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Sample records for autosomal dominant distal

  1. Autosomal dominant

    MedlinePlus

    ... whether the trait is dominant or recessive. A single abnormal gene on one of the first 22 nonsex ( autosomal ) chromosomes from either parent can cause an autosomal disorder. Dominant inheritance means ...

  2. A recurrent WARS mutation is a novel cause of autosomal dominant distal hereditary motor neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-Chien; Soong, Bing-Wen; Mademan, Inès; Huang, Yen-Hua; Liu, Chia-Rung; Hsiao, Cheng-Tsung; Wu, Hung-Ta; Liu, Tze-Tze; Liu, Yo-Tsen; Tseng, Yen-Ting; Lin, Kon-Ping; Yang, Ueng-Cheng; Chung, Ki Wha; Choi, Byung-Ok; Nicholson, Garth A; Kennerson, Marina L; Chan, Chih-Chiang; De Jonghe, Peter; Cheng, Tzu-Hao; Liao, Yi-Chu; Züchner, Stephan; Baets, Jonathan; Lee, Yi-Chung

    2017-03-22

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathy is a heterogeneous group of inherited neuropathies characterized by distal limb muscle weakness and atrophy. Although at least 15 genes have been implicated in distal hereditary motor neuropathy, the genetic causes remain elusive in many families. To identify an additional causal gene for distal hereditary motor neuropathy, we performed exome sequencing for two affected individuals and two unaffected members in a Taiwanese family with an autosomal dominant distal hereditary motor neuropathy in which mutations in common distal hereditary motor neuropathy-implicated genes had been excluded. The exome sequencing revealed a heterozygous mutation, c.770A > G (p.His257Arg), in the cytoplasmic tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) gene (WARS) that co-segregates with the neuropathy in the family. Further analyses of WARS in an additional 79 Taiwanese pedigrees with inherited neuropathies and 163 index cases from Australian, European, and Korean distal hereditary motor neuropathy families identified the same mutation in another Taiwanese distal hereditary motor neuropathy pedigree with different ancestries and one additional Belgian distal hereditary motor neuropathy family of Caucasian origin. Cell transfection studies demonstrated a dominant-negative effect of the p.His257Arg mutation on aminoacylation activity of TrpRS, which subsequently compromised protein synthesis and reduced cell viability. His257Arg TrpRS also inhibited neurite outgrowth and led to neurite degeneration in the neuronal cell lines and rat motor neurons. Further in vitro analyses showed that the WARS mutation could potentiate the angiostatic activities of TrpRS by enhancing its interaction with vascular endothelial-cadherin. Taken together, these findings establish WARS as a gene whose mutations may cause distal hereditary motor neuropathy and alter canonical and non-canonical functions of TrpRS.

  3. Relative Contribution of Mutations in Genes for Autosomal Dominant Distal Hereditary Motor Neuropathies: A Genotype-Phenotype Correlation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dierick, Ines; Baets, Jonathan; Irobi, Joy; Jacobs, An; De Vriendt, Els; Deconinck, Tine; Merlini, Luciano; Van den Bergh, Peter; Rasic, Vedrana Milic; Robberecht, Wim; Fischer, Dirk; Morales, Raul Juntas; Mitrovic, Zoran; Seeman, Pavel; Mazanec, Radim; Kochanski, Andrzej; Jordanova, Albena; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Helderman-van den Enden, A. T. J. M.; Wokke, John H. J.; Nelis, Eva; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathy (HMN) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders affecting spinal alpha-motor neurons. Since 2001, mutations in six different genes have been identified for autosomal dominant distal HMN; "glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS)," "dynactin 1 (DCTN1)," "small heat shock 27 kDa…

  4. Autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy (ADVIRC).

    PubMed Central

    Blair, N P; Goldberg, M F; Fishman, G A; Salzano, T

    1984-01-01

    We report the second family recognised to have autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy. The clinical features were (1) autosomal dominant inheritance; (2) peripheral, coarse pigmentary degeneration of the fundus for 360 degrees, with a relatively discrete posterior border in the equatorial region (this finding may be pathognomonic); (3) superficial punctate yellowish-white opacities in the retina; (4) various vascular abnormalities; (5) breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier; (6) retinal neovascularisation; (7) vitreous abnormalities; and (8) choroidal atrophy. Visual reduction was mainly due to macular oedema or vitreous haemorrhage. Images PMID:6689931

  5. [Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney].

    PubMed

    Jorge Adad, S; Estevão Barbosa, M; Fácio Luíz, J M; Furlan Rodrigues, M C; Iwamoto, S

    1996-01-01

    A 48-year-old male had autosomic dominant polycystic kidneys with dimensions, to the best of our knowledge, never previously reported; the right kidney weighed 15,100 g and measured 53 x 33 x 9cm and the left one 10.200 g and 46 x 21 x 7cm, with cysts measuring up to 14cm in diameter. Nephrectomy was done to control persistent hematuria and to relief disconfort caused by the large kidneys. The renal function is stable four years after transplantation.

  6. Autosomal dominant genes (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease. One of the parents will have the disease (since it is dominant) in this mode of inheritance and that person is called the CARRIER. Only one parent must be a carrier in order for the child to inherit the disease.

  7. A new autosomal dominant craniofacial deafness syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kassutto, S; Kassutto, Z; Ben-Ami, T; Goodman, R M

    1987-11-01

    A Jewish family is reported in which the proband and her father had congenital hearing loss and unusual facies consisting of facial asymmetry, temporal alopecia with frontal bossing, a broad nasal root and small nasal alae. In addition, both were born with a short frenulum of the tongue. We believe these findings represent a new autosomal dominant deafness syndrome with distinct craniofacial features.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... stationary night blindness autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Close All Description Autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness is a disorder of the retina , which is ...

  9. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia deafness and narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Melberg, A; Hetta, J; Dahl, N; Nennesmo, I; Bengtsson, M; Wibom, R; Grant, C; Gustavson, K H; Lundberg, P O

    1995-12-01

    A new autosomal dominant syndrome in a Swedish pedigree is described. Five patients were affected with cerebellar ataxia and sensorineural deafness. Four of these patients had symptoms of narcolepsy. Optic atrophy, other neurological abnormalities and psychiatric symptoms developed with increasing disease duration. Three patients had non-neurological disease in addition, including diabetes mellitus in two and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in one. Autopsy with neuropathological examination was performed in one case. Molecular studies focused on the short arm of chromosome 6, including the HLA DR2 locus associated with narcolepsy and the (CAG)n repeat at the spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) locus. Biochemical investigation of muscle biopsy of one case indicated mitochondrial dysfunction with selective decrease in ATP production for substrates that normally give the highest rates. The activity of glutamate dehydrogenase was reduced, indicating a low mitochondrial density. We postulate an autosomal dominant genetic factor responsible for this syndrome. Linkage was excluded to HLA DR2, and a normal sized SCA1 repeat was observed. We conclude that a locus predisposing to ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy exists outside this region of chromosome 6.

  10. [Treatment of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Torra, Roser

    2014-01-21

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is the most frequent hereditary kidney disease. However it lacks a specific treatment. Its prevalence is 1/800 and causes the need for renal replacement therapy in 8-10% of patients on dialysis or kidney transplant. It is caused by mutations in the PKD1 and PKD2 genes, which cause a series of alterations in the polycystic cells, which have become therapeutic targets. There are many molecules that are being tested to counteract the alterations of these therapeutic targets. There are studies in all phases of research, from phase i to phase iv. Some of the molecules being tested are tolvaptan, mTOR inhibitors and, among many other, somatostatin analogues. These drugs are extensively reviewed in this article. Based on the accumulated experience the primary objective of the trials is the slowing of the increase in renal volume. Yet other renal end points such as renal function and hypertension are necessary. It is expected that in the coming years we can have specific, well tolerated, effective and affordable drugs for the treatment of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

  11. Non-syndromic autosomal-dominant deafness.

    PubMed

    Petersen, M B

    2002-07-01

    Non-syndromic deafness is a paradigm of genetic heterogeneity. More than 70 loci have been mapped, and 25 of the nuclear genes responsible for non-syndromic deafness have been identified. Autosomal-dominant genes are responsible for about 20% of the cases of hereditary non-syndromic deafness, with 16 different genes identified to date. In the present article we review these 16 genes, their function and their contribution to deafness in different populations. The complexity is underlined by the fact that several of the genes are involved in both dominant and recessive non-syndromic deafness or in both non-syndromic and syndromic deafness. Mutations in eight of the genes have so far been detected in only single dominant deafness families, and their contribution to deafness on a population base might therefore be limited, or is currently unknown. Identification of all genes involved in hereditary hearing loss will help in the understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying normal hearing, will facilitate early diagnosis and intervention and might offer opportunities for rational therapy.

  12. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in children

    PubMed Central

    Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary renal disease, affecting one in 500 individuals. The cardinal manifestation of ADPKD is progressive cystic dilatation of renal tubules with kidney enlargement and progression to end-stage renal disease in approximately half of cases by 60 years of age. Although previously considered a condition of adults, it is clear that children and young adults are subject to the complications of ADPKD. Recent findings It has been increasingly recognized that interventions early in life are necessary in order to confer the best long-term outcome in this common condition. Therefore, it is imperative for pediatricians to recognize the manifestations and complications of this disease. Until recently ADPKD management focused on general principles of chronic kidney disease. However, several recent clinical trials in children and adults with ADPKD have focused on disease-specific therapies. Summary This review will highlight the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and appropriate management of ADPKD in childhood and will review recent relevant clinical trials in children and adults with this condition. PMID:25635587

  13. Hypertension in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Arlene B.; Stepniakowski, Konrad; Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension is common and occurs in a majority of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients prior to loss of kidney function. Hypertension relates to progressive kidney enlargement, and is a significant independent risk factor for progression to end stage renal disease. The pathogenesis of hypertension in ADPKD is complex and dependent on many factors that influence each other. Pkd1 and Pkd2 expression levels are highest in the major vessels and are present in the cilia of endothelial cells and in vascular smooth muscle cells. Decreased or absent polycystin 1 or 2 expression is associated with abnormal vascular structure and function. Pkd1/Pkd2 deficiency results in reduced nitric oxide (NO) levels, altered endothelial response to shear stress with attenuation in vascular relaxation. 10–20% of ADPKD children demonstrate hypertension and the majority of adults are hypertensive before any loss of kidney function. Cardiac abnormalities such as left ventricular hypertrophy and carotid intimal wall thickening are present prior to the development of hypertension in ADPKD. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system occurs in ADPKD due to decreased NO production as well as bilateral cyst expansion and intra-renal ischemia. With increasing cyst size, further activation of the RAAS occurs, blood pressure increases and a vicious cycle ensues with enhanced cyst growth and hypertension ultimately leading to ESRD. Inhibition of the angiotensin aldosterone system is possible with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers. However, interventional studies have not yet demonstrated benefit in slowing progression to renal failure in ADPKD. Currently, large multicenter studies are being performed to determine the beneficial effects of RAAS inhibition both early and late in ADPKD. PMID:20219618

  14. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease diagnosed in utero. Review.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Magdalena; Huras, Hubert; Wiecheć, Marcin; Jach, Robert; Radoń-Pokracka, Małgorzata; Górecka, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is one of most common inherited renal diseases. It is estimated that very early onset ADPKD affects even 2% patients. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of genetics, prenatal diagnosis and prognosis in very early onset autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant hyper-IgE syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions autosomal dominant hyper-IgE syndrome ...

  16. Early onset autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia with miosis: four cases.

    PubMed

    Timby, Niklas; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Kristiansen, Ingela; Eriksson, Urban; Erikson, Anders

    2008-01-01

    Previously, at least 29 different forms of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) have been described. We describe a family with four members through three generations with autosomal dominant ataxia in combination with miosis and hyperreflexia. This family's ataxia does not match any of the previously described SCAs and is probably a novel form of SCA. To continue with the search for the genetic background of this disease, more cases are needed.

  17. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: A Path Forward.

    PubMed

    Rangan, Gopala K; Lopez-Vargas, Pamela; Nankivell, Brian J; Tchan, Michel; Tong, Allison; Tunnicliffe, David J; Savige, Judy

    2015-11-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the commonest inherited cause of renal failure in adults, and is due to loss-of-function mutations in either the PKD1 or PKD2 genes, which encode polycystin-1 and polycystin-2, respectively. These proteins have an essential role in maintaining the geometric structure of the distal collecting duct in the kidney in adult life, and their dysfunction predisposes to renal cyst formation. The typical renal phenotype of ADPKD is the insidious development of hundreds of renal cysts, which form in childhood and grow progressively through life, causing end-stage kidney failure in the fifth decade in about half affected by the mutation. Over the past 2 decades, major advances in genetics and disease pathogenesis have led to well-conducted randomized controlled trials, and observational studies that have resulted in an accumulation of evidence-based data, and raise hope that the lifetime risk of kidney failure due to ADPKD will be progressively curtailed during this century. This review will provide a contemporary summary of the current state of the field in disease pathogenesis and therapeutics, and also briefly highlights the importance of clinical practice guidelines, patient perspectives, patient-reported outcomes, uniform trial reporting, and health-economics in ADPKD.

  18. HPGD mutations cause cranioosteoarthropathy but not autosomal dominant digital clubbing.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Wenke; Beninde, Julia; Hoffmann, Katrin; Lindner, Tom H; Bassir, Christian; Aksu, Fuat; Hübner, Christoph; Verbeek, Nienke E; Mundlos, Stefan; Horn, Denise

    2009-12-01

    Cranio-osteoarthropathy, clinically classified as a variant of primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, is a very rare autosomal-recessive condition characterized by delayed closure of the cranial sutures and fontanels, digital clubbing, arthropathy, and periostosis. Recently, mutations in the gene HPGD, which encodes the NAD(+)-dependent 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase, were reported in four families affected with primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and one family with autosomal-recessive isolated nail clubbing. We report the clinical and molecular findings in four patients from two families affected with cranio-osteoarthropathy and one family with isolated, autosomal dominant digital clubbing. Genome-wide homozygosity mapping identified a locus for cranio-osteoarthropathy harboring the HPGD gene in one affected family. We detected two novel homozygous mutations in HPGD in these families: a missense mutation affecting the NAD(+) binding motif and a frameshift mutation. The clinical presentation in our patients was variable. Digital clubbing and hyperhidrosis were present in all cases. Delayed closure of the cranial sutures and fontanels, periostosis, and arthropathy were not consistent clinical features. No HPGD mutation was detected in a familial case of autosomal dominant isolated digital clubbing. The failure to identify any mutation in a family with an autosomal dominant type of isolated digital clubbing suggests that HPGD is not the major gene for this condition.

  19. Autosomal dominant syndrome of camptodactyly, clinodactyly, syndactyly, and bifid toes.

    PubMed

    Malik, Sajid; Afzal, Muhammad; Gul, Sumera; Wahab, Abdul; Ahmad, Mahmud

    2010-09-01

    We report on a 25-year follow-up of a Pakistani kindred with a unique combination of camptodactyly and clinodactyly of 5th fingers, mesoaxial camptodactyly of toes, and ulnar deviation of 3rd fingers. The less common anomalies in the affected subjects include syndactyly involving all digits, and bifid toes. This condition is grossly bilateral, symmetrical, and affects upper and lower limbs of the 26 affected subjects in the kindred. The comparable number of affected male and female subjects (chi(2) = 0.154, P < 0.1), disease allele transmission by mother and father, and the malformation segregation in four consecutive generations are strongly suggestive of autosomal dominant inheritance. Differential diagnosis considered syndactyly types II, III, and V. Only type II syndactyly manifests noticeable phenotypic overlap with the clinical presentation in this family; however, the typical type II syndactyly changes are absent. To the best of our knowledge, this autosomal dominant limb phenotype has not been reported previously.

  20. [Polycystic liver disease without autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Peces, R; González, P; Venegas, J L

    2003-01-01

    Polycystic liver disease is characterized by the presence of multiple bile duct-derived epithelial cysts scattered in the liver parenchyma. The natural history and clinical manifestations of polycystic liver disease are based on the disease as it manifests in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The occurrence of polycystic liver disease independently from polycystic kidney disease has been known for a long time. More recently, a gene for autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease has been identified on chromosome 19p 13.2-13.1. Isolated polycystic liver disease is underdiagnosed and genetically distinct from polycystic liver disease associated with ADPKD but with similar pathogenesis and clinical manifestations. We report here two men with polycystic liver disease no associated with ADPKD. Ultrasound and computed tomography imaging were effective in documenting the underlying lesions non-invasively.

  1. Hypertension in children with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD).

    PubMed

    Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa A

    2013-02-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary renal disease, affecting 1 in 1000 individuals. Previously termed "adult polycystic kidney disease", ADPKD is now known to have important clinical manifestations beginning early in life and even in utero. Hypertension is an important risk factor for progressive renal and cardiovascular disease in children with ADPKD and may signify irremediable organ injury. The purpose of this article is to review current knowledge and treatment strategies in hypertension associated with pediatric ADPKD.

  2. Autosomal dominant congenital Horner's syndrome in a Dutch family.

    PubMed Central

    Hageman, G; Ippel, P F; te Nijenhuis, F C

    1992-01-01

    A Dutch family is reported with congenital Horner's syndrome in five cases spanning five generations, with symptoms of varying degree but mainly ptosis and meiosis. Heterochromia iridium, anhidrosis, and enophthalmos were not present. The site of the lesion may be in the region between Gasser's ganglion and the short vertical segment of the internal carotid artery near the siphon. There are only four previous reports showing autosomal dominant inheritance of congenital Horner's syndrome. Images PMID:1548493

  3. Autosomal dominant congenital Horner's syndrome in a Dutch family.

    PubMed

    Hageman, G; Ippel, P F; te Nijenhuis, F C

    1992-01-01

    A Dutch family is reported with congenital Horner's syndrome in five cases spanning five generations, with symptoms of varying degree but mainly ptosis and meiosis. Heterochromia iridium, anhidrosis, and enophthalmos were not present. The site of the lesion may be in the region between Gasser's ganglion and the short vertical segment of the internal carotid artery near the siphon. There are only four previous reports showing autosomal dominant inheritance of congenital Horner's syndrome.

  4. Familial pulmonary hypertension. Evidence of autosomal dominant inheritance.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, P; McRae, C

    1970-01-01

    A patient with primary pulmonary hypertension is the fourth member of a family proven to have the disease. The patient's father married twice; the disease appeared in both families, and was transmitted through two generations. Multiple genetic and environmental factors may result in pulmonary hypertension, but the distribution of cases in this family and in others reported is consistent with the autosomal dominant inheritance of a single genetic trait. PMID:5212347

  5. Sacral radicular cysts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Peces, Ramón; Peces, Carlos; Pérez-Dueñas, Virginia; Vega-Cabrera, Cristina; Campos, Isabel

    2009-10-01

    This is the first report of a case of sacral radicular cysts in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). A 46-year-old woman with ADPKD was found to have bilateral sacral radicular cysts discovered incidentally by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cysts arising from arachnoid or spinal meningeal sac should be considered one of the manifestations of a more widespread connective tissue disorder associated with ADPKD.

  6. Predictors of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease progression.

    PubMed

    Schrier, Robert W; Brosnahan, Godela; Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa A; Chonchol, Michel; Friend, Keith; Gitomer, Berenice; Rossetti, Sandro

    2014-11-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is a genetic disorder associated with substantial variability in its natural course within and between affected families. Understanding predictors for rapid progression of this disease has become increasingly important with the emergence of potential new treatments. This systematic review of the literature since 1988 evaluates factors that may predict and/or effect autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease progression. Predicting factors associated with early adverse structural and/or functional outcomes are considered. These factors include PKD1 mutation (particularly truncating mutation), men, early onset of hypertension, early and frequent gross hematuria, and among women, three or more pregnancies. Increases in total kidney volume and decreases in GFR and renal blood flow greater than expected for a given age also signify rapid disease progression. Concerning laboratory markers include overt proteinuria, macroalbuminuria, and perhaps, elevated serum copeptin levels in affected adults. These factors and others may help to identify patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease who are most likely to benefit from early intervention with novel treatments.

  7. Nonallelic heterogeneity in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa with incomplete penetrance

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.K.; Berson, E.L.; Dryja, T.P.

    1994-08-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of retinal diseases in which photoreceptor cells throughout the retina degenerate. Although there is considerable genetic heterogeneity (autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked forms exist), there is a possibility that some clinically defined subtypes of the disease may be the result of mutations at the same locus. One possible clinically defined subtype is that of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) with incomplete penetrance. Whereas in most families with ADRP, carriers can be clearly identified because of visual loss, ophthalmological findings, or abnormal electroretinograms (ERGs), in occasional families some obligate carriers are asymptomatic and have normal or nearly normal ERGs even late in life. A recent paper reported the mapping of the diseases locus in one pedigree (designated adRP7) with ADRP with incomplete penetrance to chromosome 7p. To test the idea that ADRP with incomplete penetrance may be genetically homogeneous, we have evaluated whether a different family with incomplete penetrance also has a disease gene linked to the same region. 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: the last 3 years

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Vicente E.; Harris, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is the most prevalent, potentially lethal monogenic disorder. It has large inter- and intra-familial variability explained to a large extent by its genetic heterogeneity and modifier genes. An increased understanding of its underlying genetic, molecular, and cellular mechanisms and a better appreciation of its progression and systemic manifestations have laid out the foundation for the development of clinical trials and potentially effective therapies. The purpose of this review is to update the core of knowledge in this area with recent publications that have appeared during 2006–2009. PMID:19455193

  9. Nutraceutical for Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease Therapy.

    PubMed

    Yuajit, Chaowalit; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited renal disorder caused by mutations of either PKD1 or PKD2 gene. Cyst formation initiates from a combination of abnormal cell proliferation along with enhanced fluid secretion. ADPKD is characterized by the progressive enlargement of cysts which destroy the renal parenchymal cells, resulting in renal failure. Currently, there is no effective treatment for this disease. Interestingly, several relevant therapeutic effects of herbal medicine relevant to pathogenic process of ADPKD have urged the researchers to search for potential candidate herb as nutraceutical for ADPKD therapy. Up to now, several natural compounds, such as triptolide, curcumin, ginkolide B, and steviol (stevia extract) have been shown to be able to retard cyst progression in ADPKD. The detailed mechanism of these compounds showed that triptolide enhanced calcium restoration, curcumin inhibited ERK & p-STAT3 pathways, ginkolide B inhibited Ras/MAPK pathway, and steviol activated AMPK, which inhibited CFTR channel and mTOR pathway in cell and mouse models of PKD. In addition, they are currently inpreclinical and clinical studies, respectively. This review focuses on the pathophysiology of ADPKD and the recent therapeutic approaches, especially a potential use of nutraceutical for the treatment of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

  10. Homozygotes for the autosomal dominant neoplasia syndrome (MEN1)

    SciTech Connect

    Brandi, M.L.; Falchetti, A.; Tonelli, F. ); Weber, G.; Svensson, A.; Larsson, C. ); Castello, R.; Furlani, L.; Scappaticci, S.; Fraccaro, M.

    1993-12-01

    Families in which both parents are heterozygotes for the same autosomal dominant neoplasia syndrome are extremely unusual. Recently, the authors had the unique opportunity to evaluate three symptomatic siblings from the union between two unrelated individuals affected by multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). When the three siblings and their parents and relatives were genotyped for 12 markers tightly linked to the MEN1 locus, at 11q13, two of the siblings were found to be homozygotes, and one a heterozygote, for MEN1. With regard to the MEN1 syndrome, no phenotypic differences were observed between the two homozygotes and the heterozygotes. However, the two homozygotes showed unexplained infertility, which was not the case for any of the heterozygotes. Thus, MEN1 appears to be a disease with complete dominance, and the presence of two MEN1 alleles with mutations of the type that occur constitutionally may be insufficient for tumor development. 28 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Autosomal dominant epidermodysplasia verruciformis: a clinicotherapeutic experience in two cases.

    PubMed

    Vohra, Surbhi; Sharma, Nand Lal; Shanker, Vinay; Mahajan, Vikram K; Jindal, Nidhi

    2010-01-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare genodermatosis characterized by a unique susceptibility to cutaneous infection by a group of phylogenetically related human papilloma viruses (HPVs). These patients show a defect in cell-mediated immunity specific toward the causative HPVs that lead to lifelong disease. The defect is usually inherited as autosomal recessive trait and presents clinically with plane warts, pityriasis versicolor-like lesions and reddish verrucous plaques. Dysplastic and malignant changes in the form of actinic keratoses, Bowen's disease and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are common but metastasis occurs rarely. A totally effective treatment against EV is as yet highly desirable. Two siblings having autosomal dominant EV presented with multiple actinic keratoses in addition to classic lesions. One of them had also developed well-differentiated SCC over forehead with metastases to regional lymph nodes. They were treated with combination of excision of small malignant/premalignant lesions, topical 5-flurouracil and sun protection. Additionally, elective excision/grafting of large SCC was performed after chemotherapy/radiotherapy in patient with metastatic SCC. Oral acitretin (25 mg/day) was of benefit in the other patient. Overall clinicotherapeutic experience in both the patients is discussed here.

  12. Rare genetic causes of autosomal dominant or recessive hypercholesterolaemia.

    PubMed

    Soutar, Anne K

    2010-02-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is a human inherited disorder of metabolism characterised by increased serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. It is caused by defects in the LDL-receptor pathway that impair normal uptake and clearance of LDL by the liver. The commonest cause of FH is mutations in LDLR, the gene for the LDL receptor, but defects also occur in APOB that encodes its major protein ligand. More recently, defects in two other genes, LDLRAP1 and PCSK9, have been found in patients with FH and investigation of these has shed new light on the functioning and complexity of the LDL receptor pathway. Cells from patients with autosomal recessive hypercholesterolaemia (ARH) fail to internalise the LDL receptor because they carry two defective alleles of LDLRAP1, a gene that encodes a specific clathrin adaptor protein. PCSK9 encodes proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9, a secreted protein that binds to the LDL receptor and promotes its degradation. Gain-of function mutations in PCSK9 are autosomal dominant and cause hypercholesterolaemia because they increase the affinity of PCSK9 protein for the LDL receptor, whereas loss-of-function mutations reduce serum cholesterol because LDL-receptor protein is exposed to reduced PCSK9-mediated degradation. Thus, PCSK9 has become a new target for cholesterol-lowering drug therapy.

  13. LAMB3 mutations causing autosomal-dominant amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Kim, J W; Seymen, F; Lee, K E; Ko, J; Yildirim, M; Tuna, E B; Gencay, K; Shin, T J; Kyun, H K; Simmer, J P; Hu, J C-C

    2013-10-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) can be either isolated or part of a larger syndrome. Junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) is a collection of autosomal-recessive disorders featuring AI associated with skin fragility and other symptoms. JEB is a recessive syndrome usually caused by mutations in both alleles of COL17A1, LAMA3, LAMB3, or LAMC2. In rare cases, heterozygous carriers in JEB kindreds display enamel malformations in the absence of skin fragility (isolated AI). We recruited two kindreds with autosomal-dominant amelogenesis imperfecta (ADAI) characterized by generalized severe enamel hypoplasia with deep linear grooves and pits. Whole-exome sequencing of both probands identified novel heterozygous mutations in the last exon of LAMB3 that likely truncated the protein. The mutations perfectly segregated with the enamel defects in both families. In Family 1, an 8-bp deletion (c.3446_3453del GACTGGAG) shifted the reading frame (p.Gly 1149Glufs*8). In Family 2, a single nucleotide substitution (c.C3431A) generated an in-frame translation termination codon (p.Ser1144*). We conclude that enamel formation is particularly sensitive to defects in hemidesmosome/basement-membrane complexes and that syndromic and non-syndromic forms of AI can be etiologically related.

  14. Autosomal dominant thrombocytopenia with microthrombocytes: a family study.

    PubMed

    Jackson, N; Mohammad, S; Zainal, N; Jamaluddin, N; Hishamuddin, M

    1995-12-01

    A family demonstrating autosomal dominant thrombocytopenia is described. A 28-year-old Malay housewife was found to have a platelet count of 40 x 10(9)/l with a low mean platelet volume (6.8 fl) while being investigated prior to ovarian cystectomy. The bone marrow was consistent with immune thrombocytopenia but she failed to respond to appropriate therapy. Five siblings, one parent and one nephew have easy bruising and platelet counts of 39-82 x 10(9)/l. Platelet aggregation studies excluded a major functional defect. Survival of homologous platelets in the circulation was normal. Familial thrombocytopenias are rare but important to differentiate from the common acquired thrombocytopenias in order to spare the patient unnecessary treatments.

  15. [Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL)].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Chung; Hsiao, Cheng-Tsung; Soong, Bing-Wen; Lee, Yi-Chung

    2014-06-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is the most prevalent monogenic cerebral small vessel diseases caused by a mutation in the NOTCH3 gene. The clinical manifestations of CADASIL range from single or multiple lacunar infarcts, transient ischemic attacks, dementia, migraine with aura to psychiatric disorders. The features of brain MRI of CADASIL include multiple lacunar infarcts and diffuse leukoencephalopathy, which frequently involves external capsules and anterior temporal regions. Almost all patients with CADASIL harbor cysteine-involving mutations in NOTCH3. In Taiwan, two thirds of CADASIL patients carry NOTCH3 p.R544C mutations, and only approximately 56% of patients with CADASIL have leukoencephalopathy with anterior temporal regions involvement.

  16. Clinical Trials in Pediatric Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa A.

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary kidney disease and is associated with concerning long-term implications for kidney function and cardiovascular health. Early intervention is needed in order to mitigate these long-term complications. Herein, we review important findings from recent clinical trials in ADPKD and their relevance to affected children and young adults and consider future directions for intervention. Recent clinical trials support aggressive control of blood pressure with blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system as well as potential benefit of pravastatin therapy in children and young adults with ADPKD. There are several other candidate therapies, some of which have shown benefit in adult ADPKD, which require further investigation in affected children. PMID:28386535

  17. Frontonasal dysplasia: a family presenting autosomal dominant inheritance pattern.

    PubMed

    Koçak, H; Ceylaner, G

    2009-01-01

    Frontonasal dysplasia (FND, also called frontonasal dysostosis or median cleft face syndrome) includes a spectrum of abnormalities affecting the eyes, forehead and nose, and resulting from midfacial dysraphia. The clinical picture is highly variable, but major findings in FND include ocular hypertelorism, a broad nasal root, median cleft affecting nose or both the nose and upper lip, and widow's peak. It is usually a sporadic disorder, although a few familial cases have been reported. We report here a three-generation family with multiple affected members with frontonasal dysplasia. This observation suggests autosomal dominant inheritance. Furthermore, some of the features e.g. over-riding toes, nail changes, vertical crease on plantar region of the feet in the index patient were not reported up to now.

  18. Mitochondrial anomalies in a Swiss family with autosomal dominant myoglobinuria

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-du Pan, R.C.; Favre, H.; Junod, A.

    1997-04-14

    We report on a Swiss family in which 10 individuals of both sexes in 4 successive generations suffered from myoglobinuria, precipitated by febrile illness. It is the second family described with autosomal dominant inheritance of myoglobinuria. Four individuals suffered acute renal failure, which in two was reversible only after dialysis. In a recent case, a mitochondrial disorder was suspected because of an abnormal increase in lactate levels during an exercise test and because of a subsarcolemmal accumulation of mitochondria in a muscle biopsy, associated with a lack of cytochrome C oxidase in some muscle fibers. No mutation in the mitochondrial DNA was identified. Along with the inheritance pattern, these findings suggest that the myoglobinuria in this family is caused by a nuclear-encoded mutation affecting the respiratory chain. 22 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in Argentina.

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, D M; Martín, R S; Fraga, A; Virginillo, M; Kornblihtt, A R; Arrizurieta, E; Viribay, M; San Millán, J L; Herrera, M; Bernath, V

    1997-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is an inherited disorder with genetic heterogeneity. Up to three loci are involved in this disease, PKD1 on chromosome 16p13.3, PKD2 on 4q21, and a third locus of unknown location. Here we report the existence of locus heterogeneity for this disease in the Argentinian population by performing linkage analysis on 12 families of Caucasian origin. Eleven families showed linkage to PKD 1 and one family showed linkage to PKD2. Two recombinants in the latter family placed the locus PKD2 proximal to D4S1563, in agreement with data recently published on the cloning of this gene. Analysis of clinical data suggests a milder ADPKD phenotype for the PKD2 family. PMID:9350815

  20. [Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: is the treatment for tomorrow?].

    PubMed

    Cornec-Le Gall, Emilie; Le Meur, Yannick

    2014-11-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most frequent Mendelian inherited disorder. It covers 6.1% of incident ESRD patients in France in 2011. Long left untreated, this disease will soon benefit from targeted therapies currently under evaluation. Several molecules have already reached the stage of clinical trials: the evaluation of mTOR inhibitors yielded deceiving results and, more recently, 2 different molecules demonstrated a slight impact on the progression of total kidney volume (TKV): tolvaptan, vasopressin receptor-V2 inhibitor and somatostatin analogues; both of these molecules acting throughout the decrease of intracellular AMPc. The purpose of this review is to briefly describe the signaling pathways involved, then to present both the published and ongoing clinical trials and the promising molecules evaluated in murine models.

  1. Autosomal-Dominant Multiple Pterygium Syndrome Is Caused by Mutations in MYH3

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Jessica X.; Burrage, Lindsay C.; Beck, Anita E.; Marvin, Colby T.; McMillin, Margaret J.; Shively, Kathryn M.; Harrell, Tanya M.; Buckingham, Kati J.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Jain, Mahim; Alanay, Yasemin; Berry, Susan A.; Carey, John C.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lee, Brendan H.; Krakow, Deborah; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Anderson, Peter; Blue, Elizabeth Marchani; Annable, Marcus; Browning, Brian L.; Buckingham, Kati J.; Chen, Christina; Chin, Jennifer; Chong, Jessica X.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Davis, Colleen P.; Frazar, Christopher; Harrell, Tanya M.; He, Zongxiao; Jain, Preti; Jarvik, Gail P.; Jimenez, Guillaume; Johanson, Eric; Jun, Goo; Kircher, Martin; Kolar, Tom; Krauter, Stephanie A.; Krumm, Niklas; Leal, Suzanne M.; Luksic, Daniel; Marvin, Colby T.; McMillin, Margaret J.; McGee, Sean; O’Reilly, Patrick; Paeper, Bryan; Patterson, Karynne; Perez, Marcos; Phillips, Sam W.; Pijoan, Jessica; Poel, Christa; Reinier, Frederic; Robertson, Peggy D.; Santos-Cortez, Regie; Shaffer, Tristan; Shephard, Cindy; Shively, Kathryn M.; Siegel, Deborah L.; Smith, Joshua D.; Staples, Jeffrey C.; Tabor, Holly K.; Tackett, Monica; Underwood, Jason G.; Wegener, Marc; Wang, Gao; Wheeler, Marsha M.; Yi, Qian; Bamshad, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple pterygium syndrome (MPS) is a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare Mendelian conditions characterized by multiple pterygia, scoliosis, and congenital contractures of the limbs. MPS typically segregates as an autosomal-recessive disorder, but rare instances of autosomal-dominant transmission have been reported. Whereas several mutations causing recessive MPS have been identified, the genetic basis of dominant MPS remains unknown. We identified four families affected by dominantly transmitted MPS characterized by pterygia, camptodactyly of the hands, vertebral fusions, and scoliosis. Exome sequencing identified predicted protein-altering mutations in embryonic myosin heavy chain (MYH3) in three families. MYH3 mutations underlie distal arthrogryposis types 1, 2A, and 2B, but all mutations reported to date occur in the head and neck domains. In contrast, two of the mutations found to cause MPS in this study occurred in the tail domain. The phenotypic overlap among persons with MPS, coupled with physical findings distinct from other conditions caused by mutations in MYH3, suggests that the developmental mechanism underlying MPS differs from that of other conditions and/or that certain functions of embryonic myosin might be perturbed by disruption of specific residues and/or domains. Moreover, the vertebral fusions in persons with MPS, coupled with evidence of MYH3 expression in bone, suggest that embryonic myosin plays a role in skeletal development. PMID:25957469

  2. SPP2 Mutations Cause Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Chen, Xue; Xu, Qihua; Gao, Xiang; Tam, Pancy O. S.; Zhao, Kanxing; Zhang, Xiumei; Chen, Li Jia; Jia, Wenshuang; Zhao, Qingshun; Vollrath, Douglas; Pang, Chi Pui; Zhao, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) shows progressive loss of photoreceptors involved with heterogeneous genetic background. Here, by exome sequencing and linkage analysis on a Chinese family with autosomal dominant RP, we identified a putative pathogenic variant, p.Gly97Arg, in the gene SPP2, of which expression was detected in multiple tissues including retina. The p.Gly97Arg was absent in 800 ethnically matched chromosomes and 1400 in-house exome dataset, and was located in the first of the two highly conserved disulfide bonded loop of secreted phosphoprotein 2 (Spp-24) encoded by SPP2. Overexpression of p.Gly97Arg and another signal peptide mutation, p.Gly29Asp, caused cellular retention of both endogenous wild type and exogenous mutants in vitro, and primarily affected rod photoreceptors in zebrafish mimicking cardinal feature of RP. Taken together, our data indicate that the two mutations of SPP2 have dominant negative effects and cellular accumulation of Spp-24 might be particularly toxic to photoreceptors and/or retinal pigment epithelium. SPP2 has a new role in retinal degeneration. PMID:26459573

  3. Evidence for locus heterogeneity in human autosomal dominant split hand/split foot malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.E.; Wijsman, E.M.; Stephens, K.; Evans, J.P. ); Scherer, S.W.; Tsui, L.C. ); Kukolich, M. )

    1994-07-01

    Split hand/split foot (SHSF; also known as ectrodactyly) is a human developmental disorder characterized by missing central digits and other distal limb malformations. An association between SHSF and cytogenetically visible rearrangements of chromosome 7 at bands q21-q22 provides compelling evidence for the location of a causative gene at this location, and the locus has been designated SHFD1. In the present study, marker loci were localized to the SHFD1 critical region through the analysis of somatic cell hybrids derived from individuals with SHSF and cytogenetic abnormalities involving the 7q21-q22 region. Combined genetic and physical data suggest that the order of markers in the SHFD1 critical region is cen-D7S492-D7S527-(D7S479-D7S491)-SHFD1-D7S553-D7S518-qter. Dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms at three of these loci were used to test for linkage of SHSF to this region in a large pedigree that demonstrates autosomal dominant SHSF. Evidence against linkage of the SHSF gene to 7q21-q22 was obtained in this pedigree. Therefore, combined molecular and genetic data provide evidence for locus heterogeneity in autosomal dominant SHSF. The authors propose the name SHSF2 for this second locus. 34 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. [Related reproductive issues on male autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Cai, Hong-cai; Shang, Xue-jun; Huang, Yu-feng

    2015-11-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a most common inherited renal disease, about 50% with a family history, although the exact etiology not yet clear. To date, ADPKD, a multisystem disorder without effective preventive and therapeutic means, has been shown to be detrimental to human health. Recent studies show that severe oligoasthenozoospermia, necrospermia, immotile sperm, azoospermia, epididymal cyst, seminal vesicle cyst, and ejaculatory duct cyst found in male ADPKD patients may lead to male infertility, though the specific mechanisms remain unknown. Structural anomaly of spermatozoa, defect of polycystin, mutation of PKD genes, and micro-deletion of the AZF gene could be the reasons for the higher incidence of abnormal semen quality in male ADPKD patients. Assisted reproductive techniques can increase the chances of pregnancy, whereas the health of the offspring should be taken into consideration. This article presents an overview of reproductive issues concerning infertile male ADPKD patients from the perspective of the morbidity, pathophysiological mechanism, diagnosis, and management of the disease.

  5. [Clinical diagnosis of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease].

    PubMed

    Magistroni, Riccardo; Izzi, Claudia; Scolari, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common genetic disorder related to kidney. ADPKD is usually easy to diagnose in people who have a family history of ADPKDs developing typical symptoms, including flank, abdominal pain or macroscopic hematuria. In this setting, diagnosis in adults at risk for ADPKD is commonly performed by ultrasonography, which reveals two enlarged kidneys with multiple bilateral cysts. ADPKD may be more difficult to diagnose in the absence of family history or in subjects with atypical presentation, including asymmetric or focal renal imaging findings, discordant disease within family, early onset of ADPKD and development of ESRD before 30 yr of age. The presence of a total of three or more renal cysts for at-risk subjects aged 15-39 years and two cysts or more in each kidney for at-risk subjects aged 40-59 years are sufficient for the diagnosis of ADPKD. The absence of any renal cyst is sufficient for disease exclusion only for at-risk subjects aged 40 years or older. If the family history is negative, the diagnosis of ADPKD can be made in a patient with enlarged kidneys, numerous cysts, presence of liver cysts and absence of findings suggesting a different cystic disease. If the imaging diagnosis is not clear or showing atypical manifestations in subjects, molecular genetic testing should be performed.

  6. Repeat expansion and autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorders: consensus and controversy.

    PubMed

    Rudnicki, Dobrila D; Margolis, Russell L

    2003-08-22

    Repeat-expansion mutations cause 13 autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorders falling into three groups. Huntington's disease (HD), dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA), spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), and spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) types 1, 2, 3, 7 and 17 are each caused by a CAG repeat expansion that encodes polyglutamine. Convergent lines of evidence demonstrate that neurodegeneration in these diseases is a consequence of the neurotoxic effects of abnormally long stretches of glutamines. How polyglutamine induces neurodegeneration, and why neurodegeneration occurs in only select neuronal populations, remains a matter of intense investigation. SCA6 is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in CACNA1A, a gene that encodes a subunit of the P/Q-type calcium channel. The threshold length at which the repeat causes disease is much shorter than in the other polyglutamine diseases, and neurodegeneration may arise from expansion-induced change of function in the calcium channel. Huntington's disease-like 2 (HDL2) and SCAs 8, 10 and 12 are rare disorders in which the repeats (CAG, CTG or ATTCT) are not in protein-coding regions. Investigation into these diseases is still at an early stage, but it is now reasonable to hypothesise that the net effect of each expansion is to alter gene expression. The different pathogenic mechanisms in these three groups of diseases have important implications for the development of rational therapeutics.

  7. Cardiovascular abnormalities in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Ecder, Tevfik; Schrier, Robert W.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular problems are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Hypertension is a common early symptom of ADPKD, and occurs in approximately 60% of patients before renal function has become impaired. Hypertension is associated with an increased rate of progression to end-stage renal disease and is the most important potentially treatable variable in ADPKD. Left ventricular hypertrophy, which is a powerful, independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, also occurs frequently in patients with ADPKD. Both hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy have important roles in cardiovascular complications in these individuals. Moreover, biventricular diastolic dysfunction, endothelial dysfunction, increased carotid intima-media thickness, and impaired coronary flow velocity reserve are present even in young patients with ADPKD who have normal blood pressure and well-preserved renal function. These findings suggest that cardiovascular involvement starts very early in the course of ADPKD. Intracranial and extracranial aneurysms and cardiac valvular defects are other potential cardiovascular problems in patients with ADPKD. Early diagnosis and treatment of hypertension, with drugs that block the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, has the potential to decrease the cardiovascular complications and slow the progression of renal disease in ADPKD. PMID:19322187

  8. Autosomal dominant cyclic hematopoiesis: Genetics, phenotype, and natural history

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.E.; Stephens, K.; Dale, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant cyclic hematopoiesis (ADCH; cyclic neutropenia) is a rare disorder manifested by transient neutropenia that recurs every three weeks. To facilitate mapping the ADCH gene by genetic linkage analysis, we studied 9 ADCH families with 42 affected individuals. Pedigrees revealed AD inheritance with no evidence for decreased penetrance. Similar intra- and interfamilial variable expression was observed, with no evidence to support heterogeneity. At least 3 families displayed apparent new mutations. Many adults developed chronic neutropenia, while offspring always cycled during childhood. Children displayed recurrent oral ulcers, gingivitis, lymphadenopathy, fever, and skin and other infections with additional symptoms. Interestingly, there were no cases of neonatal infection. Some children required multiple hospitalizations for treatment. Four males under age 18 died of Clostridium sepsis following necrotizing enterocolitis; all had affected mothers. No other deaths due to ADCH were found; most had improvement of symptoms and infections as adults. Adults experienced increased tooth loss prior to age 30 (16 out of 27 adults, with 9 edentulous). No increase in myelodysplasia, malignancy, or congenital anomalies was observed. Recombinant G-CSF treatment resulted in dramatic improvement of symptoms and infections. The results suggest that ADCH is not a benign disorder, especially in childhood, and abdominal pain requires immediate evaluation. Diagnosis of ADCH requires serial blood counts in the proband and at least one CBC in relatives to exclude similar disorders. Genetic counseling requires specific histories as well as CBCs of each family member at risk to determine status regardless of symptom history, especially to assess apparent new mutations.

  9. [Infectious complications in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Pirson, Yves; Kanaan, Nada

    2015-04-01

    Despite advances in the management of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease over the past two decades, infection of liver and kidney cysts remains a serious and potentially threatening complication. Kidney cyst infection is the most frequent complication. It is differentiated from hemorrhage by the clinical presentation (mainly the severity and duration of fever), C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cells levels, and the density of the suspected cyst on computed tomography. Liver cyst infection occurs more frequently in patients with large cysts volumes. It can be life threatening and has a tendency to recur. In both infections, the best radiological imaging technique is positron emission tomography after intravenous injection of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose combined with computed tomography. Treatment with a fluoroquinolone should be continued for 6 weeks. Cyst aspiration is necessary only when cysts are very large and/or when infection is resistant to antibiotic treatment. In patients who are candidates to kidney transplantation, a history of recurrent kidney cyst infection justifies pre-transplant nephrectomy, while a past history of recurrent liver cyst infection or angiocholitis leads to consider liver transplantation. Among extrarenal and extrahepatic complications of polycystic disease, colic diverticulosis is reported to be associated with increased risk of infection in patients on hemodialysis and after kidney transplantation. However, this observation needs to be confirmed.

  10. Why kidneys fail in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Grantham, Jared J; Mulamalla, Sumanth; Swenson-Fields, Katherine I

    2011-08-23

    The weight of evidence gathered from studies in humans with hereditary polycystic kidney disease (PKD)1 and PKD2 disorders, as well as from experimental animal models, indicates that cysts are primarily responsible for the decline in glomerular filtration rate that occurs fairly late in the course of the disease. The processes underlying this decline include anatomic disruption of glomerular filtration and urinary concentration mechanisms on a massive scale, coupled with compression and obstruction by cysts of adjacent nephrons in the cortex, medulla and papilla. Cysts prevent the drainage of urine from upstream tributaries, which leads to tubule atrophy and loss of functioning kidney parenchyma by mechanisms similar to those found in ureteral obstruction. Cyst-derived chemokines, cytokines and growth factors result in a progression to fibrosis that is comparable with the development of other progressive end-stage renal diseases. Treatment of renal cystic disorders early enough to prevent or reduce cyst formation or slow cyst growth, before the secondary changes become widespread, is a reasonable strategy to prolong the useful function of kidneys in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

  11. Developments in the management of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Masoumi, Amirali; Reed-Gitomer, Berenice; Kelleher, Catherine; Bekheirnia, Mir Reza; Schrier, Robert W

    2008-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most frequent life- threatening, hereditary disease. ADPKD is more common than sickle cell anemia, cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy, hemophilia, Down’s syndrome, and Huntington’s disease combined. ADPKD is a multisystemic disorder characterized by the progressive development of renal cysts and marked renal enlargement. Structural and functional renal deterioration occurs in ADPKD patients and is the fourth leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in adults. Aside from the renal manifestations, extrarenal structural abnormalities, such as liver cysts, cardiovascular abnormalities, and intracranial aneurysms may lead to morbidity and mortality. Recent studies have identified prognostic factors for progressive renal impairment including gender, race, age, proteinuria, hematuria, hypertension and increased left ventricular mass index (LVMI). Early diagnosis and better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease provides the opportunity to aggressivly treat hypertension with renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors and thereby potentially reduce LVMI, prevent cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and slow progression of the renal disease. PMID:18728845

  12. Caffeine intake by patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Vendramini, L.C.; Nishiura, J.L.; Baxmann, A.C.; Heilberg, I.P.

    2012-01-01

    Because caffeine may induce cyst and kidney enlargement in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), we evaluated caffeine intake and renal volume using renal ultrasound in ADPKD patients. Caffeine intake was estimated by the average of 24-h dietary recalls obtained on 3 nonconsecutive days in 102 ADPKD patients (68 females, 34 males; 39 ± 12 years) and compared to that of 102 healthy volunteers (74 females, 28 males; 38 ± 14 years). The awareness of the need for caffeine restriction was assessed. Clinical and laboratory data were obtained from the medical records of the patients. Mean caffeine intake was significantly lower in ADPKD patients versus controls (86 vs 134 mg/day), and 63% of the ADPKD patients had been previously aware of caffeine restriction. Caffeine intake did not correlate with renal volume in ADPKD patients. There were no significant differences between the renal volumes of patients in the highest and lowest tertiles of caffeine consumption. Finally, age-adjusted multiple linear regression revealed that renal volume was associated with hypertension, chronic kidney disease stage 3 and the time since diagnosis, but not with caffeine intake. The present small cross-sectional study indicated a low level of caffeine consumption by ADPKD patients when compared to healthy volunteers, which was most likely due to prior awareness of the need for caffeine restriction. Within the range of caffeine intake observed by ADPKD patients in this study (0-471 mg/day), the renal volume was not directly associated with caffeine intake. PMID:22801417

  13. Genetics, phenotype, and natural history of autosomal dominant cyclic hematopoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.E. |; Dale, D.C.

    1996-12-30

    Cyclic hematopoiesis (CH, or cyclic neutropenia) is a rare disease manifested by transient severe neutropenia that recurs approximately every 21 days. The hematologic profile of families with the autosomal dominant form (ADCH) has not been well characterized, and it is unknown if the phenotype is distinct from the more common sporadic congenital or acquired forms of CH. We studied nine ADCH families whose children displayed typical CH blood patterns. Pedigrees confirmed dominant inheritance without evidence of heterogeneity or decreased penetrance; three pedigrees suggested new mutations. Families were Caucasian with exception of one with a Cherokee Native American founder. A wide spectrum of symptom severity, ranging from asymptomatic to life-threatening illness, was observed within families. The phenotype changed with age. Children displayed typical neutrophil cycles with symptoms of mucosal ulceration, lymphadenopathy, and infections. Adults often had fewer and milder symptoms, sometimes accompanied by mild chronic neutropenia without distinct cycles. While CH is commonly described as {open_quotes}benign{close_quotes}, four children in three of the nine families died of Clostridium or E. coli colitis, documenting the need for urgent evaluation of abdominal pain. Misdiagnosis with other neutropenias was common but can be avoided by serial blood counts in index cases. Genetic counseling requires specific histories and complete blood counts in relatives at risk to assess status regardless of symptoms, especially to determine individuals with new mutations. We propose diagnostic criteria for ADCH in affected children and adults. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment resulted in dramatic improvement of neutropenia and morbidity. The differential diagnosis from other forms of familial neutropenia is reviewed. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Evidence for locus heterogeneity in human autosomal dominant split hand/split foot malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.P.; Palmer, S.E.; Wijsman, E.M.

    1994-09-01

    Split hand/split foot (SHSF, also known as ectrodactyly) is a human developmental disorder characterized by absent central rays and other distal limb malformations. Physical mapping of SHSF-associated chromosomal rearrangements has provided compelling evidence for the location of a causative gene locus (designated SHFD1) on chromosome 7 within q21.3-q22.1. In the present study, marker loci were localized to the SHFD1 critical region through the analysis of somatic cell hybrids derived from individuals with SHSF and cytogenetic abnormalities involving the 7q21.3q22.1 region. Combined genetic and physical data suggest that the order of markers in the SHFD1 critical region is cen - D7S492 - COL1A2 - D7S527 - D7S479 - D7S491 - SHFD1 - D7S554 - ASNS - D7S518 -qter. Dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms at several of these loci were used to test for linkage of SHSF to this region in a large pedigree that demonstrated autosomal dominant inheritance of this disorder. Strong evidence against linkage of SHSF to the SHFD1 critical region was obtained, and the gene responsible for the SHSF phenotype in this pedigree was excluded from a 10 cM interval spanning the entire SHFD1 critical region. Evidence of exclusion to the SHFD1 critical region was also observed in five additional families. Thus, combined molecular and genetic data provide evidence for locus heterogeneity in autosomal dominant SHSF, implying that mutations in at least two separate autosomal genes can result in this distinctive human developmental disorder.

  15. Messenger RNA processing is altered in autosomal dominant leukodystrophy†

    PubMed Central

    Bartoletti-Stella, Anna; Gasparini, Laura; Giacomini, Caterina; Corrado, Patrizia; Terlizzi, Rossana; Giorgio, Elisa; Magini, Pamela; Seri, Marco; Baruzzi, Agostino; Parchi, Piero; Brusco, Alfredo; Cortelli, Pietro; Capellari, Sabina

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterized by autonomic dysfunction, followed by cerebellar and pyramidal features. ADLD is caused by duplication of the lamin B1 gene (LMNB1), which leads to its increased expression. The molecular pathways involved in the disease are still poorly understood. Hence, we analyzed global gene expression in fibroblasts and whole blood of LMNB1 duplication carriers and used Gene Set Enrichment Analysis to explore their gene signatures. We found that LMNB1 duplication is associated with dysregulation of genes involved in the immune system, neuronal and skeletal development. Genes with an altered transcriptional profile clustered in specific genomic regions. Among the dysregulated genes, we further studied the role of RAVER2, which we found to be overexpressed at mRNA and protein level. RAVER2 encodes a putative trans regulator of the splicing repressor polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB) and is likely implicated in alternative splicing regulation. Functional studies demonstrated an abnormal splicing pattern of several PTB-target genes and of the myelin protein gene PLP1, previously demonstrated to be involved in ADLD. Mutant mice with different lamin B1 expression levels confirmed that Raver2 expression is dependent on lamin B1 in neural tissue and determines an altered splicing pattern of PTB-target genes and Plp1. Overall our results demonstrate that deregulation of lamin B1 expression induces modified splicing of several genes, likely driven by raver-2 overexpression, and suggest that an alteration of mRNA processing could be a pathogenic mechanism in ADLD. PMID:25637521

  16. Multigenerational autosomal dominant inheritance of 5p chromosomal deletions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Willing, Marcia; Grange, Dorothy K; Shinawi, Marwan; Manwaring, Linda; Vineyard, Marisa; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Cottrell, Catherine E

    2016-03-01

    Deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5 (5p-) is associated with phenotypic features including a cat-like cry in infancy, dysmorphic facial features, microcephaly, and intellectual disability, and when encompassing a minimal critical region, may be defined as Cri-du-Chat syndrome (CdCS). Most 5p deletions are de novo in origin, and familial cases are often associated with translocation and inversion. Herein, we report three multigenerational families carrying 5p terminal deletions of different size transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner causing variable clinical findings. Terminal 5p deletions and the mode of inheritance were clinically characterized and molecularly analyzed by a combination of microarray and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses. Shared phenotypic features documented in this cohort included neuropsychiatric findings, poor growth, and dysmorphic facial features. This study supports newly recognized effects of aberrant SEMA5A and CTNND2 dosage on severity of autistic and cognitive phenotypes. Comparative analysis of the breakpoints narrows the critical region for the cat-like cry down to an interval less than 1 Mb encompassing a candidate gene ICE1, which regulates small nuclear RNA transcription. This study also indicates that familial terminal 5p deletion is a rare presentation displaying intra- and inter-familial phenotypic variability, the latter of which may be attributed to size and gene content of the deletion. The observed intra-familial phenotypic heterogeneity suggests that additional modifying elements including genetic and environmental factors may have an impact on the clinical manifestations observed in 5p deletion carriers, and in time, further high resolution studies of 5p deletion breakpoints will continue to aid in defining genotype-phenotype correlations.

  17. Heterozygous Reelin Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Lateral Temporal Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Dazzo, Emanuela; Fanciulli, Manuela; Serioli, Elena; Minervini, Giovanni; Pulitano, Patrizia; Binelli, Simona; Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Luisi, Concetta; Pasini, Elena; Striano, Salvatore; Striano, Pasquale; Coppola, Giangennaro; Chiavegato, Angela; Radovic, Slobodanka; Spadotto, Alessandro; Uzzau, Sergio; La Neve, Angela; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Mecarelli, Oriano; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.; Ottman, Ruth; Michelucci, Roberto; Nobile, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) is a genetic epilepsy syndrome clinically characterized by focal seizures with prominent auditory symptoms. ADLTE is genetically heterogeneous, and mutations in LGI1 account for fewer than 50% of affected families. Here, we report the identification of causal mutations in reelin (RELN) in seven ADLTE-affected families without LGI1 mutations. We initially investigated 13 ADLTE-affected families by performing SNP-array linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing and identified three heterozygous missense mutations co-segregating with the syndrome. Subsequent analysis of 15 small ADLTE-affected families revealed four additional missense mutations. 3D modeling predicted that all mutations have structural effects on protein-domain folding. Overall, RELN mutations occurred in 7/40 (17.5%) ADLTE-affected families. RELN encodes a secreted protein, Reelin, which has important functions in both the developing and adult brain and is also found in the blood serum. We show that ADLTE-related mutations significantly decrease serum levels of Reelin, suggesting an inhibitory effect of mutations on protein secretion. We also show that Reelin and LGI1 co-localize in a subset of rat brain neurons, supporting an involvement of both proteins in a common molecular pathway underlying ADLTE. Homozygous RELN mutations are known to cause lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia. Our findings extend the spectrum of neurological disorders associated with RELN mutations and establish a link between RELN and LGI1, which play key regulatory roles in both the developing and adult brain. PMID:26046367

  18. Autosomal Dominant Hypocalcemia (Hypoparathyroidism) Types 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Roszko, Kelly L.; Bi, Ruiye D.; Mannstadt, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular calcium is essential for life and its concentration in the blood is maintained within a narrow range. This is achieved by a feedback loop that receives input from the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR), expressed on the surface of parathyroid cells. In response to low ionized calcium, the parathyroids increase secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) which increases serum calcium. The CASR is also highly expressed in the kidneys, where it regulates the reabsorption of calcium from the primary filtrate. Autosomal dominant hypocalcemia (ADH) type 1 is caused by heterozygous activating mutations in the CASR which increase the sensitivity of the CASR to extracellular ionized calcium. Consequently, PTH synthesis and secretion are suppressed at normal ionized calcium concentrations. Patients present with hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, low magnesium levels, and low or low-normal levels of PTH. Urinary calcium excretion is typically increased due to the decrease in circulating PTH concentrations and by the activation of the renal tubular CASR. Therapeutic attempts using CASR antagonists (calcilytics) to treat ADH are currently under investigation. Recently, heterozygous mutations in the alpha subunit of the G protein G11 (Gα11) have been identified in patients with ADH, and this has been classified as ADH type 2. ADH2 mutations lead to a gain-of-function of Gα11, a key mediator of CASR signaling. Therefore, the mechanism of hypocalcemia appears similar to that of activating mutations in the CASR, namely an increase in the sensitivity of parathyroid cells to extracellular ionized calcium. Studies of activating mutations in the CASR and gain-of-function mutations in Gα11 can help define new drug targets and improve medical management of patients with ADH types 1 and 2. PMID:27803672

  19. Blood Pressure in Early Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schrier, Robert W.; Abebe, Kaleab Z.; Perrone, Ronald D.; Torres, Vicente E.; Braun, William E.; Steinman, Theodore I.; Winklhofer, Franz T.; Brosnahan, Godela; Czarnecki, Peter G.; Hogan, Marie C.; Miskulin, Dana C.; Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic F.; Grantham, Jared J.; Harris, Peter C.; Flessner, Michael F.; Bae, Kyongtae T.; Moore, Charity G.; Chapman, Arlene B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hypertension is common in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and is associated with increased total kidney volume, activation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system, and progression of kidney disease. METHODS In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 558 hypertensive participants with ADPKD (15 to 49 years of age, with an estimated glomerular filtration rate [GFR] >60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 of body-surface area) to either a standard blood-pressure target (120/70 to 130/80 mm Hg) or a low blood-pressure target (95/60 to 110/75 mm Hg) and to either an angiotensin-converting–enzyme inhibitor (lisinopril) plus an angiotensin-receptor blocker (telmisartan) or lisinopril plus placebo. The primary outcome was the annual percentage change in the total kidney volume. RESULTS The annual percentage increase in total kidney volume was significantly lower in the low-blood-pressure group than in the standard-blood-pressure group (5.6% vs. 6.6%, P = 0.006), without significant differences between the lisinopril–telmisartan group and the lisinopril–placebo group. The rate of change in estimated GFR was similar in the two medication groups, with a negative slope difference in the short term in the low-blood-pressure group as compared with the standard-blood-pressure group (P<0.001) and a marginally positive slope difference in the long term (P = 0.05). The left-ventricular-mass index decreased more in the low-blood-pressure group than in the standard-blood-pressure group (−1.17 vs. −0.57 g per square meter per year, P<0.001); urinary albumin excretion was reduced by 3.77% with the low-pressure target and increased by 2.43% with the standard target (P<0.001). Dizziness and light-headedness were more common in the low-blood-pressure group than in the standard-blood-pressure group (80.7% vs. 69.4%, P = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS In early ADPKD, the combination of lisinopril and telmisartan did not significantly

  20. Angiotensin Blockade in Late Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Vicente E.; Abebe, Kaleab Z.; Chapman, Arlene B.; Schrier, Robert W.; Braun, William E.; Steinman, Theodore I.; Winklhofer, Franz T.; Brosnahan, Godela; Czarnecki, Peter G.; Hogan, Marie C.; Miskulin, Dana C.; Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic F.; Grantham, Jared J.; Harris, Peter C.; Flessner, Michael F.; Moore, Charity G.; Perrone, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hypertension develops early in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and is associated with disease progression. The renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS) is implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension in patients with ADPKD. Dual blockade of the RAAS may circumvent compensatory mechanisms that limit the efficacy of monotherapy with an angiotensin-converting–enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or angiotensin II–receptor blocker (ARB). METHODS In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 486 patients, 18 to 64 years of age, with ADPKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate [GFR], 25 to 60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 of body-surface area) to receive an ACE inhibitor (lisinopril) and placebo or lisinopril and an ARB (telmisartan), with the doses adjusted to achieve a blood pressure of 110/70 to 130/80 mm Hg. The composite primary outcome was the time to death, end-stage renal disease, or a 50% reduction from the baseline estimated GFR. Secondary outcomes included the rates of change in urinary aldosterone and albumin excretion, frequency of hospitalizations for any cause and for cardiovascular causes, incidence of pain, frequency of ADPKD-related symptoms, quality of life, and adverse study-medication effects. Patients were followed for 5 to 8 years. RESULTS There was no significant difference between the study groups in the incidence of the composite primary outcome (hazard ratio with lisinopril–telmisartan, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 0.82 to 1.42). The two treatments controlled blood pressure and lowered urinary aldosterone excretion similarly. The rates of decline in the estimated GFR, urinary albumin excretion, and other secondary outcomes and adverse events, including hyperkalemia and acute kidney injury, were also similar in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS Monotherapy with an ACE inhibitor was associated with blood-pressure control in most patients with ADPKD and stage 3 chronic kidney disease

  1. Bilateral Nephrectomy for Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease and Timing of Kidney Transplant: A Review of the Technical Advances in Surgical Management of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Disease.

    PubMed

    Dengu, Fungai; Azhar, Bilal; Patel, Shaneel; Hakim, Nadey

    2015-06-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic disease is a multisystem inherited condition affecting the kidneys and is an important cause of end-stage renal disease. Patients with autosomal dominant polycystic disease experience symptoms related to size and cystic nature of their kidneys, which can be difficult to manage. Traditionally, the only surgical option for management was open bilateral/unilateral native nephrectomy, which carried with it significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, it was deemed unsafe and rarely performed. However, surgery for autosomal dominant polycystic disease has evolved rapidly with the advent of minimally invasive surgery and improved medical management of end-stage renal failure patients. Laparoscopic and hand-assisted laparoscopic techniques have been adopted and have demonstrated reduced morbidity. The timing of this intervention in relation to transplant is controversial and presents a major challenge in managing this patient population.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions CADASIL cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy ...

  3. Renal relevant radiology: radiologic imaging in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic; Mittal, Ankush; Mittal, Pardeep; Chapman, Arlene

    2014-02-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease is a systemic disorder and the most common hereditary renal disease, which is characterized by cyst growth, progressive renal enlargement, and development of renal failure. The cystic nature of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and its renal and extrarenal complications (kidney stones, cyst hemorrhage, intracerebral aneurysm, liver cysts, cardiac valve abnormalities, etc.) give radiologic imaging studies a central role in the management of these patients. This article reviews the indications, comparative use, and limitation of various imaging modalities (ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, computerized tomography scan, Positron emission tomography scan, and renal scintigraphy) for the diagnosis and management of complications in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Finally, this work provides evidence for the value of total kidney volume to predict disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

  4. Renin-Angiotensin-aldosterone system in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Tkachenko, Oleksandra; Helal, Imed; Shchekochikhin, Dmitry; Schrier, Robert W

    2013-02-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is the most frequent life-threatening hereditary disease. Prognostic factors for progressive renal impairment have been identified such as gender, race, age, proteinuria, hematuria, hypertension. Hypertension is the only risk factor for renal dysfunction in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, which is presently treatable. Better understanding of the pathophysiology of hypertension will help in defining appropriate interventions. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system is the pivotal factor in the pathogenesis of hypertension in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Basic research and clinical studies in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease implicated activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system. Therapy of hypertension in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blocker has the potential to prevent cardiovascular complications and slow the progression of renal disease. The results of two large multicenter double-blind placebo controlled randomized clinical trials (the HALT-PKD trials) possibly will elucidate the beneficial effects of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system inhibition in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

  5. A gene for autosomal dominant congenital nystagmus localizes to 6p12

    SciTech Connect

    Kerrison, J.B.; Arnould, V.J.; Koenekoop, R.K.

    1996-05-01

    Congenital nystagmus is an idiopathic disorder characterized by bilateral ocular oscillations usually manifest during infancy. Vision is typically decreased due to slippage of images across the fovea. As such, visual acuity correlates with nystagmus intensity, which is the amplitude and frequency of eye movements at a given position of gaze. X-linked, autosomal dominant, and autosomal recessive pedigrees have been described, but no mapping studies have been published. We recently described a large pedigree with autosomal dominant congenital nystagmus. A genome-wide search resulted in six markers on 6p linked by two-point analysis at {theta} = 0 (D6S459, D6S452, D6S465, FTHP1, D6S257, D6S430). Haplotype analysis localizes the gene for autosomal dominant congenital motor mystagmus to an 18-cM region between D6S271 and D6S455. 16 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. A de novo mutation of the MYH7 gene in a large Chinese family with autosomal dominant myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Tetsuya; Xiong, Hui; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Wang, Shuo; Satake, Wataru; Jiao, Hui; Yang, Yanling; Cha, Pei-Chieng; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Nishino, Ichizo; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Wu, Xiru; Toda, Tatsushi

    2015-01-01

    Laing distal myopathy (LDM) is an autosomal dominant myopathy that is caused by mutations in the slow/beta cardiac myosin heavy-chain (MYH7) gene. It has been recently reported that LDM presents with a wide range of clinical manifestations. We herein report a large Chinese family with autosomal dominant myopathy. The affected individuals in the family presented with foot drop in early childhood, along with progressive distal and proximal limb weakness. Their characteristic symptoms include scapular winging and scoliosis in the early disease phase and impairment of ambulation in the advanced phase. Although limb-girdle muscle dystrophy (LGMD) was suspected initially, a definite diagnosis could not be reached. As such, we performed linkage analysis and detected four linkage regions, namely 1q23.2-24.1, 14q11.2-12, 15q26.2-26.3 and 17q24.3. Through subsequent whole exome sequencing, we found a de novo p.K1617del causative mutation in the MYH7 gene and diagnosed the disease as LDM. This is the first LDM case in China. Our patients have severe clinical manifestations that mimic LGMD in comparison with the patients with the same mutation reported elsewhere. PMID:27081534

  7. High serum soluble α-Klotho levels in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Sari, Funda; Inci, Ayca; Dolu, Suleyman; Ellidag, Hamit Yasar; Cetinkaya, Ramazan; Ersoy, Fettah Fevzi

    2017-02-01

    This study aims to determine fibroblast growth factor-23 and soluble α-Klotho levels in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. A total of 76 patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and 32 healthy volunteers were included in the study. Serum fibroblast growth factor-23 and soluble α-Klotho levels were measured with ELISA kits. Parathyroid hormone, phosphate, calcium, creatinine, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels, urinary protein to creatinine ratio and estimated glomerular filtration rate were also measured or calculated. Patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease had significantly higher serum parathyroid hormone (p<0.001), fibroblast growth factor-23 (p<0.001), soluble α-Klotho levels (p=0.001) and lower serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels (p<0.001) as compared with healthy volunteers. Serum fibroblast growth factor-23, soluble α-Klotho and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels were similar in all five chronic kidney disease stages of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (p>0.05). Fibroblast growth factor-23 (r=-0.251, p=0.034) and soluble α-Klotho levels (r=-0.251, p=0.034) were found to be negatively correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate. This study shows increased fibroblast growth factor-23 levels in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease which is in harmony with the general trend in patients with chronic kidney disease of other aetiologies, but, unlike them, also a significant increase in serum soluble α-Klotho levels in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease suggesting an aberrant production or a decreased clearance of α-Klotho molecule. Considering the unique increases in erythropoietin levels due to erythropoietin production in renal cysts, we assume, patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease may potentially have different soluble α-Klotho production/clearance characteristics than the patients with other parenchymal renal diseases.

  8. [Treatment of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) - Tolvaptan].

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The European Medicines Agency approved tolvaptan to slow cyst growth and renal failure progression in adults with ADPKD, glomerular filtration 60 mL/min x 1.73 m2 and rapidly progressive disease. In a multicenter 3-year study, conducted on 1,445 patients with non-genotyped ADPKD, ages 18-50 years, predicted creatinine clearance 60 mL/min and kidney total volume 750 mL, tolvaptan slowed kidney failure progression (-23%-46% for different objectives) and reduced kidney volume increase and pain without effects on hypertension and albuminuria.Tolvaptan induced reversible idiosyncratic hepatopathy in 4% of patients (1% in placebo). Tolvaptan antagonizes ADH effects, reduces cyclic-AMP generation in distal nephron, and induces water diuresis. It has high protein-binding and 8-hour half-life. Dosage is 60-120 mg/day in two different doses (for instance 45/15 or 60/30 mg). Treatment starts using lower dose and continues with cautious up-titolation. Data are insufficient for severe hepatopathy or nephropathy. There is no antidote against overdose. Dialysis should not remove tolvaptan. Aquaretic effects require high fluid intake to prevent dehydration. Treatment should be reduced or suspended in case of inadequate fluid intake or dehydration. Weight, natremia and plasma osmolality can inform on dehydration risks. Efficacy is not yet investigated on end-stage renal disease, non-renal ADPKD-related disorders, and mortality.

  9. A genome-wide search for genes predisposing to manic-depression, assuming autosomal dominant inheritance

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, H.; Jensen, S.; Hoff, M.; Holik, J.; Plaetke, R.; Reimherr, F.; Wender, P.; Leppert, M.; Byerley, W. )

    1993-06-01

    Manic-depressive illness (MDI), also known as [open quotes]bipolar affective disorder[close quotes], is a common and devastating neuropsychiatric illness. Although pivotal biochemical alterations underlying the disease are unknown, results of family, twin, and adoption studies consistently implicate genetic transmission in the pathogenesis of MDI. In order to carry out linkage analysis, the authors ascertained eight moderately sized pedigrees containing multiple cases of the disease. For a four-allele marker mapping at 5 cM from the disease gene, the pedigree sample has >97% power to detect a dominant allele under genetic homogeneity and has >73% power under 20% heterogeneity. To date, the eight pedigrees have been genotyped with 328 polymorphic DNA loci throughout the genome. When autosomal dominant inheritance was assumed, 273 DNA markers gave lod scores <[minus]2.0 at [theta] = .05, and 4 DNA marker loci yielded lod scores >1 (chromosome 5 -- D5S39, D5S43, and D5S62; chromosome 11 -- D11S85). Of the markers giving lod scores >1, only D5S62 continued to show evidence for linkage when the affected-pedigree-member method was used. The D5S62 locus maps to distal 5q, a region containing neurotransmitter-receptor genes for dopamine, norepinephrine, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid. Although additional work in this region may be warranted, the linkage results should be interpreted as preliminary data, as 68 unaffected individuals are not past the age of risk. 72 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. Autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia: Tight linkage to chromosome 15q

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.K.; Wu, C.B.; Jones, S.M.; Lesicki, A.; Reinglass, T.; Sharp, G.B.; Lange, B.M.; Varvil, T.; Otterud, B.; Leppert, M.

    1995-01-01

    Autosomal dominant, uncomplicated familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by insidiously progressive lower-extremity spasticity. Recently, a locus on chromosome 14q was shown to be tightly linked with the disorder in one of three families. We performed linkage analysis in a kindred with autosomal dominant uncomplicated FSP. After excluding the chromosome 14q locus, we observed tight linkage of the disorder to a group of markers on chromosome 15q (maximum two-point lod score 9.70; {theta} = .05). Our results clearly establish the existence of a locus for autosomal dominant FSP in the centromeric region of chromosome 15q. Comparing clinical and genetic features in FSP families linked to chromosome 14q with those linked to chromosome 15q may provide insight into the pathophysiology of this disorder. 34 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Genetics advances in autosomal dominant focal epilepsies: focus on DEPDC5.

    PubMed

    Baulac, Stéphanie

    2014-01-01

    Rare multiplex families with autosomal dominant focal epilepsies have been described with specific age-related and electroclinical syndromes: autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE), familial temporal lobe epilepsy (FTLE), and familial focal epilepsy with variable foci (FFEVF). Molecular genetic advances in inherited focal epilepsies have pinpointed their genetic heterogeneity and the fact that they are mediated by different biological pathways: ion channel subunit genes have been linked to ADNFLE (CHRNA4, CHRNA2, CHRNB2, and KCNT1, encoding, respectively, the α4, α2, and β2 subunits of the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, and a potassium channel subunit); neuronal secreted protein (LGI1-encoding epitempin) has been linked to autosomal dominant epilepsy with auditory features; and mTORC1-repressor DEPDC5 (DEP domain-containing protein 5) gene has recently been reported in a broad spectrum of inherited focal epilepsies (ADNFLE, FTLE, FFEVF). This chapter focuses on DEPDC5, a newly identified gene.

  12. Evidence of autosomal dominant mutations in childhood-onset proximal spinal muscular atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Rudnik-Schoeneborn, S.; Wirth, B.; Zerres, K. )

    1994-07-01

    Autosomal recessive and dominant inheritance of proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) are well documented. Several genetic studies found a significant deviation from the assumption of recessive inheritance in SMA, with affected children in one generation. The existence of new autosomal dominant mutations has been assumed as the most suitable explanation, which is supported by three observations of this study: (1) The segregation ratio calculated in 333 families showed a significant deviation from autosomal recessive inheritance in the milder forms of SMA (= .09[+-].06 for onset at 10-36 mo and .13[+-].07 for onset at >36 mo; and P = .09[+-]0.7 for SMA IIIa and .12[+-].07 for SMA IIIb). (2) Three families with affected subjects in two generations are reported, in whom the disease could have started as an autosomal dominant mutation. (3) Linkage studies with chromosome 5q markers showed that in 5 (5.4%) of 93 informative families the patient shared identical haplotypes with at least one healthy sib. Other mechanisms, such as the existence of phenocopies, pseudodominance, or a second autosomal recessive gene locus, cannot be excluded in single families. The postulation of spontaneous mutations, however, is a suitable explanation for all three observations. Estimated risk figures for genetic counseling are given. 29 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Autosomal dominant epidermodysplasia verruciformis lacking a known EVER1 or EVER2 mutation.

    PubMed

    McDermott, David F; Gammon, Bryan; Snijders, Peter J; Mbata, Ihunanya; Phifer, Beth; Howland Hartley, A; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Murphy, Philip M; Hwang, Sam T

    2009-01-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis is a rare genodermatosis characterized by abnormal susceptibility to infection with specific human papillomavirus serotypes. Epidermodysplasia verruciformis is a genetically heterogeneous disease, and autosomal recessive and X-linked inheritance patterns have been reported. Nonsense mutations in the genes EVER1 and EVER2 have been identified in over 75% of cases. We present epidermodysplasia verruciformis in a father and a son with typical histologic and clinical findings that occur in the absence of mutations in EVER1 or EVER2. Epidermodysplasia verruciformis in this father/son pair in a nonconsanguinous pedigree is consistent with autosomal dominant inheritance. This is the first report of autosomal dominant transmission of epidermodysplasia verruciformis, providing further evidence of the genetic heterogeneity of epidermodysplasia verruciformis.

  14. Evaluation and Management of Pain in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Marie C.; Norby, Suzanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Transient episodes of pain are common in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). A small fraction of patients have disabling chronic pain. In this review, we discuss the etiologies of pain in ADPKD; review how ADPKD patients should be assessed; and discuss medical, surgical, and other management options. PMID:20439087

  15. Familial Paroxysmal Exercise-Induced Dystonia: Atypical Presentation of Autosomal Dominant GTP-Cyclohydrolase 1 Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Russell C.; Melchers, Anna; Fung, Victor S. C.; Grattan-Smith, Padraic; Houlden, Henry; Earl, John

    2010-01-01

    Paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia (PED) is one of the rarer forms of paroxysmal dyskinesia, and can occur in sporadic or familial forms. We report a family (male index case, mother and maternal grandfather) with autosomal dominant inheritance of paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia. The dystonia began in childhood and was only ever induced…

  16. Multiple thoracic paraspinal meningeal cysts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Coche, Emmanuel; Persu, Alexandre; Cosnard, Guy; Quoidbach, Albert; Pirson, Yves

    2003-02-01

    Spinal meningeal cysts have been reported in 3 patients as an extrarenal manifestation of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The authors report on a fourth patient with ADPKD who was found to harbor 7 thoracic meningeal cysts, appearing as paraspinal masses on plain films. The authors provide a comprehensive radiologic description of this abnormality.

  17. Recurrent Cholangitis in a Patient with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) and Caroli's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Eiko; Sawa, Naoki; Hoshino, Junichi; Suwabe, Tatsuya; Hayami, Noriko; Yamanouchi, Masayuki; Sekine, Akinari; Hiramatsu, Rikako; Imafuku, Aya; Kawada, Masahiro; Ubara, Yoshifumi; Imamura, Tsunao; Takaichi, Kenmei

    We herein present a rare case of an autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patient with Caroli's disease, a congenital embryonic biliary tree ductal plate abnormality often associated with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. A 76-year-old woman with ADPKD on hemodialysis was admitted to our hospital with recurrent cholangitis and hepatobiliary stones. Caroli's disease was diagnosed according to typical imaging findings of cystic intrahepatic bile duct dilatation and the central dot sign. Hepatobiliary system abnormalities such as Caroli's disease should be considered in febrile ADPKD patients, even in the absence of typical clinical signs or symptoms.

  18. A new locus for autosomal dominant stargardt-like disease maps to chromosome 4.

    PubMed Central

    Kniazeva, M; Chiang, M F; Morgan, B; Anduze, A L; Zack, D J; Han, M; Zhang, K

    1999-01-01

    Stargardt disease (STGD) is the most common hereditary macular dystrophy and is characterized by decreased central vision, atrophy of the macula and underlying retinal-pigment epithelium, and frequent presence of prominent flecks in the posterior pole of the retina. STGD is most commonly inherited as an autosomal recessive trait, but many families have been described in which features of the disease are transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner. A recessive locus has been identified on chromosome 1p (STGD1), and dominant loci have been mapped to both chromosome 13q (STGD2) and chromosome 6q (STGD3). In this study, we describe a kindred with an autosomal dominant Stargardt-like phenotype. A genomewide search demonstrated linkage to a locus on chromosome 4p, with a maximum LOD score of 5.12 at a recombination fraction of.00, for marker D4S403. Analysis of extended haplotypes localized the disease gene to an approximately 12-cM interval between loci D4S1582 and D4S2397. Therefore, this kindred establishes a new dominant Stargardt-like locus, STGD4. PMID:10205271

  19. Imaging characteristics of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL)

    PubMed Central

    Stojanov, Dragan; Aracki-Trenkic, Aleksandra; Vojinovic, Slobodan; Ljubisavljevic, Srdjan; Benedeto-Stojanov, Daniela; Tasic, Aleksandar; Vujnovic, Sasa

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is an autosomal dominant vascular disorder. Diagnosis and follow-up in patients with CADASIL are based mainly on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI shows white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), lacunar infarcts and cerebral microbleeds (CMBs). WMHs lesions tend to be symmetrical and bilateral, distributed in the periventricular and deep white matter. The anterior temporal lobe and external capsules are predilection sites for WMHs, with higher specificity and sensitivity of anterior temporal lobe involvement compared to an external capsule involvement. Lacunar infarcts are presented by an imaging signal that has intensity of cerebrospinal fluid in all MRI sequences. They are localized within the semioval center, thalamus, basal ganglia and pons. CMBs are depicted as focal areas of signal loss on T2 images which increases in size on the T2*-weighted gradient echo planar images (“blooming effect”). PMID:25725137

  20. Molecular Pathways and Therapies in Autosomal-Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Saigusa, Takamitsu

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most prevalent inherited renal disease, characterized by multiple cysts that can eventually lead to kidney failure. Studies investigating the role of primary cilia and polycystins have significantly advanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of PKD. This review will present clinical and basic aspects of ADPKD, review current concepts of PKD pathogenesis, evaluate potential therapeutic targets, and highlight challenges for future clinical studies. PMID:25933820

  1. The KBG syndrome: confirmation of autosomal dominant inheritance and further delineation of the phenotype.

    PubMed

    Tekin, Mustafa; Kavaz, Asli; Berberoğlu, Merih; Fitoz, Suat; Ekim, Mesiha; Ocal, Gönül; Akar, Nejat

    2004-10-15

    We report on a Turkish family in which the father and his two sons were diagnosed as having the KBG syndrome. Large upper central incisors were the diagnostic finding in all three patients along with mental retardation, cryptorchidism, skeletal abnormalities, and short stature. Our report clearly confirms that the inheritance is autosomal dominant in KBG syndrome, although a high male to female ratio has been observed in published cases.

  2. Progressive Cone Dysfunction and Geographic Atrophy of the Macula in Late Stage Autosomal Dominant Vitreoretinochoroidopathy (ADVIRC).

    PubMed

    Chen, Connie June; Goldberg, Morton F

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy (ADVIRC) is a rare inherited ocular disease associated with distinct mutations in the BEST1 gene. Typically, patients have only mild visual impairment, and rarely do patients have moderate or severe visual impairment, often as a result of vitreous hemorrhage. We now describe progressive central macular atrophy and cone dysfunction leading to visual loss in an elderly ADVIRC patient 33 years after initial presentation.

  3. Autosomal-dominant nystagmus, foveal hypoplasia and presenile cataract associated with a novel PAX6 mutation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Shery; Thomas, Mervyn G; Andrews, Caroline; Chan, Wai-Man; Proudlock, Frank A; McLean, Rebecca J; Pradeep, Archana; Engle, Elizabeth C; Gottlob, Irene

    2014-03-01

    Autosomal-dominant idiopathic infantile nystagmus has been linked to 6p12 (OMIM 164100), 7p11.2 (OMIM 608345) and 13q31-q33 (OMIM 193003). PAX6 (11p13, OMIM 607108) mutations can also cause autosomal-dominant nystagmus, typically in association with aniridia or iris hypoplasia. We studied a large multigenerational white British family with autosomal-dominant nystagmus, normal irides and presenile cataracts. An SNP-based genome-wide analysis revealed a linkage to a 13.4-MB region on chromosome 11p13 with a maximum lod score of 2.93. A mutation analysis of the entire coding region and splice junctions of the PAX6 gene revealed a novel heterozygous missense mutation (c.227C>G) that segregated with the phenotype and is predicted to result in the amino-acid substitution of proline by arginine at codon 76 p.(P76R). The amino-acid variation p.(P76R) within the paired box domain is likely to destabilise the protein due to steric hindrance as a result of the introduction of a polar and larger amino acid. Eye movement recordings showed a significant intrafamilial variability of horizontal, vertical and torsional nystagmus. High-resolution in vivo imaging of the retina using optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed features of foveal hypoplasia, including rudimentary foveal pit, incursion of inner retinal layers, short photoreceptor outer segments and optic nerve hypoplasia. Thus, this study presents a family that segregates a PAX6 mutation with nystagmus and foveal hypoplasia in the absence of iris abnormalities. Moreover, it is the first study showing detailed characteristics using eye movement recordings of autosomal-dominant nystagmus in a multigenerational family with a novel PAX6 mutation.

  4. Molecular pathways and therapies in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Saigusa, Takamitsu; Bell, P Darwin

    2015-05-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most prevalent inherited renal disease, characterized by multiple cysts that can eventually lead to kidney failure. Studies investigating the role of primary cilia and polycystins have significantly advanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of PKD. This review will present clinical and basic aspects of ADPKD, review current concepts of PKD pathogenesis, evaluate potential therapeutic targets, and highlight challenges for future clinical studies.

  5. Autosomal-dominant nystagmus, foveal hypoplasia and presenile cataract associated with a novel PAX6 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Shery; Thomas, Mervyn G; Andrews, Caroline; Chan, Wai-Man; Proudlock, Frank A; McLean, Rebecca J; Pradeep, Archana; Engle, Elizabeth C; Gottlob, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant idiopathic infantile nystagmus has been linked to 6p12 (OMIM 164100), 7p11.2 (OMIM 608345) and 13q31-q33 (OMIM 193003). PAX6 (11p13, OMIM 607108) mutations can also cause autosomal-dominant nystagmus, typically in association with aniridia or iris hypoplasia. We studied a large multigenerational white British family with autosomal-dominant nystagmus, normal irides and presenile cataracts. An SNP-based genome-wide analysis revealed a linkage to a 13.4-MB region on chromosome 11p13 with a maximum lod score of 2.93. A mutation analysis of the entire coding region and splice junctions of the PAX6 gene revealed a novel heterozygous missense mutation (c.227C>G) that segregated with the phenotype and is predicted to result in the amino-acid substitution of proline by arginine at codon 76 p.(P76R). The amino-acid variation p.(P76R) within the paired box domain is likely to destabilise the protein due to steric hindrance as a result of the introduction of a polar and larger amino acid. Eye movement recordings showed a significant intrafamilial variability of horizontal, vertical and torsional nystagmus. High-resolution in vivo imaging of the retina using optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed features of foveal hypoplasia, including rudimentary foveal pit, incursion of inner retinal layers, short photoreceptor outer segments and optic nerve hypoplasia. Thus, this study presents a family that segregates a PAX6 mutation with nystagmus and foveal hypoplasia in the absence of iris abnormalities. Moreover, it is the first study showing detailed characteristics using eye movement recordings of autosomal-dominant nystagmus in a multigenerational family with a novel PAX6 mutation. PMID:23942204

  6. Autosomal dominant brachyolmia in a large Swedish family: phenotypic spectrum and natural course.

    PubMed

    Grigelioniene, Giedre; Geiberger, Stefan; Horemuzova, Eva; Moström, Eva; Jäntti, Nina; Neumeyer, Lo; Åström, Eva; Nordenskjöld, Magnus; Nordgren, Ann; Mäkitie, Outi

    2014-07-01

    Autosomal dominant brachyolmia (Type 3, OMIM #113500) belongs to a group of skeletal dysplasias caused by mutations in the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 4 (TRPV4) gene, encoding a Ca++-permeable, non-selective cation channel. The disorder is characterized by disproportionate short stature with short trunk, scoliosis and platyspondyly. The phenotypic variability and long-term natural course remain inadequately characterized. The purpose of this study was to describe a large Swedish family with brachyolmia type 3 due to a heterozygous TRPV4 mutation c.1847G>A (p.R616Q) in 11 individuals. The mutation has previously been detected in another family with autosomal dominant brachyolmia [Rock et al., 2008]. Review of hospital records and patient assessments indicated that clinical symptoms of brachyolmia became evident by school age with chronic pain in the spine and hips; radiographic changes were evident earlier. Growth was not affected during early childhood but deteriorated with age in some patients due to increasing spinal involvement. Affected individuals had a wide range of subjective symptoms with chronic pain in the extremities and the spine, and paresthesias. Our findings indicate that autosomal dominant brachyolmia may be associated with significant long-term morbidity, as seen in this family.

  7. Increases in kidney volume in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease can be detected within 6 months.

    PubMed

    Kistler, Andreas D; Poster, Diane; Krauer, Fabienne; Weishaupt, Dominik; Raina, Shagun; Senn, Oliver; Binet, Isabelle; Spanaus, Katharina; Wüthrich, Rudolf P; Serra, Andreas L

    2009-01-01

    Kidney volume growth is considered the best surrogate marker predicting the decline of renal function in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. To assess the therapeutic benefit of new drugs more rapidly, changes in kidney volume need to be determined over a short time interval. Here we measured renal volume changes by manual segmentation volumetry applied to magnetic resonance imaging scans obtained with an optimized T1-weighted acquisition protocol without gadolinium-based contrast agents. One hundred young patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and preserved renal function had a significant increase in total kidney volume by 2.71+/-4.82% in 6 months. Volume measurements were highly reproducible and accurate, as indicated by correlation coefficients of 1.000 for intra-observer and 0.996 for inter-observer agreement, with acceptable within-subject standard deviations. The change in renal volume correlated with baseline total kidney volume in all age subgroups. Total kidney volume positively correlated with male gender, hypertension, albuminuria and a history of macrohematuria but negatively with creatinine clearance. Albuminuria was associated with accelerated volume progression. Our study shows that increases in kidney volume can be reliably measured over a 6 month period in early autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease using unenhanced magnetic resonance imaging sequences.

  8. Autosomal dominant spondylocostal dysostosis is caused by mutation in TBX6.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Duncan B; McInerney-Leo, Aideen; Gucev, Zoran S; Gardiner, Brooke; Marshall, Mhairi; Leo, Paul J; Chapman, Deborah L; Tasic, Velibor; Shishko, Abduhadi; Brown, Matthew A; Duncan, Emma L; Dunwoodie, Sally L

    2013-04-15

    In humans, congenital spinal defects occur with an incidence of 0.5-1 per 1000 live births. One of the most severe syndromes with such defects is spondylocostal dysostosis (SCD). Over the past decade, the genetic basis of several forms of autosomal recessive SCD cases has been solved with the identification of four causative genes (DLL3, MESP2, LFNG and HES7). Autosomal dominant forms of SCD have also been reported, but to date no genetic etiology has been described for these. Here, we have used exome capture and next-generation sequencing to identify a stoploss mutation in TBX6 that segregates with disease in two generations of one family. We show that this mutation has a deleterious effect on the transcriptional activation activity of the TBX6 protein, likely due to haploinsufficiency. In mouse, Tbx6 is essential for the patterning of the vertebral precursor tissues, somites; thus, mutation of TBX6 is likely to be causative of SCD in this family. This is the first identification of the genetic cause of an autosomal dominant form of SCD, and also demonstrates the potential of exome sequencing to identify genetic causes of dominant diseases even in small families with few affected individuals.

  9. Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis associated with renal tubular acidosis is due to a CLCN7 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Piret, Sian E.; Gorvin, Caroline M.; Trinh, Anne; Taylor, John; Lise, Stefano; Taylor, Jenny C.; Ebeling, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the causative mutation in a family with an unusual presentation of autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (OPT), proximal renal tubular acidosis (RTA), renal stones, epilepsy, and blindness, a combination of features not previously reported. We undertook exome sequencing of one affected and one unaffected family member, followed by targeted analysis of known candidate genes to identify the causative mutation. This identified a missense mutation (c.643G>A; p.Gly215Arg) in the gene encoding the chloride/proton antiporter 7 (gene CLCN7, protein CLC‐7), which was confirmed by amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS)‐PCR, and to be present in the three available patients. CLC‐7 mutations are known to cause autosomal dominant OPT type 2, also called Albers–Schonberg disease, which is characterized by osteosclerosis, predominantly of the spine, pelvis and skull base, resulting in bone fragility and fractures. Albers–Schonberg disease is not reported to be associated with RTA, but autosomal recessive OPT type 3 (OPTB3) with RTA is associated with carbonic anhydrase type 2 (CA2) mutations. No mutations were detected in CA2 or any other genes known to cause proximal RTA. Neither CLCN7 nor CA2 mutations have previously been reported to be associated with renal stones or epilepsy. Thus, we identified a CLCN7 mutation in a family with autosomal dominant osteopetrosis, RTA, renal stones, epilepsy, and blindness. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27540713

  10. Evidence for locus heterogeneity in autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Speer, M.C.; Stajich, J.M.; Gaskell, P.C.

    1995-12-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) is a diagnostic classification encompassing a broad group of proximal myopathies. A gene for the dominant form of LGMD (LGMD1A) has recently been localized to a 7-cM region of chromosome 5q between D5S178 and IL9. We studied three additional dominant LGMD families for linkage to these two markers and excluded all from localization to this region, providing evidence for locus heterogeneity within the dominant form of LGMD. Although the patterns of muscle weakness were similar in all families studied, the majority of affected family members in the chromosome 5-linked pedigree have a dysarthric speech pattern, which is not present in any of the five unlinked families. The demonstration of heterogeneity within autosomal dominant LGMD is the first step in attempting to subclassify these families with similar clinical phenotypes on a molecular level. 33 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. TBC1D24 Mutation Causes Autosomal Dominant Non-Syndromic Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Azaiez, Hela; Booth, Kevin T.; Bu, Fengxiao; Huygen, Patrick; Shibata, Seiji; Shearer, A. Eliot; Kolbe, Diana; Meyer, Nicole; Black-Ziegelbein, E. Ann; Smith, Richard J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary hearing loss (HHL) is extremely heterogeneous. Over 70 genes have been identified to date, and with the advent of massively parallel sequencing, the pace of novel gene discovery has accelerated. In a family segregating progressive autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss (ADNSHL) we used OtoSCOPE® to exclude mutations in known deafness genes and then performed segregation mapping and whole exome sequencing (WES) to identify a unique variant, p.Ser178Leu, in TBC1D24 that segregates with the hearing loss phenotype. TBC1D24 encodes a GTPase-activating protein expressed in the cochlea. Ser178 is highly conserved across vertebrates and its change is predicted to be damaging. Other variants in TBC1D24 have been associated with a panoply of clinical symptoms including autosomal recessive NSHL (ARNSHL), syndromic hearing impairment associated with onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, mental retardation and seizures (DOORS syndrome), and a wide range of epileptic disorders. PMID:24729539

  12. Recessive versus imprinted disorder: consanguinity can impede establishing the diagnosis of autosomal dominant pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib

    PubMed Central

    Turan, Serap; Akin, Leyla; Akcay, Teoman; Adal, Erdal; Sarikaya, Sevil; Bastepe, Murat; Jüppner, Harald

    2010-01-01

    Hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia with low/normal parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels can be observed in hypoparathyroidism (HP), a disorder that may follow an autosomal dominant (AD) or autosomal recessive (AR) mode of inheritance. Similar biochemical changes are also observed in pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) type Ia and Ib, but affected patients usually show elevated PTH levels indicative of hormonal resistance. Features of Albright’s hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) are typically not observed in patients affected by familial forms of PHP-Ib, which are most frequently caused by maternally inherited, heterozygous microdeletions within STX16 and are associated with isolated loss of methylation at GNAS exon A/B. We established the molecular defect in two children of consanguineous Turkish parents, who presented with hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and low 25-OH vitamin D levels, but initially normal or only mildly elevated PTH levels, i.e. findings that do not readily exclude HP. After normalizing serum magnesium levels, hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia persisted, and PTH levels increased, suggesting PTH-resistance rather than PTH-deficiency. Because of the absence of AHO and parental consanguinity, an AR form of PHP-Ib appeared plausible, which had previously been suggested for sporadic cases. However, loss of GNAS methylation was restricted to exon A/B, which led to the identification of the 3-kb STX16 microdeletion. The same mutation was also detected in the healthy mother, who did not show any GNAS methylation abnormality, indicating that her deletion resides on the paternal allele. Our findings emphasize the importance of considering a parentally imprinted, autosomal dominant disorder even if consanguinity suggests an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. PMID:20538864

  13. Diverging longitudinal changes in astrocytosis and amyloid PET in autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Vieitez, Elena; Saint-Aubert, Laure; Carter, Stephen F; Almkvist, Ove; Farid, Karim; Schöll, Michael; Chiotis, Konstantinos; Thordardottir, Steinunn; Graff, Caroline; Wall, Anders; Långström, Bengt; Nordberg, Agneta

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a multifactorial dementia disorder characterized by early amyloid-β, tau deposition, glial activation and neurodegeneration, where the interrelationships between the different pathophysiological events are not yet well characterized. In this study, longitudinal multitracer positron emission tomography imaging of individuals with autosomal dominant or sporadic Alzheimer's disease was used to quantify the changes in regional distribution of brain astrocytosis (tracer (11)C-deuterium-L-deprenyl), fibrillar amyloid-β plaque deposition ((11)C-Pittsburgh compound B), and glucose metabolism ((18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose) from early presymptomatic stages over an extended period to clinical symptoms. The 52 baseline participants comprised autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease mutation carriers (n = 11; 49.6 ± 10.3 years old) and non-carriers (n = 16; 51.1 ± 14.2 years old; 10 male), and patients with sporadic mild cognitive impairment (n = 17; 61.9 ± 6.4 years old; nine male) and sporadic Alzheimer's disease (n = 8; 63.0 ± 6.5 years old; five male); for confidentiality reasons, the gender of mutation carriers is not revealed. The autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease participants belonged to families with known mutations in either presenilin 1 (PSEN1) or amyloid precursor protein (APPswe or APParc) genes. Sporadic mild cognitive impairment patients were further divided into (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B-positive (n = 13; 62.0 ± 6.4; seven male) and (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B-negative (n = 4; 61.8 ± 7.5 years old; two male) groups using a neocortical standardized uptake value ratio cut-off value of 1.41, which was calculated with respect to the cerebellar grey matter. All baseline participants underwent multitracer positron emission tomography scans, cerebrospinal fluid biomarker analysis and neuropsychological assessment. Twenty-six of the participants underwent clinical and imaging follow-up examinations after 2.8 ± 0.6 years. By using linear

  14. The anterior segment disorder autosomal dominant keratitis is linked to the Aniridia/PAX-6 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzayans, F.; Pearce, W.G.; Mah, T.S.

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant keratitis (ADK) is an eye disease characterized by anterior stromal corneal opacification and vascularization in the peripheral cornea. Progression into the central cornea may compromise visual acuity. Other anterior segment features include minimal radial defects of the iris stroma. Posterior segment involvement is characterized by foveal hypoplasia with minimal effect on visual acuity. Aniridia is a second autosomal dominantly inherited ocular disorder defined by structural defects of the iris, frequently severe enough to cause an almost complete absence of iris. This may be accompanied by other anterior segment manifestations, including cataract and keratitis. Posterior segment involvement in aniridia is characterized by foveal hypoplasia resulting in a highly variable impairment of visual acuity, often with nystagmus. Aniridia is usually inherited as an autosomal dominant disease and occurs in 1 in 50,000 to 100,000 people. Aniridia has been shown to result from mutations in PAX-6, a gene thought to regulate fetal eye development. The similar clinical findings in ADK and aniridia, with the similar patterns of inheritance, compelled us to investigate if these two ocular disorders are variants of the same genetic disorder. We have tested for linkage between PAX-6 and ADK within an ADK family with 33 members over four generations, including 11 affected individuals. Linkage studies reveal that D11S914 (located within 3 cM of PAX-6) does not recombine with ADK (LOD score 3.61; {theta} = 0.00), consistent with PAX-6 mutations being responsible for ADK. Direct sequencing of PAX-6 RT-PCR products from ADK patients is underway to identify the mutation within the PAX-6 gene that results in ADK. The linkage of PAX-6 with ADK, along with a recent report that mutations in PAX-6 also underlie Peter`s anomaly, implicates PAX-6 widely in anterior segment malformations.

  15. Autosomal dominant congenital fibre type disproportion: a clinicopathological and imaging study of a large family.

    PubMed

    Sobrido, M J; Fernández, J M; Fontoira, E; Pérez-Sousa, C; Cabello, A; Castro, M; Teijeira, S; Alvarez, S; Mederer, S; Rivas, E; Seijo-Martínez, M; Navarro, C

    2005-07-01

    Congenital fibre type disproportion (CFTD) is considered a non-progressive or slowly progressive muscle disease with relative smallness of type 1 fibres on pathological examination. Although generally benign, CFTD has a variable natural course and severe progression has been observed in some patients. The pathogenesis of the disorder is unknown and many authors consider CFTD a syndrome with multiple aetiologies rather than a separate clinical entity. A positive family history has been reported in about 40% of cases, but the inheritance pattern is not clear. Both autosomal recessive and dominant modes of inheritance have been suggested. The present paper describes a large, multigenerational kindred that has an inherited myopathy fulfilling the histological criteria of CFTD, with autosomal dominant transmission and high penetrance. The clinical picture, remarkably similar in all affected family members, started in early infancy with mild limb muscle weakness. There was slow progression of symptoms into adulthood, with moderate to severe, mainly proximal, muscle weakness without loss of ambulation. Muscle biopsy from two affected individuals demonstrated predominance of small type 1 muscle fibres without other significant findings. Nerve conduction studies were normal and needle electromyography showed a myopathic pattern. MRI examination performed on three patients from successive generations showed involvement of proximal limb and paraspinal muscles. The clinical and pathological homogeneity in the present family, together with the lack of additional histological abnormalities after decades of disease progression in two affected individuals, supports this being a distinct myopathy with fibre type disproportion. Whether the disease in this family can be regarded as a form of the congenital myopathy known as CFTD or rather a unique condition sharing histological features with CFTD needs further investigation. This is, to our knowledge, the largest kindred with muscle

  16. Autosomal Dominant Inheritance of a Predisposition to Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections and Intracranial Saccular Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Regalado, Ellen; Medrek, Sarah; Tran-Fadulu, Van; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Golabbakhsh, Hossein; Smart, Suzanne; Chen, Julia H.; Shete, Sanjay; Kim, Dong H.; Stern, Ralph; Braverman, Alan C.; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2013-01-01

    A genetic predisposition for thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD) can be inherited in an autosomal dominant manner with decreased penetrance and variable expression. Four genes identified to date for familial TAAD account for approximately 20% of the heritable predisposition. In a cohort of 514 families with two or more members with presumed autosomal dominant TAAD, 48 (9.3%) families have one or more members who were at 50% risk to inherit the presumptive gene causing TAAD had an intracranial vascular event. In these families, gender is significantly associated with disease presentation (p <0.001), with intracranial events being more common in women (65.4%) while TAAD events occurred more in men (64.2%,). Twenty-nine of these families had intracranial aneurysms (ICA) that could not be designated as saccular or fusiform due to incomplete data. TGFBR1, TGFBR2, and ACTA2 mutations were found in 4 families with TAAD and predominantly fusiform ICAs. In 15 families, of which 14 tested negative for 3 known TAAD genes, 17 family members who were at risk for inheriting TAAD had saccular ICAs. In 2 families, women who harbored the genetic mutation causing TAAD had ICAs. In 2 additional families, intracranial, thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms were observed. This study documents the autosomal dominant inheritance of TAADs with saccular ICAs, a previously recognized association that has not been adequately characterized as heritable.I these families, routine cerebral and aortic imaging for at risk members could prove beneficial for timely medical and surgical management to prevent a cerebral hemorrhage or aortic dissection. PMID:21815248

  17. Bilateral cysts in the choroid plexus in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Casteleijn, Niek F; Spithoven, Edwin M; Rookmaaker, Maarten B; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I; Gansevoort, Ron T

    2015-05-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a genetic systemic disorder, which is associated with cyst formation in several organs, renal function decline and a higher prevalence of intracranial aneurysms. We report a 52-year-old, otherwise healthy, man with ADPKD who had asymptomatic, bilateral, multiple cysts in the choroid plexus, which is an extremely rare abnormality. Recent evidence suggests that the polycystin proteins, which are dysfunctional in ADPKD, are found in ciliated choroid plexus cells that are involved with regulation of cerebrospinal fluid homeostasis. We hypothesize therefore that choroid plexus cysts may be part of the ADPKD phenotype, which has not been described before.

  18. Activation of AMP-activated kinase as a strategy for managing autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F; Barroso-Aranda, Jorge; Contreras, Francisco

    2009-12-01

    There is evidence that overactivity of both mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) contributes importantly to the progressive expansion of renal cysts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Recent research has established that AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) can suppress the activity of each of these proteins. Clinical AMPK activators such as metformin and berberine may thus have potential in the clinical management of ADPKD. The traditional use of berberine in diarrhea associated with bacterial infections may reflect, in part, the inhibitory impact of AMPK on chloride extrusion by small intestinal enterocytes.

  19. [Massive inferior vena cava thrombosis in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic hepatorenal disease].

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Gil, F; Costero, O; Pobes, A

    2002-01-01

    We report a 68-year-old man with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, who developed multiple venous thromboses (inferior vena cava, left renal vein and iliofemoral veins) caused by local compression of the intrahepatic inferior vena cava by hepatic cysts. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of inferior vena cava thrombosis caused by hepatic cysts compression. Doppler ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging were effective in documenting the venous thromboses and the underlying lesions non-invasively. Long-term anticoagulation was an efficient and safe treatment.

  20. Octreotide reduces hepatic, renal and breast cystic volume in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Peces, Ramón; Cuesta-López, Emilio; Peces, Carlos; Pérez-Dueñas, Virginia; Vega-Cabrera, Cristina; Selgas, Rafael

    2011-06-01

    A 43-year-old woman with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) received octreotide for 12 months, and this was associated with a 6.3% reduction in liver volume, an 8% reduction in total kidney volume and stabilization of renal function. There was also a reduction of cyst size in fibrocystic disease of breast. These data suggest that the cyst fluid accumulation in different organs from patients with ADPKD is a dynamic process which can be reversed by octreotide. This is the first report of a case of simultaneous reduction in hepatic, renal and breast cystic volume with preservation of renal function in a patient with ADPKD receiving octreotide.

  1. A new deletion in autosomal dominant guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase I deficiency gene--Segawa disease.

    PubMed

    Bianca, S; Bianca, M

    2006-02-01

    Hereditary Progressive Dystonia with marked diurnal fluctuation (HPD) is an autosomally dominantly inherited dystonia which is characterized by marked diurnal fluctuation of symptoms and by marked and sustained response to levodopa associated with mutations in guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase (GCH-1) deficiency gene. We report an italian patient with a new 18 bp deletion at 267 in exon 1 in the GCH-1 gene. The peculiarity of our patient is the new mutations never reported and mnemonic disturbances that are also not reported in the classical HPD.A genotype-phenotype relationship may be suggested between different gene mutations and non classical clinical manifestations.

  2. Mechanisms and management of hypertension in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic; Williams, Olubunmi; Chapman, Arlene

    2014-12-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most commonly inherited kidney disease, characterized by progressive cyst growth and renal enlargement, resulting in renal failure. Hypertension is common and occurs early, prior to loss of kidney function. Whether hypertension in ADPKD is a primary vasculopathy secondary to mutations in the polycystin genes or secondary to activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system by cyst expansion and intrarenal ischemia is unclear. Dysregulation of the primary cilium causing endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell dysfunction is a component of ADPKD. In this article, we review the epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical characteristics of hypertension in ADPKD and give specific recommendations for its treatment.

  3. Randomized Clinical Trial of Long-Acting Somatostatin for Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney and Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Masyuk, Tetyana V.; Page, Linda J.; Kubly, Vickie J.; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Li, Xujian; Kim, Bohyun; King, Bernard F.; Glockner, James; Holmes, David R.; Rossetti, Sandro; Harris, Peter C.; LaRusso, Nicholas F.; Torres, Vicente E.

    2010-01-01

    There are no proven, effective therapies for polycystic kidney disease (PKD) or polycystic liver disease (PLD). We enrolled 42 patients with severe PLD resulting from autosomal dominant PKD (ADPKD) or autosomal dominant PLD (ADPLD) in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of octreotide, a long-acting somatostatin analogue. We randomly assigned 42 patients in a 2:1 ratio to octreotide LAR depot (up to 40 mg every 28 ± 5 days) or placebo for 1 year. The primary end point was percent change in liver volume from baseline to 1 year, measured by MRI. Secondary end points were changes in total kidney volume, GFR, quality of life, safety, vital signs, and clinical laboratory tests. Thirty-four patients had ADPKD, and eight had ADPLD. Liver volume decreased by 4.95% ± 6.77% in the octreotide group but remained practically unchanged (+0.92% ± 8.33%) in the placebo group (P = 0.048). Among patients with ADPKD, total kidney volume remained practically unchanged (+0.25% ± 7.53%) in the octreotide group but increased by 8.61% ± 10.07% in the placebo group (P = 0.045). Changes in GFR were similar in both groups. Octreotide was well tolerated; treated individuals reported an improved perception of bodily pain and physical activity. In summary, octreotide slowed the progressive increase in liver volume and total kidney volume, improved health perception among patients with PLD, and had an acceptable side effect profile. PMID:20431041

  4. Alternating hemiplegia of childhood: a syndrome inherited with an autosomal dominant trait.

    PubMed

    Kanavakis, Emmanuel; Xaidara, Athina; Papathanasiou-Klontza, Dimitra; Papadimitriou, Alexandros; Velentza, Stavroula; Youroukos, Sotiris

    2003-12-01

    Alternating hemiplegia of childhood is a rare disorder characterized by recurrent attacks of hemiplegia affecting either side of the body, oculomotor and autonomic disturbances, movement disorders, and progressive cognitive impairment. We report on one family with autosomal dominant alternating hemiplegia. The disorder was first recognized in a 9-year-old child, the third son of the family, who presented with learning disability, tonic-clonic seizures, dystonic attacks, and episodes of alternating hemiplegia starting at the age of 2 1/2 years. His mother and three brothers had similar symptoms. The maternal uncle, who has learning disability, had experienced multiple dystonic attacks. Tests performed on the family, including computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and magnetic resonance angiography of the brain as well as metabolic evaluation, were normal. Cytogenetic analysis was normal and mitochondrial DNA analysis revealed no deletions or mutations in the four affected family members and the grandmother. An autosomal dominant mode of inheritance is suggested by the fact that both sexes are affected in two generations.

  5. Familial clustering of medullary sponge kidney is autosomal dominant with reduced penetrance and variable expressivity.

    PubMed

    Fabris, Antonia; Lupo, Antonio; Ferraro, Pietro M; Anglani, Franca; Pei, York; Danza, Francesco M; Gambaro, Giovanni

    2013-02-01

    Medullary sponge kidney (MSK) is a renal malformation typically associated with nephrocalcinosis and recurrent calcium nephrolithiasis. Approximately 12% of recurrent stone formers have MSK, which is generally considered a sporadic disorder. Since its discovery, three pedigrees have been described in which an apparently autosomal dominant inheritance was suggested. Here, family members of 50 patients with MSK were systematically investigated by means of interviews, renal imaging, and biochemical studies in an effort to establish whether MSK is an inheritable disorder. Twenty-seven MSK probands had 59 first- and second-degree relatives of both genders with MSK in all generations. There were progressively lower mean levels of serum calcium, urinary sodium, pH, and volume, combined with higher serum phosphate and potassium from probands to relatives with bilateral, to those with unilateral, and to those unaffected by MSK. This suggests that most affected relatives have a milder form of MSK than the probands, which would explain why they had not been so diagnosed. Thus, our study provides strong evidence that familial clustering of MSK is common, and has an autosomal dominant inheritance, a reduced penetrance, and variable expressivity.

  6. Oculopharyngeal Weakness, Hypophrenia, Deafness, and Impaired Vision: A Novel Autosomal Dominant Myopathy with Rimmed Vacuoles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ting; Lu, Xiang-Hui; Wang, Hui-Fang; Ban, Rui; Liu, Hua-Xu; Shi, Qiang; Wang, Qian; Yin, Xi; Pu, Chuan-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Myopathies with rimmed vacuoles are a heterogeneous group of muscle disorders with progressive muscle weakness and varied clinical manifestations but similar features in muscle biopsies. Here, we describe a novel autosomal dominant myopathy with rimmed vacuoles in a large family with 11 patients of three generations affected. Methods: A clinical study including family history, obstetric, pediatric, and development history was recorded. Clinical examinations including physical examination, electromyography (EMG), serum creatine kinase (CK), bone X-rays, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed in this family. Open muscle biopsies were performed on the proband and his mother. To find the causative gene, the whole-exome sequencing was carried out. Results: Disease onset was from adolescence to adulthood, but the affected patients of the third generation presented an earlier onset and more severe clinical manifestations than the older generations. Clinical features were characterized as dysarthria, dysphagia, external ophthalmoplegia, limb weakness, hypophrenia, deafness, and impaired vision. However, not every patient manifested all symptoms. Serum CK was mildly elevated and EMG indicated a myopathic pattern. Brain MRI showed cerebellum and brain stem mildly atrophy. Rimmed vacuoles and inclusion bodies were observed in muscle biopsy. The whole-exome sequencing was performed, but the causative gene has not been found. Conclusions: We reported a novel autosomal dominant myopathy with rimmed vacuoles characterized by dysarthria, dysphagia, external ophthalmoplegia, limb weakness, hypophrenia, deafness, and impaired vision, but the causative gene has not been found and needs further study. PMID:27453229

  7. Autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease: diagnosis, classification, and management--A KDIGO consensus report.

    PubMed

    Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Alper, Seth L; Antignac, Corinne; Bleyer, Anthony J; Chauveau, Dominique; Dahan, Karin; Deltas, Constantinos; Hosking, Andrew; Kmoch, Stanislav; Rampoldi, Luca; Wiesener, Michael; Wolf, Matthias T; Devuyst, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    Rare autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease is caused by mutations in the genes encoding uromodulin (UMOD), hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β (HNF1B), renin (REN), and mucin-1 (MUC1). Multiple names have been proposed for these disorders, including 'Medullary Cystic Kidney Disease (MCKD) type 2', 'Familial Juvenile Hyperuricemic Nephropathy (FJHN)', or 'Uromodulin-Associated Kidney Disease (UAKD)' for UMOD-related diseases and 'MCKD type 1' for the disease caused by MUC1 mutations. The multiplicity of these terms, and the fact that cysts are not pathognomonic, creates confusion. Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) proposes adoption of a new terminology for this group of diseases using the term 'Autosomal Dominant Tubulointerstitial Kidney Disease' (ADTKD) appended by a gene-based subclassification, and suggests diagnostic criteria. Implementation of these recommendations is anticipated to facilitate recognition and characterization of these monogenic diseases. A better understanding of these rare disorders may be relevant for the tubulointerstitial fibrosis component in many forms of chronic kidney disease.

  8. Comprehensive Genetic Analysis of Japanese Autosomal Dominant Sensorineural Hearing Loss Patients

    PubMed Central

    Iwasa, Yoh-ichiro; Nishio, Shin-ya; Usami, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Background In general, autosomal dominant inherited hearing loss does not have a founder mutation, with the causative mutation different in each family. For this reason, there has been a strong need for efficient diagnosis methods for autosomal dominant sensorineural hearing loss (ADSNHL) patients. This study sought to verify the effectiveness of our analysis algorithm for the screening of ADSNHL patients as well as the usefulness of the massively parallel DNA sequencing (MPS). Subjects and Methods Seventy-five Japanese ADSNHL patients from 53 ENT departments nationwide participated in this study. We conducted genetic analysis of 75 ADSNHL patients using the Invader assay, TaqMan genotyping assay and MPS-based genetic screening. Results A total of 46 (61.3%) ADSNHL patients were found to have at least one candidate gene variant. Conclusion We were able to achieve a high mutation detection rate through the combination of the Invader assay, TaqMan genotyping assay and MPS. MPS could be used to successfully identify mutations in rare deafness genes. PMID:27911912

  9. EPHB4 kinase–inactivating mutations cause autosomal dominant lymphatic-related hydrops fetalis

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Almedina, Silvia; Holdhus, Rita; Vicente, Andres; Fotiou, Elisavet; Lin, Shin; Petersen, Kjell; Simpson, Michael A.; Hoischen, Alexander; Atton, Giles; Karapouliou, Christina; Brice, Glen; Gordon, Kristiana; Wiseman, John W.; Wedin, Marianne; Rockson, Stanley G.; Jeffery, Steve; Mortimer, Peter S.; Snyder, Michael P.; Berland, Siren; Mansour, Sahar; Makinen, Taija

    2016-01-01

    Hydrops fetalis describes fluid accumulation in at least 2 fetal compartments, including abdominal cavities, pleura, and pericardium, or in body tissue. The majority of hydrops fetalis cases are nonimmune conditions that present with generalized edema of the fetus, and approximately 15% of these nonimmune cases result from a lymphatic abnormality. Here, we have identified an autosomal dominant, inherited form of lymphatic-related (nonimmune) hydrops fetalis (LRHF). Independent exome sequencing projects on 2 families with a history of in utero and neonatal deaths associated with nonimmune hydrops fetalis uncovered 2 heterozygous missense variants in the gene encoding Eph receptor B4 (EPHB4). Biochemical analysis determined that the mutant EPHB4 proteins are devoid of tyrosine kinase activity, indicating that loss of EPHB4 signaling contributes to LRHF pathogenesis. Further, inactivation of Ephb4 in lymphatic endothelial cells of developing mouse embryos led to defective lymphovenous valve formation and consequent subcutaneous edema. Together, these findings identify EPHB4 as a critical regulator of early lymphatic vascular development and demonstrate that mutations in the gene can cause an autosomal dominant form of LRHF that is associated with a high mortality rate. PMID:27400125

  10. A mutation in FRIZZLED2 impairs Wnt signaling and causes autosomal dominant omodysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Saal, Howard M.; Prows, Cynthia A.; Guerreiro, Iris; Donlin, Milene; Knudson, Luke; Sund, Kristen L.; Chang, Ching-Fang; Brugmann, Samantha A.; Stottmann, Rolf W.

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant omodysplasia is a rare skeletal dysplasia characterized by short humeri, radial head dislocation, short first metacarpals, facial dysmorphism and genitourinary anomalies. We performed next-generation whole-exome sequencing and comparative analysis of a proband with omodysplasia, her unaffected parents and her affected daughter. We identified a de novo mutation in FRIZZLED2 (FZD2) in the proband and her daughter that was not found in unaffected family members. The FZD2 mutation (c.1644G>A) changes a tryptophan residue at amino acid 548 to a premature stop (p.Trp548*). This altered protein is still produced in vitro, but we show reduced ability of this mutant form of FZD2 to interact with its downstream target DISHEVELLED. Furthermore, expressing the mutant form of FZD2 in vitro is not able to facilitate the cellular response to canonical Wnt signaling like wild-type FZD2. We therefore conclude that the FRIZZLED2 mutation is a de novo, novel cause for autosomal dominant omodysplasia. PMID:25759469

  11. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation compensation may preserve vision in patients with OPA1-linked autosomal dominant optic atrophy.

    PubMed

    Van Bergen, Nicole J; Crowston, Jonathan G; Kearns, Lisa S; Staffieri, Sandra E; Hewitt, Alex W; Cohn, Amy C; Mackey, David A; Trounce, Ian A

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy (ADOA) is the most common inherited optic atrophy where vision impairment results from specific loss of retinal ganglion cells of the optic nerve. Around 60% of ADOA cases are linked to mutations in the OPA1 gene. OPA1 is a fission-fusion protein involved in mitochondrial inner membrane remodelling. ADOA presents with marked variation in clinical phenotype and varying degrees of vision loss, even among siblings carrying identical mutations in OPA1. To determine whether the degree of vision loss is associated with the level of mitochondrial impairment, we examined mitochondrial function in lymphoblast cell lines obtained from six large Australian OPA1-linked ADOA pedigrees. Comparing patients with severe vision loss (visual acuity [VA]<6/36) and patients with relatively preserved vision (VA>6/9) a clear defect in mitochondrial ATP synthesis and reduced respiration rates were observed in patients with poor vision. In addition, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) enzymology in ADOA patients with normal vision revealed increased complex II+III activity and levels of complex IV protein. These data suggest that OPA1 deficiency impairs OXPHOS efficiency, but compensation through increases in the distal complexes of the respiratory chain may preserve mitochondrial ATP production in patients who maintain normal vision. Identification of genetic variants that enable this response may provide novel therapeutic insights into OXPHOS compensation for preventing vision loss in optic neuropathies.

  12. Linkage of the late onset autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia (DFSPII) to chromosome 2p markers

    SciTech Connect

    Hentati, A.; Wasserman, B.; Siddique, T.

    1994-09-01

    Pure familial spastic paraplegias (FSP) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by spasticity of lower limbs. FSP in inherited as an autosomal dominant (DFSP) or an autosomal recessive (RFSP) trait. DFSP has been classified into early onset (DFSPI) and late onset (DFSPII) based on the mean age of onset in families. A locus for RFSP has been mapped to chromosome 8, while a locus for DFSPI has been mapped to chromosome 14q. Genetic locus heterogeneity was observed in both of these forms. The location of DFSPII locus (or loci) is unknown. We collected DNA samples from 81 individuals including 26 affecteds from three DFSPII families (9998, 840, 581). The mean age of onset of systems was 26.5, 42.5, and 35.2 years, respectively. We first tested 156 DNA markers distributed throughout the human 22 autosomes with family 9998 and positive lod scores were obtained with chromosome 2p markers D2S174 (Z({theta})=2.93 at {theta}=0.00), D2S146 (Z({theta})=1.03 at {theta}=0.00) and D2S177 (Z({theta})=1.04 at {theta}=0.00). Analysis of the 2 additional families confirmed the linkage with a peak lod score of Z({theta})=4.62 at {theta}=0.105 with D2S174. The multipoint linkage analysis using the map D2S175-10cM-D2S174-14cM-D2DS177 suggested that the DFSPII locus most likely maps between D2S174 and D2S177 with Z({theta})=6.11. There was no evidence in our data supporting genetic locus heterogeneity for the DFSPII.

  13. Quantitative Amyloid Imaging in Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer’s Disease: Results from the DIAN Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yi; Blazey, Tyler M.; Owen, Christopher J.; Christensen, Jon J.; Friedrichsen, Karl; Joseph-Mathurin, Nelly; Wang, Qing; Hornbeck, Russ C.; Ances, Beau M.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Cash, Lisa A.; Koeppe, Robert A.; Klunk, William E.; Galasko, Douglas; Brickman, Adam M.; McDade, Eric; Ringman, John M.; Thompson, Paul M.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Salloway, Stephen P.; Schofield, Peter R.; Masters, Colin L.; Villemagne, Victor L.; Fox, Nick C.; Förster, Stefan; Chen, Kewei; Reiman, Eric M.; Xiong, Chengjie; Marcus, Daniel S.; Weiner, Michael W.; Morris, John C.; Bateman, Randall J.; Benzinger, Tammie L. S.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid imaging plays an important role in the research and diagnosis of dementing disorders. Substantial variation in quantitative methods to measure brain amyloid burden exists in the field. The aim of this work is to investigate the impact of methodological variations to the quantification of amyloid burden using data from the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer’s Network (DIAN), an autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease population. Cross-sectional and longitudinal [11C]-Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) PET imaging data from the DIAN study were analyzed. Four candidate reference regions were investigated for estimation of brain amyloid burden. A regional spread function based technique was also investigated for the correction of partial volume effects. Cerebellar cortex, brain-stem, and white matter regions all had stable tracer retention during the course of disease. Partial volume correction consistently improves sensitivity to group differences and longitudinal changes over time. White matter referencing improved statistical power in the detecting longitudinal changes in relative tracer retention; however, the reason for this improvement is unclear and requires further investigation. Full dynamic acquisition and kinetic modeling improved statistical power although it may add cost and time. Several technical variations to amyloid burden quantification were examined in this study. Partial volume correction emerged as the strategy that most consistently improved statistical power for the detection of both longitudinal changes and across-group differences. For the autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease population with PiB imaging, utilizing brainstem as a reference region with partial volume correction may be optimal for current interventional trials. Further investigation of technical issues in quantitative amyloid imaging in different study populations using different amyloid imaging tracers is warranted. PMID:27010959

  14. Screening for mutations in rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS in patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.A.; Gannon, A.M.; Daiger, S.P.

    1994-09-01

    Mutations in rhodopsin account for approximately 30% of all cases of autosomal dominant retinits pigmentosa (adRP) and mutations in peripherin/RDS account for an additional 5% of cases. Also, mutations in rhodopsin can cause autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa and mutations in peripherin/RDS can cause dominant macular degeneration. Most disease-causing mutations in rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS are unique to one family or, at most, to a few families within a limited geographic region, though a few mutations are found in multiple, unrelated families. To further determine the spectrum of genetic variation in these genes, we screened DNA samples from 134 unrelated patients with retinitis pigmentosa for mutations in both rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS using SSCP followed by genomic sequencing. Of the 134 patients, 86 were from families with apparent adRP and 48 were either isolated cases or were from families with an equivocal mode of inheritance. Among these patients we found 14 distinct rhodopsin mutations which are likely to cause retinal disease. Eleven of these mutations were found in one individual or one family only, whereas the Pro23His mutation was found in 14 {open_quotes}unrelated{close_quotes}individuals. The splice-site mutation produces dominant disease though with highly variable expression. Among the remaining patients were found 6 distinct peripherin/RDS mutations which are likely to cause retinal disease. These mutations were also found in one patient or family only, except the Gly266Asp mutation which was found in two unrelated patients. These results confirm the expected frequency and broad spectrum of mutations causing adRP.

  15. Autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia; Linkage analysis and evidence for linkage to chromosome 2p

    SciTech Connect

    Figlewicz, D.A.; Dube, M.P.; Rouleau, G.A.

    1994-09-01

    Familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) is a degenerative disorder of the motor system characterized by progressive weakness and spasticity of the lower limbs. Little is known about the pathophysiology of this disorder. FSP can be inherited as an autosomal dominant (AD), autosomal recessive, or X-linked trait. We have undertaken linkage analysis for a group of 36 AD FSP families from which we have collected blood samples from 427 individuals, including 148 affected individuals. Typing of polymorphic markers has allowed us to exclude more than 50% of the genome. Recently, linkage for AD FSP to a locus on chromosome 14q was reported. Our AD FSP kindreds were tested for linkage to markers spanning the 20 cM region between D14S69 and D14S66; however, we were not able to establish linkage for any of our families to chromosome 14. Lod scores suggestive of linkage for some AD FSP kindreds have been obtained for markers on chromosome 2p. We have tested seven polymorphic markers spanning the region between D2S405 and D2S177. Our highest aggregate lod score, including all families tested, was obtained at the locus D2S352: 2.4 at 20 cM. Results from HOMOG analysis for linkage heterogeneity will be reported.

  16. Fine localization of the locus for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa on chromosome 17p

    SciTech Connect

    Goliath, R.; Janssens, P.; Beighton, P.

    1995-10-01

    The term {open_quotes}retintis pigmentosa{close_quotes} (RP) refers to a group of inherited retinal degenerative disorders. Clinical manifestations include night-blindness, with variable age of onset, followed by constriction of the visual field that may progress to total loss of sight in later life. Previous studies have shown that RP is caused by mutations within different genes and may be inherited as an X-linked recessive (XLRRP), autosomal recessive (ARRP), or autosomal dominant (ADRP) trait. The AD form of this group of conditions has been found to be caused by mutations within the rhodopsin gene in some families and the peripherin/RDS gene in others. In addition, some ADRP families have been found to be linked to anonymous markers on 8cen, 7p, 7q,19q, and, more recently, 17p. The ADRP gene locus on the short arm of chromosome 17 was identified in a large South African family (ADRP-SA) of British origin. The phenotypic expression of the disorder, which has been described elsewhere is consistent in the pedigree with an early onset of disease symptoms. In all affected subjects in the family, onset of symptoms commenced before the age of 10 years. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Autosomal dominant zonular cataract with sutural opacities localized to chromosome 17q11-12

    SciTech Connect

    Padma, T.; Ayyagari, R.; Murty, J.S.

    1995-10-01

    Congenital cataracts constitute a morphologically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases that are a major cause of childhood blindness. Different loci for hereditary congenital cataracts have been mapped to chromosomes 1, 2, 16, and 17q24. We report linkage of a gene causing a unique form of autosomal dominant zonular cataracts with Y-sutural opacities to chromosome 17q11-12 in a three-generation family exhibiting a maximum lod score of 3.9 at D17S805. Multipoint analysis gave a Mod confidence interval of 17 cM. This interval is bounded by the markers D17S799 and D17S798, a region that would encompass a number of candidate genes including that coding for {Beta}A3/A1-crystallin. 30 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. A stepwise approach for effective management of chronic pain in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Casteleijn, Niek F.; Visser, Folkert W.; Drenth, Joost P.H.; Gevers, Tom J.G.; Groen, Gerbrand J.; Hogan, Marie C.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Drenth, J.P.H.; de Fijter, J.W.; Gansevoort, R.T.; Peters, D.J.M.; Wetzels, J.; Zietse, R.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain, defined as pain existing for >4–6 weeks, affects >60% of patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic disease (ADPKD). It can have various causes, indirectly or directly related to the increase in kidney and liver volume in these patients. Chronic pain in ADPKD patients is often severe, impacting physical activity and social relationships, and frequently difficult to manage. This review provides an overview of pathophysiological mechanisms that can lead to pain and discusses the sensory innervation of the kidneys and the upper abdominal organs, including the liver. In addition, the results of a systematic literature search of ADPKD-specific treatment options are presented. Based on pathophysiological knowledge and evidence derived from the literature an argumentative stepwise approach for effective management of chronic pain in ADPKD is proposed. PMID:25165181

  19. Perinatal Management of Pregnancy Complicated by Autosomal Dominant Emery–Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Megumi; Shirasawa, Hiromitsu; Makino, Kenichi; Miura, Hiroshi; Sato, Wataru; Shimizu, Dai; Sato, Naoki; Kumagai, Jin; Sato, Akira; Terada, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Autosomal dominant Emery–Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (AD-EDMD) is rare compared with other forms of muscular dystrophy and is characterized by cardiac conduction defects. Here, we present the case of a patient diagnosed with AD-EDMD during the first trimester of pregnancy who developed acute preeclampsia and subsequently, congestive heart failure (CHF) following cesarean section. Case A 36-year-old, gravida 0 para 0 woman was diagnosed with AD-EDMD by genetic testing during the first trimester of pregnancy, and she suddenly developed preeclampsia and partial HELLP (hemolytic anemia, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets) syndrome at 33 weeks of gestation. The patient subsequently developed CHF following cesarean section. Conclusion CHF can occur as a direct result of the cardiac defects arising due to EDMD, and therefore, careful prenatal and postpartum management is recommended for such cases. PMID:27054045

  20. Disseminated kidney tuberculosis complicating autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Hideki; Amemiya, Morimasa; Chiba, Koji; Urushibara, Masayasu; Satoh, Jun-Ichi; Noro, Akira

    2012-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is rare, and its diagnosis and treatment are difficult because numerous cysts are exposed to infection and antibiotics do not easily penetrate infected cysts. Here, we report the case of a 43-year-old Japanese man with disseminated urogenital tuberculosis (TB) and ADPKD without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Delayed diagnosis and ineffective anti-TB chemotherapy worsened his condition. Finally, he underwent bilateral nephrectomy but experienced postoperative complications. In conclusion, kidney TB should be recognized as a cause of renal infection in ADPKD, and surgical treatment should be instituted without delay. The importance of early diagnosis and treatment cannot be overemphasized to prevent kidney TB deterioration.

  1. Mutational analysis of PKD1 gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingyan; Li, Lanrong; Liu, Qingmin

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a hereditary disease and common renal disease. Mutations of PKD genes are responsible for this disease. We analyzed a large Chinese family with ADPKD using Sanger sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for this disease. The family comprised 27 individuals including 10 ADPKD patients. These ADPKD patients had severe renal disease and most of them died very young. We analyzed 6 survival patients gene and found they all had C10529T mutation in exon 35 of PKD1 gene. We did not found gene mutation in any unaffected relatives or 300 unrelated controls. These findings suggested that the C10529T mutation in PKD1 gene might be the pathogenic mutation responsible for the disease in this family. PMID:26722532

  2. [Cardiac tamponade as first manifestation in Mediterranean fever with autosomal dominant form].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Ferrer, F; Martinez Villar, M; Fernández Bernal, A; Martín de Lara, I; Paya Elorza, I

    2015-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a hereditary disease characterized by brief, recurring and self-limited episodes of fever and pain with inflammation, of one or several serous (peritoneum, pleura, pericardium, synovial or vaginal tunic of the testicle). Amyloidosis is its more important complication and the principal reason of death in the cases in which it appears. Diagnosis is based on the clinic and is confirmed by genetic tests. The treatment with Colchicine (0,02-0,03 mg/kg/day) prevents the recurrence of FMF attacks and the development of secondary (AA) amyloidosis. We report a case of a 13-year-old child in which FMF was diagnosed after several coincidental episodes with fever, pericarditis and cardiac tamponade. The genetic confirmation showed an autosomal dominant inheritance that is less frecuent than the recesive form, in this disease.

  3. A stepwise approach for effective management of chronic pain in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Casteleijn, Niek F; Visser, Folkert W; Drenth, Joost P H; Gevers, Tom J G; Groen, Gerbrand J; Hogan, Marie C; Gansevoort, Ron T

    2014-09-01

    Chronic pain, defined as pain existing for >4-6 weeks, affects >60% of patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic disease (ADPKD). It can have various causes, indirectly or directly related to the increase in kidney and liver volume in these patients. Chronic pain in ADPKD patients is often severe, impacting physical activity and social relationships, and frequently difficult to manage. This review provides an overview of pathophysiological mechanisms that can lead to pain and discusses the sensory innervation of the kidneys and the upper abdominal organs, including the liver. In addition, the results of a systematic literature search of ADPKD-specific treatment options are presented. Based on pathophysiological knowledge and evidence derived from the literature an argumentative stepwise approach for effective management of chronic pain in ADPKD is proposed.

  4. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: the changing face of clinical management.

    PubMed

    Ong, Albert C M; Devuyst, Olivier; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Walz, Gerd

    2015-05-16

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is the most common inherited kidney disease and accounts for 7-10% of all patients on renal replacement therapy worldwide. Although first reported 500 years ago, this disorder is still regarded as untreatable and its pathogenesis is poorly understood despite much study. During the past 40 years, however, remarkable advances have transformed our understanding of how the disease develops and have led to rapid changes in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment, especially during the past decade. This Review will summarise the key findings, highlight recent developments, and look ahead to the changes in clinical practice that will likely arise from the adoption of a new management framework for this major kidney disease.

  5. [Photic sneeze reflex or autosomal dominant compelling helio-ophthalmic outburst syndrome].

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, J M

    2006-01-01

    Sneeze is an ubiquitous phenomenon that happens to everyone. In spite of this, little attention has been paid to it, among medical literature in general, and even less in neurologic texts. A curious entity, called photic sneeze reflex, solar sneeze reflex, light sneeze reflex or autosomal dominant compelling helio-ophthalmic outburst syndrome, known perhaps since ancient Greek, has been scarcely described in the scientific literature, mainly as clinical notes and letters to the editor, but in a detailed way, we can find just a few reports. This reflex appears when subjects are exposed suddenly to intense sunlight and it consists of long incoercible sneeze bursts. It is usually ignored by its sufferers, who report it as a curiosity or a minor complaint, and its importance has been neglected in spite of its hereditary nature and its apparently high prevalence. We review the history, epidemiology, genetics, neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and physiopathology of this reflex hereditary response.

  6. Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa with apparent incomplete penetrance: a clinical, electrophysiological, psychophysical, and molecular genetic study.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, A T; Fitzke, F; Jay, M; Arden, G B; Inglehearn, C F; Keen, T J; Bhattacharya, S S; Bird, A C

    1993-01-01

    Twenty five symptomatic individuals and six asymptomatic obligate gene carriers from four families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) showing apparent incomplete penetrance have been studied. Symptomatic individuals from three families showed early onset of night blindness, non-recordable rod electroretinograms, and marked elevation of both rod and cone thresholds in all subjects tested. In the fourth family, there was more variation in the age of onset of night blindness and some symptomatic individuals showed well preserved rod and cone function in some retinal areas. All asymptomatic individuals tested had evidence of mild abnormalities of rod and cone function, indicating that these families show marked variation in expressivity rather than true non-penetrance of the adRP gene. No mutations of the rhodopsin or RDS genes were found in these families and the precise genetic mutation(s) remain to be identified. PMID:8025041

  7. Vertebral artery dissection in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, Takuma; Yamashiro, Kazuo; Tanaka, Ryota; Hirano, Kazuoki; Shimada, Yoshiaki; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited renal cystic disease, and it is associated with various extrarenal manifestations, including vascular complications, such as intracranial aneurysms, and aortic root dilatation and aneurysms. However, intracranial arterial dissection has rarely been reported. We herein report the cases of 2 patients with ADPKD who developed a vertebral artery (VA) dissection. Dissection was also observed on the other side of the VA and in the internal carotid artery in the first and second patient, respectively. Both patients also had a history of hypertension, which is frequently accompanied by ADPKD, and their serum creatinine levels were normal. Our report supports the importance of considering ADPKD as one of the possible pathogenic factors in arterial dissection.

  8. Mutational analysis of PKD1 gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingyan; Li, Lanrong; Liu, Qingmin

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a hereditary disease and common renal disease. Mutations of PKD genes are responsible for this disease. We analyzed a large Chinese family with ADPKD using Sanger sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for this disease. The family comprised 27 individuals including 10 ADPKD patients. These ADPKD patients had severe renal disease and most of them died very young. We analyzed 6 survival patients gene and found they all had C10529T mutation in exon 35 of PKD1 gene. We did not found gene mutation in any unaffected relatives or 300 unrelated controls. These findings suggested that the C10529T mutation in PKD1 gene might be the pathogenic mutation responsible for the disease in this family.

  9. [Seminal vesicle cysts and infertility in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Venegas, J L

    2005-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a systemic hereditary disorder characterized by bilateral diffuse renal cysts. Extrarenal involvement is a well known manifestation of ADPKD. Cysts in the liver, pancreas, lung, spleen, oesophagus, ovary, testis, epididymis, prostate, thyroid, bladder, uterus, brain, paraespinal, and seminal vesicle have also been described. The occurrence of seminal vesicle cysts is often unrecognised. We report here a man with seminal vesicle cysts and azoospermia associated with ADPKD. Seminal vesicle cysts are not uncommon in ADPKD and in some cases it is associated with infertility. Ultrasound and computed tomography imaging were effective in documenting the underlying lesions non-invasively. Studies evaluating fertility in patients with seminal vesicle cysts and ADPKD are needed.

  10. TNF-receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS): an autosomal dominant multisystem disorder.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Nima

    2006-11-01

    The TNF-receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is an autosomal dominant auto-inflammatory disorder, characterized by recurrent febrile attacks and localized inflammation. TRAPS is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the TNF Receptor Super Family 1A (TNFRSF1A) on chromosome 12p13. However, the incomplete penetrance and genetic heterogeneity have been reported in this syndrome. Although the ethnic diversity and clinical heterogeneity may propose the role of other genes in the pathogenesis of TRAPS, some low-penetrance TNFRSF1A variants contribute to atypical inflammatory responses in other autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, molecular studies on TRAPS and other auto-inflammatory disorders could be suggested to identify additional genes coding the molecules in the TNF signalling process.

  11. Autosomal dominant (Beukes) premature degenerative osteoarthropathy of the hip joint unlinked to COL2A1

    SciTech Connect

    Beighton, P.; Ramesar, R.; Cilliers, H.J.

    1994-12-01

    Molecular investigations have been undertaken in several separate large South African families with autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasias in which premature degenerative osteoarthropathy of the hip joint was the major manifestation. There are sometimes additional minor changes in the spine and these conditions fall into the general spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) nosological category. In some kindreds, linkage between phenotype and the type II collagen gene (COL2A1) has been established, while in others there is no linkage. We have now completed molecular linkage investigations in an Afrikaner family named Beukes, in which 47 members in 6 generations have premature osteoarthropathy of the hip joint. A LOD score of minus infinity indicates that this condition is not the result of a defect of the COL2A1 gene. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Localization of genes for autosomal dominant congenital cataracts to chromosomes 2 and 17

    SciTech Connect

    Ayyagari, R.; Scott, M.; Wozencraft, L.

    1994-09-01

    Linkage analysis was performed in a seven generation family in which 28 of 52 individuals examined had autosomal dominant congenital pulverulent cataracts and a five generation family in which 10 of 17 individuals examined had autosomal dominant congenital zonular cataracts with sutural opacities. Initial analysis with 21 microsatellite markers in 7 candidate gene regions localized the pulverulent cataract locus to the long arm of chromosome 2 near the {beta}B2-crystallin gene. A lod score of 3.6 was obtained with D2S72 ({theta}=0.12), 3.5 with CRYG ({theta}=0.06), 3.4 with ({theta}=0.05), 2.0 with D2S117 ({theta}=0.22) and 6.6 with D2S128 ({theta}=0.05). Multipoint linkage analysis gave Zmax=4.2 at D2S157 with a one lod confidence interval covering 19 cM. The closest flanking markers showing obligate recombinants are D2S157 and D2S173. The zonular cataract locus was mapped to chromosome 2 near the {gamma}-crystallin gene cluster. A maximum lod score of 3.8 was obtained with D17S805 ({theta}=0.0), 2.1 with D17S798 ({theta}=0.60), and 3.7 with NF1 ({theta}=0.0). Multipoint analysis showed Zmax=3.81 at D17S805 with a one lod confidence interval covering 17 cM based on the Genethon map, localizing cataracts between markers D17S799 and D17S800. Further efforts are being directed at refining the localization of these cataract loci and examining the nearby crystallin genes for possible mutations.

  13. Regional variability of imaging biomarkers in autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Benzinger, Tammie L. S.; Blazey, Tyler; Jack, Clifford R.; Koeppe, Robert A.; Su, Yi; Xiong, Chengjie; Raichle, Marcus E.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Ances, Beau M.; Bateman, Randall J.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Fagan, Anne M.; Goate, Alison; Marcus, Daniel S.; Aisen, Paul S.; Christensen, Jon J.; Ercole, Lindsay; Hornbeck, Russ C.; Farrar, Angela M.; Aldea, Patricia; Jasielec, Mateusz S.; Owen, Christopher J.; Xie, Xianyun; Mayeux, Richard; Brickman, Adam; McDade, Eric; Klunk, William; Mathis, Chester A.; Ringman, John; Thompson, Paul M.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Saykin, Andrew J.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Salloway, Stephen; Correia, Stephen; Schofield, Peter R.; Masters, Colin L.; Rowe, Christopher; Villemagne, Victor L.; Martins, Ralph; Ourselin, Sebastien; Rossor, Martin N.; Fox, Nick C.; Cash, David M.; Weiner, Michael W.; Holtzman, David M.; Buckles, Virginia D.; Moulder, Krista; Morris, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Major imaging biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease include amyloid deposition [imaged with [11C]Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET], altered glucose metabolism (imaged with [18F]fluro-deoxyglucose PET), and structural atrophy (imaged by MRI). Recently we published the initial subset of imaging findings for specific regions in a cohort of individuals with autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease. We now extend this work to include a larger cohort, whole-brain analyses integrating all three imaging modalities, and longitudinal data to examine regional differences in imaging biomarker dynamics. The anatomical distribution of imaging biomarkers is described in relation to estimated years from symptom onset. Autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease mutation carrier individuals have elevated PiB levels in nearly every cortical region 15 y before the estimated age of onset. Reduced cortical glucose metabolism and cortical thinning in the medial and lateral parietal lobe appeared 10 and 5 y, respectively, before estimated age of onset. Importantly, however, a divergent pattern was observed subcortically. All subcortical gray-matter regions exhibited elevated PiB uptake, but despite this, only the hippocampus showed reduced glucose metabolism. Similarly, atrophy was not observed in the caudate and pallidum despite marked amyloid accumulation. Finally, before hypometabolism, a hypermetabolic phase was identified for some cortical regions, including the precuneus and posterior cingulate. Additional analyses of individuals in which longitudinal data were available suggested that an accelerated appearance of volumetric declines approximately coincides with the onset of the symptomatic phase of the disease. PMID:24194552

  14. Autosomal dominant frontonasal dysplasia (atypical Greig syndrome): Lessons from the Xt mutant mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, M.L.; Nunes, M.E.

    1994-09-01

    Greig syndrome is the autosomal dominant association of mild hypertelorism, variable polysyndactyly, and normal intelligence. Several families have been found to have translocations or deletions of 7p13 interrupting the normal expression of GLI3 (a zinc finger, DNA binding, transcription repressor). Recently, a mutation in the mouse homologue of GLI3 was found in the extra-toes mutant mouse (Xt). The phenotypic features of this mouse model include mild hypertelorism, postaxial polydactyly of the forelimbs, preaxial polydactyly of the hindlimbs, and variable tibial hemimelia. The homozygous mutant Xt/Xt have severe frontonasal dysplasia (FND), polysyndactyly of fore-and hindlimbs and invariable tibial hemimelia. We have recently evaluated a child with severe (type D) frontonasal dysplasia, fifth finger camptodactyly, preaxial polydactyly of one foot, and ispilateral tibial hemimelia. His father was born with a bifid nose, broad columnella, broad feet, and a two centimeter leg length discrepancy. The paternal grandmother of the proband is phenotypically normal; however, her fraternal twin died at birth with severe facial anomalies. The paternal great-grandmother of the proband is phenotypically normal however her niece was born with moderate ocular hypertelorism. This pedigree is suggestive of an autosomal dominant form of frontonasal dysplasia with variable expressivity. The phenotypic features of our case more closely resemble the Xt mouse than the previously defined features of Greig syndrome in humans. This suggests that a mutation in GLI3 may be responsible for FND in this family. We are currently using polymorphic dinucleotide repeat markers flanking GLI3 in a attempt to demonstrate linkage in this pedigree. Demonstration of a GLI3 mutation in this family would broaden our view of the spectrum of phenotypes possible in Greig syndrome and could provide insight into genotype/phenotype correlation in FND.

  15. A novel nonsense mutation in CRYBB1 associated with autosomal dominant congenital cataract

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Juhua; Zhu, Yihua; Gu, Feng; He, Xiang; Cao, Zongfu; Li, Xuexi; Tong, Yi

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To identify the molecular defect underlying an autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract in a Chinese family. Methods Twenty-two members of a three-generation pedigree were recruited, clinical examinations were performed, and genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes. All members were genotyped with polymorphic microsatellite markers adjacent to each of the known cataract-related genes. Linkage analysis was performed after genotyping. Candidate genes were screened for mutation using direct sequencing. Individuals were screened for presence of a mutation by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Results Linkage analysis identified a maximum LOD score of 3.31 (recombination fraction [θ]=0.0) with marker D22S1167 on chromosome 22, which flanks the β-crystallin gene cluster (CRYBB3, CRYBB2, CRYBB1, and CRYBA4). Sequencing the coding regions and the flanking intronic sequences of these four candidate genes identified a novel, heterozygous C→T transition in exon 6 of CRYBB1 in the affected individuals of the family. This single nucleotide change introduced a novel BfaI site and was predicted to result in a nonsense mutation at codon 223 that changed a phylogenetically conserved amino acid to a stop codon (p.Q223X). RFLP analysis confirmed that this mutation co-segregated with the disease phenotype in all available family members and was not found in 100 normal unrelated individuals from the same ethnic background. Conclusions This study has identified a novel nonsense mutation in CRYBB1 (p.Q223X) associated with autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract. PMID:18432316

  16. Autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia: Tight linkage to chromosome 15q

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.K.; Wu, C.T.B.; Jones, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    Familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) (MIM No.18260) constitutes a clinically and genetically diverse group of disorders that share the primary feature of progressive, severe, lower extremity spasticity. FSP is classified according to the mode of inheritance and whether progressive spasticity occurs in isolation ({open_quotes}uncomplicated FSP{close_quotes}) or with other neurologic abnormalities ({open_quotes}complicated FSP{close_quotes}), including optic neuropathy, retinopathy, extrapyramidal disturbance, dementia, ataxia, ichthyosis, mental retardation, or deafness. Recently, autosomal dominant, uncomplicated FSP was shown to be genetically heterogeneous and tightly linked to a group of microsatellite markers on chromosome 14q in one large kindred. We examined 126 members of a non-consanguineous North American kindred of Irish descent. FSP was diagnosed in 31 living subjects who developed insidiously progressive gait disturbance between ages 12 and 35 years. Using genetic linkage analysis to microsatellite DNA polymorphisms, we showed that the FSP locus on chromosome 14q was exluded from linkage with the disorder in our family. Subsequently, we searched for genetic linkage between the disorder and microsatellite DNA polymorphisms spanning approximately 50% of the genome. We observed significantly positive, two-point maximum lod scores (Z) for markers on chromosome 15q: D15S128 (Z=9.70, {theta}=0.05), D15S165 (Z=3.30, {theta}=0.10), and UT511 (Z=3.86, {theta}=0.10). Our data clearly establishes that one locus for autosomal dominant, uncomplicated FSP is mapped to the pericentric region of chromosome 15q. Identifying genes responsible for chromosome 15q-linked and chromosome 14q-linked FSP will greatly advance our understanding of this condition and hopefully other inherited and degenerative brain and spinal cord disorders that are also characterized by axonal degeneration.

  17. Autosomal dominant postaxial polydactyly, nail dystrophy, and dental abnormalities map to chromosome 4p16, in the region containing the Ellis-van Creveld syndrome locus.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, T D; Guttmacher, A E; McKinnon, W; Sharma, M; McKusick, V A; Jabs, E W

    1997-01-01

    We have studied a four-generation family with features of Weyers acrofacial dysostosis, in which the proband has a more severe phenotype, resembling Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. Weyers acrofacial dysostosis is an autosomal dominant condition with dental anomalies, nail dystrophy, postaxial polydactyly, and mild short stature. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome is a similar condition, with autosomal recessive inheritance and the additional features of disproportionate dwarfism, thoracic dysplasia, and congenital heart disease. Linkage and haplotype analysis determined that the disease locus in this pedigree resides on chromosome 4p16, distal to the genetic marker D4S3007 and within a 17-cM region flanking the genetic locus D4S2366. This region includes the Ellis-van Creveld syndrome locus, which previously was reported to map within a 3-cM region between genetic markers D4S2957 and D4S827. Either the genes for the condition in our family and for Ellis-van Creveld syndrome are near one another or these two conditions are allelic with mutations in the same gene. These data also raise the possibility that Weyers acrofacial dysostosis is the heterozygous expression of a mutation that, in homozygous form, causes the autosomal recessive disorder Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. Images Figure 1 PMID:9399901

  18. Relevance of ultrasound examination in general practice. A case report of a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cwojdzińska-Jankowska, Izabela; Plewa, Anna

    2013-09-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is a genetic disorder which results in the development of multiple cysts in the kidneys and other parenchymal organs. The two genes in which mutations are known to cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease are PKD1 and PKD2. Approximately 50% of individuals with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease will develop end-stage renal disease by the age of 60. Early stages of the disease are usually asymptomatic and at the moment of establishing a definitive diagnosis, complications and associated disorders, including end-stage renal disease, occur frequently. About 95% of individuals with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease have an affected parent and about 5% have a de novo mutation. Each child of an affected individual has a 50% chance of inheriting the mutation. The first symptoms of disease usually develop in the third or fourth decades of life. Imaging examinations of relatives at risk allow for an early detection when no clinical symptoms are present as well as enable treatment of complications and associated disorders. Ultrasound examination as a basic and minimally invasive imaging technique can be easily used in general practice. In the majority of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, sonography allows for a certain and reliable diagnosis of this disease. Additionally, it enables to perform follow-up examinations both of the patient and their family. The possibility of ultrasound imaging in general practice broadens clinical examination and facilitates establishing a proper diagnosis. The paper presents a case report of a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Its aim was to present the relevance of ultrasound examination in general practice.

  19. DISTAL MYOPATHIES

    PubMed Central

    Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Over a century ago, Gowers described two young patients in whom distal muscles weakness involved the hand, foot, sternocleidomastoid, and facial muscles in the other case the shoulder and distal leg musculature. Soon after, , similar distal myopathy cases were reported whereby the absence of sensory symptoms and of pathologic changes in the peripheral nerves and spinal cord at postmortem examination allowed differentiation from Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. In 1951, Welander described autosomal dominant (AD) distal arm myopathy in a large Scandanavian cohort. Since then the number of well-characterized distal myopathies has continued to grow such that the distal myopathies have formed a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. Affected kindred commonly manifest weakness that is limited to foot and toe muscles even in advanced stages of the disease, with variable mild proximal leg, distal arm, neck and laryngeal muscle involvement in selected individuals. An interesting consequence of the molecular characterization of the distal myopathies has been the recognition that mutation in a single gene can lead to more than one clinical disorder. For example, Myoshi myopathy (MM) and limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) type 2B are allelic disorders due to defects in the gene that encodes dysferlin. The six well described distal myopathy syndromes are shown in Table 1. Table 2 lists advances in our understanding of the myofibrillar myopathy group and Table 3 includes more recently delineated and less common distal myopathies. In the same manner, the first section of this review pertains to the more traditional six distal myopathies followed by discussion of the myofibrillar myopathies. In the third section, we review other clinically and genetically distinctive distal myopathy syndromes usually based upon single or smaller family cohorts. The fourth section considers other neuromuscular disorders that are important to recognize as they display prominent

  20. A Three-Generation Family with Idiopathic Facial Palsy Suggesting an Autosomal Dominant Inheritance with High Penetrance

    PubMed Central

    Grønhøj Larsen, Christian; Gyldenløve, Mette; Jønch, Aia Elise; Charabi, Birgitte; Tümer, Zeynep

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic facial palsy (IFP), also known as Bell's palsy, is a common neurologic disorder, but recurrent and familial forms are rare. This case series presents a three-generation family with idiopathic facial palsy. The mode of inheritance of IFP has previously been suggested as autosomal dominant with low or variable penetrance, but the present family indicates an autosomal dominant trait with high or complete penetrance. Chromosome microarray studies did not reveal a pathogenic copy number variation, which could enable identification of a candidate gene. PMID:25685580

  1. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease with diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis - an unusual association: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is an inherited disorder that is characterized by the development and growth of cysts in the kidneys and other organs. Urinary protein excretion is usually less than 1 g/24 hours in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, and an association of nephrotic syndrome with this condition is considered rare. There are only anecdotal case reports of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease associated with nephrotic syndrome, with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis being the most commonly reported histopathological diagnosis. Nephrotic-range proteinuria in the presence of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, with or without an accompanying decline in renal function, should be investigated by open renal biopsy to exclude coexisting glomerular disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease with histologically proven diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis presenting with nephrotic-range proteinuria. No other reports of this could be found in a global electronic search of the literature. Case presentation We report the case of a 35-year-old Indo-Aryan man with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease associated with nephrotic syndrome and a concomitant decline in his glomerular filtration rate. Open renal biopsy revealed diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis. An accurate diagnosis enabled us to manage him conservatively with a successful outcome, without the use of corticosteroid which is the standard treatment and the drug most commonly used to treat nephrotic syndrome empirically. Conclusion Despite the reluctance of physicians to carry out a renal biopsy on patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, our case supports the idea that renal biopsy is needed in patients with polycystic kidney disease with nephrotic-range proteinuria to make an accurate diagnosis. It also illustrates the importance of open renal

  2. De Novo GMNN Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Primordial Dwarfism Associated with Meier-Gorlin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Burrage, Lindsay C.; Charng, Wu-Lin; Eldomery, Mohammad K.; Willer, Jason R.; Davis, Erica E.; Lugtenberg, Dorien; Zhu, Wenmiao; Leduc, Magalie S.; Akdemir, Zeynep C.; Azamian, Mahshid; Zapata, Gladys; Hernandez, Patricia P.; Schoots, Jeroen; de Munnik, Sonja A.; Roepman, Ronald; Pearring, Jillian N.; Jhangiani, Shalini; Katsanis, Nicholas; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Brunner, Han G.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Eng, Christine M.; Xia, Fan; Lalani, Seema R.; Lupski, James R.; Bongers, Ernie M.H.F.; Yang, Yaping

    2015-01-01

    Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is a genetically heterogeneous primordial dwarfism syndrome known to be caused by biallelic loss-of-function mutations in one of five genes encoding pre-replication complex proteins: ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, and CDC6. Mutations in these genes cause disruption of the origin of DNA replication initiation. To date, only an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern has been described in individuals with this disorder, with a molecular etiology established in about three-fourths of cases. Here, we report three subjects with MGS and de novo heterozygous mutations in the 5′ end of GMNN, encoding the DNA replication inhibitor geminin. We identified two truncating mutations in exon 2 (the 1st coding exon), c.16A>T (p.Lys6∗) and c.35_38delTCAA (p.Ile12Lysfs∗4), and one missense mutation, c.50A>G (p.Lys17Arg), affecting the second-to-last nucleotide of exon 2 and possibly RNA splicing. Geminin is present during the S, G2, and M phases of the cell cycle and is degraded during the metaphase-anaphase transition by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), which recognizes the destruction box sequence near the 5′ end of the geminin protein. All three GMNN mutations identified alter sites 5′ to residue Met28 of the protein, which is located within the destruction box. We present data supporting a gain-of-function mechanism, in which the GMNN mutations result in proteins lacking the destruction box and hence increased protein stability and prolonged inhibition of replication leading to autosomal-dominant MGS. PMID:26637980

  3. De Novo GMNN Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Primordial Dwarfism Associated with Meier-Gorlin Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Burrage, Lindsay C; Charng, Wu-Lin; Eldomery, Mohammad K; Willer, Jason R; Davis, Erica E; Lugtenberg, Dorien; Zhu, Wenmiao; Leduc, Magalie S; Akdemir, Zeynep C; Azamian, Mahshid; Zapata, Gladys; Hernandez, Patricia P; Schoots, Jeroen; de Munnik, Sonja A; Roepman, Ronald; Pearring, Jillian N; Jhangiani, Shalini; Katsanis, Nicholas; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; Brunner, Han G; Beaudet, Arthur L; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Eng, Christine M; Xia, Fan; Lalani, Seema R; Lupski, James R; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Yang, Yaping

    2015-12-03

    Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is a genetically heterogeneous primordial dwarfism syndrome known to be caused by biallelic loss-of-function mutations in one of five genes encoding pre-replication complex proteins: ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, and CDC6. Mutations in these genes cause disruption of the origin of DNA replication initiation. To date, only an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern has been described in individuals with this disorder, with a molecular etiology established in about three-fourths of cases. Here, we report three subjects with MGS and de novo heterozygous mutations in the 5' end of GMNN, encoding the DNA replication inhibitor geminin. We identified two truncating mutations in exon 2 (the 1(st) coding exon), c.16A>T (p.Lys6(∗)) and c.35_38delTCAA (p.Ile12Lysfs(∗)4), and one missense mutation, c.50A>G (p.Lys17Arg), affecting the second-to-last nucleotide of exon 2 and possibly RNA splicing. Geminin is present during the S, G2, and M phases of the cell cycle and is degraded during the metaphase-anaphase transition by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), which recognizes the destruction box sequence near the 5' end of the geminin protein. All three GMNN mutations identified alter sites 5' to residue Met28 of the protein, which is located within the destruction box. We present data supporting a gain-of-function mechanism, in which the GMNN mutations result in proteins lacking the destruction box and hence increased protein stability and prolonged inhibition of replication leading to autosomal-dominant MGS.

  4. Preclinical trials in autosomal dominant AD: implementation of the DIAN-TU trial.

    PubMed

    Mills, S M; Mallmann, J; Santacruz, A M; Fuqua, A; Carril, M; Aisen, P S; Althage, M C; Belyew, S; Benzinger, T L; Brooks, W S; Buckles, V D; Cairns, N J; Clifford, D; Danek, A; Fagan, A M; Farlow, M; Fox, N; Ghetti, B; Goate, A M; Heinrichs, D; Hornbeck, R; Jack, C; Jucker, M; Klunk, W E; Marcus, D S; Martins, R N; Masters, C M; Mayeux, R; McDade, E; Morris, J C; Oliver, A; Ringman, J M; Rossor, M N; Salloway, S; Schofield, P R; Snider, J; Snyder, P; Sperling, R A; Stewart, C; Thomas, R G; Xiong, C; Bateman, R J

    2013-10-01

    The Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer's Network Trials Unit (DIAN-TU) was formed to direct the design and management of interventional therapeutic trials of international DIAN and autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease (ADAD) participants. The goal of the DIAN-TU is to implement safe trials that have the highest likelihood of success while advancing scientific understanding of these diseases and clinical effects of proposed therapies. The DIAN-TU has launched a trial design that leverages the existing infrastructure of the ongoing DIAN observational study, takes advantage of a variety of drug targets, incorporates the latest results of biomarker and cognitive data collected during the observational study, and implements biomarkers measuring Alzheimer's disease (AD) biological processes to improve the efficiency of trial design. The DIAN-TU trial design is unique due to the sophisticated design of multiple drugs, multiple pharmaceutical partners, academics servings as sponsor, geographic distribution of a rare population and intensive safety and biomarker assessments. The implementation of the operational aspects such as home health research delivery, safety magnetic resonance imagings (MRIs) at remote locations, monitoring clinical and cognitive measures, and regulatory management involving multiple pharmaceutical sponsors of the complex DIAN-TU trial are described.

  5. Functional polycystin-1 dosage governs autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease severity.

    PubMed

    Hopp, Katharina; Ward, Christopher J; Hommerding, Cynthia J; Nasr, Samih H; Tuan, Han-Fang; Gainullin, Vladimir G; Rossetti, Sandro; Torres, Vicente E; Harris, Peter C

    2012-11-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is caused by mutations to PKD1 or PKD2, triggering progressive cystogenesis and typically leading to end-stage renal disease in midlife. The phenotypic spectrum, however, ranges from in utero onset to adequate renal function at old age. Recent patient data suggest that the disease is dosage dependent, where incompletely penetrant alleles influence disease severity. Here, we have developed a knockin mouse model matching a likely disease variant, PKD1 p.R3277C (RC), and have proved that its functionally hypomorphic nature modifies the ADPKD phenotype. While Pkd1+/null mice are normal, Pkd1RC/null mice have rapidly progressive disease, and Pkd1RC/RC animals develop gradual cystogenesis. These models effectively mimic the pathophysiological features of in utero-onset and typical ADPKD, respectively, correlating the level of functional Pkd1 product with disease severity, highlighting the dosage dependence of cystogenesis. Additionally, molecular analyses identified p.R3277C as a temperature-sensitive folding/trafficking mutant, and length defects in collecting duct primary cilia, the organelle central to PKD pathogenesis, were clearly detected for the first time to our knowledge in PKD1. Altogether, this study highlights the role that in trans variants at the disease locus can play in phenotypic modification of dominant diseases and provides a truly orthologous PKD1 model, optimal for therapeutic testing.

  6. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type I: A review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Type I autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) characterized by ataxia with other neurological signs, including oculomotor disturbances, cognitive deficits, pyramidal and extrapyramidal dysfunction, bulbar, spinal and peripheral nervous system involvement. The global prevalence of this disease is not known. The most common type I ADCA is SCA3 followed by SCA2, SCA1, and SCA8, in descending order. Founder effects no doubt contribute to the variable prevalence between populations. Onset is usually in adulthood but cases of presentation in childhood have been reported. Clinical features vary depending on the SCA subtype but by definition include ataxia associated with other neurological manifestations. The clinical spectrum ranges from pure cerebellar signs to constellations including spinal cord and peripheral nerve disease, cognitive impairment, cerebellar or supranuclear ophthalmologic signs, psychiatric problems, and seizures. Cerebellar ataxia can affect virtually any body part causing movement abnormalities. Gait, truncal, and limb ataxia are often the most obvious cerebellar findings though nystagmus, saccadic abnormalities, and dysarthria are usually associated. To date, 21 subtypes have been identified: SCA1-SCA4, SCA8, SCA10, SCA12-SCA14, SCA15/16, SCA17-SCA23, SCA25, SCA27, SCA28 and dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA). Type I ADCA can be further divided based on the proposed pathogenetic mechanism into 3 subclasses: subclass 1 includes type I ADCA caused by CAG repeat expansions such as SCA1-SCA3, SCA17, and DRPLA, subclass 2 includes trinucleotide repeat expansions that fall outside of the protein-coding regions of the disease gene including SCA8, SCA10 and SCA12. Subclass 3 contains disorders caused by specific gene deletions, missense mutation, and nonsense mutation and includes SCA13, SCA14, SCA15/16, SCA27 and SCA28. Diagnosis is based on clinical history, physical examination, genetic molecular

  7. Heterozygous HTRA1 mutations are associated with autosomal dominant cerebral small vessel disease.

    PubMed

    Verdura, Edgard; Hervé, Dominique; Scharrer, Eva; Amador, Maria Del Mar; Guyant-Maréchal, Lucie; Philippi, Anne; Corlobé, Astrid; Bergametti, Françoise; Gazal, Steven; Prieto-Morin, Carol; Beaufort, Nathalie; Le Bail, Benoit; Viakhireva, Irina; Dichgans, Martin; Chabriat, Hugues; Haffner, Christof; Tournier-Lasserve, Elisabeth

    2015-08-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease represents a heterogeneous group of disorders leading to stroke and cognitive impairment. While most small vessel diseases appear sporadic and related to age and hypertension, several early-onset monogenic forms have also been reported. However, only a minority of patients with familial small vessel disease carry mutations in one of known small vessel disease genes. We used whole exome sequencing to identify candidate genes in an autosomal dominant small vessel disease family in which known small vessel disease genes had been excluded, and subsequently screened all candidate genes in 201 unrelated probands with a familial small vessel disease of unknown aetiology, using high throughput multiplex polymerase chain reaction and next generation sequencing. A heterozygous HTRA1 variant (R166L), absent from 1000 Genomes and Exome Variant Server databases and predicted to be deleterious by in silico tools, was identified in all affected members of the index family. Ten probands of 201 additional unrelated and affected probands (4.97%) harboured a heterozygous HTRA1 mutation predicted to be damaging. There was a highly significant difference in the number of likely deleterious variants in cases compared to controls (P = 4.2 × 10(-6); odds ratio = 15.4; 95% confidence interval = 4.9-45.5), strongly suggesting causality. Seven of these variants were located within or close to the HTRA1 protease domain, three were in the N-terminal domain of unknown function and one in the C-terminal PDZ domain. In vitro activity analysis of HTRA1 mutants demonstrated a loss of function effect. Clinical features of this autosomal dominant small vessel disease differ from those of CARASIL and CADASIL by a later age of onset and the absence of the typical extraneurological features of CARASIL. They are similar to those of sporadic small vessel disease, except for their familial nature. Our data demonstrate that heterozygous HTRA1 mutations are an important cause

  8. BDNF Val66Met moderates memory impairment, hippocampal function and tau in preclinical autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yen Ying; Hassenstab, Jason; Cruchaga, Carlos; Goate, Alison; Fagan, Anne M; Benzinger, Tammie L S; Maruff, Paul; Snyder, Peter J; Masters, Colin L; Allegri, Ricardo; Chhatwal, Jasmeer; Farlow, Martin R; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Laske, Christoph; Levin, Johannes; McDade, Eric; Ringman, John M; Rossor, Martin; Salloway, Stephen; Schofield, Peter R; Holtzman, David M; Morris, John C; Bateman, Randall J

    2016-10-01

    SEE ROGAEVA AND SCHMITT-ULMS DOI101093/AWW201 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphism is implicated in synaptic excitation and neuronal integrity, and has previously been shown to moderate amyloid-β-related memory decline and hippocampal atrophy in preclinical sporadic Alzheimer's disease. However, the effect of BDNF in autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease is unknown. We aimed to determine the effect of BDNF Val66Met on cognitive function, hippocampal function, tau and amyloid-β in preclinical autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease. We explored effects of apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 on these relationships. The Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network conducted clinical, neuropsychological, genetic, biomarker and neuroimaging measures at baseline in 131 mutation non-carriers and 143 preclinical autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease mutation carriers on average 12 years before clinical symptom onset. BDNF genotype data were obtained for mutation carriers (95 Val66 homozygotes, 48 Met66 carriers). Among preclinical mutation carriers, Met66 carriers had worse memory performance, lower hippocampal glucose metabolism and increased levels of cerebrospinal fluid tau and phosphorylated tau (p-tau) than Val66 homozygotes. Cortical amyloid-β and cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 levels were significantly different from non-carriers but did not differ between preclinical mutation carrier Val66 homozygotes and Met66 carriers. There was an effect of APOE on amyloid-β levels, but not cognitive function, glucose metabolism or tau. As in sporadic Alzheimer's disease, the deleterious effects of amyloid-β on memory, hippocampal function, and tau in preclinical autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease mutation carriers are greater in Met66 carriers. To date, this is the only genetic factor found to moderate downstream effects of amyloid-β in autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Exome sequencing reveals a heterozygous DLX5 mutation in a Chinese family with autosomal-dominant split-hand/foot malformation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue; Xin, Qian; Li, Lin; Li, Jiangxia; Zhang, Changwu; Qiu, Rongfang; Qian, Chenmin; Zhao, Hailing; Liu, Yongchao; Shan, Shan; Dang, Jie; Bian, Xianli; Shao, Changshun; Gong, Yaoqin; Liu, Qiji

    2014-01-01

    Split-hand/foot malformation (SHFM) is a congenital limb deformity due to the absence or dysplasia of central rays of the autopod. Six SHFM loci have already been identified. Here we describe a Chinese family with autosomal-dominant SHFM1 that has previously been mapped to 7q21.2-21.3. The two affected family members, mother and son, showed deep median clefts between toes, ectrodactyly and syndactyly; the mother also showed triphalangeal thumbs. Exome sequencing and variant screening of candidate genes in the six loci known to be responsible for SHFM revealed a novel heterozygous mutation, c.558G>T (p.(Gln186His)), in distal-less homeobox 5 (DLX5). As DLX5 encodes a transcription factor capable of transactivating MYC, we also tested whether the mutation could affect DLX5 transcription acitivity. Results from luciferase reporter assay revealed that a mutation in DLX5 compromised its transcriptional activity. This is the first report of a mutation in DLX5 leading to autosomal-dominant SHFM1. PMID:24496061

  10. Assessing Risk of Disease Progression and Pharmacological Management of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Soroka, Steven; Alam, Ahsan; Bevilacqua, Micheli; Girard, Louis-Philippe; Komenda, Paul; Loertscher, Rolf; McFarlane, Philip; Pandeya, Sanjaya; Tam, Paul; Bichet, Daniel G.

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited renal disorder worldwide. The disease is characterized by renal cysts and progressive renal failure due to progressive enlargement of cysts and renal fibrosis. An estimated 45% to 70% of patients with ADPKD progress to end-stage renal disease by age 65 years. Although both targeted and nontargeted therapies have been tested in patients with ADPKD, tolvaptan is currently the only pharmacological therapy approved in Canada for the treatment of ADPKD. The purpose of this consensus recommendation is to develop an evidence-informed recommendation for the optimal management of adult patients with ADPKD. This document focuses on the role of genetic testing, the role of renal imaging, predicting the risk of disease progression, and pharmacological treatment options for ADPKD. These areas of focus were derived from 2 national surveys that were disseminated to nephrologists and patients with ADPKD with the aim of identifying unmet needs in the management of ADPKD in Canada. Specific recommendations are provided for the treatment of ADPKD with tolvaptan. PMID:28321325

  11. A Novel CRYBB2 Stopgain Mutation Causing Congenital Autosomal Dominant Cataract in a Chinese Family

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu; Zhai, Yaru; Huang, Lulin; Gong, Bo; Li, Jie; Hao, Fang; Wu, Zhengzheng

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is the most common cause of the visual disability and blindness in childhood. This study aimed to identify gene mutations responsible for autosomal dominant congenital cataract (ADCC) in a Chinese family using next-generation sequencing technology. This family included eight unaffected and five affected individuals. After complete ophthalmic examinations, the blood samples of the proband and two available family members were collected. Then the whole exome sequencing was performed on the proband and Sanger sequencing was applied to validate the causal mutation in the two family members and control samples. After the whole exome sequencing data were filtered through a series of existing variation databases, a heterozygous mutation c.499T

  12. A recurrent deletion mutation in OPA1 causes autosomal dominant optic atrophy in a Chinese family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liping; Shi, Wei; Song, Liming; Zhang, Xiao; Cheng, Lulu; Wang, Yanfang; Ge, Xianglian; Li, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Min, Qingjie; Jin, Zi-Bing; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2014-11-01

    Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) is the most frequent form of hereditary optic neuropathy and occurs due to the degeneration of the retinal ganglion cells. To identify the genetic defect in a family with putative ADOA, we performed capture next generation sequencing (CNGS) to screen known retinal disease genes. However, six exons failed to be sequenced by CNGS in optic atrophy 1 gene (OPA1). Sequencing of those exons identified a 4 bp deletion mutation (c.2983-1_2985del) in OPA1. Furthermore, we sequenced the transcripts of OPA1 from the patient skin fibroblasts and found there is six-nucleotide deletion (c.2984-c.2989, AGAAAG). Quantitative-PCR and Western blotting showed that OPA1 mRNA and its protein expression have no obvious difference between patient skin fibroblast and control. The analysis of protein structure by molecular modeling suggests that the mutation may change the structure of OPA1 by formation of an alpha helix protruding into an existing pocket. Taken together, we identified an OPA1 mutation in a family with ADOA by filling the missing CNGS data. We also showed that this mutation affects the structural intactness of OPA1. It provides molecular insights for clinical genetic diagnosis and treatment of optic atrophy.

  13. Arrested maturation of excitatory synapses in autosomal dominant lateral temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu-Dong; Lee, Sanghoon; Jin, Zhe; Wright, Moriah; Smith, Stephen E P; Anderson, Matthew P

    2009-10-01

    A subset of central glutamatergic synapses are coordinately pruned and matured by unresolved mechanisms during postnatal development. We report that the human epilepsy gene LGI1, encoding leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated protein-1 and mutated in autosomal dominant lateral temporal lobe epilepsy (ADLTE), mediates this process in hippocampus. We created transgenic mice either expressing a truncated mutant LGI1 (835delC) found in ADLTE or overexpressing a wild-type LGI1. We discovered that the normal postnatal maturation of presynaptic and postsynaptic functions was arrested by the 835delC mutant LGI1, and contrastingly, was magnified by excess wild-type LGI1. Concurrently, mutant LGI1 inhibited dendritic pruning and increased the spine density to markedly increase excitatory synaptic transmission. Inhibitory transmission, by contrast, was unaffected. Furthermore, mutant LGI1 promoted epileptiform discharge in vitro and kindling epileptogenesis in vivo with partial gamma-aminobutyric acid(A) (GABA(A)) receptor blockade. Thus, LGI1 represents a human gene mutated to promote epilepsy through impaired postnatal development of glutamatergic circuits.

  14. From bone abnormalities to mineral metabolism dysregulation in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mekahli, Djalila; Bacchetta, Justine

    2013-11-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common monogenic cause of kidney failure. It is a systemic disorder, not only affecting the kidneys, but also associated with cyst formation in other organs such as the liver, spleen, pancreas, and seminal vesicles. Other extra-renal symptoms may consist of intracranial arterial aneurysms, cardiac valvular defects, abdominal and inguinal hernias and colonic diverticulosis. Very little is known regarding bone involvement in ADPKD; however, recent evidence has revealed the potential role of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). FGF23 is an endocrine fibroblast growth factor acting in the kidney as a phosphaturic hormone and a suppressor of active vitamin D with key effects on the bone/kidney/parathyroid axis, and has been shown to increase in patients with ADPKD, even with normal renal function. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of bone and mineral abnormalities found in experimental models and in patients with ADPKD, and to discuss the possible role of FGF23 in this disease.

  15. Effective Small Interfering RNA Therapy to Treat CLCN7-dependent Autosomal Dominant Osteopetrosis Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Capulli, Mattia; Maurizi, Antonio; Ventura, Luca; Rucci, Nadia; Teti, Anna

    2015-01-01

    In about 70% of patients affected by autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type 2 (ADO2), osteoclast activity is reduced by heterozygous mutations of the CLCN7 gene, encoding the ClC-7 chloride/hydrogen antiporter. CLCN7G215R-, CLCN7R767W-, and CLCN7R286W-specific siRNAs silenced transfected mutant mRNA/EGFP in HEK293 cells, in RAW264.7 cells and in human osteoclasts, with no change of CLCN7WT mRNA and no effect of scrambled siRNA on the mutant transcripts. Osteoclasts from Clcn7G213R ADO2 mice showed reduced bone resorption, a condition rescued by Clcn7G213R-specific siRNA. Treatment of ADO2 mice with Clcn7G213R-specific siRNA induced increase of bone resorption variables and decrease of trabecular bone mass, leading to an overall improvement of the osteopetrotic bone phenotype. Treatment did not induce overt adverse effects and was effective also with siRNAs specific for other mutants. These results demonstrate that a siRNA-based experimental treatment of ADO2 is feasible, and underscore a translational impact for future strategy to cure this therapeutically neglected form of osteopetrosis. PMID:26325626

  16. Determinants of renal volume in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Grantham, JJ; Cook, LT; Torres, VE; Bost, JE; Chapman, AB; Harris, PC; Guay-Woodford, LM; Bae, KT

    2009-01-01

    The Consortium of Radiologic Imaging Studies of Polycystic Kidney Disease (CRISP) recently showed that renal enlargement in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease mimicked exponential growth. We determined the effects of cyst initiation rate, total number, and growth rate on the time-dependent change of total cyst volume (TCV). Mathematical models with equations integrating cyst surface area, volume, and an invariant growth rate constant were used to compute the time-dependent change in volume of solitary and multiple cysts. Multiple expanding cysts increased TCV in an exponential-like pattern even when individual cysts formed at different rates or exhibited different but constant growth rates. TCV depended on the rate of cyst initiation and on the total number of cysts; however, the compounding effect of exponential-like growth was the most powerful determinant of long-term cyst expansion. Extrapolation of TCV data plots for individual subjects back to an age of 18 predicted TCV values within an established range. We conclude that cysts started early in life were the main contributor to eventual TCV while their growth rate primarily determined renal size; although the rate of formation and the ultimate number of cysts also contributed. The good fit between the exponential models and the extrapolated CRISP data indicates that the TCV growth rate is a defining trait for individual patients and may be used as a prognostic marker. PMID:17960141

  17. Familial variable immunodeficiency: autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance with variable expression of the defect(s).

    PubMed

    Feldman, G; Koziner, B; Talamo, R; Bloch, K J

    1975-10-01

    In 1963, Rosen and Bougas reported the case of a woman with recurrent infection, marked elevation of 19S, and virtual absence of 7S gamma globulin. Recently, members of her family were found to have similar abnormalities: Ten of the 37 family members tested had elevated levels of serum IgM accompanied by a combined deficiency of IgG and IgA in three, and by a deficiency of either IgG or IgA in two. In five, an increase in IgM was the sole abnormality. Two children had deficiencies of IgG and IgA with normal serum levels of IgM. Ten of the 12 affected individuals had no IgD detectable by radial immunodiffusion and six had a low percentage of IgG-bearing B lymphocytes. A lack of correlation between the immunochemical abnormalities and either the presence or severity of clinical illness was observed. The presence of immunodeficiency in three generations and in both sexes of this family suggests an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance with variable penetrance of the defect.

  18. Autosomal Dominant Cortical Tremor, Myoclonus, and Epilepsy Syndrome mimicking Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    AYDIN ÖZEMİR, Zeynep; OĞUZ AKARSU, Emel; MATUR, Zeliha; ÖGE, Ali Emre; BAYKAN, Betül

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus, and epilepsy (ADCME) syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous and under-recognized disease characterized by tremulous movements mimicking essential tremor, myoclonus, and rare generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Here we described the clinical and electrophysiological features of three siblings with ADCME syndrome mimicking juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME). Methods Three siblings (two females and one male) diagnosed with ADCME were analyzed by electroencephalogram (EEG), somatosensory evoked potentials, and accelerometric recordings. The results were compared with 14 JME patients without tremor and 14 with essential tremor (ET). Results The shared features of the siblings were cortical tremor, myoclonia, epilepsy, migraine, and psychiatric symptoms. In all siblings, tremor had started before myoclonic epilepsy associated with 4–6 Hz generalized spike and wave discharges. The N20-P25 and P25-N35 amplitudes were substantially higher in the three siblings with ADCME. Although tremor frequencies were similar to those of the ET group, the siblings had mild interrupting low-amplitude myoclonus, suggestive of cortical tremor, in the accelerometric analysis. Conclusion We presented a detailed clinical evaluation with electrophysiological confirmation of ADCME syndrome in a Turkish family. This rare clinical picture might be misdiagnosed as JME and should be kept in mind to ensure correct diagnosis and to provide a homogenous group for genetic studies. PMID:28373807

  19. Identification of a rhodopsin gene mutation in a large family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinping; Shi, Wei; Cheng, Lulu; Wang, Yanfang; Chen, Ding; Hu, Xuting; Xu, Jinling; Xu, Limin; Wu, Yaming; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2016-01-22

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically highly heterogeneous retinal disease and one of the leading causes of blindness in the world. Next-generation sequencing technology has enormous potential for determining the genetic etiology of RP. We sought to identify the underlying genetic defect in a 35-year-old male from an autosomal-dominant RP family with 14 affected individuals. By capturing next-generation sequencing (CNGS) of 144 genes associated with retinal diseases, we identified eight novel DNA variants; however, none of them cosegregated for all the members of the family. Further analysis of the CNGS data led to identification of a recurrent missense mutation (c.403C > T, p.R135W) in the rhodopsin (RHO) gene, which cosegregated with all affected individuals in the family and was not observed in any of the unaffected family members. The p.R135W mutation has a reference single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) ID (rs104893775), and it appears to be responsible for the disease in this large family. This study highlights the importance of examining NGS data with reference SNP IDs. Thus, our study is important for data analysis of NGS-based clinical genetic diagnoses.

  20. Neuropathology of Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer Disease in the National Alzheimer Coordinating Center Database

    PubMed Central

    Monsell, Sarah; Ng, Denise W.; Zhou, Yan; Nguyen, Andy; Coppola, Giovanni; Van Berlo, Victoria; Mendez, Mario F.; Tung, Spencer; Weintraub, Sandra; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Bigio, Eileen H.; Gitelman, Darren R.; Fisher-Hubbard, Amanda O.; Albin, Roger L.; Vinters, Harry V.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) represents a genetically heterogeneous entity. To elucidate neuropathologic features of autosomal dominant AD ([ADAD] due to PSEN1, APP, or PSEN2 mutations), we compared hallmark AD pathologic findings in 60 cases of ADAD and 120 cases of sporadic AD matched for sex, race, ethnicity, and disease duration. Greater degrees of neuritic plaque and neurofibrillary tangle formation and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) were found in ADAD (p values < 0.01). Moderate to severe CAA was more prevalent in ADAD (63.3% vs. 39.2%, p = 0.003), and persons with PSEN1 mutations beyond codon 200 had higher average Braak scores and severity and prevalence of CAA than those with mutations before codon 200. Lewy body pathology was less extensive in ADAD but was present in 27.1% of cases. We also describe a novel pathogenic PSEN1 mutation (P267A). The finding of more severe neurofibrillary pathology and CAA in ADAD, particularly in carriers of PSEN1 mutations beyond codon 200, warrants consideration when designing trials to treat or prevent ADAD. The finding of Lewy body pathology in a substantial minority of ADAD cases supports the assertion that development of Lewy bodies may be in part driven by abnormal β-amyloid protein precursor processing. PMID:26888304

  1. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) - literature review apropos an autopsy case.

    PubMed

    Wesołowski, Wojciech; Dziewulska, Dorota; Koziarska, Malwina; Iżycka-Świeszewska, Ewa

    2015-09-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a non-atherosclerotic, non-amyloid cerebral angiopathy involving small arteries and arterioles. This entity presents vascular changes in the form of smooth muscle degeneration with swollen myocytes and PAS-positive granular deposits, together with vascular fibrosis and hyalinization. In parallel, diffuse white matter destruction with infarcts, tissue rarefaction, spongiosis, lacunes and demyelination are characteristic. Ultrastructurally, vascular granular osmiophilic material (GOM) is pathognomonic for this hereditary disease caused by NOTCH3 mutation. We diagnosed CADASIL in the autopsy examination of a 53-year-old woman with a 9-year history of a progressive neurological disease with complex motor and cognitive deficits, accompanied by non-specific diffuse white matter changes on neuroimaging. Despite several multicentre hospitalizations, the precise diagnosis was not established until the post-mortem examination of the brain was made. CADASIL is a rare entity, but it should be considered by a pathologist in a differential diagnosis of vascular diseases of the brain, especially in cases with atypical clinical presentation and familial history. The prompt diagnosis depends on the quality of the brain autopsy and proper sampling. The post mortem examination, where “Morituri vivos docent”, is still significant.

  2. A gene for autosomal dominant hearing loss on the short arm of chromosome 1

    SciTech Connect

    Van Camp, G.; Coucke, P.; Willems, P.J.

    1994-09-01

    Hearing loss is the most common form of sensory impairment and many cases are attributable to genetic causes. The genetic defects underlying several syndromic forms of deafness have been identified, but little is known about the causes of non-syndromic hereditary deafness which accounts for the majority of inherited hearing loss. We report here a large Indonesian family with non-syndromal postlingual hearing loss starting in the high frequencies and showing autosomal dominant inheritance. To locate the gene responsible for the hearing loss in this family, we performed a genome search by genetic linkage analysis with microsatellite markers distributed over the whole genome. We have mapped the gene causing deafness in an extended Indonesian family to chromosome 1p with a multipoint lod score higher than 7. Two other smaller families, showing a similar hereditary hearing loss, were also tested for linkage with chromosome 1p. One family originating from the U.S. was linked to this new locus with a multipoint lod score exceeding 5. In another family from the Netherlands this locus was excluded. The flanking markers D1S255 and D1S211 define a region of 6 cM on chromosome 1p which is likely to contain the deafness gene present in the Indonesian and American family.

  3. Mutations in DNMT1 cause autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Juliane; Lin, Ling; Schormair, Barbara; Kornum, Birgitte R; Faraco, Juliette; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Melberg, Atle; Cornelio, Ferdinando; Urban, Alexander E; Pizza, Fabio; Poli, Francesca; Grubert, Fabian; Wieland, Thomas; Graf, Elisabeth; Hallmayer, Joachim; Strom, Tim M; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2012-05-15

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy (ADCA-DN) is characterized by late onset (30-40 years old) cerebellar ataxia, sensory neuronal deafness, narcolepsy-cataplexy and dementia. We performed exome sequencing in five individuals from three ADCA-DN kindreds and identified DNMT1 as the only gene with mutations found in all five affected individuals. Sanger sequencing confirmed the de novo mutation p.Ala570Val in one family, and showed co-segregation of p.Val606Phe and p.Ala570Val, with the ADCA-DN phenotype, in two other kindreds. An additional ADCA-DN kindred with a p.GLY605Ala mutation was subsequently identified. Narcolepsy and deafness were the first symptoms to appear in all pedigrees, followed by ataxia. DNMT1 is a widely expressed DNA methyltransferase maintaining methylation patterns in development, and mediating transcriptional repression by direct binding to HDAC2. It is also highly expressed in immune cells and required for the differentiation of CD4+ into T regulatory cells. Mutations in exon 20 of this gene were recently reported to cause hereditary sensory neuropathy with dementia and hearing loss (HSAN1). Our mutations are all located in exon 21 and in very close spatial proximity, suggesting distinct phenotypes depending on mutation location within this gene.

  4. Myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated crescentic glomerulonephritis in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is an inherited disorder that is characterized by the development of cysts in the kidneys and other organs. Urinary protein excretion is usually less than 1 g/day, and ADPKD is rarely associated with nephrotic syndrome or rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN). To date, myeloperoxidase (MPO)-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated crescentic glomerulonephritis (CrGN) has not been reported in a patient with ADPKD. Case presentations We report two cases of MPO-ANCA positive ADPKD. A 60-year-old Japanese woman (case 1) and a 54-year-old Japanese woman (case 2) presented with RPGN featuring severe proteinuria and microscopic hematuria. In both patients percutaneous needle biopsy of the kidney revealed MPO-ANCA-associated CrGN with a paucity of glomerular immunoglobulin staining. Each patient received intravenous methylprednisolone for 3 days, followed by oral prednisolone. Case 1 showed gradual improvement and has not progressed to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), but case 2 developed ESRD requiring hemodialysis within one month despite treatment. Conclusion These are the first two reported cases of MPO-ANCA-associated CrGN in patients with ADPKD. Our experience suggests that serial measurement of the ANCA titer and renal biopsy should be considered for accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment of ADPKD patients who present with proteinuria, hematuria, and rapid decline of renal function. PMID:23617397

  5. Morphological and Functional Features of Hepatic Cyst Epithelium in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alvaro, Domenico; Onori, Paolo; Alpini, Gianfranco; Franchitto, Antonio; Jefferson, Douglas M.; Torrice, Alessia; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Stefanelli, Fabrizio; Mancino, Maria Grazia; Strazzabosco, Mario; Angelico, Mario; Attili, Adolfo; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the morphological and functional features of hepatic cyst epithelium in adult autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). In six ADPKD patients, we investigated the morphology of cyst epithelium apical surface by scanning electron microscopy and the expression of estrogen receptors (ERs), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), IGF1 receptors (IGF1-R), growth hormone receptor, the proliferation marker proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and pAKT by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Proliferation of liver cyst-derived epithelial cells was evaluated by both MTS proliferation assay and [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA. The hepatic cyst epithelium displayed heterogeneous features, being normal in small cysts (<1 cm), characterized by rare or shortened cilia in 1- to 3-cm cysts, and exhibiting the absence of both primary cilia and microvilli in large cysts (>3 cm). Cyst epithelium showed marked immunohistochemical expression of ER, growth hormone receptor, IGF1, IGF1-R, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and pAKT. IGF1 was 10-fold more enriched in the hepatic cyst fluid than in serum. Serum-deprived liver cyst-derived epithelial cells proliferated when exposed to 17β-estradiol and IGF1 and when exposed to human cyst fluid. ER or IGF1-R antagonists inhibited the proliferative effect of serum readmission, cyst fluid, 17β-estradiol, and IGF1. Our findings could explain the role of estrogens in accelerating the progression of ADPKD and may suggest a potential benefit of therapeutic strategies based on estrogen antagonism. PMID:18202196

  6. Spanish guidelines for the management of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ars, Elisabet; Bernis, Carmen; Fraga, Gloria; Martínez, Víctor; Martins, Judith; Ortiz, Alberto; Rodríguez-Pérez, José Carlos; Sans, Laia; Torra, Roser

    2014-09-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most frequent cause of genetic renal disease and accounts for 6-10% of patients on renal replacement therapy (RRT). Very few prospective, randomized trials or clinical studies address the diagnosis and management of this relatively frequent disorder. No clinical guidelines are available to date. This is a consensus statement presenting the recommendations of the Spanish Working Group on Inherited Kidney Diseases, which were agreed to following a literature search and discussions. Levels of evidence found were C and D according to the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (University of Oxford). The recommendations relate to, among other topics, the use of imaging and genetic diagnosis, management of hypertension, pain, cyst infections and bleeding, extra-renal involvement including polycystic liver disease and cranial aneurysms, management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and RRT and management of children with ADPKD. Recommendations on specific ADPKD therapies are not provided since no drug has regulatory approval for this indication.

  7. Mispolarization of desmosomal proteins and altered intercellular adhesion in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Silberberg, Melina; Charron, Audra J; Bacallao, Robert; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2005-06-01

    Polycystin-1, the product of the major gene mutated in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), has been shown to associate with multiple epithelial cell junctions. Our hypothesis is that polycystin-1 is an important protein for the initial establishment of cell-cell junctions and maturation of the cell and that polycystin-1 localization is dependent on the degree of cell polarization. Using laser-scanning confocal microscopy and two models of cell polarization, polycystin-1 and desmosomes were found to colocalize during the initial establishment of cell-cell contact when junctions were forming. However, colocalization was lost in confluent monolayers. Parallel morphological and biochemical evaluations revealed a profound mispolarization of desmosomal components to both the apical and basolateral domains in primary ADPKD cells and tissue. Studies of the intermediate filament network associated with desmosomes showed that there is a decrease in cytokeratin levels and an abnormal expression of the mesenchymal protein vimentin in the disease. Moreover, we show for the first time that the structural alterations seen in adherens and desmosomal junctions have a functional impact, leaving the ADPKD cells with weakened cell-cell adhesion. In conclusion, in this paper we show that polycystin-1 transiently colocalizes with desmosomes and that desmosomal proteins are mislocalized as a consequence of polycystin-1 mutation.

  8. A new locus for autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta on chromosome 8q24.3.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Gustavo; Pemberton, Trevor J; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Scarel-Caminaga, Raquel; Mehrian-Shai, Ruty; Gonzalez-Quevedo, Catalina; Ninis, Vasiliki; Hartiala, Jaana; Allayee, Hooman; Snead, Malcolm L; Leal, Suzanne M; Line, Sergio R P; Patel, Pragna I

    2007-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a collective term used to describe phenotypically diverse forms of defective tooth enamel development. AI has been reported to exhibit a variety of inheritance patterns, and several loci have been identified that are associated with AI. We have performed a genome-wide scan in a large Brazilian family segregating an autosomal dominant form of AI and mapped a novel locus to 8q24.3. A maximum multipoint LOD score of 7.5 was obtained at marker D8S2334 (146,101,309 bp). The disease locus lies in a 1.9 cM (2.1 Mb) region according to the Rutgers Combined Linkage-Physical map, between a VNTR marker (at 143,988,705 bp) and the telomere (146,274,826 bp). Ten candidate genes were identified based on gene ontology and microarray-facilitated gene selection using the expression of murine orthologues in dental tissue, and examined for the presence of a mutation. However, no causative mutation was identified.

  9. Total Kidney Volume as a Biomarker of Disease Progression in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tangri, Navdeep; Hougen, Ingrid; Alam, Ahsan; Perrone, Ronald; McFarlane, Phil; Pei, York

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is an inherited disorder characterized by the formation of kidney cysts and kidney enlargement, which progresses to kidney failure by the fifth to seventh decade of life in a majority of patients. Disease progression is evaluated primarily through serum creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) measurements; however, it is known that serum creatinine and eGFR values typically do not change until the fourth or fifth decade of life. Until recently, therapy only existed to target complications of ADPKD. As therapeutic agents continue to be investigated for use in ADPKD, a suitable biomarker of disease progression in place of serum creatinine is needed. Sources of information: This review summarizes recent research regarding the use of total kidney volume as a biomarker in ADPKD, as presented at the Canadian Society of Nephrology symposium held in April 2015. Findings: Measurement of patients’ total kidney volume made using ultrasound (US) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown by the Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies of Polycystic Kidney Disease (CRISP) study to be directly correlated with both increases in cyst volume and change in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Additional studies have shown total kidney volume to have an association with complications of ADPKD as well. Limitations: Areas for further study continue to exist in comparison of methods of measuring total kidney volume. Implications: We believe that the evidence suggests that total kidney volume may be an appropriate surrogate marker for ADPKD disease progression. PMID:28321323

  10. Neuropathology of Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer Disease in the National Alzheimer Coordinating Center Database.

    PubMed

    Ringman, John M; Monsell, Sarah; Ng, Denise W; Zhou, Yan; Nguyen, Andy; Coppola, Giovanni; Van Berlo, Victoria; Mendez, Mario F; Tung, Spencer; Weintraub, Sandra; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Bigio, Eileen H; Gitelman, Darren R; Fisher-Hubbard, Amanda O; Albin, Roger L; Vinters, Harry V

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) represents a genetically heterogeneous entity. To elucidate neuropathologic features of autosomal dominant AD ([ADAD] due to PSEN1, APP, or PSEN2 mutations), we compared hallmark AD pathologic findings in 60 cases of ADAD and 120 cases of sporadic AD matched for sex, race, ethnicity, and disease duration. Greater degrees of neuritic plaque and neurofibrillary tangle formation and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) were found in ADAD (p values < 0.01). Moderate to severe CAA was more prevalent in ADAD (63.3% vs. 39.2%, p = 0.003), and persons with PSEN1 mutations beyond codon 200 had higher average Braak scores and severity and prevalence of CAA than those with mutations before codon 200. Lewy body pathology was less extensive in ADAD but was present in 27.1% of cases. We also describe a novel pathogenic PSEN1 mutation (P267A). The finding of more severe neurofibrillary pathology and CAA in ADAD, particularly in carriers of PSEN1 mutations beyond codon 200, warrants consideration when designing trials to treat or prevent ADAD. The finding of Lewy body pathology in a substantial minority of ADAD cases supports the assertion that development of Lewy bodies may be in part driven by abnormal β-amyloid protein precursor processing.

  11. Percutaneous Treatment of Pyocystis in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Akinci, Devrim Turkbey, Baris; Yilmaz, Rahmi; Akpinar, Erhan; Ozmen, Mustafa N.; Akhan, Okan

    2008-09-15

    The course of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is frequently complicated by infection of a cyst within a polycystic kidney, which is a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma damaging the clinical course of patients. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous drainage in management of infected cysts in ADPKD patients. Between May 2003 and December 2006, percutaneous drainage was performed in 16 infected renal cysts of four kidneys in three patients (two females, one male), with a mean age of 57.3 years. Cyst dimensions, total amount of drained cyst fluid, catheterization duration, isolated microorganisms, and follow-up duration were recorded. Technical, clinical success rates were 100%; the complication rate was 0%. Diameters of cysts ranged between 3 and 8 cm. Average volume of drained fluid and average duration of catheterization for one cyst were 226 ml and 9.8 days. No recurrence was encountered but one patient (no. 3), who had pyocystis in the right kidney and was treated with catheterization, referred with left flank pain due to pyocystis in her left kidney 3 months later. Follow-up durations were 35, 47, and 11 months for patients 1, 2, and 3, respectively. For patient 3, follow-up duration for the second procedure was 7 months. We conclude that percutaneous drainage with antibiotic therapy should be the initial method in management of infected cysts in ADPKD patients, with high success and low complication rates.

  12. "An evil heritage": interview study of pain and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Heiwe, Susanne; Bjuke, Monica

    2009-09-01

    Pain is a common problem for patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Knowledge about patients' experience of the pain, pain management, and pain's effect on everyday life is, however, limited. In clinical practice there is a need to improve the care of these patients. To be able to do so, information about how the disease and its pain affect the patients is required. This study explores patients' experience of living with ADPKD and its pain. The findings are based on in-depth semistructured interviews. The participants were 22 patients with ADPKD. The data were transcribed and analyzed by using phenomenology. Findings showed that the patients experienced limitations in their everyday life due to inexplicable and unpredictable pain and fatigue. Also, pain management was experienced as suboptimal and pain was seldom discussed at health care appointments. Emotional distress concerning the hereditary nature of the disease was also present. Health care providers need to increase their focus on pain and pain management to reduce the disease's intrusion in patients' everyday life. Also, patients and people in the patients' immediate surroundings need to be given information and education about the disease and its pain as well as the opportunity to talk about their worries concerning heredity. By implementing the findings of the present study when meeting a patient with ADPKD, improved patient satisfaction and health-related quality of life could be accomplished.

  13. Autosomal dominant immune dysregulation syndrome in humans with CTLA4 mutations.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Desirée; Bode, Claudia; Kenefeck, Rupert; Hou, Tie Zheng; Wing, James B; Kennedy, Alan; Bulashevska, Alla; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Grüning, Björn A; Unger, Susanne; Frede, Natalie; Baumann, Ulrich; Witte, Torsten; Schmidt, Reinhold E; Dueckers, Gregor; Niehues, Tim; Seneviratne, Suranjith; Kanariou, Maria; Speckmann, Carsten; Ehl, Stephan; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Warnatz, Klaus; Rakhmanov, Mirzokhid; Thimme, Robert; Hasselblatt, Peter; Emmerich, Florian; Cathomen, Toni; Backofen, Rolf; Fisch, Paul; Seidl, Maximilian; May, Annette; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Ikemizu, Shinji; Salzer, Ulrich; Franke, Andre; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Walker, Lucy S K; Sansom, David M; Grimbacher, Bodo

    2014-12-01

    The protein cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) is an essential negative regulator of immune responses, and its loss causes fatal autoimmunity in mice. We studied a large family in which five individuals presented with a complex, autosomal dominant immune dysregulation syndrome characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia, recurrent infections and multiple autoimmune clinical features. We identified a heterozygous nonsense mutation in exon 1 of CTLA4. Screening of 71 unrelated patients with comparable clinical phenotypes identified five additional families (nine individuals) with previously undescribed splice site and missense mutations in CTLA4. Clinical penetrance was incomplete (eight adults of a total of 19 genetically proven CTLA4 mutation carriers were considered unaffected). However, CTLA-4 protein expression was decreased in regulatory T cells (Treg cells) in both patients and carriers with CTLA4 mutations. Whereas Treg cells were generally present at elevated numbers in these individuals, their suppressive function, CTLA-4 ligand binding and transendocytosis of CD80 were impaired. Mutations in CTLA4 were also associated with decreased circulating B cell numbers. Taken together, mutations in CTLA4 resulting in CTLA-4 haploinsufficiency or impaired ligand binding result in disrupted T and B cell homeostasis and a complex immune dysregulation syndrome.

  14. Two novel mutations in PRPF3 causing autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zilin; Yan, Min; Sun, Wan; Wu, Zehua; Han, Liyun; Zhou, Zheng; Zheng, Fang; Chen, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous set of hereditary eye diseases, characterized by selective death of photoreceptor cells in the retina, resulting in progressive visual impairment. Approximately 20–40% of RP cases are autosomal dominant RP (ADRP). In this study, a Chinese ADRP family previously localized to the region between D1S2819 and D1S2635 was sequenced via whole-exome sequencing and a variant c.1345C > G (p.R449G) was identified in PRPF3. The Sanger sequencing was performed in probands of additional 95 Chinese ADRP families to investigate the contribution of PRPF3 to ADRP in Chinese population and another variant c.1532A > C (p.H511P) was detected in one family. These two variants, co-segregate with RP in two families respectively and both variants are predicted to be pathological. This is the first report about the spectrum of PRPF3 mutations in Chinese population, leading to the identification of two novel PRPF3 mutations. Only three clustered mutations in PRPF3 have been identified so far in several populations and all are in exon 11. Our study expands the spectrum of PRPF3 mutations in RP. We also demonstrate that PRPF3 mutations are responsible for 2.08% of ADRP families in this cohort indicating that PRPF3 mutations might be relatively rare in Chinese ADRP patients. PMID:27886254

  15. A new autosomal dominant eye and lung syndrome linked to mutations in TIMP3 gene

    PubMed Central

    Meunier, Isabelle; Bocquet, Béatrice; Labesse, Gilles; Zeitz, Christina; Defoort-Dhellemmes, Sabine; Lacroux, Annie; Mauget-Faysse, Martine; Drumare, Isabelle; Gamez, Anne-Sophie; Mathieu, Cyril; Marquette, Virginie; Sagot, Lola; Dhaenens, Claire-Marie; Arndt, Carl; Carroll, Patrick; Remy-Jardin, Martine; Cohen, Salomon Yves; Sahel, José-Alain; Puech, Bernard; Audo, Isabelle; Mrejen, Sarah; Hamel, Christian P.

    2016-01-01

    To revisit the autosomal dominant Sorsby fundus dystrophy (SFD) as a syndromic condition including late-onset pulmonary disease. We report clinical and imaging data of ten affected individuals from 2 unrelated families with SFD and carrying heterozygous TIMP3 mutations (c.572A > G, p.Y191C, exon 5, in family 1 and c.113C > G, p.S38C, exon 1, in family 2). In family 1, all SFD patients older than 50 (two generations) had also a severe emphysema, despite no history of smoking or asthma. In the preceding generation, the mother died of pulmonary emphysema and she was blind after the age of 50. Her two great-grandsons (<20 years), had abnormal Bruch Membrane thickness, a sign of eye disease. In family 2, eye and lung diseases were also associated in two generations, both occurred later, and lung disease was moderate (bronchiectasis). This is the first report of a syndromic SFD in line with the mouse model uncovering the role of TIMP3 in human lung morphogenesis and functions. The TIMP3 gene should be screened in familial pulmonary diseases with bronchiectasis, associated with a medical history of visual loss. In addition, SFD patients should be advised to avoid tobacco consumption, to practice sports, and to undergo regular pulmonary examinations. PMID:27601084

  16. A Novel Nonsense Mutation of POU4F3 Gene Causes Autosomal Dominant Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Wang, Mingming; Zhang, Fengguo; Zhou, Yicui; Li, Jianfeng; Zheng, Qingyin; Bai, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    POU4F3 gene encodes a transcription factor which plays an essential role in the maturation and maintenance of hair cells in cochlea and vestibular system. Several mutations of POU4F3 have been reported to cause autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss in recent years. In this study, we describe a pathogenic nonsense mutation located in POU4F3 in a four-generation Chinese family. Target region capture sequencing was performed to search for the candidate mutations from 81 genes related to nonsyndromic hearing loss in this family. A novel nonsense mutation of POU4F3, c.337C>T (p. Gln113⁎), was identified in a Chinese family characterized by late-onset progressive nonsyndromic hearing loss. The novel mutation cosegregated with hearing loss in this family and was absent in 200 ethnicity-matched controls. The mutation led to a stop codon and thus a truncated protein with no functional domains remained. Transient transfection and immunofluorescence assay revealed that the subcellular localization of the truncated protein differed markedly from normal protein, which could be the underlying reason for complete loss of its normal function. Here, we report the first nonsense mutation of POU4F3 associated with progressive hearing loss and explored the possible underlying mechanism. Routine examination of POU4F3 is necessary for the genetic diagnosis of hereditary hearing loss in the future. PMID:27999687

  17. [Inhibitors of intra-cystic secretion: novel therapies in ADPKD (Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease)].

    PubMed

    Miranda, Nunzia; Miranda, Francesca; Rinaldi, Luca; Stratigis, Spiros; Capasso, Giovambattista

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited human renal disorder. Progressive enlargement of the kidneys is due to aberrant proliferation of the cyst epithelial cells, together with accumulation of fluid within the cyst cavities due to transepithelial fluid secretion. Multiple studies have suggested that fluid secretion across ADPKD cyst-lining cells is driven by the transepithelial secretion of chloride, mediated by the apical cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel (CFTR) and specific basolateral transporters. Increased levels of cAMP, probably reflecting modifications in intracellular calcium homeostasis and abnormal stimulation of the vasopressin V2 receptor, in mutant renal epithelia, play an important role in the pathogenesis of ADPKD and contribute to both transepithelial secretion of fluid and proliferation of cyst epithelia. For example, cAMP activates the CFTR leading to the stimulation of Cl- secretion into the cyst lumen. This review focuses on the pathophysiology and molecular mechanism of fluid secretion in ADPKD cysts examined during pre-clinical trials of potentially useful drugs for the treatment of this condition.

  18. Branched-chain amino acids enhance cyst development in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Junya; Nishio, Saori; Hattanda, Fumihiko; Nakazawa, Daigo; Kimura, Toru; Sata, Michio; Makita, Minoru; Ishikawa, Yasunobu; Atsumi, Tatsuya

    2017-03-21

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by the progressive development of kidney and liver cysts. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) cascade is one of the important pathways regulating cyst growth in ADPKD. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), including leucine, play a crucial role to activate mTOR pathway. Therefore, we administered BCAA dissolved in the drinking water to Pkd1(flox/flox):Mx1-Cre (cystic) mice from four to 22 weeks of age after polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid-induced conditional Pkd1 knockout at two weeks of age. The BCAA group showed significantly greater kidney/body weight ratio and higher cystic index in both the kidney and liver compared to the placebo-treated mice. We found that the L-type amino acid transporter 1 that facilitates BCAA entry into cells is strongly expressed in cells lining the cysts. We also found increased cyst-lining cell proliferation and upregulation of mTOR and mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) pathways in the BCAA group. In vitro, we cultured renal epithelial cell lines from Pkd1 null mice with or without leucine. Leucine was found to stimulate cell proliferation, as well as activate mTOR and MAPK/ERK pathways in these cells. Thus, BCAA accelerated disease progression by mTOR and MAPK/ERK pathways. Hence, BCAA may be harmful to patients with ADPKD.

  19. Erythropoietin Slows Photoreceptor Cell Death in a Mouse Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Kasmala, Lorraine; Bond, Wesley S.; de Lucas Cerrillo, Ana M.; Wynn, Kristi; Lewin, Alfred S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To test the efficacy of systemic gene delivery of a mutant form of erythropoietin (EPO-R76E) that has attenuated erythropoietic activity, in a mouse model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Methods Ten-day old mice carrying one copy of human rhodopsin with the P23H mutation and both copies of wild-type mouse rhodopsin (hP23H RHO+/-,mRHO+/+) were injected into the quadriceps with recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) carrying either enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) or EpoR76E. Visual function (electroretinogram) and retina structure (optical coherence tomography, histology, and immunohistochemistry) were assessed at 7 and 12 months of age. Results The outer nuclear layer thickness decreased over time at a slower rate in rAAV.EpoR76E treated as compared to the rAAV.eGFP injected mice. There was a statistically significant preservation of the electroretinogram at 7, but not 12 months of age. Conclusions Systemic EPO-R76E slows death of the photoreceptors and vision loss in hP23H RHO+/-,mRHO+/+ mice. Treatment with EPO-R76E may widen the therapeutic window for retinal degeneration patients by increasing the number of viable cells. Future studies might investigate if co-treatment with EPO-R76E and gene replacement therapy is more effective than gene replacement therapy alone. PMID:27299810

  20. Lysophosphatidic Acid is a Modulator of Cyst Growth in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Blazer-Yost, Bonnie L.; Blacklock, Brenda J.; Flaig, Stephanie; Bacallao, Robert L.; Gattone, Vincent H.

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by the slow growth of multiple fluid-filled cysts predominately in the kidney tubules and liver bile ducts. Elucidation of mechanisms that control cyst growth will provide the basis for rational therapeutic intervention. We used electrophysiological methods to identify lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) as a component of cyst fluid and serum that stimulates secretory Cl- transport in the epithelial cell type that lines renal cysts. LPA effects are manifested through receptors located on the basolateral membrane of the epithelial cells resulting in stimulation of channel activity in the apical membrane. Concentrations of LPA measured in human ADPKD cyst fluid and in normal serum are sufficient to maximally stimulate ion transport. Thus, cyst fluid seepage and/or leakage of vascular LPA into the interstitial space are capable of stimulating epithelial cell secretion resulting in cyst enlargement. These observations are particularly relevant to the rapid decline in renal function in late-stage disease and to the “third hit” hypothesis that renal injury exacerbates cyst growth. PMID:22179013

  1. Mutations in a BTB-Kelch Protein, KLHL7, Cause Autosomal-Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, James S.; Ray, Joseph W.; Waseem, Naushin; Johnson, Kory; Brooks, Matthew J.; Hugosson, Therése; Breuer, Debra; Branham, Kari E.; Krauth, Daniel S.; Bowne, Sara J.; Sullivan, Lori S.; Ponjavic, Vesna; Gränse, Lotta; Khanna, Ritu; Trager, Edward H.; Gieser, Linn M.; Hughbanks-Wheaton, Dianna; Cojocaru, Radu I.; Ghiasvand, Noor M.; Chakarova, Christina F.; Abrahamson, Magnus; Göring, Harald H.H.; Webster, Andrew R.; Birch, David G.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Fann, Yang; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.; Daiger, Stephen P.; Heckenlively, John R.; Andréasson, Sten; Swaroop, Anand

    2009-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) refers to a genetically heterogeneous group of progressive neurodegenerative diseases that result in dysfunction and/or death of rod and cone photoreceptors in the retina. So far, 18 genes have been identified for autosomal-dominant (ad) RP. Here, we describe an adRP locus (RP42) at chromosome 7p15 through linkage analysis in a six-generation Scandinavian family and identify a disease-causing mutation, c.449G→A (p.S150N), in exon 6 of the KLHL7 gene. Mutation screening of KLHL7 in 502 retinopathy probands has revealed three different missense mutations in six independent families. KLHL7 is widely expressed, including expression in rod photoreceptors, and encodes a 75 kDa protein of the BTB-Kelch subfamily within the BTB superfamily. BTB-Kelch proteins have been implicated in ubiquitination through Cullin E3 ligases. Notably, all three putative disease-causing KLHL7 mutations are within a conserved BACK domain; homology modeling suggests that mutant amino acid side chains can potentially fill the cleft between two helices, thereby affecting the ubiquitination complexes. Mutations in an identical region of another BTB-Kelch protein, gigaxonin, have previously been associated with giant axonal neuropathy. Our studies suggest an additional role of the ubiquitin-proteasome protein-degradation pathway in maintaining neuronal health and in disease. PMID:19520207

  2. Comprehensive PKD1 and PKD2 Mutation Analysis in Prenatal Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Audrézet, Marie-Pierre; Corbiere, Christine; Lebbah, Said; Morinière, Vincent; Broux, Françoise; Louillet, Ferielle; Fischbach, Michel; Zaloszyc, Ariane; Cloarec, Sylvie; Merieau, Elodie; Baudouin, Véronique; Deschênes, Georges; Roussey, Gwenaelle; Maestri, Sandrine; Visconti, Chiara; Boyer, Olivia; Abel, Carine; Lahoche, Annie; Randrianaivo, Hanitra; Bessenay, Lucie; Mekahli, Djalila; Ouertani, Ines; Decramer, Stéphane; Ryckenwaert, Amélie; Cornec-Le Gall, Emilie; Salomon, Rémi; Ferec, Claude; Heidet, Laurence

    2016-03-01

    Prenatal forms of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) are rare but can be recurrent in some families, suggesting a common genetic modifying background. Few patients have been reported carrying, in addition to the familial mutation, variation(s) in polycystic kidney disease 1 (PKD1) or HNF1 homeobox B (HNF1B), inherited from the unaffected parent, or biallelic polycystic kidney and hepatic disease 1 (PKHD1) mutations. To assess the frequency of additional variations in PKD1, PKD2, HNF1B, and PKHD1 associated with the familial PKD mutation in early ADPKD, these four genes were screened in 42 patients with early ADPKD in 41 families. Two patients were associated with de novo PKD1 mutations. Forty patients occurred in 39 families with known ADPKD and were associated with PKD1 mutation in 36 families and with PKD2 mutation in two families (no mutation identified in one family). Additional PKD variation(s) (inherited from the unaffected parent when tested) were identified in 15 of 42 patients (37.2%), whereas these variations were observed in 25 of 174 (14.4%, P=0.001) patients with adult ADPKD. No HNF1B variations or PKHD1 biallelic mutations were identified. These results suggest that, at least in some patients, the severity of the cystic disease is inversely correlated with the level of polycystin 1 function.

  3. The PROPKD Score: A New Algorithm to Predict Renal Survival in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Cornec-Le Gall, Emilie; Audrézet, Marie-Pierre; Rousseau, Annick; Hourmant, Maryvonne; Renaudineau, Eric; Charasse, Christophe; Morin, Marie-Pascale; Moal, Marie-Christine; Dantal, Jacques; Wehbe, Bassem; Perrichot, Régine; Frouget, Thierry; Vigneau, Cécile; Potier, Jérôme; Jousset, Philippe; Guillodo, Marie-Paule; Siohan, Pascale; Terki, Nazim; Sawadogo, Théophile; Legrand, Didier; Menoyo-Calonge, Victorio; Benarbia, Seddik; Besnier, Dominique; Longuet, Hélène; Férec, Claude; Le Meur, Yannick

    2016-03-01

    The course of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) varies among individuals, with some reaching ESRD before 40 years of age and others never requiring RRT. In this study, we developed a prognostic model to predict renal outcomes in patients with ADPKD on the basis of genetic and clinical data. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1341 patients from the Genkyst cohort and evaluated the influence of clinical and genetic factors on renal survival. Multivariate survival analysis identified four variables that were significantly associated with age at ESRD onset, and a scoring system from 0 to 9 was developed as follows: being male: 1 point; hypertension before 35 years of age: 2 points; first urologic event before 35 years of age: 2 points; PKD2 mutation: 0 points; nontruncating PKD1 mutation: 2 points; and truncating PKD1 mutation: 4 points. Three risk categories were subsequently defined as low risk (0-3 points), intermediate risk (4-6 points), and high risk (7-9 points) of progression to ESRD, with corresponding median ages for ESRD onset of 70.6, 56.9, and 49 years, respectively. Whereas a score ≤3 eliminates evolution to ESRD before 60 years of age with a negative predictive value of 81.4%, a score >6 forecasts ESRD onset before 60 years of age with a positive predictive value of 90.9%. This new prognostic score accurately predicts renal outcomes in patients with ADPKD and may enable the personalization of therapeutic management of ADPKD.

  4. Detection of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease by NMR spectroscopic fingerprinting of urine.

    PubMed

    Gronwald, Wolfram; Klein, Matthias S; Zeltner, Raoul; Schulze, Bernd-Detlef; Reinhold, Stephan W; Deutschmann, Markus; Immervoll, Ann-Kathrin; Böger, Carsten A; Banas, Bernhard; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Oefner, Peter J

    2011-06-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a frequent cause of kidney failure; however, urinary biomarkers for the disease are lacking. In a step towards identifying such markers, we used multidimensional-multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with support vector machine-based classification and analyzed urine specimens of 54 patients with ADPKD and slightly reduced estimated glomerular filtration rates. Within this cohort, 35 received medication for arterial hypertension and 19 did not. The results were compared with NMR profiles of 46 healthy volunteers, 10 ADPKD patients on hemodialysis with residual renal function, 16 kidney transplant patients, and 52 type 2 diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease. Based on the average of 51 out of 701 NMR features, we could reliably discriminate ADPKD patients with moderately advanced disease from ADPKD patients with end-stage renal disease, patients with chronic kidney disease of other etiologies, and healthy probands with an accuracy of >80%. Of the 35 patients with ADPKD receiving medication for hypertension, most showed increased excretion of proteins and also methanol. In contrast, elevated urinary methanol was not found in any of the control and other patient groups. Thus, we found that NMR fingerprinting of urine differentiates ADPKD from several other kidney diseases and individuals with normal kidney function. The diagnostic and prognostic potential of these profiles requires further evaluation.

  5. Autosomal dominant ataxia: Genetic evidence for locus heterogeneity from a cuban founder-effect population

    PubMed Central

    Auburger, Georg; Diaz, Guillermo Orozco; Capote, Raul Ferreira; Sanchez, Suzana Gispert; Perez, Marta Paradoa; del Cueto, Marianela Estrada; Meneses, Mirna Garcia; Farrall, Martin; Williamson, Robert; Chamberlain, Susan; Baute, Luis Heredero

    1990-01-01

    The locus for autosomal dominant ataxia with a diagnosis of olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy at autopsy has been previously assigned to chromosome 6p. However, evidence for two alternative locations has been reported. We have recently described a large potential founder-effect population of such patients in the Holguin province of Cuba. With an estimated 1,000 patients available for analysis, this extensive cluster of families provides a unique opportunity for the definitive localization of the genetic mutation. Linkage analysis between the disease locus in this population and markers within and flanking the HLA region on chromosome 6 were undertaken in 12 families comprising over 100 affected individuals. Despite similarity in the clinical phenotype between those families where the disease locus has been reported to be linked to the HLA locus and the Cuban patients, no evidence of linkage to this region could be demonstrated in the latter. The disease locus was excluded from a 96-cM genetic interval of the short arm of chromosome 6, encompassing the F13A1–HLA–GLO1–MUT/D6S4 loci. These data strongly support the existence of genetic heterogeneity for the disease. PMID:1971152

  6. Multiple liver cyst infection caused by Salmonella ajiobo in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Himeno, Akihiro; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Suzuki, Yumiko; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Isozaki, Taisuke

    2013-06-01

    Most Salmonella infections are usually self-limited; however, some cases of enteritis result in bacteremia, and there have been reports of extra-intestinal manifestations. Cyst infections are rare, and few cases have been reported. We report a 77-year-old woman with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) complicated with a multiple liver cyst infection caused by Salmonella ajiobo. The patient was hospitalized for fever, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. The blood culture identified Salmonella sp., but the source of infection was not detected by computed tomography or echography. The patient was initially treated with meropenem followed by fluoroquinolones for 3 weeks; however, her C-reactive protein level was high (10-20 mg/dL) even after the antimicrobial therapy. The patient had a fever again on day 51, and Salmonella sp. was detected again from 2 sets of blood cultures. Despite the antimicrobial treatment, her general condition gradually deteriorated, and she died on day 66. The autopsy revealed that most of the liver had been replaced by cysts. Several cysts filled with pus were detected and Salmonella ajiobo was identified in the pus of the infected cysts.

  7. Liver cysts in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease: clinical and computed tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, E.; Cook, L.T.; Grantham, J.J.

    1985-08-01

    Hepatic CT findings were analyzed in 44 patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease and were correlated with liver and renal function tests and liver, splenic, and renal CT volume measurements. CT showed many large liver cysts in 31.8% of patients, small liver cysts in 25%, and no liver cysts in 43.2%. Patients with many large cysts often showed increased liver volumes. There was no correlation between severity of liver involvement and extent of renal cystic disease as determined from urea nitrogen and creatinine levels and renal volumes. Liver function tests were normal except in two patients, one with a cholangiocarcinoma, which may have arisen from a cyst, and the other with an infected liver cyst and chronic active hepatitis. Accordingly, if liver function tests are abnormal, an attempt should be made to identify complications of polycystic liver disease such as tumor cyst infection, and biliary obstruction. CT is a useful method for detecting liver cysts and identifying patients at risk for these complications.

  8. Autosomal Dominant Hypoparathyroidism Caused by Germline Mutation in GNA11: Phenotypic and Molecular Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dong; Opas, Evan E.; Tuluc, Florin; Metzger, Daniel L.; Hou, Cuiping; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2014-01-01

    Context: Most cases of autosomal dominant hypoparathyroidism (ADH) are caused by gain-of-function mutations in CASR or dominant inhibitor mutations in GCM2 or PTH. Objective: Our objectives were to identify the genetic basis for ADH in a multigenerational family and define the underlying disease mechanism. Subjects: Here we evaluated a multigenerational family with ADH in which affected subjects had normal sequences in these genes and were shorter than unaffected family members. Methods: We collected clinical and biochemical data from 6 of 11 affected subjects and performed whole-exome sequence analysis on DNA from two affected sisters and their affected father. Functional studies were performed after expression of wild-type and mutant Gα11 proteins in human embryonic kidney-293-CaR cells that stably express calcium-sensing receptors. Results: Whole-exome-sequencing followed by Sanger sequencing revealed a heterozygous mutation, c.179G>T; p.R60L, in GNA11, which encodes the α-subunit of G11, the principal heterotrimeric G protein that couples calcium-sensing receptors to signal activation in parathyroid cells. Functional studies of Gα11 R60L showed increased accumulation of intracellular concentration of free calcium in response to extracellular concentration of free calcium with a significantly decreased EC50 compared with wild-type Gα11. By contrast, R60L was significantly less effective than the oncogenic Q209L form of Gα11 as an activator of the MAPK pathway. Compared to subjects with CASR mutations, patients with GNA11 mutations lacked hypercalciuria and had normal serum magnesium levels. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that the germline gain-of-function mutation of GNA11 is a cause of ADH and implicate a novel role for GNA11 in skeletal growth. PMID:24823460

  9. A novel OPA1 mutation in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant optic atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Juanjuan; Yuan, Yimin; Lin, Bing; Feng, Hao; Li, Yan; Dai, Xianning; Zhou, Huihui; Dong, Xujie; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Guan, Min-Xin

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report the characterization of a four-generation large Chinese family with ADOA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find a new heterozygous mutation c.C1198G in OPA1 gene which may be a novel pathogenic mutation in this pedigree. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We do not find any mitochondrial DNA mutations associated with optic atrophy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Other factors may also contribute to the phenotypic variability of ADOA in this pedigree. -- Abstract: A large four-generation Chinese family with autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) was investigated in the present study. Eight of the family members were affected in this pedigree. The affected family members exhibited early-onset and progressive visual impairment, resulting in mild to profound loss of visual acuity. The average age-at-onset was 15.9 years. A new heterozygous mutation c.C1198G was identified by sequence analysis of the 12th exon of the OPA1 gene. This mutation resulted in a proline to alanine substitution at codon 400, which was located in an evolutionarily conserved region. This missense mutation in the GTPase domain was supposed to result in a loss of function for the encoded protein and act through a dominant negative effect. No other mutations associated with optic atrophy were found in our present study. The c.C1198G heterozygous mutation in the OPA1 gene may be a novel key pathogenic mutation in this pedigree with ADOA. Furthermore, additional nuclear modifier genes, environmental factors, and psychological factors may also contribute to the phenotypic variability of ADOA in this pedigree.

  10. Intermediate phenotypes in patients with autosomal dominant hyper-IgE syndrome caused by somatic mosaicism

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Amy P.; Sowerwine, Kathryn J.; Lawrence, Monica G.; Davis, Joie; Henderson, Carolyn J.; Zarember, Kol A.; Garofalo, Mary; Gallin, John I.; Kuhns, Douglas B.; Heller, Theo; Milner, Joshua D.; Puck, Jennifer M.; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Holland, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Autosomal dominant hyper-IgE syndrome (AD-HIES) is caused by mutations in signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). We describe 2 subjects in whom somatic mosaicism was associated with intermediate phenotypes. Objective Somatic mosaics might shed light on the pathogenesis of dominant STAT3 mutations and the mechanisms behind the immunologic and nonimmunologic features of the disease. Methods Clinical evaluations were conducted. Mutant STAT3 was amplified from different tissues and sequenced, and the percentage of mosaicism in various cell types was calculated. Flow cytometry was performed to determine percentages of IL-171 cells, IL-221 cells, or both. Suction blisters were induced in 1 subject, and exudate fluid was analyzed for whether emigrating neutrophils were STAT3 mutant or wild-type; neutrophils from peripheral blood were simultaneously examined. Results The 2 subjects with STAT3 somatic mosaicism had intermediate phenotypes and were found to have preserved TH17 cell compartments and apparently normal CD8 cells. However, they still had infections, including mucocutaneous candidiasis. The percentage of STAT3 mutant neutrophils migrating into blisters at 16 hours was the same as in peripheral blood, suggesting normal chemotaxis. Conclusion STAT3 mosaicism accounts for a milder phenotype and allows for further investigation into the pathogenesis of AD-HIES. Despite having a preserved TH17 cell compartment, both subjects with mosaicism had chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, suggesting that candidiasis in subjects with AD-HIES is not driven solely by low TH17 cell numbers. The percentage of STAT3 mutant neutrophils emigrating into a suction blister at 16 hours was the same as the percentage in peripheral blood, suggesting that early chemotaxis of STAT3 neutrophils is normal in vivo. PMID:23623265

  11. A Missense Mutation in KCTD17 Causes Autosomal Dominant Myoclonus-Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Mencacci, Niccolo E.; Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Zdebik, Anselm; Asmus, Friedrich; Ludtmann, Marthe H.R.; Ryten, Mina; Plagnol, Vincent; Hauser, Ann-Kathrin; Bandres-Ciga, Sara; Bettencourt, Conceição; Forabosco, Paola; Hughes, Deborah; Soutar, Marc M.P.; Peall, Kathryn; Morris, Huw R.; Trabzuni, Daniah; Tekman, Mehmet; Stanescu, Horia C.; Kleta, Robert; Carecchio, Miryam; Zorzi, Giovanna; Nardocci, Nardo; Garavaglia, Barbara; Lohmann, Ebba; Weissbach, Anne; Klein, Christine; Hardy, John; Pittman, Alan M.; Foltynie, Thomas; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Gasser, Thomas; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is a rare movement disorder characterized by a combination of non-epileptic myoclonic jerks and dystonia. SGCE mutations represent a major cause for familial M-D being responsible for 30%–50% of cases. After excluding SGCE mutations, we identified through a combination of linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) as the only segregating variant in a dominant British pedigree with seven subjects affected by M-D. A subsequent screening in a cohort of M-D cases without mutations in SGCE revealed the same KCTD17 variant in a German family. The clinical presentation of the KCTD17-mutated cases was distinct from the phenotype usually observed in M-D due to SGCE mutations. All cases initially presented with mild myoclonus affecting the upper limbs. Dystonia showed a progressive course, with increasing severity of symptoms and spreading from the cranio-cervical region to other sites. KCTD17 is abundantly expressed in all brain regions with the highest expression in the putamen. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis, based on mRNA expression profile of brain samples from neuropathologically healthy individuals, showed that KCTD17 is part of a putamen gene network, which is significantly enriched for dystonia genes. Functional annotation of the network showed an over-representation of genes involved in post-synaptic dopaminergic transmission. Functional studies in mutation bearing fibroblasts demonstrated abnormalities in endoplasmic reticulum-dependent calcium signaling. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) mutation causes autosomal dominant M-D. Further functional studies are warranted to further characterize the nature of KCTD17 contribution to the molecular pathogenesis of M-D. PMID:25983243

  12. Hereditary spastic paraplegias with autosomal dominant, recessive, X-linked, or maternal trait of inheritance.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Löscher, Wolfgang; Quasthoff, Stefan; Wanschitz, Julia; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Stevanin, Giovanni

    2012-07-15

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders that are clinically characterised by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower-limbs (pure SPG) and, majoritorian, additional more extensive neurological or non-neurological manifestations (complex or complicated SPG). Pure SPG is characterised by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower-limbs, and occasionally sensory disturbances or bladder dysfunction. Complex SPGs additionally include cognitive impairment, dementia, epilepsy, extrapyramidal disturbances, cerebellar involvement, retinopathy, optic atrophy, deafness, polyneuropathy, or skin lesions in the absence of coexisting disorders. Nineteen SPGs follow an autosomal-dominant (AD-SPG), 27 an autosomal-recessive (AR-SPG), 5 X-linked (XL-SPG), and one a maternal trait of inheritance. SPGs are due to mutations in genes encoding for proteins involved in the maintenance of corticospinal tract neurons. Among the AD-SPGs, 40-45% of patients carry mutations in the SPAST-gene (SPG4) and 10% in the ATL1-gene (SPG3), while the other 9 genes are more rarely involved (NIPA1 (SPG6), KIAA0196 (SPG8), KIF5A (SPG10), RNT2 (SPG12), SPGD1 (SPG13), BSCL2 (SPG17), REEP1 (SPG31), ZFYVE27 (SPG33, debated), and SLC33A1 (SPG42, debated)). Among the AR-SPGs, ~20% of the patients carry mutations in the KIAA1840 (SPG11) gene whereas the 15 other genes are rarely mutated and account for SPGs in single families yet (CYP7B1 (SPG5), SPG7 (SPG7), ZFYVE26 (SPG15), ERLIN2 (SPG18), SPG20 (SPG20), ACP33 (SPG21), KIF1A (SPG30), FA2H (SPG35), NTE (SPG39), GJA12/GJC2 (SPG44), KIAA0415 (SPG48) and 4 genes encoding for the AP4-complex (SPG47)). Among the XL-SPGs, 3 causative genes have been identified (L1CAM (SPG1), PLP1 (SPG2), and SLC16A2 (SPG22)). The diagnosis of SPGs is based on clinical, instrumental and genetic investigations. Treatment is exclusively symptomatic.

  13. Further evidence for a locus for autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma on chromosome 1q and evidence for genetic heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggs, J.; Paglinauan, C.; Stawski, S.

    1994-09-01

    Glaucoma is a term used to describe a group of disorders which have in common a characteristic degeneration of the optic nerve associated with typical visual field defects and usually associated with elevated intraocular pressure. Two percent of white Americans and 6-10% of black Americans are affected by the disease. Compelling data indicate that susceptibility to many types of glaucoma is inherited. Hereditary juvenile glaucoma is one form of glaucoma that develops in children and is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance. Using a single large Caucasian pedigree affected with autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma, Sheffield discovered positive linkage to a group of markers that map to a 30 cM region on the long arm of chromosome 1 (1q21-q31). We have subsequently identified three unrelated Caucasian pedigrees affected with autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma that also demonstrate linkage to this region on chromosome 1, with the highest combined lod score of 5.12 at theta = .05 for marker D1S218. The identification of critical recombinant individuals in our three pedigrees has allowed us to further localize the disease gene to a 12 cM region between markers D1S242 and D1S431. In addition, we have identified several pedigrees which do not demonstrate linkage to chromosome 1q, including a black family affected with autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma that is indistinguishable clinically from the disorder affecting the caucasian pedigrees and three pedigrees affected with pigmentary dispersion syndrome, a form of glaucoma that also affects the juvenile population and is also inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. These findings provide evidence for genetic heterogeneity in juvenile glaucoma.

  14. A 76-bp deletion in the Mip gene causes autosomal dominant cataract in Hfi mice.

    PubMed

    Sidjanin, D J; Parker-Wilson, D M; Neuhäuser-Klaus, A; Pretsch, W; Favor, J; Deen, P M; Ohtaka-Maruyama, C; Lu, Y; Bragin, A; Skach, W R; Chepelinsky, A B; Grimes, P A; Stambolian, D E

    2001-06-15

    Hfi is a dominant cataract mutation where heterozygotes show hydropic lens fibers and homozygotes show total lens opacity. The Hfi locus was mapped to the distal part of mouse chromosome 10 close to the major intrinsic protein (Mip), which is expressed only in cell membranes of lens fibers. Molecular analysis of Mip revealed a 76-bp deletion that resulted in exon 2 skipping in Mip mRNA. In Hfi/Hfi this deletion resulted in a complete absence of the wildtype Mip. In contrast, Hfi/+ animals had the same amount of wildtype Mip as +/+. Results from pulse-chase expression studies excluded hetero-oligomerization of wildtype and mutant Mip as a possible mechanism for cataract formation in the Hfi/+. We propose that the cataract phenotype in the Hfi heterozygote mutant is due to a detrimental gain of function by the mutant Mip resulting in either cytotoxicity or disruption in processing of other proteins important for the lens. Cataract formation in the Hfi/Hfi mouse is probably a combined result of both the complete loss of wildtype Mip and a gain of function of the mutant Mip.

  15. Screening for Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: A Survey of 420 Nephrologists

    PubMed Central

    Flahault, Adrien; Trystram, Denis; Fouchard, Marie; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Nataf, François; Joly, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite a high prevalence of intracranial aneurysm (ICA) in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), rupture events are rare. The current recommendations for ICA screening are based on expert opinions and studies with low levels of evidence. Objectives The aim of our study was to describe the attitudes of practicing nephrologists in Europe towards screening for ICA using magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Methods We conducted a web-based survey among 1315 European French-speaking nephrologists and nephrology residents. An anonymous, electronic questionnaire including 24 independent questions related to ICA screening modalities, indications and participant profiles was sent by email between September and December 2014. Four hundred and twenty nephrologists (mostly from France) participated, including 31 nephrology residents; the response rate was 32%. Results Systematic screening for ICA was advocated by 28% of the nephrologists. A family history of ICA rupture, sudden death, stroke and migraine were consensual indications for screening (> 90% of the panel). In other clinical situations largely not covered by the recommendations (pregnancy, nephrectomy, kidney transplantation, cardiac or hepatic surgery, uncontrolled hypertension, lack of familial ADPKD history, at-risk activity, tobacco use), the attitudes towards screening were highly divergent. ICA screening was influenced by nephrologists experience with ADPKD and by their practice setting. The majority of participants (57%) would not repeat a normal ICA screening. Only a few participants (22%) knew that non-contrast MRA was the reference diagnostic tool for ICA screening, whereas most participants thought that contrast enhancement was necessary to screen for ICA. The results from the nephrology residents were analyzed separately and yielded similar results. Conclusion This practice survey revealed that most nephrologists follow the current recommendations for the initial screening of

  16. Bilineal Disease and Trans-Heterozygotes in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pei, York; Paterson, Andrew D.; Wang, Kai Rong; He, Ning; Hefferton, Donna; Watnick, Terry; Germino, Greg G.; Parfrey, Patrick; Somlo, Stefan; St. George-Hyslop, Peter

    2001-01-01

    In searching for a putative third gene for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), we studied the genetic inheritance of a large family (NFL10) previously excluded from linkage to both the PKD1 locus and the PKD2 locus. We screened 48 members of the NFL10 pedigree, by ultrasonography, and genotyped them, with informative markers, at both the PKD1 locus and the PKD2 locus. Twenty-eight of 48 individuals assessed were affected with ADPKD. Inspection of the haplotypes of these individuals suggested the possibility of bilineal disease from independently segregating PKD1 and PKD2 mutations. Using single-stranded conformational analysis, we screened for and found a PKD2 mutation (i.e., 2152delA; L736X) in 12 affected pedigree members. Additionally, when the disease status of these individuals was coded as “unknown” in linkage analysis, we also found, with markers at the PKD1 locus, significant LOD scores (i.e., >3.0). These findings strongly support the presence of a PKD1 mutation in 15 other affected pedigree members, who lack the PKD2 mutation. Two additional affected individuals had trans-heterozygous mutations involving both genes, and they had renal disease that was more severe than that in affected individuals who had either mutation alone. This is the first documentation of bilineal disease in ADPKD. In humans, trans-heterozygous mutations involving both PKD1 and PKD2 are not necessarily embryonically lethal. However, the disease associated with the presence of both mutations appears to be more severe than the disease associated with either mutation alone. The presence of bilineal disease as a confounder needs to be considered seriously in the search for the elusive PKD3 locus. PMID:11156533

  17. Growth hormone deficiency in monozygotic twins with autosomal dominant pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib.

    PubMed

    Sano, Shinichiro; Iwata, Hiromi; Matsubara, Keiko; Fukami, Maki; Kagami, Masayo; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) is associated with compromised signal transductions via PTH receptor (PTH-R) and other G-protein-coupled receptors including GHRH-R. To date, while GH deficiency (GHD) has been reported in multiple patients with PHP-Ia caused by mutations on the maternally expressed GNAS coding regions and in two patients with sporadic form of PHP-Ib accompanied by broad methylation defects of maternally derived GNAS differentially methylated regions (DMRs), it has not been identified in a patient with an autosomal dominant form of PHP-Ib (AD-PHP-Ib) accompanied by an STX16 microdeletion and an isolated loss of methylation (LOM) at exon A/B-DMR. We studied 5 4/12-year-old monozygotic twins with short stature (both -3.4 SD) and GHD (peak GH values, <6.0 μg/L after arginine and clonidine stimulations). Molecular studies revealed maternally derived STX16 microdeletions and isolated LOMs at exon A/B-DMR in the twins, confirming the diagnosis of AD-PHP-Ib. GNAS mutation was not identified, and neither mutation nor copy number variation was detected in GH1, POU1F1, PROP1, GHRHR, LHX3, LHX4, and HESX1 in the twins. The results, in conjunction with the previous finding that GNAS shows maternal expression in the pituitary, suggest that GHD of the twins is primarily ascribed to compromised GHRH-R signaling caused by AD-PTH-Ib. Thus, resistance to multiple hormones including GHRH should be considered in AD-PHP-Ib.

  18. Mutational analysis of the LDL receptor and APOB genes in Mexican individuals with autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Vaca, Gerardo; Vàzquez, Alejandra; Magaña, Marìa Teresa; Ramìrez, Marìa Lourdes; Dàvalos, Ingrid P; Martìnez, Esperanza; Marìn, Bertha; Carrillo, Gabriela

    2011-10-01

    The goal of this project was to identify families with autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH) to facilitate early detection and treatment and to provide genetic counselling as well as to approximate the mutational diversity of ADH in Mexico. Mutational analysis of the LDLR and APOB genes in 62 index cases with a clinical and/or biochemical diagnosis of ADH was performed. Twenty-five mutations (24 LDLR, 1 APOB) were identified in 38 index cases. A total of 162 individuals with ADH were identified using familial segregation analysis performed in 269 relatives of the index cases. In addition, a novel PCSK9 mutation, c.1850 C>A (p.Ala617Asp), was detected. The LDLR mutations showed the following characteristics: (1) four mutations are novel: c.695 -1G>T, c.1034_1035insA, c.1586 G>A, c.2264_2273del; (2) the most common mutations were c.682 G>A (FH-Mexico), c.1055 G>A (FH-Mexico 2), and c.1090 T>C (FH-Mexico 3); (3) five mutations were identified in 3 or more apparently unrelated probands; (4) three mutations were observed in a true homozygous state; and (5) four index cases were compound heterozygous, and one was a carrier of two mutations in the same allele. These results suggest that, in Mexico, ADH exhibits allelic heterogeneity with 5 relatively common LDLR mutations and that mutations in the APOB gene are not a common cause of ADH. This knowledge is important for the genotype-phenotype correlation and for optimising both cholesterol lowering therapies and mutational analysis protocols. In addition, these data contribute to the understanding of the molecular basis of ADH in Mexico.

  19. PKD1 and PKD2 mutations in Slovenian families with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Vouk, Katja; Strmecki, Lana; Stekrova, Jitka; Reiterova, Jana; Bidovec, Matjaz; Hudler, Petra; Kenig, Anton; Jereb, Simona; Zupanic-Pajnic, Irena; Balazic, Joze; Haarpaintner, Guido; Leskovar, Bostjan; Adamlje, Anton; Skoflic, Antun; Dovc, Reina; Hojs, Radovan; Komel, Radovan

    2006-01-01

    Background Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder caused by mutations in at least two different loci. Prior to performing mutation screening, if DNA samples of sufficient number of family members are available, it is worthwhile to assign the gene involved in disease progression by the genetic linkage analysis. Methods We collected samples from 36 Slovene ADPKD families and performed linkage analysis in 16 of them. Linkage was assessed by the use of microsatellite polymorphic markers, four in the case of PKD1 (KG8, AC2.5, CW3 and CW2) and five for PKD2 (D4S1534, D4S2929, D4S1542, D4S1563 and D4S423). Partial PKD1 mutation screening was undertaken by analysing exons 23 and 31–46 and PKD2 . Results Lod scores indicated linkage to PKD1 in six families and to PKD2 in two families. One family was linked to none and in seven families linkage to both genes was possible. Partial PKD1 mutation screening was performed in 33 patients (including 20 patients from the families where linkage analysis could not be performed). We analysed PKD2 in 2 patients where lod scores indicated linkage to PKD2 and in 7 families where linkage to both genes was possible. We detected six mutations and eight polymorphisms in PKD1 and one mutation and three polymorphisms in PKD2. Conclusion In our study group of ADPKD patients we detected seven mutations: three frameshift, one missense, two nonsense and one putative splicing mutation. Three have been described previously and 4 are novel. Three newly described framesfift mutations in PKD1 seem to be associated with more severe clinical course of ADPKD. Previously described nonsense mutation in PKD2 seems to be associated with cysts in liver and milder clinical course. PMID:16430766

  20. The PROPKD Score: A New Algorithm to Predict Renal Survival in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cornec-Le Gall, Emilie; Audrézet, Marie-Pierre; Rousseau, Annick; Hourmant, Maryvonne; Renaudineau, Eric; Charasse, Christophe; Morin, Marie-Pascale; Moal, Marie-Christine; Dantal, Jacques; Wehbe, Bassem; Perrichot, Régine; Frouget, Thierry; Vigneau, Cécile; Potier, Jérôme; Jousset, Philippe; Guillodo, Marie-Paule; Siohan, Pascale; Terki, Nazim; Sawadogo, Théophile; Legrand, Didier; Menoyo-Calonge, Victorio; Benarbia, Seddik; Besnier, Dominique; Longuet, Hélène; Férec, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The course of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) varies among individuals, with some reaching ESRD before 40 years of age and others never requiring RRT. In this study, we developed a prognostic model to predict renal outcomes in patients with ADPKD on the basis of genetic and clinical data. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1341 patients from the Genkyst cohort and evaluated the influence of clinical and genetic factors on renal survival. Multivariate survival analysis identified four variables that were significantly associated with age at ESRD onset, and a scoring system from 0 to 9 was developed as follows: being male: 1 point; hypertension before 35 years of age: 2 points; first urologic event before 35 years of age: 2 points; PKD2 mutation: 0 points; nontruncating PKD1 mutation: 2 points; and truncating PKD1 mutation: 4 points. Three risk categories were subsequently defined as low risk (0–3 points), intermediate risk (4–6 points), and high risk (7–9 points) of progression to ESRD, with corresponding median ages for ESRD onset of 70.6, 56.9, and 49 years, respectively. Whereas a score ≤3 eliminates evolution to ESRD before 60 years of age with a negative predictive value of 81.4%, a score >6 forecasts ESRD onset before 60 years of age with a positive predictive value of 90.9%. This new prognostic score accurately predicts renal outcomes in patients with ADPKD and may enable the personalization of therapeutic management of ADPKD. PMID:26150605

  1. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type III: a review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia (ADCA) Type III is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) classically characterized by pure cerebellar ataxia and occasionally by non-cerebellar signs such as pyramidal signs, ophthalmoplegia, and tremor. The onset of symptoms typically occurs in adulthood; however, a minority of patients develop clinical features in adolescence. The incidence of ADCA Type III is unknown. ADCA Type III consists of six subtypes, SCA5, SCA6, SCA11, SCA26, SCA30, and SCA31. The subtype SCA6 is the most common. These subtypes are associated with four causative genes and two loci. The severity of symptoms and age of onset can vary between each SCA subtype and even between families with the same subtype. SCA5 and SCA11 are caused by specific gene mutations such as missense, inframe deletions, and frameshift insertions or deletions. SCA6 is caused by trinucleotide CAG repeat expansions encoding large uninterrupted glutamine tracts. SCA31 is caused by repeat expansions that fall outside of the protein-coding region of the disease gene. Currently, there are no specific gene mutations associated with SCA26 or SCA30, though there is a confirmed locus for each subtype. This disease is mainly diagnosed via genetic testing; however, differential diagnoses include pure cerebellar ataxia and non-cerebellar features in addition to ataxia. Although not fatal, ADCA Type III may cause dysphagia and falls, which reduce the quality of life of the patients and may in turn shorten the lifespan. The therapy for ADCA Type III is supportive and includes occupational and speech modalities. There is no cure for ADCA Type III, but a number of recent studies have highlighted novel therapies, which bring hope for future curative treatments. PMID:23331413

  2. Clinical Correlates of Mass Effect in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunsuk; Park, Hayne Cho; Ryu, Hyunjin; Kim, Kiwon; Kim, Hyo Sang; Oh, Kook-Hwan; Yu, Su Jong; Chung, Jin Wook; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Seung Hyup; Cheong, Hae Il; Lee, Kyubeck; Park, Jong Hoon; Pei, York; Hwang, Young-Hwan; Ahn, Curie

    2015-01-01

    Mass effect from polycystic kidney and liver enlargement can result in significant clinical complications and symptoms in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). In this single-center study, we examined the correlation of height-adjusted total liver volume (htTLV) and total kidney volume (htTKV) by CT imaging with hepatic complications (n = 461) and abdominal symptoms (n = 253) in patients with ADPKD. “Mass-effect” complications were assessed by review of medical records and abdominal symptoms, by a standardized research questionnaire. Overall, 91.8% of patients had 4 or more liver cysts on CT scans. Polycystic liver disease (PLD) was classified as none or mild (htTLV < 1,600 mL/m); moderate (1,600 ≤ htTLV <3,200 mL/m); and severe (htTLV ≥ 3,200 mL/m). The prevalence of moderate and severe PLD in our patient cohort was 11.7% (n = 54/461) and 4.8% (n = 22/461), respectively, with a female predominance in both the moderate (61.1%) and severe (95.5%) PLD groups. Pressure-related complications such as leg edema (20.4%), ascites (16.6%), and hernia (3.6%) were common, and patients with moderate to severe PLD exhibited a 6-fold increased risk (compared to no or mild PLD) for these complications in multivariate analysis. Similarly, abdominal symptoms including back pain (58.8%), flank pain (53.1%), abdominal fullness (46.5%), and dyspnea/chest-discomfort (44.3%) were very common, and patients with moderate to severe PLD exhibited a 5-fold increased risk for these symptoms. Moderate to severe PLD is a common and clinically important problem in ~16% of patients with ADPKD who may benefit from referral to specialized centers for further management. PMID:26641645

  3. Differences in allele frequencies of autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia SNPs in the Malaysian population.

    PubMed

    Alex, Livy; Chahil, Jagdish Kaur; Lye, Say Hean; Bagali, Pramod; Ler, Lian Wee

    2012-06-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is caused by different interactions of lifestyle and genetic determinants. At the genetic level, it can be attributed to the interactions of multiple polymorphisms, or as in the example of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), it can be the result of a single mutation. A large number of genetic markers, mostly single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) or mutations in three genes, implicated in autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH), viz APOB (apolipoprotein B), LDLR (low density lipoprotein receptor) and PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type-9), have been identified and characterized. However, such studies have been insufficiently undertaken specifically in Malaysia and Southeast Asia in general. The main objective of this study was to identify ADH variants, specifically ADH-causing mutations and hypercholesterolemia-associated polymorphisms in multiethnic Malaysian population. We aimed to evaluate published SNPs in ADH causing genes, in this population and to report any unusual trends. We examined a large number of selected SNPs from previous studies of APOB, LDLR, PCSK9 and other genes, in clinically diagnosed ADH patients (n=141) and healthy control subjects (n=111). Selection of SNPs was initiated by searching within genes reported to be associated with ADH from known databases. The important finding was 137 mono-allelic markers (44.1%) and 173 polymorphic markers (55.8%) in both subject groups. By comparing to publicly available data, out of the 137 mono-allelic markers, 23 markers showed significant differences in allele frequency among Malaysians, European Whites, Han Chinese, Yoruba and Gujarati Indians. Our data can serve as reference for others in related fields of study during the planning of their experiments.

  4. Distinct patterns of APP processing in the CNS in autosomal-dominant and sporadic Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Pera, Marta; Alcolea, Daniel; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Guardia-Laguarta, Cristina; Colom-Cadena, Martí; Badiola, Nahuai; Suárez-Calvet, Marc; Lladó, Albert; Barrera-Ocampo, Alvaro A; Sepulveda-Falla, Diego; Blesa, Rafael; Molinuevo, José L; Clarimón, Jordi; Ferrer, Isidre; Gelpi, Ellen; Lleó, Alberto

    2013-02-01

    Autosomal-dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD) is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) or Presenilin (PSEN) genes. Studies from families with ADAD have been critical to support the amyloid cascade hypothesis of Alzheimer disease (AD), the basis for the current development of amyloid-based disease-modifying therapies in sporadic AD (SAD). However, whether the pathological changes in APP processing in the CNS in ADAD are similar to those observed in SAD remains unclear. In this study, we measured β-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE) protein levels and activity, APP and APP C-terminal fragments in brain samples from subjects with ADAD carrying APP or PSEN1 mutations (n = 18), patients with SAD (n = 27) and age-matched controls (n = 22). We also measured sAPPβ and BACE protein levels, as well as BACE activity, in CSF from individuals carrying PSEN1 mutations (10 mutation carriers and 7 non-carrier controls), patients with SAD (n = 32) and age-matched controls (n = 11). We found that in the brain, the pattern in ADAD was characterized by an increase in APP β-C-terminal fragment (β-CTF) levels despite no changes in BACE protein levels or activity. In contrast, the pattern in SAD in the brain was mainly characterized by an increase in BACE levels and activity, with less APP β-CTF accumulation than ADAD. In the CSF, no differences were found between groups in BACE activity or expression or sAPPβ levels. Taken together, these data suggest that the physiopathological events underlying the chronic Aβ production/clearance imbalance in SAD and ADAD are different. These differences should be considered in the design of intervention trials in AD.

  5. The role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Becchetti, Andrea; Aracri, Patrizia; Meneghini, Simone; Brusco, Simone; Amadeo, Alida

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) is a focal epilepsy with attacks typically arising in the frontal lobe during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. It is characterized by clusters of complex and stereotyped hypermotor seizures, frequently accompanied by sudden arousals. Cognitive and psychiatric symptoms may be also observed. Approximately 12% of the ADNFLE families carry mutations on genes coding for subunits of the heteromeric neuronal nicotinic receptors (nAChRs). This is consistent with the widespread expression of these receptors, particularly the α4β2(*) subtype, in the neocortex and thalamus. However, understanding how mutant nAChRs lead to partial frontal epilepsy is far from being straightforward because of the complexity of the cholinergic regulation in both developing and mature brains. The relation with the sleep-waking cycle must be also explained. We discuss some possible pathogenetic mechanisms in the light of recent advances about the nAChR role in prefrontal regions as well as the studies carried out in murine models of ADNFLE. Functional evidence points to alterations in prefrontal GABA release, and the synaptic unbalance probably arises during the cortical circuit maturation. Although most of the available functional evidence concerns mutations on nAChR subunit genes, other genes have been recently implicated in the disease, such as KCNT1 (coding for a Na(+)-dependent K(+) channel), DEPD5 (Disheveled, Egl-10 and Pleckstrin Domain-containing protein 5), and CRH (Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone). Overall, the uncertainties about both the etiology and the pathogenesis of ADNFLE point to the current gaps in our knowledge the regulation of neuronal networks in the cerebral cortex.

  6. The role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Becchetti, Andrea; Aracri, Patrizia; Meneghini, Simone; Brusco, Simone; Amadeo, Alida

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) is a focal epilepsy with attacks typically arising in the frontal lobe during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. It is characterized by clusters of complex and stereotyped hypermotor seizures, frequently accompanied by sudden arousals. Cognitive and psychiatric symptoms may be also observed. Approximately 12% of the ADNFLE families carry mutations on genes coding for subunits of the heteromeric neuronal nicotinic receptors (nAChRs). This is consistent with the widespread expression of these receptors, particularly the α4β2* subtype, in the neocortex and thalamus. However, understanding how mutant nAChRs lead to partial frontal epilepsy is far from being straightforward because of the complexity of the cholinergic regulation in both developing and mature brains. The relation with the sleep-waking cycle must be also explained. We discuss some possible pathogenetic mechanisms in the light of recent advances about the nAChR role in prefrontal regions as well as the studies carried out in murine models of ADNFLE. Functional evidence points to alterations in prefrontal GABA release, and the synaptic unbalance probably arises during the cortical circuit maturation. Although most of the available functional evidence concerns mutations on nAChR subunit genes, other genes have been recently implicated in the disease, such as KCNT1 (coding for a Na+-dependent K+ channel), DEPD5 (Disheveled, Egl-10 and Pleckstrin Domain-containing protein 5), and CRH (Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone). Overall, the uncertainties about both the etiology and the pathogenesis of ADNFLE point to the current gaps in our knowledge the regulation of neuronal networks in the cerebral cortex. PMID:25717303

  7. Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa: no evidence for nonallelic genetic heterogeneity on 3q.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar-Singh, R; Wang, H; Humphries, P; Farrar, G J

    1993-01-01

    Since the initial report of linkage of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) to the long arm of chromosome 3, several mutations in the gene encoding rhodopsin, which also maps to 3q, have been reported in adRP pedigrees. However, there has been some discussion as to the possibility of a second adRP locus on 3q. This suggestion has important diagnostic and research implications and must raise doubts about the usefulness of linked markers for reliable diagnosis of RP patients. In order to address this issue we have performed an admixture test (A-test) on 10 D3S47-linked adRP pedigrees and have found a likelihood ratio of heterogeneity versus homogeneity of 4.90. We performed a second A-test, combining the data from all families with known rhodopsin mutations. In this test we obtained a reduced likelihood ratio of heterogeneity versus homogeneity, of 1.0. On the basis of these statistical analyses we have found no significant support for two adRP loci on chromosome 3q. Furthermore, using 40 CEPH families, we have localized the rhodopsin gene to the D3S47-D3S20 interval, with a maximum lod score (Zm) of 20 and have found that the order qter-D3S47-rhodopsin-D3S20-cen is significantly more likely than any other order. In addition, we have mapped (Zm = 30) the microsatellite marker D3S621 relative to other loci in this region of the genome. PMID:8430695

  8. Clinical Correlates of Mass Effect in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunsuk; Park, Hayne Cho; Ryu, Hyunjin; Kim, Kiwon; Kim, Hyo Sang; Oh, Kook-Hwan; Yu, Su Jong; Chung, Jin Wook; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Seung Hyup; Cheong, Hae Il; Lee, Kyubeck; Park, Jong Hoon; Pei, York; Hwang, Young-Hwan; Ahn, Curie

    2015-01-01

    Mass effect from polycystic kidney and liver enlargement can result in significant clinical complications and symptoms in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). In this single-center study, we examined the correlation of height-adjusted total liver volume (htTLV) and total kidney volume (htTKV) by CT imaging with hepatic complications (n = 461) and abdominal symptoms (n = 253) in patients with ADPKD. "Mass-effect" complications were assessed by review of medical records and abdominal symptoms, by a standardized research questionnaire. Overall, 91.8% of patients had 4 or more liver cysts on CT scans. Polycystic liver disease (PLD) was classified as none or mild (htTLV < 1,600 mL/m); moderate (1,600 ≤ htTLV <3,200 mL/m); and severe (htTLV ≥ 3,200 mL/m). The prevalence of moderate and severe PLD in our patient cohort was 11.7% (n = 54/461) and 4.8% (n = 22/461), respectively, with a female predominance in both the moderate (61.1%) and severe (95.5%) PLD groups. Pressure-related complications such as leg edema (20.4%), ascites (16.6%), and hernia (3.6%) were common, and patients with moderate to severe PLD exhibited a 6-fold increased risk (compared to no or mild PLD) for these complications in multivariate analysis. Similarly, abdominal symptoms including back pain (58.8%), flank pain (53.1%), abdominal fullness (46.5%), and dyspnea/chest-discomfort (44.3%) were very common, and patients with moderate to severe PLD exhibited a 5-fold increased risk for these symptoms. Moderate to severe PLD is a common and clinically important problem in ~16% of patients with ADPKD who may benefit from referral to specialized centers for further management.

  9. Predictors of rapid disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Valentina; Gastaldon, Fiorella; Caprara, Carlotta; Giuliani, Anna; Martino, Francesca; Ferrari, Fiorenza; Ronco, Claudio

    2017-02-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is one of the most common genetic diseases with a reported prevalence of 1:400 to 1:1000. Since the intact kidneys can compensate for the loss of glomerular filtration in ADPKD patients, renal insufficiency usually remains undetected until almost the fourth decade of life. Hereafter, reliable diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers to identify ADPKD progression are urgently needed. Several studies and systematic reviews tried to identify markers or predictors of rapid disease progression of ADPKD. The aim of this study is to review predictors of rapid disease progression of ADPKD that can be useful to the clinician. We will describe several factors associated with rapid progression of ADPKD derived from retrospective or cross-sectional studies, suggesting the best and most useful predictors that may help to patients management in clinical practice. We will attempt to identify the most useful predictors of rapid disease progression of ADPKD: established TKV growth rate >5% per year, annual estimated glomerular filtration rate decline >5 mL/min/1.73 m2, truncating PKD1 mutations and elevated plasma copeptin level. The combination of several factors that can predict the rapid ADPKD progression is more accurate than a single-marker strategy. The "PRO-PKD" risk scoring system combined with TKV, can be useful in order to evaluate the ADPKD patients and they appear to be appropriate predictors of progression disease. Moreover levels of copeptin and some urinary markers can be matched to these factors for improved patient assessment in rapid progression.

  10. [Pathophysiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment options for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Noël, Natacha; Rieu, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the leading genetic cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) worldwide. Its prevalence is evaluated according to studies and population between 1/1000 and 1/4000 live births and it accounts for 6 to 8% of incident ESRD patients in developed countries. ADPKD is characterized by numerous cysts in both kidneys and various extrarenal manifestations that are detailed in this review. Clinico-radiological and genetic diagnosis are also discussed. Mutations in the PKD1 and PKD2 codifying for polycystin-1 (PC-1) and polycystin-2 (PC-2) are responsible for the 85 and 15% of ADPKD cases, respectively. In primary cilia of normal kidney epithelial cells, PC-1 and PC-2 interact forming a complex involved in flow- and cilia-dependant signalling pathways where intracellular calcium and cAMP play a central role. Alteration of these multiple signal transduction pathways leads to cystogenesis accompanied by dysregulated planar cell polarity, excessive cell proliferation and fluid secretion, and pathogenic interactions of epithelial cells with an abnormal extracellular matrix. The mass effect of expanding cyst is responsible for the decline in glomerular filtration rate that occurs late in the course of the disease. For many decades, the treatment for ADPKD aims to lessen the condition's symptoms, limit kidney damage, and prevent complications. Recently, the development of promising specific treatment raises the hope to slow the growth of cysts and delay the disease. Treatment strategies targeting cAMP signalling such as vasopressin receptor antagonists or somatostatin analogs have been tested successfully in clinical trials with relative safety. Newer treatments supported by preclinical trials will become available in the next future. Recognizing early markers of renal progression (clinical, imaging, and genetic markers) to identify high-risk patients and multidrug approaches with synergistic effects may provide new opportunities

  11. Nephrotic syndrome and idiopathic membranous nephropathy associated with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Peces, Ramón; Martínez-Ara, Jorge; Peces, Carlos; Picazo, Mariluz; Cuesta-López, Emilio; Vega, Cristina; Azorín, Sebastián; Selgas, Rafael

    2011-05-05

    We report the case of a 38-year-old male with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and concomitant nephrotic syndrome secondary to membranous nephropathy (MN). A 3-month course of prednisone 60 mg daily and losartan 100 mg daily resulted in resistance. Treatment with chlorambucil 0.2 mg/kg daily, low-dose prednisone, plus an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) and an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) for 6 weeks resulted in partial remission of his nephrotic syndrome for a duration of 10 months. After relapse of the nephrotic syndrome, a 13-month course of mycophenolate mofetil (MFM) 2 g daily and low-dose prednisone produced complete remission for 44 months. After a new relapse, a second 24-month course of MFM and low-dose prednisone produced partial to complete remission of proteinuria with preservation of renal function. Thirty-six months after MFM withdrawal, complete remission of nephrotic-range proteinuria was maintained and renal function was preserved. This case supports the idea that renal biopsy is needed for ADPKD patients with nephrotic-range proteinuria in order to exclude coexisting glomerular disease and for appropriate treatment/prevention of renal function deterioration. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of nephrotic syndrome due to MN in a patient with ADPKD treated with MFM, with remission of proteinuria and preservation of renal function after more than 10 years. Findings in this patient also suggest that MFM might reduce cystic cell proliferation and fibrosis, preventing progressive renal scarring with preservation of renal function.

  12. Frequency of Nerve Root Sleeve Cysts in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aşık, Murat; Tufan, Fatih; Akpınar, Timur Selçuk; Akalın, Nilgül; Ceyhan, Elvan; Tunç, Necmeddin; Hasıloğlu, Zehra Işık; Altıparmak, Mehmet Rıza; Ecder, Tevfik; Albayram, Sait

    2016-01-01

    Background There is sporadic data about the occurrence of spinal meningeal cysts in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). We suggest that there is a relationship with the frequency and size of spinal meningeal cysts and headache, intracranial aneurysms, and cerebrospinal fluid leakage in patients with ADPKD. Aim To investigate the relationship with spinal meningeal cyst, cerebrospinal fluid leakage, and headache in patients with ADPKD. Study Design Cross-sectional study. Methods We enrolled 50 patients with ADPKD and 37 healthy volunteers. This cross-sectional study included patients with ADPKD and matched healthy volunteers. Magnetic resonance imaging myelography was performed using the 3D-T2 HASTE technique in an MRI scanner. We questioned our subjects regarding presence of headache and evaluated headache severity using a visual analog scale. The relationship between the number and size of spinal meningeal cysts with headache, intracranial aneurysms, and liver cysts was also investigated. Results Spinal meningeal cysts were more numerous and larger in patients than in controls (14.8±11.6 vs. 6.4±4.6 cysts respectively, p<0.001, 68.3±49.3 vs. 25.4±20.1 mm, p<0.001, respectively). Spinal cyst number and size were similar in APDKD patients with or without intracranial aneurysms. Headache score was correlated with the size and number of spinal meningeal cysts. This was valid only in patients with ADPKD. Conclusion Abnormality involving the vessel wall in ADPKD may explain the increased number of spinal meningeal cysts in ADPKD. Moreover, leakage of cerebrospinal fluid secondary to spinal meningeal cyst may be responsible for recurrent severe headache by causing spontaneous intracranial hypotension in these patients. PMID:27994919

  13. Tinea imbricata: autosomal dominant pattern of susceptibility in a polygamous indigenous family of the Nahuatl zone in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, A; Araiza, J; Koffman-Alfaro, Susana; Paredes-Solis, Vanessa; Cuevas-Covarrubias, S; Rivera, M R

    2004-08-01

    We report on 9 confirmed cases of tinea imbricata (Tokelau, infection due to Trichophyton concentricum) out of 16 family members. They had a common mother with three different fathers. The genetic analysis of the family suggests an autosomal dominant pattern of susceptibility. Most cases (8/9) were presented as concentric and lamellar forms. One patient also had onychomycosis due to T. concentricum. Only two out of nine cases had a positive response to trichophytin.

  14. Berberine slows cell growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bonon, Anna; Mangolini, Alessandra; Pinton, Paolo; Senno, Laura del; Aguiari, Gianluca

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •Berberine at appropriate doses slows cell proliferation in ADPKD cystic cells. •Reduction of cell growth by berberine occurs by inhibition of ERK and p70-S6 kinase. •Higher doses of berberine cause an overall cytotoxic effect. •Berberine overdose induces apoptotic bodies formation and DNA fragmentation. •Antiproliferative properties of this drug make it a new candidate for ADPKD therapy. -- Abstract: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary monogenic disorder characterized by development and enlargement of kidney cysts that lead to loss of renal function. It is caused by mutations in two genes (PKD1 and PKD2) encoding for polycystin-1 and polycystin-2 proteins which regulate different signals including cAMP, mTOR and EGFR pathways. Abnormal activation of these signals following PC1 or PC2 loss of function causes an increased cell proliferation which is a typical hallmark of this disease. Despite the promising findings obtained in animal models with targeted inhibitors able to reduce cystic cell growth, currently, no specific approved therapy for ADPKD is available. Therefore, the research of new more effective molecules could be crucial for the treatment of this severe pathology. In this regard, we have studied the effect of berberine, an isoquinoline quaternary alkaloid, on cell proliferation and apoptosis in human and mouse ADPKD cystic cell lines. Berberine treatment slows cell proliferation of ADPKD cystic cells in a dose-dependent manner and at high doses (100 μg/mL) it induces cell death in cystic cells as well as in normal kidney tubule cells. However, at 10 μg/mL, berberine reduces cell growth in ADPKD cystic cells only enhancing G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase of cell cycle and inhibiting ERK and p70-S6 kinases. Our results indicate that berberine shows a selected antiproliferative activity in cellular models for ADPKD, suggesting that this molecule and similar natural compounds could open new

  15. Hyperaldosteronism and cardiovascular risk in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lai, Silvia; Petramala, Luigi; Mastroluca, Daniela; Petraglia, Emanuela; Di Gaeta, Alessandro; Indino, Elena; Panebianco, Valeria; Ciccariello, Mauro; Shahabadi, Hossein H; Galani, Alessandro; Letizia, Claudio; D'Angelo, Anna Rita

    2016-07-01

    Hypertension is commonly associated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), often discovered before the onset of renal failure, albeit the pathogenetic mechanisms are not well elucidated. Hyperaldosteronism in ADPKD may contribute to the development of insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction, and progression of cardiorenal disease. The aim of study was to evaluate the prevalence of primary aldosteronism (PA) in ADPKD patients and identify some surrogate biomarkers of cardiovascular risk.We have enrolled 27 hypertensive ADPKD patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥ 60 mL/min, evaluating the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), inflammatory indexes, nutritional status, homocysteine (Hcy), homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), mineral metabolism, microalbuminuria, and surrogate markers of atherosclerosis [carotid intima media thickness (cIMT), ankle/brachial index (ABI), flow mediated dilation (FMD), renal resistive index (RRI) and left ventricular mass index (LVMI)]. Furthermore, we have carried out the morpho-functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with high-field 3 T Magnetom Avanto.We have divided patients into group A, with normal plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) and group B with PA, present in 9 (33%) of overall ADPKD patients. Respect to group A, group B showed a significant higher mean value of LVMI, HOMA-IR and Hcy (P = 0.001, P = 0.004, P = 0.018; respectively), and a lower value of FMD and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH-VitD) (P = 0.037, P = 0.019; respectively) with a higher prevalence of non-dipper pattern at Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring (ABPM) (65% vs 40%, P < 0.05) at an early stage of the disease.In this study, we showed a high prevalence of PA in ADPKD patients, associated to higher LVMI, HOMA-IR, Hcy, lower FMD, and 25-OH-VitD, considered as surrogate markers of atherosclerosis, compared to ADPKD patients with normal PAC values. Our

  16. Hyperaldosteronism and cardiovascular risk in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Silvia; Petramala, Luigi; Mastroluca, Daniela; Petraglia, Emanuela; Di Gaeta, Alessandro; Indino, Elena; Panebianco, Valeria; Ciccariello, Mauro; Shahabadi, Hossein H.; Galani, Alessandro; Letizia, Claudio; D’Angelo, Anna Rita

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypertension is commonly associated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), often discovered before the onset of renal failure, albeit the pathogenetic mechanisms are not well elucidated. Hyperaldosteronism in ADPKD may contribute to the development of insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction, and progression of cardiorenal disease. The aim of study was to evaluate the prevalence of primary aldosteronism (PA) in ADPKD patients and identify some surrogate biomarkers of cardiovascular risk. We have enrolled 27 hypertensive ADPKD patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥ 60 mL/min, evaluating the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS), inflammatory indexes, nutritional status, homocysteine (Hcy), homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), mineral metabolism, microalbuminuria, and surrogate markers of atherosclerosis [carotid intima media thickness (cIMT), ankle/brachial index (ABI), flow mediated dilation (FMD), renal resistive index (RRI) and left ventricular mass index (LVMI)]. Furthermore, we have carried out the morpho-functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with high-field 3 T Magnetom Avanto. We have divided patients into group A, with normal plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) and group B with PA, present in 9 (33%) of overall ADPKD patients. Respect to group A, group B showed a significant higher mean value of LVMI, HOMA-IR and Hcy (P = 0.001, P = 0.004, P = 0.018; respectively), and a lower value of FMD and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH-VitD) (P = 0.037, P = 0.019; respectively) with a higher prevalence of non-dipper pattern at Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring (ABPM) (65% vs 40%, P < 0.05) at an early stage of the disease. In this study, we showed a high prevalence of PA in ADPKD patients, associated to higher LVMI, HOMA-IR, Hcy, lower FMD, and 25-OH-VitD, considered as surrogate markers of atherosclerosis, compared to ADPKD patients with normal

  17. Dietary salt restriction is beneficial to the management of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, Vicente E; Abebe, Kaleab Z; Schrier, Robert W; Perrone, Ronald D; Chapman, Arlene B; Yu, Alan S; Braun, William E; Steinman, Theodore I; Brosnahan, Godela; Hogan, Marie C; Rahbari, Frederic F; Grantham, Jared J; Bae, Kyongtae T; Moore, Charity G; Flessner, Michael F

    2017-02-01

    The CRISP study of polycystic kidney disease (PKD) found that urinary sodium excretion associated with the rate of total kidney volume increase. Whether sodium restriction slows the progression of Autosomal Dominant PKD (ADPKD) is not known. To evaluate this we conducted a post hoc analysis of the HALT-PKD clinical trials of renin-angiotensin blockade in patients with ADPKD. Linear mixed models examined whether dietary sodium affected rates of total kidney volume or change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in patients with an eGFR over 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (Study A) or the risk for a composite endpoint of 50% reduction in eGFR, end-stage renal disease or death, or the rate of eGFR decline in patients with an eGFR 25-60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (Study B) all in patients initiated on an under100 mEq sodium diet. During the trial urinary sodium excretion significantly declined by an average of 0.25 and 0.41 mEq/24 hour per month in studies A and B, respectively. In Study A, averaged and time varying urinary sodium excretions were significantly associated with kidney growth (0.43%/year and 0.09%/year, respectively, for each 18 mEq urinary sodium excretion). Averaged urinary sodium excretion was not significantly associated with faster eGFR decline (-0.07 ml/min/1.73m(2)/year for each 18 mEq urinary sodium excretion). In Study B, the averaged but not time-varying urinary sodium excretion significantly associated with increased risk for the composite endpoint (hazard ratio 1.08 for each 18 mEq urinary sodium excretion) and a significantly faster eGFR decline (-0.09 ml/min/1.73m(2)/year for each mEq 18 mEq urinary sodium excretion). Thus, sodium restriction is beneficial in the management of ADPKD.

  18. Renal volume and cardiovascular risk assessment in normotensive autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Sans, Laia; Pascual, Julio; Radosevic, Aleksandar; Quintian, Claudia; Ble, Mireia; Molina, Lluís; Mojal, Sergi; Ballarin, José A.; Torra, Roser; Fernández-Llama, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular disease, closely related to an early appearance of hypertension, is the most common mortality cause among autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients (ADPKD). The development of hypertension is related to an increase in renal volume. Whether the increasing in the renal volume before the onset of hypertension leads to a major cardiovascular risk in ADPKD patients remains unknown. Observational and cross-sectional study of 62 normotensive ADPKD patients with normal renal function and a group of 28 healthy controls. Renal volume, blood pressure, and renal (urinary albumin excretion), blood vessels (carotid intima media thickness and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity), and cardiac (left ventricular mass index and diastolic dysfunction parameters) asymptomatic organ damage were determined and were considered as continuous variables. Correlations between renal volume and the other parameters were studied in the ADPKD population, and results were compared with the control group. Blood pressure values and asymptomatic organ damage were used to assess the cardiovascular risk according to renal volume tertiles. Even though in the normotensive range, ADPKD patients show higher blood pressure and major asymptomatic organ damage than healthy controls. Asymptomatic organ damage is not only related to blood pressure level but also to renal volume. Multivariate regression analysis shows that microalbuminuria is only associated with height adjusted renal volume (htTKV). An htTKV above 480 mL/m represents a 10 times higher prevalence of microalbuminuria (4.8% vs 50%, P < 0.001). Normotensive ADPKD patients from the 2nd tertile renal volume group (htTKV > 336 mL/m) show higher urinary albumin excretion, but the 3rd tertile htTKV (htTKV > 469 mL/m) group shows the worst cardiovascular risk profile. Normotensive ADPKD patients show in the early stages of the disease with slight increase in renal volume, higher cardiovascular risk

  19. Two novel mutations of CLCN7 gene in Chinese families with autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (type II).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui; Shao, Chong; Zheng, Yan; He, Jin-Wei; Fu, Wen-Zhen; Wang, Chun; Zhang, Zhen-Lin

    2016-07-01

    Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II (ADO-II) is a heritable bone disorder characterized by osteosclerosis, predominantly involving the spine (vertebral end-plate thickening, or rugger-jersey spine), the pelvis ("bone-within-bone" structures) and the skull base. Chloride channel 7 (CLCN7) has been reported to be the causative gene. In this study, we aimed to identify the pathogenic mutation in four Chinese families with ADO-II. All 25 exons of the CLCN7 gene, including the exon-intron boundaries, were amplified and sequenced directly in four probands from the Chinese families with ADO-II. The mutation site was then identified in other family members and 250 healthy controls. In family 1, a known missense mutation c.296A>G in exon 4 of CLCN7 was identified in the proband, resulting in a tyrosine (UAU) to cysteine (UGU) substitution at p.99 (Y99C); the mutation was also identified in his affected father. In family 2, a novel missense mutation c.865G>C in exon 10 was identified in the proband, resulting in a valine (GUC) to leucine (CUC) substitution at p.289 (V289L); the mutation was also identified in her healthy mother and sister. In family 3, a novel missense mutation c.1625C>T in exon 17 of CLCN7 was identified in the proband, resulting in an alanine (GCG) to valine (GUG) substitution at p.542 (A542V); the mutation was also identified in her father. In family 4, a hot spot, R767W (c.2299C>T, CGG>TGG), in exon 24 was found in the proband which once again proved the susceptibility of the site or the similar genetic background in different races. Moreover, two novel mutations, V289L and A542V, occurred at a highly conserved position, found by a comparison of the protein sequences from eight vertebrates, and were predicted to have a pathogenic effect by PolyPhen-2 software, which showed "probably damaging" with a score of approximately 1. These mutation sites were not identified in 250 healthy controls. Our present findings suggest that the novel missense

  20. Renal volume and cardiovascular risk assessment in normotensive autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Sans, Laia; Pascual, Julio; Radosevic, Aleksandar; Quintian, Claudia; Ble, Mireia; Molina, Lluís; Mojal, Sergi; Ballarin, José A; Torra, Roser; Fernández-Llama, Patricia

    2016-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease, closely related to an early appearance of hypertension, is the most common mortality cause among autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients (ADPKD). The development of hypertension is related to an increase in renal volume. Whether the increasing in the renal volume before the onset of hypertension leads to a major cardiovascular risk in ADPKD patients remains unknown.Observational and cross-sectional study of 62 normotensive ADPKD patients with normal renal function and a group of 28 healthy controls. Renal volume, blood pressure, and renal (urinary albumin excretion), blood vessels (carotid intima media thickness and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity), and cardiac (left ventricular mass index and diastolic dysfunction parameters) asymptomatic organ damage were determined and were considered as continuous variables. Correlations between renal volume and the other parameters were studied in the ADPKD population, and results were compared with the control group. Blood pressure values and asymptomatic organ damage were used to assess the cardiovascular risk according to renal volume tertiles.Even though in the normotensive range, ADPKD patients show higher blood pressure and major asymptomatic organ damage than healthy controls. Asymptomatic organ damage is not only related to blood pressure level but also to renal volume. Multivariate regression analysis shows that microalbuminuria is only associated with height adjusted renal volume (htTKV). An htTKV above 480 mL/m represents a 10 times higher prevalence of microalbuminuria (4.8% vs 50%, P < 0.001). Normotensive ADPKD patients from the 2nd tertile renal volume group (htTKV > 336 mL/m) show higher urinary albumin excretion, but the 3rd tertile htTKV (htTKV > 469 mL/m) group shows the worst cardiovascular risk profile.Normotensive ADPKD patients show in the early stages of the disease with slight increase in renal volume, higher cardiovascular risk than healthy

  1. A novel frameshift mutation of POU4F3 gene associated with autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hee Keun; Park, Hong-Joon; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Park, Rekil; Kim, Un-Kyung

    2010-06-04

    Autosomal dominant mutations in the transcription factor POU4F3 gene are associated with non-syndromic hearing loss in humans; however, there have been few reports of mutations in this gene worldwide. We performed a mutation analysis of the POU4F3 gene in 42 unrelated Koreans with autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss, identifying a novel 14-bp deletion mutation in exon 2 (c.662del14) in one patient. Audiometric examination revealed severe bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in this patient. The novel mutation led to a truncated protein that lacked both functional POU domains. We further investigated the functional distinction between wild-type and mutant POU4F3 proteins using in vitro assays. The wild-type protein was completely localized in the nucleus, while the truncation of protein seriously affected its nuclear localization. In addition, the mutant failed to activate reporter gene expression. This is the first report of a POU4F3 mutation in Asia, and moreover our data suggest that further investigation will need to delineate ethnicity-specific genetic background for autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss within Asian populations.

  2. Weill-Marchesani syndrome - possible linkage of the autosomal dominant form to 15q21.1

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtz, M.K.; Samples, J.R.; Rust, K.

    1996-10-02

    Weill-Marchesani syndrome comprises short stature, brachydactyly, microspherophakia, glaucoma, and ectopia lentis is regarded as an autosomal recessive trait. We present two families each with affected individuals in 3 generations demonstrating autosomal dominant inheritance of Weill-Marchesani syndrome. Linkage analysis in these 2 families suggests a gene for Weill-Marchesani syndrome maps to 15q21.1. The dislocated lenses and connective tissue disorder in these families suggests that fibrillin-1 and microfibril-associated protein 1, which both map to 15q21.1, are candidate genes for Weill-Marchesani syndrome. Immunohistochemistry staining of skin sections from family 1 showed an apparent decrease in fibrillin staining compared to control individuals. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Renal failure in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and coexisting dermato-polymyositis: first report in the literature.

    PubMed

    Bahceci, Funda; Sari, Ramazan; Sarikaya, Metin; Atik, Esin; Karincaoglu, Yelda; Sevinc, Alper

    2004-06-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is a multisystem disorder characterized by multiple, bilateral renal cysts and is also associated with cysts in other organs, such as the liver, pancreas, and arachnoid membranes. Dermatomyositis is a disease which mainly involves the skin and muscles, although occasionally other organs are affected. In this report, a 56-year-old male patient with a four-year history of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease was presented. Renal failure was exacerbated by a coexisting dermato-polymyositis. Prednisone treatment with hemodialysis improved the situation. This is the first report renal failure in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and dermato-polymyositis.

  4. Immunological loss-of-function due to genetic gain-of-function in humans: autosomal dominance of the third kind

    PubMed Central

    Quartier, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    All the human primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) recognized as such in the 1950s were Mendelian traits and, whether autosomal or X-linked, displayed recessive inheritance. The first autosomal dominant (AD) PID, hereditary angioedema, was recognized in 1963. However, since the first identification of autosomal recessive (AR), X-linked recessive (XR) and AD PID-causing genes in 1985 (ADA; severe combined immunodeficiency), 1986 (CYBB, chronic granulomatous disease) and 1989 (SERPING1; hereditary angioedema), respectively, the number of genetically defined AD PIDs has increased more rapidly than that of any other type of PID. AD PIDs now account for 61 of the 260 known conditions (23%). All known AR PIDs are caused by alleles with some loss-of-function (LOF). A single XR PID is caused by gain-of-function (GOF) mutations (WASP-related neutropenia, 2001). In contrast, only 44 of 61 AD defects are caused by LOF alleles, which exert dominance by haploinsufficiency or negative dominance. Since 2003, up to 17 AD disorders of the third kind, due to GOF alleles, have been described. Remarkably, six of the 17 genes concerned also harbor monoallelic (STAT3), biallelic (C3, CFB, CARD11, PIK3R1) or both monoallelic and biallelic (STAT1) LOF alleles in patients with other clinical phenotypes. Most heterozygous GOF alleles result in auto-inflammation, auto-immunity, or both, with a wide range of immunological and clinical forms. Some also underlie infections and, fewer, allergies, by impairing or enhancing immunity to non-self. Malignancies are also rare. The enormous diversity of immunological and clinical phenotypes is thought provoking and mirrors the diversity and pleiotropy of the underlying genotypes. These experiments of nature provide a unique insight into the quantitative regulation of human immunity. PMID:25645939

  5. Craniosynostosis, ectopia lentis, and congenital heart defects: further delineation of an autosomal dominant syndrome with incomplete penetrance.

    PubMed

    Quercia, Nada L; Teebi, Ahmad S

    2002-01-01

    The association of craniosynostosis with ectopia lentis is extremely rare. This was recently reported in monozygotic twin sisters, supporting a genetic etiology for this syndromic association. We report on female first cousins once removed who were born with unilateral coronal synostosis. One cousin also had peripheral pulmonic branch stenosis at birth and was later found to have ectopia lentis and severe myopia. The other cousin had an atrial septal defect, mitral valve prolapse, and only mild myopia. Their intelligence is normal. The inheritance is likely autosomal dominant with variable expression and incomplete penetrance and further defines this syndrome to include congenital heart defects. These findings will have important implications for genetic counseling.

  6. Autosomal dominant aplasia cutis in three generations and one case with preaxial polydactyly in the last generation.

    PubMed

    Yağci-Küpeli, B; Çağlar, K; Büyük, S; Balci, S

    2011-01-01

    Aplasia Cutis Congenita (ACC), characterized by the focal absence of the skin and skin adnexia resulting from a developmental failure, may occur as part of Adams-Oliver Syndrome (AOS) which can be defined as a congenital inherited disorder, consisting of terminal transverse limb defects and vascular anomalies in addition to ACC. Coexistence of isolated preaxial polydactyly without terminal extremity defect and ACC is extremely rare. Furthermore, ACC and preaxial polydactyly has not been reported previously. Here we report a three-generation family with autosomal dominant aplasia cutis congenita and preaxial polydactyly in the last generation and discuss whether it is a coincidence or not.

  7. Missense mutations in the sodium-gated potassium channel gene KCNT1 cause severe autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Heron, Sarah E; Smith, Katherine R; Bahlo, Melanie; Nobili, Lino; Kahana, Esther; Licchetta, Laura; Oliver, Karen L; Mazarib, Aziz; Afawi, Zaid; Korczyn, Amos; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Petrou, Steven; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Dibbens, Leanne M

    2012-11-01

    We performed genomic mapping of a family with autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) and intellectual and psychiatric problems, identifying a disease-associated region on chromosome 9q34.3. Whole-exome sequencing identified a mutation in KCNT1, encoding a sodium-gated potassium channel subunit. KCNT1 mutations were identified in two additional families and a sporadic case with severe ADNFLE and psychiatric features. These findings implicate the sodium-gated potassium channel complex in ADNFLE and, more broadly, in the pathogenesis of focal epilepsies.

  8. DGAT2 Mutation in a Family with Autosomal-Dominant Early-Onset Axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease.

    PubMed

    Hong, Young Bin; Kang, Junghee; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jinho; Kwak, Geon; Hyun, Young Se; Nam, Soo Hyun; Hong, Hyun Dae; Choi, Yu-Ri; Jung, Sung-Chul; Koo, Heasoo; Lee, Ji Eun; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2016-05-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy and is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorder. We examined a Korean family in which two individuals had an autosomal-dominant axonal CMT with early-onset, sensory ataxia, tremor, and slow disease progression. Pedigree analysis and exome sequencing identified a de novo missense mutation (p.Y223H) in the diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 2 (DGAT2) gene. DGAT2 encodes an endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial-associated membrane protein, acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase, which catalyzes the final step of the triglyceride (TG) biosynthesis pathway. The patient showed consistently decreased serum TG levels, and overexpression of the mutant DGAT2 significantly inhibited the proliferation of mouse motor neuron cells. Moreover, the variant form of human DGAT2 inhibited the axonal branching in the peripheral nervous system of zebrafish. We suggest that mutation of DGAT2 is the novel underlying cause of an autosomal-dominant axonal CMT2 neuropathy. This study will help provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology of axonal CMT and contribute to the molecular diagnostics of peripheral neuropathies.

  9. Identification of a De Novo 3bp Deletion in CRYBA1/A3 Gene in Autosomal Dominant Congenital Cataract.

    PubMed

    Mohebi, Masoumeh; Akbari, Abolfazl; Babaei, Nahid; Sadeghi, Abdolrahim; Heidari, Mansour

    2016-12-01

    Autosomal dominant congenital cataract (ADCC) is the most common form of inherited cataracts and accounts for one-third of congenital cataracts. Heterozygous null mutations in the crystallin genes are the major cause of the ADCC. This study aims to detect the mutational spectrum of four crystallin genes, CRYBA1/A3, CRYBB1, CRYBB2 and CRYGD in an Iranian family. Genomic DNA was isolated from whole blood cells from theproband and other family members. The coding regions and flanking intronicsequences of crystalline genes were analyzed by Sanger sequencing in aproband with ADCC. The identified mutation was further evaluated in available family members. To predict the potential protein partners of CRYBA1/A3, we also used an in-silico analysis. A de novo heterozygous deletion (c.272-274delGAG, p.G91del) in exon 4 of CRYBA1/A3 gene, leading to a deletion of Glycine at codon 91 was found. This genetic variation did not change the reading frame of CRYBA1 protein. In conclusion, we identified a de novo in-frame 3-bp deletion in the proband with an autosomal dominant congenital cataract, but not in her parents, in an Iranian family. This mutation has occurred de novo on a paternal gamete during spermatogenesis. The in-silico results predicted the interaction of CRYBA1 protein with the other CRY as well as proteins responsible for eye cell signaling.

  10. An unusual case of cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy with occipital lobe involvement

    PubMed Central

    Trikamji, Bhavesh; Thomas, Mariam; Hathout, Gasser; Mishra, Shrikant

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is an autosomal dominant angiopathy caused by a mutation in the notch 3 gene on chromosome 19. Clinically, patients may be asymptomatic or can present with recurrent ischemic episodes and strokes leading to dementia, depression, pseudobulbar palsy, and hemi- or quadraplegia. Additional manifestations that have been described include migraine (mostly with aura), psychiatric disturbances, and epileptic seizures. Neuroimaging is essential to the diagnosis of CADASIL. On imaging CADASIL is characterized by symmetric involvement by confluent lesions located subcortically in the frontal and temporal lobes as well as in the insula, periventricularly, in the centrum semiovale, in the internal and external capsule, basal ganglia, and brain stem; with relative sparing of the fronto-orbital and the occipital subcortical regions. We describe a 49 year old male with CADASIL with absence of temporal lobe findings on MRI but predominant lesions within the periventricular white matter, occipital lobes with extension into the subcortical frontal lobes, corpus callosum and cerebellar white matter. Although CADASIL characteristically presents with anterior temporal lobe involvement, these findings may be absent and our case addresses the atypical imaging findings in CADASIL. PMID:27293347

  11. Whole Exome Sequencing Identified MCM2 as a Novel Causative Gene for Autosomal Dominant Nonsyndromic Deafness in a Chinese Family

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Cheng; Chen, Siqi; Qi, Yu; Liu, Yuhe

    2015-01-01

    We report the genetic analysis of autosomal dominant, nonsyndromic, progressive sensorineural hearing loss in a Chinese family. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified a missense variant (c.130C>T, p.R44C) in the MCM2 gene, which has a pro-apoptosis effect and is involved in the initiation of eukaryotic genome replication. This missense variant is very likely to be the disease causing variant. It segregated with hearing loss in this pedigree, and was not found in the dbSNP database or databases of genomes and SNP in the Chinese population, in 76 patients with sporadic hearing loss, or in 145 normal individuals. We performed western blot and immunofluorescence to test the MCM2 protein expression in the cochlea of rats and guinea pigs, demonstrating that MCM2 was widely expressed in the cochlea and was also surprisingly expressed in the cytoplasm of terminally differentiated hair cells. We then transiently expressed the variant MCM2 cDNA in HEK293 cells, and found that these cells displayed a slight increase in apoptosis without any changes in proliferation or cell cycle, supporting the view that this variant is pathogenic. In summary, we have identified MCM2 as a novel gene responsible for nonsyndromic hearing loss of autosomal dominant inheritance in a Chinese family. PMID:26196677

  12. Mutation Analysis Identifies GUCY2D as the Major Gene Responsible for Autosomal Dominant Progressive Cone Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kitiratschky, Veronique B. D.; Wilke, Robert; Renner, Agnes B.; Kellner, Ulrich; Vadalà, Maria; Birch, David G.; Wissinger, Bernd; Zrenner, Eberhart; Kohl, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Heterozygous mutations in the GUCY2D gene, which encodes the membrane-bound retinal guanylyl cyclase-1 protein (RetGC-1), have been shown to cause autosomal dominant inherited cone degeneration and cone–rod degeneration (adCD, adCRD). The present study was a comprehensive screening of the GUCY2D gene in 27 adCD and adCRD unrelated families of these rare disorders. Methods Mutation analysis was performed by direct sequencing as well as PCR and subsequent restriction length polymorphism analysis (PCR/RFLP). Haplotype analysis was performed in selected patients by using microsatellite markers. Results GUCY2D gene mutations were identified in 11 (40%) of 27 patients, and all mutations clustered to codon 838, including two known and one novel missense mutation: p.R838C, p.R838H, and p.R838G. Haplotype analysis showed that among the studied patients only two of the six analyzed p.R838C mutation carriers shared a common haplotype and that none of the p.R838H mutation carriers did. Conclusions GUCY2D is a major gene responsible for progressive autosomal dominant cone degeneration. All identified mutations localize to codon 838. Haplotype analysis indicates that in most cases these mutations arise independently. Thus, codon 838 is likely to be a mutation hotspot in the GUCY2D gene. PMID:18487367

  13. Autosomal Dominant Retinal Degeneration and Bone Loss in Patients with a 12-bp Deletion in the CRX Gene

    PubMed Central

    Tzekov, Radouil T.; Liu, Yuhui; Sohocki, Melanie M.; Zack, Donald J.; Daiger, Stephen P.; Heckenlively, John R.; Birch, David G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To define the phenotypic expression of a deletion in the gene encoding the transcription factor CRX in a large, seven-generation, white family. Methods Fourteen affected individuals, all heterozygous for the Leu146del12 mutation in the cone-rod homeobox gene (CRX), and four nonaffected relatives from the same family were examined with visual function tests, and 10 underwent bone mineral density (BMD) measurement. Results The ability of the mutated CRX protein to transactivate rhodopsin promoter was decreased by approximately 25%, and its ability to react synergistically with neural retinal leucine zipper (NRL) was reduced by more than 30%. The affected members of the family had an autosomal dominant ocular condition most closely resembling Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) with severe visual impairment at an early age. Depending on age, affected members showed varying degrees of significant visual acuity loss, elevated dark-adaptation thresholds, significantly reduced cone and rod electroretinogram (ERG) amplitudes, and progressive constriction of the visual fields, in most cases leading to complete blindness. Six affected members had reduced levels of BMD in the spine and the hip (osteopenia). Four affected female members who were receiving long-term hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) demonstrated normal values of BMD. Conclusions This large deletion of the CRX gene is associated with a severe form of autosomal dominant retinal degeneration. Affected members not receiving HRT showed reduced BMD (osteopenia). This phenotype may reflect the abnormal influence of mutant CRX on both retinal and pineal development. PMID:11328746

  14. BRAIN ABNORMALITIES IN YOUNG ADULTS AT GENETIC RISK FOR AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE: A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Reiman, Eric M.; Quiroz, Yakeel T.; Fleisher, Adam S.; Chen, Kewei; Velez-Pardo, Carlos; Jimenez-Del-Rio, Marlene; Fagan, Anne M.; Shah, Aarti R.; Alvarez, Sergio; Arbelaez, Andrés; Giraldo, Margarita; Acosta-Baena, Natalia; Sperling, Reisa A.; Dickerson, Brad; Stern, Chantal E.; Tirado, Victoria; Munoz, Claudia; Reiman, Rebecca A.; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Alexander, Gene E.; Langbaum, Jessica B.S.; Kosik, Kenneth S.; Tariot, Pierre N.; Lopera, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background We previously detected functional brain imaging abnormalities in young adults at genetic risk for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here, we sought to characterize structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and plasma biomarker abnormalities in young adults at risk for autosomal dominant early-onset AD. Biomarker measurements were characterized and compared in presenilin 1 (PSEN1) E280A mutation carriers and non-carriers from the world’s largest known autosomal dominant early-onset AD kindred, more than two decades before the carriers’ estimated median age of 44 at the onset of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and before their estimated age of 28 at the onset of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaque deposition. Methods Biomarker data for this cross-sectional study were acquired in Antioquia, Colombia between July and August, 2010. Forty-four participants from the Colombian Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative (API) Registry had structural MRIs, functional MRIs during associative memory encoding/novel viewing and control tasks, and cognitive assessments. They included 20 mutation carriers and 24 non-carriers, who were cognitively normal, 18-26 years old and matched for their gender, age, and educational level. Twenty of the participants, including 10 mutation carriers and 10 non-carriers, had lumbar punctures and venipunctures. Primary outcome measures included task-dependent hippocampal/parahippocampal activations and precuneus/posterior cingulate deactivations, regional gray matter reductions, CSF Aβ1-42, total tau and phospho-tau181 levels, and plasma Aβ1-42 levels and Aβ1-42/Aβ1-40 ratios. Structural and functional MRI data were compared using automated brain mapping algorithms and AD-related search regions. Cognitive and fluid biomarkers were compared using Mann-Whitney tests. Findings The mutation carrier and non-carrier groups did not differ significantly in their dementia ratings, neuropsychological

  15. Report of a kindred with x-linked (or autosomal dominant sex-limited) 46, XY partial gonadal dysgenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fechner, P.Y.; Marcantonio, S.M.; Ogata, T.; Rosales, T.O.; Smith, K.D.; Goodfellow, P.N.; Migeon, C.J.; Berkovitz, G.D. )

    1993-05-01

    The condition termed 46, XY complete gonadal dysgenesis is characterized by the lack of testicular determination with resulting streak gonads, normal Mullerian structures, and female external genitalia. In the partial form, there is incomplete testicular determination with a wide range in the degree of ambiguous genitalia and sexual duct development. The authors evaluated a kindred in which a partial form of 46, XY gonadal dysgenesis occurred in four subjects from two generations. Pedigree analysis indicated an X-linked or possibly an autosomal sex-limited mode of inheritance. All affected subjects were ascertained because of ambiguous genitalia with minimal virilization. At 10 days of age, the proband had a subnormal plasma level of testosterone, and at 4 months, there was no rise in plasma T after stimulation with hCG. At laparotomy, a dysgenetic gonad was found on the right side, but no gonad was found on the left side. A vas deferens was present on the right, indicating the presence of functional leydig cells early in fetal life. In the other affected subjects, gonadal tissue was also limited to one side of the abdomen and showed poorly developed seminiferous tubules. The sex-determining region Y gene, which encodes the testis-determining factor, was present and unaltered in the genomic DNA of all affected subjects. Duplication of the distal short arm of the X-chromosome has been associated with 46, XY complete gonadal dysgenesis in some patients. In the authors studies, Southern blot analysis revealed that sequences of the distal short arm of the X-chromosome were present in single copy, excluding a large duplication in this area of the X. Several kindreds with familial 46, XY complete gonadal dysgenesis have been reported; five of them had evidence of an X-linked mode of inheritance. The authors study of a kindred with 46, XY partial gonadal dysgenesis further supports the role of an X chromosome gene in testicular determination. 44 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  16. Genetic forms of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI): Vasopressin receptor defect (X-linked) and aquaporin defect (autosomal recessive and dominant).

    PubMed

    Bichet, Daniel G; Bockenhauer, Detlef

    2016-03-01

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), which can be inherited or acquired, is characterized by an inability to concentrate urine despite normal or elevated plasma concentrations of the antidiuretic hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP). Polyuria with hyposthenuria and polydipsia are the cardinal clinical manifestations of the disease. About 90% of patients with congenital NDI are males with X-linked NDI who have mutations in the vasopressin V2 receptor (AVPR2) gene encoding the vasopressin V2 receptor. In less than 10% of the families studied, congenital NDI has an autosomal recessive or autosomal dominant mode of inheritance with mutations in the aquaporin-2 (AQP2) gene. When studied in vitro, most AVPR2 and AQP2 mutations lead to proteins trapped in the endoplasmic reticulum and are unable to reach the plasma membrane. Prior knowledge of AVPR2 or AQP2 mutations in NDI families and perinatal mutation testing is of direct clinical value and can avert the physical and mental retardation associated with repeated episodes of dehydration.

  17. Clinical and molecular analysis of the enamelin gene ENAM in Colombian families with autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Sandra; Torres, Diana; Briceño, Ignacio; Gómez, Ana Maria; Baquero, Eliana

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the phenotype, clinical characteristics and presence of mutations in the enamelin gene ENAM in five Colombian families with autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta (ADAI). 22 individuals (15 affected and seven unaffected) belonging to five Colombian families with ADAI and eight individuals (three affected and five unaffected) belonging to three Colombian families with autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta (ARAI) that served as controls for molecular alterations and inheritance patterns were studied. Clinical, radiographic and genetic evaluations were done in all individuals. Eight exons and three intron-exon boundaries were sequenced for mutation analysis. Two of the five families with ADAI had the hypoplasic phenotype, two had the hypocalcified phenotype and one had the hypomaturative phenotype. Anterior open bite and mandibular retrognathism were the most frequent skeletal abnormalities in the families with ADAI. No mutations were found. These findings suggest that ADAI in these Colombian families was unrelated to previously described mutations in the ENAM gene. These results also indicate that other regions not included in this investigation, such as the promoter region, introns and other genes should be considered as potential ADAI candidates. PMID:23055792

  18. Clinical and molecular analysis of the enamelin gene ENAM in Colombian families with autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Sandra; Torres, Diana; Briceño, Ignacio; Gómez, Ana Maria; Baquero, Eliana

    2012-07-01

    In this study, we analyzed the phenotype, clinical characteristics and presence of mutations in the enamelin gene ENAM in five Colombian families with autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta (ADAI). 22 individuals (15 affected and seven unaffected) belonging to five Colombian families with ADAI and eight individuals (three affected and five unaffected) belonging to three Colombian families with autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta (ARAI) that served as controls for molecular alterations and inheritance patterns were studied. Clinical, radiographic and genetic evaluations were done in all individuals. Eight exons and three intron-exon boundaries were sequenced for mutation analysis. Two of the five families with ADAI had the hypoplasic phenotype, two had the hypocalcified phenotype and one had the hypomaturative phenotype. Anterior open bite and mandibular retrognathism were the most frequent skeletal abnormalities in the families with ADAI. No mutations were found. These findings suggest that ADAI in these Colombian families was unrelated to previously described mutations in the ENAM gene. These results also indicate that other regions not included in this investigation, such as the promoter region, introns and other genes should be considered as potential ADAI candidates.

  19. Extra-renal manifestations of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD): considerations for routine screening and management.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Randy L; Dahl, Neera K

    2014-02-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a systemic disease, marked by progressive increase of bilateral renal cysts, resulting in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and often leading to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Apart from renal cysts, patients often have extra-renal disease, involving the liver, heart and vasculature. Other less common but equally important extra-renal manifestations of ADPKD include diverticular disease, hernias, male infertility and pain. Extra-renal disease burden is often asymptomatic, but may result in increased morbidity and mortality. If the disease burden is significant, screening may prove beneficial. We review the rationale for current screening recommendations and propose some guidelines for screening and management of ADPKD patients.

  20. Mutations in AQP5, encoding a water-channel protein, cause autosomal-dominant diffuse nonepidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

    PubMed

    Blaydon, Diana C; Lind, Lisbet K; Plagnol, Vincent; Linton, Kenneth J; Smith, Francis J D; Wilson, Neil J; McLean, W H Irwin; Munro, Colin S; South, Andrew P; Leigh, Irene M; O'Toole, Edel A; Lundström, Anita; Kelsell, David P

    2013-08-08

    Autosomal-dominant diffuse nonepidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma is characterized by the adoption of a white, spongy appearance of affected areas upon exposure to water. After exome sequencing, missense mutations were identified in AQP5, encoding water-channel protein aquaporin-5 (AQP5). Protein-structure analysis indicates that these AQP5 variants have the potential to elicit an effect on normal channel regulation. Immunofluorescence data reveal the presence of AQP5 at the plasma membrane in the stratum granulosum of both normal and affected palmar epidermis, indicating that the altered AQP5 proteins are trafficked in the normal manner. We demonstrate here a role for AQP5 in the palmoplantar epidermis and propose that the altered AQP5 proteins retain the ability to form open channels in the cell membrane and conduct water.

  1. The first Indian-origin family with genetically proven cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL).

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sunaina; Bentley, Paul; Srivastava, Padma; Prasad, Kameshwar; Sharma, Pankaj

    2013-01-01

    We report the first family of Indian origin known to be affected by cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL). Seventeen members of the family spanning 3 generations had neurologic syndromes compatible with CADASIL, of whom 5 were genetically confirmed carriers of the Notch3 gene R141C mutation in exon 4 (421(C→T) and 141(Cys→Arg)). Our report highlights that CADASIL not only occurs sporadically in South Asians, but also may account for stroke in South Asians with a strong family history. Furthermore, the similarity of clinical presentations described here to those typical for Caucasian case series suggests that the CADASIL phenotype is preserved across racial groups.

  2. Description of a large family with autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia associated with the APOE p.Leu167del mutation

    PubMed Central

    Marduel, Marie; Ouguerram, Khadija; Serre, Valérie; Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique; Marques-Pinheiro, Alice; Berge, Knut Erik; Devillers, Martine; Luc, Gérald; Lecerf, Jean-Michel; Tosolini, Laurent; Erlich, Danièle; Peloso, Gina M.; Stitziel, Nathan; Nitchké, Patrick; Jaïs, Jean-Philippe; Abifadel, Marianne; Kathiresan, Sekar; Leren, Trond Paul; Rabès, Jean-Pierre; Boileau, Catherine; Varret, Mathilde

    2013-01-01

    Apo E mutants are associated with type III hyperlipoproteinemia characterized by high cholesterol and triglycerides levels. Autosomal Dominant Hypercholesterolemia (ADH), due to mutations in the LDLR, APOB or PCSK9 genes, is characterized by an isolated elevation of cholesterol due to high levels of low-density lipoproteins (LDL). We now report an exceptionally large family including 14 members with ADH. Through genome wide mapping, analysis of regional/functional candidate genes and whole exome sequencing, we identified a mutation in the APOE gene, p.Leu167del previously reported associated with sea-blue histiocytosis and familial combined hyperlipidemia. We confirmed the involvement of the APOE p.Leu167del in ADH, with (1) a predicted destabilization of an alpha-helix in the binding domain; (2) a decreased apo E level in LDL; and (3) a decreased catabolism of LDL. Our results show that mutations in the APOE gene can be associated with bona fide ADH. PMID:22949395

  3. Genetic linkage of autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma to 1q21-q31 in three affected pedigrees

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggs, J.L.; Paglinauan, C.; Fine, A.; Sporn, C.; Lou, D. ); Haines, J.L. )

    1994-05-15

    Glaucoma is a common disorder that results in irreversible damage to the optic nerve, causing absolute blindness. In most cases, the optic nerve is damaged by an elevation of the intraocular pressure that is the result of an abnormality in the normal drainage function of the trabecular meshwork. A family history of glaucoma is an important risk factor for the disease, suggesting that genetic defects predisposing to this condition are likely. Three pedigrees segregating an autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma demonstrated significant linkage to a group of closely spaced markers on chromosome 1. These results confirm the initial mapping of this disease and suggest that this region on chromosome 1 contains an important locus for juvenile glaucoma. The authors describe recombination events that improve the localization of the responsible gene, reducing the size of the candidate region from 30 to 12 cM. 27 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Mapping of a gene for autosomal dominant juvenile-onset open-angle glaucoma to chromosome 1 q

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, J.E.; Lichter, P.R.; Torrez, D.; Wong, D.; Johnson, A.T.; Boehnke, M.; Uro, J.L.A. )

    1994-01-01

    A large Caucasian family is presented, in which a juvenile-onset form of open-angle glaucoma is transmitted in an autosomal dominant fashion. Sixteen affected family members were identified from 31 at-risk individuals descended from the affected founder. Affected patients developed high intraocular pressures (sometimes >40 mm Hg) within the first 2 decades of life. Linkage analysis between the disease phenotype and 12 microsatellite repeat markers located on chromosome 1 q gave a maximum lod score of 8.38 at a recombination fraction of zero for marker D1S210. Analysis of recombinant haplotypes suggests a total inclusion region of about 14 cM between markers D1S194 and D1S218 at 1q21-q31. This represents the second juvenile-glaucoma family, in which the disease has been mapped to the long arm of chromosome 1. 57 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Linkage analysis excludes the glaucoma locus on 1q from involvement in autosomal dominant glaucoma with iris hypoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Heon, E.; Sheth, B.P.; Kalenak, J.W.

    1994-09-01

    Genetic factors have been implicated in a variety of types of glaucoma including primary open-angle glaucoma, infantile glaucoma, pigmentary glaucoma, and juvenile open-angle glaucoma. We previously mapped the disease-causing gene for one type of juvenile open angle glaucoma to chromosome 1q21-31. Weatherill and Hart (1969) and Pearce (1983) each noted the association of iris hypoplasia and early-onset autosomal dominant glaucoma. We recently had the opportunity to study a large family (12 affected members) with this phenotype. Affected individuals developed glaucoma at an average age of 30 years. These patients also have a strikingly underdeveloped iris stroma which causes a peculiar eye color. Linkage analysis was able to completely exclude the 1q glaucoma locus from involvement in the disorder that affects this family. A complete clinical description of the family and linkage results at additional candidate loci will be presented.

  6. Aromatase excess syndrome: a rare autosomal dominant disorder leading to pre- or peri-pubertal onset gynecomastia.

    PubMed

    Fukami, Maki; Miyado, Mami; Nagasaki, Keisuke; Shozu, Makio; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2014-03-01

    Overexpression of CYP19A1 encoding aromatase results in a rare genetic disorder referred to as aromatase excess syndrome (AEXS). Male patients with AEXS manifest pre- or peri-pubertal onset gynecomastia, gonadotropin deficiency, and advanced bone age, while female patients are mostly asymptomatic. To date, 30 male patients with molecularly confirmed AEXS have been reported. A total of 12 types of submicroscopic rearrangements, i.e., two simple duplications, four simple deletions, two simple inversions, and four complex rearrangements, have been implicated in AEXS. Clinical severity of AEXS primarily depends on the types of the rearrangements. AEXS appears to account for a small number of cases of pre- or peri-pubertal onset gynecomastia, and should be suspected particularly when gynecomastia is associated with an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern, characteristic hormone abnormalities and/or advanced bone age. Treatment with an aromatase inhibitor appears to benefit patients with AEXS, although long-term safety of this class of drugs remains unknown.

  7. A Locus for an Autosomal Dominant Form of Progressive Renal Failure and Hypertension at Chromosome 1q21

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Daniel H.; Shohat, Tamy; Yahav, Michal; Ilan, Tsafra; Rechavi, Gidi; King, Lily; Shohat, Mordechai

    2000-01-01

    Linkage studies were performed in a large family with an autosomal dominant phenotype characterized by nephropathy and hypertension. In this family of Iraqi Jewish origin, the nephropathy develops into progressive renal failure. By performing a genomewide linkage search, we localized the disease gene to chromosome 1q21; the highest LOD score was obtained for the marker at locus D1S305, which yielded a maximum LOD score of 4.71 at a recombination fraction of 0. Recombination mapping defined an interval of ∼11.6 cM, between the markers at loci D1S2696 and D1S2635, that contains the disease gene. Localization of the disease-causing gene in this family represents a necessary step toward isolation of the defective gene and toward a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of hypertension and progressive renal failure. PMID:10930359

  8. Pleuritic chest pain from portal hypertensive gastropathy in ESRD patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease misdiagnosed as pericarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Onuigbo, Macaulay Amechi Chukwukadibia; Agbasi, Nneoma; Achebe, Jennifer; Odenigbo, Charles; Oguejiofor, Fidelis

    2016-01-01

    Portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG) is a gastric mucosal lesion complicating portal hypertension, with higher prevalence in decompensated cirrhosis. PHG can sometimes complicate autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) due to the presence of multiple liver cysts. Besides, PHG is known to present as chest pain, with or without hematemesis. Other causes of chest pain in ADPKD include referred chest pain from progressively enlarging kidney cysts, and rare pericardial cysts. Chest pain, especially if pleuritic, in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, is often ascribed to uremic pericarditis. We present recurrent pleuritic chest pain in a 24-year old ESRD patient with ADPKD that was initially misdiagnosed as uremic pericarditis. It was ultimately shown to represent symptomatic PHG with excellent therapeutic response to proton pump inhibitors. PMID:27069969

  9. Co-existing autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and nephrotic syndrome in a Nigerian patient with lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Akinbodewa, A A; Adejumo, O A; Ogunsemoyin, A O; Osasan, S A; Adefolalu, O A

    2016-01-01

    A little over 30 cases on co-existing nephrotic syndrome and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) have been reported from different regions of the world since 1957. We present a case report on co-existence of nephrotic syndrome (secondary to lupus nephritis) with ADPKD in a 24-year-old woman from Nigeria. She was positive for anti-double stranded DNA. Renal histology showed International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society Class II lupus nephritis. The co-existence of nephrotic syndrome and ADPKD may have been overlooked in Africa in the past. There is a need to screen for nephrotic syndrome in patients with ADPKD among clinicians in the African setting.

  10. Ebstein anomaly associated with left ventricular noncompaction: an autosomal dominant condition that can be caused by mutations in MYH7.

    PubMed

    Vermeer, Alexa M C; van Engelen, Klaartje; Postma, Alex V; Baars, Marieke J H; Christiaans, Imke; De Haij, Simone; Klaassen, Sabine; Mulder, Barbara J M; Keavney, Bernard

    2013-08-01

    Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is a relatively common genetic cardiomyopathy, characterized by prominent trabeculations with deep intertrabecular recesses in mainly the left ventricle. Although LVNC often occurs in an isolated entity, it may also be present in various types of congenital heart disease (CHD). The most prevalent CHD in LVNC is Ebstein anomaly, which is a rare form of CHD characterized by apical displacement and partial fusion of the septal and posterior leaflet of the tricuspid valve with the ventricular septum. Several reports of sporadic as well as familial cases of Ebstein anomaly associated with LVNC have been reported. Recent studies identified mutations in the MYH7 gene, encoding the sarcomeric β-myosin heavy chain protein, in patients harboring this specific phenotype. Here, we will review the association between Ebstein anomaly, LVNC and mutations in MYH7, which seems to represent a subtype of Ebstein anomaly with autosomal dominant inheritance and variable penetrance.

  11. A Novel CRYGD Mutation (p.Trp43Arg) Causing Autosomal Dominant Congenital Cataract in a Chinese Family

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Binbin; Yu, Changhong; Xi, Yi-Bo; Cai, Hong-Chen; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Sirui; Zhou, Shiyi; Wu, Yi; Yan, Yong-Bin; Ma, Xu; Xie, Lixin

    2011-01-01

    To identify the genetic defect associated with autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract in a Chinese family, molecular genetic investigation via haplotype analysis and direct sequencing were performed Sequencing of the CRYGD gene revealed a c.127T>C transition, which resulted in a substitution of a highly conserved tryptophan with arginine at codon 43 (p.Trp43Arg). This mutation co-segregated with all affected individuals and was not observed in either unaffected family members or in 200 normal unrelated individuals. Biophysical studies indicated that the p.Trp43Arg mutation resulted in significant tertiary structural changes. The mutant protein was much less stable than the wild-type protein, and was more prone to aggregate when subjected to environmental stresses such as heat and UV irradiation. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21031598

  12. [Waardenburg syndrome type I--autosomal dominant hereditary combination of multiple facial anomalies with cochlear deafness (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Meinecke, P

    1982-03-01

    Waardenburg syndrome Type I is described on the basis of an observation of a family. The characteristic signs including lateral displacement of medial canthi ("telecanthus"), wide bridge of the nose, white forelock and severe cochlear deafness are found in one female patient only; however, her eyes are not of different colour. Five further bearers of characteristic signs in four generations are not so severely affected and show the facial anomalies only. To differentiate this syndrome against Waardenburg syndrome Type II which is complicated by deafness twice as often but occurs without the lateral displacement of the medial canthi, accurate measurement of the distance between the canthi is helpful. Waardenburg syndromes are hereditary according to the autosomal dominant principle with high penetration; intrafamiliarly, too, expressivity can vary greatly. To date treatment has been directed at the signs and symptoms; prognosis is usually favourable. Prevention appears possible through genetic family counseling.

  13. Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD): executive summary from a Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Controversies Conference.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Arlene B; Devuyst, Olivier; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Gansevoort, Ron T; Harris, Tess; Horie, Shigeo; Kasiske, Bertram L; Odland, Dwight; Pei, York; Perrone, Ronald D; Pirson, Yves; Schrier, Robert W; Torra, Roser; Torres, Vicente E; Watnick, Terry; Wheeler, David C

    2015-07-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) affects up to 12 million individuals and is the fourth most common cause for renal replacement therapy worldwide. There have been many recent advances in the understanding of its molecular genetics and biology, and in the diagnosis and management of its manifestations. Yet, diagnosis, evaluation, prevention, and treatment vary widely and there are no broadly accepted practice guidelines. Barriers to translation of basic science breakthroughs to clinical care exist, with considerable heterogeneity across countries. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes Controversies Conference on ADPKD brought together a panel of multidisciplinary clinical expertise and engaged patients to identify areas of consensus, gaps in knowledge, and research and health-care priorities related to diagnosis; monitoring of kidney disease progression; management of hypertension, renal function decline and complications; end-stage renal disease; extrarenal complications; and practical integrated patient support. These are summarized in this review.

  14. Fatal liver cyst rupture in polycystic liver disease complicated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: A case report.

    PubMed

    Tong, Fang; Liang, Yue; Zhang, Lin; Li, Wenhe; Chen, Peng; Duan, Yijie; Zhou, Yiwu

    2016-05-01

    A 59-year-old man was struck in the abdomen and later presented to the emergency room. His blood pressure dropped and eventually died 16h post trauma and just before emergency exploratory laparotomy. Autopsy revealed two polycystic kidneys and a giant polycystic liver with two ruptures. Blood (2225g) was observed in the peritoneum and the body-surface injury was minor. Genetic testing was performed to confirm that the man had an autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) complicated by polycystic liver disease (PLD). Autopsy, histopathology and medical history showed that the cause of death was the ruptures of liver cysts due to trauma. In this communication, we describe a fatal case and hope to increase awareness and recognition of PLD and ADPKD. We also wish to indicate that due to the fragile condition of liver cysts, trauma should be considered even if the body-surface injury is minor in fatal cases of PLD patient with a traumatic history.

  15. Characterization of macular structure and function in two Swedish families with genetically identified autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Abdulridha-Aboud, Wissam; Kjellström, Ulrika; Andréasson, Sten

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study the phenotype in two families with genetically identified autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) focusing on macular structure and function. Methods Clinical data were collected at the Department of Ophthalmology, Lund University, Sweden, for affected and unaffected family members from two pedigrees with adRP. Examinations included optical coherence tomography (OCT), full-field electroretinography (ffERG), and multifocal electroretinography (mfERG). Molecular genetic screening was performed for known mutations associated with adRP. Results The mode of inheritance was autosomal dominant in both families. The members of the family with a mutation in the PRPF31 (p.IVS6+1G>T) gene had clinical features characteristic of RP, with severely reduced retinal rod and cone function. The degree of deterioration correlated well with increasing age. The mfERG showed only centrally preserved macular function that correlated well with retinal thinning on OCT. The family with a mutation in the RHO (p.R135W) gene had an extreme intrafamilial variability of the phenotype, with more severe disease in the younger generations. OCT showed pathology, but the degree of morphological changes was not correlated with age or with the mfERG results. The mother, with a de novo mutation in the RHO (p.R135W) gene, had a normal ffERG, and her retinal degeneration was detected merely with the reduced mfERG. Conclusions These two families demonstrate the extreme inter- and intrafamilial variability in the clinical phenotype of adRP. This is the first Swedish report of the clinical phenotype associated with a mutation in the PRPF31 (p.IVS6+1G>T) gene. Our results indicate that methods for assessment of the central retinal structure and function may improve the detection and characterization of the RP phenotype. PMID:27212874

  16. Identification of Disease-Causing Mutations in Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa (adRP) Using Next-Generation DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Bowne, Sara J.; Sullivan, Lori S.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Ding, Li; Fulton, Robert; Abbott, Rachel M.; Sodergren, Erica J.; Birch, David G.; Wheaton, Dianna H.; Heckenlively, John R.; Liu, Qin; Pierce, Eric A.; Weinstock, George M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To determine whether massively parallel next-generation DNA sequencing offers rapid and efficient detection of disease-causing mutations in patients with monogenic inherited diseases. Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a challenging application for this technology because it is a monogenic disease in individuals and families but is highly heterogeneous in patient populations. RP has multiple patterns of inheritance, with mutations in many genes for each inheritance pattern and numerous, distinct, disease-causing mutations at each locus; further, many RP genes have not been identified yet. Methods. Next-generation sequencing was used to identify mutations in pairs of affected individuals from 21 families with autosomal dominant RP, selected from a cohort of families without mutations in “common” RP genes. One thousand amplicons targeting 249,267 unique bases of 46 candidate genes were sequenced with the 454GS FLX Titanium (Roche Diagnostics, Indianapolis, IN) and GAIIx (Illumina/Solexa, San Diego, CA) platforms. Results. An average sequence depth of 70× and 125× was obtained for the 454GS FLX and GAIIx platforms, respectively. More than 9000 sequence variants were identified and analyzed, to assess the likelihood of pathogenicity. One hundred twelve of these were selected as likely candidates and tested for segregation with traditional di-deoxy capillary electrophoresis sequencing of additional family members and control subjects. Five disease-causing mutations (24%) were identified in the 21 families. Conclusion. This project demonstrates that next-generation sequencing is an effective approach for detecting novel, rare mutations causing heterogeneous monogenic disorders such as RP. With the addition of this technology, disease-causing mutations can now be identified in 65% of autosomal dominant RP cases. PMID:20861475

  17. Autosomal dominant mesomandibular fibro-osseous dysplasia: a self-resolving inherited fibro-osseous lesion of the jaws.

    PubMed

    Koutlas, Ioannis G; Forsman, Cynthia L; Kyrkanides, Stephanos; Oetting, William S; Petryk, Anna

    2012-01-01

    A hereditary congenital condition characterized by a fibro-osseous lesion sharing some features with fibrous dysplasia and affecting the middle aspect of the mandible is presented. The condition was initially described as congenital monostotic fibrous dysplasia in two siblings, a male and a female. However, there is sufficient evidence that the disorder is autosomal dominant since it has been encountered in two of four children, both males, of the female propositus and one child, a boy, of the male propositus. All patients presented at birth or right after birth with enlargement of the middle part of the mandible. Radiographs from affected individuals have shown mesomandibular enlargement with irregular trabeculation akin of "ground-glass" appearance. Histologically, samples from all patients revealed woven bone proliferation in a cellular fibroblastic stroma. Interestingly, the originally described siblings, now in their 30s, have no evidence of jaw lesions either radiographically or clinically, thus indicating that the condition is self-limiting or self-resolving. An autosomal dominant mode of inheritance with apparent male predilection is favored. The molecular basis of this condition is currently unknown. However, the location of the lesions in the middle aspect of the mandible suggests dysregulation of Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling since BMPs regulate mandibular morphogenesis in utero, particularly in the medial region as well as postnatal bone remodeling. Immunohistochemical evaluation for a BMP-binding protein Twisted Gastrulation (TWSG1) revealed mosaic pattern of staining, with some cells, including osteoclasts, strongly stained and others exhibiting faint or no staining, thus supporting active regulation of BMP signaling within the lesion. Future investigations will determine if dysregulation of BMP signaling plays a causative role or rather reflects secondary activation of repair mechanisms and/or bone remodeling.

  18. Mutations in GANAB, Encoding the Glucosidase IIα Subunit, Cause Autosomal-Dominant Polycystic Kidney and Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Porath, Binu; Gainullin, Vladimir G; Cornec-Le Gall, Emilie; Dillinger, Elizabeth K; Heyer, Christina M; Hopp, Katharina; Edwards, Marie E; Madsen, Charles D; Mauritz, Sarah R; Banks, Carly J; Baheti, Saurabh; Reddy, Bharathi; Herrero, José Ignacio; Bañales, Jesús M; Hogan, Marie C; Tasic, Velibor; Watnick, Terry J; Chapman, Arlene B; Vigneau, Cécile; Lavainne, Frédéric; Audrézet, Marie-Pierre; Ferec, Claude; Le Meur, Yannick; Torres, Vicente E; Harris, Peter C

    2016-06-02

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common, progressive, adult-onset disease that is an important cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), which requires transplantation or dialysis. Mutations in PKD1 or PKD2 (∼85% and ∼15% of resolved cases, respectively) are the known causes of ADPKD. Extrarenal manifestations include an increased level of intracranial aneurysms and polycystic liver disease (PLD), which can be severe and associated with significant morbidity. Autosomal-dominant PLD (ADPLD) with no or very few renal cysts is a separate disorder caused by PRKCSH, SEC63, or LRP5 mutations. After screening, 7%-10% of ADPKD-affected and ∼50% of ADPLD-affected families were genetically unresolved (GUR), suggesting further genetic heterogeneity of both disorders. Whole-exome sequencing of six GUR ADPKD-affected families identified one with a missense mutation in GANAB, encoding glucosidase II subunit α (GIIα). Because PRKCSH encodes GIIβ, GANAB is a strong ADPKD and ADPLD candidate gene. Sanger screening of 321 additional GUR families identified eight further likely mutations (six truncating), and a total of 20 affected individuals were identified in seven ADPKD- and two ADPLD-affected families. The phenotype was mild PKD and variable, including severe, PLD. Analysis of GANAB-null cells showed an absolute requirement of GIIα for maturation and surface and ciliary localization of the ADPKD proteins (PC1 and PC2), and reduced mature PC1 was seen in GANAB(+/-) cells. PC1 surface localization in GANAB(-/-) cells was rescued by wild-type, but not mutant, GIIα. Overall, we show that GANAB mutations cause ADPKD and ADPLD and that the cystogenesis is most likely driven by defects in PC1 maturation.

  19. Mutation in the novel nuclear-encoded mitochondrial protein CHCHD10 in a family with autosomal dominant mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed

    Ajroud-Driss, Senda; Fecto, Faisal; Ajroud, Kaouther; Lalani, Irfan; Calvo, Sarah E; Mootha, Vamsi K; Deng, Han-Xiang; Siddique, Nailah; Tahmoush, Albert J; Heiman-Patterson, Terry D; Siddique, Teepu

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial myopathies belong to a larger group of systemic diseases caused by morphological or biochemical abnormalities of mitochondria. Mitochondrial disorders can be caused by mutations in either the mitochondrial or nuclear genome. Only 5% of all mitochondrial disorders are autosomal dominant. We analyzed DNA from members of the previously reported Puerto Rican kindred with an autosomal dominant mitochondrial myopathy (Heimann-Patterson et al. 1997). Linkage analysis suggested a putative locus on the pericentric region of the long arm of chromosome 22 (22q11). Using the tools of integrative genomics, we established chromosome 22 open reading frame 16 (C22orf16) (later designated as CHCHD10) as the only high-scoring mitochondrial candidate gene in our minimal candidate region. Sequence analysis revealed a double-missense mutation (R15S and G58R) in cis in CHCHD10 which encodes a coiled coil-helix-coiled coil-helix protein of unknown function. These two mutations completely co-segregated with the disease phenotype and were absent in 1,481 Caucasian and 80 Hispanic (including 32 Puerto Rican) controls. Expression profiling showed that CHCHD10 is enriched in skeletal muscle. Mitochondrial localization of the CHCHD10 protein was confirmed using immunofluorescence in cells expressing either wild-type or mutant CHCHD10. We found that the expression of the G58R, but not the R15S, mutation induced mitochondrial fragmentation. Our findings identify a novel gene causing mitochondrial myopathy, thereby expanding the spectrum of mitochondrial myopathies caused by nuclear genes. Our findings also suggest a role for CHCHD10 in the morphologic remodeling of the mitochondria.

  20. A heterozygous dominant-negative mutation in the coiled-coil domain of STAT1 is the cause of autosomal-dominant Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Masahiro; Yamada, Masafumi; Ito, Kenta; Tozawa, Yusuke; Morino, Saeko; Horikoshi, Yuho; Takada, Hidetoshi; Abdrabou, Shimaa Said Mohamed Ali; Takezaki, Shunichiro; Kobayashi, Ichiro; Ariga, Tadashi

    2017-01-01

    Heterozygous dominant-negative mutations of STAT1 are responsible for autosomal-dominant Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (AD-MSMD). So far, only 7 mutations have been previously described and are localized to 3 domains: the DNA-binding domain, the SH2 domain, and the tail segment. In this study, we demonstrated the first coiled-coil domain (CCD) mutation of c.749G>C, p.G250A (G250A) in STAT1 as a genetic cause of AD-MSMD in a patient with mycobacterial multiple osteomyelitis. This de novo heterozygous mutation was shown to have a dominant-negative effect on the gamma-activated sequence (GAS) transcriptional activity following IFN-γ stimulation, which could be attributable to the abolished phosphorylation of STAT1 from the wild-type (WT) allele. The three-dimensional structure of STAT1 revealed the G250 residue was located distant from a cluster of residues affected by gain-of-function mutations responsible for chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis.

  1. Towards the identification of (a) gene(s) for autosomal dominant medullary cystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Viola, Battista Fabio; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Caridi, Gianluca; Amoroso, Antonio; Rampoldi, Luca; Casari, Giorgio

    2003-01-01

    Medullary cystic kidney disease (MCKD) belongs with nephronophthisis (NPH) in a group of inherited tubulo-interstitial nephritis, which has been referred to as the NPH-MCKD complex. Although MCKD and NPH share morphological features, they differ in several respects. The most common variant is recessive juvenile NPH, with onset in childhood and leading to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) within the 2nd decade of life; the most frequent extrarenal involvement is tapeto-retinal degeneration. MCKD is a dominant condition recognized in later life and leading to ESRD at the age of 50 years; hyperuricemia and gout can be associated features. The first sign of MCKD is polyuria; later, the clinical findings relate to renal insufficiency. Originally, NPH and MCKD were considered separate entities. Subsequently, it has been suggested that the two diseases were a single disorder due to the clinico-pathological identity. This unifying conception was later refuted due to the identification of MCKD dominant families. Recently, considerable insight has been gained into the genetics of the NPH-MCKD complex. The majority of juvenile NPH cases are due to deletion of the NPHP1 gene on chromosome 2q13. Genes for infantile and adolescent NPH have been localized respectively to chromosome 9q22-q31 and 3q22. A new locus, NPHP4, has been recently identified on chromosome 1p36. Two genes predisposing to dominant MCKD, MCKD1 and MCKD2, have been localized to chromosome 1q21 and 16p12. Independent confirmation of the locations of MCKD1 and MCKD2 in other MCKD families, with or without hyperuricemia and gout, has been reported. The gene for familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy (FJHN), a phenotype that is very similar to MCKD, was recently mapped to 16p12, in a region overlapping with the MCKD2 locus, raising the question as to whether MCKD2 and FJHN are allelic variants of the same disease entity. The ultimate proof of the allelism between MCKD2 and FJHN will be provided by the

  2. Evaluation of autosomal dominant retinal dystrophy genes in an unaffected cohort suggests rare or private missense variants may often be benign

    PubMed Central

    Strom, Samuel P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Many genes have been reported as harboring autosomal dominant mutations causing retinal dystrophy. As newly available gene panel sequencing and whole exome sequencing will open these genes up to greater scrutiny, we assess the rate of rare coding variation in these genes among unaffected individuals to provide context for variants that will be discovered when clinical subjects are sequenced. Methods Publicly available data from the Exome Variant Project were analyzed, focusing on 36 genes known to harbor mutations causing autosomal dominant macular dystrophy. Results Rates of rare (minor allele frequency ≤0.1%) and private missense variants within autosomal dominant retinal dystrophy genes were found to occur at a high frequency in unaffected individuals, while nonsense variants were not. Conclusions We conclude that rare missense variations in most of these genes identified in individuals with retinal dystrophy cannot be confidently classified as disease-causing in the absence of additional information such as linkage or functional validation. PMID:23687434

  3. Identification of a second HOXA2 nonsense mutation in a family with autosomal dominant non-syndromic microtia and distinctive ear morphology.

    PubMed

    Piceci, F; Morlino, S; Castori, M; Buffone, E; De Luca, A; Grammatico, P; Guida, V

    2016-08-09

    Microtia is a congenital defect affecting external ears, which appear smaller and sometimes malformed. Here we describe a five-generation family with isolated bilateral microtia segregating as an autosomal dominant trait. Similar features have been previously observed in an autosomal dominant family with non-syndromic microtia and hearing loss segregating with a HOXA2 nonsense variant. HOXA2 biallelic mutations were also described in an inbreed family with autosomal recessive microtia, hearing impairment and incomplete cleft palate. In our family, sequence analysis detected a heterozygous protein truncating nonsense variant [c.670G>T, p.(Glu224*)] segregating in all affected individuals and absent in public databases. This study confirms the role of HOXA2 gene in dominant isolated microtia and contribute to further define the dysmorphogenetic effect of this gene on ear development.

  4. Two pedigrees of autosomal dominant atrioventricular canal defect (AVCD): Exclusion from the critical region on 8p

    SciTech Connect

    Amati, F.; Mari, A.; Mingarelli, R.

    1995-07-03

    Atrioventricular canal defects (AVCD) constitute the predominant congenital heart defect in Down`s syndrome. For this reason, a candidate gene involved in atrioventricular canal development was previously searched and excluded in dominant pedigrees of AVCD, using linkage analysis of polymorphisms from chromosome 21. Because of the striking association between 8p deletion and AVCD, a search for an AVCD gene was carried out in two pedigrees of individuals with autosomal dominant AVCD using a set of DNA markers of the 8pter{r_arrow}q12 region. These two families include affected individuals and subjects who have transmitted the defect but are not clinically affected. Two-point lod scores were significantly negative for all markers at penetrance levels of 90% and 50%. Multipoint analysis excluded the region covered by the markers LPL-D8S262 and 30 cM to either side of this area. This result corroborates heterogeneity of this heart defect and indicates that the genetic basis of familial AVCD is different from AVCD associated to either trisomy 21 or 8p deletion. 25 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Age-dependent gait abnormalities in mice lacking the Rnf170 gene linked to human autosomal-dominant sensory ataxia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsoo; Kim, Seong Hun; Kim, Kook Hwan; Chae, Sujin; Kim, Chanki; Kim, Jeongjin; Shin, Hee-Sup; Lee, Myung-Shik; Kim, Daesoo

    2015-12-20

    Really interesting new gene (RING) finger protein 170 (RNF170) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase known to mediate ubiquitination-dependent degradation of type-I inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (ITPR1). It has recently been demonstrated that a point mutation of RNF170 gene is linked with autosomal-dominant sensory ataxia (ADSA), which is characterized by an age-dependent increase of walking abnormalities, a rare genetic disorder reported in only two families. Although this mutant allele is known to be dominant, the functional identity thereof has not been clearly established. Here, we generated mice lacking Rnf170 (Rnf170(-/-)) to evaluate the effect of its loss of function in vivo. Remarkably, Rnf170(-/-) mice began to develop gait abnormalities in old age (12 months) in the form of asynchronous stepping between diagonal limb pairs with a fixed step sequence during locomotion, while age-matched wild-type mice showed stable gait patterns using several step sequence repertoires. As reported in ADSA patients, they also showed a reduced sensitivity for proprioception and thermal nociception. Protein blot analysis revealed that the amount of Itpr1 protein was significantly elevated in the cerebellum and spinal cord but intact in the cerebral cortex in Rnf170(-/-) mice. These results suggest that the loss of Rnf170 gene function mediates ADSA-associated phenotypes and this gives insights on the cure of patients with ADSA and other age-dependent walking abnormalities.

  6. A model for the initiation and progression of non-chromaffin paragangliomas: An autosomal dominant disorder with genetic heterogeneity and genomic imprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Mariman, E.C.M.; Beersum, S.E.C. van; Ropers, H.H.

    1994-09-01

    Non-chromaffin paragangliomas are autosomal dominantly inherited tumors of the head and neck region (frequency: 1:30,000). Genomic imprinting influences the expression of the disorder. Tumor development is restricted to offspring of male disease gene carriers. By linkage analysis and haplotyping of a single family, in which the pattern of inheritance is consistent with genomic imprinting, we have mapped the gene to a 5 cM region of chromosome 11q13.1 between D11S956 and PYGM. A maximum lod score of 7.62 at {theta}=0.0 was obtained for D11S480. This interval does not overlap with the segment 11q22.3-q23.3, to which a locus for glomus tumors has been assigned in other families. Moreover, the 5cM interval was excluded as the location of the disease gene in a second family showing the imprinting phenomenon, whereas an indication for linkage was obtained (Z=+2.65) with markers from the distal locus. These observations argue for the presence of two distinct imprinted genes for paragangliomas on 11q. Clinical findings suggest that at least one, but probably both genes code for tumor suppressor required for tumor initiation. According to this model, imprinting would account for the silencing of the two maternal copies, whereas a paternal copy would be inactive due to an inherited mutation. Tumors would then result from somatic inactivation of the other paternal gene copy in individual cells. In tumors, relaxation of imprinting seems to be a frequent feature. Here, it would necessitate subsequent inactivation of maternal gene copies to allow tumor progression. Indeed, selective loss of maternal alleles in paragangliomas has been observed with markers from 11 q. Definite proof for this model should come from the isolation and expression studies of the involved genes.

  7. Localization of a gene (CMT2A) for autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 to chromosome 1p and evidence of genetic heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Othmane, K.B.; Loprest, L.J.; Wilkinson, K.M. ); Middleton, L.T. )

    1993-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease type 2 (CMT2) is an inherited peripheral neuropathy characterized by variable age of onset and normal or slightly diminished nerve conduction velocity. CMT2 is pathologically and genetically distinct from CMT type 1 (CMT1). While CMT1 has been shown to be genetically heterogeneous, no chromosomal localization has been established for CMT2. The authors have performed pedigree linkage analysis in six large autosomal dominant CMT2 families and have demonstrated linkage and heterogeneity to a series of microsatellites (D1S160, D1S170, D1S244, D1S228 and D1S199) in the distal region of the short arm of chromosome 1. Significant evidence for heterogeneity was found using admixture analyses and the two-point lod scores. Admixture analyses using the multipoint results for the markers D1S244, D1S228, and D1S199 supported the two-point findings. Three families, DUK662, DUK1241, and 1523 gave posterior probabilities of 1.0, 0.98, and 0.88 of being of the linked type. Multipoint analysis examining the [open quotes]linked[close quotes] families showed that the most favored location for the CMT2A gene is within the interval flanked by D1S244 and D1S228 (odds approximately 70:1 of lying within versus outside that interval). These findings suggest that the CMT2 phenotype is secondary to at least two different genes and demonstrate further heterogeneity in the CMT phenotype.

  8. Urinary Biomarkers for Monitoring Disease Progression in the Han:SPRD-cy Rat Model of Autosomal-Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wiedmeyer, Charles E; Royal, Angela B

    2010-01-01

    The Han:SRPD-cy rat is a well-recognized model of human autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease. The disease is characterized by the development of progressive renal cysts, leading to declining renal function. Disease progression typically is monitored by measurement of plasma urea concentration. Although plasma urea may be an adequate measure of overall renal function, urinary biomarkers capable of accurately monitoring disease progression may be equally useful. The goal of this study was to assess several urinary biomarkers as potential markers of disease progression in male and female Han:SPRD-cy rats. These biomarkers were compared with changes in plasma urea concentration and morphometric changes as the disease progressed. Urinary activity of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and concentration of α-glutathione S-transferase were measured as markers of proximal tubular dysfunction, glutathione S-transferase Yb1 as a distal tubular marker, and collagen IV as a biomarker for glomerular lesions. Urinary albumin was used as biomarker of glomerular or proximal tubular lesions. Albuminuria increased in male rats as the disease progressed, correlating with increasing plasma urea and morphologic changes. Urine concentrations of α-glutathione S-transferase decreased significantly in the male heterozygotic compared with wildtype rats in the later stages of the disease. Urinary concentrations of glutathione S-transferase Yb1 and collagen IV and activity of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase did not change during disease progression. Measurement of urinary albumin and concentrations of α-glutathione S-transferase may be useful for monitoring disease progression in the male Han:SPRD-cy rat model in future experiments. PMID:21262131

  9. Epiphyseal dysplasia of the femoral head, mild vertebral abnormality, myopia, and sensorineural deafness: report of a pedigree with autosomal dominant inheritance.

    PubMed Central

    MacDermot, K D; Roth, S C; Hall, C; Winter, R M

    1987-01-01

    A family is presented with short stature, femoral epiphyseal dysplasia, mild vertebral changes, and sensorineural deafness inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Myopia and retinal detachment presenting in adult life were also present in some affected members. We suggest that this disorder may be a distinct entity within the spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia group of disorders. Images PMID:3681905

  10. Changes in the plasma proteome at asymptomatic and symptomatic stages of autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Muenchhoff, Julia; Poljak, Anne; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Gupta, Veer B.; Chatterjee, Pratishtha; Raftery, Mark; Masters, Colin L.; Morris, John C.; Bateman, Randall J.; Fagan, Anne M.; Martins, Ralph N.; Sachdev, Perminder S.

    2016-01-01

    The autosomal dominant form of Alzheimer’s disease (ADAD) is far less prevalent than late onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD), but enables well-informed prospective studies, since symptom onset is near certain and age of onset is predictable. Our aim was to discover plasma proteins associated with early AD pathology by investigating plasma protein changes at the asymptomatic and symptomatic stages of ADAD. Eighty-one proteins were compared across asymptomatic mutation carriers (aMC, n = 15), symptomatic mutation carriers (sMC, n = 8) and related noncarriers (NC, n = 12). Proteins were also tested for associations with cognitive measures, brain amyloid deposition and glucose metabolism. Fewer changes were observed at the asymptomatic than symptomatic stage with seven and 16 proteins altered significantly in aMC and sMC, respectively. This included complement components C3, C5, C6, apolipoproteins A-I, A-IV, C-I and M, histidine-rich glycoprotein, heparin cofactor II and attractin, which are involved in inflammation, lipid metabolism and vascular health. Proteins involved in lipid metabolism differed only at the symptomatic stage, whereas changes in inflammation and vascular health were evident at asymptomatic and symptomatic stages. Due to increasing evidence supporting the usefulness of ADAD as a model for LOAD, these proteins warrant further investigation into their potential association with early stages of LOAD. PMID:27381087

  11. A mutation in the gamma actin 1 (ACTG1) gene causes autosomal dominant hearing loss (DFNA20/26)

    PubMed Central

    van Wijk, E; Krieger, E; Kemperman, M; De Leenheer, E M R; Huygen, P; Cremers, C; Cremers, F; Kremer, H

    2003-01-01

    Linkage analysis in a multigenerational family with autosomal dominant hearing loss yielded a chromosomal localisation of the underlying genetic defect in the DFNA20/26 locus at 17q25-qter. The 6-cM critical region harboured the γ-1-actin (ACTG1) gene, which was considered an attractive candidate gene because actins are important structural elements of the inner ear hair cells. In this study, a Thr278Ile mutation was identified in helix 9 of the modelled protein structure. The alteration of residue Thr278 is predicted to have a small but significant effect on the γ 1 actin structure owing to its close proximity to a methionine residue at position 313 in helix 11. Met313 has no space in the structure to move away. Moreover, the Thr278 residue is highly conserved throughout eukaryotic evolution. Using a known actin structure the mutation could be predicted to impair actin polymerisation. These findings strongly suggest that the Thr278Ile mutation in ACTG1 represents the first disease causing germline mutation in a cytoplasmic actin isoform. PMID:14684684

  12. Polycystin-2, the protein mutated in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), is a Ca2+-permeable nonselective cation channel

    PubMed Central

    González-Perrett, Silvia; Kim, Keetae; Ibarra, Cristina; Damiano, Alicia E.; Zotta, Elsa; Batelli, Marisa; Harris, Peter C.; Reisin, Ignacio L.; Arnaout, M. Amin; Cantiello, Horacio F.

    2001-01-01

    Defects in polycystin-2, a ubiquitous transmembrane glycoprotein of unknown function, is a major cause of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), whose manifestation entails the development of fluid-filled cysts in target organs. Here, we demonstrate that polycystin-2 is present in term human syncytiotrophoblast, where it behaves as a nonselective cation channel. Lipid bilayer reconstitution of polycystin-2-positive human syncytiotrophoblast apical membranes displayed a nonselective cation channel with multiple subconductance states, and a high perm-selectivity to Ca2+. This channel was inhibited by anti-polycystin-2 antibody, Ca2+, La3+, Gd3+, and the diuretic amiloride. Channel function by polycystin-2 was confirmed by patch-clamping experiments of polycystin-2 heterologously infected Sf9 insect cells. Further, purified insect cell-derived recombinant polycystin-2 and in vitro translated human polycystin-2 had similar ion channel activity. The polycystin-2 channel may be associated with fluid accumulation and/or ion transport regulation in target epithelia, including placenta. Dysregulation of this channel provides a mechanism for the onset and progression of ADPKD. PMID:11252306

  13. A novel locus for autosomal-dominant dilated cardiomyopathy maps to chromosome 7q22.3-31.1.

    PubMed

    Schönberger, Jost; Kühler, Leif; Martins, Elisabete; Lindner, Tom H; Silva-Cardoso, Jose; Zimmer, Michael

    2005-12-01

    Inherited dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a genetically and phenotypically very heterogeneous disease. DCM is caused by mutations in multiple genes encoding proteins that are involved in force generation, force transmission, energy production and several signalling pathways. Thus, the pathophysiology of heart failure is complex and not yet fully understood. Familial forms of DCM let the way to identify new key proteins by positional cloning and to study respective pathomechanisms that are critical for normal cardiac function, but may not have been correlated with heart disease before. Here we report a three-generation pedigree including 16 individuals affected by dilated cardiomyopathy without additional phenotypes. The pedigree is consistent with autosomal-dominant inheritance and age-related penetrance. A genome-wide linkage analysis excluded linkage to all known DCM genes and loci, whereas several close markers on chromosome 7q22.3-31.1 segregated with the disease (maximum logarithm of odds score, 4.20 at D7S471 and D7S501). The disease causing mutation lies in a 9.73 Mb interval between markers D7S2545 and D7S2554 that contains no known cytoskeletal genes. Coding exons of the candidate genes LAMB1, LAMB4 and PIK3CG were screened but no mutations were identified.

  14. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals a Mutation in CRYBB2 in a Large Mexican Family with Autosomal Dominant Pulverulent Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Messina-Baas, Olga; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; González-Huerta, Luz M.; Toral-López, Jaime; Cuevas-Covarrubias, Sergio A.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract, an important cause of reversible blindness, is due to several causes including Mendelian inheritance. Thirty percent of cataracts are hereditary with participation of the gamma crystallin genes. Clinical and genetic heterogeneity is observed in patients with gene mutations and congenital cataract; about 40 genetic loci have been associated with hereditary cataract. In this study, we identified the underlying genetic cause of an autosomal dominant pulverulent cataract (ADPC) in a large Mexican family. Twenty-one affected patients and 20 healthy members of a family with ADPC were included. Genomic DNA was analyzed by whole exome sequencing in the proband, a normal daughter, and in an affected son, whereas DNA Sanger sequencing was performed in all members of the family. After the bioinformatics analysis, all samples were genotyped using Sanger sequencing to eliminate variants that do not cosegregate with the cataract. We observed a perfect cosegregation of a nonsense mutation c.475C>T (p.Q155*) in exon 6 of the CRYBB2 gene with ADPC. We calculated a logarithm of the odds score of 5.5. This mutation was not detected in healthy members of the family and in 100 normal controls. This is the first Mexican family with ADPC associated with a p.Q155* mutation. Interestingly, this specific mutation in the CRYBB2 gene seems to be exclusively associated with pulverulent/cerulean cataract (with some clinical variability) independent of the population's genetic background. PMID:27385965

  15. Description of a large family with autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia associated with the APOE p.Leu167del mutation.

    PubMed

    Marduel, Marie; Ouguerram, Khadija; Serre, Valérie; Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique; Marques-Pinheiro, Alice; Erik Berge, Knut; Devillers, Martine; Luc, Gérald; Lecerf, Jean-Michel; Tosolini, Laurent; Erlich, Danièle; Peloso, Gina M; Stitziel, Nathan; Nitchké, Patrick; Jaïs, Jean-Philippe; Abifadel, Marianne; Kathiresan, Sekar; Leren, Trond Paul; Rabès, Jean-Pierre; Boileau, Catherine; Varret, Mathilde

    2013-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo) E mutants are associated with type III hyperlipoproteinemia characterized by high cholesterol and triglycerides levels. Autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH), due to the mutations in the LDLR, APOB, or PCSK9 genes, is characterized by an isolated elevation of cholesterol due to the high levels of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs). We now report an exceptionally large family including 14 members with ADH. Through genome-wide mapping, analysis of regional/functional candidate genes, and whole exome sequencing, we identified a mutation in the APOE gene, c.500_502delTCC/p.Leu167del, previously reported associated with sea-blue histiocytosis and familial combined hyperlipidemia. We confirmed the involvement of the APOE p.Leu167del in ADH, with (1) a predicted destabilization of an alpha-helix in the binding domain, (2) a decreased apo E level in LDLs, and (3) a decreased catabolism of LDLs. Our results show that mutations in the APOE gene can be associated with bona fide ADH.

  16. Mutation Spectrum in the Large GTPase Dynamin 2, and Genotype–Phenotype Correlation in Autosomal Dominant Centronuclear Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Johann; Biancalana, Valérie; DeChene, Elizabeth T.; Bitoun, Marc; Pierson, Christopher R.; Schaefer, Elise; Karasoy, Hatice; Dempsey, Melissa A.; Klein, Fabrice; Dondaine, Nicolas; Kretz, Christine; Haumesser, Nicolas; Poirson, Claire; Toussaint, Anne; Greenleaf, Rebecca S.; Barger, Melissa A.; Mahoney, Lane J.; Kang, Peter B.; Zanoteli, Edmar; Vissing, John; Witting, Nanna; Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Dowling, James; Merlini, Luciano; Oldfors, Anders; Ousager, Lilian Bomme; Melki, Judith; Krause, Amanda; Jern, Christina; Oliveira, Acary S. B.; Petit, Florence; Jacquette, Aurélia; Chaussenot, Annabelle; Mowat, David; Leheup, Bruno; Cristofano, Michele; Aldea, Juan José Poza; Michel, Fabrice; Furby, Alain; Llona, Jose E. Barcena; Van Coster, Rudy; Bertini, Enrico; Urtizberea, Jon Andoni; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Béroud, Christophe; Prudhon, Bernard; Bedford, Melanie; Mathews, Katherine; Erby, Lori A. H.; Smith, Stephen A.; Roggenbuck, Jennifer; Crowe, Carol A.; Spitale, Allison Brennan; Johal, Sheila C.; Amato, Anthony A.; Demmer, Laurie A.; Jonas, Jessica; Darras, Basil T.; Bird, Thomas D.; Laurino, Mercy; Welt, Selman I.; Trotter, Cynthia; Guicheney, Pascale; Das, Soma; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Beggs, Alan H.; Laporte, Jocelyn

    2012-01-01

    Centronuclear myopathy (CNM) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder associated with general skeletal muscle weakness, type I fiber predominance and atrophy, and abnormally centralized nuclei. Autosomal dominant CNM is due to mutations in the large GTPase dynamin 2 (DNM2), a mechanochemical enzyme regulating cytoskeleton and membrane trafficking in cells. To date, 40 families with CNM-related DNM2 mutations have been described, and here we report 60 additional families encompassing a broad genotypic and phenotypic spectrum. In total, 18 different mutations are reported in 100 families and our cohort harbors nine known and four new mutations, including the first splice-site mutation. Genotype–phenotype correlation hypotheses are drawn from the published and new data, and allow an efficient screening strategy for molecular diagnosis. In addition to CNM, dissimilar DNM2 mutations are associated with Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT) peripheral neuropathy (CMTD1B and CMT2M), suggesting a tissue-specific impact of the mutations. In this study, we discuss the possible clinical overlap of CNM and CMT, and the biological significance of the respective mutations based on the known functions of dynamin 2 and its protein structure. Defects in membrane trafficking due to DNM2 mutations potentially represent a common pathological mechanism in CNM and CMT. PMID:22396310

  17. Mitochondrial Dysregulation Secondary to Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Autosomal Dominant Tubulointerstitial Kidney Disease – UMOD (ADTKD-UMOD)

    PubMed Central

    Kemter, Elisabeth; Fröhlich, Thomas; Arnold, Georg J.; Wolf , Eckhard; Wanke, Rüdiger

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease – UMOD’ (ADTKD-UMOD) is caused by impaired maturation and secretion of mutant uromodulin (UMOD) in thick ascending limb of Henle loop (TAL) cells, resulting in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and unfolded protein response (UPR). To gain insight into pathophysiology, we analysed proteome profiles of TAL-enriched outer renal medulla samples from ADTKD-UMOD and control mice by quantitative LC-MS/MS. In total, 212 differentially abundant proteins were identified. Numerous ER proteins, including BiP (HSPA5), phosphorylated eIF2α (EIF2S1), ATF4, ATF6 and CHOP (DDIT3), were increased abundant, consistent with UPR. The abundance of hypoxia-inducible proteins with stress survival functions, i.e. HYOU1, TXNDC5 and ERO1L, was also increased. TAL cells in ADTKD-UMOD showed a decreased proportion of mitochondria and reduced abundance of multiple mitochondrial proteins, associated with disturbed post-translational processing and activation of the mitochondrial transcription factor NRF1. Impaired fission of organelles, as suggested by reduced abundance of FIS1, may be another reason for disturbed biogenesis of mitochondria and peroxisomes. Reduced amounts of numerous proteins of the OXPHOS and citrate cycle pathways, and activation of the LKB1-AMPK-pathway, a sensor pathway of cellular energy deficits, suggest impaired energy homeostasis. In conclusion, our study revealed secondary mitochondrial dysfunction in ADTKD-UMOD. PMID:28220896

  18. Analysis of LMNB1 Duplications in Autosomal Dominant Leukodystrophy Provides Insights into Duplication Mechanisms and Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Giorgio, Elisa; Rolyan, Harshvardhan; Kropp, Laura; Chakka, Anish Baswanth; Yatsenko, Svetlana; Gregorio, Eleonora Di; Lacerenza, Daniela; Vaula, Giovanna; Talarico, Flavia; Mandich, Paola; Toro, Camilo; Pierre, Eleonore Eymard; Labauge, Pierre; Capellari, Sabina; Cortelli, Pietro; Vairo, Filippo Pinto; Miguel, Diego; Stubbolo, Danielle; Marques, Lourenco Charles; Gahl, William; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile; Melberg, Atle; Hassin-Baer, Sharon; Cohen, Oren S; Pjontek, Rastislav; Grau, Armin; Klopstock, Thomas; Fogel, Brent; Meijer, Inge; Rouleau, Guy; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre L; Ganapathiraju, Madhavi; Vanderver, Adeline; Dahl, Niklas; Hobson, Grace; Brusco, Alfredo; Brussino, Alessandro; Padiath, Quasar Saleem

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) is an adult onset demyelinating disorder that is caused by duplications of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene. However, as only a few cases have been analyzed in detail, the mechanisms underlying LMNB1 duplications are unclear. We report the detailed molecular analysis of the largest collection of ADLD families studied, to date. We have identified the minimal duplicated region necessary for the disease, defined all the duplication junctions at the nucleotide level and identified the first inverted LMNB1 duplication. We have demonstrated that the duplications are not recurrent; patients with identical duplications share the same haplotype, likely inherited from a common founder and that the duplications originated from intrachromosomal events. The duplication junction sequences indicated that nonhomologous end joining or replication-based mechanisms such fork stalling and template switching or microhomology-mediated break induced repair are likely to be involved. LMNB1 expression was increased in patients’ fibroblasts both at mRNA and protein levels and the three LMNB1 alleles in ADLD patients show equal expression, suggesting that regulatory regions are maintained within the rearranged segment. These results have allowed us to elucidate duplication mechanisms and provide insights into allele-specific LMNB1 expression levels. PMID:23649844

  19. Heterozygous Pathogenic Variant in DACT1 Causes an Autosomal-Dominant Syndrome with Features Overlapping Townes–Brocks Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Bryn D.; Metikala, Sanjeeva; Wheeler, Patricia G.; Sherpa, Mingma D.; Houten, Sander M.; Horb, Marko E.; Schadt, Eric E.

    2017-01-01

    A heterozygous nonsense variant was identified in dapper, antagonist of beta-catenin, 1 (DACT1) via whole-exome sequencing in family members with imperforate anus, structural renal abnormalities, genitourinary anomalies, and/or ear anomalies. The DACT1 c.1256G>A;p.Trp419* variant segregated appropriately in the family consistent with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. DACT1 is a member of the Wnt-signaling pathway, and mice homozygous for null alleles display multiple congenital anomalies including absent anus with blind-ending colon and genitourinary malformations. To investigate the DACT1 c.1256G>A variant, HEK293 cells were transfected with mutant DACT1 cDNA plasmid, and immunoblotting revealed stability of the DACT1 p.Trp419* protein. Overexpression of DACT1 c.1256G>A mRNA in Xenopus embryos revealed a specific gastrointestinal phenotype of enlargement of the proctodeum. Together, these findings suggest that the DACT1 c.1256G>A nonsense variant is causative of a specific genetic syndrome with features overlapping Townes–Brocks syndrome. PMID:28054444

  20. Targeted exome capture and sequencing identifies novel PRPF31 mutations in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa in Chinese families

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liping; Yin, Xiaobei; Wu, Lemeng; Chen, Ningning; Zhang, Huirong; Li, Genlin; Ma, Zhizhong

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To identify disease-causing mutations in two Chinese families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). Design Prospective analysis. Patients Two Chinese adRP families underwent genetic diagnosis. A specific hereditary eye disease enrichment panel (HEDEP) based on targeted exome capture technology was used to collect the protein coding regions of targeted 371 hereditary eye disease genes; high throughput sequencing was done with the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. The identified variants were confirmed with Sanger sequencing. Setting All experiments were performed in a large laboratory specialising in genetic studies in the Department of Ophthalmology, Peking University Third Hospital. Results Two novel mutations, including one splice site mutation (Int10 c.1074-2 A>T; p.Y359SfsX29) and one insertion (c.824_825insA; p.Y275X) of PRPF31 were identified in the two families. The two mutations segregated with the disease phenotype in their respective families. Conclusions Our findings broaden the spectrum of PRPF31 mutations causing adRP and the phenotypic spectrum of the disease in Chinese patients. The HEDEP based on targeted exome capture technology is an efficient method for molecular diagnosis in adRP patients. PMID:24202059

  1. A Novel PRPF31 Mutation in a Large Chinese Family with Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa and Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hong; Liu, Xiaoqi; Yang, Jiyun; Shi, Yi; Lin, Ying; Gong, Bo; Zhu, Xianjun; Ma, Shi; Qiao, Lifeng; Lin, He; Cheng, Jing; Yang, Zhenglin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study was intended to identify the disease causing genes in a large Chinese family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration. Methods A genome scan analysis was conducted in this family for disease gene preliminary mapping. Snapshot analysis of selected SNPs for two-point LOD score analysis for candidate gene filter. Candidate gene PRPF31 whole exons' sequencing was executed to identify mutations. Results A novel nonsense mutation caused by an insertion was found in PRPF31 gene. All the 19 RP patients in 1085 family are carrying this heterozygous nonsense mutation. The nonsense mutation is in PRPF31 gene exon9 at chr19:54629961-54629961, inserting nucleotide “A” that generates the coding protein frame shift from p.307 and early termination at p.322 in the snoRNA binding domain (NOP domain). Conclusion This report is the first to associate PRPF31 gene's nonsense mutation and adRP and JMD. Our findings revealed that PRPF31 can lead to different clinical phenotypes in the same family, resulting either in adRP or syndrome of adRP and JMD. We believe our identification of the novel “A” insertion mutation in exon9 at chr19:54629961-54629961 in PRPF31 can provide further genetic evidence for clinical test for adRP and JMD. PMID:24244300

  2. Utilizing magnetization transfer imaging to investigate tissue remodeling in a murine model of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Timothy L.; Irazabal, Maria V.; Ebrahimi, Behzad; Hopp, Katharina; Udoji, Kelly N.; Warner, Joshua D.; Korfiatis, Panagiotis; Mishra, Prasanna K.; Macura, Slobodan I.; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K.; Lerman, Lilach O.; Harris, Peter C.; Torres, Vicente E.; King, Bernard F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Noninvasive imaging techniques that quantify renal tissue composition are needed to more accurately ascertain prognosis and monitor disease progression in polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Given the success of magnetization transfer (MT) imaging to characterize various tissue remodeling pathologies, it was tested on a murine model of autosomal dominant PKD. Methods C57Bl/6 Pkd1 R3277C mice at 9, 12, and 15 months were imaged with a 16.4T MR imaging system. Images were acquired without and with RF saturation in order to calculate MT ratio (MTR) maps. Following imaging, the mice were euthanized and kidney sections were analyzed for cystic and fibrotic indices, which were compared with statistical parameters of the MTR maps. Results The MTR‐derived mean, median, 25th percentile, skewness, and kurtosis were all closely related to indices of renal pathology, including kidney weight/body weight, cystic index, and percent of remaining parenchyma. The correlation between MTR and histology‐derived cystic and fibrotic changes was R2 = 0.84 and R2 = 0.70, respectively. Conclusion MT imaging provides a new, noninvasive means of measuring tissue remodeling PKD changes and may be better suited for characterizing renal impairment compared with conventional MR techniques. Magn Reson Med 75:1466–1473, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance. PMID:25974140

  3. Heterozygous Pathogenic Variant in DACT1 Causes an Autosomal-Dominant Syndrome with Features Overlapping Townes-Brocks Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Webb, Bryn D; Metikala, Sanjeeva; Wheeler, Patricia G; Sherpa, Mingma D; Houten, Sander M; Horb, Marko E; Schadt, Eric E

    2017-01-05

    A heterozygous nonsense variant was identified in dapper, antagonist of beta-catenin, 1 (DACT1) via whole-exome sequencing in family members with imperforate anus, structural renal abnormalities, genitourinary anomalies, and/or ear anomalies. The DACT1 c.1256G>A;p.Trp419(*) variant segregated appropriately in the family consistent with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. DACT1 is a member of the Wnt-signaling pathway, and mice homozygous for null alleles display multiple congenital anomalies including absent anus with blind-ending colon and genitourinary malformations. To investigate the DACT1 c.1256G>A variant, HEK293 cells were transfected with mutant DACT1 cDNA plasmid, and immunoblotting revealed stability of the DACT1 p.Trp419(*) protein. Overexpression of DACT1 c.1256G>A mRNA in Xenopus embryos revealed a specific gastrointestinal phenotype of enlargement of the proctodeum. Together, these findings suggest that the DACT1 c.1256G>A nonsense variant is causative of a specific genetic syndrome with features overlapping Townes-Brocks syndrome.

  4. Cyst infection in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: causative microorganisms and susceptibility to lipid-soluble antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Suwabe, T; Araoka, H; Ubara, Y; Kikuchi, K; Hazue, R; Mise, K; Hamanoue, S; Ueno, T; Sumida, K; Hayami, N; Hoshino, J; Imafuku, A; Kawada, M; Hiramatsu, R; Hasegawa, E; Sawa, N; Takaichi, K

    2015-07-01

    Cyst infection is a frequent and serious complication of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Lipid-soluble antibiotics like fluoroquinolones show good penetration into cysts and are recommended for cyst infection, but causative microorganisms are often resistant to these agents. This study investigated the profile of the microorganisms causing cyst infection in ADPKD, their susceptibility to lipid-soluble antibiotics, and clinical outcomes. This retrospective study reviewed all ADPKD patients admitted to Toranomon Hospital with a diagnosis of cyst infection from January 2004 to March 2014. All patients who underwent cyst drainage and had positive cyst fluid cultures were enrolled. Patients with positive blood cultures who satisfied our criteria for cyst infection or probable infection were also enrolled. There were 99 episodes with positive cyst fluid cultures and 93 episodes with positive blood cultures. The majority of patients were on dialysis. The death rate was high when infection was caused by multiple microorganisms or when there were multiple infected cysts. Gram-negative bacteria accounted for 74-79 % of the isolates in all groups, except for patients with positive hepatic cyst fluid cultures. The susceptibility of Escherichia coli to fluoroquinolones was very low in patients with hepatic cyst infection, especially those with frequent episodes and those with hepatomegaly. Fungi were detected in two episodes. Fluoroquinolone-resistant microorganisms showed a high prevalence in cyst infection. It is important to identify causative microorganisms to avoid the overuse of fluoroquinolones and to improve the outcome of cyst infection in ADPKD.

  5. Identification of novel PKD1 and PKD2 mutations in a Chinese population with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bei; Chen, Song-Chang; Yang, Yan-Mei; Yan, Kai; Qian, Ye-Qing; Zhang, Jun-Yu; Hu, Yu-Ting; Dong, Min-Yue; Jin, Fan; Huang, He-Feng; Xu, Chen-Ming

    2015-12-03

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is one of the most frequently inherited renal diseases caused by mutations in PKD1 and PKD2. We performed mutational analyses of PKD genes in 49 unrelated patients using direct PCR-sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for PKD1 and PKD2. RT-PCR analysis was also performed in a family with a novel PKD2 splicing mutation. Disease-causing mutations were identified in 44 (89.8%) of the patients: 42 (95.5%) of the patients showed mutations in PKD1, and 2 (4.5%) showed mutations in PKD2. Ten nonsense, 17 frameshift, 4 splicing and one in-frame mutation were found in 32 of the patients. Large rearrangements were found in 3 patients, and missense mutations were found in 9 patients. Approximately 61.4% (27/44) of the mutations are first reported with a known mutation rate of 38.6%. RNA analysis of a novel PKD2 mutation (c.595_595 + 14delGGTAAGAGCGCGCGA) suggested monoallelic expression of the wild-type allele. Furthermore, patients with PKD1-truncating mutations reached end-stage renal disease (ESRD) earlier than patients with non-truncating mutations (47 ± 3.522 years vs. 59 ± 11.687 years, P = 0.016). The mutation screening of PKD genes in Chinese ADPKD patients will enrich our mutation database and significantly contribute to improve genetic counselling for ADPKD patients.

  6. Whole-exome sequencing identifies OR2W3 mutation as a cause of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiangyu; Guan, Liping; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Yao; Zheng, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Long, Jirong; Wu, Na; Wu, Long; Xiang, Ying; Xu, Bin; Shen, Miaozhong; Chen, Yanhua; Wang, Yuewen; Yin, Ye; Li, Yingrui; Xu, Haiwei; Xu, Xun; Li, Yafei

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a heterogeneous group of inherited ocular diseases, is a genetic condition that causes retinal degeneration and eventual vision loss. Though some genes have been identified to be associated with RP, still a large part of the clinical cases could not be explained. Here we reported a four-generation Chinese family with RP, during which 6 from 9 members of the second generation affected the disease. To identify the genetic defect in this family, whole-exome sequencing together with validation analysis by Sanger sequencing were performed to find possible pathogenic mutations. After a pipeline of database filtering, including public databases and in-house databases, a novel missense mutation, c. 424 C > T transition (p.R142W) in OR2W3 gene, was identified as a potentially causative mutation for autosomal dominant RP. The mutation co-segregated with the disease phenotype over four generations. This mutation was validated in another independent three-generation family. RT-PCR analysis also identified that OR2W3 gene was expressed in HESC-RPE cell line. The results will not only enhance our current understanding of the genetic basis of RP, but also provide helpful clues for designing future studies to further investigate genetic factors for familial RP. PMID:25783483

  7. Opposing Effects of Inhibitors of Aurora-A and EGFR in Autosomal-Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nikonova, Anna S.; Deneka, Alexander Y.; Eckman, Louisa; Kopp, Meghan C.; Hensley, Harvey H.; Egleston, Brian L.; Golemis, Erica A.

    2015-01-01

    Aurora-A kinase (AURKA) overexpression in numerous tumors induces aneuploidy, in part because of cytokinetic defects. Alisertib and other small-molecule inhibitors targeting AURKA are effective in some patients as monotherapies or combination therapies. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pro-proliferative signaling activity is commonly elevated in cancer, and the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib is commonly used as a standard of care agent for cancer. An erlotinib/alisertib combination therapy is currently under assessment in clinical trials, following pre-clinical studies that indicated synergy of these drugs in cancer. We were interested in further exploring the activity of this drug combination. Beyond well-established functions for AURKA in mitotic progression, additional non-mitotic AURKA functions include control of ciliary stability and calcium signaling. Interestingly, alisertib exacerbates the disease phenotype in mouse models for autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), a common inherited syndrome induced by aberrant signaling from PKD1 and PKD2, cilia-localized proteins that have calcium channel activity. EGFR is also more active in ADPKD, making erlotinib also of potential interest in this disease setting. In this study, we have explored the interaction of alisertib and erlotinib in an ADPKD model. These experiments indicated erlotinib-­restrained cystogenesis, opposing alisertib action. Erlotinib also interacted with alisertib to regulate proliferative signaling proteins, albeit in a complicated manner. Results suggest a nuanced role of AURKA signaling in different pathogenic conditions and inform the clinical use of AURKA inhibitors in cancer patients with comorbidities. PMID:26528438

  8. A ninth locus (RP18) for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa maps in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 1.

    PubMed

    Xu, S Y; Schwartz, M; Rosenberg, T; Gal, A

    1996-08-01

    We studied a large Danish family of seven generations in which autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP), a heterogeneous genetic form of retinal dystrophy, was segregating. After linkage had been excluded to all known adRP loci on chromosomes 3q, 6p, 7p, 7q, 8q, 17p, 17q and 19q, a genome screening was performed. Positive lod scores suggestive of linkage with values ranging between Z = 1.58-5.36 at theta = 0.04-0.20 were obtained for eight loci on proximal 1p and 1q. Close linkage without recombination and a maximum lod score of 7.22 at theta = 0.00 was found between the adRP locus (RP18) in this family and D1S498 which is on 1q very near the centromere. Analysis of multiply informative meioses suggests that in this family D1S534 and D1S305 flank RP18 in interval 1p13-q23. No linkage has been found to loci from this chromosomal region in six other medium sized adRP families in which the disease locus has been excluded from all known chromosomal regions harbouring an adRP gene or locus suggesting that there is (at least) one further adRP locus to be mapped in the future.

  9. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Disease is Associated with Depressed Levels of Soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Sarı, Funda; Yalçın, Arzu Didem; Genç, Gizem Esra; Sarıkaya, Metin; Bisgin, Atıl; Çetinkaya, Ramazan; Gümüşlü, Saadet

    2016-01-01

    Background: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by multiple, large renal cysts and impaired kidney function. Although the reason for the development of kidney cysts is unknown, ADPKD is associated with cell cycle arrest and abundant apoptosis of renal tubular epithelial cells. Aims: We asked whether serum-soluble TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (sTRAIL) might underlie ADPKD. Study Design: Case-control study. Methods: Serum sTRAIL levels were measured in 44 patients with ADPKD and 18 healthy volunteers. The human soluble TRAIL/Apo2L ELISA kit was used for the in vitro quantitative determination of sTRAIL in serum samples. Results: Mean serum sTRAIL levels were lower in patients with ADPKD as compared to the control group (446.9±103.1 and 875.9±349.6 pg/mL, p<0.001). Serum sTRAIL levels did not differ among stages of renal failure in patients with ADPKD. There was no correlation between serum sTRAIL levels and estimated glomerular filtration rate in patients with ADPKD (p>0.05). Conclusion: Our results show that ADPKD patients have depressed sTRAIL levels, indicating apoptosis unrelated to the stage of chronic renal failure. PMID:27761278

  10. Polycystin-2, the protein mutated in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), is a Ca2+-permeable nonselective cation channel.

    PubMed

    González-Perrett, S; Kim, K; Ibarra, C; Damiano, A E; Zotta, E; Batelli, M; Harris, P C; Reisin, I L; Arnaout, M A; Cantiello, H F

    2001-01-30

    Defects in polycystin-2, a ubiquitous transmembrane glycoprotein of unknown function, is a major cause of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), whose manifestation entails the development of fluid-filled cysts in target organs. Here, we demonstrate that polycystin-2 is present in term human syncytiotrophoblast, where it behaves as a nonselective cation channel. Lipid bilayer reconstitution of polycystin-2-positive human syncytiotrophoblast apical membranes displayed a nonselective cation channel with multiple subconductance states, and a high perm-selectivity to Ca2+. This channel was inhibited by anti-polycystin-2 antibody, Ca2+, La3+, Gd3+, and the diuretic amiloride. Channel function by polycystin-2 was confirmed by patch-clamping experiments of polycystin-2 heterologously infected Sf9 insect cells. Further, purified insect cell-derived recombinant polycystin-2 and in vitro translated human polycystin-2 had similar ion channel activity. The polycystin-2 channel may be associated with fluid accumulation and/or ion transport regulation in target epithelia, including placenta. Dysregulation of this channel provides a mechanism for the onset and progression of ADPKD.

  11. High prevalence of mutations affecting the splicing process in a Spanish cohort with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Ezquerra-Inchausti, Maitane; Barandika, Olatz; Anasagasti, Ander; Irigoyen, Cristina; López de Munain, Adolfo; Ruiz-Ederra, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is the most frequent group of inherited retinal dystrophies. It is highly heterogeneous, with more than 80 disease-causing genes 27 of which are known to cause autosomal dominant RP (adRP), having been identified. In this study a total of 29 index cases were ascertained based on a family tree compatible with adRP. A custom panel of 31 adRP genes was analysed by targeted next-generation sequencing using the Ion PGM platform in combination with Sanger sequencing. This allowed us to detect putative disease-causing mutations in 14 out of the 29 (48.28%) families analysed. Remarkably, around 38% of all adRP cases analysed showed mutations affecting the splicing process, mainly due to mutations in genes coding for spliceosome factors (SNRNP200 and PRPF8) but also due to splice-site mutations in RHO. Twelve of the 14 mutations found had been reported previously and two were novel mutations found in PRPF8 in two unrelated patients. In conclusion, our results will lead to more accurate genetic counselling and will contribute to a better characterisation of the disease. In addition, they may have a therapeutic impact in the future given the large number of studies currently underway based on targeted RNA splicing for therapeutic purposes. PMID:28045043

  12. New phenotype of the cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy mapped to chromosome 19: migraine as the prominent clinical feature.

    PubMed Central

    Vérin, M; Rolland, Y; Landgraf, F; Chabriat, H; Bompais, B; Michel, A; Vahedi, K; Martinet, J P; Tournier-Lasserve, E; Lemaitre, M H

    1995-01-01

    A survey was carried out on a large family presenting the symptoms of familial arteriopathy (CADASIL) recently mapped to chromosome 19. This is characterised clinically by recurrent subcortical infarcts developing into pseudobulbar palsy and subcortical dementia, and radiologically by early MRI abnormalities. To characterise this familial condition, 43 members older than 20 years and spreading over four generations were studied clinically (31 living, 12 deceased), genetically, and radiologically by MRI (n = 31). Twenty out of 43 were found to be clinically symptomatic and of these 13 out of 31 had MRI abnormalities. Genetic studies mapped this condition to the locus of CADASIL (lod score > 3). The natural history suggests a chronological clinicoradiological staging of this phenotype of CADASIL: stage I between 20 and 40 years with frequent migraine-like episodes and well delineated lesions of the white matter; stage II between 40 and 60 years with stroke-like episodes, bipolar or monopolar-like psychotic disorders, coalescent lesions of the white matter, and well delineated lesions of the basal ganglia; and stage III over 60 years with subcortical dementia, pseudobulbar palsy, diffuse leukoencephalopathy, and multiple well delineated lesions of the basal ganglia. This phenotype differs from the other two previously described by high frequency of migraine, frequency of psychotic disorders, and early neurological manifestations. The new acronym "cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts, leukoencephalopathy, and migraine" (CADASILM) is proposed to better describe this particular subvariety of CADASIL. Images PMID:7500094

  13. Automated segmentation of liver and liver cysts from bounded abdominal MR images in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngwoo; Bae, Sonu K.; Cheng, Tianming; Tao, Cheng; Ge, Yinghui; Chapman, Arlene B.; Torres, Vincente E.; Yu, Alan S. L.; Mrug, Michal; Bennett, William M.; Flessner, Michael F.; Landsittel, Doug P.; Bae, Kyongtae T.

    2016-11-01

    Liver and liver cyst volume measurements are important quantitative imaging biomarkers for assessment of disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and polycystic liver disease (PLD). To date, no study has presented automated segmentation and volumetric computation of liver and liver cysts in these populations. In this paper, we proposed an automated segmentation framework for liver and liver cysts from bounded abdominal MR images in patients with ADPKD. To model the shape and variations in ADPKD livers, the spatial prior probability map (SPPM) of liver location and the tissue prior probability maps (TPPMs) of liver parenchymal tissue intensity and cyst morphology were generated. Formulated within a three-dimensional level set framework, the TPPMs successfully captured liver parenchymal tissues and cysts, while the SPPM globally constrained the initial surfaces of the liver into the desired boundary. Liver cysts were extracted by combined operations of the TPPMs, thresholding, and false positive reduction based on spatial prior knowledge of kidney cysts and distance map. With cross-validation for the liver segmentation, the agreement between the radiology expert and the proposed method was 84% for shape congruence and 91% for volume measurement assessed by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). For the liver cyst segmentation, the agreement between the reference method and the proposed method was ICC  =  0.91 for cyst volumes and ICC  =  0.94 for % cyst-to-liver volume.

  14. System analysis of gene mutations and clinical phenotype in Chinese patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Meiling; Xie, Yuansheng; Chen, Zhiqiang; Liao, Yujie; Li, Zuoxiang; Hu, Panpan; Qi, Yan; Yin, Zhiwei; Li, Qinggang; Fu, Ping; Chen, Xiangmei

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited kidney disorder mainly caused by mutation in PKD1/PKD2. However, ethnic differences in mutations, the association between mutation genotype/clinical phenotype, and the clinical applicable value of mutation detection are poorly understood. We made systematically analysis of Chinese ADPKD patients based on a next-generation sequencing platform. Among 148 ADPKD patients enrolled, 108 mutations were detected in 127 patients (85.8%). Compared with mutations in Caucasian published previously, the PKD2 mutation detection rate was lower, and patients carrying the PKD2 mutation invariably carried the PKD1 mutation. The definite pathogenic mutation detection rate was lower, whereas the multiple mutations detection rate was higher in Chinese patients. Then, we correlated PKD1/PKD2 mutation data and clinical data: patients with mutation exhibited a more severe phenotype; patients with >1 mutations exhibited a more severe phenotype; patients with pathogenic mutations exhibited a more severe phenotype. Thus, the PKD1/PKD2 mutation status differed by ethnicity, and the PKD1/PKD2 genotype may affect the clinical phenotype of ADPKD. Furthermore, it makes sense to detect PKD1/PKD2 mutation status for early diagnosis and prognosis, perhaps as early as the embryo/zygote stage, to facilitate early clinical intervention and family planning. PMID:27782177

  15. High prevalence of mutations affecting the splicing process in a Spanish cohort with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Ezquerra-Inchausti, Maitane; Barandika, Olatz; Anasagasti, Ander; Irigoyen, Cristina; López de Munain, Adolfo; Ruiz-Ederra, Javier

    2017-01-03

    Retinitis pigmentosa is the most frequent group of inherited retinal dystrophies. It is highly heterogeneous, with more than 80 disease-causing genes 27 of which are known to cause autosomal dominant RP (adRP), having been identified. In this study a total of 29 index cases were ascertained based on a family tree compatible with adRP. A custom panel of 31 adRP genes was analysed by targeted next-generation sequencing using the Ion PGM platform in combination with Sanger sequencing. This allowed us to detect putative disease-causing mutations in 14 out of the 29 (48.28%) families analysed. Remarkably, around 38% of all adRP cases analysed showed mutations affecting the splicing process, mainly due to mutations in genes coding for spliceosome factors (SNRNP200 and PRPF8) but also due to splice-site mutations in RHO. Twelve of the 14 mutations found had been reported previously and two were novel mutations found in PRPF8 in two unrelated patients. In conclusion, our results will lead to more accurate genetic counselling and will contribute to a better characterisation of the disease. In addition, they may have a therapeutic impact in the future given the large number of studies currently underway based on targeted RNA splicing for therapeutic purposes.

  16. The gene responsible for autosomal dominant Doyne's honeycomb retinal dystrophy (DHRD) maps to chromosome 2p16.

    PubMed

    Gregory, C Y; Evans, K; Wijesuriya, S D; Kermani, S; Jay, M R; Plant, C; Cox, N; Bird, A C; Bhattacharya, S S

    1996-07-01

    Degeneration in the macula region of the retina is a feature of a heterogeneous group of inherited, progressive disorders, causing blinding visual impairment. Autosomal dominant Doyne's honeycomb retinal dystrophy (DHRD) is characterised by the presence of drusen deposits at the level of Bruch's membrane in the macula and around the edge of the optic nerve head. We have studied 63 members of a large, nine-generation British pedigree by linkage analysis. Two-point analysis showed significant linkage to nine markers on the short arm of chromosome 2, a region overlapping that recently reported to be linked to Malattia leventinese. A maximum lod score (Zmax) of 7.29 (theta = 0.0) was obtained at marker locus D2S2251. Haplotype analysis of recombination events localised the disease to a 5 cM region between marker loci D2S2316 and D2S378. Striking clinical similarities between DHRD and the more common condition age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) suggest that the disease gene at this locus could be considered as the most likely candidate in future studies on ARMD.

  17. Dose-Titrated Vasopressin V2 Receptor Antagonist Improves Renoprotection in a Mouse Model for Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zittema, Debbie; Versteeg, Irina B.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; van Goor, Harry; de Heer, Emile; Veraar, Kimberley A.M.; Peters, Dorien J.M.; Meijer, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Background In autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, renoprotective treatment with a vasopressin V2 receptor antagonist (V2RA) is given in a fixed dose (FD). Disease progression and drug habituation could diminish treatment efficacy. We investigated whether the renoprotective effect of the V2RA can be improved by dose titration of the V2RA aiming to maintain aquaresis at a high level. Methods The V2RA OPC-31260 was administered to Pkd1-deletion mice in an FD (0.1%) or in a titrated dose (TD, up to 0.8% when drinking volume dropped). Total kidney weight (TKW) and cyst ratio were investigated and compared to non-treated Pkd1-deletion mice. Treatment was started early or late (21 or 42 days postnatal). Results Water intake was significantly higher throughout the experiment in the TD compared to the FD group. FD treatment that was initiated early reduced TKW and cyst ratio but lost its renoprotective effect later during the experiment. In contrast, TD treatment was able to maintain the renoprotective effect. TD treatment, however, was also associated with a higher early termination rate in comparison with FD treatment. Late start of treatment (FD or TD) did not show a renoprotective effect. Conclusions Titration of a V2RA aimed to maintain aquaresis at a high level showed a better renoprotective effect compared to FD administration. However, this treatment regimen was poorly tolerated and did not overcome treatment unresponsiveness when started later in the disease. PMID:27578560

  18. Apelin and copeptin: two opposite biomarkers associated with kidney function decline and cyst growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lacquaniti, Antonio; Chirico, Valeria; Lupica, Rosaria; Buemi, Antoine; Loddo, Saverio; Caccamo, Chiara; Salis, Paola; Bertani, Tullio; Buemi, Michele

    2013-11-01

    Vasopressin (AVP) plays a detrimental role in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Copeptin represents a measurable substitute for circulating AVP whereas apelin counteracts AVP signaling. The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive value of apelin and copeptin for the progression of ADPKD disease. 52 ADPKD patients were enrolled and followed until the end of the observation period or the primary study endpoint was reached, defined by the combined outcome of decrease of glomerular filtration rate associated with a total renal volume increase. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was employed for identifying the progression of renal disease and Kaplan-Meier curves assessed the renal survival. Adjusted risk estimates for progression endpoint and incident renal replacement therapy (RRT) were calculated using Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. ADPKD patients were characterized by lower apelin levels and higher copeptin levels when compared with healthy subjects. These biomarkers were strictly correlated with osmolality and markers of renal function. At ROC analysis, apelin and copeptin showed a very good diagnostic profile in identifying ADPKD progression. After the follow up of 24 months, 33 patients reached the endpoint. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis showed that apelin predicted renal disease progression and incident RRT independently of other potential confounders. Apelin is associated with kidney function decline in ADPKD, suggesting that it may be a new marker to predict kidney outcome.

  19. Diagnostic Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel Gene, EMILIN1, Associated with Autosomal-Dominant Hereditary Connective Tissue Disease.

    PubMed

    Capuano, Alessandra; Bucciotti, Francesco; Farwell, Kelly D; Tippin Davis, Brigette; Mroske, Cameron; Hulick, Peter J; Weissman, Scott M; Gao, Qingshen; Spessotto, Paola; Colombatti, Alfonso; Doliana, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Heritable connective tissue diseases are a highly heterogeneous family of over 200 disorders that affect the extracellular matrix. While the genetic basis of several disorders is established, the etiology has not been discovered for a large portion of patients, likely due to rare yet undiscovered disease genes. By performing trio-exome sequencing of a 55-year-old male proband presenting with multiple symptoms indicative of a connective disorder, we identified a heterozygous missense alteration in exon 1 of the Elastin Microfibril Interfacer 1 (EMILIN1) gene, c.64G>A (p.A22T). The proband presented with ascending and descending aortic aneurysms, bilateral lower leg and foot sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy, arthropathy, and increased skin elasticity. Sanger sequencing confirmed that the EMILIN1 alteration, which maps around the signal peptide cleavage site, segregated with disease in the affected proband, mother, and son. The impaired secretion of EMILIN-1 in cells transfected with the mutant p.A22T coincided with abnormal protein accumulation within the endoplasmic reticulum. In skin biopsy of the proband, we detected less EMILIN-1 with disorganized and abnormal coarse fibrils, aggregated deposits underneath the epidermis basal lamina, and dermal cells apoptosis. These findings collectively suggest that EMILIN1 may represent a new disease gene associated with an autosomal-dominant connective tissue disorder.

  20. Total Kidney Volume in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: A Biomarker of Disease Progression and Therapeutic Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Alam, Ahsan; Dahl, Neera K; Lipschutz, Joshua H; Rossetti, Sandro; Smith, Patricia; Sapir, Daniel; Weinstein, Jordan; McFarlane, Philip; Bichet, Daniel G

    2015-10-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common potentially life-threatening monogenic disorder in humans, characterized by progressive development and expansion of fluid-filled cysts in the kidneys and other organs. Ongoing cyst growth leads to progressive kidney enlargement, whereas kidney function remains stable for decades as a result of hyperfiltration and compensation by unaffected nephrons. Kidney function irreversibly declines only in the late stages of the disease, when most of the parenchyma is lost to cystic and fibrotic tissue and the remaining compensatory capacity is overwhelmed. Hence, conventional kidney function measures, such as glomerular filtration rate, do not adequately assess disease progression in ADPKD, especially in its early stages. Given the recent development of potential targeted therapies in ADPKD, it has become critically important to identify relevant biomarkers that can be used to determine the degree of disease progression and evaluate the effects of therapeutic interventions on the course of the disease. We review the current evidence to provide an informed perspective on whether total kidney volume (TKV) is a suitable biomarker for disease progression and whether TKV can be used as an efficacy end point in clinical trials. We conclude that because cystogenesis is the central factor leading to kidney enlargement, TKV appears to be an appropriate biomarker and is gaining wider acceptance. Several studies have identified TKV as a relevant imaging biomarker for monitoring and predicting disease progression and support its use as a prognostic end point in clinical trials.

  1. Automated segmentation of liver and liver cysts from bounded abdominal MR images in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngwoo; Bae, Sonu K; Cheng, Tianming; Tao, Cheng; Ge, Yinghui; Chapman, Arlene B; Torres, Vincente E; Yu, Alan S L; Mrug, Michal; Bennett, William M; Flessner, Michael F; Landsittel, Doug P; Bae, Kyongtae T

    2016-11-21

    Liver and liver cyst volume measurements are important quantitative imaging biomarkers for assessment of disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and polycystic liver disease (PLD). To date, no study has presented automated segmentation and volumetric computation of liver and liver cysts in these populations. In this paper, we proposed an automated segmentation framework for liver and liver cysts from bounded abdominal MR images in patients with ADPKD. To model the shape and variations in ADPKD livers, the spatial prior probability map (SPPM) of liver location and the tissue prior probability maps (TPPMs) of liver parenchymal tissue intensity and cyst morphology were generated. Formulated within a three-dimensional level set framework, the TPPMs successfully captured liver parenchymal tissues and cysts, while the SPPM globally constrained the initial surfaces of the liver into the desired boundary. Liver cysts were extracted by combined operations of the TPPMs, thresholding, and false positive reduction based on spatial prior knowledge of kidney cysts and distance map. With cross-validation for the liver segmentation, the agreement between the radiology expert and the proposed method was 84% for shape congruence and 91% for volume measurement assessed by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). For the liver cyst segmentation, the agreement between the reference method and the proposed method was ICC  =  0.91 for cyst volumes and ICC  =  0.94 for % cyst-to-liver volume.

  2. Antihypertensive treatments in adult autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: network meta-analysis of the randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Bing; Yu, Shengqiang; Xu, Chenggang; Mao, Zhiguo; Ye, Chaoyang; Chen, Dongping; Zhao, Xuezhi; Wu, Jun; Chen, Wansheng; Mei, Changlin

    2015-01-01

    Background Blood pressure (BP) control is one of the most important treatments of Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The comparative efficacy of antihypertensive treatments in ADPKD patients is inconclusive. Methods Network meta-analysis was used to evaluate randomized controlled trials (RCT) which investigated antihypertensive treatments in ADPKD. PubMed, Embase, Ovid, and Cochrane Collaboration were searched. The primary outcome was estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Secondary outcomes were serum creatinine (Scr), urinary albumin excretion (UAE), systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean artery pressure (MAP) and left ventricular mass index (LVMI). Results We included 10 RCTs with 1386 patients and six interventions: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI), Angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB), combination of ACEI and ARB, calcium channel blockers (CCB), β-blockers and dilazep. There was no difference of eGFR in all the treatments in both network and direct comparisons. No significant differences of Scr, SBP, DBP, MAP, and LVMI were found in network comparisons. However, ACEI significantly reduced SBP, DBP, MAP and LVMI when compared to CCB. Significantly increased UAE was observed in CCB compared with ACEI or ARB. Bayesian probability analysis found ARB ranked first in the surrogate measures of eGFR, UAE and SBP. Conclusions There is little evidence to detect differences of antihypertensive treatments on kidney disease progression in ADPKD patients. More RCTs will be needed in the future. Use of ARB may be an optimal choice in clinical practice. PMID:26636542

  3. Localization of a Gene for Autosomal Recessive Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis with Normal Hearing (rdRTA2) to 7q33-34

    PubMed Central

    Karet, Fiona E.; Finberg, Karin E.; Nayir, Ahmet; Bakkaloglu, Aysin; Ozen, Seza; Hulton, Sally A.; Sanjad, Sami A.; Al-Sabban, Essam A.; Medina, Juan F.; Lifton, Richard P.

    1999-01-01

    Summary Failure of distal nephrons to excrete excess acid results in the “distal renal tubular acidoses” (dRTA). Early childhood features of autosomal recessive dRTA include severe metabolic acidosis with inappropriately alkaline urine, poor growth, rickets, and renal calcification. Progressive bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is evident in approximately one-third of patients. We have recently identified mutations in ATP6B1, encoding the B-subunit of the collecting-duct apical proton pump, as a cause of recessive dRTA with SNHL. We now report the results of genetic analysis of 13 kindreds with recessive dRTA and normal hearing. Analysis of linkage and molecular examination of ATP6B1 indicated that mutation in ATP6B1 rarely, if ever, accounts for this phenotype, prompting a genomewide linkage search for loci underlying this trait. The results strongly supported linkage with locus heterogeneity to a segment of 7q33-34, yielding a maximum multipoint LOD score of 8.84 with 68% of kindreds linked. The LOD-3 support interval defines a 14-cM region flanked by D7S500 and D7S688. That 4 of these 13 kindreds do not support linkage to rdRTA2 and ATP6B1 implies the existence of at least one additional dRTA locus. These findings establish that genes causing recessive dRTA with normal and impaired hearing are different, and they identify, at 7q33-34, a new locus, rdRTA2, for recessive dRTA with normal hearing. PMID:10577919

  4. Novel method for genomic analysis of PKD1 and PKD2 mutations in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ying-Cai; Blumenfeld, Jon D; Anghel, Raluca; Donahue, Stephanie; Belenkaya, Rimma; Balina, Marina; Parker, Thomas; Levine, Daniel; Leonard, Debra G B; Rennert, Hanna

    2009-02-01

    Genetic testing of PKD1 and PKD2 is useful for diagnosis and prognosis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), particularly in asymptomatic individuals or those without a family history. PKD1 testing is complicated by the large transcript size, complexity of the gene region, and the extent of gene variations. A molecular assay was developed using Transgenomic's SURVEYOR Nuclease and WAVE Nucleic Acid High Sensitivity Fragment Analysis System to screen for PKD1 and PKD2 variants, followed by sequencing of variant gene segments, thereby reducing the sequencing reactions by 80%. This method was compared to complete DNA sequencing performed by a reference laboratory for 25 ADPKD patients from 22 families. The pathogenic potential of gene variations of unknown significance was examined by evolutionary comparison, effects of amino acid substitutions on protein structure, and effects of splice-site alterations. A total of 90 variations were identified, including all 82 reported by the reference laboratory (100% sensitivity). A total of 76 variations (84.4%) were in PKD1 and 14 (15.6%) in PKD2. Definite pathogenic mutations (seven nonsense, four truncation, and three splicing defects) were detected in 64% (14/22) of families. The remaining 76 variants included 26 missense, 33 silent, and 17 intronic changes. Two heterozygous nonsense mutations were incorrectly determined by the reference laboratory as homozygous. "Probably pathogenic" mutations were identified in an additional five families (overall detection rate 86%). In conclusion, the SURVEYOR nuclease method was comparable to direct sequencing for detecting ADPKD mutations, achieving high sensitivity with lower cost, providing an important tool for genetic analysis of complex genes.

  5. Somatotroph Pituitary Adenoma with Acromegaly and Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease – SSTR5 polymorphism and PKD1 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Syro, Luis V.; Sundsbak, Jamie L.; Scheithauer, Bernd W.; Toledo, Rodrigo A.; Camargo, Mauricio; Heyer, Christina M.; Sekiya, Tomoko; Uribe, Humberto; Escobar, Jorge I.; Vasquez, Martin; Rotondo, Fabio; Toledo, Sergio P. A.; Kovacs, Kalman; Horvath, Eva; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Harris, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    A 39-year-old woman with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) presented with acromegaly and a pituitary macroadenoma. There was a family history of this renal disorder. She had undergone surgery for pituitary adenoma 6 years prior. Physical examination disclosed bitemporal hemianopsia and elevation of both basal growth hormone (GH) 106 ng/mL (normal 0–5) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) 811 ng/mL (normal 48–255) blood levels. A magnetic resonance imaging scan disclosed a 3.0 cm sellar and suprasellar mass with both optic chiasm compression and left cavernous sinus invasion. Histologic, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies of the lesion disclosed a sparsely granulated somatotroph adenoma. Standard chromosome analysis on the blood sample showed no abnormality. Sequence analysis of the coding regions of PKD1 and PKD2 employing DNA from both peripheral leukocytes and the tumor revealed the most common PKD1 mutation, 5014_5015delAG. Analysis of the entire SSTR5 gene disclosed the variant c.143C>A (p.L48M, rs4988483) change in the heterozygous state in both blood and tumor, while no pathogenic mutations were noted in the MEN1, AIP, p27Kip1 and SSTR2 genes. To our knowledge, this is the fourth reported case of a GH-producing pituitary adenoma associated with ADPKD, but the first subject to extensive morphological, ultrastructural, cytogenetic and molecular studies. The question arises whether the physical proximity of the PKD1 and SSTR5 genes on chromosome 16 indicates a causal relationship between ADPKD and the somatotroph adenoma. PMID:21744088

  6. Therapeutic Area Data Standards for Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: A Report From the Polycystic Kidney Disease Outcomes Consortium (PKDOC).

    PubMed

    Perrone, Ronald D; Neville, Jon; Chapman, Arlene B; Gitomer, Berenice Y; Miskulin, Dana C; Torres, Vicente E; Czerwiec, Frank S; Dennis, Eslie; Kisler, Bron; Kopko, Steve; Krasa, Holly B; LeRoy, Elizabeth; Castedo, Juliana; Schrier, Robert W; Broadbent, Steve

    2015-10-01

    Data standards provide a structure for consistent understanding and exchange of data and enable the integration of data across studies for integrated analysis. There is no data standard applicable to kidney disease. We describe the process for development of the first-ever Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) data standard for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) by the Polycystic Kidney Disease Outcomes Consortium (PKDOC). Definition of common data elements and creation of ADPKD-specific data standards from case report forms used in long-term ADPKD registries, an observational cohort (Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies of Polycystic Kidney Disease [CRISP] 1 and 2), and a randomized clinical trial (Halt Progression of Polycystic Kidney Disease [HALT-PKD]) are described in detail. This data standard underwent extensive review, including a global public comment period, and is now available online as the first PKD-specific data standard (www.cdisc.org/therapeutic). Submission of clinical trial data that use standard data structures and terminology will be required for new electronic submissions to the US Food and Drug Administration for all disease areas by the end of 2016. This data standard will allow for the mapping and pooling of available data into a common data set in addition to providing a foundation for future studies, data sharing, and long-term registries in ADPKD. This data set will also be used to support the regulatory qualification of total kidney volume as a prognostic biomarker for use in clinical trials. The availability of consensus data standards for ADPKD has the potential to facilitate clinical trial initiation and increase sharing and aggregation of data across observational studies and among completed clinical trials, thereby improving our understanding of disease progression and treatment.

  7. Identification of a Novel Gene on 10q22.1 Causing Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa (adRP)

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Lori S.; Bowne, Sara J.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Blanton, Susan H.; Wheaton, Dianna K.; Avery, Cheryl E.; Cadena, Elizabeth D.; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Fulton, Robert S.; Wilson, Richard K.; Weinstock, George M.; Lewis, Richard A.; Birch, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome linkage mapping identified a region on chromosome 10q21.3–q22.1 with a maximum LOD score of 3.0 at 0 % recombination in a six-generation family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). All known adRP genes and X-linked RP genes were excluded in the family by a combination of methods. Whole-exome next-generation sequencing revealed a missense mutation in hexokinase 1, HK1 c.2539G > A, p.Glu847Lys, tracking with disease in all affected family members. One severely-affected male is homozygous for this region by linkage analysis and has two copies of the mutation. No other potential mutations were detected in the linkage region nor were any candidates identified elsewhere in the genome. Subsequent testing detected the same mutation in four additional, unrelated adRP families, for a total of five mutations in 404 probands tested (1.2 %). Of the five families, three are from the Acadian population in Louisiana, one is French Canadian and one is Sicilian. Haplotype analysis of the affected chromosome in each family and the homozygous individual revealed a rare, shared haplotype of 450 kb, suggesting an ancient founder mutation. HK1 is a widely-expressed gene, with multiple, abundant retinal transcripts, coding for hexokinase 1. Hexokinase catalyzes phosphorylation of glucose to glusose-6-phospate, the first step in glycolysis. The Glu847Lys mutation is in a highly-conserved site, outside of the active site or known functional sites. PMID:26427411

  8. Identification of copy number variation in the gene for autosomal dominant optic atrophy, OPA1, in a Chinese pedigree.

    PubMed

    Jin, X; Chen, Y H; Liu, Z; Deng, Y; Li, N N; Huang, H; Qi, M; Yi, X; Zhu, J

    2015-09-21

    Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) is an optic neuropathy characterized by bilateral optic nerve pallor and decreased visual acuity. It has been reported to be associated with two genes, OPA1, OPA3, and the OPA4, OPA5, and OPA8 loci. However, mutations in OPA1 constitute the most prevalent cause of ADOA. The purpose of this study was to identify the underlying genetic defect in a Chinese pedigree with ADOA. DNA from six members of a Chinese pedigree was collected for testing genomic and copy number variation (CNV) by targeted region capture and next generation sequencing (targeted NGS). A new developmental CNV detection method was applied to analyze the sequence data. Further verification of CNV was performed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Three members of the pedigree with clinically diagnosed ADOA were screened for pathogenic genes related to ophthalmic genetic disease. No eligible pathogenic point mutations associated with ADOA disease-causing genes were found in pedigree members with ADOA. Upon further analysis for CNVs, we found a heterozygous deletion in exons 1-9 of OPA1, which was confirmed by real-time PCR. In this study we used a new developmental method to detect CNVs associated with ADOA in a Chinese pedigree. To our knowledge, this is the first case of ADOA caused by a CNV of the OPA1 gene in Chinese patients. The findings suggest that CNVs might be an important mutation type in Chinese patients with ADOA, and that CNV screening should be performed when point mutation screens are negative in these patients.

  9. Localization of a gene for autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (Albers-Schönberg disease) to chromosome 1p21.

    PubMed Central

    Van Hul, W; Bollerslev, J; Gram, J; Van Hul, E; Wuyts, W; Benichou, O; Vanhoenacker, F; Willems, P J

    1997-01-01

    Albers-Schönberg disease, the classical form of osteopetrosis, is an autosomal dominant condition with generalized increased skeletal density due to reduced bone resorption. Characteristic radiological findings are generalized osteosclerosis, with, most typically, end-plate sandwichlike thickening of the vertebrae (Rugger-Jersey spine) and the bone-within-bone (endobones) phenomenon. We studied an extended kindred with Albers-Schönberg disease and found linkage with several markers from chromosome 1p21. The Albers-Schönberg gene is located in a candidate region of approximately 8.5 cM flanked by markers D1S486 and D1S2792. A maximum LOD score (Z(max)) of 4.09 was obtained in multipoint analysis at loci D1S239/D1S248. Possible linkage of osteopetrosis to this chromosomal region was analyzed because the CSF-1 gene, which is mutated in the op/op mouse model for osteopetrosis, is located in 1p21. However, SSCP and mutation analysis in patients did not reveal any abnormality, which excludes the CSF-1 gene as the disease-causing gene. This was confirmed by refined physical mapping of the CSF-1 gene outside the candidate region for the Albers-Schönberg gene. The identification of the molecular defect underlying Albers-Schönberg disease will therefore be dependent on the isolation of other genes from an 8.5-cM candidate region on chromosome 1p21. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:9311741

  10. Unfolded protein response-induced dysregulation of calcium homeostasis promotes retinal degeneration in rat models of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, V; Kotla, P; Strang, C; Gorbatyuk, M

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) in rats is closely associated with a persistently activated unfolded protein response (UPR). If unchecked, the UPR might trigger apoptosis, leading to photoreceptor death. One of the UPR-activated cellular signaling culminating in apoptotic photoreceptor cell death is linked to an increase in intracellular Ca2+. Therefore, we validated whether ADRP retinas experience a cytosolic Ca2+ overload, and whether sustained UPR in the wild-type retina could promote retinal degeneration through Ca2+-mediated calpain activation. We performed an ex vivo experiment to measure intracellular Ca2+ in ADRP retinas as well as to detect the expression levels of proteins that act as Ca2+ sensors. In separate experiments with the subretinal injection of tunicamycin (UPR inducer) and a mixture of calcium ionophore (A231278) and thapsigargin (SERCA2b inhibitor) we assessed the consequences of a sustained UPR activation and increased intracellular Ca2+ in the wild-type retina, respectively, by performing scotopic ERG, histological, and western blot analyses. Results of the study revealed that induced UPR in the retina activates calpain-mediated signaling, and increased intracellular Ca2+ is capable of promoting retinal degeneration. A significant decline in ERG amplitudes at 6 weeks post treatment was associated with photoreceptor cell loss that occurred through calpain-activated CDK5-pJNK-Csp3/7 pathway. Similar calpain activation was found in ADRP rat retinas. A twofold increase in intracellular Ca2+ and up- and downregulations of ER membrane-associated Ca2+-regulated IP3R channels and SERCA2b transporters were detected. Therefore, sustained UPR activation in the ADRP rat retinas could promote retinal degeneration through increased intracellular Ca2+ and calpain-mediated apoptosis. PMID:26844699

  11. Identification of two novel mutations in FAM136A and DTNA genes in autosomal-dominant familial Meniere's disease

    PubMed Central

    Requena, Teresa; Cabrera, Sonia; Martín-Sierra, Carmen; Price, Steven D.; Lysakowski, Anna; Lopez-Escamez, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Meniere's disease (MD) is a chronic disorder of the inner ear defined by sensorineural hearing loss, tinnitus and episodic vertigo, and familial MD is observed in 5–15% of sporadic cases. Although its pathophysiology is largely unknown, studies in human temporal bones have found an accumulation of endolymph in the scala media of the cochlea. By whole-exome sequencing, we have identified two novel heterozygous single-nucleotide variants in FAM136A and DTNA genes, both in a Spanish family with three affected cases in consecutive generations, highly suggestive of autosomal-dominant inheritance. The nonsense mutation in the FAM136A gene leads to a stop codon that disrupts the FAM136A protein product. Sequencing revealed two mRNA transcripts of FAM136A in lymphoblasts from patients, which were confirmed by immunoblotting. Carriers of the FAM136A mutation showed a significant decrease in the expression level of both transcripts in lymphoblastoid cell lines. The missense mutation in the DTNA gene produces a novel splice site which skips exon 21 and leads to a shorter alternative transcript. We also demonstrated that FAM136A and DTNA proteins are expressed in the neurosensorial epithelium of the crista ampullaris of the rat by immunohistochemistry. While FAM136A encodes a mitochondrial protein with unknown function, DTNA encodes a cytoskeleton-interacting membrane protein involved in the formation and stability of synapses with a crucial role in the permeability of the blood–brain barrier. Neither of these genes has been described in patients with hearing loss, FAM136A and DTNA being candidate gene for familiar MD. PMID:25305078

  12. Cold temperature improves mobility and survival in Drosophila models of autosomal-dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP).

    PubMed

    Baxter, Sally L; Allard, Denise E; Crowl, Christopher; Sherwood, Nina Tang

    2014-08-01

    Autosomal-dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) is a crippling neurodegenerative disease for which effective treatment or cure remains unknown. Victims experience progressive mobility loss due to degeneration of the longest axons in the spinal cord. Over half of AD-HSP cases arise from loss-of-function mutations in spastin, which encodes a microtubule-severing AAA ATPase. In Drosophila models of AD-HSP, larvae lacking Spastin exhibit abnormal motor neuron morphology and function, and most die as pupae. Adult survivors display impaired mobility, reminiscent of the human disease. Here, we show that rearing pupae or adults at reduced temperature (18°C), compared with the standard temperature of 24°C, improves the survival and mobility of adult spastin mutants but leaves wild-type flies unaffected. Flies expressing human spastin with pathogenic mutations are similarly rescued. Additionally, larval cooling partially rescues the larval synaptic phenotype. Cooling thus alleviates known spastin phenotypes for each developmental stage at which it is administered and, notably, is effective even in mature adults. We find further that cold treatment rescues larval synaptic defects in flies with mutations in Flower (a protein with no known relation to Spastin) and mobility defects in flies lacking Kat60-L1, another microtubule-severing protein enriched in the CNS. Together, these data support the hypothesis that the beneficial effects of cold extend beyond specific alleviation of Spastin dysfunction, to at least a subset of cellular and behavioral neuronal defects. Mild hypothermia, a common neuroprotective technique in clinical treatment of acute anoxia, might thus hold additional promise as a therapeutic approach for AD-HSP and, potentially, for other neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. De novo post-transplant thrombotic microangiopathy localized only to the graft in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease with thrombophilia

    PubMed Central

    Rolla, Davide; Fontana, Iris; Ravetti, Jean Louis; Marsano, Luigina; Bellino, Diego; Panaro, Laura; Ansaldo, Francesca; Mathiasen, Lisa; Storace, Giulia; Trezzi, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a serious complication of renal transplantation and is mostly related to the prothrombotic effect of calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs). A subset of TMA (29%-38%) is localized only to the graft. Case 1: A young woman suffering from autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) underwent kidney transplant. After 2 months, she showed slow renal deterioration (serum creatinine from 1.9 to 3.1 mg/dl), without hematological signs of hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS); only LDH enzyme transient increase was detected. Renal biopsy showed TMA: temporary withdraw of tacrolimus and plasmapheresis was performed. The renal function recovered (serum creatinine 1.9 mg/dl). From screening for thrombophilia, we found a mutation of the Leiden factor V gene. Case 2: A man affected by ADPKD underwent kidney transplantation, with delay graft function; first biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis, but a second biopsy revealed TMA, while no altered hematological parameters of HUS was detected. We observed only a slight increase of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels. The tacrolimus was halved and plasmapheresis was performed: LDH levels normalized within 10 days and renal function improved (serum creatinine from 9 to 2.9 mg/dl). We found a mutation of the prothrombin gene. Only a renal biopsy clarifies the diagnosis of TMA, but it is necessary to pay attention to light increasing level of LDH. Conclusion: Prothrombotic effect of CNIs and mTOR inhibitor, mutation of genes encoding factor H or I, anticardiolipin antibodies, vascular rejection, cytomegalovirus infection are proposed to trigger TMA; we detected mutations of factor II and Leiden factor V, as facilitating conditions for TMA in patients affected by ADPKD. PMID:26693501

  14. HLA-B27 is a potential risk factor for posttransplantation diabetes mellitus in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak-Nowacka, M; Safranow, K; Nowosiad, M; Dębska-Ślizień, A; Dziewanowski, K; Głyda, M; Jankowska, M; Rutkowski, B; Ciechanowski, K

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate HLA phenotype predisposition to posttransplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM) in kidney transplant recipients stratified according to kidney failure etiology. Ninety-eight transplant recipient pairs with kidney grafts from the same cadaveric donor were qualified for the study. In each pair, 1 kidney was grafted to an individual with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD group) and 1 to recipient with a different cause of kidney failure (non-ADPKD group). All class II HLA antigens were determined with the PCR-SSP molecular method. To identify class I HLA molecules we used both molecular and serologic methods. Diabetes was diagnosed according to the American Diabetes Association criteria. The posttransplantation observation period was 12 months. In the ADPKD group, HLA-B27 was more common in PTDM than non-PTDM patients; 31.6% versus 11.4% (P = .069). The difference achieved significance when comparing insulin-treated with non-insulin-treated patients (44.4% vs 12.4%; P = .029). In the non-ADPKD group, HLA-A28 and HLA-B13 were observed more frequently in patients with PTDM than in recipients without diabetes (22.2% vs 2.5% [P = .0099] and 22.2% vs 3.8% [P = .020]). All of these associations were significant upon multivariate analysis. HLA-B27 allele is a factor predisposing ADPKD patients to insulin-dependent PTDM. Antigens predisposing to PTDM among kidney graft recipients without ADPKD include HLA-A28 and B13.

  15. Autosomal dominant nanophthalmos (NNO1) with high hyperopia and angle-closure glaucoma maps to chromosome 11.

    PubMed Central

    Othman, M I; Sullivan, S A; Skuta, G L; Cockrell, D A; Stringham, H M; Downs, C A; Fornés, A; Mick, A; Boehnke, M; Vollrath, D; Richards, J E

    1998-01-01

    Nanophthalmos is an uncommon developmental ocular disorder characterized by a small eye, as indicated by short axial length, high hyperopia (severe farsightedness), high lens/eye volume ratio, and a high incidence of angle-closure glaucoma. We performed clinical and genetic evaluations of members of a large family in which nanophthalmos is transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner. Ocular examinations of 22 affected family members revealed high hyperopia (range +7.25-+13.00 diopters; mean +9.88 diopters) and short axial length (range 17.55-19.28 mm; mean 18.13 mm). Twelve affected family members had angle-closure glaucoma or occludable anterior-chamber angles. Linkage analysis of a genome scan demonstrated highly significant evidence that nanophthalmos in this family is the result of a defect in a previously unidentified locus (NNO1) on chromosome 11. The gene was localized to a 14.7-cM interval between D11S905 and D11S987, with a maximum LOD score of 5. 92 at a recombination fraction of .00 for marker D11S903 and a multipoint maximum LOD score of 6.31 for marker D11S1313. NNO1 is the first human locus associated with nanophthalmos or with an angle-closure glaucoma phenotype, and the identification of the NNO1 locus is the first step toward the cloning of the gene. A cloned copy of the gene will enable examination of the relationship, if any, between nanophthalmos and less severe forms of hyperopia and between nanophthalmos and other conditions in which angle-closure glaucoma is a feature. PMID:9792868

  16. Somatotroph pituitary adenoma with acromegaly and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: SSTR5 polymorphism and PKD1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Syro, Luis V; Sundsbak, Jamie L; Scheithauer, Bernd W; Toledo, Rodrigo A; Camargo, Mauricio; Heyer, Christina M; Sekiya, Tomoko; Uribe, Humberto; Escobar, Jorge I; Vasquez, Martin; Rotondo, Fabio; Toledo, Sergio P A; Kovacs, Kalman; Horvath, Eva; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Harris, Peter C

    2012-09-01

    A 39-year-old woman with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) presented with acromegaly and a pituitary macroadenoma. There was a family history of this renal disorder. She had undergone surgery for pituitary adenoma 6 years prior. Physical examination disclosed bitemporal hemianopsia and elevation of both basal growth hormone (GH) 106 ng/mL (normal 0-5) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) 811 ng/mL (normal 48-255) blood levels. A magnetic resonance imaging scan disclosed a 3.0 cm sellar and suprasellar mass with both optic chiasm compression and left cavernous sinus invasion. Pathologic, cytogenetic, molecular and in silico analysis was undertaken. Histologic, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies of the lesion disclosed a sparsely granulated somatotroph adenoma. Standard chromosome analysis on the blood sample showed no abnormality. Sequence analysis of the coding regions of PKD1 and PKD2 employing DNA from both peripheral leukocytes and the tumor revealed the most common PKD1 mutation, 5014_5015delAG. Analysis of the entire SSTR5 gene disclosed the variant c.142C>A (p.L48M, rs4988483) in the heterozygous state in both blood and tumor, while no pathogenic mutations were noted in the MEN1, AIP, p27Kip1 and SSTR2 genes. To our knowledge, this is the fourth reported case of a GH-producing pituitary adenoma associated with ADPKD, but the first subjected to extensive morphological, ultrastructural, cytogenetic and molecular studies. The physical proximity of the PKD1 and SSTR5 genes on chromosome 16 suggests a causal relationship between ADPKD and somatotroph adenoma.

  17. The Severe Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa Rhodopsin Mutant Ter349Glu Mislocalizes and Induces Rapid Rod Cell Death*

    PubMed Central

    Hollingsworth, T. J.; Gross, Alecia K.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the rhodopsin gene cause approximately one-tenth of retinitis pigmentosa cases worldwide, and most result in endoplasmic reticulum retention and apoptosis. Other rhodopsin mutations cause receptor mislocalization, diminished/constitutive activity, or faulty protein-protein interactions. The purpose of this study was to test for mechanisms by which the autosomal dominant rhodopsin mutation Ter349Glu causes an early, rapid retinal degeneration in patients. The mutation adds an additional 51 amino acids to the C terminus of the protein. Folding and ligand interaction of Ter349Glu rhodopsin were tested by ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible) spectrophotometry. The ability of the mutant to initiate phototransduction was tested using a radioactive filter binding assay. Photoreceptor localization was assessed both in vitro and in vivo utilizing fluorescent immunochemistry on transfected cells, transgenic Xenopus laevis, and knock-in mice. Photoreceptor ultrastructure was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Spectrally, Ter349Glu rhodopsin behaves similarly to wild-type rhodopsin, absorbing maximally at 500 nm. The mutant protein also displays in vitro G protein activation similar to that of WT. In cultured cells, mislocalization was observed at high expression levels whereas ciliary localization occurred at low expression levels. Similarly, transgenic X. laevis expressing Ter349Glu rhodopsin exhibited partial mislocalization. Analysis of the Ter349Glu rhodopsin knock-in mouse showed a rapid, early onset degeneration in homozygotes with a loss of proper rod outer segment development and improper disc formation. Together, the data show that both mislocalization and rod outer segment morphogenesis are likely associated with the human phenotype. PMID:23940033

  18. Low Prevalence of Mutations in Known Loci for Autosomal Dominant Hypercholesterolemia in a Multi-Ethnic Patient Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zahid; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Chen, Chiyaun; Garg, Abhimanyu

    2013-01-01

    Background Autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH), characterized by elevated plasma levels of low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), is caused by variants in at least three different genes:LDL receptor (LDLR), apolipoprotein B-100 (APOB), and proprotein convertase subtilisin-like kexin type 9 (PCSK9). There is paucity of data about the molecular basis of ADH among ethnic groups other than those of European or Japanese descent. Here, we examined the molecular basis of ADH in a multi-ethnic patient cohort from lipid clinics in a large urban U.S. city. Methods and Results A total of 38 males and 53 females, age 22 to 76 years, met modified Simon-Broome criteria for ADH and were screened for mutations in the exons and consensus splice sites of LDLR, and in selected exons of APOB and PCSK9. Deletions and duplications of LDLR exons were detected with multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Heterozygous variants in LDLR were identified in 30 patients and in APOB in one patient. The remaining 60 patients (65%) had “unexplained ADH.” A higher proportion of African Americans (77%) than either non-Hispanic whites (57%) or Hispanics (53%) had “unexplained ADH.” As compared to patients with LDLR variants, those with “unexplained ADH” had lower levels of LDL-C (292 ± 47vs 239 ± 42 mg/dL, respectively; p < 0.0001) and higher levels of HDL-cholesterol (45 ± 12vs 54 ± 13 mg/dL, respectively, p = 0.003). Conclusions Our findings suggest that additional loci may contribute to ADH, especially in understudied populations such as African Americans. PMID:23064986

  19. Mutations in POGLUT1, encoding protein O-glucosyltransferase 1, cause autosomal-dominant Dowling-Degos disease.

    PubMed

    Basmanav, F Buket; Oprisoreanu, Ana-Maria; Pasternack, Sandra M; Thiele, Holger; Fritz, Günter; Wenzel, Jörg; Größer, Leopold; Wehner, Maria; Wolf, Sabrina; Fagerberg, Christina; Bygum, Anette; Altmüller, Janine; Rütten, Arno; Parmentier, Laurent; El Shabrawi-Caelen, Laila; Hafner, Christian; Nürnberg, Peter; Kruse, Roland; Schoch, Susanne; Hanneken, Sandra; Betz, Regina C

    2014-01-02

    Dowling-Degos disease (DDD) is an autosomal-dominant genodermatosis characterized by progressive and disfiguring reticulate hyperpigmentation. We previously identified loss-of-function mutations in KRT5 but were only able to detect pathogenic mutations in fewer than half of our subjects. To identify additional causes of DDD, we performed exome sequencing in five unrelated affected individuals without mutations in KRT5. Data analysis identified three heterozygous mutations from these individuals, all within the same gene. These mutations, namely c.11G>A (p.Trp4*), c.652C>T (p.Arg218*), and c.798-2A>C, are within POGLUT1, which encodes protein O-glucosyltransferase 1. Further screening of unexplained cases for POGLUT1 identified six additional mutations, as well as two of the above described mutations. Immunohistochemistry of skin biopsies of affected individuals with POGLUT1 mutations showed significantly weaker POGLUT1 staining in comparison to healthy controls with strong localization of POGLUT1 in the upper parts of the epidermis. Immunoblot analysis revealed that translation of either wild-type (WT) POGLUT1 or of the protein carrying the p.Arg279Trp substitution led to the expected size of about 50 kDa, whereas the c.652C>T (p.Arg218*) mutation led to translation of a truncated protein of about 30 kDa. Immunofluorescence analysis identified a colocalization of the WT protein with the endoplasmic reticulum and a notable aggregating pattern for the truncated protein. Recently, mutations in POFUT1, which encodes protein O-fucosyltransferase 1, were also reported to be responsible for DDD. Interestingly, both POGLUT1 and POFUT1 are essential regulators of Notch activity. Our results furthermore emphasize the important role of the Notch pathway in pigmentation and keratinocyte morphology.

  20. A loss-of-function model for cystogenesis in human autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease type 2.

    PubMed Central

    Torra, R; Badenas, C; San Millán, J L; Pérez-Oller, L; Estivill, X; Darnell, A

    1999-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is genetically heterogeneous, with at least three chromosomal loci (PKD1, PKD2, and PKD3) that account for the disease. Mutations in the PKD2 gene, on the long arm of chromosome 4, are expected to be responsible for approximately 15% of cases of ADPKD. Although ADPKD is a systemic disease, it shows a focal expression, because <1% of nephrons become cystic. A feasible explanation for the focal nature of events in PKD1, proposed on the basis of the two-hit theory, suggests that cystogenesis results from the inactivation of the normal copy of the PKD1 gene by a second somatic mutation. The aim of this study is to demonstrate that somatic mutations are present in renal cysts from a PKD2 kidney. We have studied 30 renal cysts from a patient with PKD2 in which the germline mutation was shown to be a deletion that encompassed most of the disease gene. Loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) studies showed loss of the wild-type allele in 10% of cysts. Screening of six exons of the gene by SSCP detected eight different somatic mutations, all of them expected to produce truncated proteins. Overall, >/=37% of the cysts studied presented somatic mutations. No LOH for the PKD1 gene or locus D3S1478 were observed in those cysts, which demonstrates that somatic alterations are specific. We have identified second-hit mutations in human PKD2 cysts, which suggests that this mechanism could be a crucial event in the development of cystogenesis in human ADPKD-type 2. PMID:10417277

  1. Vascular endothelial growth factor as an angiogenesis biomarker for the progression of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Martins, D P; Souza, M A; Baitello, M E Lopes; Nogueira, V; Oliveira, C I Ferreira; Pinhel, M A de Souza; Caldas, H C; Filho, M A; Souza, D R Silva

    2016-01-26

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a hereditary nephropathy characterized by abnormal growth of epithelial cells. Genetic factors, including the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene, play an important role in its progression. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of VEGF-C936T polymorphism in the development and progression of ADPKD. In total, 302 individuals were studied and divided into two groups: G1 (73 patients with ADPKD) and G2 (229 individuals without the disease). Among the patients, 46 (63%) progressed to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and required hemodialysis and/or renal transplant. These patients were re-grouped into G1-A for progression analysis. A peripheral blood sample was obtained from all subjects; the DNA was extracted and the VEGF-C936T polymorphism analyzed using polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism. The significance level was set at P < 0.05. The homozygous wild-type genotype (C/C) was predominant in G1 (78%) and G2 (79%; P = 0.9249). We observed a significant reduction in the mean age of patients with the risk allele (C/T + T/T = 44.3 ± 13.4 years) compared to the C/C genotype (52.2 ± 9.6 years; P = 0.047) in G1-A. In conclusion, the VEGF-C936T polymorphism does not discriminate patients from controls. However, the presence of the T allele appears to accelerate the progression of ADPKD, anticipating ESRD, thereby suggesting its importance in the prognosis of the disease. However, the importance role played by VEGF gene variants in different populations and larger sample sizes must be verified.

  2. A novel DNAJB6 mutation causes dominantly-inherited distal-onset myopathy and compromises DNAJB6 function.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-Chien; Tsai, Yu-Shuen; Soong, Bing-Wen; Huang, Yen-Hua; Wu, Hung-Ta; Chen, Ying-Hao; Lin, Kon-Ping; Liao, Yi-Chu; Lee, Yi-Chung

    2017-02-23

    Mutations in the DNAJB6 gene have been identified as a rare cause of dominantly-inherited limb-girdle muscular dystrophy or distal-onset myopathy. To identify the genetic cause of distal-onset myopathy in a Taiwanese family of Han Chinese origin, we performed exome sequencing for the two affected individuals and identified a heterozygous mutation, c.287C>T (p.Pro96Leu) in the DNAJB6 gene that co-segregated with myopathy in the family. Notably, this mutation is novel and localizes within the glycine and phenylalanine-rich (G/F) domain and alters an amino acid residue previously reported with a different mutation. Furthermore, in vitro functional studies demonstrated that the c.287C>T (p.Pro96Leu) mutation possessed a dominant negative effect on the anti-aggregation function of DNAJB6 protein. Taken together, these findings expand the molecular spectrum of DNAJB6 mutations and also emphasize the pathogenic role of DNAJB6 dysfunction in distal-onset myopathy.

  3. Autosomal dominant hearing loss resulting from p.R75Q mutation in the GJB2 gene: nonsyndromic presentation in a South Indian family.

    PubMed

    Pavithra, Amritkumar; Selvakumari, Mathiyalagan; Nityaa, Venkatesan; Sharanya, Narasimhan; Ramakrishnan, Rajagopalan; Narasimhan, Murali; Srisailapathy, C R Srikumari

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the GJB2 gene encoding the gap junction protein Connexin 26 have been associated with autosomal recessive as well as dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss. Owing to the involvement of connexins in skin homeostasis, GJB2 mutations have also been associated with syndromic forms of hearing loss showing various skin manifestations. We report an assortatively mating hearing impaired family of south Indian origin with three affected members spread over two generations, having p.R75Q mutation in the GJB2 gene in the heterozygous condition. The inheritance pattern was autosomal dominant with mother and son being affected. Dermatological and histopathologic examinations showed absence of palmoplantar keratoderma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report from India on p.R75Q mutation in the GJB2 gene with nonsyndromic hearing loss.

  4. Autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia: Reduction of the FSPI candidate region on chromosome 14q to 7 cM and locus heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Gispert, S.; Santos, N.; Auburger, G.; Damen, R.; Voit, T.; Schulz, J.; Klockgether, T.; Orozco, G.; Kreuz, F.; Weissenbach, J.

    1995-01-01

    Three large pedigrees of Germany descent with autosomal dominant {open_quotes}pure{close_quotes} familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) were characterized clinically and genetically. Haplotype and linkage analyses, with microsatellites covering the FSP region on chromosome 14q (locus FSP1), were performed. In pedigree W, we found a haplotype that cosegregates with the disease and observed three crossing-over events, reducing the FSP1 candidate region to 7 cM; in addition, the observation of apparent anticipation in this family suggests a trinucleotide repeat expansion as the mutation. In pedigree D and S, the gene locus could be excluded from the whole FSP1 region, confirming the locus heterogeneity of autosomal dominant FSP. 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. A novel Notch3 deletion mutation in a Chinese patient with cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL).

    PubMed

    Weiming, Fan; Yuliang, Wang; Youjie, Li; Xinsheng, Liu; Shuyang, Xie; Zhaoxia, Liu

    2013-02-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a rare autosomal dominant hereditary cerebrovascular disease characterised by migraine attacks, recurrent subcortical transient ischemic attacks or strokes, cognitive decline, and dementia. It is caused by mutations in the Notch3 gene on chromosome 19p13.1, which is the only gene currently known to be closely associated with CADASIL. We describe a novel 100 base pair base fragment deletion mutation (ENST 00000263388, c.512-611del) in the Notch3 gene from a Chinese patient with CADASIL. The present patient has the characteristic clinical and family history for CADASIL, which suggests that C.512del611 may be a cause of CADASIL as well as most of the previously reported Notch3 mutations.

  6. Autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease in a family without polycystic kidney disease associated with a novel missense protein kinase C substrate 80K-H mutation.

    PubMed

    Peces, Ramón; Drenth, Joost P H; Te Morsche, Rene H M; González, Pedro; Peces, Carlos

    2005-12-28

    Polycystic liver disease (PLD) is characterized by the presence of multiple bile duct-derived epithelial cysts scattered in the liver parenchyma. PLD can manifest itself in patients with severe autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Isolated autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease (ADPLD) is genetically distinct from PLD associated with ADPKD, although it may have similar pathogenesis and clinical manifestations. Recently, mutations in two causative genes for ADPLD, independently from ADPKD, have been identified. We report here a family (a mother and her daughter) with a severe form of ADPLD not associated with ADPKD produced by a novel missense protein kinase C substrate 80K-H (PRKCSH) mutation (R281W). This mutation causes a severe phenotype, since the two affected subjects manifested signs of portal hypertension. Doppler sonography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are effective in documenting the underlying lesions in a non-invasive way.

  7. Design and baseline characteristics of participants in the study of antihypertensive therapy in children and adolescents with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD).

    PubMed

    Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa A; Fick-Brosnahan, Godela M; Duley, Irene; Johnson, Ann M; Strain, John D; DeGroff, Curt G; Schrier, Robert W

    2005-04-01

    In this manuscript, we describe our ongoing randomized clinical trial to assess the efficacy of blood pressure control with angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition on renal cyst growth over a 5-year study period in children and young adults aged 4-21 years with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Baseline demographic and laboratory data for the study groups are reported. Results of this study could significantly impact the standard of care for management of ADPKD in this population.

  8. Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) as a model of small vessel disease: update on clinical, diagnostic, and management aspects.

    PubMed

    Di Donato, Ilaria; Bianchi, Silvia; De Stefano, Nicola; Dichgans, Martin; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Duering, Marco; Jouvent, Eric; Korczyn, Amos D; Lesnik-Oberstein, Saskia A J; Malandrini, Alessandro; Markus, Hugh S; Pantoni, Leonardo; Penco, Silvana; Rufa, Alessandra; Sinanović, Osman; Stojanov, Dragan; Federico, Antonio

    2017-02-24

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is the most common and best known monogenic small vessel disease. Here, we review the clinical, neuroimaging, neuropathological, genetic, and therapeutic aspects based on the most relevant articles published between 1994 and 2016 and on the personal experience of the authors, all directly involved in CADASIL research and care. We conclude with some suggestions that may help in the clinical practice and management of these patients.

  9. Nicotine normalizes intracellular subunit stoichiometry of nicotinic receptors carrying mutations linked to autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Son, Cagdas D; Moss, Fraser J; Cohen, Bruce N; Lester, Henry A

    2009-05-01

    Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) is linked with high penetrance to several distinct nicotinic receptor (nAChR) mutations. We studied (alpha4)(3)(beta2)(2) versus (alpha4)(2)(beta2)(3) subunit stoichiometry for five channel-lining M2 domain mutations: S247F, S252L, 776ins3 in alpha4, V287L, and V287M in beta2. alpha4 and beta2 subunits were constructed with all possible combinations of mutant and wild-type (WT) M2 regions, of cyan and yellow fluorescent protein, and of fluorescent and nonfluorescent M3-M4 loops. Sixteen fluorescent subunit combinations were expressed in N2a cells. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was analyzed by donor recovery after acceptor photobleaching and by pixel-by-pixel sensitized emission, with confirmation by fluorescence intensity ratios. Because FRET efficiency is much greater for adjacent than for nonadjacent subunits and the alpha4 and beta2 subunits occupy specific positions in nAChR pentamers, observed FRET efficiencies from (alpha4)(3)(beta2)(2) carrying fluorescent alpha4 subunits were significantly higher than for (alpha4)(2)(beta2)(3); the converse was found for fluorescent beta2 subunits. All tested ADNFLE mutants produced 10 to 20% increments in the percentage of intracellular (alpha4)(3)(beta2)(2) receptors compared with WT subunits. In contrast, 24- to 48-h nicotine (1 muM) exposure increased the proportion of (alpha4)(2)(beta2)(3) in WT receptors and also returned subunit stoichiometry to WT levels for alpha4S248F and beta2V287L nAChRs. These observations may be relevant to the decreased seizure frequency in patients with ADNFLE who use tobacco products or nicotine patches. Fluorescence-based investigations of nAChR subunit stoichiometry may provide efficient drug discovery methods for nicotine addiction or for other disorders that result from dysregulated nAChRs.

  10. Urine-sample-derived human induced pluripotent stem cells as a model to study PCSK9-mediated autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Si-Tayeb, Karim; Idriss, Salam; Champon, Benoite; Caillaud, Amandine; Pichelin, Matthieu; Arnaud, Lucie; Lemarchand, Patricia; Le May, Cédric; Zibara, Kazem; Cariou, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a critical modulator of cholesterol homeostasis. Whereas PCSK9 gain-of-function (GOF) mutations are associated with autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH) and premature atherosclerosis, PCSK9 loss-of-function (LOF) mutations have a cardio-protective effect and in some cases can lead to familial hypobetalipoproteinemia (FHBL). However, limitations of the currently available cellular models preclude deciphering the consequences of PCSK9 mutation further. We aimed to validate urine-sample-derived human induced pluripotent stem cells (UhiPSCs) as an appropriate tool to model PCSK9-mediated ADH and FHBL. To achieve our goal, urine-sample-derived somatic cells were reprogrammed into hiPSCs by using episomal vectors. UhiPSC were efficiently differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). Compared to control cells, cells originally derived from an individual with ADH (HLC-S127R) secreted less PCSK9 in the media (-38.5%; P=0.038) and had a 71% decrease (P<0.001) of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake, whereas cells originally derived from an individual with FHBL (HLC-R104C/V114A) displayed a strong decrease in PCSK9 secretion (-89.7%; P<0.001) and had a 106% increase (P=0.0104) of LDL uptake. Pravastatin treatment significantly enhanced LDL receptor (LDLR) and PCSK9 mRNA gene expression, as well as PCSK9 secretion and LDL uptake in both control and S127R HLCs. Pravastatin treatment of multiple clones led to an average increase of LDL uptake of 2.19 ± 0.77-fold in HLC-S127R compared to 1.38 ± 0.49 fold in control HLCs (P<0.01), in line with the good response to statin treatment of individuals carrying the S127R mutation (mean LDL cholesterol reduction=60.4%, n=5). In conclusion, urine samples provide an attractive and convenient source of somatic cells for reprogramming and hepatocyte differentiation, but also a powerful tool to further decipher PCSK9 mutations and function.

  11. Diagnostic Algorithm in the Management of Acute Febrile Abdomen in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Neuville, Marie; Hustinx, Roland; Jacques, Jessica; Krzesinski, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute febrile abdomen represents a diagnostic challenge in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Although criteria have been proposed for cyst infection (CyI) and hemorrhage (CyH), there is a lack of comparative assessments. Furthermore, distinguishing cystic from non-cystic complications remains problematic. Design ADPKD patients presenting with abdominal pain and/or fever between 01/2005 and 06/2015 were retrospectively identified in a systematic computerized billing database. CyH was defined as spontaneous intracystic density above 50 Hounsfield units on computed tomography (CT). CyI was definite if confirmed by cyst puncture, and probable if 4 criteria were met: 3-day fever, loin/liver tenderness, C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels >50mg/L and no CT evidence for CyH. Other episodes were grouped as inflammation of unknown origin (IUO). Results Among a cohort of 173 ADPKD patients, 101 presented with 205 episodes of abdominal pain (n = 172) and/or fever (n = 33). 20 patients experienced 30 CyH, whereas 16 presented 23 episodes of definite (n = 11) or probable (n = 12) CyI. 35 IUO were observed in 31 patients. Clinically, fever was observed in 7% vs. 100% vs. 66% of CyH, CyI and IUO, respectively. Biologically, CRP cut-off at 70 mg/dl showed 92% sensitivity and 81% specificity in CyI diagnosis. Urine or blood cultures remained sterile in >90% of CyH, but were contributive in 53.4% of CyI and IUO, with a 74.2% prevalence for E. coli. Radiologically, ultrasounds, CT and magnetic resonance diagnosed CyI in 2.6%, 20% and 16.7% of cases, respectively. 18F-FDG positron-emission tomography (PET)/CT was done within a median period of 7 days post antibiotics, and significantly changed patient management in 71.4%. Conclusions This retrospective single-center series underscores the usefulness of clinical–fever–and biological–CRP–parameters, but emphasizes the limitations of bacteriological and radiological investigations

  12. Cystatin C estimated glomerular filtration rate to assess renal function in early stages of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Sans, Laia; Radosevic, Aleksandar; Quintian, Claudia; Montañés, Rosario; Gràcia, Silvia; Vilaplana, Carles; Mojal, Sergi; Ballarin, José A.

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Height-adjusted total kidney volume (htTKV) is the best marker of disease progression in early autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) when renal function still remains normal. The usefulness of cystatin-C as a biomarker to assess renal function according to renal volume has not been studied in ADPKD patients. Methods Observational and cross-sectional study of 62 ADPKD patients. htTKV, creatinine and cystatin-C estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were determined. Correlations between htTKV and eGFR were studied. A control group was used to determine the association between renal function differences and htTKV. Results htTKV significantly correlated with cystatin-C-eGFR (r = -0.384, p = 0.002) but not with creatinine-eGFR (r = -0.225, p = 0.078). With htTKV stratified into tertiles, a significant difference of cystatin-C-eGFR but not in creatinine-eGFR was detected in the third tertile when compared with the first tertile group (110.0±22.2 vs 121.3±7.2; p = 0.023 and 101.8±17.2 vs 106.9±15.1; p = 0.327 respectively). When cystatin-C-eGFR of the controls was used as the reference, htTKV above 605 ml/m identified with a 75% sensitivity and 84.9% specificity those patients with a significant worse kidney function. However, this cut-off value could not be identified using creatinine-eGFR. Conclusions Cystatin-C-eGFR but not creatinine-eGFR correlated with htTKV in ADPKD patients in early stages of the disease. Differences in cystatin-C-eGFR but not in creatinine-eGFR have been identified through htTKV tertiles. A htTKV above 605 ml/m is associated with a worse renal function only if cystatin-C-eGFR is used. Cystatin-C-eGFR should be studied in prospective studies of early stages of ADPKD to determine its usefulness as an early marker of disease progression. PMID:28346513

  13. Functional characteristics of three new germline mutations of the thyrotropin receptor gene causing autosomal dominant toxic thyroid hyperplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Tonacchera, M.; Van Sande, J.; Cetani, F.

    1996-02-01

    We report three unrelated families in which hyperthyroidism associated with thyroid hyperplasia was transmitted in an autosomal dominant fashion, in the absence of signs of autoimmunity. Exon 10 of the TSH receptor gene was directly sequenced after PCR amplification from DNA of peripheral leukocytes. In one family, a C to A transversion resulted in an S505R substitution in the third transmembrane segment; in the second, an A to T transversion caused an N650Y substitution in the sixth transmembrane segment; and in the third family, an A to G transition resulted in an N670S substitution in the seventh transmembrane segment. When expressed by transfection in COS-7 cells, each mutated receptor displayed an increase in constitutive stimulation of cAMP production; no effect on basal accumulation of inositol phosphates (IP) could be detected. In binding studies, cells transfected with wild-type of mutated receptors showed similar levels of expression, with the mutated receptors displaying similar or slightly increased affinity for bovine TSH (bTSH) binding. Cells transfected with S505R and N650Y mutants showed a similar cAMP maximal TSH-stimulated accumulation over the cells transfected with the wild type, whereas N670S transfectants showed a blunted response with an increase in EC{sub 50}. A higher IP response to 100 mU/mL bTSH over that obtained with the wild-type receptor was obtained in cells transfected with N650Y; in contrast, cells transfected with S505R showed a blunted IP production (50% less), and the N670S mutant completely lost the ability to stimulate IP accumulation in response to bTSH. The differential effects of individual mutations on stimulation by bTSH of cAMP or IP accumulation suggest that individual mutant receptors may achieve different active conformations with selective abilities to couple to G{sub s}{alpha} and to G{sub q}{alpha}. 17 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Mutations in Splicing Factor Genes Are a Major Cause of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa in Belgian Families

    PubMed Central

    Coppieters, Frauke; Roels, Dimitri; De Jaegere, Sarah; Flipts, Helena; De Zaeytijd, Julie; Walraedt, Sophie; Claes, Charlotte; Fransen, Erik; Van Camp, Guy; Depasse, Fanny; Casteels, Ingele; de Ravel, Thomy

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) is characterized by an extensive genetic heterogeneity, implicating 27 genes, which account for 50 to 70% of cases. Here 86 Belgian probands with possible adRP underwent genetic testing to unravel the molecular basis and to assess the contribution of the genes underlying their condition. Methods Mutation detection methods evolved over the past ten years, including mutation specific methods (APEX chip analysis), linkage analysis, gene panel analysis (Sanger sequencing, targeted next-generation sequencing or whole exome sequencing), high-resolution copy number screening (customized microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization). Identified variants were classified following American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) recommendations. Results Molecular genetic screening revealed mutations in 48/86 cases (56%). In total, 17 novel pathogenic mutations were identified: four missense mutations in RHO, five frameshift mutations in RP1, six mutations in genes encoding spliceosome components (SNRNP200, PRPF8, and PRPF31), one frameshift mutation in PRPH2, and one frameshift mutation in TOPORS. The proportion of RHO mutations in our cohort (14%) is higher than reported in a French adRP population (10.3%), but lower than reported elsewhere (16.5–30%). The prevalence of RP1 mutations (10.5%) is comparable to other populations (3.5%-10%). The mutation frequency in genes encoding splicing factors is unexpectedly high (altogether 19.8%), with PRPF31 the second most prevalent mutated gene (10.5%). PRPH2 mutations were found in 4.7% of the Belgian cohort. Two families (2.3%) have the recurrent NR2E3 mutation p.(Gly56Arg). The prevalence of the recurrent PROM1 mutation p.(Arg373Cys) was higher than anticipated (3.5%). Conclusions Overall, we identified mutations in 48 of 86 Belgian adRP cases (56%), with the highest prevalence in RHO (14%), RP1 (10.5%) and PRPF31 (10.5%). Finally, we expanded the molecular

  15. Longitudinal change of neuroimaging and clinical markers in autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Wai-Ying Wendy; Tudorascu, Dana L.; McDade, Eric M.; Ikonomovic, Snezana; James, Jeffrey A.; Minhas, Davneet; Mowrey, Wenzhu; Sheu, Lei K.; Snitz, Beth E.; Weissfeld, Lisa; Gianaros, Peter J.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Price, Julie C.; Mathis, Chester A.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Klunk, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The biomarker model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) hypothesizes a dynamic sequence of amyloidosis, neurodegeneration, and cognitive decline, as an individual progresses from preclinical AD to dementia. Despite supportive evidence from cross-sectional studies, verification with long-term within-individual data is needed. Methods Autosomal dominant AD (ADAD) mutation carriers, aged 21 years or older (no cognitive restrictions), were recruited from across the United States via referral by colleagues or ADAD families themselves. Sixteen individuals with mutations in PSEN1, PSEN2 or APP, aged 28 to 56, were assessed longitudinally every one to two years, between March 23, 2003 and August 1, 2014. Participants completed two to eight assessments (total=83), over a period of two to eleven years. We measured global amyloid-beta load with Pittsburgh Compound-B PET, posterior cortical metabolism with [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose PET, hippocampal volume (age-, and gender-corrected) with T1 MRI, verbal memory with 10-item delayed word recall, and general cognition with Mini Mental State Exam. We estimated overall biomarker trajectories across estimated years from symptom onset (EYO) using linear mixed models, and compared ADAD estimates to cross-sectional data from cognitively normal, older controls selected to be negative for amyloidosis, hypometabolism, and hippocampal atrophy. In seven individuals with the longest follow-up (seven/eight assessments spanning six to eleven years), we further examined the within-individual progression of amyloidosis, metabolism, hippocampal volume, and cognition, to identify progressive within-individual change in these markers (increase/decrease of greater than two Z-scores standardized to controls). Findings Significant differences in ADAD compared to controls (p<0·01) were detected in the following order: increased amyloidosis (−7.5 EYO), decreased metabolism (0 EYO), decreased hippocampal volume and verbal memory (+7.5 EYO

  16. A postnatal role for embryonic myosin revealed by MYH3 mutations that alter TGFβ signaling and cause autosomal dominant spondylocarpotarsal synostosis

    PubMed Central

    Zieba, Jennifer; Zhang, Wenjuan; Chong, Jessica X.; Forlenza, Kimberly N.; Martin, Jorge H.; Heard, Kelly; Grange, Dorothy K.; Butler, Merlin G.; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Lachman, Ralph S.; Nickerson, Deborah; Regnier, Michael; Cohn, Daniel H.; Bamshad, Michael; Krakow, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    Spondylocarpotarsal synostosis (SCT) is a skeletal disorder characterized by progressive vertebral, carpal and tarsal fusions, and mild short stature. The majority of affected individuals have an autosomal recessive form of SCT and are homozygous or compound heterozygous for nonsense mutations in the gene that encodes the cytoskeletal protein filamin B (FLNB), but a subset do not have FLNB mutations. Exome sequence analysis of three SCT patients negative for FLNB mutations identified an autosomal dominant form of the disease due to heterozygosity for missense or nonsense mutations in MYH3, which encodes embryonic myosin. Cells transfected with the MYH3 missense mutations had reduced TGFβ signaling, revealing a regulatory role for embryonic myosin in the TGFβ signaling pathway. In wild-type mice, there was persistent postnatal expression of embryonic myosin in the small muscles joining the neural arches of the spine suggesting that loss of myosin function in these muscles contribute to the disease. Our findings demonstrate that dominant mutations in MYH3 underlie autosomal dominant SCT, identify a postnatal role for embryonic myosin and suggest that altered regulation of signal transduction in the muscles within the spine may lead to the development of vertebral fusions. PMID:28205584

  17. A postnatal role for embryonic myosin revealed by MYH3 mutations that alter TGFβ signaling and cause autosomal dominant spondylocarpotarsal synostosis.

    PubMed

    Zieba, Jennifer; Zhang, Wenjuan; Chong, Jessica X; Forlenza, Kimberly N; Martin, Jorge H; Heard, Kelly; Grange, Dorothy K; Butler, Merlin G; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Lachman, Ralph S; Nickerson, Deborah; Regnier, Michael; Cohn, Daniel H; Bamshad, Michael; Krakow, Deborah

    2017-02-16

    Spondylocarpotarsal synostosis (SCT) is a skeletal disorder characterized by progressive vertebral, carpal and tarsal fusions, and mild short stature. The majority of affected individuals have an autosomal recessive form of SCT and are homozygous or compound heterozygous for nonsense mutations in the gene that encodes the cytoskeletal protein filamin B (FLNB), but a subset do not have FLNB mutations. Exome sequence analysis of three SCT patients negative for FLNB mutations identified an autosomal dominant form of the disease due to heterozygosity for missense or nonsense mutations in MYH3, which encodes embryonic myosin. Cells transfected with the MYH3 missense mutations had reduced TGFβ signaling, revealing a regulatory role for embryonic myosin in the TGFβ signaling pathway. In wild-type mice, there was persistent postnatal expression of embryonic myosin in the small muscles joining the neural arches of the spine suggesting that loss of myosin function in these muscles contribute to the disease. Our findings demonstrate that dominant mutations in MYH3 underlie autosomal dominant SCT, identify a postnatal role for embryonic myosin and suggest that altered regulation of signal transduction in the muscles within the spine may lead to the development of vertebral fusions.

  18. Determination of Genotypic and Phenotypic Characteristics of Friedreich’s Ataxia and Autosomal Dominant Spinocerebellar Ataxia Types 1, 2, 3, and 6

    PubMed Central

    BOZ, Pınar Bengi; KOÇ, Filiz; KOCATÜRK SEL, Sabriye; GÜZEL, Ali İrfan; KASAP, Halil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study aimed to analyze the genotypic characteristics of Friedreich’s ataxia (FA) and autosomal dominant ataxias [such as spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) types 1, 2, 3, and 6] using molecular and biological methods in hereditary cerebellar ataxia considering both clinical and electrophysiological findings. Methods The study included 129 indexed cases, who applied to the neurology department and were diagnosed with hereditary cerebellar ataxia through clinical, laboratory, and electrophysiological findings, and 15 sibling patients who were diagnosed through family scanning (144 cases in total); their genetic analyses were also performed. Detailed physical and neurological examinations, pedigree analyses, electroneurography, evoked potentials, cerebral–spinal magnetic resonance imaging, and echocardiographic analyses were performed for all cases. Blood samples were collected from patients, and the genotypic characteristics of autosomal dominant SCA types 1, 2, 3, and 6 were investigated. Statistical analyses were performed with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS Inc; Chicago, IL, USA) 17.0. Results Almost 50% of patients were defined as FA. Moreover, two SCA1 cases and one SCA6 case were detected. Conclusion In our study, 47.2% of patients with FA had developed hereditary cerebellar ataxia. Ground and autosomal dominant-linked SCA1 and SCA6 were each detected in one family. These data suggest that patients with cerebellar ataxia of hereditary origin should be primarily examined for FA. PMID:28360782

  19. Novel ATP6V1B1 and ATP6V0A4 mutations in autosomal recessive distal renal tubular acidosis with new evidence for hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Stover, E H; Borthwick, K J; Bavalia, C; Eady, N; Fritz, D M; Rungroj, N; Giersch, A B S; Morton, C C; Axon, P R; Akil, I; Al-Sabban, E A; Baguley, D M; Bianca, S; Bakkaloglu, A; Bircan, Z; Chauveau, D; Clermont, M-J; Guala, A; Hulton, S A; Kroes, H; Li Volti, G; Mir, S; Mocan, H; Nayir, A; Ozen, S; Rodriguez Soriano, J; Sanjad, S A; Tasic, V; Taylor, C M; Topaloglu, R; Smith, A N; Karet, F E

    2002-11-01

    Autosomal recessive distal renal tubular acidosis (rdRTA) is characterised by severe hyperchloraemic metabolic acidosis in childhood, hypokalaemia, decreased urinary calcium solubility, and impaired bone physiology and growth. Two types of rdRTA have been differentiated by the presence or absence of sensorineural hearing loss, but appear otherwise clinically similar. Recently, we identified mutations in genes encoding two different subunits of the renal alpha-intercalated cell's apical H(+)-ATPase that cause rdRTA. Defects in the B1 subunit gene ATP6V1B1, and the a4 subunit gene ATP6V0A4, cause rdRTA with deafness and with preserved hearing, respectively. We have investigated 26 new rdRTA kindreds, of which 23 are consanguineous. Linkage analysis of seven novel SNPs and five polymorphic markers in, and tightly linked to, ATP6V1B1 and ATP6V0A4 suggested that four families do not link to either locus, providing strong evidence for additional genetic heterogeneity. In ATP6V1B1, one novel and five previously reported mutations were found in 10 kindreds. In 12 ATP6V0A4 kindreds, seven of 10 mutations were novel. A further nine novel ATP6V0A4 mutations were found in "sporadic" cases. The previously reported association between ATP6V1B1 defects and severe hearing loss in childhood was maintained. However, several patients with ATP6V0A4 mutations have developed hearing loss, usually in young adulthood. We show here that ATP6V0A4 is expressed within the human inner ear. These findings provide further evidence for genetic heterogeneity in rdRTA, extend the spectrum of disease causing mutations in ATP6V1B1 and ATP6V0A4, and show ATP6V0A4 expression within the cochlea for the first time.

  20. Novel ATP6V1B1 and ATP6V0A4 mutations in autosomal recessive distal renal tubular acidosis with new evidence for hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Stover, E; Borthwick, K; Bavalia, C; Eady, N; Fritz, D; Rungroj, N; Giersch, A; Morton, C; Axon, P; Akil, I; Al-Sabban, E; Baguley, D; Bianca, S; Bakkaloglu, A; Bircan, Z; Chauveau, D; Clermont, M; Guala, A; Hulton, S; Kroes, H; Li, V; Mir, S; Mocan, H; Nayir, A; Ozen, S; Rodriguez, S; Sanjad, S; Tasic, V; Taylor, C; Topaloglu, R; Smith, A; Karet, F

    2002-01-01

    Autosomal recessive distal renal tubular acidosis (rdRTA) is characterised by severe hyperchloraemic metabolic acidosis in childhood, hypokalaemia, decreased urinary calcium solubility, and impaired bone physiology and growth. Two types of rdRTA have been differentiated by the presence or absence of sensorineural hearing loss, but appear otherwise clinically similar. Recently, we identified mutations in genes encoding two different subunits of the renal α-intercalated cell's apical H+-ATPase that cause rdRTA. Defects in the B1 subunit gene ATP6V1B1, and the a4 subunit gene ATP6V0A4, cause rdRTA with deafness and with preserved hearing, respectively. We have investigated 26 new rdRTA kindreds, of which 23 are consanguineous. Linkage analysis of seven novel SNPs and five polymorphic markers in, and tightly linked to, ATP6V1B1 and ATP6V0A4 suggested that four families do not link to either locus, providing strong evidence for additional genetic heterogeneity. In ATP6V1B1, one novel and five previously reported mutations were found in 10 kindreds. In 12 ATP6V0A4 kindreds, seven of 10 mutations were novel. A further nine novel ATP6V0A4 mutations were found in "sporadic" cases. The previously reported association between ATP6V1B1 defects and severe hearing loss in childhood was maintained. However, several patients with ATP6V0A4 mutations have developed hearing loss, usually in young adulthood. We show here that ATP6V0A4 is expressed within the human inner ear. These findings provide further evidence for genetic heterogeneity in rdRTA, extend the spectrum of disease causing mutations in ATP6V1B1 and ATP6V0A4, and show ATP6V0A4 expression within the cochlea for the first time. PMID:12414817

  1. In Vivo CRISPR/Cas9 Gene Editing Corrects Retinal Dystrophy in the S334ter-3 Rat Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Bakondi, Benjamin; Lv, Wenjian; Lu, Bin; Jones, Melissa K; Tsai, Yuchun; Kim, Kevin J; Levy, Rachelle; Akhtar, Aslam Abbasi; Breunig, Joshua J; Svendsen, Clive N; Wang, Shaomei

    2016-01-01

    Reliable genome editing via Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 may provide a means to correct inherited diseases in patients. As proof of principle, we show that CRISPR/Cas9 can be used in vivo to selectively ablate the rhodopsin gene carrying the dominant S334ter mutation (RhoS334) in rats that model severe autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. A single subretinal injection of guide RNA/Cas9 plasmid in combination with electroporation generated allele-specific disruption of RhoS334, which prevented retinal degeneration and improved visual function. PMID:26666451

  2. In Vivo CRISPR/Cas9 Gene Editing Corrects Retinal Dystrophy in the S334ter-3 Rat Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Bakondi, Benjamin; Lv, Wenjian; Lu, Bin; Jones, Melissa K; Tsai, Yuchun; Kim, Kevin J; Levy, Rachelle; Akhtar, Aslam Abbasi; Breunig, Joshua J; Svendsen, Clive N; Wang, Shaomei

    2016-03-01

    Reliable genome editing via Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 may provide a means to correct inherited diseases in patients. As proof of principle, we show that CRISPR/Cas9 can be used in vivo to selectively ablate the rhodopsin gene carrying the dominant S334ter mutation (Rho(S334)) in rats that model severe autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. A single subretinal injection of guide RNA/Cas9 plasmid in combination with electroporation generated allele-specific disruption of Rho(S334), which prevented retinal degeneration and improved visual function.

  3. Autosomal dominant Brody disease cosegregates with a chromosomal (2;7)(p11.2;p12.1) translocation in an Italian family.

    PubMed

    Novelli, Antonio; Valente, Enza Maria; Bernardini, Laura; Ceccarini, Caterina; Sinibaldi, Lorenzo; Caputo, Viviana; Cavalli, Pietro; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2004-07-01

    Brody disease is a rare muscle disorder characterized by exercise-induced impairment in muscle relaxation, due to a markedly reduced influx of calcium ions in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. A subset of autosomal recessive families harbour mutations in the ATP2A1 gene, encoding the fast-twitch skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA1). Rare autosomal dominant families have been described, in which ATP2A1 was excluded as the causative gene, further supporting genetic heterogeneity. We report four individuals from a three-generation Italian family with a clinical phenotype of Brody disease, in which linkage analysis excluded ATP2A1 as the responsible gene. The disease cosegregates in an autosomal dominant fashion with an apparently balanced constitutional chromosome translocation (2;7)(p11.2;p12.1), suggesting a causal relationship between the rearrangement and the phenotype. FISH analysis using YAC and PAC clones as probes refined the breakpoint regions to genomic segments of about 164 and 120 kb, respectively, providing a possible clue to pinpoint the location of a novel gene responsible for this rare muscle disorder.

  4. A rare case of primary hyperoxaluria type 1 co-existing with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease in a newborn.

    PubMed

    Devriendt, Arnaud; Damry, Nash; Hall, Michèle; Mesquita, Maria; Avni, Fred

    2011-01-01

    We describe the first reported case to our knowledge of an infant presenting with the extremely rare association of primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH-1) and autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). This diagnosis was suspected on the basis of the renal US findings and confirmed by complementary examinations. It led to severe oxalosis with very rapid onset of end-stage renal failure (ESRF) and required combined liver-kidney transplantation at the age of 18 months. The boy died 13 days after transplantation.

  5. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) associated with a novel C82R mutation in the NOTCH3 gene.

    PubMed

    Zea-Sevilla, M Ascensión; Bermejo-Velasco, Pedro; Serrano-Heranz, Regino; Calero, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a rare inherited cerebrovascular disease associated with mutations in the NOTCH3 gene on chromosome 19, and represents the most common hereditary stroke disorder. We describe a pedigree, which suffered the classical clinical CADASIL pattern of migraine headaches, recurrent subcortical infarcts, and subcortical dementia, associated with a previously undescribed missense mutation (c.[244T>C], p.[C82R]) in NOTCH3. This new mutation extends the list of known pathogenic mutations responsible for CADASIL, which are associated with an odd number of cysteine residues within any of the epidermal growth factor-like repeats of Notch3 receptor protein.

  6. Post transplant urinary tract infection in Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease a perpetual diagnostic dilema - 18-fluorodeoxyglucose - Positron emission computerized tomography - A valuable tool.

    PubMed

    Sainaresh, Vv; Jain, Sh; Patel, Hv; Shah, Pr; Vanikar, Av; Trivedi, Hl

    2011-04-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infection contracted by renal allograft recipients. In patients of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), cyst infection presents a complex diagnostic and therapeutic challenge especially in the post transplant period. Accurate diagnosis forms the cornerstone in salvaging the graft from potentially catastrophic outcome. We describe a case of xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XPN) in the native kidney in a patient of post transplant ADPKD which presented as frequently relapsing UTI with graft dysfunction where in accurate diagnosis was made possible with the aid of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) - Positron emission computerized tomography (PET/CT).

  7. c.G2114A MYH9 mutation (DFNA17) causes non-syndromic autosomal dominant hearing loss in a Brazilian family

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Vitor G.L.; Lezirovitz, Karina; Yamamoto, Guilherme L.; Moura de Souza, Carolina Fischinger; Ferreira, Simone Gomes; Mingroni-Netto, Regina C.

    2014-01-01

    We studied a family presenting 10 individuals affected by autosomal dominant deafness in all frequencies and three individuals affected by high frequency hearing loss. Genomic scanning using the 50k Affymetrix microarray technology yielded a Lod Score of 2.1 in chromosome 14 and a Lod Score of 1.9 in chromosome 22. Mapping refinement using microsatellites placed the chromosome 14 candidate region between markers D14S288 and D14S276 (8.85 cM) and the chromosome 22 near marker D22S283. Exome sequencing identified two candidate variants to explain hearing loss in chromosome 14 [PTGDR – c.G894A:p.R298R and PTGER2 – c.T247G:p.C83G], and one in chromosome 22 [MYH9, c.G2114A:p.R705H]. Pedigree segregation analysis allowed exclusion of the PTGDR and PTGER2 variants as the cause of deafness. However, the MYH9 variant segregated with the phenotype in all affected members, except the three individuals with different phenotype. This gene has been previously described as mutated in autosomal dominant hereditary hearing loss and corresponds to DFNA17. The mutation identified in our study is the same described in the prior report. Thus, although linkage studies suggested a candidate gene in chromosome 14, we concluded that the mutation in chromosome 22 better explains the hearing loss phenotype in the Brazilian family. PMID:25505834

  8. Targeted Gene Capture and Massively Parallel Sequencing Identify TMC1 as the Causative Gene in a Six-generation Chinese Family with Autosomal Dominant Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xue; Huang, Sha-Sha; Yuan, Yong-Yi; Wang, Guo-Jian; Xu, Jin-Cao; Ji, Yu-Bin; Han, Ming-Yu; Yu, Fei; Kang, Dong-Yang; Lin, Xi; Dai, Pu

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary nonsyndromic hearing loss is extremely heterogeneous. Mutations in the transmembrane channel-like gene1 (TMC1) are known to cause autosomal dominant and recessive forms of nonsyndromic hearing loss linked to the loci of DFNA36 and DFNB7/11, respectively. We characterized a six-generation Chinese family (5315) with progressive, postlingual autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss (ADNSHL). By combining targeted capture of 82 known deafness genes, next-generation sequencing and bioinformatic analysis, we identified TMC1 c.1714G>A (p. D572N) as the disease-causing mutation. This mutation co-segregated with hearing loss in other family members and was not detected in 308 normal controls. In order to determine the prevalence of TMC1 c.1714G>A in Chinese ADNSHL families, we used DNA samples from 67 ADNSHL families with sloping audiogram and identified two families carry this mutation. To determine whether it arose from a common ancestor, we analyzed nine STR markers. Our results indicated that TMC1 c.1714G>A (p.D572N) account for about 4.4% (3/68) of ADNSHL in the Chinese population. PMID:26079994

  9. Next generation sequencing to identify novel genetic variants causative of autosomal dominant familial hypercholesterolemia associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Al-Allaf, Faisal A; Athar, Mohammad; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Taher, Mohiuddin M; Khan, Wajahatullah; Ba-Hammam, Faisal A; Abalkhail, Hala; Alashwal, Abdullah

    2015-07-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant inherited disease characterized by elevated plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). It is an autosomal dominant disease, caused by variants in Ldlr, ApoB or Pcsk9, which results in high levels of LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) leading to early coronary heart disease. Sequencing whole genome for screening variants for FH are not suitable due to high cost. Hence, in this study we performed targeted customized sequencing of FH 12 genes (Ldlr, ApoB, Pcsk9, Abca1, Apoa2, Apoc3, Apon2, Arh, Ldlrap1, Apoc2, ApoE, and Lpl) that have been implicated in the homozygous phenotype of a proband pedigree to identify candidate variants by NGS Ion torrent PGM. Only three genes (Ldlr, ApoB, and Pcsk9) were found to be highly associated with FH based on the variant rate. The results showed that seven deleterious variants in Ldlr, ApoB, and Pcsk9 genes were pathological and were clinically significant based on predictions identified by SIFT and PolyPhen. Targeted customized sequencing is an efficient technique for screening variants among targeted FH genes. Final validation of seven deleterious variants conducted by capillary resulted to only one novel variant in Ldlr gene that was found in exon 14 (c.2026delG, p. Gly676fs). The variant found in Ldlr gene was a novel heterozygous variant derived from a male in the proband.

  10. Identification of a novel collagen type IV alpha-4 (COL4A4) mutation in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant Alport syndrome using exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Sheng; Xu, Hongbo; Yuan, Jinzhong; Xiao, Jingjing; Yuan, Lamei; Deng, Xiong; Guan, Liping; Zhu, Anding; Rong, Pengfei; Zhang, Jianguo; Deng, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Alport syndrome (AS) is an inherited disorder characterized by glomerulonephritis and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The aim of this study was to identify the gene responsible for the glomerulopathy in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant AS using exome sequencing. Methods: A 4-generation, 30-member Chinese Han family was enrolled in this study. Exome sequencing was conducted in the proband of the family, and then direct sequencing was performed in family members of the pedigree and 100 normal controls. Results: A novel frameshift mutation, c.3213delA (p.Gly1072Glufs*69), in the collagen type IV alpha-4 gene (COL4A4) was found to be the genetic cause. Neither sensorineural hearing loss nor ocular abnormalities were present in the patients of this family. Other clinical features, such as age of onset, age of ESRD occurring and disease severity, varied among the patients of this family. Interpretation & conclusions: A novel frameshift mutation, c.3213delA (p.Gly1072Glufs*69) in the COL4A4 gene, was identified in the Chinese pedigree with autosomal dominant AS. Our findings may provide new insights into the cause and diagnosis of AS and also have implications for genetic counselling. PMID:27934798

  11. Autosomal dominant prelingual hearing loss with palmoplantar keratoderma syndrome: Variability in clinical expression from mutations of R75W and R75Q in the GJB2 gene.

    PubMed

    Birkenhäger, Ralf; Lüblinghoff, Nicola; Prera, Erick; Schild, Christian; Aschendorff, Antje; Arndt, Susan

    2010-07-01

    About one to three of a 1,000 neonates are afflicted at birth with a serious hearing impairment, with about half of the cases due to genetic causes. Genetic causes of hearing impairment are very heterogeneous. About half of all cases of genetically caused nonsyndromic hearing loss can be ascribed to mutations in the GJB2 gene (connexin 26) and to deletions in the GJB6 gene(connexin 30). Thus far, about 90 different mutations have been identified in the GJB2 gene, of which the majority are autosomal recessive. Ten mutations are autosomal dominant and are in most cases associated with various skin diseases: the keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome, Vohwinkel syndrome and palmoplantar keratoderma with deafness. To date, the following mutations have been identified which lead to the Palmoplantar Keratoderma syndrome with deafness; Gly59Ala, Gly59Arg, His73Arg, Arg75Trp, and Arg75Gln. We are reporting on four patients with severe hearing impairment. They are members of three unrelated families, who are carriers of mutations Arg75Trp or Arg75Gln, but unlike patients of other publications, do not all present with Palmoplantar Keratoderma syndrome. Our investigations document additional evidence for the correlation between the cited mutations in the GJB2 gene and a syndromic hearing impairment with palmoplantar keratoderma.

  12. Clinical variability of the cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy phenotype in two siblings of a large family showing the same mutation

    PubMed Central

    Vyshka, Gentian; Kruja, Jera

    2013-01-01

    A 44-year-old Albanian male was consulted and diagnosed with dementia. His magnetic resonance imaging suggested diffuse white matter changes. The suspicion of cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) was raised, and a genetic analysis confirmed such a suspicion through uncovering a pathogenic mutation at the level of exon 4 (c.475C>T) of chromosome 19. The patient came from a large family of 13 children, all of whom underwent clinical, genetic, and imaging examination. The pathogenic mutation was found present only in his eldest sister (50 years old), and she presented also very suggestive signs of CADASIL in her respective imaging study, but without any clinically significant counterpart. All other siblings were free from clinical and radiological signs of the disorder. Our opinion was that we were dealing with a mutation showing a very low level of penetrance, with only two siblings affected in a large Albanian family with 13 children. PMID:24124395

  13. Rapamycin reduces kidney volume and delays the loss of renal function in a patient with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Peces, Ramón; Peces, Carlos; Pérez-Dueñas, Virginia; Cuesta-López, Emilio; Azorín, Sebastián; Selgas, Rafael

    2009-04-01

    This is the first report of a case of a reduction in kidney volume and preservation of renal function in a patient with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) receiving rapamycin. A 42-year-old man with ADPKD and a severe persistent bleeding from his solitary left kidney was successfully treated with tranexamic acid (TXA). He also received low-dose rapamycin for 8 months, and this was associated with a 23.5% reduction in kidney volume, improvement and stabilization of renal function, and normalization of haemoglobin levels. When treatment with rapamycin was interrupted, renal function deteriorated within an 8-month period and haemodialysis (HD) became necessary. Kidney volume increased at once, and life-threatening bleeding prompted a nephrectomy 4 months after the onset of HD. These data suggest that the reduction in kidney volume and preservation of renal function with rapamycin could be the result of the antiangiogenic, antiproliferative effects of rapamycin.

  14. [18F-FDG PET/CT diagnosis of liver cyst infection in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and fever of unknown origin].

    PubMed

    Banzo, J; Ubieto, M A; Gil, D; Prats, E; Razola, P; Tardín, L; Andrés, A; Rambalde, E F; Ayala, S M; Cáncer, L; Velilla, J

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis, localization and treatment of infected cysts in the kidney or liver of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) remain a clinical challenge. We report the findings of (18)F-FDG PET-CT in an ADPKD diagnosed patient who required renal transplantation five years before and in his follow up presented repeated episodes of bacteriemia without known focus on radiological tests performed. The (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan showed numerous hypermetabolic images with focal or ring-shaped morphology related to the content and the wall of some hepatic cysts. The increased metabolic activity was localized on segments VI and VII. We proceeded to drainage of one cyst in segment VI, removing 110 cc of purulent fluid which grew E. Coli BLEE. The (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan should be included in the diagnostic algorithm for detecting infected liver cysts in patients with ADPKD and fever of unknown origin.

  15. Splicing defects caused by exonic mutations in PKD1 as a new mechanism of pathogenesis in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Claverie-Martin, Felix; Gonzalez-Paredes, Francisco J; Ramos-Trujillo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The correct splicing of precursor-mRNA depends on the actual splice sites plus exonic and intronic regulatory elements recognized by the splicing machinery. Surprisingly, an increasing number of examples reveal that exonic mutations disrupt the binding of splicing factors to these sequences or generate new splice sites or regulatory elements, causing disease. This contradicts the general assumption that missense mutations disrupt protein function and that synonymous mutations are merely polymorphisms. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common inherited disorder caused mainly by mutations in the PKD1 gene. Recently, we analyzed a substantial number of PKD1 missense or synonymous mutations to further characterize their consequences on pre-mRNA splicing. Our results showed that one missense and 2 synonymous mutations induce significant defects in pre-mRNA splicing. Thus, it appears that aberrant splicing as a result of exonic mutations is a previously unrecognized cause of ADPKD.

  16. Heterozygous Loss-of-Function SEC61A1 Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Tubulo-Interstitial and Glomerulocystic Kidney Disease with Anemia.

    PubMed

    Bolar, Nikhita Ajit; Golzio, Christelle; Živná, Martina; Hayot, Gaëlle; Van Hemelrijk, Christine; Schepers, Dorien; Vandeweyer, Geert; Hoischen, Alexander; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Raes, Ann; Matthys, Erve; Sys, Emiel; Azou, Myriam; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Praet, Marleen; Van Camp, Guy; McFadden, Kelsey; Pediaditakis, Igor; Přistoupilová, Anna; Hodaňová, Kateřina; Vyleťal, Petr; Hartmannová, Hana; Stránecký, Viktor; Hůlková, Helena; Barešová, Veronika; Jedličková, Ivana; Sovová, Jana; Hnízda, Aleš; Kidd, Kendrah; Bleyer, Anthony J; Spong, Richard S; Vande Walle, Johan; Mortier, Geert; Brunner, Han; Van Laer, Lut; Kmoch, Stanislav; Katsanis, Nicholas; Loeys, Bart L

    2016-07-07

    Autosomal-dominant tubulo-interstitial kidney disease (ADTKD) encompasses a group of disorders characterized by renal tubular and interstitial abnormalities, leading to slow progressive loss of kidney function requiring dialysis and kidney transplantation. Mutations in UMOD, MUC1, and REN are responsible for many, but not all, cases of ADTKD. We report on two families with ADTKD and congenital anemia accompanied by either intrauterine growth retardation or neutropenia. Ultrasound and kidney biopsy revealed small dysplastic kidneys with cysts and tubular atrophy with secondary glomerular sclerosis, respectively. Exclusion of known ADTKD genes coupled with linkage analysis, whole-exome sequencing, and targeted re-sequencing identified heterozygous missense variants in SEC61A1-c.553A>G (p.Thr185Ala) and c.200T>G (p.Val67Gly)-both affecting functionally important and conserved residues in SEC61. Both transiently expressed SEC6A1A variants are delocalized to the Golgi, a finding confirmed in a renal biopsy from an affected individual. Suppression or CRISPR-mediated deletions of sec61al2 in zebrafish embryos induced convolution defects of the pronephric tubules but not the pronephric ducts, consistent with the tubular atrophy observed in the affected individuals. Human mRNA encoding either of the two pathogenic alleles failed to rescue this phenotype as opposed to a complete rescue by human wild-type mRNA. Taken together, these findings provide a mechanism by which mutations in SEC61A1 lead to an autosomal-dominant syndromic form of progressive chronic kidney disease. We highlight protein translocation defects across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, the principal role of the SEC61 complex, as a contributory pathogenic mechanism for ADTKD.

  17. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, genetic homogeneity, and mapping of the locus within a 2-cM interval

    SciTech Connect

    Ducros, A.; Alamowitch, S.; Nagy, T.

    1996-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a recently identified autosomal dominant cerebral arteriopathy characterized by the recurrence of subcortical infarcts leading to dementia. A genetic linkage analysis conducted in two large families recently allowed us to map the affected gene on chromosome 19 in a 12-cM interval bracketed by D19S221 and D19S215. In the present study, these first 2 families and 13 additional ones, including a total of 199 potentially informative meiosis, have been genotyped with eight polymorphic markers located between D19S221 and D19S215. All families were linked to chromosome 19. The highest combined lod score (Z{sub max} = 37.24 at {theta} = .01) was obtained with marker D19S841, a new CA{sub n} microsatellite marker that we isolated from chromosome 19 cosmids. The recombinant events observed within these families were used to refine the genetic mapping of CADASIL within a 2-cM interval that is now bracketed by D19S226 and D19S199 on 19p13.1. These data strongly suggest the genetic homogeneity of this recently identified condition and establish the value of its clinical and neuroimaging diagnostic criteria. Besides their importance for the ongoing positional cloning of the CADASIL gene, these data help to refine the genetic mapping of CADASIL relative to familial hemiplegic migraine and hereditary paroxysmal cerebellar ataxia, conditions that we both mapped within the same chromosome 19 region. 35 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Targeted deletion of the Nesp55 DMR defines another Gnas imprinting control region and provides a mouse model of autosomal dominant PHP-Ib.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Leopold F; Mrakovcic, Maria; Steinborn, Ralf; Chung, Ung-Il; Bastepe, Murat; Jüppner, Harald

    2010-05-18

    Approximately 100 genes undergo genomic imprinting. Mutations in fewer than 10 imprinted genetic loci, including GNAS, are associated with complex human diseases that differ phenotypically based on the parent transmitting the mutation. Besides the ubiquitously expressed Gsalpha, which is of broad biological importance, GNAS gives rise to an antisense transcript and to several Gsalpha variants that are transcribed from the nonmethylated parental allele. We previously identified two almost identical GNAS microdeletions extending from exon NESP55 to antisense (AS) exon 3 (delNESP55/delAS3-4). When inherited maternally, both deletions are associated with erasure of all maternal GNAS methylation imprints and autosomal-dominant pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib, a disorder characterized by parathyroid hormone-resistant hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia. As for other imprinting disorders, the mechanisms resulting in abnormal GNAS methylation are largely unknown, in part because of a paucity of suitable animal models. We now showed in mice that deletion of the region equivalent to delNESP55/delAS3-4 on the paternal allele (DeltaNesp55(p)) leads to healthy animals without Gnas methylation changes. In contrast, mice carrying the deletion on the maternal allele (DeltaNesp55(m)) showed loss of all maternal Gnas methylation imprints, leading in kidney to increased 1A transcription and decreased Gsalpha mRNA levels, and to associated hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Besides representing a murine autosomal-dominant pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib model and one of only few animal models for imprinted human disorders, our findings suggest that the Nesp55 differentially methylated region is an additional principal imprinting control region, which directs Gnas methylation and thereby affects expression of all maternal Gnas-derived transcripts.

  19. Autosomal dominant Kufs` disease: Clinical heterogeneity in nine families, and exclusion of linkage to CLN1 and CLN3 markers in a large American kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Andermann, F.; Andermann, E.; Carpenter, S.

    1994-09-01

    Most forms of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) are autosomal recessive, and three genes have already been mapped: the infantile form (CLN 1); the juvenile form (CLN 3); and the early juvenile variant (CLN 5) on chromosomes 1, 16 and 13, respectively. Kufs` disease or adolescent-adult onset NCL is usually inherited as an autosomal recessive trait, and presents as three distinct clinical syndromes: progressive myoclonus epilepsy (PME) with onset in the early teens or around age 30; and onset of dementia with motor disability in the 30s. We have studied three families originating from different parts of the USA manifesting dominantly inherited Kufs` disease. Granular osmophilic deposits (GROD) were found in brain, but storage in skin was not an obligatory feature. Six dominantly inherited PME families have been ascertained from three different regions of Spain. No storage was found in skin or muscle in any of these families. The mean age of onset in the American families is earlier, the clinical manifestations more severe, and the progression much more rapid that in the Spanish families. These findings would suggest the possibility of genetic heterogeneity involving two or more loci, or different mutations at the same gene locus. Genetic linkage studies have been carried out in a six-generation New Jersey family in an attempt to characterize the gene(s) responsible for this disorder. The infantile NCL locus on chromosome 1p (CLN1) and the juvenile NCL locus on chromosome 16p (CLN 3) have been excluded in this family. Further clinical, pathological and molecular genetic studies should lead to the clarification of the diagnostic approaches in this disorder.

  20. A Nonsyndromic Autosomal Dominant Oligodontia with A Novel Mutation of PAX9-A Clinical and Genetic Report

    PubMed Central

    Prasanna, Praveen; Athimuthu, Anantharaj; Bhat, Prasanna Kumar; Puttashamachari, Yogish

    2015-01-01

    Oligodontia is congenital absence of one or more teeth which has familial abnormality and attributable to various mutations or polymorphisms of genes often associated with malformative syndromes. The present case reports a rare case of non syndromic oligodontia in an 8-year-old girl with missing 14 permanent teeth excluding third molars in mixed dentition. It is a rare finding which has not been frequently documented in Indian children. Mutations in MSX1 and PAX9 have been described in families in which inherited oligodontia characteristically involves permanent incisors, lateral incisors, premolars and molars. Our study analysed one large family with dominantly inherited oligodontia clinically and genetically. This phonotype is distinct from oligodontia phenotypes associated with mutations in PAX9. Sequencing of the PAX9 revealed a novel mutation in the paired domain of the molecule. The multiple sequence alignment and SNP analysis of the PAX9 exon 2 revealed two mutations. PMID:26266225

  1. DVL3 Alleles Resulting in a −1 Frameshift of the Last Exon Mediate Autosomal-Dominant Robinow Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    White, Janson J.; Mazzeu, Juliana F.; Hoischen, Alexander; Bayram, Yavuz; Withers, Marjorie; Gezdirici, Alper; Kimonis, Virginia; Steehouwer, Marloes; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; van Bon, Bregje W.M.; Sutton, V. Reid; Lupski, James R.; Brunner, Han G.; Carvalho, Claudia M.B.

    2016-01-01

    Robinow syndrome is a rare congenital disorder characterized by mesomelic limb shortening, genital hypoplasia, and distinctive facial features. Recent reports have identified, in individuals with dominant Robinow syndrome, a specific type of variant characterized by being uniformly located in the penultimate exon of DVL1 and resulting in a −1 frameshift allele with a premature termination codon that escapes nonsense-mediated decay. Here, we studied a cohort of individuals who had been clinically diagnosed with Robinow syndrome but who had not received a molecular diagnosis from variant studies of DVL1, WNT5A, and ROR2. Because of the uniform location of frameshift variants in DVL1-mediated Robinow syndrome and the functional redundancy of DVL1, DVL2, and DVL3, we elected to pursue direct Sanger sequencing of the penultimate exon of DVL1 and its paralogs DVL2 and DVL3 to search for potential disease-associated variants. Remarkably, targeted sequencing identified five unrelated individuals harboring heterozygous, de novo frameshift variants in DVL3, including two splice acceptor mutations and three 1 bp deletions. Similar to the variants observed in DVL1-mediated Robinow syndrome, all variants in DVL3 result in a −1 frameshift, indicating that these highly specific alterations might be a common cause of dominant Robinow syndrome. Here, we review the current knowledge of these peculiar variant alleles in DVL1- and DVL3-mediated Robinow syndrome and further elucidate the phenotypic features present in subjects with DVL1 and DVL3 frameshift mutations. PMID:26924530

  2. Combined Liver and Kidney Transplant in a Patient with Budd-Chiari Syndrome Secondary to Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease Associated with Polycystic Liver Disease: Report of a Case with a 9-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez de la Piscina, Patricia; Duca, Ileana; Estrada, Silvia; Calderón, Rosario; Ganchegui, Idoia; Campos, Amaia; Spicakova, Katerina; Salvador, Marta; Delgado, Elvira; Bengoa, Raquel; García-Campos, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic liver disease (PLD) is a hereditary disease inherited by autosomal dominant trait that occurs as a frequent extrarenal manifestation of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). We report a case of a 59-year-old woman diagnosed with ADPKD associated with PLD. End-stage chronic renal failure with a secondary Budd-Chiari syndrome developed during the patient's clinical course. She underwent combined liver and kidney transplantation, with a successful response over a 9-year follow-up period. PMID:24987537

  3. Enhanced but hypofunctional osteoclastogenesis in an autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II case carrying a c.1856C>T mutation in CLCN7

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Kun; Hock, Janet; Wang, Chunyu; Yu, Xijie

    2016-01-01

    Type II autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (ADO2), which is the most common form of osteopetrosis, is caused by heterozygous mutations in the chloride channel 7 (CLCN7) gene. The osteopetrosis of ADO2 has been attributed to hypofunctional osteoclasts. The mechanism underlying the abnormality in osteoclast function remains largely unknown. This study was designed to investigate gene mutations and osteoclast function in a case that was clinically diagnosed as ADO2. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples of this patient, and the 25 exons of CLCN7 were amplified. Peripheral blood from the ADO2 subject and a healthy age- and sex-matched control was used to evaluate osteoclastogenesis, osteoclast morphology, and bone resorption. Analysis of DNA from the patient showed a germline heterozygous missense mutation, c.1856C>T (p.P619L), in exon 20 of CLCN7. A similar homozygous mutation at this site was previously reported in a patient with autosomal recessive osteopetrosis. When cultured, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from the ADO2 patient spontaneously differentiated into mature osteoclasts in vitro. The ADO2 patient’s PBMCs formed enhanced, but heterogeneous, osteoclasts in both the presence and absence of macrophage-colony stimulating factor, and nuclear factor-ĸB ligand. Bone resorption was reduced in the ADO2 patient’s osteoclasts, which exhibited aberrant morphology and abnormal distribution of integrin avβ3. Gene analysis found increased c-fos expression and reduced RhoA and integrin beta 3 expression in ADO2 cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that enhanced, heterogeneous osteoclast induction may be an intrinsic characteristic of ADO2. PMID:27990310

  4. SLC3A1 and SLC7A9 Mutations in Autosomal Recessive or Dominant Canine Cystinuria: A New Classification System

    PubMed Central

    Brons, A.-K.; Henthorn, P. S.; Raj, K.; Fitzgerald, C. A.; Liu, J.; Sewell, A. C.; Giger, U.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cystinuria, one of the first recognized inborn errors of metabolism, has been reported in many dog breeds. Hypothesis/Objectives To determine urinary cystine concentrations, inheritance and mutations in the SLC3A1 and SLC7A9 genes associated with cystinuria in 3 breeds. Animals Mixed and purebred Labrador Retrievers (n=6), Australian Cattle Dogs (6), Miniature Pinschers (4) and 1 mixed breed dog with cystine urolithiasis, relatives and control dogs. Methods Urinary cystinuria and aminoaciduria was assessed and exons of the SLC3A1 and SLC7A9 genes were sequenced from genomic DNA. Results In each breed, male and female dogs, independent of neuter status, were found to form calculi. A frameshift mutation in SLC3A1 (c.350delG) resulting in a premature stop codon was identified in autosomal-recessive (AR) cystinuria in Labrador Retrievers and mixed breed dogs. A 6 bp deletion (c.1095_1100del) removing 2 threonines in SLC3A1 was found in autosomal-dominant (AD) cystinuria with a more severe phenotype in homozygous than in heterozygous Australian Cattle Dogs. A missense mutation in SLC7A9 (c.964G>A) was discovered in AD cystinuria in Miniature Pinschers with only heterozygous affected dogs observed to date. Breed specific DNA tests were developed, but the prevalence of each mutation remains unknown. Conclusions and clinical importance These studies describe the first AD inheritance and the first putative SLC7A9 mutation to cause cystinuria in dogs and expand our understanding of this phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous disease, leading to a new classification system for canine cystinuria and better therapeutic management and genetic control in these breeds. PMID:24001348

  5. A Novel DFNA36 Mutation in TMC1 Orthologous to the Beethoven (Bth) Mouse Associated with Autosomal Dominant Hearing Loss in a Chinese Family

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yali; Wang, Dayong; Zong, Liang; Zhao, Feifan; Guan, Liping; Zhang, Peng; Shi, Wei; Lan, Lan; Wang, Hongyang; Li, Qian; Han, Bing; Yang, Ling; Jin, Xin; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jun; Wang, Qiuju

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the transmembrane channel-like gene 1 (TMC1) can cause both DFNA36 and DFNB7/11 hearing loss. More than thirty DFNB7/11 mutations have been reported, but only three DFNA36 mutations were reported previously. In this study, we found a large Chinese family with 222 family members showing post-lingual, progressive sensorineural hearing loss which were consistent with DFNA36 hearing loss. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) test of the youngest patient showed a special result with nearly normal threshold but prolonged latency, decreased amplitude, and the abnormal waveform morphology. Exome sequencing of the proband found four candidate variants in known hearing loss genes. Sanger sequencing in all family members found a novel variant c.1253T>A (p.M418K) in TMC1 at DFNA36 that co-segregated with the phenotype. This mutation in TMC1 is orthologous to the mutation found in the hearing loss mouse model named Bth ten years ago. In another 51 Chinese autosomal dominant hearing loss families, we screened the segments containing the dominant mutations of TMC1 and no functional variants were found. TMC1 is expressed in the hair cells in inner ear. Given the already known roles of TMC1 in the mechanotransduction in the cochlea and its expression in inner ear, our results may provide an interesting perspective into its function in inner ear. PMID:24827932

  6. A novel DFNA36 mutation in TMC1 orthologous to the Beethoven (Bth) mouse associated with autosomal dominant hearing loss in a Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yali; Wang, Dayong; Zong, Liang; Zhao, Feifan; Guan, Liping; Zhang, Peng; Shi, Wei; Lan, Lan; Wang, Hongyang; Li, Qian; Han, Bing; Yang, Ling; Jin, Xin; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jun; Wang, Qiuju

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the transmembrane channel-like gene 1 (TMC1) can cause both DFNA36 and DFNB7/11 hearing loss. More than thirty DFNB7/11 mutations have been reported, but only three DFNA36 mutations were reported previously. In this study, we found a large Chinese family with 222 family members showing post-lingual, progressive sensorineural hearing loss which were consistent with DFNA36 hearing loss. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) test of the youngest patient showed a special result with nearly normal threshold but prolonged latency, decreased amplitude, and the abnormal waveform morphology. Exome sequencing of the proband found four candidate variants in known hearing loss genes. Sanger sequencing in all family members found a novel variant c.1253T>A (p.M418K) in TMC1 at DFNA36 that co-segregated with the phenotype. This mutation in TMC1 is orthologous to the mutation found in the hearing loss mouse model named Bth ten years ago. In another 51 Chinese autosomal dominant hearing loss families, we screened the segments containing the dominant mutations of TMC1 and no functional variants were found. TMC1 is expressed in the hair cells in inner ear. Given the already known roles of TMC1 in the mechanotransduction in the cochlea and its expression in inner ear, our results may provide an interesting perspective into its function in inner ear.

  7. Recovery of Dominant, Autosomal Flightless Mutants of Drosophila Melanogaster and Identification of a New Gene Required for Normal Muscle Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Cripps, R. M.; Ball, E.; Stark, M.; Lawn, A.; Sparrow, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    To identify further mutations affecting muscle function and development in Drosophila melanogaster we recovered 22 autosomal dominant flightless mutations. From these we have isolated eight viable and lethal alleles of the muscle myosin heavy chain gene, and seven viable alleles of the indirect flight muscle (IFM)-specific Act88F actin gene. The Mhc mutations display a variety of phenotypic effects, ranging from reductions in myosin heavy chain content in the indirect flight muscles only, to reductions in the levels of this protein in other muscles. The Act88F mutations range from those which produce no stable actin and have severely abnormal myofibrillar structure, to those which accumulate apparently normal levels of actin in the flight muscles but which still have abnormal myofibrils and fly very poorly. We also recovered two recessive flightless mutants on the third chromosome. The remaining five dominant flightless mutations are all lethal alleles of a gene named lethal(3)Laker. The Laker alleles have been characterized and the gene located in polytene bands 62A10,B1-62B2,4. Laker is a previously unidentified locus which is haplo-insufficient for flight. In addition, adult wild-type heterozygotes and the lethal larval trans-heterozygotes show abnormalities of muscle structure indicating that the Laker gene product is an important component of muscle. PMID:8056306

  8. Application of Whole Exome Sequencing in Six Families with an Initial Diagnosis of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Almoguera, Berta; Li, Jiankang; Fernandez-San Jose, Patricia; Liu, Yichuan; March, Michael; Pellegrino, Renata; Golhar, Ryan; Corton, Marta; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; López-Molina, Maria Isabel; García-Sandoval, Blanca; Guo, Yiran; Tian, Lifeng; Liu, Xuanzhu; Guan, Liping; Zhang, Jianguo; Keating, Brendan; Xu, Xun; Hakonarson, Hakon; Ayuso, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the genetics underlying dominant forms of inherited retinal dystrophies using whole exome sequencing (WES) in six families extensively screened for known mutations or genes. Thirty-eight individuals were subjected to WES. Causative variants were searched among single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and insertion/deletion variants (indels) and whenever no potential candidate emerged, copy number variant (CNV) analysis was performed. Variants or regions harboring a candidate variant were prioritized and segregation of the variant with the disease was further assessed using Sanger sequencing in case of SNVs and indels, and quantitative PCR (qPCR) for CNVs. SNV and indel analysis led to the identification of a previously reported mutation in PRPH2. Two additional mutations linked to different forms of retinal dystrophies were identified in two families: a known frameshift deletion in RPGR, a gene responsible for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and p.Ser163Arg in C1QTNF5 associated with Late-Onset Retinal Degeneration. A novel heterozygous deletion spanning the entire region of PRPF31 was also identified in the affected members of a fourth family, which was confirmed with qPCR. This study allowed the identification of the genetic cause of the retinal dystrophy and the establishment of a correct diagnosis in four families, including a large heterozygous deletion in PRPF31, typically considered one of the pitfalls of this method. Since all findings in this study are restricted to known genes, we propose that targeted sequencing using gene-panel is an optimal first approach for the genetic screening and that once known genetic causes are ruled out, WES might be used to uncover new genes involved in inherited retinal dystrophies.

  9. Application of Whole Exome Sequencing in Six Families with an Initial Diagnosis of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa: Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-San Jose, Patricia; Liu, Yichuan; March, Michael; Pellegrino, Renata; Golhar, Ryan; Corton, Marta; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; López-Molina, Maria Isabel; García-Sandoval, Blanca; Guo, Yiran; Tian, Lifeng; Liu, Xuanzhu; Guan, Liping; Zhang, Jianguo; Keating, Brendan; Xu, Xun

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the genetics underlying dominant forms of inherited retinal dystrophies using whole exome sequencing (WES) in six families extensively screened for known mutations or genes. Thirty-eight individuals were subjected to WES. Causative variants were searched among single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and insertion/deletion variants (indels) and whenever no potential candidate emerged, copy number variant (CNV) analysis was performed. Variants or regions harboring a candidate variant were prioritized and segregation of the variant with the disease was further assessed using Sanger sequencing in case of SNVs and indels, and quantitative PCR (qPCR) for CNVs. SNV and indel analysis led to the identification of a previously reported mutation in PRPH2. Two additional mutations linked to different forms of retinal dystrophies were identified in two families: a known frameshift deletion in RPGR, a gene responsible for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and p.Ser163Arg in C1QTNF5 associated with Late-Onset Retinal Degeneration. A novel heterozygous deletion spanning the entire region of PRPF31 was also identified in the affected members of a fourth family, which was confirmed with qPCR. This study allowed the identification of the genetic cause of the retinal dystrophy and the establishment of a correct diagnosis in four families, including a large heterozygous deletion in PRPF31, typically considered one of the pitfalls of this method. Since all findings in this study are restricted to known genes, we propose that targeted sequencing using gene-panel is an optimal first approach for the genetic screening and that once known genetic causes are ruled out, WES might be used to uncover new genes involved in inherited retinal dystrophies. PMID:26197217

  10. Associations Between Biomarkers and Age in the Presenilin 1 E280A Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer Disease Kindred A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Fleisher, Adam S.; Chen, Kewei; Quiroz, Yakeel T.; Jakimovich, Laura J.; Gomez, Madelyn Gutierrez; Langois, Carolyn M.; Langbaum, Jessica B. S.; Roontiva, Auttawut; Thiyyagura, Pradeep; Lee, Wendy; Ayutyanont, Napatkamon; Lopez, Liliana; Moreno, Sonia; Muñoz, Claudia; Tirado, Victoria; Acosta-Baena, Natalia; Fagan, Anne M.; Giraldo, Margarita; Garcia, Gloria; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Tariot, Pierre N.; Lopera, Francisco; Reiman, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Age-associated changes in brain imaging and fluid biomarkers are characterized and compared in presenilin 1 (PSEN1) E280A mutation carriers and noncarriers from the world’s largest known autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (AD) kindred. OBJECTIVE To characterize and compare age-associated changes in brain imaging and fluid biomarkers in PSEN1 E280A mutation carriers and noncarriers. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Cross-sectional measures of 18F-florbetapir positron emission tomography, 18F-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, structural magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and plasma biomarkers of AD were assessed from 54 PSEN1 E280A kindred members (age range, 20-59 years). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We used brain mapping algorithms to compare regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose and gray matter volumes in cognitively unimpaired mutation carriers and noncarriers. We used regression analyses to characterize associations between age and the mean cortical to pontine 18F-florbetapir standard uptake value ratios, precuneus cerebral metabolic rates for glucose, hippocampal gray matter volume, CSF Aβ1-42, total tau and phosphorylated tau181, and plasma Aβ measurements. Age at onset of progressive biomarker changes that distinguish carriers from noncarriers was estimated using best-fitting regression models. RESULTS Compared with noncarriers, cognitively unimpaired mutation carriers had significantly lower precuneus cerebral metabolic rates for glucose, smaller hippocampal volume, lower CSF Aβ1-42, higher CSF total tau and phosphorylated tau181, and higher plasma Aβ1-42 measurements. Sequential changes in biomarkers were seen at age 20 years (95% CI, 14-24 years) for CSF Aβ1-42, age 16 years (95% CI, 11-24 years) for the mean cortical 18F-florbetapir standard uptake value ratio, age 15 years (95% CI, 10-24 years) for precuneus cerebral metabolic rate for glucose, age 15 years (95% CI, 7-20 years) for CSF total tau

  11. A large genomic deletion leads to enhancer adoption by the lamin B1 gene: a second path to autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD)

    DOE PAGES

    Giorgio, E.; Robyr, D.; Spielmann, M.; ...

    2015-02-20

    Chromosomal rearrangements with duplication of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene underlie autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD), a rare neurological disorder in which overexpression of LMNB1 causes progressive central nervous system demyelination. However, we previously reported an ADLD family (ADLD-1-TO) without evidence of duplication or other mutation in LMNB1 despite linkage to the LMNB1 locus and lamin B1 overexpression. By custom array-CGH, we further investigated this family and report here that patients carry a large (~660 kb) heterozygous deletion that begins 66 kb upstream of the LMNB1 promoter. Lamin B1 overexpression was confirmed in further ADLD-1-TO tissues and in amore » postmortem brain sample, where lamin B1 was increased in the frontal lobe. Through parallel studies, we investigated both loss of genetic material and chromosomal rearrangement as possible causes of LMNB1 overexpression, and found that ADLD-1-TO plausibly results from an enhancer adoption mechanism. The deletion eliminates a genome topological domain boundary, allowing normally forbidden interactions between at least three forebrain-directed enhancers and the LMNB1 promoter, in line with the observed mainly cerebral localization of lamin B1 overexpression and myelin degeneration. Finally, this second route to LMNB1 overexpression and ADLD is a new example of the relevance of regulatory landscape modifications in determining Mendelian phenotypes.« less

  12. The disruption of a novel limb cis-regulatory element of SHH is associated with autosomal dominant preaxial polydactyly-hypertrichosis

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Florence; Jourdain, Anne-Sophie; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Keren, Boris; Andrieux, Joris; Duterque-Coquillaud, Martine; Porchet, Nicole; Manouvrier-Hanu, Sylvie; Escande, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    The expression gradient of the morphogen Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) is crucial in establishing the number and the identity of the digits during anteroposterior patterning of the limb. Its anterior ectopic expression is responsible for preaxial polydactyly (PPD). Most of these malformations are due to the gain-of-function of the Zone of Polarizing Activity Regulatory Sequence, the only limb-specific enhancer of SHH known to date. We report a family affected with a novel condition associating PPD and hypertrichosis of the upper back, following an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. This phenotype is consistent with deregulation of SHH expression during limb and follicle development. In affected members, we identified a 2 kb deletion located ~240 kb upstream from the SHH promoter. The deleted sequence is capable of repressing the transcriptional activity of the SHH promoter in vitro, consistent with a silencer activity. We hypothesize that the deletion of this silencer could be responsible for SHH deregulation during development, leading to a PPD-hypertrichosis phenotype. PMID:25782671

  13. Education modifies the relation of vascular pathology to cognitive function: cognitive reserve in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Zieren, Nikola; Duering, Marco; Peters, Nils; Reyes, Sonia; Jouvent, Eric; Hervé, Dominique; Gschwendtner, Andreas; Mewald, Yvonne; Opherk, Christian; Chabriat, Hugues; Dichgans, Martin

    2013-02-01

    A clinical impact of cognitive reserve (CR) has been demonstrated in Alzheimer's disease, whereas its role in vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the impact of CR in patients with cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), a genetic variant of pure VCI. A total of 247 NOTCH3 mutation carriers from a two-center study were investigated using detailed neuropsychological and neuroimaging protocols. CR was operationalized as years of formal education. Brain pathology was assessed by MRI using normalized brain volume and lacunar lesion volume as proxies. Multivariate analyses were done for each structural measure with scores of processing speed, executive function, and memory as dependent variables. Additional linear regression models were conducted with interaction terms for education × brain volume and education × lacunar lesion volume. Education had an independent impact on cognitive performance in subjects with mild and moderate degrees of brain pathology, whereas there was no significant influence of education on cognition in patients with severe MRI changes. This interaction was found for processing speed, the cognitive domain most impaired in our patients. Our findings demonstrate an interaction of education and brain pathology in regard to cognitive impairment: the effect of education seems most pronounced in early disease stages but may ultimately be overwhelmed by the pathological changes. The results extend the concept of CR to VCI.

  14. Probing Mechanisms of Photoreceptor Degeneration in a New Mouse Model of the Common Form of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa due to P23H Opsin Mutations*♦

    PubMed Central

    Sakami, Sanae; Maeda, Tadao; Bereta, Grzegorz; Okano, Kiichiro; Golczak, Marcin; Sumaroka, Alexander; Roman, Alejandro J.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Rhodopsin, the visual pigment mediating vision under dim light, is composed of the apoprotein opsin and the chromophore ligand 11-cis-retinal. A P23H mutation in the opsin gene is one of the most prevalent causes of the human blinding disease, autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Although P23H cultured cell and transgenic animal models have been developed, there remains controversy over whether they fully mimic the human phenotype; and the exact mechanism by which this mutation leads to photoreceptor cell degeneration remains unknown. By generating P23H opsin knock-in mice, we found that the P23H protein was inadequately glycosylated with levels 1–10% that of wild type opsin. Moreover, the P23H protein failed to accumulate in rod photoreceptor cell endoplasmic reticulum but instead disrupted rod photoreceptor disks. Genetically engineered P23H mice lacking the chromophore showed accelerated photoreceptor cell degeneration. These results indicate that most synthesized P23H protein is degraded, and its retinal cytotoxicity is enhanced by lack of the 11-cis-retinal chromophore during rod outer segment development. PMID:21224384

  15. A large genomic deletion leads to enhancer adoption by the lamin B1 gene: a second path to autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD)

    PubMed Central

    Giorgio, Elisa; Robyr, Daniel; Spielmann, Malte; Ferrero, Enza; Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Imperiale, Daniele; Vaula, Giovanna; Stamoulis, Georgios; Santoni, Federico; Atzori, Cristiana; Gasparini, Laura; Ferrera, Denise; Canale, Claudio; Guipponi, Michel; Pennacchio, Len A.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Brussino, Alessandro; Brusco, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements with duplication of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene underlie autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD), a rare neurological disorder in which overexpression of LMNB1 causes progressive central nervous system demyelination. However, we previously reported an ADLD family (ADLD-1-TO) without evidence of duplication or other mutation in LMNB1 despite linkage to the LMNB1 locus and lamin B1 overexpression. By custom array-CGH, we further investigated this family and report here that patients carry a large (∼660 kb) heterozygous deletion that begins 66 kb upstream of the LMNB1 promoter. Lamin B1 overexpression was confirmed in further ADLD-1-TO tissues and in a postmortem brain sample, where lamin B1 was increased in the frontal lobe. Through parallel studies, we investigated both loss of genetic material and chromosomal rearrangement as possible causes of LMNB1 overexpression, and found that ADLD-1-TO plausibly results from an enhancer adoption mechanism. The deletion eliminates a genome topological domain boundary, allowing normally forbidden interactions between at least three forebrain-directed enhancers and the LMNB1 promoter, in line with the observed mainly cerebral localization of lamin B1 overexpression and myelin degeneration. This second route to LMNB1 overexpression and ADLD is a new example of the relevance of regulatory landscape modifications in determining Mendelian phenotypes. PMID:25701871

  16. Mutation in the PCSK9 Gene in Omani Arab Subjects with Autosomal Dominant Hypercholesterolemia and its Effect on PCSK9 Protein Structure.

    PubMed

    Al-Waili, Khalid; Al-Zidi, Ward Al-Muna; Al-Abri, Abdul Rahim; Al-Rasadi, Khalid; Al-Sabti, Hilal Ali; Shah, Karna; Al-Futaisi, Abdullah; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Banerjee, Yajnavalka

    2013-01-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type (PCSK9) is a crucial protein in LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) metabolism by virtue of its pivotal role in the degradation of the LDL receptor. Mutations in the PCSK9 gene have previously been found to segregate with autosomal dominant familial hypercholesterolemia (ADFH). In this study, DNA sequencing of the 12 exons of the PCSK9 gene has been performed for two patients with a clinical diagnosis of familial hypercholesterolemia where mutation in the LDL-receptor gene hasn't been excluded. One missense mutation was detected in the exon 9 PCSK9 gene in the two ADFH patients. The patients were found to be heterozygote for Ile474Val (SNP rs562556). Using an array of in silico tools, we have investigated the effect of the above mutation on different structural levels of the PCSK9 protein. Although, the mutation has already been reported in the literature for other populations, to the best of our knowledge this is the first report of a mutation in the PCSK9 gene from the Arab population, including the Omani population.

  17. Deciphering Variability of PKD1 and PKD2 in an Italian Cohort of 643 Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD).

    PubMed

    Carrera, Paola; Calzavara, Silvia; Magistroni, Riccardo; den Dunnen, Johan T; Rigo, Francesca; Stenirri, Stefania; Testa, Francesca; Messa, Piergiorgio; Cerutti, Roberta; Scolari, Francesco; Izzi, Claudia; Edefonti, Alberto; Negrisolo, Susanna; Benetti, Elisa; Alibrandi, Maria Teresa Sciarrone; Manunta, Paolo; Boletta, Alessandra; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2016-08-08

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary kidney disease. We analysed PKD1 and PKD2, in a large cohort of 440 unrelated Italian patients with ADPKD and 203 relatives by direct sequencing and MLPA. Molecular and detailed phenotypic data have been collected and submitted to the PKD1/PKD2 LOVD database. This is the first large retrospective study in Italian patients, describing 701 variants, 249 (35.5%) already associated with ADPKD and 452 (64.5%) novel. According to the criteria adopted, the overall detection rate was 80% (352/440). Novel variants with uncertain significance were found in 14% of patients. Among patients with pathogenic variants, in 301 (85.5%) the disease is associated with PKD1, 196 (55.7%) truncating, 81 (23%) non truncating, 24 (6.8%) IF indels, and in 51 (14.5%) with PKD2. Our results outline the high allelic heterogeneity of variants, complicated by the presence of variants of uncertain significance as well as of multiple variants in the same subject. Classification of novel variants may be particularly cumbersome having an important impact on the genetic counselling. Our study confirms the importance to improve the assessment of variant pathogenicity for ADPKD; to this point databasing of both clinical and molecular data is crucial.

  18. Identification of a Novel Mutation in BRD4 that Causes Autosomal Dominant Syndromic Congenital Cataracts Associated with Other Neuro-Skeletal Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hyun-Seok; Kim, Jeonhyun; Kwak, Woori; Jeong, Hyeonsoo; Lim, Gyu-Bin

    2017-01-01

    Congenital cataracts can occur as a non-syndromic isolated ocular disease or as a part of genetic syndromes accompanied by a multi-systemic disease. Approximately 50% of all congenital cataract cases have a heterogeneous genetic basis. Here, we describe three generations of a family with an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern and common complex phenotypes, including bilateral congenital cataracts, short stature, macrocephaly, and minor skeletal anomalies. We did not find any chromosomal aberrations or gene copy number abnormalities using conventional genetic tests; accordingly, we conducted whole-exome sequencing (WES) to identify disease-causing genetic alterations in this family. Based on family WES data, we identified a novel BRD4 missense mutation as a candidate causal variant and performed cell-based experiments by ablation of endogenous BRD4 expression in human lens epithelial cells. The protein expression levels of connexin 43, p62, LC3BII, and p53 differed significantly between control cells and cells in which endogenous BRD4 expression was inhibited. We inferred that a BRD4 missense mutation was the likely disease-causing mutation in this family. Our findings may improve the molecular diagnosis of congenital cataracts and support the use of WES to clarify the genetic basis of complex diseases. PMID:28076398

  19. [A case of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) in which lomerizine hydrochloride was suggested to prevent recurrent stroke].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hisao; Nagami, Shuhei; Takahashi, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    A 60-year-old man visited our hospital because of left hemiparesis in September 2006. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a high-intensity lesions in the right corona radiata on diffusion-weighted images and a high-intensity lesions in the basal ganglia and deep white matter on T2-weighted images. He recovered with no sequelae. Antithrombotic agents such as aspirin were given to prevent stroke, but stroke recurred three times over the course of 3 years. In February 2009, neurological examination revealed right hemiparalysis and dysarthria. Dysphagia and cognitive decline had been progressing gradually. We suspected cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) on the basis of the clinical and family history. An Arg75Pro mutation in the Notch3 gene was found, but did not involve a cysteine residue. Antithrombotic agents were ineffective. We tried lomerizine hydrochloride, which was reported to prevent stroke in a patient with CADASIL. In Japan, lomerizine hydrochloride is used to prevent migraine and to selectively inhibit cerebral artery contraction. During treatment with lomerizine hydrochloride (5 mg/day) for more than 3 years, there was no recurrence of cerebral infarction and no further deterioration of cognitive function or MRI findings. There is no evidence supporting the efficacy of antithrombotic agents in CADASIL patients. Moreover, antithrombotic agents have been reported to increase the frequency of clinically silent microbleeds on MRI in CADASIL. Lomerizine hydrochloride might therefore be one option for the treatment of CADASIL.

  20. Autosomal dominant Marfan-like connective-tissue disorder with aortic dilation and skeletal anomaslies not linked to the Fibrillin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Boileau, C.; Coulon, M.; Alexandre, J.-A.; Junien, C. ); Jondeau, G.; Delorme, G.; Dubourg, O.; Bourdarias, J.-P. ); Babron, M.-C.; Bonaieti-Pellie, C. ); Sakai, L. ); Melki, J. )

    1993-07-01

    The authors describe a large family with a connective-tissue disorder that exhibits some of the skeletal and cardiovascular features seen in Marfan syndrome. However, none of the 19 affected individuals displayed ocular abnormalities and therefore did not comply with recognized criteria for this disease. These patients could alternatively be diagnosed as MASS (mitral valve, aorta, skeleton, and skin) phenotype patients or represent a distinct clinical entity, i.e., a new autosomal dominant connective-tissue disorder. The fibrillin genes located on chromosomes 15 and 5 are clearly involved in the classic form of Marfan syndrome and a clinically related disorder (congenital contractural arachnodactyly), respectively. To test whether one of these genes was also implicated in this French family, the authors performed genetic analyses. Blood samples were obtained for 56 family members, and four polymorphic fibrillin gene markers, located on chromosomes 15 (Fib15) and 5 (Fib5), respectively, were tested. Linkage between the disease allele and the markers of these two genes was excluded with lod scores of [minus]11.39 (for Fib15) and [minus]13.34 (for Fib5), at 0 = .001, indicating that the mutation is at a different locus. This phenotype thus represents a new connective-tissue disorder, overlapping but different from classic Marfan syndrome. 33 refs., 1 fig. 2 tabs.

  1. Mapping one form of autosomal dominant postaxial polydactyly type A to chromosome 7p15-q11.23 by linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishna, U.; Mehenni, H.; Antonarakis, S.E.

    1997-03-01

    Postaxial polydactyly type-A (PAP-A) in humans is an autosomal dominant trait characterized by an extra digit in the ulnar and/or fibular side of the upper and/or lower extremities. The extra digit is well formed and articulates with the fifth, or extra, metacarpal/metatarsal, and thus it is usually functional. In order to map the gene responsible for PAP-A, we studied a five-generation Indian family of 37 individuals (15 of whom were affected). A genomewide search with highly informative polymorphic markers on part of the pedigree showed linkage between the PAP-A phenotype and markers on chromosome 7p15-q11.23 (no crossovers were found with D7S526, D7S795, D7S528, D7S521, D7S691, D7S667, D7S478, D7S1830, D7S803, D7S801, or ELN). The highest LOD score was obtained with marker D7S801 (Z{sub max} = 4.21; {theta} = 0). Haplotype analysis enabled the mapping of the PAP-A phenotype in this family between markers D7S2848 and D7S669. Analysis of additional families with PAP-A will narrow down the critical genomic region, facilitate positional cloning of the PAP-A gene, and/or uncover potential genetic heterogeneity. 42 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. The disruption of a novel limb cis-regulatory element of SHH is associated with autosomal dominant preaxial polydactyly-hypertrichosis.

    PubMed

    Petit, Florence; Jourdain, Anne-Sophie; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Keren, Boris; Andrieux, Joris; Duterque-Coquillaud, Martine; Porchet, Nicole; Manouvrier-Hanu, Sylvie; Escande, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    The expression gradient of the morphogen Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) is crucial in establishing the number and the identity of the digits during anteroposterior patterning of the limb. Its anterior ectopic expression is responsible for preaxial polydactyly (PPD). Most of these malformations are due to the gain-of-function of the Zone of Polarizing Activity Regulatory Sequence, the only limb-specific enhancer of SHH known to date. We report a family affected with a novel condition associating PPD and hypertrichosis of the upper back, following an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. This phenotype is consistent with deregulation of SHH expression during limb and follicle development. In affected members, we identified a 2 kb deletion located ~240 kb upstream from the SHH promoter. The deleted sequence is capable of repressing the transcriptional activity of the SHH promoter in vitro, consistent with a silencer activity. We hypothesize that the deletion of this silencer could be responsible for SHH deregulation during development, leading to a PPD-hypertrichosis phenotype.

  3. The effect of novel mutations on the structure and enzymatic activity of unconventional myosins associated with autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Tae-Jun; Oh, Se-Kyung; Park, Hong-Joon; Sato, Osamu; Venselaar, Hanka; Choi, Soo Young; Kim, SungHee; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Bok, Jinwoong; Lee, Sang-Heun; Vriend, Gert; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Kim, Un-Kyung; Choi, Jae Young

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in five unconventional myosin genes have been associated with genetic hearing loss (HL). These genes encode the motor proteins myosin IA, IIIA, VI, VIIA and XVA. To date, most mutations in myosin genes have been found in the Caucasian population. In addition, only a few functional studies have been performed on the previously reported myosin mutations. We performed screening and functional studies for mutations in the MYO1A and MYO6 genes in Korean cases of autosomal dominant non-syndromic HL. We identified four novel heterozygous mutations in MYO6. Three mutations (p.R825X, p.R991X and Q918fsX941) produce a premature truncation of the myosin VI protein. Another mutation, p.R205Q, was associated with diminished actin-activated ATPase activity and actin gliding velocity of myosin VI in an in vitro analysis. This finding is consistent with the results of protein modelling studies and corroborates the pathogenicity of this mutation in the MYO6 gene. One missense variant, p.R544W, was found in the MYO1A gene, and in silico analysis suggested that this variant has deleterious effects on protein function. This finding is consistent with the results of protein modelling studies and corroborates the pathogenic effect of this mutation in the MYO6 gene. PMID:25080041

  4. Mutation in the Hair Cell Specific Gene POU4F3 Is a Common Cause for Autosomal Dominant Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss in Chinese Hans

    PubMed Central

    He, Longxia; Pang, Xiuhong; Chen, Penghui

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss (ADNSHL) is extremely heterogeneous. So far the genetic etiological contribution of the gene POU4F3 associated with ADNSHL has been rarely reported. In our previous study, a c.603_604delGG mutation in the hair cell specific gene POU4F3 has been identified as the pathogenic cause in one of the seven Chinese Han ADNSHL families. In the present study, we performed targeted next-generation sequencing of 144 known deafness genes in another nine Chinese Han ADNSHL families and identified two more novel mutations in POU4F3, p.Leu311Pro and c.120+1G>C, as the pathogenic cause. Clinical characterization of the affected individuals in these three families showed that the three POU4F3 mutations may lead to progressive hearing loss with variable ages of onset and degrees of severity. Our results suggested that mutations in POU4F3 are a relatively common cause (3/16) for ADNSHL in Chinese Hans, which should be routinely screened in such cases during genetic testing. PMID:28053790

  5. Whole exome sequencing links dental tumor to an autosomal-dominant mutation in ANO5 gene associated with gnathodiaphyseal dysplasia and muscle dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Andreeva, T. V.; Tyazhelova, T. V.; Rykalina, V. N.; Gusev, F. E.; Goltsov, A. Yu.; Zolotareva, O. I.; Aliseichik, M. P.; Borodina, T. A.; Grigorenko, A. P.; Reshetov, D. A.; Ginter, E. K.; Amelina, S. S.; Zinchenko, R. A.; Rogaev, E. I.

    2016-01-01

    Tumors of the jaws may represent different human disorders and frequently associate with pathologic bone fractures. In this report, we analyzed two affected siblings from a family of Russian origin, with a history of dental tumors of the jaws, in correspondence to original clinical diagnosis of cementoma consistent with gigantiform cementoma (GC, OMIM: 137575). Whole exome sequencing revealed the heterozygous missense mutation c.1067G > A (p.Cys356Tyr) in ANO5 gene in these patients. To date, autosomal-dominant mutations have been described in the ANO5 gene for gnathodiaphyseal dysplasia (GDD, OMIM: 166260), and multiple recessive mutations have been described in the gene for muscle dystrophies (OMIM: 613319, 611307); the same amino acid (Cys) at the position 356 is mutated in GDD. These genetic data and similar clinical phenotypes demonstrate that the GC and GDD likely represent the same type of bone pathology. Our data illustrate the significance of mutations in single amino-acid position for particular bone tissue pathology. Modifying role of genetic variations in another gene on the severity of the monogenic trait pathology is also suggested. Finally, we propose the model explaining the tissue-specific manifestation of clinically distant bone and muscle diseases linked to mutations in one gene. PMID:27216912

  6. Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy under Ultrasound Guidance in Patients with Renal Calculi and Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: A Report of 11 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Yang, Xuecheng; Zhong, Xiulong; Wang, Zhenlin; Xue, Senyao; Yu, Weifeng

    2017-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis accelerates the renal failure in the patients with ADPKD. In order to evaluate the role of percutaneous nephrolithotomy in management of calculus in these patients, 11 patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and renal stones were included in the study. Two patients had bilateral renal stones. All patients were treated by percutaneous nephrolithotomy under ultrasound guidance. 13 percutaneous nephrolithotomy procedures were performed in 1 stage by the urology team under ultrasound guidance. 5 people received second operation with flexible nephroscopy in lateral position. The success rate and morbidity and mortality of the technique and hospital stay were recorded. Results. The puncture procedure was fully successful in all cases. The renal function improved in these patients. 5 patients had moderate fever after the surgery. 5 patients received flexible nephroscopy to take out the residual calculi. 2 persons had ESWL therapy after the surgery. Conclusion. PCNL is an ideal, safe, and effective method to remove the stones from those patients with no definite increase in the risk of complication. The outcome and stone-free rate are satisfactory comparable to the PCNL in the patients without ADPKD. PMID:28321250

  7. APC-like congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (CHRPE) in non-APC patients: Evidence for autosomal dominant transmission in one family

    SciTech Connect

    Thonney, E.; Munier, F.L. Pescia, G.

    1994-09-01

    The presence of congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (CHRPE) is known to be the earliest phenotypic marker in carriers of a mutant allele of the adenomatous polyposis coli gene (APC). The specificity of CHRPE is known to be over 97%, provided that the lesions are bilateral and their total number higher than 4. In the present study, we describe 3 patients from 2 unrelated families with bilateral multiple asymptomatic CHRPE (8-17), normal visual function and no family history of APC. Clinical examination failed to detect other extracolonic signs of APC nor did a search for adenomatous polyps by colonscopy. In one family, the ocular phenotype was transmitted from a father to his only son. Mutation hot spots at codons 302, 622, 625, 1061 and 1309 of the APC gene (about 25% of germline mutations) were all tested normal. We postulate that these APC-free ocular findings reflect the allelic involvement of a mutant APC allele that remains to be characterized. However, involvement of another yet unrecognized autosomal dominant gene cannot be ruled out and additional families with this unique trait should be studied.

  8. Mislocalisation of BEST1 in iPSC-derived retinal pigment epithelial cells from a family with autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy (ADVIRC)

    PubMed Central

    Carter, David A.; Smart, Matthew J. K.; Letton, William V. G.; Ramsden, Conor M.; Nommiste, Britta; Chen, Li Li; Fynes, Kate; Muthiah, Manickam N.; Goh, Pollyanna; Lane, Amelia; Powner, Michael B.; Webster, Andrew R.; da Cruz, Lyndon; Moore, Anthony T.; Coffey, Peter J.; Carr, Amanda-Jayne F.

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy (ADVIRC) is a rare, early-onset retinal dystrophy characterised by distinct bands of circumferential pigmentary degeneration in the peripheral retina and developmental eye defects. ADVIRC is caused by mutations in the Bestrophin1 (BEST1) gene, which encodes a transmembrane protein thought to function as an ion channel in the basolateral membrane of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Previous studies suggest that the distinct ADVIRC phenotype results from alternative splicing of BEST1 pre-mRNA. Here, we have used induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology to investigate the effects of an ADVIRC associated BEST1 mutation (c.704T > C, p.V235A) in patient-derived iPSC-RPE. We found no evidence of alternate splicing of the BEST1 transcript in ADVIRC iPSC-RPE, however in patient-derived iPSC-RPE, BEST1 was expressed at the basolateral membrane and the apical membrane. During human eye development we show that BEST1 is expressed more abundantly in peripheral RPE compared to central RPE and is also expressed in cells of the developing retina. These results suggest that higher levels of mislocalised BEST1 expression in the periphery, from an early developmental stage, could provide a mechanism that leads to the distinct clinical phenotype observed in ADVIRC patients. PMID:27653836

  9. A large genomic deletion leads to enhancer adoption by the lamin B1 gene: a second path to autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD)

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgio, E.; Robyr, D.; Spielmann, M.; Ferrero, E.; Di Gregorio, E.; Imperiale, D.; Vaula, G.; Stamoulis, G.; Santoni, F.; Atzori, C.; Gasparini, L.; Ferrera, D.; Canale, C.; Guipponi, M.; Pennacchio, L. A.; Antonarakis, S. E.; Brussino, A.; Brusco, A.

    2015-02-20

    Chromosomal rearrangements with duplication of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene underlie autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD), a rare neurological disorder in which overexpression of LMNB1 causes progressive central nervous system demyelination. However, we previously reported an ADLD family (ADLD-1-TO) without evidence of duplication or other mutation in LMNB1 despite linkage to the LMNB1 locus and lamin B1 overexpression. By custom array-CGH, we further investigated this family and report here that patients carry a large (~660 kb) heterozygous deletion that begins 66 kb upstream of the LMNB1 promoter. Lamin B1 overexpression was confirmed in further ADLD-1-TO tissues and in a postmortem brain sample, where lamin B1 was increased in the frontal lobe. Through parallel studies, we investigated both loss of genetic material and chromosomal rearrangement as possible causes of LMNB1 overexpression, and found that ADLD-1-TO plausibly results from an enhancer adoption mechanism. The deletion eliminates a genome topological domain boundary, allowing normally forbidden interactions between at least three forebrain-directed enhancers and the LMNB1 promoter, in line with the observed mainly cerebral localization of lamin B1 overexpression and myelin degeneration. Finally, this second route to LMNB1 overexpression and ADLD is a new example of the relevance of regulatory landscape modifications in determining Mendelian phenotypes.

  10. A large genomic deletion leads to enhancer adoption by the lamin B1 gene: a second path to autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD).

    PubMed

    Giorgio, Elisa; Robyr, Daniel; Spielmann, Malte; Ferrero, Enza; Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Imperiale, Daniele; Vaula, Giovanna; Stamoulis, Georgios; Santoni, Federico; Atzori, Cristiana; Gasparini, Laura; Ferrera, Denise; Canale, Claudio; Guipponi, Michel; Pennacchio, Len A; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Brussino, Alessandro; Brusco, Alfredo

    2015-06-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements with duplication of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene underlie autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD), a rare neurological disorder in which overexpression of LMNB1 causes progressive central nervous system demyelination. However, we previously reported an ADLD family (ADLD-1-TO) without evidence of duplication or other mutation in LMNB1 despite linkage to the LMNB1 locus and lamin B1 overexpression. By custom array-CGH, we further investigated this family and report here that patients carry a large (∼660 kb) heterozygous deletion that begins 66 kb upstream of the LMNB1 promoter. Lamin B1 overexpression was confirmed in further ADLD-1-TO tissues and in a postmortem brain sample, where lamin B1 was increased in the frontal lobe. Through parallel studies, we investigated both loss of genetic material and chromosomal rearrangement as possible causes of LMNB1 overexpression, and found that ADLD-1-TO plausibly results from an enhancer adoption mechanism. The deletion eliminates a genome topological domain boundary, allowing normally forbidden interactions between at least three forebrain-directed enhancers and the LMNB1 promoter, in line with the observed mainly cerebral localization of lamin B1 overexpression and myelin degeneration. This second route to LMNB1 overexpression and ADLD is a new example of the relevance of regulatory landscape modifications in determining Mendelian phenotypes.

  11. The effect of novel mutations on the structure and enzymatic activity of unconventional myosins associated with autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Tae-Jun; Oh, Se-Kyung; Park, Hong-Joon; Sato, Osamu; Venselaar, Hanka; Choi, Soo Young; Kim, SungHee; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Bok, Jinwoong; Lee, Sang-Heun; Vriend, Gert; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Kim, Un-Kyung; Choi, Jae Young

    2014-07-01

    Mutations in five unconventional myosin genes have been associated with genetic hearing loss (HL). These genes encode the motor proteins myosin IA, IIIA, VI, VIIA and XVA. To date, most mutations in myosin genes have been found in the Caucasian population. In addition, only a few functional studies have been performed on the previously reported myosin mutations. We performed screening and functional studies for mutations in the MYO1A and MYO6 genes in Korean cases of autosomal dominant non-syndromic HL. We identified four novel heterozygous mutations in MYO6. Three mutations (p.R825X, p.R991X and Q918fsX941) produce a premature truncation of the myosin VI protein. Another mutation, p.R205Q, was associated with diminished actin-activated ATPase activity and actin gliding velocity of myosin VI in an in vitro analysis. This finding is consistent with the results of protein modelling studies and corroborates the pathogenicity of this mutation in the MYO6 gene. One missense variant, p.R544W, was found in the MYO1A gene, and in silico analysis suggested that this variant has deleterious effects on protein function. This finding is consistent with the results of protein modelling studies and corroborates the pathogenic effect of this mutation in the MYO6 gene.

  12. Clinical and molecular studies of 73 Italian families with autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type I: SCA1 and SCA2 are the most common genotypes.

    PubMed

    Pareyson, D; Gellera, C; Castellotti, B; Antonelli, A; Riggio, M C; Mazzucchelli, F; Girotti, F; Pietrini, V; Mariotti, C; Di Donato, S

    1999-05-01

    We clinically and genetically evaluated 73 Italian families with autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) type I. Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) type 1 was the most common genotype (SCA1), accounting for 41% of cases (30 families), SCA2 was slightly less frequent (29%, 21 families), and the remaining families were negative for the SCA1, SCA2, and SCA3 mutations. Among the positively genotyped families, SCA1 was found most frequently in families from northern Italy (50%), while SCA2 was the most common mutation in families from the southern part of the country (56%). Slow saccades and decreased deep tendon reflexes were observed significantly more frequently in SCA2 patients, while increased deep tendon reflexes and nystagmus were more common in SCA1. In SCA1 and SCA2 families there was a significant inverse correlation between expansion size and age at onset. Analysis of triplet repeat numbers in parent-offspring pairs showed greater meiotic instability, which was associated with an earlier onset of the disease in SCA2 families than in SCA1 families.

  13. Refining the localization of the PKD2 locus on chromosome 4q by linkage analysis in Spanish families with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease type 2.

    PubMed Central

    San Millán, J L; Viribay, M; Peral, B; Martínez, I; Weissenbach, J; Moreno, F

    1995-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. At least two distinct forms of ADPKD are now well defined. In approximately 86% of affected European families, a gene defect localized to 16p13.3 was responsible for ADPKD, while a second locus has been recently localized to 4q13-q23 as candidate for the disease in the remaining families. We present confirmation of linkage to microsatellite markers on chromosome 4q in eight Spanish families with ADPKD, in which the disease was not linked to 16p13.3. By linkage analysis with marker D4S423, a maximum lod score of 9.03 at a recombination fraction of .00 was obtained. Multipoint linkage analysis, as well as a study of recombinant haplotypes, placed the PKD2 locus between D4S1542 and D4S1563, thereby defining a genetic interval of approximately 1 cM. The refined map will serve as a genetic framework for additional genetic and physical mapping of the region and will improve the accuracy of presymptomatic diagnosis of PKD2. PMID:7825585

  14. Deciphering Variability of PKD1 and PKD2 in an Italian Cohort of 643 Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD)

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Paola; Calzavara, Silvia; Magistroni, Riccardo; den Dunnen, Johan T.; Rigo, Francesca; Stenirri, Stefania; Testa, Francesca; Messa, Piergiorgio; Cerutti, Roberta; Scolari, Francesco; Izzi, Claudia; Edefonti, Alberto; Negrisolo, Susanna; Benetti, Elisa; Alibrandi, Maria Teresa Sciarrone; Manunta, Paolo; Boletta, Alessandra; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary kidney disease. We analysed PKD1 and PKD2, in a large cohort of 440 unrelated Italian patients with ADPKD and 203 relatives by direct sequencing and MLPA. Molecular and detailed phenotypic data have been collected and submitted to the PKD1/PKD2 LOVD database. This is the first large retrospective study in Italian patients, describing 701 variants, 249 (35.5%) already associated with ADPKD and 452 (64.5%) novel. According to the criteria adopted, the overall detection rate was 80% (352/440). Novel variants with uncertain significance were found in 14% of patients. Among patients with pathogenic variants, in 301 (85.5%) the disease is associated with PKD1, 196 (55.7%) truncating, 81 (23%) non truncating, 24 (6.8%) IF indels, and in 51 (14.5%) with PKD2. Our results outline the high allelic heterogeneity of variants, complicated by the presence of variants of uncertain significance as well as of multiple variants in the same subject. Classification of novel variants may be particularly cumbersome having an important impact on the genetic counselling. Our study confirms the importance to improve the assessment of variant pathogenicity for ADPKD; to this point databasing of both clinical and molecular data is crucial. PMID:27499327

  15. Endothelin 1 gene is not a major modifier of chronic kidney disease advancement among the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Annapareddy, Shiva Nagendra Reddy; Elumalai, Ramprasad; Lakkakula, Bhaskar V K S; Ramanathan, Gnanasambandan; Periyasamy, Soundararajan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by the presence of numerous cysts in the kidney and manifest with various renal and extra-renal complications leading to ESRD. Endothelin may contribute to various renal and extra-renal manifestations pointing to genetic and environmental modifying factors that alter the risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD) in ADPKD. In the present study we investigated six genes coding for endothelin 1 ( EDN1 ) tagging-single nucleotide polymorphisms (tag-SNPs) to unravel the EDN1 gene modifier effect for renal disease progression in ADPKD. Materials and Methods: The tag-SNPs were genotyped using FRET-based KASPar method in 108 ADPKD patients and 119 healthy subjects. Cochran-Armitage trend test was used to determine the association between ADPKD and EDN1 tag-SNPs. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the effect of tag-SNPs on CKD progression. The relationship between different CKD stages and hypertension and their interaction Mantel-Haenszel stratified analysis was performed. Results: All loci are polymorphic and followed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Distribution of EDN1 genotypes and haplotypes in control and ADPKD is not statistically significant. Five SNPs covering 3.4 kb forming single LD block, but the LD was not strong between SNPs. The EDN1 genotypes are not contributing to the CKD advancement among the ADPKD patients. Conclusion: These results suggest that the EDN1 gene is not a major modifier of CKD advancement among ADPKD patients.

  16. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Missense Variant in EFEMP1 Co-Segregating in a Family with Autosomal Dominant Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Donna S.; Bennett, Thomas M.; Shiels, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is a clinically important and genetically heterogeneous cause of progressive vision loss as a result of retinal ganglion cell death. Here we have utilized trio-based, whole-exome sequencing to identify the genetic defect underlying an autosomal dominant form of adult-onset POAG segregating in an African-American family. Exome sequencing identified a novel missense variant (c.418C>T, p.Arg140Trp) in exon-5 of the gene coding for epidermal growth factor (EGF) containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (EFEMP1) that co-segregated with disease in the family. Linkage and haplotype analyses with microsatellite markers indicated that the disease interval overlapped a known POAG locus (GLC1H) on chromosome 2p. The p.Arg140Trp substitution was predicted in silico to have damaging effects on protein function and transient expression studies in cultured cells revealed that the Trp140-mutant protein exhibited increased intracellular accumulation compared with wild-type EFEMP1. In situ hybridization of the mouse eye with oligonucleotide probes detected the highest levels of EFEMP1 transcripts in the ciliary body, cornea, inner nuclear layer of the retina, and the optic nerve head. The recent finding that a common variant near EFEMP1 was associated with optic nerve-head morphology supports the possibility that the EFEMP1 variant identified in this POAG family may be pathogenic. PMID:26162006

  17. G-protein signaling modulator 1 deficiency accelerates cystic disease in an orthologous mouse model of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Michelle; Pavlov, Tengis S; Nozu, Kandai; Rasmussen, Shauna A; Ilatovskaya, Daria V; Lerch-Gaggl, Alexandra; North, Lauren M; Kim, Hyunho; Qian, Feng; Sweeney, William E; Avner, Ellis D; Blumer, Joe B; Staruschenko, Alexander; Park, Frank

    2012-12-26

    Polycystic kidney diseases are the most common genetic diseases that affect the kidney. There remains a paucity of information regarding mechanisms by which G proteins are regulated in the context of polycystic kidney disease to promote abnormal epithelial cell expansion and cystogenesis. In this study, we describe a functional role for the accessory protein, G-protein signaling modulator 1 (GPSM1), also known as activator of G-protein signaling 3, to act as a modulator of cyst progression in an orthologous mouse model of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). A complete loss of Gpsm1 in the Pkd1(V/V) mouse model of ADPKD, which displays a hypomorphic phenotype of polycystin-1, demonstrated increased cyst progression and reduced renal function compared with age-matched cystic Gpsm1(+/+) and Gpsm1(+/-) mice. Electrophysiological studies identified a role by which GPSM1 increased heteromeric polycystin-1/polycystin-2 ion channel activity via Gβγ subunits. In summary, the present study demonstrates an important role for GPSM1 in controlling the dynamics of cyst progression in an orthologous mouse model of ADPKD and presents a therapeutic target for drug development in the treatment of this costly disease.

  18. A Pkd1-Fbn1 genetic interaction implicates TGF-β signaling in the pathogenesis of vascular complications in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongyan; Wang, Connie J; Judge, Daniel P; Halushka, Marc K; Ni, Jie; Habashi, Jennifer P; Moslehi, Javid; Bedja, Djahida; Gabrielson, Kathleen L; Xu, Hangxue; Qian, Feng; Huso, David; Dietz, Harry C; Germino, Gregory G; Watnick, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common cause of renal failure that is due to mutations in two genes, PKD1 and PKD2. Vascular complications, including aneurysms, are a well recognized feature of ADPKD, and a subgroup of families exhibits traits reminiscent of Marfan syndrome (MFS). MFS is caused by mutations in fibrillin-1 (FBN1), which encodes an extracellular matrix protein with homology to latent TGF-β binding proteins. It was recently demonstrated that fibrillin-1 deficiency is associated with upregulation of TGF-β signaling. We investigated the overlap between ADPKD and MFS by breeding mice with targeted mutations in Pkd1 and Fbn1. Double heterozygotes displayed an exacerbation of the typical Fbn1 heterozygous aortic phenotype. We show that the basis of this genetic interaction results from further upregulation of TGF-β signaling caused by Pkd1 haploinsufficiency. In addition, we demonstrate that loss of PKD1 alone is sufficient to induce a heightened responsiveness to TGF-β. Our data link the interaction of two important diseases to a fundamental signaling pathway.

  19. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grantham, Jared J.

    2010-01-01

    Shortly after being elbowed in the flank during a pickup basketball game, a 35-year-old healthy man has severe, colicky abdominal pain followed by gross hematuria. He is hospitalized, and a renal ultrasound scan reveals bilateral polycystic kidneys and liver cysts, previously unknown to the patient. The blood pressure is 160/100 mm Hg. The serum creatinine concentration is 0.9 mg per deciliter (80 μmol per liter). The pain subsides in 2 days with analgesics, rest, and fluids; the gross hematuria resolves in 4 days, although microscopic hematuria persists. How should his case be further evaluated and managed? PMID:20009161

  20. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... with available imaging techniques (ultrasound and computerized tomography). Diagnosis of earlier stages of disease in children and young adults was much more difficult. Few treatments were available for chronic kidney disease in general, and there was no specific therapy ...

  1. Uncloned expanded CAG/CTG repeat sequences in autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) detected by the repeat expansion detection (RED) method.

    PubMed Central

    Pujana, M A; Volpini, V; Gratacós, M; Corral, J; Banchs, I; Sánchez, A; Genís, D; Cervera, C; Estivill, X

    1998-01-01

    In some neurodegenerative diseases, genetic anticipation correlates with expansions of the CAG/CTG repeat sequence above the normal range through the generations of a pedigree. Among these neurodegenerative diseases are late onset autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (ADCA). ADCA are genetically heterogeneous disorders with different cloned genes for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), type 2 (SCA2), type 3 or Machado-Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD), and type 6 (SCA6). Another related dominant ataxia, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA), also shows CAG/CTG repeat expansions. Genetic anticipation has been reported for all of them except for the recently cloned SCA6 gene. Other, as yet undetected SCA genes may show the same features. We have used the repeat expansion detection (RED) method to detect repeat expansions directly in DNA samples from ADCA patients not resulting from known genes. Our sample consists of 19 affected index cases, corresponding to 52.8% of our ADCA families without CAG/CTG repeat expansions in the SCA1, SCA2, SCA3/MJD, SCA6, or DRPLA genes. Eighty-nine percent of the index cases had expansions of a CAG/CTG sequence greater than 40 repeats by RED, while these were observed in only 26.9% of 78 healthy subjects from the general population (p < 0.0001). The distribution of RED fragments in controls and ADCA patients also shows significant differences with the Mann-Whitney U test (U = 376.5, p = 0.0007). Moreover, there was a significant inverse correlation between the size of expansion and the age of onset (r = -0.54, p = 0.018). These results show CAG/CTG repeat expansions of over 40 repeats in our sample of ADCA families not resulting from known SCA genes. Images PMID:9507387

  2. An autosomal dominant locus, Nka, mapping to the Ly-49 region of a rat natural killer (NK) gene complex, controls NK cell lysis of allogeneic lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells can recognize and kill MHC-incompatible normal bone marrow-derived cells. Presently characterized MHC-binding receptors on NK cells, including the Ly-49 family in the mouse, transmit inhibitory signals upon binding to cognate class I MHC ligands. Here we study in vivo NK-mediated lysis of normal allogeneic lymphocytes in crosses between alloreactivity-competent PVG rats and alloreactivity-deficient DA rats. NK cells from both strains are able to lyse standard tumor targets. We identify an autosomal dominant locus, Nka, that controls NK-mediated alloreactivity. Individuals carrying the dominant PVG allele in single dose were fully competent in eliminating allogeneic target cells, suggesting that Nka encodes or regulates a gene product inducing or activating alloreactivity. By linkage analysis and pulsed field gel electrophoresis, a natural killer gene complex (NKC) on rat chromosome 4 is described that contains the rat NKR-P1 and Ly-49 multigene families plus a rat NKG2D homologue. Nka maps within the NKC, together with the most telomeric Ly-49 family members, but separate from NKG2D and the NKR-P1 family. The Nka-encoded response, moreover, correlates with the expression of transcripts for Ly-49 receptors in NK cell populations, as Northern blot analysis demonstrated low expression of Ly-49 genes in DA NK cells, in contrast to high expression in alloreactivity-competent PVG, (DA X PVG)F1, and PVG.1AVI NK cells. The low Ly-49 expression in DA is not induced by MHC haplotype, as demonstrated by high expression of Ly-49 in the DA MHC- congenic PVG.1AVI strain. Finally, we have cloned and characterized the first four members of the rat Ly-49 gene family. Their cytoplasmic domains demonstrate substantial heterogeneity, consistent with the hypothesis that different Ly-49 family members may subserve different signaling functions. PMID:8642329

  3. Identification of p.A684V missense mutation in the WFS1 gene as a frequent cause of autosomal dominant optic atrophy and hearing impairment

    PubMed Central

    Rendtorff, Nanna D.; Lodahl, Marianne; Boulahbel, Houda; Johansen, Ida R.; Pandya, Arti; Welch, Katherine O.; Norris, Virginia W.; Arnos, Kathleen S.; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Emery, Sarah B.; Mets, Marilyn B.; Fagerheim, Toril; Eriksson, Kristina; Hansen, Lars; Bruhn, Helene; Möller, Claes; Lindholm, Sture; Ensgård, Stefan; Lesperance, Marci M.; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth

    2011-01-01

    Optic atrophy (OA) and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) are key abnormalities in several syndromes, including the recessively inherited Wolfram syndrome, caused by mutations in WFS1. In contrast, the association of autosomal dominant OA and SNHL without other phenotypic abnormalities is rare, and almost exclusively attributed to mutations in the Optic Atrophy-1 gene (OPA1), most commonly the p.R445H mutation. We present eight probands and their families from the US, Sweden, and UK with OA and SNHL, whom we analyzed for mutations in OPA1 and WFS1. Among these families, we found three heterozygous missense mutations in WFS1 segregating with OA and SNHL: p.A684V (six families), and two novel mutations, p.G780S and p.D797Y, all involving evolutionarily conserved amino acids and absent from 298 control chromosomes. Importantly, none of these families harbored the OPA1 p.R445H mutation. No mitochondrial DNA deletions were detected in muscle from one p.A684V patient analyzed. Finally, wolframin p.A684V mutant ectopically expressed in HEK cells showed reduced protein levels compared to wild-type wolframin, strongly indicating that the mutation is disease-causing. Our data support OA and SNHL as a phenotype caused by dominant mutations in WFS1 in these additional eight families. Importantly, our data provide the first evidence that a single, recurrent mutation in WFS1, p.A684V, may be a common cause of ADOA and SNHL, similar to the role played by the p.R445H mutation in OPA1. Our findings suggest that patients who are heterozygous for WFS1 missense mutations should be carefully clinically examined for OA and other manifestations of Wolfram syndrome. PMID:21538838

  4. Autosomal-Dominant Corneal Endothelial Dystrophies CHED1 and PPCD1 Are Allelic Disorders Caused by Non-coding Mutations in the Promoter of OVOL2

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Alice E.; Liskova, Petra; Evans, Cerys J.; Dudakova, Lubica; Nosková, Lenka; Pontikos, Nikolas; Hartmannová, Hana; Hodaňová, Kateřina; Stránecký, Viktor; Kozmík, Zbyněk; Levis, Hannah J.; Idigo, Nwamaka; Sasai, Noriaki; Maher, Geoffrey J.; Bellingham, James; Veli, Neyme; Ebenezer, Neil D.; Cheetham, Michael E.; Daniels, Julie T.; Thaung, Caroline M.H.; Jirsova, Katerina; Plagnol, Vincent; Filipec, Martin; Kmoch, Stanislav; Tuft, Stephen J.; Hardcastle, Alison J.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy 1 (CHED1) and posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy 1 (PPCD1) are autosomal-dominant corneal endothelial dystrophies that have been genetically mapped to overlapping loci on the short arm of chromosome 20. We combined genetic and genomic approaches to identify the cause of disease in extensive pedigrees comprising over 100 affected individuals. After exclusion of pathogenic coding, splice-site, and copy-number variations, a parallel approach using targeted and whole-genome sequencing facilitated the identification of pathogenic variants in a conserved region of the OVOL2 proximal promoter sequence in the index families (c.−339_361dup for CHED1 and c.−370T>C for PPCD1). Direct sequencing of the OVOL2 promoter in other unrelated affected individuals identified two additional mutations within the conserved proximal promoter sequence (c.−274T>G and c.−307T>C). OVOL2 encodes ovo-like zinc finger 2, a C2H2 zinc-finger transcription factor that regulates mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition and acts as a direct transcriptional repressor of the established PPCD-associated gene ZEB1. Interestingly, we did not detect OVOL2 expression in the normal corneal endothelium. Our in vitro data demonstrate that all four mutated OVOL2 promoters exhibited more transcriptional activity than the corresponding wild-type promoter, and we postulate that the mutations identified create cryptic cis-acting regulatory sequence binding sites that drive aberrant OVOL2 expression during endothelial cell development. Our data establish CHED1 and PPCD1 as allelic conditions and show that CHED1 represents the extreme of what can be considered a disease spectrum. They also implicate transcriptional dysregulation of OVOL2 as a common cause of dominantly inherited corneal endothelial dystrophies. PMID:26749309

  5. Cranial nerves palsy as an initial feature of an early onset distal hereditary motor neuropathy--a new distal hereditary motor neuropathy phenotype.

    PubMed

    Haberlová, J; Claeys, K G; De Jonghe, P; Seeman, P

    2009-06-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathy is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterised by a pure motor axonal neuropathy. It is occasionally associated with additional signs such as facial weakness, vocal cord paralysis, weakness of the diaphragm, and pyramidal signs. Although predominantly the inheritance is autosomal dominant, all types of inheritance have been described. Here we report a Czech family with cranial nerves palsy as an initial feature of a non progressive infantile onset dominant distal hereditary motor neuropathy. This family may represent a new subtype of distal hereditary motor neuropathy.

  6. Founder Effect of a c.828+3A>T Splice Site Mutation in Peripherin 2 (PRPH2) Causing Autosomal Dominant Retinal Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Suma P.; Birch, David G.; Ruiz, Richard S.; Hughbanks-Wheaton, Dianna K.; Sullivan, Lori S.; Bowne, Sara J.; Stone, Edwin M.; Daiger, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Screening for splice site mutation c.828+3A>T in the peripherin 2 (PRPH2) gene should be a high priority in families with highly variable retinal dystrophies. The correction of missplicing is a potential therapeutic target. Objective To determine the prevalence, genetic origin, and molecular mechanism of a donor c.828+3A>T mutation in the PRPH2 (peripherin 2, retinal degeneration slow) gene in individuals with retinal dystrophies. Design, Setting, and Participants Case-control study that took place at the University of Texas Health Science Center, the University of Iowa, and the Retina Foundation of the Southwest, from January 1, 1987, to August 1, 2014, including affected individuals from 200 families with a diagnosis of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa, 35 families with unspecified macular dystrophies, and 116 families with pattern dystrophy. Participants were screened for the c.828+3A>T mutation by restriction-enzyme digest, single-strand conformational polymorphism screening, or bidirectional sequencing. Haplotypes of polymorphic markers flanking the PRPH2 locus and sequence variants within the gene were determined by denaturing gel electrophoresis or automated capillary-based cycle sequencing. The effect of the splice site mutation on the PRPH2 transcript was analyzed using NetGene2, a splice prediction program and by the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction of illegitimate transcripts from peripheral white blood cells. Main Outcomes and Measures Results of testing for splice site mutation, haplotypes, and alternate transcripts. Results The PRPH2 mutation was found in 97 individuals of 19 independently ascertained families with a clinical diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa, macular dystrophy, and/or pattern dystrophy. All affected individuals also shared a rare haplotype of approximately 644 kilobase pairs containing the c.828+3A>T mutation, which extends from the short tandem repeat polymorphism D6S282 to c.1013G>A (rs434102, a

  7. Immunolocalization of platelet‐derived growth factor receptor‐β (PDGFR‐β) and pericytes in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL)

    PubMed Central

    Fenwick, Richard; Oakley, Arthur E.; Ihara, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Aims Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is identified by aggregates of NOTCH3 extracellular domain (N3ECD) along capillaries and the deposition of granular osmiophilic material (GOM). We assessed the pattern of distribution of pericytes in relation to N3ECD deposits in cerebral microvessels of CADASIL subjects. Methods We assessed post mortem brains from (n = 50) subjects with CADASIL, cerebral small vessel disease, and similar‐age cognitively normal and older controls. Immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent staining methods were used to study the distribution and quantify immunoreactivities of the platelet‐derived growth factor receptor‐β (PDGFR‐β) (for pericytes) and microvascular markers in the frontal cortex and white matter. Results PDGFR‐β antibody stained cells typical of pericytes in capillaries and small arterioles in both the grey and white matter. PDGFR‐β reactive pericytes adopted ‘crescent’ morphology wrapped closely around capillary walls readily evident in cross‐sections. We noted considerable overlap between PDGFR‐β and N3ECD imunoreactivities in capillaries. Quantitative analysis of PDGFR‐β immunoreactivity revealed significant differences in PDGFR‐β %A in CADASIL compared with young controls (P < 0.05). PDGFR‐β %A was further positively correlated with the basement membrane marker collagen IV (r = 0.529, P = 0.009), but was not associated with GLUT‐1, the marker for endothelial cells. Conclusions Our results suggest increased expression of PDGFR‐β immunoreactive pericytes in cerebral microvessels in CADASIL compared with similar age controls. While we cannot confirm whether PDGFR‐β‐expressing pericytes produce N3ECD and hence GOM, our findings demonstrate that up‐regulation of pericyte‐like cells is associated with microvascular changes, including loss of vascular smooth muscle cells in CADASIL. PMID:25303037

  8. Celecoxib inhibits growth of human autosomal dominant polycystic kidney cyst-lining epithelial cells through the VEGF/Raf/MAPK/ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Wang, Nian-Song; Fu, Li-Li; Ye, Chao-Yang; Yu, Sheng-Qiang; Mei, Chang-Lin

    2012-07-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a progressive chronic kidney disease. To date there are no effective medicines to halt development and growth of cysts. In the present study, we explored novel effects of celecoxib (CXB), a COX-2 specific inhibitor, on primary cultures of human ADPKD cyst-lining epithelial cells. Primary cultures of ADPKD cyst-lining epithelial cells were obtained from five patients. Effects of CXB were measured by various assays to detect BrdU incorporation, apoptosis and proliferation in vitro. Additionally, effects of CXB on kidney weight, the cyst index, the fibrosis index, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (SCr), serum 6-keto-PGF-1α, serum thromboxane-2 (TXB2) and renal PCNA expression were assessed in Han:SPRD rat, a well-characterized rodent model of PKD. CXB inhibited proliferation of ADPKD cyst-lining epithelial cells, blocked the release of VEGF from the cells and induced extensive apoptosis in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, CXB up-regulated the cell cycle negative regulator p21(CIP/WAF1) and the cell cycle positive regulator Cyclin A, blocked ERK1/2 phosphorylation, induced apoptotic factors (Bax and caspase-3) and reduced Bcl-2. Furthermore, CXB inhibited the expression of VEGFR-2 and Raf-1 in ADPKD cyst-lining epithelial cells. CXB markedly reduced the cyst index, the fibrosis index, leukocyte infiltration, BUN, SCr, serum 6-keto-PGF-1α, TXB2 and renal PCNA expression in Han:SPRD rat. We demonstrated for the first time that CXB could suppress renal cyst-lining growth both in vitro and in vivo in Han:SPRD rat. CXB can inhibit proliferation, suppress cell cycle progression, and induce apoptosis in ADPKD cyst-lining epithelial cells through the inhibition of the VEGF/VEGFR-2/Raf-1/MAPK/ERK signaling pathway.

  9. Autosomal Dominant Retinal Dystrophies Caused by a Founder Splice Site Mutation, c.828+3A>T, in PRPH2 and Protein Haplotypes in trans as Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Suma P.; Hughbanks-Wheaton, Dianna K.; Birch, David G.; Sullivan, Lori S.; Conneely, Karen N.; Bowne, Sara J.; Stone, Edwin M.; Daiger, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We determined the phenotypic variation, disease progression, and potential modifiers of autosomal dominant retinal dystrophies caused by a splice site founder mutation, c.828+3A>T, in the PRPH2 gene. Methods A total of 62 individuals (19 families) harboring the PRPH2 c.828+3A>T mutation, had phenotype analysis by fundus appearance, electrophysiology, and visual fields. The PRPH2 haplotypes in trans were sequenced for potential modifying variants and generalized estimating equations (GEE) used for statistical analysis. Results Several distinct phenotypes caused by the PRPH2 c.828+3A>T mutation were observed and fell into two clinical categories: Group I (N = 44) with mild pattern dystrophies (PD) and Group II (N = 18) with more severe cone-rod dystrophy (CRD), retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and central areolar chorioretinal dystrophy (CACD). The PRPH2 Gln304-Lys310-Asp338 protein haplotype in trans was found in Group I only (29.6% vs. 0%), whereas the Glu304-Lys310-Gly338 haplotype was predominant in Group II (94.4% vs. 70.4%). Generalized estimating equations analysis for PD versus the CRD/CACD/RP phenotypes in individuals over 43 years alone with the PRPH2 haplotypes in trans and age as predictors, adjusted for correlation within families, confirmed a significant effect of haplotype on severity (P = 0.03) with an estimated odds ratio of 7.16 (95% confidence interval [CI] = [2.8, 18.4]). Conclusions The PRPH2 c.828+3A>T mutation results in multiple distinct phenotypes likely modified by protein haplotypes in trans; the odds of having the CACD/RP-like phenotype (versus the PD phenotype) are 7.16 times greater with a Glu304-Lys310-Gly338 haplotype in trans. Further functional studies of the modifying haplotypes in trans and PRPH2 splice variants may offer therapeutic targets. PMID:26842753

  10. Autosomal-dominant retinitis pigmentosa caused by a mutation in SNRNP200, a gene required for unwinding of U4/U6 snRNAs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chen; Bellur, Deepti L; Lu, Shasha; Zhao, Feng; Grassi, Michael A; Bowne, Sara J; Sullivan, Lori S; Daiger, Stephen P; Chen, Li Jia; Pang, Chi Pui; Zhao, Kanxing; Staley, Jonathan P; Larsson, Catharina

    2009-11-01

    Mutations in genes associated with the U4/U6-U5 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) complex of the spliceosome are implicated in autosomal-dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP), a group of progressive retinal degenerative disorders leading to visual impairment, loss of visual field, and even blindness. We recently assigned a locus (RP33) for adRP to 2cen-q12.1, a region that harbors the SNRNP200 gene encoding hBrr2, another U4/U6-U5 snRNP component that is required for unwinding of U4/U6 snRNAs during spliceosome activation and for disassembly of the spliceosome. Here, we report the identification of a missense mutation, c.3260C>T (p.S1087L), in exon 25 of the SNRNP200 gene in an RP33-linked family. The c.3260C>T substitution showed complete cosegregation with the retinitis pigmentosa (RP) phenotype over four generations, but was absent in a panel of 400 controls. The p.S1087L mutation and p.R1090L, another adRP-associated allele, reside in the "ratchet" helix of the first of two Sec63 domains implicated in the directionality and processivity of nucleic acid unwinding. Indeed, marked defects in U4/U6 unwinding, but not U4/U6-U5 snRNP assembly, were observed in budding yeast for the analogous mutations (N1104L and R1107L) of the corresponding Brr2p residues. The linkage of hBrr2 to adRP suggests that the mechanism of pathogenesis for splicing-factor-related RP may fundamentally derive from a defect in hBrr2-dependent RNA unwinding and a consequent defect in spliceosome activation.

  11. Influence of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene rs4362 polymorphism on the progression of kidney failure in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD)

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Gnanasambandan; Ghosh, Santu; Elumalai, Ramprasad; Periyasamy, Soundararajan; Lakkakula, Bhaskar V.K.S.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is an inherited systemic disorder, characterized by the fluid filled cysts in the kidneys leading to end stage renal failure in later years of life. Hypertension is one of the major factors independently contributing to the chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression. The renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) genes have been extensively studied as hypertension candidate genes. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of angiotensin converting enzyme tagging - single nucleotide polymorphisms (ACE tag-SNPs) in progression of CKD in patients with ADPKD. Methods: In the present study six ACE tagSNPs (angiotensin converting enzyme tag single nucleotide polymorphisms) and insertion/deletion (I/D) in 102 ADPKD patients and 106 control subjects were investigated. The tagSNPs were genotyped using FRET-based KASPar method and ACE ID by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and electrophoresis. Genotypes and haplotypes were compared between ADPKD patients and controls. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the effect of genotypes and hypertension on CKD advancement. Mantel-Haenszel (M-H) stratified analysis was performed to study the relationship between different CKD stages and hypertension and their interaction. Results: All loci were polymorphic and except rs4293 SNP the remaining loci followed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Distribution of ACE genotypes and haplotypes in controls and ADPKD patients was not significant. A significant linkage disequilibrium (LD) was observed between SNPs forming two LD blocks. The univariate analysis revealed that the age, hypertension, family history of diabetes and ACE rs4362 contributed to the advancement of CKD. Interpretation & conclusions: The results suggest that the ACE genotypes are effect modifiers of the relationship between hypertension and CKD advancement among the ADPKD patients. PMID:27748299

  12. A Novel GCAP1 Missense Mutation (L151F) in a Large Family with Autosomal Dominant Cone-Rod Dystrophy (adCORD)

    PubMed Central

    Sokal, Izabela; Dupps, William J.; Grassi, Michael A.; Brown, Jeremiah; Affatigato, Louisa M.; Roychowdhury, Nirmalya; Yang, Lili; Filipek, Slawomir; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Stone, Edwin M.; Baehr, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate the phenotypic and biochemical characteristics of a novel mutation associated with autosomal dominant cone–rod dystrophy (adCORD). Methods Twenty-three family members of a CORD pedigree underwent clinical examinations, including visual acuity tests, standardized full-field ERG, and fundus photography. Genomic DNA was screened for mutations in GCAP1 exons using DNA sequencing and single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. Function and stability of recombinant GCAP1-L151F were tested as a function of [Ca2+], and its structure was probed by molecular dynamics. Results Affected family members experienced dyschromatopsia, hemeralopia, and reduced visual acuity by the second to third decade of life. Electrophysiology revealed a nonrecordable photopic response with later attenuation of the scotopic response. Affected family members harbored a C→T transition in exon 4 of the GCAP1 gene, resulting in an L151F missense mutation affecting the EF hand motif 4 (EF4). This change was absent in 11 unaffected family members and in 100 unrelated normal subjects. GCAP1-L151F stimulation of photoreceptor guanylate cyclase was not completely inhibited at high physiological [Ca2+], consistent with a lowered affinity for Ca2+-binding to EF4. Conclusions A novel L151F mutation in the EF4 hand domain of GCAP1 is associated with adCORD. The clinical phenotype is characterized by early cone dysfunction and a progressive loss of rod function. The biochemical phenotype is best described as persistent stimulation of photoreceptor guanylate cyclase, representing a gain of function of mutant GCAP1. Although a conservative substitution, molecular dynamics suggests a significant change in Ca2+-binding to EF4 and EF2 and changes in the shape of L151F-GCAP1. PMID:15790869

  13. Early atherosclerosis in normotensive patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: the relation between epicardial adipose tissue thickness and carotid intima-media thickness.

    PubMed

    Sag, Saim; Yildiz, Abdulmecit; Gullulu, Sumeyye; Gungoren, Fatih; Ozdemir, Bulent; Cegilli, Ercan; Oruc, Aysegul; Ersoy, Alparslan; Gullulu, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Epicardial adipose tissue thickness (EATT) is suggested as a novel marker of subclinical atherosclerosis. Despite increased carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients, the extent of the relationship between CIMT and EATT is unknown. The main purpose of our study was to evaluate the relation between EATT and CIMT in normotensive ADPKD patients with well-preserved renal function. Fifty-five normotensive ADPKD patients with normal renal function and 50 healthy control subjects were included in the study. EATT and CIMT were measured by echocardiography in all subjects. Correlation between EATT and CIMT was evaluated in ADPKD patients, while multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to determine factors predicting EATT and CIMT. ADPKD patients had significantly higher levels CIMT [0.7 (0.4-1.2) vs. 0.5 (0.4-0.8) mm, p < 0.001] and EATT (6.8 ± 2.7 vs. 4.8 ± 1.2 mm, p < 0.001) as compared with control subjects. Significant positive correlation was found between EATT and CIMT (r = 0.58, p < 0.001). Higher CRP levels (OR 54.7, 95 % CI 37.44-72.01, p < 0.001) and having ADPKD (OR 10.2, 95 % CI 2.53-17.86, p = 0.01) were the only independent factors associated with a higher EATT. A higher age (OR 0.35, 95 % CI -0.02 to 0.71, p = 0.06) tended to be independently associated with a higher EATT. In conclusion, our findings suggest that EATT, being simply measured by echocardiography and correlated with CIMT, can be used to detect subclinical atherosclerosis in normotensive ADPKD patients.

  14. Brief Screening of Vascular Cognitive Impairment in Patients With Cerebral Autosomal-Dominant Arteriopathy With Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy Without Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Hollocks, Matthew J.; Tan, Rhea Y.Y.; Morris, Robin G.; Markus, Hugh S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a monogenic form of cerebral small vessel disease leading to early-onset stroke and dementia, with younger patients frequently showing subclinical deficits in cognition. At present, there are no targeted cognitive screening measures for this population. However, the Brief Memory and Executive Test (BMET) and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) have shown utility in detecting cognitive impairment in sporadic small vessel disease. This study assesses the BMET and the MoCA as clinical tools for detecting mild cognitive deficits in CADASIL. Methods— Sixty-six prospectively recruited patients with CADASIL, and 66 matched controls completed the BMET, with a subset of these also completing the MoCA. Receiver operating characteristic curves were calculated to examine the sensitivity and specificity of clinical cutoffs for the detection of vascular cognitive impairment and reduced activities of daily living. Results— Patients with CADASIL showed more cognitive impairment overall and were poorer on both executive/processing and memory indices of the BMET relative to controls. The BMET showed good accuracy in predicting vascular cognitive impairment (85% sensitivity and 84% specificity) and impaired instrumental activities of daily living (92% sensitivity and 77% specificity). The MoCA also showed good predictive validity for vascular cognitive impairment (80% sensitivity and 78% specificity) and instrumental activities of daily living (75% sensitivity and 76% specificity). The most important background predictor of vascular cognitive impairment was a history of stroke. Conclusions— The results indicate that the BMET and the MoCA are clinically useful and sensitive screening measures for early cognitive impairment in patients with CADASIL. PMID:27625375

  15. Characterization of Autosomal Dominant Hypercholesterolemia Caused by PCSK9 Gain of Function Mutations and Its Specific Treatment With Alirocumab, a PCSK9 Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Defesche, Joep; Fouchier, Sigrid W.; Bruckert, Eric; Luc, Gérald; Cariou, Bertrand; Sjouke, Barbara; Leren, Trond P.; Harada-Shiba, Mariko; Mabuchi, Hiroshi; Rabès, Jean-Pierre; Carrié, Alain; van Heyningen, Charles; Carreau, Valérie; Farnier, Michel; Teoh, Yee P.; Bourbon, Mafalda; Kawashiri, Masa-aki; Nohara, Atsushi; Soran, Handrean; Marais, A. David; Tada, Hayato; Abifadel, Marianne; Boileau, Catherine; Chanu, Bernard; Katsuda, Shoji; Kishimoto, Ichiro; Lambert, Gilles; Makino, Hisashi; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Pichelin, Matthieu; Yagi, Kunimasa; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Zair, Yassine; Mellis, Scott; Yancopoulos, George D.; Stahl, Neil; Mendoza, Johanna; Du, Yunling; Hamon, Sara; Krempf, Michel; Swergold, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Background— Patients with PCSK9 gene gain of function (GOF) mutations have a rare form of autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia. However, data examining their clinical characteristics and geographic distribution are lacking. Furthermore, no randomized treatment study in this population has been reported. Methods and Results— We compiled clinical characteristics of PCSK9 GOF mutation carriers in a multinational retrospective, cross-sectional, observational study. We then performed a randomized placebo-phase, double-blind study of alirocumab 150 mg administered subcutaneously every 2 weeks to 13 patients representing 4 different PCSK9 GOF mutations with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) ≥70 mg/dL on their current lipid-lowering therapies at baseline. Observational study: among 164 patients, 16 different PCSK9 GOF mutations distributed throughout the gene were associated with varying severity of untreated LDL-C levels. Coronary artery disease was common (33%; average age of onset, 49.4 years), and untreated LDL-C concentrations were higher compared with matched carriers of mutations in the LDLR (n=2126) or apolipoprotein B (n=470) genes. Intervention study: in PCSK9 GOF mutation patients randomly assigned to receive alirocumab, mean percent reduction in LDL-C at 2 weeks was 62.5% (P<0.0001) from baseline, 53.7% compared with placebo-treated PCSK9 GOF mutation patients (P=0.0009; primary end point). After all subjects received 8 weeks of alirocumab treatment, LDL-C was reduced by 73% from baseline (P<0.0001). Conclusions— PCSK9 GOF mutation carriers have elevated LDL-C levels and are at high risk of premature cardiovascular disease. Alirocumab, a PCSK9 antibody, markedly lowers LDL-C levels and seems to be well tolerated in these patients. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique Identifier: NCT01604824. PMID:26374825

  16. Autosomal dominant STAT3 deficiency and hyper-IgE syndrome: molecular, cellular, and clinical features from a French national survey.

    PubMed

    Chandesris, Marie-Olivia; Melki, Isabelle; Natividad, Angels; Puel, Anne; Fieschi, Claire; Yun, Ling; Thumerelle, Caroline; Oksenhendler, Eric; Boutboul, David; Thomas, Caroline; Hoarau, Cyrille; Lebranchu, Yvon; Stephan, Jean-Louis; Cazorla, Celine; Aladjidi, Nathalie; Micheau, Marguerite; Tron, François; Baruchel, André; Barlogis, Vincent; Palenzuela, Gilles; Mathey, Catherine; Dominique, Stéphane; Body, Gérard; Munzer, Martine; Fouyssac, Fanny; Jaussaud, Rolland; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Blanche, Stéphane; Debré, Marianne; Le Bourgeois, Muriel; Gandemer, Virginie; Lambert, Nathalie; Grandin, Virginie; Ndaga, Stéphanie; Jacques, Corinne; Harre, Chantal; Forveille, Monique; Alyanakian, Marie-Alexandra; Durandy, Anne; Bodemer, Christine; Suarez, Felipe; Hermine, Olivier; Lortholary, Olivier; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Fischer, Alain; Picard, Capucine

    2012-07-01

    Autosomal dominant deficiency of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is the main genetic etiology of hyper-immunoglobulin (Ig) E syndrome. We documented the molecular, cellular, and clinical features of 60 patients with heterozygous STAT3 mutations from 47 kindreds followed in France. We identified 11 known and 13 new mutations of STAT3. Low levels of interleukin (IL)-6-dependent phosphorylation and nuclear translocation (or accumulation) of STAT3 were observed in Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B lymphocytes (EBV-B cells) from all STAT3-deficient patients tested. The immunologic phenotype was characterized by high serum IgE levels (96% of the patients), memory B-cell lymphopenia (94.5%), and hypereosinophilia (80%). A low proportion of IL-17A-producing circulating T cells was found in 14 of the 15 patients tested. Mucocutaneous infections were the most frequent, typically caused by Staphylococcus aureus (all patients) and Candida albicans (85%). Up to 90% of the patients had pneumonia, mostly caused by Staph. aureus (31%) or Streptococcus pneumoniae (30%). Recurrent pneumonia was associated with secondary bronchiectasis and pneumatocele (67%), as well as secondary aspergillosis (22%). Up to 92% of the patients had dermatitis and connective tissue abnormalities, with facial dysmorphism (95%), retention of decidual teeth (65%), osteopenia (50%), and hyperextensibility (50%). Four patients developed non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The clinical outcome was favorable, with 56 patients, including 43 adults, still alive at the end of study (mean age, 21 yr; range, 1 mo to 46 yr). Only 4 patients died, 3 from severe bacterial infection (aged 1, 15, and 29 yr, respectively). Antibiotic prophylaxis (90% of patients), antifungal prophylaxis (50%), and IgG infusions (53%) improved patient health, as demonstrated by the large decrease in pneumonia recurrence. Overall, the prognosis of STAT3 deficiency may be considered good, provided that multiple prophylactic

  17. Autosomal Dominant STAT3 Deficiency and Hyper-IgE Syndrome Molecular, Cellular, and Clinical Features From a French National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Chandesris, Marie-Olivia; Melki, Isabelle; Natividad, Angels; Puel, Anne; Fieschi, Claire; Yun, Ling; Thumerelle, Caroline; Oksenhendler, Eric; Boutboul, David; Thomas, Caroline; Hoarau, Cyrille; Lebranchu, Yvon; Stephan, Jean-Louis; Cazorla, Celine; Aladjidi, Nathalie; Micheau, Marguerite; Tron, Fran[cedil]cois; Baruchel, Andre; Barlogis, Vincent; Palenzuela, Gilles; Mathey, Catherine; Dominique, Stephane; Body, Gerard; Munzer, Martine; Fouyssac, Fanny; Jaussaud, Rolland; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Blanche, Stephane; Debre, Marianne; Le Bourgeois, Muriel; Gandemer, Virginie; Lambert, Nathalie; Grandin, Virginie; Ndaga, Stephanie; Jacques, Corinne; Harre, Chantal; Forveille, Monique; Alyanakian, Marie-Alexandra; Durandy, Anne; Bodemer, Christine; Suarez, Felipe; Hermine, Olivier; Lortholary, Olivier; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Fischer, Alain; Picard, Capucine

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal dominant deficiency of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is the main genetic etiology of hyper-immunoglobulin (Ig) E syndrome. We documented the molecular, cellular, and clinical features of 60 patients with heterozygous STAT3 mutations from 47 kindreds followed in France. We identified 11 known and 13 new mutations of STAT3. Low levels of interleukin (IL)-6-dependent phosphorylation and nuclear translocation (or accumulation) of STAT3 were observed in Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B lymphocytes (EBV-B cells) from all STAT3-deficient patients tested. The immunologic phenotype was characterized by high serum IgE levels (96% of the patients), memory B-cell lymphopenia (94.5%), and hypereosinophilia (80%). A low proportion of IL-17A-producing circulating T cells was found in 14 of the 15 patients tested. Mucocutaneous infections were the most frequent, typically caused by Staphylococcus aureus (all patients) and Candida albicans (85%). Up to 90% of the patients had pneumonia, mostly caused by Staph. aureus (31%) or Streptococcus pneumoniae (30%). Recurrent pneumonia was associated with secondary bronchiectasis and pneumatocele (67%), as well as secondary aspergillosis (22%). Up to 92% of the patients had dermatitis and connective tissue abnormalities, with facial dysmorphism (95%), retention of decidual teeth (65%), osteopenia (50%), and hyperextensibility (50%). Four patients developed non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The clinical outcome was favorable, with 56 patients, including 43 adults, still alive at the end of study (mean age, 21 yr; range, 1 mo to 46 yr). Only 4 patients died, 3 from severe bacterial infection (aged 1, 15, and 29 yr, respectively). Antibiotic prophylaxis (90% of patients), antifungal prophylaxis (50%), and IgG infusions (53%) improved patient health, as demonstrated by the large decrease in pneumonia recurrence. Overall, the prognosis of STAT3 deficiency may be considered good, provided that multiple prophylactic

  18. Nicotine-induced dystonic arousal complex in a mouse line harboring a human autosomal-dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy mutation.

    PubMed

    Teper, Yaroslav; Whyte, Douglas; Cahir, Elizabeth; Lester, Henry A; Grady, Sharon R; Marks, Michael J; Cohen, Bruce N; Fonck, Carlos; McClure-Begley, Tristan; McIntosh, J Michael; Labarca, Cesar; Lawrence, Andrew; Chen, Feng; Gantois, Ilse; Davies, Philip J; Petrou, Steven; Murphy, Mark; Waddington, John; Horne, Malcolm K; Berkovic, Samuel F; Drago, John

    2007-09-19

    We generated a mouse line harboring an autosomal-dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) mutation: the alpha4 nicotinic receptor S248F knock-in strain. In this mouse, modest nicotine doses (1-2 mg/kg) elicit a novel behavior termed the dystonic arousal complex (DAC). The DAC includes stereotypical head movements, body jerking, and forelimb dystonia; these behaviors resemble some core features of ADNFLE. A marked Straub tail is an additional component of the DAC. Similar to attacks in ADNFLE, the DAC can be partially suppressed by the sodium channel blocker carbamazepine or by pre-exposure to a very low dose of nicotine (0.1 mg/kg). The DAC is centrally mediated, genetically highly penetrant, and, surprisingly, not associated with overt ictal electrical activity as assessed by (1) epidural or frontal lobe depth-electrode electroencephalography or (2) hippocampal c-fos-regulated gene expression. Heterozygous knock-in mice are partially protected from nicotine-induced seizures. The noncompetitive antagonist mecamylamine does not suppress the DAC, although it suppresses high-dose nicotine-induced wild-type-like seizures. Experiments on agonist-induced 86Rb+ and neurotransmitter efflux from synaptosomes and on alpha4S248Fbeta2 receptors expressed in oocytes confirm that the S248F mutation confers resistance to mecamylamine blockade. Genetic background, gender, and mutant gene expression levels modulate expression of the DAC phenotype in mice. The S248F mouse thus appears to provide a model for the paroxysmal dystonic element of ADNFLE semiology. Our model complements what is seen in other ADNFLE animal models. Together, these mice cover the spectrum of behavioral and electrographic events seen in the human condition.

  19. Automatic total kidney volume measurement on follow-up magnetic resonance images to facilitate monitoring of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Timothy L.; Korfiatis, Panagiotis; Edwards, Marie E.; Warner, Joshua D.; Irazabal, Maria V.; King, Bernard F.; Torres, Vicente E.; Erickson, Bradley J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Renal imaging examinations provide high-resolution information about the anatomic structure of the kidneys and are used to measure total kidney volume (TKV) in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients. TKV has become the gold-standard image biomarker for ADPKD progression at early stages of the disease and is used in clinical trials to characterize treatment efficacy. Automated methods to segment the kidneys and measure TKV are desirable because of the long time requirement for manual approaches such as stereology or planimetry tracings. However, ADPKD kidney segmentation is complicated by a number of factors, including irregular kidney shapes and variable tissue signal at the kidney borders. Methods We describe an image processing approach that overcomes these problems by using a baseline segmentation initialization to provide automatic segmentation of follow-up scans obtained years apart. We validated our approach using 20 patients with complete baseline and follow-up T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. Both manual tracing and stereology were used to calculate TKV, with two observers performing manual tracings and one observer performing repeat tracings. Linear correlation and Bland–Altman analysis were performed to compare the different approaches. Results Our automated approach measured TKV at a level of accuracy (mean difference ± standard error = 0.99 ± 0.79%) on par with both intraobserver (0.77 ± 0.46%) and interobserver variability (1.34 ± 0.70%) of manual tracings. All approaches had excellent agreement and compared favorably with ground-truth manual tracing with interobserver, stereological and automated approaches having 95% confidence intervals ∼±100 mL. Conclusions Our method enables fast, cost-effective and reproducible quantification of ADPKD progression that will facilitate and lower the costs of clinical trials in ADPKD and other disorders requiring accurate, longitudinal kidney quantification. In

  20. Structure-Function Modeling of Optical Coherence Tomography and Standard Automated Perimetry in the Retina of Patients with Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Travis B.; Parker, Maria; Steinkamp, Peter N.; Weleber, Richard G.; Smith, Ning; Wilson, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess relationships between structural and functional biomarkers, including new topographic measures of visual field sensitivity, in patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Methods Spectral domain optical coherence tomography line scans and hill of vision (HOV) sensitivity surfaces from full-field standard automated perimetry were semi-automatically aligned for 60 eyes of 35 patients. Structural biomarkers were extracted from outer retina b-scans along horizontal and vertical midlines. Functional biomarkers were extracted from local sensitivity profiles along the b-scans and from the full visual field. These included topographic measures of functional transition such as the contour of most rapid sensitivity decline around the HOV, herein called HOV slope for convenience. Biomarker relationships were assessed pairwise by coefficients of determination (R2) from mixed-effects analysis with automatic model selection. Results Structure-function relationships were accurately modeled (conditional R2>0.8 in most cases). The best-fit relationship models and correlation patterns for horizontally oriented biomarkers were different than vertically oriented ones. The structural biomarker with the largest number of significant functional correlates was the ellipsoid zone (EZ) width, followed by the total photoreceptor layer thickness. The strongest correlation observed was between EZ width and HOV slope distance (marginal R2 = 0.85, p<10−10). The mean sensitivity defect at the EZ edge was 7.6 dB. Among all functional biomarkers, the HOV slope mean value, HOV slope mean distance, and maximum sensitivity along the b-scan had the largest number of significant structural correlates. Conclusions Topographic slope metrics show promise as functional biomarkers relevant to the transition zone. EZ width is strongly associated with the location of most rapid HOV decline. PMID:26845445

  1. Combination of Whole Genome Sequencing, Linkage, and Functional Studies Implicates a Missense Mutation in Titin as a Cause of Autosomal Dominant Cardiomyopathy With Features of Left Ventricular Noncompaction

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Robert; de Villiers, Carin P.; Hooper, Charlotte; Ormondroyd, Liz; Pagnamenta, Alistair; Lise, Stefano; Salatino, Silvia; Knight, Samantha J.L.; Taylor, Jenny C.; Thomson, Kate L.; Arnold, Linda; Chatziefthimiou, Spyros D.; Konarev, Petr V.; Wilmanns, Matthias; Ehler, Elisabeth; Ghisleni, Andrea; Gautel, Mathias; Blair, Edward; Watkins, Hugh

    2016-01-01

    Background— High throughput next-generation sequencing techniques have made whole genome sequencing accessible in clinical practice; however, the abundance of variation in the human genomes makes the identification of a disease-causing mutation on a background of benign rare variants challenging. Methods and Results— Here we combine whole genome sequencing with linkage analysis in a 3-generation family affected by cardiomyopathy with features of autosomal dominant left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy. A missense mutation in the giant protein titin is the only plausible disease-causing variant that segregates with disease among the 7 surviving affected individuals, with interrogation of the entire genome excluding other potential causes. This A178D missense mutation, affecting a conserved residue in the second immunoglobulin-like domain of titin, was introduced in a bacterially expressed recombinant protein fragment and biophysically characterized in comparison to its wild-type counterpart. Multiple experiments, including size exclusion chromatography, small-angle x ray scattering, and circular dichroism spectroscopy suggest partial unfolding and domain destabilization in the presence of the mutation. Moreover, binding experiments in mammalian cells show that the mutation markedly impairs binding to the titin ligand telethonin. Conclusions— Here we present genetic and functional evidence implicating the novel A178D missense mutation in titin as the cause of a highly penetrant familial cardiomyopathy with features of left ventricular noncompaction. This expands the spectrum of titin’s roles in cardiomyopathies. It furthermore highlights that rare titin missense variants, currently often ignored or left uninterpreted, should be considered to be relevant for cardiomyopathies and can be identified by the approach presented here. PMID:27625337

  2. A Novel Haplotype with the R345W Mutation in the EFEMP1 Gene Associated with Autosomal Dominant Drusen in a Japanese Family

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Tomokazu; Bedell, Matthew; Zhang, Kang; Yamada, Hisashi; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To describe ophthalmic and molecular genetic findings in a family of Japanese patients with Malattia leventinese (ML)/Doyne honeycomb retinal dystrophy (DHRD), also known as autosomal dominant drusen. Methods. Four patients with ML/DHRD, including a 42-year-old female proband, were ascertained. The proband underwent complete ophthalmic examinations, including fundus and electrodiagnostic investigations, and Humphrey visual field (VF) perimetry. Mutation screening of the EFEMP1 gene and haplotype analysis were performed in the family, an Indian ML/DHRD family, and a branch of 1 of 39 ML/DHRD families in the United States, in which all affected patients shared a common haplotype. Results. A heterozygous missense mutation (p.R345W) was identified in all four Japanese patients and in affected patients of the other two families. This mutation was the only mutation that has been exclusively found in the gene. The disease haplotype in the Japanese family was different from those of the other two families. Clinically, central retinas were prominently affected in the proband and her mother, and subsequently the proband developed subfoveal choroidal neovascularization in the left eye, whereas her younger sister with the mutation, who was asymptomatic, exhibited only fine macular drusen. Long-term follow-up of Humphrey VF and multifocal-electroretinography (mfERG) in the proband also revealed progressive attenuation of macular function in the right eye. Conclusions. This is the first report to describe a Japanese family with variable expressivity of ML/DHRD, in which a novel disease haplotype was identified. Humphrey VF and mfERG testing may be helpful in determining the long-term outcome of macular function. PMID:19850834

  3. The Pattern of Retinal Ganglion Cell Loss in OPA1-Related Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy Inferred From Temporal, Spatial, and Chromatic Sensitivity Losses

    PubMed Central

    Majander, Anna; João, Catarina; Rider, Andrew T.; Henning, G. Bruce; Votruba, Marcela; Moore, Anthony T.; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Stockman, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Progressive retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss is the pathological hallmark of autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA) caused by pathogenic OPA1 mutations. The aim of this study was to conduct an in-depth psychophysical study of the visual losses in DOA and to infer any selective vulnerability of visual pathways subserved by different RGC subtypes. Methods We recruited 25 patients carrying pathogenic OPA1 mutations and age-matched healthy individuals. Spatial contrast sensitivity functions (SCSFs) and chromatic contrast sensitivity were quantified, the latter using the Cambridge Colour Test. In 11 patients, long (L) and short (S) wavelength–sensitive cone temporal acuities were measured as a function of target illuminance, and L-cone temporal contrast sensitivity (TCSF) as a function of temporal frequency. Results Spatial contrast sensitivity functions were abnormal, with the loss of sensitivity increasing with spatial frequency. Further, the highest L-cone temporal acuity fell on average by 10 Hz and the TCSFs by 0.66 log10 unit. Chromatic thresholds along the protan, deutan, and tritan axes were 8, 9, and 14 times higher than normal, respectively, with losses increasing with age and S-cone temporal acuity showing the most significant age-related decline. Conclusions Losses of midget parvocellular, parasol magnocellular, and bistratified koniocellular RGCs could account for the losses of high spatial frequency sensitivity and protan and deutan sensitivities, high temporal frequency sensitivity, and S-cone temporal and tritan sensitivities, respectively. The S-cone–related losses showed a significant deterioration with increasing patient age and could therefore prove useful biomarkers of disease progression in DOA. PMID:28125838

  4. Cyst infection in hospital-admitted autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients is predominantly multifocal and associated with kidney and liver volume.

    PubMed

    Balbo, B E P; Sapienza, M T; Ono, C R; Jayanthi, S K; Dettoni, J B; Castro, I; Onuchic, L F

    2014-07-01

    Positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has improved cyst infection (CI) management in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The determinants of kidney and/or liver involvement, however, remain uncertain. In this study, we evaluated clinical and imaging factors associated with CI in kidney (KCI) and liver (LCI) in ADPKD. A retrospective cohort study was performed in hospital-admitted ADPKD patients with suspected CI. Clinical, imaging and surgical data were analyzed. Features of infected cysts were evaluated by PET/CT. Total kidney (TKV) and liver (TLV) volumes were measured by CT-derived multiplanar reconstruction. CI was detected in 18 patients who experienced 24 episodes during an interval of 30 months (LCI in 12, KCI in 10 and concomitant infection in 2). Sensitivities of CT, magnetic resonance imaging and PET/CT were 25.0, 71.4, and 95.0%. Dysuria (P<0.05), positive urine culture (P<0.01), and previous hematuria (P<0.05) were associated with KCI. Weight loss (P<0.01) and increased C-reactive protein levels (P<0.05) were associated with LCI. PET/CT revealed that three or more infected cysts were present in 70% of the episodes. TKV was higher in kidney-affected than in LCI patients (AUC=0.91, P<0.05), with a cut-off of 2502 mL (72.7% sensitivity, 100.0% specificity). TLV was higher in liver-affected than in KCI patients (AUC=0.89, P<0.01) with a cut-off of 2815 mL (80.0% sensitivity, 87.5% specificity). A greater need for invasive procedures was observed in LCI (P<0.01), and the overall mortality was 20.8%. This study supports PET/CT as the most sensitive imaging method for diagnosis of cyst infection, confirms the multifocal nature of most hospital-admitted episodes, and reveals an association of kidney and liver volumes with this complication.

  5. Mutations in SPECC1L, encoding sperm antigen with calponin homology and coiled-coil domains 1-like, are found in some cases of autosomal dominant Opitz G/BBB syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kruszka, Paul; Li, Dong; Harr, Margaret H; Wilson, Nathan R; Swarr, Daniel; McCormick, Elizabeth M; Chiavacci, Rosetta M; Li, Mindy; Martinez, Ariel F; Hart, Rachel A; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Deardorff, Matthew A; Falk, Marni J; Allanson, Judith E; Hudson, Cindy; Johnson, John P; Saadi, Irfan; Hakonarson, Hakon; Muenke, Maximilian; Zackai, Elaine H

    2015-01-01

    Background Opitz G/BBB syndrome is a heterogeneous disorder characterised by variable expression of midline defects including cleft lip and palate, hypertelorism, laryngealtracheoesophageal anomalies, congenital heart defects, and hypospadias. The X-linked form of the condition has been associated with mutations in the MID1 gene on Xp22. The autosomal dominant form has been linked to chromosome 22q11.2, although the causative gene has yet to be elucidated. Methods and results In this study, we performed whole exome sequencing on DNA samples from a three-generation family with characteristics of Opitz G/BBB syndrome with negative MID1 sequencing. We identified a heterozygous missense mutation c.1189A>C (p.Thr397Pro) in SPECC1L, located at chromosome 22q11.23. Mutation screening of an additional 19 patients with features of autosomal dominant Opitz G/BBB syndrome identified a c.3247G>A ( p.Gly1083Ser) mutation segregating with the phenotype in another three-generation family. Conclusions Previously, SPECC1L was shown to be required for proper facial morphogenesis with disruptions identified in two patients with oblique facial clefts. Collectively, these data demonstrate that SPECC1L mutations can cause syndromic forms of facial clefting including some cases of autosomal dominant Opitz G/BBB syndrome and support the original linkage to chromosome 22q11.2. PMID:25412741

  6. Autosomal recessive

    MedlinePlus

    ... and the other gene comes from the father. Recessive inheritance means both genes in a pair must be abnormal to cause ... born to parents who carry the same autosomal recessive change ... abnormal gene from both parents and developing the disease. You ...

  7. Refined genetic mapping of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa locus RP18 reduces the critical region to 2 cM between D1S442 and D1S2858 on chromosome 1q.

    PubMed

    Xu, S Y; Rosenberg, T; Gal, A

    1998-04-01

    Linkage analysis was performed on a large Danish family to refine the position of RP18, the locus for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa, mapped previously between D1S534 and D1S305 in chromosome 1p13-q21. We genotyped the family members for five microsatellite-type DNA polymorphisms and mapped RP18 between D1S422 and D1S2858 to a region of less than 2 cM. No obvious candidate gene has yet been assigned to the chromosomal interval defined here.

  8. Refinement of the OPA1 gene locus on chromosome 3q28-q29 to a region of 2-8 cM, in one Cuban pedigree with autosomal dominant optic atrophy type Kjer

    SciTech Connect

    Lunkes, A.; Hartung, U.; Auburger, G.

    1995-10-01

    Kjer type autosomal dominant optic atrophy was reported to have a prevalence of 1:50,000 and is therefore the most common form of familial optic atrophy. Age at onset and chronic progressive course were used as subclassification criteria by Kjer, Jaeger, and Smith, stating that almost all cases manifested subacutely before 8 years of age. Typically, tritan color defects and small paracentral scotomas are found together with both variable reduction of visual acuity, of approximately 0.3/0.1, and a temporal pallor on fundoscopy. Pathologically the retinal ganglion cells are affected, resulting in a progressive degeneration of the optic nerve. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies Atypical Welander Distal Myopathy in Patient

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Patrick; Jackson, Jessica; Harris, Kimberly; Selcen, Duygu; Dimberg, Elliot; Atwal, Paldeep

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Welander distal myopathy is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by muscle weakness in the hands and feet. Exome sequencing of affected families discovered a segregating p.Glu384Lys pathogenic variant in TIA-1 as the main genetic cause of Welander distal myopathy. TIA-1 encodes an RNA-binding protein which serves as a key component of stress granules. This protein also regulates splicing and translation of mRNA. Our patient developed progressive weakness in his hands and feet during his late 40s that was misdiagnosed as a neuropathy that caused muscle atrophy. Follow-up genetic testing revealed a p.Glu384Lys pathogenic variant in TIA-1, and he was then diagnosed with Welander distal myopathy. Our case report underlines the importance of electrodiagnostic and genetic testing of patients. PMID:28221306

  10. The chromosome 16q-linked autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (16q-ADCA): A newly identified degenerative ataxia in Japan showing peculiar morphological changes of the Purkinje cell: The 50th Anniversary of Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kinya; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2010-10-01

    The chromosome 16q22.1-linked autosomal-dominant cerebellar ataxia (16q-ADCA) is a form of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) common in Japan. It is clinically characterized by late-onset purely cerebellar ataxia. The neuropathologic hallmark of 16q-ADCA is degeneration of Purkinje cells accompanied by an eosinophilic structure which we named "halo-like amorphous materials". By immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy, the structure has been so far found to contain two components: the somatic sprouts from the Purkinje cells and presynaptic terminals of unknown origin. As far as we are aware, this peculiar morphological change of Purkinje cells has not been previously described. Further investigations may disclose unique pathological processes in SCA.

  11. Absence of distal interphalangeal creases of fingers with flexion limitation.

    PubMed Central

    Fried, K; Mundel, G

    1976-01-01

    An Ashkenazi Jewish family is described, in which absence of distal interphalangeal creases of fingers with flexion limitation is transmitted through 4 generations with 8 affected individuals. The malformation is caused by an autosomal dominant gene with full penetrance and variable expressivity, and causes only little inconvenience. In one case the joints were normal on radiological examination. The malformation was not associated with any other anomaly except in the propositus who was referred becaused of profound mental retardation and cerebral palsy. This association is probably fortuitous as the other affected members were of above average intelligence. We were unable to find any report on this anomaly without associated malformations. Images PMID:933109

  12. Absence of distal interphalangeal creases of fingers with flexion limitation.

    PubMed

    Fried, K; Mundel, G

    1976-04-01

    An Ashkenazi Jewish family is described, in which absence of distal interphalangeal creases of fingers with flexion limitation is transmitted through 4 generations with 8 affected individuals. The malformation is caused by an autosomal dominant gene with full penetrance and variable expressivity, and causes only little inconvenience. In one case the joints were normal on radiological examination. The malformation was not associated with any other anomaly except in the propositus who was referred becaused of profound mental retardation and cerebral palsy. This association is probably fortuitous as the other affected members were of above average intelligence. We were unable to find any report on this anomaly without associated malformations.

  13. Complete Heart Block with Diastolic Heart Failure and Pulmonary Edema Secondary to Enlarging Previously Diagnosed Thrombosed Aneurysm of Sinus of Valsalva in a Patient with History of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Eltawansy, Sherif Ali; Thomas, Maria Joana; Daniels, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is associated with vascular aneurysms that can affect any part of the vascular tree, like ascending aorta or coronary arteries. Sinus of Valsalva is known as an anatomical dilation at the root of aorta above the aortic valve and very few cases show aneurysm at that site in patients with ADPKD. Sinus of Valsalva aneurysm (SVA) can present with rupture and acute heart failure and infective endocarditis or could be asymptomatic accidentally discovered during cardiac catheterization. We report a case of a 76-year-old male with a unique constellation of cardiovascular anomalies associated with ADPKD. Patient was previously diagnosed with aneurysms affecting ascending aorta, sinus of Valsalva, and coronary arteries. Several years later, he came with complete heart block which was discovered later to be secondary to enlargement of his previously diagnosed thrombosed SVA. His case was complicated with acute heart failure and pulmonary edema. Conclusion. Patients with ADPKD can present with extrarenal manifestations. In our case, aneurysm at sinus of Valsalva was progressively enlarging and presented with complete heart block. PMID:25861484

  14. A gene for autosomal dominant paroxysmal choreoathetosis/spasticity (CSE) maps to the vicinity of a potassium channel gene cluster on chromosome 1p, probably within 2 cM between D1S443 and D1S197

    SciTech Connect

    Auburger, G.; Ratzlaff, T.; Lunkes, A.; Nelles, H.W.

    1996-01-01

    Paroxysmal choreoathetosis/episodic ataxia is a heterogeneous neurological syndrome usually inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Recently, the association of one form of episodic ataxia (defined by the presence of additional myokymia) with point mutations in the potassium channel gene KCNA1 was described. This gene locus on chromosome 12p (HGMW-approved symbol CSE) was excluded in a large pedigree with paroxysmal choreoathetosis and additional spasticity. Linkage to chromosome 1p where a cluster of related potassium channel genes is located, was demonstrated. Genotyping of 18 affected and 11 unaffected family members with 28 microsatellites over a region of 45 cM proved linkage with a lod score of 7.2 at a recombination fraction {theta}=0 to D1S451/421/447/GGAT4C11. Crossing-over events in 9 patients and 4 unaffected offspring suggested a probable assignment of the gene to a region of 2 cM between D1S443 and D1S197. 24 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Detection of complement factor B in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy disease using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Unlü, M; de Lange, R P; de Silva, R; Kalaria, R; St Clair, D

    2000-03-24

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a hereditary condition with onset in mid-adulthood and is associated with mutations in the Notch-3 gene. (Joutel, A., Corepechot, C., Ducros, A., Vahedi, K., Chabriat, H., Mouton, P., Alamowitch, S., Domenda, V., Cecilion, M., Marechal, J., Vayssiere, C., Cruaud, C., Cabanis, E.A., Ruchoux, M.M. , Weissenvach, J., Bach, J.F., Bousser, M.G. and Tournier-Lasserve, E., Notch3 mutations in CADASIL, a hereditary adult-onset condition causing stroke and dementia. Nature, 383 (1996) 707-710) Ultrastructural examination of the pathology of the cerebral infarcts reveals deposits in the vascular smooth muscle cells of the small arteries of the brain, but there is no obvious indication how the Notch-3 mutations give rise the observed pathology, nor is there any information on the exact nature of the deposits. We have investigated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from three CADASIL cases with known mutations in Notch-3 using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. CSF from these patients was compared to that of six controls. We detected a single spot in the protein maps of patients which was absent from all the controls. In-gel tryptic digestion of this protein followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the tryptic fragments and a database search identified the spot as human complement factor B. These preliminary findings suggest that the alternative complement pathway may play a role in the pathogenesis of CADASIL.

  16. The gene for autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia (SCAI) maps centromeric to D6S89 and shows no recombination, in nine large kindreds, with a dinucleotide repeat at the AM10 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Kwiatkowski, T.J. Jr.; Zoghbi, H.Y.; Beaudet, A.L.; Banfi, S.; McCall, A.E. ); Orr, H.T.; Duvick, L.A.; Ranum, L.P.W. ); Jodice, C.; Persichetti, F.; Novelletto, A.; Terrenato, L. ); LeBorgne-DeMarquoy, F. ); Subramony, S.H. )

    1993-08-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is an autosomal dominant disorder which is genetically linked to the short arm of chromosome 6, telomeric to the human major histocompatibility complex (HLA) and very close to D6S89. Previous multipoint linkage analysis using HLA, D6S89, and SCA1 suggested that SCA1 maps centromeric to D5S89. Data from this study using nine large kindreds indicate a maximum lod score between SCA1 and D6S89 of 67.58 at a maximum recombination fraction of .004. To localize SCA1 more precisely, the authors identified five dinucleotide polymorphisms near D6S89. Genotypic analyses at these polymorphic loci were carried out in nine multigeneration SCA1 kindreds and in the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain reference families. A new marker, AM10GA, demonstrates no recombination with SCA1. The maximum lod score for AM10GA linkage to SCA1 is 42.14 at a recombination fraction of 0. Linkage analysis and analysis of recombination events confirm that SCA1 maps centromeric to D6S89 and establish the following order: CEN-D6S109-AM10GA/SCA1-D6S89-LR40-D6S202-TEL. 20 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Transthyretin V122I (pV142I)* cardiac amyloidosis: an age-dependent autosomal dominant cardiomyopathy too common to be overlooked as a cause of significant heart disease in elderly African Americans.

    PubMed

    Buxbaum, Joel N; Ruberg, Frederick L

    2017-01-19

    Since the identification of a valine-to-isoleucine substitution at position 122 (TTR V122I; pV142I) in the transthyretin (TTR)-derived fibrils extracted from the heart of a patient with late-onset cardiac amyloidosis, it has become clear that the amyloidogenic mutation and the disease occur almost exclusively in individuals of identifiable African descent. In the United States, the amyloidogenic allele frequency is 0.0173 and is carried by 3.5% of community-dwelling African Americans. Genotyping across Africa indicates that the origin of the allele is in the West African countries that were the major source of the slave trade to North America. At autopsy, the allele was found to be associated with cardiac TTR amyloid deposition in all the carriers after age 65 years; however, the clinical penetrance varies, resulting in substantial heart disease in some carriers and few symptoms in others. The allele has been found in 10% of African Americans older than age 65 with severe congestive heart failure. At this time there are potential forms of therapy in clinical trials. The combination of a highly accurate genetic test and the potential for specific therapy demands a greater awareness of this autosomal dominant, age-dependent cardiac disease in the cardiology community.Genet Med advance online publication 19 January 2017Genetics in Medicine (2017); doi:10.1038/gim.2016.200.

  18. Recommendations for the use of tolvaptan in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: a position statement on behalf of the ERA-EDTA Working Groups on Inherited Kidney Disorders and European Renal Best Practice.

    PubMed

    Gansevoort, Ron T; Arici, Mustafa; Benzing, Thomas; Birn, Henrik; Capasso, Giovambattista; Covic, Adrian; Devuyst, Olivier; Drechsler, Christiane; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Emma, Francesco; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Le Meur, Yannick; Massy, Ziad A; Ong, Albert C M; Ortiz, Alberto; Schaefer, Franz; Torra, Roser; Vanholder, Raymond; Więcek, Andrzej; Zoccali, Carmine; Van Biesen, Wim

    2016-03-01

    Recently, the European Medicines Agency approved the use of the vasopressin V2 receptor antagonist tolvaptan to slow the progression of cyst development and renal insufficiency of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in adult patients with chronic kidney disease stages 1-3 at initiation of treatment with evidence of rapidly progressing disease. In this paper, on behalf of the ERA-EDTA Working Groups of Inherited Kidney Disorders and European Renal Best Practice, we aim to provide guidance for making the decision as to which ADPKD patients to treat with tolvaptan. The present position statement includes a series of recommendations resulting in a hierarchical decision algorithm that encompasses a sequence of risk-factor assessments in a descending order of reliability. By examining the best-validated markers first, we aim to identify ADPKD patients who have documented rapid disease progression or are likely to have rapid disease progression. We believe that this procedure offers the best opportunity to select patients who are most likely to benefit from tolvaptan, thus improving the benefit-to-risk ratio and cost-effectiveness of this treatment. It is important to emphasize that the decision to initiate treatment requires the consideration of many factors besides eligibility, such as contraindications, potential adverse events, as well as patient motivation and lifestyle factors, and requires shared decision-making with the patient.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... a channel that transports charged chlorine atoms (chloride ions) across the cell membrane. Mutations in the BEST1 ... clear how these versions of bestrophin affect chloride ion transport or lead to the eye abnormalities characteristic ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant hypocalcemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormone (hypoparathyroidism). This hormone is involved in the regulation of calcium levels in the blood. Abnormal levels ... that increase calcium can also disrupt the normal regulation of other molecules, such as phosphate and magnesium, ...

  1. Risk of Japanese carriers of hyperphosphorylated paratarg-7, the first autosomal-dominantly inherited risk factor for hematological neoplasms, to develop monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Grass, Sandra; Iida, Shinsuke; Wikowicz, Aleksandra; Preuss, Klaus-Dieter; Inagaki, Atsushi; Shimizu, Kazuyuki; Ziepert, Marita; Ueda, Ryuzo; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Hyperphosphorylated paratarg-7 (pP-7) is a frequent target of paraproteins in German patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS)/multiple myeloma (MM). The frequency of MGUS/MM is lower in Japan than in Europe. As pP-7, the first molecularly defined autosomal-dominant risk factor for any hematological neoplasm, is inherited in a dominant fashion, we determined the incidence of the pP-7 carrier state in a Japanese population, and compared the frequency of pP-7-specific paraproteins and the pP-7 carrier state in Japanese and German patients with MGUS/MM. Peripheral blood from 111 Japanese patients with MGUS/MM and 278 healthy blood donors was analyzed for the pP-7 carrier state by isoelectric focusing and for pP-7-specific antibodies by ELISA. The Japanese group was compared with 252 German MGUS/MM patients and 200 healthy controls. Five of 111 (4.5%) Japanese and 35/252 (13.9%) German IgA/IgG MGUS/MM patients had a pP-7-specific paraprotein (P=0.009). The prevalence of healthy pP-7 carriers in the Japanese study group was 1/278 (0.36%), whereas it was 4/200 in the German group (P=0.166). The relative risk for pP-7 carriers developing MGUS/MM had an odds ratio of 13.1 in the Japanese and 7.9 in the German group. In conclusion, the fraction of pP-7 carriers with a pP-7-specific paraprotein is lower among Japanese than in German patients with MGUS/MM, but pP-7 carriers in both ethnic groups have a high risk of developing MGUS/MM.

  2. New autosomal recessive faciodigitogenital syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Teebi, A S; Naguib, K K; Al-Awadi, S; Al-Saleh, Q A

    1988-01-01

    Most pedigrees of Aarskog's faciodigitogenital syndrome have suggested X linked inheritance. However, sex influenced autosomal dominant inheritance is also a possibility in some families. We describe an Arab family of normal consanguineous parents with five children (three males and two females) with some features of Aarskog syndrome in addition to some unusual hair changes. The possibility that this family represents a distinct previously unrecognised faciodigitogenital syndrome with short stature and hair abnormalities is suggested and discussed. Images PMID:3398008

  3. A pseudo-dominant form of Gitelman’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de La Faille, Renaud; Vallet, Marion; Venisse, Annabelle; Nau, Valérie; Collet-Gaudillat, Carole; Houillier, Pascal; Jeunemaitre, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Gitelman’s syndrome is an autosomal recessive salt losing nephropathy caused by inactivated mutations of the SLC12A3 gene, encoding the NaCl cotransporter of the distal convoluted tubule. We report a French family with five affected members over two generations suggesting a dominant transmission. After SLC12A3 sequencing of seven individuals, four mutations were detected. Pseudo-dominant transmission was explained by the union of a compound heterozygous woman (two mutations on one allele and one mutation on the other) with a heterozygous healthy man. This study shows the importance of complete genetic analysis of families with unusual presentation. PMID:25984200

  4. Technical Evaluation: Identification of Pathogenic Mutations in PKD1 and PKD2 in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease by Next-Generation Sequencing and Use of a Comprehensive New Classification System

    PubMed Central

    Higashihara, Eiji; Kawano, Haruna; Higashiyama, Ryo; Koga, Daisuke; Fukui, Takafumi; Gondo, Nobuhisa; Oka, Takehiko; Kawahara, Kozo; Rigo, Krisztina; Hague, Tim; Katsuragi, Kiyonori; Sudo, Kimiyoshi; Takeshi, Masahiko; Horie, Shigeo; Nutahara, Kikuo

    2016-01-01

    Genetic testing of PKD1 and PKD2 is expected to play an increasingly important role in determining allelic influences in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in the near future. However, to date, genetic testing is not commonly employed because it is expensive, complicated because of genetic heterogeneity, and does not easily identify pathogenic variants. In this study, we developed a genetic testing system based on next-generation sequencing (NGS), long-range polymerase chain reaction, and a new software package. The new software package integrated seven databases and provided access to five cloud-based computing systems. The database integrated 241 polymorphic nonpathogenic variants detected in 140 healthy Japanese volunteers aged >35 years, who were confirmed by ultrasonography as having no cysts in either kidney. Using this system, we identified 60 novel and 30 known pathogenic mutations in 101 Japanese patients with ADPKD, with an overall detection rate of 89.1% (90/101) [95% confidence interval (CI), 83.0%–95.2%]. The sensitivity of the system increased to 93.1% (94/101) (95% CI, 88.1%–98.0%) when combined with multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis, making it sufficient for use in a clinical setting. In 82 (87.2%) of the patients, pathogenic mutations were detected in PKD1 (95% CI, 79.0%–92.5%), whereas in 12 (12.8%) patients pathogenic mutations were detected in PKD2 (95% CI, 7.5%–21.0%); this is consistent with previously reported findings. In addition, we were able to reconfirm our pathogenic mutation identification results using Sanger sequencing. In conclusion, we developed a high-sensitivity NGS-based system and successfully employed it to identify pathogenic mutations in PKD1 and PKD2 in Japanese patients with ADPKD. PMID:27835667

  5. A Point Mutation in the Ubiquitin Ligase RNF170 That Causes Autosomal Dominant Sensory Ataxia Destabilizes the Protein and Impairs Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor-mediated Ca2+ Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Forrest A.; Lu, Justine P.; Sliter, Danielle A.; Dupré, Nicolas; Rouleau, Guy A.; Wojcikiewicz, Richard J. H.

    2015-01-01

    RNF170 is an endoplasmic reticulum membrane ubiquitin ligase that contributes to the ubiquitination of activated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors, and also, when point mutated (arginine to cysteine at position 199), causes autosomal dominant sensory ataxia (ADSA), a disease characterized by neurodegeneration in the posterior columns of the spinal cord. Here we demonstrate that this point mutation inhibits RNF170 expression and signaling via IP3 receptors. Inhibited expression of mutant RNF170 was seen in cells expressing exogenous RNF170 constructs and in ADSA lymphoblasts, and appears to result from enhanced RNF170 autoubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. The basis for these effects was probed via additional point mutations, revealing that ionic interactions between charged residues in the transmembrane domains of RNF170 are required for protein stability. In ADSA lymphoblasts, platelet-activating factor-induced Ca2+ mobilization was significantly impaired, whereas neither Ca2+ store content, IP3 receptor levels, nor IP3 production were altered, indicative of a functional defect at the IP3 receptor locus, which may be the cause of neurodegeneration. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genetic deletion of RNF170 showed that RNF170 mediates the addition of all of the ubiquitin conjugates known to become attached to activated IP3 receptors (monoubiquitin and Lys48- and Lys63-linked ubiquitin chains), and that wild-type and mutant RNF170 have apparently identical ubiquitin ligase activities toward IP3 receptors. Thus, the Ca2+ mobilization defect seen in ADSA lymphoblasts is apparently not due to aberrant IP3 receptor ubiquitination. Rather, the defect likely reflects abnormal ubiquitination of other substrates, or adaptation to the chronic reduction in RNF170 levels. PMID:25882839

  6. A truncated form of rod photoreceptor PDE6 β-subunit causes autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness by interfering with the inhibitory activity of the γ-subunit.

    PubMed

    Manes, Gaël; Cheguru, Pallavi; Majumder, Anurima; Bocquet, Béatrice; Sénéchal, Audrey; Artemyev, Nikolai O; Hamel, Christian P; Brabet, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness (adCSNB) is caused by mutations in three genes of the rod phototransduction cascade, rhodopsin (RHO), transducin α-subunit (GNAT1), and cGMP phosphodiesterase type 6 β-subunit (PDE6B). In most cases, the constitutive activation of the phototransduction cascade is a prerequisite to cause adCSNB. The unique adCSNB-associated PDE6B mutation found in the Rambusch pedigree, the substitution p.His258Asn, leads to rod photoreceptors desensitization. Here, we report a three-generation French family with adCSNB harboring a novel PDE6B mutation, the duplication, c.928-9_940dup resulting in a tyrosine to cysteine substitution at codon 314, a frameshift, and a premature termination (p.Tyr314Cysfs*50). To understand the mechanism of the PDE6β1-314fs*50 mutant, we examined the properties of its PDE6-specific portion, PDE6β1-313. We found that PDE6β1-313 maintains the ability to bind noncatalytic cGMP and the inhibitory γ-subunit (Pγ), and interferes with the inhibition of normal PDE6αβ catalytic subunits by Pγ. Moreover, both truncated forms of the PDE6β protein, PDE6β1-313 and PDE6β1-314fs*50 expressed in rods of transgenic X. laevis are targeted to the phototransduction compartment. We hypothesize that in affected family members the p.Tyr314Cysfs*50 change results in the production of the truncated protein, which binds Pγ and causes constitutive activation of the phototransduction thus leading to the absence of rod adaptation.

  7. Autosomal dominant transmission of a Goldenhar-like syndrome: Description of a family and report of a sporadic case with a de novo 4p16;8q24.11 translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Graganm H.N. Jr.; Hixon, H.; Bacino, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    We report vertical transmission of a Goldenhar-like syndrome, including a father and 5 offspring, with male-to-male transmission and variable features that include hearing loss, ear anomalies (microtia, ear tags/pits), branchial cysts, ocular/periocular dermoids, micrognathia and seizures. We also report an individual with an apparently balanced de novo reciprocal translocation with breakpoints at 4p16 and 8q24.11. This individual has unilateral microtia, an epibulbar dermoid cyst, facial asymmetry with a small chin, and seizures. In addition to these features resembling those seen in the family above, she has multiple exostoses, supraventricular tachycardia, hypoglycemia and mild developmental delays. Based on the overlap in physical findings between this family and the individual with the de novo reciprocal translocation, linkage studies on the family were intiated. Preliminary results exclude linkage to HOX 7 at 4p16.1 but not to 8q. The brancho-oto-renal syndrome has previously been localized to 8q11-8q13, but linkage to this region appears unlikely. Although most cases of Goldenhar syndrome appear to be sporadic, there are a few reports of autosomal dominant inheritance (MIM No. 164210). One such family showed vertical transmission of dermoids, ear anomalies, hearing loss, micrognathia and vertebral anomalies, but no branchial cysts. Another family showed sensorineural deafness, preauricular pits, and branchial fistulae, and other families reveal ear anomalies, branchial fistulas, and hearing loss. These latter families appear to lack ocular/periocular dermoids, and appear to be affected by a different disorder (MIM No. 125100). Further clinical delineation of such families, combined with genetic linkage analysis, should help to sort out this heterogeneity.

  8. Congenital insensitivity to pain: Fracturing without apparent skeletal pathobiology caused by an autosomal dominant, second mutation in SCN11A encoding voltage-gated sodium channel 1.9.

    PubMed

    Phatarakijnirund, Voraluck; Mumm, Steven; McAlister, William H; Novack, Deborah V; Wenkert, Deborah; Clements, Karen L; Whyte, Michael P

    2016-03-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP) comprises the rare heritable disorders without peripheral neuropathy that feature inability to feel pain. Fracturing and joint destruction are common complications, but lack detailed studies of mineral and skeletal homeostasis and bone histology. In 2013, discovery of a heterozygous gain-of-function mutation in SCN11A encoding voltage-gated sodium channel 1.9 (Nav1.9) established a distinctive CIP in three unrelated patients who suffered multiple painless fractures, self-inflicted mutilation, chronic diarrhea, and hyperhidrosis. Here, we studied a mother and two children with CIP by physical examination, biochemical testing, radiological imaging including DXA, iliac crest histology, and mutation analysis. She suffered fractures primarily of her lower extremities beginning at age two years, and had Charcot deformity of both ankles and joint hypermobility. Nerve conduction velocity together with electromyography were normal. Her children had recurrent major fractures beginning in early childhood, joint hypermobility, and chronic diarrhea. She had an excoriated external nare, and both children had hypertrophic scars from scratching. Skin collagen studies were normal. Radiographs revealed fractures and deformities. However, lumbar spine and total hip BMD Z-scores, biochemical parameters of mineral and skeletal homeostasis, and iliac crest histology of the mother (after in vivo tetracycline labeling) were normal. Genomic DNA from the children revealed a unique heterozygous missense mutation in exon 23 (c.3904C>T, p.Leu1302Phe) of SCN11A that is absent in SNP databases and alters an evolutionarily conserved amino acid. This autosomal dominant CIP reflects the second gain-of-function mutation of SCN11A. Perhaps joint hypermobility is an unreported feature. How mutation of Nav1.9 causes fracturing remains unexplained. Lack of injury awareness is typically offered as the reason, and was supported by our unremarkable biochemical

  9. A Point Mutation in the Ubiquitin Ligase RNF170 That Causes Autosomal Dominant Sensory Ataxia Destabilizes the Protein and Impairs Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor-mediated Ca2+ Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wright, Forrest A; Lu, Justine P; Sliter, Danielle A; Dupré, Nicolas; Rouleau, Guy A; Wojcikiewicz, Richard J H

    2015-05-29

    RNF170 is an endoplasmic reticulum membrane ubiquitin ligase that contributes to the ubiquitination of activated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors, and also, when point mutated (arginine to cysteine at position 199), causes autosomal dominant sensory ataxia (ADSA), a disease characterized by neurodegeneration in the posterior columns of the spinal cord. Here we demonstrate that this point mutation inhibits RNF170 expression and signaling via IP3 receptors. Inhibited expression of mutant RNF170 was seen in cells expressing exogenous RNF170 constructs and in ADSA lymphoblasts, and appears to result from enhanced RNF170 autoubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. The basis for these effects was probed via additional point mutations, revealing that ionic interactions between charged residues in the transmembrane domains of RNF170 are required for protein stability. In ADSA lymphoblasts, platelet-activating factor-induced Ca(2+) mobilization was significantly impaired, whereas neither Ca(2+) store content, IP3 receptor levels, nor IP3 production were altered, indicative of a functional defect at the IP3 receptor locus, which may be the cause of neurodegeneration. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genetic deletion of RNF170 showed that RNF170 mediates the addition of all of the ubiquitin conjugates known to become attached to activated IP3 receptors (monoubiquitin and Lys(48)- and Lys(63)-linked ubiquitin chains), and that wild-type and mutant RNF170 have apparently identical ubiquitin ligase activities toward IP3 receptors. Thus, the Ca(2+) mobilization defect seen in ADSA lymphoblasts is apparently not due to aberrant IP3 receptor ubiquitination. Rather, the defect likely reflects abnormal ubiquitination of other substrates, or adaptation to the chronic reduction in RNF170 levels.

  10. Description of a large kindred with autosomal dominant inheritance of branchial arch anomalies, hearing loss, and ear pits, and exclusion of the branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome gene locus (chromosome 8q13.3).

    PubMed

    Stratakis, C A; Lin, J P; Rennert, O M

    1998-09-23

    It has been suggested that branchio-oculo-facial (BOF) syndrome, deafness with ear pits, and associated conditions [MIM nos. 125100, 120502], and branchio-oto-renal (BOR) [MIM no. 113650] or Melnick-Fraser syndrome represent phenotypic variants of the BOR syndrome, which is inherited in an autosomal dominant (AD) manner and has variable clinical expression. Recently, the BOR gene was mapped to chromosome region 8q13.3 and its sequence was identified as the human homolog of the Drosophila eyes absent (EYA1) gene. We studied an extended family with AD inheritance of branchial arch anomalies (BAA), hearing loss, and ear pits, whose phenotype differed from that of patients with BOR in that none of the affected members had renal abnormalities or lacrimal duct stenosis. Fifteen affected members were studied; ear pits were present in all of them, whereas hearing loss and other BAA were present in 40 and 20%, respectively. Blood was collected from 31 patients; DNA was extracted by standard methods and amplified using primers from microsatellite sequences flanking the BOR locus on chromosome 8q13.3 (D8S1807, D8S530, and D8S543). Linkage analysis was performed under two models of AD inheritance with different penetrance: 100% and 80%. In both cases, the logarithm of odds (LOD) scores produced were significantly less than -2; exclusion of the 8q13.3 locus was also confirmed by multipoint LOD score analysis. We conclude that, in one large family with AD inheritance of BAA, hearing loss and ear pits, the BOR locus was excluded. This represents the first documentation of heterogeneity in branchio-oto anomalies, syndromes with phenotypes similar to BOR syndrome.

  11. Analysis of data from the ERA-EDTA Registry indicates that conventional treatments for chronic kidney disease do not reduce the need for renal replacement therapy in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Spithoven, Edwin M; Kramer, Anneke; Meijer, Esther; Orskov, Bjarne; Wanner, Christoph; Caskey, Fergus; Collart, Frederic; Finne, Patrik; Fogarty, Damian G; Groothoff, Jaap W; Hoitsma, Andries; Nogier, Marie-Béatrice; Postorino, Maurizio; Ravani, Pietro; Zurriaga, Oscar; Jager, Kitty J; Gansevoort, Ron T

    2014-12-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a major cause of end-stage kidney failure, but is often identified early and therefore amenable to timely treatment. Interventions known to postpone the need for renal replacement therapy (RRT) in non-ADPKD patients have also been tested in ADPKD patients, but with inconclusive results. To help resolve this we determined changes in RRT incidence rates as an indicator for increasing effective renoprotection over time in ADPKD. We analyzed data from the European Renal Association-European Dialyses and Transplant Association Registry on 315,444 patients starting RRT in 12 European countries between 1991 and 2010, grouped into four 5-year periods. Of them, 20,596 were due to ADPKD. Between the first and last period the mean age at onset of RRT increased from 56.6 to 58.0 years. The age- and gender-adjusted incidence rate of RRT for ADPKD increased slightly over the four periods from 7.6 to 8.3 per million population. No change over time was found in the incidence of RRT for ADPKD up to age 50, whereas in recent time periods the incidence in patients above the age of 70 clearly increased. Among countries there was a significant positive association between RRT take-on rates for non-ADPKD kidney disease and ADPKD. Thus, the increased age at onset of RRT is most likely due to an increased access for elderly ADPKD patients or lower competing risk prior to the start of RRT rather than the consequence of effective emerging renoprotective treatments for ADPKD.

  12. Using neural networks as an aid in the determination of disease status: comparison of clinical diagnosis to neural-network predictions in a pedigree with autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Falk, C T; Gilchrist, J M; Pericak-Vance, M A; Speer, M C

    1998-04-01

    Studies of the genetics of certain inherited diseases require expertise in the determination of disease status even for single-locus traits. For example, in the diagnosis of autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD1A), it is not always possible to make a clear-cut determination of disease, because of variability in the diagnostic criteria, age at onset, and differential presentation of disease. Mapping such diseases is greatly simplified if the data present a homogeneous genetic trait and if disease status can be reliably determined. Here, we present an approach to determination of disease status, using methods of artificial neural-network analysis. The method entails "training" an artificial neural network, with input facts (based on diagnostic criteria) and related results (based on disease diagnosis). The network contains weight factors connecting input "neurons" to output "neurons," and these connections are adjusted until the network can reliably produce the appropriate outputs for the given input facts. The trained network can be "tested" with a second set of facts, in which the outcomes are known but not provided to the network, to see how well the training has worked. The method was applied to members of a pedigree with LGMD1A, now mapped to chromosome 5q. We used diagnostic criteria and disease status to train a neural network to classify individuals as "affected" or "not affected." The trained network reproduced the disease diagnosis of all individuals of known phenotype, with 98% reliability. This approach defined an appropriate choice of clinical factors for determination of disease status. Additionally, it provided insight into disease classification of those considered to have an "unknown" phenotype on the basis of standard clinical diagnostic methods.

  13. Congenital Insensitivity To Pain: Fracturing Without Apparent Skeletal Pathobiology Caused By An Autosomal Dominant, Second Mutation in SCN11A Encoding Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel 1.9

    PubMed Central

    Phatarakijnirund, Voraluck; Mumm, Steven; McAlister, William H.; Novack, Deborah; Wenkert, Deborah; Clements, Karen L.; Whyte, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP) comprises the rare heritable disorders without peripheral neuropathy that feature inability to feel pain. Fracturing and joint destruction are common complications, but lack detailed studies of mineral and skeletal homeostasis and bone histology. In 2013, discovery of a heterozygous gain-of-function mutation in SCN11A encoding voltage-gated sodium channel 1.9 (Nav1.9) established a distinctive CIP in three unrelated patients who suffered multiple painless fractures, self-inflicted mutilation, chronic diarrhea, and hyperhidrosis. Here, we studied a mother and two children with CIP by physical examination, biochemical testing, radiological imaging including DXA, iliac crest histology, and mutation analysis. She suffered fractures primarily of her lower extremities beginning at age two years, and had Charcot deformity of both ankles and joint hypermobility. Nerve conduction velocity and biopsy and electromyography were normal. Her children had recurrent major fractures beginning in early childhood, joint hypermobility, and chronic diarrhea. She had an excoriated external nare, and both children had hypertrophic scars from scratching. Skin collagen studies were normal. Radiographs revealed fractures and deformities. However, lumbar spine and total hip BMD Z-scores, biochemical parameters of mineral and skeletal homeostasis, and iliac crest histology of the mother (after in vivo tetracycline labeling) were normal. Genomic DNA from the children revealed a unique heterozygous missense mutation in exon 23 (c.3904C>T, p.Leu1302Phe) of SCN11A that is absent in SNP databases and alters an evolutionarily conserved amino acid. This autosomal dominant CIP reflects the second gain-of-function mutation of SCN11A. Perhaps joint hypermobility is an unreported feature. How mutation of Nav1.9 causes fracturing remains unexplained. Lack of injury awareness is typically offered as the reason, and was supported by our unremarkable biochemical

  14. Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Soutar, Anne K; Naoumova, Rossitza P

    2004-08-01

    Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH) presents with a clinical phenotype similar to that of classical homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) caused by defects in the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene but is more variable, generally less severe, and more responsive to lipid-lowering therapy than homozygous FH; furthermore, FH is inherited with a dominant pattern. The approximately 50 known affected ARH individuals are mostly of Sardinian or Middle Eastern origin, but rare cases of ARH have occurred worldwide. The physiological defect in ARH is a failure of some, but not all, cell types to mediate LDL receptor-dependent internalization of LDL and is caused by mutations in the gene for a putative adaptor protein called ARH. In affected cells, the LDL receptor gene is normal but LDL receptor protein accumulates at the cell surface; this also occurs in livers of recombinant mice lacking ARH, providing an explanation for the failure of clearance of LDL from plasma in ARH patients. The structural features of the ARH protein and its capacity to interact with the internalization sequence of the LDL receptor, plasma membrane phospholipids, and the clathrin endocytic machinery suggest that it plays a key role in the LDL receptor pathway.

  15. Familial co-segregation of Coffin-Lowry syndrome inherited from the mother and autosomal dominant Waardenburg type IV syndrome due to deletion of EDNRB inherited from the father.

    PubMed

    Loupe, Jacob; Sampath, Srirangan; Lacassie, Yves

    2014-10-01

    We report an African-American family that was identified after the proposita was referred for diagnostic evaluation at 4½ months with a history of Hirschsprung and dysmorphic features typical of Waardenburg syndrome (WS). Family evaluation revealed that the father had heterochromidia irides and hypertelorism supporting the clinical diagnosis of WS; however, examination of the mother revealed characteristic facial and digital features of Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS). Molecular testing of the mother identified a novel 2 bp deletion (c.865_866delCA) in codon 289 of RPS6KA3 leading to a frame-shift and premature termination of translation 5 codons downstream (NM_004586.2:p.Gln289ValfsX5). This deletion also was identified in the proposita and her three sisters with a clinical suspicion of CLS, all of whom as carriers for this X-linked disorder had very subtle manifestations. The molecular confirmation of WS type 4 (Shah-Waardenburg; WS4) was not as straightforward. To evaluate WS types 1-4, multiple sequential molecular tests were requested, including Sanger sequencing of all exons, and deletion/duplication analysis using MLPA for PAX3, MITF, SOX10, EDN3 and EDNRB. Although sequencing did not identify any disease causing variants, MLPA identified a heterozygous deletion of the entire EDNRB in the father. This deletion was also found in the proposita and the oldest child. Since the heterozygous deletion was the only change identified in EDNRB, this family represents one of the few cases of an autosomal dominant inheritance of WS4 involving the endothelin pathway. Altogether, clinical evaluation of the family revealed one child to be positive for WS4 and two positive for CLS, while two children were positive for both diseases simultaneously (including the proposita) while another pair test negative for either disease. This kinship is an example of the coincidence of two conditions co-segregating in one family, with variable phenotypes requiring molecular testing to

  16. Pathogenic mutations associated with cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy differently affect Jagged1 binding and Notch3 activity via the RBP/JK signaling Pathway.

    PubMed