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Sample records for autoresonance maser carm

  1. The Design of a 100 GHz CARM (Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Maser) Oscillator Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-14

    2364. (Radio Engng. Electron. Phys., 21, 78-73). 5) Ginzburg , N. S., Zarnitsyna, I. G., and Nusinovich, G. S., 1981, Theory of relativistic cyclotron...An efficient Doppler-shifted electron-cyclotron maser oscillator. Int J. Electron., 53, 555-57 1. 7) Bratman, V. L., Ginzburg , N. S., Nusinovich, G...1386-1389. (Sov. Tech. Phys. Lett., 8, 596-597). 12) Botvinnik, I. E., Bratman, V. L., Volkov, A. B., Ginzburg , N. S, Denisov, G. G., Kol’chugin, B

  2. Cyclotron autoresonance maser in the millimeter region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolov, N. A.; Spasovski, I. P.; Kostov, K. G.; Velichkov, J. N.; Spasov, V. A.

    1990-06-01

    This paper investigates the optimal experimental conditions for a cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARM) regime realized by a nonadiabatic magnetic beam pumping in the millimeter wavelength region. In the experiment, a Blumline-type accelerator with a voltage up to 650 kV and maximal current up to 10 kA is used to generate a hollow beam with a pulse duration of 30 ns. The electron beam, emitted from a graphite cathode with a 10-mm diameter, propagates in a cylindrical drift tube of 56 mm diam and a length of 500 mm. The external magnetic field B, provided by a solenoidal magnet, is homogeneous along the drift tube up to a distance of 300 mm from the cathode. The experiment demonstrated the generation of microwave radiation in the time interval from 0.0016 to 0.0023 sec after the switch-on of the external magnetic field. Two maxima of the output microwave power (8 and 10 MW) at a wavelength of 5 and 5.5 mm, respectively, were observed.

  3. MM-wave cyclotron auto-resonance maser for plasma heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccuzzi, S.; Dattoli, G.; Di Palma, E.; Doria, A.; Gallerano, G. P.; Giovenale, E.; Mirizzi, F.; Spassovsky, I.; Ravera, G. L.; Surrenti, V.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2014-02-01

    Heating and Current Drive systems are of outstanding relevance in fusion plasmas, magnetically confined in tokamak devices, as they provide the tools to reach, sustain and control burning conditions. Heating systems based on the electron cyclotron resonance (ECRH) have been extensively exploited on past and present machines DEMO, and the future reactor will require high frequencies. Therefore, high power (≥1MW) RF sources with output frequency in the 200 - 300 GHz range would be necessary. A promising source is the so called Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Maser (CARM). Preliminary results of the conceptual design of a CARM device for plasma heating, carried out at ENEA-Frascati will be presented together with the planned R&D development.

  4. MM-wave cyclotron auto-resonance maser for plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccuzzi, S.; Ravera, G. L.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Dattoli, G.; Di Palma, E.; Doria, A.; Gallerano, G. P.; Giovenale, E.; Spassovsky, I.; Surrenti, V.; Mirizzi, F.

    2014-02-12

    Heating and Current Drive systems are of outstanding relevance in fusion plasmas, magnetically confined in tokamak devices, as they provide the tools to reach, sustain and control burning conditions. Heating systems based on the electron cyclotron resonance (ECRH) have been extensively exploited on past and present machines DEMO, and the future reactor will require high frequencies. Therefore, high power (≥1MW) RF sources with output frequency in the 200 - 300 GHz range would be necessary. A promising source is the so called Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Maser (CARM). Preliminary results of the conceptual design of a CARM device for plasma heating, carried out at ENEA-Frascati will be presented together with the planned R and D development.

  5. Nonlinear analysis of a large-orbit coaxial-waveguide cyclotron autoresonance maser amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang Zhengbiao; Zhang Shichang

    2007-10-01

    Nonlinear simulations are presented to analyze the influences of the electron beam and the magnetic field parameters on the output power of a large-orbit coaxial-waveguide cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARM) amplifier. It is found that the guiding-center spread of the relativistic electrons has negligible impact on the output power due to the small field change felt by the large-orbit electrons. The electron-beam velocity spread and energy spread substantially decrease the output power, because these spreads directly affect the beam-wave interaction through the Doppler term and the relativistic cyclotron frequency term in the cyclotron resonance condition. However, this adverse effect may be offset by properly tapering the operating magnetic field. The output power is sensitive to both the slope and the amplitude of the tapered magnetic field. Nonlinear simulation demonstrates the feasibility that a large-orbit coaxial-waveguide CARM amplifier can be expected to provide output power with several megawatts, ultrahigh gain, and good bandwidth in the millimeter and submillimeter wavelength ranges.

  6. A 250-GHz CARM (Cyclotron Auto Resonance Maser) oscillator experiment driven by an induction linac

    SciTech Connect

    Caplan, M.; Kulke, B.; Bubp, D.G. ); McDermott, D.; Luhmann, N. )

    1990-09-14

    A 250-GHz Cyclotron Auto Resonance Maser (CARM) oscillator has been designed and constructed and will be tested using a 1-kA, 2-MeV electron beam produced by the induction linac at the Accelerator Research Center (ARC) facility of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The oscillator circuit was made to operate in the TE{sub 11} mode at ten times cutoff using waveguide Bragg reflectors to create an external cavity Q of 8000. Theory predicts cavity fill times of less than 30 ns (pulse length) and efficiencies approaching 20% is sufficiently low transverse electron velocity spreads are maintained (2%).

  7. Development of High Power CARM (Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Maser) Oscillators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-14

    Hicks Rd. Rolling Meadows, Illinois 60008 Attn: Dr. Gunter Dohler 1 copy Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box Y Mail Stop 3 Building 9201 -2 Oak ...efficiency for optimized A can be presented on an F - y plot 4 similar to the plot used to characterize the gyrotron [3]. TI’e laiau.eter " defined in...UNCLASSIFIED Approved for public release; distribution 2 0 DECASS C a - n’ ’.O RAD %C SC E D unlimited. 4 P-P-ORM, NO ORCA% Z.A ON% PEPO5T N _jMBER S 5

  8. High-efficiency CARM

    SciTech Connect

    Bratman, V.L.; Kol`chugin, B.D.; Samsonov, S.V.; Volkov, A.B.

    1995-12-31

    The Cyclotron Autoresonance Maser (CARM) is a well-known variety of FEMs. Unlike the ubitron in which electrons move in a periodical undulator field, in the CARM the particles move along helical trajectories in a uniform magnetic field. Since it is much simpler to generate strong homogeneous magnetic fields than periodical ones for a relatively low electron energy ({Brit_pounds}{le}1-3 MeV) the period of particles` trajectories in the CARM can be sufficiently smaller than in the undulator in which, moreover, the field decreases rapidly in the transverse direction. In spite of this evident advantage, the number of papers on CARM is an order less than on ubitron, which is apparently caused by the low (not more than 10 %) CARM efficiency in experiments. At the same time, ubitrons operating in two rather complicated regimes-trapping and adiabatic deceleration of particles and combined undulator and reversed guiding fields - yielded efficiencies of 34 % and 27 %, respectively. The aim of this work is to demonstrate that high efficiency can be reached even for a simplest version of the CARM. In order to reduce sensitivity to an axial velocity spread of particles, a short interaction length where electrons underwent only 4-5 cyclotron oscillations was used in this work. Like experiments, a narrow anode outlet of a field-emission electron gun cut out the {open_quotes}most rectilinear{close_quotes} near-axis part of the electron beam. Additionally, magnetic field of a small correcting coil compensated spurious electron oscillations pumped by the anode aperture. A kicker in the form of a sloping to the axis frame with current provided a control value of rotary velocity at a small additional velocity spread. A simple cavity consisting of a cylindrical waveguide section restricted by a cut-off waveguide on the cathode side and by a Bragg reflector on the collector side was used as the CARM-oscillator microwave system.

  9. FEL's with bragg reflection resonators: cyclotron auto resonance masers versus ubitrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bratman, V.L.; Denisov, G.G.; Ginzburg, N.S.; Petelin, M.I.

    1983-03-01

    FEL's based on the stimulated undulator radiation (ubitrons) are compared with those based on the stimulated cyclotron radiation (cyclotron autoresonance masers (CARM's)). If the high-current accelerators are used as electron injectors, then from the viewpoint of simplicity of oscillatory electron energy pumping, criticality with respect to electron velocity dispersion, and efficiency, CARM's seem to be more effective than ubitrons at mm and sbmm waves. For such HF generators, resonators based on selective Bragg reflection of electromagnetic waves in corrugated metallic tubes are most attractive. CARM's of this type yield 6 MW at a 4 mm wavelength and 10 MW at a 2 mm wavelength in the single-mode regime.

  10. Observation of harmonic gyro-backward-wave oscillation in a 100 GHz CARM oscillator experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCowan, Robert B.; Sullivan, Carol A.; Gold, Steven H.; Fliflet, Arne W.

    1991-02-01

    A cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARM) oscillator experiment is reported, using a 600 keV, 200 A electron beam, and a whispering gallery-mode rippled-wall Bragg cavity. This device was designed to produce tens of megawatts of radiation at 100 GHz from a CARM interaction, but instead has produced only moderate powers (tens of kWs) in fundamental gyrotron modes near 35 GHz, in third-harmonic-gyro-BWO modes, and possible third-harmonic gyrotron modes at frequencies near the expected CARM frequency, with no discernable CARM radiation. The lack of observable CARM radiation is attributed to excessive ripple on the voltage waveform and to mode competition. Calculations of the spectrum and growth rate of the backward-wave oscillations are consistent with the experimental observation.

  11. CARM and harmonic gyro-amplifier experiments at 17 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Menninger, W.L.; Danly, B.G.; Alberti, S.; Chen, C.; Rullier, J.L.; Temkin, R.J.; Giguet, E. |

    1993-11-01

    Cyclotron resonance maser amplifiers are possible sources for applications such as electron cyclotron resonance heating of fusion plasmas and driving high-gradient rf linear accelerators. For accelerator drivers, amplifiers or phase locked-oscillators are required. A 17 GHz cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARM) amplifier experiment and a 17 GHz third harmonic gyro-amplifier experiment are presently underway at the MIT Plasma Fusion Center. Using the SRL/MIT SNOMAD II introduction accelerator to provide a 380 kV, 180 A, 30 ns flat top electron beam, the gyro-amplifier experiment has produced 5 MW of rf power with over 50 dB of gain at 17 GHz. The gyro-amplifier operates in the TE{sub 31} mode using a third harmonic interaction. Because of its high power output, the gyro-amplifier will be used as the rf source for a photocathode rf electron gun experiment also taking place at MIT. Preliminary gyro-amplifier results are presented, including measurement of rf power, gain versus interaction length, and the far-field pattern. A CARM experiment designed to operate in the TE{sub 11} mode is also discussed.

  12. Autoresonant control of drift waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shagalov, A. G.; Rasmussen, J. Juul; Naulin, V.

    2017-03-01

    The control of nonlinear drift waves in a magnetized plasmas column has been investigated. The studies are based on the Hasegawa–Mima model, which is solved on a disk domain with radial inhomogeneity of the plasma density. The system is forced by a rotating potential with varying frequency defined on the boundary. To excite and control the waves we apply the autoresonant effect, taking place when the amplitude of the forcing exceeds a threshold value and the waves are phase-locked with the forcing. We demonstrate that the autoresonant approach is applicable for excitation of a range of steady nonlinear waves of the lowest azimuthal mode numbers and for controlling their amplitudes and phases. We also demonstrate the excitation of zonal flows (m = 0 modes), which are controlled via the forced modes.

  13. Autoresonance of coupled nonlinear waves

    SciTech Connect

    Yaakobi, Oded; Friedland, Lazar

    2011-01-04

    Resonant three-wave interactions (R3WIs) and their dynamical counterpart, three-oscillator interactions (R3OIs) play a fundamental role in many fields of physics. Consequently, controlling R3WI/R3OIs is an important goal of both basic and applied physics research. We have developed new control schemes based on a recent approach of wave autoresonance. This approach is based on the intrinsic property of many nonlinear waves and oscillations to stay in resonance (phase-lock) even when parameters of the system vary in time and/or space. We review autoresonance in several new coupled wave systems including externally driven R3OI systems and multidimensional R3WIs. Particularly, we have focused on autoresonant stimulated Raman scattering in nonuniform plasmas. This research comprises an important step toward understanding of adiabatic synchronization of nonlinear waves in space-time varying media with a potential of many new applications in plasma physics and related fields, such as fluid dynamics, nonlinear optics, and acoustics.

  14. Autoresonant Dynamics of Optical Guided Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Barak, Assaf; Lamhot, Yuval; Segev, Mordechai; Friedland, Lazar

    2009-09-18

    We study, theoretically and experimentally, autoresonant dynamics of optical waves in a spatially chirped nonlinear directional coupler. We show that adiabatic passage through a linear resonance in a weakly coupled light-wave system yields a sharp threshold transition to nonlinear phase locking and amplification to predetermined amplitudes. This constitutes the first observation of autoresonance phenomena in optics.

  15. Autoresonant Excitation of Antiproton Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Butler, E.; Carpenter, P. T.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hurt, J. L.; Hydomako, R.; Jonsell, S.; Madsen, N.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate controllable excitation of the center-of-mass longitudinal motion of a thermal antiproton plasma using a swept-frequency autoresonant drive. When the plasma is cold, dense, and highly collective in nature, we observe that the entire system behaves as a single-particle nonlinear oscillator, as predicted by a recent theory. In contrast, only a fraction of the antiprotons in a warm plasma can be similarly excited. Antihydrogen was produced and trapped by using this technique to drive antiprotons into a positron plasma, thereby initiating atomic recombination.

  16. Astronomical masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elitzur, Moshe

    1992-01-01

    Recent research related to astronomical masers is reviewed. First, attention is given to phenomenology, including observations and modeling of galactic and extragalactic maser sources. The discussion then focuses on the developments concerning the physical properties of maser radiation. Finally, the use of masers as general tools for the study of astronomical environments where the radiation is produced and where it propagates, is discussed.

  17. Autoresonant four-wave mixing in optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Yaakobi, O.; Friedland, L.

    2010-08-15

    A theory of autoresonant four-wave mixing in tapered fibers is developed in application to optical parametric amplification (OPA). In autoresonance, the interacting waves (two pump waves, a signal, and an idler) stay phase-locked continuously despite variation of system parameters (spatial tapering). This spatially extended phase-locking allows complete pump depletion in the system and uniform amplification spectrum in a wide frequency band. Different aspects of autoresonant OPA are described including the automatic initial phase-locking, conditions for autoresonant transition, stability, and spatial range of the autoresonant interaction.

  18. Autoresonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajans, J.; Friedland, L.

    A weakly-driven pendulum cannot be strongly excited by a fixed frequency drive. The only way to strongly excite the pendulum is to use a drive whose frequency decreases with time. Feedback is often used to control the rate at which the frequency decreases. Feedback need not be employed, however, the drive frequency can simply be swept downwards. With this method, the drive strength must exceed a threshold proportional to the sweep rate raised to the 3/4 power. This threshold has been discovered only recently, and holds for a very broad class of driven nonlinear oscillators. The threshold may explain the abundance of 3:2 resonances and sparsity of 2:1 resonances observed between the orbital periods of Neptune and the Plutinos (Pluto and many of the Kuiper Belt objects), and has been extensively investigated in the Diocotron and other systems in single-species plasmas.

  19. The Sagdeev pseudopotential approach to autoresonance effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, a theoretical model of the autoresonance effect based on the pseudoparticle oscillation in a classical potential well is presented. The underlying connection between the autoresonance effect and the shock wave generation in fluid dynamics is revealed and effects of different parameters such as the potential, damping, external force amplitude, and frequency variation on the phase-locking effect are examined. We use the full nonlinear energy spectrum of oscillations in order to selectively choose our start frequency for the autoresonance effect to occur. We also use an exponential chirping mechanism instead of the linear one which is usually employed. We believe that the former chirping mechanism is a more natural way of energy injection into the dynamical system and provides a more effective approach with sufficient control on the phase locking stability and duration. It is shown that the double sweeping of both driving force magnitude and frequency leads to dense large amplitude wave packets which we call autoexcitons. These entities may be useful in instantaneous energy transport in fluids and heating of plasmas. The autoresonance effect with exponential chirping and variable force amplitude is shown to be effective for weakly nonlinear Helmholtz and Duffing oscillators as well as fully nonlinear Sagdeev potential of electron-ion plasma hydrodynamic models. The occurrence of phase locking and autoexciton formation is studied for driven ion acoustic waves in terms of different plasma parameters and equation of state of ion fluid.

  20. Multidimensional, autoresonant three-wave interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yaakobi, O.; Friedland, L.

    2008-10-15

    The theory of autoresonant three-wave interactions is generalized to more than one space and/or time variation of the background medium. In the most general case, the three waves propagate in a four-dimensional (4D) slowly space-time varying background, with an embedded 3D linear resonance hypersurface, where the linear frequency and wave-vector matching conditions of the three waves are satisfied exactly. The autoresonance in the system is the result of weak nonlinear frequency shifts and nonuniformity in the problem and is manifested by satisfaction of the nonlinear resonance conditions in an extended region of space-time adjacent to the resonance surface despite the variation of the background. The threshold condition for autoresonance is found and further discussed in application to stimulated Raman scattering in a 1D, time-dependent plasma case. Asymptotic description of the autoresonant waves far away from the resonance surface is obtained. The theory is illustrated and tested in 2D numerical simulatio0008.

  1. Cosmic Masers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Dale F.

    1978-01-01

    Intense radiation at microwave frequencies is emitted by certain nebular regions and stellar atmospheres. It is generated by maser action, which does for microwaves what laser action does for light. Describes in detail the types of masers and their action. (Author/MA)

  2. TG wave autoresonant control of plasma temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kabantsev, A. A. Driscoll, C. F.

    2015-06-29

    The thermal correction term in the Trivelpiece-Gould (TG) wave’s frequency has been used to accurately control the temperature of electron plasma, by applying a swept-frequency continuous drive autoresonantly locked in balance with the cyclotron cooling. The electron temperature can be either “pegged” at a desired value (by constant drive frequency); or varied cyclically (following the tailored frequency course), with rates limited by the cooling time (on the way down) and by chosen drive amplitude (on the way up)

  3. Autoresonant magnetization switching by spin-orbit torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Go, Gyungchoon; Lee, Seung-Jae; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2017-05-01

    Autoresonance is a self-sustained resonance mechanism due to a driving force whose frequency monotonically varies with time. We theoretically show that the autoresonance mechanism allows an efficient switching of perpendicular magnetization by spin-orbit spin-transfer torques. We find that a threshold current for the autoresonant switching can be much smaller than that of conventional spin-orbit torque switching driven by a DC current. Moreover, the suggested scheme allows fully deterministic switching without the help of any external field.

  4. Hydrogen maser frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F. C.

    1980-01-01

    The fundamental theoretical limitations of the maser, systematic processes that cause instability, and some aspects of recently designed masers are described. A design for field use that has evolved from the development of the space borne maser is presented. The performance of this type of maser is close to theoretical limits imposed by thermal noise. Further developments of smaller masers for space and terrestrial use and recent work on masers operating at low temperatures is also discussed.

  5. Runaway electrons in a Tokamak: A free-electron maser

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzan, B.; Steuer, K.; Suttrop, W.

    1997-01-01

    In Ohmic divertor plasma discharges of the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak a small population of runaway electrons is purposely generated at the beginning of the discharge. About 1.5 s after the runaways` generation fluctuating emission in the microwave region with a very narrow bandwidth is observed. The radiation can be explained by relativistic runaway electrons forming a free-electron maser in the tokamak: The dynamics of the runaways is simulated by taking into account the acceleration in the electric field, collisions with the plasma particles, synchrotron radiation losses and the resonances between the gyromotion and harmonics of the magnetic ripple field. According to this the runaways reach a final energy determined by the ripple resonance mechanism and are monoenergetic enough to form a cyclotron autoresonance maser. The guiding of the radiation along the bent path of the runaways is accomplished by nearly resonant runaways around the amplifying runaways. The emission frequency depends on the final energy of the runaways and the observed bandwidth via the maser`s gain on their particle density. Analyzing the emitted fluctuating emission is thus a potentially new diagnostic for runaways. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Autoresonance versus localization in weakly coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, Agnessa; Manevitch, Leonid I.

    2016-04-01

    We study formation of autoresonance (AR) in a two-degree of freedom oscillator array including a nonlinear (Duffing) oscillator (the actuator) weakly coupled to a linear attachment. Two classes of systems are studied. In the first class of systems, a periodic force with constant (resonance) frequency is applied to a nonlinear oscillator (actuator) with slowly time-decreasing stiffness. In the systems of the second class a nonlinear time-invariant oscillator is subjected to an excitation with slowly increasing frequency. In both cases, the attached linear oscillator and linear coupling are time-invariant, and the system is initially engaged in resonance. This paper demonstrates that in the systems of the first type AR in the nonlinear actuator entails oscillations with growing amplitudes in the linear attachment while in the system of the second type energy transfer from the nonlinear actuator is insufficient to excite high-energy oscillations of the attachment. It is also shown that a slow change of stiffness may enhance the response of the actuator and make it sufficient to support oscillations with growing energy in the attachment even beyond the linear resonance. Explicit asymptotic approximations of the solutions are obtained. Close proximity of the derived approximations to exact (numerical) results is demonstrated.

  7. Proton maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensley, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    New calculations are reported which confirm the ability of an a priori random, initial-phase proton beam to drive a simple, single-stage microwave cavity maser or transit-time oscillator (TTO) to saturation conversion efficiencies of about 11 percent. The required initial TE(011) mode field can be provided from beam ramp-up bandwidth of excitation to a low level from an external source. A saturation field of 45 tesla and output power of 0.2 TW are calculated using an electron insulation field of 10 tesla and a 3 MeV, 400 Ka/sq cm beam. Results are compared to those for an electron beam of the same energy and geometry, and it is shown that proton beams potentially can provide a three order of magnitude increase in overall microwave power production density over that obtainable from electron beam TTOs.

  8. Autoresonant vibro-impact system with electromagnetic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, I. J.; Babitsky, V. I.; Halliwell, N. A.

    2007-12-01

    Vibration is often used to improve the performance of material handling, processing or separation machinery. Linear suspension and sinusoidal motion of moving parts are usually employed in the design of these machines. A typical example would be vibrating screens used to grade gravel in sand and gravel extracting systems. A dramatic improvement in performance can be achieved if nonlinear suspension, with limiters to provide a vibro-impact motion, can be established. Unfortunately, effective vibro-impact resonant behaviour cannot be sustained in practice with traditional forced excitation due to the system sensitivity to small changes in load. Effective vibro-impact regimes, however, can now be achieved using the concept of autoresonant systems. An electromagnetic drive actuator is a simple and reliable means of vibration excitation. Importantly, this drive allows for an expansion of the autoresonant approach towards high-power applications. This paper introduces a novel autoresonant machine design, which has been developed for this type of actuator. Autoresonant operation is demonstrated using an experimental rig of vibro-impact shale shaker with electromagnetic actuator.

  9. Terahertz water masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, David

    Using the GREAT instrument, we will observe terahertz water masers toward seven oxygen-rich evolved stars with circumstellar envelopes that emit maser radiation in the 22 and 321 GHz water transitions: o Cet, U Ori, R Leo, R Crt, RS Vir, S CrB and R Cas. Our primary target will be the 8(27)-7(34) line of water vapor at 1296.411 GHz, a transition that our models predicted would be a strong maser - a prediction recently confirmed by our Cycle 4 observations of W Hya and U Her. This transition, which was not accessible with Herschel/HIFI, has a significantly higher frequency than any water maser transition observed to date. In combination with ground-based maser observations at lower frequencies, the proposed observations will provide new constraints on the conditions of gas temperature, gas density, and IR radiation field within the maser-emitting region, providing important information about the maser pumping mechanism.

  10. Modeling of autoresonant control of a parametrically excited screen machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolfazl Zahedi, S.; Babitsky, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    Modelling of nonlinear dynamic response of a screen machine described by the nonlinear coupled differential equations and excited by the system of autoresonant control is presented. The displacement signal of the screen is fed to the screen excitation directly by means of positive feedback. Negative feedback is used to fix the level of screen amplitude response within the expected range. The screen is anticipated to vibrate with a parametric resonance and the excitation, stabilization and control response of the system are studied in the stable mode. Autoresonant control is thoroughly investigated and output tracking is reported. The control developed provides the possibility of self-tuning and self-adaptation mechanisms that allow the screen machine to maintain a parametric resonant mode of oscillation under a wide range of uncertainty of mass and viscosity.

  11. Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Accelerator for environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yong; Shchelkunov, Sergey V.; Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2017-03-01

    A MW-level CW electron beam source for environmental remediation based on extensions of the scientifically-proven Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Accelerator, dubbed CARA, is described here. CARA is distinguished by its exceptionally high RF-to-beam efficiency, by its production of a self-scanning beam, and by its proportionately lower specific power loading on a beam output window. Its environmental applications include sterilization, flue gas and waste water treatment.

  12. Theory of astronomical masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kylafis, Nikolaos D.

    The theory of astronomical masers is reviewed. As with laboratory masers, masing occurs when a transition between two energy levels of a molecule exhibits inverted populations. In order to present the basic concepts about masers, an idealized two-level system is used. The exact energy level structure is taken into account later on when the pumping of specific molecules is discussed. Unlike laboratory masers, where the radiation must be bounced between two mirrors to accumulate gain, the propagation of radiation in astronomical masers is a lot simpler. This is because astronomical masers are single-pass and broadband. Thus, the main theoretical effort has concentrated on inventing efficient mechanisms that produce population inversion. Specific pumping mechanisms for the three molecules (H2O, SiO and OH) that exhibit strong masing are presented and their ability to explain the observations is discussed.

  13. Polarized maser growth

    SciTech Connect

    Melrose, D.B.; Judge, A.C.

    2004-11-01

    A polarized maser is assumed to operate in an anisotropic medium with natural modes polarized differently to the maser. It is shown that when the spatial growth rate and the generalized Faraday rotation rate are comparable, the polarization of the growing radiation is different from those of the maser and medium. In particular, for a lineary polarized maser operating in a medium with linearly polarized natural modes, the growing radiation is partially circularly polarized. This provides a previously unrecognized source of circular polarization that may be relevant to pulsar radio emission.

  14. Experimental Observations of Microwave Emission from a 35 GHz Cyclotron Autoresonant Maser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-27

    beam to corkscrew about the axis with a specific amount of perpendicular velocity. Having received sufficient perpendicular velocity, the beam .xits the...power input to the crystal is shown in figure 2-13 and is treated as linear on the log - log scale. The calibration equation corresponding to the...power values rise linearly (on the log ordinate) to some point of saturation and then begin an oscillatory motion, consistent with numer- ical simulation

  15. Integral Cavity Hydrogen Maser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    development on a new microwave cavity for the NASA Research (NR) hydrogen maser for the NASA Crustal Dynamics Program. Also included with the results will be...bulb and all the cavity components bonded together, was developed. The "integral cavity" was installed in the NR maser. This NASA Research Experimental

  16. Cyclotron auto resonance maser and free electron laser devices: a unified point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Palma, E.; Sabia, E.; Dattoli, G.; Licciardi, S.; Spassovsky, I.

    2017-02-01

    We take advantage of previous research in the field of cyclotron auto resonance maser (CARM) and undulator-based free electron laser (U-FEL) sources to establish a common formalism for the relevant description of the underlying physical mechanisms. This strategy is aimed at stressing the deep analogies between the two devices and at providing a practical tool for their study based on the use of well-tested scaling formulae developed independently for the two systems.

  17. Autoresonance Cooling of Ions in an Electrostatic Ion Beam Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangwar, R. K.; Saha, K.; Heber, O.; Rappaport, M. L.; Zajfman, D.

    2017-09-01

    Autoresonance (AR) cooling of a bunch of ions oscillating inside an electrostatic ion beam trap is demonstrated for the first time. The relatively wide initial longitudinal velocity distribution is reduced by at least an order of magnitude using AR acceleration and ramping forces. The hot ions escaping the bunch are not lost from the system but continue to oscillate in the trap outside of the bunch and may be further cooled by successive AR processes. Ion-ion collisions inside the bunch close to the turning points in the trap's mirrors contribute to the thermalization of the ions. This cooling method can be applied to any mass and any charge.

  18. Asymptotic analysis of the model of gyromagnetic autoresonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyakin, L. A.

    2017-02-01

    The system of ordinary differential equations that in a specific case describes the cyclotron motion of a charged particle in an electromagnetic wave is considered. The capture of the particle into autoresonance when its energy undergoes a significant change is studied. The main result is a description of the capture domain, which is the set of initial points in the phase plane where the resonance trajectories start. This description is obtained in the asymptotic approximation with respect to the small parameter that in this problem corresponds to the amplitude of the electromagnetic wave.

  19. Parametric autoresonant excitation of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

    PubMed

    Friedland, L; Shagalov, A G

    2016-10-01

    Parametric excitation of autoresonant solutions of the nonlinear Schrodinger (NLS) equation by a chirped frequency traveling wave is discussed. Fully nonlinear theory of the process is developed based on Whitham's averaged variational principle and its predictions verified in numerical simulations. The weakly nonlinear limit of the theory is used to find the threshold on the amplitude of the driving wave for entering the autoresonant regime. It is shown that above the threshold, a flat (spatially independent) NLS solution can be fully converted into a traveling wave. A simplified, few spatial harmonics expansion approach is also developed for studying this nonlinear mode conversion process, allowing interpretation as autoresonant interaction within triads of spatial harmonics.

  20. Breakdown of autoresonance due to separatrix crossing in dissipative systems: From Josephson junctions to the three-wave problem.

    PubMed

    Chacón, Ricardo

    2008-12-01

    Optimal energy amplification via autoresonance in dissipative systems subjected to separatrix crossings is discussed through the universal model of a damped driven pendulum. Analytical expressions of the autoresonance responses and forces as well as the associated adiabatic invariants for the phase space regions separated by the underlying separatrix are derived from the energy-based theory of autoresonance. Additionally, applications to a single Josephson junction, topological solitons in Frenkel-Kontorova chains, as well as to the three-wave problem in dissipative media are discussed in detail from the autoresonance analysis.

  1. Hydrogen-Maser/Ruby-Maser/Quartz-Crystal Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Rabi T.; Dick, G. John

    1994-01-01

    Highly stable oscillator suitable for use as 100-MHz frequency standard consists of 100-MHz hydrogen maser combined with double-phase-locked-loop receiver. Generates 100-MHz signal with reduced noise. Contains 100-MHz voltage-controlled quartz-crystal oscillator (VCO) locked in phase to superconducting-cavity maser oscillator (SCMO). SCMO, locks in phase to hydrogen maser, phase-locking receiver and its SCMO/ VCO combination to hydrogen maser. Aspects of SCMO described in previous reports, including "Performance of Superconducting-Cavity Maser" (NPO-18175), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 15, No. 6. Performances of component oscillators complement each other.

  2. Hydrogen-Maser/Ruby-Maser/Quartz-Crystal Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Rabi T.; Dick, G. John

    1994-01-01

    Highly stable oscillator suitable for use as 100-MHz frequency standard consists of 100-MHz hydrogen maser combined with double-phase-locked-loop receiver. Generates 100-MHz signal with reduced noise. Contains 100-MHz voltage-controlled quartz-crystal oscillator (VCO) locked in phase to superconducting-cavity maser oscillator (SCMO). SCMO, locks in phase to hydrogen maser, phase-locking receiver and its SCMO/ VCO combination to hydrogen maser. Aspects of SCMO described in previous reports, including "Performance of Superconducting-Cavity Maser" (NPO-18175), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 15, No. 6. Performances of component oscillators complement each other.

  3. Control of autoresonance in mechanical and physical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, A.

    2017-03-01

    Autoresonant energy transfer has been considered as one of the most effective methods of excitation and control of high-energy oscillations for a broad range of physical and engineering systems. Nonlinear time-invariant feedback control provides effective self-tuning and self-adaptation mechanisms targeted at preserving resonance oscillations under variations of the system parameters but its implementation may become extremely complicated. A large class of systems can avoid nonlinear feedback, still producing the required state due to time-variant feed-forward frequency control. This type of control in oscillator arrays employs an intrinsic property of a nonlinear oscillator to vary both its amplitude and the frequency when the driving frequency changes. This paper presents a survey of recently published and new results studying possibilities and limitations of time-variant frequency control in nonlinear oscillator arrays. This article is part of the themed issue 'Horizons of cybernetical physics'.

  4. Averaged variational principle for autoresonant Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal modes

    SciTech Connect

    Khain, P.; Friedland, L.

    2010-10-15

    Whitham's averaged variational principle is applied in studying dynamics of formation of autoresonant (continuously phase-locked) Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal (BGK) modes in a plasma driven by a chirped frequency ponderomotive wave. A flat-top electron velocity distribution is used as a model allowing a variational formulation within the water bag theory. The corresponding Lagrangian, averaged over the fast phase variable yields evolution equations for the slow field variables, allows uniform description of all stages of excitation of driven-chirped BGK modes, and predicts modulational stability of these nonlinear phase-space structures. Numerical solutions of the system of slow variational equations are in good agreement with Vlasov-Poisson simulations.

  5. Maser and laser engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, T.K.

    1980-01-01

    This book is intended to be a textbook for an upper division one-semester electrical engineering course. Students are expected to have had some undegraduate course work in modern physics and in electromagnetic field theory. General aspects regarding devices based on quantum electronics are considered along with gas masers, solid masers, gas lasers, solid lasers, semiconductor lasers, liquid lasers, modulation techniques for lasers, and opto-electrical demodulators and energy convertors. Attention is given to quantum electric harmonic generators, Raman lasers, optical parametric interactions, holograms, optical terms, crystallographic terms, band theory, Schroedinger formulation and Dirac formation, and the quantum number of electrons in a hydrogen atom.

  6. Recirculating cryogenic hydrogen maser

    SciTech Connect

    Huerlimann, M.D.; Hardy, W.N.; Berlinsky, A.J.; Cline, R.W.

    1986-08-01

    We report on the design and initial testing of a new type of hydrogen maser, operated at dilution refrigerator temperatures, in which H atoms circulate back and forth between a microwave-pumped state selector and the maser cavity. Other novel design features include liquid-/sup 4/He-coated walls, He-cooled electronics, and the use of microscopic magnetic particles to relax the two lowest hyperfine levels in the state selector. Stabilities at least as good as that of a Rb clock and a high-stability quartz oscillator are observed for measuring times between 1 and 300 s.

  7. Masers and VSOP-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elitzur, M.

    2009-08-01

    Maser studies where VSOP-2 can make its strongest impact involve proper motion measurements. In this talk I review outstanding issues in topics ranging from star forming regions to active galactic nuclei in which VSOP-2 proper motion measurements offer the promise of seminal contributions.

  8. Anomalous autoresonance threshold for chirped-driven Korteweg-de-Vries waves.

    PubMed

    Friedland, L; Shagalov, A G; Batalov, S V

    2015-10-01

    Large amplitude traveling waves of the Korteweg-de-Vries (KdV) equation can be excited and controlled by a chirped frequency driving perturbation. The process involves capturing the wave into autoresonance (a continuous nonlinear synchronization) with the drive by passage through the linear resonance in the problem. The transition to autoresonance has a sharp threshold on the driving amplitude. In all previously studied autoresonant problems the threshold was found via a weakly nonlinear theory and scaled as α(3/4),α being the driving frequency chirp rate. It is shown that this scaling is violated in a long wavelength KdV limit because of the increased role of the nonlinearity in the problem. A fully nonlinear theory describing the phenomenon and applicable to all wavelengths is developed.

  9. Light-weight hydrogen maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, H. E.

    1985-12-01

    Based upon a new approach to cavity resonator and atom storage assembly design, experimental work was undertaken to develop a much smaller and lighter hydrogen maser frequency standard. An operational prototype maser of light-weight and small size resulted, but the new cavity and bulb design did not result in improved stability. Upon knowledge gained in this program further work funded by other government agencies has resulted in successful hydrogen maser oscillators having unprecedent frequency stability.

  10. Physical Characteristics of Astronomical Masers

    SciTech Connect

    Elitzur, M.

    1982-10-01

    The radio line emission of interstellar molecules routinely shows deviations from thermal equilibrium which culminate with strong maser radiation in some sources. Like its laboratory counterpart, the maser radiation is amplified through the effect of induced processes in a region where a population inversion exists and displays many of the basic features of laboratory lasers. This review is intended to explain the basic theory of astronomical masers and to survey the theoretical models which were developed for specific sources.

  11. Insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Chul-Gon; Kim, Dong-Il; Park, Min-Jung; Choi, Joo-Hee; Jeong, Jieun; Wi, Anjin; Park, Whoashig; Han, Ho-Jae; Park, Soo-Hyun

    2015-06-05

    Previously, we reported that CARM1 undergoes ubiquitination-dependent degradation in renal podocytes. It was also reported that CARM1 is necessary for fasting-induced hepatic gluconeogenesis. Based on these reports, we hypothesized that treatment with insulin, a hormone typically present under the 'fed' condition, would inhibit gluconeogenesis via CARM1 degradation. HepG2 cells, AML-12 cells, and rat primary hepatocytes were treated with insulin to confirm CARM1 downregulation. Surprisingly, insulin treatment increased CARM1 expression in all cell types examined. Furthermore, treatment with insulin increased histone 3 methylation at arginine 17 and 26 in HepG2 cells. To elucidate the role of insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation, the HA-CARM1 plasmid was transfected into HepG2 cells. CARM1 overexpression did not increase the expression of lipogenic proteins generally increased by insulin signaling. Moreover, CARM1 knockdown did not influence insulin sensitivity. Insulin is known to facilitate hepatic proliferation. Like insulin, CARM1 overexpression increased CDK2 and CDK4 expression. In addition, CARM1 knockdown reduced the number of insulin-induced G2/M phase cells. Moreover, GFP-CARM1 overexpression increased the number of G2/M phase cells. Based on these results, we concluded that insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation. These observations indicate that CARM1 plays an important role in liver pathophysiology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Antihydrogen formation by autoresonant excitation of antiproton plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertsche, William Alan; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bowe, P. D.; Carpenter, P. T.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S. F.; Charlton, M.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hurt, J. L.; Hydomako, R.; Jonsell, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; Werf, D. P. van der; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    In efforts to trap antihydrogen, a key problem is the vast disparity between the neutral trap energy scale (˜ 50 \\upmueV), and the energy scales associated with plasma confinement and space charge ( 1 eV). In order to merge charged particle species for direct recombination, the larger energy scale must be overcome in a manner that minimizes the initial antihydrogen kinetic energy. This issue motivated the development of a novel injection technique utilizing the inherent nonlinear nature of particle oscillations in our traps. We demonstrated controllable excitation of the center-of-mass longitudinal motion of a thermal antiproton plasma using a swept-frequency autoresonant drive. When the plasma is cold, dense and highly collective in nature, we observe that the entire system behaves as a single-particle nonlinear oscillator, as predicted by a recent theory. In contrast, only a fraction of the antiprotons in a warm or tenuous plasma can be similarly excited. Antihydrogen was produced and trapped by using this technique to drive antiprotons into a positron plasma, thereby initiating atomic recombination. The nature of this injection overcomes some of the difficulties associated with matching the energies of the charged species used to produce antihydrogen.

  13. Antihydrogen formation by autoresonant excitation of antiproton plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertsche, William Alan; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bowe, P. D.; Carpenter, P. T.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S. F.; Charlton, M.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hurt, J. L.; Hydomako, R.; Jonsell, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; Werf, D. P. van der; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2012-12-01

    In efforts to trap antihydrogen, a key problem is the vast disparity between the neutral trap energy scale (˜ 50 \\upmueV), and the energy scales associated with plasma confinement and space charge ( 1 eV). In order to merge charged particle species for direct recombination, the larger energy scale must be overcome in a manner that minimizes the initial antihydrogen kinetic energy. This issue motivated the development of a novel injection technique utilizing the inherent nonlinear nature of particle oscillations in our traps. We demonstrated controllable excitation of the center-of-mass longitudinal motion of a thermal antiproton plasma using a swept-frequency autoresonant drive. When the plasma is cold, dense and highly collective in nature, we observe that the entire system behaves as a single-particle nonlinear oscillator, as predicted by a recent theory. In contrast, only a fraction of the antiprotons in a warm or tenuous plasma can be similarly excited. Antihydrogen was produced and trapped by using this technique to drive antiprotons into a positron plasma, thereby initiating atomic recombination. The nature of this injection overcomes some of the difficulties associated with matching the energies of the charged species used to produce antihydrogen.

  14. Insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Yeom, Chul-gon; Kim, Dong-il; Park, Min-jung; Choi, Joo-hee; Jeong, Jieun; Wi, Anjin; Park, Whoashig; Han, Ho-jae; Park, Soo-hyun

    2015-06-05

    Previously, we reported that CARM1 undergoes ubiquitination-dependent degradation in renal podocytes. It was also reported that CARM1 is necessary for fasting-induced hepatic gluconeogenesis. Based on these reports, we hypothesized that treatment with insulin, a hormone typically present under the ‘fed’ condition, would inhibit gluconeogenesis via CARM1 degradation. HepG2 cells, AML-12 cells, and rat primary hepatocytes were treated with insulin to confirm CARM1 downregulation. Surprisingly, insulin treatment increased CARM1 expression in all cell types examined. Furthermore, treatment with insulin increased histone 3 methylation at arginine 17 and 26 in HepG2 cells. To elucidate the role of insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation, the HA-CARM1 plasmid was transfected into HepG2 cells. CARM1 overexpression did not increase the expression of lipogenic proteins generally increased by insulin signaling. Moreover, CARM1 knockdown did not influence insulin sensitivity. Insulin is known to facilitate hepatic proliferation. Like insulin, CARM1 overexpression increased CDK2 and CDK4 expression. In addition, CARM1 knockdown reduced the number of insulin-induced G2/M phase cells. Moreover, GFP-CARM1 overexpression increased the number of G2/M phase cells. Based on these results, we concluded that insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation. These observations indicate that CARM1 plays an important role in liver pathophysiology. - Highlights: • Insulin treatment increases CARM1 expression in hepatocytes. • CARM1 overexpression does not increase the expression of lipogenic proteins. • CARM1 knockdown does not influence insulin sensitivity. • Insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation.

  15. FAST Maser Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. S.

    2014-09-01

    FAST, the Five-hundred meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope, will become the largest operating single-dish telescope in the coming years. It has many advantages: much better sensitivity for its largest collecting area; large sky coverage due to its innovative design of the active primary surface; extremely radio quiet from its unique location, etc. In this work, I will highlight the future capabilities of FAST to discover and observe both galactic and extragalactic masers.

  16. Future Observations of Cosmic Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slysh, V.

    Cosmic masers became a powerful tool for study of stellar evolution in the Galaxy, bursts of star-formation in external galaxies, and accretion disks around central black holes in active galaxies. Due to the small size and narrow line width of maser spots it is possible to measure transversal and radial velocity with high accuracy. Kinematics of the maser spots often reveals expansion and outflow of the matter from proto-stars and new-born stars, or rotation of circumstellar and circumnuclear disks. Stellar may disks contain proto-planets, and maser spots can trace their orbits. Parameters of the circumnuclear disks measured with maser spot motion are directly related to the mass of the central black hole. Another result of the study of maser kinematics is determination of distance to proto-stars and to galaxies. In the latter case the distance determination is independent of the red shift distance and may be used for the determination of the geometry of the Universe. The accuracy of the kinematic measurements of masers is limited by the available angular resolution, time span and sensitivity of VLBI systems used for such observations. The available time span is limited by the fast time variations of masers, especially variations in H2O masers. Many of the masers studied with VLBI have unresolved maser spots, even at the highest resolution. Examples of OH masers unresolved on the space-ground baselines of the Japanese interferometer HALCA are given in [1,2]. In H2O maser W3(OH) the fringe amplitude remains constant from zero baseline up to 635 M λ, which corresponds to the angular size of less than 0.06 milliarcsec [3]. High angular resolution images of methanol maser spots reveal presence of the position-velocity gradient across the spots from 3.3 to 50 AU/km s-1 . Bandwidth smearing of maser spot images may cause apparent increase of the size when measured with low spectral resolution. In NGC7538 0.1 km s-1 spectral resolution will cause increase of the angular

  17. Passive maser development at NRL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, J. D.; Frank, A.; Folen, V.

    1981-01-01

    The application of passive hydrogen masers to satellites was investigated. The NRL maser is of compact design suitable for the space environment. It is based on a dielectrically loaded sapphire cavity and uses a computer optimized set of four shields. The servo design is a phase sensitive method which directly measures the phase dispersion of the interrogating signal as it passes through the cavity.

  18. On the possibility of the autoresonant motion of an electron in a slow electromagnetic wave

    SciTech Connect

    Milantiev, V.P.

    1994-12-31

    By autoresonant motion one usually means the motion when the condition of cyclotron resonance of gyrating particle with electromagnetic wave is conserved during all the time of the motion in spite of the relativistic mass increase. Such a motion takes place only in the case of vacuum wave, when the phase velocity {nu}{sub p} is equal to the speed of light in a vacuum C. Otherwise autoresonance is impossible, and energy of the particle oscillates in time. The authors now discuss the possibility of the autoresonance in a slow electromagnetic wave ({nu}{sub p} < c) propagating along the straight lines of the external magnetic field. It turns out that the autoresonant regime of the motion in a slow electromagnetic wave possible if some rather restrictive relations between the electric drift velocity and the phase velocity of wave take place. It depends also on the polarization of wave. The general case of the elliptical polarization is considered. The optimal regime corresponds to the wave with linear polarization in the direction of the constant electric field. For this case the calculations show that energy of the particle can unlimitedly increase (or decrease). The rate of acceleration can be even larger than in the case of vacuum wave. Radiation forces will restrict this process.

  19. Surface-state hydrogen maser

    SciTech Connect

    Maan, A.C.; Verhaar, B.J.; Stoof, H.T.C. ); Silvera, I.F. )

    1993-11-01

    We describe a hydrogen maser operating at very low temperatures in which most of the hydrogen atoms are condensed on a superfluid helium surface in long-lived states. This proposed maser can be used to obtain information on the properties of the hydrogen--liquid-helium-surface system. In addition, it promises to be an interesting system from the point of view of nonlinear dynamics. It is found that the surface recombination to molecular hydrogen, which might be considered as undesirable, is actually necessary to achieve the masing conditions. We develop the maser equations and consider a number of realistic conditions for operation.

  20. Astrophysical masers; Proceedings of the Conference, Arlington, VA, Mar. 9-11, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clegg, Andrew W. (Editor); Nedoluha, Gerald E. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Various papers on astrophysical masers are presented. The general topics addressed include: theory, maser surveys, extragalactic masers, masers in star-forming regions (general), OH masers in star-forming regions, water masers in star-forming regions, methanol masers in star-forming regions, proper motions, scattering, variability, circumstellar masers (general), circumstellar OH masers, circumstellar water masers, circumstellar SiO masers, and solar system masers.

  1. Astrophysical masers; Proceedings of the Conference, Arlington, VA, Mar. 9-11, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clegg, Andrew W. (Editor); Nedoluha, Gerald E. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Various papers on astrophysical masers are presented. The general topics addressed include: theory, maser surveys, extragalactic masers, masers in star-forming regions (general), OH masers in star-forming regions, water masers in star-forming regions, methanol masers in star-forming regions, proper motions, scattering, variability, circumstellar masers (general), circumstellar OH masers, circumstellar water masers, circumstellar SiO masers, and solar system masers.

  2. 32-GHz Wideband Maser Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shell, J. S.; Neff, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    High-gain, wideband, microwave amplifier based on ruby cooled by liquid helium. Features include low input equivalent noise temperature and 400-MHz bandwidth. Design basically extension of previous reflected-wave masers built for frequency range of 18 to 26 GHz. Maser amplifier includes eight stages connected in reflected-wave configuration. Particularly useful for detection of weak microwave signals in radio astronomy and communications.

  3. Evaluation of modern hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, A.; Kuhnle, P.; Sydnor, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    The masers were tested for environmental sensitivities (magnetic field, temperature, barometric pressure) and long-term aging. Allan variance runs of 72 days were made in order to attain averaging times from several seconds to 1 million seconds. Auto- and cross-correlation techniques were used to determine the effects of uncontrolled parameters such as humidity. Three-cornered-hat and other data reduction techniques were used to determine the characteristics of the individual masers.

  4. 32-GHz Wideband Maser Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shell, J. S.; Neff, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    High-gain, wideband, microwave amplifier based on ruby cooled by liquid helium. Features include low input equivalent noise temperature and 400-MHz bandwidth. Design basically extension of previous reflected-wave masers built for frequency range of 18 to 26 GHz. Maser amplifier includes eight stages connected in reflected-wave configuration. Particularly useful for detection of weak microwave signals in radio astronomy and communications.

  5. Autoresonant control of nonlinear mode in ultrasonic transducer for machining applications.

    PubMed

    Babitsky, V I; Astashev, V K; Kalashnikov, A N

    2004-04-01

    Experiments conducted in several countries have shown that the improvement of machining quality can be promoted through conversion of the cutting process into one involving controllable high-frequency vibration at the cutting zone. This is achieved through the generation and maintenance of ultrasonic vibration of the cutting tool to alter the fracture process of work-piece material cutting to one in which loading of the materials at the tool tip is incremental, repetitive and controlled. It was shown that excitation of the high-frequency vibro-impact mode of the tool-workpiece interaction is the most effective way of ultrasonic influence on the dynamic characteristics of machining. The exploitation of this nonlinear mode needs a new method of adaptive control for excitation and stabilisation of ultrasonic vibration known as autoresonance. An approach has been developed to design an autoresonant ultrasonic cutting unit as an oscillating system with an intelligent electronic feedback controlling self-excitation in the entire mechatronic system. The feedback produces the exciting force by means of transformation and amplification of the motion signal. This allows realisation for robust control of fine resonant tuning to bring the nonlinear high Q-factor systems into technological application. The autoresonant control provides the possibility of self-tuning and self-adaptation mechanisms for the system to keep the nonlinear resonant mode of oscillation under unpredictable variation of load, structure and parameters. This allows simple regulation of intensity of the process whilst keeping maximum efficiency at all times. An autoresonant system with supervisory computer control was developed, tested and used for the control of the piezoelectric transducer during ultrasonically assisted cutting. The system has been developed as combined analog-digital, where analog devices process the control signal, and parameters of the devices are controlled digitally by computer. The

  6. Experimental Research on the Laser Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Accelerator “LACARA”

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T C

    2008-11-11

    The Laser Cyclotron Auto-Resonant Accelerator LACARA has successfully operated this year. Results are summarized, an interpretation of operating data is provided in the body of the report, and recommendations are made how the experiment should be carried forward. The Appendix A contains a description of the LACARA apparatus, currently installed at the Accelerator Test Facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory. This report summarizes the project, extending over three grant-years.

  7. Effect of polarization and focusing on laser pulse driven auto-resonant particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, Vikram; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, Predhiman

    2014-04-15

    The effect of laser polarization and focusing is theoretically studied on the final energy gain of a particle in the Auto-resonant acceleration scheme using a finite duration laser pulse with Gaussian shaped temporal envelope. The exact expressions for dynamical variables viz. position, momentum, and energy are obtained by analytically solving the relativistic equation of motion describing particle dynamics in the combined field of an elliptically polarized finite duration pulse and homogeneous static axial magnetic field. From the solutions, it is shown that for a given set of laser parameters viz. intensity and pulse length along with static magnetic field, the energy gain by a positively charged particle is maximum for a right circularly polarized laser pulse. Further, a new scheme is proposed for particle acceleration by subjecting it to the combined field of a focused finite duration laser pulse and static axial magnetic field. In this scheme, the particle is initially accelerated by the focused laser field, which drives the non-resonant particle to second stage of acceleration by cyclotron Auto-resonance. The new scheme is found to be efficient over two individual schemes, i.e., auto-resonant acceleration and direct acceleration by focused laser field, as significant particle acceleration can be achieved at one order lesser values of static axial magnetic field and laser intensity.

  8. Merging Maser and Cesium Clocks in Timescales

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    OCT 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Merging Maser And Cesium Clocks In Timescales 5a...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Merging Maser and Cesium Clocks In Timescales Demetrios...recent maser data relatively higher than older maser data. A Kalman Filter could assign different phase, frequency, and frequency drift process

  9. Radiative transfer in astronomical masers. III - Filamentary masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elitzur, Moshe; Mckee, Christopher F.; Hollenbach, David J.

    1991-01-01

    The complete solution of a filamentary maser is presented. An integral equation and an iterative procedure are developed to calculate and solve the contribution of rays emanating from the filament sidewall. The solution provides complete expressions for the distributions of intensity and flux across the source as functions of position and direction with regard to the axis. The results are used to find the number distribution of brightness temperature in a large sample of randomly oriented filaments with an arbitrary distribution of lengths. The effects of external radiation on the maser structure and intensity are studied. It is proposed that the two giant bursts of H2O maser emission observed in W49 and Orion resulted from the interaction or two interacting filaments and a foreground slab amplifying a background filament.

  10. Radiative transfer in astronomical masers. III - Filamentary masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elitzur, Moshe; Mckee, Christopher F.; Hollenbach, David J.

    1991-01-01

    The complete solution of a filamentary maser is presented. An integral equation and an iterative procedure are developed to calculate and solve the contribution of rays emanating from the filament sidewall. The solution provides complete expressions for the distributions of intensity and flux across the source as functions of position and direction with regard to the axis. The results are used to find the number distribution of brightness temperature in a large sample of randomly oriented filaments with an arbitrary distribution of lengths. The effects of external radiation on the maser structure and intensity are studied. It is proposed that the two giant bursts of H2O maser emission observed in W49 and Orion resulted from the interaction or two interacting filaments and a foreground slab amplifying a background filament.

  11. A transportable hydrogen maser for Australia Telescope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J. W.; Lin, C. F.; Zhai, Z. C.; Wilson, W. E.; Fagg, H.

    To equip the Chinese VLBI network, a transportable compact active hydrogen maser has been developed at Shanghai Observatory (SO) since 1985. So far five such masers have come into use for VLBI radioastronomy and some military. These hydrogen masers are all compact, relatively light, rugged and easily transportable. In Nov. 1993, one of these masers was transported to Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF) to determine its performance as a stable oscillator for VLBI. This paper describes the design and construction of the hydrogen maser and presents the results tested at Parkes Observatory of ATNF.

  12. Maser observation in VY CMa with VERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yoon Kyung

    We present the results of multi-epoch VERA (VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry) observations of H2O masers at 22 GHz and ^28SiO masers at 43 GHz in the supergiant VY Canis Majoris (hereafter, VY CMa). We estimate the inner motion of H2O masers over 6 months and that of SiO masers over 1 month. Using the inner motion, we calculated the statistical parallax of VY CMa. The size of the emitting region for ^28SiO masers is R_SiO ~1.81-2.89 R_* and it is consistent with the previous study.

  13. Water masers in dusty environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babkovskaia, N.; Poutanen, J.

    2004-04-01

    We study in detail a pumping mechanism for the λ=1.35 cm maser transition 616 -> 523 in ortho-H2O based on the difference between gas and dust temperatures. The upper maser level is populated radiatively through 414 -> 505 and 505 -> 616 transitions. The heat sink is realized by absorbing the 45 μm photons, corresponding to the 523 -> 414 transition, by cold dust. We compute the inversion of maser level populations in the optically thick medium as a function of the hydrogen concentration, the water-to-dust mass ratio, and the difference between the gas and the dust temperatures. The main results of the numerical simulations are interpreted in terms of a simplified four-level model. We show that the maser strength depends mostly on the product of hydrogen concentration and the dust-to-water mass ratio but not on the size distribution of the dust particles or their type. We also suggest approximate formulae that describe accurately the inversion and can be used for fast calculations of the maser luminosity. Depending on the gas temperature, the maximum maser luminosity is reached when the water concentration NH_2O approx 106-107 cm-3 times the dust-to-hydrogen mass ratio, and the inversion completely disappears at densities just an order of magnitude larger. For a dust temperature of 130 K, the 616 -> 523 transition becomes inverted already at a temperature difference of Δ T˜ 1 K, while other possible masing transitions require a larger Δ T⪆ 30 K. We identify the region of the parameter space where other ortho- and para-water masing transitions can appear.

  14. Characteristics of advanced hydrogen maser frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    In house research and development at Goddard Space Flight Center to provide advanced frequency and time standards for the most demanding applications is concentrated primarily in field operable atomic hydrogen masers. Some of the most important goals for the new maser designs have been improved long and short term stability, elimination of the need for auto tuning, increased maser oscillation level, improved hydrogen economy, increased operational life, minimization of operator control or monitoring, improvement in magnetic isolation or sensitivity, and reduction in size and weight. New design concepts which have been incorporated in these masers to achieve these goals are described. The basic maser assemblies and control systems have recently been completed; the masers are oscillating; and operational testing has begun. Data illustrating the improvements in maser performance was available and presented.

  15. An Analysis of NTSC's Timekeeping Hydrogen Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui-jie, Song; Shao-wu, Dong; Zheng-ming, Wang; Li-li, Qu; Yue-juan, Jing; Wei, Li

    2016-10-01

    In this article, the hydrogen masers in the NTSC (National Time Service Center) timekeeping laboratory are tested. In order to avoid the impact of larger noise of caesium atomic clocks, TA(k) or UTC(k) is not used as reference, instead, the four hydrogen masers are mutually referred and tested. The frequency stability of hydrogen masers is analyzed using the four-cornered hat method, and the Allan standard deviations of each single hydrogen maser in different sample times are estimated. Then, according to the characteristics of hydrogen masers, by removing the trend term, excluding outliers, and smoothing the data with a mathematical method to separate the Gaussian noises of hydrogen masers, and finally by through the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, the Gaussian noise of each hydrogen maser is estimated.

  16. Analysis of NTSC's Timekeeping Hydrogen Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, H. J.; Dong, S. W.; Wang, Z. M.; Qu, L. L.; Jing, Y. J.; Li, W.

    2015-11-01

    In this article, the hydrogen masers were tested in NTSC (National Time Service Center) keeping time laboratory. In order to avoid the impact of larger noise of caesium atomic clocks, TA(k) or UTC(k) was not used as reference, and four hydrogen masers were mutually referred and tested. The frequency stabilities of hydrogen masers were analyzed by using four-cornered hat method, and the Allan standard deviation of single hydrogen maser was estimated in different sampling time. Then according to the characteristics of hydrogen masers, by removing the trend term, excluding outliers, and smoothing data with mathematical methods to separate the Gaussian noise of hydrogen masers, and finally through the normal Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, a single hydrogen maser's Gaussian noise has been estimated.

  17. Differential CARM1 Isoform Expression in Subcellular Compartments and among Malignant and Benign Breast Tumors.

    PubMed

    Shlensky, David; Mirrielees, Jennifer A; Zhao, Zibo; Wang, Lu; Mahajan, Aparna; Yu, Menggang; Sherer, Nathan M; Wilke, Lee G; Xu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1) is a coactivator for ERα and cancer-relevant transcription factors, and can methylate diverse cellular targets including histones. CARM1 is expressed in one of two alternative splice isoforms, full-length CARM1 (CARM1FL) and truncated CARM1 (CARM1ΔE15). CARM1FL and CARM1ΔE15 function differently in transcriptional regulation, protein methylation, and mediation of pre-mRNA splicing in cellular models. To investigate the functional roles and the prognosis potential of CARM1 alternative spliced isoforms in breast cancer, we used recently developed antibodies to detect differential CARM1 isoform expression in subcellular compartments and among malignant and benign breast tumors. Immunofluorescence in MDA-MB-231 and BG-1 cell lines demonstrated that CARM1ΔE15 is the dominant isoform expressed in the cytoplasm, and CARM1FL is more nuclear localized. CARM1ΔE15 was found to be more sensitive to Hsp90 inhibition than CARM1FL, indicating that the truncated isoform may be the oncogenic form. Clinical cancer samples did not have significantly higher expression of CARM1FL or CARM1ΔE15 than benign breast samples at the level of mRNA or histology. Furthermore neither CARM1FL nor CARM1ΔE15 expression correlated with breast cancer molecular subtypes, tumor size, or lymph node involvement. The analysis presented here lends new insights into the possible oncogenic role of CARM1ΔE15. This study also demonstrates no obvious association of CARM1 isoform expression and clinical correlates in breast cancer. Recent studies, however, have shown that CARM1 expression correlates with poor prognosis, indicating a need for further studies of both CARM1 isoforms in a large cohort of breast cancer specimens.

  18. Simultaneous Observation of Water and Class I Methanol Masers toward Class II Methanol Maser Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyunwoo; Kim, Kee-Tae; Byun, Do-Young; Lee, Seokho; Park, Yong-Sun

    2015-11-01

    We present a simultaneous single-dish survey of 22 GHz water masers and 44 and 95 GHz class I methanol masers toward 77 6.7 GHz class II methanol maser sources, which were selected from the Arecibo methanol maser Galactic plane survey catalog. Water maser emission is detected in 39 (51%) sources, 15 of which are new detections. Methanol maser emission at 44 and 95 GHz is found in 25 (32%) and 19 (25%) sources, 21 and 13 of which, respectively, are newly detected. We find four high-velocity (>30 km s-1) water maser sources, including three dominant blue- or redshifted outflows. The 95 GHz masers always appear with 44 GHz maser emission. They are strongly correlated with 44 GHz masers in velocity, flux density, and luminosity, yet they are not correlated with either water or 6.7 GHz class II methanol masers. The average peak flux density ratio of 95 GHz masers to 44 GHz masers is close to unity, which is two times higher than previous estimates. The flux densities of class I methanol masers are more closely correlated with the associated Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey core mass than those of water masers or class II methanol masers. Using the large velocity gradient model and assuming unsaturated class I methanol maser emission, we derive the fractional abundance of methanol to be in the range 4.2 × 10-8-2.3 × 10-6, with a median value of 3.3 ± 2.7 × 10-7.

  19. MASERS (CHAPTERS I THRU III),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This work was provided in order to illustrate the possibility of creation of a maser by use of inversional transitions in a beam of heavy ammonia ND3...radiation of such a generator at frequency of 1656.18 Mc. (line J = 6, K = 6 of inversional spectrum of ND3) constitutes a magnitude of the order of

  20. Different type of maser star

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, D.F.; Dinger, A.S.C.

    1982-03-01

    A systematic survey of short-period, semiregular variable stars has been made resulting in the detection of six new water masers. Of the 14 short-period maser stars now known, nine are classified as SRb variables. All are very late spectral type SRb's typically M7, while the overwhelming majority of normal SRb stars is M4 to M6. Their (2.2 ..mu..)--(11 ..mu..) colar indices are among the lowest of any known maser stars. They are presumably less dusty as well. Four of the SRb stars and two of the remainder do not obey the correlation between period and velocity spread of the emission features that is found for the Mira and long-period, semiregular variables. Finally, high galactic latitudes dominate; 13 of the 14 are in excess of 13/sup 0/, and nine of these are greater than 25/sup 0/. These facts suggest that the short-period semiregular variables: particularly the SRb stars: may be a very different type of maser star than the Mira and long-period semiregular variables.

  1. Ammonia masers in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, T. L.; Schilke, P.

    Since 1986, 10 ammonia masers have been found. Most of these are found in the sources W51D, W51e1/e2, NGC7538, DR21, and W33. Among them are a few masers or maser candidates, arising from metastable inversion lines. There are many more masers arising from nonmetastable inversion lines. The most outstanding is intense maser emission from the (J,K) = (9,6) inversion line. Only in W51D are any masering nonmetastable transitions of para-NH3 to be found. Since the masering levels are more than 500 K above ground state, there are a large number of levels populated, and the excitation scheme must be complex. It is likely that there is no unique excitation scheme for all types of ammonia masers. Although there have been a few attempts to model the ammonia maser excitation, including excitation involving vibrationally excited levels, the quest for an all-encompassing ammonia maser excitation model is still going on.

  2. Room-temperature solid-state maser.

    PubMed

    Oxborrow, Mark; Breeze, Jonathan D; Alford, Neil M

    2012-08-16

    The invention of the laser has resulted in many innovations, and the device has become ubiquitous. However, the maser, which amplifies microwave radiation rather than visible light, has not had as large an impact, despite being instrumental in the laser's birth. The maser's relative obscurity has mainly been due to the inconvenience of the operating conditions needed for its various realizations: atomic and free-electron masers require vacuum chambers and pumping; and solid-state masers, although they excel as low-noise amplifiers and are occasionally incorporated in ultrastable oscillators, typically require cryogenic refrigeration. Most realizations of masers also require strong magnets, magnetic shielding or both. Overcoming these various obstacles would pave the way for improvements such as more-sensitive chemical assays, more-precise determinations of biomolecular structure and function, and more-accurate medical diagnostics (including tomography) based on enhanced magnetic resonance spectrometers incorporating maser amplifiers and oscillators. Here we report the experimental demonstration of a solid-state maser operating at room temperature in pulsed mode. It works on a laboratory bench, in air, in the terrestrial magnetic field and amplifies at around 1.45 gigahertz. In contrast to the cryogenic ruby maser, in our maser the gain medium is an organic mixed molecular crystal, p-terphenyl doped with pentacene, the latter being photo-excited by yellow light. The maser's pumping mechanism exploits spin-selective molecular intersystem crossing into pentacene's triplet ground state. When configured as an oscillator, the solid-state maser's measured output power of around -10 decibel milliwatts is approximately 100 million times greater than that of an atomic hydrogen maser, which oscillates at a similar frequency (about 1.42 gigahertz). By exploiting the high levels of spin polarization readily generated by intersystem crossing in photo-excited pentacene and other

  3. Autoresonant-spectrometric determination of the residual gas composition in the ALPHA experiment apparatus.

    PubMed

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; Turner, M; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Zhmoginov, A

    2013-06-01

    Knowledge of the residual gas composition in the ALPHA experiment apparatus is important in our studies of antihydrogen and nonneutral plasmas. A technique based on autoresonant ion extraction from an electrostatic potential well has been developed that enables the study of the vacuum in our trap. Computer simulations allow an interpretation of our measurements and provide the residual gas composition under operating conditions typical of those used in experiments to produce, trap, and study antihydrogen. The methods developed may also be applicable in a range of atomic and molecular trap experiments where Penning-Malmberg traps are used and where access is limited.

  4. Non-Markovian autoresonant dynamics of tunneling from discrete to continuum modes

    SciTech Connect

    Barak, Assaf; Segev, Mordechai

    2011-09-15

    We study the autoresonant dynamics of a discrete level coupled to a continuum, and show that passing adiabatically through a linear resonance, above a well-defined threshold, yields a transition to nonlinear phase locking and linear non-Markovian decay to the continuum. This process results in broadening of the population of the continuum modes beyond its natural linewidth. This concept can be employed to alter spontaneous emission, where driving an atom into phase locking with continuum modes will yield the emission of short pulses.

  5. Autoresonant-spectrometric determination of the residual gas composition in the ALPHA experiment apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amole, C.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Capra, A.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Isaac, C. A.; Jonsell, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Little, A.; Madsen, N.; McKenna, J. T. K.; Menary, S.; Napoli, S. C.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C. Ø.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; Stracka, S.; So, C.; Thompson, R. I.; Turner, M.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Zhmoginov, A.

    2013-06-01

    Knowledge of the residual gas composition in the ALPHA experiment apparatus is important in our studies of antihydrogen and nonneutral plasmas. A technique based on autoresonant ion extraction from an electrostatic potential well has been developed that enables the study of the vacuum in our trap. Computer simulations allow an interpretation of our measurements and provide the residual gas composition under operating conditions typical of those used in experiments to produce, trap, and study antihydrogen. The methods developed may also be applicable in a range of atomic and molecular trap experiments where Penning-Malmberg traps are used and where access is limited.

  6. Autoresonant Transition in the Presence of Noise and Self-Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, I.; Friedland, L.; Sarid, E.; Shagalov, A. G.

    2009-10-09

    A sharp threshold for resonant capture of an ensemble of trapped particles driven by chirped frequency oscillations is analyzed. It is shown that at small temperatures T, the capture probability versus driving amplitude is a smoothed step function with the step location and width scaling as alpha{sup 3/4} (alpha being the chirp rate) and (alphaT){sup 1/2}, respectively. Strong repulsive self-fields reduce the width of the threshold considerably, as the ensemble forms a localized autoresonant macroparticle.

  7. Autoresonances of m=2 diocotron oscillations in non-neutral electron plasmas.

    PubMed

    Gomberoff, K; Higaki, H; Kaga, C; Ito, K; Okamoto, H

    2016-10-01

    The existence of autoresonances for m=2 diocotron oscillations of non-neutral electron plasmas in a uniform magnetic field was predicted by particle-in-cell simulations and it was confirmed in experiments. The obtained results show clear deviations from the standard threshold amplitude dependence on the sweep rate. The threshold amplitude approaches a constant at a lower sweep rate when there is a damping force. It was also found that the aspect ratio for the oval cross section of the confined plasma can be controlled by the frequency of the externally applied driving force.

  8. Autoresonances of m =2 diocotron oscillations in non-neutral electron plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomberoff, K.; Higaki, H.; Kaga, C.; Ito, K.; Okamoto, H.

    2016-10-01

    The existence of autoresonances for m =2 diocotron oscillations of non-neutral electron plasmas in a uniform magnetic field was predicted by particle-in-cell simulations and it was confirmed in experiments. The obtained results show clear deviations from the standard threshold amplitude dependence on the sweep rate. The threshold amplitude approaches a constant at a lower sweep rate when there is a damping force. It was also found that the aspect ratio for the oval cross section of the confined plasma can be controlled by the frequency of the externally applied driving force.

  9. Temperature-Control Apparatus For Hydrogen Maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F. C.; Mattison, E. M.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal-control apparatus maintains hydrogen maser at nearly constant temperature during long-term operational test. Designed to maintain, in small cylindrical vacuum tank containing maser, nearly isothermal condition when test conducted in air. Provides approximation of more nearly isothermal condition expected to be maintained in intended application, in which maser operated in vacuum environment and losses of heat reduced further by multilayer reflective insulation.

  10. SiO Maser Emission in Miras

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 394, 51–66 (2009) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2008.14237.x SiO maser emission in Miras M. D. Gray,1 M. Wittkowski,2 M. Scholz...October 27; in original form 2008 September 1 ABSTRACT We describe a combined dynamic atmosphere and maser propagation model of SiO maser emission in...brightest at an optical phase of 0.1–0.25, which is consistent with observed phase lags. Dust can have both mild and profound effects on the maser emission

  11. Experimental and computational study of autoresonant injection of antiprotons into positron plasma in antihydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Chukman; Wurtele, Jonathan; Fajans, Joel; Friedland, Lazar; Bertsche, William

    2012-10-01

    The injection of antiprotons into positron plasma during antihydrogen synthesis in ALPHA is simulated numerically and compared with experimental measurements. The antiprotons and positrons are initially confined in adjacent axial potential wells in a nested Penning-Malmberg trap. The antiproton plasma is excited autoresonantly and partially injected into the adjacent positron plasma, creating antihydrogen. The excitation and injection process is modeled numerically with a hybrid code in which the antiproton plasma responds to the autoresonant drive fully dynamically, and the positrons respond quasi-statically. The strong axial magnetic field suppresses radial transport on the timescales of interest. The antiproton plasma is thus assumed to consist of concentric cylindrical tubes within which antiprotons move only in the axial direction, and the evolution of the phase space distributions in each tube obeys a one-dimensional Vlasov equation. The antiproton self-field is obtained by solving the Poisson equation in two-dimensions, thereby coupling the tubes. Alternative injection schemes and the effect of varying antiproton number and temperature are also examined.

  12. Water Masers in the Andromeda Galaxy. II. Where Do Masers Arise?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Nikta; Darling, Jeremy

    2016-08-01

    We present a comparative multiwavelength analysis of water-maser-emitting regions and non-maser-emitting luminous 24 μm star-forming regions in the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) to identify the sites most likely to produce luminous water masers useful for astrometry and proper motion studies. Included in the analysis are Spitzer 24 μm photometry, Herschel 70 and 160 μm photometry, Hα emission, dust temperature, and star-formation rate. We find significant differences between the maser-emitting and non-maser-emitting regions: water-maser-emitting regions tend to be more infrared-luminous and show higher star-formation rates. The five water masers in M31 are consistent with being analogs of water masers in Galactic star-forming regions and represent the high-luminosity tail of a larger (and as yet undetected) population. Most regions likely to produce water masers bright enough for proper motion measurements using current facilities have already been surveyed, but we suggest three ways to detect additional water masers in M31: (1) reobserve the most luminous mid- or far-infrared sources with higher sensitivity than was used in the Green Bank Telescope survey; (2) observe early-stage star-forming regions selected by millimeter continuum that have not already been selected by their 24 μm emission, and (3) reobserve the most luminous mid- or far-infrared sources and rely on maser variability for new detections.

  13. Hydrogen maser oscillation at 10 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crampton, S. B.; Jones, K. M.; Souza, S. P.

    1984-01-01

    A low temperature atomic hydrogen maser was developed using frozen atomic neon as the storage surface. The maser has been operated in the pulsed mode at temperatures from 6 K to 11 K and as a self-excited oscillator from 9 K to 10.5 K.

  14. First experiences with the H-maser EFOS 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlueter, W.; Nottarp, K.; Feil, D.; Busca, G.

    1983-01-01

    The results are given on the performance measurements, on the dependence on external temperature, and on external magnetic field of a hydrogen maser. It is compared with another hydrogen maser. Details of the transportation and installation of the maser are given. The hydrogen maser frequency is compared with cesium oscillators to derive long-term behavior.

  15. Excitation of millimeter and submillimeter water masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Melnick, Gary J.

    1991-01-01

    The excitation of maser emission in millimeter and submillimeter transitions of interstellar and circumstellar water is considered. An escape probability method is used to determine the equilibrium populations in 349 rotational states of both ortho- and para-water under varying conditions of gas temperature, density, water abundance, and radiation field. It is shown that, under those conditions believed to prevail around late-type stars and within star-forming regions, strong millimeter and submillimeter water maser emission can be generated by collisional excitations by H2. Several maser transitions can have strengths close to that of the 22 GHz line. The water maser line which can be observed from mountaintop facilities and those which will require air- or space-borne platforms are indicated. The exact portion of parameter space in which each maser transition exhibits peak emission is shown.

  16. Low-noise receivers: Microwave maser development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, R.; Wiebe, E. R.

    1977-01-01

    An S-Band traveling-wave maser with a 2260- to 2400-MHz tuning capability has been built and installed on the 26-m antenna. The traveling-wave maser closed cycle refrigerator package was assembled within a limited time schedule and at low cost to meet the requirements of the very long baseline interferometry validation task. The maser uses a superconducting magnet with a field staggering coil for gain/bandwidth adjustment. The maser pump source is a Gunn effect oscillator with the capability of continuous tuning throughout the entire maser tuning range. The package was assembled from surplus components that have been used previously in the Deep Space Network in a variety of applications.

  17. Excitation of millimeter and submillimeter water masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Melnick, Gary J.

    1991-01-01

    The excitation of maser emission in millimeter and submillimeter transitions of interstellar and circumstellar water is considered. An escape probability method is used to determine the equilibrium populations in 349 rotational states of both ortho- and para-water under varying conditions of gas temperature, density, water abundance, and radiation field. It is shown that, under those conditions believed to prevail around late-type stars and within star-forming regions, strong millimeter and submillimeter water maser emission can be generated by collisional excitations by H2. Several maser transitions can have strengths close to that of the 22 GHz line. The water maser line which can be observed from mountaintop facilities and those which will require air- or space-borne platforms are indicated. The exact portion of parameter space in which each maser transition exhibits peak emission is shown.

  18. A kind of small hydrogen maser for time-keeping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhai, Z. C.; Lin, C. F.; He, J. W.; Huang, H. X.; Lu, J. F.

    1992-01-01

    A kind of small hydrogen maser standard for timekeeping is being developed at Shanghai Observatory. The maser employs a cylindrical capacitively loaded cavity construction, resulting in significant size and weight reduction compared to a traditional hydrogen maser. The Q of the compact cavity is electronically enhanced by a suitable positive feedback into the cavity to enable sustained maser oscillation. The long-term stability of the maser is improved by a cavity frequency stabilization servo-system. The design and development of the maser, as well as photographs of the new maser system during the construction phase are described.

  19. Energetic Particle Modes: example of Autoresonance and Superradiance in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonca, Fulvio; Chen, Liu

    2013-10-01

    Energetic Particle Modes (EPM) are resonant non-normal modes born out of the shear Alfvén wave (SAW) continuous spectrum when the energetic particle (EP) drive overcomes continuum damping in nonuniform fusion plasmas. Their nonlinear evolution is characterized by radially convective amplification of the EPM wave-packet and secular EP radial transports. Here, we demonstrate that EPM-EP phase locking is an example of Autoresonance in fusion plasmas; and that the corresponding EPM-EP nonlinear dynamics has interesting analogies with Superradiance. These complex nonlinear behaviors are described, in a simple yet practically relevant limiting case, by a complex Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation. Research support: ITER-CN, US DoE Grants and EURATOM/ENEA Contract of Association.

  20. Ray tracing reconstruction investigation for C-arm tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malalla, Nuhad A. Y.; Chen, Ying

    2016-04-01

    C-arm tomosynthesis is a three dimensional imaging technique. Both x-ray source and the detector are mounted on a C-arm wheeled structure to provide wide variety of movement around the object. In this paper, C-arm tomosynthesis was introduced to provide three dimensional information over a limited view angle (less than 180o) to reduce radiation exposure and examination time. Reconstruction algorithms based on ray tracing method such as ray tracing back projection (BP), simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) and maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) were developed for C-arm tomosynthesis. C-arm tomosynthesis projection images of simulated spherical object were simulated with a virtual geometric configuration with a total view angle of 40 degrees. This study demonstrated the sharpness of in-plane reconstructed structure and effectiveness of removing out-of-plane blur for each reconstruction algorithms. Results showed the ability of ray tracing based reconstruction algorithms to provide three dimensional information with limited angle C-arm tomosynthesis.

  1. FIRST INTERSTELLAR HCO{sup +} MASER

    SciTech Connect

    Hakobian, Nicholas S.; Crutcher, Richard M. E-mail: crutcher@illinois.edu

    2012-10-10

    A previously unseen maser in the J = 1-0 transition of HCO{sup +} has been detected by the Combined Array for Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). A subarcsecond map was produced of the 2 arcmin{sup 2} region around DR21(OH), which has had previous detections of OH and methanol masers. This new object has remained undetected until now due to its extremely compact size. The object has a brightness temperature of >2500 K and an FWHM linewidth of 0.497 km s{sup -1}, both of which suggest non-thermal line emission consistent with an unsaturated maser. This object coincides in position and velocity with the methanol maser named DR21(OH)-1 by Plambeck and Menten. No compact HCO{sup +} emission was present in the CARMA data toward the other methanol masers described in that Letter. These new results support the theory introduced in Plambeck and Menten that these masers likely arise from strong outflows interacting with low mass, high density pockets of molecular gas. This is further supported by recent observations of a CO outflow by Zapata et al. that traces the outflow edges and confirms that the maser position lies along the edge of the outflow where interaction with molecular tracers can occur.

  2. Frequency stability of maser oscillators operated with cavity Q. [hydrogen and rubidium masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tetu, M.; Tremblay, P.; Lesage, P.; Petit, P.; Audoin, C.

    1982-01-01

    The short term frequency stability of masers equipped with an external feedback loop to increase the cavity quality factor was studied. The frequency stability of a hydrogen and a rubidium maser were measured and compared with theoretical evaluation. It is shown that the frequency stability passes through an optimum when the cavity Q is varied. Long term fluctuations are discussed and the optimum mid term frequency stability achievably by small size active and passive H-masers is considered.

  3. Hydrogen maser development at Laval University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanier, J.; Racine, G.; Kunski, R.; Picard, M.

    1981-01-01

    The physical construction of two hydrogen masers is described and results of measurements made on one of the masers are given. These include: cavity Q, thermal time constant, line Q, signal power output, magnetic shielding factor. Preliminary results indicate that the frequency stability will be mainly affected by the thermal of the cavity. The magnetic field and the barometric fluctuations should not affect the maser at the stability level above a few parts in 10 to the 15th power, which is the goal for averaging times of several hours.

  4. Water masers in the Saturnian system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebenko, S. V.; Gurvits, L. I.; Elitzur, M.; Cosmovici, C. B.; Avruch, I. M.; Montebugnoli, S.; Salerno, E.; Pluchino, S.; Maccaferri, G.; Mujunen, A.; Ritakari, J.; Wagner, J.; Molera, G.; Uunila, M.

    2009-02-01

    Context: The presence of water has long been seen as a key condition for life in planetary environments. The Cassini spacecraft discovered water vapour in the Saturnian system by detecting absorption of UV emission from a background star. Investigating other possible manifestations of water is essential, one of which, provided physical conditions are suitable, is maser emission. Aims: We report detection of water maser emission at 22 GHz associated with several Kronian satellites using Earth-based radio telescopes. Methods: We searched for water maser emission in the Saturnian system in an observing campaign using the Metsähovi and Medicina radio telescopes. Spectral data were Doppler-corrected over orbital phase for the Saturnian satellites, yielding detections of water maser emission associated with the moons Hyperion, Titan, Enceladus, and Atlas. Results: The detection of Saturnian water molecules by remote astronomical observation can be combined with in situ spacecraft measurements to harmonise the physical model of the Saturnian system.

  5. New OH Observations toward Northern Class I Methanol Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Val'tts, I. E.; Litovchenko, I. D.; Bayandina, O. S.; Alakoz, A. V.; Larionov, G. M.; Mukha, D. V.; Nabatov, A. S.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Zakharenko, V. V.; Alekseev, E. V.; Nikolaenko, V. S.; Kulishenko, V. F.; Odincov, S. A.

    2012-07-01

    Maser emission of OH(1720) is formed, according to modern concepts, under the influence of collisional pumping. Class I methanol masers (MMI) are also formed by a collisional mechanism of the inversion of the molecular levels. It is not excluded in this case that physical conditions in the condensations of the interstellar medium where masers are formed may be similar for MMI and OH(1720) masers, and they can associate with each other. To establish a possible association between these two kinds of masers, and obtain reliable statistical estimates, a survey of class I methanol masers at a frequency of 1720 MHz has been carried out.

  6. Operational parameters for the superconducting cavity maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R. T.; Dick, G. J.; Strayer, D. M.

    1989-05-01

    Tests of the superconducting cavity maser (SCM) ultra-stable frequency source have been made for the first time using a hydrogen maser for a frequency reference. In addition to characterizing the frequency stability, the sensitivity of the output frequency to several crucial parameters was determined for various operating conditions. Based on this determination, the refrigeration and thermal control systems of the SCM were modified. Subsequent tests showed substantially improved performance, especially at the longest averaging times.

  7. Operational parameters for the superconducting cavity maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, R. T.; Dick, G. J.; Strayer, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    Tests of the superconducting cavity maser (SCM) ultra-stable frequency source have been made for the first time using a hydrogen maser for a frequency reference. In addition to characterizing the frequency stability, the sensitivity of the output frequency to several crucial parameters was determined for various operating conditions. Based on this determination, the refrigeration and thermal control systems of the SCM were modified. Subsequent tests showed substantially improved performance, especially at the longest averaging times.

  8. Hydrogen masers and cesium fountains at NRC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulanger, J.-S.; Morris, D.; Douglas, R. J.; Gagne, M.-C.

    1994-01-01

    The NRC masers H-3 and H-4 have been operating since June 1993 with cavity servo control. These low-flux active H masers are showing stabilities of about 10(exp -15) from 1 hour to several days. Stability results are presented, and the current and planned uses of the masers are discussed. A cesium fountain primary frequency standard project has been started at NRC. Trapping and launching experiments with the goal of 7 m/s launches are beginning. We discuss our plans for a local oscillator and servo that exploit the pulsed aspect of cesium fountain standards, and meet the challenge of 10(exp -14) tau(exp -1/2) stability without requiring masers. At best, we expect to run this frequency standard initially for periods of hours each working day rather than continuously for years, and so frequency transfer to outside laboratories has been carefully considered. We conclude that masers (or other even better secondary clocks) are required to exploit this potential accuracy of the cesium fountain. We present and discuss our conclusion that it is feasible to transfer frequency in this way with a transfer-induced uncertainty of less than 10(exp -15), even in the presence of maser frequency drift and random walk noise.

  9. Performance of Soviet and US hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uljanov, Adolph A.; Demidov, Nikolai A.; Mattison, Edward M.; Vessot, Robert F. C.; Allan, David W.; Winkler, Gernot M. R.

    1990-01-01

    The frequencies of Soviet- and U.S.-built hydrogen masers located at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and at the United States Naval Observatory (USNO) were compared with each other and, via Global Positioning System (GPS) common-view measurements, with three primary frequency-reference scales. The best masers were found to have fractional frequency stabilities as low as 6 times 10(exp -16) for averaging times of approximately 10(exp 4) s. Members of the USNO maser ensemble provided frequency prediction better than 1 times 10(exp 14) for periods up to a few weeks. The frequency residuals of these masers, after removal of frequency drift and rate of change of drift, had stabilities of a few parts in 10(exp -15), with serveral masers achieving residual stabilities well below 1 times 10(exp -15) for intervals from 10(exp 5)s to 2 times 10(exp 6)s. The fractional frequency drifts of the 13 masers studied, relative to the primary reference standards, ranged from -0.2 times 10(exp -15)/day to +9.6 times 10(exp -15)/day.

  10. Resonant isolator for maser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauss, R. C.; Quinn, R. B. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An isolator is described for use in a low noise maser amplifier, which provides low loss across a wide bandwidth and which can be constructed at moderate cost. The isolator includes a train of garnet or ferrite elements extending along the length of a microwave channel parallel to the slow wave structure, with the elements being of staggered height, so that the thin elements which are resonant to the microwaves are separated by much thicker elements. The thick garnet or ferrite elements reduce the magnetic flux passing through the thin elements to permit altering of the shape of the thin elements so as to facilitate their fabrication and to provide better isolation with reduced loss, by increasing the thickness of the thin elements and decreasing their length and width.

  11. External bulb variable volume maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V. S.; Cervenka, P. O. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A maser functioning as a frequency standard stable to one part in 10 to the 14th power includes a variable volume, constant surface area storage bulb having a fixed volume portion located in a resonant cavity from which the frequency standard is derived. A variable volume portion of the bulb, exterior to the resonant cavity, has a maximum volume on the same order of magnitude as the fixed volume bulb portion. The cavity has a length to radius ratio of at least 3:1 so that the operation is attained without the need for a feedback loop. A baffle plate, between the fixed and variable volume bulb portions, includes apertures for enabling hydrogen atoms to pass between the two bulb portions and is an electromagnetic shield that prevents coupling of the electromagnetic field of the cavity into the variable volume bulb portion.

  12. 37 GHz METHANOL MASERS : HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE FOR THE CLASS II METHANOL MASER PHASE?

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingsen, S. P.; Breen, S. L.; Sobolev, A. M.; Voronkov, M. A.; Caswell, J. L.; Lo, N.

    2011-12-01

    We report the results of a search for class II methanol masers at 37.7, 38.3, and 38.5 GHz toward a sample of 70 high-mass star formation regions. We primarily searched toward regions known to show emission either from the 107 GHz class II methanol maser transition, or from the 6.035 GHz excited OH transition. We detected maser emission from 13 sources in the 37.7 GHz transition, eight of these being new detections. We detected maser emission from three sources in the 38 GHz transitions, one of which is a new detection. We find that 37.7 GHz methanol masers are only associated with the most luminous 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol maser sources, which in turn are hypothesized to be the oldest class II methanol sources. We suggest that the 37.7 GHz methanol masers are associated with a brief evolutionary phase (of 1000-4000 years) prior to the cessation of class II methanol maser activity in the associated high-mass star formation region.

  13. Intraoperative positioning of mobile C-arms using artificial fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressel, Philipp; Wang, Lejing; Kutter, Oliver; Traub, Joerg; Heining, Sandro-Michael; Navab, Nassir

    2010-02-01

    In trauma and orthopedic surgery, imaging through X-ray fluoroscopy with C-arms is ubiquitous. This leads to an increase in ionizing radiation applied to patient and clinical staff. Placing these devices in the desired position to visualize a region of interest is a challenging task, requiring both skill of the operator and numerous X-rays for guidance. We propose an extension to C-arms for which position data is available that provides the surgeon with so called artificial fluoroscopy. This is achieved by computing digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) from pre- or intraoperative CT data. The approach is based on C-arm motion estimation, for which we employ a Camera Augmented Mobile C-arm (CAMC) system, and a rigid registration of the patient to the CT data. Using this information we are able to generate DRRs and simulate fluoroscopic images. For positioning tasks, this system appears almost exactly like conventional fluoroscopy, however simulating the images from the CT data in realtime as the C-arm is moved without the application of ionizing radiation. Furthermore, preoperative planning can be done on the CT data and then visualized during positioning, e.g. defining drilling axes for pedicle approach techniques. Since our method does not require external tracking it is suitable for deployment in clinical environments and day-to-day routine. An experiment with six drillings into a lumbar spine phantom showed reproducible accuracy in positioning the C-arm, ranging from 1.1 mm to 4.1 mm deviation of marker points on the phantom compared in real and virtual images.

  14. A hydrogen maser with cavity auto-tuner for timekeeping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. F.; He, J. W.; Zhai, Z. C.

    1992-01-01

    A hydrogen maser frequency standard for timekeeping was worked on at the Shanghai Observatory. The maser employs a fast cavity auto-tuner, which can detect and compensate the frequency drift of the high-Q resonant cavity with a short time constant by means of a signal injection method, so that the long term frequency stability of the maser standard is greatly improved. The cavity auto-tuning system and some maser data obtained from the atomic time comparison are described.

  15. A hydrogen maser with cavity auto-tuner for timekeeping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. F.; He, J. W.; Zhai, Z. C.

    1992-01-01

    A hydrogen maser frequency standard for timekeeping was worked on at the Shanghai Observatory. The maser employs a fast cavity auto-tuner, which can detect and compensate the frequency drift of the high-Q resonant cavity with a short time constant by means of a signal injection method, so that the long term frequency stability of the maser standard is greatly improved. The cavity auto-tuning system and some maser data obtained from the atomic time comparison are described.

  16. Outward Motions of SiO Masers around VX Sgr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J. B.; Shen, Z.-Q.; Chen, X.; Jiang, D. R.

    2014-09-01

    We report the proper motions of SiO maser features around VX Sgr from the two-epoch VLBA observations (2006 December 15 and 2007 August 19). The majority of maser feature activities show a trend of outward motions. It is consistent with our previous finding that the outflow may play an important role for SiO maser pumping.

  17. Radiation reaction effect on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, Vikram; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, P. K.

    2015-12-15

    The effects of radiation reaction force on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration scheme are studied using Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion. These studies are carried out for both linear and circularly polarized laser fields in the presence of static axial magnetic field. From the parametric study, a radiation reaction dominated region has been identified in which the particle dynamics is greatly effected by this force. In the radiation reaction dominated region, the two significant effects on particle dynamics are seen, viz., (1) saturation in energy gain by the initially resonant particle and (2) net energy gain by an initially non-resonant particle which is caused due to resonance broadening. It has been further shown that with the relaxation of resonance condition and with optimum choice of parameters, this scheme may become competitive with the other present-day laser driven particle acceleration schemes. The quantum corrections to the Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion have also been taken into account. The difference in the energy gain estimates of the particle by the quantum corrected and classical Landau-Lifshitz equation is found to be insignificant for the present day as well as upcoming laser facilities.

  18. A search for water masers associated with class II methanol masers - II. Longitude range 341° to 6°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titmarsh, A. M.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Breen, S. L.; Caswell, J. L.; Voronkov, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    This is the second paper in a series of catalogues of 22-GHz water maser observations towards the 6.7-GHz methanol masers from the Methanol Multibeam (MMB) survey. In this paper, we present our water maser observations made with the Australia Telescope Compact Array towards the masers from the MMB survey between l = 341° through the Galactic Centre to l = 6°. Of the 204 6.7-GHz methanol masers in this longitude range, we found 101 to have associated water maser emission (˜50 per cent). We found no difference in the 6.7-GHz methanol maser luminosities of those with and without water masers. In sources where both maser species are observed, the luminosities of the methanol and water masers are weakly correlated. Studying the mid-infrared colours from GLIMPSE (Galactic Legacy Infrared Midplane Survey Extraordinaire), we found no differences between the colours of those sources associated with both methanol and water masers and those associated with just methanol. Comparing the column density and dust mass calculated from the 870-μm thermal dust emission observed by ATLASGAL (APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the GALaxy), we found no differences between those sources associated with both water and methanol masers and those with methanol only. Since water masers are collisionally pumped and often show emission further away from their accompanying young stellar object (YSO) than the radiatively pumped 6.7-GHz methanol masers, it is likely that water masers are not as tightly correlated to the evolution of the parent YSO and so do not trace such a well-defined evolutionary state as 6.7-GHz methanol masers.

  19. Physical characteristics of bright Class I methanol masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leurini, S.; Menten, K. M.; Walmsley, C. M.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Class I methanol masers are thought to be tracers of interstellar shock waves. However, they have received relatively little attention mostly as a consequence of their low luminosities compared to other maser transitions. This situation has changed recently and Class I methanol masers are now routinely used as signposts of outflow activity especially in high extinction regions. The recent detection of polarisation in Class I lines now makes it possible to obtain direct observational information about magnetic fields in interstellar shocks. Aims: We make use of newly calculated collisional rate coefficients for methanol to investigate the excitation of Class I methanol masers and to reconcile the observed Class I methanol maser properties with model results. Methods: We performed large velocity gradient calculations with a plane-parallel slab geometry appropriate for shocks to compute the pump and loss rates which regulate the interactions of the different maser systems with the maser reservoir. We study the dependence of the pump rate coefficient, the maser loss rate, and the inversion efficiency of the pumping scheme of several Class I masers on the physics of the emitting gas. Results: We predict inversion in all transitions where maser emission is observed. Bright Class I methanol masers are mainly high-temperature (>100 K) high-density (n(H2) ~ 107-108 cm-3) structures with methanol maser emission measures, ξ, corresponding to high methanol abundances close to the limits set by collisional quenching. Our model predictions reproduce reasonably well most of the observed properties of Class I methanol masers. Class I masers in the 25 GHz series are the most sensitive to the density of the medium and mase at higher densities than other lines. Moreover, even at high density and high methanol abundances, their luminosity is predicted to be lower than that of the 44 GHz and 36 GHz masers. Our model predictions also reflect the observational result that the

  20. Flexible bulb large storage box hydrogen maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V.

    1973-01-01

    The principal limitation on the accuracy of the hydrogen maser as a primary frequency standard has been the irreproducibility of the frequency shift caused by collisions of the radiating atoms with the walls of the vessel containing them. The flexible bulb-large storage box hydrogen maser allows correction for this wall shift within a single device, sidestepping the reproducibility problem, and reducing the frequency error from the wall shift to the level imposed by the device's stability. The principles of the device are discussed including the flexible bulb technique and the complications caused by a multiple region storage bulb. The stability of the device is discussed including a comparison with an ordinary hydrogen maser. Data is presented from a working flexible bulb-large storage box hydrogen maser demonstrating the feasibility of the device and showing some of its operating characteristics. The flexibility of the device is demonstrated by showing how the device's added degrees of freedom allow measurement of parameters unmeasurable in an ordinary hydrogen maser.

  1. Cryogenic masers. [frequency stability and design parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berlinsky, A. J.; Hardy, W. N.

    1982-01-01

    Various factors affecting the frequency stability of hydrogen masers are described and related to maser design parameters. The long-term frequency stability of a hydrogen maser is limited by the mechanical stability of the cavity, and the magnitudes of the wall relaxation, spin exchange, and recombination rates which affect the Q of the line. Magnetic resonance studies of hydrogen atoms at temperatures below 1 K and in containers coated with liquid helium films demonstrated that cryogenic masers may allow substantial improvements in all of these parameters. In particular the thermal expansion coefficients of most materials are negligible at 1 K. Spin exchange broadening is three orders of magnitude smaller at 1 K than at room temperature, and the recombination and wall relaxation rates are negligible at 0.52 K where the frequency shift due to the 4 He-coated walls of the container has a broad minimum as a function of temperature. Other advantages of the helium-cooled maser result from the high purity, homogeneity, and resilence of helium-film-coated walls and the natural compatibility of the apparatus with helium-cooled amplifiers.

  2. Class i Methanol Maser Conditions Near SNRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, Bridget C.; Pihlström, Ylva M.; Sjouwerman, Loránt O.

    2015-06-01

    We present results from calculations of the physical conditions necessary for the occurrence of 36.169 (4-1-30 E), 44.070 (70-61 A^+), 84.521 (5-1-40 E), and 95.169 (80-71 A^+) GHz methanol (CH_3OH) maser emission lines near supernova remnants (SNRs), using the MOLPOP-CEP program. The calculations show that given a sufficient methanol abundance, methanol maser emission arises over a wide range of densities and temperatures, with optimal conditions at n˜ 10^4-10^6 cm-3 and T>60 K. The 36~GHz and 44~GHz transitions display more significant maser optical depths compared to the 84~GHz and 95~GHz transitions over the majority of physical conditions. It is also shown that line ratios are an important and applicable probe of the gas conditions. The line ratio changes are largely a result of the E-type transitions becoming quenched faster at increasing densities. The modeling results will be discussed using recent observations of CH_3OH masers near the SNRs G1.4-0.1, W28, and Sgr A East and used as a diagnostic tool to estimate densities and temperatures of the regions in which the CH_3OH masers are observed.

  3. Hydrogen Maser Clock (HMC) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, Robert F. C.; Mattison, Edward M.

    1997-01-01

    The Hydrogen Maser Clock (HMC) project was originally conceived to fly on a reflight of the European Space Agency (ESA) free flying platform, the European Recoverable Carrier (EURECA) that had been launched into space and recovered by NASA's Space Transportation System (STS). A Phase B study for operation of HMC as one of the twelve EURECA payload components was begun in July 1991, and completed a year later. Phase C/D of HMC began in August 1992 and continued into early 1995. At that time ESA decided not to refly EURECA, leaving HMC without access to space. Approximately 80% of the flight support electronics are presently operating the HMC's physics package in a vacuum tank at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, and are now considered to be well-tested flight electronics. The package will continue to be operated until the end of 1997 or until a flight opportunity becomes avaiable. Appendices: letters and trip report; proceedings of the symposium on frequency standards and metrology; milli-celsius-stability thermal control for an orbiting frequency standard.

  4. CT imaging with a mobile C-arm prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheryauka, Arvi; Tubbs, David; Langille, Vinton; Kalya, Prabhanjana; Smith, Brady; Cherone, Rocco

    2008-03-01

    Mobile X-ray imagery is an omnipresent tool in conventional musculoskeletal and soft tissue applications. The next generation of mobile C-arm systems can provide clinicians of minimally-invasive surgery and pain management procedures with both real-time high-resolution fluoroscopy and intra-operative CT imaging modalities. In this study, we research two C-arm CT experimental system configurations and evaluate their imaging capabilities. In a non-destructive evaluation configuration, the X-ray Tube - Detector assembly is stationary while an imaging object is placed on a rotating table. In a medical imaging configuration, the C-arm gantry moves around the patient and the table. In our research setting, we connect the participating devices through a Mobile X-Ray Imaging Environment known as MOXIE. MOXIE is a set of software applications for internal research at GE Healthcare - Surgery and used to examine imaging performance of experimental systems. Anthropomorphic phantom volume renderings and orthogonal slices of reconstructed images are obtained and displayed. The experimental C-arm CT results show CT-like image quality that may be suitable for interventional procedures, real-time data management, and, therefore, have great potential for effective use on the clinical floor.

  5. Polyphenols of Carménère Grapes.

    PubMed

    Huamán-Castilla, Nils Leander; Mariotti-Celis, María Salomé; Pérez-Correa, José Ricardo

    2017-06-01

    Carménère is the emblematic grape of Chile. Recent studies indicate that it has a different polyphenolic profile than other commercial varieties of grape among other factors, due to its long maturation period. The grape and wine of Carménère stand out for having high concentrations of anthocyanins (malvidin), flavonols (quercetin and myricetin) and flavanols (catechin, epicatechin and epigallocatechin). These compounds are related to the distinctive characteristic of Carménère wine regarding astringency and color. In vivo and in vitro models suggest some positive effects of these polyphenols in the treatment and prevention of chronic diseases, such as atherosclerosis and cancer. Therefore, there is a high level of interest to develop scalable industrial methods in order to obtain and purify Carménère grape polyphenol extracts that could be used to improve the characteristics of wines from other varieties or produce nutraceuticals or functional foods for preventing and treating various chronic diseases.

  6. Polyphenols of Carménère Grapes

    PubMed Central

    Huamán-Castilla, Nils Leander; Mariotti-Celis, María Salomé; Pérez-Correa, José Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Carménère is the emblematic grape of Chile. Recent studies indicate that it has a different polyphenolic profile than other commercial varieties of grape among other factors, due to its long maturation period. The grape and wine of Carménère stand out for having high concentrations of anthocyanins (malvidin), flavonols (quercetin and myricetin) and flavanols (catechin, epicatechin and epigallocatechin). These compounds are related to the distinctive characteristic of Carménère wine regarding astringency and color. In vivo and in vitro models suggest some positive effects of these polyphenols in the treatment and prevention of chronic diseases, such as atherosclerosis and cancer. Therefore, there is a high level of interest to develop scalable industrial methods in order to obtain and purify Carménère grape polyphenol extracts that could be used to improve the characteristics of wines from other varieties or produce nutraceuticals or functional foods for preventing and treating various chronic diseases. PMID:28845147

  7. Final report to US Department of Energy: Cyclotron autoresonance accelerator for electron beam dry scrubbing of flue gases

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, J.L.

    2001-05-25

    Several designs have been built and operated of microwave cyclotron autoresonance accelerators (CARA's) with electron beam parameters suitable for remediation of pollutants in flue gas emissions from coal-burning power plants. CARA designs have also been developed with a TW-level 10.6 micron laser driver for electron acceleration from 50 to 100 MeV, and with UHF drivers for proton acceleration to over 500 MeV. Dose requirements for reducing SO2, NOx, and particulates in flue gas emissions to acceptable levels have been surveyed, and used to optimize the design of an electron beam source to deliver this dose.

  8. Molecular masers as tracers of early stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strel'Nitskii, V. S.

    The discovery, observation, and interpretation of molecular masers in regions of active star formation are discussed. OH masers noted in these regions are the product of the disintegration of dense molecular envelopes surrounding compact H-II regions of young OB stars, and they typically have densities of about 10 to the 6th/cu cm and temperatures of about 100 K. H2O masers are connected with still earlier stages of stellar evolution, and are located closer to their parent stars than the OH sources. Strong CH3OH 2.5-cm masers are closely associated with OH masers.

  9. Observations of water maser sources at Arcetri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comoretto, Giovanni; Valdettaro, Riccardo; Palla, Francesco; Brand, Jan; Cesaroni, Riccardo; Felli, Marcello; Natale, Enzo; Palagi, Francesco; Panella, Dario; Tofani, Gianni

    We present the current activity of the Arcetri group in the field of water masers. This is mainly represented by observations with the Medicina radiotelescope, whose main outcome has been the compilation of the Arcetri Catalog and the study of time variability of selected sources. The Arcetri Catalog update reports the results of the observations carried out from January 1993 to April 2000 on a sample of 300 sources. The global properties of the complete Arcetri Catalog (including Comoretto et al. 1990, and Brand et al. 1994) are discussed. Of the 1013 sources, 937 have an IRAS counterpart within 1 arcmin from the nominal position of the maser. We establish a classification scheme based on the IRAS flux densities which allows to distinguish between water masers associated with star forming regions and late-type stars. The time variability study shows a large variety of behaviors. Generally more luminous sources present less variable emission and spectral components over a wider velocity range.

  10. Stability limit of the cryogenic hydrogen maser

    SciTech Connect

    Maan, A.C.; Stoof, H.T.C.; Verhaar, B.J. ); Mandel, P. )

    1990-05-28

    It is pointed out that the usual oscillation condition of the H maser is only a necessary condition for steady operation. Reducing the coupled field-matter dynamics to the complex Lorenz equations we derive a second requirement which together with the first forms a set of necessary and sufficient conditions for the steady operation to be stable. The instability of the steady state predicted by the equations should be easily accessible experimentally for the cryogenic H maser. It will be characterized by a pulsed output power which, depending on the detuning, is either periodic or chaotic.

  11. A New 95 GHz Methanol Maser Catalog. I. Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenjin; Xu, Ye; Chen, Xi; Ellingsen, Simon P.; Lu, Dengrong; Ju, Binggang; Li, Yingjie

    2017-08-01

    The Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m radio telescope has been used to search for 95 GHz (80–71A+) class I methanol masers toward 1020 Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) sources, leading to 213 detections. We have compared the line width of the methanol and HCO+ thermal emission in all of the methanol detections, and on that basis, we find that 205 of the 213 detections are very likely to be masers. This corresponds to an overall detection rate of 95 GHz methanol masers toward our BGPS sample of 20%. Of the 205 detected masers, 144 (70%) are new discoveries. Combining our results with those of previous 95 GHz methanol maser searches, a total of 481 95 GHz methanol masers are now known. We have compiled a catalog listing the locations and properties of all known 95 GHz methanol masers.

  12. CARM1 is required for proper control of proliferation and differentiation of pulmonary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Karen B; Alberich-Jordà, Meritxell; Yadav, Neelu; Kocher, Olivier; Diruscio, Annalisa; Ebralidze, Alexander; Levantini, Elena; Sng, Natasha J L; Bhasin, Manoj; Caron, Tyler; Kim, Daehoon; Steidl, Ulrich; Huang, Gang; Halmos, Balázs; Rodig, Scott J; Bedford, Mark T; Tenen, Daniel G; Kobayashi, Susumu

    2010-07-01

    Coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase I (CARM1; PRMT4) regulates gene expression by multiple mechanisms including methylation of histones and coactivation of steroid receptor transcription. Mice lacking CARM1 are small, fail to breathe and die shortly after birth, demonstrating the crucial role of CARM1 in development. In adults, CARM1 is overexpressed in human grade-III breast tumors and prostate adenocarcinomas, and knockdown of CARM1 inhibits proliferation of breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that loss of CARM1 in mouse embryos would inhibit pulmonary cell proliferation, resulting in respiratory distress. By contrast, we report here that loss of CARM1 results in hyperproliferation of pulmonary epithelial cells during embryonic development. The lungs of newborn mice lacking CARM1 have substantially reduced airspace compared with their wild-type littermates. In the absence of CARM1, alveolar type II cells show increased proliferation. Electron microscopic analyses demonstrate that lungs from mice lacking CARM1 have immature alveolar type II cells and an absence of alveolar type I cells. Gene expression analysis reveals a dysregulation of cell cycle genes and markers of differentiation in the Carm1 knockout lung. Furthermore, there is an overlap in gene expression in the Carm1 knockout and the glucocorticoid receptor knockout lung, suggesting that hyperproliferation and lack of maturation of the alveolar cells are at least in part caused by attenuation of glucocorticoid-mediated signaling. These results demonstrate for the first time that CARM1 inhibits pulmonary cell proliferation and is required for proper differentiation of alveolar cells.

  13. CARM1 is required for proper control of proliferation and differentiation of pulmonary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Karen B.; Alberich-Jordà, Meritxell; Yadav, Neelu; Kocher, Olivier; DiRuscio, Annalisa; Ebralidze, Alexander; Levantini, Elena; Sng, Natasha J. L.; Bhasin, Manoj; Caron, Tyler; Kim, Daehoon; Steidl, Ulrich; Huang, Gang; Halmos, Balázs; Rodig, Scott J.; Bedford, Mark T.; Tenen, Daniel G.; Kobayashi, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase I (CARM1; PRMT4) regulates gene expression by multiple mechanisms including methylation of histones and coactivation of steroid receptor transcription. Mice lacking CARM1 are small, fail to breathe and die shortly after birth, demonstrating the crucial role of CARM1 in development. In adults, CARM1 is overexpressed in human grade-III breast tumors and prostate adenocarcinomas, and knockdown of CARM1 inhibits proliferation of breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that loss of CARM1 in mouse embryos would inhibit pulmonary cell proliferation, resulting in respiratory distress. By contrast, we report here that loss of CARM1 results in hyperproliferation of pulmonary epithelial cells during embryonic development. The lungs of newborn mice lacking CARM1 have substantially reduced airspace compared with their wild-type littermates. In the absence of CARM1, alveolar type II cells show increased proliferation. Electron microscopic analyses demonstrate that lungs from mice lacking CARM1 have immature alveolar type II cells and an absence of alveolar type I cells. Gene expression analysis reveals a dysregulation of cell cycle genes and markers of differentiation in the Carm1 knockout lung. Furthermore, there is an overlap in gene expression in the Carm1 knockout and the glucocorticoid receptor knockout lung, suggesting that hyperproliferation and lack of maturation of the alveolar cells are at least in part caused by attenuation of glucocorticoid-mediated signaling. These results demonstrate for the first time that CARM1 inhibits pulmonary cell proliferation and is required for proper differentiation of alveolar cells. PMID:20530543

  14. Rubidium 87 gas cell studies, phase 2. [design and characteristics of rubidium maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanier, J.

    1974-01-01

    The design, development, and characteristics of a rubidium 87 maser are discussed. The design of a receiver capable of locking a crystal oscillator to the maser signal is reported. The subjects considered are: (1) maser construction, (2) maser control electronics, (3) the characteristics of the receiver, and (4) results of experimental maser tests.

  15. Theoretical comparison of maser materials for a 32-GHz maser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, James R.

    1988-01-01

    The computational results of a comparison of maser materials for a 32 GHz maser amplifier are presented. The search for a better maser material is prompted by the relatively large amount of pump power required to sustain a population inversion in ruby at frequencies on the order of 30 GHz and above. The general requirements of a maser material and the specific problems with ruby are outlined. The spin Hamiltonian is used to calculate energy levels and transition probabilities for ruby and twelve other materials. A table is compiled of several attractive operating points for each of the materials analyzed. All the materials analyzed possess operating points that could be superior to ruby. To complete the evaluation of the materials, measurements of inversion ratio and pump power requirements must be made in the future.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Water maser survey of methanol maser sources (Szymczak+, 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, M.; Pillai, T.; Menten, K. M.

    2005-02-01

    High sensitivity observations of the 22GHz water maser emission have been carried out with the Effelsberg 100m radio telescope. The observed sample was 79 candidate high-mass protostellar objects from a flux-limited sample of 6.7GHz methanol sources (Szymczak et al., 2002A&A...392..277S). Water maser emission was found in 41 sources of which 28 were not previously catalogued. (3 data files).

  17. Using Single-Particle Motion Simulation to Optimize Coil Parameters for Inducing Autoresonant Heating in the PFRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jackey; Cohen, Samuel; Glasser, Alan H.; Barth, Ido; PFRC Team

    2015-11-01

    The heating of ions confined in a field-reversed configuration (FRC) equilibrium magnetic geometry subject to a small-amplitude, odd-parity rotating magnetic field (RMF) has previously been observed in single-particle Hamiltonian simulations. We consider a form of the autoresonance method to provide added heating capabilities. Two coils encircling the FRC were added near the X-points of the FRC, co-axial with the major axis; these may be used to add oscillating components, primarily to the axial field, stiffening or relaxing the field, shortening or lengthening the x-point distance. Various parameters of the simulations were modified, including the positions of the coils along the axis, the amplitude and frequency of the oscillations, as well as other FRC parameters to determine whether autoresonant heating is a feasible method for increasing ion heating. This work was support, in part, by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466 and the Princeton Environmental Institute. This work is supported by the department of energy contract DE-AC02-09CH11466 as well as the Princeton Environmental Institute.

  18. Performance Of Superconducting-Cavity Maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John; Wang, Rabi T.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes experiments on operation of superconducting-cavity maser - all-cryogenic oscillator. Operates with degree of stability, at short measuring times, superior to that achievable by any other means. All components designed for cryogenic operation and stabilizing cavity very rigid, consisting of sapphire filling coated with lead.

  19. W43A: a Maverick Maser Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond, P. J.; Nyman, L. Å.

    The authors report on some preliminary results from a multi-epoch monitoring project of the OH and H2O masers in the source W43A. Their results suggest that W43A is a very young stellar object which has just entered a strong stellar wind stage.

  20. A database of circumstellar OH masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, D.; Bunzel, F.

    2015-10-01

    We present a new database of circumstellar OH masers at 1612, 1665, and 1667 MHz in the Milky Way galaxy. The database (version 2.4) contains 13 655 observations and 2341 different stars detected in at least one transition. Detections at 1612 MHz are considered to be complete until the end of 2014 as long as they were published in refereed papers. Detections of the main lines (1665 and 1667 MHz) and non-detections in all transitions are included only if published after 1983. The database contains flux densities and velocities of the two strongest maser peaks, the expansion velocity of the shell, and the radial velocity of the star. Links are provided for about 100 stars (<5% of all stars with OH masers) to interferometric observations and monitoring programs of the maser emission published since their beginnings in the 1970s. Access to the database is possible over the Web (http://www.hs.uni-hamburg.de/maserdb), allowing cone searches for individual sources and lists of sources. A general search is possible in selected regions of the sky and by defining ranges of flux densities and/or velocities. Alternative ways to access the data are via the German Virtual Observatory and the CDS. The data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/582/A68

  1. Report on the Special Hydrogen Maser Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Derek

    1990-01-01

    This workshop was held as a discussion forum for hydrogen maser problems, particularly for those related to wall shift and wall relaxation effects. Brief summaries of the presentations made by the speakers together with some of the discussion that followed are given. These summaries were derived from tape recordings of the session and from notes.

  2. Maser Source-Finding Methods in HOPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, A. J.; Purcell, C.; Longmore, S.; Jordan, C. H.; Lowe, V.

    2012-12-01

    The H2O Southern Galactic Plane Survey (HOPS) has observed 100 deg2 of the Galactic plane, using the Mopra radio telescope to search for emission from multiple spectral lines in the 12-mm band (19.5-27.5GHz). Perhaps the most important of these spectral lines is the 22.2-GHz water-maser transition. We describe the methods used to identify water-maser candidates and subsequent confirmation of the sources. Our methods involve a simple determination of likely candidates by searching peak emission maps, utilising the intrinsic nature of water-maser emission, spatially unresolved and spectrally narrow-lined. We estimate completeness limits and compare our method with results from the DUCHAMP source finder. We find that the two methods perform similarly. We conclude that the similarity in performance is due to the intrinsic limitation of the noise characteristics of the data. The advantages of our method are that it is slightly more efficient in eliminating spurious detections and is simple to implement. The disadvantage is that it is a manual method of finding sources and so is not practical on datasets much larger than HOPS, or for datasets with extended emission that needs to be characterised. We outline a two-stage method for the most efficient means of finding masers, using DUCHAMP.

  3. A different type of maser star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, D. F.; Dinger, A. S. C.

    1982-01-01

    A systematic survey of short-period, semiregular variable stars has been made resulting in the detection of six new water masers. Of the 14 short-period maser stars now known, nine are classified as SRb variables. All are very late spectral type SRb's, typically M7, while the overwhelming majority of normal SRb stars is M4 to M6. Their 2.2-11 micron color indices are among the lowest of any known maser stars. They are presumably less dusty as well. Four of the SRb stars and two of the remainder do not obey the correlation between period and velocity spread of the emission features that is found for the Mira and long-period, semiregular variables. Finally, high galactic latitudes dominate; 13 of the 14 are in excess of 13 deg, and nine of these are greater than 25 deg. These facts suggest that the short-period semiregular variables - particularly in SRb stars - may be a very different type of maser star than the Mira and long-period semiregular variables.

  4. MICROWAVE AND OPTICAL MASERS FOR MM WAVES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    associated cryogenic equipment. Preliminary study of the lattice absorption spectrum of CaWO4, CaMoO4 and PbMoO4 is presented. A possible 5 micron optical maser transition in the CaWO4:Nd(3) system is evaluated.

  5. Report on the Special Hydrogen Maser Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Derek

    1990-05-01

    This workshop was held as a discussion forum for hydrogen maser problems, particularly for those related to wall shift and wall relaxation effects. Brief summaries of the presentations made by the speakers together with some of the discussion that followed are given. These summaries were derived from tape recordings of the session and from notes.

  6. Analysis of vertical and horizontal circular C-arm trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, A.; Choi, J.-H.; Keil, A.; Niebler, C.; Sarmiento, M.; Fieselmann, A.; Gold, G.; Delp, S.; Fahrig, R.

    2011-03-01

    C-arm angiography systems offer great flexibility in the acquisition of trajectories for computed tomography. Theoretically, these systems are able to scan patients while standing in an upright position. This would allow novel insights into structural changes of the human anatomy while weight bearing. However, this would require a scan on a horizontal trajectory parallel to the ground floor which is currently not supported by standard C-arm CT acquisition protocols. In this paper, we compared the standard vertical and the new horizontal scanning trajectories by analysis of the source positions and source to detector distances during the scan. We employed a C-arm calibration phantom to compute the exact scan geometry. Based on the analysis of the projection matrices, we computed the source position in 3D and the source to detector distance for each projection. We then used the calibrated scan geometries to reconstruct the calibration phantom. Based on this reconstruction in comparison to the ideal phantom geometry we also evaluated the geometric reconstruction error. As expected, both the vertical and the horizontal scan trajectories exhibit a significant C-arm "wobble". But in both kinds of trajectories, the reproducibility over several scans was comparable. We were able to reconstruct the calibration phantom with satisfactory geometric reconstruction accuracy. With a reconstruction error of 0.2 mm, we conclude that horizontal C-arm scans are possible and show properties similar to those of vertical C-arm scans. The remaining challenge is compensation for the involuntary movement of the standing subject during a weight-bearing acquisition. We investigated this using an optical tracking system and found that the average movement at the knee while standing upright for 5 seconds is between 0.42 mm and 0.54 mm, and goes up to as much as 12 mm when the subject is holding a 60° squat. This involuntary motion is much larger than the reconstruction accuracy. Hence, we

  7. A gravitationally lensed water maser in the early Universe.

    PubMed

    Impellizzeri, C M Violette; McKean, John P; Castangia, Paola; Roy, Alan L; Henkel, Christian; Brunthaler, Andreas; Wucknitz, Olaf

    2008-12-18

    Water masers are found in dense molecular clouds closely associated with supermassive black holes at the centres of active galaxies. On the basis of the understanding of the local water-maser luminosity function, it was expected that masers at intermediate and high redshifts would be extremely rare. However, galaxies at redshifts z > 2 might be quite different from those found locally, not least because of more frequent mergers and interaction events. Here we use gravitational lensing to search for masers at higher redshifts than would otherwise be possible, and find a water maser at redshift 2.64 in the dust- and gas-rich, gravitationally lensed type-1 quasar MG J0414+0534 (refs 6-13). The isotropic luminosity is 10,000 (, solar luminosity), which is twice that of the most powerful local water maser and half that of the most distant maser previously known. Using the locally determined luminosity function, the probability of finding a maser this luminous associated with any single active galaxy is 10(-6). The fact that we see such a maser in the first galaxy we observe must mean that the volume densities and luminosities of masers are higher at redshift 2.64.

  8. The use of dual C-arms during fixation of calcaneal fractures: a technique tip.

    PubMed

    Abousayed, Mostafa M; Toussaint, Rull James; Kwon, John Y

    2014-06-01

    We describe a simple technique using dual C-arms (large and mini C-arm together) for open reduction internal fixation of calcaneal fractures in the lateral decubitus position that (1) decreases the difficulty of obtaining proper intraoperative imaging; (2) limits C-arm movement, which decreases risk of contamination and operative time; and (3) minimizes the drawbacks of each imaging fluoroscopic modality. Level V, Technical tip, Expert opinion.

  9. Nuclear AMPK regulated CARM1 stabilization impacts autophagy in aged heart.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Yu, Lu; Xue, Han; Yang, Zheng; Yin, Yue; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Mai; Ma, Heng

    2017-04-29

    Senescence-associated autophagy downregulation leads to cardiomyocyte dysfunction. Coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1) participates in many cellular processes, including autophagy in mammals. However, the effect of CARM1 in aging-related cardiac autophagy decline remains undefined. Moreover, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key regulator in metabolism and autophagy, however, the role of nuclear AMPK in autophagy outcome in aged hearts still unclear. Hers we identify the correlation between nuclear AMPK and CARM1 in aging heart. We found that fasting could promote autophagy in young hearts but not in aged hearts. The CARM1 stabilization is markedly decrease in aged hearts, which impaired nucleus TFEB-CARM1 complex and autophagy flux. Further, S-phase kinase-associated protein 2(SKP2), responsible for CARM1 degradation, was increased in aged hearts. We further validated that AMPK dependent FoxO3 phosphorylation was markedly reduced in nucleus, the decreased nuclear AMPK-FoxO3 activity fails to suppress SKP2-E3 ubiquitin ligase. This loss of repression leads to The CARM1 level and autophagy in aged hearts could be restored through AMPK activation. Taken together, AMPK deficiency results in nuclear CARM1 decrease mediated in part by SKP2, contributing to autophagy dysfunction in aged hearts. Our results identified nuclear AMPK controlled CARM1 stabilization as a new actor that regulates cardiac autophagy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Enhanced magnetic Purcell effect in room-temperature masers

    PubMed Central

    Breeze, Jonathan; Tan, Ke-Jie; Richards, Benjamin; Sathian, Juna; Oxborrow, Mark; Alford, Neil McN

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the world’s first room-temperature maser was demonstrated. The maser consisted of a sapphire ring housing a crystal of pentacene-doped p-terphenyl, pumped by a pulsed rhodamine-dye laser. Stimulated emission of microwaves was aided by the high quality factor and small magnetic mode volume of the maser cavity yet the peak optical pumping power was 1.4 kW. Here we report dramatic miniaturization and 2 orders of magnitude reduction in optical pumping power for a room-temperature maser by coupling a strontium titanate resonator with the spin-polarized population inversion provided by triplet states in an optically excited pentacene-doped p-terphenyl crystal. We observe maser emission in a thimble-sized resonator using a xenon flash lamp as an optical pump source with peak optical power of 70 W. This is a significant step towards the goal of continuous maser operation. PMID:25698634

  11. Ground-state OH maser distributions in the Galactic Centre region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Hai-Hua; Walsh, Andrew J.; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Dawson, Joanne R.

    2017-01-01

    Ground-state OH masers identified in the Southern Parkes Large-Area Survey in Hydroxyl were observed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array to obtain positions with high accuracy (~1 arcsec). We classified these OH masers into evolved star OH maser sites, star formation OH maser sites, supernova remnant OH maser sites, planetary nebula OH maser sites and unknown maser sites using their accurate positions. Evolved star and star formation OH maser sites in the Galactic Centre region (between Galactic longitudes of -5° to +5° and Galactic latitudes of -2° and +2°) were studied in detail to understand their distributions.

  12. Atomic Velocity Distributions Out of Hydrogen Maser Dissociators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-15

    REPORT SSD-TR-90-02 10 Atomic Velocity Distributions Out of Hydrogen 0’) Maser Dissociators B. JADUSZLIWER and Y. C. CHAN Chemistry and Physics...Maser Dissociators 12 PERSONAL AUTHOP4S) Jaduszliwer, B.; and Chan, Y. C. 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (ba, AMa, Day) 15...number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP _...Atomic clocks Hydrogen maser; Hydrogen dissociator ; Velocity distributions. K .-K / - 19. ABSTRACT (Contum on reverse

  13. Atomic Velocity Distributions Out of Hydrogen Maser Dissociators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    ATOMIC VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS OUT OF HYDROGEN MASER DISSOCIATORS Bernardo Jaduszliwer and Yat C. Chan Chemistry and Physics Laboratory The... dissociators , of the type used in hydrogen masers. This work was moti- vated by lang-term reliability issues related to the possible usc of masers as...hydrogen budgct will depend not only on the dissoci - ation efficiency, but also the vclocity distribution of the hydrogen atorrls leaving the

  14. C-arm rotation as a method for reducing peak skin dose in interventional cardiology.

    PubMed

    Pasciak, Alexander S; Bourgeois, Austin C; Jones, A Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged interventional cardiology (IC) procedures may result in radiation-induced skin injury, a potentially preventable cause of patient morbidity. Rotating the C-arm during an IC procedure may reduce this risk, although the methods by which the technique can be practically applied remains unexplored. A previous study demonstrated that C-arm rotation often increases peak skin dose (PSD) in interventional radiology procedures. The purpose of this study was to determine whether C-arm rotation reduces the PSD in IC procedures and, if so, under what circumstances. Simulations were performed using a numerical ray-tracing algorithm to analyse the effect of C-arm rotation on PSD across a range of patient sizes, C-arm configurations and procedure types. Specific data from modern fluoroscopes and patient dimensions were used as inputs to the simulations. In many cases, modest C-arm rotation angles completely eliminated overlap between X-ray field sites on the skin. When overlap remained, PSD increases were generally small. One exception was craniocaudal rotation, which tended to increase PSD. C-arm rotation was most effective for large patients and small X-ray field sizes. Small patients may not benefit from C-arm rotation as a procedural modification. The use of a prophylactic method where the C-arm was rotated between small opposing oblique angles was effective in reducing PSD. With the exception of rotation to steep craniocaudal angles, rotating the C-arm reduces PSD in IC procedures when used as either a procedural modification or a prophylactic strategy. Tight collimation increases the benefit of C-arm rotation.

  15. C-arm rotation as a method for reducing peak skin dose in interventional cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Pasciak, Alexander S; Bourgeois, Austin C; Jones, A Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Prolonged interventional cardiology (IC) procedures may result in radiation-induced skin injury, a potentially preventable cause of patient morbidity. Rotating the C-arm during an IC procedure may reduce this risk, although the methods by which the technique can be practically applied remains unexplored. A previous study demonstrated that C-arm rotation often increases peak skin dose (PSD) in interventional radiology procedures. The purpose of this study was to determine whether C-arm rotation reduces the PSD in IC procedures and, if so, under what circumstances. Materials and methods Simulations were performed using a numerical ray-tracing algorithm to analyse the effect of C-arm rotation on PSD across a range of patient sizes, C-arm configurations and procedure types. Specific data from modern fluoroscopes and patient dimensions were used as inputs to the simulations. Results In many cases, modest C-arm rotation angles completely eliminated overlap between X-ray field sites on the skin. When overlap remained, PSD increases were generally small. One exception was craniocaudal rotation, which tended to increase PSD. C-arm rotation was most effective for large patients and small X-ray field sizes. Small patients may not benefit from C-arm rotation as a procedural modification. The use of a prophylactic method where the C-arm was rotated between small opposing oblique angles was effective in reducing PSD. Conclusions With the exception of rotation to steep craniocaudal angles, rotating the C-arm reduces PSD in IC procedures when used as either a procedural modification or a prophylactic strategy. Tight collimation increases the benefit of C-arm rotation. PMID:25568803

  16. Radiative Instabilities in Three-Dimensional Astrophysical Masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scappaticci, Gerardo A.; Watson, William D.

    1995-01-01

    Inherent instabilities in the radiative transfer for astrophysical masers have been recognized and calculated in the linear maser idealization in our previous investigations. The same instabilities are now shown to occur in the more realistic, three-dimensional geometries. Fluctuations in the emergent flux result and may be related to the observed fluctuations in the radiative flux from the 1665 MHz OH masers that have been reported to occur on timescales as short as 1000 s. The time-dependent differential equations of radiative transfer are solved numerically for three-dimensional astrophysical masers. Computations are performed for spherical and elongated (rectangular parallelepiped) geometries.

  17. Interpretation of the newly discovered submillimeter water maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Melnick, Gary J.

    1990-01-01

    The 10(29)-9(36)321 GHz water maser discovered recently by Menten et al. (1990) may be pumped collisionally under a wide range of physical conditions. This range of conditions is similar but not identical to that required to excite the well-studied 22 GHz water maser. The ratio of the observed 22 GHz and 321 GHz intersteller maser luminosities can be explained by collisional excitation within the same warm, dense gas. Collisional pumping in a circumstellar envelope can account for the observed 321 GHz maser emission in the supergiant star VY CMa.

  18. A search for methanol masers at 44 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalenskij, S. V.; Bachiller, R.; Berulis, I. I.; Val'tts, I. E.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J.; Martin-Pintado, J.; Rodriguez-Franco, A.; Slysh, V. I.

    1992-10-01

    Results of an extensive survey of young stellar objects in the methanol line 7(0) - 6(1)A(+) (44 GHz) are presented. Three new masers were detected towards cold IRAS sources in the dark clouds L 291 (GGD 27), L 379, and IC 1396 N. The new masers were also observed in 4(-1) - 3(0) E (36 GHz) and 1(0) - 0(0)A(+) (48 GHz) methanol transitions. A relationship between methanol masers and high-velocity flows with dense disks around central sources is proposed, and a possible correlation between maser emission and their intensity in the FIR is suggested.

  19. Survey of Outer Galaxy Molecular Lines Associated with Water Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, N.; Hachisuka, K.; Umemoto, T.

    2009-08-01

    H_2O masers in Young stellar objects (YSOs) in our Galaxy are one of the targets of the VSOP-2 science. The advantage of VSOP-2 observation is the highest angular resolution which can detect a proper motion of H_2O masers for distant objects over short time intervals. To find candidate sources, we observed H2O maser sources in the outer Galaxy using the VLA, and we surveyed the molecular lines toward these sources to understand the environment of YSOs. Higher H2 column densities of YSOs were found for objects with active H2O masers.

  20. Pumping Mechanisms for SiO Masers around VX Sgr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J. B.; Shen, Z.-Q.; Chen, X.; Yi, Jiyune; Jiang, D. R.; Yun, Y. J.

    2011-06-01

    VX Sgr, a semi-regular variable, is a red giant star with intense SiO maser emission at 43 GHz. The pumping mechanism of the circumstellar SiO masers has been controversial for decades since its discovery. In order to pursue this long-standing problem further, we have carried out simultaneous VLBA observations of two 7 mm SiO masers at five epochs in about two years. We present relatively aligned υ = 1 and υ = 2, J = 1-0 SiO maser maps and discuss the dominant pumping mechanism, which may be epoch dependent or a combination of both mechanisms.

  1. New auto-tuning technique for the hydrogen maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, R. L.; Maleki, L.

    1983-01-01

    Auto-tuning of the maser cavity compensates for cavity pulling effect, and other sources of contribution to the long term frequency drift. Schemes previously proposed for the maser cavity auto-tuning can have adverse effects on the performance of the maser. A new scheme is proposed based on the phase relationship between the electric and the magnetic fields inside the cavity. This technique has the desired feature of auto-tuning the cavity with a very high sensitivity and without disturbing the maser performance. Some approaches for the implementation of this scheme and possible areas of difficulty are examined.

  2. NEW MASER EMISSION FROM NONMETASTABLE AMMONIA IN NGC 7538

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Ian M.; Kim, Stella Seojin

    2011-09-20

    We present the first interferometric observations at 18.5 GHz of IRS 1 in NGC 7538. These observations include images of the nonmetastable {sup 14}NH{sub 3} (9, 6) masers with a synthesized beam of 2 arcsec and images of the continuum emission with a synthesized beam of 150 mas. Of the maser emission, the previously known feature near v {sub LSR} = -60 km s{sup -1} is spectrally resolved into at least two components and we observe several new maser emission features near v {sub LSR} = -57 km s{sup -1}. The new maser emission near -57 km s{sup -1} lies 250 {+-} 90 mas northwest of the maser emission near -60 km s{sup -1}. All of the masers are angularly unresolved indicating brightness temperatures T{sub B} > 2000 K. We are also able to conclusively associate the ammonia masers with the position of IRS 1. The excitation of these rare ammonia masers is discussed in the context of the rich maser environment of IRS 1.

  3. Synchrotron masers and fast radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.

    2017-02-01

    Fast radio bursts, with a typical duration of 1 ms and 1 Jy flux density at gigahertz frequencies, have brightness temperatures exceeding 1033 K, requiring a coherent emission process. This can be achieved by bunching particles in volumes smaller than the typical wavelength, but this may be challenging. Maser emission is a possibility. Under certain conditions, the synchrotron-stimulated emission process can be more important than true absorption, and a synchrotron maser can be created. This occurs when the emitting electrons have a very narrow distribution of pitch angles and energies. This process overcomes the difficulties of having extremely dense bunches of particles and relaxes the light-crossing time limits, since there is no simple relation between the actual size of the source and the observed variability time-scale.

  4. Maser Astrometry with VERA and VSOP-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, M.; Bushimata, T.; Choi, Y. K.; Hirota, T.; Imai, H.; Iwadate, K.; Jike, T.; Kameno, S.; Kameya, O.; Kamohara, R.; Kawaguchi, N.; Kijima, M.; Kim, M.; Kobayashi, H.; Kuji, S.; Kurayama, T.; Manabe, S.; Matsui, M.; Matsumoto, N.; Miyaji, T.; Nagayama, T.; Nakagawa, A.; Nakamura, K.; Oh, C. S.; Omodaka, T.; Oyama, T.; Sakai, S.; Sato, K.; Sato, M.; Sasao, T.; Shibata, K. M.; Tamura, Y.; Yamashita, K.

    2009-08-01

    We present recent results of maser astrometry obtained with VERA (VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry), which is a Japanese VLBI array dedicated to phase-referencing astrometry to explore the 3-D structure of the Milky Way Galaxy. Since 2004 we have been conducting regular monitoring of maser sources with VERA, and we have already detected parallaxes for several sources, ranging from a few 100 pc to 5 kpc. These results include measurements for Galactic star-forming regions such as ORI-KL, S269, NGC 281 as well as those for late type stars such as VY CMa. We also discuss the VERA---VSOP-2 connection in the near future, and propose astrometric observations with VSOP-2.

  5. OH maser proper motions in Cepheus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migenes, V.; Cohen, R. J.; Brebner, G. C.

    1992-02-01

    MERLIN measurements made between 1982 and 1989 reveal proper motions of OH masers in the source Cepheus A. The proper motions are typically a few milliarcsec per year, and are mainly directed away from the central H II regions. Statistical analysis of the data suggests an expansion time-scale of some 300 yr. The distance of the source implied by the proper motions is 320+140/-80 pc, assuming that the expansion is isotropic. The proper motions can be reconciled with the larger distance of 730 pc which is generally accepted, provided that the masers are moving at large angles to the line of sight. The expansion time-scale agrees with that of the magnetic field decay recently reported by Cohen, et al. (1990).

  6. Magnetic refrigeration for maser amplifier cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a multifrequency upconverter-maser system for the DSN has created the need to develop a closed-cycle refrigerator (CCR) capable of providing more than 3 watts of refrigeration capability at 4.5 K. In addition, operating concerns such as the high cost of electrical power consumption and the loss of maser operation due to CCR failures require that improvements be made to increase the efficiency and reliability of the CCR. One refrigeration method considered is the replacement of the Joule-Thomson expansion circuit with a magnetic refrigeration. Magnetic refrigerators can provide potentially reliable and highly efficient refrigeration at a variety of temperature ranges and cooling power. The concept of magnetic refrigeration is summarized and a literature review of existing magnetic refrigerator designs which have been built and tested and that may also be considered as possibilities as a 4 K to 15 K magnetic refrigeration stage for the DSN closed-cycle refrigerator is provided.

  7. Magnetic refrigeration for maser amplifier cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a multifrequency upconverter-maser system for the DSN has created the need to develop a closed-cycle refrigerator (CCR) capable of providing more than 3 watts of refrigeration capability at 4.5 K. In addition, operating concerns such as the high cost of electrical power consumption and the loss of maser operation due to CCR failures require that improvements be made to increase the efficiency and reliability of the CCR. One refrigeration method considered is the replacement of the Joule-Thomson expansion circuit with a magnetic refrigeration. Magnetic refrigerators can provide potentially reliable and highly efficient refrigeration at a variety of temperature ranges and cooling power. The concept of magnetic refrigeration is summarized and a literature review of existing magnetic refrigerator designs which have been built and tested and that may also be considered as possibilities as a 4 K to 15 K magnetic refrigeration stage for the DSN closed-cycle refrigerator is provided.

  8. MASER OBSERVATIONS OF WESTERLUND 1 AND COMPREHENSIVE CONSIDERATIONS ON MASER PROPERTIES OF RED SUPERGIANTS ASSOCIATED WITH MASSIVE CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Fok, Thomas K. T.; Nakashima, Jun-ichi; Yung, Bosco H. K.; Hsia, Chih-Hao; Deguchi, Shuji

    2012-11-20

    We report the results of Australia Telescope Compact Array observations of the Westerlund 1 (Wd1) region in the SiO v = 1, J = 1-0, and H{sub 2}O 6{sub 16}-5{sub 23} maser lines, and we also report the analysis of maser properties of red supergiants (RSGs) associated with six massive clusters including Wd1. The primary purpose of this research is to explore possibilities of using maser emission for investigating the nature of massive clusters and associated RSGs. The SiO v = 1, J = 1-0, and H{sub 2}O 6{sub 16}-5{sub 23} maser lines are detected toward two of four known RSGs in Wd1. The large velocity ranges of maser emission are consistent with the RSG status. RSGs with maser emission tend to exhibit redder log (F {sub 21}/F {sub 12}) and [K-12.13] colors compared to RSGs with no maser emission. The mass-loss rates derived from dust radiative transfer modeling suggest that RSGs with maser emission tend to exhibit larger mass-loss rates compared to RSGs with no maser emission. In an extended sample of 57 RSGs in six massive clusters, detections in the SiO line tend to homogeneously distribute in absolute luminosity L, whereas those in the H{sub 2}O line tend to distribute in a region with large L values.

  9. Maser Observations of Westerlund 1 and Comprehensive Considerations on Maser Properties of Red Supergiants Associated with Massive Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fok, Thomas K. T.; Nakashima, Jun-ichi; Yung, Bosco H. K.; Hsia, Chih-Hao; Deguchi, Shuji

    2012-11-01

    We report the results of Australia Telescope Compact Array observations of the Westerlund 1 (Wd1) region in the SiO v = 1, J = 1-0, and H2O 616-523 maser lines, and we also report the analysis of maser properties of red supergiants (RSGs) associated with six massive clusters including Wd1. The primary purpose of this research is to explore possibilities of using maser emission for investigating the nature of massive clusters and associated RSGs. The SiO v = 1, J = 1-0, and H2O 616-523 maser lines are detected toward two of four known RSGs in Wd1. The large velocity ranges of maser emission are consistent with the RSG status. RSGs with maser emission tend to exhibit redder log (F 21/F 12) and [K-12.13] colors compared to RSGs with no maser emission. The mass-loss rates derived from dust radiative transfer modeling suggest that RSGs with maser emission tend to exhibit larger mass-loss rates compared to RSGs with no maser emission. In an extended sample of 57 RSGs in six massive clusters, detections in the SiO line tend to homogeneously distribute in absolute luminosity L, whereas those in the H2O line tend to distribute in a region with large L values.

  10. Water Masers in the Andromeda Galaxy. I. A Survey for Water Masers, Ammonia, and Hydrogen Recombination Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Jeremy; Gerard, Benjamin; Amiri, Nikta; Lawrence, Kelsey

    2016-07-01

    We report the results of a Green Bank Telescope survey for water masers, ammonia (1, 1) and (2, 2), and the H66α recombination line toward 506 luminous compact 24 μm emitting regions in the Andromeda Galaxy (M31). We include the 206 sources observed in the Darling water maser survey for completeness. The survey was sensitive enough to detect any maser useful for ˜10 μas yr-1 astrometry. No new water masers, ammonia lines, or H66α recombination lines were detected individually or in spectral stacks reaching rms noise levels of ˜3 mJy and ˜0.2 mJy, respectively, in 3.1-3.3 km s-1 channels. The lack of detections in individual spectra and in the spectral stacks is consistent with Galactic extrapolations. Contrary to previous assertions, there do not seem to be any additional bright water masers to be found in M31. The strong variability of water masers may enable new maser detections in the future, but variability may also limit the astrometric utility of known (or future) masers because flaring masers must also fade.

  11. The superconducting cavity stability ruby maser oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. J.; Strayer, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    Analysis of an application of the rudy maser to a superconducting Cavity Stabilized oscillator shows many attractive features. These derive from the mechancial stability inherent in an all-cryogenic design and from the properties of the ruby maser itself. A multiple-cavity design has been developed to allow physical separation of the high-Q superconducting cavity and the ruby element with its requried applied magnetic field. Mode selection is accomplished in this design by tuning the ruby by means of the applied field. We conclude that such an oscillator would perform well, even with cavity Q's as low as 10 to the 8th power allowing the use of a superconductor-on-sapphire resonator with its greater rigidity and lower thermal expansion. A first test of the Superconducting Cavity Stabilized Maser Oscillator (SCSMO) confirms the efficacy of the multiple-cavity design and the applicability of the ruby maser. Frequency variation less than 4x10 to the minus 11th power was measured in the stabilized mode and is attributed to the reference oscillator and to instabilities in the pump source. Variation of 10 to the minus 10th power was observed in the low-Q unstabilized mode, again attributable to pump fluctuations. Even so, direct scaling to a Q of 10 the 9th power predicts a stability better than 10 to the minus 15th power. Together with results showing the lowest losses to date in sapphire at microwave frequencies, and preliminary experiments on superconductor-on-sapphire resonators, frequency stability, levels as low as 10 to the minus 17th power are indicated.

  12. Novel CARM1-Interacting Protein, DZIP3, Is a Transcriptional Coactivator of Estrogen Receptor-α

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, Daniel J.; Chauhan, Swati; Jimenez-Stinson, Diane; Elliott, Kathleen R.; Tsewang, Tenzin D.; Lee, Young-Ho; Marples, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1) is known to promote estrogen receptor (ER)α-mediated transcription in breast cancer cells. To further characterize the regulation of ERα-mediated transcription by CARM1, we screened CARM1-interacting proteins by yeast two-hybrid. Here, we have identified an E3 ubiquitin ligase, DAZ (deleted in azoospermia)-interacting protein 3 (DZIP3), as a novel CARM1-binding protein. DZIP3-dependent ubiquitination of histone H2A has been associated with repression of transcription. However, ERα reporter gene assays demonstrated that DZIP3 enhanced ERα-mediated transcription and cooperated synergistically with CARM1. Interaction with CARM1 was observed with the E3 ligase RING domain of DZIP3. The methyltransferase activity of CARM1 partially contributed to the synergy with DZIP3 for transcription activation, but the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of DZIP3 was dispensable. DZIP3 also interacted with the C-terminal activation domain 2 of glucocorticoid receptor-interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) and enhanced the interaction between GRIP1 and CARM1. Depletion of DZIP3 by small interfering RNA in MCF7 cells reduced estradiol-induced gene expression of ERα target genes, GREB1 and pS2, and DZIP3 was recruited to the estrogen response elements of the same ERα target genes. These results indicate that DZIP3 is a novel coactivator of ERα target gene expression. PMID:26505218

  13. The Mini C-arm Adds Quality and Efficiency to the Pediatric Orthopedic Outpatient Clinic.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Matthew G; Hennrikus, William L; Slough Hill, Jennifer M; Armstrong, Douglas G; King, Steven H

    2016-11-01

    The mini C-arm has become increasingly popular in the practice of orthopedics. To the authors' knowledge, its use in the pediatric orthopedic outpatient clinic has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the practice efficiency and radiation exposure to the patient when the mini C-arm was used in the pediatric orthopedic outpatient clinic. One hundred consecutive midshaft and distal forearm fractures were evaluated by one orthopedic surgeon in follow-up using a mini C-arm. For each case, the radiation physicist calculated the amount of skin exposure in milligray (mGy). The average skin exposure to the patient from the mini C-arm was 0.58 mGy, compared with 0.2 mGy for anteroposterior view and lateral view radiographs. Use of the mini C-arm, in place of plain radiographs obtained in the radiology department, decreased time waiting during clinic visits by 23 minutes. This study reports 2 important findings. First, surprisingly, the mini C-arm used a slightly higher radiation dose than standard imaging with plain radiographs. Second, use of the mini C-arm saved time and improved the efficiency of the clinic visit. Overall, the mini C-arm improves quality and efficiency in the pediatric orthopedic outpatient clinic. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1097-e1099.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Hydrogen masers with cavity frequency switching servos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Harry E.; Owings, H. B.; Koppang, Paul A.

    1990-01-01

    The stability of the free-running hydrogen maser is limited by pulling of the unperturbed hydrogen transition frequency due to instability of the cavity resonance frequency. While automatic spin-exchange tuning is in principle the more basic and accurate method, the required beam intensity switching and the long servo time constant result in reduced stability for measuring intervals up to 10(exp 6) seconds. More importantly, the spin-exchange tuning method requires a second stable frequency source as a reference, ideally a second hydrogen maser, to get the best results. The cavity frequency switching servo, on the other hand, has very little effect on the maser short term stability, and is fast enough to correct for cavity drift while maintaining the cavity at the spin-exchange tuned offset required to minimize instability due to beam intensity fluctuations. Not only does the cavity frequency switching servo not require a second stable frequency source, but the frequency reference is the atomic hydrogen radiated beam signal, so that no extra RF connections need be made to the cavity, and externally generated signals that would perturb the hydrogen atom need not be transmitted through the cavity. The operation of the cavity frequency switching stabilization method is discussed and the transient response of the servo and certain other aspects of the technique that have potential for achieving improved basic accuracy are illustrated.

  15. Water Masers in AGN Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braatz, J. A.; Reid, M. J.; Greenhill, L. J.; Kuo, C.-Y.; Condon, J. J.; Lo, K.-Y.; Henkel, C.

    2009-08-01

    Water vapor masers at 22 GHz have been detected in over 100 galaxies, most of them AGNs. High resolution VLBI observations of these masers provide the only opportunity for direct imaging of sub-parsec structure in AGN accretion disks. The key science goals associated with such observations are concentrated in two areas. First, observations of nearby, bright sources, exemplified by NGC 4258, enable unique investigations of accretion disk geometry, substructure, thickness, and rotation properties. Second, when combined with spectral line monitoring, VLBI imaging and subsequent disk modeling enables the estimation of a distance to the host galaxy independent of standard candle arguments. In this contribution we present VLBI observations of two maser disk systems in galaxies well into the Hubble flow, UGC 3789 and NGC 6323. A long term goal in these studies is to measure the Hubble constant with high precision and, as a complement to CMB observations, constrain several key cosmological parameters, including the equation of state for dark energy. Observations with VSOP-2 at 22 GHz will have the resolution critical for mapping substructure in these accretion disks and will contribute to reducing systematic errors in the measurement of distances to galaxies.

  16. Insights into high mass star formation from methanol maser observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Hontas Freeman

    2013-06-01

    We present high angular resolution data on Class I and Class II methanol masers, together with other tracers of star formation like H2O masers, ultracompact (UC) ionized hydrogen (H II) regions, and 4.5 um infrared sources, taken from the literature. The aim is to study what these data tell us about the process of high mass star formation; in particular, whether disk-outflow systems are compatible with the morphology exhibited by Class I and Class II methanol masers. Stars form in the dense cores inside molecular clouds, and while the process of the formation of stars like our Sun is reasonably well understood, details of the formation of stars with masses eight times that of our Sun or greater, the so-called high mass stars, remain a mystery. Being compact and bright sources, masers provide an excellent way to observe high mass star forming regions. In particular, Class II methanol masers are found exclusively in high mass star forming regions. Based on the positions of the Class I and II methanol and H2O masers, UCHII regions and 4.5 um infrared sources, and the center velocities (vLSR) of the Class I methanol and H2O masers, compared to the vLSR of the Class II methanol masers, we propose three disk-outflow models that may be traced by methanol masers. In all three models, we have located the Class II methanol maser near the protostar, and the Class I methanol maser in the outflow, as is known from observations during the last twenty years. In our first model, the H2O masers trace the linear extent of the outflow. In our second model, the H2O masers are located in a circumstellar disk. In our third model, the H2O masers are located in one or more outflows near the terminating shock where the outflow impacts the ambient interstellar medium. Together, these models reiterate the utility of coordinated high angular resolution observations of high mass star forming regions in maser lines and associated star formation tracers.

  17. Prostate implant reconstruction from C-arm images with motion-compensated tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghan, Ehsan; Moradi, Mehdi; Wen, Xu; French, Danny; Lobo, Julio; Morris, W. James; Salcudean, Septimiu E.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: Accurate localization of prostate implants from several C-arm images is necessary for ultrasound-fluoroscopy fusion and intraoperative dosimetry. The authors propose a computational motion compensation method for tomosynthesis-based reconstruction that enables 3D localization of prostate implants from C-arm images despite C-arm oscillation and sagging. Methods: Five C-arm images are captured by rotating the C-arm around its primary axis, while measuring its rotation angle using a protractor or the C-arm joint encoder. The C-arm images are processed to obtain binary seed-only images from which a volume of interest is reconstructed. The motion compensation algorithm, iteratively, compensates for 2D translational motion of the C-arm by maximizing the number of voxels that project on a seed projection in all of the images. This obviates the need for C-arm full pose tracking traditionally implemented using radio-opaque fiducials or external trackers. The proposed reconstruction method is tested in simulations, in a phantom study and on ten patient data sets. Results: In a phantom implanted with 136 dummy seeds, the seed detection rate was 100% with a localization error of 0.86 {+-} 0.44 mm (Mean {+-} STD) compared to CT. For patient data sets, a detection rate of 99.5% was achieved in approximately 1 min per patient. The reconstruction results for patient data sets were compared against an available matching-based reconstruction method and showed relative localization difference of 0.5 {+-} 0.4 mm. Conclusions: The motion compensation method can successfully compensate for large C-arm motion without using radio-opaque fiducial or external trackers. Considering the efficacy of the algorithm, its successful reconstruction rate and low computational burden, the algorithm is feasible for clinical use.

  18. Prostate implant reconstruction from C-arm images with motion-compensated tomosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, Ehsan; Moradi, Mehdi; Wen, Xu; French, Danny; Lobo, Julio; Morris, W. James; Salcudean, Septimiu E.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate localization of prostate implants from several C-arm images is necessary for ultrasound-fluoroscopy fusion and intraoperative dosimetry. The authors propose a computational motion compensation method for tomosynthesis-based reconstruction that enables 3D localization of prostate implants from C-arm images despite C-arm oscillation and sagging. Methods: Five C-arm images are captured by rotating the C-arm around its primary axis, while measuring its rotation angle using a protractor or the C-arm joint encoder. The C-arm images are processed to obtain binary seed-only images from which a volume of interest is reconstructed. The motion compensation algorithm, iteratively, compensates for 2D translational motion of the C-arm by maximizing the number of voxels that project on a seed projection in all of the images. This obviates the need for C-arm full pose tracking traditionally implemented using radio-opaque fiducials or external trackers. The proposed reconstruction method is tested in simulations, in a phantom study and on ten patient data sets. Results: In a phantom implanted with 136 dummy seeds, the seed detection rate was 100% with a localization error of 0.86 ± 0.44 mm (Mean ± STD) compared to CT. For patient data sets, a detection rate of 99.5% was achieved in approximately 1 min per patient. The reconstruction results for patient data sets were compared against an available matching-based reconstruction method and showed relative localization difference of 0.5 ± 0.4 mm. Conclusions: The motion compensation method can successfully compensate for large C-arm motion without using radio-opaque fiducial or external trackers. Considering the efficacy of the algorithm, its successful reconstruction rate and low computational burden, the algorithm is feasible for clinical use. PMID:21992346

  19. OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF HOST GALAXIES OF EXTRAGALACTIC NUCLEAR WATER MASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Guangtun; Zaw, Ingyin; Blanton, Michael R.; Greenhill, Lincoln J.

    2011-12-01

    We study the optical properties of the host galaxies of nuclear 22 GHz ({lambda} = 1.35 cm) water masers. To do so, we cross-match the galaxy sample surveyed for water maser emission (123 detections and 3806 non-detections) with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) low-redshift galaxy sample (z < 0.05). Out of 1636 galaxies with SDSS photometry, we identify 48 detections; out of the 1063 galaxies that also have SDSS spectroscopy, we identify 33 detections. We find that maser detection rate is higher at higher optical luminosity (M{sub B} ), larger velocity dispersion ({sigma}), and higher [O III] {lambda}5007 luminosity, with [O III] {lambda}5007 being the dominant factor. These detection rates are essentially the result of the correlations of isotropic maser luminosity with all three of these variables. These correlations are natural if maser strength increases with central black hole mass and the level of active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity. We also find that the detection rate is higher in galaxies with higher extinction. Based on these results, we propose that maser surveys seeking to efficiently find masers should rank AGN targets by extinction-corrected [O III] {lambda}5007 flux when available. This prioritization would improve maser detection efficiency, from an overall {approx}3% without pre-selection to {approx}16% for the strongest intrinsic [O III] {lambda}5007 emitters, by a factor of {approx}5.

  20. A receiver design for the superconducting cavity-maser oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, R. T.; Dick, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    A new frequency standard was demonstrated with the aid of a double phase locked loop (PLL) receiver. A superconducting cavity maser oscillator (SCMO) and a hydrogen maser are combined to show the medium term performance of the hydrogen maser together with improved short term performance made possible by the SCMO. The receiver, which generates a 100 MHz signal with reduced noise, is phase locked to (and may be used in place of) the 100 MHz hydrogen maser output. The maser signal, 2.69xxx-GHz SCMO output, and a 100 MHz quartz crystal oscillator are optimally combined by the receiver. A measured two source fractional frequency stability of 2 x 10(exp -14) was obtained for a measuring time of r = 1 sec, and 1 x 10(exp -15) at r = 1,000 sec. The 1 sec value is approx. 10 times lower than that for hydrogen masers, while the 1,000 sec value is identical to hydrogen maser performance. The design is based on phase noise models for the hydrogen maser, the SCMO, and quartz crystal oscillators for offset frequencies down to 1 x 10(exp -6) Hz.

  1. Accurate OH Maser Positions from the SPLASH Pilot Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Hai-Hua; Walsh, Andrew J.; Green, James A.; Breen, Shari L.; Dawson, J. R.; Ellingsen, Simon P.; Gómez, José F.; Jordan, Christopher H.; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Lowe, Vicki; Jones, Paul A.

    2016-12-01

    We report on high spatial resolution observations, using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), of ground-state OH masers. These observations were carried out toward 196 pointing centers previously identified in the Southern Parkes Large-Area Survey in Hydroxyl (SPLASH) pilot region, between Galactic longitudes of 334° and 344° and Galactic latitudes of ‑2° and +2°. Supplementing our data with data from the MAGMO (Mapping the Galactic Magnetic field through OH masers) survey, we find maser emission toward 175 of the 196 target fields. We conclude that about half of the 21 nondetections were due to intrinsic variability. Due to the superior sensitivity of the followup ATCA observations, and the ability to resolve nearby sources into separate sites, we have identified 215 OH maser sites toward the 175 fields with detections. Among these 215 OH maser sites, 111 are new detections. After comparing the positions of these 215 maser sites to the literature, we identify 122 (57%) sites associated with evolved stars (one of which is a planetary nebula), 64 (30%) with star formation, two sites with supernova remnants, and 27 (13%) of unknown origin. The infrared colors of evolved star sites with symmetric maser profiles tend to be redder than those of evolved star sites with asymmetric maser profiles, which may indicate that symmetric sources are generally at an earlier evolutionary stage.

  2. Optical Properties of Host Galaxies of Extragalactic Nuclear Water Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangtun; Zaw, Ingyin; Blanton, Michael R.; Greenhill, Lincoln J.

    2011-12-01

    We study the optical properties of the host galaxies of nuclear 22 GHz (λ = 1.35 cm) water masers. To do so, we cross-match the galaxy sample surveyed for water maser emission (123 detections and 3806 non-detections) with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) low-redshift galaxy sample (z < 0.05). Out of 1636 galaxies with SDSS photometry, we identify 48 detections; out of the 1063 galaxies that also have SDSS spectroscopy, we identify 33 detections. We find that maser detection rate is higher at higher optical luminosity (MB ), larger velocity dispersion (σ), and higher [O III] λ5007 luminosity, with [O III] λ5007 being the dominant factor. These detection rates are essentially the result of the correlations of isotropic maser luminosity with all three of these variables. These correlations are natural if maser strength increases with central black hole mass and the level of active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity. We also find that the detection rate is higher in galaxies with higher extinction. Based on these results, we propose that maser surveys seeking to efficiently find masers should rank AGN targets by extinction-corrected [O III] λ5007 flux when available. This prioritization would improve maser detection efficiency, from an overall ~3% without pre-selection to ~16% for the strongest intrinsic [O III] λ5007 emitters, by a factor of ~5.

  3. Coating a Hydrogen-Maser Chamber With CF4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, Robert F. C.; Mattison, Edward

    1987-01-01

    Coating of carbon tetrafluoride formed on interior surface of atomic-hydrogen maser by allowing gas to freeze on surface. New coating enables maser to oscillate down to 26 K; most effective previous coating, fluorinated ethylene/polypropylene (FEP) copolymer allowed oscillation down to about 50 K.

  4. Registration of 2D C-Arm and 3D CT Images for a C-Arm Image-Assisted Navigation System for Spinal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Ju; Lin, Geng-Li; Tse, Alex; Chu, Hong-Yu; Tseng, Ching-Shiow

    2015-01-01

    C-Arm image-assisted surgical navigation system has been broadly applied to spinal surgery. However, accurate path planning on the C-Arm AP-view image is difficult. This research studies 2D-3D image registration methods to obtain the optimum transformation matrix between C-Arm and CT image frames. Through the transformation matrix, the surgical path planned on preoperative CT images can be transformed and displayed on the C-Arm images for surgical guidance. The positions of surgical instruments will also be displayed on both CT and C-Arm in the real time. Five similarity measure methods of 2D-3D image registration including Normalized Cross-Correlation, Gradient Correlation, Pattern Intensity, Gradient Difference Correlation, and Mutual Information combined with three optimization methods including Powell's method, Downhill simplex algorithm, and genetic algorithm are applied to evaluate their performance in converge range, efficiency, and accuracy. Experimental results show that the combination of Normalized Cross-Correlation measure method with Downhill simplex algorithm obtains maximum correlation and similarity in C-Arm and Digital Reconstructed Radiograph (DRR) images. Spine saw bones are used in the experiment to evaluate 2D-3D image registration accuracy. The average error in displacement is 0.22 mm. The success rate is approximately 90% and average registration time takes 16 seconds. PMID:27018859

  5. SIMULTANEOUS OBSERVATIONS OF SiO AND H{sub 2}O MASERS TOWARD KNOWN STELLAR SiO MASER SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Se-Hyung; Kim, Jaeheon E-mail: jhkim@kasi.re.kr

    2012-11-01

    We carried out simultaneous observations of four maser lines, SiO v = 1, 2, {sup 29}SiO v = 0, J = 1-0, and H{sub 2}O 6{sub 16}-5{sub 23}, toward 83 known SiO maser sources without H{sub 2}O maser detections using the Korean VLBI Network single dish telescopes. Both SiO and H{sub 2}O masers were detected from 14 sources, resulting in a detection rate of 16.9%. H{sub 2}O maser emission without SiO maser emission was detected from one source. Therefore, H{sub 2}O maser emission was newly detected from 15 sources. SiO maser emission without H{sub 2}O detection was detected from 55 sources, which gives a total SiO maser detection rate of 83.1% when including sources that have both SiO and H{sub 2}O maser emission detected. SiO v = 2 maser emission was detected from nine sources without v = 1 maser detection. The SiO v = 2 maser sources without the v = 1 maser detections need to be investigated, with a large number of v = 2 only maser sources related to the development of dust shells and their evolutionary sequence from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) to post-AGB stars. The average values of the peak and integrated antenna temperature ratios of H{sub 2}O to SiO masers are 0.44 and 0.28 in the 14 sources that have both SiO and H{sub 2}O detections. Observational characteristics of several individual sources are noted and the dependence of the different maser intensity ratios on the stellar phase is discussed. In addition, the observational results of SiO and H{sub 2}O masers are discussed in IRAS two-color diagrams.

  6. Spectral line profiles and luminosities of astrophysical water masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nedoluha, Gerald E.; Watson, William D.

    1991-01-01

    The spectral line narrowing and rebroadening that occurs for astrophysical masers as a function of the emergent radiative flux is calculated for the prominent, 22 GHz masing transition of water. The increased line breadths due to hyperfine structure lead to reliable, essentially model-independent upper limits to the emergent flux that tend to be lower than other estimates for these masers. For many 22 GHz masers, including the outbursts in W49 and Orion, the observed line breadths are less than 0.9 km/s. For these, the upper limit to the emergent maser flux is 10 to the 10th K-sr when expressed in terms of the brightness temperature and the solid angle for beaming. It is concluded that the extreme brightness of the interstellar water masers is due to a high degree of beaming and not to more effective pumping.

  7. Rapid time variations and radiative instabilities of astrophysical masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scappaticci, Gerardo A.; Watson, William D.

    1992-01-01

    The time-varying intensities are obtained for astrophysical masers that are radiatively unstable. Numerical integrations of the time-dependent, nonlinear equations of radiative transfer are performed with the usual approximation of a linear maser. At long times after changes in the physical conditions, the intensity of maser radiation reaches an asymptotic behavior and oscillates permanently in these idealized calculations with a period that is related to the length of the maser divided by the speed of light. The intensity varies by more than a factor of 10. These intensities depend upon the same four parameters as we originally found to determine the regime for radiative instabilities based on a stability analysis of the steady state. A detailed comparison is made between the predictions of the stability analysis and the time variations of the intensities. Calculations are performed for interacting pairs as well as isolated, individual masers.

  8. Shock-excited NH3 (3, 3) masers in the NGC 6334 star-forming region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraemer, Kathleen E.; Jackson, James M.

    1995-01-01

    We report the discovery of four NH3 (3, 3) masers in the NGC 6334 star formation region. The masers are found in two of the seven far-infrared continuum sources where high-mass star formation is taking place in this molecular cloud. These masers occur at the ends of high-velocity molecular outflows; no maser emission was found near regions without high-velocity outflows. The NH3 masers are not associated with any other type of maser. These results confirm that the NH3 (3, 3) masers are caused by shocks and probably mark the location where the molecular outflow jet impinges upon the ambient medium.

  9. Shock-excited NH3 (3, 3) masers in the NGC 6334 star-forming region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraemer, Kathleen E.; Jackson, James M.

    1995-01-01

    We report the discovery of four NH3 (3, 3) masers in the NGC 6334 star formation region. The masers are found in two of the seven far-infrared continuum sources where high-mass star formation is taking place in this molecular cloud. These masers occur at the ends of high-velocity molecular outflows; no maser emission was found near regions without high-velocity outflows. The NH3 masers are not associated with any other type of maser. These results confirm that the NH3 (3, 3) masers are caused by shocks and probably mark the location where the molecular outflow jet impinges upon the ambient medium.

  10. New Approaches in SiO Maser Shell Tomography Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, R. B.; Boboltz, D. A.; Winter, L. A.; Straughn, A. H.

    2003-12-01

    Silicon Monoxide (SiO) masers form at a few stellar radii in the extended atmospheres of evolved stars, the innermost of the commonly seen stellar maser species. As compact, high brightness-temperature regions that lie inside the dust forming radius, SiO masers as imaged by mm-wavelength Very Long Baseline Interferometry (mm-VLBI) have frequently been cited as probes of physical conditions at the photosphere-wind boundary. Current SiO maser studies exploit the remarkable resolution of mm-VLBI and the responsiveness and fast duty cycles of the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) to make images in multiple transitions of SiO. Yet VLBI leaves the observer with a disjointed set of images, with the different excitation transitions generally not registered, even within the same epoch. We have explored and applied a variety of techniques intended for unbiased extraction of physical data from SiO maser images, and explain for two red giant case studies how simple mathematical approaches can register transitions and epochs and extract apparent maser proper motions from VLBA data. In the case of Mira (o Ceti), we fit proper motions and attempt to register the sparse shells of v=1 and v=2 7mm masers. For R Cas, we register the two bright 7mm maser shells plus the v=1 3mm maser shell, and make the case for the passage of a pulsation shock re-invigorating the 3mm masers. This research was part of the Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program at Haystack, with additional development carried out under Haystack's mission in mm-VLBI techniques. The REU program and mm-VLBI at Haystack are sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

  11. Closed-form inverse kinematics for intra-operative mobile C-arm positioning with six degrees of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lejing; Zou, Rui; Weidert, Simon; Landes, Juergen; Euler, Ekkehard; Burschka, Darius; Navab, Nassir

    2011-03-01

    For trauma and orthopedic surgery, maneuvering a mobile C-arm X-ray device into a desired position in order to acquire the right picture is a routine task. The precision and ease of use of the C-arm positioning becomes even more important for more advanced imaging techniques as parallax-free X-ray image stitching, for example. Standard mobile C-arms have only five degrees of freedom (DOF), which definitely restricts their motions that have six DOF in 3D Cartesian space. We have proposed a method to model the kinematics of the mobile Carm and operating table as an integrated 6DOF C-arm X-ray imaging system.1 This enables mobile C-arms to be positioned relative to the patient's table with six DOF in 3D Cartesian space. Moving mobile C-arms to a desired position and orientation requires finding the necessary joint values, which is an inverse kinematics problem. In this paper, we present closed-form solutions, i.e. analytic expressions, obtained in an algebraic way for the inverse kinematics problem of the 6DOF C-arm model. In addition, we implement a 6DOF C-arm system for interactively radiation-free C-arm positioning based on a continuous guidance from C-arm pose estimation. For this we employ a visual marker pattern attached under the operating table and a mobile C-arm system augmented by a video camera and mirror construction. In our experiment, repositioning C-arm to a pre-defined pose in a phantom study demonstrates the practicality and accuracy of our developed 6DOF C-arm system.

  12. A C-arm calibration method with application to fluoroscopic image-guided procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Lav; Gibbs, Jason D.; Wibowo, Henky

    2012-02-01

    C-arm fluoroscopy units provide continuously updating X-ray video images during surgical procedure. The modality is widely adopted for its low cost, real-time imaging capabilities, and its ability to display radio-opaque tools in the anatomy. It is, however, important to correct for fluoroscopic image distortion and estimate camera parameters, such as focal length and camera center, for registration with 3D CT scans in fluoroscopic imageguided procedures. This paper describes a method for C-arm calibration and evaluates its accuracy in multiple C-arm units and in different viewing orientations. The proposed calibration method employs a commerciallyavailable unit to track the C-arm and a calibration plate. The method estimates both the internal calibration parameters and the transformation between the coordinate systems of tracker and C-arm. The method was successfully tested on two C-arm units (GE OEC 9800 and GE OEC 9800 Plus) of different image intensifier sizes and verified with a rigid airway phantom model. The mean distortion-model error was found to be 0.14 mm and 0.17 mm for the respective C-arms. The mean overall system reprojection error (which measures the accuracy of predicting an image using tracker coordinates) was found to be 0.63 mm for the GE OEC 9800.

  13. New Maser Emission from Nonmetastable Ammonia in NGC 7538. IV. Coincident Masers in Adjacent States of Para-ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Ian M.; Joyce, Spenser A.

    2014-02-01

    We present the first detection of para-ammonia masers in NGC 7538: multiple epochs of observation of the 14NH3 (J, K) = (10, 8) and (9,8) lines. We detect both thermal absorption and nonthermal emission in the (10,8) and (9,8) transitions and the absence of a maser in the (11,8) transition. The (9,8) maser is observed to increase in intensity by 40% over six months. Using interferometric observations with a synthesized beam of 0.''25, we find that the (10,8) and (9,8) masers originate at the same sky position near IRS 1. With strong evidence that the (10,8) and (9,8) masers arise in the same volume, we discuss the application of pumping models for the simultaneous excitation of nonmetastable (J > K) para-ammonia states having the same value of K and consecutive values of J. We also present detections of thermal absorption in rotational states ranging in energy from E/kB ~ 200 K to 2000 K, and several non-detections in higher-energy states. In particular, we describe the populations in eight adjacent rotational states with K = 6, including two maser transitions, along with the implications for ortho-ammonia pumping models. An existing torus model for molecular gas in the environment of IRS 1 has been applied to the masers; a variety of maser species are shown to agree with the model. Historical and new interferometric observations of 15NH3 (3,3) masers in the region indicate a precession of the rotating torus at a rate comparable to continuum-emission-based models of the region. We discuss the general necessity of interferometric observations for diagnosing the excitation state of the masers and for determining the geometry of the molecular environment.

  14. New maser emission from nonmetastable ammonia in NGC 7538. IV. Coincident masers in adjacent states of para-ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Ian M.; Joyce, Spenser A.

    2014-02-20

    We present the first detection of para-ammonia masers in NGC 7538: multiple epochs of observation of the {sup 14}NH{sub 3} (J, K) = (10, 8) and (9,8) lines. We detect both thermal absorption and nonthermal emission in the (10,8) and (9,8) transitions and the absence of a maser in the (11,8) transition. The (9,8) maser is observed to increase in intensity by 40% over six months. Using interferometric observations with a synthesized beam of 0.''25, we find that the (10,8) and (9,8) masers originate at the same sky position near IRS 1. With strong evidence that the (10,8) and (9,8) masers arise in the same volume, we discuss the application of pumping models for the simultaneous excitation of nonmetastable (J > K) para-ammonia states having the same value of K and consecutive values of J. We also present detections of thermal absorption in rotational states ranging in energy from E/k{sub B} ∼ 200 K to 2000 K, and several non-detections in higher-energy states. In particular, we describe the populations in eight adjacent rotational states with K = 6, including two maser transitions, along with the implications for ortho-ammonia pumping models. An existing torus model for molecular gas in the environment of IRS 1 has been applied to the masers; a variety of maser species are shown to agree with the model. Historical and new interferometric observations of {sup 15}NH{sub 3} (3,3) masers in the region indicate a precession of the rotating torus at a rate comparable to continuum-emission-based models of the region. We discuss the general necessity of interferometric observations for diagnosing the excitation state of the masers and for determining the geometry of the molecular environment.

  15. Interventional C-arm tomosynthesis for vascular imaging: initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langan, David A.; Claus, Bernhard E. H.; Al Assad, Omar; Trousset, Yves; Riddell, Cyril; Avignon, Gregoire; Solomon, Stephen B.; Lai, Hao; Wang, Xin

    2015-03-01

    As percutaneous endovascular procedures address more complex and broader disease states, there is an increasing need for intra-procedure 3D vascular imaging. In this paper, we investigate C-Arm 2-axis tomosynthesis ("Tomo") as an alternative to C-Arm Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) for workflow situations in which the CBCT acquisition may be inconvenient or prohibited. We report on our experience in performing tomosynthesis acquisitions with a digital angiographic imaging system (GE Healthcare Innova 4100 Angiographic Imaging System, Milwaukee, WI). During a tomo acquisition the detector and tube each orbit on a plane above and below the table respectively. The tomo orbit may be circular or elliptical, and the tomographic half-angle in our studies varied from approximately 16 to 28 degrees as a function of orbit period. The trajectory, geometric calibration, and gantry performance are presented. We overview a multi-resolution iterative reconstruction employing compressed sensing techniques to mitigate artifacts associated with incomplete data reconstructions. In this work, we focus on the reconstruction of small high contrast objects such as iodinated vasculature and interventional devices. We evaluate the overall performance of the acquisition and reconstruction through phantom acquisitions and a swine study. Both tomo and comparable CBCT acquisitions were performed during the swine study thereby enabling the use of CBCT as a reference in the evaluation of tomo vascular imaging. We close with a discussion of potential clinical applications for tomo, reflecting on the imaging and workflow results achieved.

  16. High frequency CARM driver for rf linacs. Final report, September 15, 1989--March 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Danly, B.G.

    1993-09-23

    This CARM program has successfully demonstrated the first ever long-pulse CARM oscillator operation; these results demonstrate the potential of CARMs as an alternative source of millimeter waves to the gyrotron for ECRH plasma heating. The result of 1.8 MW at 27.8 GHz and 0.5 {mu}s pulse width in the TE{sub 11} mode represent a clear demonstration of the capabilities of the CARM oscillator for the production of high powers with large frequency upshift. It is hoped that this successful proof-of-principle demonstration.will lead to further development of the CARM as an ECRH source by the DOE Office of Fusion Energy, Development and Technology Division. This success is a direct outcome of this support of the Advanced Energy Projects Office of DOE in the form of this program. The CARM amplifier component of the program, although unsuccessful at obtaining CARM amplifier operation at 17 GHz, has succeeded by furthering the understanding of the limitations and difficulties that lie ahead for continued CARM amplifier development. The amplifier component of the program has successfully demonstrated a high power second and third harmonic gyro-TWT amplifier. Up to 5 MW of power at 17.1 GHz and >50dB gain have been obtained. These results should be viewed as an important contribution of this program to the development of viable microwave sources for powering the next linear collider. Indeed, the present gyro-amplifier, which resulted from this program, is presently being used in ongoing high-gradient accelerator research at MIT under a DOE High Energy Physics grant. As a result of both the oscillator and amplifier advances made during this program, the CARM and harmonic gyro-TWT have reached a significantly more mature level; their future role in specific applications of benefit to DOEs OFE and HEP offices may now be pursued.

  17. The turbulent bremsstrahlung (plasma-maser) effect

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimirov, S. V.

    2011-01-04

    Because of nonlinear interaction between particles and waves, energy conversion between waves of large frequency difference can occur without particle population inversion or resonant wave-wave interaction. The effect involves the nonresonant interaction of the plasma particles with a pair of plasma modes of large frequency difference, and wave energy is converted into particle energy. This effect can appear in laboratory as well as astrophysical plasmas and is important in determining the transport properties of weakly turbulent plasmas. Here, the most important aspects of the plasma-maser theory is discussed.

  18. Traveling-Wave Maser for 32 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shell, James; Clauss, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The figure depicts a traveling-wave ruby maser that has been designed (though not yet implemented in hardware) to serve as a low-noise amplifier for reception of weak radio signals in the frequency band of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz. The design offers significant improvements over previous designs of 32-GHz traveling-wave masers. In addition, relative to prior designs of 32-GHz amplifiers based on high-electron-mobility transistors, this design affords higher immunity to radio-frequency interference and lower equivalent input noise temperature. In addition to the basic frequency-band and low-noise requirements, the initial design problem included a requirement for capability of operation in a closed-cycle helium refrigerator at a temperature .4 K and a requirement that the design be mechanically simplified, relative to prior designs, in order to minimize the cost of fabrication and assembly. Previous attempts to build 32- GHz traveling-wave masers involved the use of metallic slow-wave structures comprising coupled transverse electromagnetic (TEM)-mode resonators that were subject to very tight tolerances and, hence, were expensive to fabricate and assemble. Impedance matching for coupling signals into and out of these earlier masers was very difficult. A key feature of the design is a slow-wave structure, the metallic portions of which would be mechanically relatively simple in that, unlike in prior slow-wave structures, there would be no internal metal steps, irises, or posts. The metallic portions of the slow-wave structure would consist only of two rectangular metal waveguide arms. The arms would contain sections filled with the active material (ruby) alternating with evanescent-wave sections. This structure would be transparent in both the signal-frequency band (the aforementioned range of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz) and the pump-frequency band (65.75 to 66.75 GHz), and would impose large slowing factors in both frequency bands. Resonant ferrite isolators would be placed in the

  19. Extragalactic Water Maser Observations with VSOP-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Y.; VSOP-2 Science Working Group

    2009-08-01

    Space-VLBI is known to achieve greatly increased angular resolution compared with ground-based VLBI observations. VSOP-2 will offer 75 μarcsec angular resolution at 22 GHz. With this improved angular resolution, VSOP-2 observations of H_2O megamaser will refine the measurements of proper motions, accelerations, distances to galaxies, and other physical parameters of galactic nuclei. In this presentation, the prospects of VSOP-2 observations of extragalactic H_2O maser with strong emphasis on H_2O megamaser are presented.

  20. Block 2A traveling-wave maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trowbridge, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    Two 8.4GHz low-noise traveling-wave masers (TWMS) with effective input noise temperatures of 3.6 to 3.9 K and bandwidth in excess of 100 MHz have been supplied to the Deep Space Network. These TWMs are used on the 64-meter antennas at Deep Space Stations 14 and 43 to meet the requirements of the Voyager Uranus encounter. The TWMs have improved isolator assemblies and new interstage matching configurations to reduce gain/bandwidth ripple. They are equipped with followup Field Effect Transistor Amplifiers as part of the design to meet the 100-MHz bandwidth requirements of very long baseline interferometry.

  1. S Persei: Optical and water maser variability - 1984 to 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little-Marenin, I. R.; Benson, P. J.; Mcconahay, M. M.; Cadmus, R. R., Jr.; Stencel, R. E.; Eriksson, K.

    1991-01-01

    The M supergiant S Persei was monitored since 1984 optically and since 1987 for water maser emission at 22 GHz. The dozen H2O maser features show complex variations in intensity with many of the features varying independently of one another. Some of the water maser features brightened dramatically at the time of the bright optical maximum observed in 1988 August and again 10 weeks later. It is possible the increase in water maser intensity is related to the ejection of a dust shell near the time of the preceding optical minimum. The intensity variations of the maser spectrum as being produced by an asymmetric distribution of maser spots are interpreted. A double shell of maser spots may be present on the near side of the shell, but appears to be lacking or be occulted on the far side. No chromospheric activity was detected about 10 weeks after optical maximum. A well developed shock is seen in a near-infrared spectrum obtained in 1988 October.

  2. Instabilities and the transport of polarized astrophysical maser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallin, Bradley K.; Watson, William D.

    1995-01-01

    Time-dependent, radiative instabilities in the creation and transport of polarized astrophysical maser radiation in the presence of a magnetic field are calculated. The instabilities are similar to and occur under the same conditions as those found previously by Scappaticci & Watson for unpolarized maser radiation. The common limits in which the Zeeman splitting is much greater than, and much less than, the spectral line breadths are both considered in the current investigation. The resulting fluctuations in the emergent radiation are potentially relevant for the OH 1665 MHz masers which have been reported to fluctuate on timescales of 1000 s and which tend to be polarized. Instabilities occur and alter the transport of maser radiation only under a quite limited range of conditions. In particular, we find here that the instabilities do not occur for conditions that are appropriate for astrophysical masers with small Zeeman splittings such as the SiO and H2O masers. The time-independent, numerical solutions to the GKK equations of radiative transfer that have been obtained in previous investigations are thus essentially always valid except within a narrow range of conditions relevant for the OH masers.

  3. Radiative instabilities and 1000 second fluctuations in astrophysical masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scappaticci, Gerardo A.; Watson, William D.

    1992-01-01

    A stability analysis for small (linear) perturbations is presented for the radiation in astrophysical masers treated in the usual, linear maser approximation. Instabilities that oscillate with a period of about L/c, where L is the length of the maser are found. They occur (1) when the maser is partly but not heavily saturated, (2) when the decay rate Gamma for the molecular states is near c/L, and (3) when the product of the brightness temperature T sub 0 of the incident radiation and the angle for the beaming is less than a critical value that depends upon the particular masing transition. A fourth parameter, the fractional inversion in the pumping multiplied by (T sub 0/frequency), determines the importance of spontaneous emission which can eliminate the instabilities. These instabilities are a likely cause for the fluctuations in the radiation from the 18 cm OH masers that have been reported to occur on time scales as short as 1000 s. The calculations are applicable to other types of astrophysical masers as well, and suggest that spontaneous emission will prevent similar instabilities in the H2O and SiO masers.

  4. New Observations Deepen Mystery Surrounding Water Masers in Elliptical Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    New observations with the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope have deepened the mystery surrounding water molecules in a galaxy 65 million light- years away. The water molecules are acting as natural masers -- amplifiers of microwave radio emissions -- and these cosmic masers within the galaxy NGC 1052 are raising difficult questions for astronomers trying to explain them. Results of the new observations, which pinpoint the location of water masers in NGC 1052, were announced today at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Toronto, Ontario. The researchers are: Jim Braatz of Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Mark Claussen and Phil Diamond of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Socorro, New Mexico, Andrew Wilson of the University of Maryland in College Park, Maryland, and Christian Henkel of the Max Planck Institute fur Radioastronomie in Bonn, Germany. Water masers have been detected in several other galaxies. However, most galaxies containing water "megamasers" such as those in NGC 1052 are spiral galaxies. NGC 1052 is one of only two elliptical galaxies in which water megamasers have been detected. Because ellipticals tend to have much less gas and dust than spirals, the existence of the water masers in NGC 1052 is surprising by itself, though that galaxy does have more gas and dust than the typical elliptical. Located in the constellation Cetus, NGC 1052 also has an active nucleus, believed to be powered by the gravitational energy of a supermassive black hole at its core. The new VLBA observations produced an additional mystery. In other galaxies with water megamasers, the masers are believed to lie within a disk of molecules orbiting the galaxy's central black hole. This is the case, for example, in the now-famous galaxy NGC 4258, where the movement of the orbiting disk can be traced by measuring both the Doppler shift of radio emission from the masers and by tracking the motion of

  5. S Persei: Optical and water maser variability - 1984 to 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little-Marenin, I. R.; Benson, P. J.; Mcconahay, M. M.; Cadmus, R. R., Jr.; Stencel, R. E.; Eriksson, K.

    1991-01-01

    The M supergiant S Persei was monitored since 1984 optically and since 1987 for water maser emission at 22 GHz. The dozen H2O maser features show complex variations in intensity with many of the features varying independently of one another. Some of the water maser features brightened dramatically at the time of the bright optical maximum observed in 1988 August and again 10 weeks later. It is possible the increase in water maser intensity is related to the ejection of a dust shell near the time of the preceding optical minimum. The intensity variations of the maser spectrum as being produced by an asymmetric distribution of maser spots are interpreted. A double shell of maser spots may be present on the near side of the shell, but appears to be lacking or be occulted on the far side. No chromospheric activity was detected about 10 weeks after optical maximum. A well developed shock is seen in a near-infrared spectrum obtained in 1988 October.

  6. Research on the Frequency Steering Strategy of a Hydrogen Maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Dong-shan; Zhao, Shu-hong; Gao, Yu-ping

    2017-07-01

    In the master clock system, the local standard time UTC(k) with a better short-term stability will be generated, if the hydrogen maser is set as a frequency source of the master clock. But the hydrogen maser always exhibits an apparent frequency drift, thus its long-term stability gets poor with the time, therefore the stability and accuracy of UTC(k) become worse. To solve this problem, the performance of hydrogen maser is compared with cesium clocks, and the time scale algorithm is modified when the hydrogen maser is involved, a new steering strategy is proposed when a hydrogen maser is used as the frequency source of the master clock. An experimental system is set up with the programs compiled, and finally the new steering strategy is testified with the laboratory data. The results show that when the hydrogen maser is involved in the atomic time scale calculation, the short-term frequency stability of the reference time scale will be improved. Meanwhile, the local time UTC(k) has a better short-term frequency stability when the frequency source of the master clock uses a hydrogen maser instead of a cesium clock.

  7. THE ENVIRONMENT OF THE STRONGEST GALACTIC METHANOL MASER

    SciTech Connect

    Sanna, A.; Menten, K. M.; Carrasco-González, C.; Brunthaler, A.; Reid, M. J.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Krishnan, V.; Moscadelli, L.; Cesaroni, R.

    2015-05-01

    The high-mass star-forming site G009.62+00.20 E hosts the 6.7 GHz methanol maser source with the greatest flux density in the Galaxy which has been flaring periodically over the last 10 yr. We performed high-resolution astrometric measurements of the CH{sub 3}OH, H{sub 2}O, and OH maser emission and 7 mm continuum in the region. The radio continuum emission was resolved in two sources separated by 1300 AU. The CH{sub 3}OH maser cloudlets are distributed along two north–south ridges of emission to the east and west of the strongest radio continuum component. This component likely pinpoints a massive young stellar object which heats up its dusty envelope, providing a constant IR pumping for the Class II CH{sub 3}OH maser transitions. We suggest that the periodic maser activity may be accounted for by an independent, pulsating, IR radiation field provided by a bloated protostar in the vicinity of the brightest masers. We also report the discovery of an elliptical distribution of CH{sub 3}OH maser emission in the region of periodic variability.

  8. Research on the Steering Strategy for Hydrogen Maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, D. S.; Zhao, S. H.; Gao, Y. P.

    2016-07-01

    In the master clock system, the local standard time UTC(k) with a better short-term stability will be generated, if the hydrogen maser is set as a frequency source of the master clock. But the hydrogen maser always exhibits an apparent frequency drift, thus its long-term stability gets poor with time, therefore the stability and accuracy of UTC(k) become worse. To solve this problem, we compare the performance of hydrogen maser with cesium clocks, and modify the time scale algorithm when the hydrogen maser is involved, we also propose a new steering strategy when hydrogen maser is used as the frequency source of master clock. We set up an experiment system and write programs, and finally the new steering strategy is testified with the laboratory data. Results show that when the hydrogen maser is involved in the atomic time scale calculation, the short-term frequency stability of reference time scale will be improved. Meanwhile, the local time UTC(k) has a better short-term frequency stability when the frequency source of the master clock uses hydrogen maser instead of cesium clock.

  9. Discovery of four water masers in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breen, S. L.; Lovell, J. E. J.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Horiuchi, S.; Beasley, A. J.; Marvel, K.

    2013-06-01

    We report the detection of four water masers within the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC): two discovered with the 70-m Tidbinbilla radio telescope, and two discovered with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). Precise positions of all four masers have been derived from ATCA observations, and the characteristics of each water maser have been monitored over a period of several years. Sensitive observations towards two previously detected water masers reported in the literature failed to detect any emission. The detected water masers show evidence of higher levels of temporal variability than equivalent Galactic sources, and one of the features associated with NGC 346 IR1 shows an acceleration of 9.6 km s-1 yr-1 over a 31 d period. Sensitive targeted observations for methanol and OH masers failed to detect any accompanying emission - in the case of methanol perhaps highlighting an under abundance in the SMC, consistent with expectations due to lower metallicity. The water masers are both bright and compact making them excellent targets for Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations, which can potentially measure the proper motion of the SMC (˜1-2 mas yr-1) with temporal baselines of ˜12 months. Such observations would utilize sources associated with only the current epoch of star formation and hence have several advantages over alternative methods.

  10. WATER MASERS ASSOCIATED WITH STAR FORMATION IN THE ANTENNAE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Brogan, Crystal; Johnson, Kelsey; Darling, Jeremy

    2010-06-10

    We present Very Large Array (VLA) observations with 80 mas resolution ({approx}9 pc) of the recently discovered Galactic-analog (GA)-H{sub 2}O masers in the Antennae interacting galaxies (NGC 4038/NGC 4039; Arp244). Three regions of water maser emission are detected: two in the 'interaction region' (IAR) and the third {approx}5.''6 ({approx_gt}600 pc) west of the NGC 4039 nucleus. The isotropic H{sub 2}O maser luminosities range from 1.3 to 7.7 L{sub sun}. All three maser regions are mostly obscured in the optical/near-infrared continuum, and are coincident with massive CO-identified molecular clouds. The H{sub 2}O maser velocities are in excellent agreement with those of the molecular gas. We also present archival VLA 3.6 cm data with {approx}0.''28 ({approx}30 pc) and {approx}0.''8 ({approx}90 pc) resolution toward the maser locations. All three maser regions are coincident with compact 3.6 cm radio continuum emission, and two are dominated by thermal ionized gas, suggesting the presence of natal super star clusters containing the equivalent of a few thousand O stars. We also present detailed comparisons between the radio data and existing Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (optical) and NICMOS (near-IR) data and find that both maser regions in the IAR are also associated with Pa{alpha} emission and neither source is detected shortward of 2 {mu}m. These results highlight the potential of using GA-H{sub 2}O masers to pinpoint sites of young super star cluster formation with exquisite angular resolution.

  11. The Revised Version of Class I Methanol Maser Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, G. M.; Litovchenko, I. D.; Val'tts, I. E.; Alakoz, A. V.

    2011-05-01

    The revised version of the class I methanol maser catalog is presented. It contains 198 sources in total. New class I methanol masers detected in the direction of EGOs (38 sources) were added to the previous list containing ˜ 160 sources (the list have been published in the first version of this catalog - see reference in the text). Electronic version of the catalog has been generated in the form of html file - http://www.asc.rssi.ru/MMI. A statistical analysis was carried out within 2' around a maser position to find an identification of class I methanol masers with any objects typical for star-forming regions - UCHII regions, IRAS sources, dark clouds, bipolar outflows, CS lines as of dense gas tracer, and other masers (class II methanol masers, OH and H_2O). Class I methanol masers identification was made with short-wave infrared objects EGO (extended green objects), which are tracers of bipolar outflows in young stellar objects. It was shown that in the new version of catalog more than 50% of class I methanol masers are identified with bipolar outflow - given EGOs as bipolar outflows (compared with the result of 22% in the first version of the catalog that contains no information about EGO). This result is a strong evidence in favor of the fact that EGOs are indeed active bipolar outflows. At the same time it is important to note, that none of the bipolar outflow, already registered in the direction of class I methanol maser, did not coincide with EGO (with the exception of G45.47+0.07). The results are submitted in a form of a diagram.

  12. Water maser emission in the Saturnian system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Shinji; Cimo, Giuseppe; Gurvits, Leonid; Pogrebenko, Sergei; Molera Calves, Guifré

    2010-10-01

    Prompted by the recent discovery of a water vapour plume of Enceladus by the Cassini spacecraft, our team started an observational programme to search for possible 22 GHz water vapour maser emission associated with different objects in the Kronian system. The observations have been conducted so far with the 32 m Medicina radio telescope (INAF-IRA, Italy) and the 14 m Metsahovi radio telescope (Aalto University, MRO, Finland). During the 2006-2008 campaigns, more than 300 hours of data have been analysed, and initial results including maser detections up to 7.0 sigma level have been presented. The detections attracted considerable interest and attempts to confirm them and investigate the phenomenon in depth. No confirmations have been published so far. In order to provide critical verification of these detections and study the details of masing conditions efficiently, we request a total of 20 hours on the Tidbinbilla 70 m telescope (DSS43) to observe Saturn and its moons during several, non-consecutive days. Due to natural changes of the planetary target positions, targets' coordinates will be provided after the antenna time is allocated.

  13. Loss cone-driven cyclotron maser instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Yun; Yi, Sibaek; Lim, Dayeh; Kim, Hee-Eun; Seough, Jungjoon; Yoon, Peter H.

    2013-11-01

    The weakly (or mildly) relativistic cyclotron maser instability has been successfully applied to explain the Earth's auroral kilometric radiation and other radio sources in nature and laboratory. Among the most important physical parameters that determine the instability criteria is the ratio of plasma-to-electron cyclotron frequencies, ωp/Ω. It is therefore instructive to consider how the normalized maximum growth rate, γmax/Ω, varies as a function of ωp/Ω. Although many authors have already discussed this problem, in order to complete the analysis, one must also understand how the radiation emission angle corresponding to the maximum growth, θmax, scales with ωp/Ω, since the propagation angle determines the radiation beaming pattern. Also, the behavior of the frequency corresponding to the maximum growth rate at each harmonic, (ωmax-sΩ)/Ω, where s=1,2,3,ċ , as a function of ωp/Ωis of importance for a complete understanding of the maser excitation. The present paper computes these additional quantities for the first time, making use of a model loss cone electron distribution function.

  14. In orbit demonstration of a H-maser clock system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busca, Giovanni; Bernier, Laurent-Guy; Starker, Siegfried K.; Feltham, S.

    1992-01-01

    The ESA/NASA technology demonstration flight of a pair of hydrogen masers on the EURECA 3 mission is planned for 1998. The ESA part of the experiment will have a maser built by Neuchatel Observatory and a microwave time and frequency transfer system derived from the existing Precise Range and Range Rate Equipment (PRARE) system. The NASA part of the experiment will have a maser built by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and a laser time transfer system. The technology demonstration experiment is described with its expected outcomes and applications.

  15. Origin of Observed Periodic Components in Astrophysical Masers' Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siparov, S.; Samodurov, V.; Laptev, G.

    2017-01-01

    Further analysis of data previously obtained during the monitoring observations of 49 astrophysical water (22 GHz) masers shows that in some cases the intensity of an individual component of the maser spectrum changes periodically, on timescales of tens of minutes. It is argued that this variation cannot be the effect of instrumental errors, weather conditions or interstellar medium instabilities, because only a single feature of the maser spectrum fluctuates but not the whole spectrum. The suggested interpretation of this effect is based on the optic-metrical parametric resonance produced by gravitational radiation emitted by short-period binary stars, with the examples of such binaries sufficing the conditions given.

  16. Unbiased water and methanol maser surveys of NGC 1333

    SciTech Connect

    Lyo, A-Ran; Kim, Jongsoo; Byun, Do-Young; Lee, Ho-Gyu

    2014-11-01

    We present the results of unbiased 22 GHz H{sub 2}O water and 44 GHz class I CH{sub 3}OH methanol maser surveys in the central 7' × 10' area of NGC 1333 and two additional mapping observations of a 22 GHz water maser in a ∼3' × 3' area of the IRAS4A region. In the 22 GHz water maser survey of NGC 1333 with a sensitivity of σ ∼ 0.3 Jy, we confirmed the detection of masers toward H{sub 2}O(B) in the region of HH 7-11 and IRAS4B. We also detected new water masers located ∼20'' away in the western direction of IRAS4B or ∼25'' away in the southern direction of IRAS4A. We could not, however, find young stellar objects or molecular outflows associated with them. They showed two different velocity components of ∼0 and ∼16 km s{sup –1}, which are blue- and redshifted relative to the adopted systemic velocity of ∼7 km s{sup –1} for NGC 1333. They also showed time variabilities in both intensity and velocity from multi-epoch observations and an anti-correlation between the intensities of the blue- and redshifted velocity components. We suggest that the unidentified power source of these masers might be found in the earliest evolutionary stage of star formation, before the onset of molecular outflows. Finding this kind of water maser is only possible through an unbiased blind survey. In the 44 GHz methanol maser survey with a sensitivity of σ ∼ 0.5 Jy, we confirmed masers toward IRAS4A2 and the eastern shock region of IRAS2A. Both sources are also detected in 95 and 132 GHz methanol maser lines. In addition, we had new detections of methanol masers at 95 and 132 GHz toward IRAS4B. In terms of the isotropic luminosity, we detected methanol maser sources brighter than ∼5 × 10{sup 25} erg s{sup –1} from our unbiased survey.

  17. In orbit demonstration of a H-maser clock system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busca, Giovanni; Bernier, Laurent-Guy; Starker, Siegfried K.; Feltham, S.

    1992-07-01

    The ESA/NASA technology demonstration flight of a pair of hydrogen masers on the EURECA 3 mission is planned for 1998. The ESA part of the experiment will have a maser built by Neuchatel Observatory and a microwave time and frequency transfer system derived from the existing Precise Range and Range Rate Equipment (PRARE) system. The NASA part of the experiment will have a maser built by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and a laser time transfer system. The technology demonstration experiment is described with its expected outcomes and applications.

  18. Simultaneous Observatinos of H2O and SiO Masers Toward Known Extragalactic Water Maser Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Se-Hyung; Yoon, Dong-Hwan; Kim, Jaeheon; Byun, Do-Young; Wagner, Jan

    2015-12-01

    We observe ten known 22 GHz H_{2}O maser galaxies during February 19-22, 2011 using the 21 m Tamna telescope of the Korean VLBI Network and a new wide-band digital spectrometer. Simultaneously we searched for 43 GHz SiO v = 1, 2, J = 1-0 maser emission. We detect H_{2}O maser emission towards five sources (M 33, NGC 1052, NGC 1068, NGC 4258, M 82), with non-detections towards the remaining sources (UGC 3193, UGC 3789, Antennae H_{2}O-West, M 51, NGC 6323) likely due to sensitivity. Our 22 GHz spectra are consistent with earlier findings. Our simultaneous 43 GHz SiO maser search produced non-detections, yielding - for the first time - upper limits on the 43 GHz SiO maser emission in these sources at a 3 σ sensitivity level of 0.018 K-0.033 K (0.24 Jy-0.44 Jy) in a 1.75 km s^{-1} velocity resolution. Our findings suggest that any 43 GHz SiO masers in these sources (some having starburst-associated H_{2}O kilomasers) must be faint compared to the 22 GHz H_{2}O maser emission.

  19. The electron-cyclotron maser for astrophysical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treumann, Rudolf A.

    2006-08-01

    The electron-cyclotron maser is a process that generates coherent radiation from plasma. In the last two decades, it has gained increasing attention as a dominant mechanism of producing high-power radiation in natural high-temperature magnetized plasmas. Originally proposed as a somewhat exotic idea and subsequently applied to include non-relativistic plasmas, the electron-cyclotron maser was considered as an alternative to turbulent though coherent wave-wave interaction which results in radio emission. However, when it was recognized that weak relativistic corrections had to be taken into account in the radiation process, the importance of the electron-cyclotron maser rose to the recognition it deserves. Here we review the theory and application of the electron-cyclotron maser to the directly accessible plasmas in our immediate terrestrial and planetary environments. In situ access to the radiating plasmas has turned out to be crucial in identifying the conditions under which the electron-cyclotron maser mechanism is working. Under extreme astrophysical conditions, radiation from plasmas may provide a major energy loss; however, for generating the powerful radiation in which the electron-cyclotron maser mechanism is capable, the plasma must be in a state where release of susceptible amounts of energy in the form of radiation is favorable. Such conditions are realized when the plasma is unable to digest the available free energy that is imposed from outside and stored in its particle distribution. The lack of dissipative processes is a common property of collisionless plasmas. When, in addition, the plasma density becomes so low that the amount of free energy per particle is large, direct emission becomes favorable. This can be expressed as negative absorption of the plasma which, like in conventional masers, leads to coherent emission even though no quantum correlations are involved. The physical basis of this formal analogy between a quantum maser and the

  20. The 6-GHz multibeam maser survey - II. Statistical analysis and Galactic distribution of 6668-MHz methanol masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. A.; Breen, S. L.; Fuller, G. A.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Voronkov, M. A.; Avison, A.; Brooks, K.; Burton, M. G.; Chrysostomou, A.; Cox, J.; Diamond, P. J.; Gray, M. D.; Hoare, M. G.; Masheder, M. R. W.; Pestalozzi, M.; Phillips, C.; Quinn, L. J.; Richards, A. M. S.; Thompson, M. A.; Walsh, A. J.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Wong-McSweeney, D.; Yates, J. A.

    2017-08-01

    The Methanol Multibeam survey has produced the largest and most complete census of methanol and excited-state hydroxyl masers in the Galaxy to date. Observing the entire Galactic plane visible from the Southern hemisphere for 6668-MHz methanol and 6030/6035-MHz hydroxyl masers, to an rms sensitivity of 0.015 Jy km s-1, the survey has detected a total of 972 methanol maser sources, implying a total Galactic population of ˜1290 sources with flux densities above the survey 3σ peak flux density limit of 0.51 Jy. We present here the statistical properties of the methanol detections of the survey, including distributions in flux density, variability and range of source velocities. The data suggest that the weaker masers exhibit greater variability. We also present an analysis of the Galactic distribution of 6668-MHz methanol masers. For the Galactic distribution, we present kinematic distance resolutions to an additional 202 sources to those published previously, and collate these with previous allocations, as well as exploring a recent Bayesian distance approach based on maser parallaxes to separately determine distances. We examine Galactic structure and determine the luminosity function of the Galactic population of methanol masers. We find that more luminous masers have an evenly distributed wide range of velocity widths compared with less luminous masers being dominated by narrow velocity ranges, with the implication that this may be tied to the evolution of the host protostar(s). We also see an indication that brighter sources are seen towards the arm origins.

  1. Detection of water masers toward young stellar objects in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Johanson, A. K.; Migenes, V.; Breen, S. L.

    2014-02-01

    We present results from a search for water maser emission toward N4A, N190, and N206, three regions of massive star formation in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Four water masers were detected; two toward N4A, and two toward N190. In the latter region, no previously known maser emission has been reported. Future studies of maser proper motion to determine the galactic dynamics of the LMC will benefit from the independent data points the new masers in N190 provide. Two of these masers are associated with previously identified massive young stellar objects (YSOs), which strongly supports the authenticity of the classification. We argue that the other two masers identify previously unknown YSOs. No masers were detected toward N206, but it does host a newly discovered 22 GHz continuum source, also associated with a massive YSO. We suggest that future surveys for water maser emission in the LMC be targeted toward the more luminous, massive YSOs.

  2. High frequency CARM driver for RF LINACS. Progess report, year 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-30

    Progress during the second year of this program has been noteworthy in both theoretical and experimental areas. Two experiments on a CARM oscillator were performed and analysed. The first long-pulse operation of a CARM oscillator was carried out, with output powers of approximately 100 kW and operating efficiencies of approximately 2%. Much has been learned from the analysis of the first two experiments, and both the amplifier and oscillator experiments planned for the next year will benefit substantially from the knowledge gained during these oscillator experiments. We have installed and tested an new electron gun made by Thompson Tubes Electroniques of France. This gun has now operated at up to 580 kV on our modulator; use of this gun for the upcoming CARM experiments should result in a significant increase in performance due to a much better beam quality and the capability of operation at a much higher voltage. In the theoretical area, Year II has seen substantial improvements to the MIT CARM codes. The amplifier and oscillator codes have been successfully benchmarked against other codes, linear theory, aid experimental work. This includes the development of multimode CARM amplifier linear and nonlinear theory, the theory of harmonic CARMs, and the inclusion of TM modes in the nonlinear simulations. In addition, work this spring has centered on the effects of AC longitudinal space charge on CARM linear gain. CARM amplifier phase stability has been studied theoretically and found to be significantly better than that of free-electron lasers, relativistic klystrons, or gyroklystrons, provided the device is properly designed. Both multimode simulations and particle-in-cell simulations have been carried out to study mode competition effects between convectively unstable and absolutely unstable modes. Improvement of the Pierce-Wiggler code, named TRAJIK for modeling the beam formation prior to tie interaction region has been carried out.

  3. Mega-masers, Dark Energy and the Hubble Constant

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Fred K. Y.

    2007-10-15

    Powerful water maser emission (water mega-masers) can be found in accretion disks in the nuclei of some galaxies. Besides providing a measure of the mass at the nucleus, such mega-masers can be used to determine the distance to the host galaxy, based on a kinematic model. We will explain the importance of determining the Hubble Constant to high accuracy for constraining the equation of state of Dark Energy and describe the Mega-maser Cosmology Project that has the goal of determining the Hubble Constant to better than 3%. Time permitting, we will also present the scientific capabilities of the current and future NRAO facilities: ALMA, EVLA, VLBA and GBT, for addressing key astrophysical problems

  4. Spectra of circularly polarized radiation from astrophysical OH masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nedoluha, Gerald E.; Watson, William D.

    1990-01-01

    A striking feature of astrophysical masers is the tendency for either one or the other of the circular polarizations to dominate in the radiation from the strong, widely observed masing transitions of OH at 18 cm. Spectral line profiles are calculated for polarized maser radiation due to the combined effects of a velocity gradient and, as is indicated for these transitions, a Zeeman splitting that is at least comparable with the thermal contributions to the breadths of the spectral lines. The resulting spectral features are similar in appearance, including the presence of large net circular polarization and narrow line breadths, to the commonly observed spectra of OH masers in molecular clouds. The calculations presented here are performed as a function of frequency without making the approximations of a large velocity gradient. Rapid cross relaxation, which has been advocated by others for the OH masers, is assumed.

  5. Spectra of circularly polarized radiation from astrophysical OH masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nedoluha, Gerald E.; Watson, William D.

    1990-01-01

    A striking feature of astrophysical masers is the tendency for either one or the other of the circular polarizations to dominate in the radiation from the strong, widely observed masing transitions of OH at 18 cm. Spectral line profiles are calculated for polarized maser radiation due to the combined effects of a velocity gradient and, as is indicated for these transitions, a Zeeman splitting that is at least comparable with the thermal contributions to the breadths of the spectral lines. The resulting spectral features are similar in appearance, including the presence of large net circular polarization and narrow line breadths, to the commonly observed spectra of OH masers in molecular clouds. The calculations presented here are performed as a function of frequency without making the approximations of a large velocity gradient. Rapid cross relaxation, which has been advocated by others for the OH masers, is assumed.

  6. Planar H2O masers in star-forming regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elitzur, Moshe; Hollenbach, David J.; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1992-01-01

    The paper examines the planar geometry of shocked material, which is the key property in enabling the high brightness temperatures of H2O masers in star-forming regions. The brightness temperature, beaming angle, and the maser spot size are determined for thin, saturated planar masers under the assumption that the velocity change across the maser due to ordered motions is small compared with the thermal or microturbulent line width. For a given set of physical parameters, the brightness temperature is essentially fully determined by the length of the velocity-coherent region in the shocked plane along the line of sight. Effective aspect ratios (about 5-50) are found that are in agreement with values previously inferred from observed brightness temperatures.

  7. Atomic hydrogen maser active oscillator cavity and bulb design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.; Washburn, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    The performance characteristics and reliability of the active oscillator atomic hydrogen maser depend upon oscillation parameters which characterize the interaction region of the maser, the resonant cavity and atom storage bulb assembly. With particular attention to use of the cavity frequency switching servo (1) to reduce cavity pulling, it is important to maintain high oscillation level, high atomic beam flux utilization efficiency, small spin exchange parameter and high cavity quality factor. It is also desirable to have a small and rigid cavity and bulb structure and to minimize the cavity temperature sensitivity. Curves for a novel hydrogen maser cavity configuration which is partially loaded with a quartz dielectric cylinder and show the relationships between cavity length, cavity diameter, bulb size, dielectric thickness, cavity quality factor, filling factor and cavity frequency temperature coefficient are presented. The results are discussed in terms of improvement in maser performance resulting from particular design choices.

  8. Mega-masers, Dark Energy and the Hubble Constant

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Fred K.Y.

    2007-10-15

    Powerful water maser emission (water mega-masers) can be found in accretion disks in the nuclei of some galaxies. Besides providing a measure of the mass at the nucleus, such mega-masers can be used to determine the distance to the host galaxy, based on a kinematic model. We will explain the importance of determining the Hubble Constant to high accuracy for constraining the equation of state of Dark Energy and describe the Mega-maser Cosmology Project that has the goal of determining the Hubble Constant to better than 3%. Time permitting, we will also present the scientific capabilities of the current and future NRAO facilities: ALMA, EVLA, VLBA and GBT, for addressing key astrophysical problems

  9. Planar H2O masers in star-forming regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elitzur, Moshe; Hollenbach, David J.; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1992-01-01

    The paper examines the planar geometry of shocked material, which is the key property in enabling the high brightness temperatures of H2O masers in star-forming regions. The brightness temperature, beaming angle, and the maser spot size are determined for thin, saturated planar masers under the assumption that the velocity change across the maser due to ordered motions is small compared with the thermal or microturbulent line width. For a given set of physical parameters, the brightness temperature is essentially fully determined by the length of the velocity-coherent region in the shocked plane along the line of sight. Effective aspect ratios (about 5-50) are found that are in agreement with values previously inferred from observed brightness temperatures.

  10. AMPK-SKP2-CARM1 signalling cascade in transcriptional regulation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hi-Jai R; Kim, Hyunkyung; Oh, Sungryong; Lee, Jun-Gi; Kee, Minjung; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Kweon, Mi-Na; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Baek, Sung Hee

    2016-06-23

    Autophagy is a highly conserved self-digestion process, which is essential for maintaining homeostasis and viability in response to nutrient starvation. Although the components of autophagy in the cytoplasm have been well studied, the molecular basis for the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of autophagy is poorly understood. Here we identify co-activator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1) as a crucial component of autophagy in mammals. Notably, CARM1 stability is regulated by the SKP2-containing SCF (SKP1-cullin1-F-box protein) E3 ubiquitin ligase in the nucleus, but not in the cytoplasm, under nutrient-rich conditions. Furthermore, we show that nutrient starvation results in AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent phosphorylation of FOXO3a in the nucleus, which in turn transcriptionally represses SKP2. This repression leads to increased levels of CARM1 protein and subsequent increases in histone H3 Arg17 dimethylation. Genome-wide analyses reveal that CARM1 exerts transcriptional co-activator function on autophagy-related and lysosomal genes through transcription factor EB (TFEB). Our findings demonstrate that CARM1-dependent histone arginine methylation is a crucial nuclear event in autophagy, and identify a new signalling axis of AMPK-SKP2-CARM1 in the regulation of autophagy induction after nutrient starvation.

  11. Marker detection evaluation by phantom and cadaver experiments for C-arm pose estimation pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steger, Teena; Hoßbach, Martin; Wesarg, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    C-arm fluoroscopy is used for guidance during several clinical exams, e.g. in bronchoscopy to locate the bronchoscope inside the airways. Unfortunately, these images provide only 2D information. However, if the C-arm pose is known, it can be used to overlay the intrainterventional fluoroscopy images with 3D visualizations of airways, acquired from preinterventional CT images. Thus, the physician's view is enhanced and localization of the instrument at the correct position inside the bronchial tree is facilitated. We present a novel method for C-arm pose estimation introducing a marker-based pattern, which is placed on the patient table. The steel markers form a pattern, allowing to deduce the C-arm pose by use of the projective invariant cross-ratio. Simulations show that the C-arm pose estimation is reliable and accurate for translations inside an imaging area of 30 cm x 50 cm and rotations up to 30°. Mean error values are 0.33 mm in 3D space and 0.48 px in the 2D imaging plane. First tests on C-arm images resulted in similarly compelling accuracy values and high reliability in an imaging area of 30 cm x 42.5 cm. Even in the presence of interfering structures, tested both with anatomy phantoms and a turkey cadaver, high success rates over 90% and fully satisfying execution times below 4 sec for 1024 px × 1024 px images could be achieved.

  12. Timescale algorithms combining cesium clocks and hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breakiron, Lee A.

    1992-01-01

    The United States Naval Observatory (USNO) atomic timescale, formerly based on an ensemble of cesium clocks, is now produced by an ensemble of cesium clocks and hydrogen masers. In order to optimize stability and reliability, equal clock weighting has been replaced by a procedure reflecting the relative, time-varying noise characteristics of the two different types of clocks. Correlation of frequency drift is required, and residual drift is avoided by the eventual complete deweighting of the masers.

  13. On the line Q degradation in hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernier, L. G.; Busca, Giovanni; Schweda, Hartmut S.

    1990-01-01

    In hydrogen masers, the atomic resonance quality factor is largely determined by the properties of the Teflon coating on the quartz storage bulb. Normally a good Teflon coating will last many years. On the other hand, there may be a relatively fast degradation of the quality factor if the Teflon coating is bad. A series of observations and measurements performed on an hydrogen maser that had successively a bad and a good Teflon coating are discussed.

  14. Correlation of SiO maser flux with stellar flux

    SciTech Connect

    Cahn, J.H.

    1981-12-01

    A survey of available SiO maser observations of the 43.122-GHz, v = 1, J = 1..-->..0 transition has been made in order to further investigate the question of a correlation of maser flux with bolometric flux. This correlation has been shown to exist both for data which have been phase shifted to mean maximum and for those which have not.

  15. The Discovery of New Ammonia Masers in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teachey, Alex; Mills, Elisabeth A.; Meier, David S.; Ott, Juergen; Butterfield, Natalie; Lang, Cornelia C.; Morris, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The ammonia molecule has long been recognized as a reliable gauge of cloud temperatures. Certain ammonia transitions are known to have a potential for masing, but to date only a handful of these masers have been identified. In this work we have examined several Galactic Center clouds using K-band data from the Very Large Array in DnC configuration (resolution ~3" / 0.1 pc) to identify new ammonia masers in the (3,3) metastable line. At present we have found four compact (< 3'') regions -- two in G0.253+0.016 (The Brick) and two near Sagittarius A -- that we can report with high confidence as newly-discovered ammonia (3,3) masers. A total of 16 additional regions are identified as likely maser candidates requiring additional analysis. Our findings suggest that the maser mechanism will preferentially amplify the main ammonia emission line over its hyperfine satellite lines, resulting in artificially low opacities measured from the ratio of these lines. This property can have the effect of partially hiding the signature of the (3,3) maser in opacity-corrected Boltzmann plots. In the highest confidence regions we measure main-to-hyperfine ratios significantly in excess of the maximum theoretical ratio for an optically-thin line, yielding negative opacities, consistent with our hypothesis of main line maser amplification. These results will be of value not only in future ammonia maser searches but also for the reliability of the ammonia molecule as a temperature tracer, and for the determination of ammonia ortho-to-para ratios.

  16. Water Masers in the Early (z > 2) Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Minh; Norris, Ray; Emonts, Bjorn; Seymour, Nick

    2013-04-01

    We propose to use the ATCA to search for and measure the 22 GHz (rest-frame) water maser emission in the early (z > 2) universe. Powerful water masers are found in warm dense molecular clouds closely associated with supermassive black holes at the centres of active galaxies. Locally, water maser emission is mostly found in type-2 AGN (AGN viewed edge-on) because of the large column densities of molecular gas along the line of sight in the torus, confirming the unified model of AGN. However, galaxies at redshifts z > 2 might be quite different from those found locally, not least because of more frequent mergers in the past. Finding masers at high redshift will therefore provide a unique probe of the inner physics of very powerful AGN in the early universe. We will target two extremely IR-luminous AGN at z > 2. A search for masers at z > 2 is only feasible on the ATCA because of the improvement in sensitivity expected from the new 4cm receivers and the wide bandwidth of CABB. Detecting high redshift water masers would be an exciting demonstration of the new science enabled by the ATCA upgrades.

  17. Proposal for a room-temperature diamond maser

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Liang; Pfender, Matthias; Aslam, Nabeel; Neumann, Philipp; Yang, Sen; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    The application of masers is limited by its demanding working conditions (high vacuum or low temperature). A room-temperature solid-state maser is highly desirable, but the lifetimes of emitters (electron spins) in solids at room temperature are usually too short (∼ns) for population inversion. Masing from pentacene spins in p-terphenyl crystals, which have a long spin lifetime (∼0.1 ms), has been demonstrated. This maser, however, operates only in the pulsed mode. Here we propose a room-temperature maser based on nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond, which features the longest known solid-state spin lifetime (∼5 ms) at room temperature, high optical pumping efficiency (∼106 s−1) and material stability. Our numerical simulation demonstrates that a maser with a coherence time of approximately minutes is feasible under readily accessible conditions (cavity Q-factor ∼5 × 104, diamond size ∼3 × 3 × 0.5 mm3 and pump power <10 W). A room-temperature diamond maser may facilitate a broad range of microwave technologies. PMID:26394758

  18. Proposal for a room-temperature diamond maser.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liang; Pfender, Matthias; Aslam, Nabeel; Neumann, Philipp; Yang, Sen; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-09-23

    The application of masers is limited by its demanding working conditions (high vacuum or low temperature). A room-temperature solid-state maser is highly desirable, but the lifetimes of emitters (electron spins) in solids at room temperature are usually too short (∼ns) for population inversion. Masing from pentacene spins in p-terphenyl crystals, which have a long spin lifetime (∼0.1 ms), has been demonstrated. This maser, however, operates only in the pulsed mode. Here we propose a room-temperature maser based on nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond, which features the longest known solid-state spin lifetime (∼5 ms) at room temperature, high optical pumping efficiency (∼10(6) s(-1)) and material stability. Our numerical simulation demonstrates that a maser with a coherence time of approximately minutes is feasible under readily accessible conditions (cavity Q-factor ∼5 × 10(4), diamond size ∼3 × 3 × 0.5 mm(3) and pump power <10 W). A room-temperature diamond maser may facilitate a broad range of microwave technologies.

  19. A model for extremely powerful extragalactic water masers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ying-Cheng; Alcock, C.

    1988-08-01

    The reasons for the differences between extremely powerful extragalatic water masers (EPEWMs) and strong Galactic H/sub 2/O masers are discussed. This model quite successfully explains many important characteristics of EPEWMs; the rapid time variations, the broad range and random velocity distribution, the extremely high luminosities, the various heights or widths of features in spectra, the strong infrared radiation from the galaxies, how an active nucleus contributes to an EPEWM, how some parts of EPEWMs producing strong features are pumped, why this pump mechanism can work, and why EPEWMs are different from strong Galactic H/sub 2/O masers. Recent observations of extragalactic water masers which have extremely high luminosities raise the possibility that the stimulated emission rate in the maser emission line in these regions is much higher than in Galactic masers. It is possible that the local stimulated emission rate exceeds the local bandwidth for the radiation. In this case the standard expression relating the photon emission rate to the profile averaged mean intensity does not apply. A new expression for the photon emission rate is derived.

  20. Molecular catastrophes and circumstellar SiO masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    Understanding the complex SiO maser regions of highly evolved stars can be improved through multiwavelength studies of 'premaser' stars, such as M0-M4 giants and semiregular variables, which can be placed on normal H-R diagrams unlike most of the OH-IR stars. I argue that SiO masers are a key part of the transformation of hot stellar plasma into cold circumstellar silicate dust, in the outflows from evolved, oxygen rich stars. Evidence for this statement rests on the following: (1) red giant mass loss originates in a stochastic, amsotropic manner; (2) SiO maser maps of Miras and red supergiants show numerous maser spots within a few stellar radii; (3) molecules and dust naturally form in a cooling outflow; (4) the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer provided evidence for diverse and variable 10 micron silicate features in Miras, and these shapes correlate well with the proposed maser chronology, suggesting a formation and annealing sequence. The theory for the occurrence of SiO masers involving thermal instability, related 'new' physics, recent calculations and a prediction are discussed.

  1. Cyclotron maser using the anomalous Doppler effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenko, A. N.; Borisov, A. R.; Fomenko, G. P.; Shlapakovskii, A. S.; Shtein, Iu. G.

    1983-11-01

    The operation of an anomalous-Doppler-effect cyclotron-resonance maser using a waveguide partially filled with dielectric as the slow-wave system is reported. The device investigated is similar to that of Didenko et al. (1983) and comprises a 300-mm-long 50-mm-o.d. 30-mm-i.d. waveguide with fabric-laminate dielectric, located 150 mm from the cathode in a 500-mm-long region of uniform 0-20-kG magnetic field, and a coaxial magnetic-insulation gun producing a 13-mm-i.d. 25-mm-o.d. hollow electron beam. Radiation at 12 + or - 1 mm wavelength and optimum power 20 MW is observed using hot-carrier detectors, with a clear peak in the power-versus-magnetic-field curve at about 6.4 kG.

  2. Maser cavity servo-tuning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, R. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Two collocated, weakly coupled probes, one loop and one dipole, detect the magnetic and electric fields inside a maser cavity. Signals from the probes are compared in phase, and the signal output from the phase detector is applied to a varactor, the reactance of which is coupled into the cavity by a microwave coupler. Alternatively, the varactor may be placed inside the cavity. Any deviation of phase from 90 deg as detected by the phase detector will then produce an error signal that will change the reactance coupled into the resonant cavity to change its reactance, and thus correct its resonance frequency. An alternative to using two probes is to use a single disk probe oriented to detect both the magnetic and electric fields, and thus provide the error signal directly.

  3. Nonlinear theory of a plasma Cherenkov maser

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J.S.; Heo, E.G.; Choi, D.I.

    1995-12-31

    The nonlinear saturation state in a plasma Cherenkov maser (PCM) propagating the intense relativistic electron beam through a circular waveguide partially filled with a dense annular plasma, is analyzed from the nonlinear formulation based on the cold fluid-Maxwell equations. We obtain the nonlinear efficiency and the final operation frequency under consideration of the effects of the beam current, the beam energy and the slow wave structure. We show that the saturation mechanism of a PCM instablity is a close correspondence in that of the relativistic two stream instability by the coherent trapping of electrons in a single most-ustable wave. And the optimal conditions in PCM operation are also obtained from performing our nonliear analysis together with computer simulations.

  4. Ultra-Stable Superconducting-Maser Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, Donald M.; Dick, G. John

    1989-01-01

    Unprecedented stability of frequency in superconducting, triple-cavity ruby maser oscillator achieved by incorporation of amplitude-control subsystem. New design enhances ultra-stable measurements of time by reducing fluctuations to 2 X 10 to negative 19th power routinely, and to as little as 10 to negative 20th power in exceptional cases. Currents induced in superconducting pickup coil by changes in magnetic field in ruby. Currents from coil fed to superconducting quantum-interference device (SQUID) magnetometer, output used to generate control signal for electronically variable attenuator. Attenuator varies pump-signal amplitude in response to magnetic-field fluctuations in ruby. Very high feedback-loop gain used for sensitivity of control and adequate compensation of fluctuations.

  5. Discovering metal-poor circumstellar OH masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Steve; Green, James; van Loon, Jacco; Wood, Peter; Imai, Hiroshi; Groenewegen, Martin; Nanni, Ambra

    2014-10-01

    OH masers are excellent signposts for a variety of phenomenon including winds of highly-evolved stars (1612 MHz). Using the superior angular resolution and sensitivity of the ATCA, high spectral resolution of the CABB backend, and close proximity to the LMC (with half solar metallicity), this observation will allow us to extend an important relation involving the evolution of red giants and supergiants in a lower metallicity (van Loon, 2012). With even fewer detections with clear double-peaked profiles, indicating an expansion velocity of the circumstellar envelope, successful observation is vital for the advancement of our stellar mass-loss models. By refining the metallicity dependence of the mass-loss of highly-evolved red giants and supergiants in their superwind phase, we can better understand the evolution of these stars and their feedback within galaxies.

  6. SIMULTANEOUS OBSERVATIONS OF SiO AND H{sub 2}O MASERS TOWARD KNOWN STELLAR SiO AND H{sub 2}O MASER SOURCES. I

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jaeheon; Cho, Se-Hyung; Oh, Chung Sik; Byun, Do-Young E-mail: cho@kasi.re.k E-mail: bdy@kasi.re.k

    2010-05-15

    We present the results of simultaneous observations of both SiO and H{sub 2}O masers toward 166 known SiO and H{sub 2}O maser sources using the Korean VLBI Network Yonsei 21 m radio telescope during 2009 June. Both SiO and H{sub 2}O maser emission were detected from 112 sources giving a detection rate of 67% at one epoch observation. SiO-only maser emission was detected from 42 sources, while H{sub 2}O-only maser emission was detected from four sources. Most of the SiO masers appear around the stellar velocity, while H{sub 2}O masers show different characteristics compared with SiO masers. There are more than 20 sources that show a one-way peak or double peaks with respect to the stellar velocity and SiO maser peak velocity. The H{sub 2}O maser peak and integrated intensity ratios with respect to those of SiO (v = 1) show increasingly larger values from Mira variables, to OH/IR stars, to semi-regular variables. In addition, the IRAS two-color diagram of SiO and H{sub 2}O maser observational results is discussed.

  7. Development of 32-m Radio Telescopes for Monitoring Observations of Methanol Masers, H2O Masers, and Radio Continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonekura, Y.; Saito, Y.; Saito, T.; Mori, T.; Soon, K. L.; Momose, M.; Yokosawa, M.; Ogawa, H.; Fujisawa, K.; Sugiyama, K.; Motogi, K.; Takaba, H.; Sorai, K.; Nakai, N.; Kameno, S.; Kobayashi, H.; Kawaguchi, N.; Hachisuka, K.

    2013-10-01

    We report the renovation of two satellite-communication antennas, named Takahagi and Hitachi 32-m antennas, into cm-wave radio telescopes. Both antennas have been successfully renovated into radio telescopes until 2012. VLBI observations at 6.7, 8, and 22 GHz have been successful since 2010. We have started single-dish observations of methanol masers at 6.7 GHz and H2O masers at 22 GHz from 2013.

  8. Detection of a weak maser emission pedestal associated with the SiO maser. [in variable late stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, L. E.; Dickinson, D. F.; Brown, L. W.; Buhl, D.

    1978-01-01

    Results are reported for high-spectral-resolution observations of the v = 1, J = 1-0 SiO maser sources at 43,122.027 MHz (6.95 mm wavelength) associated with the variable stars Omega Cet, NML Tau, VY CMa, R Leo, W Hya, VX Sgr, NML Cyg, and R Cas. A weak underlying maser emission pedestal is clearly observed in the spectra of all but NML Cyg and R Cas. The data indicate that the underlying pedestal of SiO emission appears to originate in a shell-like region around the star, has a thermal appearance even though it must be due to weak maser emission, and appears to be part of the spectral signature of SiO maser emission from late-type stars. It is found that the center velocities of the pedestals may be used to determine stellar radial velocities. Observations of large-scale time variations in the intensity of the Ori A SiO maser and the detection of weak maser pedestals associated with each of the two strong emission-feature groups in Orion are also discussed. It is suggested that the Orion molecular cloud might contain two late-type long-period variable stars that may be semiregular variables.

  9. Supernova remnant masers: Shock interactions with molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, John William

    Maser emission from the 1720-MHz transition of hydroxyl(OH) has identified shock interactions in 10% of all supernova remnants(SNRs). Such maser-emitting SNRs are also bright in molecular line emission. Though somewhat rare, SNRs interacting with dense molecular clouds are an important class in which to study cosmic ray acceleration, SNR evolution, and effects on the energetics and chemistry of the interstellar medium. To study molecular shocks via a multiwavelength approach, the VLA, GBT, Spitzer Space Telescope have been used in the following ways: (i) With the GBT widespread OH(1720 MHz) emission and absorption in other OH lines is observed across the interaction site. Observations of all four ground-state transitions at 1720, 1667/5 and 1612 MHz allows us to model OH excitation, yielding the temperature, density and OH abundance in the post-shock gas. Maser emission is found to have a higher flux density with the GBT than with high-resolution VLA observations for 10 of 15 observed remnants, suggesting maser emission is present on large spatial scales. (ii) Sensitive VLA observations of select SNRs (W44, IC 443, Kes 69, 3C 391, G357.7+0.3) reveal the nature of enhanced 1720 MHz emission. Numerous weak compact masers as well as diffuse extended emission are detected tracing the shock-front. Zeeman splitting of masers permits the post-shock magnetic field strength and the line of sight field direction to be directly measured. (iii) Rotational lines of molecular hydrogen are detected at the position of several masers with Spitzer IRS spectroscopy between 5 and 35 mm. Excitation of the hydrogen lines requires the passage of a C-type shock through dense molecular gas, in agreement with the conditions derived from OH excitation. The presence of bright ionic lines requires multiple shocks present at the interaction site. (iv) A new survey for SNR-masers has identified four new interacting SNRs within 10 degrees of the Galactic Center. Maser-emitting SNRs are found to

  10. A CO observation of the Galactic methanol masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhiyuan; Wu, Yuefang; Liu, Tie; Li, Lixin; Li, Di; Ju, Binggang

    2014-07-01

    Context. We investigated the molecular gas associated with 6.7 GHz methanol masers throughout the Galaxy using a J = 1-0 transition of the CO isotopologues. Aims: The methanol maser at 6.7 GHz is an ideal tracer for young high-mass star-forming cores. Based on molecular line emissions in the maser sources throughout the Galaxy, we can estimate their physical parameters and, thereby, investigate the forming conditions of the high-mass stars. Methods: Using the 13.7-m telescope at the Purple Mountain Observatory (PMO), we have obtained 12CO and 13CO (1-0) lines for 160 methanol masers sources from the first to the third Galactic quadrants. We made efforts to resolve the distance ambiguity by careful comparison with the radio continuum and HI 21 cm observations. We examined the statistical properties in three aspects: first, the variation throughout the Galaxy; second, the correlation between the different parameters; third, the difference between the maser sources and the infrared dark clouds. In addition, we have also carried out 13CO mapping for 33 sources in our sample. Results: First, the maser sources show increased 13CO line widths toward the Galactic center, suggesting that the molecular gas are more turbulent toward the Galactic center. This trend can be noticeably traced by the 13C line width. In comparison, the Galactic variation for the H2 column density and the 12CO excitation temperature are less significant. Second, the 12CO excitation temperature shows a noticeable correlation with the H2 column density. A possible explanation consistent with the collapse model is that the higher surface-density gas is more efficient to the stellar heating and/or has a higher formation rate of high-mass stars. Third, comparing the infrared dark clouds, the maser sources on average have significantly lower H2 column densities, moderately higher temperatures, and similar line widths. Fourth, In the mapped regions around 33 masers, 51 13CO cores have been revealed. Among

  11. Detection of class I methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) maser candidates in supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Pihlström, Y. M.; Mesler, R. A.; McEwen, B. C.; Sjouwerman, L. O.; Frail, D. A.; Claussen, M. J.

    2014-04-01

    We have used the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to search for 36 GHz and 44 GHz methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) lines in a sample of 21 Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs). Mainly the regions of the SNRs with 1720 MHz OH masers were observed. Despite the limited spatial extent covered in our search, methanol masers were detected in both G1.4–0.1 and W28. Additional masers were found in Sgr A East. More than 40 masers were found in G1.4–0.1, which we deduce are due to interactions between the SNR and at least two separate molecular clouds. The six masers in W28 are associated with the molecular cloud that is also associated with the OH maser excitation. We discuss the possibility that the methanol maser may be more numerous in SNRs than the OH maser, but harder to detect due to observational constraints.

  12. Preliminary results from a 7 station VLBI survey of OH masers in the galactic plane

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, P.J.; Martinson, A.; Dennison, B.; Booth, R.S.; Winnberg, A.

    1988-11-01

    An initial analysis of a large VLBI survey of OH masers in the Galactic Plane reveals a correlation of maser component angular size with source distance. This correlation is presumably due to the effect of an intervening scattering medium.

  13. Ground-Based Investigations with the Cryogenic Hydrogen Maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.; Mattison, Edward; Vessot, Robert F. C.

    2003-01-01

    The cryogenic hydrogen maser (CHM) developed at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) was designed to be functionally similar to SAO room temperature hydrogen masers with appropriate modifications made for operation at cryogenic temperatures. A schematic of the SAO CHM is shown in Figure 1, and a description of this device and its operation follows. A beam of molecular hydrogen is dissociated into atoms at room temperature. The resultant beam of atomic hydrogen is then cooled, magnetically state selected, and focused into a quartz storage bulb centered inside of a microwave cavity resonant with the hydrogen hyperfine transition at 1420 MHz. The quartz storage bulb is coated with a superfluid He-4 film, and both the bulb and cavity are maintained near 0.5 K. The maser signal is coupled out inductively and carried to room temperature via semi-rigid coaxial cable. After passing through a room temperature isolator and preamp, the maser signal is detected with a low-noise heterodyne receiver as used in the room temperature SAO hydrogen masers. The maser temperature is lowered to 0.5 K using a recirculating He-3 refrigerator. This refrigerator consists of several cooling stages: a liquid nitrogen stage at 77 K, a liquid 4He bath at 4.2 K, a pumped He-4 pot at approximately 1.7 K, and the pumped, recirculating He-3 stage at 0.5 K. The atomic hydrogen beam, state selector, storage bulb and cavity are all connected inside a single, maser vacuum chamber (MVC). This space is pumped out from below by a turbo pump. Above the MVC, an inlet to the space allows for the input of flowing superfluid 4He film. External to the MVC is a second, outer vacuum chamber (OVC), maintained for operation of the cryostat and also pumped by a turbo pump. Inside the OVC, there is radiation shielding at 77 K and 1.7 K.

  14. Ground-Based Investigations with the Cryogenic Hydrogen Maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.; Mattison, Edward; Vessot, Robert F. C.

    2003-01-01

    The cryogenic hydrogen maser (CHM) developed at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) was designed to be functionally similar to SAO room temperature hydrogen masers with appropriate modifications made for operation at cryogenic temperatures. A schematic of the SAO CHM is shown in Figure 1, and a description of this device and its operation follows. A beam of molecular hydrogen is dissociated into atoms at room temperature. The resultant beam of atomic hydrogen is then cooled, magnetically state selected, and focused into a quartz storage bulb centered inside of a microwave cavity resonant with the hydrogen hyperfine transition at 1420 MHz. The quartz storage bulb is coated with a superfluid He-4 film, and both the bulb and cavity are maintained near 0.5 K. The maser signal is coupled out inductively and carried to room temperature via semi-rigid coaxial cable. After passing through a room temperature isolator and preamp, the maser signal is detected with a low-noise heterodyne receiver as used in the room temperature SAO hydrogen masers. The maser temperature is lowered to 0.5 K using a recirculating He-3 refrigerator. This refrigerator consists of several cooling stages: a liquid nitrogen stage at 77 K, a liquid 4He bath at 4.2 K, a pumped He-4 pot at approximately 1.7 K, and the pumped, recirculating He-3 stage at 0.5 K. The atomic hydrogen beam, state selector, storage bulb and cavity are all connected inside a single, maser vacuum chamber (MVC). This space is pumped out from below by a turbo pump. Above the MVC, an inlet to the space allows for the input of flowing superfluid 4He film. External to the MVC is a second, outer vacuum chamber (OVC), maintained for operation of the cryostat and also pumped by a turbo pump. Inside the OVC, there is radiation shielding at 77 K and 1.7 K.

  15. Excited-State OH Masers and Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihlström, Ylva M.; Fish, Vincent L.; Sjouwerman, Loránt O.; Zschaechner, Laura K.; Lockett, Philip B.; Elitzur, Moshe

    2008-03-01

    The collisionally pumped, ground-state 1720 MHz maser line of OH is widely recognized as a tracer for shocked regions and observed in star-forming regions and supernova remnants. Whereas some lines of excited states of OH have been detected and studied in star-forming regions, the subject of excited-state OH in supernova remnants—where high collision rates are to be expected—is only recently being addressed. Modeling of collisional excitation of OH demonstrates that 1720, 4765, and 6049 MHz masers can occur under similar conditions in regions of shocked gas. In particular, the 6049 and 4765 MHz masers become more significant at increased OH column densities where the 1720 MHz masers begin to be quenched. In supernova remnants, the detection of excited-state OH line maser emission could therefore serve as a probe of regions of higher column densities. Using the Very Large Array, we searched for excited-state OH in the 4.7, 7.8, 8.2, and 23.8 GHz lines in four well-studied supernova remnants with strong 1720 MHz maser emission (Sgr A East, W28, W44 and IC 443). No detections were made, at typical detection limits of around 10 mJy beam-1. The search for the 6 GHz lines were done using Effelsberg since the VLA receivers did not cover those frequencies, and are reported on in an accompanying letter (Fish and coworkers). We also cross-correlated the positions of known supernova remnants with the positions of 1612 MHz maser emission obtained from blind surveys. No probable associations were found, perhaps except in the Sgr A East region. The lack of detections of excited-state OH indicates that the OH column densities suffice for 1720 MHz inversion but not for inversion of excited-state transitions, consistent with the expected results for C-type shocks.

  16. Nuclear Spin Maser at Highly Stabilized Low Magnetic Field and Search for Atomic EDM

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimi, A.; Asahi, K.; Inoue, T.; Uchida, M.; Hatakeyama, N.; Tsuchiya, M.; Kagami, S.

    2009-08-04

    A nuclear spin maser is operated at a low static field through an active feedback scheme based on an optical nuclear spin detection and succeeding spin control by a transverse field application. The frequency stability of this optical-coupling spin maser is improved by installation of a low-noise current source for a solenoid magnet producing a static magnetic field in the maser operation. Experimental devices for application of the maser to EDM experiment are being developed.

  17. Multimode Analysis of Bragg Reflectors for Cyclotron Maser Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-16

    exponentially with distance in the reflector. The spatial dependance of the TMI I mode is oscillatory. Figure 3 shows the frequency dependence of the...mode reflector for a CARM oscillator resonator. Figure 4 shows the frequency dependance of the reflection and mode conversion in the reflector. In order

  18. How to Detect Inclined Water Maser Disks (and Possibly Measure Black Hole Masses)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Jeremy

    2017-03-01

    We describe a method for identifying inclined water maser disks orbiting massive black holes and for potentially using them to measure black hole masses. Owing to the geometry of maser amplification pathways, the minority of water maser disks are observable: only those viewed nearly edge-on have been identified, suggesting that an order of magnitude additional maser disks exist. We suggest that inward-propagating masers are gravitationally deflected by the central black hole, thereby scattering water maser emission out of the disk plane and enabling detection. The signature of an inclined water maser disk would be narrow masers near the systemic velocity that appear to emit from the black hole position, as identified by the radio continuum core. To explore this possibility, we present high-resolution (0.″07-0.″17) Very Large Array line and continuum observations of 13 galaxies with narrow water maser emission and show that three are good inclined-disk candidates (five remain ambiguous). For the best case, CGCG 120-039, we show that the maser and continuum emission are coincident to within 3.5 ± 1.4 pc (6.7 ± 2.7 mas). Subsequent very long baseline interferometric maps can confirm candidate inclined disks and have the potential to show maser rings or arcs that provide a direct measurement of black hole mass, although the mass precision will rely on knowledge of the size of the maser disk.

  19. Water Maser Emission and the Visual Light Curve of R Draconis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmer, Samantha J.; Benson, Priscilla J.; Little-Marenin, Irene R.

    1991-10-01

    The water maser emmision of R Draconis was observed at 22 GHz at the Haystack Observatory approximately once each month from November 1988 to July 1990. There is a correlation between the variations of the maser emission and the AAVSO light curve; the peak of the maser activity follows the light activity by about 0.2 period.

  20. Self-consistent simulation of an electron beam for a new autoresonant x-ray generator based on TE 102 rectangular mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugar-Zhabon, V. D.; Orozco, E. A.; Herrera, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    The space cyclotron autoresonance interaction of an electron beam with microwaves of TE 102 rectangular mode is simulated. It is shown that in these conditions the beam electrons can achieve energies which are sufficient to generate hard x-rays. The physical model consists of a rectangular cavity fed by a magnetron oscillator through a waveguide with a ferrite isolator, an iris window and a system of dc current coils which generates an axially symmetric magnetic field. The 3D magnetic field profile is that which maintains the electron beam in the space autoresonance regime. To simulate the beam dynamics, a full self-consistent electromagnetic particle-in-cell code is developed. It is shown that the injected 12keV electron beam of 0.5A current is accelerated to energy of 225keV at a distance of an order of 17cm by 2.45GHz standing microwave field with amplitude of 14kV/cm.

  1. An on-board surgical tracking and video augmentation system for C-arm image guidance.

    PubMed

    Reaungamornrat, S; Otake, Y; Uneri, A; Schafer, S; Mirota, D J; Nithiananthan, S; Stayman, J W; Kleinszig, G; Khanna, A J; Taylor, R H; Siewerdsen, J H

    2012-09-01

    Conventional tracker configurations for surgical navigation carry a variety of limitations, including limited geometric accuracy, line-of-sight obstruction, and mismatch of the view angle with the surgeon's-eye view. This paper presents the development and characterization of a novel tracker configuration (referred to as "Tracker-on-C") intended to address such limitations by incorporating the tracker directly on the gantry of a mobile C-arm for fluoroscopy and cone-beam CT (CBCT). A video-based tracker (MicronTracker, Claron Technology Inc., Toronto, ON, Canada) was mounted on the gantry of a prototype mobile isocentric C-arm next to the flat-panel detector. To maintain registration within a dynamically moving reference frame (due to rotation of the C-arm), a reference marker consisting of 6 faces (referred to as a "hex-face marker") was developed to give visibility across the full range of C-arm rotation. Three primary functionalities were investigated: surgical tracking, generation of digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) from the perspective of a tracked tool or the current C-arm angle, and augmentation of the tracker video scene with image, DRR, and planning data. Target registration error (TRE) was measured in comparison with the same tracker implemented in a conventional in-room configuration. Graphics processing unit (GPU)-accelerated DRRs were generated in real time as an assistant to C-arm positioning (i.e., positioning the C-arm such that target anatomy is in the field-of-view (FOV)), radiographic search (i.e., a virtual X-ray projection preview of target anatomy without X-ray exposure), and localization (i.e., visualizing the location of the surgical target or planning data). Video augmentation included superimposing tracker data, the X-ray FOV, DRRs, planning data, preoperative images, and/or intraoperative CBCT onto the video scene. Geometric accuracy was quantitatively evaluated in each case, and qualitative assessment of clinical feasibility

  2. Optimal C-arm angulation during transcatheter aortic valve replacement: Accuracy of a rotational C-arm computed tomography based three dimensional heart model

    PubMed Central

    Veulemans, Verena; Mollus, Sabine; Saalbach, Axel; Pietsch, Max; Hellhammer, Katharina; Zeus, Tobias; Westenfeld, Ralf; Weese, Jürgen; Kelm, Malte; Balzer, Jan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the accuracy of a rotational C-arm CT-based 3D heart model to predict an optimal C-arm configuration during transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). METHODS Rotational C-arm CT (RCT) under rapid ventricular pacing was performed in 57 consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis as part of the pre-procedural cardiac catheterization. With prototype software each RCT data set was segmented using a 3D heart model. From that the line of perpendicularity curve was obtained that generates a perpendicular view of the aortic annulus according to the right-cusp rule. To evaluate the accuracy of a model-based overlay we compared model- and expert-derived aortic root diameters. RESULTS For all 57 patients in the RCT cohort diameter measurements were obtained from two independent operators and were compared to the model-based measurements. The inter-observer variability was measured to be in the range of 0°-12.96° of angular C-arm displacement for two independent operators. The model-to-operator agreement was 0°-13.82°. The model-based and expert measurements of aortic root diameters evaluated at the aortic annulus (r = 0.79, P < 0.01), the aortic sinus (r = 0.93, P < 0.01) and the sino-tubular junction (r = 0.92, P < 0.01) correlated on a high level and the Bland-Altman analysis showed good agreement. The interobserver measurements did not show a significant bias. CONCLUSION Automatic segmentation of the aortic root using an anatomical model can accurately predict an optimal C-arm configuration, potentially simplifying current clinical workflows before and during TAVR. PMID:27847562

  3. SIMULTANEOUS OBSERVATIONS OF SiO AND H{sub 2}O MASERS TOWARD KNOWN STELLAR H{sub 2}O MASER SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jaeheon; Cho, Se-Hyung; Kim, Sang Joon E-mail: cho@kasi.re.kr

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of simultaneous observations of SiO v = 1, 2, {sup 29}SiO v = 0, J = 1-0, and H{sub 2}O 6{sub 16}-5{sub 23} maser lines toward 152 known stellar H{sub 2}O maser sources using the Yonsei 21 m radio telescope of the Korean VLBI Network from 2009 June to 2011 January. Both SiO and H{sub 2}O masers were detected from 62 sources with a detection rate of 40.8%. The SiO-only maser emission without H{sub 2}O maser detection was detected from 27 sources, while the H{sub 2}O-only maser without SiO maser detection was detected from 22 sources. Therefore, the overall SiO maser emission was detected from 89 sources, resulting in a detection rate of 58.6%. We have identified 70 new detections of the SiO maser emission. For both H{sub 2}O and SiO maser detected sources, the peak and integrated antenna temperatures of SiO masers are stronger than those of H{sub 2}O masers in both Mira variables and OH/IR stars and the relative intensity ratios of H{sub 2}O to SiO masers in OH/IR stars are larger than those in Mira variables. In addition, distributions of 152 observed sources were investigated in the IRAS two-color diagram.

  4. Evolved star water maser cloud size determined by star size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, A. M. S.; Etoka, S.; Gray, M. D.; Lekht, E. E.; Mendoza-Torres, J. E.; Murakawa, K.; Rudnitskij, G.; Yates, J. A.

    2012-10-01

    Context. Cool, evolved stars undergo copious mass loss but the detailed mechanisms and the form in which the matter is returned to the ISM are still under debate. Aims: We investigated the structure and evolution of the wind at 5 to 50 stellar radii from asymptotic giant branch and red supergiant stars. Methods: 22-GHz water masers around seven evolved stars were imaged using MERLIN, at sub-AU resolution. Each source was observed at between 2 and 7 epochs, covering several stellar periods. We compared our results with long-term single dish monitoring provided by the Pushchino radio telescope. Results: The 22-GHz emission is located in approximately spherical, thick, unevenly filled shells. The outflow velocity increases twofold or more between the inner and outer shell limits. Water maser clumps could be matched at successive epochs separated by less than two years for AGB stars, or at least 5 years for RSG. This is much shorter than the decades taken for the wind to cross the maser shell, and comparison with spectral monitoring shows that some features fade and reappear. In five sources, most of the matched maser features brighten or dim in concert from one epoch to the next. A number of individual maser features show idiosyncratic behaviour, including one cloud in W Hya caught in the act of passing in front of a background cloud leading to 50-fold, transient amplification. The masing clouds are one or two orders of magnitude denser than the wind average and contain a substantial fraction of the mass loss in this region, with a filling factor <1%. The RSG clouds are about ten times bigger than those round the AGB stars. Conclusions: Proper motions are dominated by expansion, with no systematic rotation. The maser clouds presumably survive for decades (the shell crossing time) but the masers are not always beamed in our direction. Only radiative effects can explain changes in flux density throughout the maser shells on short timescales. The size of the clouds is

  5. INTERSTELLAR H{sub 2}O MASERS FROM J SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbach, David; Elitzur, Moshe; McKee, Christopher F.

    2013-08-10

    We present a model in which the 22 GHz H{sub 2}O masers observed in star-forming regions occur behind shocks propagating in dense regions (preshock density n{sub 0} {approx} 10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} cm{sup -3}). We focus on high-velocity (v{sub s} {approx}> 30 km s{sup -1}) dissociative J shocks in which the heat of H{sub 2} re-formation maintains a large column of {approx}300-400 K gas; at these temperatures the chemistry drives a considerable fraction of the oxygen not in CO to form H{sub 2}O. The H{sub 2}O column densities, the hydrogen densities, and the warm temperatures produced by these shocks are sufficiently high to enable powerful maser action. The observed brightness temperatures (generally {approx} 10{sup 11}-10{sup 14} K) are the result of coherent velocity regions that have dimensions in the shock plane that are 10-100 times the shock thickness of {approx}10{sup 13} cm. The masers are therefore beamed toward the observer, who typically views the shock ''edge-on'', or perpendicular to the shock velocity; the brightest masers are then observed with the lowest line-of-sight velocities with respect to the ambient gas. We present numerical and analytic studies of the dependence of the maser inversion, the resultant brightness temperature, the maser spot size and shape, the isotropic luminosity, and the maser region magnetic field on the shock parameters and the coherence path length; the overall result is that in galactic H{sub 2}O 22 GHz masers, these observed parameters can be produced in J shocks with n{sub 0} {approx} 10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} cm{sup -3} and v{sub s} {approx} 30-200 km s{sup -1}. A number of key observables such as maser shape, brightness temperature, and global isotropic luminosity depend only on the particle flux into the shock, j = n{sub 0} v{sub s} , rather than on n{sub 0} and v{sub s} separately.

  6. High frequency CARM driver for RF linacs. Progress report, Year 1

    SciTech Connect

    Danly, B.G.

    1990-05-15

    Progress during the first year of this program has been noteworthy in both theoretical and experimental areas. Substantial improvements to the MIT CARM codes have been carried out, and the code has been successfully benchmarked against other codes, linear theory, and experimental work. CARM amplifier phase stability has been studied theoretically and found to be significantly better than that of free-electron lasers or relativistic klystrons, provided the device is properly designed. Both multimode simulations and particle-in-cell simulations have been carried out to study mode competition effects between convectively unstable and absolutely unstable modes. Improvement of the Pierce-Wiggler code for modeling the beam formation prior to the interaction region has been carried out. Experimental designs for a long-pulse, modulator-driven CARM amplifier experiment which will be carried out by the end of this fiscal year have been mostly completed. Designs for an induction-linac-driven CARM amplifier experiment, which will be carried out by the end of Year II of this program,, have also been performed. Finally, a CARM oscillator experiment is presently underway at our facility.

  7. Observations of the Zeeman effect in Class I methanol masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratim Sarma, Anuj; Momjian, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    We present observations of the Zeeman effect in Class I methanol maser sources toward high mass star forming regions. Toward DR21(OH), we have detected the Zeeman effect at 44 GHz in a 219 Jy/beam maser centered at an LSR velocity of 0.83 km/s, and we find $zB_\\text{los} = 53.5 \\pm 2.7$ Hz. If 44 GHz methanol masers are excited at $10^{7-8}$ cm$^{-3}$, then magnetic fields in DR21(OH) should be ~10 mG. Our detected $zB_\\text{los}$ would then imply that the Zeeman splitting factor for the 44 GHz methanol maser line should be ~5 Hz/mG. Such small values for z would not be surprising, since the methanol molecule is non-paramagnetic, like H2O. Since there are no direct measurements or calculations of the 44 GHz methanol maser Zeeman splitting factor to date, such empirical attempts could prove valuable in building a repository of measurements from which to gain an understanding of the magnitude of z.

  8. Development of the maser-caviton ball lightning theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handel, Peter H.; Leitner, Jean-Francois

    1994-05-01

    The maser-caviton ball lightning theory is briefly described, is compared with the available observations of ball lightning, and is further developed on the basis of the rate equations governing the evolution of the photon number in a single-mode maser. The focus of this paper is on the explosive growth of the photon number at the premature demise of a large atmospheric maser. Ball lightning is a localized high-field soliton forming a cavity surrounded by plasma in this theory. The source of VHF energy is a large atmospheric maser occupying a volume of serveral cubic miles for the case of open air ball lightning, and occupying the volume of the room in electrically shielded confined ball lightning cases. The main, well-known features of ball lightning, including its appearance right after a strong electric field pulse usually caused by lightning, its passage through closed windows and other dielectrics, its always harmless existence in electrically shielded (e.g., metallic) enclosures, without the possibility of electrostatic-explosive demise, its total absence in the vicinity of high peaks or lightning observation stations, as well as the character of its positioning and motion with respect to conducting bodies, and its apparent lack of buoyancy in the air can all be explained consistently only with the help of this theory as far as we can see. The explosive demise of open air ball lightning is described here in terms of maser spiking phonomena with the help of elementary equations.

  9. SiO isotopic maser emission from VY Canis Majoris

    SciTech Connect

    Deguchi, S.; Good, J.; Fan, Y.; Mao, X.; Wang, D.; Ukita, N.

    1983-01-15

    We have detected strong maser emission from VY CMa in the /sup 29/SiO J = 2--1, v = 0 transition. The intensity of the /sup 29/SiO emission is about twice that of the ground-state /sup 28/SiO maser emission which we have also measured. We also looked for /sup 30/SiO emission, but none was detected. Both the /sup 28/SiO and /sup 29/SiO emission profiles have been measured on occasions separated by as much as 3 months, and no variability has been detected in the detailed structure of the lines above the level of the noise. The radial velocities of the masers in VY CMa are close to the central star velocity as derived from the OH 1612 MHz double-peaked maser emission and the broad /sup 28/SiO weak emission. One possible explanation for this is that the maser emission comes from a rotating disk around the central star.

  10. Surgical screw segmentation for mobile C-arm CT devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görres, Joseph; Brehler, Michael; Franke, Jochen; Wolf, Ivo; Vetter, Sven Y.; Grützner, Paul A.; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Nabers, Diana

    2014-03-01

    Calcaneal fractures are commonly treated by open reduction and internal fixation. An anatomical reconstruction of involved joints is mandatory to prevent cartilage damage and premature arthritis. In order to avoid intraarticular screw placements, the use of mobile C-arm CT devices is required. However, for analyzing the screw placement in detail, a time-consuming human-computer interaction is necessary to navigate through 3D images and therefore to view a single screw in detail. Established interaction procedures of repeatedly positioning and rotating sectional planes are inconvenient and impede the intraoperative assessment of the screw positioning. To simplify the interaction with 3D images, we propose an automatic screw segmentation that allows for an immediate selection of relevant sectional planes. Our algorithm consists of three major steps. At first, cylindrical characteristics are determined from local gradient structures with the help of RANSAC. In a second step, a DBScan clustering algorithm is applied to group similar cylinder characteristics. Each detected cluster represents a screw, whose determined location is then refined by a cylinder-to-image registration in a third step. Our evaluation with 309 screws in 50 images shows robust and precise results. The algorithm detected 98% (303) of the screws correctly. Thirteen clusters led to falsely identified screws. The mean distance error for the screw tip was 0.8 +/- 0.8 mm and for the screw head 1.2 +/- 1 mm. The mean orientation error was 1.4 +/- 1.2 degrees.

  11. Water masers in the Kronian system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebenko, Sergei V.; Gurvits, Leonid I.; Elitzur, Moshe; Cosmovici, Cristiano B.; Avruch, Ian M.; Pluchino, Salvatore; Montebugnoli, Stelio; Salerno, Emma; Maccaferri, Giuseppe; Mujunen, Ari; Ritakari, Jouko; Molera, Guifre; Wagner, Jan; Uunila, Minttu; Cimo, Giuseppe; Schilliro, Francesco; Bartolini, Marco

    The presence of water has been considered for a long time as a key condition for life in planetary environments. The Cassini mission discovered water vapour in the Kronian system by detecting absorption of UV emission from a background star (Hansen et al. 2006). Prompted by this discovery, we started an observational campaign for search of another manifestation of the water vapour in the Kronian system, its maser emission at the frequency of 22 GHz (1.35 cm wavelength). Observations with the 32 m Medicina radio telescope (INAF-IRA, Italy) started in 2006 using Mk5A data recording and the JIVE-Huygens software correlator. Later on, an on-line spectrometer was used at Medicina. The 14 m Metsähovi radio telescope (TKK-MRO, Finland) joined the observational campaign in 2008 using a locally developed data capture unit and software spectrometer. More than 300 hours of observations were collected in 2006-2008 campaign with the two radio telescopes. The data were analysed at JIVE using the Doppler tracking technique to compensate the observed spectra for the radial Doppler shift for various bodies in the Kronian system (Pogrebenko et al. 2009). Here we report the observational results for Hyperion, Titan, Enceladus and Atlas, and their physical interpretation. Encouraged by these results we started a campaign of follow up observations including other radio telescopes.

  12. Nonlinear analysis of the Cerenkov maser

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, H.P.; Ganguly, A.K. )

    1990-10-01

    The nonlinear evolution of the Cerenkov maser amplifier is investigated numerically for a configuration that consists of an energetic electron beam propagating through a dielectric-lined cylindrical waveguide. An axial guide magnetic field is included in the formulation in order to improve beam confinement. A set of coupled nonlinear differential equations is derived in three dimensions that governs the evolution of both the electromagnetic field and the trajectories of an ensemble of electrons. The system is assumed to be azimuthally symmetric, and the electromagnetic field is represented as a superposition of the TM{sub 0{ital n}} modes of the vacuum waveguide. The initial conditions are chosen to model the simultaneous injection of either a solid or annular electron beam, and an electromagnetic wave of arbitrary input power. Thermal effects are treated under the assumption that the beam is {ital initially} monoenergetic but exhibits a pitch angle spread; however, the subsequent evolution of the beam is treated in a self-consistent manner. This class of distribution is appropriate to the treatment of diode-produced beams and describes a beam with an initial axial energy spread. This is the crucial determinant in the efficiency, since saturation occurs by means of an axial bunching mechanism that results in the phase trapping of the beam. The specific parameters used in the numerical analysis correspond to experiments conducted at Dartmouth College (J. Appl. Phys. {bold 58}, 627 (1985)), and good agreement is found between theory and experiment.

  13. Amplification of OAM radiation by astrophysical masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, M. D.; Pisano, G.; Maccalli, S.; Schemmel, P.

    2014-12-01

    We extend the theory of astrophysical maser propagation through a medium with a Zeeman-split molecular response to the case of a non-uniform magnetic field, and allow a component of the electric field of the radiation in the direction of propagation: a characteristic of radiation with orbital angular momentum. A classical reduction of the governing equations leads to a set of nine differential equations for the evolution of intensity-like parameters for each Fourier component of the radiation. Four of these parameters correspond to the standard Stokes parameters, whilst the other five represent the z-component of the electric field, and its coupling to the conventional components in the x-y-plane. A restricted analytical solution of the governing equations demonstrates a non-trivial coupling of the Stokes parameters to those representing orbital angular momentum: the z-component of the electric field can grow from a background in which only Stokes-I is non-zero. A numerical solution of the governing equations reveals radiation patterns with a radial and angular structure for the case of an ideal quadrupole magnetic field perpendicular to the propagation direction. In this ideal case, generation of radiation orbital angular momentum, like polarization, can approach 100 per cent.

  14. A correlational analysis of the effects of changing environmental conditions on the NR atomic hydrogen maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragonette, Richard A.; Suter, Joseph J.

    1992-01-01

    An extensive statistical analysis has been undertaken to determine if a correlation exists between changes in an NR atomic hydrogen maser's frequency offset and changes in environmental conditions. Correlation analyses have been performed comparing barometric pressure, humidity, and temperature with maser frequency offset as a function of time for periods ranging from 5.5 to 17 days. Semipartial correlation coefficients as large as -0.9 have been found between barometric pressure and maser frequency offset. Correlation between maser frequency offset and humidity was small compared to barometric pressure and unpredictable. Analysis of temperature data indicates that in the most current design, temperature does not significantly affect maser frequency offset.

  15. NASA hydrogen maser accuracy and stability in relation to world standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.; Percival, D. B.

    1973-01-01

    Frequency comparisons were made among five NASA hydrogen masers in 1969 and again in 1972 to a precision of one part in 10 to the 13th power. Frequency comparisons were also made between these masers and the cesium-beam ensembles of several international standards laboratories. The hydrogen maser frequency stabilities as related to IAT were comparable to the frequency stabilities of individual time scales with respect to IAT. The relative frequency variations among the NASA masers, measured after the three-year interval, were 2 + or - 2 parts in 10 to the 13th power. Thus time scales based on hydrogen masers would have excellent long-term stability and uniformity.

  16. A correlational analysis of the effects of changing environmental conditions on the NR atomic hydrogen maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragonette, Richard A.; Suter, Joseph J.

    1992-01-01

    An extensive statistical analysis has been undertaken to determine if a correlation exists between changes in an NR atomic hydrogen maser's frequency offset and changes in environmental conditions. Correlation analyses have been performed comparing barometric pressure, humidity, and temperature with maser frequency offset as a function of time for periods ranging from 5.5 to 17 days. Semipartial correlation coefficients as large as -0.9 have been found between barometric pressure and maser frequency offset. Correlation between maser frequency offset and humidity was small compared to barometric pressure and unpredictable. Analysis of temperature data indicates that in the most current design, temperature does not significantly affect maser frequency offset.

  17. Physics of systematic frequency variations in hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattison, Edward M.

    1990-01-01

    The frequency stability of hydrogen masers for intervals longer that 10(exp 4) seconds is limited at present by systematic processes. Researchers discuss the physics of frequency-determining mechanisms internal to the maser that are susceptible to systematic variations, and the connections between these internal mechanisms and external environmental factors. Based upon estimates of the magnitudes of systematic effects, they find that the primary internal mechanisms currently limiting long-term maser frequency stability are cavity pulling, at the level parts in 10(exp 15) per day, and wall shift variations, at the level of parts in 10(exp 16) to parts in 10(exp 15) per day. They discuss strategies for reducing systematic frequency variations.

  18. Physics of systematic frequency variations in hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattison, Edward M.

    1992-01-01

    The frequency stability of hydrogen masers for intervals longer than 10 exp 4 s is currently limited by systematic processes. The physics of frequency-determining mechanisms internal to the maser that are susceptible to systematic variations, and the connections between these internal mechanisms and external environmental factors are discussed. From estimates of the magnitudes of systematic effects, it is found that the primary internal mechanisms limiting long-term maser frequency stability are cavity pulling, at the level of parts in 1015 per day, and wall shift variations, at the level of parts in 10 exp 16 to parts in 10 exp 15 per day. Strategies for reducing systematic frequency variations are discussed.

  19. Physics of systematic frequency variations in hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattison, Edward M.

    1992-01-01

    The frequency stability of hydrogen masers for intervals longer than 10 exp 4 s is currently limited by systematic processes. The physics of frequency-determining mechanisms internal to the maser that are susceptible to systematic variations, and the connections between these internal mechanisms and external environmental factors are discussed. From estimates of the magnitudes of systematic effects, it is found that the primary internal mechanisms limiting long-term maser frequency stability are cavity pulling, at the level of parts in 1015 per day, and wall shift variations, at the level of parts in 10 exp 16 to parts in 10 exp 15 per day. Strategies for reducing systematic frequency variations are discussed.

  20. Water masers in W49N - The youngest stellar jet?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Low, MORDECAI-M.; Elitzur, Moshe

    1992-01-01

    Observations by Gwinn et al. (1992) of the proper motions of water masers in W49N show that they have an elongated distribution expanding from a common center. Features with high space velocity only occur far from the center, while low-velocity features occur at all distances. It is proposed that water masers in star-forming regions occur in expanding shells swept up by high-velocity winds from young, massive stars during the early phases of the expansion. In W49N, confinement of the bubble by a density distribution with an axial cavity can explain both the velocity field and the shape of the maser distribution. A fully dynamical calculation of the expanding bubble is presented which provides a satisfactory fit for the observations and suggests that this system is only about 250 yr old. Thus these observations may show the very first stages of the formation of a jet from a young stellar object.

  1. The distribution of maser emission in OH/IR stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welty, Alan D.; Fix, John D.; Mutel, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    The 1612 MHz OH emission from five OH/IR stars has been mapped at three epochs over a 2.5 yr period of time. Although the stars were observed at very different phases in the radio light curve of each, there were no remarkable changes in the appearance of the maps. This probably implies that the properties of the masers do not range widely throughout a maser shell. The maps have been used to produce star-centered surface maps of the distribution of maser emission from each star. The surface maps generally are sparsely filled with OH emission and are dominated by relatively few (about 10) major clumps of emission. The presence of large regions of low intensity in the surface maps suggests that the number of individual emitting elements is relatively small or that there are a larger number of elements which are distributed in the shell in a distinctly nonrandom manner.

  2. Non-Zeeman circular polarization of molecular maser spectral lines

    SciTech Connect

    Houde, Martin

    2014-11-01

    We apply the anisotropic resonant scattering model developed to explain the presence of non-Zeeman circular polarization signals recently detected in the {sup 12}CO (J = 2 → 1) and (J = 1 → 0) transitions in molecular clouds to Stokes V spectra of SiO v = 1 and v = 2, (J = 1 → 0) masers commonly observed in evolved stars. It is found that the observed antisymmetric 'S'- and symmetric '∪'- or '∩'-shaped spectral profiles naturally arise when the maser radiation scatters off populations of foreground molecules located outside the velocity range covered by the background maser radiation. Using typical values for the relevant physical parameters, it is estimated that magnetic field strengths on the order of a few times 15 mG are sufficient to explain the observational results found in the literature.

  3. Runaway electrons in a tokamak: A free-electron maser

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzan, B.; Steuer, K.

    1997-04-01

    In ohmic divertor plasma discharges of the ASDEX upgrade tokamak containing a small population of runaway electrons, fluctuating emission in the microwave region with a very narrow bandwidth is observed. The radiation can be explained by relativistic runaway electrons, which are captured in a ripple resonance of the tokamak and are thus made monoenergetic enough that they can undergo the collective instability of a free-electron maser. From the frequency of the maser, the energy of the runaway electrons, and from the linewidth and energy per radiation pulse, the particle density of the runaway electrons is determined locally. Observing this maser radiation is thus a different diagnostic for runaway electrons in tokamaks. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. MeerKAT and its potential for Cosmic MASER Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Roy; Goedhart, Sharmila; Jonas, Justin

    2012-07-01

    The MeerKAT radio telescope array is the South African precursor instrument for the proposed Square Kilometer Array's mid-band frequency range. It will be the most sensitive centimetre-wavelength telescope in the southern hemisphere until the SKA is built. It will cover a broad range of astronomical science from the evolution of galaxies to tests of Einstein's theory of General Relativity, using Pulsars. The chosen frequency bands will enable sensitive southern Galactic maser surveys in the main lines of hydroxyl, 12 GHz methanol and perhaps 14.5 GHz formaldehyde lines as well as searches for redshifted water masers from red-shifts greater than about 0.5. Proposals for Large Surveys using MeerKAT were solicited in late 2009 and resulted in some 20 proposals from teams comprising 500 scientists, world-wide. The successful proposals relevant to maser research will be discussed below.

  5. Binary systems: implications for outflows & periodicities relevant to masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nishant K.; Deshpande, Avinash A.

    2012-07-01

    Bipolar molecular outflows have been observed and studied extensively in the past, but some recent observations of periodic variations in maser intensity pose new challenges. Even quasi-periodic maser flares have been observed and reported in the literature. Motivated by these data, we have tried to study situations in binary systems with specific attention to the two observed features, i.e., the bipolar flows and the variabilities in the maser intensity. We have studied the evolution of spherically symmetric wind from one of the bodies in the binary system, in the plane of the binary. Our approach includes the analytical study of rotating flows with numerical computation of streamlines of fluid particles using PLUTO code. We present the results of our findings assuming simple configurations, and discuss the implications.

  6. Binary systems: implications for outflows and periodicities relevant to masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nishant K.; Deshpande, Avinash A.

    Bipolar molecular outflows have been observed and studied extensively in the past, but some recent observations of periodic variations in maser intensity pose new challenges. Even quasi-periodic maser flares have been observed and reported in the literature. Motivated by these data, we have tried to study situations in binary systems with specific attention to the two observed features, i.e., the bipolar flows and the variabilities in the maser intensity. We have studied the evolution of spherically symmetric wind from one of the bodies in the binary system, in the plane of the binary. Our approach includes the analytical study of rotating flows with numerical computation of streamlines of fluid particles using PLUTO code. We present the results of our findings assuming simple configurations, and discuss the implications.

  7. Physics of systematic frequency variations in hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattison, Edward M.

    1990-01-01

    The frequency stability of hydrogen masers for intervals longer that 10(exp 4) seconds is limited at present by systematic processes. Researchers discuss the physics of frequency-determining mechanisms internal to the maser that are susceptible to systematic variations, and the connections between these internal mechanisms and external environmental factors. Based upon estimates of the magnitudes of systematic effects, they find that the primary internal mechanisms currently limiting long-term maser frequency stability are cavity pulling, at the level parts in 10(exp 15) per day, and wall shift variations, at the level of parts in 10(exp 16) to parts in 10(exp 15) per day. They discuss strategies for reducing systematic frequency variations.

  8. Experimental evaluation of a ruby maser at 43 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, C. R.; Neff, D.

    1982-01-01

    Inversion ratio measurements were conducted at several frequencies between 27 and 43 GHz for a pink ruby material (0.05% Cr/3+/ in Al2O3) at the push-pull pump angle of 54.7 degrees in order to determine the upper frequency limit where pink ruby could be expected to operate as a practical maser amplifier. Based on these measurements, a single-stage maser was developed which yielded 8 + or - 1 dB net gain and a 3 dB bandwidth of 180 MHz at a center frequency of 42.5 GHz. It is concluded that a multistage reflected wave maser could achieve bandwidths exceeding 1 GHz with 30 dB net gain at center frequencies near 40 GHz.

  9. Experimental evaluation of a ruby maser at 43 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. R.; Neff, D.

    1982-11-01

    Inversion ratio measurements were conducted at several frequencies between 27 and 43 GHz for a pink ruby material (0.05% Cr/3+/ in Al2O3) at the push-pull pump angle of 54.7 degrees in order to determine the upper frequency limit where pink ruby could be expected to operate as a practical maser amplifier. Based on these measurements, a single-stage maser was developed which yielded 8 + or - 1 dB net gain and a 3 dB bandwidth of 180 MHz at a center frequency of 42.5 GHz. It is concluded that a multistage reflected wave maser could achieve bandwidths exceeding 1 GHz with 30 dB net gain at center frequencies near 40 GHz.

  10. Proper Motions of Water Masers in Circumstellar Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvel, K. B.; Diamond, P. J.; Kemball, A. J.

    We present proper motion measurements of circumstellar water masers obtained with the VLBA. The objects observed include S Persei, VX Sagittarii, U Herculis, VY Canis Majoris, NML Cygni, IK Tauri and RX Bootis. Results of the observations and modeling indicate that the water masers exist in a kinematically complex region of the circumstellar envelope, which is not well fit by the standard model of a uniformly expanding spherical wind. Attempts at fitting an ellipsoidal geometric distribution with a variety of kinematic models are presented. Estimates for the distances of the stars are also discussed. A change in position of the maser spots as a function of velocity has been measured. This effect may be used to place limits on accelerations in the masing gas.

  11. Water masers in W49N - The youngest stellar jet?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Low, MORDECAI-M.; Elitzur, Moshe

    1992-01-01

    Observations by Gwinn et al. (1992) of the proper motions of water masers in W49N show that they have an elongated distribution expanding from a common center. Features with high space velocity only occur far from the center, while low-velocity features occur at all distances. It is proposed that water masers in star-forming regions occur in expanding shells swept up by high-velocity winds from young, massive stars during the early phases of the expansion. In W49N, confinement of the bubble by a density distribution with an axial cavity can explain both the velocity field and the shape of the maser distribution. A fully dynamical calculation of the expanding bubble is presented which provides a satisfactory fit for the observations and suggests that this system is only about 250 yr old. Thus these observations may show the very first stages of the formation of a jet from a young stellar object.

  12. Intra-procedure Visualization of the Esophagus using Interventional C-arm CT as Guidance for Left Atrial Radiofrequency Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Tognolini, Alessia; Al-Ahmad, Amin; Wang, Paul J.; Hsia, Henry H.; Herfkens, Robert J.; Girard, Erin; Moore, Teri; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Rational and Objectives During radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) for atrial fibrillation, the esophagus is at risk for thermal injury. In this study we compared using C-arm CT to clinical CT, without administration of oral contrast, to visualize the esophagus and its relationship to the left atrium (LA) and the ostia of the pulmonary veins (PV) during the RF ablation procedure. Materials and Methods Sixteen subjects underwent both cardiac clinical CT and C-arm CT. CT scans were obtained on a multi-detector CT using a standard ECG-gated protocol. C-arm CT scans were obtained using either a multi-sweep protocol with retrospective ECG-gating or a non-gated single-sweep protocol. C-arm CT and CT scans were analyzed in a random order and then compared for the following criteria: a) visualization of the esophagus (yes/no), b) relationship of esophagus position to the 4 PVs, and c) direct contact or absence of a fat pad between the esophagus and PV antrum. Results a) The esophagus was identified in all C-arm CT and CT scans. In 4 cases, orthogonal planes were needed on C-arm CT (inferior PV level); b) In 6 patients, the esophagus location on C-arm CT was different from CT; c) Direct contact was reported in 19/64 (30%) of the segments examined on CT vs. 26/64 (41%) on C-arm CT. In 5/64 segments (8%), C-arm CT overestimated a direct contact of the esophagus to the LA. Conclusion C-arm CT image quality without administration of oral contrast agents was shown to be sufficient for visualization of the esophagus location during an RFCA procedure for atrial fibrillation. PMID:21440465

  13. Measurement of Radiation Exposure When Using the Mini C-Arm to Reduce Pediatric Upper Extremity Fractures.

    PubMed

    Sumko, Michael J; Hennrikus, William; Slough, Jennifer; Jensen, Kelly; Armstrong, Douglas; King, Stephen; Urish, Kenneth

    2016-03-01

    Previous literature has underreported radiation exposure with the use of mini C-arm during pediatric forearm fracture reductions. The purpose of this study is to report an accurate amount of radiation exposure during fracture reductions using a mini C-arm that records the amount of kilovolts, milliamps, and the number of seconds of foot pedal use. Eighty-six consecutive pediatric patients undergoing upper extremity fracture reduction in the emergency department were studied. The orthopaedic resident, either a PGY2 or PGY3, performed a manipulative reduction and casting of the fracture with use of the mini C-arm. Postreduction, in cast, anteroposterior and lateral images from the mini C-arm were saved to the computerized radiology system. The mini C-arm recorded the amount of kilovolts, milliamps, and the number of seconds that the foot pedal was used for each reduction. A radiology physicist (S.K.) calculated the amount of millirem (mR) exposure for each reduction from these data. The resident using the mini C-arm and the fracture pattern affected the amount of radiation exposure. The average mini C-arm mR exposure for distal radius fractures was 63 mR; forearm 109 mR; elbow 53 mR; and hand 69 mR. For comparison, conventional anteroposterior/lateral forearm radiographs emit an average of 20 mR. Less-experienced PGY2 residents had a higher mR exposure per reduction compared with PGY3 residents. Radiation exposure when using the mini C-arm for reduction of pediatric fractures has been underestimated in previous literature. Radiation from the mini C-arm exceeded that from conventional radiographs in most cases. We recommend that residents receive training about the use of the mini C-arm before its utilization as an aid to reduce pediatric fractures in the emergency department.

  14. DISCOVERY OF NUCLEAR WATER MASER EMISSION IN CENTAURUS A

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Juergen; Meier, David S.; Walter, Fabian; Mao, Minnie Y. E-mail: dmeier@nmt.edu E-mail: mmao@nrao.edu; and others

    2013-07-10

    We report the detection of a 22 GHz water maser line in the nearest (D {approx} 3.8 Mpc) radio galaxy Centaurus A (Cen A) using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). The line is centered at a velocity of {approx}960 km s{sup -1}, which is redshifted by about 415 km s{sup -1} from the systemic velocity. Such an offset, as well as the width of {approx}120 km s{sup -1}, could be consistent with either a nuclear maser arising from an accretion disk of the central supermassive black hole (SMBH), or with a jet maser that is emitted from the material that is shocked near the base of the jet in Cen A. The best spatial resolution of our ATCA data constrains the origin of the maser feature within <3 pc of the SMBH. The maser exhibits an isotropic luminosity of {approx}1 L{sub Sun }, which classifies it as a kilomaser, and appears to be variable on timescales of months. A kilomaser can also be emitted by shocked gas in star-forming regions. Given the small projected distance from the core, the large offset from systemic velocity, and the smoothness of the line feature, we conclude that a jet maser line emitted by shocked gas around the base of the active galactic nucleus is the most likely explanation. For this scenario we can infer a minimum density of the radio jet of {approx}> 10 cm{sup -3}, which indicates substantial mass entrainment of surrounding gas into the propagating jet material.

  15. Formaldehyde Masers: Exclusive Tracers of High-mass Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, E. D.; Olmi, L.; Morales Ortiz, J.; Brown, J. E.; Hofner, P.; Kurtz, S.; Linz, H.; Creech-Eakman, M. J.

    2015-11-01

    The detection of four formaldehyde (H2CO) maser regions toward young high-mass stellar objects in the last decade, in addition to the three previously known regions, calls for an investigation of whether H2CO masers are an exclusive tracer of young high-mass stellar objects. We report the first survey specifically focused on the search for 6 cm H2CO masers toward non high-mass star-forming regions (non HMSFRs). The observations were conducted with the 305 m Arecibo Telescope toward 25 low-mass star-forming regions, 15 planetary nebulae and post-AGB stars, and 31 late-type stars. We detected no H2CO emission in our sample of non HMSFRs. To check for the association between high-mass star formation and H2CO masers, we also conducted a survey toward 22 high-mass star-forming regions from a Hi-GAL (Herschel infrared Galactic Plane Survey) sample known to harbor 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers. We detected a new 6 cm H2CO emission line in G32.74-0.07. This work provides further evidence that supports an exclusive association between H2CO masers and young regions of high-mass star formation. Furthermore, we detected H2CO absorption toward all Hi-GAL sources, and toward 24 low-mass star-forming regions. We also conducted a simultaneous survey for OH (4660, 4750, 4765 MHz), H110α (4874 MHz), HCOOH (4916 MHz), CH3OH (5005 MHz), and CH2NH (5289 MHz) toward 68 of the sources in our sample of non HMSFRs. With the exception of the detection of a 4765 MHz OH line toward a pre-planetary nebula (IRAS 04395+3601), we detected no other spectral line to an upper limit of 15 mJy for most sources.

  16. miR-195 enhances the radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells by suppressing CARM1

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Li; Chen, Jiangtao; Zhou, Zhongyong; He, Zhikuan

    2017-01-01

    Background microRNAs (miRNAs) can regulate the sensitivity of cancer cells to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Aberrant expression of miR-195 has been found to be involved in colorectal cancer (CRC); however, its function and underlying mechanism in the radioresistance of CRC remains unclear. Methods The levels of miR-195 and CARM1 were detected by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis in HCT-116 and HT-29 cells, respectively. Colony survival and apoptosis were determined by clonogenic assay and flow cytometry analysis, respectively. The apoptosis-related proteins Bax, Bcl-2, and γ-H2AX were detected using Western blot. The targets of miR-195 were identified by bioinformatic prediction and luciferase reporter assays. CRC cells in vitro and in vivo were exposed to different doses of X-ray radiations. Results miR-195 was downregulated, and CARM1 was upregulated in HCT-116 and HT-29 cells. miR-195 overexpression or CARM1 knockdown suppressed colony survival, induced apoptosis, promoted expression of Bax and γ-H2AX, and inhibited Bcl-2 expression in CRC cells. CARM1 was identified and validated to be a functional target of miR-195. Moreover, restored expression of CARM1 reversed the enhanced radiosensitivity of CRC cells induced by miR-195. Furthermore, miR-195 increased the sensitivity of CRC cells to radiation in vivo. Conclusion miR-195 enhances radiosensitivity of CRC cells through suppressing CARM1. Therefore, miR-195 acts as a potential regulator of radioresistance for CRC cells and as a promising therapeutic target for CRC patients. PMID:28255246

  17. SIMULTANEOUS OBSERVATIONS OF SiO AND H{sub 2}O MASERS TOWARD SYMBIOTIC STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Se-Hyung; Kim, Jaeheon E-mail: jhkim@kasi.re.k

    2010-08-10

    We present the results of simultaneous observations of SiO v = 1, 2, J = 1-0, {sup 29}SiO v = 0, J = 1-0, and H{sub 2}O 6{sub 16}-5{sub 23} maser lines performed with the KVN Yonsei 21 m radio telescope from 2009 November to 2010 January. We searched for these masers in 47 symbiotic stars and detected maser emission from 21 stars, giving the first time detection from 19 stars. Both SiO and H{sub 2}O masers were detected from seven stars of which six were D-type symbiotic stars and one was an S-type star, WRAY 15-1470. In the SiO maser emission, the {sup 28}SiO v = 1 maser was detected from 10 stars, while the v = 2 maser was detected from 15 stars. In particular, the {sup 28}SiO v = 2 maser emission without the v = 1 maser detection was detected from nine stars with a detection rate of 60%, which is much higher than that of isolated Miras/red giants. The {sup 29}SiO v = 0 maser emission was also detected from two stars, H 2-38 and BF Cyg, together with the {sup 28}SiO v = 2 maser. We conclude that these different observational results between isolated Miras/red giants and symbiotic stars may be related with the presence of hot companions in a symbiotic binary system.

  18. Where do the Nuclear H2O masers in Centaurus A Originate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Juergen; Henkel, Christian; Edwards, Philip; Meier, David; Brunthaler, Andreas; Mao, Minnie; Peck, Alison; Brisken, Walter; Mueller, Cornelia; Impellizzeri, Caterina M. V.; McCoy, Mark

    2013-10-01

    We have recently detected nuclear water maser emission in the closest radio galaxy, Centaurus A, using the ATCA (Ott et al. 2013). Even with a maximum baseline of 6 km, the ATCA lacks the spatial resolution required to pin down the exact location of the maser spots and hence unambiguously determine the origin of the maser emission. The spectral properties suggest a jet maser scenario, a maser that is pumped by the jet colliding with an ambient molecular cloud. However, we cannot exclude a disk maser, ie. a maser excited in the accretion disk of Centaurus A's central supermassive black hole (SMBH). Here we propose to use the LBA to spatially resolve the location of the water maser emission in Centaurus A. For a jet maser we will be able to determine the distance from the SMBH, whether it is located at the receding or approaching jet, and measure any positional offset between the maser and the jet. For a disk maser, we will be able to derive a disk model and thus the mass of the SMBH, as well as a geometric distance to the merely 3.8 Mpc distant Cen A. This would contribute to the calibration of the cosmological distance ladder.

  19. Observations of Non Typical Masers at the RT-22 Radio Telescope in 2004-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulga, V. M.; Antyufeyev, O. V.; Zubrin, S. Y.; Myshenko, V. V.; Piddyachiy, V. I.; Korolev, A. M.; Patoka, O. M.

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: Some peculiarities of emission of Class I methanol masers on the 80–71A+ transition at 95 GHz in sources closely associated with protostar-forming regions and in supernova remnants are studied. Here belongs the investigation of SiO (J=2–1) maser variability in R Cassiopeiae, too. Design/methodology/approach: Search for Class I methanol masers is based on the idea of coincidence of regions of their emission with sources of OH masing transition in the bottom level of energy at frequency of 1720 MHz (2Π3/2 J=3/2 F=2–1). Findings: Two methanol masers on transition 80–71A+ (95 GHz) in the supernova remnants IC 443 and Kes 79 are detected. Variabilities of SiO maser emission on transition J=2–1 in R Cassiopeiae are shown for the first time. Conclusions: Variability of methanol and SiO masers is their general feature. On the example of three objects, the possibility of using the 1720 MHz OH maser as an indicator in the search for Class I methanol masers is shown. Especially it is important in the study of methanol maser emission in supernova remnants that has been proved to be true by detection of methanol masers on transition 80–71A+ (95 GHz) in IC 443 and Kes 79. Features of spectra variability of emission in R Cassiopeiae testify to formation and disappearance of SiO (J=2–1) masers.

  20. X-Band Ultra-Low Noise Maser Amplifier Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, G.; Johnson, D.; Ortiz, G.

    1993-01-01

    Noise temperature measurements of an 8440 MHz ultra-low noise maser amplifier (ULNA) have been performed at sub-atmospheric, liquid helium temperatures. The traveling wave maser operated while immersed in a liquid helium bath. The lowest input noise temperature measured was 1.23 plus or minus 0.16 K at a physical temperature of 1.60 kelvin. At this physical temperature the observed gain per unit length of ruby was 4.6 dB/cm, and the amplifier had a 3 dB-bandwidth of 76 MHz.

  1. X-band ultralow-noise maser amplifier performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, G. W.; Ortiz, G. G.; Johnson, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    Noise temperature measurements of an 8440-MHz ultralow noise maser amplifier (ULNA) have been performed at subatmospheric, liquid-helium temperatures. The traveling-wave maser was operated while immersed in a liquid helium bath. The lowest input noise temperature measured was 1.43 +/- 0.16 K at a physical temperature of 1.60 K. At this physical temperature, the observed gain per centimeter of ruby was 4.9 dB/cm. The amplifier had a 3-dB bandwidth of 76 MHz.

  2. N-bursty emission from Uranus: A cyclotron maser source?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, D. B.; Menietti, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    Ray tracing studies of RX-mode emission from the north polar regions of Uranus indicate that the n-bursty radio emission may have a source along field lines with footprints near the northern magnetic pole (perhaps in the cusp), but not necessarily associated with regions of strong UV emission. This is in contrast with similar studies for the Uranus nightside smooth radio emission, which are believed to be due to the cyclotron maser instability. Source regions can be found for both hollow and filled emission cones and for frequencies well above the local gyrofreuquency implying that mechanisms other than the cyclotron maser mechanism may be operating.

  3. Cryogenic H maser in a strong B field

    SciTech Connect

    Maan, A.C.; Stoof, H.T.C.; Verhaar, B.J. )

    1990-03-01

    We study the spin-exchange frequency shift of the cryogenic hydrogen maser for {ital B}{ne}0. A general expression is derived in terms of populations of ground-state hyperfine levels. The coefficients in this expression are calculated in the degenerate-internal-states approximation, as well as to first order in the hyperfine plus Zeeman splitting. Numerical results are compared with rigorous coupled-channel calculations. Some implications are pointed out for the frequency stability of the H maser in a magnetic field.

  4. Magnetic shielding and vacuum test for passive hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubser, D. U.; Wolf, S. A.; Jacoby, A. B.; Jones, L. D.

    1982-01-01

    Vibration tests on high permeability magnetic shields used in the SAO-NRL Advanced Development Model (ADM) hydrogen maser were made. Magnetic shielding factors were measured before and after vibration. Preliminary results indicate considerable (25%) degradation. Test results on the NRL designed vacuum pumping station for the ADM hydrogen maser are also discussed. This system employs sintered zirconium carbon getter pumps to pump hydrogen plus small ion pumps to pump the inert gases. In situ activation tests and pumping characteristics indicate that the system can meet design specifications.

  5. Atomic hydrogen maser measurements with wall surfaces of carbon tetrafluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F. C.; Mattison, E. M.; Imbier, E. A.; Zhai, Z. C.

    1984-01-01

    The principal objectives of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory cold maser research programs are given. This work is aimed principally at understanding more about the interaction of hydrogen atoms with wall coatings of fluorinated ethylene propylene (Dupont Teflon FEP-120 co-polymer) and of carbon tetrafluoride (CE4). The principal measured quantity in these experiments is the wall shift of the maser's output frequency. The wall shift per atomic collision was calculated from the measured wall frequency shift. This assumes that the wall surface area is smooth on a molecular scale.

  6. Dielectric-loaded waveguide circulator for cryogenically cooled and cascaded maser waveguide structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauss, R. C.; Quinn, R. B. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A dielectrically loaded four port waveguide circulator is used with a reflected wave maser connected to a second port between first and third ports to form one of a plurality of cascaded maser waveguide structures. The fourth port is connected to a waveguide loaded with microwave energy absorbing material. The third (output signal) port of one maser waveguide structure is connected by a waveguide loaded with dielectric material to the first (input) port of an adjacent maser waveguide structure, and the second port is connected to a reflected wave maser by a matching transformer which passes the signal to be amplified into and out of the reflected wavemaser and blocks pumping energy in the reflected wave maser from entering the circulator. A number of cascaded maser waveguide structures are thus housed in a relatively small volume of conductive material placed within a cryogenically cooled magnet assembly.

  7. C-arm positioning using virtual fluoroscopy for image-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Silva, T.; Punnoose, J.; Uneri, A.; Goerres, J.; Jacobson, M.; Ketcha, M. D.; Manbachi, A.; Vogt, S.; Kleinszig, G.; Khanna, A. J.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Osgood, G.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2017-03-01

    Introduction: Fluoroscopically guided procedures often involve repeated acquisitions for C-arm positioning at the cost of radiation exposure and time in the operating room. A virtual fluoroscopy system is reported with the potential of reducing dose and time spent in C-arm positioning, utilizing three key advances: robust 3D-2D registration to a preoperative CT; real-time forward projection on GPU; and a motorized mobile C-arm with encoder feedback on C-arm orientation. Method: Geometric calibration of the C-arm was performed offline in two rotational directions (orbit α, orbit β). Patient registration was performed using image-based 3D-2D registration with an initially acquired radiograph of the patient. This approach for patient registration eliminated the requirement for external tracking devices inside the operating room, allowing virtual fluoroscopy using commonly available systems in fluoroscopically guided procedures within standard surgical workflow. Geometric accuracy was evaluated in terms of projection distance error (PDE) in anatomical fiducials. A pilot study was conducted to evaluate the utility of virtual fluoroscopy to aid C-arm positioning in image guided surgery, assessing potential improvements in time, dose, and agreement between the virtual and desired view. Results: The overall geometric accuracy of DRRs in comparison to the actual radiographs at various C-arm positions was PDE (mean ± std) = 1.6 ± 1.1 mm. The conventional approach required on average 8.0 ± 4.5 radiographs spent "fluoro hunting" to obtain the desired view. Positioning accuracy improved from 2.6o ± 2.3o (in α) and 4.1o ± 5.1o (in β) in the conventional approach to 1.5o ± 1.3o and 1.8o ± 1.7o, respectively, with the virtual fluoroscopy approach. Conclusion: Virtual fluoroscopy could improve accuracy of C-arm positioning and save time and radiation dose in the operating room. Such a system could be valuable to training of fluoroscopy technicians as well as

  8. C-arm Positioning Using Virtual Fluoroscopy for Image-Guided Surgery.

    PubMed

    De Silva, T; Punnoose, J; Uneri, A; Goerres, J; Jacobson, M; Ketcha, M D; Manbachi, A; Vogt, S; Kleinszig, G; Khanna, A J; Wolinksy, J-P; Osgood, G; Siewerdsen, J H

    2017-02-11

    Fluoroscopically guided procedures often involve repeated acquisitions for C-arm positioning at the cost of radiation exposure and time in the operating room. A virtual fluoroscopy system is reported with the potential of reducing dose and time spent in C-arm positioning, utilizing three key advances: robust 3D-2D registration to a preoperative CT; real-time forward projection on GPU; and a motorized mobile C-arm with encoder feedback on C-arm orientation. Geometric calibration of the C-arm was performed offline in two rotational directions (orbit α, orbit β). Patient registration was performed using image-based 3D-2D registration with an initially acquired radiograph of the patient. This approach for patient registration eliminated the requirement for external tracking devices inside the operating room, allowing virtual fluoroscopy using commonly available systems in fluoroscopically guided procedures within standard surgical workflow. Geometric accuracy was evaluated in terms of projection distance error (PDE) in anatomical fiducials. A pilot study was conducted to evaluate the utility of virtual fluoroscopy to aid C-arm positioning in image guided surgery, assessing potential improvements in time, dose, and agreement between the virtual and desired view. The overall geometric accuracy of DRRs in comparison to the actual radiographs at various C-arm positions was PDE (mean ± std) = 1.6 ± 1.1 mm. The conventional approach required on average 8.0 ± 4.5 radiographs spent "fluoro hunting" to obtain the desired view. Positioning accuracy improved from 2.6° ± 2.3° (in α) and 4.1° ± 5.1° (in β) in the conventional approach to 1.5° ± 1.3° and 1.8° ± 1.7°, respectively, with the virtual fluoroscopy approach. Virtual fluoroscopy could improve accuracy of C-arm positioning and save time and radiation dose in the operating room. Such a system could be valuable to training of fluoroscopy technicians as well as intraoperative use in fluoroscopically guided

  9. AMMONIA AND CO OBSERVATIONS TOWARD LOW-LUMINOSITY 6.7 GHz METHANOL MASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y. W.; Xu, Y.; Yang, J.; Zhang, S. B.; Pandian, J. D.; Henkel, C.; Menten, K. M.

    2010-09-01

    To investigate whether distinctions exist between low- and high-luminosity Class II 6.7 GHz methanol masers, we have undertaken multi-line mapping observations of various molecular lines, including the NH{sub 3} (1,1), (2,2), (3,3), (4,4), and {sup 12}CO (1-0) transitions, toward a sample of nine low-luminosity 6.7 GHz masers and {sup 12}CO (1-0) observations toward a sample of eight high-luminosity 6.7 GHz masers, for which we already had NH{sub 3} spectral line data. Emission in the NH{sub 3} (1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) transitions was detected in eight out of nine low-luminosity maser sources, in which 14 cores were identified. We derive densities, column densities, temperatures, core sizes, and masses of both low- and high-luminosity maser regions. A comparative analysis of the physical quantities reveals marked distinctions between the low-luminosity and high-luminosity groups: in general, cores associated with high-luminosity 6.7 GHz masers are larger and more massive than those traced by low-luminosity 6.7 GHz masers; regions traced by the high-luminosity masers have larger column densities but lower densities than those of the low-luminosity maser regions. Further, strong correlations between 6.7 GHz maser luminosity and NH{sub 3} (1,1) and (2,2) line widths are found, indicating that internal motions in high-luminosity maser regions are more energetic than those in low-luminosity maser regions. A {sup 12}CO (1-0) outflow analysis also shows distinctions in that outflows associated with high-luminosity masers have wider line wings and larger sizes than those associated with low-luminosity masers.

  10. NEW MASER EMISSION FROM NONMETASTABLE AMMONIA IN NGC 7538. II. GREEN BANK TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS INCLUDING WATER MASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Ian M.; Seojin Kim, Stella

    2011-12-15

    We present new maser emission from {sup 14}NH{sub 3} (9,6) in NGC 7538. Our observations include the known spectral features near v{sub LSR} = -60 km s{sup -1} and -57 km s{sup -1} and several more features extending to -46 km s{sup -1}. In three epochs of observation spanning two months we do not detect any variability in the ammonia masers, in contrast to the >10-fold variability observed in other {sup 14}NH{sub 3} (9,6) masers in the Galaxy over comparable timescales. We also present observations of water masers in all three epochs for which emission is observed over the velocity range -105 km s{sup -1} < v{sub LSR} < -4 km s{sup -1}, including the highest velocity water emission yet observed from NGC 7538. Of the remarkable number of maser species in IRS 1, H{sub 2}O and, now, {sup 14}NH{sub 3} are the only masers known to exhibit emission outside of the velocity range -62 km s{sup -1} < v{sub LSR} < -51 km s{sup -1}. However, we find no significant intensity or velocity correlations between the water emission and ammonia emission. We also present a non-detection in the most sensitive search to date toward any source for emission from the CC{sup 32}S and CC{sup 34}S molecules, indicating an age greater than Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 4} yr for IRS 1-3. We discuss these findings in the context of embedded stellar cores and recent models of the region.

  11. Extragalactic Sub-millimeter H2O Maser - Detection of a 321 GHz Water Maser in Circinus Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Y.; Horiuchi, S.; Doi, A.; Miyoshi, M.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first detection of the extragalactic 321 GHz H2O emission towards the Circinus Galaxy, the nearby Type2 Seyfert galaxy. It is likely that the detected emission is a maser because of the narrow line shape, the compact emission (< 0.66″) and the high energy level of the transition. High velocity emission, red-shifted up to 635 km/s, was tentatively detected. The maser location of about 0.02 pc from the center of the galaxy is estimated by adopting the Kepler rotating disk model. This could be the molecular material observed closest to the central engine.

  12. Cyclotron Maser Emission - Stars, Planets and Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorgul, Irena

    2010-11-01

    X-ray and radio observations of active stars over many years have shown that they frequently generate X-ray bursts that are quickly followed by radio bursts. In many cases the radio bursts are highly polarised. More recently, the star CU Virginis has been found to exhibit pulsar-like behaviour. In both these situations we believe that the radio emission can be best explained by a cyclotron maser type instability initiated by electron beams funnelling down converging magnetic field configurations typical of a dipole magnetic topology. Just such a geometry also exists in the Earth's auroral zone and so our model can explain the Earth's auroral kilometric radiation (AKR). Via a similar process, all the gas giant/magnetised planets in the solar system also emit radio emission. We have established a laboratory-based facility that has verified many of the details of our original theoretical description. The experiment has demonstrated, for example, that an electron beam entering a strongly converging magnetic field geometry does indeed produce a ``horse-shoe'' (or crescent-shaped) distribution in velocity space. It is the generation of this horse-shoe distribution, also observed in the Earth's auroral zone, which is vital for our theoretical model. It leads to a population inversion in the perpendicular velocity distribution and generation of electromagnetic waves close to the cyclotron frequency. We will discuss recent developments in the theory and simulation of the instability and relate these to the laboratory, space and astrophysical observations. The research was supported by UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. The input of R.A. Cairns, R. Bingham, B.J. Kellett and the experimental and computer modelling team at Strathclyde University, Glasgow is gratefully acknowledged.

  13. Intercostal Artery Supplying Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Demonstration of a Tumor Feeder by C-arm CT and Multidetector Row CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyo-Cheol Chung, Jin Wook; Lee, In Joon; An, Sangbu; Seong, Nak Jong; Son, Kyu Ri; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung

    2011-02-15

    This study was designed to describe tumor feeders from the intercostal artery supplying hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) on C-arm CT and multidetector row CT. From March 2008 to May 2009, C-arm CT of the intercostal artery was prospectively performed in 24 HCC patients. Two interventional radiologists, who performed C-arm CT, evaluated tumor feeders on C-arm CT and multidetector row CT scans by consensus. In total, 35 intercostal arteries were examined by C-arm CT. All tumor feeders except one showed a sharp upward turn at or near the costochondral junction. On axial C-arm CT images, all tumor feeders were observed as an enhancing dot in the upper intercostal space along the diaphragm. On multidetector CT scans, 17 tumor feeders were observed and 18 were not. Tumor feeders from the intercostal artery are observed as an enhancing dot along the diaphragm on C-arm CT and can be seen on multidetector row CT in approximately half of patients.

  14. Experimental evaluation of the accuracy at the C-arm pose estimation with x-ray images.

    PubMed

    Thurauf, Sabine; Vogt, Florian; Hornung, Oliver; Korner, Mario; Nasseri, M Ali; Knoll, Alois; Thurauf, Sabine; Vogt, Florian; Hornung, Oliver; Korner, Mario; Nasseri, M Ali; Knoll, Alois; Thurauf, Sabine; Knoll, Alois; Korner, Mario; Vogt, Florian; Hornung, Oliver; Nasseri, M Ali

    2016-08-01

    C-arm X-ray systems need a high spatial accuracy for applications like cone beam computed tomography and 2D/3D overlay. One way to achieve the needed precision is a model-based calibration of the C-arm system. For such a calibration a kinematic and dynamic model of the system is constructed whose parameters are computed by pose measurements of the C-arm. Instead of common measurement systems used for a model-based calibration for robots like laser trackers, we use X-ray images of a calibration phantom to measure the C-arm pose. By the direct use of the imaging system, we overcome registration errors between the measurement device and the C-arm system. The C-arm pose measurement by X-ray imaging, the new measurement technique, has to be evaluated to check if the measurement accuracy is sufficient for the model-based calibration regarding the two mentioned applications. The scope of this work is a real world evaluation of the C-arm pose measurement accuracy with X-ray images of a calibration phantom using relative phantom movements and a laser tracker as ground truth.

  15. Intense Electron Beam Cyclotron Masers with Microsecond Pulselengths

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-20

    undesired oscillations, M412l absolute instability, TB1 Igyro-BWO, TESI second and Oird harmonic), were te most serious competing modes in the prsent Bragg...high harmonic interactions such as the second harmonic TESI gyrotron interaction and the third harmonic TE51 absolute instability interaction. We...We ruled out the TE31 CARM and high harmonic gyrotron modes such as a second harmonic TBE5 or third harmonic TESI in interpreting the breakdown pattern

  16. Study of Improvement of Hydrogen Maser Frequency Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crampton, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    The research work dealt primarily with reducing the atom leakage rate using as storage surfaces the FEP Teflon surfaces conventionally used in contemporary hydrogen maser frequency standards. Some work was also done on a possible alternative to the conventional surfaces, but the results here and elsewhere suggest that the alternative surface is not promising enough to warrant much further work.

  17. The 6-GHz multibeam maser survey - I. Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. A.; Caswell, J. L.; Fuller, G. A.; Avison, A.; Breen, S. L.; Brooks, K.; Burton, M. G.; Chrysostomou, A.; Cox, J.; Diamond, P. J.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Gray, M. D.; Hoare, M. G.; Masheder, M. R. W.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Pestalozzi, M.; Phillips, C.; Quinn, L.; Thompson, M. A.; Voronkov, M. A.; Walsh, A.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Wong-McSweeney, D.; Yates, J. A.; Cohen, R. J.

    2009-01-01

    A new seven-beam 6-7GHz receiver has been built to survey the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds for newly forming high-mass stars that are pinpointed by strong methanol maser emission at 6668MHz. The receiver was jointly constructed by Jodrell Bank Observatory (JBO) and the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF) and allows simultaneous coverage at 6668 and 6035MHz. It was successfully commissioned at Parkes in 2006 January and is now being used to conduct the Parkes-Jodrell multibeam maser survey of the Milky Way. This will be the first systematic survey of the entire Galactic plane for masers of not only 6668-MHz methanol, but also 6035-MHz excited-state hydroxyl. The survey is two orders of magnitude faster than most previous systematic surveys and has an rms noise level of ~0.17Jy. This paper describes the observational strategy, techniques and reduction procedures of the Galactic and Magellanic Cloud surveys, together with deeper, pointed, follow-up observations and complementary observations with other instruments. It also includes an estimate of the survey detection efficiency. The 111d of observations with the Parkes telescope have so far yielded >800 methanol sources, of which ~350 are new discoveries. The whole project will provide the first comprehensive Galaxy-wide catalogue of 6668-MHz and 6035-MHz masers.

  18. A shock origin for interstellar H2O masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; Elitzur, Moshe; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1993-01-01

    We present a comprehensive model for the powerful H2O masers observed in starforming regions. In this model the masers occur behind dissociative shocks propagating in dense regions. This paper focuses on high-velocity dissociative shocks in which the heat of H2 reformation on dust grains maintains a large column of 300 - 400 K gas, where the chemistry drives a considerable fraction of the oxygen not in CO to form H2O. The H2O column densities, the hydrogen densities, and the warm temperatures produced by these shocks are sufficiently high to enable powerful maser action, where the maser is excited by thermal collisions with H atoms and H2 molecules. A critical ingredient in determining the shock structure is the magnetic pressure, and the fields required by our models are in agreement with recent observations. The observed brightness temperatures are the result of coherent velocity regions which have dimensions in the shock plane that are five to 50 times the postshock thickness.

  19. Ultra-stable performance of the superconducting cavity maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. J.; Wang, Rabi T.

    1991-01-01

    Recent measurements on the superconducting cavity maser (SCM) oscillator show frequency stability of parts in 10 exp 15 for times from 1 to 1000 sec. Phase noise of approximately -80 dB/f-cubed was also measured. This short- and mid-term performance is believed to be better than that of any known microwave oscillator. In particular, stability at a measuring time of 1 sec is 10 times better than that of a hydrogen maser, and phase noise at 8 GHz is more than 20 dB below that of the best multiplied quartz crystal oscillators. Substantial technical improvements have been made to eliminate frequency instability due to operational parameters. They are temperature, pump frequency, pump power, pump frequency polarization, temperature gradient, coupling strength, and output VSWR. Either the parameter was stabilized or the coefficient which couples the parameter to the operating frequency was minimized. A frequency pulling coil has been implemented and tested to enable the SCM to be slaved to a hydrogen maser with a time constant of approximately 50 sec. This combination would allow the excellent long term performance of the hydrogen maser to be improved by the newly available short term performance of the SCM.

  20. Improved masers for X-band and Ku band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauss, R. C.; Quinn, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    Slow-wave structure of traveling-wave maser utilizes comb system which is comprised of ruby on one side and alumina on other; alumina also supports isolator material. Radiation at pump frequency is coupled to ruby through shaped alumina strips. Contact between ruby bars and comb completes conductance path for heat transfer.

  1. A beam-maser instability: Direct amplification of radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. P.; Zhou, G. C.; Yoon, Peter H.; Wu, C. S.

    2002-06-01

    The cyclotron maser instability has been applied in the past to laboratory microwave generation devices, and radiation from planetary magnetospheres, such as Earth's kilometric radiation and Jovian decametric radiation. Recently, the same concept was put forth to explain solar coronal radio bursts. In particular, it was suggested that the ordinary (O) mode propagating in antiparallel direction with respect to the electron beam may be important. For this reason, this article revisits the maser instability theory with a particular emphasis on understanding the key difference between forward- and backward-propagating O-mode masers. It is found that the O-mode maser instability is excited over a significant range of wave phase angle which corresponds to the backward propagation. Of the various physical parameters the average beam speed and the ratio of plasma-to-gyro-frequencies, ωp/Ω, play important roles. Past discussions have emphasized the role of ωp/Ω. The present analysis also includes the effects of average beam speed on the instability. It is shown that there is a critical beam speed for the instability onset, beyond which the growth rate is quasi-independent of the beam speed. Such a finding has not been reported in the literature before.

  2. Ultra-stable performance of the superconducting cavity maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. J.; Wang, Rabi T.

    1991-01-01

    Recent measurements on the superconducting cavity maser (SCM) oscillator show frequency stability of parts in 10 exp 15 for times from 1 to 1000 sec. Phase noise of approximately -80 dB/f-cubed was also measured. This short- and mid-term performance is believed to be better than that of any known microwave oscillator. In particular, stability at a measuring time of 1 sec is 10 times better than that of a hydrogen maser, and phase noise at 8 GHz is more than 20 dB below that of the best multiplied quartz crystal oscillators. Substantial technical improvements have been made to eliminate frequency instability due to operational parameters. They are temperature, pump frequency, pump power, pump frequency polarization, temperature gradient, coupling strength, and output VSWR. Either the parameter was stabilized or the coefficient which couples the parameter to the operating frequency was minimized. A frequency pulling coil has been implemented and tested to enable the SCM to be slaved to a hydrogen maser with a time constant of approximately 50 sec. This combination would allow the excellent long term performance of the hydrogen maser to be improved by the newly available short term performance of the SCM.

  3. A shock origin for interstellar H2O masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; Elitzur, Moshe; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1993-01-01

    We present a comprehensive model for the powerful H2O masers observed in starforming regions. In this model the masers occur behind dissociative shocks propagating in dense regions. This paper focuses on high-velocity dissociative shocks in which the heat of H2 reformation on dust grains maintains a large column of 300 - 400 K gas, where the chemistry drives a considerable fraction of the oxygen not in CO to form H2O. The H2O column densities, the hydrogen densities, and the warm temperatures produced by these shocks are sufficiently high to enable powerful maser action, where the maser is excited by thermal collisions with H atoms and H2 molecules. A critical ingredient in determining the shock structure is the magnetic pressure, and the fields required by our models are in agreement with recent observations. The observed brightness temperatures are the result of coherent velocity regions which have dimensions in the shock plane that are five to 50 times the postshock thickness.

  4. ATCA OBSERVATIONS OF SiO MASERS IN THE GALACTIC CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    Li Juan; An Tao; Shen Zhiqiang; Miyazaki, Atsushi E-mail: antao@shao.ac.c E-mail: amiya@miz.nao.ac.j

    2010-09-01

    We present the Australia Telescope Compact Array observations of the SiO masers in the Galactic center (GC) in transitions of v = 1, J = 2-1 at 86 GHz and v = 1, J = 1-0 at 43 GHz. Two 86 GHz SiO masers were detected within the central parsec, and they are associated with IRS 10EE and IRS 15NE, respectively. We detected eighteen 43 GHz SiO masers within a projected separation of {approx_lt}2 pc from Sagittarius A*, among which seven masers are newly discovered from our observations. This raises the total number of 43 GHz SiO masers within the central 4 pc of the GC region to 22. Simultaneous observations at 86 and 43 GHz showed that the intensity of 43 GHz SiO maser is {approx}3 times higher than that of 86 GHz maser in IRS 10EE (an OH/IR star), while the integrated flux of the SiO maser emission at 43 GHz is comparable with that at 86 GHz in IRS 15NE (an ordinary Mira variable). These results are consistent with previous observations of massive late-type stars in the Galaxy in which the 86 GHz SiO maser is in general weaker than the 43 GHz SiO maser in OH/IR stars, while the two transitions are comparably strong in Mira stars.

  5. SiO and CH3OH mega-masers in NGC 1068

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junzhi; Zhang, Jiangshui; Gao, Yu; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Li, Di; Fang, Min; Shi, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Maser is an acronym for microwave amplification by stimulated emission of radiation; in astronomy mega-masers are masers in galaxies that are ≥106 times more luminous than typical galactic maser sources. Observational studies of mega-masers can help us to understand their origins and characteristics. More importantly, mega-masers can be used as diagnostic tracers to probe the physical properties of their parent galaxies. Since the late 1970s, only three types of molecules have been found to form mega-masers: H2O, OH and H2CO. Here we report the detection of both SiO and CH3OH mega-masers near the centre of Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 at millimetre wavelengths, obtained using the IRAM 30-m telescope. We argue that the SiO mega-maser originated from the nuclear disk and the CH3OH mega-maser originated from shock fronts. High-resolution observations in the future will enable us to investigate AGN feedback and determine the masses of central supermassive black holes in such galaxies. PMID:25386834

  6. SiO and CH3OH mega-masers in NGC 1068.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junzhi; Zhang, Jiangshui; Gao, Yu; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Li, Di; Fang, Min; Shi, Yong

    2014-11-11

    Maser is an acronym for microwave amplification by stimulated emission of radiation; in astronomy mega-masers are masers in galaxies that are ≥ 10(6) times more luminous than typical galactic maser sources. Observational studies of mega-masers can help us to understand their origins and characteristics. More importantly, mega-masers can be used as diagnostic tracers to probe the physical properties of their parent galaxies. Since the late 1970s, only three types of molecules have been found to form mega-masers: H2O, OH and H2CO. Here we report the detection of both SiO and CH3OH mega-masers near the centre of Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 at millimetre wavelengths, obtained using the IRAM 30-m telescope. We argue that the SiO mega-maser originated from the nuclear disk and the CH3OH mega-maser originated from shock fronts. High-resolution observations in the future will enable us to investigate AGN feedback and determine the masses of central supermassive black holes in such galaxies.

  7. UNUSUAL SHOCK-EXCITED OH MASER EMISSION IN A YOUNG PLANETARY NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Hai-Hua; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Walsh, Andrew J.; Gómez, José F.; Green, James A.; Dawson, Joanne R.; Ellingsen, Simon P.; Breen, Shari L.; Jones, Paul A.; Cunningham, Maria R.; Gibson, Steven J.

    2016-01-20

    We report on OH maser emission toward G336.644−0.695 (IRAS 16333−4807), which is a H{sub 2}O maser-emitting Planetary Nebula (PN). We have detected 1612, 1667, and 1720 MHz OH masers at two epochs using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, hereby confirming it as the seventh known case of an OH-maser-emitting PN. This is only the second known PN showing 1720 MHz OH masers after K 3−35 and the only evolved stellar object with 1720 MHz OH masers as the strongest transition. This PN is one of a group of very young PNe. The 1612 MHz and 1667 MHz masers are at a similar velocity to the 22 GHz H{sub 2}O masers, whereas the 1720 MHz masers show a variable spectrum, with several components spread over a higher velocity range (up to 36 km s{sup −1}). We also detect Zeeman splitting in the 1720 MHz transition at two epochs (with field strengths of ∼2 to ∼10 mG), which suggests the OH emission at 1720 MHz is formed in a magnetized environment. These 1720 MHz OH masers may trace short-lived equatorial ejections during the formation of the PN.

  8. Automatic cable artifact removal for cardiac C-arm CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, C.; Schäfer, D.; Kim, M.; Chen, S. J.; Carroll, J.; Eshuis, P.; Dössel, O.; Grass, M.

    2014-03-01

    Cardiac C-arm computed tomography (CT) imaging using interventional C-arm systems can be applied in various areas of interventional cardiology ranging from structural heart disease and electrophysiology interventions to valve procedures in hybrid operating rooms. In contrast to conventional CT systems, the reconstruction field of view (FOV) of C-arm systems is limited to a region of interest in cone-beam (along the patient axis) and fan-beam (in the transaxial plane) direction. Hence, highly X-ray opaque objects (e.g. cables from the interventional setup) outside the reconstruction field of view, yield streak artifacts in the reconstruction volume. To decrease the impact of these streaks a cable tracking approach on the 2D projection sequences with subsequent interpolation is applied. The proposed approach uses the fact that the projected position of objects outside the reconstruction volume depends strongly on the projection perspective. By tracking candidate points over multiple projections only objects outside the reconstruction volume are segmented in the projections. The method is quantitatively evaluated based on 30 simulated CT data sets. The 3D root mean square deviation to a reference image could be reduced for all cases by an average of 50 % (min 16 %, max 76 %). Image quality improvement is shown for clinical whole heart data sets acquired on an interventional C-arm system.

  9. C-arm CT with XRIIs and digital flat panels: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahrig, Rebecca; Ganguly, Arundhuti; Starman, Jared D.; Strobel, Norbert K.

    2004-10-01

    C-arm CT first emerged as a useful high-contrast imaging modality in the late 1990s, using an XRII as the large area x-ray detector. To date, the C-arm approach to intra-procedural 3D imaging has primarily been used for high-contrast imaging tasks. The emerging goal for these systems is to extend the imaging range into the area of soft-tissue, and it is thought that digital flat-panel detectors may help. Flat panels replace the analog image intensifier, the camera optics, the pickup tube and the analog-to-digital converter with an all-digital detector. Flat panel detectors have a linear response, do not require distortion correction, do not suffer from veiling glare or blooming, and have higher dynamic range that current XRIIs. On the other hand, XRIIs have greater flexibility in FOV, and could support higher frame rates at high resolution, thereby reducing the effects of view aliasing. We have experience with a typical XRII-based C-arm imaging system and a new high-end C-arm equipped with a large flat-panel detector. Initial investigations show that when projection pixel size, acquisition geometry and focal spot size are matched, the flat-panel-based system produces reconstructions with improved MTF, primarily due to the additional interpolation step required for XRII warp correction. Investigations of artifact levels and comparison with in vivo CT images are presented.

  10. C-arm technique using distance driven method for nephrolithiasis and kidney stones detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malalla, Nuhad; Sun, Pengfei; Chen, Ying; Lipkin, Michael E.; Preminger, Glenn M.; Qin, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Distance driven represents a state of art method that used for reconstruction for x-ray techniques. C-arm tomography is an x-ray imaging technique that provides three dimensional information of the object by moving the C-shaped gantry around the patient. With limited view angle, C-arm system was investigated to generate volumetric data of the object with low radiation dosage and examination time. This paper is a new simulation study with two reconstruction methods based on distance driven including: simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) and Maximum Likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM). Distance driven is an efficient method that has low computation cost and free artifacts compared with other methods such as ray driven and pixel driven methods. Projection images of spherical objects were simulated with a virtual C-arm system with a total view angle of 40 degrees. Results show the ability of limited angle C-arm technique to generate three dimensional images with distance driven reconstruction.

  11. Extended CH3OH maser flare excited by a bursting massive YSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscadelli, L.; Sanna, A.; Goddi, C.; Walmsley, M. C.; Cesaroni, R.; Caratti o Garatti, A.; Stecklum, B.; Menten, K. M.; Kraus, A.

    2017-04-01

    Aims: Recently, substantial flaring in the 6.7 GHz methanol maser line has been observed toward the high-mass young stellar object (YSO) S255 NIRS 3, where an accretion burst was also detected in the IR. Our goal is to study the change in the properties of the 6.7 GHz masers between the pre- and outburst phases, and investigate the connection between the maser and the accretion burst. Methods: With the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) and the European VLBI Network (EVN), we performed observations of the 6.7 GHz masers (covering a range in angular resolution from a few milliarcseconds to ≈1'') during the burst phase and compared these observations with pre-burst measurements at similar spatial scales. Results: The accretion burst and the subsequent increase in IR luminosity are very likely the origin of the 6.7 GHz maser flare. Since most maser centers operate in the unsaturated regime, a change by a relatively small factor (≈5) in the flux of pumping photons has produced an exponential growth in the maser intensity. The main pre-burst maser cluster is no longer detected during the burst. Compared to the pre-burst phase, flaring 6.7 GHz masers emit across a different VLSR range that is more strongly redshifted, and the emission extends over a larger area at larger separation from the high-mass YSO. In particular, the outburst peak emission originates from a remarkably extended (0.̋2-0.̋3) maser plateau at a radial distance of 500-1000 AU from the source. Conclusions: Both the maser flare and the extraordinarily large extent of the maser structure can be a natural consequence of the burst in the accretion luminosity of the high-mass YSO. Our results strongly support models that predict IR radiative pumping for the 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers.

  12. An H2O Maser survey towards BGPS sources in the Outer Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Hong-Wei; Zhou, Jian-Jun; Esimbek, Jarken; Wu, Gang; He, Yu-Xin; Ji, Wei-Guang; Tang, Xiao-Ke; Yuan, Ye

    2016-06-01

    We performed an H2O maser survey towards 274 Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) sources with 85° < l < 193° using the Nanshan 25 m radio telescope. We detected 25 H2O masers, and five of them are new detections. The detection rate of H2O masers in our sample is 9% which is very low. The detection rate of H2O masers increases as the 1.1 mm flux density of BGPS sources increases, and both the peak flux density and luminosity of H2O masers increase as the sources evolve. The detection rate of H2O masers toward BGPS sources without HCO+ emission is low. The BGPS sources associated with both H2O and CH3OH masers seem to be more compact than those only associated with H2O masers. This indicates that the sources with both masers may be in a relatively later evolutionary stage. The strongest H2O maser source G133.715+01.217, also well known as W3 IRS 5 which has a flux density of 2.9×103 Jy, was detected at eight different nearby positions. By measuring the correlation between the flux densities of these H2O masers and their angular distance from the true source location, we get the influence radius r = \\frac{1}{{0.8}}log ≤ft({\\frac{{F_0}}{{3\\text{rms}}}}\\right). For our observations, strong sources can be detected anywhere within this radius. It is helpful to determine whether or not a weak maser nearby the strong maser is a true detection.

  13. A Water Maser and NH3 Survey of GLIMPSE Extended Green Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyganowski, C. J.; Koda, J.; Rosolowsky, E.; Towers, S.; Donovan Meyer, J.; Egusa, F.; Momose, R.; Robitaille, T. P.

    2013-02-01

    We present the results of a Nobeyama 45 m H2O maser and NH3 survey of all 94 northern GLIMPSE extended green objects (EGOs), a sample of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) identified based on their extended 4.5 μm emission. We observed the NH3(1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) inversion lines, and detected emission toward 97%, 63%, and 46% of our sample, respectively (median rms ~ 50 mK). The H2O maser detection rate is 68% (median rms ~ 0.11 Jy). The derived H2O maser and clump-scale gas properties are consistent with the identification of EGOs as young MYSOs. To explore the degree of variation among EGOs, we analyze subsamples defined based on mid-infrared (MIR) properties or maser associations. H2O masers and warm dense gas, as indicated by emission in the higher-excitation NH3 transitions, are most frequently detected toward EGOs also associated with both Class I and II CH3OH masers. Ninety-five percent (81%) of such EGOs are detected in H2O (NH3(3,3)), compared to only 33% (7%) of EGOs without either CH3OH maser type. As populations, EGOs associated with Class I and/or II CH3OH masers have significantly higher NH3 line widths, column densities, and kinetic temperatures than EGOs undetected in CH3OH maser surveys. However, we find no evidence for statistically significant differences in H2O maser properties (such as maser luminosity) among any EGO subsamples. Combining our data with the 1.1 mm continuum Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey, we find no correlation between isotropic H2O maser luminosity and clump number density. H2O maser luminosity is weakly correlated with clump (gas) temperature and clump mass.

  14. GLOBAL VERY LONG BASELINE INTERFEROMETRY OBSERVATIONS OF THE 6.0 GHz HYDROXYL MASERS IN ONSALA 1

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, Vincent L.; Sjouwerman, Lorant O. E-mail: lsjouwer@nrao.ed

    2010-06-10

    We present global very long baseline interferometry observations of the first excited-state hydroxyl (OH) masers in the massive star-forming region Onsala 1 (ON 1). The 29 masers detected are nearly all from the 6035 MHz transition and nearly all are identifiable as Zeeman pair components. The 6030 and 6035 MHz masers are coincident with previously published positions of ground-state masers to within a few milliarcseconds, and the magnetic fields deduced from Zeeman splitting are comparable. The 6.0 GHz masers in ON 1 are always found in close spatial association with 1665 MHz OH masers, in contrast to the situation in the massive star-forming region W3(OH), suggesting that extreme high density OH maser sites (excited-state masers with no accompanying ground-state maser, as seen in W3(OH)) are absent from ON 1. The large magnetic field strength among the northern, blueshifted masers is confirmed. The northern masers may trace an outflow or be associated with an exciting source separate from the other masers, or the relative velocities of the northern and southern masers may be indicative of expansion and rotation. High angular resolution observations of nonmasing material will be required in order to understand the complex maser distribution in ON 1.

  15. SOFIA/GREAT Discovery of Terahertz Water Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Melnick, Gary J.; Kaufman, Michael J.; Wiesemeyer, Helmut; Güsten, Rolf; Kraus, Alex; Menten, Karl M.; Ricken, Oliver; Faure, Alexandre

    2017-07-01

    We report the discovery of water maser emission at frequencies above 1 THz. Using the GREAT instrument on SOFIA, we have detected emission in the 1.296411 THz {8}27-{7}34 transition of water toward three oxygen-rich evolved stars: W Hya, U Her, and VY CMa. An upper limit on the 1.296 THz line flux was obtained toward R Aql. Near-simultaneous observations of the 22.23508 GHz {6}16-{5}23 water maser transition were carried out toward all four sources using the Effelsberg 100 m telescope. The measured line fluxes imply 22 GHz/1.296 THz photon luminosity ratios of 0.012, 0.12, and 0.83, respectively, for W Hya, U Her, and VY CMa, values that confirm the 22 GHz maser transition to be unsaturated in W Hya and U Her. We also detected the 1.884888 THz {8}45-{7}52 transition toward W Hya and VY CMa, and the 1.278266 THz {7}43-{6}52 transition toward VY CMa. Like the 22 GHz maser transition, all three of the THz emission lines detected here originate from the ortho-H2O spin isomer. Based upon a model for the circumstellar envelope of W Hya, we estimate that stimulated emission is responsible for ∼85% of the observed 1.296 THz line emission, and thus that this transition may be properly described as a terahertz-frequency maser. In the case of the 1.885 THz transition, by contrast, our W Hya model indicates that the observed emission is dominated by spontaneous radiative decay, even though a population inversion exists. GREAT is a development by the MPI für Radioastronomie and the KOSMA/Universität zu Köln, in cooperation with the MPI für Sonnensystemforschung and the DLR Institut für Planetenforschung.

  16. Simulated Galactic methanol maser distribution to constrain Milky Way parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiroga-Nuñez, L. H.; van Langevelde, H. J.; Reid, M. J.; Green, J. A.

    2017-08-01

    Context. Using trigonometric parallaxes and proper motions of masers associated with massive young stars, the Bar and Spiral Structure Legacy (BeSSeL) survey has reported the most accurate values of the Galactic parameters so far. The determination of these parameters with high accuracy has a widespread impact on Galactic and extragalactic measurements. Aims: This research is aimed at establishing the confidence with which such parameters can be determined. This is relevant for the data published in the context of the BeSSeL survey collaboration, but also for future observations, in particular from the southern hemisphere. In addition, some astrophysical properties of the masers can be constrained, notably the luminosity function. Methods: We have simulated the population of maser-bearing young stars associated with Galactic spiral structure, generating several samples and comparing them with the observed samples used in the BeSSeL survey. Consequently, we checked the determination of Galactic parameters for observational biases introduced by the sample selection. Results: Galactic parameters obtained by the BeSSeL survey do not seem to be biased by the sample selection used. In fact, the published error estimates appear to be conservative for most of the parameters. We show that future BeSSeL data and future observations with southern arrays will improve the Galactic parameters estimates and smoothly reduce their mutual correlation. Moreover, by modeling future parallax data with larger distance values and, thus, greater relative uncertainties for a larger numbers of sources, we found that parallax-distance biasing is an important issue. Hence, using fractional parallax uncertainty in the weighting of the motion data is imperative. Finally, the luminosity function for 6.7 GHz methanol masers was determined, allowing us to estimate the number of Galactic methanol masers.

  17. The rotate-plus-shift C-arm trajectory: complete CT data with limited angular rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritschl, Ludwig; Kuntz, Jan; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2015-03-01

    In the last decade C-arm-based cone-beam CT became a widely used modality for intraoperative imaging. Typically a C-arm scan is performed using a circle-like trajectory around a region of interest. Therefor an angular range of at least 180° plus fan-angle must be covered to ensure a completely sampled data set. This fact defines some constraints on the geometry and technical specifications of a C-arm system, for example a larger C radius or a smaller C opening respectively. These technical modifications are usually not beneficial in terms of handling and usability of the C-arm during classical 2D applications like fluoroscopy. The method proposed in this paper relaxes the constraint of 180° plus fan-angle rotation to acquire a complete data set. The proposed C-arm trajectory requires a motorization of the orbital axis of the C and of ideally two orthogonal axis in the C plane. The trajectory consists of three parts: A rotation of the C around a defined iso-center and two translational movements parallel to the detector plane at the begin and at the end of the rotation. Combining these three parts to one trajectory enables for the acquisition of a completely sampled dataset using only 180° minus fan-angle of rotation. To evaluate the method we show animal and cadaver scans acquired with a mobile C-arm prototype. We expect that the transition of this method into clinical routine will lead to a much broader use of intraoperative 3D imaging in a wide field of clinical applications.

  18. The effective dose assessment of C-arm CT in hepatic arterial embolisation therapy.

    PubMed

    Tyan, Y-S; Li, Y-Y; Ku, M-C; Huang, H-H; Chen, T-R

    2013-04-01

    To assess the effective dose of the liver C-arm computed tomography (CT) scan during hepatic arterial embolisation surgery with clinical dose-area product (DAP) data from Taiwan. The experiment used two kinds of phantoms: RANDO® Man and RANDO Woman (The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY), embedded with thermoluminescent dosemeters at locations according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection 103 report. The conversion factors of DAP to effective doses for males and females, respectively, were obtained. The clinical DAP data of liver C-arm CT scan during hepatic arterial embolisation surgery were collected in a hospital in Taiwan. There were 125 liver transarterial embolisation therapy cases, including 94 males and 31 females, from February 2009 to June 2010. C-arm CT was used 38 times for males and 17 times for females. The corresponding average and standard deviation of clinical DAP were 61.0±6.6 Gy cm(2) and 52.2±8.3 Gy cm(2), respectively. The DAP of RANDO Man and RANDO Woman phantoms simply scanned by C-arm CT are much lower than that of patients. After consideration of the clinical DAP of patients, the effective doses of a liver C-arm CT scan recommended for males and females in Taiwan are 11.5±2.3 mSv and 11.3±3.0 mSv, respectively. The conversion factors of DAP to effective doses for males and females are 0.19±0.03 mSv Gy(-1) cm(-2) and 0.22±0.05 mSv Gy(-1) cm(-2). Only if the actual DAP value of a patient scan is multiplied by the conversion factor can the correct effective dose be determined.

  19. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF WATER MASERS IN STAR-FORMING REGIONS: CEPHEUS A AND W75 N

    SciTech Connect

    Uscanga, L.; Gomez, J. F.; Anglada, G.; Canto, J.; Curiel, S.; Torrelles, J. M.; Patel, N. A.; Raga, A. C. E-mail: jfg@iaa.e E-mail: scuriel@astroscu.unam.m E-mail: npatel@cfa.harvard.ed

    2010-05-20

    We have done a statistical analysis of Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) data of water masers in the star-forming regions (SFRs) Cepheus A and W75 N, using correlation functions to study the spatial clustering and Doppler-velocity distribution of these masers. Two-point spatial correlation functions show a characteristic scale size for clusters of water maser spots {approx_lt}1 AU, similar to the values found in other SFRs. This suggests that the scale for water maser excitation tends to be {approx_lt}1 AU. Velocity correlation functions show power-law dependences with indices that can be explained by regular velocity fields, such as expansion and/or rotation. These velocity fields are similar to those indicated by the water maser proper-motion measurements; therefore, the velocity correlation functions appear to reveal the organized motion of water maser spots on scales larger than 1 AU.

  20. WATER AND METHANOL MASER ACTIVITIES IN THE NGC 2024 FIR 6 REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju; Byun, Do-Young; Lee, Jeong-Eun

    2012-11-10

    The NGC 2024 FIR 6 region was observed in the water maser line at 22 GHz and the methanol class I maser lines at 44, 95, and 133 GHz. The water maser spectra displayed several velocity components and month-scale time variabilities. Most of the velocity components may be associated with FIR 6n, while one component was associated with FIR 4. A typical lifetime of the water maser velocity components is about eight months. The components showed velocity fluctuations with a typical drift rate of about 0.01 km s{sup -1} day{sup -1}. The methanol class I masers were detected toward FIR 6. The methanol emission is confined within a narrow range around the systemic velocity of the FIR 6 cloud core. The methanol masers suggest the existence of shocks driven by either the expanding H II region of FIR 6c or the outflow of FIR 6n.

  1. Natural Masers and Two Point Wave Studies in the Forthcoming RESONANCE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beloff, N.; Walker, S. N.; Demekhov, A. G.; Mogilevsky, M. M.

    2005-12-01

    The only natural masers that can be studied experimentally in-situ are magnetospheric masers. Concept of the magnetospheric cyclotron maser has been derived from the self-consistent theory of the radiation belts. In this natural maser energetic charged particles serve as an active substance, and an electro-dynamic system is formed by the magnetic flux tube filled with the background plasma and corresponding ionospheric footprint. The forthcoming RESONANCE project will provide the opportunity for multipoint measurements of waves and plasma processes involved in magnetospheric masers phenomenon. It will allow detailed in-situ studies of resonant wave-particle interactions that excite pearl and whistler waves in the inner magnetosphere. Methods of linear and nonlinear processes identification that quantify the dynamics of plasma waves generated by magnetopsheric masers are considered. The proposed technique allows differentiating between the linear wave-particle interaction and nonlinear processes of energy transfer in plasma turbulence.

  2. A Search for Submillimeter H2O Masers in Active Galaxies: The Detection of 321 GHZ H2O Maser Emission in NGC 4945

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Horiuchi, Shinji; Doi, Akihiro; Miyoshi, Makoto; Edwards, Philip G.

    2016-08-01

    We present further results of a search for extragalactic submillimeter H2O masers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The detection of a 321 GHz H2O maser in the nearby type 2 Seyfert galaxy, the Circinus galaxy, has previously been reported, and here the spectral analysis of four other galaxies is described. We have discovered H2O maser emission at 321 GHz toward the center of NGC 4945, a nearby type 2 Seyfert. The maser emission shows Doppler-shifted velocity features with velocity ranges similar to those of the previously reported 22 GHz H2O masers however, the non-contemporaneous observations also show differences in velocity offsets. The subparsec-scale distribution of the 22 GHz H2O masers revealed by earlier very long baseline interferometry observations suggests that the submillimeter masers could arise in an edge-on rotating disk. The maser features remain unresolved by the synthesized beam of ˜0.″54 (˜30 pc) and are located toward the 321 GHz continuum peak within errors. A marginally detected (3σ) high-velocity feature is redshifted by 579 km {{{s}}}-1 with respect to the systemic velocity of the galaxy. Assuming that this feature is real and arises from a Keplerian rotating disk in this galaxy, it is located at a radius of ˜0.020 pc (˜1.5 × 105 Schwarzschild radii), which would enable molecular material closer to the central engine to be probed than the 22 GHz H2O masers. This detection confirms that submillimeter H2O masers are a potential tracer of the circumnuclear regions of active galaxies, which will benefit from higher angular resolution studies with ALMA.

  3. An audit of the safe use of the mini c-arm image intensifier in the out-patient setting.

    PubMed

    Hasham, S; Burke, F D; Evans, S J; Arundell, M K; Quinton, D N

    2007-10-01

    Mini C-arm image intensifiers are used commonly in surgery of the upper limb. With relatively low doses of emitted ionising radiation, portability and superior quality of image, they are a useful aid to the operating surgeon. However, these benefits are not so often used outside the theatre setting. This paper examines the use of a mini C-arm image intensifier in the out-patient clinic and presents an audit of 100 consecutive out-patients. We reviewed the potential benefits and effects on their care pathway. We also look at the specific radiation protection issues of the mini C-arm image intensifier in the out-patients clinic. We believe use of the mini C-arm image intensifier in the out-patient setting may speed treatment and reduce the cost of treatment.

  4. WATER MASERS IN THE ANDROMEDA GALAXY: THE FIRST STEP TOWARD PROPER MOTION

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, Jeremy

    2011-05-01

    We have detected and confirmed five water maser complexes in the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) using the Green Bank Telescope. These masers will provide the high brightness temperature point sources needed for proper motion studies of M31, enabling measurement of its full three-dimensional velocity vector and its geometric distance via proper rotation. The motion of M31 is the keystone of Local Group dynamics and a gateway to the dark matter profiles of galaxies in general. Our survey for water masers selected 206 luminous compact 24 {mu}m emitting regions in M31 and was sensitive enough to detect any maser useful for {approx}10 {mu}as yr{sup -1} astrometry. The newly discovered masers span the isotropic luminosity range (0.3-1.9) x 10{sup -3} L{sub sun} in single spectral components and are analogous to luminous Galactic masers. The masers are distributed around the molecular ring, including locations close to the major and minor axes, which is nearly ideal for proper motion studies. We find no correlation between 24 {mu}m luminosity and water maser luminosity, suggesting that while water masers arise in star-forming regions, the nonlinear amplification pathways and beamed nature of the water masers means that they are not predictable based on IR luminosity alone. This suggests that there are additional bright masers to be found in M31. We predict that the geometric distance and systemic proper motion of M31 can be measured in 2-3 years with current facilities. A 'moving cluster' observation of diverging masers as M31 approaches the Galaxy may be possible in the long term.

  5. REVISING THE KINEMATICS OF 12 GHz CH{sub 3}OH MASERS TOWARD W3(OH)

    SciTech Connect

    Moscadelli, L.; Xu, Y.; Chen, X.

    2010-06-20

    We derive accurate proper motions of the CH{sub 3}OH 12 GHz masers toward the W3(OH) ultra-compact (UC) H II region, employing seven epochs of VLBA observations spanning a time interval of about 10 yr. The achieved velocity accuracy is of the order of 0.1 km s{sup -1}, adequate to precisely measure the relative velocities of most of the 12 GHz masers in W3(OH), with amplitude varying in the range 0.3-3 km s{sup -1}. Toward W3(OH), the most intense 12 GHz masers concentrate in a small area toward the north (the northern clump) of the UC H II region. We have compared the proper motions of the CH{sub 3}OH 12 GHz masers with those (derived from literature data) of the OH 6035 MHz masers, emitting from the same region of the methanol masers. In the northern clump, the two maser emissions emerge from nearby (but likely distinct) cloudlets of masing gas with, in general, a rather smooth variation of line-of-sight and sky-projected velocities, which suggests some connection of the environments and kinematics traced by both maser types. The conical outflow model, previously proposed to account for the 12 GHz maser kinematics in the northern clump, does not reproduce the new, accurate measurements of 12 GHz maser proper motions and has to be rejected. We focus on the subset of 12 GHz masers of the northern clump belonging to the 'linear structure at P.A. = 130{sup 0}-140{sup 0}', whose regular variation of LSR velocities with position presents evidence for some ordered motion. We show that the three-dimensional velocities of this 'linear distribution' of 12 GHz masers can be well fitted considering a flat, rotating disk, seen almost edge-on.

  6. CANDIDATES FOR THE YOUNG STELLAR OUTFLOWS: WATER AND METHANOL MASERS FROM YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Wanggi; Lyo, A-Ran; Kim, Kee-Tae; Byun, Do-Young

    2012-11-01

    We conducted simultaneous 22 GHz water maser and 44 GHz class I methanol maser surveys of newly identified 282 H{sub 2} emission features from the 2.122 {mu}m H{sub 2} narrowband image survey in the Galactic plane (UWISH2 project) using Korean VLBI Network 21 m radio telescopes. We detected 16 and 13 new water and methanol maser sources, respectively. This result indicates that at least {approx}5% of the H{sub 2} emission features originate from young stellar objects (YSOs) that are in the right physical condition to produce the water and methanol masers. The masers are closely related to the current outflow activities in the Galactic plane. The power sources of these 23 diffused/collimated H{sub 2} emission features (six sources are detected for both masers) are likely to be intermediate- to high-mass YSOs, based on a comparison with the maser luminosities of other well-studied YSOs. Both maser velocities are mostly close to their own systemic velocities within {approx}<5 km s{sup -1}, even though water masers generally show larger variabilities in the intensity, velocity, and shape than methanol masers. We also discovered three new water maser sources with high-velocity components: {approx}25 km s{sup -1} redshifted CMHO 019, {approx}50 km s{sup -1} blueshifted CMHO 132, and {approx}120 km s{sup -1} blueshifted CMHO 182. In particular, we propose that the dominant blueshifted water maser of CHMO 182 can be a unique laboratory for the study of the high-mass young stellar jet and its acceleration.

  7. The cyclotron maser theory of AKR and Z-mode radiation. [Auroral Kilometric Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    The cyclotron maser mechanism which may be responsible for the generation of auroral kilometric radiation and Z-mode radiation is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the basic concepts of the cyclotron maser theory, particularly the relativistic effect of the cyclotron resonance condition. Recent development of the theory is reviewed. Finally, the results of a computer simulation study which helps to understand the nonlinear saturation of the maser instability are reported.

  8. The Long-Term Stability of the U.S. Naval Observatory’s Masers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    36th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting 1 THE LONG-TERM STABILITY OF THE U.S. NAVAL OBSERVATORY’S MASERS Demetrios...Matsakis, Paul Koppang Time Service Department U.S. Naval Observatory Washington, DC, USA and R. Michael Garvey Symmetricom, Inc. Beverly...1990, and five more masers were delivered in 1992 through 1994. These masers, coupled with the acquisition of cesium-beam standards and improved time

  9. A survey of 44-GHz Class I methanol masers toward High Mass Protostellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berenice Rodríguez Garza, Carolina; Kurtz, Stan

    2016-01-01

    We present preliminary results of 44-GHz Class I methanol maser observations made with the Very Large Array toward a sample of 55 High Mass Protostellar Objects. We found a 44% detection rate of methanol maser emission. We present a statistical description of our results, along with a comparison of the location of the 44-GHz masers with respect to shocked gas, traced by Extended Green Objects seen in the Spitzer/IRAC bands.

  10. FORMALDEHYDE MASERS: EXCLUSIVE TRACERS OF HIGH-MASS STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Araya, E. D.; Brown, J. E.; Olmi, L.; Ortiz, J. Morales; Hofner, P.; Creech-Eakman, M. J.; Kurtz, S.; Linz, H.

    2015-11-15

    The detection of four formaldehyde (H{sub 2}CO) maser regions toward young high-mass stellar objects in the last decade, in addition to the three previously known regions, calls for an investigation of whether H{sub 2}CO masers are an exclusive tracer of young high-mass stellar objects. We report the first survey specifically focused on the search for 6 cm H{sub 2}CO masers toward non high-mass star-forming regions (non HMSFRs). The observations were conducted with the 305 m Arecibo Telescope toward 25 low-mass star-forming regions, 15 planetary nebulae and post-AGB stars, and 31 late-type stars. We detected no H{sub 2}CO emission in our sample of non HMSFRs. To check for the association between high-mass star formation and H{sub 2}CO masers, we also conducted a survey toward 22 high-mass star-forming regions from a Hi-GAL (Herschel infrared Galactic Plane Survey) sample known to harbor 6.7 GHz CH{sub 3}OH masers. We detected a new 6 cm H{sub 2}CO emission line in G32.74−0.07. This work provides further evidence that supports an exclusive association between H{sub 2}CO masers and young regions of high-mass star formation. Furthermore, we detected H{sub 2}CO absorption toward all Hi-GAL sources, and toward 24 low-mass star-forming regions. We also conducted a simultaneous survey for OH (4660, 4750, 4765 MHz), H110α (4874 MHz), HCOOH (4916 MHz), CH{sub 3}OH (5005 MHz), and CH{sub 2}NH (5289 MHz) toward 68 of the sources in our sample of non HMSFRs. With the exception of the detection of a 4765 MHz OH line toward a pre-planetary nebula (IRAS 04395+3601), we detected no other spectral line to an upper limit of 15 mJy for most sources.

  11. Current role of hybrid CT/angiography system compared with C-arm cone beam CT for interventional oncology

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Y; Inaba, Y; Inoue, M; Nishiofuku, H; Anai, H; Hori, S; Sakaguchi, H; Kichikawa, K

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid CT/angiography (angiography) system and C-arm cone beam CT provide cross-sectional imaging as an adjunct to angiography. Current interventional oncological procedures can be conducted precisely using these two technologies. In this article, several cases using a hybrid CT/angiography system are shown first, and then the advantages and disadvantages of the hybrid CT/angiography and C-arm cone beam CT are discussed with literature reviews. PMID:24968749

  12. Current role of hybrid CT/angiography system compared with C-arm cone beam CT for interventional oncology.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, T; Arai, Y; Inaba, Y; Inoue, M; Nishiofuku, H; Anai, H; Hori, S; Sakaguchi, H; Kichikawa, K

    2014-09-01

    Hybrid CT/angiography (angiography) system and C-arm cone beam CT provide cross-sectional imaging as an adjunct to angiography. Current interventional oncological procedures can be conducted precisely using these two technologies. In this article, several cases using a hybrid CT/angiography system are shown first, and then the advantages and disadvantages of the hybrid CT/angiography and C-arm cone beam CT are discussed with literature reviews.

  13. An effective technique for calibrating the intrinsic parameters of a vascular C-arm from a planar target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorges, Sébastien; Kerrien, Erwan; Berger, Marie-Odile; Trousset, Yves; Pescatore, Jérémie; Anxionnat, René; Picard, Luc

    2006-03-01

    The real time recovery of the projection geometry is a fundamental issue in interventional navigation applications (e.g. guide wire reconstruction, medical augmented reality). In most works, the intrinsic parameters are supposed to be constant and the extrinsic parameters (C-arm motion) are deduced either from the orientation sensors of the C-arm or from other additional sensors (eg. optical and/or electro-magnetic sensors). However, due to the weight of the X-ray tube and the C-arm, the system is undergoing deformations which induce variations of the intrinsic parameters as a function of the C-arm orientation. In our approach, we propose to measure the effects of the mechanical deformations onto the intrinsic parameters in a calibration procedure. Robust calibration methods exist (the gold standard is the multi-image calibration) but they are time consuming and too tedious to set up in a clinical context. For these reasons, we developed an original and easy to use method, based on a planar calibration target, which aims at measuring with a high level of accuracy the variation of the intrinsic parameters on a vascular C-arm. The precision of the planar-based method was evaluated by the mean of error propagation using techniques described in. 8 It appeared that the precision of the intrinsic parameters are comparable to the one obtained from the multi-image calibration method. The planar-based method was also successfully used to assess to behavior of the C-arm with respect to the C-arm orientations. Results showed a clear variation of the principal point when the LAO/RAO orientation was changed. In contrast, the intrinsic parameters do not change during a cranio-caudal C-arm motion.

  14. Pericardium based model fusion of CT and non-contrasted C-arm CT for visual guidance in cardiac interventions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yefeng

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive transcatheter cardiac interventions are being adopted rapidly to treat a range of cardiovascular diseases. Pre-operative imaging, e.g., computed tomography (CT), plays an important role in surgical planning and simulation of cardiac interventions. Overlaying a 3D cardiac model extracted from pre-operative images onto real-time fluoroscopic images provides valuable visual guidance during the intervention. However, direct 3D to 2D fusion is difficult and may require quite amounts of user interaction. Intra-operative non-contrasted C-arm CT can be used as an intermedium for model fusion. The cardiac model is first warped to C-arm CT and later overlaid onto fluoroscopy. The C-arm CT to fluoroscopy overlay is straightforward since both images are captured on the same machine and the C-arm projection geometry can be directly used for overlay. Though various image registration methods may be used to fuse pre-operative images and C-arm CT, cross-modality image registration is not robust due to the significant difference in image characteristics (contrasted vs. non-contrasted). In this work we propose a model based fusion method using the pericardium to align pre-operative CT to intra-operative C-arm CT. After automatic segmentation of the pericardium in both CT and C-arm CT, the deformation field is estimated and then applied to warp the cardiac model extracted from CT to C-arm CT. The proposed method can be applied to fuse different cardiac models (e.g., chambers, aorta, coronary arteries, and cardiac valves). A feasibility study on aortic root model fusion shows that a reasonable accuracy can be achieved using a generic model (from a different patient), while more accurate results come from a patient-specific model. Intelligently weighted fusion can further improve the accuracy by using all available cardiac models in a pre-collected training set.

  15. On the Relationship of UC HII Regions and Class II Methanol Masers. I. Source Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, B.; Menten, K. M.; Wu, Y.; Bartkiewicz, A.; Rygl, K.; Reid, M. J.; Urquhart, J. S.; Zheng, X.

    2016-12-01

    We conducted Very Large Array C-configuration observations to measure positions and luminosities of Galactic Class II 6.7 GHz methanol masers and their associated ultra-compact H ii regions. The spectral resolution was 3.90625 kHz and the continuum sensitivity reached 45 μJy beam-1. We mapped 372 methanol masers with peak flux densities of more than 2 Jy selected from the literature. Absolute positions have nominal uncertainties of 0.″3. In this first paper on the data analysis, we present three catalogs; the first gives information on the strongest feature of 367 methanol maser sources, and the second provides information on all detected maser spots. The third catalog presents derived data of the 127 radio continuum counterparts associated with maser sources. Our detection rate of radio continuum counterparts toward methanol masers is approximately one-third. Our catalogs list properties including distance, flux density, luminosity, and the distribution in the Galactic plane. We found no significant relationship between luminosities of masers and their associated radio continuum counterparts, however, the detection rate of radio continuum emission toward maser sources increases statistically with the maser luminosities.

  16. Axial Symmetry and Rotation in the SiO Maser Shell of IK Tauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boboltz, D. A.; Diamond, P. J.

    2005-06-01

    We observed v=1, J=1-0 43 GHz SiO maser emission toward the Mira variable IK Tauri (IK Tau) using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). The images resulting from these observations show that SiO masers form a highly elliptical ring of emission approximately 58×32 mas with an axial ratio of 1.8:1. The major axis of this elliptical distribution is oriented at a position angle of ~59°. The line-of-sight velocity structure of the SiO masers has an apparent axis of symmetry consistent with the elongation axis of the maser distribution. Relative to the assumed stellar velocity of 35 km s-1, the blue- and redshifted masers were found to lie to the northwest and southeast of this symmetry axis, respectively. This velocity structure suggests a northwest-southeast (NW-SE) rotation of the SiO maser shell with an equatorial velocity, which we determine to be ~3.6 km s-1. Such a NW-SE rotation is in agreement with a circumstellar envelope geometry invoked to explain previous H2O and OH maser observations. In this geometry, H2O and OH masers are preferentially created in a region of enhanced density along the NE-SW equator orthogonal to the rotation/polar axis suggested by the SiO maser velocities.

  17. Light and buffer-gas frequency shifts in the Rb-85 maser frequency standard.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, W. A.; Novick, R.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of buffer gas and pumping light on the output frequency of the Rb-85 maser is discussed. In contrast to a primary standard, these frequency shifts can be used to advantage when it is necessary to operate the maser at a frequency which differs from the ground-state hyperfine frequency by a few kilohertz. Using appropriate mixtures of buffer gas and carefully shaped lamp spectral profiles, it is also possible to operate the maser exactly at the ground-state hyperfine frequency. It is pointed out that the short-term phase stability of the maser is not impaired by these shifts.

  18. Two New SiO Maser Sources in High-Mass Star-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Se-Hyung; Yun, Youngjoo; Kim, Jaeheon; Liu, Tie; Kim, Kee-Tae; Choi, Minho

    2016-08-01

    Silicon monoxide (SiO) masers are rare in star-forming regions, with the exception of five known SiO maser sources. However, we detected two new SiO maser sources from infrared-loud clumps of the high-mass star-forming regions G19.61-0.23 and G75.78+0.34. High angular resolution observations toward G19.61-0.23 suggest that the deeply embedded young stellar object (YSO) of SMA1 is powering the SiO masers. In addition, the SiO v = 1, J = 1 \\to 0 line shows four spike features, while the v = 2 maser shows combined features of one spike and broad wing components, implying energetic activities of the YSO of SMA1 in the G19.61-0.23 hot molecular core. The SiO v = 0, J = 2 \\to 1 emission shows bipolar outflows in the NE-SW direction with respect to the center of the SiO maser source. A high angular resolution map of the SiO v = 1, J = 2 \\to 1 maser in G75.78+0.34 shows that the SiO maser is associated with the CORE source at the earliest stage of high-mass star formation. Therefore, the newly detected SiO masers and their associated outflows will provide good probes for investigating this early high-mass star formation.

  19. ON THE USE OF RUTILE AS AN 8MM MASER MATERIAL.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    MASERS, RUTILE, RADIO ASTRONOMY, SOLID STATE PHYSICS, IMPEDANCE MATCHING, CHROMIUM, IRON , CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES, PUMPING(ELECTRONICS), TAPER, BROADBAND, PUSH PULL AMPLIFIERS, REFLECTION.

  20. Class II 6.7 GHz Methanol Maser Association with Young Massive Cores Revealed by ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chibueze, James O.; Csengeri, Timea; Tatematsu, Ken’ichi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Iguchi, Satoru; Alhassan, Jibrin A.; Higuchi, Aya E.; Bontemps, Sylvain; Menten, Karl M.

    2017-02-01

    We explored the implication of the association (or lack of it) of 6.7 GHz class II methanol (CH3OH) masers with massive dense cores (MDCs) detected (within a sample of ATLASGAL selected infrared quiet massive clumps) at 0.9 mm with Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter array. We found 42 out of the 112 cores (37.5%) detected with the Atacama Compact Array (ACA) to be associated with 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers. The lowest mass core with CH3OH maser association is ∼ 12 {M}ȯ . The angular offsets of the ACA cores from the 6.7 GHz CH3OH maser peak positions range from 0.″17 to 4.″79, with a median value of 2.″19. We found a weak correlation between the 0.9 mm continuum (MDCs) peak fluxes and the peak fluxes of their associated methanol multibeam (MMB) 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers. About 90% of the cores associated with 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers have masses of >40 M ⊙. The CH3OH maser containing cores are candidates for embedded high-mass protostellar objects in their earliest evolutionary stages. With our ACA 0.9 continuum data compared with the MMB 6.7 GHz CH3OH maser survey, we have constrained the cores already housing massive protostars based on their association with the radiatively pumped 6.7 GHz CH3OH masers.

  1. Water masers associated with low-mass stars - a survey of the Rho Ophiuchi infrared cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Wilking, B.A.; Claussen, M.J.

    1987-09-01

    The detection of H2O masers toward two extremely young premain-sequence objects embedded in the nearby Rho Ophiuchi molecular cloud complex is reported. These embedded sources are among the lowest luminosity objects known to be associated with maser emission. Their proximity presents possibilities for high spatial resolution studies of masers and the near-stellar environment of stars in their earliest stage of evolution; using aperture synthesis techniques with VLBI and/or VLBA will result in an unsurpassed resolution of better than 0.2 A.U. The mechanisms resulting in the maser activity of the objects are discussed. 31 references.

  2. High Resolution Surveys of the Water and Methanol Star Formation Masers in the Central Molecular Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickert, Matthew; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad; Ott, Juergen; Meier, David S.; Krieger, Nico; SWAG

    2017-01-01

    We present some of the first high resolution fully interferometric surveys of 6.7 GHz methanol and 22 GHz water masers towards the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ). These masers are good signposts for early (<0.05 Myrs) star formation. Using the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), we searched the inner 3 x 0.7 deg of the Galactic Center (GC) for methanol masers with resolutions of 0.9” (0.04 pc) and 0.4 km/s (8 kHz) and an average channel sensitivity of ~0.01 Jy/beam. With this high resolution and sensitivity, we have detected ~100 methanol masers, which is over a factor of two more than has previously been detected. We have also conducted two surveys of water masers in this region. As part of the Survey of Water and Ammonia in the Galactic Center (SWAG), the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) was used to survey a variety of molecular lines, including the 22 GHz water line. With the ATCA, we have detected over 200 water masers using resolutions of 26” (1 pc) and 2 km/s (60 kHz) and an average channel sensitivity of ~0.01 Jy/beam. Afterward, we conducted the first on-the-fly (OTF) VLA survey of water masers with improved resolutions of 0.7” (0.03 pc) and 0.4 km/s (26 kHz) and an average channel sensitivity of ~0.05 Jy/beam. Although the analysis of this OTF survey is not yet complete, we have already identified water masers that were not visible in the SWAG data.The improvement in the number of detected masers allows us to better analyze the distribution of these masers. We show that the SWAG water masers appear uniformly distributed along the Galactic plane, despite the asymmetry of the molecular gas distribution, where ~2/3 of the gas mass is located at positive Galactic longitudes. The methanol masers follow the molecular gas distribution, with a majority of the masers being found at positive longitudes. This could indicate a difference in the star forming history of these two parts of the CMZ and/or that the 22 GHz water masers are contaminated by water

  3. 22 GHz H2O maser survey towards 221 BGPS sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Hongwei; Zhou, Jianjun; Esimbek, Jarken; Wu, Gang; He, Yuxin; Ji, Weiguang; Tang, Xiaoke

    2015-11-01

    We performed a 22 GHz H2O maser survey towards 221 Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) sources. We detected 107 H2O masers, of which 12 are new. The detection rate is 48.4 per cent for our sample. We obtained the positions of five new H2O masers via On The Fly (OTF) observations. The detection rate of H2O masers is correlated with continuum emission fluxes of BGPS sources at far-infrared, sub-millimetre and millimetre wavelengths. We employed the classification of Dunham et al. to classify the evolutionary stage of BGPS sources into Group 0, 1, 2, and 3. The detection rate and velocity range of H2O masers increases as the BGPS sources evolve from Group 1 to Group 3. The BGPS sources associated with both H2O and CH3OH masers are more compact than that associated with either only H2O or only CH3OH masers. This indicates that the sources associated with both H2O and CH3OH masers are in relative later evolutionary stage. The detection rate of H2O masers towards BGPS sources displaying evidence of the collapse phenomenon is 62.1 per cent, which suggests that most BGPS sources showing indications of collapse phenomena contain ongoing active star formation activities.

  4. First pass cable artefact correction for cardiac C-arm CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, C.; Schäfer, D.; Kim, M.; Chen, S. J.; Carroll, J. D.; Eshuis, P.; Dössel, O.; Grass, M.

    2014-07-01

    Cardiac C-arm CT imaging delivers a tomographic region-of-interest reconstruction of the patient's heart during image guided catheter interventions. Due to the limited size of the flat detector a volume image is reconstructed, which is truncated in the cone-beam (along the patient axis) and the fan-beam (in the transaxial plane) direction. To practically address this local tomography problem correction methods, like projection extension, are available for first pass image reconstruction. For second pass correction methods, like metal artefact reduction, alternative correction schemes are required when the field of view is limited to a region-of-interest of the patient. In classical CT imaging metal artefacts are corrected by metal identification in a first volume reconstruction and generation of a corrected projection data set followed by a second reconstruction. This approach fails when the metal structures are located outside the reconstruction field of view. When a C-arm CT is performed during a cardiac intervention pacing leads and other cables are frequently positioned on the patients skin, which results in propagating streak artefacts in the reconstruction volume. A first pass approach to reduce this type of artefact is introduced and evaluated here. It makes use of the fact that the projected position of objects outside the reconstruction volume changes with the projection perspective. It is shown that projection based identification, tracking and removal of high contrast structures like cables, only detected in a subset of the projections, delivers a more consistent reconstruction volume with reduced artefact level. The method is quantitatively evaluated based on 50 simulations using cardiac CT data sets with variable cable positioning. These data sets are forward projected using a C-arm CT system geometry and generate artefacts comparable to those observed in clinical cardiac C-arm CT acquisitions. A C-arm CT simulation of every cardiac CT data set without

  5. Frequency, phase, and amplitude changes of the hydrogen maser oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audoin, Claude; Diener, William A.

    1992-01-01

    The frequency, the phase, and the amplitude changes of the hydrogen maser oscillation, which are induced by the modulation of the cavity resonant frequency, are considered. The results obtained apply specifically to one of the H-maser cavity autotuning methods which is actually implemented, namely the cavity frequency-switching method. The frequency, the phase, and the amplitude changes are analyzed theoretically. The phase and the amplitude variations are measured experimentally. It is shown, in particular, that the phase of oscillation is subjected to abrupt jumps at the times of the cavity frequency switching, whose magnitude is specified. The results given can be used for the design of a phase-locked loop (PLL) aimed at minimizing the transfer of the phase modulation to the slaved VCXO.

  6. Cepheid Variables in the Maser-host Galaxy NGC 4258

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Samantha L.; Macri, Lucas M.

    2015-06-01

    We present results of a ground-based survey for Cepheid variables in NGC 4258. This galaxy plays a key role in the Extragalactic Distance Scale due to its very precise and accurate distance determination via very long baseline interferometry observations of water masers. We imaged two fields within this galaxy using the Gemini North telescope and the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph, obtaining 16 epochs of data in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey gri bands over 4 yr. We carried out point-spread function photometry and detected 94 Cepheids with periods between 7 and 127 days, as well as an additional 215 variables which may be Cepheids or Population II pulsators. We used the Cepheid sample to test the absolute calibration of theoretical gri Period-Luminosity relations and found good agreement with the maser distance to this galaxy. The expected data products from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope should enable Cepheid searches out to at least 10 Mpc.

  7. Threshold Dynamics of a Semiconductor Single Atom Maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.-Y.; Stehlik, J.; Eichler, C.; Mi, X.; Hartke, T. R.; Gullans, M. J.; Taylor, J. M.; Petta, J. R.

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate a single atom maser consisting of a semiconductor double quantum dot (DQD) that is embedded in a high-quality-factor microwave cavity. A finite bias drives the DQD out of equilibrium, resulting in sequential single electron tunneling and masing. We develop a dynamic tuning protocol that allows us to controllably increase the time-averaged repumping rate of the DQD at a fixed level detuning, and quantitatively study the transition through the masing threshold. We further examine the crossover from incoherent to coherent emission by measuring the photon statistics across the masing transition. The observed threshold behavior is in agreement with an existing single atom maser theory when small corrections from lead emission are taken into account.

  8. Frequency, phase, and amplitude changes of the hydrogen maser oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audoin, Claude; Diener, William A.

    1992-01-01

    The frequency, the phase, and the amplitude changes of the hydrogen maser oscillation, which are induced by the modulation of the cavity resonant frequency, are considered. The results obtained apply specifically to one of the H-maser cavity autotuning methods which is actually implemented, namely the cavity frequency-switching method. The frequency, the phase, and the amplitude changes are analyzed theoretically. The phase and the amplitude variations are measured experimentally. It is shown, in particular, that the phase of oscillation is subjected to abrupt jumps at the times of the cavity frequency switching, whose magnitude is specified. The results given can be used for the design of a phase-locked loop (PLL) aimed at minimizing the transfer of the phase modulation to the slaved VCXO.

  9. POLARIZED EMISSION FROM SiO MASERS IN IK Tauri

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, W. D.; Ragland, S.; Danchi, W. C.

    2011-08-01

    We present high spatial and frequency resolution images of the SiO masers in Stokes I, Q, U, and V around the asymptotic giant branch star IK Tau and describe and exploit a new technique for making accurate calibration of Stokes V. This technique also resulted in improved images of Stokes I. An evaluation of the results suggests that the circular polarization is neither the result of Zeeman splitting nor an alternate propagation effect. The pattern of circular and linear polarization across the maser lines shows no tendency toward that expected for simple Zeeman splitting. The fractional circular polarization greatly exceeds that expected from the alternate mechanism. The overall shape of the masing ring has changed from the elliptical form repeatedly observed over the last decade and a half.

  10. Nonlinear saturation characteristics of a dielectric Cherenkov maser

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J.S.; Heo, E.G.; Choi, D.I.

    1995-12-31

    The nonlinear saturation state in a dielectric Cherenkov maser (DCM) with the TM mode and the intense relativistic electron beam is analyzed from the nonlinear formulation based on the cold fluid-Maxwell equations. We obtain the nonlinear efficiency and the final operation frequency under consideration of the effects of the beam current, the beam energy and the dielectric materials and show that the characteristics of a DCM instablity has a strong resemblance to that of the relativistic two stream instability by the coherent trapping of electrons in a single most-ustable wave. Finally, the nonlinear analysis shows that the Cherenkov maser operation with a lower-energy beam can be more efficient in the higher frequency regime for the case of the high power DCM with a high current.

  11. SiO MASERS IN ASYMMETRIC MIRAS. II. R CANCRI

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, W. D.; Ragland, S.; Pluzhnik, E. A.; Danchi, W. C.; Traub, W. A.; Lacasse, M. G.

    2009-12-01

    This is the second paper in a series of multi-epoch observations of the SiO masers at 7 mm wavelength in several asymptotic giant branch stars from a sample of Mira variable stars showing evidence of asymmetric structure in the infrared. These stars have been observed interferometrically in the infrared by the Infrared Optical Telescope Array and with Very Long Baseline Array measurements of the SiO masers. In this paper, we present the observations of R Cancri (R Cnc). The systemic velocity of R Cnc is estimated to be 15.8 {+-} 0.2 km s{sup -1}. A comparison is made with the model calculations of Gray et al. which predict some but not all observed features.

  12. The cronos hydrogen maser clock redshift experiment on Radioastron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busca, G.; Bernier, L. G.; Schweda, H.; Kardashev, N.; Andreianov, V.; Roxburgh, I. W.; Polnarev, S.

    2003-10-01

    The Radioastron satellite, having a highly elliptical orbit with a period of 28 hours and a mission duration of more than 3 years, offers the interesting possibility of a redshift experiment. The Space Hydrogen Maser, recently introduced as a new instrument on the satellite in order to be used as local oscillator for the Space VLBI, can in fact be tracked in frequency from the ground stations, implementing only minor modifications in the originally planned frequency transfer system. The modified system allows also the measurements of the geometric and ionospheric Doppler shifts. An analysis of the best strategy for achieving the highest measurement precision is presented. The analysis takes into account the maser frequency stability, its environmental sensitivities, and the other known sources of noise. The error budget of the experiment is established.

  13. Asymptotic inference in system identification for the atom maser.

    PubMed

    Catana, Catalin; van Horssen, Merlijn; Guta, Madalin

    2012-11-28

    System identification is closely related to control theory and plays an increasing role in quantum engineering. In the quantum set-up, system identification is usually equated to process tomography, i.e. estimating a channel by probing it repeatedly with different input states. However, for quantum dynamical systems such as quantum Markov processes, it is more natural to consider the estimation based on continuous measurements of the output, with a given input that may be stationary. We address this problem using asymptotic statistics tools, for the specific example of estimating the Rabi frequency of an atom maser. We compute the Fisher information of different measurement processes as well as the quantum Fisher information of the atom maser, and establish the local asymptotic normality of these statistical models. The statistical notions can be expressed in terms of spectral properties of certain deformed Markov generators, and the connection to large deviations is briefly discussed.

  14. RadioAstron Maser Observations: a Record in Angular Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, A. M.; Shakhvorostova, N. N.; Alakoz, A. V.; Baan, W. A.; RadioAstron Maser Team

    2017-06-01

    Extremely long baselines of the space-ground interferometer RadioAstron allow to achieve ultra-high angular resolutions. The possibility of detection of a maser emission with resolutions about tens of micro-arcseconds was arguable before successful experiments reported in this paper. We present the results of the maser survey obtained by RadioAstron during first 5 years of operation. Extremely high angular resolution of 11 microarcseconds have been achieved in observations of the megamaser galaxy NGC 4258. For the galaxy at the distance about 7 Mpc this corresponds to linear resolution around 80 AU. Very compact features with angular sizes about 20 micro-arcseconds have been detected in star-forming regions of our Galaxy. Corresponding linear sizes are about 5-10 millions of kilometers.

  15. Threshold Dynamics of a Semiconductor Single Atom Maser.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y-Y; Stehlik, J; Eichler, C; Mi, X; Hartke, T R; Gullans, M J; Taylor, J M; Petta, J R

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate a single atom maser consisting of a semiconductor double quantum dot (DQD) that is embedded in a high-quality-factor microwave cavity. A finite bias drives the DQD out of equilibrium, resulting in sequential single electron tunneling and masing. We develop a dynamic tuning protocol that allows us to controllably increase the time-averaged repumping rate of the DQD at a fixed level detuning, and quantitatively study the transition through the masing threshold. We further examine the crossover from incoherent to coherent emission by measuring the photon statistics across the masing transition. The observed threshold behavior is in agreement with an existing single atom maser theory when small corrections from lead emission are taken into account.

  16. IR and SiO Maser Observations of Miras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotton, W. D.; Mennesson, B.; Diamond, P. J.; Perrin, G.; Coudé du Foresto, V.; Chagnon, G.; van Langevelde, H. J.; Ridgway, S.; Waters, R.; Vlemmings, W.; Morel, S.; Traub, W.; Carleton, N.; Lacasse, M.

    2005-12-01

    Preliminary results of a coordinated program of near IR and SiO maser interferometric observations of Mira variables are reported. The 2.2 and 3.6 micron results are from the FLUOR/TISIS beam combiners on the IOTA interferometer and the SiO maser observations from the VLBA. The ratio of the SiO ring diameter to the apparent diameter at 2.2 microns for stars in our sample cluster around 2, whereas the 3.6 micron diameters range from slightly larger than the 2.2 micron diameter to approximately the SiO ring diameter. This may be due to differences in the opacity of the molecular envelope at 3.6 microns.

  17. CEPHEID VARIABLES IN THE MASER-HOST GALAXY NGC 4258

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, Samantha L.; Macri, Lucas M.

    2015-06-15

    We present results of a ground-based survey for Cepheid variables in NGC 4258. This galaxy plays a key role in the Extragalactic Distance Scale due to its very precise and accurate distance determination via very long baseline interferometry observations of water masers. We imaged two fields within this galaxy using the Gemini North telescope and the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph, obtaining 16 epochs of data in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey gri bands over 4 yr. We carried out point-spread function photometry and detected 94 Cepheids with periods between 7 and 127 days, as well as an additional 215 variables which may be Cepheids or Population II pulsators. We used the Cepheid sample to test the absolute calibration of theoretical gri Period–Luminosity relations and found good agreement with the maser distance to this galaxy. The expected data products from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope should enable Cepheid searches out to at least 10 Mpc.

  18. IDENTIFICATION OF BURSTING WATER MASER FEATURES IN ORION KL

    SciTech Connect

    Hirota, Tomoya; Honma, Mareki; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Shibata, Katsunori M.; Tsuboi, Masato; Fujisawa, Kenta; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki; Imai, Hiroshi; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Shimoikura, Tomomi; Yonekura, Yoshinori

    2011-10-01

    In 2011 February, a burst event of the H{sub 2}O maser in Orion KL (Kleinmann-Low object) has started after a 13 year silence. This is the third time such phenomena has been detected in Orion KL, followed by the events in 1979-1985 and 1998. We have carried out astrometric observations of the bursting H{sub 2}O maser features in Orion KL with the VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA), a Japanese very long baseline interferometry network dedicated for astrometry. The total flux of the bursting feature at the local standard of rest (LSR) velocity of 7.58 km s{sup -1} reaches 4.4 x 10{sup 4} Jy in 2011 March. The intensity of the bursting feature is three orders of magnitude larger than that of the same velocity feature in the quiescent phase in 2006. Two months later, another new feature appears at the LSR velocity of 6.95 km s{sup -1} in 2011 May, separated by 12 mas north of the 7.58 km s{sup -1} feature. Thus, the current burst occurs at two spatially different features. The bursting masers are elongated along the northwest-southeast direction as reported in the previous burst in 1998. We determine the absolute positions of the bursting features for the first time ever with a submilliarcsecond (mas) accuracy. Their positions are coincident with the shocked molecular gas called the Orion Compact Ridge. We tentatively detect the absolute proper motions of the bursting features toward the southwest direction. It is most likely that the outflow from the radio source I or another young stellar object interacting with the Compact Ridge is a possible origin of the H{sub 2}O maser burst.

  19. Natural lasers and masers in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    Population inversions have been found in the atmospheres of planets and comets, and amplification has been inferred for several cases. In this paper, I review the molecular systems that exhibit lasing and masing action, review the properties of atmospheres that permit these natural lasers and masers to exist, and give examples of their use as probes of remote regions. One potential future application is the possible communication over interstellar distances at GHz rates.

  20. Free electron maser experiments in the low-frequency limit

    SciTech Connect

    Drori, R.; Jerby, E.; Shahadi, A.

    1995-12-31

    Table-top free-electron maser (FEM) experiments operating in the low-frequency (< 1 GHz) low-energy ({approximately} 1 keV) limit are reported. These FEM devices employ parallel-stripline non-dispersive waveguides (which support TEM-modes), and planar folded-foil wigglers. Thermionic cathodes and carbon-fiber cold-cathodes are used in these experiments. Results of oscillator and amplifier experiments are presented and compared with theory.

  1. An improved storage bulb mount for DSN hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dachel, P. R.; Russell, D. P.; Tucker, T. K.; Stratman, L. B.

    1979-01-01

    The presently used JPL hydrogen maser suspended atomic storage bulb and a rigid, single-plane mounted bulb are compared. The new bulb incorporates three major design changes: (1) mounting design; (2) alterations to the collimator; and (3) decrease in mass. These design changes are expected to increase the long-term stability of the frequency standard by reducing its sensitivity to vibration and thermal effects.

  2. The Water Maser in II Zw 96: Scientific Justification

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggins, Brandon Kerry

    2015-08-06

    We propose a VLBI search to image and locate the water emission in II Zw 96. We propose 3 sites within II Zw 96 for VLBI followup (see the proposed target listing below). We request 2.5 hours of on-source integration time with the VLBA per source. The array will achieve ~ 65µJy sensitivity in K band in this time which will be sufficient to detect luminous water maser features.

  3. Ground-Based Investigations with the Cryogenic Hydrogen Maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.; Mattison, Edward; Vessot, Robert F. C.

    2001-01-01

    The room temperature hydrogen maser is an active atomic oscillator used as a high-frequency-stability local oscillator for radio astronomy, metrology, and spacecraft navigation, and in tests of fundamental physics. The cryogenic hydrogen maser (CHM) operates at 0.5 K, employing superfluid helium-coated walls to store the masing hydrogen atoms. We are investigating whether the CHM may provide better frequency stability than the room temperature hydrogen maser: one to three orders of magnitude improvement may be possible because of greatly reduced thermal noise and larger signal power. Exceptional frequency stability will be required for spacecraft tracking in future deep-space missions, for space-based tests of relativity and gravitation, and for local (i.e., flywheel) oscillators used with absolute frequency standards such as laser-cooled atomic fountains and linear ion traps. These new devices are passive high-resolution frequency discriminators. Alone, they cannot function as superior atomic clocks; their effective operation depends on being integrated with an active local oscillator with excellent short term stability - such as that possible with the CHM.

  4. The system design of a rubidium maser frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, C. X.

    1984-01-01

    The Rubidium Maser Frequency Standard is a precision frequency source with excellent short-term stability. A type PBR-II Rb maser frequency standard was developed by the Beijing Institute of Radio Metrology and Measurement (BIRMM). The time-domain frequency stability (two-sample variance) of this frequency standard is less than 1/5 times 10 to the 13th power for t=10ms yields 1.0s, fh=1.0 KHz. Two PBR-II frequency standards were used as reference frequency sources in a frequency stability measurement system. Some important system characteristics for the PBR-II Rb maser frequency standard such as phase noise and frequency stability transfer characteristics are discussed. Furthermore, the design of the frequency standard for optimum frequency stability of the output signal; the choice of a voltage controlled crystal oscillator for the frequency standard; the design of the phase-locked loop; and the frequency stability test results on the PBR-II are discussed.

  5. MAGMO: Mapping the Galactic Magnetic field through OH masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, James A.; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi M.; Caswell, James L.; Robishaw, Tim; Harvey-Smith, Lisa; Mao, Sui Ann

    2015-03-01

    We are undertaking a project (MAGMO) to examine large-scale magnetic fields pervading regions of high-mass star formation. The project will test if the orientations of weak large-scale magnetic fields can be maintained in the contraction (and field amplification) to the high densities encountered in high-mass star forming regions. This will be achieved through correlating targeted observations of ground-state hydroxyl (OH) maser emission towards hundreds of sites of high-mass star formation spread throughout the spiral arms of the Milky Way. Through the Zeeman splitting of the OH maser emission these observations will determine the strength and orientation of the in-situ magnetic field. The completion of the southern hemisphere Methanol Multibeam survey has provided an abundance of targets for ground-state OH maser observations, approximately 1000 sites of high-mass star formation. With this sample, much larger and more homogeneous than previously available, we will have the statistics necessary to outweigh random fluctuations and observe an underlying Galactic magnetic field if it exists. We presented details of the overall progress of the project illustrated by the results of a pilot sample of sources towards the Carina-Sagittarius spiral arm tangent, where a coherent field is implied.

  6. RADIO CONTINUUM EMISSION AND WATER MASERS TOWARD CB 54

    SciTech Connect

    De Gregorio-Monsalvo, Itziar; Gomez, Jose F.; Anglada, Guillem; Suarez, Olga; Torrelles, Jose M.; Kuiper, Thomas B. H.; Patel, Nimesh A.

    2009-06-15

    We present high angular resolution observations of water masers at 1.3 cm and radio continuum emission at 1.3, 3.6, and 6 cm toward the Bok globule CB 54 using the Very Large Array. At 1.3 cm, with subarcsecond angular resolution, we detect a radio continuum compact source located to the southwest of the globule and spatially coincident with a mid-infrared (mid-IR) embedded object (MIR-b). The spectral index derived between 6 and 1.3 cm ({alpha} = 0.3 {+-} 0.4) is flat, consistent with optically thin free-free emission from ionized gas. We propose the shock-ionization scenario as a viable mechanism for producing the radio continuum emission observed at cm frequencies. Water masers are detected at two different positions separated by 2.''3, and coincide spatially with two mid-IR sources: MIR-b and MIR-c. The association of these mid-IR sources with water masers confirms that they are likely protostars undergoing mass loss, and they are the best candidate as driving sources of the molecular outflows in the region.

  7. STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF 12.2 GHz METHANOL MASERS ASSOCIATED WITH A COMPLETE SAMPLE OF 6.7 GHz METHANOL MASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, S. L.; Caswell, J. L.; Green, J. A.; Voronkov, M. A.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Fuller, G. A.; Quinn, L. J.; Avison, A.

    2011-06-01

    We present definitive detection statistics for 12.2 GHz methanol masers toward a complete sample of 6.7 GHz methanol masers detected in the Methanol Multibeam survey south of declination -20{sup 0}. In total, we detect 250 12.2 GHz methanol masers toward 580 6.7 GHz methanol masers. This equates to a detection rate of 43.1%, which is lower than that of previous significant searches of comparable sensitivity. Both the velocity ranges and the flux densities of the target 6.7 GHz sources surpass that of their 12.2 GHz companion in almost all cases. Eighty percent of the detected 12.2 GHz methanol maser peaks are coincident in velocity with the 6.7 GHz maser peak. Our data support an evolutionary scenario whereby the 12.2 GHz sources are associated with a somewhat later evolutionary stage than the 6.7 GHz sources devoid of this transition. Furthermore, we find that the 6.7 GHz and 12.2 GHz methanol sources increase in luminosity as they evolve. In addition to this, evidence for an increase in velocity range with evolution is presented. This implies that it is not only the luminosity but also the volume of gas conducive to the different maser transitions that increases as the sources evolve. Comparison with GLIMPSE mid-infrared sources has revealed a coincidence rate between the locations of the 6.7 GHz methanol masers and GLIMPSE point sources similar to that achieved in previous studies. Overall, the properties of the GLIMPSE sources with and without 12.2 GHz counterparts are similar. There is a higher 12.2 GHz detection rate toward those 6.7 GHz methanol masers that are coincident with extended green objects.

  8. Simultaneous Observations of H2O and SiO Masers toward OH/IR Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Chi-Young; Cho, Se-Hyung; Kim, Sungeun; Kim, Jaeheon; Yoon, Dong-hwan; Hwang, Jihye

    2017-09-01

    We performed simultaneous observations of SiO v = 1, 2, 29SiO v = 0, J = 1–0, and H2O {6}12\\to {5}23 maser lines toward 252 OH/IR stars using the individual 21 m telescopes of the Korean VLBI Network (KVN). The observations for studying SiO and H2O maser properties associated with the different evolutionary stages of OH/IR stars were carried out from 2011 November to 2012 July. Both H2O and SiO masers were detected from 50 sources with a detection rate of 20% in one epoch of observation. One-sided SiO maser emissions without H2O were detected from 108 sources and H2O maser emission was detected from 11 sources, of which the detection rates were 43% and 4%, respectively. The overall detection rate of the SiO maser was 63%, and that of the H2O maser was 24%. There were 65 new detections in the SiO maser lines, 22 new detections in the H2O maser line, and 4 new detections in the 29SiO maser line. For the H2O and/or SiO maser- detected sources, mutual relations between SiO and H2O maser properties (including peak and integrated antenna temperatures, and full widths at zero power, etc.) are investigated based on a statistical analysis. We also investigate these maser properties on an IRAS two-color diagram related to stellar evolutionary sequences. In particular, a large number of SiO v = 2-only detected sources appear among the SiO-only detected sources compared to those of both H2O and SiO maser detected sources and also appear in the later evolutionary stages of asymptotic giant branch AGB stars in the IRAS two-color diagram. These results may be associated with the development of a hot and thick dust envelope at later stages of AGB evolution and the different excitation conditions of SiO v = 1 and v = 2 masers. Our observational results will be useful for statistical studies of circumstellar envelopes of OH/IR stars related to their late evolution and future very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations.

  9. Very Large Array Monitoring of 1720 MHz OH Masers toward the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihlström, Y. M.; Sjouwerman, L. O.; Mesler, R. A.

    2011-10-01

    We present the first variability study of the 1720 MHz OH masers located in the Galactic center. Most of these masers are associated with the interaction between the supernova remnant Sgr A East and the interstellar medium, but a few masers are associated with the circumnuclear disk (CND). The monitoring program covered five epochs and a timescale of 20-195 days, during which no masers disappeared and no new masers appeared. All masers have previously been detected in a single-epoch observation about one year prior to the start of the monitoring experiment, implying relatively stable conditions for the 1720 MHz OH masers. No extreme variability was detected. The masers associated with the northeastern interaction region between the supernova remnant and the +50 km s-1 molecular cloud show the highest level of variability. This can be explained with the +50 km s-1 molecular cloud being located behind the supernova remnant and with a region of high OH absorbing column density along the line of sight. Possibly, the supernova remnant provides additional turbulence to the gas in this region, through which the maser emission must travel. The masers in the southern interaction region are located on the outermost edge of Sgr A East, the line of sight of which is not covered by either absorbing OH gas or a supernova remnant, in agreement with the much lower variability level observed. Similarly, the masers associated with the CND show little variability, consistent with those arising through collisions between relatively large clumps of gas in the CND and no significant amount of turbulent gas along the line of sight.

  10. Complete the development and construction of a spaceborne hydrogen maser clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, Robert F. C.

    1990-01-01

    The objective, to complete the development of an engineering model of a spaceborne hydrogen maser, was successfully achieved. A layout of the maser and detail drawings of the physics package was completed during the first 7 months of the contract. A computer model was made for the maser's thermal design. Using numerical computations, heater resistances were established for 7 temperature controlled zones. The physics package includes: a vacuum manifold that houses four sorption pumps capable of scavenging hydrogen for 4 years, a titanium vacuum tank housing the cavity, metallic seals for all vacuum joints, an RF dissociator within the vacuum envelope, a two-layer printed circuit solenoid and four layers of moly-permalloy magnetic shields. Problems were encountered and overcome in the procurements of the PC solenoid and the magnetic shields. After completion of the fabrication of the maser's components, the maser was assembled using these parts and other components made available by SAO, NRL, and NASA from earlier development work. In March, 1990, the vacuum system was assembled, and by May the maser assembly was completed. The magnetic shielding was poor and the shields were removed, reannealed by a local vendor, and the maser was reassembled. The maser began tests in early June and has been oscillating since that time. The test results of the maser are very good and a life test of the maser is being conducted. It is anticipated that the development and construction of a maser to be tested in space under a new contract from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center will continue.

  11. VERY LARGE ARRAY MONITORING OF 1720 MHz OH MASERS TOWARD THE GALACTIC CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    Pihlstroem, Y. M.; Mesler, R. A.; Sjouwerman, L. O.

    2011-10-20

    We present the first variability study of the 1720 MHz OH masers located in the Galactic center. Most of these masers are associated with the interaction between the supernova remnant Sgr A East and the interstellar medium, but a few masers are associated with the circumnuclear disk (CND). The monitoring program covered five epochs and a timescale of 20-195 days, during which no masers disappeared and no new masers appeared. All masers have previously been detected in a single-epoch observation about one year prior to the start of the monitoring experiment, implying relatively stable conditions for the 1720 MHz OH masers. No extreme variability was detected. The masers associated with the northeastern interaction region between the supernova remnant and the +50 km s{sup -1} molecular cloud show the highest level of variability. This can be explained with the +50 km s{sup -1} molecular cloud being located behind the supernova remnant and with a region of high OH absorbing column density along the line of sight. Possibly, the supernova remnant provides additional turbulence to the gas in this region, through which the maser emission must travel. The masers in the southern interaction region are located on the outermost edge of Sgr A East, the line of sight of which is not covered by either absorbing OH gas or a supernova remnant, in agreement with the much lower variability level observed. Similarly, the masers associated with the CND show little variability, consistent with those arising through collisions between relatively large clumps of gas in the CND and no significant amount of turbulent gas along the line of sight.

  12. EXPANDED VERY LARGE ARRAY DETECTION OF 44.1 GHz CLASS I METHANOL MASERS IN SAGITTARIUS A

    SciTech Connect

    Pihlstroem, Y. M.; Sjouwerman, L. O.; Fish, V. L.

    2011-09-20

    We report on the detection of 44 GHz Class I methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) maser emission in the Sagittarius A (Sgr A) complex with the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA). These EVLA observations show that the Sgr A complex harbors at least four different tracers of shocked regions in the radio regime. The 44 GHz masers correlate with the positions and velocities of previously detected 36 GHz CH{sub 3}OH masers, but less with 1720 MHz OH masers. Our detections agree with theoretical predictions that the densities and temperatures conducive for 1720 MHz OH masers may also produce 36 and 44 GHz CH{sub 3}OH maser emission. However, many 44 GHz masers do not overlap with 36 GHz methanol masers, suggesting that 44 GHz masers also arise in regions too hot and too dense for 36 GHz masers to form. This agrees with the non-detection of 1720 MHz OH masers in the same area, which are thought to be excited under even cooler and less dense conditions. We speculate that the geometry of the 36 GHz masers outlines the current location of a shock front.

  13. 3-D geometry calibration and markerless electromagnetic tracking with a mobile C-arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheryauka, Arvi; Barrett, Johnny; Wang, Zhonghua; Litvin, Andrew; Hamadeh, Ali; Beaudet, Daniel

    2007-03-01

    The design of mobile X-ray C-arm equipment with image tomography and surgical guidance capabilities involves the retrieval of repeatable gantry positioning in three-dimensional space. Geometry misrepresentations can cause degradation of the reconstruction results with the appearance of blurred edges, image artifacts, and even false structures. It may also amplify surgical instrument tracking errors leading to improper implant placement. In our prior publications we have proposed a C-arm 3D positioner calibration method comprising separate intrinsic and extrinsic geometry calibration steps. Following this approach, in the present paper, we extend the intrinsic geometry calibration of C-gantry beyond angular positions in the orbital plane into angular positions on a unit sphere of isocentric rotation. Our method makes deployment of markerless interventional tool guidance with use of high-resolution fluoro images and electromagnetic tracking feasible at any angular position of the tube-detector assembly. Variations of the intrinsic parameters associated with C-arm motion are measured off-line as functions of orbital and lateral angles. The proposed calibration procedure provides better accuracy, and prevents unnecessary workflow steps for surgical navigation applications. With a slight modification, the Misalignment phantom, a tool for intrinsic geometry calibration, is also utilized to obtain an accurate 'image-to-sensor' mapping. We show simulation results, image quality and navigation accuracy estimates, and feasibility data acquired with the prototype system. The experimental results show the potential of high-resolution CT imaging (voxel size below 0.5 mm) and confident navigation in an interventional surgery setting with a mobile C-arm.

  14. C-arm cone-beam computed tomography in interventional oncology: technical aspects and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Floridi, Chiara; Radaelli, Alessandro; Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Grass, Micheal; Lin, Ming De; Chiaradia, Melanie; Geschwind, Jean-Francois; Kobeiter, Hishman; Squillaci, Ettore; Maleux, Geert; Giovagnoni, Andrea; Brunese, Luca; Wood, Bradford; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Rotondo, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a new imaging technology integrated in modern angiographic systems. Due to its ability to obtain cross-sectional imaging and the possibility to use dedicated planning and navigation software, it provides an informed platform for interventional oncology procedures. In this paper, we highlight the technical aspects and clinical applications of CBCT imaging and navigation in the most common loco-regional oncological treatments. PMID:25012472

  15. Single-view geometric calibration for C-arm inverse geometry CT.

    PubMed

    Slagowski, Jordan M; Dunkerley, David A P; Hatt, Charles R; Speidel, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    Accurate and artifact-free reconstruction of tomographic images requires precise knowledge of the imaging system geometry. A projection matrix-based calibration method to enable C-arm inverse geometry CT (IGCT) is proposed. The method is evaluated for scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX), a C-arm mounted inverse geometry fluoroscopic technology. A helical configuration of fiducials is imaged at each gantry angle in a rotational acquisition. For each gantry angle, digital tomosynthesis is performed at multiple planes and a composite image analogous to a cone-beam projection is generated from the plane stack. The geometry of the C-arm, source array, and detector array is determined at each angle by constructing a parameterized three-dimensional-to-two-dimensional projection matrix that minimizes the sum-of-squared deviations between measured and projected fiducial coordinates. Simulations were used to evaluate calibration performance with translations and rotations of the source and detector. The relative root-mean-square error in a reconstruction of a numerical thorax phantom was 0.4% using the calibration method versus 7.7% without calibration. In phantom studies, reconstruction of SBDX projections using the proposed method eliminated artifacts present in noncalibrated reconstructions. The proposed IGCT calibration method reduces image artifacts when uncertainties exist in system geometry.

  16. Region-of-interest reconstruction on medical C-arms with the ATRACT algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennerlein, Frank; Maier, Andreas

    2012-03-01

    Between 2006 and 2008, the business volume of the top 20 orthopedic manufacturers increased by 30% to about 35 Billion. Similar growth rates could be observed in the market of neurological devices, which went up in 2009 by 10.9% to a volume of 2.2 Billion in the US and by 7.0% to 500 Million in Europe.* These remarkable increases are closely connected to the fact that nowadays, many medical procedures, such as implantations in osteosynthesis or the placement of stents in neuroradiology can be performed using minimally-invasive approaches. Such approaches require elaborate interoperative imaging technology. C-arm based tomographic X-ray region-of-interest (ROI) tomography can deliver suitable imaging guidance in these circumstances: it can offer 3D information in desired patient regions at reasonably low X-ray dose. Tomographic ROI reconstruction, however, is in general challenging since projection images might be severely truncated. Recently, a novel, truncation-robust algorithm (ATRACT) has been suggested for 3D C-arm ROI imaging. In this paper, we report for the first time on the performance of ATRACT for reconstruction from real, angiographic C-arm data. Our results indicate that the resulting ROI image quality is suitable for intraoperative imaging. We observe only little differences to the images from a non-truncated acquisition, which would necessarily require significantly more X-ray dose.

  17. Prostate brachytherapy seed localization using a mobile c-arm without tracking.

    PubMed

    Ayad, Maria S; Lee, Junghoon; Prince, Jerry L; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2009-03-13

    The success of prostate brachytherapy depends on the faithful delivery of a dose plan. In turn, intraoperative localization and visualization of the implanted radioactive brachytherapy seeds enables more proficient and informed adjustments to the executed plan during therapy. Prior work has demonstrated adequate seed reconstructions from uncalibrated mobile c-arms using either external tracking devices or image-based fiducials for c-arm pose determination. These alternatives are either time-consuming or interfere with the clinical flow of the surgery, or both. This paper describes a seed reconstruction approach that avoids both tracking devices and fiducials. Instead, it uses the preoperative dose plan in conjunction with a set of captured images to get initial estimates of the c-arm poses followed by an auto-focus technique using the seeds themselves as fiducials to refine the pose estimates. Intraoperative seed localization is achieved through iteratively solving for poses and seed correspondences across images and reconstructing the 3D implanted seeds. The feasibility of this approach was demonstrated through a series of simulations involving variable noise levels, seed densities, image separability and number of images. Preliminary results indicate mean reconstruction errors within 1.2 mm for noisy plans of 84 seeds or fewer. These are attained for additive noise whose standard deviation of the 3D mean error introduced to the plan to simulate the implant is within 3.2 mm.

  18. Physico-Chemical Research on the Sounding Rocket Maser 13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockowandt, Christian; Kemi, Stig; Abrahamsson, Mattias; Florin, Gunnar

    MASER is a sounding rocket platform for short-duration microgravity experiments, providing the scientific community with an excellent microgravity tool. The MASER programme has been running by SSC from 1987 and has up to 2012 provided twelve successful flights for microgravity missions with 6-7 minutes of microgravity, the g-level is normally below 1x10-5 g. The MASER 13 is planned to be launched in spring 2015 from Esrange Space Center in Northern Sweden. The rocket will carry four ESA financed experiment modules. The MASER 13 vehicle will be propelled by the 2-stage solid fuel VSB-30 rocket motor, which provided the 390 kg payload with an apogee of 260 km and 6 and a half minutes of microgravity. Swedish Space Corporation carries out the MASER missions for ESA and the program is also available for other customers. The payload comprise four different experiment modules of which three could be defined as physic-chemical research; XRMON-SOL, CDIC-3, MEDI. It also comprises the Maser Service Module and the recovery system. The Service Module provided real-time 5 Mbps down-link of compressed experiment digital video data from the on-board cameras, as well as high-speed housekeeping telemetry data. XRMON-SOL In this experiment the influence of gravity on the formation of an equiaxed microstructure will be investigated. Special attention will be put on the aspect of nucleation, segregation and impingement. The experiment scope is to melt and solidify an AlCu-alloy sample in microgravity. The solidification will be performed in an isothermal environment. The solidification process will be monitored and recorded with X-ray image during the whole flight, images will also be down-linked to ground for real-time monitoring and possible interaction. CDIC-3 The goal is to study in migrogravity the spatio-temporal dynamics of a chemical front travelling in a thin solution layer open to the air and specifically the respective role of Marangoni and density-related hydrodynamic

  19. 44 GHz Class I Methanol (CH_3OH) Maser Survey in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, Bridget C.; Sjouwerman, Loránt O.; Pihlström, Ylva M.

    2016-12-01

    We report on a large 44 GHz (70-61 A +) methanol (CH3OH) maser survey of the Galactic Center. The Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array was used to search for CH3OH maser emission covering a large fraction of the region around Sgr A. In 25 pointings, over 300 CH3OH maser sources (>10σ) were detected. The majority of the maser sources have a single peak emission spectrum with line of sight velocities that range from about -13 to 72 km s-1. Most maser sources were found to have velocities around 35-55 km s-1, closely following velocities of neighboring interacting molecular clouds (MCs). The full width at half-maximum of each individual spectral feature is very narrow (˜0.85 km s-1 on average). In the north, where Sgr A East is known to be interacting with the 50 km s-1 MC, more than 100 44 GHz CH3OH masers were detected. In addition, three other distinct concentrations of masers were found, which appear to be located closer to the interior of the interacting MCs. It is possible that a subset of masers is associated with star formation, although conclusive evidence is lacking.

  20. Equivalent circuit model of traveling-wave maser slow-wave structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shell, J.

    1991-01-01

    An approach is presented for deriving transmission line equivalent circuits that can approximately model the S-parameter response of traveling wave maser slow wave structures. The technique is illustrated by computing the S-parameter responses of an X-band and S-band maser slow wave structure and comparing these with experimental measurements.

  1. Excited-state hydroxyl maser catalogue from the methanol multibeam survey - I. Positions and variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avison, A.; Quinn, L. J.; Fuller, G. A.; Caswell, J. L.; Green, J. A.; Breen, S. L.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Gray, M. D.; Pestalozzi, M.; Thompson, M. A.; Voronkov, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of the first complete unbaised survey of the Galactic plane for 6035-MHz excited-state hydroxyl (ex-OH) masers undertaken as part of the methanol multibeam (MMB) survey. These observations cover the Galactic longitude ranges 186° < l < 60° including the Galactic Centre. We report the detection of 127 ex-OH masers within the survey region, 47 being new sources. The positions of new detections were determined from interferometric observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We discuss the association of 6035-MHz masers in our survey with the 6668-MHz masers from the MMB Survey, finding 37 likely CH3OH-ex-OH maser pairs with physical separations of ≤0.03 pc and 55 pairings separated by ≤0.1 pc. Using these we calculate for the first time an ex-OH maser lifetime of between 3.3 × 103 and 8.3 × 103 yr. We also discuss the variability of the 6035-MHz masers and detection rates of counterpart 6030-MHz ex-OH masers (28 per cent of our sample having detection at both frequencies).

  2. Recent results on the peformance of EFOS, NP and NX hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V.; Ingold, J. S.; Stalder, T.; Saifi, M.; Dachel, P.; Wardrip, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    In response to a NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Work Assignment, Bendix Field Engineering Corporation evaluated the performance of the Oscilloquartz EPOS-2 hydrogen maser along with that of NASA NX-3 and NP-2 hydrogen masers in early 1983. This paper presents the results of that evaluation.

  3. A 6.7 GHz Methanol Maser Survey at High Galactic Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kai; Chen, Xi; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Xiao-Qiong; Wang, Jun-Zhi; Jiang, Dong-Rong; Li, Juan; Dong, Jian; Wu, Ya-Jun; Qiao, Hai-Hua; Ren, Zhiyuan

    2017-09-01

    We performed a systematic 6.7 GHz Class II methanol maser survey using the Shanghai Tianma Radio Telescope toward targets selected from the all-sky Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) point catalog. In this paper, we report the results from the survey of those at high Galactic latitudes, i.e., | b| > 2°. Of 1473 selected WISE point sources at high latitude, 17 point positions that were actually associated with 12 sources were detected with maser emission, reflecting the rarity (1%–2%) of methanol masers in the region away from the Galactic plane. Out of the 12 sources, 3 are detected for the first time. The spectral energy distribution at infrared bands shows that these new detected masers occur in the massive star-forming regions. Compared to previous detections, the methanol maser changes significantly in both spectral profiles and flux densities. The infrared WISE images show that almost all of these masers are located in the positions of the bright WISE point sources. Compared to the methanol masers at the Galactic plane, these high-latitude methanol masers provide good tracers for investigating the physics and kinematics around massive young stellar objects, because they are believed to be less affected by the surrounding cluster environment.

  4. Detectability of Circumstellar SiO Maser Emission on VSOP-2 Baselines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomer, F.; Bujarrabal, V.; Ruiz, R. S.; Dodson, R.; Alcolea, J.; Desmurs, J.-F.

    2009-08-01

    We have studied compact circumstellar SiO maser emission at 86 GHz with the Global Millimeter VLBI Array (GMVA), which provides the same spatial resolution as the VSOP-2 to ground baselines at 43 GHz. We present preliminary maps of the emission, estimate the flux and size of the maser spots, and discuss their detectability on baselines from VSOP-2 to ground telescopes.

  5. Using Hydrogen Recombination Masers to Study Disk and Wind Kinematics in MWC 349A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emery, Deanna Lily; Zhang, Qizhou

    2017-06-01

    The kinematics of circumstellar disks and disk winds are poorly understood due to the difficulty of producing well resolved observational data. The bright hydrogen recombination-line maser emission originating from the circumstellar disk of MWC 349A offers a unique opportunity to study the disk at milli-arcsecond precision. Using high angular resolution observations of the maser emission from MWC 349A carried out by the SMA, we were able to produce and analyze rotation curves for the H26α, H30α, and H31α transitions. We found that maser features originating from the disk follow Keplerian motion. Furthermore, the H31α masers in the disk appear to form in a narrow annulus at a fixed radius from the star, consistent with previous studies of the H30α and H26α masers. Based on analysis of the rotation curves for the three maser transitions, we determined that maser transitions for lower quantum numbers occur in the inner and denser regions of the disk than the higher quantum transitions. Additionally, we derived the density distribution within the disk, which follows the relation ne ~ R-4.9 ± 0.6. Finally, we found that a stellar mass of M = 10 ± 3 M⊙ was most consistent with the kinematics of the maser features originating from the Keplerian disk.

  6. C-Arm Computed Tomography Compared With Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography for Treatment Planning Before Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Christoph Waggershauser, Tobias; Tiling, Reinhold; Weckbach, Sabine; Johnson, Thorsten; Meissner, Oliver; Klingenbeck-Regn, Klaus; Reiser, Maximilian; Hoffmann, Ralf Thorsten

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether rotational C-arm computed tomography (CT) allows visualization of liver metastases and adds relevant information for radioembolization (RE) treatment planning. Technetium angiography, together with C-arm CT, was performed in 47 patients to determine the feasibility for RE. C-arm CT images were compared with positron emission tomography (PET)/CT images for the detection of liver tumors. The images were also rated according one of the following three categories: (1) images that provide no additional information compared with DSA alone; (2) images that do provide additional information compared with DSA; and (2) images that had an impact on eligibility determination for and planning of the RE procedure. In all patients, 283 FDG-positive liver lesions were detected by PET. In venous contrast-phase CT, 221 (78.1%) and 15 (5.3%) of these lesions were either hypodense or hyperdense, respectively. In C-arm CT, 103 (36.4%) liver lesions were not detectable because they were outside of either the field of view or the contrast-enhanced liver segment. Another 25 (8.8%) and 98 (34.6%) of the liver lesions were either hyperdense or presented primarily as hypodense lesions with a rim enhancement, respectively. With PET/CT as the standard of reference, venous CT and C-arm CT failed to detect 47 (16.6%) and 57 (20.1%) of all liver lesions, respectively. For RE planning, C-arm CT provided no further information, provide some additional information, or had an impact on the procedure in 20 (42.5%), 15 (31.9%) and 12 (25.6%) of patients, respectively. We conclude that C-arm CT may add decisive information in patients scheduled for RE.

  7. Pose-aware C-arm for automatic re-initialization of interventional 2D/3D image registration.

    PubMed

    Fotouhi, Javad; Fuerst, Bernhard; Johnson, Alex; Lee, Sing Chun; Taylor, Russell; Osgood, Greg; Navab, Nassir; Armand, Mehran

    2017-07-01

    In minimally invasive interventions assisted by C-arm imaging, there is a demand to fuse the intra-interventional 2D C-arm image with pre-interventional 3D patient data to enable surgical guidance. The commonly used intensity-based 2D/3D registration has a limited capture range and is sensitive to initialization. We propose to utilize an opto/X-ray C-arm system which allows to maintain the registration during intervention by automating the re-initialization for the 2D/3D image registration. Consequently, the surgical workflow is not disrupted and the interaction time for manual initialization is eliminated. We utilize two distinct vision-based tracking techniques to estimate the relative poses between different C-arm arrangements: (1) global tracking using fused depth information and (2) RGBD SLAM system for surgical scene tracking. A highly accurate multi-view calibration between RGBD and C-arm imaging devices is achieved using a custom-made multimodal calibration target. Several in vitro studies are conducted on pelvic-femur phantom that is encased in gelatin and covered with drapes to simulate a clinically realistic scenario. The mean target registration errors (mTRE) for re-initialization using depth-only and RGB [Formula: see text] depth are 13.23 mm and 11.81 mm, respectively. 2D/3D registration yielded 75% success rate using this automatic re-initialization, compared to a random initialization which yielded only 23% successful registration. The pose-aware C-arm contributes to the 2D/3D registration process by globally re-initializing the relationship of C-arm image and pre-interventional CT data. This system performs inside-out tracking, is self-contained, and does not require any external tracking devices.

  8. The Added Value of Volume-of-Interest C-Arm CT Imaging during Endovascular Treatment of Intracranial Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Chintalapani, G; Chinnadurai, P; Maier, A; Xia, Y; Bauer, S; Shaltoni, H; Morsi, H; Mawad, M E

    2016-04-01

    Successful endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms requires understanding the exact relationship of implanted devices to the aneurysm, parent artery, and other branch vessels during the treatment. Intraprocedural C-arm CT imaging has been shown to provide such information. However, its repeated use is limited due to increasing radiation exposure to the patient. The goal of this study was to evaluate a new volume-of-interest C-arm CT imaging technique, which would provide device-specific information through multiple 3D acquisitions of only the region of interest, thus reducing cumulative radiation exposure to the patient. VOI C-arm CT images were obtained in 28 patients undergoing endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms. VOI images were acquired with the x-ray source collimated around the deployed device, both horizontally and vertically. The images were reconstructed by using a novel prototype robust reconstruction algorithm to minimize truncation artifacts from double collimation. The reconstruction accuracy of VOI C-arm CT images was assessed quantitatively by comparing them with the full-head noncollimated images. Quantitative analysis showed that the quality of VOI C-arm CT images is comparable with that of the standard Feldkamp, Davis, and Kress reconstruction of noncollimated C-arm CT images (correlation coefficient = 0.96 and structural similarity index = 0.92). Furthermore, 91.5% reduction in dose-area product was achieved with VOI imaging compared with the full-head acquisition. VOI imaging allows multiple 3D C-arm CT acquisitions and provides information related to device expansion, parent wall apposition, and neck coverage during the procedure, with very low additional radiation exposure to the patient. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  9. A search for gravitationally lensed water masers in dusty quasars and star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKean, J. P.; Impellizzeri, C. M. V.; Roy, A. L.; Castangia, P.; Samuel, F.; Brunthaler, A.; Henkel, C.; Wucknitz, O.

    2011-02-01

    Luminous extragalactic water masers are known to be associated with active galactic nuclei and have provided accurate estimates for the mass of the central supermassive black hole and the size and structure of the circumnuclear accretion disc in nearby galaxies. To find water maser systems at much higher redshifts, we have begun a survey of known gravitationally lensed quasars and star-forming galaxies. In this paper, we present a search for 22 GHz (rest-frame) water masers towards five dusty, gravitationally lensed quasars and star-forming galaxies at redshifts between 2.3 and 2.9 with the Effelsberg radio telescope and the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA). Our observations do not find any new definite examples of high-redshift water maser galaxies, suggesting that large reservoirs of dust and gas are not a sufficient condition for powerful water maser emission. However, we do find the tentative detection of a water maser system in the active galaxy IRAS 10214+4724 at redshift 2.285. Our survey has now doubled the number of gravitationally lensed galaxies and quasars that have been searched for high-redshift water maser emission. We also present an updated analysis of the high-redshift water maser luminosity function that is based on the results presented here and from the only cosmologically distant (z > 1) water maser galaxy found thus far, MG J0414+0534 at redshift 2.64. By comparing with the water maser luminosity function locally and at moderate redshifts, we find that there must be some evolution in the luminosity function of water maser galaxies at high redshifts. By assuming a moderate evolution [(1 +z)4] in the water maser luminosity function, we find that blind surveys for water maser galaxies are only worthwhile with extremely high sensitivity like that of the planned Square Kilometre Array (Phase 2), which is scheduled to be completed by 2020. However, instruments like the EVLA and MeerKAT will be capable of detecting water maser systems similar to the

  10. A high-sensitivity 6.7 GHz methanol maser survey toward H2O sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Li, J. J.; Hachisuka, K.; Pandian, J. D.; Menten, K. M.; Henkel, C.

    2008-07-01

    We present the results of a high sensitivity survey for 6.7 GHz methanol masers towards 22 GHz water masers using the 100 m Efflesberg telescope. A total of 89 sources were observed and 10 new methanol masers were detected. The new detections are relatively faint with peak flux densities of between 0.5 and 4.0 Jy. A nil detection rate from low-mass star forming regions enhances the conclusion that the masers are only associated with massive star formation. Even the faintest methanol maser in our survey, with a luminosity of 1.1 × 10-9 L_⊙, is associated with massive stars, as inferred from its infrared luminosity. Table 3 is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. PHYSICAL CONDITIONS AROUND 6.7 GHz METHANOL MASERS. I. AMMONIA

    SciTech Connect

    Pandian, J. D.; Wyrowski, F.; Menten, K. M.

    2012-07-01

    Methanol masers at 6.7 GHz are known to be tracers of high-mass star formation in our Galaxy. In this paper, we study the large-scale physical conditions in the star-forming clumps/cores associated with 6.7 GHz methanol masers using observations of the (1, 1), (2, 2), and (3, 3) inversion transitions of ammonia with the Effelsberg telescope. The gas kinetic temperature is found to be higher than in infrared dark clouds, highlighting the relatively evolved nature of the maser sources. Other than a weak correlation between maser luminosity and the ammonia line width, we do not find any differences between low- and high-luminosity methanol masers.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Water masers in M31. II. Multiwavelength data (Amiri+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, N.; Darling, J.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present a comparative multiwavelength analysis of 22GHz water-maser-emitting and non-maser-emitting 24um luminous star-forming regions in M31. We use WISE, Spitzer, and Herschel infrared continuum maps, maps of derived quantities such as star formation and dust temperature, and archival catalogs to examine the differences between maser-emitting and non-maser-emitting regions, to examine correlations between observable quantities among each population, and to constrain the parameter space most likely to produce detectable water masers. Throughout the manuscript, we assume a distance to M31 of 780kpc when calculating luminosities from continuum or line flux measurements. (2 data files).

  13. Microarcsecond proper motions of extragalactic water vapor masers in M33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhill, L. J.; Moran, J. M.; Reid, M. J.; Menten, K. M.; Hirabayashi, H.

    1993-01-01

    A second-epoch spectral line VLBI synthesis map of the H2O maser associated with the H II region IC 133 in the galaxy M33 is presented. Thirty-two spatially distinct maser features were identified, and a second center of maser activity within the IC 133 complex, IC 133 West, which is displaced about 0.3 arcsec from IC 133 Main, was discovered. A comparison of the two available maps of IC 133 is used to estimate the right ascension components of proper motion over a period of 479 d for five maser features to accuracies of between 7 and 16 micro-as. The dispersions in transverse and radial velocities for the maser features are consistent with the accepted distance to M33 of 720 kpc, where the data admit a fractional uncertainty in distance of 50 percent.

  14. Zeeman Effect observations toward 36 GHz methanol masers in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potvin, Justin A.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Pratim Sarma, Anuj

    2017-01-01

    We present observations of 36 GHz Class I methanol masers taken with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in the B configuration with the aim of detecting the Zeeman Effect. We targeted several 36 GHz Class I methanol masers associated with supernova remnants (SNRs) toward the Galactic Center. Each source was observed in dual circular polarizations for three hours. The observed spectral profiles of the masers are complex, with several components blended in velocity. In only one case was the Stokes V maser profile prominent enough to reveal a 2-sigma hint of a magnetic field of zBlos = 14.56 +/- 5.60 Hz; we have chosen to express our results in terms of zBlos since the Zeeman splitting factor (z) for 36 GHz methanol masers has not been measured. There are several hints that these spectra would reveal significant magnetic fields if they could be spatially and spectrally resolved.

  15. Atomic velocity distributions out of hydrogen-maser dissociators. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Jaduszliwer, B.; Chan, Y.C.

    1990-02-15

    Velocity distributions are determined for atoms effusing out of radio frequency discharge hydrogen dissociators, of the type used in hydrogen masers. This work was motivated by long-term reliability issues related to the possible use of masers as freqency standards for satellites. A primary issue is the maser's hydrogen budget, because many of the common failure modes of a maser involve either the hydrogen source or sink. Because the focusing properties of the state-selecting magnets are velocity dependent, the overall hydrogen budget will depend not only on the dissociation efficiency but also on the velocity distribution of the hydrogen atoms leaving the dissociation. Many times, that distribution has been tacitly assumed to be Maxwellian at wall temperature, but pressure in the dissociator increases. Operating the dissociator to yield a matched to that distribution may significantly improve the efficiency hydrogen use by the maser.

  16. Dual-polarization 8.45 GHz traveling-wave maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, R. B.

    1987-01-01

    An 8.5 GHz dual-channel, dual-polarization traveling-wave maser (TWM) amplifier was installed in the XKR solar system radar cone at DSS 14. The TWM is based on the Blk IIA 8.45 GHz maser structure, with two of the four maser stages being used for each channel, and each maser half then followed by a high-performance GaAs FET amplifier to achieve the desired net gain. A shortened low-noise input waveguide and an orthogonal-mode junction which is cooled to 4.5 K feeds each amplifier chain. The rotation of an external polarizer permits the polarization of each channel to be defined as either linear or circular. A circular waveguide switch was also developed to provide for noise calibration and to protect the maser from incident transmitter power.

  17. Microarcsecond proper motions of extragalactic water vapor masers in M33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhill, L. J.; Moran, J. M.; Reid, M. J.; Menten, K. M.; Hirabayashi, H.

    1993-01-01

    A second-epoch spectral line VLBI synthesis map of the H2O maser associated with the H II region IC 133 in the galaxy M33 is presented. Thirty-two spatially distinct maser features were identified, and a second center of maser activity within the IC 133 complex, IC 133 West, which is displaced about 0.3 arcsec from IC 133 Main, was discovered. A comparison of the two available maps of IC 133 is used to estimate the right ascension components of proper motion over a period of 479 d for five maser features to accuracies of between 7 and 16 micro-as. The dispersions in transverse and radial velocities for the maser features are consistent with the accepted distance to M33 of 720 kpc, where the data admit a fractional uncertainty in distance of 50 percent.

  18. Variability of Formaldehyde Masers in the Context of Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, Esteban; Hofner, P.; Goss, W. M.

    2007-12-01

    In the last few years significant progress has been made in the study of formaldehyde (H2CO) 6cm masers. We have discovered four new H2CO maser regions in the Galaxy resulting in a total of seven massive star forming regions where H2CO masers have been detected. In this contribution we discuss one of the aspects of our ongoing research, i.e., variability of H2CO masers and its relation with young regions of massive star formation. In particular, we report the discovery of possible periodic H2CO and CH3OH maser flares in IRAS 18566+0408. E.A. is supported by a NRAO predoctoral fellowship, and P.H. acknowledges partial support by NSF grant AST-0454665.

  19. Time Variation of SiO Masers in VX Sagittarii over an Optically Quiescent Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamohara, Ryuichi; Deguchi, Shuji; Miyoshi, Makoto; Shen, Zhi-Qiang

    2005-04-01

    The time variation of SiO masers in a semi-regular variable, VX Sgr, was investigated in the period between 1994 and 2004 when the optical light curve exhibited an ˜6-yr quiescent phase intercepting a regularly pulsating era. The quiescent period occurred with a delay of several years after a decrease in the SiO maser flux. VLBA observations of SiO masers made during this period showed no drastic spatial variation except for emission features being shifted from south-west to north-east. The SiO maser flux decrease, and a succeeding optical quiescent phase, may indicate that the stellar mass-loss rate diminished over a few years around 1994. A SiO maser flare occurring in 1999 may be a reminiscence of a final gas blow, which resulted in the optically quiescent period.

  20. [Balloonsacroplasty: C-arm or CT controlled application? : Experience with 46 patients].

    PubMed

    Prokop, A; Andresen, R; Chmielnicki, M

    2016-11-01

    Sacral insufficiency fractures are often overlooked and lead to severe therapy-resistant pain. These fractures can be most sensitively detected with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Similar to balloon kyphoplasty, sacroplasty provides fixation of these fractures with cement. This study was carried out to investigate whether pain is reduced using this method and whether computed tomography (CT)-guided cement application results in less cement extravasation and fewer complications than C-arm controlled application. In a retrospective multicenter study, 46 patients (41 female, 5 male) with an average age of 75 years were treated by sacroplasty. The procedure was performed with CT-guidance for 25 patients and with C-arm control for 21 patients. Pain was evaluated using a visual analog scale. Patients were followed up for 6 months. The average operation time was 35 min and postinterventional hospital stay averaged 4 days. In the CT group pain decreased from an average score of 8.8 ± 0.7 preoperatively to 2.6 ± 0.6 postoperatively (p < 0.001) and in the C-arm group pain decreased from 8.2 ±1.0 to 2.2± 1.4 (p < 0.001). There were no cases of cement extravasation in the CT group (0 out of 25 = 0 %) and 8 asymptomatic cases in the C-arm group (8 out of 21 = 38 %). In addition, there were two injuries to the superior gluteal artery with hematoma in the area of puncture, one requiring operative treatment. There were two mortalities in the CT group from lung disease and stroke during the study but this was unrelated to the operation. Balloon sacroplasty results in a reliable and significant reduction in pain for sacral insufficiency fractures. The C-arm controlled cement application resulted in more frequent extravasation and complications than CT-guided application.

  1. Comparison of Radiation Exposure from Fixed Table Fluoroscopy to a Portable C-Arm During Ureteroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Fernando J; Shin, Richard H; Waisanen, Kyle M; Nguyen, Giao; Wang, Chu; Scales, Charles D; Ferrandino, Michael N; Preminger, Glenn M; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Lipkin, Michael E

    2017-09-01

    Current treatment practices within the field of endourology require the routine use of radiation exposure to provide adequate imaging during urologic procedures. One such procedure requiring repeated radiation exposure during treatment is ureteroscopy. We set out to compare estimated fluoroscopic radiation exposures employing fixed table and portable C-arm fluoroscopy. A cross-sectional dosimetry phantom model was placed supine on both fixed fluoroscopy and standard operating room tables. The models were then exposed to three separate 5-minute runs of fluoroscopic exposure. Metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor dosimeters were utilized in organ-specific locations to determine specific radiation exposure dosages. Absorbed radiation was determined for each organ location for both fluoroscopy units. Organ dose volumetric corrections were performed for skin and red bone marrow, to correct for the nonirradiated portion. Organ dose rate (ODR, mGy/s) and effective dose rate (EDR, mSv/s) were calculated, with values reported as mean ± standard deviation. There were found to be statistically significant elevations for both total EDR and organ-specific dose rates with the use of fixed table fluoroscopy compared with C-arm fluoroscopy. EDR was found to be 0.0240 ± 0.0019 mSv/s for the fixed table unit and 0.0029 ± 0.0005 mSv/s for the C-arm unit (p = 0.0024). Internal organs exposed to the most radiation during fixed table fluoroscopy included the gall bladder and stomach in comparison to C-arm fluoroscopy, which found elevated exposure in the kidneys, pancreas, and spleen. The routine use of fixed table fluoroscopy results in significantly elevated estimated organ doses and EDR when directly compared with C-arm fluoroscopy in model trials. This difference should be taken into consideration by practicing urologists when patient treatment requires the use of fluoroscopy to maintain radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable.

  2. A 95 GHz CLASS I METHANOL MASER SURVEY TOWARD GLIMPSE EXTENDED GREEN OBJECTS (EGOs)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xi; Shen Zhiqiang; Gan Conggui; Ellingsen, Simon P.; Titmarsh, Anita

    2011-09-01

    We report the results of a systematic survey for 95 GHz class I methanol masers toward a new sample of 192 massive young stellar object candidates associated with ongoing outflows (known as extended green objects or EGOs) identified from the Spitzer Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) survey. The observations were made with the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF) Mopra 22 m radio telescope and resulted in the detection of 105 new 95 GHz class I methanol masers. For 92 of the sources our observations provide the first identification of a class I maser transition associated with these objects (i.e., they are new class I methanol maser sources). Our survey proves that there is indeed a high detection rate (55%) of class I methanol masers toward EGOs. Comparison of the GLIMPSE point sources associated with EGOs with and without class I methanol maser detections shows that they have similar mid-IR colors, with the majority meeting the color selection criteria -0.6 < [5.8]-[8.0] < 1.4 and 0.5 < [3.6]-[4.5] < 4.0. Investigations of the Infrared Array Camera and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer 24 {mu}m colors and the associated millimeter dust clump properties (mass and density) of the EGOs for the sub-samples based on the class of methanol masers they are associated with suggest that the stellar mass range associated with class I methanol masers extends to lower masses than for class II methanol masers, or alternatively class I methanol masers may be associated with more than one evolutionary phase during the formation of a high-mass star.

  3. A SEARCH FOR 95 GHz CLASS I METHANOL MASERS IN MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Cong-Gui; Chen, Xi; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Xu, Ye; Ju, Bing-Gang

    2013-01-20

    We have observed a sample of 288 molecular outflow sources including 123 high-mass and 165 low-mass sources in order to search for class I methanol masers at the 95 GHz transition and to investigate the relationship between outflow characteristics and class I methanol maser emission with the Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m radio telescope. Our survey detected 62 sources with 95 GHz methanol masers above a 3{sigma} detection limit, which includes 47 high-mass sources and 15 low-mass sources. Therefore, the detection rate is 38% for high-mass outflow sources and 9% for low-mass outflow sources, suggesting that class I methanol masers are relatively easily excited in high-mass sources. There are 37 newly detected 95 GHz methanol masers (including 27 high-mass and 10 low-mass sources), 19 of which are newly identified (i.e., first identification) class I methanol masers (including 13 high-mass and 6 low-mass sources). A statistical analysis of the distributions of maser detections with the outflow parameters reveals that the maser detection efficiency increases with the outflow properties (e.g., mass, momentum, kinetic energy, mechanical luminosity of outflows, etc.). Systematic investigations of the relationships between the intrinsic luminosity of methanol masers and the outflow properties (including mass, momentum, kinetic energy, bolometric luminosity, and mass-loss rate of the central stellar sources) indicate a positive correlation. This further supports the theory that class I methanol masers are collisionally pumped and associated with shocks when outflows interact with the surrounding ambient medium.

  4. Assessment of the adequacy of closed reduction in fractures of the zygomatic arch using "C"-arm image intensifier.

    PubMed

    Ramanoojam, Shandilya; Gadre, Pushkar; Shah, Shishir; Gadre, Kiran Shrikrishna

    2011-07-01

    Major problems in closed reduction of isolated, minimally displaced, and depressed zygomatic arch fractures are blind nature of the technique, reliability on digital palpation, reduction click, and step deformity between fragments. The purpose of this study was to objectively confirm the adequacy of closed reduction intraoperatively and the usefulness of the "C"-arm image intensifier. A total of 12 patients with 1- to 8-day-old unilateral isolated and depressed zygomatic arch fracture underwent closed reduction under "C"-arm image intensifier. Of these patients, 9 were men and 3 were women, with age ranging from 18 to 32 years. Intraoperative prereduction and postreduction images were obtained using the "C"-arm image intensifier. Criteria for adequate reduction were the following: intrafragmentary gap less than 0.5 mm, no overriding of fragments, no depression of fragments, and no step deformity. After being clinically satisfied about the reduction, images on "C"-arm showed no intrafragmentary gap. In 3 patients, there were residual overriding and minimal rotation around the anteroposterior axis of the posterior fragment. In 1 patient, rotation and step deformity remained. In this patient, additional stabilization was provided. The "C"-arm image intensifier shows some poorly reduced or unstable isolated depressed zygomatic arch fractures that remain unidentified even after careful palpation. Thus, it plays a recognizable role to avoid the trouble of second intervention.

  5. G 10.472+0.027: AN EXTREME WATER MASER OUTFLOW ASSOCIATED WITH A MASSIVE PROTOSTELLAR CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Titmarsh, A. M.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Breen, S. L.; Caswell, J. L.; Voronkov, M. A.

    2013-09-20

    An Australia Telescope Compact Array search for 22 GHz water masers toward 6.7 GHz class II methanol masers detected in the Methanol Multibeam survey has resulted in the detection of extremely high-velocity emission from one of the sources. The water maser emission associated with this young stellar object covers a velocity span of nearly 300 km s{sup –1}. The highest velocity water maser emission is redshifted from the systemic velocity by 250 km s{sup –1}, which is a new record for high-mass star formation regions. The maser is associated with a very young late O, or early B star, which may still be actively accreting matter (and driving the extreme outflow). If that is the case, future observations of the kinematics of this water maser will provide a unique probe of accretion processes in the highest mass young stellar objects and test models of water maser formation.

  6. A WATER MASER AND NH{sub 3} SURVEY OF GLIMPSE EXTENDED GREEN OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cyganowski, C. J.; Koda, J.; Towers, S.; Meyer, J. Donovan; Rosolowsky, E.; Egusa, F.; Momose, R.; Robitaille, T. P.

    2013-02-10

    We present the results of a Nobeyama 45 m H{sub 2}O maser and NH{sub 3} survey of all 94 northern GLIMPSE extended green objects (EGOs), a sample of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) identified based on their extended 4.5 {mu}m emission. We observed the NH{sub 3}(1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) inversion lines, and detected emission toward 97%, 63%, and 46% of our sample, respectively (median rms {approx} 50 mK). The H{sub 2}O maser detection rate is 68% (median rms {approx} 0.11 Jy). The derived H{sub 2}O maser and clump-scale gas properties are consistent with the identification of EGOs as young MYSOs. To explore the degree of variation among EGOs, we analyze subsamples defined based on mid-infrared (MIR) properties or maser associations. H{sub 2}O masers and warm dense gas, as indicated by emission in the higher-excitation NH{sub 3} transitions, are most frequently detected toward EGOs also associated with both Class I and II CH{sub 3}OH masers. Ninety-five percent (81%) of such EGOs are detected in H{sub 2}O (NH{sub 3}(3,3)), compared to only 33% (7%) of EGOs without either CH{sub 3}OH maser type. As populations, EGOs associated with Class I and/or II CH{sub 3}OH masers have significantly higher NH{sub 3} line widths, column densities, and kinetic temperatures than EGOs undetected in CH{sub 3}OH maser surveys. However, we find no evidence for statistically significant differences in H{sub 2}O maser properties (such as maser luminosity) among any EGO subsamples. Combining our data with the 1.1 mm continuum Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey, we find no correlation between isotropic H{sub 2}O maser luminosity and clump number density. H{sub 2}O maser luminosity is weakly correlated with clump (gas) temperature and clump mass.

  7. Finding Short-Term Variability in Methanol Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonin, Samuel; Barott, W. C.; Catanach, T.

    2012-05-01

    The Allen Telescope Array (ATA) performed 53 observations of 6.7 GHz methanol masers between July 2010 and January 2011 in an effort to identify short-timescale variability. With the notable exception of Weisberg et al. (2005), few analyses have been performed analyzing variability in masers on timescales of minutes or less. This work is aimed both at providing additional data (including refined positions) on the catalog of observed sources as well as identifying the prevalence and cause of short-term phenomena. Observations utilized both the ATA correlator (for mapping) and beamformer (for recording voltage time series). A combination of Fast-Fourier Transforms and Continuous Wavelet Transforms are applied to channelized power series waterfalls) in this investigation. Wavelet analysis can be thought of as a generalization of Fourier analysis that allows us to examine non-stationary characteristics of the spectra. The survey included both short (10 minute), long (60 minute), and follow-up observations on candidate targets. Analysis so far has identified three variable sources out of 43 distinct objects that were observed. These objects exhibit significant variation on the order of several minutes, are consistent in follow-up observations, and we have ruled out instrumental variation. Future and ongoing work includes identifying the source of this variation as intrinsic to the source or a property of the ISM. Shorter time-scales will be investigated using a combination of techniques, including total power variation, pulse searching (in an attempt to find pulsars), and phase-shift demodulation techniques. The case for SETI analysis of these data is given, for example, by Cordes (1993), who suggested that extraterrestrial intelligences could use masers to amplify interstellar signals.This project was funded by the National Science Foundation Grant AST0852095. [1] Weisberg J. M. et al. (2005) Science, 309, 5731. [2] Cordes J. M. (1993) Astron. Soc. Pacific Conf. Series

  8. Laboratory astrophysics: Investigation of planetary and astrophysical maser emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, R.; Speirs, D. C.; Kellett, B. J.; Vorgul, I.; McConville, S. L.; Cairns, R. A.; Cross, A. W.; Phelps, A. D. R.; Ronald, K.

    This paper describes a model for cyclotron maser emission applicable to planetary auroral radio emission, the stars UV Ceti and CU Virginus, blazar jets and astrophysical shocks. These emissions may be attributed to energetic electrons moving into convergent magnetic fields that are typically found in association with dipole like planetary magnetospheres or shocks. It is found that magnetic compression leads to the formation of a velocity distribution having a horseshoe shape as a result of conservation of the electron magnetic moment. Under certain plasma conditions where the local electron plasma frequency ω pe is much less than the cyclotron frequency ω ce the distribution is found to be unstable to maser type radiation emission. We have established a laboratory-based facility that has verified many of the details of our original theoretical description and agrees well with numerical simulations. The experiment has demonstrated that the horseshoe distribution produces cyclotron emission at a frequency just below the local electron cyclotron frequency, with polarisation close to X-mode and propagating nearly perpendicularly to the electron beam motion. We discuss recent developments in the theory and simulation of the instability including addressing radiation escape problems, and relate these to the laboratory, space, and astrophysical observations. The experiments showed strong narrow band EM emissions at frequencies just below the cold-plasma cyclotron frequency as predicted by the theory. Measurements of the conversion efficiency, mode and spectral content were in close agreement with the predictions of numerical simulations undertaken using a particle-in-cell code and also with satellite observations confirming the horseshoe maser as an important emission mechanism in geophysical/astrophysical plasmas. In each case we address how the radiation can escape the plasma without suffering strong absorption at the second harmonic layer.

  9. Laboratory astrophysics: Investigation of planetary and astrophysical maser emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, R.; Speirs, D. C.; Kellett, B. J.; Vorgul, I.; McConville, S. L.; Cairns, R. A.; Cross, A. W.; Phelps, A. D. R.; Ronald, K.

    2013-10-01

    This paper describes a model for cyclotron maser emission applicable to planetary auroral radio emission, the stars UV Ceti and CU Virginus, blazar jets and astrophysical shocks. These emissions may be attributed to energetic electrons moving into convergent magnetic fields that are typically found in association with dipole like planetary magnetospheres or shocks. It is found that magnetic compression leads to the formation of a velocity distribution having a horseshoe shape as a result of conservation of the electron magnetic moment. Under certain plasma conditions where the local electron plasma frequency ω pe is much less than the cyclotron frequency ω ce the distribution is found to be unstable to maser type radiation emission. We have established a laboratory-based facility that has verified many of the details of our original theoretical description and agrees well with numerical simulations. The experiment has demonstrated that the horseshoe distribution produces cyclotron emission at a frequency just below the local electron cyclotron frequency, with polarisation close to X-mode and propagating nearly perpendicularly to the electron beam motion. We discuss recent developments in the theory and simulation of the instability including addressing radiation escape problems, and relate these to the laboratory, space, and astrophysical observations. The experiments showed strong narrow band EM emissions at frequencies just below the cold-plasma cyclotron frequency as predicted by the theory. Measurements of the conversion efficiency, mode and spectral content were in close agreement with the predictions of numerical simulations undertaken using a particle-in-cell code and also with satellite observations confirming the horseshoe maser as an important emission mechanism in geophysical/astrophysical plasmas. In each case we address how the radiation can escape the plasma without suffering strong absorption at the second harmonic layer.

  10. Backward wave cyclotron-maser emission in the auroral magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Speirs, D C; Bingham, R; Cairns, R A; Vorgul, I; Kellett, B J; Phelps, A D R; Ronald, K

    2014-10-10

    In this Letter, we present theory and particle-in-cell simulations describing cyclotron radio emission from Earth's auroral region and similar phenomena in other astrophysical environments. In particular, we find that the radiation, generated by a down-going electron horseshoe distribution is due to a backward-wave cyclotron-maser emission process. The backward wave nature of the radiation contributes to upward refraction of the radiation that is also enhanced by a density inhomogeneity. We also show that the radiation is preferentially amplified along the auroral oval rather than transversely. The results are in agreement with recent Cluster observations.

  11. Origin of water masers in W49N

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Elitzur, Moshe

    1993-01-01

    It is proposed that H2O masers in star-forming regions occur early in the expansion of thin shells swept up by high-velocity winds from young massive stars. In W49N, confinement of the shell by a density distribution with an axial cavity can explain both the velocity field and the shape of the mass distribution. A modified version of the thin-shell code of Mac Low and McCray (1988), including radiation cooling, is used to model dynamically the expanding shell.

  12. Modeling of the hydrogen maser disk in MWC 349

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Victor O.; Smith, Howard A.; Strelnitski, Vladimir S.

    1994-01-01

    Maser amplification in a Keplerian circumstellar disk seen edge on-the idea put forward by Gordon (1992), Martin-Pintado, & Serabyn (1992), and Thum, Martin-Pintado, & Bachiller (1992) to explain the millimeter hydrogen recombination lines in MWC 349-is further justified and developed here. The double-peaked (vs. possible triple-peaked) form of the observed spectra is explained by the reduced emission from the inner portion of the disk, the portion responsible for the central ('zero velocity') component of a triple-peaked spectrum. Radial gradient of electron density and/or free-free absorption within the disk are identified as the probable causes of this central 'hole' in the disk and of its opacity. We calculate a set of synthetic maser spectra radiated by a homogeneous Keplerian ring seen edge-on and compare them to the H30-alpha observations of Thum et al., averaged over about 1000 days. We used a simple graphical procedure to solve an inverse problem and deduced the probable values of some basic disk and maser parameters. We find that the maser is essentially unsaturated, and that the most probable values of electron temperature. Doppler width of the microturbulence, and electron density, all averaged along the amplification path are, correspondingly, T(sub e) less than or equal to 11,000 K, V(sub micro) less than or equal to 14 km/s, n(sub e) approx. = (3 +/- 2) x 10(exp 7)/cu cm. The model shows that radiation at every frequency within the spectrum arises in a monochromatic 'hot spot.' The maximum optical depth within the 'hot spot' producing radiation at the spectral peak maximum is tau(sub max) approx. = 6 +/- 1; the effective width of the masing ring is approx. = 0.4-0.7 times its outer diameter; the size of the 'hot spot' responsible for the radiation at the spectral peak frequency is approx. = 0.2-0.3 times the distance between the two 'hot spots' corresponding to two peaks. An important derivation of our model is the dynamical mass of the central star

  13. Kinetic analysis of two dimensional metallic grating Cerenkov maser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Ding

    2011-08-15

    The dispersion relation of two dimensional metallic grating Cerenkov maser has been given by using kinetic analysis, in which the influence of electron movement is directly considered without using an equivalent dielectric medium assumption. The effects of structural parameters and beam state on the interaction gain and synchronous frequency have also been investigated in detail by numerical calculations. To an illustrative case, the quantitative relations produced from varying the gap distance between electron beam and metallic grating, beam current, electron transverse to axial velocity ratio, and electron axial velocity spread have been obtained. The developed method can be used to predict the real interaction system performances.

  14. Maser radiometer for cosmic background radiation anisotropy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fixsen, D. J.; Wilkinson, D. T.

    1982-06-01

    A maser amplifier was incorporated into a low noise radiometer designed to measure large-scale anisotropy in the 3 deg K microwave background radiation. To minimize emission by atmospheric water vapor and oxygen, the radiometer is flown in a small balloon to an altitude to 25 km. Three successful flights were made - two from Palestine, Texas and one from Sao Jose dos Campos, Brazil. Good sky coverage is important to the experiment. Data from the northern hemisphere flights has been edited and calibrated.

  15. Electron-cyclotron maser instability in relativistic plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, P. L.

    1986-01-01

    The electron-cyclotron maser instability is studied for the case of an anisotropic electron velocity distribution in the regime where the relativistic corrections to the wave dispersion are significant. Solution of the linear dispersion relation reveals that when the plasma frequency-gyrofrequency ratio is less than v(te)/c, the instability is localized just below k(perpendicular)c/Omega(e) = 1. The growth rate is then strongly peaked for emission at 90 deg to the magnetic field and is considerably larger than would be the case if the cold-plasma dispersion theory were valid. These features are confirmed by EM particle simulations.

  16. The discrete nature of circumstellar OH maser emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Philip J.; Fix, John D.

    1990-01-01

    The Arecibo radio telescope was used to obtain high-resolution, high-SNR 1612-MHz observations of seven circumstellar OH maser sources. Each spectrum displays the double-peaked emission line profile characteristics of an expanding shell. The jaggedness of the spectra, which varies from source to source, is consistent with statistical fluctuations in the number of discrete emitting elements contributing at a given velocity. In particular, it is found that the spectra of WX Psc and OH 53.6-0.2 contain narrow, weak, isolated emission features which may arise from individual emitting elements.

  17. Maser radiometer for cosmic background radiation anisotropy measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fixsen, D. J.; Wilkinson, D. T.

    1982-01-01

    A maser amplifier was incorporated into a low noise radiometer designed to measure large-scale anisotropy in the 3 deg K microwave background radiation. To minimize emission by atmospheric water vapor and oxygen, the radiometer is flown in a small balloon to an altitude to 25 km. Three successful flights were made - two from Palestine, Texas and one from Sao Jose dos Campos, Brazil. Good sky coverage is important to the experiment. Data from the northern hemisphere flights has been edited and calibrated.

  18. Mixing properties of the one-atom maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruneau, Laurent

    2014-06-01

    We study the relaxation properties of the quantized electromagnetic field in a cavity under repeated interactions with single two-level atoms, so-called one-atom maser. We improve the ergodic results obtained in Bruneau and Pillet (J Stat Phys 134(5-6):1071-1095, 2009) and prove that, whenever the atoms are initially distributed according to the canonical ensemble at temperature , all the invariant states are mixing. Under some non-resonance condition this invariant state is known to be thermal equilibirum at some renormalized temperature and we prove that the mixing is then arbitrarily slow, in other words that there is no lower bound on the relaxation speed.

  19. Localisation using mini c-arm fluoroscopy of needles ingested by a woman with schizophrenia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Our aim was to specify the use of mini C-arm fluoroscopy in a woman with schizophrenia who was suffering from abdominal pain because of ingested needles. Case presentation Here we report the case of an 18-year-old Turkish woman with schizophrenia who was admitted to the emergency department with signs of an acute abdomen as a result of ingestion of multiple needles. This is the third case in the literature for which mini C-arm fluoroscopy has been used to localize metallic sewing needles. Conclusion When intentional ingestion occurs, surgery is rarely required. It is hard to localize ingested sewing needles and mini C-arm fluoroscopy is a good alternative when metal detectors are not available for localization of metal sewing needles. We recommend this approach because it helps to avoid unnecessary exploration, shortens the duration of surgery and provides outstanding results. PMID:19830107

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: H2O maser emission from irregular variables (Szymczak+ 1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, M.; Engels, D.

    1997-05-01

    We have performed a search for the 22 GHz water maser line among 72 optically identified irregular and semiregular red variables. New detections were made of five stars, while only four of nine objects previously known as maser sources were redetected. The probability for the detection of H2O maser emission increases with V light amplitude, and with H-K and K-[12] colours just as in regular Mira and semiregular variables of SRa- and SRb-types. The detection rate of water masers is about 25% for nearby Lb objects (D<400pc) in the sample, comparable to that observed in the SRa and SRb stars. No masers were detected in objects with mass loss rates <=4x10-8M⊙/yr. Maser luminosities are 1041-1043photons/s similar to that of the bluest Miras and typical SRa and SRb stars showing water maser emission. A comparison of our data on irregular stars with those previously obtained on SRa and SRb variables suggests that most radio and infrared properties are indistinguishable among both classes of objects. (1 data file).

  1. Accelerating a water maser face-on jet from a high mass young stellar object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motogi, Kazuhito; Sorai, Kazuo; Honma, Mareki; Hirota, Tomoya; Hachisuka, Kazuya; Niinuma, Kotaro; Sugiyama, Koichiro; Yonekura, Yoshinori; Fujisawa, Kenta

    2016-10-01

    We report on long-term single-dish and VLBI monitoring for intermittent flare activities of a dominant blue-shifted H2O maser associated with a southern high mass young stellar object, G353.273+0.641. Bi-weekly single-dish monitoring using the Hokkaido University Tomakomai 11 m radio telescope has shown that a systematic acceleration continues over four years beyond the lifetime of individual maser features. This fact suggests that the H2O maser traces a region where molecular gas is steadily accelerated. There were five maser flares during the five years of monitoring, and maser distributions in four of them were densely monitored by VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA). The overall distribution of the maser features suggests the presence of a bipolar jet, with the 3D kinematics indicating that it is almost face-on (inclination angle of ˜ 8°-17° from the line of sight). Most maser features were recurrently excited within a region of 100×100 au2 around the radio continuum peak, while their spatial distributions significantly varied between each flare. This confirms that episodic propagations of outflow shocks recurrently invoke intermittent flare activities. We also measured annual parallax, deriving a source distance of 1.70^{+0.19}_{-0.16} kpc that is consistent with the commonly used photometric distance.

  2. Relaxation of molecular velocities and spectral line profiles of astrophysical masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Nels; Watson, William D.

    1993-01-01

    The rates at which the velocities of water molecules relax to a Maxwellian distribution are calculated under conditions that are representative of those in astrophysical water masers. Populations are calculated as a function of velocity for the lowest 40 rotational energy levels of ortho-water in order to make a detailed determination of the velocity relaxation rate. Relaxation rates for the 22 GHz maser at H2 densities of 10 exp 9/cu cm are 2.0/s and 5.1/s for temperatures of 400 K and 1000 K, respectively. Under these and other conditions, as well as for other maser transitions, the relaxation rate far exceeds the loss rate - usually by more than a factor of 10. Thus maser lines can remain narrow up to intensities that are at least a factor of 10 greater than the saturation intensity, and to path lengths that are at least a factor of 10 greater than the path length at which saturation occurs. Relaxation is dominated by the effects of trapped infrared radiation, though elastic and inelastic collisions are also included in the calculations. These relaxation rates, together with the observed line breadths of the 22 GHz masers, provide limits on maser luminosities which indicate that the brightest 22 GHz masers are highly beamed, with solid angles smaller than 10 exp -5 to 10 exp -4 Sr.

  3. A Catalog of Methanol Masers in Massive Star-forming Regions. III. The Molecular Outflow Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Ruiz, A. I.; Kurtz, S. E.; Araya, E. D.; Hofner, P.; Loinard, L.

    2016-02-01

    We present an interferometric survey of the 44 GHz class I methanol maser transition toward a sample of 69 sources consisting of high-mass protostellar object (HMPO) candidates and ultracompact (UC) H ii regions. We found a 38% detection rate (16 of 42) in the HMPO candidates and a 54% detection rate (13 of 24) for the regions with ionized gas. This result indicates that class I methanol maser emission is more common toward the more evolved young stellar objects of our sample. Comparing with similar interferometric data sets, our observations show narrower linewidths, likely due to our higher spatial resolution. Based on a comparison between molecular outflow tracers and the maser positions, we find several cases where the masers appear to be located at the outflow interface with the surrounding core. Unlike previous surveys, we also find several cases where the masers appear to be located close to the base of the molecular outflow, although we cannot discard projection effects. This and other surveys of class I methanol masers not only suggest that these masers may trace shocks at different stages, but also that they may even trace shocks arising from a number of different phenomena occurring in star-forming regions: young/old outflows, cloud-cloud collisions, expanding H ii regions, among others.

  4. A CATALOG OF METHANOL MASERS IN MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS. III. THE MOLECULAR OUTFLOW SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Gómez-Ruiz, A. I.; Kurtz, S. E.; Loinard, L.; Araya, E. D.; Hofner, P.

    2016-02-15

    We present an interferometric survey of the 44 GHz class I methanol maser transition toward a sample of 69 sources consisting of high-mass protostellar object (HMPO) candidates and ultracompact (UC) H ii regions. We found a 38% detection rate (16 of 42) in the HMPO candidates and a 54% detection rate (13 of 24) for the regions with ionized gas. This result indicates that class I methanol maser emission is more common toward the more evolved young stellar objects of our sample. Comparing with similar interferometric data sets, our observations show narrower linewidths, likely due to our higher spatial resolution. Based on a comparison between molecular outflow tracers and the maser positions, we find several cases where the masers appear to be located at the outflow interface with the surrounding core. Unlike previous surveys, we also find several cases where the masers appear to be located close to the base of the molecular outflow, although we cannot discard projection effects. This and other surveys of class I methanol masers not only suggest that these masers may trace shocks at different stages, but also that they may even trace shocks arising from a number of different phenomena occurring in star-forming regions: young/old outflows, cloud–cloud collisions, expanding H ii regions, among others.

  5. The almost ubiquitous association of 6.7-GHz methanol masers with dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquhart, J. S.; Moore, T. J. T.; Menten, K. M.; König, C.; Wyrowski, F.; Thompson, M. A.; Csengeri, T.; Leurini, S.; Eden, D. J.

    2015-02-01

    We report the results of 870-μm continuum observations, using the Large APEX Bolometer Camera, towards 77 class-II, 6.7-GHz methanol masers identified by the Methanol MultiBeam (MMB) survey to map the thermal emission from cool dust towards these objects. These data complement a study of 630 methanol masers associated with compact dense clumps identified from the APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL) survey. Compact dust emission is detected towards 70 sources, which implies a dust-association rate of 99 per cent for the full MMB catalogue. Evaluation of the derived dust and maser properties leads us to conclude that the combined sample represents a single population tracing the same phenomenon. We find median clump masses of a few 103 M⊙ and that all but a handful of sources satisfy the mass-size criterion required for massive star formation. This study provides the strongest evidence of the almost ubiquitous association of methanol masers with massive, star-forming clumps. The fraction of methanol-maser associated clumps is a factor of ˜2 lower in the outer Galaxy than the inner Galaxy, possibly a result of the lower metallicity environment of the former. We find no difference in the clump-mass and maser-luminosity distributions of the inner and outer Galaxy. The maser-pumping and clump formation mechanisms are therefore likely to be relatively invariant to Galactic location. Finally, we use the ratio of maser luminosity and clump mass to investigate the hypothesis that the maser luminosity is a good indicator of the evolutionary stage of the embedded source, however, we find no evidence to support this.

  6. Cosmic Fire Hydrants: The nature of 11 high-velocity water masers in our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey-Smith, Lisa; Walsh, Andrew; Breen, Shari; Green, jimi; Purcell, Cormac; Longmore, Steve N.

    2015-08-01

    Water masers act as excellent cosmic markers for the motion of dynamic astronomical regions such as young massive circumstellar disks and outflows from evolved stars. Studying fast water masers gives us a very rare insight into two very a significant stages of stellar evolution.In high-mass star forming regions, water masers are formed in the walls of conical outflows, in collimated jets and in some cases under the influence of a circumstellar disk wind. High-resolution studies of these masers therefore enable us to probe the accretion mechanism for massive star formation. Water masers in post-Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars probe the very brief phase of aspherical mass-loss before the outer layers of the circumstellar envelope are ionised and the star becomes a Planetary Nebula. The process of aspherical Planetary Nebula formation is still the subject of considerable debate, with the binary hypothesis and magnetic collimation of fast winds being the leading explanations at present.We selected the eleven water maser sites from the H2O Southern Galactic Plane Survey that have differential radial velocities greater than 200 km/s. The water maser sites were subsequently re-observed at higher angular resolution to localise the maser positions with respect to other astronomical emission in the vicinity and where possible, to probe the internal velocity gradients. We conducted a multi-wavelength study of these sites of water masers to determine the stage of stellar evolution, their physical size and a number of other attributes. We present several significant new results and open questions that demand further investigation.

  7. VLA Survey of Dense Gas in Extended Green Objects: Prevalence of 25 GHz Methanol Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Towner, A. P. M.; Brogan, C. L.; Hunter, T. R.; Cyganowski, C. J.; McGuire, B. A.; Indebetouw, R.; Friesen, R. K.; Chandler, C. J.

    2017-06-01

    We present ˜1″-4″ resolution Very Large Array (VLA) observations of four CH3OH {J}2{--}{J}1-E 25 GHz transitions (J = 3, 5, 8, 10) along with the 1.3 cm continuum toward 20 regions of active massive star formation containing Extended Green Objects (EGOs), 14 of which we have previously studied with the VLA in the Class I 44 GHz and Class II 6.7 GHz maser lines. Sixteen regions are detected in at least one 25 GHz line (J = 5), with 13 of 16 exhibiting maser emission. In total, we report 34 new sites of CH3OH maser emission and 10 new sites of thermal CH3OH emission, significantly increasing the number of 25 GHz Class I CH3OH masers observed at high angular resolution. We identify probable or likely maser counterparts at 44 GHz for all 15 of the 25 GHz masers for which we have complementary data, providing further evidence that these masers trace similar physical conditions despite uncorrelated flux densities. The sites of thermal and maser emission of CH3OH are both predominantly associated with the 4.5 μm emission from the EGO, and the presence of thermal CH3OH emission is accompanied by 1.3 cm continuum emission in 9 out of 10 cases. Of the 19 regions that exhibit 1.3 cm continuum emission, it is associated with the EGO in 16 cases (out of a total of 20 sites), 13 of which are new detections at 1.3 cm. Twelve of the 1.3 cm continuum sources are associated with 6.7 GHz maser emission and likely trace deeply embedded massive protostars.

  8. Informatics in radiology: use of a C-arm fluoroscopy simulator to support training in intraoperative radiography.

    PubMed

    Bott, Oliver Johannes; Dresing, Klaus; Wagner, Markus; Raab, Björn-Werner; Teistler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Mobile image intensifier systems (C-arms) are used frequently in orthopedic and reconstructive surgery, especially in trauma and emergency settings, but image quality and radiation exposure levels may vary widely, depending on the extent of the C-arm operator's knowledge and experience. Current training programs consist mainly of theoretical instruction in C-arm operation, the physical foundations of radiography, and radiation avoidance, and are largely lacking in hands-on application. A computer-based simulation program such as that tested by the authors may be one way to improve the effectiveness of C-arm training. In computer simulations of various scenarios commonly encountered in the operating room, trainees using the virtX program interact with three-dimensional models to test their knowledge base and improve their skill levels. Radiographs showing the simulated patient anatomy and surgical implants are "reconstructed" from data computed on the basis of the trainee's positioning of models of a C-arm, patient, and table, and are displayed in real time on the desktop monitor. Trainee performance is signaled in real time by color graphics in several control panels and, on completion of the exercise, is compared in detail with the performance of an expert operator. Testing of this computer-based training program in continuing medical education courses for operating room personnel showed an improvement in the overall understanding of underlying principles of intraoperative radiography performed with a C-arm, with resultant higher image quality, lower overall radiation exposure, and greater time efficiency. Supplemental material available at http://radiographics.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/rg.313105125/-/DC1.

  9. Comparison of air kerma between C-arm CT and 64-multidetector-row CT using a phantom.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Seiki; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Nakai, Motoki; Murotani, Kazuhiro; Nishioku, Tadayoshi; Shirai, Shintaro; Sonomura, Tetsuo

    2014-05-01

    To compare air kerma after scanning a phantom with C-arm CT and with 64-multidetector row CT (64MDCT). A phantom was scanned using parameters based on data of ten patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who had C-arm CT during hepatic arteriography and 64MDCT during arterial portography. Radiation monitors were used to measure air kerma ten times at each of five points: the center (A), top (B), left side (C), bottom (D), and right side (E). For C-arm CT vs. 64MDCT, air kerma after scanning was 10.5 ± 0.2 vs. 6.4 ± 0.0 for A, 1.5 ± 0.0 vs. 11.6 ± 0.2 for B, 37.1 ± 0.2 vs. 11.1 ± 0.1 for C, 55.6 ± 1.0 vs. 10.6 ± 0.1 for D, and 40.5 ± 0.5 vs. 11.7 ± 0.1 for E, respectively. Air kerma for A, B, C, D, and E was 1.64, 0.13, 3.34, 5.24, and 3.46 times greater for C-arm CT than for 64MDCT, respectively. Using the same scanning parameters as for clinical cases, air kerma values were greater with C-arm CT than with 64MDCT; at the dorsal side of the phantom, they were 5.24 times greater with C-arm CT compared with 64MDCT.

  10. Comparison of Three Statistical Classification Techniques for Maser Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Ellen M.; Holland, Barbara R.; Ellingsen, Simon P.; Breen, Shari L.; Chen, Xi; Humphries, Melissa

    2016-04-01

    We applied three statistical classification techniques-linear discriminant analysis (LDA), logistic regression, and random forests-to three astronomical datasets associated with searches for interstellar masers. We compared the performance of these methods in identifying whether specific mid-infrared or millimetre continuum sources are likely to have associated interstellar masers. We also discuss the interpretability of the results of each classification technique. Non-parametric methods have the potential to make accurate predictions when there are complex relationships between critical parameters. We found that for the small datasets the parametric methods logistic regression and LDA performed best, for the largest dataset the non-parametric method of random forests performed with comparable accuracy to parametric techniques, rather than any significant improvement. This suggests that at least for the specific examples investigated here accuracy of the predictions obtained is not being limited by the use of parametric models. We also found that for LDA, transformation of the data to match a normal distribution led to a significant improvement in accuracy. The different classification techniques had significant overlap in their predictions; further astronomical observations will enable the accuracy of these predictions to be tested.

  11. Van Der Pol model of a Cerenkov maser

    SciTech Connect

    Kleckner, M.; Ron, A.; Botton, M.

    1995-12-31

    A non-linear analysis of a Cerenkov maser is presented. The system consists of a ring configuration of a cylindrical waveguide filled with a dielectric material. A single transverse-magnetic mode is assumed to propagate in the system. A low-density pencil electron beam travels in part of the ring, confined by a strong axial magnetic field. Using the single-particle description for the beam and the wave equation for the field, we obtain a set of two coupled non-linear differential equations describing the slowly varying amplitude and phase of the electromagnetic mode. The gain per path is assumed to be small and the spatial growth of the field is neglected. The resulting time dependent amplitude includes the exponential gain of the linear stage and the saturation to its maximum value. The time dependent frequency is also calculated. The two equations are combined to a single Van Der Pol equation with a non-linear restoring force. This description demonstrates the similarities and differences between the Cerenkov maser and other lasing systems.

  12. Cyclotron maser emission of auroral Z mode radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melrose, D. B.; Hewitt, R. G.; Dulk, G. A.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented suggesting that loss cone driven cyclotron maser emission by upgoing electrons, closely analogous to auroral kilometric radiation (AKR), may be the mechanism behind the observed Z mode radiation. With this hypothesis, the lack of a strong correlation between the Z mode radiation and AKR is not surprising; the ray paths for the X mode and the Z mode are markedly different, with the former directed upward and the latter downward. In addition, it is expected that the generation of the Z mode will be favored only in regions where the ratio of the plasma frequency to the electron cyclotron frequency is greater than or approximately equal to 0.3, that is, where the X mode radiation is suppressed. If the fraction of the radiation generated that crosses the cyclotron layer is large, then the argument in favor of the loss cone driven cyclotron maser as the source of the observed Z mode radiation is a strong one. The spatial growth rates are fairly large in comparison with those for the X mode, and there seems to be little doubt that Z mode radiation should be generated under conditions that differ only slightly from those for the generation of X mode radiation in AKR.

  13. 6.7 GHz methanol maser variability in Cepheus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, M.; Wolak, P.; Bartkiewicz, A.

    2014-03-01

    6.7 GHz methanol maser emission from the well-studied star-forming region Cepheus A was monitored with the Torun 32 m radio telescope. We found synchronized and anticorrelated changes of the flux density of the two blueshifted and one redshifted maser features for ˜30 per cent of 1340 d of our observations. Two of those features exhibited high-amplitude flux density variations with periods of 84-87 d over the last 290 d interval of the monitoring. We also report on two flares of emission at two different redshifted velocities completely covered during the whole outburst. These flare events lasted 510-670 d and showed a very rapid linear rise and slow exponential decline, which may be caused by variability of the seed flux density. The flux density of the two strongest features dropped by a factor of 2-5 on a time-scale ˜22 yr, while other features have not changed significantly during this period, but showed strong variability on time-scales ≲ 5 yr.

  14. H2CO Observations Towards CH3OH Maser Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okoh, Daniel; Esimbek, Jarken; Zhou, JianJun; Tang, Xindi; Chukwude, Augustine; Urama, Johnson; Okeke, Pius

    2013-03-01

    Formaldehyde (H2CO) is an accurate probe of physical conditions in dense and low-temperature molecular clouds towards massive star formation regions, while 6.7 GHz methanol (CH3OH) masers provide ideal sites to probe the earliest stages of massive stellar formation. We present preliminary results of our investigation into the possible relationship between formaldehyde and methanol astrophysical masers with the view to expanding knowledge on massive star formation processes. Observations are done using the Nanshan 25m radio telescope of the Xinjiang Astronomical Observatories, Urumqi, China. 127 Methanol sources (from the work of Green et al. 2010, Xu et al. 2003, Pestalozzi et al. 2005, and Xu et al. 2009) have been observed so far for 4.8 GHz formaldehyde absorption lines, and H2CO signals have been detected in 86 of them, 31 of which are newly discovered. We obtained good correlation (0.85 correlation coefficient) between the velocities of the sources, and a poor correlation (-0.03 correlation coefficient) between their intensities, an indication that signals from the two lines originate from about the same region, but that the excitation mechanisms that drive them are likely different.

  15. Soft-tissue imaging with C-arm cone-beam CT using statistical reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Adam S.; Webster Stayman, J.; Otake, Yoshito; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Vogt, Sebastian; Gallia, Gary L.; Khanna, A. Jay; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2014-02-01

    The potential for statistical image reconstruction methods such as penalized-likelihood (PL) to improve C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) soft-tissue visualization for intraoperative imaging over conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) is assessed in this work by making a fair comparison in relation to soft-tissue performance. A prototype mobile C-arm was used to scan anthropomorphic head and abdomen phantoms as well as a cadaveric torso at doses substantially lower than typical values in diagnostic CT, and the effects of dose reduction via tube current reduction and sparse sampling were also compared. Matched spatial resolution between PL and FBP was determined by the edge spread function of low-contrast (˜40-80 HU) spheres in the phantoms, which were representative of soft-tissue imaging tasks. PL using the non-quadratic Huber penalty was found to substantially reduce noise relative to FBP, especially at lower spatial resolution where PL provides a contrast-to-noise ratio increase up to 1.4-2.2× over FBP at 50% dose reduction across all objects. Comparison of sampling strategies indicates that soft-tissue imaging benefits from fully sampled acquisitions at dose above ˜1.7 mGy and benefits from 50% sparsity at dose below ˜1.0 mGy. Therefore, an appropriate sampling strategy along with the improved low-contrast visualization offered by statistical reconstruction demonstrates the potential for extending intraoperative C-arm CBCT to applications in soft-tissue interventions in neurosurgery as well as thoracic and abdominal surgeries by overcoming conventional tradeoffs in noise, spatial resolution, and dose.

  16. High temporal resolution cardiac cone-beam CT using a slowly rotating C-arm gantry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guang-Hong; Tang, Jie; Nett, Brian; Leng, Shuai; Zambelli, Joseph; Qi, Zhihua; Bevins, Nick; Reeder, Scott; Rowley, Howard

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To achieve three dimensional isotropic dynamic cardiac CT imaging with high temporal resolution for evaluation of cardiac function with a slowly rotating C-arm system. Method and Materials: A recently introduced extension to compressed sensing, viz. Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS), in which a prior image is used as a constraint in the reconstruction has enabled this application. An in-vivo animal experiment (e.g. a beagle model) was conducted using an interventional C-arm system. The imaging protocol was as follows: contrast was injected, the contrast equilibrated, breathing was suspended for ~14 seconds during which time 420 equally spaced projections were acquired. This data set was used to reconstruct a fully sampled blurred image volume using the conventional FDK algorithm (e.g. the prior image). Then the data set was retrospectively gated into 19 phases according to the recorded ECG signal (heart rate ~ 95bpm) and images were reconstructed with the PICCS algorithm. Results: Cardiac MR was used as the gold standard due to its high temporal resolution. The same short-axis slice was selected from the PICCS-CT data set and the MR data set. Manual contouring on the peak systolic and peak diastolic frames was performed to assess the ejection fraction contribution from this single plane. The calculated ejection fractions with PICCS-CT agreed well with the MR results. Conclusion: We have demonstrated the ability to use a slowly rotating interventional C-arm system in order to make measurements of cardiac function. The new technique provides high isotropic spatial resolution (~0.5 mm) along with high temporal resolution (~ 33 ms). The evaluation of cardiac function demonstrated a great agreement with single slice cardiac MR.

  17. Evaluating the feasibility of C-arm CT for brain perfusion imaging: an in vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, A.; Fieselmann, A.; Boese, J.; Rohkohl, C.; Hornegger, J.; Fahrig, R.

    2010-02-01

    C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) is increasingly being used to supplement 2D real-time data with 3D information. Temporal resolution is currently limited by the mechanical rotation speed of the C-arm which presents challenges for applications such as imaging of contrast flow in brain perfusion CT (PCT). We present a novel scheme where multiple scans are obtained at different start times with respect to the contrast injection. The data is interleaved temporally and interpolated during 3D reconstruction. For evaluation we developed a phantom to generate the range of temporal frequencies relevant for PCT. The highest requirements are for imaging the arterial input function (AIF) modeled as a gamma-variate function. Fourier transform analysis of the AIF showed that 90% of the spectral energy is contained at frequencies lower than 0.08Hz. We built an acrylic cylinder phantom of diameter 1.9 cm, with 25 sections of 1cm length each. Iodine concentration in each compartment was varied to produce a half-cycle sinusoid variation in HU in version 1, and 2.5 cycles in version 2 of the phantom. The phantom was moved linearly at speeds from 0.5cm/s to 4cm/s (temporal frequencies of 0.02Hz to 0.09Hz) and imaged using a C-arm system. Phantom CT numbers in a slice reconstructed at isocenter were measured and sinusoidal fits to the data were obtained. The fitted sinusoids had frequencies that were within 3+/-2% of the actual temporal frequencies of the sinusoid. This suggests that the imaging and reconstruction scheme is adequate for PCT imaging.

  18. Sequential intrinsic and extrinsic geometry calibration in fluoro CT imaging with a mobile C-arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheryauka, Arvi; Breham, Sebastien; Christensen, Wayne

    2006-03-01

    Design of C-arm equipment with 3D imaging capabilitys involves retrieval of repeatable gantry positioning information along the acquisition trajectory. Inaccurate retrieval or improper use of positioning information may cause degradation of the reconstruction results, appearance of image artifacts, or indicate false structures. The geometry misrepresentation can also lead to the errors in relative pose assessment of anatomy-of-interest and interventional tools. Comprehensive C gantry calibration with an extended set of misalignment and motion parameters suffers from ambiguity caused by parameter cross-correlation and significant computational complexity. We deploy the concept of a waterfall calibration that comprises sequential intrinsic and extrinsic geometry calibration delineation steps. Following the image-based framework, the first step in our method is intrinsic calibration that deals with delineation of geometry of the X-ray tube-Detector assembly. Extrinsic parameters define motion of the C-arm assembly in 3D space and relate the Camera and World coordinate systems. We formulate both intrinsic and extrinsic calibration problems in vectorized form with total variation constraints. The proposed method has been verified by numerical design and validated by experimental studies. Sequential delineation of intrinsic and extrinsic geometries has demonstrated very efficient performance. The method eliminates the cross-correlation between cone-beam projection parameters, provides significantly better accuracy and computational speed, simplifies the structures of calibration targets used, and avoids the unnecessary workflow and image processing steps. It appears to be adequate for quality and cost derivations in an interventional surgery settings using a mobile C-arm.

  19. New detections of 321 GHz water masers toward late-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liljeström, Tarja; Winnberg, Anders; Booth, Roy

    The SEST telescope has been used for a submillimeter water maser survey toward late-type stars. Six new 321 GHz water masers were detected. These, as well as the earlier reported sources, VY CMa and o Cet, were also observed in the vibrationally excited water maser line at 96 GHz. However, only VY CMa and o Cet showed the 96 GHz emission. The line velocity of o Cet is blueshifted, suggesting that the hot water vapor at 96 GHz takes part in the pulsation-shock motion of the Mira variable.

  20. Historical Cost Curves for Hydrogen Masers and Cesium Beam Frequency and Timing Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, D. S.; Moore, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    Historical cost curves were developed for hydrogen masers and cesium beam standards used for frequency and timing calibration in the Deep Space Network. These curves may be used to calculate the cost of future hydrogen masers or cesium beam standards in either future or current dollars. The cesium beam standards are decreasing in cost by about 2.3% per year since 1966, and hydrogen masers are decreasing by about 0.8% per year since 1978 relative to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration inflation index.

  1. H2O maser survey of IRAS sources at high galactic latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselli, P.; Codella, C.; Palumbo, G. G. C.; Pareschi, G.

    A high galactic latitude sample of 175 IRAS sources located within the core of molecular clouds has been searched for H2O maser emission with the Medicina 32 m dish operated at 22 GHz. Seventeen percent of the sample previously searched by other authors contained only four detections. The search did not produce any new water maser emitter, while the previously known maser were seen again. The low value of 2 percent overall detection rate can be explained in terms of Galactic distribution of massive cores.

  2. Investigation of low temperature atomic hydrogen spin-exchange collisions using a cryogenic hydrogen maser

    SciTech Connect

    Walsworth, R.L.; Mattison, E.M.; Vessot, R.F.C.; Silvera, I.F.

    1993-05-01

    We have used a cryogenic hydrogen maser to study ground state atomic hydrogen spin-exchange collisions at temperatures near 0.5 K. Recent quantum-mechanical treatments of low energy atomic collisions predict that hyperfine-induced spin-exchange frequency shifts will become large at low temperatures, and will affect the performance of new atomic frequency standards such as the cryogenic hydrogen maser and the cesium fountain. We have measured the effects of low temperature spin-exchange collisions on maser line-broadening and frequency, and in particular the hyperfine-induced frequency shift.

  3. Historical cost curves for hydrogen masers and cesium beam frequency and timing standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remer, D. S.; Moore, R. C.

    1985-02-01

    Historical cost curves were developed for hydrogen masers and cesium beam standards used for frequency and timing calibration in the Deep Space Network. These curves may be used to calculate the cost of future hydrogen masers or cesium beam standards in either future or current dollars. The cesium beam standards are decreasing in cost by about 2.3% per year since 1966, and hydrogen masers are decreasing by about 0.8% per year since 1978 relative to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration inflation index.

  4. Water Maser Kinematics in the Jet of OH 12.8-0.9

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-10

    They exhibit both H2O and OH maser emission ; how- ever, the relative characteristics of the two maser species differ from those of the typical AGB star...12 and 60 m. Other 25 m peakers include young PNs and carbon stars with circumstellar silicate emission features (Kwok et al. 1997). OH 12.80.9 has...2004). H2O maser emission from OH 12.80.9 was first detected by Engels et al. (1986), who noted the fact that the H2O emission peaks are outside

  5. Mapping the surprisingly high-velocity submm H2O masers of water-fountain nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Ramiro; Chapman, Jessica; Vlemmings, Wouter; Tafoya, Daniel; Chavarria, Luis; Perez-Sanchez, Andres

    2014-04-01

    Understanding the outflows and their formation for water-fountain nebulae is crucial for understanding the formation of bipolar planetary nebulae. Our first discovery of submillimeter water masers towards a number of water-fountains has created an exciting new opportunity to study these important sources. We intend to image the water masers towards three sources recently detected in the submillimeter water masers transition simultaneously at 22 GHz with ATCA and at 321 GHz with ALMA. These observations will allow us to determine the physical conditions of the gas in the fast jets responsible for shaping their circumstellar environment.

  6. [The survey and its interpretation for interstellar OH and H2O masers].

    PubMed

    Liu, Han-peng; Forster, J R; Sun, Jin

    2006-03-01

    A statistics of sky survey for interstellar H2O and OH masers is presented. These masers can be classified into 3 categories. The total number of sources in each category is of the same order of magnitude, and they can maintain--10(5) years. But there are fewer than half masers with detectable H II regions. An improved radiative pumping mechanism is proposed, and it overcame the known drawback of former radiative models. The observationally statistical results can be interpreted by both the new mechanism and the evolutional model with gravitational force of star responsible for the H II region.

  7. The rotate-plus-shift C-arm trajectory. Part I. Complete data with less than 180° rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Ritschl, Ludwig; Fleischmann, Christof; Kuntz, Jan Kachelrieß, Marc

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: In the last decade, C-arm-based cone-beam CT became a widely used modality for intraoperative imaging. Typically a C-arm CT scan is performed using a circular or elliptical trajectory around a region of interest. Therefore, an angular range of at least 180° plus fan angle must be covered to ensure a completely sampled data set. However, mobile C-arms designed with a focus on classical 2D applications like fluoroscopy may be limited to a mechanical rotation range of less than 180° to improve handling and usability. The method proposed in this paper allows for the acquisition of a fully sampled data set with a system limited to a mechanical rotation range of at least 180° minus fan angle using a new trajectory design. This enables CT like 3D imaging with a wide range of C-arm devices which are mainly designed for 2D imaging. Methods: The proposed trajectory extends the mechanical rotation range of the C-arm system with two additional linear shifts. Due to the divergent character of the fan-beam geometry, these two shifts lead to an additional angular range of half of the fan angle. Combining one shift at the beginning of the scan followed by a rotation and a second shift, the resulting rotate-plus-shift trajectory enables the acquisition of a completely sampled data set using only 180° minus fan angle of rotation. The shifts can be performed using, e.g., the two orthogonal positioning axes of a fully motorized C-arm system. The trajectory was evaluated in phantom and cadaver examinations using two prototype C-arm systems. Results: The proposed trajectory leads to reconstructions without limited angle artifacts. Compared to the limited angle reconstructions of 180° minus fan angle, image quality increased dramatically. Details in the rotate-plus-shift reconstructions were clearly depicted, whereas they are dominated by artifacts in the limited angle scan. Conclusions: The method proposed here employs 3D imaging using C-arms with less than 180° rotation

  8. Characterizing supernova remnant and molecular cloud interaction environments using Class I methanol (CH3OH) masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, Bridget C.

    Astronomical masers are useful probes of the physical conditions of the gas in which they are formed. Masers form under specific physical conditions and therefore, can be used to trace distinct environments, for example, star forming regions (SFRs), supernova remnants (SNRs), evolved stars, and outflows. In particular, collisionally excited 36 and 44 GHz methanol (CH3OH) and 1720 MHz hydroxl (OH) masers are found associated with gas shocked by the interaction between SNRs and neighboring molecular clouds (MCs). The overall goal of my thesis research is to combine modeling and observations to characterize the properties and formation of Class I CH3OH masers in these SNR/MC interaction regions. Developing a general model of the distribution of maser emission in these regions in all SNRs interacting with MCs will aid in the understanding of different processes that may be triggered through these interactions, namely induced star formation (SF) and cosmic ray (CR) acceleration. More accurate information on the density (and density gradients) in these turbulent regions could, for example, be used as inputs or constraints for models of galactic SNR CR acceleration and help explain if conditions are conducive for SF. In this thesis, I present results from calculations of the physical conditions necessary for the occurrence of collisionally pumped Class I 36, 44, 84, and 95 GHz CH3OH maser lines near SNRs, using an escape probability and level population code. The modeling shows that given a sufficient CH3OH abundance, CH3OH maser emission arises over a wide range of densities and temperatures, with optimal conditions at 10 4 < n 60 K, overlapping with masing conditions for 1720 MHz OH masers. In addition, the 36 and 44 GHz transitions display more significant maser optical depths compared to the 84 and 95 GHz transitions over the majority of the physical conditions. The line intensity ratios between multiple transitions significantly change with altering physical

  9. A Statistical Investigation of the Connection between X-ray and Water Maser Emission in Galaxy Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutter, Andrew; Constantin, A.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies reveal a potential intimate connection between maser emission and X-ray obscuring columns in galaxy centers, with higher obscuration for more pronounced water maser activity. The number statistics involved in these investigations remain small, however. Currently, there are 151 confirmed maser detections and over 3300 surveyed non-maser galaxies. A careful crossmatch with public data from five X-ray telescope survey catalogs (the 2XMMi-DR3 from the XMM-Newton telescope, the Chandra Source Catalog, the ROSAT All-Sky Survey bright and faint source catalogs, the Swift Burst Alert Telescope 70 month survey, and the Integral IBIS 7-year All-Sky Survey) reveals X-ray information for 103 detected maser galaxies and ~650 non-detections, offering a clear statistical advantage over previous work. We are thus able to conduct a statistical comparison of the X-ray properties of the largest sample of X-ray active galaxies surveyed for water vapor emission at 22 GHz. We find that the X-ray detection rate of masers is on average 3.5 times greater than that of non-masers, with the rates increasing in harder X-ray bands. The X-ray apparent brightness of maser and non-maser detections are similar at soft X-rays, but the maser galaxies are increasingly brighter than the non-masers in the harder bands. The X-ray luminosities calculated without correction for intrinsic absorption are lower for maser galaxies, which supports previous results showing generally higher neutral hydrogen column densities (NH) in these sources. We statistically test the potential evidence for greater obscuration in increasingly more luminous maser galaxies via monte carlo simulations of various NH distributions that are motivated by previous studies, and explore the possible physical connections that could govern them.

  10. 22 GHz water maser search in 37 nearby galaxies. Four new water megamasers in Seyfert 2 and OH maser/absorber galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J.

    2013-12-01

    Aims: We report four new 22 GHz H2O water masers found in a Green Bank Telescope search toward 37 nearby objects. Our goal was to find new maser galaxies, active galactic nucleus (AGN) disk masers, and objects where hydroxyl and water maser species coexist. Methods: We observed 37 sources within 250 Mpc that were selected by high X-ray luminosity (LX > 1040 W) and high absorbing column density (NH ≳ 1022 cm-2). Sources included dual or triple AGN and interacting systems. We also searched objects detected in hydroxyl (OH). A catalog of 4038 known H2O (non)detections was assembled to avoid unnecessary reobservations. The final selection consisted of 16 new sources, 13 nondetections to follow up with a factor 10 higher sensitivity, 10 OH masers and 1 deep OH absorber, of which 37 were observed. Results: Water megamasers were detected towards the Sy 2 galaxy 2MFGC 13581, towards the 6 GHz OH absorber NGC 4261 and towards the two 1.6 GHz OH maser sources IRAS 17526+3253 and IRAS 20550+1656. We set upper limits on 33 nondetections. The detection rate was 25% in OH galaxies and 11% overall. The mean sensitivity was 4 mJy over 24.4 kHz (0.31 km s-1) or between 0.1 L⊙ and 1.0 L⊙ rms for the distances covered by the source sample. Combined with other searches, a total of 95 objects have now been searched for both OH and H2O masers. Conclusions: The maser features in 2MFGC 13581 are typical of a sub-parsec accretion disk, whereas NGC 4261 likely has jet masers in a masing torus. The NGC 4261 galaxy (3C 270; dusty torus, twin jet) and its masers appear similar to NGC 1052, where continuum seed emission by a twin jet supports masers in the torus. Imaging with very long baseline interferometry is required to determine the masing regions in NGC 4261 and 2MFGC 13581. IRAS 17526+3253 has narrow 350 L⊙ systemic masers, and the tentative 5σ detection in IRAS 20550+1656 (II Zw 96) strongly resembles massive star formation kilomasers in NGC 2146. The latter two detections

  11. DISCOVERY OF 6.035 GHz HYDROXYL MASER FLARES IN IRAS 18566+0408

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Marzouk, A. A.; Araya, E. D.; Hofner, P.; Kurtz, S.; Linz, H.; Olmi, L.

    2012-05-10

    We report the discovery of 6.035 GHz hydroxyl (OH) maser flares toward the massive star-forming region IRAS 18566+0408 (G37.55+0.20), which is the only region known to show periodic formaldehyde (4.8 GHz H{sub 2}CO) and methanol (6.7 GHz CH{sub 3}OH) maser flares. The observations were conducted between 2008 October and 2010 January with the 305 m Arecibo Telescope in Puerto Rico. We detected two flare events, one in 2009 March and one in 2009 September to November. The OH maser flares are not simultaneous with the H{sub 2}CO flares, but may be correlated with CH{sub 3}OH flares from a component at corresponding velocities. A possible correlated variability of OH and CH{sub 3}OH masers in IRAS 18566+0408 is consistent with a common excitation mechanism (IR pumping) as predicted by theory.

  12. A Search for H2O Maser Emission from Wide-Angle Outflows in Nearby AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Emily; Braatz, James A.; Pesce, Dom; Megamaser Cosmology Project

    2017-01-01

    As part of large surveys for 22 GHz water maser emission in external galaxies, the Green Bank Telescope has made over 4000 distinct observations resulting in nondetections. Most of these observations are 10-minute integrations toward nearby active galaxies, often as part of the Megamaser Cosmology Project. We have grouped the observed galaxies according their nuclear activity type and made stacked averages of the nondetections, searching for low-level, ubiquitous maser emission. Such emission might be expected, for example, if there is faint maser emission from a wide-angle outflow component in the nuclei of AGNs. We detected no maser emission in our stacked averages of Seyfert 1s and Seyfert 2s, or in the sum of all nondetections. We explore the significance of this result in the context of clumpy outflow models.

  13. Hyperfine contribution to spin-exchange frequency shifts in the hydrogen maser

    SciTech Connect

    Verhaar, B.J.; Koelman, J.M.V.A.; Stoof, H.T.C.; Luiten, O.J.; Crampton, S.B.

    1987-05-01

    We have rigorously included hyperfine interactions during electron-spin-exchange collisions between ground-state hydrogen atoms and find additional frequency shifts which are significant for low-temperature atomic hydrogen maser oscillators.

  14. Water maser emission from X-ray-heated circumnuclear gas in active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Maloney, Philip R.; Conger, Sarah

    1994-01-01

    We have modeled the physical and chemical conditions present within dense circumnuclear gas that is irradiated by X-rays from an active galactic nucleus. Over a wide range of X-ray fluxes and gas pressures, the effects of X-ray heating give rise to a molecular layer at temperatures of 400-1000 K within which the water abundance is large. The physical conditions within this molecular layer naturally give rise to collisionally pumped maser emission in the 6(sub 16) - 5(sub 23) 22 GHz transition of ortho-water, with predicted maser luminosities of 10(exp 2 +/- 0.5) solar luminosity per sq. pc of illuminated area. Given plausible assumptions about the geometry of the source and about the degree to which the maser emission is anisotropic, such surface luminosities are sufficient to explain the large apparent luminosities observed in water maser sources that are associated with active galactic nuclei.

  15. State of the art and future directions for the atomic hydrogen maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vessot, Robert F. C.

    1990-05-01

    The present status of technology development for atomic hydrogen masers (H-masers) is reviewed. The limitations to frequency stability and accuracy are discussed with emphasis on the problems associated with cavity resonator instability and the lack of reproducibility and stability of the storage volume wall coating frequency shift. New types of coating developed in the Soviet Union and better, cavity resonator materials, are expected to make possible frequency at the 10(exp -16) level at 10(exp 4) sec. Better control of systematic effects should extend the long-term stability to levels better than 10(exp -15) for intervals beyond one day. Present use of H-masers as flywheel oscillators in timekeeping systems is discussed as is the outlook for the future cryogenic and room temperature H-masers as flywheel oscillators to operate very high resolution frequency discriminators based on the newly evolving technology of trapped and cooled ions and atoms.

  16. State of the art and future directions for the atomic hydrogen maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, Robert F. C.

    1990-01-01

    The present status of technology development for atomic hydrogen masers (H-masers) is reviewed. The limitations to frequency stability and accuracy are discussed with emphasis on the problems associated with cavity resonator instability and the lack of reproducibility and stability of the storage volume wall coating frequency shift. New types of coating developed in the Soviet Union and better, cavity resonator materials, are expected to make possible frequency at the 10(exp -16) level at 10(exp 4) sec. Better control of systematic effects should extend the long-term stability to levels better than 10(exp -15) for intervals beyond one day. Present use of H-masers as flywheel oscillators in timekeeping systems is discussed as is the outlook for the future cryogenic and room temperature H-masers as flywheel oscillators to operate very high resolution frequency discriminators based on the newly evolving technology of trapped and cooled ions and atoms.

  17. State of the art and future directions for the atomic hydrogen maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, Robert F. C.

    1990-01-01

    The present status of technology development for atomic hydrogen masers (H-masers) is reviewed. The limitations to frequency stability and accuracy are discussed with emphasis on the problems associated with cavity resonator instability and the lack of reproducibility and stability of the storage volume wall coating frequency shift. New types of coating developed in the Soviet Union and better, cavity resonator materials, are expected to make possible frequency at the 10(exp -16) level at 10(exp 4) sec. Better control of systematic effects should extend the long-term stability to levels better than 10(exp -15) for intervals beyond one day. Present use of H-masers as flywheel oscillators in timekeeping systems is discussed as is the outlook for the future cryogenic and room temperature H-masers as flywheel oscillators to operate very high resolution frequency discriminators based on the newly evolving technology of trapped and cooled ions and atoms.

  18. The NASA/GSFC hydrogen maser program: A review of recent data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, M.; Bates, A. G.; Rueger, L. J.; Reinhardt, V. S.; Dachel, P.; Kunski, R.; Kruger, R.

    1983-01-01

    Data is presented on the phase and frequency stability, over time periods extending to one week, of the new NR field operable hydrogen masers developed by the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) and the older NX and NP field operable hydrogen masers developed by Goddard Space Flight Center and maintained and upgraded by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (BFEC). Data is presented on the NR masers in the laboratory showing frequency stabilities well into the 10 to the -15th power range and phase stabilities well into the 100 ps range for periods of up to one day. Data is presented on upgraded NP masers in the laboratory showing that the frequency stability has been improved substantially to virtually the NR level. VLBI data is presented on the phase difference between NX-2 at Owens Valley, California and NR-2 at Fort Davis, Texas for a one week period showing, after removal of a constant frequency drift, a 350 ps RMS phase stability.

  19. Water maser emission from X-ray-heated circumnuclear gas in active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Maloney, Philip R.; Conger, Sarah

    1994-01-01

    We have modeled the physical and chemical conditions present within dense circumnuclear gas that is irradiated by X-rays from an active galactic nucleus. Over a wide range of X-ray fluxes and gas pressures, the effects of X-ray heating give rise to a molecular layer at temperatures of 400-1000 K within which the water abundance is large. The physical conditions within this molecular layer naturally give rise to collisionally pumped maser emission in the 6(sub 16) - 5(sub 23) 22 GHz transition of ortho-water, with predicted maser luminosities of 10(exp 2 +/- 0.5) solar luminosity per sq. pc of illuminated area. Given plausible assumptions about the geometry of the source and about the degree to which the maser emission is anisotropic, such surface luminosities are sufficient to explain the large apparent luminosities observed in water maser sources that are associated with active galactic nuclei.

  20. Techniques for Accurate Parallax Measurements for 6.7 GHz Methanol Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, M. J.; Brunthaler, A.; Menten, K. M.; Sanna, A.; Xu, Y.; Li, J. J.; Wu, Y.; Hu, B.; Zheng, X. W.; Zhang, B.; Immer, K.; Rygl, K.; Moscadelli, L.; Sakai, N.; Bartkiewicz, A.; Choi, Y. K.

    2017-08-01

    The BeSSeL Survey is mapping the spiral structure of the Milky Way by measuring trigonometric parallaxes of hundreds of maser sources associated with high-mass star formation. While parallax techniques for water masers at high frequency (22 GHz) have been well documented, recent observations of methanol masers at lower frequency (6.7 GHz) have revealed astrometric issues associated with signal propagation through the ionosphere that could significantly limit parallax accuracy. These problems displayed as a “parallax gradient” on the sky when measured against different background quasars. We present an analysis method in which we generate position data relative to an “artificial quasar” at the target maser position at each epoch. Fitting parallax to these data can significantly mitigate the problems and improve parallax accuracy.

  1. Superconductor magnets used for stagger-tuning traveling-wave maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Superconducting materials reduce size and weight of magnets used for stagger-tuning individual traveling-wave maser crystals. The invention is useful in microwave communication systems requiring a high information rate.

  2. Discovery of periodic class II methanol masers associated with G339.986-0.425 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maswanganye, J. P.; van der Walt, D. J.; Goedhart, S.; Gaylard, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    10 new class II methanol masers from the 6.7-GHz Methanol Multibeam survey catalogues III and IV were selected for a monitoring programme at both 6.7 and 12.2 GHz with the 26-m Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory radio telescope for 2 yr and 9 months, from 2012 August to 2015 May. In the sample, only masers associated with G339.986-0.425 were found to show periodic variability at both 6.7 and 12.2 GHz. The existence of periodic variation was tested with four independent methods. The analytical method gave the best estimation of the period, which was 246 ± 1 d. The time series of G339.986-0.425 show strong correlations across velocity channels and between the 6.7- and 12.2-GHz masers. The time delay was also measured across channels and shows structure across the spectrum which is continuous between different maser components.

  3. The saturation of the electron-cyclotron maser instability and the interpretation of solar millisecond spikes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    A self-consistent numeric two-dimensional code of the kinetic wave-particle equations developed to investigate the maser dynamics in the solar context is applied to solar millisecond-spike observations in order to improve the diagnostic capabilities of the theory of the electron-cyclotron maser instablitity. Attention is given to the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field selecting magneto-ionic modes with relatively short saturation lengths and suppressing mechanisms such as collisional deflection, free-free absorption, and gyroresonance absorption. The time scales of maser saturation in respect to time scales of global particle changes in a magnetic loop are covered, relevant observations of solar millisecond spikes are described, and the interpretation in terms of physical parameters deduced from the quasi-linear maser simulations are presented. It is demonstrated that the quasi-linear simulations make it possible to constrain the physical parameters from the observed time scale and frequency.

  4. Statistical studies based on simultaneous SiO and H{sub 2}O maser surveys toward evolved stars

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jaeheon; Cho, Se-Hyung; Kim, Sang Joon E-mail: cho@kasi.re.kr

    2014-01-01

    Based on the simultaneous observational results of SiO and H{sub 2}O masers toward 401 evolved stars, we have performed statistical analyses. We find that the peak and integrated intensities of SiO masers are stronger than those of H{sub 2}O masers in both Mira variables and OH/IR stars at most optical phases. However, the relative intensity ratios of H{sub 2}O to SiO masers in OH/IR stars are larger than those in Mira variables. Moreover, the intensity ratios of H{sub 2}O to SiO masers are found to be increased around the optical phases from 0-0.4. The H{sub 2}O photon luminosities also tend to be more dependent on the optical phase compared with those of SiO masers. These facts suggest that H{sub 2}O masers are more sensitive to expanding the motion of circumstellar envelopes and also shock waves arising from the pulsations of the central star compared with SiO masers. This result may also be related to the differences in the maser location and pumping mechanism between H{sub 2}O and SiO masers. The full width at zero power of SiO masers in Mira variables shows similar values to those of OH/IR stars, while those of H{sub 2}O masers in OH/IR stars show larger values than those of Mira variables. These differences may originate from the different mass-loss rates and the different location of the two masers. The mean velocity shift of SiO and H{sub 2}O masers with respect to the stellar velocity was investigated as a function of optical phase. The velocity shift of the H{sub 2}O masers shows that the redshifted emission dominates during the phases from 0.3-0.6, while the blueshifted emission appears at phase 0.6 and coexists with the redshifted emission during other phases. These features show an associated pattern with the CO ΔV = 3 radial velocity curve, which exhibits a typical pulsation motion. On the other hand, the velocity shift of the SiO v = 2 maser shows slightly similar features to the H{sub 2}O maser, while that of SiO v = 1 does not show these similar

  5. Targeted VLA Observations of 22 GHz Water Masers Towards the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickert, Matthew; Ott, Juergen; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad; Meier, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) has a unique environment with a large amount (5 x107 M⊙) of dense (104 cm-3) warm (75-200 K) molecular gas. To probe sites of ongoing star formation in this region, we carried out follow-up VLA observations targeting 22 GHz water masers detected by a recent Mopra survey of the inner 3° x 1° of the Galactic Center (Chambers et al. 2014, A&A 563, A68). We present preliminary results of these measurements with higher angular resolution (2" x 0.9"), spectral resolution (0.2 km s-1), and sensitivity (40 mJy beam-1) and a velocity coverage of -200 to 250 km s-1. A total of 32 maser positions are detected. Several sources display complex spectra with a number of new velocity components. From the 32 maser positions, over 200 spectral features have been identified, indicating clusters of masers. The complex spectra are indicative of young (< 105 years) star forming regions, with some of the components likely being produced from outflows. The brightest component is over 500 Jy beam-1 towards the HII region G359.14+0.03 with a vLSR of -9 km s-1. The most prominent location of water masers is the star forming region Sgr B2, where over 80 spectral components are identified from 9 different positions with peak flux densities ranging from 0.8 to 142 Jy beam-1. Three of these positions contain enhanced 4.5 μm green extended sources, indicating these masers are likely associated with outflows. Sgr C contains 3 separate maser positions with a total of 4 spectral components ranging from -70 to -66 km s-1 and peak flux densities of 4 to 15 Jy beam-1. One of these positions is also associated with a green source. We will compare the water maser positions with positions of radiatively pumped 6.7 GHz methanol masers and other green (3-8 μm) sources. This comparison will be used to verify that star formation is the underlying source of these masers and to identify masers associated with outlfows.

  6. Monitoring Observatinos of H2O and SiO Masers Toward Post-AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaeheon; Cho, Se-Hyung; Yoon, Dong-Hwan

    2016-12-01

    We present the results of simultaneous monitoring observations of H_2O 6_{1,6}-5_{2,3} (22 GHz) and SiO J=1-0, 2-1, 3-2 maser lines (43, 86, 129 GHz) toward five post-AGB (candidate) stars, using the 21-m single-dish telescopes of the Korean VLBI Network. Depending on the target objects, 7 - 11 epochs of data were obtained. We detected both H_2O and SiO maser lines from four sources: OH16.1-0.3, OH38.10-0.13, OH65.5+1.3, and IRAS 19312+1950. We could not detect H_2O maser emission toward OH13.1+5.1 between the late OH/IR and post-AGB stage. The detected H_2O masers show typical double-peaked line profiles. The SiO masers from four sources, except IRAS 19312+1950, show the peaks around the stellar velocity as a single peak, whereas the SiO masers from IRAS 19312+1950 occur above the red peak of the H_2O maser. We analyzed the properties of detected maser lines, and investigated their evolutionary state through comparison with the full widths at zero power. The distribution of observed target sources was also investigated in the IRAS two-color diagram in relation with the evolutionary stage of post-AGB stars. From our analyses, the evolutionary sequence of observed sources is suggested as OH65.5+1.3 → OH13.1+5.1 → OH16.1-0.3 → OH38.10-0.13, except for IRAS 19312+1950. In addition, OH13.1+5.1 from which the H_2O maser has not been detected is suggested to be on the gateway toward the post-AGB stage. With respect to the enigmatic object, IRAS 19312+1950, we could not clearly figure out its nature. To properly explain the unusual phenomena of SiO and H_2O masers, it is essential to establish the relative locations and spatial distributions of two masers using VLBI technique. We also include the 1.2 - 160 μm spectral energy distribution using photometric data from the following surveys: 2MASS, WISE, MSX, IRAS, and AKARI (IRC and FIS). In addition, from the IRAS LRS spectra, we found that the depth of silicate absorption features shows significant variations

  7. ITEL Experiment Module and its Flight on MASER9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löth, K.; Schneider, H.; Larsson, B.; Jansson, O.; Houltz, Y.

    2002-01-01

    The ITEL (Interfacial Turbulence in Evaporating Liquid) module is built under contract from the European Space Agency (ESA) and is scheduled to fly onboard a Sounding Rocket (MASER 9) in March 2002. The project is conducted by Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) with Lambda-X as a subcontractor responsible for the optical system. The Principle Investigator is Pierre Colinet from Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB). The experiment in ITEL on Maser 9 is part of a research program, which will make use of the International Space Station. The purpose of the flight on Maser 9 is to observe the cellular convection (Marangoni-Bénard instability) which arise when the surface tension varies with temperature yielding thermocapillary instabilities. During the 6 minutes of microgravity of the ITEL experiment, a highly volatile liquid layer (ethyl alcohol) will be evaporated, and the convection phenomena generated by the evaporation process will be visualized. Due to the cooling by latent heat consumption at the level of the evaporating free surface, a temperature gradient is induced perpendicularly to it. The flight experiment module contains one experiment cell, including a gas system for regulation of nitrogen flow over the evaporating surface and an injection unit that is used for injection of liquid into the cell both initially and during surface regulation. The experiment cell is equipped with pressure and flow sensors as well as thermocouples both inside the liquid and at different positions in the cell. Two optical diagnostic systems have been developed around the experiment cell. An interferometric optical tomograph measures the 3-dimensional distribution of temperature in the evaporating liquid and a Schlieren system visualizes the temperature gradients inside the liquid together with the liquid surface deformation. A PC/104 based electronic system is used for management and control of the experiment. The electronic system handles measurements, housekeeping, image

  8. Interventional heart wall motion analysis with cardiac C-arm CT systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Kerstin; Maier, Andreas K.; Zheng, Yefeng; Wang, Yang; Lauritsch, Günter; Schwemmer, Chris; Rohkohl, Christopher; Hornegger, Joachim; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-05-01

    Today, quantitative analysis of three-dimensional (3D) dynamics of the left ventricle (LV) cannot be performed directly in the catheter lab using a current angiographic C-arm system, which is the workhorse imaging modality for cardiac interventions. Therefore, myocardial wall analysis is completely based on the 2D angiographic images or pre-interventional 3D/4D imaging. In this paper, we present a complete framework to study the ventricular wall motion in 4D (3D+t) directly in the catheter lab. From the acquired 2D projection images, a dynamic 3D surface model of the LV is generated, which is then used to detect ventricular dyssynchrony. Different quantitative features to evaluate LV dynamics known from other modalities (ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging) are transferred to the C-arm CT data. We use the ejection fraction, the systolic dyssynchrony index a 3D fractional shortening and the phase to maximal contraction (ϕi, max) to determine an indicator of LV dyssynchrony and to discriminate regionally pathological from normal myocardium. The proposed analysis tool was evaluated on simulated phantom LV data with and without pathological wall dysfunctions. The LV data used is publicly available online at https://conrad.stanford.edu/data/heart. In addition, the presented framework was tested on eight clinical patient data sets. The first clinical results demonstrate promising performance of the proposed analysis tool and encourage the application of the presented framework to a larger study in clinical practice.

  9. Arginine Methylation of MDH1 by CARM1 Inhibits Glutamine Metabolism and Suppresses Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Ping; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Jian; Huang, Xian; Zuo, Yong; Wang, Tian-Shi; Gao, Xue; Xu, Ying-Ying; Zou, Shao-Wu; Liu, Ying-Bin; Cheng, Jin-Ke; Lei, Qun-Ying

    2016-11-17

    Distinctive from their normal counterparts, cancer cells exhibit unique metabolic dependencies on glutamine to fuel anabolic processes. Specifically, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells rely on an unconventional metabolic pathway catalyzed by aspartate aminotransferase, malate dehydrogenase 1 (MDH1), and malic enzyme 1 to rewire glutamine metabolism and support nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) production. Here, we report that methylation on arginine 248 (R248) negatively regulates MDH1. Protein arginine methyltransferase 4 (PRMT4/CARM1) methylates and inhibits MDH1 by disrupting its dimerization. Knockdown of MDH1 represses mitochondria respiration and inhibits glutamine metabolism, which sensitizes PDAC cells to oxidative stress and suppresses cell proliferation. Meanwhile, re-expression of wild-type MDH1, but not its methylation-mimetic mutant, protects cells from oxidative injury and restores cell growth and clonogenic activity. Importantly, MDH1 is hypomethylated at R248 in clinical PDAC samples. Our study reveals that arginine methylation of MDH1 by CARM1 regulates cellular redox homeostasis and suppresses glutamine metabolism of pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. An augmented reality C-arm for intraoperative assessment of the mechanical axis: a preclinical study.

    PubMed

    Fallavollita, Pascal; Brand, Alexander; Wang, Lejing; Euler, Ekkehard; Thaller, Peter; Navab, Nassir; Weidert, Simon

    2016-11-01

    Determination of lower limb alignment is a prerequisite for successful orthopedic surgical treatment. Traditional methods include the electrocautery cord, alignment rod, or axis board which rely solely on C-arm fluoroscopy navigation and are radiation intensive. To assess a new augmented reality technology in determining lower limb alignment. A camera-augmented mobile C-arm (CamC) technology was used to create a panorama image consisting of hip, knee, and ankle X-rays. Twenty-five human cadaver legs were used for validation with random varus or valgus deformations. Five clinicians performed experiments that consisted in achieving acceptable mechanical axis deviation. The applicability of the CamC technology was assessed with direct comparison to ground-truth CT. A t test, Pearson's correlation, and ANOVA were used to determine statistical significance. The value of Pearson's correlation coefficient R was 0.979 which demonstrates a strong positive correlation between the CamC and ground-truth CT data. The analysis of variance produced a p value equal to 0.911 signifying that clinician expertise differences were not significant with regard to the type of system used to assess mechanical axis deviation. All described measurements demonstrated valid measurement of lower limb alignment. With minimal effort, clinicians required only 3 X-ray image acquisitions using the augmented reality technology to achieve reliable mechanical axis deviation.

  11. Technical Note: Confirming the prescribed angle of CT localizer radiographs and c-arm projection acquisitions

    SciTech Connect

    Szczykutowicz, Timothy P.; Labby, Zacariah E.; Wallace, Charles; Rubert, Nicholas

    2016-02-15

    Purpose: Accurate CT radiograph angle is not usually important in diagnostic CT. However, there are applications in radiation oncology and interventional radiology in which the orientation of the x-ray source and detector with respect to the patient is clinically important. The authors present a method for measuring the accuracy of the tube/detector assembly with respect to the prescribed tube/detector position for CT localizer, fluoroscopic, and general radiograph imaging using diagnostic, mobile, and c-arm based CT systems. Methods: A mathematical expression relating the x-ray projection of two metal BBs is related to gantry angle. Measurement of the BBs at a prescribed gantry (i.e., c-arm) angle can be obtained and using this relation the prescribed versus actual gantry angle compared. No special service mode or proprietary information is required, only access to projection images is required. Projection images are available in CT via CT localizer radiographs and in the interventional setting via fluorography. Results: The technique was demonstrated on two systems, a mobile CT scanner and a diagnostic CT scanner. The results confirmed a known issue with the mobile scanner and accurately described the CT localizer angle of the diagnostic system tested. Conclusions: This method can be used to quantify gantry angle, which is important when projection images are used for procedure guidance, such as in brachytherapy and interventional radiology applications.

  12. Feasibility of prostate robotic radiation therapy on conventional C-arm linacs.

    PubMed

    Dong, Peng; Nguyen, Dan; Ruan, Dan; King, Christopher; Long, Troy; Romeijn, Edwin; Low, Daniel A; Kupelian, Patrick; Steinberg, Michael; Yang, Yingli; Sheng, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Significant dosimetric improvement for radiation therapy using optimized noncoplanar fields has been previously demonstrated. The purpose here is to study the feasibility of optimized robotic noncoplanar radiation therapy, termed 4π therapy, for prostate cancer treatments on a conventional C-arm linac. Twelve low-risk prostate cancer patients previously treated by 2-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were selected. Forty gray in 5 fractions were prescribed to cover 95% of the prostate planning target volume (PTV). To replan by 4π therapy, a column generation method was used to optimize beam orientations and fluence. A total of 30 beams were selected for each patient. Both planning methods provided adequate PTV coverage. Compared against VMAT plans, the 4π plan reduced the rectum V50%, V80%, V90%, D1cc, and the penile bulb maximum doses by 50%, 28%, 19% 11%, and 9% (P < .005), respectively, and the mean body dose was reduced from 2.07 Gy to 1.75 Gy (P = .0001). The bladder dose was only slightly reduced. By optimizing beam angles and fluences in the noncoplanar solution space, superior prostate treatment plan quality was achieved compared against state of the art VMAT plans. The dosimetric potential for 4π therapy is established on an existing C-arm linac platform. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: OH maser emission from star forming regions (Szymczak+, 2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, M.; Gerard, E.

    2003-11-01

    High sensitivity observations of all four transitions of the ground state at 18cm of OH in both senses of circular polarization have been carried out with the Nancay radio telescope. The sample was a set of 100 star forming regions detected in a recent unbiased survey of 6668MHz methanol masers (Szymczak et al., 2002A&A...392..277S). OH maser emission was found in 55 objects of which 31 were not previously catalogued. (4 data files).

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 95GHz class I methanol maser survey (Chen+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Ellingsen, S. P.; He, J.-H.; Xu, Y.; Gan, C.-G.; Shen, Z.-Q.; An, T.; Sun, Y.; Ju, B.-G.

    2012-07-01

    We used the released catalogs from the GLIMPSE survey (version 2.0; Cat. II/293) and the BGPS (version 1.0.1; Cat. J/ApJS/188/123) to construct a target sample for our class I methanol maser search. The observations of the 80-71A+ (95.1964630GHz) class I methanol maser transition were made using the PMO 13.7m telescope in Delingha, China during 2011 March-April. (4 data files).

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: ATCA obs. of ground-state OH masers (Qiao+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, H.-H.; Walsh, A. J.; Green, J. A.; Breen, S. L.; Dawson, J. R.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Gomez, J. F.; Jordan, C. H.; Shen, Z.-Q.; Lowe, V.; Jones, P. A.

    2017-01-01

    Observations were conducted with the ATCA from 2013 October 24 to 29, and 2015 January 27. At the frequency of the ground-state OH masers, the 6A array results in a synthesized beam between 4.07"x7.41" and 5.50"x12.53". Observational pointing centers were determined based on the Parkes OH maser detections introduced in Dawson+ (2014MNRAS.439.1596D). (1 data file).

  16. Unusual radio flare in the OH maser source VY Canis Majoris

    SciTech Connect

    Iudaeva, N.A.

    1986-06-01

    From May 1983 to April 1985 the VY CMa source was observed in the 1665-, 1667-MHz principal OH maser emission lines with the RATAN-600 radio telescope, at 2.6 x 45 arcmin x 5.4 km/sec resolution. An OH flare in February-March 1985 was accompanied by the emergence of satellite features symmetric about the strongly variable dominant 1667-MHz peak. The possible geometry of the maser emission site is discussed. 6 references.

  17. Stäckel-type dynamic model of the Galaxy based on maser kinematic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, A. O.; Nikiforov, I. I.; Ossipkov, L. P.

    A dynamic model of the Galaxy is constructed based on kinematic data for masers with trigonometric parallaxes. Maser data is used to compute the model potential in the Galactic plane. The potential is then generalized to three dimensions assuming the existence of a third quadratic integral of motion. The resulting Galactic model potential is of Stäckel's type. The corresponding space density function is determined from Poisson's equation.

  18. The Arcetri Catalog of H2O maser sources: Update 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdettaro, R.; Palla, F.; Brand, J.; Cesaroni, R.; Comoretto, G.; Di Franco, S.; Felli, M.; Natale, E.; Palagi, F.; Panella, D.; Tofani, G.

    2001-03-01

    We present a second update of the Arcetri Catalog of water masers (Comoretto et al. \\cite{Comoretto90}; Brand et al. \\cite{Brand94}). The present study reports the results of the observations carried out with the Medicina 32-m radiotelescope from January 1993 to April 2000 on a sample of 300 sources. This compilation consists of newly discovered maser sources that did not appear in the previous Arcetri Catalogs and is made of: a) detections from the literature, and b) unpublished detections obtained with the Medicina antenna. Overall, 83 out of 300 sources were detected. The detection rate is low (28%) and we attribute his result to the inclusion in our survey of a rather large number of spurious maser detections that have appeared in one particular paper. The observational parameters are reported in tabular form for all the 300 sources and the spectra of the detected masers are presented. We discuss the global properties of the complete Arcetri Catalog based on Comoretto et al. (\\cite{Comoretto90}), Brand et al. (\\cite{Brand94}) and the present observations, which now contains 1013 galactic water maser sources. Of these, 937 have an IRAS counterpart within 1 arcmin from the nominal position of the maser. We establish a classification scheme based on the IRAS flux densities which allows to distinguish between water masers associated with star forming regions and late-type stars. The Arcetri Catalog represents a useful data base for systematic studies of galactic water maser sources. Based on observations collected with the Medicina 32-m radiotelescope. The Medicina telescope is operated by the Istituto di Radioastronomia, C.N.R., Bologna. Table 2 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.125.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/368/845

  19. Ground-State SiO Maser Emission Toward Evolved Stars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    emulateapj v. 11/12/01 GROUND-STATE SIO MASER EMISSION TOWARD EVOLVED STARS D. A. BOBOLTZ U.S. Naval Observatory, 3450 Massachusetts Ave., NW...Accepted by the Astrophysical Journal 2004 February 20 ABSTRACT We have made the first unambiguous detection of vibrational ground-state maser emission ...observed. Ground-state thermal emission was detected for one of the stars, RX Boo, with a peak brightness temperature of 200 K. Comparing the v = 0 and

  20. A Search for Water Maser Emission from Brown Dwarfs and Low-luminosity Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, José F.; Palau, Aina; Uscanga, Lucero; Manjarrez, Guillermo; Barrado, David

    2017-05-01

    We present a survey for water maser emission toward a sample of 44 low-luminosity young objects, comprising (proto-)brown dwarfs, first hydrostatic cores (FHCs), and other young stellar objects (YSOs) with bolometric luminosities lower than 0.4 L ⊙. Water maser emission is a good tracer of energetic processes, such as mass-loss and/or accretion, and is a useful tool to study these processes with very high angular resolution. This type of emission has been confirmed in objects with L bol ≳ 1 L ⊙. Objects with lower luminosities also undergo mass-loss and accretion, and thus, are prospective sites of maser emission. Our sensitive single-dish observations provided a single detection when pointing toward the FHC L1448 IRS 2E. However, follow-up interferometric observations showed water maser emission associated with the nearby YSO L1448 IRS 2 (a Class 0 protostar of L bol ≃ 3.6-5.3 L ⊙) and did not find any emission toward L1448 IRS 2E. The upper limits for water maser emission determined by our observations are one order of magnitude lower than expected from the correlation between water maser luminosities and bolometric luminosities found for YSOs. This suggests that this correlation does not hold at the lower end of the (sub)stellar mass spectrum. Possible reasons are that the slope of this correlation is steeper at L bol ≤ 1 L ⊙ or that there is an absolute luminosity threshold below which water maser emission cannot be produced. Alternatively, if the correlation still stands at low luminosity, the detection rates of masers would be significantly lower than the values obtained in higher-luminosity Class 0 protostars.