many months of data from areas containing a few gauges are required to validate satellite estimates over the areas, and that the areas should be of the order of several hundred km in diameter. Over gauge arrays of sufficiently high density, the optimal areas and averaging times are reduced. The possibility of using time-weighted averages of gauge data is explored.

  11. Incorporating measurement error in n = 1 psychological autoregressive modeling.

    PubMed

    Schuurman, Noémi K; Houtveen, Jan H; Hamaker, Ellen L

    2015-01-01

    Measurement error is omnipresent in psychological data. However, the vast majority of applications of autoregressive time series analyses in psychology do not take measurement error into account. Disregarding measurement error when it is present in the data results in a bias of the autoregressive parameters. We discuss two models that take measurement error into account: An autoregressive model with a white noise term (AR+WN), and an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model. In a simulation study we compare the parameter recovery performance of these models, and compare this performance for both a Bayesian and frequentist approach. We find that overall, the AR+WN model performs better. Furthermore, we find that for realistic (i.e., small) sample sizes, psychological research would benefit from a Bayesian approach in fitting these models. Finally, we illustrate the effect of disregarding measurement error in an AR(1) model by means of an empirical application on mood data in women. We find that, depending on the person, approximately 30-50% of the total variance was due to measurement error, and that disregarding this measurement error results in a substantial underestimation of the autoregressive parameters.

  12. Estimating leaf chlorophyll of barley at different growth stages using spectral indices to reduce soil background and canopy structure effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kang; Lenz-Wiedemann, Victoria; Chen, Xinping; Bareth, Georg

    2014-11-01

    Monitoring in situ chlorophyll (Chl) content in agricultural crop leaves is of great importance for stress detection, nutritional state diagnosis, yield prediction and studying the mechanisms of plant and environment interaction. Numerous spectral indices have been developed for chlorophyll estimation from leaf- and canopy-level reflectance. However, in most cases, these indices are negatively affected by variations in canopy structure and soil background. The objective of this study was to develop spectral indices that can reduce the effects of varied canopy structure and growth stages for the estimation of leaf Chl. Hyperspectral reflectance data was obtained through simulation by a radiative transfer model, PROSAIL, and measurements from canopies of barley comprising different cultivars across growth stages using spectroradiometers. We applied a comprehensive band-optimization algorithm to explore five types of spectral indices: reflectance difference (RD), reflectance ratio (RR), normalized reflectance difference (NRD), difference of reflectance ratio (DRR) and ratio of reflectance difference (RRD). Indirectly using the multiple scatter correction (MSC) theory, we hypothesized that RRD can eliminate adverse effects of soil background, canopy structure and multiple scattering. Published indices and multivariate models such as optimum multiple band regression (OMBR), partial least squares regression (PLSR) and support vector machines for regression (SVR) were also employed. Results showed that the ratio of reflectance difference index (RRDI) optimized for simulated data significantly improved the correlation with Chl (R2 = 0.98, p < 0.0001) and was insensitive to LAI variations (1-8), compared to widely used indices such as MCARI/OSAVI (R2 = 0.64, p < 0.0001) and TCARI/OSAVI (R2 = 0.74, p < 0.0001). The RRDI optimized for barley explained 76% of the variation in Chl and outperformed multivariate models. However, the accuracy decreased when employing the indices

  13. Satellite Estimation of Spectral Surface UV Irradiance. 2; Effect of Horizontally Homogeneous Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krothov, N.; Herman, J. R.; Bhartia, P. K.; Ahmad, Z.a; Fioletov, V.

    1998-01-01

    The local variability of UV irradiance at the Earth's surface is mostly caused by clouds in addition to the seasonal variability. Parametric representations of radiative transfer RT calculations are presented for the convenient solution of the transmission T of ultraviolet radiation through plane parallel clouds over a surface with reflectivity R(sub s). The calculations are intended for use with the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) measured radiances to obtain the calculated Lambert equivalent scene reflectivity R for scenes with and without clouds. The purpose is to extend the theoretical analysis of the estimation of UV irradiance from satellite data for a cloudy atmosphere. Results are presented for a range of cloud optical depths and solar zenith angles for the cases of clouds over a low reflectivity surface R(sub s) less than 0.1, over a snow or ice surface R(sub s) greater than 0.3, and for transmission through a non-conservative scattering cloud with single scattering albedo omega(sub 0) = 0.999. The key finding for conservative scattering is that the cloud-transmission function C(sub T), the ratio of cloudy-to clear-sky transmission, is roughly C(sub T) = 1 - R(sub c) with an error of less than 20% for nearly overhead sun and snow-free surfaces. For TOMS estimates of UV irradiance in the presence of both snow and clouds, independent information about snow albedo is needed for conservative cloud scattering. For non-conservative scattering with R(sub s) greater than 0.5 (snow) the satellite measured scene reflectance cannot be used to estimate surface irradiance. The cloud transmission function has been applied to the calculation of UV irradiance at the Earth's surface and compared with ground-based measurements.

  14. A joint estimation detection of Glaucoma progression in 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography optic nerve head images

    PubMed Central

    Belghith, Akram; Bowd, Christopher; Weinreb, Robert N.; Zangwill, Linda M.

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is an ocular disease characterized by distinctive changes in the optic nerve head (ONH) and visual field. Glaucoma can strike without symptoms and causes blindness if it remains without treatment. Therefore, early disease detection is important so that treatment can be initiated and blindness prevented. In this context, important advances in technology for non-invasive imaging of the eye have been made providing quantitative tools to measure structural changes in ONH topography, an essential element for glaucoma detection and monitoring. 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), an optical imaging technique, has been commonly used to discriminate glaucomatous from healthy subjects. In this paper, we present a new framework for detection of glaucoma progression using 3D SD-OCT images. In contrast to previous works that the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurement provided by commercially available spectral-domain optical coherence tomograph, we consider the whole 3D volume for change detection. To integrate a priori knowledge and in particular the spatial voxel dependency in the change detection map, we propose the use of the Markov Random Field to handle a such dependency. To accommodate the presence of false positive detection, the estimated change detection map is then used to classify a 3D SDOCT image into the “non-progressing” and “progressing” glaucoma classes, based on a fuzzy logic classifier. We compared the diagnostic performance of the proposed framework to existing methods of progression detection. PMID:25606299

  15. A joint estimation detection of Glaucoma progression in 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography optic nerve head images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belghith, Akram; Bowd, Christopher; Weinreb, Robert N.; Zangwill, Linda M.

    2014-03-01

    Glaucoma is an ocular disease characterized by distinctive changes in the optic nerve head (ONH) and visual field. Glaucoma can strike without symptoms and causes blindness if it remains without treatment. Therefore, early disease detection is important so that treatment can be initiated and blindness prevented. In this context, important advances in technology for non-invasive imaging of the eye have been made providing quantitative tools to measure structural changes in ONH topography, an essential element for glaucoma detection and monitoring. 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), an optical imaging technique, has been commonly used to discriminate glaucomatous from healthy subjects. In this paper, we present a new framework for detection of glaucoma progression using 3D SD-OCT images. In contrast to previous works that the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurement provided by commercially available spectral-domain optical coherence tomograph, we consider the whole 3D volume for change detection. To integrate a priori knowledge and in particular the spatial voxel dependency in the change detection map, we propose the use of the Markov Random Field to handle a such dependency. To accommodate the presence of false positive detection, the estimated change detection map is then used to classify a 3D SDOCT image into the "non-progressing" and "progressing" glaucoma classes, based on a fuzzy logic classifier. We compared the diagnostic performance of the proposed framework to existing methods of progression detection.

  16. Development and calibration of an automatic spectral albedometer to estimate near-surface snow SSA time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Ghislain; Libois, Quentin; Arnaud, Laurent; Verin, Gauthier; Dumont, Marie

    2016-06-01

    Spectral albedo of the snow surface in the visible/near-infrared range has been measured for 3 years by an automatic spectral radiometer installed at Dome C (75° S, 123° E) in Antarctica in order to retrieve the specific surface area (SSA) of superficial snow. This study focuses on the uncertainties of the SSA retrieval due to instrumental and data processing limitations. We find that when the solar zenith angle is high, the main source of uncertainties is the imperfect angular response of the light collectors. This imperfection introduces a small spurious wavelength-dependent trend in the albedo spectra which greatly affects the SSA retrieval. By modeling this effect, we show that for typical snow and illumination conditions encountered at Dome C, retrieving SSA with an accuracy better than 15 % (our target) requires the difference of response between 400 and 1100 nm to not exceed 2 %. Such a small difference can be achieved only by (i) a careful design of the collectors, (ii) an ad hoc correction of the spectra using the actual measured angular response of the collectors, and (iii) for solar zenith angles less than 75°. The 3-year time series of retrieved SSA features a 3-fold decrease every summer which is significantly larger than the estimated uncertainties. This highlights the high dynamics of near-surface SSA at Dome C.

  17. X-ray dual energy spectral parameter optimization for bone Calcium/Phosphorus mass ratio estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulou, P. I.; Fountos, G. P.; Martini, N. D.; Koukou, V. N.; Michail, C. M.; Valais, I. G.; Kandarakis, I. S.; Nikiforidis, G. C.

    2015-09-01

    Calcium (Ca) and Phosphorus (P) bone mass ratio has been identified as an important, yet underutilized, risk factor in osteoporosis diagnosis. The purpose of this simulation study is to investigate the use of effective or mean mass attenuation coefficient in Ca/P mass ratio estimation with the use of a dual-energy method. The investigation was based on the minimization of the accuracy of Ca/P ratio, with respect to the Coefficient of Variation of the ratio. Different set-ups were examined, based on the K-edge filtering technique and single X-ray exposure. The modified X-ray output was attenuated by various Ca/P mass ratios resulting in nine calibration points, while keeping constant the total bone thickness. The simulated data were obtained considering a photon counting energy discriminating detector. The standard deviation of the residuals was used to compare and evaluate the accuracy between the different dual energy set-ups. The optimum mass attenuation coefficient for the Ca/P mass ratio estimation was the effective coefficient in all the examined set-ups. The variation of the residuals between the different set-ups was not significant.

  18. An autoregressive growth model for longitudinal item analysis.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Minjeong; Rabe-Hesketh, Sophia

    2016-09-01

    A first-order autoregressive growth model is proposed for longitudinal binary item analysis where responses to the same items are conditionally dependent across time given the latent traits. Specifically, the item response probability for a given item at a given time depends on the latent trait as well as the response to the same item at the previous time, or the lagged response. An initial conditions problem arises because there is no lagged response at the initial time period. We handle this problem by adapting solutions proposed for dynamic models in panel data econometrics. Asymptotic and finite sample power for the autoregressive parameters are investigated. The consequences of ignoring local dependence and the initial conditions problem are also examined for data simulated from a first-order autoregressive growth model. The proposed methods are applied to longitudinal data on Korean students' self-esteem.

  19. Estimation of Soil Moisture Content from the Spectral Reflectance of Bare Soils in the 0.4–2.5 μm Domain

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, Sophie; Briottet, Xavier; Lesaignoux, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    This work aims to compare the performance of new methods to estimate the Soil Moisture Content (SMC) of bare soils from their spectral signatures in the reflective domain (0.4–2.5 μm) in comparison with widely used spectral indices like Normalized Soil Moisture Index (NSMI) and Water Index SOIL (WISOIL). Indeed, these reference spectral indices use wavelengths located in the water vapour absorption bands and their performance are thus very sensitive to the quality of the atmospheric compensation. To reduce these limitations, two new spectral indices are proposed which wavelengths are defined using the determination matrix tool by taking into account the atmospheric transmission: Normalized Index of Nswir domain for Smc estimatiOn from Linear correlation (NINSOL) and Normalized Index of Nswir domain for Smc estimatiOn from Non linear correlation (NINSON). These spectral indices are completed by two new methods based on the global shape of the soil spectral signatures. These methods are the Inverse Soil semi-Empirical Reflectance model (ISER), using the inversion of an existing empirical soil model simulating the soil spectral reflectance according to soil moisture content for a given soil class, and the convex envelope model, linking the area between the envelope and the spectral signature to the SMC. All these methods are compared using a reference database built with 32 soil samples and composed of 190 spectral signatures with five or six soil moisture contents. Half of the database is used for the calibration stage and the remaining to evaluate the performance of the SMC estimation methods. The results show that the four new methods lead to similar or better performance than the one obtained by the reference indices. The RMSE is ranging from 3.8% to 6.2% and the coefficient of determination R2 varies between 0.74 and 0.91 with the best performance obtained with the ISER model. In a second step, simulated spectral radiances at the sensor level are used to

  20. Estimation of soil moisture content from the spectral reflectance of bare soils in the 0.4-2.5 µm domain.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Sophie; Briottet, Xavier; Lesaignoux, Audrey

    2015-02-02

    This work aims to compare the performance of new methods to estimate the Soil Moisture Content (SMC) of bare soils from their spectral signatures in the reflective domain (0.4-2.5 µm) in comparison with widely used spectral indices like Normalized Soil Moisture Index (NSMI) and Water Index SOIL (WISOIL). Indeed, these reference spectral indices use wavelengths located in the water vapour absorption bands and their performance are thus very sensitive to the quality of the atmospheric compensation. To reduce these limitations, two new spectral indices are proposed which wavelengths are defined using the determination matrix tool by taking into account the atmospheric transmission: Normalized Index of Nswir domain for Smc estimatiOn from Linear correlation (NINSOL) and Normalized Index of Nswir domain for Smc estimatiOn from Non linear correlation (NINSON). These spectral indices are completed by two new methods based on the global shape of the soil spectral signatures. These methods are the Inverse Soil semi-Empirical Reflectance model (ISER), using the inversion of an existing empirical soil model simulating the soil spectral reflectance according to soil moisture content for a given soil class, and the convex envelope model, linking the area between the envelope and the spectral signature to the SMC. All these methods are compared using a reference database built with 32 soil samples and composed of 190 spectral signatures with five or six soil moisture contents. Half of the database is used for the calibration stage and the remaining to evaluate the performance of the SMC estimation methods. The results show that the four new methods lead to similar or better performance than the one obtained by the reference indices. The RMSE is ranging from 3.8% to 6.2% and the coefficient of determination R2 varies between 0.74 and 0.91 with the best performance obtained with the ISER model. In a second step, simulated spectral radiances at the sensor level are used to analyse

  1. Intercepted photosynthetically active radiation in wheat canopies estimated by spectral reflectance. [Phoenix, Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, J. L.; Asrar, G.; Kanemasu, E. T.

    1982-01-01

    The interception of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) was evaluated relative to greenness and normalized difference (MSS 7-5/7+5) for five planting dates of wheat for 1978-79 and 1979-80 in Phoenix. Intercepted PAR was calculated from a model driven by leaf area index and stage of growth. Linear relationships were found between greenness and normalized difference with a separate model representing growth and senescence of the crop. Normalized difference was a significantly better model and would be easier to apply than the empirically derived greenness parameter. For the leaf area growth portion of the season the model between PAR interception and normalized difference was the same over years, however, for the leaf senescence the models showed more variability due to the lack of data on measured interception in sparse canopies. Normalized difference could be used to estimate PAR interception directly for crop growth models.

  2. Photoprotective Response in Plants Impacts Estimation of Biophysical Parameters Using Spectral Reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zygielbaum, A. I.; Arkebauer, T. J.; Walter-Shea, E.

    2014-12-01

    Previously, we reported that reflectance increased across the whole PAR spectrum when plants were subjected to water stress. This effect was shown to exist in maize grown under greenhouse conditions and under field conditions. Greenhouse experiments showed that, in addition to leaf water content, the effect was strongly correlated with incident light intensity. Further, through the use of an integrating sphere, we demonstrated that the change in reflectance was due to a change in absorption rather than in a change scattering or other optical path effect. Time lapse microscopy showed lightening between leaf veins analogous to effects measured by researchers observing cross sections of stressed C4 plants. To further refine our study, additional leaf level and canopy level studies were undertaken. Excised leaf sections were separately exposed to red and white light in the laboratory as the leaf dried. Increasing reflectance and transmittance were observed for the section exposed to white light, while little change was observed under red light. Each of these observations can be explained by chloroplast avoidance movement, a photoprotective response causing chloroplasts to aggregate along cell walls effectively hiding chlorophyll from observation. Chloroplast movement, for example, is driven by blue light; explaining the lack of observed change under red light. Estimation of biophysical parameters, such as chlorophyll content and greenness, are affected by the difference between the "apparent" chlorophyll content and the actual chlorophyll content of leaves and canopies. Up to 30% changes in the VARI remote sensing index have been observed morning to afternoon in field-grown maize. Ten percent changes in chlorophyll estimates have been observed in greenhouse maize. We will report on further research and on the extension of our work to include the impact of chloroplast avoidance on remote sensing of C3 plants, specifically soybean, at leaf and canopy levels.

  3. Probing turbulence intermittency via autoregressive moving-average models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faranda, Davide; Dubrulle, Bérengère; Daviaud, François; Pons, Flavio Maria Emanuele

    2014-12-01

    We suggest an approach to probing intermittency corrections to the Kolmogorov law in turbulent flows based on the autoregressive moving-average modeling of turbulent time series. We introduce an index Υ that measures the distance from a Kolmogorov-Obukhov model in the autoregressive moving-average model space. Applying our analysis to particle image velocimetry and laser Doppler velocimetry measurements in a von Kármán swirling flow, we show that Υ is proportional to traditional intermittency corrections computed from structure functions. Therefore, it provides the same information, using much shorter time series. We conclude that Υ is a suitable index to reconstruct intermittency in experimental turbulent fields.

  4. On the spectral formulation of Granger causality.

    PubMed

    Chicharro, D

    2011-12-01

    Spectral measures of causality are used to explore the role of different rhythms in the causal connectivity between brain regions. We study several spectral measures related to Granger causality, comprising the bivariate and conditional Geweke measures, the directed transfer function, and the partial directed coherence. We derive the formulation of dependence and causality in the spectral domain from the more general formulation in the information-theory framework. We argue that the transfer entropy, the most general measure derived from the concept of Granger causality, lacks a spectral representation in terms of only the processes associated with the recorded signals. For all the spectral measures we show how they are related to mutual information rates when explicitly considering the parametric autoregressive representation of the processes. In this way we express the conditional Geweke spectral measure in terms of a multiple coherence involving innovation variables inherent to the autoregressive representation. We also link partial directed coherence with Sims' criterion of causality. Given our results, we discuss the causal interpretation of the spectral measures related to Granger causality and stress the necessity to explicitly consider their specific formulation based on modeling the signals as linear Gaussian stationary autoregressive processes.

  5. Assessment of estimated retinal atrophy progression in Stargardt macular dystrophy using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Rupert W; Muñoz, Beatriz; Wolfson, Yulia; Sophie, Raafay; Fletcher, Emily; Bittencourt, Millena G; Scholl, Hendrik P N

    2016-01-01

    Aims To estimate disease progression based on analysis of macular volume measured by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in patients affected by Stargardt macular dystrophy (STGD1) and to evaluate the influence of software errors on these measurements. Methods 58 eyes of 29 STGD1 patients were included. Numbers and types of algorithm errors were recorded and manually corrected. In a subgroup of 36 eyes of 18 patients with at least two examinations over time, total macular volume (TMV) and volumes of all nine Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) subfields were obtained. Random effects models were used to estimate the rate of change per year for the population, and empirical Bayes slopes were used to estimate yearly decline in TMV for individual eyes. Results 6958 single B-scans from 190 macular cube scans were analysed. 2360 (33.9%) showed algorithm errors. Mean observation period for follow-up data was 15 months (range 3–40). The median (IQR) change in TMV using the empirical Bayes estimates for the individual eyes was −0.103 (−0.145, −0.059) mm3 per year. The mean (±SD) TMV was 6.321±1.000 mm3 at baseline, and rate of decline was −0.118 mm3 per year (p=0.003). Yearly mean volume change was −0.004 mm3 in the central subfield (mean baseline=0.128 mm3), −0.032 mm3 in the inner (mean baseline=1.484 mm3) and −0.079 mm3 in the outer ETDRS subfields (mean baseline=5.206 mm3). Conclusions SD-OCT measurements allow monitoring the decline in retinal volume in STGD1; however, they require significant manual correction of software errors. PMID:26568636

  6. Spectral stochastic estimation of high-Reynolds-number wall-bounded turbulence for a refined inner-outer interaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baars, Woutijn J.; Hutchins, Nicholas; Marusic, Ivan

    2016-11-01

    For wall-bounded flows, the model of Marusic, Mathis and Hutchins (2010) allows one to predict the statistics of the streamwise fluctuating velocity in the inner-region, from a measured input signal in the logarithmic region. Normally, a user-defined portion of the input forms the large-scale content in the prediction. Incoherent smaller scales are then fused to the prediction via universally expressed fluctuations that are subject to an amplitude modulation. Here we present a refined version of the model using spectral linear stochastic estimation, which eliminates a user-defined scale-separation of the input. An empirically-derived transfer kernel comprises an implicit filtering via a scale-dependent gain and phase-this kernel captures the coherent portion in the prediction. An additional refinement of the model embodies a relative shift between the stochastically estimated scales in the prediction and the modulation envelope of the universal small-scales. Predictions over a three-decade span of Reynolds numbers, Reτ O (103) to O (106) , highlight promising applications of the refined model to high-Reynolds-number flows, in which coherent scales become the primary contributor to the fluctuating energy.

  7. Spectral stochastic estimation of high-Reynolds-number wall-bounded turbulence for a refined inner-outer interaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baars, Woutijn J.; Hutchins, Nicholas; Marusic, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    For wall-bounded flows, the model of Marusic et al. [Science 329, 193 (2010), 10.1126/science.1188765] allows one to predict the statistics of the streamwise fluctuating velocity in the inner region, from a measured input signal in the logarithmic region. Normally, a user-defined large-scale portion of the input forms the large-scale content in the prediction by scaling its amplitude, as well as temporally shifting the signal to account for the physical inclination of these scales. Incoherent smaller scales are then fused to the prediction via universally expressed fluctuations that are subject to an amplitude modulation. Here we present a refined version of the model using spectral linear stochastic estimation, which eliminates a user-defined scale separation of the input. Now, an empirically derived transfer kernel comprises an implicit filtering via a scale-dependent gain and phase; this kernel captures the coherent portion in the prediction. An additional refinement of the model embodies a relative shift between the stochastically estimated scales in the prediction and the modulation envelope of the universal small scales. Predictions over a three-decade span of Reynolds numbers, Reτ˜O (103) to O (106) , highlight promising applications of the refined model to high-Reynolds-number flows, in which coherent scales become the primary contributor to the fluctuating energy.

  8. Synergistic angular and spectral estimation of aerosol properties using CHRIS/PROBA-1 and simulated Sentinel-3~data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, W. H.; North, P. R. J.

    2014-06-01

    A method has been developed to estimate Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), Fine Mode Fraction (FMF) and Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) over land surfaces using simulated Sentinel-3 data. The method uses inversion of a coupled surface/atmosphere radiative transfer model, and includes a general physical model of angular surface reflectance. An iterative process is used to determine the optimum value of the aerosol properties providing the best fit of the corrected reflectance values for a number of view angles and wavelengths with those provided by the physical model. A method of estimating AOD using only angular retrieval has previously been demonstrated on data from the ENVISAT and PROBA-1 satellite instruments, and is extended here to the synergistic spectral and angular sampling of Sentinel-3 and the additional aerosol properties. The method is tested using hyperspectral, multi-angle Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (CHRIS) images. The values obtained from these CHRIS observations are validated using ground based sun-photometer measurements. Results from 22 image sets using the synergistic retrieval and improved aerosol models show an RMSE of 0.06 in AOD, reduced to 0.03 over vegetated targets.

  9. Numerical limitations in application of vector autoregressive modeling and Granger causality to analysis of EEG time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammerdiner, Alla; Xanthopoulos, Petros; Pardalos, Panos M.

    2007-11-01

    In this chapter a potential problem with application of the Granger-causality based on the simple vector autoregressive (VAR) modeling to EEG data is investigated. Although some initial studies tested whether the data support the stationarity assumption of VAR, the stability of the estimated model is rarely (if ever) been verified. In fact, in cases when the stability condition is violated the process may exhibit a random walk like behavior or even be explosive. The problem is illustrated by an example.

  10. Chloroplast Avoidance Movement Causes Increasing PAR Reflectance in Water Stressed Plants and May Distort Biophysical Estimates Based On Spectral Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zygielbaum, A. I.; Arkebauer, T. J.; Walter-Shea, E.

    2013-12-01

    Vegetation photoprotective responses impact the reflected spectra in the visible or photosynthetically active (PAR) spectral region. Earlier, we presented a case that the increasing PAR reflectance which accompanies increasing water stress was due to one such response, chloroplast avoidance movement. This increasing reflectance has been reported in published papers for several decades and dismissed as operator error or a result of changes in leaf turgor or optical pathway. We showed, however, that such changes in the PAR region, which occurred with no significant change in chlorophyll content, were caused by decreasing absorption, not changes in light scatter. Further, we demonstrated that the changes in reflectance were correlated with changes in ambient light (downwelling radiance). To further refine the case that chloroplast movement is the basis of these observations, excised leaves were exposed separately to either red light or white light illumination of equal photon flux densities. The transmittance observed as these leaves dried increased in the leaves exposed to white light and remained constant in the leaves exposed to red light. Since chloroplast movement is driven by blue light, our conjecture is strengthened. We have also observed distinct morning vs. afternoon differences in reflectance spectra of greenhouse-grown plants; indices derived from these spectra also vary diurnally--leading us to coin the phase 'apparent chlorophyll'. All observations previously reported were the result of greenhouse experiments. We report herein on observations of leaf and canopy reflectances under field conditions and on the impact the increasing reflectance has on estimation of chlorophyll content using spectral indices. We also present evidence that increasing reflectance which is concomitant with increasing plant stress may not correlate with stress indications using the photochemical reflectance index (PRI) and discuss the implications of that observation.

  11. Use of spectral channels and vegetation indices from satellite VEGETATION time series for the Post-Fire vegetation recovery estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coluzzi, Rosa; Lasaponara, Rosa; Montesano, Tiziana; Lanorte, Antonio; de Santis, Fortunato

    2010-05-01

    Satellite data can help monitoring the dynamics of vegetation in burned and unburned areas. Several methods can be used to perform such kind of analysis. This paper is focused on the use of different satellite-based parameters for fire recovery monitoring. In particular, time series of single spectral channels and vegetation indices from SPOT-VEGETATION have investigated. The test areas is the Mediterranean ecosystems of Southern Italy. For this study we considered: 1) the most widely used index to follow the process of recovery after fire: normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) obtained from the visible (Red) and near infrared (NIR) by using the following formula NDVI = (NIR_Red)/(NIR + Red), 2) moisture index MSI obtained from the near infrared and Mir for characterization of leaf and canopy water content. 3) NDWI obtained from the near infrared and Mir as in the case of MSI, but with the normalization (as the NDVI) to reduce the atmospheric effects. All analysis for this work was performed on ten-daily normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) image composites (S10) from the SPOT- VEGETATION (VGT) sensor. The final data set consisted of 279 ten-daily, 1 km resolution NDVI S1O composites for the period 1 April 1998 to 31 December 2005 with additional surface reflectance values in the blue (B; 0.43-0.47,um), red (R; 0.61-0.68,um), near-infrared (NIR; 0.78-0.89,um) and shortwave-infrared (SWIR; 1.58-1.75,um) spectral bands, and information on the viewing geometry and pixel status. Preprocessing of the data was performed by the Vlaamse Instelling voor Technologisch Onderzoek (VITO) in the framework of the Global Vegetation Monitoring (GLOVEG) preprocessing chain. It consisted of the Simplified Method for Atmospheric Correction (SMAC) and compositing at ten-day intervals based on the Maximum Value Compositing (MVC) criterion. All the satellite time series were analysed using the Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) to estimate post fire vegetation recovery

  12. In situ spectral measurements improve the efficiency of light use efficiency models to estimate gross primary productivity in Mediterranean cork oak woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerasoli, S.; Silva, J. M.; Carvalhais, N.; Correia, A.; Costa e Silva, F.; Pereira, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    The Light Use Efficiency (LUE) concept is usually applied to retrieve Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) estimates in models integrating spectral indexes, namely Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI), considered proxies of biophysical properties of vegetation. The integration of spectral measurements into LUE models can increase the robustness of GPP estimates by optimizing particular parameters of the model. NDVI and PRI are frequently obtained by broad band sensors on remote platforms at low spatial resolution (e.g. MODIS). In highly heterogeneous ecosystems such spectral information may not be representative of the dynamic response of the ecosystem to climate variables. In Mediterranean oak woodlands different plant functional types (PFT): trees canopy, shrubs and herbaceous layer, contribute to the overall Gross Primary Productivity (GPP). In situ spectral measurements can provide useful information on each PFT and its temporal variability. The objectives of this study were: i) to analyze the temporal variability of NDVI, PRI and others spectral indices for the three PFT, their response to climate variables and their relationship with biophysical properties of vegetation; ii) to optimize a LUE model integrating selected spectral indexes in which the contribution of each PFT to the overall GPP is estimated individually; iii) to compare the performance of disaggregated GPP estimates and lumped GPP estimates, evaluated against eddy covariance measurements. Ground measurements of vegetation reflectance were performed in a cork oak woodland located in Coruche, Portugal (39°8'N, 8°19'W) where carbon and water fluxes are continuously measured by eddy covariance. Between April 2011 and June 2013 reflectance measurements of the herbaceous layer, shrubs and trees canopy were acquired with a FieldSpec3 spectroradiometer (ASD Inc.) which provided data in the range of 350-2500nm. Measurements were repeated approximately on

  13. Kepler AutoRegressive Planet Search: Motivation & Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caceres, Gabriel; Feigelson, Eric; Jogesh Babu, G.; Bahamonde, Natalia; Bertin, Karine; Christen, Alejandra; Curé, Michel; Meza, Cristian

    2015-08-01

    The Kepler AutoRegressive Planet Search (KARPS) project uses statistical methodology associated with autoregressive (AR) processes to model Kepler lightcurves in order to improve exoplanet transit detection in systems with high stellar variability. We also introduce a planet-search algorithm to detect transits in time-series residuals after application of the AR models. One of the main obstacles in detecting faint planetary transits is the intrinsic stellar variability of the host star. The variability displayed by many stars may have autoregressive properties, wherein later flux values are correlated with previous ones in some manner. Auto-Regressive Moving-Average (ARMA) models, Generalized Auto-Regressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity (GARCH), and related models are flexible, phenomenological methods used with great success to model stochastic temporal behaviors in many fields of study, particularly econometrics. Powerful statistical methods are implemented in the public statistical software environment R and its many packages. Modeling involves maximum likelihood fitting, model selection, and residual analysis. These techniques provide a useful framework to model stellar variability and are used in KARPS with the objective of reducing stellar noise to enhance opportunities to find as-yet-undiscovered planets. Our analysis procedure consisting of three steps: pre-processing of the data to remove discontinuities, gaps and outliers; ARMA-type model selection and fitting; and transit signal search of the residuals using a new Transit Comb Filter (TCF) that replaces traditional box-finding algorithms. We apply the procedures to simulated Kepler-like time series with known stellar and planetary signals to evaluate the effectiveness of the KARPS procedures. The ARMA-type modeling is effective at reducing stellar noise, but also reduces and transforms the transit signal into ingress/egress spikes. A periodogram based on the TCF is constructed to concentrate the signal

  14. Beyond long memory in heart rate variability: An approach based on fractionally integrated autoregressive moving average time series models with conditional heteroscedasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leite, Argentina; Paula Rocha, Ana; Eduarda Silva, Maria

    2013-06-01

    Heart Rate Variability (HRV) series exhibit long memory and time-varying conditional variance. This work considers the Fractionally Integrated AutoRegressive Moving Average (ARFIMA) models with Generalized AutoRegressive Conditional Heteroscedastic (GARCH) errors. ARFIMA-GARCH models may be used to capture and remove long memory and estimate the conditional volatility in 24 h HRV recordings. The ARFIMA-GARCH approach is applied to fifteen long term HRV series available at Physionet, leading to the discrimination among normal individuals, heart failure patients, and patients with atrial fibrillation.

  15. Effects of water depth and spectral bandwidth on Stokes drift estimation based on short-term variation of wave conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrhaug, Dag; Wang, Hong; Holmedal, Lars Erik

    2016-04-01

    The Stokes drift represents an important transport component of ocean circulation models. Locally it is responsible for transport of e.g. contaminated ballast water from ships, oil spills, plankton and larvae. It also plays an important role in mixing processes across the interphase between the atmosphere and the ocean. The Stokes drift is the mean Lagrangian velocity obtained from the water particle trajectory in the wave propagation direction; it is maximum at the surface, decreasing rapidly with the depth below the surface. The total mean mass transport is obtained by integrating the Stokes drift over the water depth; this is also referred to as the volume Stokes transport. The paper provides a simple analytical method which can be used to give estimates of the Stokes drift in moderate intermediate water depth based on short-term variation of wave conditions. This is achieved by using a joint distribution of individual wave heights and wave periods together with an explicit solution of the wave dispersion equation. The mean values of the surface Stokes drift and the volume Stokes transport for individual random waves within a sea state are presented, and the effects of water depth and spectral bandwidth parameter are discussed. Furthermore, example of results corresponding to typical field conditions are presented to demonstrate the application of the method, including the Stokes drift profile in the water column beneath the surface. Thus, the present analytical method can be used to estimate the Stokes drift in moderate intermediate water depth for random waves within a sea state based on available wave statistics.

  16. Estimation of Signal Coherence Threshold and Concealed Spectral Lines Applied to Detection of Turbofan Engine Combustion Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2010-01-01

    Combustion noise from turbofan engines has become important, as the noise from sources like the fan and jet are reduced. An aligned and un-aligned coherence technique has been developed to determine a threshold level for the coherence and thereby help to separate the coherent combustion noise source from other noise sources measured with far-field microphones. This method is compared with a statistics based coherence threshold estimation method. In addition, the un-aligned coherence procedure at the same time also reveals periodicities, spectral lines, and undamped sinusoids hidden by broadband turbofan engine noise. In calculating the coherence threshold using a statistical method, one may use either the number of independent records or a larger number corresponding to the number of overlapped records used to create the average. Using data from a turbofan engine and a simulation this paper shows that applying the Fisher z-transform to the un-aligned coherence can aid in making the proper selection of samples and produce a reasonable statistics based coherence threshold. Examples are presented showing that the underlying tonal and coherent broad band structure which is buried under random broadband noise and jet noise can be determined. The method also shows the possible presence of indirect combustion noise. Copyright 2011 Acoustical Society of America. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the Acoustical Society of America.

  17. Estimation of signal coherence threshold and concealed spectral lines applied to detection of turbofan engine combustion noise.

    PubMed

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2011-05-01

    Combustion noise from turbofan engines has become important, as the noise from sources like the fan and jet are reduced. An aligned and un-aligned coherence technique has been developed to determine a threshold level for the coherence and thereby help to separate the coherent combustion noise source from other noise sources measured with far-field microphones. This method is compared with a statistics based coherence threshold estimation method. In addition, the un-aligned coherence procedure at the same time also reveals periodicities, spectral lines, and undamped sinusoids hidden by broadband turbofan engine noise. In calculating the coherence threshold using a statistical method, one may use either the number of independent records or a larger number corresponding to the number of overlapped records used to create the average. Using data from a turbofan engine and a simulation this paper shows that applying the Fisher z-transform to the un-aligned coherence can aid in making the proper selection of samples and produce a reasonable statistics based coherence threshold. Examples are presented showing that the underlying tonal and coherent broad band structure which is buried under random broadband noise and jet noise can be determined. The method also shows the possible presence of indirect combustion noise.

  18. A simplified 96-well method for the estimation of phenolic acids and antioxidant activity from eggplant pulp extracts using UV spectral scan data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eggplant fruit is ranked amongst the top ten vegetables in terms of oxygen radical absorbance capacity due to its high phenolic acid content. The main objective of this study was to determine if a simple UV spectral analysis method can be used as a screening tool to estimate the amount of phenolic ...

  19. A study of the spectral broadening of simulated Doppler signals using FFT and AR modelling.

    PubMed

    Keeton, P I; Schlindwein, F S; Evans, D H

    1997-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound is used clinically to detect stenosis in the carotid artery. The presence of stenosis may be identified by disturbed flow patterns distal to the stenosis that cause spectral broadening in the spectrum of the Doppler signal around peak systole. This paper investigates the behaviour of the spectral broadening index (SBI) derived from wide-band spectra obtained using autoregressive modelling (AR), compared with the SBI based on the fast-Fourier transform (FFT) spectra. Simulated Doppler signals were created using white noise and shaped filters to analyse spectra typically found around the systolic peak and to assess the magnitude and variance of AR and FFT-SBI for a range of signal-to-noise ratios. The results of the analysis show a strong correlation between the indices calculated using the FFT and AR algorithms. Despite the qualitative improvement of the AR spectra over the FFT, the estimation of SBI for short data frames is not significantly improved using AR.

  20. The impact of missing data in a generalized integer-valued autoregression model for count data.

    PubMed

    Alosh, Mohamed

    2009-11-01

    The impact of the missing data mechanism on estimates of model parameters for continuous data has been extensively investigated in the literature. In comparison, minimal research has been carried out for the impact of missing count data. The focus of this article is to investigate the impact of missing data on a transition model, termed the generalized autoregressive model of order 1 for longitudinal count data. The model has several features, including modeling dependence and accounting for overdispersion in the data, that make it appealing for the clinical trial setting. Furthermore, the model can be viewed as a natural extension of the commonly used log-linear model. Following introduction of the model and discussion of its estimation we investigate the impact of different missing data mechanisms on estimates of the model parameters through a simulation experiment. The findings of the simulation experiment show that, as in the case of normally distributed data, estimates under the missing completely at random (MCAR) and missing at random (MAR) mechanisms are close to their analogue for the full dataset and that the missing not at random (MNAR) mechanism has the greatest bias. Furthermore, estimates based on imputing the last observed value carried forward (LOCF) for missing data under the MAR assumption are similar to those of the MAR. This latter finding might be attributed to the Markov property underlying the model and to the high level of dependence among successive observations used in the simulation experiment. Finally, we consider an application of the generalized autoregressive model to a longitudinal epilepsy dataset analyzed in the literature.

  1. Estimation of basis line-integrals in a spectral distortion-modeled photon counting detector using low-order polynomial approximation of x-ray transmittance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Okkyun; Kappler, Steffen; Polster, Christoph; Taguchi, Katsuyuki

    2016-10-26

    Photon counting detector (PCD)-based computed tomography exploits spectral information from a transmitted x-ray spectrum to estimate basis line-integrals. The recorded spectrum, however, is distorted and deviates from the transmitted spectrum due to spectral response effect (SRE). Therefore, the SRE needs to be compensated for when estimating basis lineintegrals. One approach is to incorporate the SRE model with an incident spectrum into the PCD measurement model and the other approach is to perform a calibration process that inherently includes both the SRE and the incident spectrum. A maximum likelihood estimator can be used to the former approach, which guarantees asymptotic optimality; however, a heavy computational burden is a concern. Calibration-based estimators are a form of the latter approach. They can be very efficient; however, a heuristic calibration process needs to be addressed. In this paper, we propose a computationally efficient three-step estimator for the former approach using a low-order polynomial approximation of x-ray transmittance. The low-order polynomial approximation can change the original non-linear estimation method to a two-step linearized approach followed by an iterative bias correction step. We show that the calibration process is required only for the bias correction step and prove that it converges to the unbiased solution under practical assumptions. Extensive simulation studies validate the proposed method and show that the estimation results are comparable to those of the ML estimator while the computational time is reduced substantially.

  2. An extended multivariate autoregressive framework for EEG-based information flow analysis of a brain network.

    PubMed

    Hettiarachchi, Imali T; Mohamed, Shady; Nyhof, Luke; Nahavandi, Saeid

    2013-01-01

    Recently effective connectivity studies have gained significant attention among the neuroscience community as Electroencephalography (EEG) data with a high time resolution can give us a wider understanding of the information flow within the brain. Among other tools used in effective connectivity analysis Granger Causality (GC) has found a prominent place. The GC analysis, based on strictly causal multivariate autoregressive (MVAR) models does not account for the instantaneous interactions among the sources. If instantaneous interactions are present, GC based on strictly causal MVAR will lead to erroneous conclusions on the underlying information flow. Thus, the work presented in this paper applies an extended MVAR (eMVAR) model that accounts for the zero lag interactions. We propose a constrained adaptive Kalman filter (CAKF) approach for the eMVAR model identification and demonstrate that this approach performs better than the short time windowing-based adaptive estimation when applied to information flow analysis.

  3. Statistical comparison of methods for estimating sediment thickness from Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) seismic methods: An example from Tylerville, Connecticut, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Carole D.; Lane, John

    2016-01-01

    Determining sediment thickness and delineating bedrock topography are important for assessing groundwater availability and characterizing contamination sites. In recent years, the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) seismic method has emerged as a non-invasive, cost-effective approach for estimating the thickness of unconsolidated sediments above bedrock. Using a three-component seismometer, this method uses the ratio of the average horizontal- and vertical-component amplitude spectrums to produce a spectral ratio curve with a peak at the fundamental resonance frequency. The HVSR method produces clear and repeatable resonance frequency peaks when there is a sharp contrast (>2:1) in acoustic impedance at the sediment/bedrock boundary. Given the resonant frequency, sediment thickness can be determined either by (1) using an estimate of average local sediment shear-wave velocity or by (2) application of a power-law regression equation developed from resonance frequency observations at sites with a range of known depths to bedrock. Two frequently asked questions about the HVSR method are (1) how accurate are the sediment thickness estimates? and (2) how much do sediment thickness/bedrock depth estimates change when using different published regression equations? This paper compares and contrasts different approaches for generating HVSR depth estimates, through analysis of HVSR data acquired in the vicinity of Tylerville, Connecticut, USA.

  4. Spectral analysis of the Chandler wobble: comparison of the discrete Fourier analysis and the maximum entropy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzezinski, A.

    2014-12-01

    The methods of spectral analysis are applied to solve the following two problems concerning the free Chandler wobble (CW): 1) to estimate the CW resonance parameters, the period T and the quality factor Q, and 2) to perform the excitation balance of the observed free wobble. It appears, however, that the results depend on the algorithm of spectral analysis applied. Here we compare the following two algorithms which are frequently applied for analysis of the polar motion data, the classical discrete Fourier analysis and the maximum entropy method corresponding to the autoregressive modeling of the input time series. We start from general description of both methods and of their application to the analysis of the Earth orientation observations. Then we compare results of the analysis of the polar motion and the related excitation data.

  5. Computational problems in autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, G. C.; Goodarzi, S. M.; Oneill, W. D.; Gottlieb, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    The choice of the sampling interval and the selection of the order of the model in time series analysis are considered. Band limited (up to 15 Hz) random torque perturbations are applied to the human ankle joint. The applied torque input, the angular rotation output, and the electromyographic activity using surface electrodes from the extensor and flexor muscles of the ankle joint are recorded. Autoregressive moving average models are developed. A parameter constraining technique is applied to develop more reliable models. The asymptotic behavior of the system must be taken into account during parameter optimization to develop predictive models.

  6. Quantitative measurement of speech sound distortions with the aid of minimum variance spectral estimation method for dentistry use.

    PubMed

    Bereteu, L; Drăgănescu, G E; Stănescu, D; Sinescu, C

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we search an adequate quantitative method based on minimum variance spectral analysis in order to reflect the dependence of the speech quality on the correct positioning of the dental prostheses. We also search some quantitative parameters, which reflect the correct position of dental prostheses in a sensitive manner.

  7. Utilizing the ratio and the summation of two spectral lines for estimation of optical depth: Focus on thick plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, Fatemeh; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a study is performed on the spectral lines of plasma radiations created from focusing of the Nd:YAG laser on Al standard alloys at atmospheric air pressure. A new theoretical method is presented to investigate the evolution of the optical depth of the plasma based on the radiative transfer equation, in LTE condition. This work relies on the Boltzmann distribution, lines broadening equations, and as well as the self-absorption relation. Then, an experimental set-up is devised to extract some of plasma parameters such as temperature from modified line ratio analysis, electron density from Stark broadening mechanism, line intensities of two spectral lines in the same order of ionization from similar species, and the plasma length from the shadowgraphy section. In this method, the summation and the ratio of two spectral lines are considered for evaluation of the temporal variations of the plasma parameters in a LIBS homogeneous plasma. The main advantage of this method is that it comprises the both of thin and thick laser induced plasmas without straight calculation of self-absorption coefficient. Moreover, the presented model can also be utilized for evaluation the transition of plasma from the thin condition to the thick one. The results illustrated that by measuring the line intensities of two spectral lines at different evolution times, the plasma cooling and the growth of the optical depth can be followed.

  8. Application of maximum likelihood estimator in nano-scale optical path length measurement using spectral-domain optical coherence phase microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Motaghian Nezam, S. M. R.; Joo, C; Tearney, G. J.; de Boer, J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Spectral-domain optical coherence phase microscopy (SD-OCPM) measures minute phase changes in transparent biological specimens using a common path interferometer and a spectrometer based optical coherence tomography system. The Fourier transform of the acquired interference spectrum in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is complex and the phase is affected by contributions from inherent random noise. To reduce this phase noise, knowledge of the probability density function (PDF) of data becomes essential. In the present work, the intensity and phase PDFs of the complex interference signal are theoretically derived and the optical path length (OPL) PDF is experimentally validated. The full knowledge of the PDFs is exploited for optimal estimation (Maximum Likelihood estimation) of the intensity, phase, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in SD-OCPM. Maximum likelihood (ML) estimates of the intensity, SNR, and OPL images are presented for two different scan modes using Bovine Pulmonary Artery Endothelial (BPAE) cells. To investigate the phase accuracy of SD-OCPM, we experimentally calculate and compare the cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) of the OPL standard deviation and the square root of the Cramér-Rao lower bound (1/2SNR) over 100 BPAE images for two different scan modes. The correction to the OPL measurement by applying ML estimation to SD-OCPM for BPAE cells is demonstrated. PMID:18957999

  9. A Case Study of the Performance of Different Detrending Methods in Turbulent-Flux Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donateo, Antonio; Cava, Daniela; Contini, Daniele

    2017-02-01

    The performance of different detrending methods in removing the low-frequency contribution to the calculation of turbulent fluxes is investigated. The detrending methods are applied to the calculation of turbulent fluxes of different scalars (temperature, ultrafine particle number concentration, carbon dioxide and water vapour concentration), collected at two different measurement sites: one urban and one suburban. We test and compare the performance of filtering methodologies frequently used in real-time and automated procedures (mean removal, linear detrending, running mean, autoregressive filter) with the results obtained from a reference method, which is a spectral filter based on the Fourier decomposition of the time series. In general, the largest differences are found in the comparison between the reference and the mean-removal procedures. The linear detrending and running-mean procedures produce comparable results, and turbulent-flux estimations in better agreement with the reference procedure than those obtained with the mean-removal procedure. The best agreement between the running mean and the spectral filter is achieved with a time window of 15 min at both sites. For all the variables studied, average fluxes calculated using the autoregressive filter are increasingly overestimated for a time constant τ compared with that obtained using the spectral filter. The minimization of the difference between the two detrending methods is achieved with a time constant of 120 s, with similar behaviour observed at both sites.

  10. Surgical workflow analysis with Gaussian mixture multivariate autoregressive (GMMAR) models: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Loukas, Constantinos; Georgiou, Evangelos

    2013-01-01

    There is currently great interest in analyzing the workflow of minimally invasive operations performed in a physical or simulation setting, with the aim of extracting important information that can be used for skills improvement, optimization of intraoperative processes, and comparison of different interventional strategies. The first step in achieving this goal is to segment the operation into its key interventional phases, which is currently approached by modeling a multivariate signal that describes the temporal usage of a predefined set of tools. Although this technique has shown promising results, it is challenged by the manual extraction of the tool usage sequence and the inability to simultaneously evaluate the surgeon's skills. In this paper we describe an alternative methodology for surgical phase segmentation and performance analysis based on Gaussian mixture multivariate autoregressive (GMMAR) models of the hand kinematics. Unlike previous work in this area, our technique employs signals from orientation sensors, attached to the endoscopic instruments of a virtual reality simulator, without considering which tools are employed at each time-step of the operation. First, based on pre-segmented hand motion signals, a training set of regression coefficients is created for each surgical phase using multivariate autoregressive (MAR) models. Then, a signal from a new operation is processed with GMMAR, wherein each phase is modeled by a Gaussian component of regression coefficients. These coefficients are compared to those of the training set. The operation is segmented according to the prior probabilities of the surgical phases estimated via GMMAR. The method also allows for the study of motor behavior and hand motion synchronization demonstrated in each phase, a quality that can be incorporated into modern laparoscopic simulators for skills assessment.

  11. Mass estimation of MAXI J1659-152 during spectral and temporal analsyis with TCAF and POS models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molla, Aslam Ali; Debnath, Dipak; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Mondal, Santanu; Jana, Arghajit; Chatterjee, Debjit

    2016-07-01

    The Galactic transient black hole candidate (BHC) MAXI J1659-152 showed its first X-ray outburst on 25th Spet. 2010. We make a detailed spectral and temporal study of this outburst with RXTE/PCA data. The spectral analysis was made with Two Component Advective Flow (TCAF) model fits file as an additive table model in XSPEC. While fitting spectra with TCAF, we note that model fitted normalization (N) remains almost constant (129.7 - 146.3) which lead us to calculate mass of the black hole (BH). We then refitted all the spectra with fixed normalization value of 139 (calculated from weighted averaging of the N values), and found that mass of the BH comes in the range of 4.69-7.75 M_Sun. It is to be noted that in TCAF model fits file, mass is an input parameter. We also calculted mass of the BH, with our study of the QPO frequency evolution during declining phase of the outburst with the Propagating Oscillatory Shock (POS) model. We observe that in the declining phase of the outburst the shock moves away from the black hole as the QPO frequency decreases. We obtain our best fit of QPO evolution by using mass of the BH at 6 M_Sun and acceptable fit (reduced chisq value < 1.5) for the mass range of 5.08-7.38 M_Sun, which lie within the range of mass obtained from our spectral fit. So, from the study of spectral and temporal variability of this source we conclude the probable mass range of the black hole to be 4.69 - 7.75 M_Sun.

  12. Rocket experiments for spectral estimation of electron density fine structure in the auroral and equatorial ionosphere and preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomei, B. A.; Smith, L. G.

    1986-01-01

    Sounding rockets equipped to monitor electron density and its fine structure were launched into the auroral and equatorial ionosphere in 1980 and 1983, respectively. The measurement electronics are based on the Langmuir probe and are described in detail. An approach to the spectral analysis of the density irregularities is addressed and a software algorithm implementing the approach is given. Preliminary results of the analysis are presented.

  13. Spectral vegetation indices for estimating shrub cover, green phytomass and leaf turnover in a sedge-shrub tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushida, K.; Kim, Y.; Tsuyuzaki, S.; Fukuda, M.

    2008-12-01

    Using field observations, we determined the relationships between spectral indices and the shrub ratio, green phytomass and leaf turnover of a sedge-shrub tundra community in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, USA. We established a 50-m ~ 50-m plot (69.73°N 143.62°W) located on a floodplain of the refuge. The willow shrub (Salix lanata) and sedge (Carex bigelowii) dominated the plot vegetation. In July to August 2007, we established ten 0.5-m ~ 0.5-m quadrats on both shrub- covered ground (shrub quadrats) and on ground with no shrubs (sedge quadrats). All the shrubs within the shrub quadrats were harvested, and the photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic parts were weighed. Subsequently, the remaining green phytomass was also harvested and weighed. The shrub quadrats were measured spectrally before and after harvesting the shrubs. The sedge quadrats were also measured spectrally. The shrub ratio was more strongly correlated with the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI, R2 of 0.57) than the normalized difference infrared index (NDII), the soil-adjusted vegetation index (SAVI) or the enhanced vegetation index (EVI). On the other hand, for both green phytomass and leaf turnover, the strongest correlation was with NDII (R2 of 0.63 and 0.79, respectively).

  14. Maximum-likelihood spectral estimation and adaptive filtering techniques with application to airborne Doppler weather radar. Thesis Technical Report No. 20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Jonathan Y.

    1994-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the signal processing problems associated with the detection of hazardous windshears using airborne Doppler radar when weak weather returns are in the presence of strong clutter returns. In light of the frequent inadequacy of spectral-processing oriented clutter suppression methods, we model a clutter signal as multiple sinusoids plus Gaussian noise, and propose adaptive filtering approaches that better capture the temporal characteristics of the signal process. This idea leads to two research topics in signal processing: (1) signal modeling and parameter estimation, and (2) adaptive filtering in this particular signal environment. A high-resolution, low SNR threshold maximum likelihood (ML) frequency estimation and signal modeling algorithm is devised and proves capable of delineating both the spectral and temporal nature of the clutter return. Furthermore, the Least Mean Square (LMS) -based adaptive filter's performance for the proposed signal model is investigated, and promising simulation results have testified to its potential for clutter rejection leading to more accurate estimation of windspeed thus obtaining a better assessment of the windshear hazard.

  15. Spectral Modulation Effect in Teleseismic P-waves from North Korean Nuclear Tests Recorded in Broad Azimuthal Range and Possible Source Depth Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitterman, Y.; Kim, S. G.; Hofstetter, R.

    2016-04-01

    Three underground nuclear explosions, conducted by North Korea in 2006, 2009 and 2013, are analyzed. The last two tests were recorded by the Israel Seismic Network. Pronounced coherent minima (spectral nulls) at 1.2-1.3 Hz were revealed in the spectra of teleseismic P -waves. For a ground-truth explosion with a shallow source depth, this phenomenon can be interpreted in terms of the interference between the down-going P-wave and the pP phase reflected from the Earth's surface. This effect was also observed at ISN stations for a Pakistan nuclear explosion at a different frequency 1.7 Hz and the PNE Rubin-2 in West Siberia at 1 Hz, indicating a source-effect and not a site-effect. Similar spectral minima having essentially the same frequency, as at ISN, were observed in teleseismic P-waves for all the three North Korean explosions recorded at networks and arrays in Kazakhstan (KURK), Norway (NNSN), Australia (ASAR, WRA) and Canada (YKA), covering a broad azimuthal range. Data of 2009 and 2013 tests at WRA and KURK arrays showed harmonic spectral modulation with three multiple minima frequencies, evidencing the clear interference effect. These observations support the above-mentioned interpretation. Based on the null frequency dependency on the near-surface acoustic velocity and the source depth, the depth of the North Korean tests was estimated about 2.0-2.1 km. It was shown that the observed null frequencies and the obtained source depth estimates correspond to P- pP interference phenomena in both cases of a vertical shaft or a horizontal drift in a mountain. This unusual depth estimation needs additional validation based on more stations and verification by other methods.

  16. Remembrance of phases past: An autoregressive method for generating realistic atmospheres in simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinath, Srikar; Poyneer, Lisa A.; Rudy, Alexander R.; Ammons, S. M.

    2014-08-01

    The advent of expensive, large-aperture telescopes and complex adaptive optics (AO) systems has strengthened the need for detailed simulation of such systems from the top of the atmosphere to control algorithms. The credibility of any simulation is underpinned by the quality of the atmosphere model used for introducing phase variations into the incident photons. Hitherto, simulations which incorporate wind layers have relied upon phase screen generation methods that tax the computation and memory capacities of the platforms on which they run. This places limits on parameters of a simulation, such as exposure time or resolution, thus compromising its utility. As aperture sizes and fields of view increase the problem will only get worse. We present an autoregressive method for evolving atmospheric phase that is efficient in its use of computation resources and allows for variability in the power contained in frozen flow or stochastic components of the atmosphere. Users have the flexibility of generating atmosphere datacubes in advance of runs where memory constraints allow to save on computation time or of computing the phase at each time step for long exposure times. Preliminary tests of model atmospheres generated using this method show power spectral density and rms phase in accordance with established metrics for Kolmogorov models.

  17. EEG source localization based on multivariate autoregressive models using Kalman filtering.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Buriticá, J I; Giraldo, E; Castellanos-Domínguez, G

    2011-01-01

    The estimation of current distributions from electroencephalographic recordings poses an inverse problem, which can approximately be solved by including dynamical models as spatio-temporal constraints onto the solution. In this paper, we consider the electrocardiography source localization task, where a specific structure for the dynamical model of current distribution is directly obtained from the data by fitting multivariate autoregressive models to electroencephalographic time series. Whereas previous approaches consider an approximation of the internal connectivity of the sources, the proposed methodology takes into account a realistic structure of the model estimated from the data, such that it becomes possible to obtain improved inverse solutions. The performance of the new method is demonstrated by application to simulated electroencephalographic data over several signal to noise ratios, where the source localization task is evaluated by using the localization error and the data fit error. Finally, it is shown that estimating MVAR models makes possible to obtain inverse solutions of considerably improved quality, as compared to the usual instantaneous inverse solutions, even if the regularized inverse of Tikhonov is used.

  18. Kalman-based autoregressive moving average modeling and inference for formant and antiformant tracking.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Daryush D; Rudoy, Daniel; Wolfe, Patrick J

    2012-09-01

    Vocal tract resonance characteristics in acoustic speech signals are classically tracked using frame-by-frame point estimates of formant frequencies followed by candidate selection and smoothing using dynamic programming methods that minimize ad hoc cost functions. The goal of the current work is to provide both point estimates and associated uncertainties of center frequencies and bandwidths in a statistically principled state-space framework. Extended Kalman (K) algorithms take advantage of a linearized mapping to infer formant and antiformant parameters from frame-based estimates of autoregressive moving average (ARMA) cepstral coefficients. Error analysis of KARMA, wavesurfer, and praat is accomplished in the all-pole case using a manually marked formant database and synthesized speech waveforms. KARMA formant tracks exhibit lower overall root-mean-square error relative to the two benchmark algorithms with the ability to modify parameters in a controlled manner to trade off bias and variance. Antiformant tracking performance of KARMA is illustrated using synthesized and spoken nasal phonemes. The simultaneous tracking of uncertainty levels enables practitioners to recognize time-varying confidence in parameters of interest and adjust algorithmic settings accordingly.

  19. Multichannel adaptive signal detection in space-time colored compound-gaussian autoregressive processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qi; Ma, Xiaochuan; Yan, Shefeng; Hao, Chengpeng; Shi, Bo

    2012-12-01

    In this article, we consider the problem of adaptive detection for a multichannel signal in the presence of spatially and temporally colored compound-Gaussian disturbance. By modeling the disturbance as a multichannel autoregressive (AR) process, we first derive a parametric generalized likelihood ratio test against compound-Gaussian disturbance (CG-PGLRT) assuming that the true multichannel AR parameters are perfectly known. For the two-step GLRT design criterion, we combine the multichannel AR parameter estimation algorithm with three covariance matrix estimation strategies for compound-Gaussian environment, then obtain three adaptive CG-PGLRT detectors by replacing the ideal multichannel AR parameters with their estimates. Owing to treating the random texture components of disturbance as deterministic unknown parameters, all of the proposed detectors require no a priori knowledge about the disturbance statistics. The performance assessments are conducted by means of Monte Carlo trials. We focus on the issues of constant false alarm rate (CFAR) behavior, detection and false alarm probabilities. Numerical results show that the proposed adaptive CG-PGLRT detectors have dramatically ease the training and computational burden compared to the generalized likelihood ratio test-linear quadratic (GLRT-LQ) which is referred to as covariance matrix based detector and relies more heavily on training.

  20. Autoregressive modelling for rolling element bearing fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Bugharbee, H.; Trendafilova, I.

    2015-07-01

    In this study, time series analysis and pattern recognition analysis are used effectively for the purposes of rolling bearing fault diagnosis. The main part of the suggested methodology is the autoregressive (AR) modelling of the measured vibration signals. This study suggests the use of a linear AR model applied to the signals after they are stationarized. The obtained coefficients of the AR model are further used to form pattern vectors which are in turn subjected to pattern recognition for differentiating among different faults and different fault sizes. This study explores the behavior of the AR coefficients and their changes with the introduction and the growth of different faults. The idea is to gain more understanding about the process of AR modelling for roller element bearing signatures and the relation of the coefficients to the vibratory behavior of the bearings and their condition.

  1. Statistics enhancement in hyperspectral data analysis using spectral-spatial labeling, the EM algorithm, and the leave-one-out covariance estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Pi-Fuei; Landgrebe, David A.

    1998-10-01

    Hyperspectral data potentially contain more information than multispectral data because of higher dimensionality. Information extraction algorithm performance is strongly related to the quantitative precision with which the desired classes are defined, a characteristic which increase rapidly with dimensionality. Due to the limited number of training samples used in defining classes, the information extraction of hyperspectral data may not perform as well as needed. In this paper, schemes for statistics enhancement are investigated for alleviating this problem. Previous works including the EM algorithm and the Leave-One-Out covariance estimator are discussed. The HALF covariance estimator is proposed for two-class problems by using the symmetry property of the normal distribution. A spectral-spatial labeling scheme is proposed to increase the training sample sizes automatically. We also seek to combine previous works with the proposed methods so as to take full advantage of statistics enhancement. Using these techniques, improvement in classification accuracy has been observed.

  2. Estimation of Mass of Compact Object in H 1743-322 from 2010 and 2011 Outbursts using TCAF Solution and Spectral Index–QPO Frequency Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molla, Aslam Ali; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Debnath, Dipak; Mondal, Santanu

    2017-01-01

    The well-known black hole candidate (BHC) H 1743-322 exhibited temporal and spectral variabilities during several outbursts. The variation of the accretion rates and flow geometry that change on a daily basis during each of the outbursts can be very well understood using the recent implementation of the two-component advective flow solution of the viscous transonic flow equations as an additive table model in XSPEC. This has dramatically improved our understanding of accretion flow dynamics. Most interestingly, the solution allows us to treat the mass of the BHC as a free parameter and its mass could be estimated from spectral fits. In this paper, we fitted the data of two successive outbursts of H 1743-322 in 2010 and 2011 and studied the evolution of accretion flow parameters, such as two-component (Keplerian and sub-Keplerian) accretion rates, shock location (i.e., size of the Compton cloud), etc. We assume that the model normalization remains the same across the states in both these outbursts. We used this to estimate the mass of the black hole and found that it comes out in the range of 9.25{--}12.86 {M}ȯ . For the sake of comparison, we also estimated mass using the Photon index versus Quasi Periodic Oscillation frequency correlation method, which turns out to be 11.65+/- 0.67 {M}ȯ using GRO J1655-40 as a reference source. Combining these two estimates, the most probable mass of the compact object becomes {11.21}-1.96+1.65 {M}ȯ .

  3. How Well Can We Estimate Areal-Averaged Spectral Surface Albedo from Ground-Based Transmission in an Atlantic Coastal Area?

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Riihimaki, Laura D.; Marinovici, Maria C.

    2015-10-15

    Areal-averaged albedos are particularly difficult to measure in coastal regions, because the surface is not homogenous, consisting of a sharp demarcation between land and water. With this difficulty in mind, we evaluate a simple retrieval of areal-averaged surface albedo using ground-based measurements of atmospheric transmission alone under fully overcast conditions. To illustrate the performance of our retrieval, we find the areal-averaged albedo using measurements from the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) at five wavelengths (415, 500, 615, 673, and 870 nm). These MFRSR data are collected at a coastal site in Graciosa Island, Azores supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The areal-averaged albedos obtained from the MFRSR are compared with collocated and coincident Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) white-sky albedo at four nominal wavelengths (470, 560, 670 and 860 nm). These comparisons are made during a 19-month period (June 2009 - December 2010). We also calculate composite-based spectral values of surface albedo by a weighted-average approach using estimated fractions of major surface types observed in an area surrounding this coastal site. Taken as a whole, these three methods of finding albedo show spectral and temporal similarities, and suggest that our simple, transmission-based technique holds promise, but with estimated errors of about ±0.03. Additional work is needed to reduce this uncertainty in areas with inhomogeneous surfaces.

  4. Comparing Broad-Band and Red Edge-Based Spectral Vegetation Indices to Estimate Nitrogen Concentration of Crops Using Casi Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanjie; Liao, Qinhong; Yang, Guijun; Feng, Haikuan; Yang, Xiaodong; Yue, Jibo

    2016-06-01

    In recent decades, many spectral vegetation indices (SVIs) have been proposed to estimate the leaf nitrogen concentration (LNC) of crops. However, most of these indices were based on the field hyperspectral reflectance. To test whether they can be used in aerial remote platform effectively, in this work a comparison of the sensitivity between several broad-band and red edge-based SVIs to LNC is investigated over different crop types. By using data from experimental LNC values over 4 different crop types and image data acquired using the Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI) sensor, the extensive dataset allowed us to evaluate broad-band and red edge-based SVIs. The result indicated that NDVI performed the best among the selected SVIs while red edge-based SVIs didn't show the potential for estimating the LNC based on the CASI data due to the spectral resolution. In order to search for the optimal SVIs, the band combination algorithm has been used in this work. The best linear correlation against the experimental LNC dataset was obtained by combining the 626.20nm and 569.00nm wavebands. These wavelengths correspond to the maximal chlorophyll absorption and reflection position region, respectively, and are known to be sensitive to the physiological status of the plant. Then this linear relationship was applied to the CASI image for generating an LNC map, which can guide farmers in the accurate application of their N fertilization strategies.

  5. How well can we estimate areal-averaged spectral surface albedo from ground-based transmission in the Atlantic coastal area?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, Evgueni; Barnard, James; Flynn, Connor; Riihimaki, Laura; Marinovici, Cristina

    2015-10-01

    Areal-averaged albedos are particularly difficult to measure in coastal regions, because the surface is not homogenous, consisting of a sharp demarcation between land and water. With this difficulty in mind, we evaluate a simple retrieval of areal-averaged surface albedo using ground-based measurements of atmospheric transmission alone under fully overcast conditions. To illustrate the performance of our retrieval, we find the areal-averaged albedo using measurements from the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) at five wavelengths (415, 500, 615, 673, and 870 nm). These MFRSR data are collected at a coastal site in Graciosa Island, Azores supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The areal-averaged albedos obtained from the MFRSR are compared with collocated and coincident Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) whitesky albedo at four nominal wavelengths (470, 560, 670 and 860 nm). These comparisons are made during a 19-month period (June 2009 - December 2010). We also calculate composite-based spectral values of surface albedo by a weighted-average approach using estimated fractions of major surface types observed in an area surrounding this coastal site. Taken as a whole, these three methods of finding albedo show spectral and temporal similarities, and suggest that our simple, transmission-based technique holds promise, but with estimated errors of about ±0.03. Additional work is needed to reduce this uncertainty in areas with inhomogeneous surfaces.

  6. Estimating wetland vegetation abundance from Landsat-8 operational land imager imagery: a comparison between linear spectral mixture analysis and multinomial logit modeling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Gong, Zhaoning; Zhao, Wenji; Pu, Ruiliang; Liu, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Mapping vegetation abundance by using remote sensing data is an efficient means for detecting changes of an eco-environment. With Landsat-8 operational land imager (OLI) imagery acquired on July 31, 2013, both linear spectral mixture analysis (LSMA) and multinomial logit model (MNLM) methods were applied to estimate and assess the vegetation abundance in the Wild Duck Lake Wetland in Beijing, China. To improve mapping vegetation abundance and increase the number of endmembers in spectral mixture analysis, normalized difference vegetation index was extracted from OLI imagery along with the seven reflective bands of OLI data for estimating the vegetation abundance. Five endmembers were selected, which include terrestrial plants, aquatic plants, bare soil, high albedo, and low albedo. The vegetation abundance mapping results from Landsat OLI data were finally evaluated by utilizing a WorldView-2 multispectral imagery. Similar spatial patterns of vegetation abundance produced by both fully constrained LSMA algorithm and MNLM methods were observed: higher vegetation abundance levels were distributed in agricultural and riparian areas while lower levels in urban/built-up areas. The experimental results also indicate that the MNLM model outperformed the LSMA algorithm with smaller root mean square error (0.0152 versus 0.0252) and higher coefficient of determination (0.7856 versus 0.7214) as the MNLM model could handle the nonlinear reflection phenomenon better than the LSMA with mixed pixels.

  7. Estimating Expressed Temperature and Fractional Area of Hot Lava at the Kilauea Vent with AVIRIS Spectral Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.

    2001-01-01

    Imaging spectroscopy offers a framework based in physics and chemistry for scientific investigation of a wide range of phenomena of interest in the Earth environment. In the scientific discipline of volcanology knowledge of lava temperature and distribution at the surface provides insight into the volcano status and subsurface processes. A remote sensing strategy to measure surface lava temperatures and distribution would support volcanology research. Hot targets such as molten lava emit spectral radiance as a function of temperature. A figure shows a series of Planck functions calculated radiance spectra for hot targets at different temperatures. A maximum Lambertian solar reflected radiance spectrum is shown as well. While similar in form, each hot target spectrum has a unique spectral shape and is distinct from the solar reflected radiance spectrum. Based on this temperature-dependent signature, imaging spectroscopy provides an innovative approach for the remote-sensing-based measurement of lava temperature. A natural site for investigation of the measurement of lava temperature is the Big Island of Hawaii where molten lava from the Kilauea vent is present at the surface. In the past, Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data sets have been used for the analysis of hot volcanic targets and hot burning fires. The research presented here builds upon and extends this earlier work. The year 2000 Hawaii AVIRIS data set has been analyzed to derive lava temperatures taking into account factors of fractional fill, solar reflected radiance, and atmospheric attenuation of the surface emitted radiance. The measurements, analyses, and current results for this research are presented here.

  8. Characteristics of the transmission of autoregressive sub-patterns in financial time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiangyun; An, Haizhong; Fang, Wei; Huang, Xuan; Li, Huajiao; Zhong, Weiqiong

    2014-09-01

    There are many types of autoregressive patterns in financial time series, and they form a transmission process. Here, we define autoregressive patterns quantitatively through an econometrical regression model. We present a computational algorithm that sets the autoregressive patterns as nodes and transmissions between patterns as edges, and then converts the transmission process of autoregressive patterns in a time series into a network. We utilised daily Shanghai (securities) composite index time series to study the transmission characteristics of autoregressive patterns. We found statistically significant evidence that the financial market is not random and that there are similar characteristics between parts and whole time series. A few types of autoregressive sub-patterns and transmission patterns drive the oscillations of the financial market. A clustering effect on fluctuations appears in the transmission process, and certain non-major autoregressive sub-patterns have high media capabilities in the financial time series. Different stock indexes exhibit similar characteristics in the transmission of fluctuation information. This work not only proposes a distinctive perspective for analysing financial time series but also provides important information for investors.

  9. Characteristics of the transmission of autoregressive sub-patterns in financial time series.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiangyun; An, Haizhong; Fang, Wei; Huang, Xuan; Li, Huajiao; Zhong, Weiqiong

    2014-09-05

    There are many types of autoregressive patterns in financial time series, and they form a transmission process. Here, we define autoregressive patterns quantitatively through an econometrical regression model. We present a computational algorithm that sets the autoregressive patterns as nodes and transmissions between patterns as edges, and then converts the transmission process of autoregressive patterns in a time series into a network. We utilised daily Shanghai (securities) composite index time series to study the transmission characteristics of autoregressive patterns. We found statistically significant evidence that the financial market is not random and that there are similar characteristics between parts and whole time series. A few types of autoregressive sub-patterns and transmission patterns drive the oscillations of the financial market. A clustering effect on fluctuations appears in the transmission process, and certain non-major autoregressive sub-patterns have high media capabilities in the financial time series. Different stock indexes exhibit similar characteristics in the transmission of fluctuation information. This work not only proposes a distinctive perspective for analysing financial time series but also provides important information for investors.

  10. The pulse-pair algorithm as a robust estimator of turbulent weather spectral parameters using airborne pulse Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxa, Ernest G., Jr.; Lee, Jonggil

    1991-01-01

    The pulse pair method for spectrum parameter estimation is commonly used in pulse Doppler weather radar signal processing since it is economical to implement and can be shown to be a maximum likelihood estimator. With the use of airborne weather radar for windshear detection, the turbulent weather and strong ground clutter return spectrum differs from that assumed in its derivation, so the performance robustness of the pulse pair technique must be understood. Here, the effect of radar system pulse to pulse phase jitter and signal spectrum skew on the pulse pair algorithm performance is discussed. Phase jitter effect may be significant when the weather return signal to clutter ratio is very low and clutter rejection filtering is attempted. The analysis can be used to develop design specifications for airborne radar system phase stability. It is also shown that the weather return spectrum skew can cause a significant bias in the pulse pair mean windspeed estimates, and that the poly pulse pair algorithm can reduce this bias. It is suggested that use of a spectrum mode estimator may be more appropriate in characterizing the windspeed within a radar range resolution cell for detection of hazardous windspeed gradients.

  11. Estimation of leaf water content using spectral bands from the commercial satellite, DigitalGlobe WorldView-3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recently-launched high-resolution commercial satellite, DigitalGlobe’s WorldView-3, has 8 bands in the shortwave infrared (SWIR) wavelength region, which may be capable of estimating canopy water content at 3.7-m spatial resolution. WorldView-3 also has 8 multispectral bands at 1.24-m resolution ...

  12. Comparison of leaf color chart observations with digital photographs and spectral measurements for estimating maize leaf chlorophyll content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop nitrogen management is important world-wide, as much for small fields as it is for large operations. Developed as a non-destructive aid for estimating nitrogen content in rice crops, leaf color charts (LCC) are a numbered series of plastic panels that range from yellowgreen to dark green. By vi...

  13. A vector auto-regressive model for onshore and offshore wind synthesis incorporating meteorological model information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, D.; Bell, K. R. W.; McMillan, D.; Infield, D.

    2014-05-01

    The growth of wind power production in the electricity portfolio is striving to meet ambitious targets set, for example by the EU, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 20% by 2020. Huge investments are now being made in new offshore wind farms around UK coastal waters that will have a major impact on the GB electrical supply. Representations of the UK wind field in syntheses which capture the inherent structure and correlations between different locations including offshore sites are required. Here, Vector Auto-Regressive (VAR) models are presented and extended in a novel way to incorporate offshore time series from a pan-European meteorological model called COSMO, with onshore wind speeds from the MIDAS dataset provided by the British Atmospheric Data Centre. Forecasting ability onshore is shown to be improved with the inclusion of the offshore sites with improvements of up to 25% in RMS error at 6 h ahead. In addition, the VAR model is used to synthesise time series of wind at each offshore site, which are then used to estimate wind farm capacity factors at the sites in question. These are then compared with estimates of capacity factors derived from the work of Hawkins et al. (2011). A good degree of agreement is established indicating that this synthesis tool should be useful in power system impact studies.

  14. Granger Causality in Multivariate Time Series Using a Time-Ordered Restricted Vector Autoregressive Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siggiridou, Elsa; Kugiumtzis, Dimitris

    2016-04-01

    Granger causality has been used for the investigation of the inter-dependence structure of the underlying systems of multi-variate time series. In particular, the direct causal effects are commonly estimated by the conditional Granger causality index (CGCI). In the presence of many observed variables and relatively short time series, CGCI may fail because it is based on vector autoregressive models (VAR) involving a large number of coefficients to be estimated. In this work, the VAR is restricted by a scheme that modifies the recently developed method of backward-in-time selection (BTS) of the lagged variables and the CGCI is combined with BTS. Further, the proposed approach is compared favorably to other restricted VAR representations, such as the top-down strategy, the bottom-up strategy, and the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO), in terms of sensitivity and specificity of CGCI. This is shown by using simulations of linear and nonlinear, low and high-dimensional systems and different time series lengths. For nonlinear systems, CGCI from the restricted VAR representations are compared with analogous nonlinear causality indices. Further, CGCI in conjunction with BTS and other restricted VAR representations is applied to multi-channel scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings of epileptic patients containing epileptiform discharges. CGCI on the restricted VAR, and BTS in particular, could track the changes in brain connectivity before, during and after epileptiform discharges, which was not possible using the full VAR representation.

  15. 1D Current Source Density (CSD) Estimation in Inverse Theory: A Unified Framework for Higher-Order Spectral Regularization of Quadrature and Expansion-Type CSD Methods.

    PubMed

    Kropf, Pascal; Shmuel, Amir

    2016-07-01

    Estimation of current source density (CSD) from the low-frequency part of extracellular electric potential recordings is an unstable linear inverse problem. To make the estimation possible in an experimental setting where recordings are contaminated with noise, it is necessary to stabilize the inversion. Here we present a unified framework for zero- and higher-order singular-value-decomposition (SVD)-based spectral regularization of 1D (linear) CSD estimation from local field potentials. The framework is based on two general approaches commonly employed for solving inverse problems: quadrature and basis function expansion. We first show that both inverse CSD (iCSD) and kernel CSD (kCSD) fall into the category of basis function expansion methods. We then use these general categories to introduce two new estimation methods, quadrature CSD (qCSD), based on discretizing the CSD integral equation with a chosen quadrature rule, and representer CSD (rCSD), an even-determined basis function expansion method that uses the problem's data kernels (representers) as basis functions. To determine the best candidate methods to use in the analysis of experimental data, we compared the different methods on simulations under three regularization schemes (Tikhonov, tSVD, and dSVD), three regularization parameter selection methods (NCP, L-curve, and GCV), and seven different a priori spatial smoothness constraints on the CSD distribution. This resulted in a comparison of 531 estimation schemes. We evaluated the estimation schemes according to their source reconstruction accuracy by testing them using different simulated noise levels, lateral source diameters, and CSD depth profiles. We found that ranking schemes according to the average error over all tested conditions results in a reproducible ranking, where the top schemes are found to perform well in the majority of tested conditions. However, there is no single best estimation scheme that outperforms all others under all tested

  16. Multivariate autoregressive models with exogenous inputs for intracerebral responses to direct electrical stimulation of the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jui-Yang; Pigorini, Andrea; Massimini, Marcello; Tononi, Giulio; Nobili, Lino; Van Veen, Barry D.

    2012-01-01

    A multivariate autoregressive (MVAR) model with exogenous inputs (MVARX) is developed for describing the cortical interactions excited by direct electrical current stimulation of the cortex. Current stimulation is challenging to model because it excites neurons in multiple locations both near and distant to the stimulation site. The approach presented here models these effects using an exogenous input that is passed through a bank of filters, one for each channel. The filtered input and a random input excite a MVAR system describing the interactions between cortical activity at the recording sites. The exogenous input filter coefficients, the autoregressive coefficients, and random input characteristics are estimated from the measured activity due to current stimulation. The effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated using intracranial recordings from three surgical epilepsy patients. We evaluate models for wakefulness and NREM sleep in these patients with two stimulation levels in one patient and two stimulation sites in another resulting in a total of 10 datasets. Excellent agreement between measured and model-predicted evoked responses is obtained across all datasets. Furthermore, one-step prediction is used to show that the model also describes dynamics in pre-stimulus and evoked recordings. We also compare integrated information—a measure of intracortical communication thought to reflect the capacity for consciousness—associated with the network model in wakefulness and sleep. As predicted, higher information integration is found in wakefulness than in sleep for all five cases. PMID:23226122

  17. Comparing causality measures of fMRI data using PCA, CCA and vector autoregressive modelling.

    PubMed

    Shah, Adnan; Khalid, Muhammad Usman; Seghouane, Abd-Krim

    2012-01-01

    Extracting the directional interaction between activated brain areas from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) time series measurements of their activity is a significant step in understanding the process of brain functions. In this paper, the directional interaction between fMRI time series characterizing the activity of two neuronal sites is quantified using two measures; one derived based on univariate autoregressive and autoregressive exogenous (AR/ARX) and other derived based on multivariate vector autoregressive and vector autoregressive exogenous (VAR/VARX) models. The significance and effectiveness of these measures is illustrated on both simulated and real fMRI data sets. It has been revealed that VAR modelling of the regions of interest is robust in inferring true causality compared to principal component analysis (PCA) and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) based causality methods.

  18. Remote estimation of chlorophyll-a concentration in turbid water using a spectral index: a case study in Taihu Lake, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chunmei; Wei, Yuchun; Lv, Guonian; Yuan, Zhaojie

    2013-01-01

    Chlorophyll-a concentration (Chla) is a key indicator of water quality, and accurate estimates of Chla using remote sensing data remain challenging in turbid waters. Previous research has demonstrated the feasibility of retrieving Chla in vegetation using spectral index, which may be the potential reference for Chla inversion in turbid waters. In this study, 106 hyperspectral indices, including vegetation, fluorescence, and trilateral indices, as well as combinations thereof, are calculated based on the in situ spectra data of 2004 to 2011 in Taihu Lake, China, to explore their potential use in turbid waters. The results show that the normal chlorophyll index (NCI) (R690/R550-R675/R700)/(R690/R550+R675/R700) is optimal for Chla estimation, with a determination coefficient (R) of 0.92 and a root mean square error (RMSE) of 14.36 mg/m3 for the data from July to August 2004, when Chla ranged from 7 to 192 mg/m3. Validation using the datasets of 2005, 2010, and 2011 shows that after reparameterization, the NCI model yields low RMSEs and is more robust than the three- and four-band algorithms. The results indicate that the NCI model can satisfactorily estimate Chla in multiple datasets without the need of additional band tuning.

  19. A Recommended Procedure for Estimating the Cosmic-Ray Spectral Parameter of a Simple Power Law With Applications to Detector Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, L. W.

    2001-01-01

    A simple power law model consisting of a single spectral index alpha-1 is believed to be an adequate description of the galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) proton flux at energies below 10(exp 13) eV. Two procedures for estimating alpha-1 the method of moments and maximum likelihood (ML), are developed and their statistical performance compared. It is concluded that the ML procedure attains the most desirable statistical properties and is hence the recommended statistical estimation procedure for estimating alpha-1. The ML procedure is then generalized for application to a set of real cosmic-ray data and thereby makes this approach applicable to existing cosmic-ray data sets. Several other important results, such as the relationship between collecting power and detector energy resolution, as well as inclusion of a non-Gaussian detector response function, are presented. These results have many practical benefits in the design phase of a cosmic-ray detector as they permit instrument developers to make important trade studies in design parameters as a function of one of the science objectives. This is particularly important for space-based detectors where physical parameters, such as dimension and weight, impose rigorous practical limits to the design envelope.

  20. Estimation of regional hemoglobin concentration in biological tissues using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy with a novel spectral interpretation algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chen, P; Fernald, B; Lin, W

    2011-07-07

    Both in medical research and clinical settings, regional hemoglobin concentrations ([Hb]) in the microcirculation of biological tissues are highly sought. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy has been proven to be a favorable method by which to detect regional [Hb]. This paper introduces a new algorithm to retrieve [Hb] information from diffuse reflectance spectra. The proposed algorithm utilizes the natural logarithmic operation and the differential wavelet transform to effectively quench the scattering effects, and then employs the concept of isosbestic wavelength in the transformed spectra to reduce the effects of hemoglobin oxygenation. As a result, the intensity at the defined isosbestic wavelength of the transformed spectra is a good indicator of [Hb] estimation. The algorithm was derived and validated using theoretical spectra produced by Monte Carlo simulation of photon migration. Its accuracy was further evaluated using liquid tissue phantoms, and its clinical utility with an in vivo clinical study of brain tumors. The results demonstrate the applicability of the algorithm for real-time [Hb] estimations from diffuse reflectance spectra, acquired by means of a fiber-optic spectroscopy system.

  1. Estimation of the propagation direction and spectral properties of the EEG signals registered during sevoflurane anaesthesia using Directed Transfer Function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olejarczyk, Elzbieta; Kaminski, Maciej; Marciniak, Radoslaw; Byrczek, Tomasz; Stasiowski, Michal; Jalowiecki, Przemyslaw; Sobieszek, Aleksander; Zmyslowski, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate spectral properties and propagation of the EEG signals registered during sevoflurane anaesthesia between individual EEG recording channels. The intensities of activity flows were calculated for delta, theta, alpha and beta waves using the Directed Transfer Function integration procedure. It was found that delta waves played the dominant role in the EEG signal propagation during anesthesia and it was suggested that theta and alpha waves propagation could be related to the processes participating in the wakefulness control. Data obtained with DTF method were compared with data received from the analysis of cerebral blood flow with the use of PET in other laboratory. This study showed that analysis of the EEG signal propagation is useful for better understanding and thus safer induction of anaesthesia procedure.

  2. Ray tracing model for the estimation of power spectral properties in laser Doppler velocimetry of retinal vessels and its potential application to retinal vessel oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrig, Benno L.; Follonier, Lysianne

    2005-12-01

    A new model based on ray tracing was developed to estimate power spectral properties in laser Doppler velocimetry of retinal vessels and to predict the effects of laser beam size and eccentricity as well as absorption of laser light by oxygenated and reduced hemoglobin. We describe the model and show that it correctly converges to the traditional rectangular shape of the Doppler shift power spectrum, given the same assumptions, and that reduced beam size and eccentric alignment cause marked alterations in this shape. The changes in the detected total power of the Doppler-shifted light due to light scattering and absorption by blood can also be quantified with this model and may be used to determine the oxygen saturation in retinal arteries and veins. The potential of this approach is that it uses direct measurements of Doppler signals originating from moving red blood cells. This may open new avenues for retinal vessel oximetry.

  3. Simulation of estimating periodicity of seasonally stationary time series

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, C.J.

    1984-06-01

    Herein, some common periodicity estimation methods: the periodogram analysis, the maximum entropy spectral method, the successive average method as well as the graphic method are considered. For comparing these methods and verifying their practical efficiency, simulations are performed on several groups of seasonal stationary time series which are generated by the model x(t) = v(t) + z(t). v(t) being a seasonal component with different forms (Sinusoid, unequal amptitude oscillation, slope signal, exponential decay signal and block signal etc.) and z(t) being autoregressive process under different levels of signal-noise ratio. Computational results, comprehensively illustrate that the successive average method is easier to carry out and more efficient in practice.

  4. Autoregressive logistic regression applied to atmospheric circulation patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guanche, Y.; Mínguez, R.; Méndez, F. J.

    2014-01-01

    Autoregressive logistic regression models have been successfully applied in medical and pharmacology research fields, and in simple models to analyze weather types. The main purpose of this paper is to introduce a general framework to study atmospheric circulation patterns capable of dealing simultaneously with: seasonality, interannual variability, long-term trends, and autocorrelation of different orders. To show its effectiveness on modeling performance, daily atmospheric circulation patterns identified from observed sea level pressure fields over the Northeastern Atlantic, have been analyzed using this framework. Model predictions are compared with probabilities from the historical database, showing very good fitting diagnostics. In addition, the fitted model is used to simulate the evolution over time of atmospheric circulation patterns using Monte Carlo method. Simulation results are statistically consistent with respect to the historical sequence in terms of (1) probability of occurrence of the different weather types, (2) transition probabilities and (3) persistence. The proposed model constitutes an easy-to-use and powerful tool for a better understanding of the climate system.

  5. Sparse representation based image interpolation with nonlocal autoregressive modeling.

    PubMed

    Dong, Weisheng; Zhang, Lei; Lukac, Rastislav; Shi, Guangming

    2013-04-01

    Sparse representation is proven to be a promising approach to image super-resolution, where the low-resolution (LR) image is usually modeled as the down-sampled version of its high-resolution (HR) counterpart after blurring. When the blurring kernel is the Dirac delta function, i.e., the LR image is directly down-sampled from its HR counterpart without blurring, the super-resolution problem becomes an image interpolation problem. In such cases, however, the conventional sparse representation models (SRM) become less effective, because the data fidelity term fails to constrain the image local structures. In natural images, fortunately, many nonlocal similar patches to a given patch could provide nonlocal constraint to the local structure. In this paper, we incorporate the image nonlocal self-similarity into SRM for image interpolation. More specifically, a nonlocal autoregressive model (NARM) is proposed and taken as the data fidelity term in SRM. We show that the NARM-induced sampling matrix is less coherent with the representation dictionary, and consequently makes SRM more effective for image interpolation. Our extensive experimental results demonstrate that the proposed NARM-based image interpolation method can effectively reconstruct the edge structures and suppress the jaggy/ringing artifacts, achieving the best image interpolation results so far in terms of PSNR as well as perceptual quality metrics such as SSIM and FSIM.

  6. An algebraic method for constructing stable and consistent autoregressive filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlim, John; Hong, Hoon; Robbins, Jacob L.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we introduce an algebraic method to construct stable and consistent univariate autoregressive (AR) models of low order for filtering and predicting nonlinear turbulent signals with memory depth. By stable, we refer to the classical stability condition for the AR model. By consistent, we refer to the classical consistency constraints of Adams-Bashforth methods of order-two. One attractive feature of this algebraic method is that the model parameters can be obtained without directly knowing any training data set as opposed to many standard, regression-based parameterization methods. It takes only long-time average statistics as inputs. The proposed method provides a discretization time step interval which guarantees the existence of stable and consistent AR model and simultaneously produces the parameters for the AR models. In our numerical examples with two chaotic time series with different characteristics of decaying time scales, we find that the proposed AR models produce significantly more accurate short-term predictive skill and comparable filtering skill relative to the linear regression-based AR models. These encouraging results are robust across wide ranges of discretization times, observation times, and observation noise variances. Finally, we also find that the proposed model produces an improved short-time prediction relative to the linear regression-based AR-models in forecasting a data set that characterizes the variability of the Madden-Julian Oscillation, a dominant tropical atmospheric wave pattern.

  7. An algebraic method for constructing stable and consistent autoregressive filters

    SciTech Connect

    Harlim, John; Hong, Hoon; Robbins, Jacob L.

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, we introduce an algebraic method to construct stable and consistent univariate autoregressive (AR) models of low order for filtering and predicting nonlinear turbulent signals with memory depth. By stable, we refer to the classical stability condition for the AR model. By consistent, we refer to the classical consistency constraints of Adams–Bashforth methods of order-two. One attractive feature of this algebraic method is that the model parameters can be obtained without directly knowing any training data set as opposed to many standard, regression-based parameterization methods. It takes only long-time average statistics as inputs. The proposed method provides a discretization time step interval which guarantees the existence of stable and consistent AR model and simultaneously produces the parameters for the AR models. In our numerical examples with two chaotic time series with different characteristics of decaying time scales, we find that the proposed AR models produce significantly more accurate short-term predictive skill and comparable filtering skill relative to the linear regression-based AR models. These encouraging results are robust across wide ranges of discretization times, observation times, and observation noise variances. Finally, we also find that the proposed model produces an improved short-time prediction relative to the linear regression-based AR-models in forecasting a data set that characterizes the variability of the Madden–Julian Oscillation, a dominant tropical atmospheric wave pattern.

  8. Prediction of municipal solid waste generation using nonlinear autoregressive network.

    PubMed

    Younes, Mohammad K; Nopiah, Z M; Basri, N E Ahmad; Basri, H; Abushammala, Mohammed F M; Maulud, K N A

    2015-12-01

    Most of the developing countries have solid waste management problems. Solid waste strategic planning requires accurate prediction of the quality and quantity of the generated waste. In developing countries, such as Malaysia, the solid waste generation rate is increasing rapidly, due to population growth and new consumption trends that characterize society. This paper proposes an artificial neural network (ANN) approach using feedforward nonlinear autoregressive network with exogenous inputs (NARX) to predict annual solid waste generation in relation to demographic and economic variables like population number, gross domestic product, electricity demand per capita and employment and unemployment numbers. In addition, variable selection procedures are also developed to select a significant explanatory variable. The model evaluation was performed using coefficient of determination (R(2)) and mean square error (MSE). The optimum model that produced the lowest testing MSE (2.46) and the highest R(2) (0.97) had three inputs (gross domestic product, population and employment), eight neurons and one lag in the hidden layer, and used Fletcher-Powell's conjugate gradient as the training algorithm.

  9. Skart: A skewness- and autoregression-adjusted batch-means procedure for simulation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafazzoli Yazdi, Ali

    We discuss Skart, an automated batch-means procedure for constructing a skewness- and autoregression-adjusted confidence interval (CI) for the steady-state mean of a simulation output process in either discrete time (i.e., observation-based statistics) or continuous time (i.e., time-persistent statistics). Skart is a sequential procedure designed to deliver a CI that satisfies user-specified requirements concerning not only the CI's coverage probability but also the absolute or relative precision provided by its half-length. Skart exploits separate adjustments to the half-length of the classical batchmeans CI so as to account for the effects on the distribution of the underlying Student's t-statistic that arise from skewness (nonnormality) and autocorrelation of the batch means. The skewness adjustment is based on a modified Cornish-Fisher expansion for the classical batch-means Student's t -ratio, and the autocorrelation adjustment is based on an autoregressive approximation to the batch-means process for sufficiently large batch sizes. Skart also delivers a point estimator for the steady-state mean that is approximately free of initialization bias. The duration of the associated warm-up period (i.e., the statistics clearing time) is based on iteratively applying von Neumann's randomness test to spaced batch means with progressively increasing batch sizes and interbatch spacer sizes. In an experimental performance evaluation involving a wide range of test processes, Skart compared favorably with other simulation analysis methods---namely, its predecessors ASAP3, WASSP, and SBatch as well as ABATCH, LBATCH, the Heidelberger-Welch procedure, and the Law-Carson procedure. Specifically, Skart exhibited competitive sampling efficiency and substantially closer conformance to the given CI coverage probabilities than the other procedures. Also presented is a nonsequential version of Skart, called N-Skart, in which the user supplies a single simulation-generated series of

  10. Autoregressive Extrapolation for Seismic Tomography problems with Applications to Soil and Rock Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Nowack, R. L.; Pyrak-Nolte, L.

    2003-12-01

    Seismic tomographic experiments in soil and rock are strongly affected by limited and non-uniform ray coverage. We propose a new method to extrapolate data used for seismic tomography to full coverage. The proposed two-stage autoregressive extrapolation technique can be used to extend the available data and provide better tomographic images. The algorithm is based on the principle that the extrapolated data adds minimal information to the existing data. A two-stage autoregressive (AR) extrapolation scheme is then applied to the seismic tomography problem. The first stage of the extrapolation is to find the optimal prediction-error filter (PE filter). For the second stage, we use the PE filter to find the values for the missing data so that the power out of the PE filter is minimized. At the second stage, we are able to estimate missing data values with the same spectrum as the known data. This is similar to maximizing an entropy criterion. Synthetic tomographic experiments have been conducted and demonstrate that the two-stage AR extrapolation technique is a powerful tool for data extrapolation and can improve the quality of tomographic inversions of experimental and field data. Moreover, the two-stage AR extrapolation technique is tolerant to noise in the data and can still extrapolate the data to obtain overall patterns, which is very important for real data applications. In this study, we have applied AR extrapolation to a series of datasets from laboratory tomographic experiments on synthetic sediments with known structure. In these tomographic experiments, glass beads saturated with de-ionized water were used as the synthetic water-saturated background sediments. The synthetic sediments were packed in plastic cylindrical containers with a diameter of 220 mm. Tomographic experiments were then set up to measure transmitted acoustic waves through the sediment samples from multiple directions. We recorded data for sources and receivers with varying angular

  11. A Deep and Autoregressive Approach for Topic Modeling of Multimodal Data.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yin; Zhang, Yu-Jin; Larochelle, Hugo

    2016-06-01

    Topic modeling based on latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) has been a framework of choice to deal with multimodal data, such as in image annotation tasks. Another popular approach to model the multimodal data is through deep neural networks, such as the deep Boltzmann machine (DBM). Recently, a new type of topic model called the Document Neural Autoregressive Distribution Estimator (DocNADE) was proposed and demonstrated state-of-the-art performance for text document modeling. In this work, we show how to successfully apply and extend this model to multimodal data, such as simultaneous image classification and annotation. First, we propose SupDocNADE, a supervised extension of DocNADE, that increases the discriminative power of the learned hidden topic features and show how to employ it to learn a joint representation from image visual words, annotation words and class label information. We test our model on the LabelMe and UIUC-Sports data sets and show that it compares favorably to other topic models. Second, we propose a deep extension of our model and provide an efficient way of training the deep model. Experimental results show that our deep model outperforms its shallow version and reaches state-of-the-art performance on the Multimedia Information Retrieval (MIR) Flickr data set.

  12. Autoregressive conditional duration as a model for financial market crashes prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrlik, Vladimir

    2013-12-01

    There is an increasing number of studies showing that financial market crashes can be detected and predicted. The main aim of the research was to develop a technique for crashes prediction based on the analysis of durations between sequent crashes of a certain magnitude of Dow Jones Industrial Average. We have found significant autocorrelation in the series of durations between sequent crashes and suggest autoregressive conditional duration models (ACD) to forecast the crashes. We apply the rolling intervals technique in the sample of more than 400 DJIA crashes in 1896-2011 and repeatedly use the data on 100 sequent crashes to estimate a family of ACD models and calculate forecasts of the one following crash. It appears that the ACD models provide significant predictive power when combined with the inter-event waiting time technique. This suggests that despite the high quality of retrospective predictions, using the technique for real-time forecasting seems rather ineffective, as in the case of every particular crash the specification of the ACD model, which would provide the best quality prediction, is rather hard to identify.

  13. Autoregressive harmonic analysis of the earth's polar motion using homogeneous International Latitude Service data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. F.

    1983-01-01

    The homogeneous set of 80-year-long (1900-1979) International Latitude Service (ILS) polar motion data is analyzed using the autoregressive method (Chao and Gilbert, 1980), which resolves and produces estimates for the complex frequency (or frequency and Q) and complex amplitude (or amplitude and phase) of each harmonic component in the data. The ILS data support the multiple-component hypothesis of the Chandler wobble. It is found that the Chandler wobble can be adequately modeled as a linear combination of four (coherent) harmonic components, each of which represents a steady, nearly circular, prograde motion. The four-component Chandler wobble model 'explains' the apparent phase reversal during 1920-1940 and the pre-1950 empirical period-amplitude relation. The annual wobble is shown to be rather stationary over the years both in amplitude and in phase, and no evidence is found to support the large variations reported by earlier investigations. The Markowitz wobble is found to be marginally retrograde and appears to have a complicated behavior which cannot be resolved because of the shortness of the data set.

  14. Diatomic Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 114 Diatomic Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 121 diatomic molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty, and reference are given for each transition reported.

  15. Hydrocarbon Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 115 Hydrocarbon Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 91 hydrocarbon molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  16. Triatomic Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 117 Triatomic Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 55 triatomic molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  17. Spectral clustering for optical confirmation and redshift estimation of X-ray selected galaxy cluster candidates in the SDSS Stripe 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, E.; Takey, A.; Shoukry, A.

    2016-07-01

    We develop a galaxy cluster finding algorithm based on spectral clustering technique to identify optical counterparts and estimate optical redshifts for X-ray selected cluster candidates. As an application, we run our algorithm on a sample of X-ray cluster candidates selected from the third XMM-Newton serendipitous source catalog (3XMM-DR5) that are located in the Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Our method works on galaxies described in the color-magnitude feature space. We begin by examining 45 galaxy clusters with published spectroscopic redshifts in the range of 0.1-0.8 with a median of 0.36. As a result, we are able to identify their optical counterparts and estimate their photometric redshifts, which have a typical accuracy of 0.025 and agree with the published ones. Then, we investigate another 40 X-ray cluster candidates (from the same cluster survey) with no redshift information in the literature and found that 12 candidates are considered as galaxy clusters in the redshift range from 0.29 to 0.76 with a median of 0.57. These systems are newly discovered clusters in X-rays and optical data. Among them 7 clusters have spectroscopic redshifts for at least one member galaxy.

  18. Spectral Retrieval of Latent Heating Profiles from TRMM PR data. Part 3; Moistening Estimates over Tropical Ocean Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shige, S.; Takayabu, Y.; Tao, W.-K.

    2007-01-01

    The global hydrological cycle is central to the Earth's climate system, with rainfall and the physics of precipitation formation acting as the key links in the cycle. Two-thirds of global rainfall occurs in the tropics with the associated latent heating (LH) accounting for threefourths of the total heat energy available to the Earth's atmosphere. In the last decade, it has been established that standard products of LH from satellite measurements, particularly TRMM measurements, would be a valuable resource for scientific research and applications. Such products would enable new insights and investigations concerning the complexities of convection system life cycles, the diabatic heating controls and feedbacks related to rne-sosynoptic circulations and their forecasting, the relationship of tropical patterns of LH to the global circulation and climate, and strategies for improving cloud parameterizations In environmental prediction models. However, the LH and water vapor profile or budget (called the apparent moisture sink, or Q2) is closely related. This paper presented the development of an algorithm for retrieving Q2 using 'TRMM precipitation radar. Since there is no direct measurement of LH and Q2, the validation of algorithm usually applies a method called consistency check. Consistency checking involving Cloud Resolving Model (CRM)-generated LH and 42 profiles and algorithm-reconstructed is a useful step in evaluating the performance of a given algorithm. In this process, the CRM simulation of a time-dependent precipitation process (multiple-day time series) is used to obtain the required input parameters for a given algorithm. The algorithm is then used to "econsti-LKth"e heating and moisture profiles that the CRM simulation originally produced, and finally both sets of conformal estimates (model and algorithm) are compared each other. The results indicate that discrepancies between the reconstructed and CM-simulated profiles for Q2, especially at low levels

  19. Sparse multivariate autoregressive modeling for mild cognitive impairment classification.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Wee, Chong-Yaw; Jie, Biao; Peng, Ziwen; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-07-01

    Brain connectivity network derived from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is becoming increasingly prevalent in the researches related to cognitive and perceptual processes. The capability to detect causal or effective connectivity is highly desirable for understanding the cooperative nature of brain network, particularly when the ultimate goal is to obtain good performance of control-patient classification with biological meaningful interpretations. Understanding directed functional interactions between brain regions via brain connectivity network is a challenging task. Since many genetic and biomedical networks are intrinsically sparse, incorporating sparsity property into connectivity modeling can make the derived models more biologically plausible. Accordingly, we propose an effective connectivity modeling of resting-state fMRI data based on the multivariate autoregressive (MAR) modeling technique, which is widely used to characterize temporal information of dynamic systems. This MAR modeling technique allows for the identification of effective connectivity using the Granger causality concept and reducing the spurious causality connectivity in assessment of directed functional interaction from fMRI data. A forward orthogonal least squares (OLS) regression algorithm is further used to construct a sparse MAR model. By applying the proposed modeling to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) classification, we identify several most discriminative regions, including middle cingulate gyrus, posterior cingulate gyrus, lingual gyrus and caudate regions, in line with results reported in previous findings. A relatively high classification accuracy of 91.89 % is also achieved, with an increment of 5.4 % compared to the fully-connected, non-directional Pearson-correlation-based functional connectivity approach.

  20. Kepler AutoRegressive Planet Search: Initial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caceres, Gabriel; Feigelson, Eric; Jogesh Babu, G.; Bahamonde, Natalia; Bertin, Karine; Christen, Alejandra; Curé, Michel; Meza, Cristian

    2015-08-01

    The statistical analysis procedures of the Kepler AutoRegressive Planet Search (KARPS) project are applied to a portion of the publicly available Kepler light curve data for the full 4-year mission duration. Tests of the methods have been made on a subset of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) systems, classified both as planetary `candidates' and `false positives' by the Kepler Team, as well as a random sample of unclassified systems. We find that the ARMA-type modeling successfully reduces the stellar variability, by a factor of 10 or more in active stars and by smaller factors in more quiescent stars. A typical quiescent Kepler star has an interquartile range (IQR) of ~10 e-/sec, which may improve slightly after modeling, while those with IQR ranging from 20 to 50 e-/sec, have improvements from 20% up to 70%. High activity stars (IQR exceeding 100) markedly improve, but visual inspection of the residual series shows that significant deviations from Gaussianity remain for many of them. Although the reduction in stellar signal is encouraging, it is important to note that the transit signal is also altered in the resulting residual time series. The periodogram derived from our Transit Comb Filter (TCF) is most effective for shorter period planets with quick ingress/egress times (relative to Kepler's 29-minute sample rate). We do not expect high sensitivity to periods of hundreds of days. Our findings to date on real-data tests of the KARPS methodology will be discussed including confirmation of some Kepler Team `candidate' planets, no confirmation of some `candidate' and `false positive' sytems, and suggestions of mischosen harmonics in the Kepler Team periodograms. We also present cases of new possible planetary signals.

  1. Sparse Multivariate Autoregressive Modeling for Mild Cognitive Impairment Classification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Wee, Chong-Yaw; Jie, Biao; Peng, Ziwen

    2014-01-01

    Brain connectivity network derived from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is becoming increasingly prevalent in the researches related to cognitive and perceptual processes. The capability to detect causal or effective connectivity is highly desirable for understanding the cooperative nature of brain network, particularly when the ultimate goal is to obtain good performance of control-patient classification with biological meaningful interpretations. Understanding directed functional interactions between brain regions via brain connectivity network is a challenging task. Since many genetic and biomedical networks are intrinsically sparse, incorporating sparsity property into connectivity modeling can make the derived models more biologically plausible. Accordingly, we propose an effective connectivity modeling of resting-state fMRI data based on the multivariate autoregressive (MAR) modeling technique, which is widely used to characterize temporal information of dynamic systems. This MAR modeling technique allows for the identification of effective connectivity using the Granger causality concept and reducing the spurious causality connectivity in assessment of directed functional interaction from fMRI data. A forward orthogonal least squares (OLS) regression algorithm is further used to construct a sparse MAR model. By applying the proposed modeling to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) classification, we identify several most discriminative regions, including middle cingulate gyrus, posterior cingulate gyrus, lingual gyrus and caudate regions, in line with results reported in previous findings. A relatively high classification accuracy of 91.89 % is also achieved, with an increment of 5.4 % compared to the fully-connected, non-directional Pearson-correlation-based functional connectivity approach. PMID:24595922

  2. THE AKARI 2.5-5.0 μm SPECTRAL ATLAS OF TYPE-1 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATOR, LINE RATIO, AND HOT DUST TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dohyeong; Im, Myungshin; Kim, Ji Hoon; Jun, Hyunsung David; Lee, Seong-Kook; Woo, Jong-Hak; Lee, Hyung Mok; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Nakagawa, Takao; Matsuhara, Hideo; Wada, Takehiko; Takagi, Toshinobu; Oyabu, Shinki; Ohyama, Youichi E-mail: mim@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2015-01-01

    We present 2.5-5.0 μm spectra of 83 nearby (0.002 < z < 0.48) and bright (K < 14 mag) type-1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) taken with the Infrared Camera on board AKARI. The 2.5-5.0 μm spectral region contains emission lines such as Brβ (2.63 μm), Brα (4.05 μm), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (3.3 μm), which can be used for studying the black hole (BH) masses and star formation activity in the host galaxies of AGNs. The spectral region also suffers less dust extinction than in the ultra violet (UV) or optical wavelengths, which may provide an unobscured view of dusty AGNs. Our sample is selected from bright quasar surveys of Palomar-Green and SNUQSO, and AGNs with reverberation-mapped BH masses from Peterson et al. Using 11 AGNs with reliable detection of Brackett lines, we derive the Brackett-line-based BH mass estimators. We also find that the observed Brackett line ratios can be explained with the commonly adopted physical conditions of the broad line region. Moreover, we fit the hot and warm dust components of the dust torus by adding photometric data of SDSS, 2MASS, WISE, and ISO to the AKARI spectra, finding hot and warm dust temperatures of ∼1100 K and ∼220 K, respectively, rather than the commonly cited hot dust temperature of 1500 K.

  3. Scaling relationship between corner frequencies and seismic moments of ultra micro earthquakes estimated with coda-wave spectral ratio -the Mponeng mine in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, N.; Kawakata, H.; Murakami, O.; Doi, I.; Yoshimitsu, N.; Nakatani, M.; Yabe, Y.; Naoi, M. M.; Miyakawa, K.; Miyake, H.; Ide, S.; Igarashi, T.; Morema, G.; Pinder, E.; Ogasawara, H.

    2011-12-01

    Scaling relationship between corner frequencies, fc, and seismic moments, Mo is an important clue to understand the seismic source characteristics. Aki (1967) showed that Mo is proportional to fc-3 for large earthquakes (cubic law). Iio (1986) claimed breakdown of the cubic law between fc and Mo for smaller earthquakes (Mw < 2), and Gibowicz et al. (1991) also showed the breakdown for the ultra micro and small earthquakes (Mw < -2). However, it has been reported that the cubic law holds even for micro earthquakes (-1 < Mw > 4) by using high quality data observed at a deep borehole (Abercrombie, 1995; Ogasawara et al., 2001; Hiramatsu et al., 2002; Yamada et al., 2007). In order to clarify the scaling relationship for smaller earthquakes (Mw < -1), we analyzed ultra micro earthquakes using very high sampling records (48 kHz) of borehole seismometers installed within a hard rock at the Mponeng mine in South Africa. We used 4 tri-axial accelerometers of three-component that have a flat response up to 25 kHz. They were installed to be 10 to 30 meters apart from each other at 3,300 meters deep. During the period from 2008/10/14 to 2008/10/30 (17 days), 8,927 events were recorded. We estimated fc and Mo for 60 events (-3 < Mw < -1) within 200 meters from the seismometers. Assuming the Brune's source model, we estimated fc and Mo from spectral ratios. Common practice is using direct waves from adjacent events. However, there were only 5 event pairs with the distance between them less than 20 meters and Mw difference over one. In addition, the observation array is very small (radius less than 30 m), which means that effects of directivity and radiation pattern on direct waves are similar at all stations. Hence, we used spectral ratio of coda waves, since these effects are averaged and will be effectively reduced (Mayeda et al., 2007; Somei et al., 2010). Coda analysis was attempted only for relatively large 20 events (we call "coda events" hereafter) that have coda energy

  4. Investigating Causality Between Interacting Brain Areas with Multivariate Autoregressive Models of MEG Sensor Data

    PubMed Central

    Michalareas, George; Schoffelen, Jan-Mathijs; Paterson, Gavin; Gross, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In this work, we investigate the feasibility to estimating causal interactions between brain regions based on multivariate autoregressive models (MAR models) fitted to magnetoencephalographic (MEG) sensor measurements. We first demonstrate the theoretical feasibility of estimating source level causal interactions after projection of the sensor-level model coefficients onto the locations of the neural sources. Next, we show with simulated MEG data that causality, as measured by partial directed coherence (PDC), can be correctly reconstructed if the locations of the interacting brain areas are known. We further demonstrate, if a very large number of brain voxels is considered as potential activation sources, that PDC as a measure to reconstruct causal interactions is less accurate. In such case the MAR model coefficients alone contain meaningful causality information. The proposed method overcomes the problems of model nonrobustness and large computation times encountered during causality analysis by existing methods. These methods first project MEG sensor time-series onto a large number of brain locations after which the MAR model is built on this large number of source-level time-series. Instead, through this work, we demonstrate that by building the MAR model on the sensor-level and then projecting only the MAR coefficients in source space, the true casual pathways are recovered even when a very large number of locations are considered as sources. The main contribution of this work is that by this methodology entire brain causality maps can be efficiently derived without any a priori selection of regions of interest. Hum Brain Mapp, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22328419

  5. Comparison of estimators of standard deviation for hydrologic time series.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tasker, Gary D.; Gilroy, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    Unbiasing factors as a function of serial correlation, rho, and sample size, n for the sample standard deviation of a lag one autoregressive model were generated by random number simulation. Monte Carlo experiments were used to compare the performance of several alternative methods for estimating the standard deviation sigma of a lag one autoregressive model in terms of bias, root mean square error, probability of underestimation, and expected opportunity design loss. -from Authors

  6. Modified spectral count index (mSCI) for estimation of protein abundance by protein relative identification possibility (RIPpro): a new proteomic technological parameter.

    PubMed

    Sun, Aihua; Zhang, Jiyang; Wang, Chunping; Yang, Dong; Wei, Handong; Zhu, Yunping; Jiang, Ying; He, Fuchu

    2009-11-01

    Peptides Count (SC) was widely used for protein abundance estimation in proteomics. On the basis of that, Mann and co-workers corrected the SC by dividing spectrum counts by the number of observable peptides per protein and named it PAI. Here we present modified spectral count index (mSCI) for protein abundance estimation, which was defined as the number of observed peptides divided by protein relative identification possibility (RIPpro). RIPpro was derived from 6788 mRNA and protein expression data (collected from human liver samples) and related to proteins' three physical and chemical properties (MW/pI/Hp). For 46 proteins in mouse neuro2a cells, mSCI shows a linear relationship with the actual protein concentration, similar or better than PAI abundance. Also, multiple linear regressions were performed to quantitative assess several factors' impact on the mRNA/protein abundance correlation. Our results shown that the primary factor affecting protein levels was mRNA abundance (32-37%), followed by variability in protein measurement, MW and protein turnover (7-12%,7-9% and 2-3%, respectively). Interestingly, we found that the concordance between mRNA transcripts and protein expression was not consistent among all protein functional categories. This correlation was lower for signaling proteins as compared to metabolism genes. It was determined that RIPpro was the primary factor affecting signaling protein abundance (23% on average), followed by mRNA abundance (17%). In contrast, only 5% (on average) of the variability of metabolic protein abundance was explained by RIPpro, much lower than mRNA abundance (40%). These results provide the impetus for further investigation of the biological significance of mechanisms regulating the mRNA/protein abundance correlation and provide additional insight into the relative importance of the technological parameter (RIPpro) in mRNA/protein correlation research.

  7. The use of single-date MODIS imagery for estimating large-scale urban impervious surface fraction with spectral mixture analysis and machine learning techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Chengbin; Wu, Changshan

    2013-12-01

    Urban impervious surface information is essential for urban and environmental applications at the regional/national scales. As a popular image processing technique, spectral mixture analysis (SMA) has rarely been applied to coarse-resolution imagery due to the difficulty of deriving endmember spectra using traditional endmember selection methods, particularly within heterogeneous urban environments. To address this problem, we derived endmember signatures through a least squares solution (LSS) technique with known abundances of sample pixels, and integrated these endmember signatures into SMA for mapping large-scale impervious surface fraction. In addition, with the same sample set, we carried out objective comparative analyses among SMA (i.e. fully constrained and unconstrained SMA) and machine learning (i.e. Cubist regression tree and Random Forests) techniques. Analysis of results suggests three major conclusions. First, with the extrapolated endmember spectra from stratified random training samples, the SMA approaches performed relatively well, as indicated by small MAE values. Second, Random Forests yields more reliable results than Cubist regression tree, and its accuracy is improved with increased sample sizes. Finally, comparative analyses suggest a tentative guide for selecting an optimal approach for large-scale fractional imperviousness estimation: unconstrained SMA might be a favorable option with a small number of samples, while Random Forests might be preferred if a large number of samples are available.

  8. Adaptive spline autoregression threshold method in forecasting Mitsubishi car sales volume at PT Srikandi Diamond Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susanti, D.; Hartini, E.; Permana, A.

    2017-01-01

    Sale and purchase of the growing competition between companies in Indonesian, make every company should have a proper planning in order to win the competition with other companies. One of the things that can be done to design the plan is to make car sales forecast for the next few periods, it’s required that the amount of inventory of cars that will be sold in proportion to the number of cars needed. While to get the correct forecasting, on of the methods that can be used is the method of Adaptive Spline Threshold Autoregression (ASTAR). Therefore, this time the discussion will focus on the use of Adaptive Spline Threshold Autoregression (ASTAR) method in forecasting the volume of car sales in PT.Srikandi Diamond Motors using time series data.In the discussion of this research, forecasting using the method of forecasting value Adaptive Spline Threshold Autoregression (ASTAR) produce approximately correct.

  9. A comparative analysis of spectral exponent estimation techniques for 1/fβ processes with applications to the analysis of stride interval time series

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Alexander; Brach, Jennifer S.; Perera, Subashan; Sejdić, Ervin

    2013-01-01

    Background The time evolution and complex interactions of many nonlinear systems, such as in the human body, result in fractal types of parameter outcomes that exhibit self similarity over long time scales by a power law in the frequency spectrum S(f) = 1/fβ. The scaling exponent β is thus often interpreted as a “biomarker” of relative health and decline. New Method This paper presents a thorough comparative numerical analysis of fractal characterization techniques with specific consideration given to experimentally measured gait stride interval time series. The ideal fractal signals generated in the numerical analysis are constrained under varying lengths and biases indicative of a range of physiologically conceivable fractal signals. This analysis is to complement previous investigations of fractal characteristics in healthy and pathological gait stride interval time series, with which this study is compared. Results The results of our analysis showed that the averaged wavelet coefficient method consistently yielded the most accurate results. Comparison with Existing Methods: Class dependent methods proved to be unsuitable for physiological time series. Detrended fluctuation analysis as most prevailing method in the literature exhibited large estimation variances. Conclusions The comparative numerical analysis and experimental applications provide a thorough basis for determining an appropriate and robust method for measuring and comparing a physiologically meaningful biomarker, the spectral index β. In consideration of the constraints of application, we note the significant drawbacks of detrended fluctuation analysis and conclude that the averaged wavelet coefficient method can provide reasonable consistency and accuracy for characterizing these fractal time series. PMID:24200509

  10. A Hierarchical Bayesian Model for Estimating Remediation-induced Biogeochemical Transformations Using Spectral Induced Polarization Data: Development and Application to the Contaminated DOE Rifle (CO) Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Hubbard, S. S.; Williams, K. H.; Tuglus, C.; Flores-Orozco, A.; Kemna, A.

    2010-12-01

    Although in-situ bioremediation is often considered as a key approach for subsurface environmental remediation, monitoring induced biogeochemical processes, needed to evaluate the efficacy of the treatments, is challenging over field relevant scales. In this study, we develop a hierarchical Bayesian model that builds on our previous framework for estimating biogeochemical transformations using geochemical and geophysical data obtained from laboratory column experiments. The new Bayesian model treats the induced biogeochemical transformations as both spatial and temporal (rather than just temporal) processes and combines time-lapse borehole ‘point’ geochemical measurements with inverted surface- or crosshole-based spectral induced polarization (SIP) data. This model consists of three levels of statistical sub-models: (1) data model (or likelihood function), which provides links between the biogeochemical end-products and geophysical attributes, (2) process model, which describes the spatial and temporal variability of biogeochemical properties in the disturbed subsurface systems, and (3) parameter model, which describes the prior distributions of various parameters and initial conditions. The joint posterior probability distribution is explored using Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling methods to obtain the spatial and temporal distribution of the hidden parameters. We apply the developed Bayesian model to the datasets collected from the uranium-contaminated DOE Rifle site for estimating the spatial and temporal distribution of remediation-induced end products. The datasets consist of time-lapse wellbore aqueous geochemical parameters (including Fe(II), sulfate, sulfide, acetate, uranium, chloride, and bromide concentrations) and surface SIP data collected over 13 frequencies (ranging from 0.065Hz to 256Hz). We first perform statistical analysis on the multivariate data to identify possible patterns (or ‘diagnostic signatures’) of bioremediation, and then we

  11. Comparisons of Four Methods for Estimating a Dynamic Factor Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Hamaker, Ellen L.; Nesselroade, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Four methods for estimating a dynamic factor model, the direct autoregressive factor score (DAFS) model, are evaluated and compared. The first method estimates the DAFS model using a Kalman filter algorithm based on its state space model representation. The second one employs the maximum likelihood estimation method based on the construction of a…

  12. The Reciprocal Relationship between Parental Involvement and Mathematics Achievement: Autoregressive Cross-Lagged Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Sehee; Yoo, Sung-Kyung; You, Sukkyung; Wu, Chih-Chun

    2010-01-01

    This study focused on comparing the longitudinal associations between two types of parental involvement (i.e., mathematics value and academic reinforcement) and high school students' mathematics achievement, using data from the Longitudinal Study of American Youth (LSAY). Results, based on multivariate autoregressive cross-lagged modeling,…

  13. Fault detection using a two-model test for changes in the parameters of an autoregressive time series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholtz, P.; Smyth, P.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes an investigation of a statistical hypothesis testing method for detecting changes in the characteristics of an observed time series. The work is motivated by the need for practical automated methods for on-line monitoring of Deep Space Network (DSN) equipment to detect failures and changes in behavior. In particular, on-line monitoring of the motor current in a DSN 34-m beam waveguide (BWG) antenna is used as an example. The algorithm is based on a measure of the information theoretic distance between two autoregressive models: one estimated with data from a dynamic reference window and one estimated with data from a sliding reference window. The Hinkley cumulative sum stopping rule is utilized to detect a change in the mean of this distance measure, corresponding to the detection of a change in the underlying process. The basic theory behind this two-model test is presented, and the problem of practical implementation is addressed, examining windowing methods, model estimation, and detection parameter assignment. Results from the five fault-transition simulations are presented to show the possible limitations of the detection method, and suggestions for future implementation are given.

  14. Spectral and Spread Spectral Teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S

    2010-01-01

    We report how quantum information encoded into the spectral degree of freedom of a single-photon state is teleported using a finite spectrally entangled biphoton state. We further demonstrate how the bandwidth of a teleported waveform can be controllably and coherently dilated using a spread spectral variant of teleportation. We present analytical fidelities for spectral and spread spectral teleportation when complex-valued Gaussian states are prepared using a proposed experimental approach, and we discuss the utility of these techniques for integrating broad-bandwidth photonic qubits with narrow-bandwidth receivers in quantum communication systems.

  15. A nonlinear generalization of spectral Granger causality.

    PubMed

    He, Fei; Wei, Hua-Liang; Billings, Stephen A; Sarrigiannis, Ptolemaios G

    2014-06-01

    Spectral measures of linear Granger causality have been widely applied to study the causal connectivity between time series data in neuroscience, biology, and economics. Traditional Granger causality measures are based on linear autoregressive with exogenous (ARX) inputs models of time series data, which cannot truly reveal nonlinear effects in the data especially in the frequency domain. In this study, it is shown that the classical Geweke's spectral causality measure can be explicitly linked with the output spectra of corresponding restricted and unrestricted time-domain models. The latter representation is then generalized to nonlinear bivariate signals and for the first time nonlinear causality analysis in the frequency domain. This is achieved by using the nonlinear ARX (NARX) modeling of signals, and decomposition of the recently defined output frequency response function which is related to the NARX model.

  16. The Autoregressive Method: A Method of Approximating and Estimating Positive Functions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-01

    existsn a function K n(.,.) of two complex variables such that K (.,y) L 2 n n (1.7) n K (-,Y) E k n(y) cPj (.) (1.8) (g(.),Kn(- y g(y) for all e(.) 2...1.10) KE(eY) = j(y) cPj (.) J=O At the same time, we have verified the reproducing property (1.8) because any g(.) C 2 can be written as In g(*) = g jCj...Cp%(.) is 1 30- * (e ix e4p(e a E CP c(0)cp( )p a0 J=0 and pKOO P x ix .- e(Ose Cpo ~(0) Cpj (e a ( ,O K K(OO) o~p p J Now by Plancherelts theorem

  17. Finding Clocks in Genes: A Bayesian Approach to Estimate Periodicity

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yan; Hong, Christian I.; Lim, Sookkyung; Song, Seongho

    2016-01-01

    Identification of rhythmic gene expression from metabolic cycles to circadian rhythms is crucial for understanding the gene regulatory networks and functions of these biological processes. Recently, two algorithms, JTK_CYCLE and ARSER, have been developed to estimate periodicity of rhythmic gene expression. JTK_CYCLE performs well for long or less noisy time series, while ARSER performs well for detecting a single rhythmic category. However, observing gene expression at high temporal resolution is not always feasible, and many scientists are interested in exploring both ultradian and circadian rhythmic categories simultaneously. In this paper, a new algorithm, named autoregressive Bayesian spectral regression (ABSR), is proposed. It estimates the period of time-course experimental data and classifies gene expression profiles into multiple rhythmic categories simultaneously. Through the simulation studies, it is shown that ABSR substantially improves the accuracy of periodicity estimation and clustering of rhythmic categories as compared to JTK_CYCLE and ARSER for the data with low temporal resolution. Moreover, ABSR is insensitive to rhythmic patterns. This new scheme is applied to existing time-course mouse liver data to estimate period of rhythms and classify the genes into ultradian, circadian, and arrhythmic categories. It is observed that 49.2% of the circadian profiles detected by JTK_CYCLE with 1-hour resolution are also detected by ABSR with only 4-hour resolution. PMID:27340654

  18. Spectral reflectance indices for estimating yield and water content in spring wheat genotypes under well irrigated, water stress, and high temperature conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez-Rodriguez, Mario

    Scope and Method of Study. Alternative methods for selecting, detecting, and identifying higher yielding genotypes in wheat breeding programs are important for obtaining major genetic gains. The water indices can be used as an indirect selection tool because of their strong association with different physiological and yield components. Diverse spring wheat advanced lines were used, which corresponded to three international trials developed by the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT); 24th Elite Spring Wheat Yield Trial (ESWYT) with 25 lines, 11th Semi-Arid Wheat Yield Trial (SAWYT) with 40 lines, and 11th High Temperature Wheat Yield Trial (HTWYT) with 18 lines. Two other experiments also employed advanced lines for testing the relationship between water indices and water content parameters (10-16 lines) and for evaluating the influence of morphological traits (20 lines) over the water indices. Several water indices and other reflectance indices were estimated at three growth stages (booting, heading, and grain filling) using a field portable spectrometer (Analytical Spectral Devices, Boulder, CO). Field plots were planted in Northwest Mexico during three growing seasons (2006, 2007, and 2007). Grain yield, biomass, and some water status parameters were determined in diverse experiments. Findings and Conclusions. There were high correlations (phenotypic and genetic) between grain yield and the water indices showing high heritability, response to selection and correlated response, relative selection efficiency, and efficiency in selecting the higher yielding genotypes. Two water indices showed the strongest relationships (NWI-1 and NWI-3) for all the parameters determined in the well irrigated, water stress, and high temperature environments. In addition, the water indices were related with parameters commonly employed for assessing the crop water status ( i.e., water potential) during booting, anthesis and grain filling under water stress

  19. Multilevel Models for Intensive Longitudinal Data with Heterogeneous Autoregressive Errors: The Effect of Misspecification and Correction with Cholesky Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Jahng, Seungmin; Wood, Phillip K.

    2017-01-01

    Intensive longitudinal studies, such as ecological momentary assessment studies using electronic diaries, are gaining popularity across many areas of psychology. Multilevel models (MLMs) are most widely used analytical tools for intensive longitudinal data (ILD). Although ILD often have individually distinct patterns of serial correlation of measures over time, inferences of the fixed effects, and random components in MLMs are made under the assumption that all variance and autocovariance components are homogenous across individuals. In the present study, we introduced a multilevel model with Cholesky transformation to model ILD with individually heterogeneous covariance structure. In addition, the performance of the transformation method and the effects of misspecification of heterogeneous covariance structure were investigated through a Monte Carlo simulation. We found that, if individually heterogeneous covariances are incorrectly assumed as homogenous independent or homogenous autoregressive, MLMs produce highly biased estimates of the variance of random intercepts and the standard errors of the fixed intercept and the fixed effect of a level 2 covariate when the average autocorrelation is high. For intensive longitudinal data with individual specific residual covariance, the suggested transformation method showed lower bias in those estimates than the misspecified models when the number of repeated observations within individuals is 50 or more. PMID:28286490

  20. Extrapolation of a non-linear autoregressive model of pulmonary mechanics.

    PubMed

    Langdon, Ruby; Docherty, Paul D; Chiew, Yeong Shiong; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2017-02-01

    For patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), mechanical ventilation (MV) is an essential therapy in the intensive care unit (ICU). Suboptimal PEEP levels in MV can cause ventilator induced lung injury, which is associated with increased mortality, extended ICU stay, and high cost. The ability to predict the outcome of respiratory mechanics in response to changes in PEEP would thus provide a critical advantage in personalising and improving care. Testing the potentially dangerous high pressures would not be required to assess their impact. A nonlinear autoregressive (NARX) model was used to predict airway pressure in 19 data sets from 10 mechanically ventilated ARDS patients. Patient-specific NARX models were identified from pressure and flow data over one, two, three, or four adjacent PEEP levels in a recruitment manoeuvre. Extrapolation of NARX model elastance functions allowed prediction of patient responses to PEEP changes to higher or lower pressures. NARX model predictions were more successful than those using a well validated first order model (FOM). The most clinically important results were for extrapolation up one PEEP step of 2cmH2O from the highest PEEP in the training data. When the NARX model was trained on one PEEP level, the mean RMS residual for the extrapolation PEEP level was 0.52 (90% CI: 0.47-0.57) cmH2O, compared to 1.50 (90% CI: 1.38-1.62) cmH2O for the FOM. When trained on four PEEP levels, the NARX result was 0.50 (90% CI: 0.42-0.58) cmH2O, and was 1.95 (90% CI: 1.71-2.19) cmH2O for the FOM. The results suggest that a full recruitment manoeuvre may not be required for the NARX model to obtain a useful estimate of the pressure waveform at higher PEEP levels. The methodology could thus allow clinicians to make informed decisions about ventilator PEEP settings while reducing the risk associated with high PEEP, and subsequent high peak airway pressures.

  1. Lag-One Autocorrelation in Short Series: Estimation and Hypotheses Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solanas, Antonio; Manolov, Rumen; Sierra, Vicenta

    2010-01-01

    In the first part of the study, nine estimators of the first-order autoregressive parameter are reviewed and a new estimator is proposed. The relationships and discrepancies between the estimators are discussed in order to achieve a clear differentiation. In the second part of the study, the precision in the estimation of autocorrelation is…

  2. Analysis of Feedback Mechanisms with Unknown Delay Using Sparse Multivariate Autoregressive Method

    PubMed Central

    Ip, Edward H.; Zhang, Qiang; Sowinski, Tomasz; Simpson, Sean L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the study of two interacting processes in which a feedback mechanism exists between the processes. The study was motivated by problems such as the circadian oscillation of gene expression where two interacting protein transcriptions form both negative and positive feedback loops with long delays to equilibrium. Traditionally, data of this type could be examined using autoregressive analysis. However, in circadian oscillation the order of an autoregressive model cannot be determined a priori. We propose a sparse multivariate autoregressive method that incorporates mixed linear effects into regression analysis, and uses a forward-backward greedy search algorithm to select non-zero entries in the regression coefficients, the number of which is constrained not to exceed a pre-specified number. A small simulation study provides preliminary evidence of the validity of the method. Besides the circadian oscillation example, an additional example of blood pressure variations using data from an intervention study is used to illustrate the method and the interpretation of the results obtained from the sparse matrix method. These applications demonstrate how sparse representation can be used for handling high dimensional variables that feature dynamic, reciprocal relationships. PMID:26252637

  3. Estimation of mass of black hole candidate H1743-322 using spectral and timing analysis of 2010 and 2011 outbursts with TCAF and POS models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molla, Aslam Ali; Debnath, Dipak; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Mondal, Santanu; Jana, Arghajit; Chatterjee, Debjit

    2016-07-01

    The black hole X-ray binary H1743-322 has been observed almost during every X-ray mission since the inception of X-ray astronomy. Like other black hole candidates H1743-322 is highly variable. Using a self consistent accretion flow model (TCAF), we study spectral evolution during its 2010 & 2011 outbursts by keeping model normalization fixed to a value (14.5). As model normalization depends only on mass, distance and inclination angle of the black hole so, it should be a constant. This constant allows us to calculate mass of the black hole if we keep it frozen. The only uncertainty in mass and normalization measurements comes from the uncertainty of distance and inclination angle. Here we present spectral analysis of H1743-322 during 2010 and 2011 outburst and conclude that the mass of the black hole is within a range of 9 - 13 M_Sun.

  4. Estimation of the Spectral Sensitivity Functions of Un-Modified and Modified Commercial Off-The Digital Cameras to Enable Their Use as a Multispectral Imaging System for Uavs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berra, E.; Gibson-Poole, S.; MacArthur, A.; Gaulton, R.; Hamilton, A.

    2015-08-01

    Commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) digital cameras on-board unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have the potential to be used as multispectral imaging systems; however, their spectral sensitivity is usually unknown and needs to be either measured or estimated. This paper details a step by step methodology for identifying the spectral sensitivity of modified (to be response to near infra-red wavelengths) and un-modified COTS digital cameras, showing the results of its application for three different models of camera. Six digital still cameras, which are being used as imaging systems on-board different UAVs, were selected to have their spectral sensitivities measured by a monochromator. Each camera was exposed to monochromatic light ranging from 370 nm to 1100 nm in 10 nm steps, with images of each step recorded in RAW format. The RAW images were converted linearly into TIFF images using DCRaw, an open-source program, before being batch processed through ImageJ (also open-source), which calculated the mean and standard deviation values from each of the red-green-blue (RGB) channels over a fixed central region within each image. These mean values were then related to the relative spectral radiance from the monochromator and its integrating sphere, in order to obtain the relative spectral response (RSR) for each of the cameras colour channels. It was found that different un-modified camera models present very different RSR in some channels, and one of the modified cameras showed a response that was unexpected. This highlights the need to determine the RSR of a camera before using it for any quantitative studies.

  5. Spectrally selective glazings

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    Spectrally selective glazing is window glass that permits some portions of the solar spectrum to enter a building while blocking others. This high-performance glazing admits as much daylight as possible while preventing transmission of as much solar heat as possible. By controlling solar heat gains in summer, preventing loss of interior heat in winter, and allowing occupants to reduce electric lighting use by making maximum use of daylight, spectrally selective glazing significantly reduces building energy consumption and peak demand. Because new spectrally selective glazings can have a virtually clear appearance, they admit more daylight and permit much brighter, more open views to the outside while still providing the solar control of the dark, reflective energy-efficient glass of the past. This Federal Technology Alert provides detailed information and procedures for Federal energy managers to consider spectrally selective glazings. The principle of spectrally selective glazings is explained. Benefits related to energy efficiency and other architectural criteria are delineated. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application of spectrally selective glazing, and step-by-step instructions are given for estimating energy savings. Case studies are also presented to illustrate actual costs and energy savings. Current manufacturers, technology users, and references for further reading are included for users who have questions not fully addressed here.

  6. Simultaneous estimation of phase derivative and phase using parallel Kalman filter implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Rishikesh; Rastogi, Pramod

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a technique for the simultaneous estimation of interference phase derivative and phase from a complex interferogram recorded in an optical interferometric setup. The complex interferogram is represented as a spatially varying autoregressive process in a given row or column at a time. The phase derivative is estimated from the poles of the transfer function representation of the autoregressive process. The poles are computed using the spatially varying autoregressive coefficients which are estimated by a computationally efficient Rauch-Tung-Striebel smoothing algorithm. The estimated phase derivative is used as a control input to a state space model designed for the phase estimation at each pixel. The unscented Kalman filter is utilized to deal with the nonlinear measurement process for the accurate estimation of the unwrapped phase. Numerical and experimental results substantiate the ability of the proposed method in handling noisy phase fringe patterns.

  7. Two Different Points of View through Artificial Intelligence and Vector Autoregressive Models for Ex Post and Ex Ante Forecasting.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Alev Dilek; Caliskan Cavdar, Seyma

    2015-01-01

    The ANN method has been applied by means of multilayered feedforward neural networks (MLFNs) by using different macroeconomic variables such as the exchange rate of USD/TRY, gold prices, and the Borsa Istanbul (BIST) 100 index based on monthly data over the period of January 2000 and September 2014 for Turkey. Vector autoregressive (VAR) method has also been applied with the same variables for the same period of time. In this study, different from other studies conducted up to the present, ENCOG machine learning framework has been used along with JAVA programming language in order to constitute the ANN. The training of network has been done by resilient propagation method. The ex post and ex ante estimates obtained by the ANN method have been compared with the results obtained by the econometric forecasting method of VAR. Strikingly, our findings based on the ANN method reveal that there is a possibility of financial distress or a financial crisis in Turkey starting from October 2017. The results which were obtained with the method of VAR also support the results of ANN method. Additionally, our results indicate that the ANN approach has more superior prediction performance than the VAR method.

  8. Two Different Points of View through Artificial Intelligence and Vector Autoregressive Models for Ex Post and Ex Ante Forecasting

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Alev Dilek; Caliskan Cavdar, Seyma

    2015-01-01

    The ANN method has been applied by means of multilayered feedforward neural networks (MLFNs) by using different macroeconomic variables such as the exchange rate of USD/TRY, gold prices, and the Borsa Istanbul (BIST) 100 index based on monthly data over the period of January 2000 and September 2014 for Turkey. Vector autoregressive (VAR) method has also been applied with the same variables for the same period of time. In this study, different from other studies conducted up to the present, ENCOG machine learning framework has been used along with JAVA programming language in order to constitute the ANN. The training of network has been done by resilient propagation method. The ex post and ex ante estimates obtained by the ANN method have been compared with the results obtained by the econometric forecasting method of VAR. Strikingly, our findings based on the ANN method reveal that there is a possibility of financial distress or a financial crisis in Turkey starting from October 2017. The results which were obtained with the method of VAR also support the results of ANN method. Additionally, our results indicate that the ANN approach has more superior prediction performance than the VAR method. PMID:26550010

  9. An evaluation of the classical and extended Rossby wave theories in explaining spectral estimates of the first few baroclinic modes in the South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maharaj, Angela M.; Cipollini, Paolo; Holbrook, Neil J.; Killworth, Peter D.; Blundell, Jeffrey R.

    2007-06-01

    Previous literature has suggested that multiple peaks in sea level anomalies (SLA) detected by two-dimensional Fourier Transform (2D-FT) analysis are spectral components of multiple propagating signals, which may correspond to different baroclinic Rossby wave modes. We test this hypothesis in the South Pacific Ocean by applying a 2D-FT analysis to the long Rossby wave signal determined from filtered TOPEX/Poseidon and European Remote Sensing-1/2 satellite altimeter derived SLA. The first four baroclinic mode dispersion curves for the classical linear wave theory and the Killworth and Blundell extended theory are used to determine the spectral signature and energy contributions of each mode. South of 17°S, the first two extended theory modes explain up to 60% more of the variance in the observed power spectral energy than their classical linear theory counterparts. We find that Rossby wave modes 2 3 contribute to the total Rossby wave energy in the SLA data. The second mode contributes significantly over most of the basin. The third mode is also evident in some localized regions of the South Pacific but may be ignored at the large scale. Examination of a selection of case study sites suggests that bathymetric effects may dominate at longer wavelengths or permit higher order mode solutions, but mean flow tends to be the more influential factor in the extended theory. We discuss the regional variations in frequency and wave number characteristics of the extended theory modes across the South Pacific basin.

  10. Assessing plant water relations based on hidden in formation in the hyper-spectral signatures: Parameterization of olive leaf P-V curve and estimation of water potential components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rallo, Giovanni; Provenzano, Giuseppe; Jones, Hamlyn G.

    2015-04-01

    The Soil Plant Atmosphere Continuum (SPAC) is characterized by complex structures and biophysical processes acting over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. Additionally, in olive grove systems, the plant adaptive strategies to respond to soil water-limited conditions make the system even more complex. One of the greatest challenges in hydrological research is to quantify changing plant water relations. A promising new technology is provided by the advent of new field spectroscopy detectors, characterized by very high resolution over the spectral range between 300 and 2500 nm, allowing the detection of narrow reflectance or absorptance peaks, to separate close lying peaks and to discover new information, hidden at lower resolutions. The general objective of the present research was to investigate a range of plant state function parameters in a non-destructive and repeatable manner and to improve methodologies aimed to parameterize hydrological models describing the entire SPAC, or each single compartment (soil or plant). We have investigated the use of hyperspectral sensing for the parameterization of the hydraulic pressure-volume curve (P-V) for olive leaf and for the indirect estimation of the two principal leaf water potential components, i.e. turgor and osmotic potentials. Experiments were carried out on an olive grove in Sicily, during the mature phase of the first vegetative flush. Leaf spectral signatures and associated P-V measurements were acquired on olive leaves collected from well-irrigated plants and from plants maintained under moderate or severe water stress. Leaf spectral reflectance was monitored with a FieldSpec 4 spectro-radiometer (Analytical Spectral Device, Inc.), in a range of wavelengths from VIS to SWIR (350-2500 nm), with sampling intervals of 1.4 nm and 2.0 nm, respectively in the regions from 350 to 1000 nm and from 1000 to 2500 nm. Measurements required the use of contact probe and leaf clip (Analytical Spectral Device, Inc

  11. Covariance propagation in spectral indices

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, P. J.

    2015-01-09

    In this study, the dosimetry community has a history of using spectral indices to support neutron spectrum characterization and cross section validation efforts. An important aspect to this type of analysis is the proper consideration of the contribution of the spectrum uncertainty to the total uncertainty in calculated spectral indices (SIs). This study identifies deficiencies in the traditional treatment of the SI uncertainty, provides simple bounds to the spectral component in the SI uncertainty estimates, verifies that these estimates are reflected in actual applications, details a methodology that rigorously captures the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI, and provides quantified examples that demonstrate the importance of the proper treatment the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI.

  12. Covariance propagation in spectral indices

    DOE PAGES

    Griffin, P. J.

    2015-01-09

    In this study, the dosimetry community has a history of using spectral indices to support neutron spectrum characterization and cross section validation efforts. An important aspect to this type of analysis is the proper consideration of the contribution of the spectrum uncertainty to the total uncertainty in calculated spectral indices (SIs). This study identifies deficiencies in the traditional treatment of the SI uncertainty, provides simple bounds to the spectral component in the SI uncertainty estimates, verifies that these estimates are reflected in actual applications, details a methodology that rigorously captures the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI, andmore » provides quantified examples that demonstrate the importance of the proper treatment the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI.« less

  13. Spectral fitting inversion of low-frequency normal modes with self-coupling and cross-coupling of toroidal and spheroidal multiplets: numerical experiments to estimate the isotropic and anisotropic velocity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Hitoshi

    2016-06-01

    The aspherical structure of the Earth is described in terms of lateral heterogeneity and anisotropy of the P- and S-wave velocities, density heterogeneity, ellipticity and rotation of the Earth and undulation of the discontinuity interfaces of the seismic wave velocities. Its structure significantly influences the normal mode spectra of the Earth's free oscillation in the form of cross-coupling between toroidal and spheroidal multiplets and self-coupling between the singlets forming them. Thus, the aspherical structure must be conversely estimated from the free oscillation spectra influenced by the cross-coupling and self-coupling. In the present study, we improve a spectral fitting inversion algorithm which was developed in a previous study to retrieve the global structures of the isotropic and anisotropic velocities of the P and S waves from the free oscillation spectra. The main improvement is that the geographical distribution of the intensity of the S-wave azimuthal anisotropy is represented by a nonlinear combination of structure coefficients for the anisotropic velocity structure, whereas in the previous study it was expanded into a generalized spherical harmonic series. Consequently, the improved inversion algorithm reduces the number of unknown parameters that must be determined compared to the previous inversion algorithm and employs a one-step inversion method by which the structure coefficients for the isotropic and anisotropic velocities are directly estimated from the fee oscillation spectra. The applicability of the improved inversion is examined by several numerical experiments using synthetic spectral data, which are produced by supposing a variety of isotropic and anisotropic velocity structures, earthquake source parameters and station-event pairs. Furthermore, the robustness of the inversion algorithm is investigated with respect to the back-ground noise contaminating the spectral data as well as truncating the series expansions by finite terms

  14. A Poisson-lognormal conditional-autoregressive model for multivariate spatial analysis of pedestrian crash counts across neighborhoods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiyi; Kockelman, Kara M

    2013-11-01

    This work examines the relationship between 3-year pedestrian crash counts across Census tracts in Austin, Texas, and various land use, network, and demographic attributes, such as land use balance, residents' access to commercial land uses, sidewalk density, lane-mile densities (by roadway class), and population and employment densities (by type). The model specification allows for region-specific heterogeneity, correlation across response types, and spatial autocorrelation via a Poisson-based multivariate conditional auto-regressive (CAR) framework and is estimated using Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. Least-squares regression estimates of walk-miles traveled per zone serve as the exposure measure. Here, the Poisson-lognormal multivariate CAR model outperforms an aspatial Poisson-lognormal multivariate model and a spatial model (without cross-severity correlation), both in terms of fit and inference. Positive spatial autocorrelation emerges across neighborhoods, as expected (due to latent heterogeneity or missing variables that trend in space, resulting in spatial clustering of crash counts). In comparison, the positive aspatial, bivariate cross correlation of severe (fatal or incapacitating) and non-severe crash rates reflects latent covariates that have impacts across severity levels but are more local in nature (such as lighting conditions and local sight obstructions), along with spatially lagged cross correlation. Results also suggest greater mixing of residences and commercial land uses is associated with higher pedestrian crash risk across different severity levels, ceteris paribus, presumably since such access produces more potential conflicts between pedestrian and vehicle movements. Interestingly, network densities show variable effects, and sidewalk provision is associated with lower severe-crash rates.

  15. Spectral estimates of the first few Rossby wave baroclinic modes in the South Pacific Ocean from satellite altimeters and testing of theories against these observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maharaj, A. M.; Cipollini, P.; Holbrook, N. J.; Killworth, P. D.; Blundell, J. R.

    2007-12-01

    Previous literature has suggested that multiple peaks in sea level anomalies (SLA) detected by two-dimensional Fourier transform (2D-FT) analysis are spectral components of multiple propagating signals which may correspond to different baroclinic Rossby wave modes. We test this hypothesis in the South Pacific Ocean by applying a 2D-FT analysis to the long Rossby wave signal determined from filtered TOPEX/Poseidon and ERS- 1/2 satellite altimeter derived SLA. The first four baroclinic mode dispersion curves for the classical linear wave theory and the Killworth and Blundell extended theory are used to determine the spectral signature and energy contributions of each mode. South of 17°S, the first two extended theory modes explain up to 60% more of the variance in the observed power spectral energy than their classical linear theory counterparts. The second mode contributes significantly over most of the basin. The third mode is also evident in some localised regions of the South Pacific but may be ignored at the large scale. Examination of a selection of case study sites suggest that bathymetric effects may dominate at longer wavelengths, or permit higher order mode solutions but mean flow tends to be the more influential factor in the extended theory. This study also examines the prevalence and characteristics of multiple propagating signals in the South Pacific SLA using the two-dimensional Radon Transform (2D-RT). Primary Radon Transform (RT) and Fourier Transform (FT) peaks generally compared well to each other and to the extended theory first baroclinic mode for most of the domain. A comparison to the energy ratios for the first four FT baroclinic modes showed that while the number of modes in their FT and peaks in the RT analysis coincided, the actual spatial distribution and relative contribution of these was not as consistent. Strong similarities existed in the spatial location and energy contribution between RT peaks 1 and 2 and FT modes 1 and 2. We

  16. Estimation of the blood Doppler frequency shift by a time-varying parametric approach.

    PubMed

    Girault, J M; Kouamé, D; Ouahabi, A; Patat, F

    2000-03-01

    Doppler ultrasound is widely used in medical applications to extract the blood Doppler flow velocity in the arteries via spectral analysis. The spectral analysis of non-stationary signals and particularly Doppler signals requires adequate tools that should present both good time and frequency resolutions. It is well-known that the most commonly used time-windowed Fourier transform, which provides a time-frequency representation, is limited by the intrinsic trade-off between time and frequency resolutions. Parametric methods have then been introduced as an alternative to overcome this resolution problem. However, the performance of those methods deteriorates when high non-stationarities are present in the Doppler signal. For the purpose of accurately estimating the Doppler frequency shift, even when the temporal flow velocity is rapid (high non-stationarity), we propose to combine the use of the time-varying autoregressive (AR) method and the (dominant) pole frequency. This proposed method performs well in the context where non-stationarities are very high. A comparative evaluation has been made between classical (FFT based) and AR (both block and recursive) algorithms. Among recursive algorithms we test an adaptive recursive method as well as a time-varying recursive method. Finally, the superiority of the time-varying parametric approach in terms of frequency tracking and delay in the frequency estimate is illustrated for both simulated and in vivo Doppler signals.

  17. Fundamental Vibration Frequency and Damping Estimation: A Comparison Using the Random Decrement Method, the Empirical Mode Decomposition, and the HV Spectral Ratio Method for Local Site Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Lopez, C. I.; Upegui Botero, F. M.; Pulliam, J.; Willemann, R. J.; Pasyanos, M.; Schmitz, M.; Rojas Mercedes, N.; Louie, J. N.; Moschetti, M. P.; Martinez-Cruzado, J. A.; Suárez, L.; Huerfano Moreno, V.; Polanco, E.

    2013-12-01

    Site characterization in civil engineering demands to know at least two of the dynamic properties of soil systems, which are: (i) dominant vibration frequency, and (ii) damping. As part of an effort to develop understanding of the principles of earthquake hazard analysis, particularly site characterization techniques using non invasive/non destructive seismic methods, a workshop (Pan-American Advanced Studies Institute: New Frontiers in Geophysical Research: Bringing New Tools and Techniques to Bear on Earthquake Hazard Analysis and Mitigation) was conducted during july 15-25, 2013 in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic by the alliance of Pan-American Advanced Studies Institute (PASI) and Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS), jointly supported by Department of Energy (DOE) and National Science Foundation (NSF). Preliminary results of the site characterization in terms of fundamental vibration frequency and damping are here presented from data collected during the workshop. Three different methods were used in such estimations and later compared in order to identify the stability of estimations as well as the advantage or disadvantage among these methodologies. The used methods were the: (i) Random Decrement Method (RDM), to estimate fundamental vibration frequency and damping simultaneously; (ii) Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD), to estimate the vibration modes, and (iii) Horizontal to Vertical Spectra ratio (HVSR), to estimate the fundamental vibration frequency. In all cases ambient vibration and induced vibration were used.

  18. Simulation And Forecasting of Daily Pm10 Concentrations Using Autoregressive Models In Kagithane Creek Valley, Istanbul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ağaç, Kübra; Koçak, Kasım; Deniz, Ali

    2015-04-01

    A time series approach using autoregressive model (AR), moving average model (MA) and seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average model (SARIMA) were used in this study to simulate and forecast daily PM10 concentrations in Kagithane Creek Valley, Istanbul. Hourly PM10 concentrations have been measured in Kagithane Creek Valley between 2010 and 2014 periods. Bosphorus divides the city in two parts as European and Asian parts. The historical part of the city takes place in Golden Horn. Our study area Kagithane Creek Valley is connected with this historical part. The study area is highly polluted because of its topographical structure and industrial activities. Also population density is extremely high in this site. The dispersion conditions are highly poor in this creek valley so it is necessary to calculate PM10 levels for air quality and human health. For given period there were some missing PM10 concentration values so to make an accurate calculations and to obtain exact results gap filling method was applied by Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA). SSA is a new and efficient method for gap filling and it is an state-of-art modeling. SSA-MTM Toolkit was used for our study. SSA is considered as a noise reduction algorithm because it decomposes an original time series to trend (if exists), oscillatory and noise components by way of a singular value decomposition. The basic SSA algorithm has stages of decomposition and reconstruction. For given period daily and monthly PM10 concentrations were calculated and episodic periods are determined. Long term and short term PM10 concentrations were analyzed according to European Union (EU) standards. For simulation and forecasting of high level PM10 concentrations, meteorological data (wind speed, pressure and temperature) were used to see the relationship between daily PM10 concentrations. Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) was also applied to the data to see the periodicity and according to these periods models were built

  19. Improving the contrast of breast cancer masses in ultrasound using an autoregressive model based filter.

    PubMed

    von Lavante, Etienne; Noble, J Alison

    2007-01-01

    The assessment and diagnosis of breast cancer with ultrasound is a challenging problem due to the low contrast between cancer masses and benign tissue. Due to this low contrast it has proven to be difficult to achieve reliable segmentation results on breast cancer masses. An autoregressive model has been employed to filter out of the backscattered RF-signal from a tissue harmonic image which is not degraded by harmonic leakage. Measurements on the filtered image have shown a significant (up to 45%) increase in contrast between cancer masses and benign tissue.

  20. Asymmetric impact of rainfall on India's food grain production: evidence from quantile autoregressive distributed lag model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Debdatta; Mitra, Subrata Kumar

    2016-10-01

    This study used a quantile autoregressive distributed lag (QARDL) model to capture asymmetric impact of rainfall on food production in India. It was found that the coefficient corresponding to the rainfall in the QARDL increased till the 75th quantile and started decreasing thereafter, though it remained in the positive territory. Another interesting finding is that at the 90th quantile and above the coefficients of rainfall though remained positive was not statistically significant and therefore, the benefit of high rainfall on crop production was not conclusive. However, the impact of other determinants, such as fertilizer and pesticide consumption, is quite uniform over the whole range of the distribution of food grain production.

  1. [Study of cortico-cortical functional connectivity with vector autoregressive model of multichannel EEG].

    PubMed

    Kurganskiĭ, A V

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on some practical issues of using vector autoregressive model (VAR) for multichannel EEG analysis. Those issues include: EEG preprocessing, checking if the necessary conditions of VAR model applicability are met, optimal order selection, and assessment of the validity of fitted VAR model. Both non-directed (ordinary coherence and imaginary part of the complex-valued coherency) and directed (directed coherence, directed transfer function and partial directed coherence) measures of the strength of inter-channel coupling are discussed. These measures are analyzed with respect to their properties (scale invariance) and known problems in using them (spurious interactions, volume conduction).

  2. In situ nondestructive imaging of functional pigments in Micro-Tom tomato fruits by multi spectral imaging based on Wiener estimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishidate, Izumi; Ooe, Shintaro; Todoroki, Shinsuke; Asamizu, Erika

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the functional pigments in the tomato fruits nondestructively, we propose a method based on the multispectral diffuse reflectance images estimated by the Wiener estimation for a digital RGB image. Each pixel of the multispectral image is converted to the absorbance spectrum and then analyzed by the multiple regression analysis to visualize the contents of chlorophyll a, lycopene and β-carotene. The result confirms the feasibility of the method for in situ imaging of chlorophyll a, β-carotene and lycopene in the tomato fruits.

  3. Spectral Predictors

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarria, L; Lindstrom, P; Rossignac, J

    2006-11-17

    Many scientific, imaging, and geospatial applications produce large high-precision scalar fields sampled on a regular grid. Lossless compression of such data is commonly done using predictive coding, in which weighted combinations of previously coded samples known to both encoder and decoder are used to predict subsequent nearby samples. In hierarchical, incremental, or selective transmission, the spatial pattern of the known neighbors is often irregular and varies from one sample to the next, which precludes prediction based on a single stencil and fixed set of weights. To handle such situations and make the best use of available neighboring samples, we propose a local spectral predictor that offers optimal prediction by tailoring the weights to each configuration of known nearby samples. These weights may be precomputed and stored in a small lookup table. We show that predictive coding using our spectral predictor improves compression for various sources of high-precision data.

  4. [Hyper spectral estimation method for soil alkali hydrolysable nitrogen content based on discrete wavelet transform and genetic algorithm in combining with partial least squares DWT-GA-PLS)].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Yan; Zhao, Geng-Xing; Li, Xi-Can; Wang, Xiang-Feng; Li, Yu-Ling

    2013-11-01

    Taking the Qihe County in Shandong Province of East China as the study area, soil samples were collected from the field, and based on the hyperspectral reflectance measurement of the soil samples and the transformation with the first deviation, the spectra were denoised and compressed by discrete wavelet transform (DWT), the variables for the soil alkali hydrolysable nitrogen quantitative estimation models were selected by genetic algorithms (GA), and the estimation models for the soil alkali hydrolysable nitrogen content were built by using partial least squares (PLS) regression. The discrete wavelet transform and genetic algorithm in combining with partial least squares (DWT-GA-PLS) could not only compress the spectrum variables and reduce the model variables, but also improve the quantitative estimation accuracy of soil alkali hydrolysable nitrogen content. Based on the 1-2 levels low frequency coefficients of discrete wavelet transform, and under the condition of large scale decrement of spectrum variables, the calibration models could achieve the higher or the same prediction accuracy as the soil full spectra. The model based on the second level low frequency coefficients had the highest precision, with the model predicting R2 being 0.85, the RMSE being 8.11 mg x kg(-1), and RPD being 2.53, indicating the effectiveness of DWT-GA-PLS method in estimating soil alkali hydrolysable nitrogen content.

  5. TaiWan Ionospheric Model (TWIM) prediction based on time series autoregressive analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, L. C.; Macalalad, Ernest P.; Liu, C. H.

    2014-10-01

    As described in a previous paper, a three-dimensional ionospheric electron density (Ne) model has been constructed from vertical Ne profiles retrieved from the FormoSat3/Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate GPS radio occultation measurements and worldwide ionosonde foF2 and foE data and named the TaiWan Ionospheric Model (TWIM). The TWIM exhibits vertically fitted α-Chapman-type layers with distinct F2, F1, E, and D layers, and surface spherical harmonic approaches for the fitted layer parameters including peak density, peak density height, and scale height. To improve the TWIM into a real-time model, we have developed a time series autoregressive model to forecast short-term TWIM coefficients. The time series of TWIM coefficients are considered as realizations of stationary stochastic processes within a processing window of 30 days. These autocorrelation coefficients are used to derive the autoregressive parameters and then forecast the TWIM coefficients, based on the least squares method and Lagrange multiplier technique. The forecast root-mean-square relative TWIM coefficient errors are generally <30% for 1 day predictions. The forecast TWIM values of foE and foF2 values are also compared and evaluated using worldwide ionosonde data.

  6. Small-scale solar radiation forecasting using ARMA and nonlinear autoregressive neural network models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmouiza, Khalil; Cheknane, Ali

    2016-05-01

    This paper aims to introduce an approach for multi-hour forecasting (915 h ahead) of hourly global horizontal solar radiation time series and forecasting of a small-scale solar radiation database (30- and 1-s scales) for a period of 1 day (47,000 s ahead) using commonly and available measured meteorological solar radiation. Three methods are considered in this study. First, autoregressive-moving-average (ARMA) model is used to predict future values of the global solar radiation time series. However, because of the non-stationarity of solar radiation time series, a phase of detrending is needed to stationarize the irradiation data; a 6-degree polynomial model is found to be the most stationary one. Secondly, due to the nonlinearity presented in solar radiation time series, a nonlinear autoregressive (NAR) neural network model is used for prediction purposes. Taking into account the advantages of both models, the goodness of ARMA for linear problems and NAR for nonlinear problems, a hybrid method combining ARMA and NAR is introduced to produce better results. The validation process for the site of Ghardaia in Algaria shows that the hybrid model gives a normalized root mean square error (NRMSE) equals to 0.2034 compared to a NRMSE equal to 0.2634 for NAR model and 0.3241 for ARMA model.

  7. Hydrological time series modeling: A comparison between adaptive neuro-fuzzy, neural network and autoregressive techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohani, A. K.; Kumar, Rakesh; Singh, R. D.

    2012-06-01

    SummaryTime series modeling is necessary for the planning and management of reservoirs. More recently, the soft computing techniques have been used in hydrological modeling and forecasting. In this study, the potential of artificial neural networks and neuro-fuzzy system in monthly reservoir inflow forecasting are examined by developing and comparing monthly reservoir inflow prediction models, based on autoregressive (AR), artificial neural networks (ANNs) and adaptive neural-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). To take care the effect of monthly periodicity in the flow data, cyclic terms are also included in the ANN and ANFIS models. Working with time series flow data of the Sutlej River at Bhakra Dam, India, several ANN and adaptive neuro-fuzzy models are trained with different input vectors. To evaluate the performance of the selected ANN and adaptive neural fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) models, comparison is made with the autoregressive (AR) models. The ANFIS model trained with the input data vector including previous inflows and cyclic terms of monthly periodicity has shown a significant improvement in the forecast accuracy in comparison with the ANFIS models trained with the input vectors considering only previous inflows. In all cases ANFIS gives more accurate forecast than the AR and ANN models. The proposed ANFIS model coupled with the cyclic terms is shown to provide better representation of the monthly inflow forecasting for planning and operation of reservoir.

  8. FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV spectral investigation; computed frequency estimation analysis and electronic structure calculations on 4-hydroxypteridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindarajan, M.; Karabacak, M.

    2013-04-01

    In this work, the vibrational spectral analysis was carried out by using FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy in the range 100-4000 cm-1 and 400-4000 cm-1 respectively, for 4-hydroxypteridine (C6H4N4O, 4HDPETN) molecule. The potential energy curve shows that 4HDPETN molecule has two stable structures. The computational results diagnose the most stable conformer of the 4HDPETN as the S1 structure. The molecular structure, fundamental vibrational frequencies and intensities of the vibrational bands were interpreted with the aid of structure optimizations and normal coordinate force field calculations based density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio HF methods and different basis sets combination. The complete vibrational assignments of wavenumbers were made on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED). The results of the calculations were applied to simulated spectra of the title compound, which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. The scaled B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) results show the best agreement with the experimental values over the other method. The energy and oscillator strength calculated by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) complements with the experimental findings. In addition, molecular electrostatic potential, nonlinear optical and thermodynamic properties of the title compound were performed. Mulliken and natural charges of the title molecule were also calculated and interpreted.

  9. Verification and application of the extended spectral deconvolution algorithm (SDA+) methodology to estimate aerosol fine and coarse mode extinction coefficients in the marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaku, K. C.; Reid, J. S.; O'Neill, N. T.; Quinn, P. K.; Coffman, D. J.; Eck, T. F.

    2014-10-01

    The spectral deconvolution algorithm (SDA) and SDA+ (extended SDA) methodologies can be employed to separate the fine and coarse mode extinction coefficients from measured total aerosol extinction coefficients, but their common use is currently limited to AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) aerosol optical depth (AOD). Here we provide the verification of the SDA+ methodology on a non-AERONET aerosol product, by applying it to fine and coarse mode nephelometer and particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) data sets collected in the marine boundary layer. Using data sets collected on research vessels by NOAA-PMEL(National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory), we demonstrate that with accurate input, SDA+ is able to predict the fine and coarse mode scattering and extinction coefficient partition in global data sets representing a range of aerosol regimes. However, in low-extinction regimes commonly found in the clean marine boundary layer, SDA+ output accuracy is sensitive to instrumental calibration errors. This work was extended to the calculation of coarse and fine mode scattering coefficients with similar success. This effort not only verifies the application of the SDA+ method to in situ data, but by inference verifies the method as a whole for a host of applications, including AERONET. Study results open the door to much more extensive use of nephelometers and PSAPs, with the ability to calculate fine and coarse mode scattering and extinction coefficients in field campaigns that do not have the resources to explicitly measure these values.

  10. Estimation of Respiratory Rates Using the Built-in Microphone of a Smartphone or Headset.

    PubMed

    Nam, Yunyoung; Reyes, Bersain A; Chon, Ki H

    2016-11-01

    This paper proposes accurate respiratory rate estimation using nasal breath sound recordings from a smartphone. Specifically, the proposed method detects nasal airflow using a built-in smartphone microphone or a headset microphone placed underneath the nose. In addition, we also examined if tracheal breath sounds recorded by the built-in microphone of a smartphone placed on the paralaryngeal space can also be used to estimate different respiratory rates ranging from as low as 6 breaths/min to as high as 90 breaths/min. The true breathing rates were measured using inductance plethysmography bands placed around the chest and the abdomen of the subject. Inspiration and expiration were detected by averaging the power of nasal breath sounds. We investigated the suitability of using the smartphone-acquired breath sounds for respiratory rate estimation using two different spectral analyses of the sound envelope signals: The Welch periodogram and the autoregressive spectrum. To evaluate the performance of the proposed methods, data were collected from ten healthy subjects. For the breathing range studied (6-90 breaths/min), experimental results showed that our approach achieves an excellent performance accuracy for the nasal sound as the median errors were less than 1% for all breathing ranges. The tracheal sound, however, resulted in poor estimates of the respiratory rates using either spectral method. For both nasal and tracheal sounds, significant estimation outliers resulted for high breathing rates when subjects had nasal congestion, which often resulted in the doubling of the respiratory rates. Finally, we show that respiratory rates from the nasal sound can be accurately estimated even if a smartphone's microphone is as far as 30 cm away from the nose.

  11. Estimation of mineral dust direct radiative forcing at the European Aerosol Research Lidar NETwork site of Lecce, Italy, during the ChArMEx/ADRIMED summer 2013 campaign: Impact of radiative transfer model spectral resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barragan, Ruben; Romano, Salvatore; Sicard, Michaël.; Burlizzi, Pasquale; Perrone, Maria Rita; Comeron, Adolfo

    2016-09-01

    A field campaign took place in the western and central Mediterranean basin on June-July 2013 in the framework of the ChArMEx (Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/)/ADRIMED (Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact on the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region, http://adrimed.sedoo.fr/) project to characterize the aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) over the Mediterranean. This work focuses on the aerosol DRF estimations at Lecce (40.33°N; 18.11°E; 30 m above sea level) during the Saharan dust outbreak that affected southern Italy from 20 to 24 June 2013. The Global Atmospheric Model (GAME) and the Two-Stream (TS) model were used to calculate the instantaneous aerosol DRF in the short-wave (SW) and long-wave (LW) spectral ranges, at the surface and at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). The main differences between the two models were due to the different numerical methods to solve the radiative transfer (RT) equations and to the more detailed spectral resolution of GAME compared to that of TS. 167 and 115 subbands were used by GAME in the 0.3-4 and 4-37 µm spectral ranges, respectively. Conversely, the TS model used 8 and 11 subbands in the same spectral ranges, respectively. We found on 22 June that the SW-DRFs from the two models were in good agreement, both at the TOA and at the surface. The instantaneous SW-DRFs at the surface and at the TOA varied from -50 to -34 W m-2 and from -6 to +8 W m-2, respectively, while the surface and TOA LW-DRFs ranged between +3.5 and +8.0 W m-2 and between +1.7 and +6.9 W m-2, respectively. In particular, both models provided positive TOA SW-DRFs at solar zenith angles smaller than 25° because of the mixing of the desert dust with anthropogenic pollution during its transport to the study site. In contrast, the TS model overestimated the GAME LW-DRF up to about 5 and 7.5 times at the surface and at the TOA, respectively, when the dust particle contribution was largest. The low spectral

  12. Forecasting and prediction of scorpion sting cases in Biskra province, Algeria, using a seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aims of this study were to highlight some epidemiological aspects of scorpion envenomations, to analyse and interpret the available data for Biskra province, Algeria, and to develop a forecasting model for scorpion sting cases in Biskra province, which records the highest number of scorpion stings in Algeria. METHODS In addition to analysing the epidemiological profile of scorpion stings that occurred throughout the year 2013, we used the Box-Jenkins approach to fit a seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) model to the monthly recorded scorpion sting cases in Biskra from 2000 to 2012. RESULTS The epidemiological analysis revealed that scorpion stings were reported continuously throughout the year, with peaks in the summer months. The most affected age group was 15 to 49 years old, with a male predominance. The most prone human body areas were the upper and lower limbs. The majority of cases (95.9%) were classified as mild envenomations. The time series analysis showed that a (5,1,0)×(0,1,1)12 SARIMA model offered the best fit to the scorpion sting surveillance data. This model was used to predict scorpion sting cases for the year 2013, and the fitted data showed considerable agreement with the actual data. CONCLUSIONS SARIMA models are useful for monitoring scorpion sting cases, and provide an estimate of the variability to be expected in future scorpion sting cases. This knowledge is helpful in predicting whether an unusual situation is developing or not, and could therefore assist decision-makers in strengthening the province’s prevention and control measures and in initiating rapid response measures. PMID:27866407

  13. pH-dependent fluorescence of a heterologously expressed Aequorea green fluorescent protein mutant: in situ spectral characteristics and applicability to intracellular pH estimation.

    PubMed

    Robey, R B; Ruiz, O; Santos, A V; Ma, J; Kear, F; Wang, L J; Li, C J; Bernardo, A A; Arruda, J A

    1998-07-14

    The green fluorescent protein of Aequorea victoria (GFP) is a natural peptide chromophore without substrate or cofactor requirements for fluorescence. In vitro, a recombinant F64L/S65T GFP mutant (GFPmut1) exhibited pH sensitive fluorescence within the physiologic range. When heterologously expressed in BS-C-1 cells or rabbit proximal tubule cells, uniform cytosolic and nuclear fluorescence was observed. Cytosolic fluorescence constituted over 80% of the total. Excitation scanning of transfected cells revealed two GFPmut1-specific regions that were pH-sensitive over the physiologic range, and each region exhibited a unique pH "bias" in fluorescence emission. Excitation at or near the expected maximum of 488 nm (region II) uniformly resulted in fluorescence that was preferentially altered at acidic pH. In contrast, a novel "wild-type" excitation peak at 400 nm (region I) resulted in alkaline-biased fluorescence similar to that described for the wild-type chromophore in vitro, suggesting that wild-type spectral features disrupted in vitro by mutagenesis may be recovered in intact cells. Calibration of intracellular pH (pHi) with in situ fluorescence following excitation in either region revealed a semilogarithmic relationship between fluorescence intensity and pH within the physiologic range. We therefore measured pHi changes attributable to altered Na/HCO3 cotransport (NBC) activity both in GFPmut1-expressing cells and in paired untransfected cells loaded with BCECF. Basal NBC activity was the same in each group, as was the stimulation of activity by 10% CO2, thus validating the utility of GFPmut1 as a fluorescent probe for pHi and establishing a novel, useful, and practical application for GFPmut1 in monitoring pHi in real time.

  14. Assessment of accuracy of the structure-factor-size-estimator method in determining red blood cell aggregate size from ultrasound spectral backscatter coefficient.

    PubMed

    Saha, Ratan K; Franceschini, Emilie; Cloutier, Guy

    2011-04-01

    A computer simulation study to produce ultrasonic backscatter coefficients (BSCs) from red blood cell (RBC) clusters is discussed. The simulation algorithm is suitable for generating non-overlapping, isotropic, and fairly identical RBC clusters. RBCs were stacked following the hexagonal close packing (HCP) structure to form a compact spherical aggregate. Such an aggregate was repeated and placed randomly under non-overlapping condition in the three-dimensional space to mimic an aggregated blood sample. BSCs were computed between 750 KHz and 200 MHz for samples of various cluster sizes at different hematocrits. Magnitudes of BSCs increased with mean aggregate sizes at low frequencies (<20 MHz). The accuracy of the structure-factor-size-estimator (SFSE) method in determining mean aggregate size and packing factor was also examined. A good correlation (R(2) ≥ 0.94) between the mean size of aggregates predicted by the SFSE and true size was found for each hematocrit. This study shows that for spherical aggregates there exists a region for each hematocrit where SFSE works most accurately. Typically, error of SFSE in estimating mean cluster size was <20% for dimensions between 14 and 17 μm at 40% hematocrit. This study suggests that the theoretical framework of SFSE is valid under the assumption of isotropic aggregates.

  15. Use of AVHRR-derived spectral reflectances to estimate surface albedo across the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, J.; Gao, W.

    1997-03-01

    Substantial variations in surface albedo across a large area cause difficulty in estimating regional net solar radiation and atmospheric absorption of shortwave radiation when only ground point measurements of surface albedo are used to represent the whole area. Information on spatial variations and site-wide averages of surface albedo, which vary with the underlying surface type and conditions and the solar zenith angle, is important for studies of clouds and atmospheric radiation over a large surface area. In this study, a bidirectional reflectance model was used to inversely retrieve surface properties such as leaf area index and then the bidirectional reflectance distribution was calculated by using the same radiation model. The albedo was calculated by converting the narrowband reflectance to broadband reflectance and then integrating over the upper hemisphere.

  16. Testing the Causal Links between School Climate, School Violence, and School Academic Performance: A Cross-Lagged Panel Autoregressive Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benbenishty, Rami; Astor, Ron Avi; Roziner, Ilan; Wrabel, Stephani L.

    2016-01-01

    The present study explores the causal link between school climate, school violence, and a school's general academic performance over time using a school-level, cross-lagged panel autoregressive modeling design. We hypothesized that reductions in school violence and climate improvement would lead to schools' overall improved academic performance.…

  17. Curie-point depths estimated from fractal spectral analyses of magnetic anomalies in the western United States and northeast Pacific Oecan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Li, C.

    2011-12-01

    We estimate Curie-point depths (Zb) of the western United States and northeast Pacific Ocean by analyzing radially averaged amplitude spectra of magnetic anomalies based on a fractal magnetization model. The amplitude spectrum of source magnetization is proportional to the wavenumber (k) raised to a fractal exponent (-β). We first test whether long-wavelength components are captured appropriately by using variable overlapping windows ranging in sizes from 75 × 75 km2 to 200 × 200 km2. For each sliding window, the amplitude spectrum is pre-multiplied with the factor k-β prior to computation. We then use the centroid method (Tanaka et al., 1999) to calculate Zb. We find that when the window size approaches 200 × 200 km2 the resolution of estimated Zb is too low to reveal important geological features. For our study, fractal exponents larger than 0.6 will result in overcorrection. Considering the difficulty of simultaneous inversion of the depths to the top and centroid of magnetic sources (Zt and Z0 respectively) and β, we fix β = 0.5 for the whole study area. Note that β here is defined for amplitude spectrum, which is equivalent to 1 for power spectrum of 2D magnetic sources. Our results show that the estimated Curie depths range from 4 km to 40 km. The average Zb in the northern part of the northeast Pacific Ocean is about 14 km below the sea level, and almost the same depths are found in the junction of the active and ancient Cascade arcs and remanent track of Yellowstone hotspot. Subduction beneath the North American plate and consequent magmatism can account for small Zb in the above mentioned volcanic arc regions. The Mendocino Triple Junction separates the northeast Pacific into northern (mainly consisting of the Explorer, Juan de Fuca and Gorda plates) and southern parts. Both the Zb and the thickness of magnetic layer in the southern part are larger than those in the northern part. This contrast is due to the fact that the Pacific plate to the south

  18. Site amplification factors of whole Japan area estimated from spectral ratio of direct S-wave and their application to the real-time prediction of ground motion in Earthquake Early Warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiso, M.; Aoki, S.; Hoshiba, M.

    2014-12-01

    For applying the real-time prediction of ground motion proposed by Hoshiba (2013a, JGR) to Earthquake Early Warning, it is necessary to correct a site amplification factor in an observed waveform. In this study, we aim to estimate site amplification factors at whole area of Japan, and apply the real-time correction proposed by Hoshiba (2013b, BSSA) of site amplification factors to investigate their validity. To estimate site amplification factors, we used the spectral ratio of direct S-wave at two adjunct stations. We constructed a network with many pairs of stations, then solved the equations of the network in a least square sense. As a result, we successfully estimated site amplification factors almost whole of the Japan area, except a part of Hokkaido and Kyushu region, and Islands area. Next, we applied the real-time correction of site amplification factors in the observed waveforms of the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake (Mw 9.0). Distribution of site-corrected seismic intensity calculated in time domain (Kunugi et al., 2008) showed clear distance-dependent relation of seismic intensity, which was not found in the distribution of non-corrected seismic intensity. Finally, we compared the two waveforms recorded in the Ishikari Plain, Hokkaido region, Japan, with correction of site amplification factors. The features of waveform in one station was well reproduced from the waveform of other station with the correction of site amplification factor. Although there are some subjects, e.g. nonlinear behavior of the ground with strong ground motion and azimuth dependency of site amplification factors which are not considered in this study, estimated site amplification factors in this study is effective in real-time prediction of ground motion.

  19. Explanation of power law behavior of autoregressive conditional duration processes based on the random multiplicative process.

    PubMed

    Sato, Aki-Hiro

    2004-04-01

    Autoregressive conditional duration (ACD) processes, which have the potential to be applied to power law distributions of complex systems found in natural science, life science, and social science, are analyzed both numerically and theoretically. An ACD(1) process exhibits the singular second order moment, which suggests that its probability density function (PDF) has a power law tail. It is verified that the PDF of the ACD(1) has a power law tail with an arbitrary exponent depending on a model parameter. On the basis of theory of the random multiplicative process a relation between the model parameter and the power law exponent is theoretically derived. It is confirmed that the relation is valid from numerical simulations. An application of the ACD(1) to intervals between two successive transactions in a foreign currency market is shown.

  20. Explanation of power law behavior of autoregressive conditional duration processes based on the random multiplicative process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Aki-Hiro

    2004-04-01

    Autoregressive conditional duration (ACD) processes, which have the potential to be applied to power law distributions of complex systems found in natural science, life science, and social science, are analyzed both numerically and theoretically. An ACD(1) process exhibits the singular second order moment, which suggests that its probability density function (PDF) has a power law tail. It is verified that the PDF of the ACD(1) has a power law tail with an arbitrary exponent depending on a model parameter. On the basis of theory of the random multiplicative process a relation between the model parameter and the power law exponent is theoretically derived. It is confirmed that the relation is valid from numerical simulations. An application of the ACD(1) to intervals between two successive transactions in a foreign currency market is shown.

  1. Clustering Vector Autoregressive Models: Capturing Qualitative Differences in Within-Person Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bulteel, Kirsten; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Brose, Annette; Ceulemans, Eva

    2016-01-01

    In psychology, studying multivariate dynamical processes within a person is gaining ground. An increasingly often used method is vector autoregressive (VAR) modeling, in which each variable is regressed on all variables (including itself) at the previous time points. This approach reveals the temporal dynamics of a system of related variables across time. A follow-up question is how to analyze data of multiple persons in order to grasp similarities and individual differences in within-person dynamics. We focus on the case where these differences are qualitative in nature, implying that subgroups of persons can be identified. We present a method that clusters persons according to their VAR regression weights, and simultaneously fits a shared VAR model to all persons within a cluster. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated in a simulation study. Moreover, the method is illustrated by applying it to multivariate time series data on depression-related symptoms of young women. PMID:27774077

  2. An Effective Method for Selecting Physical Modes by Vector Autoregressive Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Wahab, M. M.; de Roeck, G.

    1999-05-01

    This paper describes an efficient technique for the selection of relevant modes resulting from a vector autoregressive (ARV) model. The technique is based on plotting the deterministic and stochastic contributions of each mode separately. It helps to identify visually how strong a mode is present in the measured data of the system under consideration. The method is simple to program and applicable to any model based on the data-dependent system (DDS) methodology. In order to demonstrate the applicability of the technique, two examples are presented. In the first example, simulated data of a two-degree-of-freedom system are used, while in the second example, real data on a prestressed concrete bridge are considered.

  3. Autoregressive hidden Markov models for the early detection of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Stanculescu, Ioan; Williams, Christopher K I; Freer, Yvonne

    2014-09-01

    Late onset neonatal sepsis is one of the major clinical concerns when premature babies receive intensive care. Current practice relies on slow laboratory testing of blood cultures for diagnosis. A valuable research question is whether sepsis can be reliably detected before the blood sample is taken. This paper investigates the extent to which physiological events observed in the patient's monitoring traces could be used for the early detection of neonatal sepsis. We model the distribution of these events with an autoregressive hidden Markov model (AR-HMM). Both learning and inference carefully use domain knowledge to extract the baby's true physiology from the monitoring data. Our model can produce real-time predictions about the onset of the infection and also handles missing data. We evaluate the effectiveness of the AR-HMM for sepsis detection on a dataset collected from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh.

  4. Medium term municipal solid waste generation prediction by autoregressive integrated moving average

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, Mohammad K.; Nopiah, Z. M.; Basri, Noor Ezlin A.; Basri, Hassan

    2014-09-12

    Generally, solid waste handling and management are performed by municipality or local authority. In most of developing countries, local authorities suffer from serious solid waste management (SWM) problems and insufficient data and strategic planning. Thus it is important to develop robust solid waste generation forecasting model. It helps to proper manage the generated solid waste and to develop future plan based on relatively accurate figures. In Malaysia, solid waste generation rate increases rapidly due to the population growth and new consumption trends that characterize the modern life style. This paper aims to develop monthly solid waste forecasting model using Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA), such model is applicable even though there is lack of data and will help the municipality properly establish the annual service plan. The results show that ARIMA (6,1,0) model predicts monthly municipal solid waste generation with root mean square error equals to 0.0952 and the model forecast residuals are within accepted 95% confident interval.

  5. Medium term municipal solid waste generation prediction by autoregressive integrated moving average

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younes, Mohammad K.; Nopiah, Z. M.; Basri, Noor Ezlin A.; Basri, Hassan

    2014-09-01

    Generally, solid waste handling and management are performed by municipality or local authority. In most of developing countries, local authorities suffer from serious solid waste management (SWM) problems and insufficient data and strategic planning. Thus it is important to develop robust solid waste generation forecasting model. It helps to proper manage the generated solid waste and to develop future plan based on relatively accurate figures. In Malaysia, solid waste generation rate increases rapidly due to the population growth and new consumption trends that characterize the modern life style. This paper aims to develop monthly solid waste forecasting model using Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA), such model is applicable even though there is lack of data and will help the municipality properly establish the annual service plan. The results show that ARIMA (6,1,0) model predicts monthly municipal solid waste generation with root mean square error equals to 0.0952 and the model forecast residuals are within accepted 95% confident interval.

  6. Partially linear models with autoregressive scale-mixtures of normal errors: A Bayesian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Guillermo; Castro, Mauricio; Lachos, Victor H.

    2012-10-01

    Normality and independence of error terms is a typical assumption for partial linear models. However, such an assumption may be unrealistic on many fields such as economics, finance and biostatistics. In this paper, we develop a Bayesian analysis for partial linear model with first-order autoregressive errors belonging to the class of scale mixtures of normal (SMN) distributions. The proposed model provides a useful generalization of the symmetrical linear regression models with independent error, since the error distribution cover both correlated and thick-tailed distribution, and has a convenient hierarchical representation allowing to us an easily implementation of a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) scheme. In order to examine the robustness of this distribution against outlying and influential observations, we present a Bayesian case deletion influence diagnostics based on the Kullback-Leibler (K-L) divergence. The proposed methodology is applied to the Cuprum Company monthly returns.

  7. Systematic evaluation of autoregressive error models as post-processors for a probabilistic streamflow forecast system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawietz, Martin; Xu, Chong-Yu; Gottschalk, Lars; Tallaksen, Lena

    2010-05-01

    A post-processor that accounts for the hydrologic uncertainty in a probabilistic streamflow forecast system is necessary to account for the uncertainty introduced by the hydrological model. In this study different variants of an autoregressive error model that can be used as a post-processor for short to medium range streamflow forecasts, are evaluated. The deterministic HBV model is used to form the basis for the streamflow forecast. The general structure of the error models then used as post-processor is a first order autoregressive model of the form dt = αdt-1 + σɛt where dt is the model error (observed minus simulated streamflow) at time t, α and σ are the parameters of the error model, and ɛt is the residual error described through a probability distribution. The following aspects are investigated: (1) Use of constant parameters α and σ versus the use of state dependent parameters. The state dependent parameters vary depending on the states of temperature, precipitation, snow water equivalent and simulated streamflow. (2) Use of a Standard Normal distribution for ɛt versus use of an empirical distribution function constituted through the normalized residuals of the error model in the calibration period. (3) Comparison of two different transformations, i.e. logarithmic versus square root, that are applied to the streamflow data before the error model is applied. The reason for applying a transformation is to make the residuals of the error model homoscedastic over the range of streamflow values of different magnitudes. Through combination of these three characteristics, eight variants of the autoregressive post-processor are generated. These are calibrated and validated in 55 catchments throughout Norway. The discrete ranked probability score with 99 flow percentiles as standardized thresholds is used for evaluation. In addition, a non-parametric bootstrap is used to construct confidence intervals and evaluate the significance of the results. The main

  8. A fault diagnosis methodology for rolling element bearings based on advanced signal pretreatment and autoregressive modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Bugharbee, Hussein; Trendafilova, Irina

    2016-05-01

    This study proposes a methodology for rolling element bearings fault diagnosis which gives a complete and highly accurate identification of the faults present. It has two main stages: signals pretreatment, which is based on several signal analysis procedures, and diagnosis, which uses a pattern-recognition process. The first stage is principally based on linear time invariant autoregressive modelling. One of the main contributions of this investigation is the development of a pretreatment signal analysis procedure which subjects the signal to noise cleaning by singular spectrum analysis and then stationarisation by differencing. So the signal is transformed to bring it close to a stationary one, rather than complicating the model to bring it closer to the signal. This type of pretreatment allows the use of a linear time invariant autoregressive model and improves its performance when the original signals are non-stationary. This contribution is at the heart of the proposed method, and the high accuracy of the diagnosis is a result of this procedure. The methodology emphasises the importance of preliminary noise cleaning and stationarisation. And it demonstrates that the information needed for fault identification is contained in the stationary part of the measured signal. The methodology is further validated using three different experimental setups, demonstrating very high accuracy for all of the applications. It is able to correctly classify nearly 100 percent of the faults with regard to their type and size. This high accuracy is the other important contribution of this methodology. Thus, this research suggests a highly accurate methodology for rolling element bearing fault diagnosis which is based on relatively simple procedures. This is also an advantage, as the simplicity of the individual processes ensures easy application and the possibility for automation of the entire process.

  9. Submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral line catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poynter, R. L.; Pickett, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    A computer accessible catalogue of submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral lines in the frequency range between O and 3000 GHz (such as; wavelengths longer than 100 m) is discussed. The catalogue was used as a planning guide and as an aid in the identification and analysis of observed spectral lines. The information listed for each spectral line includes the frequency and its estimated error, the intensity, lower state energy, and quantum number assignment. The catalogue was constructed by using theoretical least squares fits of published spectral lines to accepted molecular models. The associated predictions and their estimated errors are based upon the resultant fitted parameters and their covariances.

  10. Identifying effective connectivity parameters in simulated fMRI: a direct comparison of switching linear dynamic system, stochastic dynamic causal, and multivariate autoregressive models

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jason F.; Chen, Kewei; Pillai, Ajay S.; Horwitz, Barry

    2013-01-01

    The number and variety of connectivity estimation methods is likely to continue to grow over the coming decade. Comparisons between methods are necessary to prune this growth to only the most accurate and robust methods. However, the nature of connectivity is elusive with different methods potentially attempting to identify different aspects of connectivity. Commonalities of connectivity definitions across methods upon which base direct comparisons can be difficult to derive. Here, we explicitly define “effective connectivity” using a common set of observation and state equations that are appropriate for three connectivity methods: dynamic causal modeling (DCM), multivariate autoregressive modeling (MAR), and switching linear dynamic systems for fMRI (sLDSf). In addition while deriving this set, we show how many other popular functional and effective connectivity methods are actually simplifications of these equations. We discuss implications of these connections for the practice of using one method to simulate data for another method. After mathematically connecting the three effective connectivity methods, simulated fMRI data with varying numbers of regions and task conditions is generated from the common equation. This simulated data explicitly contains the type of the connectivity that the three models were intended to identify. Each method is applied to the simulated data sets and the accuracy of parameter identification is analyzed. All methods perform above chance levels at identifying correct connectivity parameters. The sLDSf method was superior in parameter estimation accuracy to both DCM and MAR for all types of comparisons. PMID:23717258

  11. Hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.

    2002-01-01

    A set of hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are added in a following estimation or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The "hybrid" method herein means a combination of an initial classical least squares analysis calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A "spectral shape" herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The "shape" can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.

  12. Different approaches of spectral analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacoume, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Several approaches to the problem of the calculation of spectral power density of a random function from an estimate of the autocorrelation function were studied. A comparative study was presented of these different methods. The principles on which they are based and the hypothesis implied were pointed out. Some indications on the optimization of the length of the estimated correlation function was given. An example of application of the different methods discussed in this paper was included.

  13. Spectral ratio method for measuring emissivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, K.

    1992-01-01

    The spectral ratio method is based on the concept that although the spectral radiances are very sensitive to small changes in temperature the ratios are not. Only an approximate estimate of temperature is required thus, for example, we can determine the emissivity ratio to an accuracy of 1% with a temperature estimate that is only accurate to 12.5 K. Selecting the maximum value of the channel brightness temperatures is an unbiased estimate. Laboratory and field spectral data are easily converted into spectral ratio plots. The ratio method is limited by system signal:noise and spectral band-width. The images can appear quite noisy because ratios enhance high frequencies and may require spatial filtering. Atmospheric effects tend to rescale the ratios and require using an atmospheric model or a calibration site. ?? 1992.

  14. Spectral decomposition in multichannel recordings based on multivariate parametric identification.

    PubMed

    Baselli, G; Porta, A; Rimoldi, O; Pagani, M; Cerutti, S

    1997-11-01

    A method of spectral decomposition in multichannel recordings is proposed, which represents the results of multivariate (MV) parametric identification in terms of classification and quantification of different oscillating mechanisms. For this purpose, a class of MV dynamic adjustment (MDA) models in which a MV autoregressive (MAR) network of causal interactions is fed by uncorrelated autoregressive (AR) processes is defined. Poles relevant to the MAR network closed-loop interactions (cl-poles) and poles relevant to each AR input are disentangled and accordingly classified. The autospectrum of each channel can be divided into partial spectra each relevant to an input. Each partial spectrum is affected by the cl-poles and by the poles of the corresponding input; consequently, it is decomposed into the relevant components by means of the residual method. Therefore, different oscillating mechanisms, even at similar frequencies, are classified by different poles and quantified by the corresponding components. The structure of MDA models is quite flexible and can be adapted to various sets of available signals and a priori hypotheses about the existing interactions; a graphical layout is proposed that emphasizes the oscillation sources and the corresponding closed-loop interactions. Application examples relevant to cardiovascular variability are briefly illustrated.

  15. Scientific and Engineering Studies: Spectral Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-11

    ETICA | —i >^1 _* 1 rf*-«- --^| i r^ / y / / 9 32 64 128 256 SIZE OF EFT 512 1024 2048 Fig. 4. RMS Error for Linear FM (Forward FFT...frequency step. * More gen - erally, (cosine)n time weighting can be accomplished alternatively by means of convolution of the (unweighted) spectrum with...POWERC computes the fractional power in bands (JA)-1 Hz wide, MKLFFT effects a fast Fourier transform (reference 4), and QTRCOS gen - erates a table

  16. Scientific and Engineering Studies; Spectral Estimation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-01-01

    where 0.46 * 2 Storage limitations in the auxiliary error computation program for the Cooley and Fisher alzorithrns prevented us from investigating... Ten r*f,) %e W) UP~~~E~.4 This Is a genera’ r~lation for ; it ill be noticei tc be independent cf crcss-spectrum &,(f", and depend only cn auto...is tantamount to not running off the edges of the available data lXnI N. Employing (96), (124) can be writ- ten as p F= aa S , (125)F, m n am m,n=0

  17. Mindfulness training promotes upward spirals of positive affect and cognition: multilevel and autoregressive latent trajectory modeling analyses

    PubMed Central

    Garland, Eric L.; Geschwind, Nicole; Peeters, Frenk; Wichers, Marieke

    2015-01-01

    Recent theory suggests that positive psychological processes integral to health may be energized through the self-reinforcing dynamics of an upward spiral to counter emotion dysregulation. The present study examined positive emotion–cognition interactions among individuals in partial remission from depression who had been randomly assigned to treatment with mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT; n = 64) or a waitlist control condition (n = 66). We hypothesized that MBCT stimulates upward spirals by increasing positive affect and positive cognition. Experience sampling assessed changes in affect and cognition during 6 days before and after treatment, which were analyzed with a series of multilevel and autoregressive latent trajectory models. Findings suggest that MBCT was associated with significant increases in trait positive affect and momentary positive cognition, which were preserved through autoregressive and cross-lagged effects driven by global emotional tone. Findings suggest that daily positive affect and cognition are maintained by an upward spiral that might be promoted by mindfulness training. PMID:25698988

  18. Spectral and spread-spectral teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S.

    2010-06-15

    We report how quantum information encoded into the spectral degree of freedom of a single-photon state may be teleported using a finite spectrally entangled biphoton state. We further demonstrate how the bandwidth of the teleported wave form can be controllably and coherently dilated using a spread-spectral variant of teleportation. We calculate analytical expressions for the fidelities of spectral and spread-spectral teleportation when complex-valued Gaussian states are transferred using a proposed experimental approach. Finally, we discuss the utility of these techniques for integrating broad-bandwidth photonic qubits with narrow-bandwidth receivers in quantum communication systems.

  19. Undecidability of the spectral gap.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Toby S; Perez-Garcia, David; Wolf, Michael M

    2015-12-10

    The spectral gap--the energy difference between the ground state and first excited state of a system--is central to quantum many-body physics. Many challenging open problems, such as the Haldane conjecture, the question of the existence of gapped topological spin liquid phases, and the Yang-Mills gap conjecture, concern spectral gaps. These and other problems are particular cases of the general spectral gap problem: given the Hamiltonian of a quantum many-body system, is it gapped or gapless? Here we prove that this is an undecidable problem. Specifically, we construct families of quantum spin systems on a two-dimensional lattice with translationally invariant, nearest-neighbour interactions, for which the spectral gap problem is undecidable. This result extends to undecidability of other low-energy properties, such as the existence of algebraically decaying ground-state correlations. The proof combines Hamiltonian complexity techniques with aperiodic tilings, to construct a Hamiltonian whose ground state encodes the evolution of a quantum phase-estimation algorithm followed by a universal Turing machine. The spectral gap depends on the outcome of the corresponding 'halting problem'. Our result implies that there exists no algorithm to determine whether an arbitrary model is gapped or gapless, and that there exist models for which the presence or absence of a spectral gap is independent of the axioms of mathematics.

  20. Generation of Some First-Order Autoregressive Markovian Sequences of Positive Random Variables with Given Marginal Distributions,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    LAWRANCE , P A LEWIS UNCLASSIFIED NWS55-81-003 NLm ’hEEEIIIIEEE mhhhhEEh EEEEEEEllEEEll 46 NPS55-81-003 NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California D C...GENERATION OF SOME FIRST-ORDER AUTOREGRESSIVE MARKOVIAN SEQUENCES OF POSITIVE RANDOM VARIABLES WITH GIVEN MARGINAL DISTRIBUTIONS by A. J. Lawrance P. A... Lawrance University of Birmingham Birmingham, England P. A. W. Lewis, Professor Department of Operations Research Reviewed by: Released by: K. T

  1. Multiple Band-Pass Autoregressive Demodulation for Rolling-Element Bearing Fault Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmann, J.; Mathew, J.

    2001-09-01

    This paper presents a novel method to enhance the detection and diagnosis of low-speed rolling-element bearing faults based on discrete wavelet packet analysis (DWPA). The method involves the automatic extraction of wavelet packets containing bearing fault-related features from the discrete wavelet packet analysis representation of machine vibrations. Automated selection of the wavelet packets of interest is achieved via an adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), which can be implemented on-line. The resultant signal extracted by this technique is essentially an optimal multiple band-pass filter of the high-frequency bearing impact transients. Used in conjunction with the autoregressive (AR) spectrum of the envelope signal, a sensitive diagnosis of the bearing condition can be made. The discrete wavelet packet analysis multiple band-pass filtering of the signal results in a significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to its high-pass counterpart, with an exceptional capacity to exclude contaminating sources of vibration. A more modest increase in the signal-to-noise ratio is achieved when compared to digital band-pass filtering, with the filter range adjusted to obtain the best possible isolation of the bearing transients.

  2. QAARM: Quasi-anharmonic auto-regressive model reveals molecular recognition pathways in ubiquitin

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, Arvind; Agarwal, Pratul K

    2011-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have dramatically improved the atomistic understanding of protein motions, energetics and function. These growing datasets have necessitated a corresponding emphasis on trajectory analysis methods for characterizing simulation data, particularly since functional protein motions and transitions are often rare and/or intricate events. Observing that such events give rise to long-tailed spatial distributions, we recently developed a higher-order statistics based dimensionality reduction method, called quasi-anharmonic analysis (QAA), for identifying biophysically-relevant reaction coordinates and substates within MD simulations. Further characterization of conformation space should consider the temporal dynamics specific to each identified substate. Our model uses hierarchical clustering to learn energetically coherent substates and dynamic modes of motion from a 0.5 {mu}s ubiqutin simulation. Autoregressive (AR) modeling within and between states enables a compact and generative description of the conformational landscape as it relates to functional transitions between binding poses. Lacking a predictive component, QAA is extended here within a general AR model appreciative of the trajectory's temporal dependencies and the specific, local dynamics accessible to a protein within identified energy wells. These metastable states and their transition rates are extracted within a QAA-derived subspace using hierarchical Markov clustering to provide parameter sets for the second-order AR model. We show the learned model can be extrapolated to synthesize trajectories of arbitrary length.

  3. Visibility graph analysis for re-sampled time series from auto-regressive stochastic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rong; Zou, Yong; Zhou, Jie; Gao, Zhong-Ke; Guan, Shuguang

    2017-01-01

    Visibility graph (VG) and horizontal visibility graph (HVG) play a crucial role in modern complex network approaches to nonlinear time series analysis. However, depending on the underlying dynamic processes, it remains to characterize the exponents of presumably exponential degree distributions. It has been recently conjectured that there is a critical value of exponent λc = ln 3 / 2 , which separates chaotic from correlated stochastic processes. Here, we systematically apply (H)VG analysis to time series from autoregressive (AR) models, which confirms the hypothesis that an increased correlation length results in larger values of λ > λc. On the other hand, we numerically find a regime of negatively correlated process increments where λ < λc, which is in contrast to this hypothesis. Furthermore, by constructing graphs based on re-sampled time series, we find that network measures show non-trivial dependencies on the autocorrelation functions of the processes. We propose to choose the decorrelation time as the maximal re-sampling delay for the algorithm. Our results are detailed for time series from AR(1) and AR(2) processes.

  4. Analysis of pelagic species decline in the upper San Francisco Estuary using multivariate autoregressive modeling (MAR)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mac Nally, Ralph; Thomson, James R.; Kimmerer, Wim J.; Feyrer, Frederick; Newman, Ken B.; Sih, Andy; Bennett, William A.; Brown, Larry; Fleishman, Erica; Culberson, Steven D.; Castillo, Gonzalo

    2010-01-01

    Four species of pelagic fish of particular management concern in the upper San Francisco Estuary, California, USA, have declined precipitously since ca. 2002: delta smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus), longfin smelt (Spirinchus thaleichthys), striped bass (Morone saxatilis), and threadfin shad (Dorosoma petenense). The estuary has been monitored since the late 1960s with extensive collection of data on the fishes, their pelagic prey, phytoplankton biomass, invasive species, and physical factors. We used multivariate autoregressive (MAR) modeling to discern the main factors responsible for the declines. An expert-elicited model was built to describe the system. Fifty-four relationships were built into the model, only one of which was of uncertain direction a priori. Twenty-eight of the proposed relationships were strongly supported by or consistent with the data, while 26 were close to zero (not supported by the data but not contrary to expectations). The position of the 2‰ isohaline (a measure of the physical response of the estuary to freshwater flow) and increased water clarity over the period of analyses were two factors affecting multiple declining taxa (including fishes and the fishes' main zooplankton prey). Our results were relatively robust with respect to the form of stock–recruitment model used and to inclusion of subsidiary covariates but may be enhanced by using detailed state–space models that describe more fully the life-history dynamics of the declining species.

  5. Quantifying effects of abiotic and biotic drivers on community dynamics with multivariate autoregressive (MAR) models.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Stephanie E; Holmes, Elizabeth E; Scheef, Lindsay P; Scheuerell, Mark D; Katz, Stephen L; Pendleton, Daniel E; Ward, Eric J

    2013-12-01

    Long-term ecological data sets present opportunities for identifying drivers of community dynamics and quantifying their effects through time series analysis. Multivariate autoregressive (MAR) models are well known in many other disciplines, such as econometrics, but widespread adoption of MAR methods in ecology and natural resource management has been much slower despite some widely cited ecological examples. Here we review previous ecological applications of MAR models and highlight their ability to identify abiotic and biotic drivers of population dynamics, as well as community-level stability metrics, from long-term empirical observations. Thus far, MAR models have been used mainly with data from freshwater plankton communities; we examine the obstacles that may be hindering adoption in other systems and suggest practical modifications that will improve MAR models for broader application. Many of these modifications are already well known in other fields in which MAR models are common, although they are frequently described under different names. In an effort to make MAR models more accessible to ecologists, we include a worked example using recently developed R packages (MAR1 and MARSS), freely available and open-access software.

  6. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia: time domain characterization using autoregressive moving average analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Triedman, J. K.; Perrott, M. H.; Cohen, R. J.; Saul, J. P.

    1995-01-01

    Fourier-based techniques are mathematically noncausal and are therefore limited in their application to feedback-containing systems, such as the cardiovascular system. In this study, a mathematically causal time domain technique, autoregressive moving average (ARMA) analysis, was used to parameterize the relations of respiration and arterial blood pressure to heart rate in eight humans before and during total cardiac autonomic blockade. Impulse-response curves thus generated showed the relation of respiration to heart rate to be characterized by an immediate increase in heart rate of 9.1 +/- 1.8 beats.min-1.l-1, followed by a transient mild decrease in heart rate to -1.2 +/- 0.5 beats.min-1.l-1 below baseline. The relation of blood pressure to heart rate was characterized by a slower decrease in heart rate of -0.5 +/- 0.1 beats.min-1.mmHg-1, followed by a gradual return to baseline. Both of these relations nearly disappeared after autonomic blockade, indicating autonomic mediation. Maximum values obtained from the respiration to heart rate impulse responses were also well correlated with frequency domain measures of high-frequency "vagal" heart rate control (r = 0.88). ARMA analysis may be useful as a time domain representation of autonomic heart rate control for cardiovascular modeling.

  7. Towards damage detection using blind source separation integrated with time-varying auto-regressive modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musafere, F.; Sadhu, A.; Liu, K.

    2016-01-01

    In the last few decades, structural health monitoring (SHM) has been an indispensable subject in the field of vibration engineering. With the aid of modern sensing technology, SHM has garnered significant attention towards diagnosis and risk management of large-scale civil structures and mechanical systems. In SHM, system identification is one of major building blocks through which unknown system parameters are extracted from vibration data of the structures. Such system information is then utilized to detect the damage instant, and its severity to rehabilitate and prolong the existing health of the structures. In recent years, blind source separation (BSS) algorithm has become one of the newly emerging advanced signal processing techniques for output-only system identification of civil structures. In this paper, a novel damage detection technique is proposed by integrating BSS with the time-varying auto-regressive modeling to identify the instant and severity of damage. The proposed method is validated using a suite of numerical studies and experimental models followed by a full-scale structure.

  8. Modeling the cardiovascular system using a nonlinear additive autoregressive model with exogenous input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedl, M.; Suhrbier, A.; Malberg, H.; Penzel, T.; Bretthauer, G.; Kurths, J.; Wessel, N.

    2008-07-01

    The parameters of heart rate variability and blood pressure variability have proved to be useful analytical tools in cardiovascular physics and medicine. Model-based analysis of these variabilities additionally leads to new prognostic information about mechanisms behind regulations in the cardiovascular system. In this paper, we analyze the complex interaction between heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and respiration by nonparametric fitted nonlinear additive autoregressive models with external inputs. Therefore, we consider measurements of healthy persons and patients suffering from obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), with and without hypertension. It is shown that the proposed nonlinear models are capable of describing short-term fluctuations in heart rate as well as systolic blood pressure significantly better than similar linear ones, which confirms the assumption of nonlinear controlled heart rate and blood pressure. Furthermore, the comparison of the nonlinear and linear approaches reveals that the heart rate and blood pressure variability in healthy subjects is caused by a higher level of noise as well as nonlinearity than in patients suffering from OSAS. The residue analysis points at a further source of heart rate and blood pressure variability in healthy subjects, in addition to heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and respiration. Comparison of the nonlinear models within and among the different groups of subjects suggests the ability to discriminate the cohorts that could lead to a stratification of hypertension risk in OSAS patients.

  9. Pole coordinates data prediction by combination of least squares extrapolation and double autoregressive prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosek, Wieslaw

    2016-04-01

    Future Earth Orientation Parameters data are needed to compute real time transformation between the celestial and terrestrial reference frames. This transformation is realized by predictions of x, y pole coordinates data, UT1-UTC data and precesion-nutation extrapolation model. This paper is focused on the pole coordinates data prediction by combination of the least-squares (LS) extrapolation and autoregressive (AR) prediction models (LS+AR). The AR prediction which is applied to the LS extrapolation residuals of pole coordinates data does not able to predict all frequency bands of them and it is mostly tuned to predict subseasonal oscillations. The absolute values of differences between pole coordinates data and their LS+AR predictions increase with prediction length and depend mostly on starting prediction epochs, thus time series of these differences for 2, 4 and 8 weeks in the future were analyzed. Time frequency spectra of these differences for different prediction lengths are very similar showing some power in the frequency band corresponding to the prograde Chandler and annual oscillations, which means that the increase of prediction errors is caused by mismodelling of these oscillations by the LS extrapolation model. Thus, the LS+AR prediction method can be modified by taking into additional AR prediction correction computed from time series of these prediction differences for different prediction lengths. This additional AR prediction is mostly tuned to the seasonal frequency band of pole coordinates data.

  10. Self-organising mixture autoregressive model for non-stationary time series modelling.

    PubMed

    Ni, He; Yin, Hujun

    2008-12-01

    Modelling non-stationary time series has been a difficult task for both parametric and nonparametric methods. One promising solution is to combine the flexibility of nonparametric models with the simplicity of parametric models. In this paper, the self-organising mixture autoregressive (SOMAR) network is adopted as a such mixture model. It breaks time series into underlying segments and at the same time fits local linear regressive models to the clusters of segments. In such a way, a global non-stationary time series is represented by a dynamic set of local linear regressive models. Neural gas is used for a more flexible structure of the mixture model. Furthermore, a new similarity measure has been introduced in the self-organising network to better quantify the similarity of time series segments. The network can be used naturally in modelling and forecasting non-stationary time series. Experiments on artificial, benchmark time series (e.g. Mackey-Glass) and real-world data (e.g. numbers of sunspots and Forex rates) are presented and the results show that the proposed SOMAR network is effective and superior to other similar approaches.

  11. Sensor network based solar forecasting using a local vector autoregressive ridge framework

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Yoo, S.; Heiser, J.; Kalb, P.

    2016-04-04

    The significant improvements and falling costs of photovoltaic (PV) technology make solar energy a promising resource, yet the cloud induced variability of surface solar irradiance inhibits its effective use in grid-tied PV generation. Short-term irradiance forecasting, especially on the minute scale, is critically important for grid system stability and auxiliary power source management. Compared to the trending sky imaging devices, irradiance sensors are inexpensive and easy to deploy but related forecasting methods have not been well researched. The prominent challenge of applying classic time series models on a network of irradiance sensors is to address their varying spatio-temporal correlations due to local changes in cloud conditions. We propose a local vector autoregressive framework with ridge regularization to forecast irradiance without explicitly determining the wind field or cloud movement. By using local training data, our learned forecast model is adaptive to local cloud conditions and by using regularization, we overcome the risk of overfitting from the limited training data. Our systematic experimental results showed an average of 19.7% RMSE and 20.2% MAE improvement over the benchmark Persistent Model for 1-5 minute forecasts on a comprehensive 25-day dataset.

  12. Assessment and prediction of air quality using fuzzy logic and autoregressive models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbajal-Hernández, José Juan; Sánchez-Fernández, Luis P.; Carrasco-Ochoa, Jesús A.; Martínez-Trinidad, José Fco.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, artificial intelligence methods have been used for the treatment of environmental problems. This work, presents two models for assessment and prediction of air quality. First, we develop a new computational model for air quality assessment in order to evaluate toxic compounds that can harm sensitive people in urban areas, affecting their normal activities. In this model we propose to use a Sigma operator to statistically asses air quality parameters using their historical data information and determining their negative impact in air quality based on toxicity limits, frequency average and deviations of toxicological tests. We also introduce a fuzzy inference system to perform parameter classification using a reasoning process and integrating them in an air quality index describing the pollution levels in five stages: excellent, good, regular, bad and danger, respectively. The second model proposed in this work predicts air quality concentrations using an autoregressive model, providing a predicted air quality index based on the fuzzy inference system previously developed. Using data from Mexico City Atmospheric Monitoring System, we perform a comparison among air quality indices developed for environmental agencies and similar models. Our results show that our models are an appropriate tool for assessing site pollution and for providing guidance to improve contingency actions in urban areas.

  13. One day prediction of nighttime VLF amplitudes using nonlinear autoregression and neural network modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santosa, H.; Hobara, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The electric field amplitude of very low frequency (VLF) transmitter from Hawaii (NPM) has been continuously recorded at Chofu (CHF), Tokyo, Japan. The VLF amplitude variability indicates lower ionospheric perturbation in the D region (60-90 km altitude range) around the NPM-CHF propagation path. We carried out the prediction of daily nighttime mean VLF amplitude by using Nonlinear Autoregressive with Exogenous Input Neural Network (NARX NN). The NARX NN model, which was built based on the daily input variables of various physical parameters such as stratospheric temperature, total column ozone, cosmic rays, Dst, and Kp indices possess good accuracy during the model building. The fitted model was constructed within the training period from 1 January 2011 to 4 February 2013 by using three algorithms, namely, Bayesian Neural Network (BRANN), Levenberg Marquardt Neural Network (LMANN), and Scaled Conjugate Gradient (SCG). The LMANN has the largest Pearson correlation coefficient (r) of 0.94 and smallest root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 1.19 dB. The constructed models by using LMANN were applied to predict the VLF amplitude from 5 February 2013 to 31 December 2013. As a result the one step (1 day) ahead predicted nighttime VLF amplitude has the r of 0.93 and RMSE of 2.25 dB. We conclude that the model built according to the proposed methodology provides good predictions of the electric field amplitude of VLF waves for NPM-CHF (midlatitude) propagation path.

  14. Gas Chromatography Data Classification Based on Complex Coefficients of an Autoregressive Model

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Weixiang; Morgan, Joshua T.; Davis, Cristina E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces autoregressive (AR) modeling as a novel method to classify outputs from gas chromatography (GC). The inverse Fourier transformation was applied to the original sensor data, and then an AR model was applied to transform data to generate AR model complex coefficients. This series of coefficients effectively contains a compressed version of all of the information in the original GC signal output. We applied this method to chromatograms resulting from proliferating bacteria species grown in culture. Three types of neural networks were used to classify the AR coefficients: backward propagating neural network (BPNN), radial basis function-principal component analysismore » (RBF-PCA) approach, and radial basis function-partial least squares regression (RBF-PLSR) approach. This exploratory study demonstrates the feasibility of using complex root coefficient patterns to distinguish various classes of experimental data, such as those from the different bacteria species. This cognition approach also proved to be robust and potentially useful for freeing us from time alignment of GC signals.« less

  15. Offline and online detection of damage using autoregressive models and artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omenzetter, Piotr; de Lautour, Oliver R.

    2007-04-01

    Developed to study long, regularly sampled streams of data, time series analysis methods are being increasingly investigated for the use of Structural Health Monitoring. In this research, Autoregressive (AR) models are used in conjunction with Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) for damage detection, localisation and severity assessment. In the first reported experimental exercise, AR models were used offline to fit the acceleration time histories of a 3-storey test structure in undamaged and various damaged states when excited by earthquake motion simulated on a shake table. Damage was introduced into the structure by replacing the columns with those of a thinner thickness. Analytical models of the structure in both damaged and undamaged states were also developed and updated using experimental data in order to determine structural stiffness. The coefficients of AR models were used as damage sensitive features and input into an ANN to build a relationship between them and the remaining structural stiffness. In the second, analytical exercise, a system with gradually progressing damage was numerically simulated and acceleration AR models with exogenous inputs were identified recursively. A trained ANN was then required to trace the structural stiffness online. The results for the offline and online approach showed the efficiency of using AR coefficient as damage sensitive features and good performance of the ANNs for damage detection, localization and quantification.

  16. Ensemble Nonlinear Autoregressive Exogenous Artificial Neural Networks for Short-Term Wind Speed and Power Forecasting.

    PubMed

    Men, Zhongxian; Yee, Eugene; Lien, Fue-Sang; Yang, Zhiling; Liu, Yongqian

    2014-01-01

    Short-term wind speed and wind power forecasts (for a 72 h period) are obtained using a nonlinear autoregressive exogenous artificial neural network (ANN) methodology which incorporates either numerical weather prediction or high-resolution computational fluid dynamics wind field information as an exogenous input. An ensemble approach is used to combine the predictions from many candidate ANNs in order to provide improved forecasts for wind speed and power, along with the associated uncertainties in these forecasts. More specifically, the ensemble ANN is used to quantify the uncertainties arising from the network weight initialization and from the unknown structure of the ANN. All members forming the ensemble of neural networks were trained using an efficient particle swarm optimization algorithm. The results of the proposed methodology are validated using wind speed and wind power data obtained from an operational wind farm located in Northern China. The assessment demonstrates that this methodology for wind speed and power forecasting generally provides an improvement in predictive skills when compared to the practice of using an "optimal" weight vector from a single ANN while providing additional information in the form of prediction uncertainty bounds.

  17. Ensemble Nonlinear Autoregressive Exogenous Artificial Neural Networks for Short-Term Wind Speed and Power Forecasting

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Fue-Sang; Yang, Zhiling; Liu, Yongqian

    2014-01-01

    Short-term wind speed and wind power forecasts (for a 72 h period) are obtained using a nonlinear autoregressive exogenous artificial neural network (ANN) methodology which incorporates either numerical weather prediction or high-resolution computational fluid dynamics wind field information as an exogenous input. An ensemble approach is used to combine the predictions from many candidate ANNs in order to provide improved forecasts for wind speed and power, along with the associated uncertainties in these forecasts. More specifically, the ensemble ANN is used to quantify the uncertainties arising from the network weight initialization and from the unknown structure of the ANN. All members forming the ensemble of neural networks were trained using an efficient particle swarm optimization algorithm. The results of the proposed methodology are validated using wind speed and wind power data obtained from an operational wind farm located in Northern China. The assessment demonstrates that this methodology for wind speed and power forecasting generally provides an improvement in predictive skills when compared to the practice of using an “optimal” weight vector from a single ANN while providing additional information in the form of prediction uncertainty bounds. PMID:27382627

  18. A graphical vector autoregressive modelling approach to the analysis of electronic diary data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In recent years, electronic diaries are increasingly used in medical research and practice to investigate patients' processes and fluctuations in symptoms over time. To model dynamic dependence structures and feedback mechanisms between symptom-relevant variables, a multivariate time series method has to be applied. Methods We propose to analyse the temporal interrelationships among the variables by a structural modelling approach based on graphical vector autoregressive (VAR) models. We give a comprehensive description of the underlying concepts and explain how the dependence structure can be recovered from electronic diary data by a search over suitable constrained (graphical) VAR models. Results The graphical VAR approach is applied to the electronic diary data of 35 obese patients with and without binge eating disorder (BED). The dynamic relationships for the two subgroups between eating behaviour, depression, anxiety and eating control are visualized in two path diagrams. Results show that the two subgroups of obese patients with and without BED are distinguishable by the temporal patterns which influence their respective eating behaviours. Conclusion The use of the graphical VAR approach for the analysis of electronic diary data leads to a deeper insight into patient's dynamics and dependence structures. An increasing use of this modelling approach could lead to a better understanding of complex psychological and physiological mechanisms in different areas of medical care and research. PMID:20359333

  19. Hydrodynamic pressure computation under real sea surface on basis of autoregressive model of irregular waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyarev, A.; Gankevich, I.

    2015-05-01

    Determining the impact of external excitations on a dynamic marine object such as ship hull in a seaway is the main goal of simulations. Now such simulations is most often based on approximate mathematical models that use results of the theory of small amplitude waves. The most complicated software for marine objects behavior simulation LAMP IV (Large amplitude motion program) uses numerical solution of traditional hydrodynamic problem without often used approximations but on the basis of theory of small amplitude waves. For efficiency reasons these simulations can be based on autoregressive model to generate real wave surface. Such a surface possesses all the hydrodynamic characteristics of sea waves, preserves dispersion relation and also shows superior performance compared to other wind wave models. Naturally, the known surface can be used to compute velocity field and in turn to determine pressures in any point under sea surface. The resulting computational algorithm can be used to determine pressures without use of theory of small-amplitude waves.

  20. Generation of spatiotemporally correlated spike trains and local field potentials using a multivariate autoregressive process.

    PubMed

    Gutnisky, Diego A; Josić, Kresimir

    2010-05-01

    Experimental advances allowing for the simultaneous recording of activity at multiple sites have significantly increased our understanding of the spatiotemporal patterns in neural activity. The impact of such patterns on neural coding is a fundamental question in neuroscience. The simulation of spike trains with predetermined activity patterns is therefore an important ingredient in the study of potential neural codes. Such artificially generated spike trains could also be used to manipulate cortical neurons in vitro and in vivo. Here, we propose a method to generate spike trains with given mean firing rates and cross-correlations. To capture this statistical structure we generate a point process by thresholding a stochastic process that is continuous in space and discrete in time. This stochastic process is obtained by filtering Gaussian noise through a multivariate autoregressive (AR) model. The parameters of the AR model are obtained by a nonlinear transformation of the point-process correlations to the continuous-process correlations. The proposed method is very efficient and allows for the simulation of large neural populations. It can be optimized to the structure of spatiotemporal correlations and generalized to nonstationary processes and spatiotemporal patterns of local field potentials and spike trains.

  1. Hybrid support vector regression and autoregressive integrated moving average models improved by particle swarm optimization for property crime rates forecasting with economic indicators.

    PubMed

    Alwee, Razana; Shamsuddin, Siti Mariyam Hj; Sallehuddin, Roselina

    2013-01-01

    Crimes forecasting is an important area in the field of criminology. Linear models, such as regression and econometric models, are commonly applied in crime forecasting. However, in real crimes data, it is common that the data consists of both linear and nonlinear components. A single model may not be sufficient to identify all the characteristics of the data. The purpose of this study is to introduce a hybrid model that combines support vector regression (SVR) and autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) to be applied in crime rates forecasting. SVR is very robust with small training data and high-dimensional problem. Meanwhile, ARIMA has the ability to model several types of time series. However, the accuracy of the SVR model depends on values of its parameters, while ARIMA is not robust to be applied to small data sets. Therefore, to overcome this problem, particle swarm optimization is used to estimate the parameters of the SVR and ARIMA models. The proposed hybrid model is used to forecast the property crime rates of the United State based on economic indicators. The experimental results show that the proposed hybrid model is able to produce more accurate forecasting results as compared to the individual models.

  2. Middle and long-term prediction of UT1-UTC based on combination of Gray Model and Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Song; Xu, Tian-he; Sun, Zhang-zhen; Li, Jia-jing

    2017-02-01

    UT1-UTC is an important part of the Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP). The high-precision predictions of UT1-UTC play a key role in practical applications of deep space exploration, spacecraft tracking and satellite navigation and positioning. In this paper, a new prediction method with combination of Gray Model (GM(1, 1)) and Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) is developed. The main idea is as following. Firstly, the UT1-UTC data are preprocessed by removing the leap second and Earth's zonal harmonic tidal to get UT1R-TAI data. Periodic terms are estimated and removed by the least square to get UT2R-TAI. Then the linear terms of UT2R-TAI data are modeled by the GM(1, 1), and the residual terms are modeled by the ARIMA. Finally, the UT2R-TAI prediction can be performed based on the combined model of GM(1, 1) and ARIMA, and the UT1-UTC predictions are obtained by adding the corresponding periodic terms, leap second correction and the Earth's zonal harmonic tidal correction. The results show that the proposed model can be used to predict UT1-UTC effectively with higher middle and long-term (from 32 to 360 days) accuracy than those of LS + AR, LS + MAR and WLS + MAR.

  3. OSSE spectral analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purcell, W. R.; Brown, K. M.; Grabelsky, D. A.; Johnson, W. N.; Jung, G. V.; Kinzer, R. L.; Kroeger, R. A.; Kurfess, J. D.; Matz, S. M.; Strickman, M. S.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of the spectra from the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) is complicated because of the typically low signal to noise (approx. 0.1 percent) and the large background variability. The OSSE instrument was designed to address these difficulties by periodically offset-pointing the detectors from the source to perform background measurements. These background measurements are used to estimate the background during each of the source observations. The resulting background-subtracted spectra can then be accumulated and fitted for spectral lines and/or continua. Data selection based on various environmental parameters can be performed at various stages during the analysis procedure. In order to achieve the instrument's statistical sensitivity, however, it will be necessary for investigators to develop a detailed understanding of the instrument operation, data collection, and the background spectrum and its variability. A brief description of the major steps in the OSSE spectral analysis process is described, including a discussion of the OSSE background spectrum and examples of several observational strategies.

  4. Quantum Spectral Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamhalter, Jan; Turilova, Ekaterina

    2017-02-01

    Quantum symmetries of spectral lattices are studied. Basic properties of spectral order on A W ∗-algebras are summarized. Connection between projection and spectral automorphisms is clarified by showing that, under mild conditions, any spectral automorphism is a composition of function calculus and Jordan ∗-automorphism. Complete description of quantum spectral symmetries on Type I and Type II A W ∗-factors are completely described.

  5. The excitation and characteristic frequency of the long-period volcanic event: An approach based on an inhomogeneous autoregressive model of a linear dynamic system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nakano, M.; Kumagai, H.; Kumazawa, M.; Yamaoka, K.; Chouet, B.A.

    1998-01-01

    We present a method to quantify the source excitation function and characteristic frequencies of long-period volcanic events. The method is based on an inhomogeneous autoregressive (AR) model of a linear dynamic system, in which the excitation is assumed to be a time-localized function applied at the beginning of the event. The tail of an exponentially decaying harmonic waveform is used to determine the characteristic complex frequencies of the event by the Sompi method. The excitation function is then derived by operating an AR filter constructed from the characteristic frequencies to the entire seismogram of the event, including the inhomogeneous part of the signal. We apply this method to three long-period events at Kusatsu-Shirane Volcano, central Japan, whose waveforms display simple decaying monochromatic oscillations except for the beginning of the events. We recover time-localized excitation functions lasting roughly 1 s at the start of each event and find that the estimated functions are very similar to each other at all the stations of the seismic network for each event. The phases of the characteristic oscillations referred to the estimated excitation function fall within a narrow range for almost all the stations. These results strongly suggest that the excitation and mode of oscillation are both dominated by volumetric change components. Each excitation function starts with a pronounced dilatation consistent with a sudden deflation of the volumetric source which may be interpreted in terms of a choked-flow transport mechanism. The frequency and Q of the characteristic oscillation both display a temporal evolution from event to event. Assuming a crack filled with bubbly water as seismic source for these events, we apply the Van Wijngaarden-Papanicolaou model to estimate the acoustic properties of the bubbly liquid and find that the observed changes in the frequencies and Q are consistently explained by a temporal change in the radii of the bubbles

  6. Hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.

    2004-03-23

    A set of hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are added in a following prediction or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The hybrid method herein means a combination of an initial calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A spectral shape herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The shape can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.

  7. Prediction of MeV electron fluxes throughout the outer radiation belt using multivariate autoregressive models

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, Kaori; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Spence, Harlan E.

    2015-12-22

    The Van Allen radiation belts surrounding the Earth are filled with MeV-energy electrons. This region poses ionizing radiation risks for spacecraft that operate within it, including those in geostationary orbit (GEO) and medium Earth orbit. In order to provide alerts of electron flux enhancements, 16 prediction models of the electron log-flux variation throughout the equatorial outer radiation belt as a function of the McIlwain L parameter were developed using the multivariate autoregressive model and Kalman filter. Measurements of omnidirectional 2.3 MeV electron flux from the Van Allen Probes mission as well as >2 MeV electrons from the GOES 15 spacecraft were used as the predictors. Furthermore, we selected model explanatory parameters from solar wind parameters, the electron log-flux at GEO, and geomagnetic indices. For the innermost region of the outer radiation belt, the electron flux is best predicted by using the Dst index as the sole input parameter. For the central to outermost regions, at L≥4.8 and L ≥5.6, the electron flux is predicted most accurately by including also the solar wind velocity and then the dynamic pressure, respectively. The Dst index is the best overall single parameter for predicting at 3 ≤ L ≤ 6, while for the GEO flux prediction, the KP index is better than Dst. Finally, a test calculation demonstrates that the model successfully predicts the timing and location of the flux maximum as much as 2 days in advance and that the electron flux decreases faster with time at higher L values, both model features consistent with the actually observed behavior.

  8. Prediction of MeV electron fluxes throughout the outer radiation belt using multivariate autoregressive models

    DOE PAGES

    Sakaguchi, Kaori; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; ...

    2015-12-22

    The Van Allen radiation belts surrounding the Earth are filled with MeV-energy electrons. This region poses ionizing radiation risks for spacecraft that operate within it, including those in geostationary orbit (GEO) and medium Earth orbit. In order to provide alerts of electron flux enhancements, 16 prediction models of the electron log-flux variation throughout the equatorial outer radiation belt as a function of the McIlwain L parameter were developed using the multivariate autoregressive model and Kalman filter. Measurements of omnidirectional 2.3 MeV electron flux from the Van Allen Probes mission as well as >2 MeV electrons from the GOES 15 spacecraftmore » were used as the predictors. Furthermore, we selected model explanatory parameters from solar wind parameters, the electron log-flux at GEO, and geomagnetic indices. For the innermost region of the outer radiation belt, the electron flux is best predicted by using the Dst index as the sole input parameter. For the central to outermost regions, at L≥4.8 and L ≥5.6, the electron flux is predicted most accurately by including also the solar wind velocity and then the dynamic pressure, respectively. The Dst index is the best overall single parameter for predicting at 3 ≤ L ≤ 6, while for the GEO flux prediction, the KP index is better than Dst. Finally, a test calculation demonstrates that the model successfully predicts the timing and location of the flux maximum as much as 2 days in advance and that the electron flux decreases faster with time at higher L values, both model features consistent with the actually observed behavior.« less

  9. The emotion recognition system based on autoregressive model and sequential forward feature selection of electroencephalogram signals.

    PubMed

    Hatamikia, Sepideh; Maghooli, Keivan; Nasrabadi, Ali Motie

    2014-07-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) is one of the useful biological signals to distinguish different brain diseases and mental states. In recent years, detecting different emotional states from biological signals has been merged more attention by researchers and several feature extraction methods and classifiers are suggested to recognize emotions from EEG signals. In this research, we introduce an emotion recognition system using autoregressive (AR) model, sequential forward feature selection (SFS) and K-nearest neighbor (KNN) classifier using EEG signals during emotional audio-visual inductions. The main purpose of this paper is to investigate the performance of AR features in the classification of emotional states. To achieve this goal, a distinguished AR method (Burg's method) based on Levinson-Durbin's recursive algorithm is used and AR coefficients are extracted as feature vectors. In the next step, two different feature selection methods based on SFS algorithm and Davies-Bouldin index are used in order to decrease the complexity of computing and redundancy of features; then, three different classifiers include KNN, quadratic discriminant analysis and linear discriminant analysis are used to discriminate two and three different classes of valence and arousal levels. The proposed method is evaluated with EEG signals of available database for emotion analysis using physiological signals, which are recorded from 32 participants during 40 1 min audio visual inductions. According to the results, AR features are efficient to recognize emotional states from EEG signals, and KNN performs better than two other classifiers in discriminating of both two and three valence/arousal classes. The results also show that SFS method improves accuracies by almost 10-15% as compared to Davies-Bouldin based feature selection. The best accuracies are %72.33 and %74.20 for two classes of valence and arousal and %61.10 and %65.16 for three classes, respectively.

  10. Stability of Caribbean coral communities quantified by long-term monitoring and autoregression models.

    PubMed

    Gross, Kevin; Edmunds, Peter J

    2015-07-01

    Tropical coral reefs exemplify ecosystems imperiled by environmental change. Anticipating the future of reef ecosystems requires understanding how scleractinian corals respond to the multiple environmental disturbances that threaten their survival. We analyzed the stability of coral reefs at three habitats at different depths along the south shore of St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands, using multivariate autoregression (MAR) models and two decades of monitoring data. We quantified several measures of ecosystem stability, including the magnitude of typical stochastic fluctuations, the rate of recovery following disturbance, and the sensitivity of coral cover to hurricanes and elevated sea temperature. Our results show that, even within a -4 km shore, coral communities in different habitats display different stability properties, and that the stability of each habitat corresponds with the habitat's known synecology. Two Orbicella-dominated habitats are less prone to annual stochastic fluctuations than coral communities in shallower water, but they recover slowly from disturbance, and one habitat has suffered recent losses in scleractinian cover that will not be quickly reversed. In contrast, a shallower, low-coral-cover habitat is subject to greater stochastic fluctuations, but rebounds more quickly from disturbance and is more robust to hurricanes and seawater warming. In some sense, the shallower community is more stable, although the stability arguably arises from having little coral cover left. Our results sharpen understanding of recent changes in coral communities at these habitats, provide a more detailed understanding of how these habitats may change in future environments, and illustrate how MAR models can be used to assess stability of communities founded upon long-lived species.

  11. Prediction of MeV electron fluxes throughout the outer radiation belt using multivariate autoregressive models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Kaori; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Spence, Harlan E.

    2015-12-01

    The Van Allen radiation belts surrounding the Earth are filled with MeV-energy electrons. This region poses ionizing radiation risks for spacecraft that operate within it, including those in geostationary orbit (GEO) and medium Earth orbit. To provide alerts of electron flux enhancements, 16 prediction models of the electron log-flux variation throughout the equatorial outer radiation belt as a function of the McIlwain L parameter were developed using the multivariate autoregressive model and Kalman filter. Measurements of omnidirectional 2.3 MeV electron flux from the Van Allen Probes mission as well as >2 MeV electrons from the GOES 15 spacecraft were used as the predictors. Model explanatory parameters were selected from solar wind parameters, the electron log-flux at GEO, and geomagnetic indices. For the innermost region of the outer radiation belt, the electron flux is best predicted by using the Dst index as the sole input parameter. For the central to outermost regions, at L ≧ 4.8 and L ≧ 5.6, the electron flux is predicted most accurately by including also the solar wind velocity and then the dynamic pressure, respectively. The Dst index is the best overall single parameter for predicting at 3 ≦ L ≦ 6, while for the GEO flux prediction, the KP index is better than Dst. A test calculation demonstrates that the model successfully predicts the timing and location of the flux maximum as much as 2 days in advance and that the electron flux decreases faster with time at higher L values, both model features consistent with the actually observed behavior.

  12. Soil spectra contributions to grass canopy spectral reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, C. J.; Miller, L. D.

    1977-01-01

    The soil or background spectra contribution to grass canopy spectral reflectance for the 0.35 to 0.80 micron region was investigated using in situ collected spectral reflectance data. Regression analysis was used to estimate accurately the unexposed soil spectral reflectance and to quantify maxima and minima for soil-green vegetation reflection contrasts.

  13. Quantile regression applied to spectral distance decay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocchini, D.; Cade, B.S.

    2008-01-01

    Remotely sensed imagery has long been recognized as a powerful support for characterizing and estimating biodiversity. Spectral distance among sites has proven to be a powerful approach for detecting species composition variability. Regression analysis of species similarity versus spectral distance allows us to quantitatively estimate the amount of turnover in species composition with respect to spectral and ecological variability. In classical regression analysis, the residual sum of squares is minimized for the mean of the dependent variable distribution. However, many ecological data sets are characterized by a high number of zeroes that add noise to the regression model. Quantile regressions can be used to evaluate trend in the upper quantiles rather than a mean trend across the whole distribution of the dependent variable. In this letter, we used ordinary least squares (OLS) and quantile regressions to estimate the decay of species similarity versus spectral distance. The achieved decay rates were statistically nonzero (p < 0.01), considering both OLS and quantile regressions. Nonetheless, the OLS regression estimate of the mean decay rate was only half the decay rate indicated by the upper quantiles. Moreover, the intercept value, representing the similarity reached when the spectral distance approaches zero, was very low compared with the intercepts of the upper quantiles, which detected high species similarity when habitats are more similar. In this letter, we demonstrated the power of using quantile regressions applied to spectral distance decay to reveal species diversity patterns otherwise lost or underestimated by OLS regression. ?? 2008 IEEE.

  14. Application of cluster analysis and autoregressive neural networks for the noise diagnostics of the IBR-2M reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepelyshev, Yu. N.; Tsogtsaikhan, Ts.; Ososkov, G. A.

    2016-09-01

    The pattern recognition methodologies and artificial neural networks were used widely for the IBR-2M pulsed reactor noise diagnostics. The cluster analysis allows a detailed study of the structure and fast reactivity effects of IBR-2M and nonlinear autoregressive neural network (NAR) with local feedback connection allows predicting slow reactivity effects. In this work we present results of a study on pulse energy noise dynamics and prediction of liquid sodium flow rate through the core of the IBR-2M reactor using cluster analysis and an artificial neural network.

  15. New Sub-nanometer Spectral Estimates of the 0-5 nm Solar Soft X-Ray Irradiance at Mars Using the Extreme UltraViolet Monitor (EUVM) Onboard MAVEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemann, E.; Eparvier, F. G.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Woods, T. N.; Peterson, W. K.; Mitchell, D. L.; Xu, S.; Liemohn, M. W.

    2015-12-01

    The Extreme UltraViolet Monitor (EUVM) onboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) probe at Mars characterizes the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray (SXR) input into the Martian atmosphere. EUVM measures solar irradiance at 0-7 nm, 17-22 nm and 121.6 nm at a nominal 1 second cadence. These bands were selected to capture variability originating at different heights in the solar atmosphere; and are used to drive the Flare Irradiance Solar Model at Mars (FISM-M) that is a model of the solar spectrum from 0.1-190 nm with 1 nm resolution and produced routinely as the EUVM Level 3 data product. The 0-5 nm range of the solar spectrum is of particular aeronomic interest because the primary species of the Mars upper atmosphere have Auger transitions in this range. When an Auger transition is excited by incident SXR radiation, secondary electrons are emitted with sufficient energy to further ionize the atmosphere. Because these transitions are highly structured, sub-nm resolution of the solar spectrum is needed in the 0-5 nm range to fully constrain the solar input and more accurately characterize the energetics of the upper atmosphere. At Earth, .1 nm resolution estimates of the solar 0-5 nm range are produced by the X-ray Photometer System (XPS) onboard the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) satellite by combining broad-band SXR measurements with solar flare temperature measurements to drive an atomic physics based forward model of solar coronal emissions. This spectrum has been validated with other models as well as with photo-electron and day glow measurements at Earth. Similar to XPS, the EUVM 0-7 nm and 17-22 nm bands can be used to produce an XPS-like model at Mars, but with reduced precision due to differences in the available bands. We present first results of this technique applied to a set of solar flares observed by MAVEN EUVM and Earth assets. In addition to comparing EUVM and Earth-asset derived 0-5 nm solar spectra to

  16. ATR neutron spectral characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.W.; Anderl, R.A.

    1995-11-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INEL provides intense neutron fields for irradiation-effects testing of reactor material samples, for production of radionuclides used in industrial and medical applications, and for scientific research. Characterization of the neutron environments in the irradiation locations of the ATR has been done by means of neutronics calculations and by means of neutron dosimetry based on the use of neutron activation monitors that are placed in the various irradiation locations. The primary purpose of this report is to present the results of an extensive characterization of several ATR irradiation locations based on neutron dosimetry measurements and on least-squares-adjustment analyses that utilize both neutron dosimetry measurements and neutronics calculations. This report builds upon the previous publications, especially the reference 4 paper. Section 2 provides a brief description of the ATR and it tabulates neutron spectral information for typical irradiation locations, as derived from the more historical neutron dosimetry measurements. Relevant details that pertain to the multigroup neutron spectral characterization are covered in section 3. This discussion includes a presentation on the dosimeter irradiation and analyses and a development of the least-squares adjustment methodology, along with a summary of the results of these analyses. Spectrum-averaged cross sections for neutron monitoring and for displacement-damage prediction in Fe, Cr, and Ni are given in section 4. In addition, section4 includes estimates of damage generation rates for these materials in selected ATR irradiation locations. In section 5, the authors present a brief discussion of the most significant conclusions of this work and comment on its relevance to the present ATR core configuration. Finally, detailed numerical and graphical results for the spectrum-characterization analyses in each irradiation location are provided in the Appendix.

  17. Microenvironment temperature prediction between body and seat interface using autoregressive data-driven model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhuofu; Wang, Lin; Luo, Zhongming; Heusch, Andrew I; Cascioli, Vincenzo; McCarthy, Peter W

    2015-11-01

    There is a need to develop a greater understanding of temperature at the skin-seat interface during prolonged seating from the perspectives of both industrial design (comfort/discomfort) and medical care (skin ulcer formation). Here we test the concept of predicting temperature at the seat surface and skin interface during prolonged sitting (such as required from wheelchair users). As caregivers are usually busy, such a method would give them warning ahead of a problem. This paper describes a data-driven model capable of predicting thermal changes and thus having the potential to provide an early warning (15- to 25-min ahead prediction) of an impending temperature that may increase the risk for potential skin damages for those subject to enforced sitting and who have little or no sensory feedback from this area. Initially, the oscillations of the original signal are suppressed using the reconstruction strategy of empirical mode decomposition (EMD). Consequentially, the autoregressive data-driven model can be used to predict future thermal trends based on a shorter period of acquisition, which reduces the possibility of introducing human errors and artefacts associated with longer duration "enforced" sitting by volunteers. In this study, the method had a maximum predictive error of <0.4 °C when used to predict the temperature at the seat and skin interface 15 min ahead, but required 45 min data prior to give this accuracy. Although the 45 min front loading of data appears large (in proportion to the 15 min prediction), a relative strength derives from the fact that the same algorithm could be used on the other 4 sitting datasets created by the same individual, suggesting that the period of 45 min required to train the algorithm is transferable to other data from the same individual. This approach might be developed (along with incorporation of other measures such as movement and humidity) into a system that can give caregivers prior warning to help avoid

  18. Spectrally resolved white light interferometry to measure material dispersion over a wide spectral band in a single acquisition.

    PubMed

    Arosa, Yago; Lago, Elena López; Varela, Luis Miguel; de la Fuente, Raúl

    2016-07-25

    In this paper we apply spectrally resolved white light interferometry to measure refractive and group index over a wide spectral band from 400 to 1000 nm. The output of a Michelson interferometer is spectrally decomposed by a homemade prism spectrometer with a high resolution camera. The group index is determined directly from the phase extracted from the spectral interferogram while the refractive index is estimated once its value at a given wavelength is known.

  19. Multidimensional spectral load balancing

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1993-01-01

    We describe an algorithm for the static load balancing of scientific computations that generalizes and improves upon spectral bisection. Through a novel use of multiple eigenvectors, our new spectral algorithm can divide a computation into 4 or 8 pieces at once. These multidimensional spectral partitioning algorithms generate balanced partitions that have lower communication overhead and are less expensive to compute than those produced by spectral bisection. In addition, they automatically work to minimize message contention on a hypercube or mesh architecture. These spectral partitions are further improved by a multidimensional generalization of the Kernighan-Lin graph partitioning algorithm. Results on several computational grids are given and compared with other popular methods.

  20. Submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral line catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poynter, R. L.; Pickett, H. M.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes a computer accessible catalogue of submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral lines in the frequency range between 0 and 10000 GHz (i.e., wavelengths longer than 30 micrometers). The catalogue can be used as a planning guide or as an aid in the identification and analysis of observed spectral lines. The information listed for each spectral line includes the frequency and its estimated error, the intensity, lower state energy, and quantum number assignment. The catalogue has been constructed using theoretical least squares fits of published spectral lines to accepted molecular models. The associated predictions and their estimated errors are based upon the resultant fitted parameters and their covariances. Future versions of this catalogue will add more atoms and molecules and update the present listings (151 species) as new data appear. The catalogue is available from the authors as a magnetic tape recorded in card images and as a set of microfiche records.

  1. Submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral line catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poynter, R. L.; Pickett, H. M.

    1981-01-01

    A computer accessible catalogue of submillimeter, millimeter and microwave spectral lines in the frequency range between 0 and 3000 GHZ (i.e., wavelengths longer than 100 mu m) is presented which can be used a planning guide or as an aid in the identification and analysis of observed spectral lines. The information listed for each spectral line includes the frequency and its estimated error, the intensity, lower state energy, and quantum number assignment. The catalogue was constructed by using theoretical least squares fits of published spectral lines to accepted molecular models. The associated predictions and their estimated errors are based upon the resultant fitted parameters and their covariances. Future versions of this catalogue will add more atoms and molecules and update the present listings (133 species) as new data appear. The catalogue is available as a magnetic tape recorded in card images and as a set of microfiche records.

  2. A probabilistic approach to spectral graph matching.

    PubMed

    Egozi, Amir; Keller, Yosi; Guterman, Hugo

    2013-01-01

    Spectral Matching (SM) is a computationally efficient approach to approximate the solution of pairwise matching problems that are np-hard. In this paper, we present a probabilistic interpretation of spectral matching schemes and derive a novel Probabilistic Matching (PM) scheme that is shown to outperform previous approaches. We show that spectral matching can be interpreted as a Maximum Likelihood (ML) estimate of the assignment probabilities and that the Graduated Assignment (GA) algorithm can be cast as a Maximum a Posteriori (MAP) estimator. Based on this analysis, we derive a ranking scheme for spectral matchings based on their reliability, and propose a novel iterative probabilistic matching algorithm that relaxes some of the implicit assumptions used in prior works. We experimentally show our approaches to outperform previous schemes when applied to exhaustive synthetic tests as well as the analysis of real image sequences.

  3. Spectral Dimensionality and Scale of Urban Radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Small, Christopher

    2001-01-01

    Characterization of urban radiance and reflectance is important for understanding the effects of solar energy flux on the urban environment as well as for satellite mapping of urban settlement patterns. Spectral mixture analyses of Landsat and Ikonos imagery suggest that the urban radiance field can very often be described with combinations of three or four spectral endmembers. Dimensionality estimates of Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) radiance measurements of urban areas reveal the existence of 30 to 60 spectral dimensions. The extent to which broadband imagery collected by operational satellites can represent the higher dimensional mixing space is a function of both the spatial and spectral resolution of the sensor. AVIRIS imagery offers the spatial and spectral resolution necessary to investigate the scale dependence of the spectral dimensionality. Dimensionality estimates derived from Minimum Noise Fraction (MNF) eigenvalue distributions show a distinct scale dependence for AVIRIS radiance measurements of Milpitas, California. Apparent dimensionality diminishes from almost 40 to less than 10 spectral dimensions between scales of 8000 m and 300 m. The 10 to 30 m scale of most features in urban mosaics results in substantial spectral mixing at the 20 m scale of high altitude AVIRIS pixels. Much of the variance at pixel scales is therefore likely to result from actual differences in surface reflectance at pixel scales. Spatial smoothing and spectral subsampling of AVIRIS spectra both result in substantial loss of information and reduction of apparent dimensionality, but the primary spectral endmembers in all cases are analogous to those found in global analyses of Landsat and Ikonos imagery of other urban areas.

  4. Modeling Polio Data Using the First Order Non-Negative Integer-Valued Autoregressive, INAR(1), Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazifedan, Turaj; Shitan, Mahendran

    Time series data may consists of counts, such as the number of road accidents, the number of patients in a certain hospital, the number of customers waiting for service at a certain time and etc. When the value of the observations are large it is usual to use Gaussian Autoregressive Moving Average (ARMA) process to model the time series. However if the observed counts are small, it is not appropriate to use ARMA process to model the observed phenomenon. In such cases we need to model the time series data by using Non-Negative Integer valued Autoregressive (INAR) process. The modeling of counts data is based on the binomial thinning operator. In this paper we illustrate the modeling of counts data using the monthly number of Poliomyelitis data in United States between January 1970 until December 1983. We applied the AR(1), Poisson regression model and INAR(1) model and the suitability of these models were assessed by using the Index of Agreement(I.A.). We found that INAR(1) model is more appropriate in the sense it had a better I.A. and it is natural since the data are counts.

  5. Time-varying coefficient vector autoregressions model based on dynamic correlation with an application to crude oil and stock markets.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fengbin; Qiao, Han; Wang, Shouyang; Lai, Kin Keung; Li, Yuze

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a new time-varying coefficient vector autoregressions (VAR) model, in which the coefficient is a linear function of dynamic lagged correlation. The proposed model allows for flexibility in choices of dynamic correlation models (e.g. dynamic conditional correlation generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (GARCH) models, Markov-switching GARCH models and multivariate stochastic volatility models), which indicates that it can describe many types of time-varying causal effects. Time-varying causal relations between West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil and the US Standard and Poor's 500 (S&P 500) stock markets are examined by the proposed model. The empirical results show that their causal relations evolve with time and display complex characters. Both positive and negative causal effects of the WTI on the S&P 500 in the subperiods have been found and confirmed by the traditional VAR models. Similar results have been obtained in the causal effects of S&P 500 on WTI. In addition, the proposed model outperforms the traditional VAR model.

  6. Spectral Redundancy in Tissue Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Tomy

    1995-01-01

    Ultrasonic backscattered signals from material comprised of quasi-periodic scatterers exhibit redundancy over both its phase and magnitude spectra. This dissertation addresses the problem of estimating the mean scatterer spacing and scatterer density from the backscattered ultrasound signal using spectral redundancy characterized by the spectral autocorrelation (SAC) function. The SAC function exploits characteristic differences between the phase spectrum of the resolvable quasi-periodic (regular) scatterers and the unresolvable uniformly distributed (diffuse) scatterers to improve estimator performance over other estimators that operate directly on the magnitude spectrum. Analytical, simulation, and experimental results (liver and breast tissue) indicate the potential of utilizing phase information using the SAC function. A closed form analytical expression for the SAC function is derived for gamma distributed scatterer spacings. The theoretical expression for the SAC function demonstrate the increased regular-to-diffuse scatterer signal ratio in the off-diagonal components of the SAC function, since the diffuse component contributes only to the diagonal components (power spectrum). The A-scan is modelled as a cyclostationary signal whose statistical parameters vary in time with single or multiple periodicities. A-scan models consist of a collection of regular scatterers with gamma distributed spacings embedded in diffuse scatterers with uniform distributed spacings. The model accounts for attenuation by convolving the frequency dependent backscatter coefficients of the scatterer centers with a time-varying system response. Simulation results show that SAC-based estimates converge more reliably over smaller amounts of data than previously used cepstrum-based estimates. A major reason for the performance advantage is the use of phase information by the SAC function, while the cepstnun uses a phaseless power spectral density, that is directly affected by the system

  7. Phase derivative estimation from a single interferogram using a Kalman smoothing algorithm.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Rishikesh; Rastogi, Pramod

    2015-08-15

    We report a technique for direct phase derivative estimation from a single recording of a complex interferogram. In this technique, the interference field is represented as an autoregressive model with spatially varying coefficients. Estimates of these coefficients are obtained using the Kalman filter implementation. The Rauch-Tung-Striebel smoothing algorithm further improves the accuracy of the coefficient estimation. These estimated coefficients are utilized to compute the spatially varying phase derivative. Stochastic evolution of the coefficients is considered, which allows estimating the phase derivative with any type of spatial variation. The simulation and experimental results are provided to substantiate the noise robustness and applicability of the proposed method in phase derivative estimation.

  8. Evaluating Spectral Signals to Identify Spectral Error

    PubMed Central

    Bazar, George; Kovacs, Zoltan; Tsenkova, Roumiana

    2016-01-01

    Since the precision and accuracy level of a chemometric model is highly influenced by the quality of the raw spectral data, it is very important to evaluate the recorded spectra and describe the erroneous regions before qualitative and quantitative analyses or detailed band assignment. This paper provides a collection of basic spectral analytical procedures and demonstrates their applicability in detecting errors of near infrared data. Evaluation methods based on standard deviation, coefficient of variation, mean centering and smoothing techniques are presented. Applications of derivatives with various gap sizes, even below the bandpass of the spectrometer, are shown to evaluate the level of spectral errors and find their origin. The possibility for prudent measurement of the third overtone region of water is also highlighted by evaluation of a complex data recorded with various spectrometers. PMID:26731541

  9. Estimation of FBMC/OQAM fading channels using dual Kalman filters.

    PubMed

    Aldababseh, Mahmoud; Jamoos, Ali

    2014-01-01

    We address the problem of estimating time-varying fading channels in filter bank multicarrier (FBMC/OQAM) wireless systems based on pilot symbols. The standard solution to this problem is the least square (LS) estimator or the minimum mean square error (MMSE) estimator with possible adaptive implementation using recursive least square (RLS) algorithm or least mean square (LMS) algorithm. However, these adaptive filters cannot well-exploit fading channel statistics. To take advantage of fading channel statistics, the time evolution of the fading channel is modeled by an autoregressive process and tracked by Kalman filter. Nevertheless, this requires the autoregressive parameters which are usually unknown. Thus, we propose to jointly estimate the FBMC/OQAM fading channels and their autoregressive parameters based on dual optimal Kalman filters. Once the fading channel coefficients at pilot symbol positions are estimated by the proposed method, the fading channel coefficients at data symbol positions are then estimated by using some interpolation methods such as linear, spline, or low-pass interpolation. The comparative simulation study we carried out with existing techniques confirms the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  10. Estimation of FBMC/OQAM Fading Channels Using Dual Kalman Filters

    PubMed Central

    Aldababseh, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    We address the problem of estimating time-varying fading channels in filter bank multicarrier (FBMC/OQAM) wireless systems based on pilot symbols. The standard solution to this problem is the least square (LS) estimator or the minimum mean square error (MMSE) estimator with possible adaptive implementation using recursive least square (RLS) algorithm or least mean square (LMS) algorithm. However, these adaptive filters cannot well-exploit fading channel statistics. To take advantage of fading channel statistics, the time evolution of the fading channel is modeled by an autoregressive process and tracked by Kalman filter. Nevertheless, this requires the autoregressive parameters which are usually unknown. Thus, we propose to jointly estimate the FBMC/OQAM fading channels and their autoregressive parameters based on dual optimal Kalman filters. Once the fading channel coefficients at pilot symbol positions are estimated by the proposed method, the fading channel coefficients at data symbol positions are then estimated by using some interpolation methods such as linear, spline, or low-pass interpolation. The comparative simulation study we carried out with existing techniques confirms the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:24701181

  11. Spectral collocation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.; Kopriva, D. A.; Patera, A. T.

    1987-01-01

    This review covers the theory and application of spectral collocation methods. Section 1 describes the fundamentals, and summarizes results pertaining to spectral approximations of functions. Some stability and convergence results are presented for simple elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic equations. Applications of these methods to fluid dynamics problems are discussed in Section 2.

  12. Intra- and interseasonal autoregressive prediction of dengue outbreaks using local weather and regional climate for a tropical environment in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Eastin, Matthew D; Delmelle, Eric; Casas, Irene; Wexler, Joshua; Self, Cameron

    2014-09-01

    Dengue fever transmission results from complex interactions between the virus, human hosts, and mosquito vectors-all of which are influenced by environmental factors. Predictive models of dengue incidence rate, based on local weather and regional climate parameters, could benefit disease mitigation efforts. Time series of epidemiological and meteorological data for the urban environment of Cali, Colombia are analyzed from January of 2000 to December of 2011. Significant dengue outbreaks generally occur during warm-dry periods with extreme daily temperatures confined between 18°C and 32°C--the optimal range for mosquito survival and viral transmission. Two environment-based, multivariate, autoregressive forecast models are developed that allow dengue outbreaks to be anticipated from 2 weeks to 6 months in advance. These models have the potential to enhance existing dengue early warning systems, ultimately supporting public health decisions on the timing and scale of vector control efforts.

  13. The Use of an Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average Model for Prediction of the Incidence of Dysentery in Jiangsu, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kewei; Song, Wentao; Li, Jinping; Lu, Wu; Yu, Jiangang; Han, Xiaofeng

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study is to forecast the incidence of bacillary dysentery with a prediction model. We collected the annual and monthly laboratory data of confirmed cases from January 2004 to December 2014. In this study, we applied an autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model to forecast bacillary dysentery incidence in Jiangsu, China. The ARIMA (1, 1, 1) × (1, 1, 2)12 model fitted exactly with the number of cases during January 2004 to December 2014. The fitted model was then used to predict bacillary dysentery incidence during the period January to August 2015, and the number of cases fell within the model's CI for the predicted number of cases during January-August 2015. This study shows that the ARIMA model fits the fluctuations in bacillary dysentery frequency, and it can be used for future forecasting when applied to bacillary dysentery prevention and control.

  14. Bayesian vector autoregressive model for multi-subject effective connectivity inference using multi-modal neuroimaging data.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Sharon; Guindani, Michele; Yeh, Hsiang J; Haneef, Zulfi; Stern, John M; Vannucci, Marina

    2017-03-01

    In this article a multi-subject vector autoregressive (VAR) modeling approach was proposed for inference on effective connectivity based on resting-state functional MRI data. Their framework uses a Bayesian variable selection approach to allow for simultaneous inference on effective connectivity at both the subject- and group-level. Furthermore, it accounts for multi-modal data by integrating structural imaging information into the prior model, encouraging effective connectivity between structurally connected regions. They demonstrated through simulation studies that their approach resulted in improved inference on effective connectivity at both the subject- and group-level, compared with currently used methods. It was concluded by illustrating the method on temporal lobe epilepsy data, where resting-state functional MRI and structural MRI were used. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1311-1332, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Comparing lagged linear correlation, lagged regression, Granger causality, and vector autoregression for uncovering associations in EHR data

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Matthew E; Albers, David J; Hripcsak, George

    2016-01-01

    Time series analysis methods have been shown to reveal clinical and biological associations in data collected in the electronic health record. We wish to develop reliable high-throughput methods for identifying adverse drug effects that are easy to implement and produce readily interpretable results. To move toward this goal, we used univariate and multivariate lagged regression models to investigate associations between twenty pairs of drug orders and laboratory measurements. Multivariate lagged regression models exhibited higher sensitivity and specificity than univariate lagged regression in the 20 examples, and incorporating autoregressive terms for labs and drugs produced more robust signals in cases of known associations among the 20 example pairings. Moreover, including inpatient admission terms in the model attenuated the signals for some cases of unlikely associations, demonstrating how multivariate lagged regression models’ explicit handling of context-based variables can provide a simple way to probe for health-care processes that confound analyses of EHR data. PMID:28269874

  16. Intra- and Interseasonal Autoregressive Prediction of Dengue Outbreaks Using Local Weather and Regional Climate for a Tropical Environment in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Eastin, Matthew D.; Delmelle, Eric; Casas, Irene; Wexler, Joshua; Self, Cameron

    2014-01-01

    Dengue fever transmission results from complex interactions between the virus, human hosts, and mosquito vectors—all of which are influenced by environmental factors. Predictive models of dengue incidence rate, based on local weather and regional climate parameters, could benefit disease mitigation efforts. Time series of epidemiological and meteorological data for the urban environment of Cali, Colombia are analyzed from January of 2000 to December of 2011. Significant dengue outbreaks generally occur during warm-dry periods with extreme daily temperatures confined between 18°C and 32°C—the optimal range for mosquito survival and viral transmission. Two environment-based, multivariate, autoregressive forecast models are developed that allow dengue outbreaks to be anticipated from 2 weeks to 6 months in advance. These models have the potential to enhance existing dengue early warning systems, ultimately supporting public health decisions on the timing and scale of vector control efforts. PMID:24957546

  17. Autoregressive processes with anomalous scaling behavior: applications to high-frequency variations of a stock market index.

    PubMed

    Dose, Christian; Porto, Markus; Roman, H Eduardo

    2003-06-01

    We employ autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity processes to model the probability distribution function (PDF) of high-frequency relative variations of the Standard & Poors 500 market index data, obtained at the time horizon of 1 min. The model reproduces quantitatively the shape of the PDF, characterized by a Lévy-type power-law decay around its center, followed by a crossover to a faster decay at the tails. Furthermore, it is able to reproduce accurately the anomalous decay of the central part of the PDF at larger time horizons and, by the introduction of a short-range memory, also the crossover behavior of the corresponding standard deviations and the time scale of the exponentially decaying autocorrelation function of returns displayed by the empirical data.

  18. Dual-component model of respiratory motion based on the periodic autoregressive moving average (periodic ARMA) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, K. C.; Jeraj, R.

    2007-07-01

    A new approach to the problem of modelling and predicting respiration motion has been implemented. This is a dual-component model, which describes the respiration motion as a non-periodic time series superimposed onto a periodic waveform. A periodic autoregressive moving average algorithm has been used to define a mathematical model of the periodic and non-periodic components of the respiration motion. The periodic components of the motion were found by projecting multiple inhale-exhale cycles onto a common subspace. The component of the respiration signal that is left after removing this periodicity is a partially autocorrelated time series and was modelled as an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) process. The accuracy of the periodic ARMA model with respect to fluctuation in amplitude and variation in length of cycles has been assessed. A respiration phantom was developed to simulate the inter-cycle variations seen in free-breathing and coached respiration patterns. At ±14% variability in cycle length and maximum amplitude of motion, the prediction errors were 4.8% of the total motion extent for a 0.5 s ahead prediction, and 9.4% at 1.0 s lag. The prediction errors increased to 11.6% at 0.5 s and 21.6% at 1.0 s when the respiration pattern had ±34% variations in both these parameters. Our results have shown that the accuracy of the periodic ARMA model is more strongly dependent on the variations in cycle length than the amplitude of the respiration cycles.

  19. Robust detection of gearbox deterioration using compromised autoregressive modeling and Kolmogorov Smirnov test statistic. Part II: Experiment and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Yimin; Mechefske, Chris K.

    2007-07-01

    Optimal maintenance decision analysis is heavily dependent on the accuracy of condition indicators. A condition indicator that is subject to such varying operating conditions as load is unable to provide precise condition information of the monitored object for making optimal operational maintenance decisions even if the maintenance program is established within a rigorous theoretical framework. For this reason, the performance of condition monitoring techniques applied to rotating machinery under varying load conditions has been a long-term concern and has attracted intensive research interest. Part I of this study proposed a novel technique based on adaptive autoregressive modeling and hypothesis tests. The method is able to automatically search for the optimal time-series model order and establish a compromised autoregressive model fitting based on the healthy gear motion residual signals under varying load conditions. The condition of the monitored gearbox is numerically represented by a modified Kolmogorov-Smirnov test statistic. Part II of this study is devoted to applications of the proposed technique to entire lifetime condition detection of three gearboxes with distinct physical specifications, distinct load conditions, and distinct failure modes. A comprehensive and thorough comparative study is conducted between the proposed technique and several counterparts. The detection technique is further enhanced by a proposed method to automatically identify and generate fault alerts with the aid of the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and thus requires no supervision from maintenance personnel. Experimental analysis demonstrated that the proposed technique applied to automatic identification and generation of fault alerts also features two highly desirable properties, i.e. few false alerts and early alert for incipient faults. Furthermore, it is found that the proposed technique is able to identify two types of abnormalities, i.e. strong ghost components abruptly

  20. Fast computation of the spectral correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoni, Jérôme; Xin, Ge; Hamzaoui, Nacer

    2017-08-01

    Although the Spectral Correlation is one of the most versatile spectral tools to analyze cyclostationary signals (i.e. signals comprising hidden periodicities or repetitive patterns), its use in condition monitoring has so far been hindered by its high computational cost. The Cyclic Modulation Spectrum (the Fourier transform of the spectrogram) stands as a much faster alternative, yet it suffers from the uncertainty principle and is thus limited to detect relatively slow periodic modulations. This paper fixes the situation by proposing a new fast estimator of the spectral correlation, the Fast Spectral Correlation, based on the short-time Fourier transform (STFT). It proceeds from the property that, for a cyclostationary signal, the STFT evidences periodic flows of energy in and across its frequency bins. The Fourier transform of the interactions of the STFT coefficients then returns a quantity which scans the Spectral Correlation along its cyclic frequency axis. The gain in computational cost as compared to the conventional estimator is like the ratio of the signal length to the STFT window length and can therefore be considerable. The validity of the proposed estimator is demonstrated on non trivial vibration signals (very weak bearing signatures and speed varying cases) and its computational advantage is used to compute a new quantity, the Enhanced Envelope Spectrum.

  1. A geometric approach to spectral subtraction

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang; Loizou, Philipos C.

    2008-01-01

    The traditional power spectral subtraction algorithm is computationally simple to implement but suffers from musical noise distortion. In addition, the subtractive rules are based on incorrect assumptions about the cross terms being zero. A new geometric approach to spectral subtraction is proposed in the present paper that addresses these shortcomings of the spectral subtraction algorithm. A method for estimating the cross terms involving the phase differences between the noisy (and clean) signals and noise is proposed. Analysis of the gain function of the proposed algorithm indicated that it possesses similar properties as the traditional MMSE algorithm. Objective evaluation of the proposed algorithm showed that it performed significantly better than the traditional spectral subtractive algorithm. Informal listening tests revealed that the proposed algorithm had no audible musical noise. PMID:19122867

  2. Method to analyze remotely sensed spectral data

    SciTech Connect

    Stork, Christopher L.; Van Benthem, Mark H.

    2009-02-17

    A fast and rigorous multivariate curve resolution (MCR) algorithm is applied to remotely sensed spectral data. The algorithm is applicable in the solar-reflective spectral region, comprising the visible to the shortwave infrared (ranging from approximately 0.4 to 2.5 .mu.m), midwave infrared, and thermal emission spectral region, comprising the thermal infrared (ranging from approximately 8 to 15 .mu.m). For example, employing minimal a priori knowledge, notably non-negativity constraints on the extracted endmember profiles and a constant abundance constraint for the atmospheric upwelling component, MCR can be used to successfully compensate thermal infrared hyperspectral images for atmospheric upwelling and, thereby, transmittance effects. Further, MCR can accurately estimate the relative spectral absorption coefficients and thermal contrast distribution of a gas plume component near the minimum detectable quantity.

  3. Estimating linear temporal trends from aggregated environmental monitoring data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erickson, Richard A.; Gray, Brian R.; Eager, Eric A.

    2017-01-01

    Trend estimates are often used as part of environmental monitoring programs. These trends inform managers (e.g., are desired species increasing or undesired species decreasing?). Data collected from environmental monitoring programs is often aggregated (i.e., averaged), which confounds sampling and process variation. State-space models allow sampling variation and process variations to be separated. We used simulated time-series to compare linear trend estimations from three state-space models, a simple linear regression model, and an auto-regressive model. We also compared the performance of these five models to estimate trends from a long term monitoring program. We specifically estimated trends for two species of fish and four species of aquatic vegetation from the Upper Mississippi River system. We found that the simple linear regression had the best performance of all the given models because it was best able to recover parameters and had consistent numerical convergence. Conversely, the simple linear regression did the worst job estimating populations in a given year. The state-space models did not estimate trends well, but estimated population sizes best when the models converged. We found that a simple linear regression performed better than more complex autoregression and state-space models when used to analyze aggregated environmental monitoring data.

  4. An upper-bound metric for characterizing spectral and spatial coregistration errors in spectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Skauli, Torbjørn

    2012-01-16

    Coregistration errors in multi- and hyperspectral imaging sensors arise when the spatial sensitivity pattern differs between bands or when the spectral response varies across the field of view, potentially leading to large errors in the recorded image data. In imaging spectrometers, spectral and spatial offset errors are customarily specified as "smile" and "keystone" distortions. However these characteristics do not account for errors resulting from variations in point spread function shape or spectral bandwidth. This paper proposes improved metrics for coregistration error both in the spatial and spectral dimensions. The metrics are essentially the integrated difference between point spread functions. It is shown that these metrics correspond to an upper bound on the error in image data. The metrics enable estimation of actual data errors for a given image, and can be used as part of the merit function in optical design optimization, as well as for benchmarking of spectral image sensors.

  5. Active spectral sensor evaluation under varying conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant stress has been estimated by spectral signature using both passive and active sensors. As optical sensors measure reflected light from a target, changes in illumination characteristics critically affect sensor response. Active sensors are of benefit in minimizing uncontrolled illumination effe...

  6. SPECTRAL SMILE CORRECTION IN CRISM HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceamanos, X.; Doute, S.

    2009-12-01

    sharpening for every Θi is determined thanks to a loop of sharpening procedures, which is assessed by the examination of an estimation of the smile energy (the MNF-smile eigenvalue). As a matter of fact, a higher sharpening is performed on Θi as long as the smile energy decreases. Experiments on CRISM data show remarkable results regarding the decrease of smile energy (up to 80%) and the spectral shape preservation. In fact, initial smile-affected spectra do no longer show shifting nor smoothing (see Fig. 2). Line-averaged spectra and band 155 of FRT5AE3_07 showing spectral smile effects Line-averaged spectra and band 155 of smile-corrected FRT5AE3_07

  7. PERIODIC AUTOREGRESSIVE-MOVING AVERAGE (PARMA) MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO WATER RESOURCES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vecchia, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    Results involving correlation properties and parameter estimation for autogressive-moving average models with periodic parameters are presented. A multivariate representation of the PARMA model is used to derive parameter space restrictions and difference equations for the periodic autocorrelations. Close approximation to the likelihood function for Gaussian PARMA processes results in efficient maximum-likelihood estimation procedures. Terms in the Fourier expansion of the parameters are sequentially included, and a selection criterion is given for determining the optimal number of harmonics to be included. Application of the techniques is demonstrated through analysis of a monthly streamflow time series.

  8. ARM Climate Research Facility Spectral Surface Albedo Value-Added Product (VAP) Report

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, S; Gaustad, K; Long, C; Mlawer, E

    2011-07-15

    This document describes the input requirements, output data products, and methodology for the Spectral Surface Albedo (SURFSPECALB) value-added product (VAP). The SURFSPECALB VAP produces a best-estimate near-continuous high spectral resolution albedo data product using measurements from multifilter radiometers (MFRs). The VAP first identifies best estimates for the MFR downwelling and upwelling shortwave irradiance values, and then calculates narrowband spectral albedo from these best-estimate irradiance values. The methodology for finding the best-estimate values is based on a simple process of screening suspect data and backfilling screened and missing data with estimated values when possible. The resulting best-estimate MFR narrowband spectral albedos are used to determine a daily surface type (snow, 100% vegetation, partial vegetation, or 0% vegetation). For non-snow surfaces, a piecewise continuous function is used to estimate a high spectral resolution albedo at 1 min temporal and 10 cm-1 spectral resolution.

  9. Commission 45: Spectral Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giridhar, Sunetra; Gray, Richard O.; Corbally, Christopher J.; Bailer-Jones, Coryn A. L.; Eyer, Laurent; Irwin, Michael J.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Majewski, Steven; Minniti, Dante; Nordström, Birgitta

    This report gives an update of developments (since the last General Assembly at Prague) in the areas that are of relevance to the commission. In addition to numerous papers, a new monograph entitled Stellar Spectral Classification with Richard Gray and Chris Corbally as leading auth