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Sample records for autosomal dominant hypomagnesemia

  1. Autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy (ADVIRC).

    PubMed Central

    Blair, N P; Goldberg, M F; Fishman, G A; Salzano, T

    1984-01-01

    We report the second family recognised to have autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy. The clinical features were (1) autosomal dominant inheritance; (2) peripheral, coarse pigmentary degeneration of the fundus for 360 degrees, with a relatively discrete posterior border in the equatorial region (this finding may be pathognomonic); (3) superficial punctate yellowish-white opacities in the retina; (4) various vascular abnormalities; (5) breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier; (6) retinal neovascularisation; (7) vitreous abnormalities; and (8) choroidal atrophy. Visual reduction was mainly due to macular oedema or vitreous haemorrhage. Images PMID:6689931

  2. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy: a degenerative disease with a range of developmental ocular anomalies. Eye (Lond). 2011 Jan;25(1):113-8. doi: 10.1038/eye.2010.165. Epub 2010 Nov 12. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Yardley J, Leroy BP, ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ADPEAF autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features Enable Javascript to view the ... Open All Close All Description Autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features ( ADPEAF ) is an uncommon form ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... stationary night blindness autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Close All Description Autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness is a disorder of the retina , which is ...

  5. [Treatment of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Torra, Roser

    2014-01-21

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is the most frequent hereditary kidney disease. However it lacks a specific treatment. Its prevalence is 1/800 and causes the need for renal replacement therapy in 8-10% of patients on dialysis or kidney transplant. It is caused by mutations in the PKD1 and PKD2 genes, which cause a series of alterations in the polycystic cells, which have become therapeutic targets. There are many molecules that are being tested to counteract the alterations of these therapeutic targets. There are studies in all phases of research, from phase i to phase iv. Some of the molecules being tested are tolvaptan, mTOR inhibitors and, among many other, somatostatin analogues. These drugs are extensively reviewed in this article. Based on the accumulated experience the primary objective of the trials is the slowing of the increase in renal volume. Yet other renal end points such as renal function and hypertension are necessary. It is expected that in the coming years we can have specific, well tolerated, effective and affordable drugs for the treatment of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

  6. Cleidocranial dysplasia with autosomal dominant inheritance pattern.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, P; Khan, S; Sharma, R; Bhargava, S

    2014-07-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal dominant disease with a wide range of expression, characterized by clavicular hypoplasia, retarded cranial ossification, delayed bone and teeth development, supernumerary teeth, stomatognathic, craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities. This paper presents a case of CCD in a female with brachycephalic skull, depressed frontal bone and nasal bridge, hypoplastic middle one-third of face with mandibular prognathism and hyper mobility of both shoulders with associated radiographic features. Odontologist is often the first professional who patient of CCD approaches, since there is a delay in the eruption or absence of permanent teeth. The premature diagnosis allows a scope for proper treatment modalities, offering a better life quality for patient. PMID:25184084

  7. Cleidocranial Dysplasia with Autosomal Dominant Inheritance Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, P; Khan, S; Sharma, R; Bhargava, S

    2014-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal dominant disease with a wide range of expression, characterized by clavicular hypoplasia, retarded cranial ossification, delayed bone and teeth development, supernumerary teeth, stomatognathic, craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities. This paper presents a case of CCD in a female with brachycephalic skull, depressed frontal bone and nasal bridge, hypoplastic middle one-third of face with mandibular prognathism and hyper mobility of both shoulders with associated radiographic features. Odontologist is often the first professional who patient of CCD approaches, since there is a delay in the eruption or absence of permanent teeth. The premature diagnosis allows a scope for proper treatment modalities, offering a better life quality for patient. PMID:25184084

  8. Angiogenesis and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jennifer L; Woolf, Adrian S; Long, David A

    2013-09-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by the growth of multiple cysts that in many cases result in end-stage renal disease. Current strategies to reduce cyst progression in ADPKD focus on modulating cell turnover, fluid secretion, and vasopressin signalling; but an alternative approach may be to target pathways providing "general support" for cyst growth, such as surrounding blood vessels. This could be achieved by altering the expression of growth factors involved in vascular network formation, such as the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin families. We highlight the evidence that blood vessels and vascular growth factors play a role in ADPKD progression. Recent experiments manipulating VEGF in ADPKD are described, and we discuss how alternative strategies to manipulate angiogenesis may be used in the future as a novel treatment for ADPKD. PMID:22990303

  9. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease diagnosed in utero. Review.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Magdalena; Huras, Hubert; Wiecheć, Marcin; Jach, Robert; Radoń-Pokracka, Małgorzata; Górecka, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is one of most common inherited renal diseases. It is estimated that very early onset ADPKD affects even 2% patients. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of genetics, prenatal diagnosis and prognosis in very early onset autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. PMID:27629138

  10. Autosomal dominant inheritance of Brachmann-de Lange syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kozma, C.

    1996-12-30

    A mother with mild phenotype and her severely affected son, both with classic manifestations of Brachmann-de Lange syndrome (BDLS), are described. This documented mother-to-child transmission supports the hypothesis of autosomal dominant transmission with intrafamilial variability. Known cases of BDLS with autosomal dominant inheritance are reviewed. Although most cases of BDLS are sporadic, a careful evaluation of parents of affected children is important for appropriate genetic counseling. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. HPGD mutations cause cranioosteoarthropathy but not autosomal dominant digital clubbing.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Wenke; Beninde, Julia; Hoffmann, Katrin; Lindner, Tom H; Bassir, Christian; Aksu, Fuat; Hübner, Christoph; Verbeek, Nienke E; Mundlos, Stefan; Horn, Denise

    2009-12-01

    Cranio-osteoarthropathy, clinically classified as a variant of primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, is a very rare autosomal-recessive condition characterized by delayed closure of the cranial sutures and fontanels, digital clubbing, arthropathy, and periostosis. Recently, mutations in the gene HPGD, which encodes the NAD(+)-dependent 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase, were reported in four families affected with primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and one family with autosomal-recessive isolated nail clubbing. We report the clinical and molecular findings in four patients from two families affected with cranio-osteoarthropathy and one family with isolated, autosomal dominant digital clubbing. Genome-wide homozygosity mapping identified a locus for cranio-osteoarthropathy harboring the HPGD gene in one affected family. We detected two novel homozygous mutations in HPGD in these families: a missense mutation affecting the NAD(+) binding motif and a frameshift mutation. The clinical presentation in our patients was variable. Digital clubbing and hyperhidrosis were present in all cases. Delayed closure of the cranial sutures and fontanels, periostosis, and arthropathy were not consistent clinical features. No HPGD mutation was detected in a familial case of autosomal dominant isolated digital clubbing. The failure to identify any mutation in a family with an autosomal dominant type of isolated digital clubbing suggests that HPGD is not the major gene for this condition. PMID:19568269

  12. Gene therapy in animal models of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Rossmiller, Brian; Mao, Haoyu; Lewin, Alfred S

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy for dominantly inherited genetic disease is more difficult than gene-based therapy for recessive disorders, which can be treated with gene supplementation. Treatment of dominant disease may require gene supplementation partnered with suppression of the expression of the mutant gene either at the DNA level, by gene repair, or at the RNA level by RNA interference or transcriptional repression. In this review, we examine some of the gene delivery approaches used to treat animal models of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa, focusing on those models associated with mutations in the gene for rhodopsin. We conclude that combinatorial approaches have the greatest promise for success.

  13. [Polycystic liver disease without autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Peces, R; González, P; Venegas, J L

    2003-01-01

    Polycystic liver disease is characterized by the presence of multiple bile duct-derived epithelial cysts scattered in the liver parenchyma. The natural history and clinical manifestations of polycystic liver disease are based on the disease as it manifests in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The occurrence of polycystic liver disease independently from polycystic kidney disease has been known for a long time. More recently, a gene for autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease has been identified on chromosome 19p 13.2-13.1. Isolated polycystic liver disease is underdiagnosed and genetically distinct from polycystic liver disease associated with ADPKD but with similar pathogenesis and clinical manifestations. We report here two men with polycystic liver disease no associated with ADPKD. Ultrasound and computed tomography imaging were effective in documenting the underlying lesions non-invasively.

  14. Predictors of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease progression.

    PubMed

    Schrier, Robert W; Brosnahan, Godela; Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa A; Chonchol, Michel; Friend, Keith; Gitomer, Berenice; Rossetti, Sandro

    2014-11-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is a genetic disorder associated with substantial variability in its natural course within and between affected families. Understanding predictors for rapid progression of this disease has become increasingly important with the emergence of potential new treatments. This systematic review of the literature since 1988 evaluates factors that may predict and/or effect autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease progression. Predicting factors associated with early adverse structural and/or functional outcomes are considered. These factors include PKD1 mutation (particularly truncating mutation), men, early onset of hypertension, early and frequent gross hematuria, and among women, three or more pregnancies. Increases in total kidney volume and decreases in GFR and renal blood flow greater than expected for a given age also signify rapid disease progression. Concerning laboratory markers include overt proteinuria, macroalbuminuria, and perhaps, elevated serum copeptin levels in affected adults. These factors and others may help to identify patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease who are most likely to benefit from early intervention with novel treatments.

  15. Novel Mutation in the CASR Gene (p.Leu123Ser) in a Case of Autosomal Dominant Hypocalcemia.

    PubMed

    Regala, Joana; Cavaco, Branca; Domingues, Rita; Limbert, Catarina; Lopes, Lurdes

    2015-03-01

    Autosomal dominant hypocalcemia, caused by activating mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) gene, is characterized by hypocalcemia with an inappropriately low concentration of parathyroid hormone (PTH). In this report, we describe the identification of a novel missense mutation in the CASR gene, in a boy with autosomal dominant hypocalcemia. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single strand and DNA sequencing revealed a heterozygous mutation in CASR gene that causes a leucine substitution for serine at codon 123 (p.Leu123Ser). This mutation was absent in DNA from 50 control patients. In silico studies suggest that the identified variant was likely pathogenic. Sequencing analysis in the mother suggested mosaicism for the same variant, and she was clinically and biochemically unaffected. Clinical manifestations of the index case started with seizures at 14 months of age; cognitive impairment and several neuropsychological disabilities were noted during childhood. Extrapyramidal signs and basal ganglia calcification developed later, namely, hand tremor and rigidity at the age of 7 and 18 years, respectively. Laboratory analysis revealed hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and low-serum PTH with hypomagnesemia and mild hypercalciuria. After 2 years of treatment with calcium supplements and calcitriol, some brief periods of clinical improvement were reported; as well as an absence of nephrocalcinosis. PMID:27617113

  16. Novel Mutation in the CASR Gene (p.Leu123Ser) in a Case of Autosomal Dominant Hypocalcemia

    PubMed Central

    Regala, Joana; Cavaco, Branca; Domingues, Rita; Limbert, Catarina; Lopes, Lurdes

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant hypocalcemia, caused by activating mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) gene, is characterized by hypocalcemia with an inappropriately low concentration of parathyroid hormone (PTH). In this report, we describe the identification of a novel missense mutation in the CASR gene, in a boy with autosomal dominant hypocalcemia. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)–single strand and DNA sequencing revealed a heterozygous mutation in CASR gene that causes a leucine substitution for serine at codon 123 (p.Leu123Ser). This mutation was absent in DNA from 50 control patients. In silico studies suggest that the identified variant was likely pathogenic. Sequencing analysis in the mother suggested mosaicism for the same variant, and she was clinically and biochemically unaffected. Clinical manifestations of the index case started with seizures at 14 months of age; cognitive impairment and several neuropsychological disabilities were noted during childhood. Extrapyramidal signs and basal ganglia calcification developed later, namely, hand tremor and rigidity at the age of 7 and 18 years, respectively. Laboratory analysis revealed hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and low-serum PTH with hypomagnesemia and mild hypercalciuria. After 2 years of treatment with calcium supplements and calcitriol, some brief periods of clinical improvement were reported; as well as an absence of nephrocalcinosis. PMID:27617113

  17. Diagnostic Imaging of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gradzik, Monika; Niemczyk, Mariusz; Gołębiowski, Marek; Pączek, Leszek

    2016-01-01

    Summary Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is one of the most common genetic disorders caused by a single gene mutation. The disease usually manifests itself at the age of 30–40 years and is characterized by formation of renal cysts along with the enlargement of kidneys and deterioration of their function, eventually leading to renal insufficiency. Imaging studies (sonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) play an important role in the diagnostics of the disease, the monitoring of its progression, and the detection of complications. Imaging is also helpful in detecting extrarenal manifestations of ADPKD, most significant of which include intracranial aneurysms and cystic liver diseases. PMID:27733888

  18. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: the last 3 years

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Vicente E.; Harris, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is the most prevalent, potentially lethal monogenic disorder. It has large inter- and intra-familial variability explained to a large extent by its genetic heterogeneity and modifier genes. An increased understanding of its underlying genetic, molecular, and cellular mechanisms and a better appreciation of its progression and systemic manifestations have laid out the foundation for the development of clinical trials and potentially effective therapies. The purpose of this review is to update the core of knowledge in this area with recent publications that have appeared during 2006–2009. PMID:19455193

  19. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: recent advances in clinical management.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhiguo; Chong, Jiehan; Ong, Albert C M

    2016-01-01

    The first clinical descriptions of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) go back at least 500 years to the late 16 (th) century. Advances in understanding disease presentation and pathophysiology have mirrored the progress of clinical medicine in anatomy, pathology, physiology, cell biology, and genetics. The identification of PKD1 and PKD2, the major genes mutated in ADPKD, has stimulated major advances, which in turn have led to the first approved drug for this disorder and a fresh reassessment of patient management in the 21 (st) century. In this commentary, we consider how clinical management is likely to change in the coming decade. PMID:27594986

  20. Autosomal dominant optic nerve colobomas, vesicoureteral reflux, and renal anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmenti, L.A.; Pierpont, M.E.; Carpenter, B.L.M.

    1995-11-06

    We describe a father and 3 sons with optic nerve colobomas, vesicoureteral reflux, and renal anomalies. The youngest son had congenital renal failure and ultimately underwent renal transplantation. The father and one son had high frequency hearing loss. There were no other affected relatives. We conclude that the association of optic nerve colobomas, renal anomalies, and vesicoureteral reflux comprises a unique autosomal dominant syndrome. Molecular investigations have determined this disorder to be associated with a single nucleotide deletion in the PAX2 gene. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: recent advances in clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Zhiguo; Chong, Jiehan; Ong, Albert C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The first clinical descriptions of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) go back at least 500 years to the late 16 th century. Advances in understanding disease presentation and pathophysiology have mirrored the progress of clinical medicine in anatomy, pathology, physiology, cell biology, and genetics. The identification of PKD1 and PKD2, the major genes mutated in ADPKD, has stimulated major advances, which in turn have led to the first approved drug for this disorder and a fresh reassessment of patient management in the 21 st century. In this commentary, we consider how clinical management is likely to change in the coming decade. PMID:27594986

  2. Novel TMEM98 mutations in pedigrees with autosomal dominant nanophthalmos

    PubMed Central

    Khorram, David; Choi, Michael; Roos, Ben R.; Stone, Edwin M.; Kopel, Teresa; Allen, Richard; Alward, Wallace L.M.; Scheetz, Todd E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Autosomal dominant nanophthalmos is an inherited eye disorder characterized by a structurally normal but smaller eye. Patients with nanophthalmos have high hyperopia (far-sightedness), a greater incidence of angle-closure glaucoma, and increased risk of surgical complications. In this study, the clinical features and the genetic basis of nanophthalmos were investigated in two large autosomal dominant nanophthalmos pedigrees. Methods Fourteen members of a Caucasian pedigree from the United States and 15 members of a pedigree from the Mariana Islands enrolled in a genetic study of nanophthalmos and contributed DNA samples. Twenty of 29 family members underwent eye examinations that included measurement of axial eye length and/or refractive error. The genetic basis of nanophthalmos in the pedigrees was studied with linkage analysis, whole exome sequencing, and candidate gene (i.e., TMEM98) sequencing to identify the nanophthalmos-causing gene. Results Nine members of the pedigree from the United States and 11 members of the pedigree from the Mariana Islands were diagnosed with nanophthalmos that is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. The patients with nanophthalmos had abnormally short axial eye lengths, which ranged from 15.9 to 18.4 mm. Linkage analysis of the nanophthalmos pedigree from the United States identified nine large regions of the genome (greater than 10 Mbp) that were coinherited with disease in this family. Genes within these “linked regions” were examined for disease-causing mutations using exome sequencing, and a His196Pro mutation was detected in the TMEM98 gene, which was recently reported to be a nanophthalmos gene. Sanger sequencing subsequently showed that all other members of this pedigree with nanophthalmos also carry the His196Pro TMEM98 mutation. Testing the Mariana Islands pedigree for TMEM98 mutations identified a 34 bp heterozygous deletion that spans the 3′ end of exon 4 in all affected family members. Neither TMEM98

  3. Nutraceutical for Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease Therapy.

    PubMed

    Yuajit, Chaowalit; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited renal disorder caused by mutations of either PKD1 or PKD2 gene. Cyst formation initiates from a combination of abnormal cell proliferation along with enhanced fluid secretion. ADPKD is characterized by the progressive enlargement of cysts which destroy the renal parenchymal cells, resulting in renal failure. Currently, there is no effective treatment for this disease. Interestingly, several relevant therapeutic effects of herbal medicine relevant to pathogenic process of ADPKD have urged the researchers to search for potential candidate herb as nutraceutical for ADPKD therapy. Up to now, several natural compounds, such as triptolide, curcumin, ginkolide B, and steviol (stevia extract) have been shown to be able to retard cyst progression in ADPKD. The detailed mechanism of these compounds showed that triptolide enhanced calcium restoration, curcumin inhibited ERK & p-STAT3 pathways, ginkolide B inhibited Ras/MAPK pathway, and steviol activated AMPK, which inhibited CFTR channel and mTOR pathway in cell and mouse models of PKD. In addition, they are currently inpreclinical and clinical studies, respectively. This review focuses on the pathophysiology of ADPKD and the recent therapeutic approaches, especially a potential use of nutraceutical for the treatment of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. PMID:26817244

  4. Regional variability of imaging biomarkers in autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Benzinger, Tammie L S; Blazey, Tyler; Jack, Clifford R; Koeppe, Robert A; Su, Yi; Xiong, Chengjie; Raichle, Marcus E; Snyder, Abraham Z; Ances, Beau M; Bateman, Randall J; Cairns, Nigel J; Fagan, Anne M; Goate, Alison; Marcus, Daniel S; Aisen, Paul S; Christensen, Jon J; Ercole, Lindsay; Hornbeck, Russ C; Farrar, Angela M; Aldea, Patricia; Jasielec, Mateusz S; Owen, Christopher J; Xie, Xianyun; Mayeux, Richard; Brickman, Adam; McDade, Eric; Klunk, William; Mathis, Chester A; Ringman, John; Thompson, Paul M; Ghetti, Bernardino; Saykin, Andrew J; Sperling, Reisa A; Johnson, Keith A; Salloway, Stephen; Correia, Stephen; Schofield, Peter R; Masters, Colin L; Rowe, Christopher; Villemagne, Victor L; Martins, Ralph; Ourselin, Sebastien; Rossor, Martin N; Fox, Nick C; Cash, David M; Weiner, Michael W; Holtzman, David M; Buckles, Virginia D; Moulder, Krista; Morris, John C

    2013-11-19

    Major imaging biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease include amyloid deposition [imaged with [(11)C]Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET], altered glucose metabolism (imaged with [(18)F]fluro-deoxyglucose PET), and structural atrophy (imaged by MRI). Recently we published the initial subset of imaging findings for specific regions in a cohort of individuals with autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease. We now extend this work to include a larger cohort, whole-brain analyses integrating all three imaging modalities, and longitudinal data to examine regional differences in imaging biomarker dynamics. The anatomical distribution of imaging biomarkers is described in relation to estimated years from symptom onset. Autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease mutation carrier individuals have elevated PiB levels in nearly every cortical region 15 y before the estimated age of onset. Reduced cortical glucose metabolism and cortical thinning in the medial and lateral parietal lobe appeared 10 and 5 y, respectively, before estimated age of onset. Importantly, however, a divergent pattern was observed subcortically. All subcortical gray-matter regions exhibited elevated PiB uptake, but despite this, only the hippocampus showed reduced glucose metabolism. Similarly, atrophy was not observed in the caudate and pallidum despite marked amyloid accumulation. Finally, before hypometabolism, a hypermetabolic phase was identified for some cortical regions, including the precuneus and posterior cingulate. Additional analyses of individuals in which longitudinal data were available suggested that an accelerated appearance of volumetric declines approximately coincides with the onset of the symptomatic phase of the disease. PMID:24194552

  5. Homozygotes for the autosomal dominant neoplasia syndrome (MEN1)

    SciTech Connect

    Brandi, M.L.; Falchetti, A.; Tonelli, F. ); Weber, G.; Svensson, A.; Larsson, C. ); Castello, R.; Furlani, L.; Scappaticci, S.; Fraccaro, M.

    1993-12-01

    Families in which both parents are heterozygotes for the same autosomal dominant neoplasia syndrome are extremely unusual. Recently, the authors had the unique opportunity to evaluate three symptomatic siblings from the union between two unrelated individuals affected by multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). When the three siblings and their parents and relatives were genotyped for 12 markers tightly linked to the MEN1 locus, at 11q13, two of the siblings were found to be homozygotes, and one a heterozygote, for MEN1. With regard to the MEN1 syndrome, no phenotypic differences were observed between the two homozygotes and the heterozygotes. However, the two homozygotes showed unexplained infertility, which was not the case for any of the heterozygotes. Thus, MEN1 appears to be a disease with complete dominance, and the presence of two MEN1 alleles with mutations of the type that occur constitutionally may be insufficient for tumor development. 28 refs., 2 figs.

  6. LAMB3 mutations causing autosomal-dominant amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Kim, J W; Seymen, F; Lee, K E; Ko, J; Yildirim, M; Tuna, E B; Gencay, K; Shin, T J; Kyun, H K; Simmer, J P; Hu, J C-C

    2013-10-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) can be either isolated or part of a larger syndrome. Junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) is a collection of autosomal-recessive disorders featuring AI associated with skin fragility and other symptoms. JEB is a recessive syndrome usually caused by mutations in both alleles of COL17A1, LAMA3, LAMB3, or LAMC2. In rare cases, heterozygous carriers in JEB kindreds display enamel malformations in the absence of skin fragility (isolated AI). We recruited two kindreds with autosomal-dominant amelogenesis imperfecta (ADAI) characterized by generalized severe enamel hypoplasia with deep linear grooves and pits. Whole-exome sequencing of both probands identified novel heterozygous mutations in the last exon of LAMB3 that likely truncated the protein. The mutations perfectly segregated with the enamel defects in both families. In Family 1, an 8-bp deletion (c.3446_3453del GACTGGAG) shifted the reading frame (p.Gly 1149Glufs*8). In Family 2, a single nucleotide substitution (c.C3431A) generated an in-frame translation termination codon (p.Ser1144*). We conclude that enamel formation is particularly sensitive to defects in hemidesmosome/basement-membrane complexes and that syndromic and non-syndromic forms of AI can be etiologically related. PMID:23958762

  7. Autosomal dominant distal myopathy: Linkage to chromosome 14

    SciTech Connect

    Laing, N.G.; Laing, B.A.; Wilton, S.D.; Dorosz, S.; Mastaglia, F.L.; Kakulas, B.A.; Robbins, P.; Meredith, C.; Honeyman, K.; Kozman, H.

    1995-02-01

    We have studied a family segregating a form of autosomal dominant distal myopathy (MIM 160500) and containing nine living affected individuals. The myopathy in this family is closest in clinical phenotype to that first described by Gowers in 1902. A search for linkage was conducted using microsatellite, VNTR, and RFLP markers. In total, 92 markers on all 22 autosomes were run. Positive linkage was obtained with 14 of 15 markers tested on chromosome 14, with little indication of linkage elsewhere in the genome. Maximum two-point LOD scores of 2.60 at recombination fraction .00 were obtained for the markers MYH7 and D14S64 - the family structure precludes a two-point LOD score {ge} 3. Recombinations with D14S72 and D14S49 indicate that this distal myopathy locus, MPD1, should lie between these markers. A multipoint analysis assuming 100% penetrance and using the markers D14S72, D14S50, MYH7, D14S64, D14S54, and D14S49 gave a LOD score of exactly 3 at MYH7. Analysis at a penetrance of 80% gave a LOD score of 2.8 at this marker. This probable localization of a gene for distal myopathy, MPD1, on chromosome 14 should allow other investigators studying distal myopathy families to test this region for linkage in other types of the disease, to confirm linkage or to demonstrate the likely genetic heterogeneity. 24 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Pathways of apoptosis in human autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Goilav, Beatrice; Satlin, Lisa M; Wilson, Patricia D

    2008-09-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a major cause of end-stage renal disease in adults. Autosomal recessive (AR) PKD affects approximately 1:20,000 live-born children with high perinatal mortality. Both diseases have abnormalities in epithelial proliferation, secretion, and cell-matrix interactions, leading to progressive cystic expansion and associated interstitial fibrosis. Cell number in a kidney reflects the balance between proliferation and apoptosis. Apoptosis results from extrinsic (ligand-induced, expression of caspase-8) and intrinsic (mitochondrial damage, expression of caspase-9) triggers. Previous studies have suggested a role for apoptosis in PKD cyst formation and parenchymal destruction. Mechanisms underlying apoptosis in human ADPKD and ARPKD were examined by quantitative immunohistochemistry and Western immunoblot analyses of age-matched normal and PKD tissues. Caspase-8 expression was significantly greater in small cysts and normal-appearing tubules than in larger cysts in ADPKD kidneys. Caspase-8 also appeared early in the disease process of ADPKD. In ARPKD, expression of caspase-8 was most pronounced in later stages of the disease and was not confined to a specific cyst size. In conclusion, apoptosis in human ADPKD is an early event, occurring predominantly in normal-appearing tubules and small cysts, and is triggered by an extrinsic factor, but it occurs later in ARPKD. PMID:18516626

  9. Mutations of DEPDC5 cause autosomal dominant focal epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Saeko; Picard, Fabienne; Rudolf, Gabrielle; Noé, Eric; Achaz, Guillaume; Thomas, Pierre; Genton, Pierre; Mundwiller, Emeline; Wolff, Markus; Marescaux, Christian; Miles, Richard; Baulac, Michel; Hirsch, Edouard; Leguern, Eric; Baulac, Stéphanie

    2016-01-01

    The main familial focal epilepsies of childhood are autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy, familial temporal lobe epilepsy and familial focal epilepsy with variable foci. A frameshift mutation in the DEPDC5 (DEP domain containing protein 5) gene was identified in a family with focal epilepsy with variable foci, by linkage analysis and exome sequencing. Subsequent pyrosequencing of DEPDC5 in a cohort of 15 additional families with focal epilepsies revealed four nonsense and one missense mutations. Our findings provided evidence for frequent (37%) loss-of-function mutations in DEPDC5 associated with a broad spectrum of focal epilepsies. The implication of a DEP domain (Dishevelled, Egl-10 and Pleckstrin domain)-containing protein that may be involved in membrane trafficking and/or G-protein signaling, opens new avenues for research. PMID:23542701

  10. Molecular diagnosis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Torra Balcells, R; Ars Criach, E

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited renal disorder. Its estimated prevalence is 1 per 800 individuals. ADPKD patients constitute 8% of the population on dialysis or kidney transplantation. The disease can be diagnosed using radiological or genetic procedures. Direct genetic diagnosis of the disease can now be performed in Spain; however, it is not an easy or cheap test. This is why every case should be considered individually to determine whether genetic testing is appropriate, and to determine which genetic test is most adequate. Genetic testing in ADPKD is of special interest for living donors and neonatal and sporadic cases. Genetic testing offers the chance of performing prenatal or pre-implantation testing of embryos in families with severe cases of the disease. Also, this will enable the disease to be treated, when specific treatment becomes available, in cases that would not be candidates for treatment without genetic confirmation.

  11. Novel therapeutic approaches to Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    LaRiviere, Wells B.; Irazabal, Maria V.; Torres, Vicente E.

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is an inherited disorder characterized by the progressive growth of renal cysts that, over time, destroy the architecture of the renal parenchyma and typically lead to kidney failure by the 6th decade of life. ADPKD is common and represents a leading cause of renal failure worldwide. Currently, there are no FDA approved treatment for the disease, and the existing standard of care is primarily supportive in nature. However, significant advances in the understanding of the molecular biology of the disease have inspired investigation into potential new therapies. Several drugs designed to slow or arrest the progression of ADPKD have shown promise in pre-clinical models and clinical trials, including vasopressin receptor antagonists and somatostatin analogs. This article examines literature underlying the rationale for molecular therapies for ADPKD and reviews the existing clinical evidence for their indication for human patients with the disease. PMID:25438190

  12. Mitochondrial anomalies in a Swiss family with autosomal dominant myoglobinuria

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-du Pan, R.C.; Favre, H.; Junod, A.

    1997-04-14

    We report on a Swiss family in which 10 individuals of both sexes in 4 successive generations suffered from myoglobinuria, precipitated by febrile illness. It is the second family described with autosomal dominant inheritance of myoglobinuria. Four individuals suffered acute renal failure, which in two was reversible only after dialysis. In a recent case, a mitochondrial disorder was suspected because of an abnormal increase in lactate levels during an exercise test and because of a subsarcolemmal accumulation of mitochondria in a muscle biopsy, associated with a lack of cytochrome C oxidase in some muscle fibers. No mutation in the mitochondrial DNA was identified. Along with the inheritance pattern, these findings suggest that the myoglobinuria in this family is caused by a nuclear-encoded mutation affecting the respiratory chain. 22 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Proteins linked to autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive disorders harbor characteristic rare missense mutation distribution patterns.

    PubMed

    Turner, Tychele N; Douville, Christopher; Kim, Dewey; Stenson, Peter D; Cooper, David N; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Karchin, Rachel

    2015-11-01

    The role of rare missense variants in disease causation remains difficult to interpret. We explore whether the clustering pattern of rare missense variants (MAF < 0.01) in a protein is associated with mode of inheritance. Mutations in genes associated with autosomal dominant (AD) conditions are known to result in either loss or gain of function, whereas mutations in genes associated with autosomal recessive (AR) conditions invariably result in loss-of-function. Loss-of-function mutations tend to be distributed uniformly along protein sequence, whereas gain-of-function mutations tend to localize to key regions. It has not previously been ascertained whether these patterns hold in general for rare missense mutations. We consider the extent to which rare missense variants are located within annotated protein domains and whether they form clusters, using a new unbiased method called CLUstering by Mutation Position. These approaches quantified a significant difference in clustering between AD and AR diseases. Proteins linked to AD diseases exhibited more clustering of rare missense mutations than those linked to AR diseases (Wilcoxon P = 5.7 × 10(-4), permutation P = 8.4 × 10(-4)). Rare missense mutation in proteins linked to either AD or AR diseases was more clustered than controls (1000G) (Wilcoxon P = 2.8 × 10(-15) for AD and P = 4.5 × 10(-4) for AR, permutation P = 3.1 × 10(-12) for AD and P = 0.03 for AR). The differences in clustering patterns persisted even after removal of the most prominent genes. Testing for such non-random patterns may reveal novel aspects of disease etiology in large sample studies. PMID:26246501

  14. Autosomal dominant cyclic hematopoiesis: Genetics, phenotype, and natural history

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.E.; Stephens, K.; Dale, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant cyclic hematopoiesis (ADCH; cyclic neutropenia) is a rare disorder manifested by transient neutropenia that recurs every three weeks. To facilitate mapping the ADCH gene by genetic linkage analysis, we studied 9 ADCH families with 42 affected individuals. Pedigrees revealed AD inheritance with no evidence for decreased penetrance. Similar intra- and interfamilial variable expression was observed, with no evidence to support heterogeneity. At least 3 families displayed apparent new mutations. Many adults developed chronic neutropenia, while offspring always cycled during childhood. Children displayed recurrent oral ulcers, gingivitis, lymphadenopathy, fever, and skin and other infections with additional symptoms. Interestingly, there were no cases of neonatal infection. Some children required multiple hospitalizations for treatment. Four males under age 18 died of Clostridium sepsis following necrotizing enterocolitis; all had affected mothers. No other deaths due to ADCH were found; most had improvement of symptoms and infections as adults. Adults experienced increased tooth loss prior to age 30 (16 out of 27 adults, with 9 edentulous). No increase in myelodysplasia, malignancy, or congenital anomalies was observed. Recombinant G-CSF treatment resulted in dramatic improvement of symptoms and infections. The results suggest that ADCH is not a benign disorder, especially in childhood, and abdominal pain requires immediate evaluation. Diagnosis of ADCH requires serial blood counts in the proband and at least one CBC in relatives to exclude similar disorders. Genetic counseling requires specific histories as well as CBCs of each family member at risk to determine status regardless of symptom history, especially to assess apparent new mutations.

  15. Renal structure and hypertension in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gabow, P A; Chapman, A B; Johnson, A M; Tangel, D J; Duley, I T; Kaehny, W D; Manco-Johnson, M; Schrier, R W

    1990-12-01

    Hypertension has been reported to occur in 50 to 75 percent of subjects with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) prior to the onset of marked renal insufficiency but concurrent with cystic deformation of the renal parenchyma. The present study was undertaken to examine whether the renal structural abnormalities are greater in hypertensive (HBP) versus normotensive (NBP) male and female patients with ADPKD who were matched within gender groups for age, body surface area, serum creatinine concentration (males HBP 1.2 +/- 0.02 vs. NBP 1.1 +/- 0.03 mg/dl. NS: females HBP 0.9 +/- 0.03 vs. NBP 0.9 +/- 0.02 mg/dl, NS) and creatinine clearance (males HBP 100 +/- 3 vs. NBP 108 +/- 3 ml/min/1.73 m2, NS: females HBP 97 +/- 3 vs. NBP 96 +/- 2 ml/min/1.73 m2, NS). Renal volume was significantly greater in the HBP compared to the NBP group (males HBP 624 +/- 47 vs. NBP 390 +/- 43 cm3, P less than 0.0005; females HBP 446 +/- 32 vs. NBP 338 +/- 24 cm3, P less than 0.002). Since increased renal volume is due to increased cysts, the results indicate that the early high incidence of hypertension in ADPKD correlates with the renal structural abnormalities in this disorder.

  16. Evaluation of Nephrolithiasis in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nishiura, José L.; Neves, Rodrigo F.C.A.; Eloi, Samara R.M.; Cintra, Susan M.L.F.; Ajzen, Sergio A.; Heilberg, Ita P.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Nephrolithiasis (LIT) is more prevalent in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) than in the general population. Renal ultrasonography may underdetect renal stones because of difficulties imposed by parenchymal and/or cyst wall calcifications. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: A total of 125 patients with ADPKD underwent ultrasonography and unenhanced computed tomography (CT) scan, routine blood chemistry, and spot and 24-h urine collections. Results: CT scan detected calculi in 32 patients, including 20 whose previous ultrasonography revealed no calculi. The percentage of hypocitraturia was high but not statistically different between patients with ADPKD+LIT or ADPKD. Hyperuricosuria and distal renal tubular acidosis were less prevalent but also did not differ between groups, whereas hyperoxaluria was significantly higher in the former. Hypercalciuria was not detected. Renal volume was significantly higher in patients with ADPKD+LIT versus ADPKD, and a stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that a renal volume ≥500 ml was a significant predictor of LIT in patients with ADPKD and normal renal function, after adjustments for age and hypertension. Conclusions: CT scan was better than ultrasonography to detect LIT in patients with ADPKD. Larger kidneys from patients with ADPKD were more prone to develop stones, irrespective of the presence of metabolic disturbances. PMID:19339428

  17. Endothelial dysfunction and angiogenesis in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Fick-Brosnahan, Godela M

    2013-02-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common potentially lethal hereditary disease. The hall mark of the disease is the development of innumerable cysts in kidneys and liver. However, a vascular phenotype including the early occurrence of hypertension, abnormalities in renal blood flow, intracranial and aortic aneurysms, spontaneous coronary and cervicocephalic artery dissections, and dolichoectasias of intracranial arteries is also part of the spectrum of ADPKD. While endothelial dysfunction occurs early in ADPKD and precedes the onset of hypertension, the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction has not been extensively studied. Development of endothelial dysfunction in ADPKD (as in other conditions characterized by endothelial dysfunction) has been linked to oxidative stress and vascular inflammation. Vascular dysfunction with increased contraction and decreased relaxation causes downstream tissue ischemia, a potent stimulus for angiogenesis. Evidence of angiogenesis on the surface of renal cysts has been documented in human ADPKD. In addition, high levels of angiogenic growth factors including vascular endothelial growth factor have been reported in cyst fluid and in the circulation of patients with ADPKD. In the following chapter we summarize recent studies examining the role and pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction and neoangiogenesis in ADPKD. PMID:23971642

  18. [Clinical diagnosis of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease].

    PubMed

    Magistroni, Riccardo; Izzi, Claudia; Scolari, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common genetic disorder related to kidney. ADPKD is usually easy to diagnose in people who have a family history of ADPKDs developing typical symptoms, including flank, abdominal pain or macroscopic hematuria. In this setting, diagnosis in adults at risk for ADPKD is commonly performed by ultrasonography, which reveals two enlarged kidneys with multiple bilateral cysts. ADPKD may be more difficult to diagnose in the absence of family history or in subjects with atypical presentation, including asymmetric or focal renal imaging findings, discordant disease within family, early onset of ADPKD and development of ESRD before 30 yr of age. The presence of a total of three or more renal cysts for at-risk subjects aged 15-39 years and two cysts or more in each kidney for at-risk subjects aged 40-59 years are sufficient for the diagnosis of ADPKD. The absence of any renal cyst is sufficient for disease exclusion only for at-risk subjects aged 40 years or older. If the family history is negative, the diagnosis of ADPKD can be made in a patient with enlarged kidneys, numerous cysts, presence of liver cysts and absence of findings suggesting a different cystic disease. If the imaging diagnosis is not clear or showing atypical manifestations in subjects, molecular genetic testing should be performed. PMID:27067212

  19. [Related reproductive issues on male autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Cai, Hong-cai; Shang, Xue-jun; Huang, Yu-feng

    2015-11-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a most common inherited renal disease, about 50% with a family history, although the exact etiology not yet clear. To date, ADPKD, a multisystem disorder without effective preventive and therapeutic means, has been shown to be detrimental to human health. Recent studies show that severe oligoasthenozoospermia, necrospermia, immotile sperm, azoospermia, epididymal cyst, seminal vesicle cyst, and ejaculatory duct cyst found in male ADPKD patients may lead to male infertility, though the specific mechanisms remain unknown. Structural anomaly of spermatozoa, defect of polycystin, mutation of PKD genes, and micro-deletion of the AZF gene could be the reasons for the higher incidence of abnormal semen quality in male ADPKD patients. Assisted reproductive techniques can increase the chances of pregnancy, whereas the health of the offspring should be taken into consideration. This article presents an overview of reproductive issues concerning infertile male ADPKD patients from the perspective of the morbidity, pathophysiological mechanism, diagnosis, and management of the disease. PMID:26738331

  20. Copa Syndrome: a Novel Autosomal Dominant Immune Dysregulatory Disease.

    PubMed

    Vece, Timothy J; Watkin, Levi B; Nicholas, Sarah K; Canter, Debra; Braun, Michael C; Guillerman, Robert Paul; Eldin, Karen W; Bertolet, Grant; McKinley, Scott D; de Guzman, Marietta; Forbes, Lisa R; Chinn, Ivan; Orange, Jordan S

    2016-05-01

    Inherently defective immunity typically results in either ineffective host defense, immune regulation, or both. As a category of primary immunodeficiency diseases, those that impair immune regulation can lead to autoimmunity and/or autoinflammation. In this review we focus on one of the most recently discovered primary immunodeficiencies that leads to immune dysregulation: "Copa syndrome". Copa syndrome is named for the gene mutated in the disease, which encodes the alpha subunit of the coatomer complex-I that, in aggregate, is devoted to transiting molecular cargo from the Golgi complex to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Copa syndrome is autosomal dominant with variable expressivity and results from mutations affecting a narrow amino acid stretch in the COPA gene-encoding COPα protein. Patients with these mutations typically develop arthritis and interstitial lung disease with pulmonary hemorrhage representing a striking feature. Immunologically Copa syndrome is associated with autoantibody development, increased Th17 cells and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression including IL-1β and IL-6. Insights have also been gained into the underlying mechanism of Copa syndrome, which include excessive ER stress owing to the impaired return of proteins from the Golgi, and presumably resulting aberrant cellular autophagy. As such it represents a novel cellular disorder of intracellular trafficking associated with a specific clinical presentation and phenotype. PMID:27048656

  1. Caffeine intake by patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vendramini, L C; Nishiura, J L; Baxmann, A C; Heilberg, I P

    2012-09-01

    Because caffeine may induce cyst and kidney enlargement in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), we evaluated caffeine intake and renal volume using renal ultrasound in ADPKD patients. Caffeine intake was estimated by the average of 24-h dietary recalls obtained on 3 nonconsecutive days in 102 ADPKD patients (68 females, 34 males; 39 ± 12 years) and compared to that of 102 healthy volunteers (74 females, 28 males; 38 ± 14 years). The awareness of the need for caffeine restriction was assessed. Clinical and laboratory data were obtained from the medical records of the patients. Mean caffeine intake was significantly lower in ADPKD patients versus controls (86 vs 134 mg/day), and 63% of the ADPKD patients had been previously aware of caffeine restriction. Caffeine intake did not correlate with renal volume in ADPKD patients. There were no significant differences between the renal volumes of patients in the highest and lowest tertiles of caffeine consumption. Finally, age-adjusted multiple linear regression revealed that renal volume was associated with hypertension, chronic kidney disease stage 3 and the time since diagnosis, but not with caffeine intake. The present small cross-sectional study indicated a low level of caffeine consumption by ADPKD patients when compared to healthy volunteers, which was most likely due to prior awareness of the need for caffeine restriction. Within the range of caffeine intake observed by ADPKD patients in this study (0-471 mg/day), the renal volume was not directly associated with caffeine intake.

  2. Recent advances in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rangan, G K; Tchan, M C; Tong, A; Wong, A T Y; Nankivell, B J

    2016-08-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common genetic renal disease in adults, affecting one in every 1000 Australians. It is caused by loss-of-function heterozygous mutations in either PKD1 or PKD2 , which encode the proteins, polycystin-1 and polycystin-2 respectively. The disease hallmark is the development of hundreds of microscopic fluid-filled cysts in the kidney during early childhood, which grow exponentially and continuously through life at varying rates (between 2% and 10% per year), causing loss of normal renal tissue and up to a 50% lifetime risk of dialysis-dependent kidney failure. Other systemic complications include hypertensive cardiac disease, hepatic cysts, intracranial aneurysms, diverticular disease and hernias. Over the last two decades, advances in the genetics and pathogenesis of this disease have led to novel treatments that reduce the rate of renal cyst growth and may potentially delay the onset of kidney failure. New evidence indicates that conventional therapies (such as angiotensin inhibitors and statins) have mild attenuating effects on renal cyst growth and that systemic levels of vasopressin are critical for promoting renal cyst growth in the postnatal period. Identifying and integrating patient-centred perspectives in clinical trials is also being advocated. This review will provide an update on recent advances in the clinical management of ADPKD. PMID:27553994

  3. Recent advances in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rangan, G K; Tchan, M C; Tong, A; Wong, A T Y; Nankivell, B J

    2016-08-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common genetic renal disease in adults, affecting one in every 1000 Australians. It is caused by loss-of-function heterozygous mutations in either PKD1 or PKD2 , which encode the proteins, polycystin-1 and polycystin-2 respectively. The disease hallmark is the development of hundreds of microscopic fluid-filled cysts in the kidney during early childhood, which grow exponentially and continuously through life at varying rates (between 2% and 10% per year), causing loss of normal renal tissue and up to a 50% lifetime risk of dialysis-dependent kidney failure. Other systemic complications include hypertensive cardiac disease, hepatic cysts, intracranial aneurysms, diverticular disease and hernias. Over the last two decades, advances in the genetics and pathogenesis of this disease have led to novel treatments that reduce the rate of renal cyst growth and may potentially delay the onset of kidney failure. New evidence indicates that conventional therapies (such as angiotensin inhibitors and statins) have mild attenuating effects on renal cyst growth and that systemic levels of vasopressin are critical for promoting renal cyst growth in the postnatal period. Identifying and integrating patient-centred perspectives in clinical trials is also being advocated. This review will provide an update on recent advances in the clinical management of ADPKD.

  4. Detection of novel genetic variation in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Borràs, E; de Sousa Dias, M; Hernan, I; Pascual, B; Mañé, B; Gamundi, M J; Delás, B; Carballo, M

    2013-11-01

    We explored an approach to detect disease-causing sequence variants in 448 candidate genes from five index cases of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) by sequence DNA capture and next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS). Detection of sequence variants was carried out by sequence capture NimbleGen and NGS in a SOLiD platform. After filtering out variants previously reported in genomic databases, novel potential adRP-causing variants were validated by dideoxy capillary electrophoresis (Sanger) sequencing and co-segregation in the families. A total of 55 novel sequence variants in the coding or splicing regions of adRP candidate genes were detected, 49 of which were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Segregation of these variants in the corresponding adRP families showed three variants present in all the RP-affected members of the family. A novel mutation, p.L270R in IMPDH1, was found to be disease causing in one family. In another family a variant, p.M96T in the NRL gene was detected; this variant was previously reported as probably causing adRP. However, the previously reported p.A76V mutation in NRL as a cause of RP was excluded by co-segregation in the family. We discuss the benefits and limitations of our approach in the context of mutation detection in adRP patients.

  5. Developments in the management of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Masoumi, Amirali; Reed-Gitomer, Berenice; Kelleher, Catherine; Bekheirnia, Mir Reza; Schrier, Robert W

    2008-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most frequent life- threatening, hereditary disease. ADPKD is more common than sickle cell anemia, cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy, hemophilia, Down’s syndrome, and Huntington’s disease combined. ADPKD is a multisystemic disorder characterized by the progressive development of renal cysts and marked renal enlargement. Structural and functional renal deterioration occurs in ADPKD patients and is the fourth leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in adults. Aside from the renal manifestations, extrarenal structural abnormalities, such as liver cysts, cardiovascular abnormalities, and intracranial aneurysms may lead to morbidity and mortality. Recent studies have identified prognostic factors for progressive renal impairment including gender, race, age, proteinuria, hematuria, hypertension and increased left ventricular mass index (LVMI). Early diagnosis and better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease provides the opportunity to aggressivly treat hypertension with renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors and thereby potentially reduce LVMI, prevent cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and slow progression of the renal disease. PMID:18728845

  6. Genetics, phenotype, and natural history of autosomal dominant cyclic hematopoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.E. |; Dale, D.C.

    1996-12-30

    Cyclic hematopoiesis (CH, or cyclic neutropenia) is a rare disease manifested by transient severe neutropenia that recurs approximately every 21 days. The hematologic profile of families with the autosomal dominant form (ADCH) has not been well characterized, and it is unknown if the phenotype is distinct from the more common sporadic congenital or acquired forms of CH. We studied nine ADCH families whose children displayed typical CH blood patterns. Pedigrees confirmed dominant inheritance without evidence of heterogeneity or decreased penetrance; three pedigrees suggested new mutations. Families were Caucasian with exception of one with a Cherokee Native American founder. A wide spectrum of symptom severity, ranging from asymptomatic to life-threatening illness, was observed within families. The phenotype changed with age. Children displayed typical neutrophil cycles with symptoms of mucosal ulceration, lymphadenopathy, and infections. Adults often had fewer and milder symptoms, sometimes accompanied by mild chronic neutropenia without distinct cycles. While CH is commonly described as {open_quotes}benign{close_quotes}, four children in three of the nine families died of Clostridium or E. coli colitis, documenting the need for urgent evaluation of abdominal pain. Misdiagnosis with other neutropenias was common but can be avoided by serial blood counts in index cases. Genetic counseling requires specific histories and complete blood counts in relatives at risk to assess status regardless of symptoms, especially to determine individuals with new mutations. We propose diagnostic criteria for ADCH in affected children and adults. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment resulted in dramatic improvement of neutropenia and morbidity. The differential diagnosis from other forms of familial neutropenia is reviewed. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Hypomagnesemia: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Phuong-Chi T; Pham, Phuong-Anh T; Pham, Son V; Pham, Phuong-Truc T; Pham, Phuong-Mai T; Pham, Phuong-Thu T

    2014-01-01

    Although magnesium is involved in a wide spectrum of vital functions in normal human physiology, the significance of hypomagnesemia and necessity for its treatment are under-recognized and underappreciated in clinical practice. In the current review, we first present an overview of the clinical significance of hypomagnesemia and normal magnesium metabolism, with a focus on renal magnesium handling. Subsequently, we review the literature for both congenital and acquired hypomagnesemic conditions that affect the various steps in normal magnesium metabolism. Finally, we present an approach to the routine evaluation and suggested management of hypomagnesemia. PMID:24966690

  8. Current management of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Akoh, Jacob A

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), the most frequent cause of genetic renal disease affecting approximately 4 to 7 million individuals worldwide and accounting for 7%-15% of patients on renal replacement therapy, is a systemic disorder mainly involving the kidney but cysts can also occur in other organs such as the liver, pancreas, arachnoid membrane and seminal vesicles. Though computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were similar in evaluating 81% of cystic lesions of the kidney, MRI may depict septa, wall thickening or enhancement leading to upgrade in cyst classification that can affect management. A screening strategy for intracranial aneurysms would provide 1.0 additional year of life without neurological disability to a 20-year-old patient with ADPKD and reduce the financial impact on society of the disease. Current treatment strategies include reducing: cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels, cell proliferation and fluid secretion. Several randomised clinical trials (RCT) including mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, somatostatin analogues and a vasopressin V2 receptor antagonist have been performed to study the effect of diverse drugs on growth of renal and hepatic cysts, and on deterioration of renal function. Prophylactic native nephrectomy is indicated in patients with a history of cyst infection or recurrent haemorrhage or to those in whom space must be made to implant the graft. The absence of large RCT on various aspects of the disease and its treatment leaves considerable uncertainty and ambiguity in many aspects of ADPKD patient care as it relates to end stage renal disease (ESRD). The outlook of patients with ADPKD is improving and is in fact much better than that for patients in ESRD due to other causes. This review highlights the need for well-structured RCTs as a first step towards trying newer interventions so as to develop updated clinical management guidelines. PMID:26380198

  9. Heterozygous Reelin Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Lateral Temporal Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Dazzo, Emanuela; Fanciulli, Manuela; Serioli, Elena; Minervini, Giovanni; Pulitano, Patrizia; Binelli, Simona; Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Luisi, Concetta; Pasini, Elena; Striano, Salvatore; Striano, Pasquale; Coppola, Giangennaro; Chiavegato, Angela; Radovic, Slobodanka; Spadotto, Alessandro; Uzzau, Sergio; La Neve, Angela; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Mecarelli, Oriano; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.; Ottman, Ruth; Michelucci, Roberto; Nobile, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) is a genetic epilepsy syndrome clinically characterized by focal seizures with prominent auditory symptoms. ADLTE is genetically heterogeneous, and mutations in LGI1 account for fewer than 50% of affected families. Here, we report the identification of causal mutations in reelin (RELN) in seven ADLTE-affected families without LGI1 mutations. We initially investigated 13 ADLTE-affected families by performing SNP-array linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing and identified three heterozygous missense mutations co-segregating with the syndrome. Subsequent analysis of 15 small ADLTE-affected families revealed four additional missense mutations. 3D modeling predicted that all mutations have structural effects on protein-domain folding. Overall, RELN mutations occurred in 7/40 (17.5%) ADLTE-affected families. RELN encodes a secreted protein, Reelin, which has important functions in both the developing and adult brain and is also found in the blood serum. We show that ADLTE-related mutations significantly decrease serum levels of Reelin, suggesting an inhibitory effect of mutations on protein secretion. We also show that Reelin and LGI1 co-localize in a subset of rat brain neurons, supporting an involvement of both proteins in a common molecular pathway underlying ADLTE. Homozygous RELN mutations are known to cause lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia. Our findings extend the spectrum of neurological disorders associated with RELN mutations and establish a link between RELN and LGI1, which play key regulatory roles in both the developing and adult brain. PMID:26046367

  10. Autosomal Dominant Hypocalcemia (Hypoparathyroidism) Types 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Roszko, Kelly L.; Bi, Ruiye D.; Mannstadt, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular calcium is essential for life and its concentration in the blood is maintained within a narrow range. This is achieved by a feedback loop that receives input from the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR), expressed on the surface of parathyroid cells. In response to low ionized calcium, the parathyroids increase secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) which increases serum calcium. The CASR is also highly expressed in the kidneys, where it regulates the reabsorption of calcium from the primary filtrate. Autosomal dominant hypocalcemia (ADH) type 1 is caused by heterozygous activating mutations in the CASR which increase the sensitivity of the CASR to extracellular ionized calcium. Consequently, PTH synthesis and secretion are suppressed at normal ionized calcium concentrations. Patients present with hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, low magnesium levels, and low or low-normal levels of PTH. Urinary calcium excretion is typically increased due to the decrease in circulating PTH concentrations and by the activation of the renal tubular CASR. Therapeutic attempts using CASR antagonists (calcilytics) to treat ADH are currently under investigation. Recently, heterozygous mutations in the alpha subunit of the G protein G11 (Gα11) have been identified in patients with ADH, and this has been classified as ADH type 2. ADH2 mutations lead to a gain-of-function of Gα11, a key mediator of CASR signaling. Therefore, the mechanism of hypocalcemia appears similar to that of activating mutations in the CASR, namely an increase in the sensitivity of parathyroid cells to extracellular ionized calcium. Studies of activating mutations in the CASR and gain-of-function mutations in Gα11 can help define new drug targets and improve medical management of patients with ADH types 1 and 2. PMID:27803672

  11. Apolipoprotein AI mutation Arg-60 causes autosomal dominant amyloidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Soutar, A K; Hawkins, P N; Vigushin, D M; Tennent, G A; Booth, S E; Hutton, T; Nguyen, O; Totty, N F; Feest, T G; Hsuan, J J

    1992-01-01

    A mutation in the gene for apolipoprotein AI (apoAI) was identified in an English family with autosomal dominant non-neuropathic systemic amyloidosis. The plasma of all affected individuals contained a variant apoAI with one additional charge, as well as normal apoAI. The propositus was heterozygous; the coding region of his apoAI gene contained both the normal sequence and a single-base substitution changing the codon for residue 60 of the mature protein from CTG (leucine) to CGG (arginine). Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization showed that the other affected individuals were also heterozygotes and that there was concordance of the mutant allele with the presence of variant plasma apoAI. Amyloid fibrils isolated from the spleen of the propositus consisted of proteins that ran as a doublet with an apparent mass of approximately 10 kDa in SDS/PAGE and a trace band at 28 kDa. Electrospray mass spectrometry of the purified 10-kDa material revealed components with mass corresponding to the N-terminal 88, 92, 93, and 94 residues of apoAI each with substitution of arginine for leucine. These observations were confirmed by direct protein sequencing and laser desorption time-of-flight mass analysis. No material with the normal apoAI sequence was detected. The trace band at 28 kDa yielded the N-terminal sequence of mature apoAI, indicating that intact or minimally degraded apoAI was also present in the fibril preparation. Discovery of this mutation and the detailed characterization of the apoAI fragments that form the amyloid fibrils open additional avenues for investigation of amyloidogenesis. Images PMID:1502149

  12. Multigenerational autosomal dominant inheritance of 5p chromosomal deletions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Willing, Marcia; Grange, Dorothy K; Shinawi, Marwan; Manwaring, Linda; Vineyard, Marisa; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Cottrell, Catherine E

    2016-03-01

    Deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5 (5p-) is associated with phenotypic features including a cat-like cry in infancy, dysmorphic facial features, microcephaly, and intellectual disability, and when encompassing a minimal critical region, may be defined as Cri-du-Chat syndrome (CdCS). Most 5p deletions are de novo in origin, and familial cases are often associated with translocation and inversion. Herein, we report three multigenerational families carrying 5p terminal deletions of different size transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner causing variable clinical findings. Terminal 5p deletions and the mode of inheritance were clinically characterized and molecularly analyzed by a combination of microarray and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses. Shared phenotypic features documented in this cohort included neuropsychiatric findings, poor growth, and dysmorphic facial features. This study supports newly recognized effects of aberrant SEMA5A and CTNND2 dosage on severity of autistic and cognitive phenotypes. Comparative analysis of the breakpoints narrows the critical region for the cat-like cry down to an interval less than 1 Mb encompassing a candidate gene ICE1, which regulates small nuclear RNA transcription. This study also indicates that familial terminal 5p deletion is a rare presentation displaying intra- and inter-familial phenotypic variability, the latter of which may be attributed to size and gene content of the deletion. The observed intra-familial phenotypic heterogeneity suggests that additional modifying elements including genetic and environmental factors may have an impact on the clinical manifestations observed in 5p deletion carriers, and in time, further high resolution studies of 5p deletion breakpoints will continue to aid in defining genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:26601658

  13. Current management of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Akoh, Jacob A

    2015-09-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), the most frequent cause of genetic renal disease affecting approximately 4 to 7 million individuals worldwide and accounting for 7%-15% of patients on renal replacement therapy, is a systemic disorder mainly involving the kidney but cysts can also occur in other organs such as the liver, pancreas, arachnoid membrane and seminal vesicles. Though computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were similar in evaluating 81% of cystic lesions of the kidney, MRI may depict septa, wall thickening or enhancement leading to upgrade in cyst classification that can affect management. A screening strategy for intracranial aneurysms would provide 1.0 additional year of life without neurological disability to a 20-year-old patient with ADPKD and reduce the financial impact on society of the disease. Current treatment strategies include reducing: cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels, cell proliferation and fluid secretion. Several randomised clinical trials (RCT) including mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, somatostatin analogues and a vasopressin V2 receptor antagonist have been performed to study the effect of diverse drugs on growth of renal and hepatic cysts, and on deterioration of renal function. Prophylactic native nephrectomy is indicated in patients with a history of cyst infection or recurrent haemorrhage or to those in whom space must be made to implant the graft. The absence of large RCT on various aspects of the disease and its treatment leaves considerable uncertainty and ambiguity in many aspects of ADPKD patient care as it relates to end stage renal disease (ESRD). The outlook of patients with ADPKD is improving and is in fact much better than that for patients in ESRD due to other causes. This review highlights the need for well-structured RCTs as a first step towards trying newer interventions so as to develop updated clinical management guidelines.

  14. Multigenerational autosomal dominant inheritance of 5p chromosomal deletions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Willing, Marcia; Grange, Dorothy K; Shinawi, Marwan; Manwaring, Linda; Vineyard, Marisa; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Cottrell, Catherine E

    2016-03-01

    Deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5 (5p-) is associated with phenotypic features including a cat-like cry in infancy, dysmorphic facial features, microcephaly, and intellectual disability, and when encompassing a minimal critical region, may be defined as Cri-du-Chat syndrome (CdCS). Most 5p deletions are de novo in origin, and familial cases are often associated with translocation and inversion. Herein, we report three multigenerational families carrying 5p terminal deletions of different size transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner causing variable clinical findings. Terminal 5p deletions and the mode of inheritance were clinically characterized and molecularly analyzed by a combination of microarray and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses. Shared phenotypic features documented in this cohort included neuropsychiatric findings, poor growth, and dysmorphic facial features. This study supports newly recognized effects of aberrant SEMA5A and CTNND2 dosage on severity of autistic and cognitive phenotypes. Comparative analysis of the breakpoints narrows the critical region for the cat-like cry down to an interval less than 1 Mb encompassing a candidate gene ICE1, which regulates small nuclear RNA transcription. This study also indicates that familial terminal 5p deletion is a rare presentation displaying intra- and inter-familial phenotypic variability, the latter of which may be attributed to size and gene content of the deletion. The observed intra-familial phenotypic heterogeneity suggests that additional modifying elements including genetic and environmental factors may have an impact on the clinical manifestations observed in 5p deletion carriers, and in time, further high resolution studies of 5p deletion breakpoints will continue to aid in defining genotype-phenotype correlations.

  15. Heterozygous reelin mutations cause autosomal-dominant lateral temporal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Dazzo, Emanuela; Fanciulli, Manuela; Serioli, Elena; Minervini, Giovanni; Pulitano, Patrizia; Binelli, Simona; Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Luisi, Concetta; Pasini, Elena; Striano, Salvatore; Striano, Pasquale; Coppola, Giangennaro; Chiavegato, Angela; Radovic, Slobodanka; Spadotto, Alessandro; Uzzau, Sergio; La Neve, Angela; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Mecarelli, Oriano; Tosatto, Silvio C E; Ottman, Ruth; Michelucci, Roberto; Nobile, Carlo

    2015-06-01

    Autosomal-dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) is a genetic epilepsy syndrome clinically characterized by focal seizures with prominent auditory symptoms. ADLTE is genetically heterogeneous, and mutations in LGI1 account for fewer than 50% of affected families. Here, we report the identification of causal mutations in reelin (RELN) in seven ADLTE-affected families without LGI1 mutations. We initially investigated 13 ADLTE-affected families by performing SNP-array linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing and identified three heterozygous missense mutations co-segregating with the syndrome. Subsequent analysis of 15 small ADLTE-affected families revealed four additional missense mutations. 3D modeling predicted that all mutations have structural effects on protein-domain folding. Overall, RELN mutations occurred in 7/40 (17.5%) ADLTE-affected families. RELN encodes a secreted protein, Reelin, which has important functions in both the developing and adult brain and is also found in the blood serum. We show that ADLTE-related mutations significantly decrease serum levels of Reelin, suggesting an inhibitory effect of mutations on protein secretion. We also show that Reelin and LGI1 co-localize in a subset of rat brain neurons, supporting an involvement of both proteins in a common molecular pathway underlying ADLTE. Homozygous RELN mutations are known to cause lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia. Our findings extend the spectrum of neurological disorders associated with RELN mutations and establish a link between RELN and LGI1, which play key regulatory roles in both the developing and adult brain. PMID:26046367

  16. Bilateral Nephrectomy for Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease and Timing of Kidney Transplant: A Review of the Technical Advances in Surgical Management of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Disease.

    PubMed

    Dengu, Fungai; Azhar, Bilal; Patel, Shaneel; Hakim, Nadey

    2015-06-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic disease is a multisystem inherited condition affecting the kidneys and is an important cause of end-stage renal disease. Patients with autosomal dominant polycystic disease experience symptoms related to size and cystic nature of their kidneys, which can be difficult to manage. Traditionally, the only surgical option for management was open bilateral/unilateral native nephrectomy, which carried with it significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, it was deemed unsafe and rarely performed. However, surgery for autosomal dominant polycystic disease has evolved rapidly with the advent of minimally invasive surgery and improved medical management of end-stage renal failure patients. Laparoscopic and hand-assisted laparoscopic techniques have been adopted and have demonstrated reduced morbidity. The timing of this intervention in relation to transplant is controversial and presents a major challenge in managing this patient population.

  17. Autosomal dominant aniridia: probable linkage to acid phosphatase-1 locus on chromosome 2.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrell, R E; Chakravarti, A; Hittner, H M; Riccardi, V M

    1980-01-01

    Maximum likelihood analysis for linkage between autosomal dominant aniridia and 12 biochemical and serological markers in a single large family showed a probable linkage between autosomal dominant aniridia and the enzyme acid phosphatase-1. The presence of an autosomal dominant aniridia gene linked to acid phosphatase-1 on chromosome arm 2p and the existence of an aniridia syndrome resulting from deletion of band 13 of the short arm of chromosome 11 establishes a chromosome basis for genetic heterogeneity of aniridia phenotypes. PMID:6929510

  18. Genetics Home Reference: cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions CADASIL cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy ...

  19. Renal Relevant Radiology: Radiologic Imaging in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic; Mittal, Ankush; Mittal, Pardeep

    2014-01-01

    Summary Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease is a systemic disorder and the most common hereditary renal disease, which is characterized by cyst growth, progressive renal enlargement, and development of renal failure. The cystic nature of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and its renal and extrarenal complications (kidney stones, cyst hemorrhage, intracerebral aneurysm, liver cysts, cardiac valve abnormalities, etc.) give radiologic imaging studies a central role in the management of these patients. This article reviews the indications, comparative use, and limitation of various imaging modalities (ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, computerized tomography scan, Positron emission tomography scan, and renal scintigraphy) for the diagnosis and management of complications in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Finally, this work provides evidence for the value of total kidney volume to predict disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. PMID:24370765

  20. A gene for autosomal dominant congenital nystagmus localizes to 6p12

    SciTech Connect

    Kerrison, J.B.; Arnould, V.J.; Koenekoop, R.K.

    1996-05-01

    Congenital nystagmus is an idiopathic disorder characterized by bilateral ocular oscillations usually manifest during infancy. Vision is typically decreased due to slippage of images across the fovea. As such, visual acuity correlates with nystagmus intensity, which is the amplitude and frequency of eye movements at a given position of gaze. X-linked, autosomal dominant, and autosomal recessive pedigrees have been described, but no mapping studies have been published. We recently described a large pedigree with autosomal dominant congenital nystagmus. A genome-wide search resulted in six markers on 6p linked by two-point analysis at {theta} = 0 (D6S459, D6S452, D6S465, FTHP1, D6S257, D6S430). Haplotype analysis localizes the gene for autosomal dominant congenital motor mystagmus to an 18-cM region between D6S271 and D6S455. 16 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. Absence of ocular manifestations in autosomal dominant Alport syndrome associated with haematological abnormalties.

    PubMed

    Colville, D; Wang, Y Y; Jamieson, R; Collins, F; Hood, J; Savige, J

    2000-12-01

    Most patients with Alport syndrome have X-linked or autosomal recessive disease that is characterised by renal failure, hearing loss, and, in nearly 75% of the cases, a dot-and-fleck retinopathy and anterior lenticonus. There are only case reports of individuals with the rare autosomal dominant form, who can have haematuria or renal failure, deafness, and, in addition, low platelet counts and neutrophil inclusions. The ocular features of autosomal dominant inheritance have not been described. We have examined the eyes in the members of two families where Alport syndrome was diagnosed on the basis of the clinical features and family history, and where autosomal dominant inheritance was confirmed by father-to-son disease transmission, the associated haematological abnormalities, and haplotypes that segregated with the recently described locus at chromosome 22q. In Family A, the eyes of two individuals with haematuria, hearing loss, and haematological abnormalities and of nine unaffected family members were examined. In Family B, the eyes of two individuals with renal failure, normal hearing, and haematological abnormalities were examined. None of the affected or unaffected members in either family had a dot-and-fleck retinopathy, anterior lenticonus, a history suggesting recurrent corneal erosions, or corneal dystrophy. These results indicate that the protein abnormality in autosomal dominant Alport syndrome does not produce the retinopathy and lenticonus typical of X-linked and autosomal recessive disease. This may be because the abnormal protein is not present or is less important in the ocular basement membranes than elsewhere, or because the presence of a normal allele in autosomal dominant disease compensates for the defective allele. PMID:11135492

  2. Genetics advances in autosomal dominant focal epilepsies: focus on DEPDC5.

    PubMed

    Baulac, Stéphanie

    2014-01-01

    Rare multiplex families with autosomal dominant focal epilepsies have been described with specific age-related and electroclinical syndromes: autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE), familial temporal lobe epilepsy (FTLE), and familial focal epilepsy with variable foci (FFEVF). Molecular genetic advances in inherited focal epilepsies have pinpointed their genetic heterogeneity and the fact that they are mediated by different biological pathways: ion channel subunit genes have been linked to ADNFLE (CHRNA4, CHRNA2, CHRNB2, and KCNT1, encoding, respectively, the α4, α2, and β2 subunits of the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, and a potassium channel subunit); neuronal secreted protein (LGI1-encoding epitempin) has been linked to autosomal dominant epilepsy with auditory features; and mTORC1-repressor DEPDC5 (DEP domain-containing protein 5) gene has recently been reported in a broad spectrum of inherited focal epilepsies (ADNFLE, FTLE, FFEVF). This chapter focuses on DEPDC5, a newly identified gene.

  3. Clinical and Radiological Findings of Autosomal Dominant Osteopetrosis Type II: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kant, Priyanka; Sharda, Neelkamal; Bhowate, Rahul R.

    2013-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare inherited genetic disease characterized by sclerosis of the skeleton caused by the absence or malfunction of osteoclasts. Three distinct forms of the disease have been recognized, autosomal dominant osteopetrosis being the most common. Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis exhibits a heterogeneous trait with milder symptoms, often at later childhood or adulthood. The aim of this case report is to present the clinical and radiographic features of a 35-year-old female patient with autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II who exhibited features of chronic generalised periodontitis, and the radiographs revealed generalised osteosclerosis and hallmark radiographic features of ADO type II, that is, “bone-within-bone appearance” and “Erlenmeyer-flask deformity.” PMID:24260721

  4. Altered fibrinolysis in autosomal dominant thrombomodulin-associated coagulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Burley, Kate; Whyte, Claire S.; Westbury, Sarah K.; Walker, Mary; Stirrups, Kathleen E.; Turro, Ernest; Chapman, Oliver G.; Reilly-Stitt, Christopher; Mutch, Nicola J.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombomodulin-associated coagulopathy (TM-AC) is a newly recognized dominant bleeding disorder in which a p.Cys537Stop variant in the thrombomodulin (TM) gene THBD, results in high plasma TM levels and protein C-mediated suppression of thrombin generation. Thrombin in complex with TM also activates thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI). However, the effect of the high plasma TM on fibrinolysis in TM-AC is unknown. Plasma from TM-AC cases and high-TM model control samples spiked with recombinant soluble TM showed reduced tissue factor–induced thrombin generation. Lysis of plasma clots from TM-AC cases was significantly delayed compared with controls but was completely restored when TM/thrombin-mediated TAFI activation was inhibited. Clots formed in blood from TM-AC cases had the same viscoelastic strength as controls but also showed a TAFI-dependent delay in fibrinolysis. Delayed fibrinolysis was reproduced in high-TM model plasma and blood samples. Partial restoration of thrombin generation with recombinant activated factor VII or activated prothrombin complex concentrate did not alter the delayed fibrinolysis in high-TM model blood. Our finding of a previously unrecognized fibrinolytic phenotype indicates that bleeding in TM-AC has a complex pathogenesis and highlights the pivotal role of TM as a regulator of hemostasis. PMID:27436851

  5. Bovine Polledness – An Autosomal Dominant Trait with Allelic Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Medugorac, Ivica; Seichter, Doris; Graf, Alexander; Russ, Ingolf; Blum, Helmut; Göpel, Karl Heinrich; Rothammer, Sophie; Förster, Martin; Krebs, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The persistent horns are an important trait of speciation for the family Bovidae with complex morphogenesis taking place briefly after birth. The polledness is highly favourable in modern cattle breeding systems but serious animal welfare issues urge for a solution in the production of hornless cattle other than dehorning. Although the dominant inhibition of horn morphogenesis was discovered more than 70 years ago, and the causative mutation was mapped almost 20 years ago, its molecular nature remained unknown. Here, we report allelic heterogeneity of the POLLED locus. First, we mapped the POLLED locus to a ∼381-kb interval in a multi-breed case-control design. Targeted re-sequencing of an enlarged candidate interval (547 kb) in 16 sires with known POLLED genotype did not detect a common allele associated with polled status. In eight sires of Alpine and Scottish origin (four polled versus four horned), we identified a single candidate mutation, a complex 202 bp insertion-deletion event that showed perfect association to the polled phenotype in various European cattle breeds, except Holstein-Friesian. The analysis of the same candidate interval in eight Holsteins identified five candidate variants which segregate as a 260 kb haplotype also perfectly associated with the POLLED gene without recombination or interference with the 202 bp insertion-deletion. We further identified bulls which are progeny tested as homozygous polled but bearing both, 202 bp insertion-deletion and Friesian haplotype. The distribution of genotypes of the two putative POLLED alleles in large semi-random sample (1,261 animals) supports the hypothesis of two independent mutations. PMID:22737241

  6. Evidence of autosomal dominant mutations in childhood-onset proximal spinal muscular atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Rudnik-Schoeneborn, S.; Wirth, B.; Zerres, K. )

    1994-07-01

    Autosomal recessive and dominant inheritance of proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) are well documented. Several genetic studies found a significant deviation from the assumption of recessive inheritance in SMA, with affected children in one generation. The existence of new autosomal dominant mutations has been assumed as the most suitable explanation, which is supported by three observations of this study: (1) The segregation ratio calculated in 333 families showed a significant deviation from autosomal recessive inheritance in the milder forms of SMA (= .09[+-].06 for onset at 10-36 mo and .13[+-].07 for onset at >36 mo; and P = .09[+-]0.7 for SMA IIIa and .12[+-].07 for SMA IIIb). (2) Three families with affected subjects in two generations are reported, in whom the disease could have started as an autosomal dominant mutation. (3) Linkage studies with chromosome 5q markers showed that in 5 (5.4%) of 93 informative families the patient shared identical haplotypes with at least one healthy sib. Other mechanisms, such as the existence of phenocopies, pseudodominance, or a second autosomal recessive gene locus, cannot be excluded in single families. The postulation of spontaneous mutations, however, is a suitable explanation for all three observations. Estimated risk figures for genetic counseling are given. 29 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. A recurring dominant negative mutation causes autosomal dominant growth hormone deficiency - a clinical research center study

    SciTech Connect

    Cogan, J.D.; Prince, M.; Phillips, J.

    1995-12-01

    Familial isolated GH deficiency type II (IGHD-II) is an autosomal dominant disorder that has been previously shown in some patients to be caused by heterogeneous GH gene defects that affect GH messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing. We report here our findings of multiple G{r_arrow}A transitions of the first base of the donor splice site of IVS 3 (+1G{r_arrow}A) in IGHD II subjects from three nonrelated kindreds from Sweden, North America, and South Africa. This + 1G{r_arrow}A substitution creates an NlaIII site that was used to demonstrate that all affected individuals in all three families were heterozygous for the mutation. To determine the effect of this mutation of GH mRNA processing, HeLa cells were transfected with expression plasmids containing normal or mutant +1G{r_arrow}A alleles, and complementary DNAs from the resulting GH mRNAs were sequenced. The mutation was found to destroy the GH IVS3 donor splice site, causing skipping of exon 3 and loss of the codons for amino acids 32-71 of the mature GH peptide from the mutant GH mRNA. Our finding of exon 3 skipping in transcripts of the +1G{r_arrow}A mutant allele is identical to our previous report of a different sixth base transition (+6T{r_arrow}C) mutation of the IVS 3 donor splice site that also causes IGHD II. Microsatellite analysis of an affected subjects` DNA from each of the three nonrelated kindreds indicates that the +1G{r_arrow}A mutation arose independently in each family. Finding that neither grandparent has the mutation in the first family suggests that it arose de novo in that family. Our data indicate that (1) +1G{r_arrow}A IVS 3 mutations perturb GH mRNA splicing and cause IGHD II; and (2) these mutations can present as de novo GHD cases. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Familial Paroxysmal Exercise-Induced Dystonia: Atypical Presentation of Autosomal Dominant GTP-Cyclohydrolase 1 Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Russell C.; Melchers, Anna; Fung, Victor S. C.; Grattan-Smith, Padraic; Houlden, Henry; Earl, John

    2010-01-01

    Paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia (PED) is one of the rarer forms of paroxysmal dyskinesia, and can occur in sporadic or familial forms. We report a family (male index case, mother and maternal grandfather) with autosomal dominant inheritance of paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia. The dystonia began in childhood and was only ever induced…

  9. Familial distal foregut atresia in a family with likely autosomal dominant inheritance pattern.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Ian; Gill, Harinder; Ng, Li Yen; Hayes, Roisin

    2012-11-01

    Familial occurrence of distal foregut atresia (DFA) (Type 1) is rare. Diagnosis is based upon the clinical symptomatology and confirmed by radiological studies, surgery and histology. A number of reports have described families in which several family members have been involved and suggested an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Little is known about the underlying genetic causes or indeed the likely pathogenic mechanism. We report a family in which there are five affected cases including three siblings where the DFA appears to be inherited in an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern with reduced penetrance.

  10. Familial hiatal hernia in a large five generation family confirming true autosomal dominant inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Carre, I; Johnston, B; Thomas, P; Morrison, P

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Familial hiatal hernia has only rarely been documented.
AIMS—To describe the pattern of inheritance of familial hiatal hernia within an affected family.
SUBJECTS—Thirty eight members of a family pedigree across five generations.
METHODS—All family members were interviewed and investigated by barium meal for evidence of a hiatal hernia.
RESULTS—Twenty three of 38 family members had radiological evidence of a hiatal hernia. No individual with a hiatal hernia was born to unaffected parents. In one case direct male to male transmission was shown.
CONCLUSIONS—Familial inheritance of hiatal hernia does occur. Evidence of direct male to male transmission points to an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance.


Keywords: familial hiatal hernia; Barrett's oesophagus; autosomal dominant genetics PMID:10517898

  11. Familial cutaneous malignant melanoma: autosomal dominant trait possibly linked to the Rh locus.

    PubMed Central

    Greene, M H; Goldin, L R; Clark, W H; Lovrien, E; Kraemer, K H; Tucker, M A; Elder, D E; Fraser, M C; Rowe, S

    1983-01-01

    Segregation and linkage analyses were undertaken in families with multiple cases of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) and a recently-described melanoma precursor, the dysplastic nevus syndrome (DNS). Clinical and laboratory data, including 23 genetic markers, were collected on 401 members of 14 high-risk kindreds. Pedigree analysis was compatible with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance for the familial CMM trait. Although a similar model probably applies to the DNS trait as well, segregation analysis could not confirm the presence of a major locus. However, linkage analysis suggested that an autosomal dominant model was appropriate for the DNS, and that a DNS/CMM susceptibility gene may be located on the short arm of chromosome 1, within 30 map units of the Rh locus [maximum logarithm of odds (lod) score = 2.00]. Images PMID:6577466

  12. Locus heterogeneity in autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia: Evidence for the existence of a fifth locus

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrazin, J.; Rouleau, G.A.; Andermann, E.

    1994-09-01

    The autosomal dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. To date, four loci have been identified: the SCA-1 locus (on chromosome (chr) 6p), the SCA-2 locus (on chr 12q), the SCA-3/MJD locus (on chr 14q), and more recently an SCA-4 locus was described (chr 16q) in a Utah kindred. We have studied one large French Canadian kindred with four generations of living affected individuals segregating an autosomal dominant form of SCA. Linkage analysis using anonymous DNA markers which flank the four previously described loci significantly excludes the French Canadian kindred from the SCA-1, SCA-2, SCA-3/MJD and SCA-4 loci. Therefore a fifth, still unmapped, SCA locus remains to be identified.

  13. Molecular Pathways and Therapies in Autosomal-Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Saigusa, Takamitsu

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most prevalent inherited renal disease, characterized by multiple cysts that can eventually lead to kidney failure. Studies investigating the role of primary cilia and polycystins have significantly advanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of PKD. This review will present clinical and basic aspects of ADPKD, review current concepts of PKD pathogenesis, evaluate potential therapeutic targets, and highlight challenges for future clinical studies. PMID:25933820

  14. Successful conservative treatment of bilateral emphysematous pyelonephritis in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Jaisuresh, K.; Bavaharan, R.

    2013-01-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis is a rare, potentially lethal complication of polycystic kidney disease. Treatment mostly includes emergency nephrectomy of the affected kidney. We report a case of bilateral emphysematous pyelonephritis in a 57-year-old diabetic male with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, who recovered with conservative treatment. Escherichia coli was cultured from the cyst aspirate. He was treated with percutaneous needle aspiration of infected cysts and intravenous antibiotics (meropenem and pazufloxacin) for 3 weeks. PMID:23814427

  15. CSF1R mutations identified in three families with autosomal dominantly inherited leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Jun; Matsukawa, Takashi; Ishiura, Hiroyuki; Higasa, Koichiro; Yoshimura, Jun; Saito, Taro L; Ahsan, Budrul; Takahashi, Yuji; Goto, Jun; Iwata, Atsushi; Niimi, Yuki; Riku, Yuuichi; Goto, Yoji; Mano, Kazuo; Yoshida, Mari; Morishita, Shinichi; Tsuji, Shoji

    2012-12-01

    Genetic and phenotypic heterogeneities are considerably high in adult-onset leukoencephalopathy, in which comprehensive mutational analyses of the candidate genes by conventional methods are too laborious. We applied exome sequencing to conduct a comprehensive mutational analysis of genes for autosomal dominant leukoencephalopathies. Genomic DNA samples from four patients of three families with autosomal dominantly inherited adult-onset leukodystrophy were subjected to exome sequencing. On the basis of the results, 21 patients with adult-onset sporadic leukodystrophy and one patient with pathologically proven HDLS were additionally screened for CSF1R mutations. Exome sequencing identified heterozygous CSF1R mutations (p.I794T and p.R777W) in two families. I794T has recently been reported as a causative mutation for hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS), and R777W is a novel mutation. Although mutational analysis of CSF1R in 21 sporadic cases revealed no mutations, another novel CSF1R mutation, p.C653Y, was identified in one patient with autopsy-proven HDSL. These variants were located in the PTK domain where the causative mutations cluster. Functional prediction of the mutant CSF1R as well as cross-species conservation of the affected amino acids supports the notion that these variants are pathogenic for HDLS. Exome sequencing is useful for a comprehensive mutational analysis of causative genes for hereditary leukoencephalopathies, and CSF1R should be considered a candidate gene for patients with autosomal dominant leukoencephalopathies.

  16. Mutation screening of the neurogenin-3 gene in autosomal dominant diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kim, S H; Warram, J H; Krolewski, A S; Doria, A

    2001-05-01

    We investigated whether genetic variability in neurogenin-3, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that is expressed in the developing pancreas, contributes to the etiology of maturity-onset diabetes of the young or other forms of autosomal dominant diabetes. Ninety-one probands of families with autosomal dominant diabetes were screened for neurogenin-3 mutations by dideoxy fingerprinting. Three sequence differences were identified: a polymorphism not affecting the amino acid sequence (L75L), a CA insertion/deletion in intron 1 (-44ins/del), and a C to T transition causing a serine to phenylalanine substitution (S199F). None of these sequence differences were more frequent in the family probands than in 179 nondiabetic controls. In contrast, allele 199F was weakly, but significantly, associated with common type 2 diabetes (199F frequencies = 0.436 in 132 cases with type 2 diabetes vs. 0.346 in the family probands and 0.346 in controls; P = 0.05). The relative risk of type 2 diabetes for 199F carriers was 1.7 (95% confidence interval, 1.04-2.7). We conclude that sequence differences in the neurogenin-3 gene do not play a major role in the development of autosomal dominant diabetes. Rather, they might contribute to common type 2 diabetes, although this finding must be replicated in other populations. PMID:11344245

  17. Further evidence for P59L mutation in GJA3 associated with autosomal dominant congenital cataract

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Chen, Yuhong; Chen, Xueli; Sun, Xinghuai

    2016-01-01

    Context: Congenital cataracts are one of the common eye disorders leading to visual impairment or blindness in children worldwide. We found a Chinese family with autosomal dominant pulverulent cataract. Aims: To identify the pathogenic gene mutation in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant inherited pulverulent cataract. Subjects and Methods: After obtained informed consent, detailed ophthalmic examinations were carried out; genomic DNAs were obtained from seven family members in a three-generation Chinese family with three affected. All exons of candidate genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and were sequenced performed by bidirectional sequencing. Results: By sequencing the encoding regions of the candidate genes, a missense mutation (c. 176C>T) was detected in gap junction protein alpha 3 genes (GJA3), which resulted in the substitution of highly conserved proline by leucine at codon 59 (p.P59L). The mutation co-segregated with all patients and was absent in 100 normal Chinese controls. Conclusions: The study identified a missense mutation (c. 176C>T) in GJA3 gene associated with autosomal dominant congenital pulverulent cataract in a Chinese family. It gave further evidence of phenotype heterogeneity for P59L mutation in GJA3 associated with congenital cataract. PMID:27609163

  18. [Mapping of gene underlying autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss(DFNA)].

    PubMed

    Sun, Han-Jun; Tao, Ran; Cheng, Jing; Yang, Shu-Zhi; Cao, Ju-Yang; Yu, Li-Ming; Hong, Meng-Di; Feng, Guo-Yin; Dai, Pu; Yuan, Hui-Jun; Han, Dong-Yi; He, Lin

    2006-12-01

    Hereditary non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss is a genetically highly heterogeneous group of disorders. To date, at least 50 loci for autosomal dominant non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss (DFNA) have been identified by linkage analysis. Here we report a huge family with late onset autosomal dominant hereditary non-syndromic hearing loss. In this family, 73 of 170 family members have been conducted physical examination, pure-tone audiometry, immittance testing and auditory brainstem response testing (ABR). The results indicated that 39 of 73 tested family members have sensorineural hearing loss in various degrees. No associated visible abnormalities in other systems were found in this family. After exclusion of the 14 known DFNA loci with markers from the Hereditary Hearing Loss Homepage (URL: http://dnalab-www.uia.ac.be/dnalab/hhh), a genome wide scan was carried out using 382 highly informative microsatellite markers at approximately 9.2 cM intervals throughout the genome. Linkage analysis was carried out under a fully penetrant autosomal dominant mode of inheritance with no phenocopies. A maximum two-point LOD score of 6.69 at theta=0 was obtained for marker D14S1040. Haplotype analysis placed the locus within a 7.6 cM genetic interval defined by marker D14S1021 and D14S70, overlapping with the DFNA9 locus. PMID:17138532

  19. TBC1D24 mutation causes autosomal-dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Azaiez, Hela; Booth, Kevin T; Bu, Fengxiao; Huygen, Patrick; Shibata, Seiji B; Shearer, A Eliot; Kolbe, Diana; Meyer, Nicole; Black-Ziegelbein, E Ann; Smith, Richard J H

    2014-07-01

    Hereditary hearing loss is extremely heterogeneous. Over 70 genes have been identified to date, and with the advent of massively parallel sequencing, the pace of novel gene discovery has accelerated. In a family segregating progressive autosomal-dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss (NSHL), we used OtoSCOPE® to exclude mutations in known deafness genes and then performed segregation mapping and whole-exome sequencing to identify a unique variant, p.Ser178Leu, in TBC1D24 that segregates with the hearing loss phenotype. TBC1D24 encodes a GTPase-activating protein expressed in the cochlea. Ser178 is highly conserved across vertebrates and its change is predicted to be damaging. Other variants in TBC1D24 have been associated with a panoply of clinical symptoms including autosomal recessive NSHL, syndromic hearing impairment associated with onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, mental retardation, and seizures (DOORS syndrome), and a wide range of epileptic disorders. PMID:24729539

  20. Evidence for locus heterogeneity in autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Speer, M.C.; Stajich, J.M.; Gaskell, P.C.

    1995-12-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) is a diagnostic classification encompassing a broad group of proximal myopathies. A gene for the dominant form of LGMD (LGMD1A) has recently been localized to a 7-cM region of chromosome 5q between D5S178 and IL9. We studied three additional dominant LGMD families for linkage to these two markers and excluded all from localization to this region, providing evidence for locus heterogeneity within the dominant form of LGMD. Although the patterns of muscle weakness were similar in all families studied, the majority of affected family members in the chromosome 5-linked pedigree have a dysarthric speech pattern, which is not present in any of the five unlinked families. The demonstration of heterogeneity within autosomal dominant LGMD is the first step in attempting to subclassify these families with similar clinical phenotypes on a molecular level. 33 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Diverging longitudinal changes in astrocytosis and amyloid PET in autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Vieitez, Elena; Saint-Aubert, Laure; Carter, Stephen F; Almkvist, Ove; Farid, Karim; Schöll, Michael; Chiotis, Konstantinos; Thordardottir, Steinunn; Graff, Caroline; Wall, Anders; Långström, Bengt; Nordberg, Agneta

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a multifactorial dementia disorder characterized by early amyloid-β, tau deposition, glial activation and neurodegeneration, where the interrelationships between the different pathophysiological events are not yet well characterized. In this study, longitudinal multitracer positron emission tomography imaging of individuals with autosomal dominant or sporadic Alzheimer's disease was used to quantify the changes in regional distribution of brain astrocytosis (tracer (11)C-deuterium-L-deprenyl), fibrillar amyloid-β plaque deposition ((11)C-Pittsburgh compound B), and glucose metabolism ((18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose) from early presymptomatic stages over an extended period to clinical symptoms. The 52 baseline participants comprised autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease mutation carriers (n = 11; 49.6 ± 10.3 years old) and non-carriers (n = 16; 51.1 ± 14.2 years old; 10 male), and patients with sporadic mild cognitive impairment (n = 17; 61.9 ± 6.4 years old; nine male) and sporadic Alzheimer's disease (n = 8; 63.0 ± 6.5 years old; five male); for confidentiality reasons, the gender of mutation carriers is not revealed. The autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease participants belonged to families with known mutations in either presenilin 1 (PSEN1) or amyloid precursor protein (APPswe or APParc) genes. Sporadic mild cognitive impairment patients were further divided into (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B-positive (n = 13; 62.0 ± 6.4; seven male) and (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B-negative (n = 4; 61.8 ± 7.5 years old; two male) groups using a neocortical standardized uptake value ratio cut-off value of 1.41, which was calculated with respect to the cerebellar grey matter. All baseline participants underwent multitracer positron emission tomography scans, cerebrospinal fluid biomarker analysis and neuropsychological assessment. Twenty-six of the participants underwent clinical and imaging follow-up examinations after 2.8 ± 0.6 years. By using linear

  2. The anterior segment disorder autosomal dominant keratitis is linked to the Aniridia/PAX-6 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzayans, F.; Pearce, W.G.; Mah, T.S.

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant keratitis (ADK) is an eye disease characterized by anterior stromal corneal opacification and vascularization in the peripheral cornea. Progression into the central cornea may compromise visual acuity. Other anterior segment features include minimal radial defects of the iris stroma. Posterior segment involvement is characterized by foveal hypoplasia with minimal effect on visual acuity. Aniridia is a second autosomal dominantly inherited ocular disorder defined by structural defects of the iris, frequently severe enough to cause an almost complete absence of iris. This may be accompanied by other anterior segment manifestations, including cataract and keratitis. Posterior segment involvement in aniridia is characterized by foveal hypoplasia resulting in a highly variable impairment of visual acuity, often with nystagmus. Aniridia is usually inherited as an autosomal dominant disease and occurs in 1 in 50,000 to 100,000 people. Aniridia has been shown to result from mutations in PAX-6, a gene thought to regulate fetal eye development. The similar clinical findings in ADK and aniridia, with the similar patterns of inheritance, compelled us to investigate if these two ocular disorders are variants of the same genetic disorder. We have tested for linkage between PAX-6 and ADK within an ADK family with 33 members over four generations, including 11 affected individuals. Linkage studies reveal that D11S914 (located within 3 cM of PAX-6) does not recombine with ADK (LOD score 3.61; {theta} = 0.00), consistent with PAX-6 mutations being responsible for ADK. Direct sequencing of PAX-6 RT-PCR products from ADK patients is underway to identify the mutation within the PAX-6 gene that results in ADK. The linkage of PAX-6 with ADK, along with a recent report that mutations in PAX-6 also underlie Peter`s anomaly, implicates PAX-6 widely in anterior segment malformations.

  3. Genetic linkage studies in autosomal dominant ataxia families with an MJD phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Silveira, I.; Lopes-Cendes, I.; Paciel, P.

    1994-09-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is an autosomal dominant spinocerebellar degeneration which was originally described in patients originating from the Portuguese islands of the Azores. The first non-Portuguese kindred was described in 1979 and was an American black family originating from North Carolina. Since then the number of pedigrees of non-Azorean, non-Portuguese origin has increased with families being reported from other European countries, as well as Brazil, Japan, India, The United States and Australia. The autosomal dominant ataxias are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. To date, genetic analysis of families with autosomal dominant ataxias has permitted the identification of four loci, the SCA1 (spinocerebellar ataxia type 1) locus on chromosome 6p, the SCA2 locus on chromosome 12q, a third locus on chromosome 14q, the MJD/SCA3 and, more recently, the DRPLA (Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy) locus on chromosome 12p. We ascertained a total of 181 individuals with 60 affected from eight Indian, two Brazilian and one Sicilian-American family; all of them have received the clinical diagnosis of MJD. Recently, we have begun molecular genetic studies in these families in order to test these four candidate regions. The SCA1 mutation and the DRPLA mutation has been found to be an expansion of a CAG repeat. Direct analysis of the SCA1 and DRPLA expansion has been performed in all families and no expansion was found in the affected individuals. We are now running flanking markers for the SCA2 and MJD/SCA3 loci. These results will also be presented.

  4. Autosomal-Dominant Multiple Pterygium Syndrome Is Caused by Mutations in MYH3

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Jessica X.; Burrage, Lindsay C.; Beck, Anita E.; Marvin, Colby T.; McMillin, Margaret J.; Shively, Kathryn M.; Harrell, Tanya M.; Buckingham, Kati J.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Jain, Mahim; Alanay, Yasemin; Berry, Susan A.; Carey, John C.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lee, Brendan H.; Krakow, Deborah; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Anderson, Peter; Blue, Elizabeth Marchani; Annable, Marcus; Browning, Brian L.; Buckingham, Kati J.; Chen, Christina; Chin, Jennifer; Chong, Jessica X.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Davis, Colleen P.; Frazar, Christopher; Harrell, Tanya M.; He, Zongxiao; Jain, Preti; Jarvik, Gail P.; Jimenez, Guillaume; Johanson, Eric; Jun, Goo; Kircher, Martin; Kolar, Tom; Krauter, Stephanie A.; Krumm, Niklas; Leal, Suzanne M.; Luksic, Daniel; Marvin, Colby T.; McMillin, Margaret J.; McGee, Sean; O’Reilly, Patrick; Paeper, Bryan; Patterson, Karynne; Perez, Marcos; Phillips, Sam W.; Pijoan, Jessica; Poel, Christa; Reinier, Frederic; Robertson, Peggy D.; Santos-Cortez, Regie; Shaffer, Tristan; Shephard, Cindy; Shively, Kathryn M.; Siegel, Deborah L.; Smith, Joshua D.; Staples, Jeffrey C.; Tabor, Holly K.; Tackett, Monica; Underwood, Jason G.; Wegener, Marc; Wang, Gao; Wheeler, Marsha M.; Yi, Qian; Bamshad, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple pterygium syndrome (MPS) is a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare Mendelian conditions characterized by multiple pterygia, scoliosis, and congenital contractures of the limbs. MPS typically segregates as an autosomal-recessive disorder, but rare instances of autosomal-dominant transmission have been reported. Whereas several mutations causing recessive MPS have been identified, the genetic basis of dominant MPS remains unknown. We identified four families affected by dominantly transmitted MPS characterized by pterygia, camptodactyly of the hands, vertebral fusions, and scoliosis. Exome sequencing identified predicted protein-altering mutations in embryonic myosin heavy chain (MYH3) in three families. MYH3 mutations underlie distal arthrogryposis types 1, 2A, and 2B, but all mutations reported to date occur in the head and neck domains. In contrast, two of the mutations found to cause MPS in this study occurred in the tail domain. The phenotypic overlap among persons with MPS, coupled with physical findings distinct from other conditions caused by mutations in MYH3, suggests that the developmental mechanism underlying MPS differs from that of other conditions and/or that certain functions of embryonic myosin might be perturbed by disruption of specific residues and/or domains. Moreover, the vertebral fusions in persons with MPS, coupled with evidence of MYH3 expression in bone, suggest that embryonic myosin plays a role in skeletal development. PMID:25957469

  5. Autosomal-Dominant Multiple Pterygium Syndrome Is Caused by Mutations in MYH3.

    PubMed

    Chong, Jessica X; Burrage, Lindsay C; Beck, Anita E; Marvin, Colby T; McMillin, Margaret J; Shively, Kathryn M; Harrell, Tanya M; Buckingham, Kati J; Bacino, Carlos A; Jain, Mahim; Alanay, Yasemin; Berry, Susan A; Carey, John C; Gibbs, Richard A; Lee, Brendan H; Krakow, Deborah; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A; Bamshad, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    Multiple pterygium syndrome (MPS) is a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare Mendelian conditions characterized by multiple pterygia, scoliosis, and congenital contractures of the limbs. MPS typically segregates as an autosomal-recessive disorder, but rare instances of autosomal-dominant transmission have been reported. Whereas several mutations causing recessive MPS have been identified, the genetic basis of dominant MPS remains unknown. We identified four families affected by dominantly transmitted MPS characterized by pterygia, camptodactyly of the hands, vertebral fusions, and scoliosis. Exome sequencing identified predicted protein-altering mutations in embryonic myosin heavy chain (MYH3) in three families. MYH3 mutations underlie distal arthrogryposis types 1, 2A, and 2B, but all mutations reported to date occur in the head and neck domains. In contrast, two of the mutations found to cause MPS in this study occurred in the tail domain. The phenotypic overlap among persons with MPS, coupled with physical findings distinct from other conditions caused by mutations in MYH3, suggests that the developmental mechanism underlying MPS differs from that of other conditions and/or that certain functions of embryonic myosin might be perturbed by disruption of specific residues and/or domains. Moreover, the vertebral fusions in persons with MPS, coupled with evidence of MYH3 expression in bone, suggest that embryonic myosin plays a role in skeletal development.

  6. Hypokalemic Hypertension Leading to a Diagnosis of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vutthikraivit, Wasawat; Assanatham, Montira

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited renal disease. Hypertension is common and occurs before decline in renal function. However, the coexistence of hypertension and hypokalemia is rare in ADPKD patients. We report on a 32-year-old woman with secondary aldosteronism. Magnetic resonance imaging of the renal arteries revealed multiple cysts of varying sizes in both the kidneys and the liver, compatible with ADPKD. Increased reninangiotensin-aldosterone system activity was secondary to cyst expansion. After initiation of angiotensin II receptor blocker, her blood pressure was controlled without additional requirement of potassium. PMID:27453714

  7. [Mapping of pathogenic genes in two families with autosomal dominant ichthyosis vulgaris].

    PubMed

    Gong, Hui-Yong; Zhang, Jing; Hu, Zheng-Mao; Wu, Ling-Qian; Liang, De-Sheng; Xie, Zhi-Guo; Pan, Qian; Bu, Feng-Xiao; Peng, Yu; Xia, Kun; Xia, Jia-Hui

    2008-07-01

    To localize the pathogenic genes of autosomal dominant ichthyosis vulgaris, we ascertained two ichthyosis vulgaris families from Hunan Province. Venous blood samples were collected from affected and unaffected family members and genomic DNA was extracted. We then performed genome scan and linkage analysis using microsatellite markers around known ichthyosis vulgaris loci in chromosomes 1 and 10. In family 1, the locus linked to ichthyosis vulgaris was located near D1S498 (1q21), which overlapped with known ichthyosis vulgaris loci. In family 2, however, all known loci for ichthyosis vulgaris were excluded and the new locus remains to be identified.

  8. Dialysis-induced Subdural Hematoma in an Arachnoid Cyst Associated with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Takata, Tadayuki; Kokudo, Yohei; Kume, Kodai; Ikeda, Kazuyo; Kamada, Masaki; Touge, Tetsuo; Deguchi, Kazushi; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Arachnoid cyst (AC) is a neurological complication of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Although an AC can increase the risk of a subdural hematoma, the clinical presentation of bleeding into an AC associated with ADPKD is not well known. We herein report the case of a 59-year-old woman in whom the initiation of hemodialysis for renal failure led to AC bleeding. A change of anticoagulant from heparin to nafamostat mesilate allowed dialysis to continue without rebleeding. These findings suggest that hemodialysis in patients with an AC associated with ADPKD may increase the risk of bleeding. Nafamostat mesilate may be useful in such cases. PMID:27477416

  9. Hypokalemic Hypertension Leading to a Diagnosis of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Vutthikraivit, Wasawat; Assanatham, Montira; Sriphrapradang, Chutintorn

    2016-06-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited renal disease. Hypertension is common and occurs before decline in renal function. However, the coexistence of hypertension and hypokalemia is rare in ADPKD patients. We report on a 32-year-old woman with secondary aldosteronism. Magnetic resonance imaging of the renal arteries revealed multiple cysts of varying sizes in both the kidneys and the liver, compatible with ADPKD. Increased reninangiotensin-aldosterone system activity was secondary to cyst expansion. After initiation of angiotensin II receptor blocker, her blood pressure was controlled without additional requirement of potassium. PMID:27453714

  10. Multifocal renal cell carcinoma of different histological subtypes in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Na, Ki Yong; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Park, Yong-Koo; Chang, Sung-Goo; Kim, Youn Wha

    2012-08-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney (ADPKD) is rare. To date, 54 cases of RCC in ADPKD have been reported. Among these, only 2 cases have different histologic types of RCC. Here we describe a 45-year-old man who received radical nephrectomy for multifocal RCC with synchronous papillary and clear cell histology in ADPKD and chronic renal failure under regular hemodialysis. The case reported herein is another example of the rare pathological finding of RCC arising in a patient with ADPKD.

  11. Evidence for locus heterogeneity in human autosomal dominant split hand/split foot malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.P.; Palmer, S.E.; Wijsman, E.M.

    1994-09-01

    Split hand/split foot (SHSF, also known as ectrodactyly) is a human developmental disorder characterized by absent central rays and other distal limb malformations. Physical mapping of SHSF-associated chromosomal rearrangements has provided compelling evidence for the location of a causative gene locus (designated SHFD1) on chromosome 7 within q21.3-q22.1. In the present study, marker loci were localized to the SHFD1 critical region through the analysis of somatic cell hybrids derived from individuals with SHSF and cytogenetic abnormalities involving the 7q21.3q22.1 region. Combined genetic and physical data suggest that the order of markers in the SHFD1 critical region is cen - D7S492 - COL1A2 - D7S527 - D7S479 - D7S491 - SHFD1 - D7S554 - ASNS - D7S518 -qter. Dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms at several of these loci were used to test for linkage of SHSF to this region in a large pedigree that demonstrated autosomal dominant inheritance of this disorder. Strong evidence against linkage of SHSF to the SHFD1 critical region was obtained, and the gene responsible for the SHSF phenotype in this pedigree was excluded from a 10 cM interval spanning the entire SHFD1 critical region. Evidence of exclusion to the SHFD1 critical region was also observed in five additional families. Thus, combined molecular and genetic data provide evidence for locus heterogeneity in autosomal dominant SHSF, implying that mutations in at least two separate autosomal genes can result in this distinctive human developmental disorder.

  12. DVL1 frameshift mutations clustering in the penultimate exon cause autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome.

    PubMed

    White, Janson; Mazzeu, Juliana F; Hoischen, Alexander; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Gambin, Tomasz; Alcino, Michele Calijorne; Penney, Samantha; Saraiva, Jorge M; Hove, Hanne; Skovby, Flemming; Kayserili, Hülya; Estrella, Elicia; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Steehouwer, Marloes; Muzny, Donna M; Sutton, V Reid; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R; Brunner, Han G; van Bon, Bregje W M; Carvalho, Claudia M B

    2015-04-01

    Robinow syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by mesomelic limb shortening, genital hypoplasia, and distinctive facial features and for which both autosomal-recessive and autosomal-dominant inheritance patterns have been described. Causative variants in the non-canonical signaling gene WNT5A underlie a subset of autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome (DRS) cases, but most individuals with DRS remain without a molecular diagnosis. We performed whole-exome sequencing in four unrelated DRS-affected individuals without coding mutations in WNT5A and found heterozygous DVL1 exon 14 mutations in three of them. Targeted Sanger sequencing in additional subjects with DRS uncovered DVL1 exon 14 mutations in five individuals, including a pair of monozygotic twins. In total, six distinct frameshift mutations were found in eight subjects, and all were heterozygous truncating variants within the penultimate exon of DVL1. In five families in which samples from unaffected parents were available, the variants were demonstrated to represent de novo mutations. All variant alleles are predicted to result in a premature termination codon within the last exon, escape nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), and most likely generate a C-terminally truncated protein with a distinct -1 reading-frame terminus. Study of the transcripts extracted from affected subjects' leukocytes confirmed expression of both wild-type and variant alleles, supporting the hypothesis that mutant mRNA escapes NMD. Genomic variants identified in our study suggest that truncation of the C-terminal domain of DVL1, a protein hypothesized to have a downstream role in the Wnt-5a non-canonical pathway, is a common cause of DRS. PMID:25817016

  13. Oculopharyngeal Weakness, Hypophrenia, Deafness, and Impaired Vision: A Novel Autosomal Dominant Myopathy with Rimmed Vacuoles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ting; Lu, Xiang-Hui; Wang, Hui-Fang; Ban, Rui; Liu, Hua-Xu; Shi, Qiang; Wang, Qian; Yin, Xi; Pu, Chuan-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Myopathies with rimmed vacuoles are a heterogeneous group of muscle disorders with progressive muscle weakness and varied clinical manifestations but similar features in muscle biopsies. Here, we describe a novel autosomal dominant myopathy with rimmed vacuoles in a large family with 11 patients of three generations affected. Methods: A clinical study including family history, obstetric, pediatric, and development history was recorded. Clinical examinations including physical examination, electromyography (EMG), serum creatine kinase (CK), bone X-rays, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed in this family. Open muscle biopsies were performed on the proband and his mother. To find the causative gene, the whole-exome sequencing was carried out. Results: Disease onset was from adolescence to adulthood, but the affected patients of the third generation presented an earlier onset and more severe clinical manifestations than the older generations. Clinical features were characterized as dysarthria, dysphagia, external ophthalmoplegia, limb weakness, hypophrenia, deafness, and impaired vision. However, not every patient manifested all symptoms. Serum CK was mildly elevated and EMG indicated a myopathic pattern. Brain MRI showed cerebellum and brain stem mildly atrophy. Rimmed vacuoles and inclusion bodies were observed in muscle biopsy. The whole-exome sequencing was performed, but the causative gene has not been found. Conclusions: We reported a novel autosomal dominant myopathy with rimmed vacuoles characterized by dysarthria, dysphagia, external ophthalmoplegia, limb weakness, hypophrenia, deafness, and impaired vision, but the causative gene has not been found and needs further study. PMID:27453229

  14. Lamin B1 overexpression increases nuclear rigidity in autosomal dominant leukodystrophy fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ferrera, Denise; Canale, Claudio; Marotta, Roberto; Mazzaro, Nadia; Gritti, Marta; Mazzanti, Michele; Capellari, Sabina; Cortelli, Pietro; Gasparini, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The architecture and structural mechanics of the cell nucleus are defined by the nuclear lamina, which is formed by A- and B-type lamins. Recently, gene duplication and protein overexpression of lamin B1 (LB1) have been reported in pedigrees with autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD). However, how the overexpression of LB1 affects nuclear mechanics and function and how it may result in pathology remain unexplored. Here, we report that in primary human skin fibroblasts derived from ADLD patients, LB1, but not other lamins, is overexpressed at the nuclear lamina and specifically enhances nuclear stiffness. Transient transfection of LB1 in HEK293 and neuronal N2a cells mimics the mechanical phenotype of ADLD nuclei. Notably, in ADLD fibroblasts, reducing LB1 protein levels by shRNA knockdown restores elasticity values to those indistinguishable from control fibroblasts. Moreover, isolated nuclei from ADLD fibroblasts display a reduced nuclear ion channel open probability on voltage-step application, suggesting that biophysical changes induced by LB1 overexpression may alter nuclear signaling cascades in somatic cells. Overall, the overexpression of LB1 in ADLD cells alters nuclear mechanics and is linked to changes in nuclear signaling, which could help explain the pathogenesis of this disease.—Ferrera, D., Canale, C., Marotta, R., Mazzaro, N., Gritti, M., Mazzanti, M., Capellari, S., Cortelli, P., Gasparini, L. Lamin B1 overexpression increases nuclear rigidity in autosomal dominant leukodystrophy fibroblasts. PMID:24858279

  15. Early-onset autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease: prevalence, genetic heterogeneity, and mutation spectrum.

    PubMed Central

    Campion, D; Dumanchin, C; Hannequin, D; Dubois, B; Belliard, S; Puel, M; Thomas-Anterion, C; Michon, A; Martin, C; Charbonnier, F; Raux, G; Camuzat, A; Penet, C; Mesnage, V; Martinez, M; Clerget-Darpoux, F; Brice, A; Frebourg, T

    1999-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD) and of autosomal dominant forms of EOAD (ADEOAD), we performed a population-based study in the city of Rouen (426,710 residents). EOAD was defined as onset of disease at age <61 years, and ADEOAD was defined as the occurrence of at least three EOAD cases in three generations. Using these stringent criteria, we calculated that the EOAD and ADEOAD prevalences per 100,000 persons at risk were 41.2 and 5.3, respectively. We then performed a mutational analysis of the genes for amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin 1 (PSEN1), and presenilin 2 (PSEN2) in 34 families with ADEOAD ascertained in France. In 19 (56%) of these families, we identified 16 distinct PSEN1 missense mutations, including 4 (Thr147Ile, Trp165Cys, Leu173Trp, and Ser390Ile) not reported elsewhere. APP mutations, including a novel mutation located at codon 715, were identified in 5 (15%) of the families. In the 10 remaining ADEOAD families and in 9 additional autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease families that did not fulfill the strict criteria for ADEOAD, no PSEN1, PSEN2, or APP mutation was identified. These results show that (1) PSEN1 and APP mutations account for 71% of ADEOAD families and (2) nonpenetrance at age <61 years is probably infrequent for PSEN1 or APP mutations. PMID:10441572

  16. Autosomal-dominant striatal degeneration is caused by a mutation in the phosphodiesterase 8B gene.

    PubMed

    Appenzeller, Silke; Schirmacher, Anja; Halfter, Hartmut; Bäumer, Sebastian; Pendziwiat, Manuela; Timmerman, Vincent; De Jonghe, Peter; Fekete, Klára; Stögbauer, Florian; Lüdemann, Peter; Hund, Margret; Quabius, Elgar Susanne; Ringelstein, E Bernd; Kuhlenbäumer, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant striatal degeneration (ADSD) is an autosomal-dominant movement disorder affecting the striatal part of the basal ganglia. ADSD is characterized by bradykinesia, dysarthria, and muscle rigidity. These symptoms resemble idiopathic Parkinson disease, but tremor is not present. Using genetic linkage analysis, we have mapped the causative genetic defect to a 3.25 megabase candidate region on chromosome 5q13.3-q14.1. A maximum LOD score of 4.1 (Theta = 0) was obtained at marker D5S1962. Here we show that ADSD is caused by a complex frameshift mutation (c.94G>C+c.95delT) in the phosphodiesterase 8B (PDE8B) gene, which results in a loss of enzymatic phosphodiesterase activity. We found that PDE8B is highly expressed in the brain, especially in the putamen, which is affected by ADSD. PDE8B degrades cyclic AMP, a second messenger implied in dopamine signaling. Dopamine is one of the main neurotransmitters involved in movement control and is deficient in Parkinson disease. We believe that the functional analysis of PDE8B will help to further elucidate the pathomechanism of ADSD as well as contribute to a better understanding of movement disorders.

  17. Evidence for locus heterogeneity in human autosomal dominant split hand/split foot malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.E.; Wijsman, E.M.; Stephens, K.; Evans, J.P. ); Scherer, S.W.; Tsui, L.C. ); Kukolich, M. )

    1994-07-01

    Split hand/split foot (SHSF; also known as ectrodactyly) is a human developmental disorder characterized by missing central digits and other distal limb malformations. An association between SHSF and cytogenetically visible rearrangements of chromosome 7 at bands q21-q22 provides compelling evidence for the location of a causative gene at this location, and the locus has been designated SHFD1. In the present study, marker loci were localized to the SHFD1 critical region through the analysis of somatic cell hybrids derived from individuals with SHSF and cytogenetic abnormalities involving the 7q21-q22 region. Combined genetic and physical data suggest that the order of markers in the SHFD1 critical region is cen-D7S492-D7S527-(D7S479-D7S491)-SHFD1-D7S553-D7S518-qter. Dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms at three of these loci were used to test for linkage of SHSF to this region in a large pedigree that demonstrates autosomal dominant SHSF. Evidence against linkage of the SHSF gene to 7q21-q22 was obtained in this pedigree. Therefore, combined molecular and genetic data provide evidence for locus heterogeneity in autosomal dominant SHSF. The authors propose the name SHSF2 for this second locus. 34 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Mutations in INF2 Are a Major Cause of Autosomal Dominant Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Olivia; Benoit, Geneviève; Gribouval, Olivier; Nevo, Fabien; Tête, Marie-Josèphe; Dantal, Jacques; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Touchard, Guy; Karras, Alexandre; Presne, Claire; Grunfeld, Jean-Pierre; Legendre, Christophe; Joly, Dominique; Rieu, Philippe; Mohsin, Nabil; Hannedouche, Thierry; Moal, Valérie; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Broutin, Isabelle; Mollet, Géraldine

    2011-01-01

    The recent identification of mutations in the INF2 gene, which encodes a member of the formin family of actin-regulating proteins, in cases of familial FSGS supports the importance of an intact actin cytoskeleton in podocyte function. To determine better the prevalence of INF2 mutations in autosomal dominant FSGS, we screened 54 families (78 patients) and detected mutations in 17% of them. All mutations were missense variants localized to the N-terminal diaphanous inhibitory domain of the protein, a region that interacts with the C-terminal diaphanous autoregulatory domain, thereby competing for actin monomer binding and inhibiting depolymerization. Six of the seven distinct altered residues localized to an INF2 region that corresponded to a subdomain of the mDia1 diaphanous inhibitory domain reported to co-immunoprecipitate with IQ motif–containing GTPase-activating protein 1 (IQGAP1). In addition, we evaluated 84 sporadic cases but detected a mutation in only one patient. In conclusion, mutations in INF2 are a major cause of autosomal dominant FSGS. Because IQGAP1 interacts with crucial podocyte proteins such as nephrin and PLCε1, the identification of mutations that may alter the putative INF2–IQGAP1 interaction provides additional insight into the pathophysiologic mechanisms linking formin proteins to podocyte dysfunction and FSGS. PMID:21258034

  19. Autosomal dominant inherited neuropathies with prominent sensory loss and mutilations: a review.

    PubMed

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; De Jonghe, Peter; Verhoeven, Kristien; Timmerman, Vincent; Wagner, Klaus; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Nicholson, Garth A

    2003-03-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSNs) are rare disorders characterized by progressive distal sensory loss, predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Foot ulcers, severe skin and bone infections, arthropathy, and amputations are frequent and feared complications. Occasionally, patients complain of spontaneous shooting or lancinating pain. Autonomic fibers can be affected to a variable degree. Patients with HSN can also have severe distal weakness, and some HSN variants have therefore been classified among the hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies (HMSNs). Molecular genetic studies of autosomal dominant inherited neuropathies with prominent sensory loss and ulceromutilating features have assigned the genetic loci for HMSN type 2B (Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome type 2B) and HSN type 1 to chromosomes 3q13-22 and 9q22.1-22.3, respectively. However, some families with HSN have been excluded for linkage to these loci, suggesting further genetic heterogeneity. Recently, disease-causing mutations in the SPTLC1 gene have been identified in patients with HSN type 1. In this review, we discuss the hallmark features associated with the distinct genetic subtypes of autosomal dominant inherited HSN and provide genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:12633143

  20. Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer Disease: A Unique Resource to Study CSF Biomarker Changes in Preclinical AD

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Suzanne Elizabeth; Fagan, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) has been greatly influenced by investigation of rare families with autosomal dominant mutations that cause early onset AD. Mutations in the genes coding for amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin 1 (PSEN-1), and presenilin 2 (PSEN-2) cause over-production of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) leading to early deposition of Aβ in the brain, which in turn is hypothesized to initiate a cascade of processes, resulting in neuronal death, cognitive decline, and eventual dementia. Studies of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from individuals with the common form of AD, late-onset AD (LOAD), have revealed that low CSF Aβ42 and high CSF tau are associated with AD brain pathology. Herein, we review the literature on CSF biomarkers in autosomal dominant AD (ADAD), which has contributed to a detailed road map of AD pathogenesis, especially during the preclinical period, prior to the appearance of any cognitive symptoms. Current drug trials are also taking advantage of the unique characteristics of ADAD and utilizing CSF biomarkers to accelerate development of effective therapies for AD. PMID:26175713

  1. EPHB4 kinase-inactivating mutations cause autosomal dominant lymphatic-related hydrops fetalis.

    PubMed

    Martin-Almedina, Silvia; Martinez-Corral, Ines; Holdhus, Rita; Vicente, Andres; Fotiou, Elisavet; Lin, Shin; Petersen, Kjell; Simpson, Michael A; Hoischen, Alexander; Gilissen, Christian; Jeffery, Heather; Atton, Giles; Karapouliou, Christina; Brice, Glen; Gordon, Kristiana; Wiseman, John W; Wedin, Marianne; Rockson, Stanley G; Jeffery, Steve; Mortimer, Peter S; Snyder, Michael P; Berland, Siren; Mansour, Sahar; Makinen, Taija; Ostergaard, Pia

    2016-08-01

    Hydrops fetalis describes fluid accumulation in at least 2 fetal compartments, including abdominal cavities, pleura, and pericardium, or in body tissue. The majority of hydrops fetalis cases are nonimmune conditions that present with generalized edema of the fetus, and approximately 15% of these nonimmune cases result from a lymphatic abnormality. Here, we have identified an autosomal dominant, inherited form of lymphatic-related (nonimmune) hydrops fetalis (LRHF). Independent exome sequencing projects on 2 families with a history of in utero and neonatal deaths associated with nonimmune hydrops fetalis uncovered 2 heterozygous missense variants in the gene encoding Eph receptor B4 (EPHB4). Biochemical analysis determined that the mutant EPHB4 proteins are devoid of tyrosine kinase activity, indicating that loss of EPHB4 signaling contributes to LRHF pathogenesis. Further, inactivation of Ephb4 in lymphatic endothelial cells of developing mouse embryos led to defective lymphovenous valve formation and consequent subcutaneous edema. Together, these findings identify EPHB4 as a critical regulator of early lymphatic vascular development and demonstrate that mutations in the gene can cause an autosomal dominant form of LRHF that is associated with a high mortality rate. PMID:27400125

  2. EPHB4 kinase–inactivating mutations cause autosomal dominant lymphatic-related hydrops fetalis

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Almedina, Silvia; Holdhus, Rita; Vicente, Andres; Fotiou, Elisavet; Lin, Shin; Petersen, Kjell; Simpson, Michael A.; Hoischen, Alexander; Atton, Giles; Karapouliou, Christina; Brice, Glen; Gordon, Kristiana; Wiseman, John W.; Wedin, Marianne; Rockson, Stanley G.; Jeffery, Steve; Mortimer, Peter S.; Snyder, Michael P.; Berland, Siren; Mansour, Sahar; Makinen, Taija

    2016-01-01

    Hydrops fetalis describes fluid accumulation in at least 2 fetal compartments, including abdominal cavities, pleura, and pericardium, or in body tissue. The majority of hydrops fetalis cases are nonimmune conditions that present with generalized edema of the fetus, and approximately 15% of these nonimmune cases result from a lymphatic abnormality. Here, we have identified an autosomal dominant, inherited form of lymphatic-related (nonimmune) hydrops fetalis (LRHF). Independent exome sequencing projects on 2 families with a history of in utero and neonatal deaths associated with nonimmune hydrops fetalis uncovered 2 heterozygous missense variants in the gene encoding Eph receptor B4 (EPHB4). Biochemical analysis determined that the mutant EPHB4 proteins are devoid of tyrosine kinase activity, indicating that loss of EPHB4 signaling contributes to LRHF pathogenesis. Further, inactivation of Ephb4 in lymphatic endothelial cells of developing mouse embryos led to defective lymphovenous valve formation and consequent subcutaneous edema. Together, these findings identify EPHB4 as a critical regulator of early lymphatic vascular development and demonstrate that mutations in the gene can cause an autosomal dominant form of LRHF that is associated with a high mortality rate. PMID:27400125

  3. A mutation in FRIZZLED2 impairs Wnt signaling and causes autosomal dominant omodysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Saal, Howard M.; Prows, Cynthia A.; Guerreiro, Iris; Donlin, Milene; Knudson, Luke; Sund, Kristen L.; Chang, Ching-Fang; Brugmann, Samantha A.; Stottmann, Rolf W.

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant omodysplasia is a rare skeletal dysplasia characterized by short humeri, radial head dislocation, short first metacarpals, facial dysmorphism and genitourinary anomalies. We performed next-generation whole-exome sequencing and comparative analysis of a proband with omodysplasia, her unaffected parents and her affected daughter. We identified a de novo mutation in FRIZZLED2 (FZD2) in the proband and her daughter that was not found in unaffected family members. The FZD2 mutation (c.1644G>A) changes a tryptophan residue at amino acid 548 to a premature stop (p.Trp548*). This altered protein is still produced in vitro, but we show reduced ability of this mutant form of FZD2 to interact with its downstream target DISHEVELLED. Furthermore, expressing the mutant form of FZD2 in vitro is not able to facilitate the cellular response to canonical Wnt signaling like wild-type FZD2. We therefore conclude that the FRIZZLED2 mutation is a de novo, novel cause for autosomal dominant omodysplasia. PMID:25759469

  4. Autosomal-Dominant Striatal Degeneration Is Caused by a Mutation in the Phosphodiesterase 8B Gene

    PubMed Central

    Appenzeller, Silke; Schirmacher, Anja; Halfter, Hartmut; Bäumer, Sebastian; Pendziwiat, Manuela; Timmerman, Vincent; De Jonghe, Peter; Fekete, Klára; Stögbauer, Florian; Lüdemann, Peter; Hund, Margret; Quabius, Elgar Susanne; Ringelstein, E. Bernd; Kuhlenbäumer, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant striatal degeneration (ADSD) is an autosomal-dominant movement disorder affecting the striatal part of the basal ganglia. ADSD is characterized by bradykinesia, dysarthria, and muscle rigidity. These symptoms resemble idiopathic Parkinson disease, but tremor is not present. Using genetic linkage analysis, we have mapped the causative genetic defect to a 3.25 megabase candidate region on chromosome 5q13.3-q14.1. A maximum LOD score of 4.1 (Θ = 0) was obtained at marker D5S1962. Here we show that ADSD is caused by a complex frameshift mutation (c.94G>C+c.95delT) in the phosphodiesterase 8B (PDE8B) gene, which results in a loss of enzymatic phosphodiesterase activity. We found that PDE8B is highly expressed in the brain, especially in the putamen, which is affected by ADSD. PDE8B degrades cyclic AMP, a second messenger implied in dopamine signaling. Dopamine is one of the main neurotransmitters involved in movement control and is deficient in Parkinson disease. We believe that the functional analysis of PDE8B will help to further elucidate the pathomechanism of ADSD as well as contribute to a better understanding of movement disorders. PMID:20085714

  5. Hypomagnesemia associated with a proton pump inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Jun; Tsuji, Kunihiro; Doyama, Hisashi; Kim, Fae; Takeda, Yasuhito; Kito, Yosuke; Ito, Renma; Nakanishi, Hiroyoshi; Hayashi, Tomoyuki; Waseda, Yohei; Tsuji, Shigetsugu; Takemura, Kenichi; Yamada, Shinya; Okada, Toshihide; Kanaya, Honin

    2012-01-01

    Severe hypomagnesemia is a serious clinical condition. Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) induced hypomagnesemia has been recognized since 2006. In March 2011 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration advised that long-term use of PPI can induce hypomagnesemia. We report the first Japanese case of hypomagnesemia associated with chronic use of PPIs in a 64-year-old man hospitalized for nausea, bilateral ankle arthritis, and tremor of the extremities who had convulsions 3 days after admission. Blood analysis showed severe hypomagnesemia. He had been taking rabeprazole (10 mg/day) for 5 years. After stopping rabeprazole and correcting the electrolytes imbalances, his symptoms improved without recurrence.

  6. Quantitative Amyloid Imaging in Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer's Disease: Results from the DIAN Study Group.

    PubMed

    Su, Yi; Blazey, Tyler M; Owen, Christopher J; Christensen, Jon J; Friedrichsen, Karl; Joseph-Mathurin, Nelly; Wang, Qing; Hornbeck, Russ C; Ances, Beau M; Snyder, Abraham Z; Cash, Lisa A; Koeppe, Robert A; Klunk, William E; Galasko, Douglas; Brickman, Adam M; McDade, Eric; Ringman, John M; Thompson, Paul M; Saykin, Andrew J; Ghetti, Bernardino; Sperling, Reisa A; Johnson, Keith A; Salloway, Stephen P; Schofield, Peter R; Masters, Colin L; Villemagne, Victor L; Fox, Nick C; Förster, Stefan; Chen, Kewei; Reiman, Eric M; Xiong, Chengjie; Marcus, Daniel S; Weiner, Michael W; Morris, John C; Bateman, Randall J; Benzinger, Tammie L S

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid imaging plays an important role in the research and diagnosis of dementing disorders. Substantial variation in quantitative methods to measure brain amyloid burden exists in the field. The aim of this work is to investigate the impact of methodological variations to the quantification of amyloid burden using data from the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer's Network (DIAN), an autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease population. Cross-sectional and longitudinal [11C]-Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) PET imaging data from the DIAN study were analyzed. Four candidate reference regions were investigated for estimation of brain amyloid burden. A regional spread function based technique was also investigated for the correction of partial volume effects. Cerebellar cortex, brain-stem, and white matter regions all had stable tracer retention during the course of disease. Partial volume correction consistently improves sensitivity to group differences and longitudinal changes over time. White matter referencing improved statistical power in the detecting longitudinal changes in relative tracer retention; however, the reason for this improvement is unclear and requires further investigation. Full dynamic acquisition and kinetic modeling improved statistical power although it may add cost and time. Several technical variations to amyloid burden quantification were examined in this study. Partial volume correction emerged as the strategy that most consistently improved statistical power for the detection of both longitudinal changes and across-group differences. For the autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease population with PiB imaging, utilizing brainstem as a reference region with partial volume correction may be optimal for current interventional trials. Further investigation of technical issues in quantitative amyloid imaging in different study populations using different amyloid imaging tracers is warranted.

  7. Quantitative Amyloid Imaging in Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer’s Disease: Results from the DIAN Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yi; Blazey, Tyler M.; Owen, Christopher J.; Christensen, Jon J.; Friedrichsen, Karl; Joseph-Mathurin, Nelly; Wang, Qing; Hornbeck, Russ C.; Ances, Beau M.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Cash, Lisa A.; Koeppe, Robert A.; Klunk, William E.; Galasko, Douglas; Brickman, Adam M.; McDade, Eric; Ringman, John M.; Thompson, Paul M.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Salloway, Stephen P.; Schofield, Peter R.; Masters, Colin L.; Villemagne, Victor L.; Fox, Nick C.; Förster, Stefan; Chen, Kewei; Reiman, Eric M.; Xiong, Chengjie; Marcus, Daniel S.; Weiner, Michael W.; Morris, John C.; Bateman, Randall J.; Benzinger, Tammie L. S.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid imaging plays an important role in the research and diagnosis of dementing disorders. Substantial variation in quantitative methods to measure brain amyloid burden exists in the field. The aim of this work is to investigate the impact of methodological variations to the quantification of amyloid burden using data from the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer’s Network (DIAN), an autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease population. Cross-sectional and longitudinal [11C]-Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) PET imaging data from the DIAN study were analyzed. Four candidate reference regions were investigated for estimation of brain amyloid burden. A regional spread function based technique was also investigated for the correction of partial volume effects. Cerebellar cortex, brain-stem, and white matter regions all had stable tracer retention during the course of disease. Partial volume correction consistently improves sensitivity to group differences and longitudinal changes over time. White matter referencing improved statistical power in the detecting longitudinal changes in relative tracer retention; however, the reason for this improvement is unclear and requires further investigation. Full dynamic acquisition and kinetic modeling improved statistical power although it may add cost and time. Several technical variations to amyloid burden quantification were examined in this study. Partial volume correction emerged as the strategy that most consistently improved statistical power for the detection of both longitudinal changes and across-group differences. For the autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease population with PiB imaging, utilizing brainstem as a reference region with partial volume correction may be optimal for current interventional trials. Further investigation of technical issues in quantitative amyloid imaging in different study populations using different amyloid imaging tracers is warranted. PMID:27010959

  8. Screening for mutations in rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS in patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.A.; Gannon, A.M.; Daiger, S.P.

    1994-09-01

    Mutations in rhodopsin account for approximately 30% of all cases of autosomal dominant retinits pigmentosa (adRP) and mutations in peripherin/RDS account for an additional 5% of cases. Also, mutations in rhodopsin can cause autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa and mutations in peripherin/RDS can cause dominant macular degeneration. Most disease-causing mutations in rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS are unique to one family or, at most, to a few families within a limited geographic region, though a few mutations are found in multiple, unrelated families. To further determine the spectrum of genetic variation in these genes, we screened DNA samples from 134 unrelated patients with retinitis pigmentosa for mutations in both rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS using SSCP followed by genomic sequencing. Of the 134 patients, 86 were from families with apparent adRP and 48 were either isolated cases or were from families with an equivocal mode of inheritance. Among these patients we found 14 distinct rhodopsin mutations which are likely to cause retinal disease. Eleven of these mutations were found in one individual or one family only, whereas the Pro23His mutation was found in 14 {open_quotes}unrelated{close_quotes}individuals. The splice-site mutation produces dominant disease though with highly variable expression. Among the remaining patients were found 6 distinct peripherin/RDS mutations which are likely to cause retinal disease. These mutations were also found in one patient or family only, except the Gly266Asp mutation which was found in two unrelated patients. These results confirm the expected frequency and broad spectrum of mutations causing adRP.

  9. Quantitative Amyloid Imaging in Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer's Disease: Results from the DIAN Study Group.

    PubMed

    Su, Yi; Blazey, Tyler M; Owen, Christopher J; Christensen, Jon J; Friedrichsen, Karl; Joseph-Mathurin, Nelly; Wang, Qing; Hornbeck, Russ C; Ances, Beau M; Snyder, Abraham Z; Cash, Lisa A; Koeppe, Robert A; Klunk, William E; Galasko, Douglas; Brickman, Adam M; McDade, Eric; Ringman, John M; Thompson, Paul M; Saykin, Andrew J; Ghetti, Bernardino; Sperling, Reisa A; Johnson, Keith A; Salloway, Stephen P; Schofield, Peter R; Masters, Colin L; Villemagne, Victor L; Fox, Nick C; Förster, Stefan; Chen, Kewei; Reiman, Eric M; Xiong, Chengjie; Marcus, Daniel S; Weiner, Michael W; Morris, John C; Bateman, Randall J; Benzinger, Tammie L S

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid imaging plays an important role in the research and diagnosis of dementing disorders. Substantial variation in quantitative methods to measure brain amyloid burden exists in the field. The aim of this work is to investigate the impact of methodological variations to the quantification of amyloid burden using data from the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer's Network (DIAN), an autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease population. Cross-sectional and longitudinal [11C]-Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) PET imaging data from the DIAN study were analyzed. Four candidate reference regions were investigated for estimation of brain amyloid burden. A regional spread function based technique was also investigated for the correction of partial volume effects. Cerebellar cortex, brain-stem, and white matter regions all had stable tracer retention during the course of disease. Partial volume correction consistently improves sensitivity to group differences and longitudinal changes over time. White matter referencing improved statistical power in the detecting longitudinal changes in relative tracer retention; however, the reason for this improvement is unclear and requires further investigation. Full dynamic acquisition and kinetic modeling improved statistical power although it may add cost and time. Several technical variations to amyloid burden quantification were examined in this study. Partial volume correction emerged as the strategy that most consistently improved statistical power for the detection of both longitudinal changes and across-group differences. For the autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease population with PiB imaging, utilizing brainstem as a reference region with partial volume correction may be optimal for current interventional trials. Further investigation of technical issues in quantitative amyloid imaging in different study populations using different amyloid imaging tracers is warranted. PMID:27010959

  10. Fine localization of the locus for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa on chromosome 17p

    SciTech Connect

    Goliath, R.; Janssens, P.; Beighton, P.

    1995-10-01

    The term {open_quotes}retintis pigmentosa{close_quotes} (RP) refers to a group of inherited retinal degenerative disorders. Clinical manifestations include night-blindness, with variable age of onset, followed by constriction of the visual field that may progress to total loss of sight in later life. Previous studies have shown that RP is caused by mutations within different genes and may be inherited as an X-linked recessive (XLRRP), autosomal recessive (ARRP), or autosomal dominant (ADRP) trait. The AD form of this group of conditions has been found to be caused by mutations within the rhodopsin gene in some families and the peripherin/RDS gene in others. In addition, some ADRP families have been found to be linked to anonymous markers on 8cen, 7p, 7q,19q, and, more recently, 17p. The ADRP gene locus on the short arm of chromosome 17 was identified in a large South African family (ADRP-SA) of British origin. The phenotypic expression of the disorder, which has been described elsewhere is consistent in the pedigree with an early onset of disease symptoms. In all affected subjects in the family, onset of symptoms commenced before the age of 10 years. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for urinary calculi in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Delakas, D; Daskalopoulos, G; Cranidis, A

    1997-06-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is an inherited systemic disorder. Renal stones have a high rate of occurrence among patients with ADPKD and are a significant cause of morbidity in this disorder. Thirteen patients with ADPKD and symptomatic or obstructive renal stones presented to our hospital for evaluation and treatment with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL). A total of 16 renal units were treated. The auxiliary procedures included placement of a double-J stent in nine kidneys when the stone was larger than 8 mm in diameter. Eleven patients (85%) were stone free 3 months after lithotripsy; a second treatment was necessary in two patients. We conclude that SWL can be used as a primary management tool for renal stones in patients with ADPKD.

  12. Salmon: a new autosomal mutation demonstrating incomplete dominance in the boine snake Boa constrictor.

    PubMed

    Ihle, R N; Schuett, G W; Hughes, K A

    2000-01-01

    An unusual and attractive pigmentation pattern mutation termed "salmon" has been identified in the United States in several captive colonies of the common neotropical boine snake boa constrictor [Boa constrictor (Boidae)]. Boa constrictors expressing the Sa pigmentation pattern appear to be restricted to regions of Panama. Animals with the Sa phenotype exhibit a sharp decrease in melanophore pigments (e.g., melanin) and an increase of xanthophore pigments (e.g., pteridines and carotenoids) throughout the body, including ventral and caudal regions. Moreover, the dorsal saddles (blotches) and lateral diamond patterns are greatly reduced and/or absent. Our study was initiated using a female B. constrictor born in captivity and expressed the Sa pigmentation pattern. Results from breeding experiments indicated an inheritance mode of autosomal incomplete dominance for the Sa and Wt alleles.

  13. [Cardiac tamponade as first manifestation in Mediterranean fever with autosomal dominant form].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Ferrer, F; Martinez Villar, M; Fernández Bernal, A; Martín de Lara, I; Paya Elorza, I

    2015-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a hereditary disease characterized by brief, recurring and self-limited episodes of fever and pain with inflammation, of one or several serous (peritoneum, pleura, pericardium, synovial or vaginal tunic of the testicle). Amyloidosis is its more important complication and the principal reason of death in the cases in which it appears. Diagnosis is based on the clinic and is confirmed by genetic tests. The treatment with Colchicine (0,02-0,03 mg/kg/day) prevents the recurrence of FMF attacks and the development of secondary (AA) amyloidosis. We report a case of a 13-year-old child in which FMF was diagnosed after several coincidental episodes with fever, pericarditis and cardiac tamponade. The genetic confirmation showed an autosomal dominant inheritance that is less frecuent than the recesive form, in this disease.

  14. Autosomal dominant (Beukes) premature degenerative osteoarthropathy of the hip joint unlinked to COL2A1

    SciTech Connect

    Beighton, P.; Ramesar, R.; Cilliers, H.J.

    1994-12-01

    Molecular investigations have been undertaken in several separate large South African families with autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasias in which premature degenerative osteoarthropathy of the hip joint was the major manifestation. There are sometimes additional minor changes in the spine and these conditions fall into the general spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) nosological category. In some kindreds, linkage between phenotype and the type II collagen gene (COL2A1) has been established, while in others there is no linkage. We have now completed molecular linkage investigations in an Afrikaner family named Beukes, in which 47 members in 6 generations have premature osteoarthropathy of the hip joint. A LOD score of minus infinity indicates that this condition is not the result of a defect of the COL2A1 gene. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Functional heterogeneity of mutant rhodopsins responsible for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed Central

    Sung, C H; Schneider, B G; Agarwal, N; Papermaster, D S; Nathans, J

    1991-01-01

    Thirteen mutant rhodopsins responsible for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) have been produced by transfection of cloned cDNA into tissue culture cells. Three mutants [class I: Phe-45----Leu, Gln-344----termination (deletion of C-terminal positions 344-348), and Pro-347----Leu] resemble wild-type rhodopsin in yield, regenerability with 11-cis-retinal, and plasma membrane localization. Ten mutants [class II: Thr-17----Met, Pro-23----His, Thr-58----Arg, Val-87----Asp, Gly-89----Asp, Gly-106----Trp, Arg-135----Leu, Arg-135----Trp, Tyr-178----Cys, and Asp-190----Gly] accumulate to significantly lower levels, regenerate with 11-cis-retinal variably or not at all, and are transported inefficiently to the plasma membrane, remaining primarily in the endoplasmic reticulum. These data suggest that there are at least two distinct biochemical defects associated with different rhodopsin mutants in ADRP. Images PMID:1924344

  16. [Photic sneeze reflex or autosomal dominant compelling helio-ophthalmic outburst syndrome].

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, J M

    2006-01-01

    Sneeze is an ubiquitous phenomenon that happens to everyone. In spite of this, little attention has been paid to it, among medical literature in general, and even less in neurologic texts. A curious entity, called photic sneeze reflex, solar sneeze reflex, light sneeze reflex or autosomal dominant compelling helio-ophthalmic outburst syndrome, known perhaps since ancient Greek, has been scarcely described in the scientific literature, mainly as clinical notes and letters to the editor, but in a detailed way, we can find just a few reports. This reflex appears when subjects are exposed suddenly to intense sunlight and it consists of long incoercible sneeze bursts. It is usually ignored by its sufferers, who report it as a curiosity or a minor complaint, and its importance has been neglected in spite of its hereditary nature and its apparently high prevalence. We review the history, epidemiology, genetics, neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and physiopathology of this reflex hereditary response.

  17. Mutational analysis of PKD1 gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingyan; Li, Lanrong; Liu, Qingmin

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a hereditary disease and common renal disease. Mutations of PKD genes are responsible for this disease. We analyzed a large Chinese family with ADPKD using Sanger sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for this disease. The family comprised 27 individuals including 10 ADPKD patients. These ADPKD patients had severe renal disease and most of them died very young. We analyzed 6 survival patients gene and found they all had C10529T mutation in exon 35 of PKD1 gene. We did not found gene mutation in any unaffected relatives or 300 unrelated controls. These findings suggested that the C10529T mutation in PKD1 gene might be the pathogenic mutation responsible for the disease in this family. PMID:26722532

  18. Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa mapping to chromosome 7p exhibits variable expression.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, R Y; Fitzke, F W; Moore, A T; Jay, M; Inglehearn, C; Arden, G B; Bhattacharya, S S; Bird, A C

    1995-01-01

    The genetic locus causing autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) has recently been mapped in a large English family to chromosome 7p. Eight affected members of this family were studied electrophysiologically and psychophysically with dark adapted static threshold perimetry and dark adaptometry. The phenotypes observed fell into three categories: minimally affected with no symptoms, and normal (or near normal) electrophysiology and psychophysics; moderately affected with mild symptoms, abnormal electroretinograms, and equal loss of rod and cone function in affected areas of the retina; and severely affected with extinguished electroretinograms and barely detectable dark adapted static threshold sensitivities. The mutation in the gene on 7p causing adRP in this family causes regional retinal dysfunction with greatly variable expressivity ranging from normal to profoundly abnormal in a manner not explained by age. PMID:7880785

  19. Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa with apparent incomplete penetrance: a clinical, electrophysiological, psychophysical, and molecular genetic study.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, A T; Fitzke, F; Jay, M; Arden, G B; Inglehearn, C F; Keen, T J; Bhattacharya, S S; Bird, A C

    1993-01-01

    Twenty five symptomatic individuals and six asymptomatic obligate gene carriers from four families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) showing apparent incomplete penetrance have been studied. Symptomatic individuals from three families showed early onset of night blindness, non-recordable rod electroretinograms, and marked elevation of both rod and cone thresholds in all subjects tested. In the fourth family, there was more variation in the age of onset of night blindness and some symptomatic individuals showed well preserved rod and cone function in some retinal areas. All asymptomatic individuals tested had evidence of mild abnormalities of rod and cone function, indicating that these families show marked variation in expressivity rather than true non-penetrance of the adRP gene. No mutations of the rhodopsin or RDS genes were found in these families and the precise genetic mutation(s) remain to be identified. PMID:8025041

  20. Linkage disequilibrium in the region of the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease gene (PKD1)

    SciTech Connect

    Snarey, A. ); Thomas, S.; Harris, P.C. ); Schneider, M.C. ); Pound, S.E.; Wright, A.F. ); Barton, N.; Somlo, S.; Germino, G.G.; Reeders, S.T.

    1994-08-01

    The gene for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (PKD1) is located on chromosome 16p, between the flanking markers D16S84 and D16S125 (26.6 prox). This region is 750 kb long and has been cloned. The authors have looked at the association of 10 polymorphic markers from the region, with the disease and with each other. This was done in a set of Scottish families that had previously shown association with D16S94, a marker proximal to the PKD1 region. They report significant association between two CA repeat markers and the disease but have not found evidence for a single founder haplotype in these families, indicating the presence of several mutations in this population. Their results favor a location of the PKD1 gene in the proximal part of the candidate region. 25 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  1. Autosomal dominant zonular cataract with sutural opacities localized to chromosome 17q11-12

    SciTech Connect

    Padma, T.; Ayyagari, R.; Murty, J.S.

    1995-10-01

    Congenital cataracts constitute a morphologically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases that are a major cause of childhood blindness. Different loci for hereditary congenital cataracts have been mapped to chromosomes 1, 2, 16, and 17q24. We report linkage of a gene causing a unique form of autosomal dominant zonular cataracts with Y-sutural opacities to chromosome 17q11-12 in a three-generation family exhibiting a maximum lod score of 3.9 at D17S805. Multipoint analysis gave a Mod confidence interval of 17 cM. This interval is bounded by the markers D17S799 and D17S798, a region that would encompass a number of candidate genes including that coding for {Beta}A3/A1-crystallin. 30 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. [Photic sneeze reflex or autosomal dominant compelling helio-ophthalmic outburst syndrome].

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, J M

    2006-01-01

    Sneeze is an ubiquitous phenomenon that happens to everyone. In spite of this, little attention has been paid to it, among medical literature in general, and even less in neurologic texts. A curious entity, called photic sneeze reflex, solar sneeze reflex, light sneeze reflex or autosomal dominant compelling helio-ophthalmic outburst syndrome, known perhaps since ancient Greek, has been scarcely described in the scientific literature, mainly as clinical notes and letters to the editor, but in a detailed way, we can find just a few reports. This reflex appears when subjects are exposed suddenly to intense sunlight and it consists of long incoercible sneeze bursts. It is usually ignored by its sufferers, who report it as a curiosity or a minor complaint, and its importance has been neglected in spite of its hereditary nature and its apparently high prevalence. We review the history, epidemiology, genetics, neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and physiopathology of this reflex hereditary response. PMID:16525923

  3. Mutational analysis of PKD1 gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingyan; Li, Lanrong; Liu, Qingmin

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a hereditary disease and common renal disease. Mutations of PKD genes are responsible for this disease. We analyzed a large Chinese family with ADPKD using Sanger sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for this disease. The family comprised 27 individuals including 10 ADPKD patients. These ADPKD patients had severe renal disease and most of them died very young. We analyzed 6 survival patients gene and found they all had C10529T mutation in exon 35 of PKD1 gene. We did not found gene mutation in any unaffected relatives or 300 unrelated controls. These findings suggested that the C10529T mutation in PKD1 gene might be the pathogenic mutation responsible for the disease in this family. PMID:26722532

  4. [Acute conditions after kidney transplantation in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Bujdák, P; Pribylincová, V; Reznícek, J; Miklosi, M; Breza, J

    2003-05-01

    There is a high risk of severe complications after kidney transplantation. In patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (AD-PKD) the incidence of complications like ischaemic cardiac disease, acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, perforation of colonic diverticulosis is especially higher. The authors want to indicate another specific complication, rupture of the cyst of own polycystic kidney with retroperitoneal haemorrhage. Within the group of 658 patients who underwent kidney transplantation between January 1981 and January 2000 there were 54 (8.2%) patients with AD-PKD. Four patients with severe retroperitoneal haemorrhage due to rupture of the cyst of own polycystic kidney we present in a short case reports. All cases were fatal. Expect morphologic and functional follow up of the graft it is necessary to follow up polycystic kidney and indicate urgent nephrectomy in the case of any change.

  5. Autosomal dominant frontonasal dysplasia (atypical Greig syndrome): Lessons from the Xt mutant mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, M.L.; Nunes, M.E.

    1994-09-01

    Greig syndrome is the autosomal dominant association of mild hypertelorism, variable polysyndactyly, and normal intelligence. Several families have been found to have translocations or deletions of 7p13 interrupting the normal expression of GLI3 (a zinc finger, DNA binding, transcription repressor). Recently, a mutation in the mouse homologue of GLI3 was found in the extra-toes mutant mouse (Xt). The phenotypic features of this mouse model include mild hypertelorism, postaxial polydactyly of the forelimbs, preaxial polydactyly of the hindlimbs, and variable tibial hemimelia. The homozygous mutant Xt/Xt have severe frontonasal dysplasia (FND), polysyndactyly of fore-and hindlimbs and invariable tibial hemimelia. We have recently evaluated a child with severe (type D) frontonasal dysplasia, fifth finger camptodactyly, preaxial polydactyly of one foot, and ispilateral tibial hemimelia. His father was born with a bifid nose, broad columnella, broad feet, and a two centimeter leg length discrepancy. The paternal grandmother of the proband is phenotypically normal; however, her fraternal twin died at birth with severe facial anomalies. The paternal great-grandmother of the proband is phenotypically normal however her niece was born with moderate ocular hypertelorism. This pedigree is suggestive of an autosomal dominant form of frontonasal dysplasia with variable expressivity. The phenotypic features of our case more closely resemble the Xt mouse than the previously defined features of Greig syndrome in humans. This suggests that a mutation in GLI3 may be responsible for FND in this family. We are currently using polymorphic dinucleotide repeat markers flanking GLI3 in a attempt to demonstrate linkage in this pedigree. Demonstration of a GLI3 mutation in this family would broaden our view of the spectrum of phenotypes possible in Greig syndrome and could provide insight into genotype/phenotype correlation in FND.

  6. Localization of genes for autosomal dominant congenital cataracts to chromosomes 2 and 17

    SciTech Connect

    Ayyagari, R.; Scott, M.; Wozencraft, L.

    1994-09-01

    Linkage analysis was performed in a seven generation family in which 28 of 52 individuals examined had autosomal dominant congenital pulverulent cataracts and a five generation family in which 10 of 17 individuals examined had autosomal dominant congenital zonular cataracts with sutural opacities. Initial analysis with 21 microsatellite markers in 7 candidate gene regions localized the pulverulent cataract locus to the long arm of chromosome 2 near the {beta}B2-crystallin gene. A lod score of 3.6 was obtained with D2S72 ({theta}=0.12), 3.5 with CRYG ({theta}=0.06), 3.4 with ({theta}=0.05), 2.0 with D2S117 ({theta}=0.22) and 6.6 with D2S128 ({theta}=0.05). Multipoint linkage analysis gave Zmax=4.2 at D2S157 with a one lod confidence interval covering 19 cM. The closest flanking markers showing obligate recombinants are D2S157 and D2S173. The zonular cataract locus was mapped to chromosome 2 near the {gamma}-crystallin gene cluster. A maximum lod score of 3.8 was obtained with D17S805 ({theta}=0.0), 2.1 with D17S798 ({theta}=0.60), and 3.7 with NF1 ({theta}=0.0). Multipoint analysis showed Zmax=3.81 at D17S805 with a one lod confidence interval covering 17 cM based on the Genethon map, localizing cataracts between markers D17S799 and D17S800. Further efforts are being directed at refining the localization of these cataract loci and examining the nearby crystallin genes for possible mutations.

  7. Autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia: Tight linkage to chromosome 15q

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.K.; Wu, C.T.B.; Jones, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    Familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) (MIM No.18260) constitutes a clinically and genetically diverse group of disorders that share the primary feature of progressive, severe, lower extremity spasticity. FSP is classified according to the mode of inheritance and whether progressive spasticity occurs in isolation ({open_quotes}uncomplicated FSP{close_quotes}) or with other neurologic abnormalities ({open_quotes}complicated FSP{close_quotes}), including optic neuropathy, retinopathy, extrapyramidal disturbance, dementia, ataxia, ichthyosis, mental retardation, or deafness. Recently, autosomal dominant, uncomplicated FSP was shown to be genetically heterogeneous and tightly linked to a group of microsatellite markers on chromosome 14q in one large kindred. We examined 126 members of a non-consanguineous North American kindred of Irish descent. FSP was diagnosed in 31 living subjects who developed insidiously progressive gait disturbance between ages 12 and 35 years. Using genetic linkage analysis to microsatellite DNA polymorphisms, we showed that the FSP locus on chromosome 14q was exluded from linkage with the disorder in our family. Subsequently, we searched for genetic linkage between the disorder and microsatellite DNA polymorphisms spanning approximately 50% of the genome. We observed significantly positive, two-point maximum lod scores (Z) for markers on chromosome 15q: D15S128 (Z=9.70, {theta}=0.05), D15S165 (Z=3.30, {theta}=0.10), and UT511 (Z=3.86, {theta}=0.10). Our data clearly establishes that one locus for autosomal dominant, uncomplicated FSP is mapped to the pericentric region of chromosome 15q. Identifying genes responsible for chromosome 15q-linked and chromosome 14q-linked FSP will greatly advance our understanding of this condition and hopefully other inherited and degenerative brain and spinal cord disorders that are also characterized by axonal degeneration.

  8. Mutational screening of 320 Brazilian patients with autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Cintra, Vívian Pedigone; Lourenço, Charles Marques; Marques, Sandra Elisabete; de Oliveira, Luana Michelli; Tumas, Vitor; Marques, Wilson

    2014-12-15

    Autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a clinical and genetically heterogeneous group of debilitating neurodegenerative diseases that are related to at least 36 different genetic loci; they are clinically characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia and are frequently accompanied by other neurological and non-neurological manifestations. The relative frequency of SCA varies greatly among different regions, presumably because of a founder effect or local ethnicities. Between July 1998 and May 2012, we investigated 320 Brazilian patients with an SCA phenotype who belonged to 150 unrelated families with an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern and 23 sporadic patients from 13 Brazilian states. A total of 265 patients (82.8%) belonging to 131 unrelated families (87.3%) were found to have a definite mutation, and SCA3 accounted for most of the familial cases (70.7%), followed by SCA7 (6%), SCA1 (5.3%), SCA2 (2.7%), SCA6 (1.3%), SCA8 (0.7%) and SCA10 (0.7%). In the Ribeirão Preto mesoregion, which is located in the northeast part of São Paulo State, the prevalence of SCA3 was approximately 5 per 100,000 inhabitants, which is the highest prevalence found in Brazil. No mutation was found in the SCA12, SCA17 and DRPLA genes, and all the sporadic cases remained without a molecular diagnosis. This study further characterizes the spectrum of SCA mutations found in Brazilian patients, which suggests the existence of regional differences and demonstrates the expansion of the SCA8 locus in Brazilian families.

  9. Homozygous carriers of APP A713T mutation in an autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease family

    PubMed Central

    Conidi, Maria E.; Bernardi, Livia; Puccio, Gianfranco; Smirne, Nicoletta; Muraca, Maria G.; Curcio, Sabrina A.M.; Colao, Rosanna; Piscopo, Paola; Gallo, Maura; Anfossi, Maria; Frangipane, Francesca; Clodomiro, Alessandra; Mirabelli, Maria; Vasso, Franca; Cupidi, Chiara; Torchia, Giusi; Di Lorenzo, Raffaele; Mandich, Paola; Confaloni, Annamaria; Maletta, Raffaele G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report, for the first time, a large autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (AD) family in which the APP A713T mutation is present in the homozygous and heterozygous state. To date, the mutation has been reported as dominant, and in the heterozygous state associated with familial AD and cerebrovascular lesions. Methods: The family described here has been genealogically reconstructed over 6 generations dating back to the 19th century. Plasma β-amyloid peptide was measured. Sequencing of causative AD genes was performed. Results: Twenty-one individuals, all but 1 born from 2 consanguineous unions, were studied: 8 were described as affected through history, 5 were studied clinically and genetically, and 8 were asymptomatic at-risk subjects. The A713T mutation was detected in the homozygous state in 3 patients and in the heterozygous state in 8 subjects (6 asymptomatic and 2 affected). Conclusions: Our findings, also supported by the β-amyloid plasma assay, confirm (1) the pathogenic role of the APP A713T mutation, (2) the specific phenotype (AD with cerebrovascular lesions) associated with this mutation, and (3) the large span of age at onset, not influenced by APOE, TOMM40, and TREM2 genes. No substantial differences concerning clinical phenotype were evidenced between heterozygous and homozygous patients, in line with the classic definition of dominance. Therefore, in this study, AD followed the classic definition of a dominant disease, contrary to that reported in a previously described AD family with recessive APP mutation. This confirms that genetic AD may be considered a disease with dominant and recessive traits of inheritance. PMID:25948718

  10. A three-generation family with idiopathic facial palsy suggesting an autosomal dominant inheritance with high penetrance.

    PubMed

    Grønhøj Larsen, Christian; Gyldenløve, Mette; Jønch, Aia Elise; Charabi, Birgitte; Tümer, Zeynep

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic facial palsy (IFP), also known as Bell's palsy, is a common neurologic disorder, but recurrent and familial forms are rare. This case series presents a three-generation family with idiopathic facial palsy. The mode of inheritance of IFP has previously been suggested as autosomal dominant with low or variable penetrance, but the present family indicates an autosomal dominant trait with high or complete penetrance. Chromosome microarray studies did not reveal a pathogenic copy number variation, which could enable identification of a candidate gene.

  11. Molecular genetics of autosomal-dominant demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Houlden, Henry; Reilly, Mary M

    2006-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders and is the most common inherited neuromuscular disorder, with an estimated overall prevalence of 17-40/10,000. Although there has been major advances in the understanding of the genetic basis of CMT in recent years, the most useful classification is still a neurophysiological classification that divides CMT into type 1 (demyelinating; median motor conduction velocity < 38 m/s) and type 2 (axonal; median motor conduction velocity > 38 m/s). An intermediate type is also increasingly being described. Inheritance can be autosomal-dominant (AD), X-linked, or autosomal-recessive (AR). AD CMT1 is the most common type of CMT and was the first form of CMT in which a causative gene was described. This review provides an up-to-date overview of AD CMT1 concentrating on the molecular genetics as the clinical, neurophysiological, and pathological features have been covered elsewhere. Four genes (PMP22, MPZ, LITAF, and EGR2) have been described in the last 15 yr associated with AD CMTI and a further gene (NEFL), originally described as causing AD CMT2 can also cause AD CMT1 (by neurophysiological criteria). Studies have shown many of these genes, when mutated, can cause a wide range of CMT phenotypes from the relatively mild CMT1 to the more severe Dejerine-Sottas disease and congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy, and even in some cases axonal CMT2. This review discusses what is known about these genes and in particular how they cause a peripheral neuropathy, when mutated. PMID:16775366

  12. De Novo GMNN Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Primordial Dwarfism Associated with Meier-Gorlin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Burrage, Lindsay C.; Charng, Wu-Lin; Eldomery, Mohammad K.; Willer, Jason R.; Davis, Erica E.; Lugtenberg, Dorien; Zhu, Wenmiao; Leduc, Magalie S.; Akdemir, Zeynep C.; Azamian, Mahshid; Zapata, Gladys; Hernandez, Patricia P.; Schoots, Jeroen; de Munnik, Sonja A.; Roepman, Ronald; Pearring, Jillian N.; Jhangiani, Shalini; Katsanis, Nicholas; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Brunner, Han G.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Eng, Christine M.; Xia, Fan; Lalani, Seema R.; Lupski, James R.; Bongers, Ernie M.H.F.; Yang, Yaping

    2015-01-01

    Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is a genetically heterogeneous primordial dwarfism syndrome known to be caused by biallelic loss-of-function mutations in one of five genes encoding pre-replication complex proteins: ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, and CDC6. Mutations in these genes cause disruption of the origin of DNA replication initiation. To date, only an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern has been described in individuals with this disorder, with a molecular etiology established in about three-fourths of cases. Here, we report three subjects with MGS and de novo heterozygous mutations in the 5′ end of GMNN, encoding the DNA replication inhibitor geminin. We identified two truncating mutations in exon 2 (the 1st coding exon), c.16A>T (p.Lys6∗) and c.35_38delTCAA (p.Ile12Lysfs∗4), and one missense mutation, c.50A>G (p.Lys17Arg), affecting the second-to-last nucleotide of exon 2 and possibly RNA splicing. Geminin is present during the S, G2, and M phases of the cell cycle and is degraded during the metaphase-anaphase transition by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), which recognizes the destruction box sequence near the 5′ end of the geminin protein. All three GMNN mutations identified alter sites 5′ to residue Met28 of the protein, which is located within the destruction box. We present data supporting a gain-of-function mechanism, in which the GMNN mutations result in proteins lacking the destruction box and hence increased protein stability and prolonged inhibition of replication leading to autosomal-dominant MGS. PMID:26637980

  13. Preclinical trials in autosomal dominant AD: implementation of the DIAN-TU trial.

    PubMed

    Mills, S M; Mallmann, J; Santacruz, A M; Fuqua, A; Carril, M; Aisen, P S; Althage, M C; Belyew, S; Benzinger, T L; Brooks, W S; Buckles, V D; Cairns, N J; Clifford, D; Danek, A; Fagan, A M; Farlow, M; Fox, N; Ghetti, B; Goate, A M; Heinrichs, D; Hornbeck, R; Jack, C; Jucker, M; Klunk, W E; Marcus, D S; Martins, R N; Masters, C M; Mayeux, R; McDade, E; Morris, J C; Oliver, A; Ringman, J M; Rossor, M N; Salloway, S; Schofield, P R; Snider, J; Snyder, P; Sperling, R A; Stewart, C; Thomas, R G; Xiong, C; Bateman, R J

    2013-10-01

    The Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer's Network Trials Unit (DIAN-TU) was formed to direct the design and management of interventional therapeutic trials of international DIAN and autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease (ADAD) participants. The goal of the DIAN-TU is to implement safe trials that have the highest likelihood of success while advancing scientific understanding of these diseases and clinical effects of proposed therapies. The DIAN-TU has launched a trial design that leverages the existing infrastructure of the ongoing DIAN observational study, takes advantage of a variety of drug targets, incorporates the latest results of biomarker and cognitive data collected during the observational study, and implements biomarkers measuring Alzheimer's disease (AD) biological processes to improve the efficiency of trial design. The DIAN-TU trial design is unique due to the sophisticated design of multiple drugs, multiple pharmaceutical partners, academics servings as sponsor, geographic distribution of a rare population and intensive safety and biomarker assessments. The implementation of the operational aspects such as home health research delivery, safety magnetic resonance imagings (MRIs) at remote locations, monitoring clinical and cognitive measures, and regulatory management involving multiple pharmaceutical sponsors of the complex DIAN-TU trial are described.

  14. Longitudinal change in CSF biomarkers in autosomal-dominant Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Anne M.; Xiong, Chengjie; Jasielec, Mateusz S.; Bateman, Randall J.; Goate, Alison M.; Benzinger, Tammie L.S.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Martins, Ralph N.; Masters, Colin L.; Mayeux, Richard; Ringman, John M.; Rossor, Martin N.; Salloway, Stephen; Schofield, Peter R.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Marcus, Daniel; Cairns, Nigel J.; Buckles, Virginia D.; Ladenson, Jack H.; Morris, John C.; Holtzman, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Clinicopathologic evidence suggests the pathology of Alzheimer disease (AD) begins many years prior to cognitive symptoms. Biomarkers are required to identify affected individuals during this asymptomatic (“pre-clinical”) stage to permit intervention with potential disease-modifying therapies designed to preserve normal brain function. Studies of families with autosomal-dominant AD (ADAD) mutations provide a unique and powerful means to investigate AD biomarker changes during the asymptomatic period. In this biomarker study comparing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), plasma and in vivo amyloid imaging, cross-sectional data obtained at baseline in individuals from ADAD families enrolled in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) demonstrate reduced concentrations of CSF amyloid-β1-42 (Aβ1–42) associated with the presence of β-amyloid plaques, and elevated concentrations of CSF tau, ptau181 and VILIP-1, markers of neurofibrillary tangles and/or neuronal injury/death, in asymptomatic mutation carriers 10-20 years prior to their estimated age at symptom onset (EAO), and prior to detection of cognitive deficits. When compared longitudinally, however, the concentrations of CSF biomarkers of neuronal injury/death within-individuals decrease after their EAO, suggesting a slowing of acute neurodegenerative processes with symptomatic disease progression. These results emphasize the importance of longitudinal, within-person assessment when modeling biomarker trajectories across the course of the disease. If corroborated, this pattern may influence the definition of a positive neurodegenerative biomarker outcome in clinical trials. PMID:24598588

  15. Heterozygous HTRA1 mutations are associated with autosomal dominant cerebral small vessel disease.

    PubMed

    Verdura, Edgard; Hervé, Dominique; Scharrer, Eva; Amador, Maria Del Mar; Guyant-Maréchal, Lucie; Philippi, Anne; Corlobé, Astrid; Bergametti, Françoise; Gazal, Steven; Prieto-Morin, Carol; Beaufort, Nathalie; Le Bail, Benoit; Viakhireva, Irina; Dichgans, Martin; Chabriat, Hugues; Haffner, Christof; Tournier-Lasserve, Elisabeth

    2015-08-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease represents a heterogeneous group of disorders leading to stroke and cognitive impairment. While most small vessel diseases appear sporadic and related to age and hypertension, several early-onset monogenic forms have also been reported. However, only a minority of patients with familial small vessel disease carry mutations in one of known small vessel disease genes. We used whole exome sequencing to identify candidate genes in an autosomal dominant small vessel disease family in which known small vessel disease genes had been excluded, and subsequently screened all candidate genes in 201 unrelated probands with a familial small vessel disease of unknown aetiology, using high throughput multiplex polymerase chain reaction and next generation sequencing. A heterozygous HTRA1 variant (R166L), absent from 1000 Genomes and Exome Variant Server databases and predicted to be deleterious by in silico tools, was identified in all affected members of the index family. Ten probands of 201 additional unrelated and affected probands (4.97%) harboured a heterozygous HTRA1 mutation predicted to be damaging. There was a highly significant difference in the number of likely deleterious variants in cases compared to controls (P = 4.2 × 10(-6); odds ratio = 15.4; 95% confidence interval = 4.9-45.5), strongly suggesting causality. Seven of these variants were located within or close to the HTRA1 protease domain, three were in the N-terminal domain of unknown function and one in the C-terminal PDZ domain. In vitro activity analysis of HTRA1 mutants demonstrated a loss of function effect. Clinical features of this autosomal dominant small vessel disease differ from those of CARASIL and CADASIL by a later age of onset and the absence of the typical extraneurological features of CARASIL. They are similar to those of sporadic small vessel disease, except for their familial nature. Our data demonstrate that heterozygous HTRA1 mutations are an important cause

  16. Relative Contribution of Mutations in Genes for Autosomal Dominant Distal Hereditary Motor Neuropathies: A Genotype-Phenotype Correlation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dierick, Ines; Baets, Jonathan; Irobi, Joy; Jacobs, An; De Vriendt, Els; Deconinck, Tine; Merlini, Luciano; Van den Bergh, Peter; Rasic, Vedrana Milic; Robberecht, Wim; Fischer, Dirk; Morales, Raul Juntas; Mitrovic, Zoran; Seeman, Pavel; Mazanec, Radim; Kochanski, Andrzej; Jordanova, Albena; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Helderman-van den Enden, A. T. J. M.; Wokke, John H. J.; Nelis, Eva; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathy (HMN) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders affecting spinal alpha-motor neurons. Since 2001, mutations in six different genes have been identified for autosomal dominant distal HMN; "glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS)," "dynactin 1 (DCTN1)," "small heat shock 27 kDa protein 1 (HSPB1),"…

  17. Autosomal Dominant Pseudohypoaldosteronism Type 1 in an Infant with Salt Wasting Crisis Associated with Urinary Tract Infection and Obstructive Uropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, Sasigarn A.; Cozzi, Corin; Hickey, Scott E.; Thrush, Devon Lamb; Astbury, Caroline; Nuthakki, Sushma

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 pseudohypoaldosteronism (PHA1) is a salt wasting syndrome caused by renal resistance to aldosterone. Primary renal PHA1 or autosomal dominant PHA1 is caused by mutations in mineralocorticoids receptor gene (NR3C2), while secondary PHA1 is frequently associated with urinary tract infection (UTI) and/or urinary tract malformations (UTM). We report a 14-day-old male infant presenting with severe hyperkalemia, hyponatremic dehydration, metabolic acidosis, and markedly elevated serum aldosterone level, initially thought to have secondary PHA1 due to the associated UTI and posterior urethral valves. His serum aldosterone remained elevated at 5 months of age, despite resolution of salt wasting symptoms. Chromosomal microarray analysis revealed a deletion of exons 3–5 in NR3C2 in the patient and his asymptomatic mother who also had elevated serum aldosterone level, confirming that he had primary or autosomal dominant PHA1. Our case raises the possibility that some patients with secondary PHA1 attributed to UTI and/or UTM may instead have primary autosomal dominant PHA1, for which genetic testing should be considered to identify the cause, determine future recurrence risk, and possibly prevent the life-threatening salt wasting in a subsequent family member. Future clinical research is needed to investigate the potential overlapping between secondary PHA1 and primary autosomal dominant PHA1. PMID:24455331

  18. Identification of a rhodopsin gene mutation in a large family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinping; Shi, Wei; Cheng, Lulu; Wang, Yanfang; Chen, Ding; Hu, Xuting; Xu, Jinling; Xu, Limin; Wu, Yaming; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically highly heterogeneous retinal disease and one of the leading causes of blindness in the world. Next-generation sequencing technology has enormous potential for determining the genetic etiology of RP. We sought to identify the underlying genetic defect in a 35-year-old male from an autosomal-dominant RP family with 14 affected individuals. By capturing next-generation sequencing (CNGS) of 144 genes associated with retinal diseases, we identified eight novel DNA variants; however, none of them cosegregated for all the members of the family. Further analysis of the CNGS data led to identification of a recurrent missense mutation (c.403C > T, p.R135W) in the rhodopsin (RHO) gene, which cosegregated with all affected individuals in the family and was not observed in any of the unaffected family members. The p.R135W mutation has a reference single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) ID (rs104893775), and it appears to be responsible for the disease in this large family. This study highlights the importance of examining NGS data with reference SNP IDs. Thus, our study is important for data analysis of NGS-based clinical genetic diagnoses. PMID:26794436

  19. A Novel GJA8 Mutation (p.V44A) Causing Autosomal Dominant Congenital Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanan; Yu, Hao; Wang, Wei; Gong, Xiaohua; Yao, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the mechanism by which a novel connexin 50 (Cx50) mutation, Cx50 V44A, in a Chinese family causes suture-sparing autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataracts. Methods Family history and clinical data were recorded and direct gene sequencing was used to identify the disease-causing mutation. The Cx50 gene was cloned from a human lens cDNA library. Connexin protein distributions were assessed by fluorescence microscopy. Hemichannel functions were analyzed by dye uptake assay. Formation of functional channels was assessed by dye transfer experiments. Results Direct sequencing of the candidate GJA8 gene revealed a novel c.131T>C transition in exon 2, which cosegregated with the disease in the family and resulted in the substitution of a valine residue with alanine at codon 44 (p. V44A) in the extracellular loop 1 of the Cx50 protein. Both Cx50 and Cx50V44A formed functional gap junctions, as shown by the neurobiotin transfer assay. However, unlike wild-type Cx50, Cx50V44A was unable to form open hemichannels in dye uptake experiments. Conclusion This work identified a unique congenital cataract in the Chinese population, caused by the novel mutation Cx50V44A, and it showed that the V44A mutation specifically impairs the gating of the hemichannels but not the gap junction channels. The dysfunctional hemichannels resulted in the development of human congenital cataracts. PMID:25517998

  20. Comprehensive PKD1 and PKD2 Mutation Analysis in Prenatal Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Audrézet, Marie-Pierre; Corbiere, Christine; Lebbah, Said; Morinière, Vincent; Broux, Françoise; Louillet, Ferielle; Fischbach, Michel; Zaloszyc, Ariane; Cloarec, Sylvie; Merieau, Elodie; Baudouin, Véronique; Deschênes, Georges; Roussey, Gwenaelle; Maestri, Sandrine; Visconti, Chiara; Boyer, Olivia; Abel, Carine; Lahoche, Annie; Randrianaivo, Hanitra; Bessenay, Lucie; Mekahli, Djalila; Ouertani, Ines; Decramer, Stéphane; Ryckenwaert, Amélie; Cornec-Le Gall, Emilie; Salomon, Rémi; Ferec, Claude; Heidet, Laurence

    2016-03-01

    Prenatal forms of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) are rare but can be recurrent in some families, suggesting a common genetic modifying background. Few patients have been reported carrying, in addition to the familial mutation, variation(s) in polycystic kidney disease 1 (PKD1) or HNF1 homeobox B (HNF1B), inherited from the unaffected parent, or biallelic polycystic kidney and hepatic disease 1 (PKHD1) mutations. To assess the frequency of additional variations in PKD1, PKD2, HNF1B, and PKHD1 associated with the familial PKD mutation in early ADPKD, these four genes were screened in 42 patients with early ADPKD in 41 families. Two patients were associated with de novo PKD1 mutations. Forty patients occurred in 39 families with known ADPKD and were associated with PKD1 mutation in 36 families and with PKD2 mutation in two families (no mutation identified in one family). Additional PKD variation(s) (inherited from the unaffected parent when tested) were identified in 15 of 42 patients (37.2%), whereas these variations were observed in 25 of 174 (14.4%, P=0.001) patients with adult ADPKD. No HNF1B variations or PKHD1 biallelic mutations were identified. These results suggest that, at least in some patients, the severity of the cystic disease is inversely correlated with the level of polycystin 1 function.

  1. A Novel Autosomal Dominant Inclusion Body Myopathy Linked to 7q22.1-31.1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Li, Xin; Zhang, Feng; Li, Yun; Zhang, Meng; Da, Yuwei; Yu, Jun; Jia, Jianping

    2012-01-01

    We describe a novel autosomal dominant hereditary inclusion body myopathy (HIBM) that clinically mimics limb girdle muscular dystrophy in a Chinese family. We performed a detailed clinical assessment of 36 individuals spanning four generations. The age of onset ranged from the 30s to the 50s. Hip girdle, neck flexion and axial muscle weakness were involved at an early stage. This disease progressed slowly, and a shoulder girdle weakness appeared later in the disease course. Muscle biopsies showed necrotic, regenerating, and rimmed vacuolated fibers as well as congophilic inclusions in some of the fibers. Electron micrograph revealed cytoplasmic inclusions of 15–21 nm filaments. A genomewide scan and haplotype analyses were performed using an Illumina Linkage-12 DNA Analysis Kit (average spacing 0.58 cM), which traced the disease to a new locus on chromosome 7q22.1–31.1 with a maximum multi-point LOD score of 3.65. The critical locus for this unique disorder, which is currently referred to as hereditary inclusion body myopathy 4 (HIBM4), spans 8.78 Mb and contains 65 genes. This localization raises the possibility that one of the genes clustered within this region may be involved in this disorder. PMID:22723986

  2. Autosomal dominant immune dysregulation syndrome in humans with CTLA4 mutations.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Desirée; Bode, Claudia; Kenefeck, Rupert; Hou, Tie Zheng; Wing, James B; Kennedy, Alan; Bulashevska, Alla; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Grüning, Björn A; Unger, Susanne; Frede, Natalie; Baumann, Ulrich; Witte, Torsten; Schmidt, Reinhold E; Dueckers, Gregor; Niehues, Tim; Seneviratne, Suranjith; Kanariou, Maria; Speckmann, Carsten; Ehl, Stephan; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Warnatz, Klaus; Rakhmanov, Mirzokhid; Thimme, Robert; Hasselblatt, Peter; Emmerich, Florian; Cathomen, Toni; Backofen, Rolf; Fisch, Paul; Seidl, Maximilian; May, Annette; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Ikemizu, Shinji; Salzer, Ulrich; Franke, Andre; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Walker, Lucy S K; Sansom, David M; Grimbacher, Bodo

    2014-12-01

    The protein cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) is an essential negative regulator of immune responses, and its loss causes fatal autoimmunity in mice. We studied a large family in which five individuals presented with a complex, autosomal dominant immune dysregulation syndrome characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia, recurrent infections and multiple autoimmune clinical features. We identified a heterozygous nonsense mutation in exon 1 of CTLA4. Screening of 71 unrelated patients with comparable clinical phenotypes identified five additional families (nine individuals) with previously undescribed splice site and missense mutations in CTLA4. Clinical penetrance was incomplete (eight adults of a total of 19 genetically proven CTLA4 mutation carriers were considered unaffected). However, CTLA-4 protein expression was decreased in regulatory T cells (Treg cells) in both patients and carriers with CTLA4 mutations. Whereas Treg cells were generally present at elevated numbers in these individuals, their suppressive function, CTLA-4 ligand binding and transendocytosis of CD80 were impaired. Mutations in CTLA4 were also associated with decreased circulating B cell numbers. Taken together, mutations in CTLA4 resulting in CTLA-4 haploinsufficiency or impaired ligand binding result in disrupted T and B cell homeostasis and a complex immune dysregulation syndrome.

  3. Effective Small Interfering RNA Therapy to Treat CLCN7-dependent Autosomal Dominant Osteopetrosis Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Capulli, Mattia; Maurizi, Antonio; Ventura, Luca; Rucci, Nadia; Teti, Anna

    2015-01-01

    In about 70% of patients affected by autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type 2 (ADO2), osteoclast activity is reduced by heterozygous mutations of the CLCN7 gene, encoding the ClC-7 chloride/hydrogen antiporter. CLCN7G215R-, CLCN7R767W-, and CLCN7R286W-specific siRNAs silenced transfected mutant mRNA/EGFP in HEK293 cells, in RAW264.7 cells and in human osteoclasts, with no change of CLCN7WT mRNA and no effect of scrambled siRNA on the mutant transcripts. Osteoclasts from Clcn7G213R ADO2 mice showed reduced bone resorption, a condition rescued by Clcn7G213R-specific siRNA. Treatment of ADO2 mice with Clcn7G213R-specific siRNA induced increase of bone resorption variables and decrease of trabecular bone mass, leading to an overall improvement of the osteopetrotic bone phenotype. Treatment did not induce overt adverse effects and was effective also with siRNAs specific for other mutants. These results demonstrate that a siRNA-based experimental treatment of ADO2 is feasible, and underscore a translational impact for future strategy to cure this therapeutically neglected form of osteopetrosis. PMID:26325626

  4. Familial temporal lobe epilepsy autosomal dominant inheritance in a large pedigree from southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Gambardella, A; Messina, D; Le Piane, E; Oliveri, R L; Annesi, G; Zappia, M; Andermann, E; Quattrone, A; Aguglia, U

    2000-02-01

    To further elucidate the inheritance pattern and range of phenotypic manifestations of benign familial temporal lobe epilepsy (FTLE), we report a large family recently identified in southern Italy. There were 8 patients (4 men), ranging in age from 31 to 68 years in three generations. One affected patient was deceased at the time of the study. Genealogical study strongly supported autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance, as three unaffected individuals transmitted the disease. Clinical anticipation could not be assessed because of the ascertainment method. Male to male transmission occurred. Identifiable antecedents for seizures were present in only two patients, who had a simple febrile convulsion and a closed head trauma, respectively. Migraine was overrepresented in this family. Onset of seizures ranged from 17 to 52 years (mean: 27 years). All patients had weekly simple partial seizures suggestive of temporal origin with vegetative or experiential phenomena. Very rare partial complex seizures occurred in 6/7 patients. One had two generalized nocturnal seizures as well. Two had previously been misdiagnosed as having gastritis or panic attacks, and one had not been diagnosed. Interictal anteromesiotemporal spiking was seen in 5/7 patients, and occurred mostly during NREM sleep. Neurological examination, brain CT or MR scans were normal. Antiepileptic medication always controlled the seizures.

  5. Sirtuin 1 inhibition delays cyst formation in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xia; Fan, Lucy X; Sweeney, William E; Denu, John M; Avner, Ellis D; Li, Xiaogang

    2013-07-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is caused by mutations in either PKD1 or PKD2 and is characterized by the development of multiple bilateral renal cysts that replace normal kidney tissue. Here, we used Pkd1 mutant mouse models to demonstrate that the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent (NAD-dependent) protein deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is involved in the pathophysiology of ADPKD. SIRT1 was upregulated through c-MYC in embryonic and postnatal Pkd1-mutant mouse renal epithelial cells and tissues and could be induced by TNF-α, which is present in cyst fluid during cyst development. Double conditional knockouts of Pkd1 and Sirt1 demonstrated delayed renal cyst formation in postnatal mouse kidneys compared with mice with single conditional knockout of Pkd1. Furthermore, treatment with a pan-sirtuin inhibitor (nicotinamide) or a SIRT1-specific inhibitor (EX-527) delayed cyst growth in Pkd1 knockout mouse embryonic kidneys, Pkd1 conditional knockout postnatal kidneys, and Pkd1 hypomorphic kidneys. Increased SIRT1 expression in Pkd1 mutant renal epithelial cells regulated cystic epithelial cell proliferation through deacetylation and phosphorylation of Rb and regulated cystic epithelial cell death through deacetylation of p53. This newly identified role of SIRT1 signaling in cystic renal epithelial cells provides the opportunity to develop unique therapeutic strategies for ADPKD.

  6. Functional Connectivity in Autosomal Dominant and Late-Onset Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jewell B; Brier, Matthew R; Bateman, Randall J; Snyder, Abraham Z; Benzinger, Tammie L; Xiong, Chengjie; Raichle, Marcus; Holtzman, David M; Sperling, Reisa A; Mayeux, Richard; Ghetti, Bernardino; Ringman, John M; Salloway, Stephen; McDade, Eric; Rossor, Martin N; Ourselin, Sebastien; Schofield, Peter R; Masters, Colin L; Martins, Ralph N; Weiner, Michael W; Thompson, Paul M; Fox, Nick C; Koeppe, Robert A; Jack, Clifford R; Mathis, Chester A; Oliver, Angela; Blazey, Tyler M; Moulder, Krista; Buckles, Virginia; Hornbeck, Russ; Chhatwal, Jasmeer; Schultz, Aaron P; Goate, Alison M; Fagan, Anne M; Cairns, Nigel J; Marcus, Daniel S; Morris, John C; Ances, Beau M

    2014-01-01

    Importance Autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD) is caused by rare genetic mutations in three specific genes, in contrast to late-onset Alzheimer Disease (LOAD), which has a more polygenetic risk profile. Design, Setting, and Participants We analyzed functional connectivity in multiple brain resting state networks (RSNs) in a cross-sectional cohort of ADAD (N=79) and LOAD (N=444) human participants using resting state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) at multiple international academic sites. Main Outcomes and Measures For both types of AD, we quantified and compared functional connectivity changes in RSNs as a function of dementia severity as measured by clinical dementia rating (CDR). In ADAD, we qualitatively investigated functional connectivity changes with respect to estimated years from onset of symptoms within five RSNs. Results Functional connectivity decreases with increasing CDR were similar for both LOAD and ADAD in multiple RSNs. Ordinal logistic regression models constructed in each type of AD accurately predicted CDR stage in the other, further demonstrating similarity of functional connectivity loss in each disease type. Among ADAD participants, functional connectivity in multiple RSNs appeared qualitatively lower in asymptomatic mutation carriers near their anticipated age of symptom onset compared to asymptomatic mutation non-carriers. Conclusions and Relevance rs-fcMRI changes with progressing AD severity are similar between ADAD and LOAD. Rs-fcMRI may be a useful endpoint for LOAD and ADAD therapy trials. ADAD disease process may be an effective model for LOAD disease process. PMID:25069482

  7. Autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus, and epilepsy (ADCME) in a unique south Indian community.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, Radha; Viswanathan, Natarajan; Shanmugam, Ganesan; Sankaralingam, Saravanan; Essaki, Bobby; Chelladurai, Rachel P

    2016-03-01

    Autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus, and epilepsy (ADCME)/familial adult onset myoclonic epilepsy (FAME) is a nonprogressive disorder characterized by (1) distal tremors that are usually precipitated by posture and action; (2) stimulus-sensitive myoclonus that is predominantly seen in the upper limb and is precipitated by photic stimuli, fatigue, emotional stress, and sleep deprivation; (3) seizures that were predominantly of the generalized tonic-clonic type that showed significant response to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). ADCME has been reported worldwide with different genetic loci in Japanese families (8q23.3-q24.1), Italian families (2p11.1-q12.2), a French family (5p15.3.1-p15.1), and a Thai family (3q26.32-q28). ADCME has not been reported in South India and is still not recognized as an independent entity under the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE). We report 241 patients with ADCME identified belonging to 48 families. The 48 families are domiciled in two southern districts of Tamilnadu in India, belonging to a community called "Nadar" whose nativity is confined to these southern districts, with reported unique genetic characteristics. This study is reported for the presentation of this rare disease in a unique ethnic group, and is the largest single report on ADCME worldwide. PMID:26749494

  8. A gene for autosomal dominant hearing loss on the short arm of chromosome 1

    SciTech Connect

    Van Camp, G.; Coucke, P.; Willems, P.J.

    1994-09-01

    Hearing loss is the most common form of sensory impairment and many cases are attributable to genetic causes. The genetic defects underlying several syndromic forms of deafness have been identified, but little is known about the causes of non-syndromic hereditary deafness which accounts for the majority of inherited hearing loss. We report here a large Indonesian family with non-syndromal postlingual hearing loss starting in the high frequencies and showing autosomal dominant inheritance. To locate the gene responsible for the hearing loss in this family, we performed a genome search by genetic linkage analysis with microsatellite markers distributed over the whole genome. We have mapped the gene causing deafness in an extended Indonesian family to chromosome 1p with a multipoint lod score higher than 7. Two other smaller families, showing a similar hereditary hearing loss, were also tested for linkage with chromosome 1p. One family originating from the U.S. was linked to this new locus with a multipoint lod score exceeding 5. In another family from the Netherlands this locus was excluded. The flanking markers D1S255 and D1S211 define a region of 6 cM on chromosome 1p which is likely to contain the deafness gene present in the Indonesian and American family.

  9. A new autosomal dominant eye and lung syndrome linked to mutations in TIMP3 gene

    PubMed Central

    Meunier, Isabelle; Bocquet, Béatrice; Labesse, Gilles; Zeitz, Christina; Defoort-Dhellemmes, Sabine; Lacroux, Annie; Mauget-Faysse, Martine; Drumare, Isabelle; Gamez, Anne-Sophie; Mathieu, Cyril; Marquette, Virginie; Sagot, Lola; Dhaenens, Claire-Marie; Arndt, Carl; Carroll, Patrick; Remy-Jardin, Martine; Cohen, Salomon Yves; Sahel, José-Alain; Puech, Bernard; Audo, Isabelle; Mrejen, Sarah; Hamel, Christian P.

    2016-01-01

    To revisit the autosomal dominant Sorsby fundus dystrophy (SFD) as a syndromic condition including late-onset pulmonary disease. We report clinical and imaging data of ten affected individuals from 2 unrelated families with SFD and carrying heterozygous TIMP3 mutations (c.572A > G, p.Y191C, exon 5, in family 1 and c.113C > G, p.S38C, exon 1, in family 2). In family 1, all SFD patients older than 50 (two generations) had also a severe emphysema, despite no history of smoking or asthma. In the preceding generation, the mother died of pulmonary emphysema and she was blind after the age of 50. Her two great-grandsons (<20 years), had abnormal Bruch Membrane thickness, a sign of eye disease. In family 2, eye and lung diseases were also associated in two generations, both occurred later, and lung disease was moderate (bronchiectasis). This is the first report of a syndromic SFD in line with the mouse model uncovering the role of TIMP3 in human lung morphogenesis and functions. The TIMP3 gene should be screened in familial pulmonary diseases with bronchiectasis, associated with a medical history of visual loss. In addition, SFD patients should be advised to avoid tobacco consumption, to practice sports, and to undergo regular pulmonary examinations. PMID:27601084

  10. Pathogenesis of Autosomal Dominant Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (SPG6) Revealed by a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Fumihiro; Arnold, William D.; Hammer, Robert E.; Ghodsizadeh, Odelia; Moti, Harmeet; Schumer, Mackenzie; Hashmi, Ahmed; Hernandez, Anthony; Sneh, Amita; Sahenk, Zarife

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness in the lower extremities that result from length-dependent central to peripheral axonal degeneration. Mutations in the non-imprinted Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome locus 1 (NIPA1) transmembrane protein cause an autosomal dominant form of HSP (SPG6). Here, we report that transgenic (Tg) rats expressing a human NIPA1/SPG6 mutation in neurons (Thy1.2-hNIPA1G106R) show marked early onset behavioral and electrophysiologic abnormalities. Detailed morphologic analyses reveal unique histopathologic findings, including the accumulation of tubulovesicular organelles with endosomal features that start at axonal and dendritic terminals, followed by multifocal vacuolar degeneration in both the CNS and peripheral nerves. In addition, the NIPA1G106R mutation in the spinal cord from older Tg rats results in an increase in bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor expression, suggesting that its degradation is impaired. This Thy1.2-hNIPA1G106R Tg rat model may serve as a valuable tool for understanding endosomal trafficking in the pathogenesis of a subgroup of HSP with an abnormal interaction with bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor, as well as for developing potential therapeutic strategies for diseases with axonal degeneration and similar pathogenetic mechanisms. PMID:24128679

  11. Identification of the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease gene, PKD1

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.C.; Zhang, F.; Geng, L.

    1994-09-01

    The PKDl gene was localized to an {approximately}480 kb interval of chromosome 16pl3. More than 20 independent transcripts were found in the interval. In view of the high new mutation rate in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney diseases (ADPKD), we anticipated the PKD1 gene would be large. The largest transcript in the region was represented by five cDNA clones located adjacent to the tuberin gene (TSC2). Two of these clones, KG8 and NKG9, contain {approximately}4.5 kb of contiguous sequence corresponding to the 3{prime} end of the 14 kb mRNA which is transcribed from telomeric to centromeric. They spans 11 exons, and to evaluate the reading frame of the cDNA, we have compared the human and monkey sequence using human primers, and found 90-94% identity at the DNA level, and by observing amino acid conservation, determined the reading frame. To date, our open-reading frame of {approximately}800 amino-acids contained only a potential threonine kinase site, but no other recognizable peptide motifs or repeats, and was not homologous to sequences in Swissprot and GenBank. No Southern blot abnormalities have been detected with the cDNA probes used. However, an exon-by-exon scan of 8 exons for mutations by SSCP and genomic sequencing (predicted missense changes) has identified 3 patients with mutations not found in normals, and identify the KG8 gene as the PKD1 gene.

  12. Mutation of the PAX6 gene in patients with autosomal dominant keratitis

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzayans, F.; Pearce, W.G.; MacDonald, I.M.; Walter, M.A.

    1995-09-01

    Autosomal dominant keratitis (ADK) is an eye disorder chiefly characterized by corneal opacification and vascularization and by foveal hypoplasia. Aniridia (shown recently to result from mutations in the PAX6 gene) has overlapping clinical findings and a similar pattern of inheritance with ADK. On the basis of these similarities, we used a candidate-gene approach to investigate whether mutations in the PAX6 gene also result in ADK. Significant linkage was found between two polymorphic loci in the PAX6 region and ADK in a family with 15 affected members in four generations (peak LOD score = 4.45; {theta} = .00 with D11S914), consistent with PAX6 mutations being responsible for ADK. SSCP analysis and direct sequencing revealed a mutation in the PAX6 exon 11 splice-acceptor site. The predicted consequent incorrect splicing results in truncation of the PAX6 proline-serine-threonine activation domain. The Sey{sup Neu} mouse results from a mutation in the Pax-6 exon 10 splice-donor site that produces a PAX6 protein truncated from the same point as occurs in our family with ADK. Therefore, the Sey{sup Neu} mouse is an excellent animal model of ADK. The finding that mutations in PAX6 also underlie Peters anomaly implicates PAX6 broadly in human anterior segment malformations. 42 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Angiogenic growth factors correlate with disease severity in young patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Berenice; Masoumi, Amirali; Elhassan, Elwaleed; McFann, Kim; Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa; Maahs, David; Snell-Bergeon, Janet; Schrier, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Renal cysts, pain and hematuria are common presentations of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in children. Renal function, however, is typically preserved in these patients despite increased renal volume. Since angiogenesis has been implicated in promotion of renal cyst growth in ADPKD we measured the serum level of various angiogenic factors and early renal structural changes and cardiovascular parameters in 71 patients with ADPKD with a mean age of 16 years. Renal structure and left ventricular mass index were measured by magnetic resonance imaging or by echocardiogram. Renal function was assessed by creatinine clearance, and urinary protein excretion. Serum growth factor levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Because of skewed distributions, the various parameters are reported as log10. Serum Log10 vascular endothelial growth factor was positively correlated with renal and cardiac structure, but negatively correlated with creatinine clearance. Serum angiopoietin 1 levels significantly correlated with structural change in both the kidney and the heart and with urinary protein. Thus, the correlation between angiogenic growth factors with both renal and cardiac disease severity is compatible with a possible role for angiogenesis in the early progression of disease in ADPKD. PMID:20881939

  14. Molecular diagnosis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease using next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Adrian Y; Michaeel, Alber; Liu, Genyan; Elemento, Olivier; Blumenfeld, Jon; Donahue, Stephanie; Parker, Tom; Levine, Daniel; Rennert, Hanna

    2014-03-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is caused by mutations in PKD1 and PKD2. However, genetic analysis is complicated by six PKD1 pseudogenes, large gene sizes, and allelic heterogeneity. We developed a new clinical assay for PKD gene analysis using paired-end next-generation sequencing (NGS) by multiplexing individually bar-coded long-range PCR libraries and analyzing them in one Illumina MiSeq flow cell. The data analysis pipeline has been optimized and automated with Unix shell scripts to accommodate variant calls. This approach was validated using a cohort of 25 patients with ADPKD previously analyzed by Sanger sequencing. A total of 250 genetic variants were identified by NGS, spanning the entire exonic and adjacent intronic regions of PKD1 and PKD2, including all 16 pathogenic mutations. In addition, we identified three novel mutations in a mutation-negative cohort of 24 patients with ADPKD previously analyzed by Sanger sequencing. This NGS method achieved sensitivity of 99.2% (95% CI, 96.8%-99.9%) and specificity of 99.9% (95% CI, 99.7%-100.0%), with cost and turnaround time reduced by as much as 70%. Prospective NGS analysis of 25 patients with ADPKD demonstrated a detection rate comparable with Sanger standards. In conclusion, the NGS method was superior to Sanger sequencing for detecting PKD gene mutations, achieving high sensitivity and improved gene coverage. These characteristics suggest that NGS would be an appropriate new standard for clinical genetic testing of ADPKD.

  15. Percutaneous Treatment of Pyocystis in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Akinci, Devrim Turkbey, Baris; Yilmaz, Rahmi; Akpinar, Erhan; Ozmen, Mustafa N.; Akhan, Okan

    2008-09-15

    The course of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is frequently complicated by infection of a cyst within a polycystic kidney, which is a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma damaging the clinical course of patients. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous drainage in management of infected cysts in ADPKD patients. Between May 2003 and December 2006, percutaneous drainage was performed in 16 infected renal cysts of four kidneys in three patients (two females, one male), with a mean age of 57.3 years. Cyst dimensions, total amount of drained cyst fluid, catheterization duration, isolated microorganisms, and follow-up duration were recorded. Technical, clinical success rates were 100%; the complication rate was 0%. Diameters of cysts ranged between 3 and 8 cm. Average volume of drained fluid and average duration of catheterization for one cyst were 226 ml and 9.8 days. No recurrence was encountered but one patient (no. 3), who had pyocystis in the right kidney and was treated with catheterization, referred with left flank pain due to pyocystis in her left kidney 3 months later. Follow-up durations were 35, 47, and 11 months for patients 1, 2, and 3, respectively. For patient 3, follow-up duration for the second procedure was 7 months. We conclude that percutaneous drainage with antibiotic therapy should be the initial method in management of infected cysts in ADPKD patients, with high success and low complication rates.

  16. Genetic linkage of autosomal dominant progressive supranuclear palsy to 1q31.1.

    PubMed

    Ros, Raquel; Gómez Garre, Pilar; Hirano, Michio; Tai, Yen F; Ampuero, Israel; Vidal, Lídice; Rojo, Ana; Fontan, Aurora; Vazquez, Ana; Fanjul, Samira; Hernandez, Jaime; Cantarero, Susana; Hoenicka, Janet; Jones, Alison; Ahsan, R Laila; Pavese, Nicola; Piccini, Paola; Brooks, David J; Perez-Tur, Jordi; Nyggard, Torbjorn; de Yébenes, Justo G

    2005-05-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a disorder of unknown pathogenesis. Familial clusters of PSP have been reported related to mutations of protein tau. We report the linkage of a large Spanish family with typical autosomal dominant PSP to a new locus in chromosome 1. Four members of this family had typical PSP, confirmed by neuropathology in one case. At least five ancestors had similar disease. Other members of the family have incomplete phenotypes. The power of the linkage analysis was increased by detecting presymptomatic individuals with 18F-fluoro-dopa and 18F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography. We screened the human genome with 340 polymorphic markers and we enriched the areas of interest with additional markers. The disease status was defined according to the clinical and positron emission tomography data. We excluded linkage to the tau gene in chromosome 17. PSP was linked, in this family, to one area of 3.4 cM in chromosome 1q31.1, with a maximal multipoint < OD score of +3.53. This area contains at least three genes, whose relevance in PSP is unknown. We expect to further define the gene responsible for PSP, which could help to understand the pathogenesis of this disease and to design effective treatment.

  17. Angiogenic growth factors correlate with disease severity in young patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Reed, Berenice Y; Masoumi, Amirali; Elhassan, Elwaleed; McFann, Kim; Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa A; Maahs, David M; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Schrier, Robert W

    2011-01-01

    Renal cysts, pain, and hematuria are common presentations of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in children. Renal function, however, is typically preserved in these patients despite increased renal volume. Since angiogenesis has been implicated in promotion of renal cyst growth in ADPKD, we measured the serum level of various angiogenic factors and early renal structural changes and cardiovascular parameters in 71 patients with ADPKD, with a mean age of 16 years. Renal structure and left ventricular mass index were measured by magnetic resonance imaging or by echocardiogram. Renal function was assessed by creatinine clearance and urinary protein excretion. Serum growth factor levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Because of skewed distributions, the various parameters are reported as log(10). Serum log(10) vascular endothelial growth factor was positively correlated with renal and cardiac structure, but negatively with creatinine clearance. Serum angiopoietin 1 levels significantly correlated with structural change in both the kidney and the heart and with urinary protein. Thus, the correlation between angiogenic growth factors with both renal and cardiac disease severity is compatible with a possible role for angiogenesis in the early progression of disease in ADPKD. PMID:20881939

  18. New therapeutic option for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients with enlarged kidney and liver.

    PubMed

    Ubara, Yoshifumi

    2006-08-01

    The kidneys of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) usually continue to increase in size even after patients begin dialysis, and mass effects can lead to severe complications. Thus far, renal manifestations of this disorder have been discussed only from the viewpoint of cyst formation or cytogenesis, not from that of vascular abnormality. Because kidneys in ADPKD patients are usually supplied by well-developed arteries, we attempted renal contraction therapy in ADPKD patients with renal transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) using intravascular coils. Mainly peripheral branches of renal arteries encircling the cysts were embolized. Our treatment has been confirmed to be effective in 266 patients until 2005. Renal size continued to decrease to 53% of the pre-TAE after 1 year. Almost all patients have had improved quality of life and nutritional status. We next tried TAE in 76 intractable patients with symptomatic polycystic liver. We tried to embolize only the hepatic segments replaced by cystic lesions in which the hepatic arteries were well-developed but the intrahepatic portal vein was obstructed. Sixty-four patients have had a good clinical course with this method. Based on our observation of ADPKD through treatment with TAE, we speculate that cyst growth in both the kidney and the liver progresses via the mechanism of 'arteriogenesis' of large vessels as well as 'angiogenesis' of small vessels. PMID:16911186

  19. Peritoneal dialysis for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xi-Shao; Xie, Zhou-Tao; Xiang, Shi-Long; Yan, Xing-Qun; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Shou, Zhang-Fei; Chen, Jiang-Hua

    2016-05-01

    To describe the long-term clinical outcomes of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) who are on peritoneal dialysis (PD) therapy. We performed a retrospective matched-cohort analysis comparing the clinical outcomes of 30 ADPKD patients with those of 30 non-diabetic patients who had bilateral small kidneys between July 1 2007 and July 31 2014. The patient groups were matched by age, gender, and time of PD initiation. There were no significant differences in the demographic or biochemical parameters, comorbid conditions, residual glomerular filtration rate, or Charlson comorbidity score at the beginning of PD. The median renal volume was 1315 ml for the ADPKD group and 213 ml for the control group. Patients with ADPKD had similar 3-year patient survival (90.6% versus 86.3%, P=0.807) and technique survival (89.2% versus 74.3%, P=0.506) compared with non-ADPKD patients. Also, there was no significant difference in the peritonitis-free survival between the ADPKD and control groups (P=0.22), and rates of peritonitis were similar (0.19 versus 0.21 episodes per patient-year, P=0.26). No differences were observed in the incidence of PD-related complications, such as hernia and dialysate leak. ADPKD is not a contraindication for PD, and a subgroup of ADPKD patients with relatively small kidney volume can be treated using PD. PMID:27143265

  20. Genetic analysis of Iranian autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: new insight to haplotype analysis.

    PubMed

    Entezam, M; Khatami, M R; Saddadi, F; Ayati, M; Roozbeh, J; Saghafi, H; Keramatipour, M

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) caused by mutations in two PKD1 and PKD2 genes. Due to the complexity of the PKD1 gene, its direct mutation screening is an expensive and time-consuming procedure. Pedigree-based haplotype analysis is a useful indirect approach to identify the responsible gene in families with multiple affected individuals, before direct mutation analysis. Here, we applied this approach to investigate 15 appropriate unrelated ADPKD families, selected from 25 families, who referred for genetic counseling. Four polymorphic microsatellite markers were selected around each PKD1 and PKD2 loci. In addition, by investigating the genomic regions, two novel flanking tetranucleotide STR markers were identified. Haplotype analysis and calculating Lod score confirmed linkage to PKD1 in 9 families (60%) and to PKD2 in 2 families (13%). Linkage to both loci was excluded in one family (6.6%). In 2 families (13%) the Lod scores were inconclusive. Causative mutation was identified successfully by direct analysis in two families with confirmed linkage, one to PKD1 and another to PKD2 locus. The study showed that determining the causative locus prior to direct mutation analysis is an efficient strategy to reduce the resources required for genetic analysis of ADPKD families. This is more prominent in PKD2-linked families. Selection of suitable markers, and appropriate PCR multiplexing strategy, using fluorescent labeled primers and 3 primer system, will also add value to this approach. PMID:26950445

  1. Further refinement of the location for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa on chromosome 7p (RP9).

    PubMed Central

    Inglehearn, C. F.; Keen, T. J.; al-Maghtheh, M.; Gregory, C. Y.; Jay, M. R.; Moore, A. T.; Bird, A. C.; Bhattacharya, S. S.

    1994-01-01

    A form of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) mapping to chromosome 7p was recently reported by this laboratory, in a single large family from southeastern England. Further sampling of the family and the use a number of genetic markers from 7p have facilitated the construction of a series of multipoint linkage maps of the region with the most likely disease gene location. From this and haplotype data, the locus can now be placed between the markers D7S484 and D7S526, in an interval estimated to be 1.6-4 cM. Genetic distances between the markers previously reported to be linked to this region and those described in the recent whole-genome poly-CA map were estimated from data in this and other families. These data should assist in the construction of a physical map of the region and will help to identify candidate genes for the 7p adRP locus. PMID:8128965

  2. Identification and functional analysis of two novel connexin 50 mutations associated with autosome dominant congenital cataracts.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yinhui; Wu, Menghan; Chen, Xinyi; Zhu, Yanan; Gong, Xiaohua; Yao, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant congenital cataracts (ADCC) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous diseases. The present study recruited two Chinese families with bilateral nuclear cataract or zonular pulverulent phenotype. Direct sequencing of candidate genes identified two novel missense mutations of Cx50, Cx50P59A (c.175C > G) and Cx50R76H (c.227G > A), both co-segregated well with all affected individuals. Bioinformatics analysis predicted deleterious for both mutations. Functional and cellular behaviors of wild type and mutant Cx50 examined by stably transfecting recombinant systems revealed similar protein expression levels. Protein distribution pattern by fluorescence microscopy showed that Cx50R76H localized at appositional membranes forming gap junctions with enormous cytoplasmic protein accumulation, whereas the Cx50P59A mutation was found inefficient at forming detectable plaques. Cell growth test by MTT assay showed that induction of Cx50P59A decreased cell viability. Our study constitutes the first report that the Cx50P59A and Cx50R76H mutations are associated with ADCC and expands the mutation spectrum of Cx50 in association with congenital cataracts. The genetic, cellular, and functional data suggest that the altered intercellular communication governed by mutated Cx50 proteins may act as the molecular mechanism underlying ADCC, which further confirms the role of Cx50 in the maintenance of human lens transparency. PMID:27216975

  3. A Missense Mutation in HK1 Leads to Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Wang, Yandong; Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Li; Lyubasyuk, Vera; Wang, Keqing; Xu, Mingchu; Li, Yumei; Wu, Frances; Wen, Cindy; Bernstein, Paul S.; Lin, Danni; Zhu, Susanna; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Kang; Chen, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous disease with over 60 causative genes known to date. Nevertheless, approximately 40% of RP cases remain genetically unsolved, suggesting that many novel disease-causing genes are yet to be identified. In this study, we aimed to identify the causative mutation for a large autosomal dominant RP (adRP) family with negative results from known retinal disease gene screening. Methods. Linkage analysis followed by whole-exome sequencing was performed. Stringent variant filtering and prioritization was carried out to identify the causative mutation. Results. Linkage analysis identified a minimal disease region of 8 Mb on chromosome 10 with a peak parametric logarithm (base 10) of odds (LOD) score of 3.500. Further whole-exome sequencing identified a heterozygous missense mutation (NM_000188.2:c.2539G>A, p.E847K) in hexokinase 1 (HK1) that segregated with the disease phenotype in the family. Biochemical assays showed that the E847K mutation does not affect hexokinase enzymatic activity or the protein stability, suggesting that the mutation may impact other uncharacterized function or result in a gain of function of HK1. Conclusions. Here, we identified HK1 as a novel causative gene for adRP. This is the first report that associates the glucose metabolic pathway with human retinal degenerative disease, suggesting a potential new disease mechanism. PMID:25316723

  4. Identification and functional analysis of two novel connexin 50 mutations associated with autosome dominant congenital cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yinhui; Wu, Menghan; Chen, Xinyi; Zhu, Yanan; Gong, Xiaohua; Yao, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant congenital cataracts (ADCC) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous diseases. The present study recruited two Chinese families with bilateral nuclear cataract or zonular pulverulent phenotype. Direct sequencing of candidate genes identified two novel missense mutations of Cx50, Cx50P59A (c.175C > G) and Cx50R76H (c.227G > A), both co-segregated well with all affected individuals. Bioinformatics analysis predicted deleterious for both mutations. Functional and cellular behaviors of wild type and mutant Cx50 examined by stably transfecting recombinant systems revealed similar protein expression levels. Protein distribution pattern by fluorescence microscopy showed that Cx50R76H localized at appositional membranes forming gap junctions with enormous cytoplasmic protein accumulation, whereas the Cx50P59A mutation was found inefficient at forming detectable plaques. Cell growth test by MTT assay showed that induction of Cx50P59A decreased cell viability. Our study constitutes the first report that the Cx50P59A and Cx50R76H mutations are associated with ADCC and expands the mutation spectrum of Cx50 in association with congenital cataracts. The genetic, cellular, and functional data suggest that the altered intercellular communication governed by mutated Cx50 proteins may act as the molecular mechanism underlying ADCC, which further confirms the role of Cx50 in the maintenance of human lens transparency. PMID:27216975

  5. BEST1-related autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy: a degenerative disease with a range of developmental ocular anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, A; McAlister, C; VandenHoven, C; Héon, E

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To describe the spectrum of phenotypic characteristics of BEST1-related autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy (ADVIRC) in a family with p.V86M mutation. Methods A retrospective review of the clinical, psychophysical, and electrophysiological phenotypes of six subjects with ADVIRC. Five family members were sequenced for mutations in the BEST1gene. Results A heterozygous change, p.V86M (c.256G>A), was identified in the BEST1gene in the three affected subjects tested, and was shown to segregate with the disease phenotype. The distance visual acuity ranged from ⩾20/25 to absent perception of light. Clinical features observed included angle closure glaucoma (n=2), microcornea with shallow anterior chamber (n=1), iris dysgenesis (n=2), cataracts (n=4), classical peripheral concentric band of retinal hyperpigmentation (n=5), and optic nerve dysplasia (n=1). Full-field electroretinogram response amplitudes ranged from low normal (two cases; 27 and 32 years) to non-recordable (two cases; 42 and 63 years). Goldmann fields were normal in two (27 and 28 years) but were abnormal in two older subjects. Optical coherence tomography showed macular thinning in the proband, whereas his affected daughter had normal macular thickness. Electro-oculography showed borderline Arden's ratio (1.50) in the lone case tested (27 years). Conclusion ADVIRC is a slowly progressive vitreoretinal degeneration that demonstrates marked intra-familial phenotypic variability. Optic nerve dysplasia and iris dysgenesis are novel observations that extend the ocular phenotype of ADVIRC. PMID:21072067

  6. Fatty Acid Oxidation is Impaired in An Orthologous Mouse Model of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Luis F.; Lin, Cheng-Chao; Zhou, Fang; Germino, Gregory G.

    2016-01-01

    Background The major gene mutated in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease was first identified over 20 years ago, yet its function remains poorly understood. We have used a systems-based approach to examine the effects of acquired loss of Pkd1 in adult mouse kidney as it transitions from normal to cystic state. Methods We performed transcriptional profiling of a large set of male and female kidneys, along with metabolomics and lipidomics analyses of a subset of male kidneys. We also assessed the effects of a modest diet change on cyst progression in young cystic mice. Fatty acid oxidation and glycolytic rates were measured in five control and mutant pairs of epithelial cells. Results We find that females have a significantly less severe kidney phenotype and correlate this protection with differences in lipid metabolism. We show that sex is a major determinant of the transcriptional profile of mouse kidneys and that some of this difference is due to genes involved in lipid metabolism. Pkd1 mutant mice have transcriptional profiles consistent with changes in lipid metabolism and distinct metabolite and complex lipid profiles in kidneys. We also show that cells lacking Pkd1 have an intrinsic fatty acid oxidation defect and that manipulation of lipid content of mouse chow modifies cystic disease. Interpretation Our results suggest PKD could be a disease of altered cellular metabolism. PMID:27077126

  7. Neuropathology of Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer Disease in the National Alzheimer Coordinating Center Database.

    PubMed

    Ringman, John M; Monsell, Sarah; Ng, Denise W; Zhou, Yan; Nguyen, Andy; Coppola, Giovanni; Van Berlo, Victoria; Mendez, Mario F; Tung, Spencer; Weintraub, Sandra; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Bigio, Eileen H; Gitelman, Darren R; Fisher-Hubbard, Amanda O; Albin, Roger L; Vinters, Harry V

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) represents a genetically heterogeneous entity. To elucidate neuropathologic features of autosomal dominant AD ([ADAD] due to PSEN1, APP, or PSEN2 mutations), we compared hallmark AD pathologic findings in 60 cases of ADAD and 120 cases of sporadic AD matched for sex, race, ethnicity, and disease duration. Greater degrees of neuritic plaque and neurofibrillary tangle formation and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) were found in ADAD (p values < 0.01). Moderate to severe CAA was more prevalent in ADAD (63.3% vs. 39.2%, p = 0.003), and persons with PSEN1 mutations beyond codon 200 had higher average Braak scores and severity and prevalence of CAA than those with mutations before codon 200. Lewy body pathology was less extensive in ADAD but was present in 27.1% of cases. We also describe a novel pathogenic PSEN1 mutation (P267A). The finding of more severe neurofibrillary pathology and CAA in ADAD, particularly in carriers of PSEN1 mutations beyond codon 200, warrants consideration when designing trials to treat or prevent ADAD. The finding of Lewy body pathology in a substantial minority of ADAD cases supports the assertion that development of Lewy bodies may be in part driven by abnormal β-amyloid protein precursor processing.

  8. A new autosomal dominant eye and lung syndrome linked to mutations in TIMP3 gene.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Isabelle; Bocquet, Béatrice; Labesse, Gilles; Zeitz, Christina; Defoort-Dhellemmes, Sabine; Lacroux, Annie; Mauget-Faysse, Martine; Drumare, Isabelle; Gamez, Anne-Sophie; Mathieu, Cyril; Marquette, Virginie; Sagot, Lola; Dhaenens, Claire-Marie; Arndt, Carl; Carroll, Patrick; Remy-Jardin, Martine; Cohen, Salomon Yves; Sahel, José-Alain; Puech, Bernard; Audo, Isabelle; Mrejen, Sarah; Hamel, Christian P

    2016-01-01

    To revisit the autosomal dominant Sorsby fundus dystrophy (SFD) as a syndromic condition including late-onset pulmonary disease. We report clinical and imaging data of ten affected individuals from 2 unrelated families with SFD and carrying heterozygous TIMP3 mutations (c.572A > G, p.Y191C, exon 5, in family 1 and c.113C > G, p.S38C, exon 1, in family 2). In family 1, all SFD patients older than 50 (two generations) had also a severe emphysema, despite no history of smoking or asthma. In the preceding generation, the mother died of pulmonary emphysema and she was blind after the age of 50. Her two great-grandsons (<20 years), had abnormal Bruch Membrane thickness, a sign of eye disease. In family 2, eye and lung diseases were also associated in two generations, both occurred later, and lung disease was moderate (bronchiectasis). This is the first report of a syndromic SFD in line with the mouse model uncovering the role of TIMP3 in human lung morphogenesis and functions. The TIMP3 gene should be screened in familial pulmonary diseases with bronchiectasis, associated with a medical history of visual loss. In addition, SFD patients should be advised to avoid tobacco consumption, to practice sports, and to undergo regular pulmonary examinations. PMID:27601084

  9. Novel role of ouabain as a cystogenic factor in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Darren P.

    2013-01-01

    The classic role of the Na-K-ATPase is that of a primary active transporter that utilizes cell energy to establish and maintain transmembrane Na+ and K+ gradients to preserve cell osmotic stability, support cell excitability, and drive secondary active transport. Recent studies have revealed that Na-K-ATPase located within cholesterol-containing lipid rafts serves as a receptor for cardiotonic steroids, including ouabain. Traditionally, ouabain was viewed as a toxin produced only in plants, and it was used in relatively high concentrations to experimentally block the pumping action of the Na-K-ATPase. However, the new and unexpected role of the Na-K-ATPase as a signal transducer revealed a novel facet for ouabain in the regulation of a myriad of cell functions, including cell proliferation, hypertrophy, apoptosis, mobility, and metabolism. The seminal discovery that ouabain is endogenously produced in mammals and circulates in plasma has fueled the interest in this endogenous molecule as a potentially important hormone in normal physiology and disease. In this article, we review the role of the Na-K-ATPase as an ion transporter in the kidney, the experimental evidence for ouabain as a circulating hormone, the function of the Na-K-ATPase as a signal transducer that mediates ouabain's effects, and novel results for ouabain-induced Na-K-ATPase signaling in cystogenesis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. PMID:23761677

  10. Erythropoietin Slows Photoreceptor Cell Death in a Mouse Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Kasmala, Lorraine; Bond, Wesley S.; de Lucas Cerrillo, Ana M.; Wynn, Kristi; Lewin, Alfred S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To test the efficacy of systemic gene delivery of a mutant form of erythropoietin (EPO-R76E) that has attenuated erythropoietic activity, in a mouse model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Methods Ten-day old mice carrying one copy of human rhodopsin with the P23H mutation and both copies of wild-type mouse rhodopsin (hP23H RHO+/-,mRHO+/+) were injected into the quadriceps with recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) carrying either enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) or EpoR76E. Visual function (electroretinogram) and retina structure (optical coherence tomography, histology, and immunohistochemistry) were assessed at 7 and 12 months of age. Results The outer nuclear layer thickness decreased over time at a slower rate in rAAV.EpoR76E treated as compared to the rAAV.eGFP injected mice. There was a statistically significant preservation of the electroretinogram at 7, but not 12 months of age. Conclusions Systemic EPO-R76E slows death of the photoreceptors and vision loss in hP23H RHO+/-,mRHO+/+ mice. Treatment with EPO-R76E may widen the therapeutic window for retinal degeneration patients by increasing the number of viable cells. Future studies might investigate if co-treatment with EPO-R76E and gene replacement therapy is more effective than gene replacement therapy alone. PMID:27299810

  11. A recurrent deletion mutation in OPA1 causes autosomal dominant optic atrophy in a Chinese family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liping; Shi, Wei; Song, Liming; Zhang, Xiao; Cheng, Lulu; Wang, Yanfang; Ge, Xianglian; Li, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Min, Qingjie; Jin, Zi-Bing; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2014-11-01

    Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) is the most frequent form of hereditary optic neuropathy and occurs due to the degeneration of the retinal ganglion cells. To identify the genetic defect in a family with putative ADOA, we performed capture next generation sequencing (CNGS) to screen known retinal disease genes. However, six exons failed to be sequenced by CNGS in optic atrophy 1 gene (OPA1). Sequencing of those exons identified a 4 bp deletion mutation (c.2983-1_2985del) in OPA1. Furthermore, we sequenced the transcripts of OPA1 from the patient skin fibroblasts and found there is six-nucleotide deletion (c.2984-c.2989, AGAAAG). Quantitative-PCR and Western blotting showed that OPA1 mRNA and its protein expression have no obvious difference between patient skin fibroblast and control. The analysis of protein structure by molecular modeling suggests that the mutation may change the structure of OPA1 by formation of an alpha helix protruding into an existing pocket. Taken together, we identified an OPA1 mutation in a family with ADOA by filling the missing CNGS data. We also showed that this mutation affects the structural intactness of OPA1. It provides molecular insights for clinical genetic diagnosis and treatment of optic atrophy.

  12. Mutations in DNMT1 cause autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Winkelmann, Juliane; Lin, Ling; Schormair, Barbara; Kornum, Birgitte R.; Faraco, Juliette; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Melberg, Atle; Cornelio, Ferdinando; Urban, Alexander E.; Pizza, Fabio; Poli, Francesca; Grubert, Fabian; Wieland, Thomas; Graf, Elisabeth; Hallmayer, Joachim; Strom, Tim M.; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy (ADCA-DN) is characterized by late onset (30–40 years old) cerebellar ataxia, sensory neuronal deafness, narcolepsy–cataplexy and dementia. We performed exome sequencing in five individuals from three ADCA-DN kindreds and identified DNMT1 as the only gene with mutations found in all five affected individuals. Sanger sequencing confirmed the de novo mutation p.Ala570Val in one family, and showed co-segregation of p.Val606Phe and p.Ala570Val, with the ADCA-DN phenotype, in two other kindreds. An additional ADCA-DN kindred with a p.GLY605Ala mutation was subsequently identified. Narcolepsy and deafness were the first symptoms to appear in all pedigrees, followed by ataxia. DNMT1 is a widely expressed DNA methyltransferase maintaining methylation patterns in development, and mediating transcriptional repression by direct binding to HDAC2. It is also highly expressed in immune cells and required for the differentiation of CD4+ into T regulatory cells. Mutations in exon 20 of this gene were recently reported to cause hereditary sensory neuropathy with dementia and hearing loss (HSAN1). Our mutations are all located in exon 21 and in very close spatial proximity, suggesting distinct phenotypes depending on mutation location within this gene. PMID:22328086

  13. A novel OPA1 mutation in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant optic atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Juanjuan; Yuan, Yimin; Lin, Bing; Feng, Hao; Li, Yan; Dai, Xianning; Zhou, Huihui; Dong, Xujie; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Guan, Min-Xin

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report the characterization of a four-generation large Chinese family with ADOA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find a new heterozygous mutation c.C1198G in OPA1 gene which may be a novel pathogenic mutation in this pedigree. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We do not find any mitochondrial DNA mutations associated with optic atrophy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Other factors may also contribute to the phenotypic variability of ADOA in this pedigree. -- Abstract: A large four-generation Chinese family with autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) was investigated in the present study. Eight of the family members were affected in this pedigree. The affected family members exhibited early-onset and progressive visual impairment, resulting in mild to profound loss of visual acuity. The average age-at-onset was 15.9 years. A new heterozygous mutation c.C1198G was identified by sequence analysis of the 12th exon of the OPA1 gene. This mutation resulted in a proline to alanine substitution at codon 400, which was located in an evolutionarily conserved region. This missense mutation in the GTPase domain was supposed to result in a loss of function for the encoded protein and act through a dominant negative effect. No other mutations associated with optic atrophy were found in our present study. The c.C1198G heterozygous mutation in the OPA1 gene may be a novel key pathogenic mutation in this pedigree with ADOA. Furthermore, additional nuclear modifier genes, environmental factors, and psychological factors may also contribute to the phenotypic variability of ADOA in this pedigree.

  14. A missense mutation in KCTD17 causes autosomal dominant myoclonus-dystonia.

    PubMed

    Mencacci, Niccolo E; Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Zdebik, Anselm; Asmus, Friedrich; Ludtmann, Marthe H R; Ryten, Mina; Plagnol, Vincent; Hauser, Ann-Kathrin; Bandres-Ciga, Sara; Bettencourt, Conceição; Forabosco, Paola; Hughes, Deborah; Soutar, Marc M P; Peall, Kathryn; Morris, Huw R; Trabzuni, Daniah; Tekman, Mehmet; Stanescu, Horia C; Kleta, Robert; Carecchio, Miryam; Zorzi, Giovanna; Nardocci, Nardo; Garavaglia, Barbara; Lohmann, Ebba; Weissbach, Anne; Klein, Christine; Hardy, John; Pittman, Alan M; Foltynie, Thomas; Abramov, Andrey Y; Gasser, Thomas; Bhatia, Kailash P; Wood, Nicholas W

    2015-06-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is a rare movement disorder characterized by a combination of non-epileptic myoclonic jerks and dystonia. SGCE mutations represent a major cause for familial M-D being responsible for 30%-50% of cases. After excluding SGCE mutations, we identified through a combination of linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) as the only segregating variant in a dominant British pedigree with seven subjects affected by M-D. A subsequent screening in a cohort of M-D cases without mutations in SGCE revealed the same KCTD17 variant in a German family. The clinical presentation of the KCTD17-mutated cases was distinct from the phenotype usually observed in M-D due to SGCE mutations. All cases initially presented with mild myoclonus affecting the upper limbs. Dystonia showed a progressive course, with increasing severity of symptoms and spreading from the cranio-cervical region to other sites. KCTD17 is abundantly expressed in all brain regions with the highest expression in the putamen. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis, based on mRNA expression profile of brain samples from neuropathologically healthy individuals, showed that KCTD17 is part of a putamen gene network, which is significantly enriched for dystonia genes. Functional annotation of the network showed an over-representation of genes involved in post-synaptic dopaminergic transmission. Functional studies in mutation bearing fibroblasts demonstrated abnormalities in endoplasmic reticulum-dependent calcium signaling. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) mutation causes autosomal dominant M-D. Further functional studies are warranted to further characterize the nature of KCTD17 contribution to the molecular pathogenesis of M-D. PMID:25983243

  15. Cerebral amyloidosis associated with cognitive decline in autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fen; Gordon, Brian A.; Ryman, Davis C.; Ma, Shengmei; Xiong, Chengjie; Hassenstab, Jason; Goate, Alison; Fagan, Anne M.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Marcus, Daniel S.; McDade, Eric; Ringman, John M.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Farlow, Martin R.; Sperling, Reisa; Salloway, Steve; Schofield, Peter R.; Masters, Colin L.; Martins, Ralph N.; Rossor, Martin N.; Jucker, Mathias; Danek, Adrian; Förster, Stefan; Lane, Christopher A.S.; Morris, John C.; Bateman, Randall J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the associations of cerebral amyloidosis with concurrent cognitive performance and with longitudinal cognitive decline in asymptomatic and symptomatic stages of autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD). Methods: Two hundred sixty-three participants enrolled in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network observational study underwent neuropsychological evaluation as well as PET scans with Pittsburgh compound B. One hundred twenty-one participants completed at least 1 follow-up neuropsychological evaluation. Four composite cognitive measures representing global cognition, episodic memory, language, and working memory were generated using z scores from a battery of 13 standard neuropsychological tests. General linear mixed-effects models were used to investigate the relationship between baseline cerebral amyloidosis and baseline cognitive performance and whether baseline cerebral amyloidosis predicts cognitive change over time (mean follow-up 2.32 years ± 0.92, range 0.89–4.19) after controlling for estimated years from expected symptom onset, APOE ε4 allelic status, and education. Results: In asymptomatic mutation carriers, amyloid burden was not associated with baseline cognitive functioning but was significantly predictive of longitudinal decline in episodic memory. In symptomatic mutation carriers, cerebral amyloidosis was correlated with worse baseline performance in multiple cognitive composites and predicted greater decline over time in global cognition, working memory, and Mini-Mental State Examination. Conclusions: Cerebral amyloidosis predicts longitudinal episodic memory decline in presymptomatic ADAD and multidomain cognitive decline in symptomatic ADAD. These findings imply that amyloidosis in the brain is an indicator of early cognitive decline and provides a useful outcome measure for early assessment and prevention treatment trials. PMID:26245925

  16. A genome-wide search for genes predisposing to manic-depression, assuming autosomal dominant inheritance

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, H.; Jensen, S.; Hoff, M.; Holik, J.; Plaetke, R.; Reimherr, F.; Wender, P.; Leppert, M.; Byerley, W. )

    1993-06-01

    Manic-depressive illness (MDI), also known as [open quotes]bipolar affective disorder[close quotes], is a common and devastating neuropsychiatric illness. Although pivotal biochemical alterations underlying the disease are unknown, results of family, twin, and adoption studies consistently implicate genetic transmission in the pathogenesis of MDI. In order to carry out linkage analysis, the authors ascertained eight moderately sized pedigrees containing multiple cases of the disease. For a four-allele marker mapping at 5 cM from the disease gene, the pedigree sample has >97% power to detect a dominant allele under genetic homogeneity and has >73% power under 20% heterogeneity. To date, the eight pedigrees have been genotyped with 328 polymorphic DNA loci throughout the genome. When autosomal dominant inheritance was assumed, 273 DNA markers gave lod scores <[minus]2.0 at [theta] = .05, and 4 DNA marker loci yielded lod scores >1 (chromosome 5 -- D5S39, D5S43, and D5S62; chromosome 11 -- D11S85). Of the markers giving lod scores >1, only D5S62 continued to show evidence for linkage when the affected-pedigree-member method was used. The D5S62 locus maps to distal 5q, a region containing neurotransmitter-receptor genes for dopamine, norepinephrine, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid. Although additional work in this region may be warranted, the linkage results should be interpreted as preliminary data, as 68 unaffected individuals are not past the age of risk. 72 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. A Missense Mutation in KCTD17 Causes Autosomal Dominant Myoclonus-Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Mencacci, Niccolo E.; Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Zdebik, Anselm; Asmus, Friedrich; Ludtmann, Marthe H.R.; Ryten, Mina; Plagnol, Vincent; Hauser, Ann-Kathrin; Bandres-Ciga, Sara; Bettencourt, Conceição; Forabosco, Paola; Hughes, Deborah; Soutar, Marc M.P.; Peall, Kathryn; Morris, Huw R.; Trabzuni, Daniah; Tekman, Mehmet; Stanescu, Horia C.; Kleta, Robert; Carecchio, Miryam; Zorzi, Giovanna; Nardocci, Nardo; Garavaglia, Barbara; Lohmann, Ebba; Weissbach, Anne; Klein, Christine; Hardy, John; Pittman, Alan M.; Foltynie, Thomas; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Gasser, Thomas; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is a rare movement disorder characterized by a combination of non-epileptic myoclonic jerks and dystonia. SGCE mutations represent a major cause for familial M-D being responsible for 30%–50% of cases. After excluding SGCE mutations, we identified through a combination of linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) as the only segregating variant in a dominant British pedigree with seven subjects affected by M-D. A subsequent screening in a cohort of M-D cases without mutations in SGCE revealed the same KCTD17 variant in a German family. The clinical presentation of the KCTD17-mutated cases was distinct from the phenotype usually observed in M-D due to SGCE mutations. All cases initially presented with mild myoclonus affecting the upper limbs. Dystonia showed a progressive course, with increasing severity of symptoms and spreading from the cranio-cervical region to other sites. KCTD17 is abundantly expressed in all brain regions with the highest expression in the putamen. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis, based on mRNA expression profile of brain samples from neuropathologically healthy individuals, showed that KCTD17 is part of a putamen gene network, which is significantly enriched for dystonia genes. Functional annotation of the network showed an over-representation of genes involved in post-synaptic dopaminergic transmission. Functional studies in mutation bearing fibroblasts demonstrated abnormalities in endoplasmic reticulum-dependent calcium signaling. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) mutation causes autosomal dominant M-D. Further functional studies are warranted to further characterize the nature of KCTD17 contribution to the molecular pathogenesis of M-D. PMID:25983243

  18. Further evidence for a locus for autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma on chromosome 1q and evidence for genetic heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggs, J.; Paglinauan, C.; Stawski, S.

    1994-09-01

    Glaucoma is a term used to describe a group of disorders which have in common a characteristic degeneration of the optic nerve associated with typical visual field defects and usually associated with elevated intraocular pressure. Two percent of white Americans and 6-10% of black Americans are affected by the disease. Compelling data indicate that susceptibility to many types of glaucoma is inherited. Hereditary juvenile glaucoma is one form of glaucoma that develops in children and is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance. Using a single large Caucasian pedigree affected with autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma, Sheffield discovered positive linkage to a group of markers that map to a 30 cM region on the long arm of chromosome 1 (1q21-q31). We have subsequently identified three unrelated Caucasian pedigrees affected with autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma that also demonstrate linkage to this region on chromosome 1, with the highest combined lod score of 5.12 at theta = .05 for marker D1S218. The identification of critical recombinant individuals in our three pedigrees has allowed us to further localize the disease gene to a 12 cM region between markers D1S242 and D1S431. In addition, we have identified several pedigrees which do not demonstrate linkage to chromosome 1q, including a black family affected with autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma that is indistinguishable clinically from the disorder affecting the caucasian pedigrees and three pedigrees affected with pigmentary dispersion syndrome, a form of glaucoma that also affects the juvenile population and is also inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. These findings provide evidence for genetic heterogeneity in juvenile glaucoma.

  19. Growth hormone deficiency in monozygotic twins with autosomal dominant pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib.

    PubMed

    Sano, Shinichiro; Iwata, Hiromi; Matsubara, Keiko; Fukami, Maki; Kagami, Masayo; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) is associated with compromised signal transductions via PTH receptor (PTH-R) and other G-protein-coupled receptors including GHRH-R. To date, while GH deficiency (GHD) has been reported in multiple patients with PHP-Ia caused by mutations on the maternally expressed GNAS coding regions and in two patients with sporadic form of PHP-Ib accompanied by broad methylation defects of maternally derived GNAS differentially methylated regions (DMRs), it has not been identified in a patient with an autosomal dominant form of PHP-Ib (AD-PHP-Ib) accompanied by an STX16 microdeletion and an isolated loss of methylation (LOM) at exon A/B-DMR. We studied 5 4/12-year-old monozygotic twins with short stature (both -3.4 SD) and GHD (peak GH values, <6.0 μg/L after arginine and clonidine stimulations). Molecular studies revealed maternally derived STX16 microdeletions and isolated LOMs at exon A/B-DMR in the twins, confirming the diagnosis of AD-PHP-Ib. GNAS mutation was not identified, and neither mutation nor copy number variation was detected in GH1, POU1F1, PROP1, GHRHR, LHX3, LHX4, and HESX1 in the twins. The results, in conjunction with the previous finding that GNAS shows maternal expression in the pituitary, suggest that GHD of the twins is primarily ascribed to compromised GHRH-R signaling caused by AD-PTH-Ib. Thus, resistance to multiple hormones including GHRH should be considered in AD-PHP-Ib.

  20. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type III: a review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Sundal, Christina; Wszolek, Zbigniew K

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia (ADCA) Type III is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) classically characterized by pure cerebellar ataxia and occasionally by non-cerebellar signs such as pyramidal signs, ophthalmoplegia, and tremor. The onset of symptoms typically occurs in adulthood; however, a minority of patients develop clinical features in adolescence. The incidence of ADCA Type III is unknown. ADCA Type III consists of six subtypes, SCA5, SCA6, SCA11, SCA26, SCA30, and SCA31. The subtype SCA6 is the most common. These subtypes are associated with four causative genes and two loci. The severity of symptoms and age of onset can vary between each SCA subtype and even between families with the same subtype. SCA5 and SCA11 are caused by specific gene mutations such as missense, inframe deletions, and frameshift insertions or deletions. SCA6 is caused by trinucleotide CAG repeat expansions encoding large uninterrupted glutamine tracts. SCA31 is caused by repeat expansions that fall outside of the protein-coding region of the disease gene. Currently, there are no specific gene mutations associated with SCA26 or SCA30, though there is a confirmed locus for each subtype. This disease is mainly diagnosed via genetic testing; however, differential diagnoses include pure cerebellar ataxia and non-cerebellar features in addition to ataxia. Although not fatal, ADCA Type III may cause dysphagia and falls, which reduce the quality of life of the patients and may in turn shorten the lifespan. The therapy for ADCA Type III is supportive and includes occupational and speech modalities. There is no cure for ADCA Type III, but a number of recent studies have highlighted novel therapies, which bring hope for future curative treatments. PMID:23331413

  1. Differences in allele frequencies of autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia SNPs in the Malaysian population.

    PubMed

    Alex, Livy; Chahil, Jagdish Kaur; Lye, Say Hean; Bagali, Pramod; Ler, Lian Wee

    2012-06-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is caused by different interactions of lifestyle and genetic determinants. At the genetic level, it can be attributed to the interactions of multiple polymorphisms, or as in the example of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), it can be the result of a single mutation. A large number of genetic markers, mostly single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) or mutations in three genes, implicated in autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH), viz APOB (apolipoprotein B), LDLR (low density lipoprotein receptor) and PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type-9), have been identified and characterized. However, such studies have been insufficiently undertaken specifically in Malaysia and Southeast Asia in general. The main objective of this study was to identify ADH variants, specifically ADH-causing mutations and hypercholesterolemia-associated polymorphisms in multiethnic Malaysian population. We aimed to evaluate published SNPs in ADH causing genes, in this population and to report any unusual trends. We examined a large number of selected SNPs from previous studies of APOB, LDLR, PCSK9 and other genes, in clinically diagnosed ADH patients (n=141) and healthy control subjects (n=111). Selection of SNPs was initiated by searching within genes reported to be associated with ADH from known databases. The important finding was 137 mono-allelic markers (44.1%) and 173 polymorphic markers (55.8%) in both subject groups. By comparing to publicly available data, out of the 137 mono-allelic markers, 23 markers showed significant differences in allele frequency among Malaysians, European Whites, Han Chinese, Yoruba and Gujarati Indians. Our data can serve as reference for others in related fields of study during the planning of their experiments.

  2. Radiologic and Clinical Bronchiectasis Associated with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moua, Teng; Zand, Ladan; Hartman, Robert P.; Hartman, Thomas E.; Qin, Dingxin; Peikert, Tobias; Qian, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Background Polycystin 1 and 2, the protein abnormalities associated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), are also found in airway cilia and smooth muscle cells. There is evidence of increased radiologic bronchiectasis associated with ADPKD, though the clinical and functional implications of this association are unknown. We hypothesized an increased prevalence of both radiologic and clinical bronchiectasis is associated with APDKD as compared to non-ADPKD chronic kidney disease (CKD) controls. Materials and Methods A retrospective case-control study was performed at our institution involving consecutive ADPKD and non-ADPKD chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients seen over a 13 year period with both chest CT and PFT. CTs were independently reviewed by two blinded thoracic radiologists. Manually collected clinical data included symptoms, smoker status, transplant history, and PFT findings. Results Ninety-two ADPKD and 95 non-ADPKD CKD control patients were compared. Increased prevalence of radiologic bronchiectasis, predominantly mild lower lobe disease, was found in ADPKD patients compared to CKD control (19 vs. 9%, P = 0.032, OR 2.49 (CI 1.1–5.8)). After adjustment for covariates, ADPKD was associated with increased risk of radiologic bronchiectasis (OR 2.78 (CI 1.16–7.12)). Symptomatic bronchiectasis occurred in approximately a third of ADPKD patients with radiologic disease. Smoking was associated with increased radiologic bronchiectasis in ADPKD patients (OR 3.59, CI 1.23–12.1). Conclusions Radiological bronchiectasis is increased in patients with ADPKD particularly those with smoking history as compared to non-ADPKD CKD controls. A third of such patients have symptomatic disease. Bronchiectasis should be considered in the differential in ADPKD patients with respiratory symptoms and smoking history. PMID:24747723

  3. Screening for Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: A Survey of 420 Nephrologists

    PubMed Central

    Flahault, Adrien; Trystram, Denis; Fouchard, Marie; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Nataf, François; Joly, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite a high prevalence of intracranial aneurysm (ICA) in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), rupture events are rare. The current recommendations for ICA screening are based on expert opinions and studies with low levels of evidence. Objectives The aim of our study was to describe the attitudes of practicing nephrologists in Europe towards screening for ICA using magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Methods We conducted a web-based survey among 1315 European French-speaking nephrologists and nephrology residents. An anonymous, electronic questionnaire including 24 independent questions related to ICA screening modalities, indications and participant profiles was sent by email between September and December 2014. Four hundred and twenty nephrologists (mostly from France) participated, including 31 nephrology residents; the response rate was 32%. Results Systematic screening for ICA was advocated by 28% of the nephrologists. A family history of ICA rupture, sudden death, stroke and migraine were consensual indications for screening (> 90% of the panel). In other clinical situations largely not covered by the recommendations (pregnancy, nephrectomy, kidney transplantation, cardiac or hepatic surgery, uncontrolled hypertension, lack of familial ADPKD history, at-risk activity, tobacco use), the attitudes towards screening were highly divergent. ICA screening was influenced by nephrologists experience with ADPKD and by their practice setting. The majority of participants (57%) would not repeat a normal ICA screening. Only a few participants (22%) knew that non-contrast MRA was the reference diagnostic tool for ICA screening, whereas most participants thought that contrast enhancement was necessary to screen for ICA. The results from the nephrology residents were analyzed separately and yielded similar results. Conclusion This practice survey revealed that most nephrologists follow the current recommendations for the initial screening of

  4. Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa: no evidence for nonallelic genetic heterogeneity on 3q.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar-Singh, R; Wang, H; Humphries, P; Farrar, G J

    1993-01-01

    Since the initial report of linkage of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) to the long arm of chromosome 3, several mutations in the gene encoding rhodopsin, which also maps to 3q, have been reported in adRP pedigrees. However, there has been some discussion as to the possibility of a second adRP locus on 3q. This suggestion has important diagnostic and research implications and must raise doubts about the usefulness of linked markers for reliable diagnosis of RP patients. In order to address this issue we have performed an admixture test (A-test) on 10 D3S47-linked adRP pedigrees and have found a likelihood ratio of heterogeneity versus homogeneity of 4.90. We performed a second A-test, combining the data from all families with known rhodopsin mutations. In this test we obtained a reduced likelihood ratio of heterogeneity versus homogeneity, of 1.0. On the basis of these statistical analyses we have found no significant support for two adRP loci on chromosome 3q. Furthermore, using 40 CEPH families, we have localized the rhodopsin gene to the D3S47-D3S20 interval, with a maximum lod score (Zm) of 20 and have found that the order qter-D3S47-rhodopsin-D3S20-cen is significantly more likely than any other order. In addition, we have mapped (Zm = 30) the microsatellite marker D3S621 relative to other loci in this region of the genome. PMID:8430695

  5. Segmentation of Individual Renal Cysts from MR Images in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Kyungsoo; Park, Bumwoo; Sun, Hongliang; Wang, Jinhong; Tao, Cheng; Chapman, Arlene B.; Torres, Vicente E.; Grantham, Jared J.; Mrug, Michal; Bennett, William M.; Flessner, Michael F.; Landsittel, Doug P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objective To evaluate the performance of a semi-automated method for the segmentation of individual renal cysts from magnetic resonance (MR) images in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Design, setting, participants, & measurements This semi-automated method was based on a morphologic watershed technique with shape-detection level set for segmentation of renal cysts from MR images. T2-weighted MR image sets of 40 kidneys were selected from 20 patients with mild to moderate renal cyst burden (kidney volume < 1500 ml) in the Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies of Polycystic Kidney Disease (CRISP). The performance of the semi-automated method was assessed in terms of two reference metrics in each kidney: the total number of cysts measured by manual counting and the total volume of cysts measured with a region-based thresholding method. The proposed and reference measurements were compared using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman analysis. Results Individual renal cysts were successfully segmented with the semi-automated method in all 20 cases. The total number of cysts in each kidney measured with the two methods correlated well (ICC, 0.99), with a very small relative bias (0.3% increase with the semi-automated method; limits of agreement, 15.2% reduction to 17.2% increase). The total volume of cysts measured using both methods also correlated well (ICC, 1.00), with a small relative bias of <10% (9.0% decrease in the semi-automated method; limits of agreement, 17.1% increase to 43.3% decrease). Conclusion This semi-automated method to segment individual renal cysts in ADPKD kidneys provides a quantitative indicator of severity in early and moderate stages of the disease. PMID:23520042

  6. A missense mutation in the Ca-sensing receptor gene causes familial autosomal dominant hypoparathyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Y.M.; Finegold, D.N.; Armitage, M.M.

    1994-09-01

    A large family was identified in which hypoparathyroidism was observed to segregate as an autosomal dominant trait in 3 generations. Linkage analysis using short tandem repeat polymorphisms linked the disease phenotype to chromosomal region 3q13. This region contains a newly identified Ca-sensing receptor (PCAR1) gene. This receptor regulates the secretion of parathyroid hormone from parathyroid cells in response to extracellular ionized Ca concentration ([Ca{sup +2}]). PCR-based single stranded conformational analysis of exonic sequences of the PCAR1 gene revealed an abnormal conformer in exon 3 in affected individuals. Direct sequencing of the amplification product from an affected and an unaffected family member showed an A {yields} G transition at nucleotide 770 of the PCAR1 gene [numbering based on the bovine sequence (Genbank accession number S67307)]. This substitution created a Msp1 restriction site which cosegregated with hypoparathyroidism in this family. This substitution was not observed in unaffected family members, unrelated spouses, or unrelated population controls. This substitution is predicted to result in the replacement of a glutamine residue at amino acid 246 by an arginine residue. The Ca-sensing receptor appears to be a member of the family of seven membrane spanning G-protein linked receptors. The extracellular location of this amino acid substitution appears to produce a gain of function mutation increasing the receptor sensitivity to [Ca{sup +2}] and decreasing the calcium {open_quotes}set point{close_quotes}. This is in contrast to the loss of function mutations observed in the PCAR1 gene in pedigrees with familial hypercalcemic hypocalciuria.

  7. Transforming growth factor-β inhibits cystogenesis in human autosomal dominant polycystic kidney epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Elberg, Dorit; Jayaraman, Siddarth; Turman, Martin A; Elberg, Gerard

    2012-08-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited cause of kidney failure and characterized by the formation of multiple fluid-filled cysts in the kidneys. It is believed that environmental factors may play an important role in the disease progression. However, the molecular identity of autocrine/paracrine factors influencing cyst formation is largely unknown. In this study, we identified transforming growth factor-β2 (TGF-β2) secreted by normal human kidney (NHK) and ADPKD cells as an inhibitor of cystogenesis in 3D culture system using ADPKD cells from human kidneys. TGF-β2 was identified in conditioned media (CM) of NHK and ADPKD cells as a latent factor activated by heat in vitro. While all TGF-β isoforms recombinant proteins (TGF-β1, -β2, or -β3) displayed a similar inhibitory effect on cyst formation, TGF-β2 was the predominant isoform detected in CM. The involvement of TGF-β2 in the suppression of cyst formation was demonstrated by using a TGF-β2 specific blocking antibody and a TGF-β receptor I kinase inhibitor. TGF-β2 inhibited cyst formation by a mechanism other than activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase that mediated cell death in ADPKD cells. Further, we found that TGF-β2 modulated expression of various genes involved in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and extracellular matrix proteins that may play a role in the regulation of cystogenesis. Collectively, our results suggest that TGF-β2 secreted by renal epithelial cells may be an inhibitor of cystogenesis influencing the progression of ADPKD.

  8. The role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Becchetti, Andrea; Aracri, Patrizia; Meneghini, Simone; Brusco, Simone; Amadeo, Alida

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) is a focal epilepsy with attacks typically arising in the frontal lobe during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. It is characterized by clusters of complex and stereotyped hypermotor seizures, frequently accompanied by sudden arousals. Cognitive and psychiatric symptoms may be also observed. Approximately 12% of the ADNFLE families carry mutations on genes coding for subunits of the heteromeric neuronal nicotinic receptors (nAChRs). This is consistent with the widespread expression of these receptors, particularly the α4β2* subtype, in the neocortex and thalamus. However, understanding how mutant nAChRs lead to partial frontal epilepsy is far from being straightforward because of the complexity of the cholinergic regulation in both developing and mature brains. The relation with the sleep-waking cycle must be also explained. We discuss some possible pathogenetic mechanisms in the light of recent advances about the nAChR role in prefrontal regions as well as the studies carried out in murine models of ADNFLE. Functional evidence points to alterations in prefrontal GABA release, and the synaptic unbalance probably arises during the cortical circuit maturation. Although most of the available functional evidence concerns mutations on nAChR subunit genes, other genes have been recently implicated in the disease, such as KCNT1 (coding for a Na+-dependent K+ channel), DEPD5 (Disheveled, Egl-10 and Pleckstrin Domain-containing protein 5), and CRH (Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone). Overall, the uncertainties about both the etiology and the pathogenesis of ADNFLE point to the current gaps in our knowledge the regulation of neuronal networks in the cerebral cortex. PMID:25717303

  9. A YAC contig encompassing the chromosome 7p locus for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Inglehearn, C.F.; Keen, T.J.; Ratel, R.

    1994-09-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited retinal degeneration characterized by night blindness and loss of peripheral vision, often leading to complete blindness. The autosomal dominant form (adRP) maps to at least six different loci, including the rhodopsin and peripherin/Rds genes and four loci identified only by linkage analysis on chromosomes 7p, 7q, 8cen and 19q. The 7p locus was reported by this laboratory in a large English family, with a lod score of 16.5. Several new genetic markers have been tested in the family and this locus has now been refined to an interval of approximately 1 cM between markers D7S795 and D7S484 in the 7p13-15 region. In order to clone the gene for adRP, we have used microsatellites and STSs from the region to identify over 80 YACs, from four different libraries, which map to this interval. End clones from key YACs were isolated for the generation of additional STSs. Eleven microsatellite markers between D7S435 (distal) and D7S484 (proximal) have been ordered by a combination of both physical and genetic mapping. In this way we have now obtained a YAC contig spanning approximately 3 megabases of chromosome 7p within which the adRP gene must lie. One gene (aquaporin) and one chromosome 7 brain EST have been placed on the contig but both map distal to the region of interest. Sixteen other ESTs and three further known 7p genes mapping in the region have been excluded. We are now attempting to build a cosmid contig in the defined interval and identify further expressed sequences from both YACs and cosmids to test as candidates for the adRP gene.

  10. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease with a perinephritic abscess.

    PubMed

    Vega, Jorge; Goecke, Helmuth; Manriquez, Francisco; Escobar, Carlos; Escobar, Max; Videla, Christian; Santamarina, Mario; Echeverria, Carlos; Guarda, Francisco Javier

    2011-02-01

    A 68-year-old female in hemodialysis due to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease underwent resection of cysts in her right kidney via a laparoscopic approach due to abdominal pain. Three weeks after surgery, she was admitted with sepsis. A CT scan showed a large abscess around the right kidney. Percutaneous drainage of abscess was performed. The pus smear showed Gram-positive cocci and the culture contained methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Ciprofloxacin, clindamycin and vancomycin were given. In the 3 weeks following admission, she remained febrile and septic and showed a progressive deterioration in her general condition, along with malnutrition and persistent drainage of purulent material from her right flank. The antibiotic therapy was changed to vancomycin, metronidazole and meropenem, but no improvement was observed. Because of the high risk associated with carrying out an open nephrectomy, we decided to use hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) as a potentially useful measure to control her infection. The patient underwent 26 daily sessions of 100% hyperbaric oxygen (2.5 atm). The use of HBOT induced a notable break in the clinical course of this patient's retroperitoneal infection. She was discharged after day 58 without any signs of inflammatory activity, and she has not presented reactivation of infection since then. We think that this case suggests that this therapy could be a new therapeutic tool in the management of patients with similar clinical features when all other therapeutic measures have failed. We did not find any other reports of the use of HBOT in infections of renal cysts.

  11. Chronic isolated macrothrombocytopenia with autosomal dominant transmission: a morphological and qualitative platelet disorder.

    PubMed

    Fabris, F; Cordiano, I; Salvan, F; Ramon, R; Valente, M; Luzzatto, G; Girolami, A

    1997-01-01

    We studied 47 subjects belonging to 13 unrelated families with a history of mild haemorrhagic diathesis and chronic thrombocytopenia. 36 patients presented some degree of thrombocytopenia: 7/36 (19%) had slight thrombocytopenia (100-150 x 10(9)/L); 26/36 (72%) had mild thrombocytopenia (50-100 x 10(9)/L) and 3/36 (8%) had severe thrombocytopenia (< 50 x 10(9)/L). No correlation was observed between platelet count and the degree of haemorrhagic diathesis, which was mild in the majority of patients. Transmission was autosomal dominant. Platelet anisocytosis, increased percentage of large platelets and absence of leukocyte inclusions were observed in 26/30 (87%) of the examined blood smears. The ultrastructural appearance of platelets was normal. Megakaryocytes appeared normal in number in 10/10 patients, but showed asynchronous nuclear-cytoplasm maturation and mainly nonlobulated nuclei. Platelet aggregation was studied in 26 patients and either increased or decreased curves were variably observed in response to different aggregating agents. Platelet-associated IgG (PAIgG) was increased in 18/31 (58%) patients, while serum autoantibodies against platelet glycoproteins Ib/IX or IIb/IIIa were demonstrable in only 1 case. An increased expression of platelet surface glycoproteins Ib and IIb/IIIa, as studied by murine monoclonal antibodies binding in 17 cases, was observed. Platelet survival performed by 111Inoxine-labelled autologous platelets was normal in the 3 studied patients. Congenital macrothrombocytopenia confirms to be a distinct clinical disorder for which the name of "chronic isolated hereditary macrothrombocytopenia" is proposed.

  12. [A Case of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) with Metastases from Bilateral Small Renal Cell Carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Nezu, Kunihisa; Sakai, Takanari; Kuromoto, Akito; Kanno, Hidenori; Sato, Masahiko; Numahata, Kenji; Hoshi, Senji

    2016-06-01

    The patient was a 47 year-old female who had autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) with bilateral small renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We performed bilateral partial nephrectomy and radiofrequency ablation to the residual tumor. Pathological diagnosis was clear cell carcinoma,Fuhrman grade 3. Sunitinib therapy was started nine months after the operation because multiple liver metastases occurred. Twenty-six months after the operation,she died from rapid progression of liver metastasis. PMID:27452494

  13. Tinea imbricata: autosomal dominant pattern of susceptibility in a polygamous indigenous family of the Nahuatl zone in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, A; Araiza, J; Koffman-Alfaro, Susana; Paredes-Solis, Vanessa; Cuevas-Covarrubias, S; Rivera, M R

    2004-08-01

    We report on 9 confirmed cases of tinea imbricata (Tokelau, infection due to Trichophyton concentricum) out of 16 family members. They had a common mother with three different fathers. The genetic analysis of the family suggests an autosomal dominant pattern of susceptibility. Most cases (8/9) were presented as concentric and lamellar forms. One patient also had onychomycosis due to T. concentricum. Only two out of nine cases had a positive response to trichophytin.

  14. Berberine slows cell growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bonon, Anna; Mangolini, Alessandra; Pinton, Paolo; Senno, Laura del; Aguiari, Gianluca

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •Berberine at appropriate doses slows cell proliferation in ADPKD cystic cells. •Reduction of cell growth by berberine occurs by inhibition of ERK and p70-S6 kinase. •Higher doses of berberine cause an overall cytotoxic effect. •Berberine overdose induces apoptotic bodies formation and DNA fragmentation. •Antiproliferative properties of this drug make it a new candidate for ADPKD therapy. -- Abstract: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary monogenic disorder characterized by development and enlargement of kidney cysts that lead to loss of renal function. It is caused by mutations in two genes (PKD1 and PKD2) encoding for polycystin-1 and polycystin-2 proteins which regulate different signals including cAMP, mTOR and EGFR pathways. Abnormal activation of these signals following PC1 or PC2 loss of function causes an increased cell proliferation which is a typical hallmark of this disease. Despite the promising findings obtained in animal models with targeted inhibitors able to reduce cystic cell growth, currently, no specific approved therapy for ADPKD is available. Therefore, the research of new more effective molecules could be crucial for the treatment of this severe pathology. In this regard, we have studied the effect of berberine, an isoquinoline quaternary alkaloid, on cell proliferation and apoptosis in human and mouse ADPKD cystic cell lines. Berberine treatment slows cell proliferation of ADPKD cystic cells in a dose-dependent manner and at high doses (100 μg/mL) it induces cell death in cystic cells as well as in normal kidney tubule cells. However, at 10 μg/mL, berberine reduces cell growth in ADPKD cystic cells only enhancing G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase of cell cycle and inhibiting ERK and p70-S6 kinases. Our results indicate that berberine shows a selected antiproliferative activity in cellular models for ADPKD, suggesting that this molecule and similar natural compounds could open new

  15. Simultaneous Native Nephrectomy and Kidney Transplantation in Patients With Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Veroux, Massimiliano; Zerbo, Domenico; Basile, Giusi; Gozzo, Cecilia; Sinagra, Nunziata; Giaquinta, Alessia; Sanfiorenzo, Angelo; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate the feasibility of simultaneous unilateral nephrectomy with kidney transplantation and to determine the effect of this procedure on perioperative morbidity and mortality and graft and patient survival. Methods Between January 2000 and May 2015, 145 patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) underwent kidney transplantation. Of those, 40 (27.5%) underwent concurrent ipsilateral native nephrectomy (group NT). Patients in group NT were compared with patients with ADPKD not undergoing concurrent nephrectomy (group NT-) and asymptomatic patients undergoing pretransplant nephrectomy (group PNT). Results The average follow-up was 66 months. The graft survival rate at 1 and 5 years was 95% and 87.5% versus 93% and 76.2% in the NT and NT- groups, respectively (P = .903 and P = .544, respectively); 1-year patient survival was 100% for NT and 97% for NT- patients (P = .288), whereas 5-year patient survival was 100% and 92% for NT and NT- groups, respectively (P = .128). After propensity score matching (34 patients per group) no significant differences were observed in 1-year (97.1% in NT and 94.1%; P = 1) and 5-year (88.2% in NT and 91.2% in NT-; P = 1) graft survival, and in 1-year (100% for both groups; P = 1) and 5-year (100% in NT and 94.1% in NT-; P = 1) patient survival. Perioperative mortality was 0% among NT and 1.2% among NT- patients, whereas perioperative surgical complications were similar in both groups. One- and 5-year graft and patient survival were similar between the NT and PNT groups, but patients in the PNT group had significantly lower levels of hemoglobin and residual diuresis volumes at the time of transplant. Moreover, PNT patients had a longer pretransplant dialysis and a longer time on the waiting list. Conclusions Simultaneous unilateral nephrectomy does not have a negative effect on patient and graft survival in patients with ADPKD and is associated with low morbidity. Pretransplant nephrectomy should

  16. Pancreatic Cysts in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: Prevalence and Association with PKD2 Gene Mutations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Ah; Blumenfeld, Jon D; Chhabra, Shalini; Dutruel, Silvina P; Thimmappa, Nanda Deepa; Bobb, Warren O; Donahue, Stephanie; Rennert, Hanna E; Tan, Adrian Y; Giambrone, Ashley E; Prince, Martin R

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To define the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging prevalence of pancreatic cysts in a cohort of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) compared with a control group without ADPKD that was matched for age, sex, and renal function. Materials and Methods In this HIPAA-compliant, institutional review board-approved study, all patients with ADPKD provided informed consent; for control subjects, informed consent was waived. Patients with ADPKD (n = 110) with mutations identified in PKD1 or PKD2 and control subjects without ADPKD or known pancreatic disease (n = 110) who were matched for age, sex, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and date of MR imaging examination were evaluated for pancreatic cysts by using axial and coronal single-shot fast spin-echo T2-weighted images obtained at 1.5 T. Total kidney volume and liver volume were measured. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted to evaluate potential associations between collected variables and presence of pancreatic cysts among patients with ADPKD. The number, size, location, and imaging characteristics of the cysts were recorded. Results Patients with ADPKD were significantly more likely than control subjects to have at least one pancreatic cyst (40 of 110 patients [36%] vs 25 of 110 control subjects [23%]; P = .027). In a univariate analysis, pancreatic cysts were more prevalent in patients with ADPKD with mutations in PKD2 than in PKD1 (21 of 34 patients [62%] vs 19 of 76 patients [25%]; P = .0002). In a multivariable logistic regression model, PKD2 mutation locus was significantly associated with the presence of pancreatic cysts (P = .0004) and with liver volume (P = .038). Patients with ADPKD and a pancreatic cyst were 5.9 times more likely to have a PKD2 mutation than a PKD1 mutation after adjusting for age, race, sex, estimated glomerular filtration rate, liver volume, and total kidney volume. Conclusion Pancreatic cysts were more prevalent in

  17. Hyperaldosteronism and cardiovascular risk in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lai, Silvia; Petramala, Luigi; Mastroluca, Daniela; Petraglia, Emanuela; Di Gaeta, Alessandro; Indino, Elena; Panebianco, Valeria; Ciccariello, Mauro; Shahabadi, Hossein H; Galani, Alessandro; Letizia, Claudio; D'Angelo, Anna Rita

    2016-07-01

    Hypertension is commonly associated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), often discovered before the onset of renal failure, albeit the pathogenetic mechanisms are not well elucidated. Hyperaldosteronism in ADPKD may contribute to the development of insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction, and progression of cardiorenal disease. The aim of study was to evaluate the prevalence of primary aldosteronism (PA) in ADPKD patients and identify some surrogate biomarkers of cardiovascular risk.We have enrolled 27 hypertensive ADPKD patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥ 60 mL/min, evaluating the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), inflammatory indexes, nutritional status, homocysteine (Hcy), homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), mineral metabolism, microalbuminuria, and surrogate markers of atherosclerosis [carotid intima media thickness (cIMT), ankle/brachial index (ABI), flow mediated dilation (FMD), renal resistive index (RRI) and left ventricular mass index (LVMI)]. Furthermore, we have carried out the morpho-functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with high-field 3 T Magnetom Avanto.We have divided patients into group A, with normal plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) and group B with PA, present in 9 (33%) of overall ADPKD patients. Respect to group A, group B showed a significant higher mean value of LVMI, HOMA-IR and Hcy (P = 0.001, P = 0.004, P = 0.018; respectively), and a lower value of FMD and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH-VitD) (P = 0.037, P = 0.019; respectively) with a higher prevalence of non-dipper pattern at Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring (ABPM) (65% vs 40%, P < 0.05) at an early stage of the disease.In this study, we showed a high prevalence of PA in ADPKD patients, associated to higher LVMI, HOMA-IR, Hcy, lower FMD, and 25-OH-VitD, considered as surrogate markers of atherosclerosis, compared to ADPKD patients with normal PAC values. Our

  18. Mutations of RagA GTPase in mTORC1 Pathway Are Associated with Autosomal Dominant Cataracts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Huan; Huang, Chukai; Zhang, Bining; Yin, Shengjie; Liang, Jiajian; Xu, Ciyan; Huang, Yuqiang; Cen, Ling-Ping; Ng, Tsz-Kin; Zheng, Ce; Zhang, Shaobin; Chen, Haoyu; Pang, Chi-Pui; Zhang, Mingzhi

    2016-06-01

    Cataracts are a significant public health problem with no proven methods for prevention. Discovery of novel disease mechanisms to delineate new therapeutic targets is of importance in cataract prevention and therapy. Herein, we report that mutations in the RagA GTPase (RRAGA), a key regulator of the mechanistic rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), are associated with autosomal dominant cataracts. We performed whole exome sequencing in a family with autosomal dominant juvenile-onset cataracts, and identified a novel p.Leu60Arg mutation in RRAGA that co-segregated with the disease, after filtering against the dbSNP database, and at least 123,000 control chromosomes from public and in-house exome databases. In a follow-up direct screening of RRAGA in another 22 families and 142 unrelated patients with congenital or juvenile-onset cataracts, RRAGA was found to be mutated in two unrelated patients (p.Leu60Arg and c.-16G>A respectively). Functional studies in human lens epithelial cells revealed that the RRAGA mutations exerted deleterious effects on mTORC1 signaling, including increased relocation of RRAGA to the lysosomes, up-regulated mTORC1 phosphorylation, down-regulated autophagy, altered cell growth or compromised promoter activity. These data indicate that the RRAGA mutations, associated with autosomal dominant cataracts, play a role in the disease by acting through disruption of mTORC1 signaling. PMID:27294265

  19. Mutations of RagA GTPase in mTORC1 Pathway Are Associated with Autosomal Dominant Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian-Huan; Huang, Chukai; Yin, Shengjie; Liang, Jiajian; Xu, Ciyan; Huang, Yuqiang; Cen, Ling-Ping; Zheng, Ce; Zhang, Shaobin; Pang, Chi-Pui; Zhang, Mingzhi

    2016-01-01

    Cataracts are a significant public health problem with no proven methods for prevention. Discovery of novel disease mechanisms to delineate new therapeutic targets is of importance in cataract prevention and therapy. Herein, we report that mutations in the RagA GTPase (RRAGA), a key regulator of the mechanistic rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), are associated with autosomal dominant cataracts. We performed whole exome sequencing in a family with autosomal dominant juvenile-onset cataracts, and identified a novel p.Leu60Arg mutation in RRAGA that co-segregated with the disease, after filtering against the dbSNP database, and at least 123,000 control chromosomes from public and in-house exome databases. In a follow-up direct screening of RRAGA in another 22 families and 142 unrelated patients with congenital or juvenile-onset cataracts, RRAGA was found to be mutated in two unrelated patients (p.Leu60Arg and c.-16G>A respectively). Functional studies in human lens epithelial cells revealed that the RRAGA mutations exerted deleterious effects on mTORC1 signaling, including increased relocation of RRAGA to the lysosomes, up-regulated mTORC1 phosphorylation, down-regulated autophagy, altered cell growth or compromised promoter activity. These data indicate that the RRAGA mutations, associated with autosomal dominant cataracts, play a role in the disease by acting through disruption of mTORC1 signaling. PMID:27294265

  20. A novel frameshift mutation of POU4F3 gene associated with autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hee Keun; Park, Hong-Joon; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Park, Rekil; Kim, Un-Kyung

    2010-06-04

    Autosomal dominant mutations in the transcription factor POU4F3 gene are associated with non-syndromic hearing loss in humans; however, there have been few reports of mutations in this gene worldwide. We performed a mutation analysis of the POU4F3 gene in 42 unrelated Koreans with autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss, identifying a novel 14-bp deletion mutation in exon 2 (c.662del14) in one patient. Audiometric examination revealed severe bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in this patient. The novel mutation led to a truncated protein that lacked both functional POU domains. We further investigated the functional distinction between wild-type and mutant POU4F3 proteins using in vitro assays. The wild-type protein was completely localized in the nucleus, while the truncation of protein seriously affected its nuclear localization. In addition, the mutant failed to activate reporter gene expression. This is the first report of a POU4F3 mutation in Asia, and moreover our data suggest that further investigation will need to delineate ethnicity-specific genetic background for autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss within Asian populations.

  1. Acute abdomen and hemorrhagic shock caused by spontaneous rupture of renal cyst in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Yaman, İsmail; Sağlam, İsmet; Kurt, Kamile

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is an important cause of end stage renal failure. Rarely, these patients may present with hemorrhagic shock caused by rupture of the renal cyst. The aim of this study was to report a rare case of a patient who arrived at the emergency department with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease presenting with acute abdominal pain and hemorrhagic shock. A 58-year-old male with chronic renal failure was admitted to the emergency department with acute abdominal pain and hemorrhagic shock. The patient was admitted to the Department of Surgery with diagnosis of acute abdomen and perirenal hematoma. Although the patient was on conservative treatment, his symptoms did not improve and the patient was operated emergently. During exploration, there was bleeding from the right polycystic kidney, which was 30×20 cm in dimension. The patient underwent nephrectomy and drainage of the hematoma, and was discharged on the fifth postoperative day without any problems. Bleeding due to rupture of a cyst in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease occurs rarely but it may be life threatening. Although conservative methods are often preferable in treatment, surgery can be life saving for patients in whom the clinical situation does not improve.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: hypomagnesemia with secondary hypocalcemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... link) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Epilepsy Information Page Educational Resources (11 links) Boston Children's ... Control and Prevention: Intellectual Disability Cincinnati Children's Hospital: Epilepsy and Seizures Disease InfoSearch: Hypomagnesemia 1, intestinal Johns ...

  3. Hypomagnesemia in Critically Ill Sepsis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vassilios; Pierrakos, Charalampos; Aretha, Diamanto; Karanikolas, Menelaos

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg), also known as “the forgotten electrolyte”, is the fourth most abundant cation overall and the second most abundant intracellular cation in the body. Mg deficiency has been implicated in the pathophysiology of many diseases. This article is a review of the literature regarding Mg abnormalities with emphasis on the implications of hypomagnesemia in critical illness and on treatment options for hypomagnesemia in critically ill patients with sepsis. Hypomagnesemia is common in critically ill patients, and there is strong, consistent clinical evidence, largely from observational studies, showing that hypomagnesemia is significantly associated with increased need for mechanical ventilation, prolonged ICU stay and increased mortality. Although the mechanism linking hypomagnesemia with poor clinical outcomes is not known, experimental data suggest mechanisms contributing to such outcomes. However, at the present time, there is no clear evidence that magnesium supplementation improves outcomes in critically ill patients with hypomagnesemia. Large, well-designed clinical trials are needed to evaluate the role of magnesium therapy for improving outcomes in critically ill patients with sepsis. PMID:26566403

  4. Weill-Marchesani syndrome - possible linkage of the autosomal dominant form to 15q21.1

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtz, M.K.; Samples, J.R.; Rust, K.

    1996-10-02

    Weill-Marchesani syndrome comprises short stature, brachydactyly, microspherophakia, glaucoma, and ectopia lentis is regarded as an autosomal recessive trait. We present two families each with affected individuals in 3 generations demonstrating autosomal dominant inheritance of Weill-Marchesani syndrome. Linkage analysis in these 2 families suggests a gene for Weill-Marchesani syndrome maps to 15q21.1. The dislocated lenses and connective tissue disorder in these families suggests that fibrillin-1 and microfibril-associated protein 1, which both map to 15q21.1, are candidate genes for Weill-Marchesani syndrome. Immunohistochemistry staining of skin sections from family 1 showed an apparent decrease in fibrillin staining compared to control individuals. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Immunological loss-of-function due to genetic gain-of-function in humans: autosomal dominance of the third kind

    PubMed Central

    Quartier, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    All the human primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) recognized as such in the 1950s were Mendelian traits and, whether autosomal or X-linked, displayed recessive inheritance. The first autosomal dominant (AD) PID, hereditary angioedema, was recognized in 1963. However, since the first identification of autosomal recessive (AR), X-linked recessive (XR) and AD PID-causing genes in 1985 (ADA; severe combined immunodeficiency), 1986 (CYBB, chronic granulomatous disease) and 1989 (SERPING1; hereditary angioedema), respectively, the number of genetically defined AD PIDs has increased more rapidly than that of any other type of PID. AD PIDs now account for 61 of the 260 known conditions (23%). All known AR PIDs are caused by alleles with some loss-of-function (LOF). A single XR PID is caused by gain-of-function (GOF) mutations (WASP-related neutropenia, 2001). In contrast, only 44 of 61 AD defects are caused by LOF alleles, which exert dominance by haploinsufficiency or negative dominance. Since 2003, up to 17 AD disorders of the third kind, due to GOF alleles, have been described. Remarkably, six of the 17 genes concerned also harbor monoallelic (STAT3), biallelic (C3, CFB, CARD11, PIK3R1) or both monoallelic and biallelic (STAT1) LOF alleles in patients with other clinical phenotypes. Most heterozygous GOF alleles result in auto-inflammation, auto-immunity, or both, with a wide range of immunological and clinical forms. Some also underlie infections and, fewer, allergies, by impairing or enhancing immunity to non-self. Malignancies are also rare. The enormous diversity of immunological and clinical phenotypes is thought provoking and mirrors the diversity and pleiotropy of the underlying genotypes. These experiments of nature provide a unique insight into the quantitative regulation of human immunity. PMID:25645939

  6. Immunological loss-of-function due to genetic gain-of-function in humans: autosomal dominance of the third kind.

    PubMed

    Boisson, Bertrand; Quartier, Pierre; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-02-01

    All the human primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) recognized as such in the 1950s were Mendelian traits and, whether autosomal or X-linked, displayed recessive inheritance. The first autosomal dominant (AD) PID, hereditary angioedema, was recognized in 1963. However, since the first identification of autosomal recessive (AR), X-linked recessive (XR) and AD PID-causing genes in 1985 (ADA; severe combined immunodeficiency), 1986 (CYBB, chronic granulomatous disease) and 1989 (SERPING1; hereditary angioedema), respectively, the number of genetically defined AD PIDs has increased more rapidly than that of any other type of PID. AD PIDs now account for 61 of the 260 known conditions (23%). All known AR PIDs are caused by alleles with some loss-of-function (LOF). A single XR PID is caused by gain-of-function (GOF) mutations (WASP-related neutropenia, 2001). In contrast, only 44 of 61 AD defects are caused by LOF alleles, which exert dominance by haploinsufficiency or negative dominance. Since 2003, up to 17 AD disorders of the third kind, due to GOF alleles, have been described. Remarkably, six of the 17 genes concerned also harbor monoallelic (STAT3), biallelic (C3, CFB, CARD11, PIK3R1) or both monoallelic and biallelic (STAT1) LOF alleles in patients with other clinical phenotypes. Most heterozygous GOF alleles result in auto-inflammation, auto-immunity, or both, with a wide range of immunological and clinical forms. Some also underlie infections and, fewer, allergies, by impairing or enhancing immunity to non-self. Malignancies are also rare. The enormous diversity of immunological and clinical phenotypes is thought provoking and mirrors the diversity and pleiotropy of the underlying genotypes. These experiments of nature provide a unique insight into the quantitative regulation of human immunity. PMID:25645939

  7. Acute cyst rupture, hemorrhage and septic shock after a shockwave lithotripsy in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeong Gon; Bae, Sang Rak; Lho, Yong Soo; Park, Hyoung Keun; Paick, Sung Hyun

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of urinary calculi in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) ranges from 10 to 36 %. Shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) for urinary calculi in ADPKD was reported to be a safe and effective treatment option. However, there is a potential risk of cyst rupture and traumatic hemorrhage because of shockwaves. A 39-year-old female with polycystic kidneys and upper ureter stone was treated with SWL and developed life-threatening complications of cyst rupture, traumatic hemorrhage and septic shock. She was initially treated with supportive care in the intensive care unit, but in the end nephrectomy was performed.

  8. Experimental transmission of an autosomal dominant spongiform encephalopathy: does the infectious agent originate in the human genome?

    PubMed Central

    Baker, H F; Ridley, R M; Crow, T J

    1985-01-01

    Marmosets inoculated intracerebrally with brain tissue from a woman with Gerstmann-Straussler syndrome (an autosomal dominant dementia associated with spongiform change and amyloid deposition) developed an encephalopathy indistinguishable from that seen in marmosets inoculated with brain tissue from a typical case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. As in Huntington's disease, in the pedigree of the patient with Gerstmann-Straussler syndrome women who subsequently developed the illness had increased fecundity. The pathogen in human transmissible dementia may arise from a sequence (which itself sometimes confers a selective advantage) located within the human genome. PMID:3926166

  9. Whole Exome Sequencing Identified MCM2 as a Novel Causative Gene for Autosomal Dominant Nonsyndromic Deafness in a Chinese Family.

    PubMed

    Gao, Juanjuan; Wang, Qi; Dong, Cheng; Chen, Siqi; Qi, Yu; Liu, Yuhe

    2015-01-01

    We report the genetic analysis of autosomal dominant, nonsyndromic, progressive sensorineural hearing loss in a Chinese family. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified a missense variant (c.130C>T, p.R44C) in the MCM2 gene, which has a pro-apoptosis effect and is involved in the initiation of eukaryotic genome replication. This missense variant is very likely to be the disease causing variant. It segregated with hearing loss in this pedigree, and was not found in the dbSNP database or databases of genomes and SNP in the Chinese population, in 76 patients with sporadic hearing loss, or in 145 normal individuals. We performed western blot and immunofluorescence to test the MCM2 protein expression in the cochlea of rats and guinea pigs, demonstrating that MCM2 was widely expressed in the cochlea and was also surprisingly expressed in the cytoplasm of terminally differentiated hair cells. We then transiently expressed the variant MCM2 cDNA in HEK293 cells, and found that these cells displayed a slight increase in apoptosis without any changes in proliferation or cell cycle, supporting the view that this variant is pathogenic. In summary, we have identified MCM2 as a novel gene responsible for nonsyndromic hearing loss of autosomal dominant inheritance in a Chinese family. PMID:26196677

  10. An unusual case of cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy with occipital lobe involvement.

    PubMed

    Trikamji, Bhavesh; Thomas, Mariam; Hathout, Gasser; Mishra, Shrikant

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is an autosomal dominant angiopathy caused by a mutation in the notch 3 gene on chromosome 19. Clinically, patients may be asymptomatic or can present with recurrent ischemic episodes and strokes leading to dementia, depression, pseudobulbar palsy, and hemi- or quadraplegia. Additional manifestations that have been described include migraine (mostly with aura), psychiatric disturbances, and epileptic seizures. Neuroimaging is essential to the diagnosis of CADASIL. On imaging CADASIL is characterized by symmetric involvement by confluent lesions located subcortically in the frontal and temporal lobes as well as in the insula, periventricularly, in the centrum semiovale, in the internal and external capsule, basal ganglia, and brain stem; with relative sparing of the fronto-orbital and the occipital subcortical regions. We describe a 49 year old male with CADASIL with absence of temporal lobe findings on MRI but predominant lesions within the periventricular white matter, occipital lobes with extension into the subcortical frontal lobes, corpus callosum and cerebellar white matter. Although CADASIL characteristically presents with anterior temporal lobe involvement, these findings may be absent and our case addresses the atypical imaging findings in CADASIL. PMID:27293347

  11. DGAT2 Mutation in a Family with Autosomal-Dominant Early-Onset Axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease.

    PubMed

    Hong, Young Bin; Kang, Junghee; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jinho; Kwak, Geon; Hyun, Young Se; Nam, Soo Hyun; Hong, Hyun Dae; Choi, Yu-Ri; Jung, Sung-Chul; Koo, Heasoo; Lee, Ji Eun; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2016-05-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy and is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorder. We examined a Korean family in which two individuals had an autosomal-dominant axonal CMT with early-onset, sensory ataxia, tremor, and slow disease progression. Pedigree analysis and exome sequencing identified a de novo missense mutation (p.Y223H) in the diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 2 (DGAT2) gene. DGAT2 encodes an endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial-associated membrane protein, acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase, which catalyzes the final step of the triglyceride (TG) biosynthesis pathway. The patient showed consistently decreased serum TG levels, and overexpression of the mutant DGAT2 significantly inhibited the proliferation of mouse motor neuron cells. Moreover, the variant form of human DGAT2 inhibited the axonal branching in the peripheral nervous system of zebrafish. We suggest that mutation of DGAT2 is the novel underlying cause of an autosomal-dominant axonal CMT2 neuropathy. This study will help provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology of axonal CMT and contribute to the molecular diagnostics of peripheral neuropathies.

  12. Whole Exome Sequencing Identified MCM2 as a Novel Causative Gene for Autosomal Dominant Nonsyndromic Deafness in a Chinese Family

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Cheng; Chen, Siqi; Qi, Yu; Liu, Yuhe

    2015-01-01

    We report the genetic analysis of autosomal dominant, nonsyndromic, progressive sensorineural hearing loss in a Chinese family. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified a missense variant (c.130C>T, p.R44C) in the MCM2 gene, which has a pro-apoptosis effect and is involved in the initiation of eukaryotic genome replication. This missense variant is very likely to be the disease causing variant. It segregated with hearing loss in this pedigree, and was not found in the dbSNP database or databases of genomes and SNP in the Chinese population, in 76 patients with sporadic hearing loss, or in 145 normal individuals. We performed western blot and immunofluorescence to test the MCM2 protein expression in the cochlea of rats and guinea pigs, demonstrating that MCM2 was widely expressed in the cochlea and was also surprisingly expressed in the cytoplasm of terminally differentiated hair cells. We then transiently expressed the variant MCM2 cDNA in HEK293 cells, and found that these cells displayed a slight increase in apoptosis without any changes in proliferation or cell cycle, supporting the view that this variant is pathogenic. In summary, we have identified MCM2 as a novel gene responsible for nonsyndromic hearing loss of autosomal dominant inheritance in a Chinese family. PMID:26196677

  13. Genetic linkage of autosomal dominant primary open angle glaucoma to chromosome 3q in a Greek pedigree.

    PubMed

    Kitsos, G; Eiberg, H; Economou-Petersen, E; Wirtz, M K; Kramer, P L; Aspiotis, M; Tommerup, N; Petersen, M B; Psilas, K

    2001-06-01

    A locus for juvenile onset open angle glaucoma (OAG) has been assigned to chromosome 1q in families with autosomal dominant inheritance (GLC1A), due to mutations in the TIGR/MYOC gene. For adult onset OAG, called primary open angle glaucoma or POAG, five loci have so far been mapped to different chromosomes (GLC1B-GLC1F). Except for the GLC1B locus, the other POAG loci have so far been reported only in single large pedigrees. We studied a large family identified in Epirus, Greece, segregating POAG in an autosomal dominant fashion. Clinical findings included increased cup to disc ratio (mean 0.7), characteristic glaucomatous changes in the visual field, and intraocular pressure before treatment more than 21 mmHg (mean 31 mmHg), with age at diagnosis 33 years and older. Linkage analysis was performed between the disease phenotype and microsatellite DNA polymorphisms. Linkage was established with a group of DNA markers located on chromosome 3q, where the GLC1C locus has previously been described in one large Oregon pedigree. A maximal multipoint lod score of 3.88 was obtained at marker D3S1763 (penetrance 80%). This represents the second POAG family linked to the GLC1C locus on chromosome 3q, and haplotype analysis in the two families suggests an independent origin of the genetic defect.

  14. An unusual case of cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy with occipital lobe involvement.

    PubMed

    Trikamji, Bhavesh; Thomas, Mariam; Hathout, Gasser; Mishra, Shrikant

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is an autosomal dominant angiopathy caused by a mutation in the notch 3 gene on chromosome 19. Clinically, patients may be asymptomatic or can present with recurrent ischemic episodes and strokes leading to dementia, depression, pseudobulbar palsy, and hemi- or quadraplegia. Additional manifestations that have been described include migraine (mostly with aura), psychiatric disturbances, and epileptic seizures. Neuroimaging is essential to the diagnosis of CADASIL. On imaging CADASIL is characterized by symmetric involvement by confluent lesions located subcortically in the frontal and temporal lobes as well as in the insula, periventricularly, in the centrum semiovale, in the internal and external capsule, basal ganglia, and brain stem; with relative sparing of the fronto-orbital and the occipital subcortical regions. We describe a 49 year old male with CADASIL with absence of temporal lobe findings on MRI but predominant lesions within the periventricular white matter, occipital lobes with extension into the subcortical frontal lobes, corpus callosum and cerebellar white matter. Although CADASIL characteristically presents with anterior temporal lobe involvement, these findings may be absent and our case addresses the atypical imaging findings in CADASIL.

  15. Genetic forms of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI): Vasopressin receptor defect (X-linked) and aquaporin defect (autosomal recessive and dominant).

    PubMed

    Bichet, Daniel G; Bockenhauer, Detlef

    2016-03-01

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), which can be inherited or acquired, is characterized by an inability to concentrate urine despite normal or elevated plasma concentrations of the antidiuretic hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP). Polyuria with hyposthenuria and polydipsia are the cardinal clinical manifestations of the disease. About 90% of patients with congenital NDI are males with X-linked NDI who have mutations in the vasopressin V2 receptor (AVPR2) gene encoding the vasopressin V2 receptor. In less than 10% of the families studied, congenital NDI has an autosomal recessive or autosomal dominant mode of inheritance with mutations in the aquaporin-2 (AQP2) gene. When studied in vitro, most AVPR2 and AQP2 mutations lead to proteins trapped in the endoplasmic reticulum and are unable to reach the plasma membrane. Prior knowledge of AVPR2 or AQP2 mutations in NDI families and perinatal mutation testing is of direct clinical value and can avert the physical and mental retardation associated with repeated episodes of dehydration.

  16. Genetic forms of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI): Vasopressin receptor defect (X-linked) and aquaporin defect (autosomal recessive and dominant).

    PubMed

    Bichet, Daniel G; Bockenhauer, Detlef

    2016-03-01

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), which can be inherited or acquired, is characterized by an inability to concentrate urine despite normal or elevated plasma concentrations of the antidiuretic hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP). Polyuria with hyposthenuria and polydipsia are the cardinal clinical manifestations of the disease. About 90% of patients with congenital NDI are males with X-linked NDI who have mutations in the vasopressin V2 receptor (AVPR2) gene encoding the vasopressin V2 receptor. In less than 10% of the families studied, congenital NDI has an autosomal recessive or autosomal dominant mode of inheritance with mutations in the aquaporin-2 (AQP2) gene. When studied in vitro, most AVPR2 and AQP2 mutations lead to proteins trapped in the endoplasmic reticulum and are unable to reach the plasma membrane. Prior knowledge of AVPR2 or AQP2 mutations in NDI families and perinatal mutation testing is of direct clinical value and can avert the physical and mental retardation associated with repeated episodes of dehydration. PMID:27156763

  17. Genetic linkage analysis of 14 candidate gene loci in a family with autosomal dominant osteoarthritis without dysplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Meulenbelt, I; Bijkerk, C; Breedveld, F C; Slagboom, P E

    1997-01-01

    The role of various gene loci was investigated in a family in which familial osteoarthritis (FOA), with onset at an early age, is transmitted as an autosomal dominant mendelian trait. The absence of clinical and radiographic signs of dysplasia and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPDD) indicates that the basic disease process in this family is osteoarthritis (OA). Genetic linkage analysis of 14 candidate genes resulted in the exclusion of 10 important genes (COL2A1, COL9A1, COL9A2, COL11A1, COL11A2, COMP, the CPDD region, CRTL-1, CRTM, and MMP3). Other relevant genes were not informative in this family. The candidate loci previously identified in FOA and heritable skeletal disorders associated with OA are clearly not involved in the development of the primary FOA phenotype in the family investigated, indicating genetic heterogeneity. Images PMID:9429149

  18. Genetic linkage of autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma to 1q21-q31 in three affected pedigrees

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggs, J.L.; Paglinauan, C.; Fine, A.; Sporn, C.; Lou, D. ); Haines, J.L. )

    1994-05-15

    Glaucoma is a common disorder that results in irreversible damage to the optic nerve, causing absolute blindness. In most cases, the optic nerve is damaged by an elevation of the intraocular pressure that is the result of an abnormality in the normal drainage function of the trabecular meshwork. A family history of glaucoma is an important risk factor for the disease, suggesting that genetic defects predisposing to this condition are likely. Three pedigrees segregating an autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma demonstrated significant linkage to a group of closely spaced markers on chromosome 1. These results confirm the initial mapping of this disease and suggest that this region on chromosome 1 contains an important locus for juvenile glaucoma. The authors describe recombination events that improve the localization of the responsible gene, reducing the size of the candidate region from 30 to 12 cM. 27 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Mapping of a gene for autosomal dominant juvenile-onset open-angle glaucoma to chromosome 1 q

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, J.E.; Lichter, P.R.; Torrez, D.; Wong, D.; Johnson, A.T.; Boehnke, M.; Uro, J.L.A. )

    1994-01-01

    A large Caucasian family is presented, in which a juvenile-onset form of open-angle glaucoma is transmitted in an autosomal dominant fashion. Sixteen affected family members were identified from 31 at-risk individuals descended from the affected founder. Affected patients developed high intraocular pressures (sometimes >40 mm Hg) within the first 2 decades of life. Linkage analysis between the disease phenotype and 12 microsatellite repeat markers located on chromosome 1 q gave a maximum lod score of 8.38 at a recombination fraction of zero for marker D1S210. Analysis of recombinant haplotypes suggests a total inclusion region of about 14 cM between markers D1S194 and D1S218 at 1q21-q31. This represents the second juvenile-glaucoma family, in which the disease has been mapped to the long arm of chromosome 1. 57 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Linkage analysis excludes the glaucoma locus on 1q from involvement in autosomal dominant glaucoma with iris hypoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Heon, E.; Sheth, B.P.; Kalenak, J.W.

    1994-09-01

    Genetic factors have been implicated in a variety of types of glaucoma including primary open-angle glaucoma, infantile glaucoma, pigmentary glaucoma, and juvenile open-angle glaucoma. We previously mapped the disease-causing gene for one type of juvenile open angle glaucoma to chromosome 1q21-31. Weatherill and Hart (1969) and Pearce (1983) each noted the association of iris hypoplasia and early-onset autosomal dominant glaucoma. We recently had the opportunity to study a large family (12 affected members) with this phenotype. Affected individuals developed glaucoma at an average age of 30 years. These patients also have a strikingly underdeveloped iris stroma which causes a peculiar eye color. Linkage analysis was able to completely exclude the 1q glaucoma locus from involvement in the disorder that affects this family. A complete clinical description of the family and linkage results at additional candidate loci will be presented.

  1. Co-existing autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and nephrotic syndrome in a Nigerian patient with lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Akinbodewa, A A; Adejumo, O A; Ogunsemoyin, A O; Osasan, S A; Adefolalu, O A

    2016-01-01

    A little over 30 cases on co-existing nephrotic syndrome and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) have been reported from different regions of the world since 1957. We present a case report on co-existence of nephrotic syndrome (secondary to lupus nephritis) with ADPKD in a 24-year-old woman from Nigeria. She was positive for anti-double stranded DNA. Renal histology showed International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society Class II lupus nephritis. The co-existence of nephrotic syndrome and ADPKD may have been overlooked in Africa in the past. There is a need to screen for nephrotic syndrome in patients with ADPKD among clinicians in the African setting. PMID:27044732

  2. Pleuritic chest pain from portal hypertensive gastropathy in ESRD patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease misdiagnosed as pericarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Onuigbo, Macaulay Amechi Chukwukadibia; Agbasi, Nneoma; Achebe, Jennifer; Odenigbo, Charles; Oguejiofor, Fidelis

    2016-01-01

    Portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG) is a gastric mucosal lesion complicating portal hypertension, with higher prevalence in decompensated cirrhosis. PHG can sometimes complicate autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) due to the presence of multiple liver cysts. Besides, PHG is known to present as chest pain, with or without hematemesis. Other causes of chest pain in ADPKD include referred chest pain from progressively enlarging kidney cysts, and rare pericardial cysts. Chest pain, especially if pleuritic, in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, is often ascribed to uremic pericarditis. We present recurrent pleuritic chest pain in a 24-year old ESRD patient with ADPKD that was initially misdiagnosed as uremic pericarditis. It was ultimately shown to represent symptomatic PHG with excellent therapeutic response to proton pump inhibitors. PMID:27069969

  3. Rare Variants in MME, Encoding Metalloprotease Neprilysin, Are Linked to Late-Onset Autosomal-Dominant Axonal Polyneuropathies.

    PubMed

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Toegel, Stefan; Schabhüttl, Maria; Weinmann, Daniela; Chiari, Catharina; Bennett, David L H; Beetz, Christian; Klein, Dennis; Andersen, Peter M; Böhme, Ilka; Fink-Puches, Regina; Gonzalez, Michael; Harms, Matthew B; Motley, William; Reilly, Mary M; Renner, Wilfried; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Schlotter-Weigel, Beate; Themistocleous, Andreas C; Weishaupt, Jochen H; Ludolph, Albert C; Wieland, Thomas; Tao, Feifei; Abreu, Lisa; Windhager, Reinhard; Zitzelsberger, Manuela; Strom, Tim M; Walther, Thomas; Scherer, Steven S; Züchner, Stephan; Martini, Rudolf; Senderek, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Axonal polyneuropathies are a frequent cause of progressive disability in the elderly. Common etiologies comprise diabetes mellitus, paraproteinaemia, and inflammatory disorders, but often the underlying causes remain elusive. Late-onset axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMT2) is an autosomal-dominantly inherited condition that manifests in the second half of life and is genetically largely unexplained. We assumed age-dependent penetrance of mutations in a so far unknown gene causing late-onset CMT2. We screened 51 index case subjects with late-onset CMT2 for mutations by whole-exome (WES) and Sanger sequencing and subsequently queried WES repositories for further case subjects carrying mutations in the identified candidate gene. We studied nerve pathology and tissue levels and function of the abnormal protein in order to explore consequences of the mutations. Altogether, we observed heterozygous rare loss-of-function and missense mutations in MME encoding the metalloprotease neprilysin in 19 index case subjects diagnosed with axonal polyneuropathies or neurodegenerative conditions involving the peripheral nervous system. MME mutations segregated in an autosomal-dominant fashion with age-related incomplete penetrance and some affected individuals were isolated case subjects. We also found that MME mutations resulted in strongly decreased tissue availability of neprilysin and impaired enzymatic activity. Although neprilysin is known to degrade β-amyloid, we observed no increased amyloid deposition or increased incidence of dementia in individuals with MME mutations. Detection of MME mutations is expected to increase the diagnostic yield in late-onset polyneuropathies, and it will be tempting to explore whether substances that can elevate neprilysin activity could be a rational option for treatment. PMID:27588448

  4. [Different forms of clinical presentation of an autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets caused by a FGF23 mutation in one family].

    PubMed

    Negri, Armando Luis; Negrotti, Teresa; Alonso, Guillermo; Pasqualini, Titania

    2004-01-01

    In this report we describe different forms of clinical presentation of an autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (ADHR) in 4 members of the same family as well as the treatment used in these patients and their response to it. Patient No 1: a 60 year old female who consulted for bone pain: Bone densitometry showed osteoporosis. Laboratory assays showed hypophosphatemia with low renal phosphate threshold, high total alkaline phosphatase, normal intact PTH and normal serum calcium. With neutral phosphate and calcitriol, the biochemical parameters normalized and bone densitometry improved significantly in less than a year. Patient No 2 her grand daughter consulted at 1 year and 8 months of age for growth retardation (height at percentile 3) and genu varum. Laboratory assays showed low serum phosphate and high total alkaline phosphatase; thickening and irregular epiphyseal borders of the wrists were observed radiologically. She began treatment with calcitriol and phosphorus with normalization of laboratory parameters and increase in growth (height increasing to percentile 50 after 20 months of therapy). Patient No 3: mother of patient No 2, she had no clinical manifestations and normal densitometry but presented low serum phosphate (1.9 mg/dl) that normalized with neutral phosphate therapy. Patient No 4: he was the youngest son of Patient No 1, who had had hypophosphatemic rickets, by age 5; his serum phosphate normalized without treatment At age 29, he presented normal serum phosphate and bone densitometry. Genomic DNA analysis performed in patient No 3, showed missense mutation with substitution of arginine at position 179 for glutamine. The family was catalogued as having autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets/osteomalacia.

  5. Mutations in GANAB, Encoding the Glucosidase IIα Subunit, Cause Autosomal-Dominant Polycystic Kidney and Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Porath, Binu; Gainullin, Vladimir G; Cornec-Le Gall, Emilie; Dillinger, Elizabeth K; Heyer, Christina M; Hopp, Katharina; Edwards, Marie E; Madsen, Charles D; Mauritz, Sarah R; Banks, Carly J; Baheti, Saurabh; Reddy, Bharathi; Herrero, José Ignacio; Bañales, Jesús M; Hogan, Marie C; Tasic, Velibor; Watnick, Terry J; Chapman, Arlene B; Vigneau, Cécile; Lavainne, Frédéric; Audrézet, Marie-Pierre; Ferec, Claude; Le Meur, Yannick; Torres, Vicente E; Harris, Peter C

    2016-06-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common, progressive, adult-onset disease that is an important cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), which requires transplantation or dialysis. Mutations in PKD1 or PKD2 (∼85% and ∼15% of resolved cases, respectively) are the known causes of ADPKD. Extrarenal manifestations include an increased level of intracranial aneurysms and polycystic liver disease (PLD), which can be severe and associated with significant morbidity. Autosomal-dominant PLD (ADPLD) with no or very few renal cysts is a separate disorder caused by PRKCSH, SEC63, or LRP5 mutations. After screening, 7%-10% of ADPKD-affected and ∼50% of ADPLD-affected families were genetically unresolved (GUR), suggesting further genetic heterogeneity of both disorders. Whole-exome sequencing of six GUR ADPKD-affected families identified one with a missense mutation in GANAB, encoding glucosidase II subunit α (GIIα). Because PRKCSH encodes GIIβ, GANAB is a strong ADPKD and ADPLD candidate gene. Sanger screening of 321 additional GUR families identified eight further likely mutations (six truncating), and a total of 20 affected individuals were identified in seven ADPKD- and two ADPLD-affected families. The phenotype was mild PKD and variable, including severe, PLD. Analysis of GANAB-null cells showed an absolute requirement of GIIα for maturation and surface and ciliary localization of the ADPKD proteins (PC1 and PC2), and reduced mature PC1 was seen in GANAB(+/-) cells. PC1 surface localization in GANAB(-/-) cells was rescued by wild-type, but not mutant, GIIα. Overall, we show that GANAB mutations cause ADPKD and ADPLD and that the cystogenesis is most likely driven by defects in PC1 maturation. PMID:27259053

  6. Mutation in the Novel Nuclear-Encoded Mitochondrial Protein CHCHD10 in a Family with Autosomal Dominant Mitochondrial Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ajroud-Driss, Senda; Fecto, Faisal; Ajroud, Kaouther; Lalani, Irfan; Calvo, Sarah E.; Mootha, Vamsi K.; Deng, Han-Xiang; Siddique, Nailah; Tahmoush, Albert J.; Heiman-Patterson, Terry D.; Siddique, Teepu

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial myopathies belong to a larger group of systemic diseases caused by morphological or biochemical abnormalities of mitochondria. Mitochondrial disorders can be caused by mutations in either the mitochondrial or the nuclear genome. Only 5% of all mitochondrial disorders are autosomal dominant. We analyzed DNA from members of a previously reported Puerto Rican kindred with an autosomal dominant mitochondrial myopathy (Heimann-Patterson et al. 1997). Linkage analysis suggested a putative locus on the pericentric region of the long arm of chromosome 22 (22q11). Using the tools of integrative genomics, we established C22orf16 (later designated as CHCHD10) as the only high scoring mitochondrial candidate gene in our minimal candidate region. Sequence analysis revealed a double missense mutation (R15S; G58R) in cis in CHCHD10 which encodes a coiled-coil helix coiled-coil helix protein of unknown function. These two mutations completely co-segregated with the disease phenotype and were absent in 1481 Caucasian and 80 Hispanic (including 32 Puerto Rican) controls. Expression profiling showed that CHCHD10 is enriched in skeletal muscle. Mitochondrial localization of the CHCHD10 protein was confirmed using immunofluorescence in cells expressing either wild-type or mutant CHCHD10. We found that expression of the G58R, but not the R15S, mutation induced mitochondrial fragmentation. Our findings identify a novel gene causing mitochondrial myopathy, thereby expanding the spectrum of mitochondrial myopathies caused by nuclear genes. Our findings also suggest a role for CHCHD10 in the morphologic remodeling of the mitochondria. PMID:25193783

  7. Mapping of autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II (Albers-Schönberg disease) to chromosome 16p13.3.

    PubMed

    Bénichou, O; Cleiren, E; Gram, J; Bollerslev, J; de Vernejoul, M C; Van Hul, W

    2001-09-01

    The osteopetroses are a heterogeneous group of conditions characterized by a bone-density increase due to impaired bone resorption. As well as the two or more autosomal recessive types, two autosomal dominant forms of osteopetrosis, differentiated by clinical and radiological signs, are described. Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (ADO) type II, also known as "Albers-Schönberg disease," is characterized by sclerosis, predominantly involving the spine (vertebral end-plate thickening, or Rugger-Jersey spine), the pelvis ("bone-within-bone" structures), and the skull base. An increased fracture rate can be observed in these patients. By linkage analysis, the presence, on chromosome 1p21, of a gene causing ADO type II was previously suggested. However, analysis of further families with ADO type II indicated genetic heterogeneity within ADO type II, with the chromosome 1p21 locus being only a minor locus. We now perform a genomewide linkage scan of a French extended family with ADO type II, which allows us to localize an ADO type II gene on chromosome 16p13.3. Analysis of microsatellite markers in five further families with ADO type II could not exclude this chromosomal region. A summed maximum LOD score of 12.70 was generated with marker D16S3027, at a recombination fraction (straight theta) of 0. On the basis of the key recombinants in the families, a candidate region of 8.4 cM could be delineated, flanked by marker D16S521, on distal side, and marker D16S423, on the proximal side. Surprisingly, one of the families analyzed is the Danish family previously suggested to have linkage to chromosome 1p21. Linkage to chromosome 16p13.3 clearly cannot be excluded in this family, since a maximum LOD score of 4.21 at theta=0 is generated with marker D16S3027. Because at present no other family with ADO type II has proved to have linkage to chromosome 1p21, we consider the most likely localization of the disease-causing gene in this family to be to chromosome 16p13.3. This thus

  8. Linkage and clinical characterization of families with the RP10 (chromosome 7q) form of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, S.A.; Humphries, P.; McGuire, R.E.

    1994-09-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a set of degenerative retinal diseases characterized by night blindness and loss of peripheral vision, often followed by loss of central vision. Genetically heterogeneous, retinitis pigmentosa has been found in autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive and X-linked forms. For autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP), 6 loci have been mapped: rhodopsin on chromosome 3q, peripherin/RDS on 6p, RP9 on 7p, RP10 on 7q, RP1 on 8q, and RP11 on 19q. Jordan et al. first reported linkage to 7q in a Spanish family with early onset disease. Recently, McGuire et al. reported the existence of a second, unrelated family of American descent with adRP that maps to the same region of 7q. The second family also has classical, diffuse retinitis pigmentosa though with later onset. The finding of two unrelated families that map to this region suggests that RP10 may account for a significant fraction of retinitis pigmentosa cases. Combining data from both families localizes the disease gene to 7q31.1-q35. In the Spanish family a Z{sub max} of 7.2 at 0% recombination was found with the marker D7S480 and affected individuals recombinant for D7S486 and D7S650 flank the disease. The American family showed a Z{sub max} of 5.3 at 0% recombination wtih the marker D7S514 and there are affected individuals recombinant for the markers D7S522, D7S677 and D7S486, and one affected individual recombinant for D7S530. Together, these data place the disease locus between D7S522 and D7S650. In addition, blue cone pigment, which maps to 7q31.3-q32, was excluded as a candidate gene in both families by linkage testing using intragenic polymorphisms and mutation screening.

  9. Autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia: reduction of the FSP1 candidate region on chromosome 14q to 7 cM and locus heterogeneity.

    PubMed Central

    Gispert, S; Santos, N; Damen, R; Voit, T; Schulz, J; Klockgether, T; Orozco, G; Kreuz, F; Weissenbach, J; Auburger, G

    1995-01-01

    Three large pedigrees of German descent with autosomal dominant "pure" familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) were characterized clinically and genetically. Haplotype and linkage analyses, with microsatellites covering the FSP region on chromosome 14q (locus FSP1), were performed. In pedigree W, we found a haplotype that cosegregates with the disease and observed three crossing-over events, reducing the FSP1 candidate region to 7 cM; in addition, the observation of apparent anticipation in this family suggests a trinucleotide repeat expansion as the mutation. In pedigrees D and S, the gene locus could be excluded from the whole FSP1 region, confirming the locus heterogeneity of autosomal dominant FSP. PMID:7825576

  10. Mutation detection in autosomal dominant Hirschsprung disease: SSCP analysis of the RET proto-oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Angrist, M.; Bolk, S.; Chakravarti, A.

    1994-09-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), or congenital aganglionic megacolon, is the most common cause of congenital bowel obstruction, with an incidence of 1 in 5000. Recently, linkage of an incompletely penetrant, dominant form of HSCR to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 10 was reported, followed by identification of mutations in the RET proto-oncogene in HSCR patients. RET mutations have also been reported in both sporadic and familial forms of three neuroendrocrine tumor syndromes. Unlike the clustered RET mutations observed in these syndromes, the 18 reported HSCR mutations are distributed throughout the extracellular and tryosine kinase domains of RET. In an effort to determine the frequency of RET mutations in HSCR and correlate genotype with phenotype, we have begun to screen for mutations among 80 HSCR probands representing a wide range of phenotypes and pedigree structures. Non-isotopic single strand conformation of polymorphism (SSCP) analysis was carried out using the Pharmacia PhastSystem{trademark}. Initial screening of exons 2 through 6 detected variants in 11 patients not seen in 24 controls. One additional band shift in exon 6 has been observed in both patients and controls. Preliminary sequence analysis has revealed two putative familial mutations in exon 2: a single base pair deletion (49Pro del C 296) and a point mutation that leads to a conservative amino acid substitution (93Gly{r_arrow}Ser). These results suggest that HSCR may be associated with a range of alterations in the coding sequence of the RET extracellular domain. Additional mutations will be described.

  11. Acute simultaneous multiple lacunar infarcts as the initial presentation of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Cheng-Tsung; Chen, Yun-Chung; Liu, Yo-Tsen; Soong, Bing-Wen; Lee, Yi-Chung

    2015-07-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is an adult-onset, dominantly inherited small-vessel disease of the brain caused by NOTCH3 mutations and characterized by recurrent subcortical infarctions, dementia, migraine with aura, and mood disturbance. We report a patient with unusual presentation of CADASIL with acute simultaneous multiple subcortical lacunar infarcts as the first manifestation. A 69-year-old man developed confusion, drowsiness, right hemiparesis, and slurred speech following orthopedic surgeries. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse leukoencephalopathy and multiple acute subcortical lacunar infarcts. Brain magnetic resonance angiography, echocardiography and 24-hour electrocardiography were unremarkable. The symptoms improved quickly after treatment with fluid hydration and antiplatelet agent, and his consciousness and mentality totally recovered within 3 days. The NOTCH3 genetic testing showed a heterozygous missense mutation, c.1630C>T (p. Arg544Cys). The experience in this case suggests that brain imaging is important in managing postoperative confusion, and any patient with diffuse leukoencephalopathy of unknown etiology may need to be tested for NOTCH3 mutations. Surgery is an important factor of encephalopathy and acute infarction in individuals with NOTCH3 mutations. Comprehensive presurgical evaluations and proactive perioperative precautions to avoid dehydration and anemia are necessary for patients with CADASIL who are about to receive anesthesia and surgery. PMID:25959358

  12. Two pedigrees of autosomal dominant atrioventricular canal defect (AVCD): Exclusion from the critical region on 8p

    SciTech Connect

    Amati, F.; Mari, A.; Mingarelli, R.

    1995-07-03

    Atrioventricular canal defects (AVCD) constitute the predominant congenital heart defect in Down`s syndrome. For this reason, a candidate gene involved in atrioventricular canal development was previously searched and excluded in dominant pedigrees of AVCD, using linkage analysis of polymorphisms from chromosome 21. Because of the striking association between 8p deletion and AVCD, a search for an AVCD gene was carried out in two pedigrees of individuals with autosomal dominant AVCD using a set of DNA markers of the 8pter{r_arrow}q12 region. These two families include affected individuals and subjects who have transmitted the defect but are not clinically affected. Two-point lod scores were significantly negative for all markers at penetrance levels of 90% and 50%. Multipoint analysis excluded the region covered by the markers LPL-D8S262 and 30 cM to either side of this area. This result corroborates heterogeneity of this heart defect and indicates that the genetic basis of familial AVCD is different from AVCD associated to either trisomy 21 or 8p deletion. 25 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Age-dependent gait abnormalities in mice lacking the Rnf170 gene linked to human autosomal-dominant sensory ataxia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsoo; Kim, Seong Hun; Kim, Kook Hwan; Chae, Sujin; Kim, Chanki; Kim, Jeongjin; Shin, Hee-Sup; Lee, Myung-Shik; Kim, Daesoo

    2015-12-20

    Really interesting new gene (RING) finger protein 170 (RNF170) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase known to mediate ubiquitination-dependent degradation of type-I inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (ITPR1). It has recently been demonstrated that a point mutation of RNF170 gene is linked with autosomal-dominant sensory ataxia (ADSA), which is characterized by an age-dependent increase of walking abnormalities, a rare genetic disorder reported in only two families. Although this mutant allele is known to be dominant, the functional identity thereof has not been clearly established. Here, we generated mice lacking Rnf170 (Rnf170(-/-)) to evaluate the effect of its loss of function in vivo. Remarkably, Rnf170(-/-) mice began to develop gait abnormalities in old age (12 months) in the form of asynchronous stepping between diagonal limb pairs with a fixed step sequence during locomotion, while age-matched wild-type mice showed stable gait patterns using several step sequence repertoires. As reported in ADSA patients, they also showed a reduced sensitivity for proprioception and thermal nociception. Protein blot analysis revealed that the amount of Itpr1 protein was significantly elevated in the cerebellum and spinal cord but intact in the cerebral cortex in Rnf170(-/-) mice. These results suggest that the loss of Rnf170 gene function mediates ADSA-associated phenotypes and this gives insights on the cure of patients with ADSA and other age-dependent walking abnormalities.

  14. Autosomal dominant hypercalciuria in a mouse model due to a mutation of the epithelial calcium channel, TRPV5.

    PubMed

    Loh, Nellie Y; Bentley, Liz; Dimke, Henrik; Verkaart, Sjoerd; Tammaro, Paolo; Gorvin, Caroline M; Stechman, Michael J; Ahmad, Bushra N; Hannan, Fadil M; Piret, Sian E; Evans, Holly; Bellantuono, Ilaria; Hough, Tertius A; Fraser, William D; Hoenderop, Joost G J; Ashcroft, Frances M; Brown, Steve D M; Bindels, René J M; Cox, Roger D; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2013-01-01

    Hypercalciuria is a major cause of nephrolithiasis, and is a common and complex disorder involving genetic and environmental factors. Identification of genetic factors for monogenic forms of hypercalciuria is hampered by the limited availability of large families, and to facilitate such studies, we screened for hypercalciuria in mice from an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis programme. We identified a mouse with autosomal dominant hypercalciuria (HCALC1). Linkage studies mapped the Hcalc1 locus to a 11.94 Mb region on chromosome 6 containing the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, members 5 (Trpv5) and 6 (Trpv6) genes. DNA sequence analysis of coding regions, intron-exon boundaries and promoters of Trpv5 and Trpv6 identified a novel T to C transition in codon 682 of TRPV5, mutating a conserved serine to a proline (S682P). Compared to wild-type littermates, heterozygous (Trpv5(682P/+)) and homozygous (Trpv5(682P/682P)) mutant mice had hypercalciuria, polyuria, hyperphosphaturia and a more acidic urine, and ∼10% of males developed tubulointerstitial nephritis. Trpv5(682P/682P) mice also had normal plasma parathyroid hormone but increased 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) concentrations without increased bone resorption, consistent with a renal defect for the hypercalciuria. Expression of the S682P mutation in human embryonic kidney cells revealed that TRPV5-S682P-expressing cells had a lower baseline intracellular calcium concentration than wild-type TRPV5-expressing cells, suggesting an altered calcium permeability. Immunohistological studies revealed a selective decrease in TRPV5-expression from the renal distal convoluted tubules of Trpv5(682P/+) and Trpv5(682P/682P) mice consistent with a trafficking defect. In addition, Trpv5(682P/682P) mice had a reduction in renal expression of the intracellular calcium-binding protein, calbindin-D(28K), consistent with a specific defect in TRPV5-mediated renal calcium reabsorption. Thus, our findings indicate

  15. [Hypomagnesemia following chemotherapy of disseminated testicular tumors].

    PubMed

    Hida, S; Nishimura, K; Nishio, Y; Okada, Y; Okada, K; Yoshida, O

    1988-01-01

    Sixteen patients with metastatic testicular cancer were treated with combination chemotherapy including cisplatin (CDDP) at 3- to 4-week intervals for two to five courses. There was a sequential fall in serum magnesium with each course of therapy: 13 of the 16 patients (81%) became hypomagnesemic, and the median magnesium nadir was 1.67 mg/dl. Serum magnesium nadir levels gradually decreased according to the cumulative CDDP dose. Acute clinical effects of the hypomagnesemia were observed in 4 patients, 2 of them complained of neuromuscular disturbance in the extremities, one of cardiac arrhythmia, and the other of Raynaud's phenomenon. The median time to the onset of hypomagnesemia was 67 days and the duration of hypomagnesemia was 24 days. The creatinine clearance (Ccr) decreased gradually according to the cumulative CDDP dose, and the mean Ccr declined from 87.2 ml/min before therapy to 55.8 ml/min. In 3 out of 16 patients, an irreversible decrease to below 50 ml/min was seen after chemotherapy. In patients with normal renal function treated by VAB-6 regimen, creatinine clearance (Ccr) decreased transiently during each course of chemotherapy and returned to the pretreatment level during the interval. The mean creatinine clearance declined from 90.7 ml/min before therapy to 82.9 ml/min after three courses of induction chemotherapy. Urinary excretion of beta 2 microglobulin (beta 2MG) increased transiently before Ccr began to decrease during each course of chemotherapy. Serum potassium and calcium concentrations decreased transiently probably due to urinary losses but there was no significant relationship between hypopotassemia, hypocalcemia and hypomagnesemia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Total Kidney Volume in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: A Biomarker of Disease Progression and Therapeutic Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Alam, Ahsan; Dahl, Neera K; Lipschutz, Joshua H; Rossetti, Sandro; Smith, Patricia; Sapir, Daniel; Weinstein, Jordan; McFarlane, Philip; Bichet, Daniel G

    2015-10-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common potentially life-threatening monogenic disorder in humans, characterized by progressive development and expansion of fluid-filled cysts in the kidneys and other organs. Ongoing cyst growth leads to progressive kidney enlargement, whereas kidney function remains stable for decades as a result of hyperfiltration and compensation by unaffected nephrons. Kidney function irreversibly declines only in the late stages of the disease, when most of the parenchyma is lost to cystic and fibrotic tissue and the remaining compensatory capacity is overwhelmed. Hence, conventional kidney function measures, such as glomerular filtration rate, do not adequately assess disease progression in ADPKD, especially in its early stages. Given the recent development of potential targeted therapies in ADPKD, it has become critically important to identify relevant biomarkers that can be used to determine the degree of disease progression and evaluate the effects of therapeutic interventions on the course of the disease. We review the current evidence to provide an informed perspective on whether total kidney volume (TKV) is a suitable biomarker for disease progression and whether TKV can be used as an efficacy end point in clinical trials. We conclude that because cystogenesis is the central factor leading to kidney enlargement, TKV appears to be an appropriate biomarker and is gaining wider acceptance. Several studies have identified TKV as a relevant imaging biomarker for monitoring and predicting disease progression and support its use as a prognostic end point in clinical trials.

  17. Diagnostic Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel Gene, EMILIN1, Associated with Autosomal-Dominant Hereditary Connective Tissue Disease.

    PubMed

    Capuano, Alessandra; Bucciotti, Francesco; Farwell, Kelly D; Tippin Davis, Brigette; Mroske, Cameron; Hulick, Peter J; Weissman, Scott M; Gao, Qingshen; Spessotto, Paola; Colombatti, Alfonso; Doliana, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Heritable connective tissue diseases are a highly heterogeneous family of over 200 disorders that affect the extracellular matrix. While the genetic basis of several disorders is established, the etiology has not been discovered for a large portion of patients, likely due to rare yet undiscovered disease genes. By performing trio-exome sequencing of a 55-year-old male proband presenting with multiple symptoms indicative of a connective disorder, we identified a heterozygous missense alteration in exon 1 of the Elastin Microfibril Interfacer 1 (EMILIN1) gene, c.64G>A (p.A22T). The proband presented with ascending and descending aortic aneurysms, bilateral lower leg and foot sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy, arthropathy, and increased skin elasticity. Sanger sequencing confirmed that the EMILIN1 alteration, which maps around the signal peptide cleavage site, segregated with disease in the affected proband, mother, and son. The impaired secretion of EMILIN-1 in cells transfected with the mutant p.A22T coincided with abnormal protein accumulation within the endoplasmic reticulum. In skin biopsy of the proband, we detected less EMILIN-1 with disorganized and abnormal coarse fibrils, aggregated deposits underneath the epidermis basal lamina, and dermal cells apoptosis. These findings collectively suggest that EMILIN1 may represent a new disease gene associated with an autosomal-dominant connective tissue disorder.

  18. A third major locus for autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia maps to 1p34.1-p32.

    PubMed Central

    Varret, M; Rabès, J P; Saint-Jore, B; Cenarro, A; Marinoni, J C; Civeira, F; Devillers, M; Krempf, M; Coulon, M; Thiart, R; Kotze, M J; Schmidt, H; Buzzi, J C; Kostner, G M; Bertolini, S; Pocovi, M; Rosa, A; Farnier, M; Martinez, M; Junien, C; Boileau, C

    1999-01-01

    Autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH), one of the most frequent hereditary disorders, is characterized by an isolated elevation of LDL particles that leads to premature mortality from cardiovascular complications. It is generally assumed that mutations in the LDLR and APOB genes account for ADH. We identified one large French pedigree (HC2) and 12 additional white families with ADH in which we excluded linkage to the LDLR and APOB, implicating a new locus we named "FH3." A LOD score of 3.13 at a recombination fraction of 0 was obtained at markers D1S2892 and D1S2722. We localized the FH3 locus to a 9-cM interval at 1p34.1-p32. We tested four regional markers in another set of 12 ADH families. Positive LOD scores were obtained in three pedigrees, whereas linkage was excluded in the others. Heterogeneity tests indicated linkage to FH3 in approximately 27% of these non-LDLR/non-APOB ADH families and implied a fourth locus. Radiation hybrid mapping located four candidate genes at 1p34.1-p32, outside the critical region, showing no identity with FH3. Our results show that ADH is genetically more heterogeneous than conventionally accepted. PMID:10205269

  19. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Disease is Associated with Depressed Levels of Soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Sarı, Funda; Yalçın, Arzu Didem; Genç, Gizem Esra; Sarıkaya, Metin; Bisgin, Atıl; Çetinkaya, Ramazan; Gümüşlü, Saadet

    2016-01-01

    Background: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by multiple, large renal cysts and impaired kidney function. Although the reason for the development of kidney cysts is unknown, ADPKD is associated with cell cycle arrest and abundant apoptosis of renal tubular epithelial cells. Aims: We asked whether serum-soluble TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (sTRAIL) might underlie ADPKD. Study Design: Case-control study. Methods: Serum sTRAIL levels were measured in 44 patients with ADPKD and 18 healthy volunteers. The human soluble TRAIL/Apo2L ELISA kit was used for the in vitro quantitative determination of sTRAIL in serum samples. Results: Mean serum sTRAIL levels were lower in patients with ADPKD as compared to the control group (446.9±103.1 and 875.9±349.6 pg/mL, p<0.001). Serum sTRAIL levels did not differ among stages of renal failure in patients with ADPKD. There was no correlation between serum sTRAIL levels and estimated glomerular filtration rate in patients with ADPKD (p>0.05). Conclusion: Our results show that ADPKD patients have depressed sTRAIL levels, indicating apoptosis unrelated to the stage of chronic renal failure. PMID:27761278

  20. Whole-exome sequencing identifies OR2W3 mutation as a cause of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiangyu; Guan, Liping; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Yao; Zheng, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Long, Jirong; Wu, Na; Wu, Long; Xiang, Ying; Xu, Bin; Shen, Miaozhong; Chen, Yanhua; Wang, Yuewen; Yin, Ye; Li, Yingrui; Xu, Haiwei; Xu, Xun; Li, Yafei

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a heterogeneous group of inherited ocular diseases, is a genetic condition that causes retinal degeneration and eventual vision loss. Though some genes have been identified to be associated with RP, still a large part of the clinical cases could not be explained. Here we reported a four-generation Chinese family with RP, during which 6 from 9 members of the second generation affected the disease. To identify the genetic defect in this family, whole-exome sequencing together with validation analysis by Sanger sequencing were performed to find possible pathogenic mutations. After a pipeline of database filtering, including public databases and in-house databases, a novel missense mutation, c. 424 C > T transition (p.R142W) in OR2W3 gene, was identified as a potentially causative mutation for autosomal dominant RP. The mutation co-segregated with the disease phenotype over four generations. This mutation was validated in another independent three-generation family. RT-PCR analysis also identified that OR2W3 gene was expressed in HESC-RPE cell line. The results will not only enhance our current understanding of the genetic basis of RP, but also provide helpful clues for designing future studies to further investigate genetic factors for familial RP. PMID:25783483

  1. Renal ultrasonographic and computed tomographic appearance, volume, and function of cats with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Reichle, Jean K; DiBartola, Stephen P; Léveillé, Renée

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the ultrasonographic (US) and computed tomographic (CT) appearance of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in cats; to compare renal volume in cats with ADPKD (n = 5; mean age 59 +/- 10 months)) and normal cats (n = 5; mean age 66 +/- 10 months) using 2 imaging modalities, US and CT; and to calculate cyst volume using CT. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was determined by 2 methods: 99mTc-diethylene-triaminepentaacetic acid (99mTc-DPTA) scintigraphic uptake and 99-Tc-DTPA plasma clearance. Sonographically, ADPKD affected kidneys were characterized by multiple anechoic to hypoechoic, round to irregularly shaped structures with variation in size. Affected kidneys had indistinct corticomedullary junctions and foci of mineralization. Intravenous (IV) contrast medium administration allowed more definitive identification of cysts with CT, and identification of distortion of renal pelves by cysts. A significant difference (Welch ANOVA, P = 0.05) was detected between the US-estimated renal volumes of normal and affected cats. No statistically significant differences were detected in CT volume (between the normal and affected cats, or between US and CT volume measurements) or the 2 GFR methods. In this group of clinically normal, middle-aged ADPKD cats, renal function was within normal limits and not significantly different than normal. PMID:12175002

  2. Changes in the plasma proteome at asymptomatic and symptomatic stages of autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Muenchhoff, Julia; Poljak, Anne; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Gupta, Veer B.; Chatterjee, Pratishtha; Raftery, Mark; Masters, Colin L.; Morris, John C.; Bateman, Randall J.; Fagan, Anne M.; Martins, Ralph N.; Sachdev, Perminder S.

    2016-01-01

    The autosomal dominant form of Alzheimer’s disease (ADAD) is far less prevalent than late onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD), but enables well-informed prospective studies, since symptom onset is near certain and age of onset is predictable. Our aim was to discover plasma proteins associated with early AD pathology by investigating plasma protein changes at the asymptomatic and symptomatic stages of ADAD. Eighty-one proteins were compared across asymptomatic mutation carriers (aMC, n = 15), symptomatic mutation carriers (sMC, n = 8) and related noncarriers (NC, n = 12). Proteins were also tested for associations with cognitive measures, brain amyloid deposition and glucose metabolism. Fewer changes were observed at the asymptomatic than symptomatic stage with seven and 16 proteins altered significantly in aMC and sMC, respectively. This included complement components C3, C5, C6, apolipoproteins A-I, A-IV, C-I and M, histidine-rich glycoprotein, heparin cofactor II and attractin, which are involved in inflammation, lipid metabolism and vascular health. Proteins involved in lipid metabolism differed only at the symptomatic stage, whereas changes in inflammation and vascular health were evident at asymptomatic and symptomatic stages. Due to increasing evidence supporting the usefulness of ADAD as a model for LOAD, these proteins warrant further investigation into their potential association with early stages of LOAD. PMID:27381087

  3. A Report of Accelerated Coronary Artery Disease Associated with Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Courtney B.; Hahn, Virginia; Kobayashi, Taisei; Litwack, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is the most common heritable form of vascular dementia and it is caused by mutations in the NOTCH3 gene. The neurologic manifestations of CADASIL syndrome have been well characterized; however, here we report one of the first de novo cases of CADASIL-associated coronary artery disease. A 45-year-old woman with a history of CADASIL and remote tobacco use presented with unstable angina. She was found to have diffuse and irregular narrowing of the left anterior descending artery and a drug eluting stent was deployed. Months later, she developed two subsequent episodes of unstable angina, requiring stent placement in the distal left anterior descending artery and the right coronary artery. Though the neurologic manifestations of CADASIL have been well described, these patients may also be predisposed to developing premature coronary artery disease. Patients with CADASIL and their physicians should be aware of this possible association because these patients may not be identified as high risk by traditional cardiovascular risk estimators. These patients may benefit from more aggressive interventions to reduce cardiac risk. PMID:26435852

  4. Why is genetic screening for autosomal dominant disorders underutilized in families? The case of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT)

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Barbara A.; Zayac, Cara; Pyeritz, Reed E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Appropriate management of autosomal dominant disorders reduces morbidity and mortality, but relies on identifying which family members are affected. Genetic testing may identify relatives needing follow-up, but is underutilized. We conducted this study to identify barriers to genetic testing for one disorder, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Methods Surveys and on-line discussion groups with people from HHT families. Results Multiple barriers to HHT genetic testing were identified including lack of knowledge about genetic testing, problems with access, and emotional barriers. Many participants: did not understand the rationale for HHT testing or benefits of early detection; believed that genetic testing is expensive and not covered by insurance; believed that primary care providers don’t know how to order genetic testing. Access to HHT testing is limited by distance from an HHT Center or a genetics clinic. Emotional barriers include fear of insurance discrimination; denial of having HHT or being at risk; guilt and stigma. Conclusion Voluntary disease organizations should develop and disseminate brief educational materials that describe the rationale for genetic testing, and emphasize the benefits of early detection and treatment. In addition, laboratories offering genetic testing should provide support for primary care physicians to order and interpret genetic tests. PMID:21637104

  5. Evidence of angiogenesis and microvascular regression in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease kidneys: a corrosion cast study.

    PubMed

    Wei, W; Popov, V; Walocha, J A; Wen, J; Bello-Reuss, E

    2006-10-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) accounts for about 10% of all cases of chronic renal failure requiring dialysis. The disease is characterized by proliferation of renal epithelial cells and formation of cysts that expand over years and replace the normal parenchyma of the kidney. As the cysts grow, the volume of the kidney can increase by more than 10-fold, implying that remodeling and expansion of the vasculature must occur to provide oxygenation and nutrition to the cyst cells. Our previous studies support the notion that there is angiogenesis in ADPKD. We report here results from resin casting of ADPKD kidneys vasculature. In this study, the corrosion-casting method was used in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy to study the vascular architecture and the evidence for angiogenesis in ADPKD kidneys. We found a well-defined vascular network around the cysts forming a 'vascular capsule' somewhat similar to that described in avascular leiomyomata. We also found that the normal vascular architecture is lost and replaced by an assortment of capillaries of larger size than those in the normal kidney, mixed with flattened and spiral arterioles, damaged glomeruli, and atresic venules, indicative of regression of the microvasculature. In the same areas, there was capillary sprouting, considered the hallmark of angiogenesis. The present study documents regression changes of the vasculature and confirms the existence of angiogenesis in ADPKD kidneys, and suggests the use of inhibitors of angiogenesis as a possible avenue for the treatment of the disease. PMID:16883324

  6. Fatal liver cyst rupture in polycystic liver disease complicated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: A case report.

    PubMed

    Tong, Fang; Liang, Yue; Zhang, Lin; Li, Wenhe; Chen, Peng; Duan, Yijie; Zhou, Yiwu

    2016-05-01

    A 59-year-old man was struck in the abdomen and later presented to the emergency room. His blood pressure dropped and eventually died 16h post trauma and just before emergency exploratory laparotomy. Autopsy revealed two polycystic kidneys and a giant polycystic liver with two ruptures. Blood (2225g) was observed in the peritoneum and the body-surface injury was minor. Genetic testing was performed to confirm that the man had an autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) complicated by polycystic liver disease (PLD). Autopsy, histopathology and medical history showed that the cause of death was the ruptures of liver cysts due to trauma. In this communication, we describe a fatal case and hope to increase awareness and recognition of PLD and ADPKD. We also wish to indicate that due to the fragile condition of liver cysts, trauma should be considered even if the body-surface injury is minor in fatal cases of PLD patient with a traumatic history. PMID:27050907

  7. Cyst infection in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: causative microorganisms and susceptibility to lipid-soluble antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Suwabe, T; Araoka, H; Ubara, Y; Kikuchi, K; Hazue, R; Mise, K; Hamanoue, S; Ueno, T; Sumida, K; Hayami, N; Hoshino, J; Imafuku, A; Kawada, M; Hiramatsu, R; Hasegawa, E; Sawa, N; Takaichi, K

    2015-07-01

    Cyst infection is a frequent and serious complication of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Lipid-soluble antibiotics like fluoroquinolones show good penetration into cysts and are recommended for cyst infection, but causative microorganisms are often resistant to these agents. This study investigated the profile of the microorganisms causing cyst infection in ADPKD, their susceptibility to lipid-soluble antibiotics, and clinical outcomes. This retrospective study reviewed all ADPKD patients admitted to Toranomon Hospital with a diagnosis of cyst infection from January 2004 to March 2014. All patients who underwent cyst drainage and had positive cyst fluid cultures were enrolled. Patients with positive blood cultures who satisfied our criteria for cyst infection or probable infection were also enrolled. There were 99 episodes with positive cyst fluid cultures and 93 episodes with positive blood cultures. The majority of patients were on dialysis. The death rate was high when infection was caused by multiple microorganisms or when there were multiple infected cysts. Gram-negative bacteria accounted for 74-79 % of the isolates in all groups, except for patients with positive hepatic cyst fluid cultures. The susceptibility of Escherichia coli to fluoroquinolones was very low in patients with hepatic cyst infection, especially those with frequent episodes and those with hepatomegaly. Fungi were detected in two episodes. Fluoroquinolone-resistant microorganisms showed a high prevalence in cyst infection. It is important to identify causative microorganisms to avoid the overuse of fluoroquinolones and to improve the outcome of cyst infection in ADPKD.

  8. Mutations in DNAJC5, Encoding Cysteine-String Protein Alpha, Cause Autosomal-Dominant Adult-Onset Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Nosková, Lenka; Stránecký, Viktor; Hartmannová, Hana; Přistoupilová, Anna; Barešová, Veronika; Ivánek, Robert; Hůlková, Helena; Jahnová, Helena; van der Zee, Julie; Staropoli, John F.; Sims, Katherine B.; Tyynelä, Jaana; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Nijssen, Peter C.G.; Mole, Sara E.; Elleder, Milan; Kmoch, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (ANCL) is characterized by accumulation of autofluorescent storage material in neural tissues and neurodegeneration and has an age of onset in the third decade of life or later. The genetic and molecular basis of the disease has remained unknown for many years. We carried out linkage mapping, gene-expression analysis, exome sequencing, and candidate-gene sequencing in affected individuals from 20 families and/or individuals with simplex cases; we identified in five individuals one of two disease-causing mutations, c.346_348delCTC and c.344T>G, in DNAJC5 encoding cysteine-string protein alpha (CSPα). These mutations—causing a deletion, p.Leu116del, and an amino acid exchange, p.Leu115Arg, respectively—are located within the cysteine-string domain of the protein and affect both palmitoylation-dependent sorting and the amount of CSPα in neuronal cells. The resulting depletion of functional CSPα might cause in parallel the presynaptic dysfunction and the progressive neurodegeneration observed in affected individuals and lysosomal accumulation of misfolded and proteolysis-resistant proteins in the form of characteristic ceroid deposits in neurons. Our work represents an important step in the genetic dissection of a genetically heterogeneous group of ANCLs. It also confirms a neuroprotective role for CSPα in humans and demonstrates the need for detailed investigation of CSPα in the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses and other neurodegenerative diseases presenting with neuronal protein aggregation. PMID:21820099

  9. Polycystin-2, the protein mutated in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), is a Ca2+-permeable nonselective cation channel

    PubMed Central

    González-Perrett, Silvia; Kim, Keetae; Ibarra, Cristina; Damiano, Alicia E.; Zotta, Elsa; Batelli, Marisa; Harris, Peter C.; Reisin, Ignacio L.; Arnaout, M. Amin; Cantiello, Horacio F.

    2001-01-01

    Defects in polycystin-2, a ubiquitous transmembrane glycoprotein of unknown function, is a major cause of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), whose manifestation entails the development of fluid-filled cysts in target organs. Here, we demonstrate that polycystin-2 is present in term human syncytiotrophoblast, where it behaves as a nonselective cation channel. Lipid bilayer reconstitution of polycystin-2-positive human syncytiotrophoblast apical membranes displayed a nonselective cation channel with multiple subconductance states, and a high perm-selectivity to Ca2+. This channel was inhibited by anti-polycystin-2 antibody, Ca2+, La3+, Gd3+, and the diuretic amiloride. Channel function by polycystin-2 was confirmed by patch-clamping experiments of polycystin-2 heterologously infected Sf9 insect cells. Further, purified insect cell-derived recombinant polycystin-2 and in vitro translated human polycystin-2 had similar ion channel activity. The polycystin-2 channel may be associated with fluid accumulation and/or ion transport regulation in target epithelia, including placenta. Dysregulation of this channel provides a mechanism for the onset and progression of ADPKD. PMID:11252306

  10. Cyst infection in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: causative microorganisms and susceptibility to lipid-soluble antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Suwabe, T; Araoka, H; Ubara, Y; Kikuchi, K; Hazue, R; Mise, K; Hamanoue, S; Ueno, T; Sumida, K; Hayami, N; Hoshino, J; Imafuku, A; Kawada, M; Hiramatsu, R; Hasegawa, E; Sawa, N; Takaichi, K

    2015-07-01

    Cyst infection is a frequent and serious complication of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Lipid-soluble antibiotics like fluoroquinolones show good penetration into cysts and are recommended for cyst infection, but causative microorganisms are often resistant to these agents. This study investigated the profile of the microorganisms causing cyst infection in ADPKD, their susceptibility to lipid-soluble antibiotics, and clinical outcomes. This retrospective study reviewed all ADPKD patients admitted to Toranomon Hospital with a diagnosis of cyst infection from January 2004 to March 2014. All patients who underwent cyst drainage and had positive cyst fluid cultures were enrolled. Patients with positive blood cultures who satisfied our criteria for cyst infection or probable infection were also enrolled. There were 99 episodes with positive cyst fluid cultures and 93 episodes with positive blood cultures. The majority of patients were on dialysis. The death rate was high when infection was caused by multiple microorganisms or when there were multiple infected cysts. Gram-negative bacteria accounted for 74-79 % of the isolates in all groups, except for patients with positive hepatic cyst fluid cultures. The susceptibility of Escherichia coli to fluoroquinolones was very low in patients with hepatic cyst infection, especially those with frequent episodes and those with hepatomegaly. Fungi were detected in two episodes. Fluoroquinolone-resistant microorganisms showed a high prevalence in cyst infection. It is important to identify causative microorganisms to avoid the overuse of fluoroquinolones and to improve the outcome of cyst infection in ADPKD. PMID:25851811

  11. Ultrastructural appearance of renal and other basement membranes in the Bull terrier model of autosomal dominant hereditary nephritis.

    PubMed

    Hood, J C; Savige, J; Seymour, A E; Dowling, J; Martinello, P; Colville, D; Sinclair, R; Naito, I; Jennings, G; Huxtable, C

    2000-08-01

    Bull terrier hereditary nephritis may represent a model for autosomal dominant Alport's syndrome because affected dogs have the typically lamellated glomerular basement membrane (GBM) and father-to-son disease transmission occurs. This study examined the ultrastructural appearance of the renal and extrarenal basement membranes and their composition in affected Bull terriers. Affected stillborn animals and puppies had subepithelial frilling and vacuolation of the GBM. In adult dogs, lamellation was common, and subepithelial frilling and vacuolation were less prominent. Foot-process effacement and mesangial matrix expansion occurred frequently. Basement membranes in the glomeruli, tubules, and Bowman's capsule were significantly thickened and often mineralized. Immunohistochemical examination showed alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) collagen chains in all renal basement membranes; alpha 3(IV), alpha 4(IV), and alpha 5(IV) chains in the GBM, distal tubular basement membrane, and Bowman's capsule; and the alpha 6(IV) chain in Bowman's capsule. Conversely, the basement membranes from the affected Bull terrier cornea, lens capsule, retina, skin, lung, and muscle had a normal ultrastructural appearance and were not thickened compared with membranes in normal age-matched dogs. The distribution of basement membrane abnormalities in Bull terrier hereditary nephritis may occur because the defective protein is present exclusively or more abundantly in the kidney and is structurally more important in the kidney or because of local intrarenal stresses. PMID:10922317

  12. System analysis of gene mutations and clinical phenotype in Chinese patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Meiling; Xie, Yuansheng; Chen, Zhiqiang; Liao, Yujie; Li, Zuoxiang; Hu, Panpan; Qi, Yan; Yin, Zhiwei; Li, Qinggang; Fu, Ping; Chen, Xiangmei

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited kidney disorder mainly caused by mutation in PKD1/PKD2. However, ethnic differences in mutations, the association between mutation genotype/clinical phenotype, and the clinical applicable value of mutation detection are poorly understood. We made systematically analysis of Chinese ADPKD patients based on a next-generation sequencing platform. Among 148 ADPKD patients enrolled, 108 mutations were detected in 127 patients (85.8%). Compared with mutations in Caucasian published previously, the PKD2 mutation detection rate was lower, and patients carrying the PKD2 mutation invariably carried the PKD1 mutation. The definite pathogenic mutation detection rate was lower, whereas the multiple mutations detection rate was higher in Chinese patients. Then, we correlated PKD1/PKD2 mutation data and clinical data: patients with mutation exhibited a more severe phenotype; patients with >1 mutations exhibited a more severe phenotype; patients with pathogenic mutations exhibited a more severe phenotype. Thus, the PKD1/PKD2 mutation status differed by ethnicity, and the PKD1/PKD2 genotype may affect the clinical phenotype of ADPKD. Furthermore, it makes sense to detect PKD1/PKD2 mutation status for early diagnosis and prognosis, perhaps as early as the embryo/zygote stage, to facilitate early clinical intervention and family planning. PMID:27782177

  13. Analysis of LMNB1 Duplications in Autosomal Dominant Leukodystrophy Provides Insights into Duplication Mechanisms and Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Giorgio, Elisa; Rolyan, Harshvardhan; Kropp, Laura; Chakka, Anish Baswanth; Yatsenko, Svetlana; Gregorio, Eleonora Di; Lacerenza, Daniela; Vaula, Giovanna; Talarico, Flavia; Mandich, Paola; Toro, Camilo; Pierre, Eleonore Eymard; Labauge, Pierre; Capellari, Sabina; Cortelli, Pietro; Vairo, Filippo Pinto; Miguel, Diego; Stubbolo, Danielle; Marques, Lourenco Charles; Gahl, William; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile; Melberg, Atle; Hassin-Baer, Sharon; Cohen, Oren S; Pjontek, Rastislav; Grau, Armin; Klopstock, Thomas; Fogel, Brent; Meijer, Inge; Rouleau, Guy; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre L; Ganapathiraju, Madhavi; Vanderver, Adeline; Dahl, Niklas; Hobson, Grace; Brusco, Alfredo; Brussino, Alessandro; Padiath, Quasar Saleem

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) is an adult onset demyelinating disorder that is caused by duplications of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene. However, as only a few cases have been analyzed in detail, the mechanisms underlying LMNB1 duplications are unclear. We report the detailed molecular analysis of the largest collection of ADLD families studied, to date. We have identified the minimal duplicated region necessary for the disease, defined all the duplication junctions at the nucleotide level and identified the first inverted LMNB1 duplication. We have demonstrated that the duplications are not recurrent; patients with identical duplications share the same haplotype, likely inherited from a common founder and that the duplications originated from intrachromosomal events. The duplication junction sequences indicated that nonhomologous end joining or replication-based mechanisms such fork stalling and template switching or microhomology-mediated break induced repair are likely to be involved. LMNB1 expression was increased in patients’ fibroblasts both at mRNA and protein levels and the three LMNB1 alleles in ADLD patients show equal expression, suggesting that regulatory regions are maintained within the rearranged segment. These results have allowed us to elucidate duplication mechanisms and provide insights into allele-specific LMNB1 expression levels. PMID:23649844

  14. AAV delivery of wild-type rhodopsin preserves retinal function in a mouse model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Mao, Haoyu; James, Thomas; Schwein, Alison; Shabashvili, Arseniy E; Hauswirth, William W; Gorbatyuk, Marina S; Lewin, Alfred S

    2011-05-01

    Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) is frequently caused by mutations in RHO, the gene for rod photoreceptor opsin. Earlier, a study on mice carrying mutated rhodopsin transgenes on either RHO + / +  or RHO + /- backgrounds suggested that the amount of wild-type rhodopsin affected survival of photoreceptors. Therefore, we treated P23H RHO transgenic mice with adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5) expressing a cDNA clone of the rhodopsin gene (RHO301) that expressed normal opsin from the mouse opsin promoter. Analysis of the electroretinogram (ERG) demonstrated that increased expression of RHO301 slowed the rate of retinal degeneration in P23H mice: at 6 months, a-wave amplitudes were increased by 100% and b-wave amplitudes by 79%. In contrast, nontransgenic mice injected with AAV5 RHO301 demonstrated a decrease in the ERG, confirming the damaging effect of rhodopsin overproduction in normal photoreceptors. In P23H mice, the increase in the ERG amplitudes was correlated with improvement of retinal structure: the thickness of the outer nuclear layer in RHO301-treated eyes was increased by 80% compared with control eyes. These findings suggest that the wild-type RHO gene can be delivered to rescue retinal degeneration in mice carrying a RHO mutation and that increased production of normal rhodopsin can suppress the effect of the mutated protein. These findings make it possible to treat ADRP caused by different mutations of RHO with the expression of wild-type RHO.

  15. New phenotype of the cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy mapped to chromosome 19: migraine as the prominent clinical feature.

    PubMed Central

    Vérin, M; Rolland, Y; Landgraf, F; Chabriat, H; Bompais, B; Michel, A; Vahedi, K; Martinet, J P; Tournier-Lasserve, E; Lemaitre, M H

    1995-01-01

    A survey was carried out on a large family presenting the symptoms of familial arteriopathy (CADASIL) recently mapped to chromosome 19. This is characterised clinically by recurrent subcortical infarcts developing into pseudobulbar palsy and subcortical dementia, and radiologically by early MRI abnormalities. To characterise this familial condition, 43 members older than 20 years and spreading over four generations were studied clinically (31 living, 12 deceased), genetically, and radiologically by MRI (n = 31). Twenty out of 43 were found to be clinically symptomatic and of these 13 out of 31 had MRI abnormalities. Genetic studies mapped this condition to the locus of CADASIL (lod score > 3). The natural history suggests a chronological clinicoradiological staging of this phenotype of CADASIL: stage I between 20 and 40 years with frequent migraine-like episodes and well delineated lesions of the white matter; stage II between 40 and 60 years with stroke-like episodes, bipolar or monopolar-like psychotic disorders, coalescent lesions of the white matter, and well delineated lesions of the basal ganglia; and stage III over 60 years with subcortical dementia, pseudobulbar palsy, diffuse leukoencephalopathy, and multiple well delineated lesions of the basal ganglia. This phenotype differs from the other two previously described by high frequency of migraine, frequency of psychotic disorders, and early neurological manifestations. The new acronym "cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts, leukoencephalopathy, and migraine" (CADASILM) is proposed to better describe this particular subvariety of CADASIL. Images PMID:7500094

  16. A secreted WNT-ligand-binding domain of FZD5 generated by a frameshift mutation causes autosomal dominant coloboma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunqiao; Widen, Sonya A; Williamson, Kathleen A; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Gerth-Kahlert, Christina; Rainger, Joe; Alur, Ramakrishna P; Strachan, Erin; Manjunath, Souparnika H; Balakrishnan, Archana; Floyd, James A; Li, Tiansen; Waskiewicz, Andrew; Brooks, Brian P; Lehmann, Ordan J; FitzPatrick, David R; Swaroop, Anand

    2016-04-01

    Ocular coloboma is a common eye malformation resulting from incomplete fusion of the optic fissure during development. Coloboma is often associated with microphthalmia and/or contralateral anophthalmia. Coloboma shows extensive locus heterogeneity associated with causative mutations identified in genes encoding developmental transcription factors or components of signaling pathways. We report an ultra-rare, heterozygous frameshift mutation in FZD5 (p.Ala219Glufs*49) that was identified independently in two branches of a large family with autosomal dominant non-syndromic coloboma. FZD5 has a single-coding exon and consequently a transcript with this frameshift variant is not a canonical substrate for nonsense-mediated decay. FZD5 encodes a transmembrane receptor with a conserved extracellular cysteine rich domain for ligand binding. The frameshift mutation results in the production of a truncated protein, which retains the Wingless-type MMTV integration site family member-ligand-binding domain, but lacks the transmembrane domain. The truncated protein was secreted from cells, and behaved as a dominant-negative FZD5 receptor, antagonizing both canonical and non-canonical WNT signaling. Expression of the resultant mutant protein caused coloboma and microphthalmia in zebrafish, and disruption of the apical junction of the retinal neural epithelium in mouse, mimicking the phenotype of Fz5/Fz8 compound conditional knockout mutants. Our studies have revealed a conserved role of Wnt-Frizzled (FZD) signaling in ocular development and directly implicate WNT-FZD signaling both in normal closure of the human optic fissure and pathogenesis of coloboma.

  17. Coronary Flow Velocity Reserve and Carotid Intima Media Thickness in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: From Impaired Tubules to Impaired Carotid and Coronary Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Turkmen, Kultigin; Oflaz, Huseyin; Uslu, Bora; Cimen, Arif O.; Elitok, Ali; Kasikcioglu, Erdem; Alisir, Sabahat; Tufan, Fatih; Namli, Sule; Uysal, Mukremin; Ecder, Tevfik

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Cardiovascular problems are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Endothelial dysfunction, an early and reversible feature in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, is associated with increased vascular smooth muscle tone, arterial stiffening, and increased intima-media thickness. Coronary flow velocity reserve is a noninvasive test showing endothelial function of epicardial coronary arteries and coronary microcirculatory function. The aim of the study was to investigate the carotid intima-media thickness and coronary flow velocity reserve in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Thirty normotensive patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (10 male, 20 female) with well-preserved renal function and 30 healthy subjects (12 male, 18 female) were included in the study. Coronary flow velocity reserve was measured at baseline and after dipyridamole infusion by echocardiography. Coronary flow velocity reserve was calculated as the ratio of hyperemic to baseline diastolic peak velocities. Results: Carotid intima-media thickness was significantly higher in patients than in control subjects (0.80 ± 0.29 versus 0.54 ± 0.14 mm, respectively; P < 0.001). Moreover, coronary flow velocity reserve was significantly lower in patients than in control subjects (1.84 ± 0.39 versus 2.65 ± 0.68, respectively; P < 0.001). Conclusions: Normotensive patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease with well-preserved renal function have significantly increased carotid intima-media thickness and significantly decreased coronary flow velocity reserve compared with healthy subjects. These findings suggest that atherosclerosis starts at an early stage in the course of their disease in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. PMID:18354076

  18. The genetics of hybrid male sterility between the allopatric species pair Drosophila persimilis and D. pseudoobscura bogotana: dominant sterility alleles in collinear autosomal regions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Audrey S; Noor, Mohamed A F

    2007-05-01

    F(1) hybrid male sterility is thought to result from interactions between loci on the X chromosome and dominant-acting loci on the autosomes. While X-linked loci that contribute to hybrid male sterility have been precisely localized in many animal taxa, their dominant autosomal interactors have been more difficult to localize precisely and/or have been shown to be of relatively smaller effect. Here, we identified and mapped at least four dominant autosomal factors contributing to hybrid male sterility in the allopatric species pair Drosophila persimilis and D. pseudoobscura bogotana. Using these results, we tested predictions of reduced recombination models of speciation. Consistent with these models, three of the four QTL associated with hybrid male sterility occur in collinear (uninverted) regions of these genomes. Furthermore, these QTL do not contribute significantly to hybrid male sterility in crosses between the sympatric species D. persimilis and D. pseudoobscura pseudoobscura. The autosomal loci identified in this study provide the basis for introgression mapping and, ultimately, for molecular cloning of interacting genes that contribute to F(1) hybrid sterility.

  19. Three families with autosomal dominant nephrogenic diabetes insipidus caused by aquaporin-2 mutations in the C-terminus.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, M; Iwai, K; Ooeda, T; Igarashi, T; Ogawa, E; Katsushima, Y; Shinbo, I; Uchida, S; Terada, Y; Arthus, M F; Lonergan, M; Fujiwara, T M; Bichet, D G; Marumo, F; Sasaki, S

    2001-10-01

    The vasopressin-regulated water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2) is known to tetramerize in the apical membrane of the renal tubular cells and contributes to urine concentration. We identified three novel mutations, each in a single allele of exon 4 of the AQP2 gene, in three families showing autosomal dominant nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). These mutations were found in the C-terminus of AQP2: a deletion of G at nucleotide 721 (721 delG), a deletion of 10 nucleotides starting at nucleotide 763 (763-772del), and a deletion of 7 nucleotides starting at nucleotide 812 (812-818del). The wild-type AQP2 is predicted to be a 271-amino acid protein, whereas these mutant genes are predicted to encode proteins that are 330-333 amino acids in length, because of the frameshift mutations. Interestingly, these three mutant AQP2s shared the same C-terminal tail of 61 amino acids. In Xenopus oocytes injected with mutant AQP2 cRNAs, the osmotic water permeability (Pf) was much smaller than that of oocytes with the AQP2 wild-type (14%-17%). Immunoblot analysis of the lysates of the oocytes expressing the mutant AQP2s detected a band at 34 kD, whereas the immunoblot of the plasma-membrane fractions of the oocytes and immunocytochemistry failed to show a significant surface expression, suggesting a defect in trafficking of these mutant proteins. Furthermore, coinjection of wild-type cRNAs with mutant cRNAs markedly decreased the oocyte Pf in parallel with the surface expression of the wild-type AQP2. Immunoprecipitation with antibodies against wild-type and mutant AQP2 indicated the formation of mixed oligomers composed of wild-type and mutant AQP2 monomers. Our results suggest that the trafficking of mutant AQP2 is impaired because of elongation of the C-terminal tail, and the dominant-negative effect is attributed to oligomerization of the wild-type and mutant AQP2s. Segregation of the mutations in the C-terminus of AQP2 with dominant-type NDI underlies the importance of this

  20. A 5-base insertion in the gammaC-crystallin gene is associated with autosomal dominant variable zonular pulverulent cataract.

    PubMed

    Ren, Z; Li, A; Shastry, B S; Padma, T; Ayyagari, R; Scott, M H; Parks, M M; Kaiser-Kupfer, M I; Hejtmancik, J F

    2000-05-01

    A seven-generation family with 30 members affected by highly variable autosomal dominant zonular pulverulent cataracts has been previously described. We have localized the cataracts to a 19-cM interval on chromosome 2q33-q35 including the gamma-crystallin gene cluster. Maximum lod scores are 4.56 (theta=0.02) with D2S157, 3.66 (theta=0.12) with D2S72, and 3.57 (theta=0.052) with CRYG. Sequencing and allele-specific oligonucleotide analysis of the pseudo gammaE-crystallin promoter region from individuals in the pedigree suggest that activation of the gammaE-crystallin pseudo gene is unlikely to cause the cataracts in the family. In addition, base changes in the TATA box but not the Sp1-binding site have been found in unaffected controls and can be excluded as a sole cause of cataracts. In order to investigate the underlying genetic mechanism of cataracts in this family further, exons of the highly expressed gammaC- and gammaD-crystallin genes have been sequenced. The gammaD-crystallin gene shows no abnormalities, but a 5-bp duplication within exon 2 of the gammaC-crystallin gene has been found in one allele of each affected family member and is absent from both unaffected family members and unaffected controls. This mutation disrupts the reading frame of the gammaC-crystallin coding sequence and is predicted to result in the synthesis of an unstable gammaC-crystallin with 38 amino acids of the first "Greek key" motif followed by 52 random amino acids. This finding suggests that the appropriate association of mutant betagamma-crystallins into oligomers is not necessary to cause cataracts and may give us new insights into the genetic mechanism of cataract formation.

  1. The severe autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa rhodopsin mutant Ter349Glu mislocalizes and induces rapid rod cell death.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, T J; Gross, Alecia K

    2013-10-01

    Mutations in the rhodopsin gene cause approximately one-tenth of retinitis pigmentosa cases worldwide, and most result in endoplasmic reticulum retention and apoptosis. Other rhodopsin mutations cause receptor mislocalization, diminished/constitutive activity, or faulty protein-protein interactions. The purpose of this study was to test for mechanisms by which the autosomal dominant rhodopsin mutation Ter349Glu causes an early, rapid retinal degeneration in patients. The mutation adds an additional 51 amino acids to the C terminus of the protein. Folding and ligand interaction of Ter349Glu rhodopsin were tested by ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible) spectrophotometry. The ability of the mutant to initiate phototransduction was tested using a radioactive filter binding assay. Photoreceptor localization was assessed both in vitro and in vivo utilizing fluorescent immunochemistry on transfected cells, transgenic Xenopus laevis, and knock-in mice. Photoreceptor ultrastructure was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Spectrally, Ter349Glu rhodopsin behaves similarly to wild-type rhodopsin, absorbing maximally at 500 nm. The mutant protein also displays in vitro G protein activation similar to that of WT. In cultured cells, mislocalization was observed at high expression levels whereas ciliary localization occurred at low expression levels. Similarly, transgenic X. laevis expressing Ter349Glu rhodopsin exhibited partial mislocalization. Analysis of the Ter349Glu rhodopsin knock-in mouse showed a rapid, early onset degeneration in homozygotes with a loss of proper rod outer segment development and improper disc formation. Together, the data show that both mislocalization and rod outer segment morphogenesis are likely associated with the human phenotype. PMID:23940033

  2. Nephroangiosclerosis in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy: is NOTCH3 mutation the common culprit?

    PubMed

    Guerrot, Dominique; François, Arnaud; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Boulos, Nada; Hanoy, Melanie; Legallicier, Bruno; Triquenot-Bagan, Aude; Guyant-Marechal, Lucie; Laquerriere, Annie; Freguin-Bouilland, Caroline; Ronco, Pierre; Godin, Michel

    2008-08-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a systemic arterial disease characterized by impairment of vascular smooth muscle cell structure and function related to NOTCH3 mutations. Pathological findings include pathognomonic granular osmiophilic material (GOM) deposition with nonspecific hyalinization within the artery wall in a variety of tissues. The main clinical presentation is iterative strokes in young adults despite the lack of cardiovascular risk factors, leading to early dementia. Although arteriosclerosis and GOM have been found in kidneys from patients with CADASIL, kidney disease has been described only once up to now, in association with immunoglobulin A nephropathy. We report the case of a 61-year-old patient with a medical history of CADASIL and recent mild hypertension. His mother also showed neuropsychiatric symptoms and end-stage renal disease of unknown cause. The patient had a chronic kidney disease defined by means of estimated glomerular filtration rate using the 4-variable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study equation of 58 mL/min/1.73 m(2) associated with mild proteinuria and intermittent microscopic hematuria. Renal histological analysis showed severe arteriosclerosis and mild interstitial fibrosis. Glomeruli did not show mesangial immunoglobulin A deposition or focal segmental proliferation. Electron microscopic analysis showed typical GOM deposition in the vicinity of altered vascular smooth muscle cells in interlobular and juxtaglomerular arteries. The nephroangiosclerosis-like lesions were unusually severe in contrast to the recent mild hypertension. The presence of GOM strongly suggests that renal lesions were related to the NOTCH3 mutation. Here, we describe the first case of familial occurrence of kidney disease with decreased kidney function in the absence of coexisting nephropathy in patients with CADASIL. We discuss the role of NOTCH3 mutation in the pathogenesis

  3. Impaired T(H)17 cell differentiation in subjects with autosomal dominant hyper-IgE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Milner, Joshua D; Brenchley, Jason M; Laurence, Arian; Freeman, Alexandra F; Hill, Brenna J; Elias, Kevin M; Kanno, Yuka; Spalding, Christine; Elloumi, Houda Z; Paulson, Michelle L; Davis, Joie; Hsu, Amy; Asher, Ava I; O'Shea, John; Holland, Steven M; Paul, William E; Douek, Daniel C

    2008-04-10

    The autosomal dominant hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES, 'Job's syndrome') is characterized by recurrent and often severe pulmonary infections, pneumatoceles, eczema, staphylococcal abscesses, mucocutaneous candidiasis, and abnormalities of bone and connective tissue. Mutations presumed to underlie HIES have recently been identified in stat3, the gene encoding STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) (refs 3, 4). Although impaired production of interferon-gamma and tumour-necrosis factor by T cells, diminished memory T-cell populations, decreased delayed-type-hypersensitivity responses and decreased in vitro lymphoproliferation in response to specific antigens have variably been described, specific immunological abnormalities that can explain the unique susceptibility to particular infections seen in HIES have not yet been defined. Here we show that interleukin (IL)-17 production by T cells is absent in HIES individuals. We observed that ex vivo T cells from subjects with HIES failed to produce IL-17, but not IL-2, tumour-necrosis factor or interferon-gamma, on mitogenic stimulation with staphylococcal enterotoxin B or on antigenic stimulation with Candida albicans or streptokinase. Purified naive T cells were unable to differentiate into IL-17-producing (T(H)17) T helper cells in vitro and had lower expression of retinoid-related orphan receptor (ROR)-gammat, which is consistent with a crucial role for STAT3 signalling in the generation of T(H)17 cells. T(H)17 cells have emerged as an important subset of helper T cells that are believed to be critical in the clearance of fungal and extracellular bacterial infections. Thus, our data suggest that the inability to produce T(H)17 cells is a mechanism underlying the susceptibility to the recurrent infections commonly seen in HIES. PMID:18337720

  4. Somatotroph pituitary adenoma with acromegaly and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: SSTR5 polymorphism and PKD1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Syro, Luis V; Sundsbak, Jamie L; Scheithauer, Bernd W; Toledo, Rodrigo A; Camargo, Mauricio; Heyer, Christina M; Sekiya, Tomoko; Uribe, Humberto; Escobar, Jorge I; Vasquez, Martin; Rotondo, Fabio; Toledo, Sergio P A; Kovacs, Kalman; Horvath, Eva; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Harris, Peter C

    2012-09-01

    A 39-year-old woman with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) presented with acromegaly and a pituitary macroadenoma. There was a family history of this renal disorder. She had undergone surgery for pituitary adenoma 6 years prior. Physical examination disclosed bitemporal hemianopsia and elevation of both basal growth hormone (GH) 106 ng/mL (normal 0-5) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) 811 ng/mL (normal 48-255) blood levels. A magnetic resonance imaging scan disclosed a 3.0 cm sellar and suprasellar mass with both optic chiasm compression and left cavernous sinus invasion. Pathologic, cytogenetic, molecular and in silico analysis was undertaken. Histologic, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies of the lesion disclosed a sparsely granulated somatotroph adenoma. Standard chromosome analysis on the blood sample showed no abnormality. Sequence analysis of the coding regions of PKD1 and PKD2 employing DNA from both peripheral leukocytes and the tumor revealed the most common PKD1 mutation, 5014_5015delAG. Analysis of the entire SSTR5 gene disclosed the variant c.142C>A (p.L48M, rs4988483) in the heterozygous state in both blood and tumor, while no pathogenic mutations were noted in the MEN1, AIP, p27Kip1 and SSTR2 genes. To our knowledge, this is the fourth reported case of a GH-producing pituitary adenoma associated with ADPKD, but the first subjected to extensive morphological, ultrastructural, cytogenetic and molecular studies. The physical proximity of the PKD1 and SSTR5 genes on chromosome 16 suggests a causal relationship between ADPKD and somatotroph adenoma.

  5. Somatotroph Pituitary Adenoma with Acromegaly and Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease – SSTR5 polymorphism and PKD1 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Syro, Luis V.; Sundsbak, Jamie L.; Scheithauer, Bernd W.; Toledo, Rodrigo A.; Camargo, Mauricio; Heyer, Christina M.; Sekiya, Tomoko; Uribe, Humberto; Escobar, Jorge I.; Vasquez, Martin; Rotondo, Fabio; Toledo, Sergio P. A.; Kovacs, Kalman; Horvath, Eva; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Harris, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    A 39-year-old woman with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) presented with acromegaly and a pituitary macroadenoma. There was a family history of this renal disorder. She had undergone surgery for pituitary adenoma 6 years prior. Physical examination disclosed bitemporal hemianopsia and elevation of both basal growth hormone (GH) 106 ng/mL (normal 0–5) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) 811 ng/mL (normal 48–255) blood levels. A magnetic resonance imaging scan disclosed a 3.0 cm sellar and suprasellar mass with both optic chiasm compression and left cavernous sinus invasion. Histologic, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies of the lesion disclosed a sparsely granulated somatotroph adenoma. Standard chromosome analysis on the blood sample showed no abnormality. Sequence analysis of the coding regions of PKD1 and PKD2 employing DNA from both peripheral leukocytes and the tumor revealed the most common PKD1 mutation, 5014_5015delAG. Analysis of the entire SSTR5 gene disclosed the variant c.143C>A (p.L48M, rs4988483) change in the heterozygous state in both blood and tumor, while no pathogenic mutations were noted in the MEN1, AIP, p27Kip1 and SSTR2 genes. To our knowledge, this is the fourth reported case of a GH-producing pituitary adenoma associated with ADPKD, but the first subject to extensive morphological, ultrastructural, cytogenetic and molecular studies. The question arises whether the physical proximity of the PKD1 and SSTR5 genes on chromosome 16 indicates a causal relationship between ADPKD and the somatotroph adenoma. PMID:21744088

  6. Determination of Autosomal Dominant or Recessive Methionine Adenosyltransferase I/III Deficiencies Based on Clinical and Molecular Studies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo-Mi; Kim, Ja Hye; Choi, Jin-Ho; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Kim, Jae-Min; Kang, Minji; Choi, In-Hee; Cheon, Chong Kun; Sohn, Young Bae; Maccarana, Marco; Yoo, Han-Wook; Lee, Beom Hee

    2016-01-01

    Methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) I/III deficiency can be inherited as autosomal dominant (AD) or as recessive (AR) traits in which mono- or biallelic MAT1A mutations have been identified, respectively. Although most patients have benign clinical outcomes, some with the AR form have neurological deficits. Here we describe 16 Korean patients with MAT I/III deficiency from 15 unrelated families identified by newborn screening. Ten probands had the AD MAT I/III deficiency, while six had AR MAT I/III deficiency. Plasma methionine (145.7 μmol/L versus 733.2 μmol/L, P < 0.05) and homocysteine levels (12.3 μmol/L versus 18.6 μmol/L, P < 0.05) were lower in the AD type than in AR type. In addition to the only reported AD MAT1A mutation, p.Arg264His, we identified two novel AD mutations, p.Arg249Gln and p.Gly280Arg. In the AR type, four previously reported and two novel mutations, p.Arg163Trp and p.Tyr335*, were identified. No exonic deletions were found by quantitative genomic polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Three-dimensional structural prediction programs indicated that the AD-type mutations were located on the dimer interface or in the substrate binding site, hindering MAT I/III dimerization or substrate binding, respectively, whereas the AR mutations were distant from the interface or substrate binding site. These results indicate that the AD or AR MAT I/III deficiency is correlated with clinical findings, substrate levels and structural features of the mutant proteins, which is important for the neurological management and genetic counseling of the patients. PMID:26933843

  7. Vascular endothelial growth factor as an angiogenesis biomarker for the progression of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Martins, D P; Souza, M A; Baitello, M E Lopes; Nogueira, V; Oliveira, C I Ferreira; Pinhel, M A de Souza; Caldas, H C; Filho, M A; Souza, D R Silva

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a hereditary nephropathy characterized by abnormal growth of epithelial cells. Genetic factors, including the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene, play an important role in its progression. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of VEGF-C936T polymorphism in the development and progression of ADPKD. In total, 302 individuals were studied and divided into two groups: G1 (73 patients with ADPKD) and G2 (229 individuals without the disease). Among the patients, 46 (63%) progressed to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and required hemodialysis and/or renal transplant. These patients were re-grouped into G1-A for progression analysis. A peripheral blood sample was obtained from all subjects; the DNA was extracted and the VEGF-C936T polymorphism analyzed using polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism. The significance level was set at P < 0.05. The homozygous wild-type genotype (C/C) was predominant in G1 (78%) and G2 (79%; P = 0.9249). We observed a significant reduction in the mean age of patients with the risk allele (C/T + T/T = 44.3 ± 13.4 years) compared to the C/C genotype (52.2 ± 9.6 years; P = 0.047) in G1-A. In conclusion, the VEGF-C936T polymorphism does not discriminate patients from controls. However, the presence of the T allele appears to accelerate the progression of ADPKD, anticipating ESRD, thereby suggesting its importance in the prognosis of the disease. However, the importance role played by VEGF gene variants in different populations and larger sample sizes must be verified. PMID:26909926

  8. Predicted Mutation Strength of Nontruncating PKD1 Mutations Aids Genotype-Phenotype Correlations in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Heyer, Christina M; Sundsbak, Jamie L; Abebe, Kaleab Z; Chapman, Arlene B; Torres, Vicente E; Grantham, Jared J; Bae, Kyongtae T; Schrier, Robert W; Perrone, Ronald D; Braun, William E; Steinman, Theodore I; Mrug, Michal; Yu, Alan S L; Brosnahan, Godela; Hopp, Katharina; Irazabal, Maria V; Bennett, William M; Flessner, Michael F; Moore, Charity G; Landsittel, Douglas; Harris, Peter C

    2016-09-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) often results in ESRD but with a highly variable course. Mutations to PKD1 or PKD2 cause ADPKD; both loci have high levels of allelic heterogeneity. We evaluated genotype-phenotype correlations in 1119 patients (945 families) from the HALT Progression of PKD Study and the Consortium of Radiologic Imaging Study of PKD Study. The population was defined as: 77.7% PKD1, 14.7% PKD2, and 7.6% with no mutation detected (NMD). Phenotypic end points were sex, eGFR, height-adjusted total kidney volume (htTKV), and liver cyst volume. Analysis of the eGFR and htTKV measures showed that the PKD1 group had more severe disease than the PKD2 group, whereas the NMD group had a PKD2-like phenotype. In both the PKD1 and PKD2 populations, men had more severe renal disease, but women had larger liver cyst volumes. Compared with nontruncating PKD1 mutations, truncating PKD1 mutations associated with lower eGFR, but the mutation groups were not differentiated by htTKV. PKD1 nontruncating mutations were evaluated for conservation and chemical change and subdivided into strong (mutation strength group 2 [MSG2]) and weak (MSG3) mutation groups. Analysis of eGFR and htTKV measures showed that patients with MSG3 but not MSG2 mutations had significantly milder disease than patients with truncating cases (MSG1), an association especially evident in extreme decile populations. Overall, we have quantified the contribution of genic and PKD1 allelic effects and sex to the ADPKD phenotype. Intrafamilial correlation analysis showed that other factors shared by families influence htTKV, with these additional genetic/environmental factors significantly affecting the ADPKD phenotype. PMID:26823553

  9. Bidirectional encroachment of collagen into the tunica media in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hairong; Blaivas, Mila; Wang, Michael M

    2012-05-25

    Arteries in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) are susceptible to smooth muscle loss and fibrosis, but the molecular components underlying these dramatic vascular changes are not well characterized. The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution of collagen isoforms in the cerebral vessels of North American CADASIL patients with classical NOTCH3 mutations. Expression of types I-VI collagen in brains obtained at autopsy from six CADASIL patients with cysteine-altering mutations in NOTCH3 was compared to control brain expression. We identified a consistent increase of types I, III, IV, and VI collagen in CADASIL brains. Strong accumulation of types I, III, IV and VI collagen was noted in all calibers of vessels, including small and medium-sized leptomeningeal arteries, small penetrating white matter arteries, and capillaries. Within leptomeningeal arteries, where we could define the three tunicae of each vessel, we found distinct collagen subtype distribution patterns in CADASIL. Types I and III collagen were largely found in either adventitial/medial or transmural locations. Type IV collagen was strictly intimal/medial. Type VI collagen was adventitial or adventitial/medial. Within the thickened penetrating arteries of CADASIL patients, all four collagens extended through most of the arterial wall. We observed increased staining of capillaries in CADASIL for types I, IV, and VI collagen. In conclusion, brain vascular collagen subtypes are increased in CADASIL in multiple layers of all sizes of arteries, with disease-specific changes most prominent in the tunica media and thickened small penetrating vessels. In diseased arteries, types I, III, and VI collagen spreads from an external location (adventitia) into the vascular media, while type IV collagen accumulates in an internal pattern (intima and media). These observations are consistent with a pathological role for collagen

  10. Identification of novel PKD1 and PKD2 mutations in a Chinese population with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bei; Chen, Song-Chang; Yang, Yan-Mei; Yan, Kai; Qian, Ye-Qing; Zhang, Jun-Yu; Hu, Yu-Ting; Dong, Min-Yue; Jin, Fan; Huang, He-Feng; Xu, Chen-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is one of the most frequently inherited renal diseases caused by mutations in PKD1 and PKD2. We performed mutational analyses of PKD genes in 49 unrelated patients using direct PCR-sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for PKD1 and PKD2. RT-PCR analysis was also performed in a family with a novel PKD2 splicing mutation. Disease-causing mutations were identified in 44 (89.8%) of the patients: 42 (95.5%) of the patients showed mutations in PKD1, and 2 (4.5%) showed mutations in PKD2. Ten nonsense, 17 frameshift, 4 splicing and one in-frame mutation were found in 32 of the patients. Large rearrangements were found in 3 patients, and missense mutations were found in 9 patients. Approximately 61.4% (27/44) of the mutations are first reported with a known mutation rate of 38.6%. RNA analysis of a novel PKD2 mutation (c.595_595 + 14delGGTAAGAGCGCGCGA) suggested monoallelic expression of the wild-type allele. Furthermore, patients with PKD1-truncating mutations reached end-stage renal disease (ESRD) earlier than patients with non-truncating mutations (47 ± 3.522 years vs. 59 ± 11.687 years, P = 0.016). The mutation screening of PKD genes in Chinese ADPKD patients will enrich our mutation database and significantly contribute to improve genetic counselling for ADPKD patients. PMID:26632257

  11. Differentially expressed genes in autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II osteoclasts reveal known and novel pathways for osteoclast biology.

    PubMed

    Coudert, Amélie E; Del Fattore, Andrea; Baulard, Céline; Olaso, Robert; Schiltz, Corinne; Collet, Corinne; Teti, Anna; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine

    2014-03-01

    Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II (ADO II) is a rare, heritable bone disorder characterized by a high bone mass and insufficient osteoclast activity. Mutations in the CLCN7 gene have been reported to cause ADO II. To gain novel insights into the pathways dysregulated in ADOII osteoclasts, we identified changes in gene expression in osteoclasts from patients with a heterozygous mutation of CLCN7. To do this, we carried out a transcriptomic study comparing gene expression in the osteoclasts of patients with ADO II and healthy donors. Our data show that, according to our selection criteria, 182 genes were differentially expressed in osteoclasts from patients and controls. From the 18 displaying the highest change in microarray, we confirmed differential expression for seven by qPCR. Although two of them have previously been found to be expressed in osteoclasts (ITGB5 and SERPINE2), the other five (CES1 (carboxyl esterase 1), UCHL1 (ubiquitin carboxy-terminal esterase L1, also known as ubiquitin thiolesterase), WARS (tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase), GBP4 (guanylate-binding protein 4), and PRF1) are not yet known to have a role in this cell type. At the protein level, we confirmed elevated expression of ITGB5 and reduced expression of WARS, PRF1, and SERPINE2. Transfection of ClC-7 harboring the G215R mutation into osteoclasts resulted in an increased ITGB5 and reduced PRF1 expression of borderline significance. Finally, we observed that the ADO II patients presented a normal or increased serum level of bone formation markers, demonstrating a coupling between dysfunctional osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Sphingosine kinase 1 mRNA was expressed at the same level in ADO II and control osteoclasts. In conclusion, these data suggest that in addition to an acidification dysfunction caused by the CLCN7 mutation, a change in ITGB5, PRF1, WARS, and SERPINE2 expression could be part of the osteoclastic phenotype of ADO II.

  12. Therapeutic Area Data Standards for Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: A Report From the Polycystic Kidney Disease Outcomes Consortium (PKDOC).

    PubMed

    Perrone, Ronald D; Neville, Jon; Chapman, Arlene B; Gitomer, Berenice Y; Miskulin, Dana C; Torres, Vicente E; Czerwiec, Frank S; Dennis, Eslie; Kisler, Bron; Kopko, Steve; Krasa, Holly B; LeRoy, Elizabeth; Castedo, Juliana; Schrier, Robert W; Broadbent, Steve

    2015-10-01

    Data standards provide a structure for consistent understanding and exchange of data and enable the integration of data across studies for integrated analysis. There is no data standard applicable to kidney disease. We describe the process for development of the first-ever Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) data standard for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) by the Polycystic Kidney Disease Outcomes Consortium (PKDOC). Definition of common data elements and creation of ADPKD-specific data standards from case report forms used in long-term ADPKD registries, an observational cohort (Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies of Polycystic Kidney Disease [CRISP] 1 and 2), and a randomized clinical trial (Halt Progression of Polycystic Kidney Disease [HALT-PKD]) are described in detail. This data standard underwent extensive review, including a global public comment period, and is now available online as the first PKD-specific data standard (www.cdisc.org/therapeutic). Submission of clinical trial data that use standard data structures and terminology will be required for new electronic submissions to the US Food and Drug Administration for all disease areas by the end of 2016. This data standard will allow for the mapping and pooling of available data into a common data set in addition to providing a foundation for future studies, data sharing, and long-term registries in ADPKD. This data set will also be used to support the regulatory qualification of total kidney volume as a prognostic biomarker for use in clinical trials. The availability of consensus data standards for ADPKD has the potential to facilitate clinical trial initiation and increase sharing and aggregation of data across observational studies and among completed clinical trials, thereby improving our understanding of disease progression and treatment. PMID:26088508

  13. De novo post-transplant thrombotic microangiopathy localized only to the graft in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease with thrombophilia

    PubMed Central

    Rolla, Davide; Fontana, Iris; Ravetti, Jean Louis; Marsano, Luigina; Bellino, Diego; Panaro, Laura; Ansaldo, Francesca; Mathiasen, Lisa; Storace, Giulia; Trezzi, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a serious complication of renal transplantation and is mostly related to the prothrombotic effect of calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs). A subset of TMA (29%-38%) is localized only to the graft. Case 1: A young woman suffering from autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) underwent kidney transplant. After 2 months, she showed slow renal deterioration (serum creatinine from 1.9 to 3.1 mg/dl), without hematological signs of hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS); only LDH enzyme transient increase was detected. Renal biopsy showed TMA: temporary withdraw of tacrolimus and plasmapheresis was performed. The renal function recovered (serum creatinine 1.9 mg/dl). From screening for thrombophilia, we found a mutation of the Leiden factor V gene. Case 2: A man affected by ADPKD underwent kidney transplantation, with delay graft function; first biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis, but a second biopsy revealed TMA, while no altered hematological parameters of HUS was detected. We observed only a slight increase of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels. The tacrolimus was halved and plasmapheresis was performed: LDH levels normalized within 10 days and renal function improved (serum creatinine from 9 to 2.9 mg/dl). We found a mutation of the prothrombin gene. Only a renal biopsy clarifies the diagnosis of TMA, but it is necessary to pay attention to light increasing level of LDH. Conclusion: Prothrombotic effect of CNIs and mTOR inhibitor, mutation of genes encoding factor H or I, anticardiolipin antibodies, vascular rejection, cytomegalovirus infection are proposed to trigger TMA; we detected mutations of factor II and Leiden factor V, as facilitating conditions for TMA in patients affected by ADPKD. PMID:26693501

  14. Cold temperature improves mobility and survival in Drosophila models of autosomal-dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP).

    PubMed

    Baxter, Sally L; Allard, Denise E; Crowl, Christopher; Sherwood, Nina Tang

    2014-08-01

    Autosomal-dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) is a crippling neurodegenerative disease for which effective treatment or cure remains unknown. Victims experience progressive mobility loss due to degeneration of the longest axons in the spinal cord. Over half of AD-HSP cases arise from loss-of-function mutations in spastin, which encodes a microtubule-severing AAA ATPase. In Drosophila models of AD-HSP, larvae lacking Spastin exhibit abnormal motor neuron morphology and function, and most die as pupae. Adult survivors display impaired mobility, reminiscent of the human disease. Here, we show that rearing pupae or adults at reduced temperature (18°C), compared with the standard temperature of 24°C, improves the survival and mobility of adult spastin mutants but leaves wild-type flies unaffected. Flies expressing human spastin with pathogenic mutations are similarly rescued. Additionally, larval cooling partially rescues the larval synaptic phenotype. Cooling thus alleviates known spastin phenotypes for each developmental stage at which it is administered and, notably, is effective even in mature adults. We find further that cold treatment rescues larval synaptic defects in flies with mutations in Flower (a protein with no known relation to Spastin) and mobility defects in flies lacking Kat60-L1, another microtubule-severing protein enriched in the CNS. Together, these data support the hypothesis that the beneficial effects of cold extend beyond specific alleviation of Spastin dysfunction, to at least a subset of cellular and behavioral neuronal defects. Mild hypothermia, a common neuroprotective technique in clinical treatment of acute anoxia, might thus hold additional promise as a therapeutic approach for AD-HSP and, potentially, for other neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Therapeutic Area Data Standards for Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: A Report From the Polycystic Kidney Disease Outcomes Consortium (PKDOC).

    PubMed

    Perrone, Ronald D; Neville, Jon; Chapman, Arlene B; Gitomer, Berenice Y; Miskulin, Dana C; Torres, Vicente E; Czerwiec, Frank S; Dennis, Eslie; Kisler, Bron; Kopko, Steve; Krasa, Holly B; LeRoy, Elizabeth; Castedo, Juliana; Schrier, Robert W; Broadbent, Steve

    2015-10-01

    Data standards provide a structure for consistent understanding and exchange of data and enable the integration of data across studies for integrated analysis. There is no data standard applicable to kidney disease. We describe the process for development of the first-ever Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) data standard for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) by the Polycystic Kidney Disease Outcomes Consortium (PKDOC). Definition of common data elements and creation of ADPKD-specific data standards from case report forms used in long-term ADPKD registries, an observational cohort (Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies of Polycystic Kidney Disease [CRISP] 1 and 2), and a randomized clinical trial (Halt Progression of Polycystic Kidney Disease [HALT-PKD]) are described in detail. This data standard underwent extensive review, including a global public comment period, and is now available online as the first PKD-specific data standard (www.cdisc.org/therapeutic). Submission of clinical trial data that use standard data structures and terminology will be required for new electronic submissions to the US Food and Drug Administration for all disease areas by the end of 2016. This data standard will allow for the mapping and pooling of available data into a common data set in addition to providing a foundation for future studies, data sharing, and long-term registries in ADPKD. This data set will also be used to support the regulatory qualification of total kidney volume as a prognostic biomarker for use in clinical trials. The availability of consensus data standards for ADPKD has the potential to facilitate clinical trial initiation and increase sharing and aggregation of data across observational studies and among completed clinical trials, thereby improving our understanding of disease progression and treatment.

  16. Identification of a Novel Gene on 10q22.1 Causing Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa (adRP)

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Lori S.; Bowne, Sara J.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Blanton, Susan H.; Wheaton, Dianna K.; Avery, Cheryl E.; Cadena, Elizabeth D.; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Fulton, Robert S.; Wilson, Richard K.; Weinstock, George M.; Lewis, Richard A.; Birch, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome linkage mapping identified a region on chromosome 10q21.3–q22.1 with a maximum LOD score of 3.0 at 0 % recombination in a six-generation family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). All known adRP genes and X-linked RP genes were excluded in the family by a combination of methods. Whole-exome next-generation sequencing revealed a missense mutation in hexokinase 1, HK1 c.2539G > A, p.Glu847Lys, tracking with disease in all affected family members. One severely-affected male is homozygous for this region by linkage analysis and has two copies of the mutation. No other potential mutations were detected in the linkage region nor were any candidates identified elsewhere in the genome. Subsequent testing detected the same mutation in four additional, unrelated adRP families, for a total of five mutations in 404 probands tested (1.2 %). Of the five families, three are from the Acadian population in Louisiana, one is French Canadian and one is Sicilian. Haplotype analysis of the affected chromosome in each family and the homozygous individual revealed a rare, shared haplotype of 450 kb, suggesting an ancient founder mutation. HK1 is a widely-expressed gene, with multiple, abundant retinal transcripts, coding for hexokinase 1. Hexokinase catalyzes phosphorylation of glucose to glusose-6-phospate, the first step in glycolysis. The Glu847Lys mutation is in a highly-conserved site, outside of the active site or known functional sites. PMID:26427411

  17. Genetic diagnosis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease by targeted capture and next-generation sequencing: utility and limitations.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiao-Ping; Du, Zhen-Fang; Ma, Ju-Ming; Chen, Xiao-Ling; Zhang, Qing; Fei, Jun; Wei, Xiao-Ming; Chen, Dong; Ke, Hai-Ping; Liu, Xuan-Zhu; Li, Feng; Chen, Zhen-Guang; Su, Zheng; Jin, Hang-Yang; Liu, Wen-Ting; Zhao, Yan; Jiang, Hu-Ling; Lan, Zhang-Zhang; Li, Peng-Fei; Fang, Ming-Yan; Dong, Wei; Zhang, Xian-Ning

    2013-03-01

    Mutation-based molecular diagnostics of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is complicated by genetic and allelic heterogeneity, large multi-exon genes, and duplication sequences of PKD1. Recently, targeted resequencing by pooling long-range polymerase chain reaction (LR-PCR) amplicons has been used in the identification of mutations in ADPKD. Despite its high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy, LR-PCR is still complicated. We performed whole-exome sequencing on two unrelated typical Chinese ADPKD probands and evaluated the effectiveness of this approach compared with Sanger sequencing. Meanwhile, we performed targeted gene and next-generation sequencing (targeted DNA-HiSeq) on 8 individuals (1 patient from one family, 5 patients and 2 normal individuals from another family). Both whole-exome sequencing and targeted DNA-HiSeq confirmed c.11364delC (p.H3788QfsX37) within the unduplicated region of PKD1 in one proband; in the other family, targeted DNA-HiSeq identified a small insertion, c.401_402insG (p.V134VfsX79), in PKD2. These methods do not overcome the screening complexity of homology. However, the true positives of variants confirmed by targeted gene and next-generation sequencing were 69.4%, 50% and 100% without a false positive in the whole coding region and the duplicated and unduplicated regions, which indicated that the screening accuracy of PKD1 and PKD2 can be largely improved by using a greater sequencing depth and elaborate design of the capture probe.

  18. Loss-of-Function Mutations in the WNT Co-receptor LRP6 Cause Autosomal-Dominant Oligodontia

    PubMed Central

    Massink, Maarten P.G.; Créton, Marijn A.; Spanevello, Francesca; Fennis, Willem M.M.; Cune, Marco S.; Savelberg, Sanne M.C.; Nijman, Isaäc J.; Maurice, Madelon M.; van den Boogaard, Marie-José H.; van Haaften, Gijs

    2015-01-01

    Tooth agenesis is one of the most common developmental anomalies in man. Oligodontia, a severe form of tooth agenesis, occurs both as an isolated anomaly and as a syndromal feature. We performed exome sequencing on 20 unrelated individuals with apparent non-syndromic oligodontia and failed to detect mutations in genes previously associated with oligodontia. In three of the probands, we detected heterozygous variants in LRP6, and sequencing of additional oligodontia-affected individuals yielded one additional mutation in LRP6. Three mutations (c.1144_1145dupAG [p.Ala383Glyfs∗8], c.1779dupT [p.Glu594∗], and c.2224_2225dupTT [p.Leu742Phefs∗7]) are predicted to truncate the protein, whereas the fourth (c.56C>T [p.Ala19Val]) is a missense variant of a conserved residue located at the cleavage site of the protein’s signal peptide. All four affected individuals harboring a LRP6 mutation had a family history of tooth agenesis. LRP6 encodes a transmembrane cell-surface protein that functions as a co-receptor with members from the Frizzled protein family in the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade. In this same pathway, WNT10A was recently identified as a major contributor in the etiology of non-syndromic oligodontia. We show that the LRP6 missense variant (c.56C>T) results in altered glycosylation and improper subcellular localization of the protein, resulting in abrogated activation of the Wnt pathway. Our results identify LRP6 variants as contributing to the etiology of non-syndromic autosomal-dominant oligodontia and suggest that this gene is a candidate for screening in DNA diagnostics. PMID:26387593

  19. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, insulin resistance, and endothelial dysfunction in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Turkmen, K.; Tufan, F.; Selçuk, E.; Akpınar, T.; Oflaz, H.; Ecder, T.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction (ED), insulin resistance (IR), and inflammation are risk factors for increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). ADPKD patients may have increased carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and decreased coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR). The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) was introduced as a marker to determine inflammation in various disorders. We aimed to investigate the relationship between NLR and IR, CFVR, CIMT, and the left ventricular mass index (LVMI) in normotensive ADPKD patients. Twentynine ADPKD patients (age 38.8 ± 10.2 years; 8 men and 21 women) and 19 healthy controls (age 33.8 ± 7.4 years; 8 men and 11 women) were included in this cross-sectional study. CFVR was calculated with echocardiography as the ratio of hyperemic to baseline diastolic peak coronary flow velocities. CIMT was measured in the distal common carotid artery by using a 10-MHz linear echocardiography probe. HOMA-IR was calculated NLR was calculated as the ratio of the neutrophil and lymphocyte counts. Age, sex, body mass index, and levels of glucose, creatinine, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein (CRP), microalbuminuria, and creatinine clearance were similar between ADPKD patients and healthy subjects. NLR, CIMT, LVMI, and HOMA-IR were significantly higher and CFVR values were significantly lower in patients with ADPKD compared to that in healthy subjects. NLR showed positive correlation with CIMT, HOMA, insulin, glucose, and HDL cholesterol levels, while it was inversely correlated with CFVR and albumin level in all subjects. In patients with ADPKD, NLR showed positive correlation with HDL cholesterol level and inverse correlation with LVMI and albumin level. NLR that was found to be increased in patients with ADPKD may be a readily available marker of inflammation and ED. PMID:23580803

  20. Autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia with sensory axonal neuropathy (SCA4): clinical description and genetic localization to chromosome 16q22.1.

    PubMed Central

    Flanigan, K.; Gardner, K.; Alderson, K.; Galster, B.; Otterud, B.; Leppert, M. F.; Kaplan, C.; Ptácek, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    The hereditary ataxias represent a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. Various classification schemes based on clinical criteria are being replaced as molecular characterization of the ataxias proceeds; so far, seven distinct autosomal dominant hereditary ataxias have been genetically mapped in the human genome. We report linkage to chromosome 16q22.1 for one of these genes (SCA4) in a five-generation family with an autosomal dominant, late-onset spinocerebellar ataxia; the gene is tightly linked to the microsatellite marker D16S397 (LOD score = 5.93 at theta = .00). In addition, we present clinical and electrophysiological data regarding the distinct and previously unreported phenotype consisting of ataxia with the invariant presence of a prominent axonal sensory neuropathy. PMID:8755926

  1. Deletion of the entire POU4F3 gene in a familial case of autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Érika L; Oiticica, Jeanne; Silva, Amanda G; Bittar, Roseli S M; Rosenberg, Carla; Mingroni-Netto, Regina C

    2014-03-01

    In 20% of cases, hereditary non-syndromic hearing loss has an autosomal dominant inheritance (ADNSHL). To date, more than 50 loci for ADNSHL have been mapped to different chromosomal regions. In order to verify whether genomic alterations contribute to the hearing loss etiology and to search for novel deafness candidate loci, we investigated probands from families with ADNSHL by oligonucleotide array-CGH. A deletion in the 5q32 region encompassing only one gene, POU4F3, which corresponds to DFNA15, was detected in one family. POU4F3 protein has an important role in the maturation, differentiation and survival of cochlear hair cells. Defects in these cells may therefore explain sensorineural hearing loss. Mutations in this gene have already been associated with autosomal dominant hearing loss but this is the first description of a germline POUF4F3 deletion associated with hearing impairment.

  2. Functional characteristics of three new germline mutations of the thyrotropin receptor gene causing autosomal dominant toxic thyroid hyperplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Tonacchera, M.; Van Sande, J.; Cetani, F.

    1996-02-01

    We report three unrelated families in which hyperthyroidism associated with thyroid hyperplasia was transmitted in an autosomal dominant fashion, in the absence of signs of autoimmunity. Exon 10 of the TSH receptor gene was directly sequenced after PCR amplification from DNA of peripheral leukocytes. In one family, a C to A transversion resulted in an S505R substitution in the third transmembrane segment; in the second, an A to T transversion caused an N650Y substitution in the sixth transmembrane segment; and in the third family, an A to G transition resulted in an N670S substitution in the seventh transmembrane segment. When expressed by transfection in COS-7 cells, each mutated receptor displayed an increase in constitutive stimulation of cAMP production; no effect on basal accumulation of inositol phosphates (IP) could be detected. In binding studies, cells transfected with wild-type of mutated receptors showed similar levels of expression, with the mutated receptors displaying similar or slightly increased affinity for bovine TSH (bTSH) binding. Cells transfected with S505R and N650Y mutants showed a similar cAMP maximal TSH-stimulated accumulation over the cells transfected with the wild type, whereas N670S transfectants showed a blunted response with an increase in EC{sub 50}. A higher IP response to 100 mU/mL bTSH over that obtained with the wild-type receptor was obtained in cells transfected with N650Y; in contrast, cells transfected with S505R showed a blunted IP production (50% less), and the N670S mutant completely lost the ability to stimulate IP accumulation in response to bTSH. The differential effects of individual mutations on stimulation by bTSH of cAMP or IP accumulation suggest that individual mutant receptors may achieve different active conformations with selective abilities to couple to G{sub s}{alpha} and to G{sub q}{alpha}. 17 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Urine-sample-derived human induced pluripotent stem cells as a model to study PCSK9-mediated autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Si-Tayeb, Karim; Idriss, Salam; Champon, Benoite; Caillaud, Amandine; Pichelin, Matthieu; Arnaud, Lucie; Lemarchand, Patricia; Le May, Cédric; Zibara, Kazem; Cariou, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a critical modulator of cholesterol homeostasis. Whereas PCSK9 gain-of-function (GOF) mutations are associated with autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH) and premature atherosclerosis, PCSK9 loss-of-function (LOF) mutations have a cardio-protective effect and in some cases can lead to familial hypobetalipoproteinemia (FHBL). However, limitations of the currently available cellular models preclude deciphering the consequences of PCSK9 mutation further. We aimed to validate urine-sample-derived human induced pluripotent stem cells (UhiPSCs) as an appropriate tool to model PCSK9-mediated ADH and FHBL. To achieve our goal, urine-sample-derived somatic cells were reprogrammed into hiPSCs by using episomal vectors. UhiPSC were efficiently differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). Compared to control cells, cells originally derived from an individual with ADH (HLC-S127R) secreted less PCSK9 in the media (-38.5%; P=0.038) and had a 71% decrease (P<0.001) of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake, whereas cells originally derived from an individual with FHBL (HLC-R104C/V114A) displayed a strong decrease in PCSK9 secretion (-89.7%; P<0.001) and had a 106% increase (P=0.0104) of LDL uptake. Pravastatin treatment significantly enhanced LDL receptor (LDLR) and PCSK9 mRNA gene expression, as well as PCSK9 secretion and LDL uptake in both control and S127R HLCs. Pravastatin treatment of multiple clones led to an average increase of LDL uptake of 2.19 ± 0.77-fold in HLC-S127R compared to 1.38 ± 0.49 fold in control HLCs (P<0.01), in line with the good response to statin treatment of individuals carrying the S127R mutation (mean LDL cholesterol reduction=60.4%, n=5). In conclusion, urine samples provide an attractive and convenient source of somatic cells for reprogramming and hepatocyte differentiation, but also a powerful tool to further decipher PCSK9 mutations and function.

  4. Urine-sample-derived human induced pluripotent stem cells as a model to study PCSK9-mediated autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Si-Tayeb, Karim; Idriss, Salam; Champon, Benoite; Caillaud, Amandine; Pichelin, Matthieu; Arnaud, Lucie; Lemarchand, Patricia; Le May, Cédric; Zibara, Kazem; Cariou, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a critical modulator of cholesterol homeostasis. Whereas PCSK9 gain-of-function (GOF) mutations are associated with autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH) and premature atherosclerosis, PCSK9 loss-of-function (LOF) mutations have a cardio-protective effect and in some cases can lead to familial hypobetalipoproteinemia (FHBL). However, limitations of the currently available cellular models preclude deciphering the consequences of PCSK9 mutation further. We aimed to validate urine-sample-derived human induced pluripotent stem cells (UhiPSCs) as an appropriate tool to model PCSK9-mediated ADH and FHBL. To achieve our goal, urine-sample-derived somatic cells were reprogrammed into hiPSCs by using episomal vectors. UhiPSC were efficiently differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). Compared to control cells, cells originally derived from an individual with ADH (HLC-S127R) secreted less PCSK9 in the media (−38.5%; P=0.038) and had a 71% decrease (P<0.001) of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake, whereas cells originally derived from an individual with FHBL (HLC-R104C/V114A) displayed a strong decrease in PCSK9 secretion (−89.7%; P<0.001) and had a 106% increase (P=0.0104) of LDL uptake. Pravastatin treatment significantly enhanced LDL receptor (LDLR) and PCSK9 mRNA gene expression, as well as PCSK9 secretion and LDL uptake in both control and S127R HLCs. Pravastatin treatment of multiple clones led to an average increase of LDL uptake of 2.19±0.77-fold in HLC-S127R compared to 1.38±0.49 fold in control HLCs (P<0.01), in line with the good response to statin treatment of individuals carrying the S127R mutation (mean LDL cholesterol reduction=60.4%, n=5). In conclusion, urine samples provide an attractive and convenient source of somatic cells for reprogramming and hepatocyte differentiation, but also a powerful tool to further decipher PCSK9 mutations and function. PMID:26586530

  5. Diagnostic Algorithm in the Management of Acute Febrile Abdomen in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Neuville, Marie; Hustinx, Roland; Jacques, Jessica; Krzesinski, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute febrile abdomen represents a diagnostic challenge in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Although criteria have been proposed for cyst infection (CyI) and hemorrhage (CyH), there is a lack of comparative assessments. Furthermore, distinguishing cystic from non-cystic complications remains problematic. Design ADPKD patients presenting with abdominal pain and/or fever between 01/2005 and 06/2015 were retrospectively identified in a systematic computerized billing database. CyH was defined as spontaneous intracystic density above 50 Hounsfield units on computed tomography (CT). CyI was definite if confirmed by cyst puncture, and probable if 4 criteria were met: 3-day fever, loin/liver tenderness, C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels >50mg/L and no CT evidence for CyH. Other episodes were grouped as inflammation of unknown origin (IUO). Results Among a cohort of 173 ADPKD patients, 101 presented with 205 episodes of abdominal pain (n = 172) and/or fever (n = 33). 20 patients experienced 30 CyH, whereas 16 presented 23 episodes of definite (n = 11) or probable (n = 12) CyI. 35 IUO were observed in 31 patients. Clinically, fever was observed in 7% vs. 100% vs. 66% of CyH, CyI and IUO, respectively. Biologically, CRP cut-off at 70 mg/dl showed 92% sensitivity and 81% specificity in CyI diagnosis. Urine or blood cultures remained sterile in >90% of CyH, but were contributive in 53.4% of CyI and IUO, with a 74.2% prevalence for E. coli. Radiologically, ultrasounds, CT and magnetic resonance diagnosed CyI in 2.6%, 20% and 16.7% of cases, respectively. 18F-FDG positron-emission tomography (PET)/CT was done within a median period of 7 days post antibiotics, and significantly changed patient management in 71.4%. Conclusions This retrospective single-center series underscores the usefulness of clinical–fever–and biological–CRP–parameters, but emphasizes the limitations of bacteriological and radiological investigations

  6. In Vivo CRISPR/Cas9 Gene Editing Corrects Retinal Dystrophy in the S334ter-3 Rat Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Bakondi, Benjamin; Lv, Wenjian; Lu, Bin; Jones, Melissa K; Tsai, Yuchun; Kim, Kevin J; Levy, Rachelle; Akhtar, Aslam Abbasi; Breunig, Joshua J; Svendsen, Clive N; Wang, Shaomei

    2016-03-01

    Reliable genome editing via Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 may provide a means to correct inherited diseases in patients. As proof of principle, we show that CRISPR/Cas9 can be used in vivo to selectively ablate the rhodopsin gene carrying the dominant S334ter mutation (Rho(S334)) in rats that model severe autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. A single subretinal injection of guide RNA/Cas9 plasmid in combination with electroporation generated allele-specific disruption of Rho(S334), which prevented retinal degeneration and improved visual function.

  7. Brain imaging and blood biomarker abnormalities in children with autosomal-dominant Alzheimer's disease: A cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz, Y.T.; Schultz, A.; Chen, K.; Protas, H.; Brickhouse, M.; Fleisher, A.S.; Langbaum, J.B.; Thiyyagura, P.; Fagan, A.M.; Shah, A.R.; Muniz, M.; Arboleda-Velasquez, JF; Munoz, C.; Garcia, G.; Acosta-Baena, N.; Giraldo, M.; Tirado, V.; Ramirez, D.; Tariot, PN; Dickerson, B.C.; Sperling, R.A.; Lopera, F.; Reiman, E.M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Brain imaging and fluid biomarkers are characterized in children at risk for autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD). OBJECTIVE To characterize and compare structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), resting-state and task-dependent functional MRI, and plasma amyloid-β (Aβ) measurements in presenilin 1 (PSEN1) E280A mutation–carrying and noncarrying children with ADAD. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Cross-sectional measures of structural and functional MRI and plasma Aβ assays were assessed in 18 PSEN1 E280A carriers and 19 noncarriers aged 9 to 17 years from a Colombian kindred with ADAD. Recruitment and data collection for this study were conducted at the University of Antioquia and the Hospital Pablo Tobon Uribe in Medellin, Colombia, between August 2011 and June 2012. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES All participants had blood sampling, structural MRI, and functional MRI during associative memory encoding and resting-state and cognitive assessments. Outcome measures included plasma Aβ1-42 concentrations and Aβ1-42:Aβ1-40 ratios, memory encoding–dependent activation changes, resting-state connectivity, and regional gray matter volumes. Structural and functional MRI data were compared using automated brain mapping algorithms and search regions related to AD. RESULTS Similar to findings in adult mutation carriers, in the later preclinical and clinical stages of ADAD, mutation-carrying children were distinguished from control individuals by significantly higher plasma Aβ1-42 levels (mean [SD]: carriers, 18.8 [5.1] pg/mL and noncarriers, 13.1 [3.2] pg/mL; P < .001) and Aβ1-42:Aβ1-40 ratios (mean [SD]: carriers, 0.32 [0.06] and noncarriers, 0.21 [0.03]; P < .001), as well as less memory encoding task–related deactivation in parietal regions (eg, mean [SD] parameter estimates for the right precuneus were −0.590 [0.50] for noncarriers and −0.087 [0.38] for carriers; P < .005 uncorrected). Unlike carriers in the later stages, mutation

  8. Hypomagnesemia in Type 2 Diabetes: A Vicious Circle?

    PubMed

    Gommers, Lisanne M M; Hoenderop, Joost G J; Bindels, René J M; de Baaij, Jeroen H F

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, hypomagnesemia (serum Mg(2+) <0.7 mmol/L) has been strongly associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patients with hypomagnesemia show a more rapid disease progression and have an increased risk for diabetes complications. Clinical studies demonstrate that T2DM patients with hypomagnesemia have reduced pancreatic β-cell activity and are more insulin resistant. Moreover, dietary Mg(2+) supplementation for patients with T2DM improves glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Intracellular Mg(2+) regulates glucokinase, KATP channels, and L-type Ca(2+) channels in pancreatic β-cells, preceding insulin secretion. Moreover, insulin receptor autophosphorylation is dependent on intracellular Mg(2+) concentrations, making Mg(2+) a direct factor in the development of insulin resistance. Conversely, insulin is an important regulator of Mg(2+) homeostasis. In the kidney, insulin activates the renal Mg(2+) channel transient receptor potential melastatin type 6 that determines the final urinary Mg(2+) excretion. Consequently, patients with T2DM and hypomagnesemia enter a vicious circle in which hypomagnesemia causes insulin resistance and insulin resistance reduces serum Mg(2+) concentrations. This Perspective provides a systematic overview of the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of Mg(2+) on insulin secretion and insulin signaling. In addition to providing a review of current knowledge, we provide novel directions for future research and identify previously neglected contributors to hypomagnesemia in T2DM.

  9. The PROM1 Mutation p.R373C Causes an Autosomal Dominant Bull's Eye Maculopathy Associated with Rod, Rod–Cone, and Macular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Michaelides, Michel; Gaillard, Marie-Claire; Escher, Pascal; Tiab, Leila; Bedell, Matthew; Borruat, François-Xavier; Barthelmes, Daniel; Carmona, Ruben; Zhang, Kang; White, Edward; McClements, Michelle; Robson, Anthony G.; Holder, Graham E.; Bradshaw, Keith; Hunt, David M.; Webster, Andrew R.; Moore, Anthony T.; Schorderet, Daniel F.; Munier, Francis L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To characterize in detail the phenotype of five unrelated families with autosomal dominant bull's eye maculopathy (BEM) due to the R373C mutation in the PROM1 gene. Methods. Forty-one individuals of five families of Caribbean (family A), British (families B, D, E), and Italian (family C) origin, segregating the R373C mutation in PROM1, were ascertained. Electrophysiological assessment, fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging, fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were performed in available subjects. Mutation screening of PROM1 was performed. Results. The R373C mutant was present heterozygously in all affected patients. The age at onset was variable and ranged between 9 and 58 years, with most of the individuals presenting with reading difficulties. Subjects commonly had a mild to moderate reduction in visual acuity except for members of family C who experienced markedly reduced central vision. The retinal phenotype was characterized by macular dystrophy, with retinal pigment epithelial mottling in younger subjects, progressing to typical BEM over time, with the development of macular atrophy in older patients. In addition, all members of family C had typical features of RP. The electrophysiological findings were variable both within and between families. Conclusions. Mutations in PROM1 have been described to cause a severe form of autosomal recessive RP in two families of Indian and Pakistani descent. The results of this study have demonstrated that a distinct redundant PROM1 mutation (R373C) can also produce an autosomal dominant, fully penetrant retinopathy, characterized by BEM with little inter- and intrafamilial variability, and retinal dystrophy with variable rod or rod–cone dysfunction and marked intra- and interfamilial variability, ranging from isolated maculopathy without generalized photoreceptor dysfunction to maculopathy associated with very severe rod–cone dysfunction. PMID:20393116

  10. c.G2114A MYH9 mutation (DFNA17) causes non-syndromic autosomal dominant hearing loss in a Brazilian family

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Vitor G.L.; Lezirovitz, Karina; Yamamoto, Guilherme L.; Moura de Souza, Carolina Fischinger; Ferreira, Simone Gomes; Mingroni-Netto, Regina C.

    2014-01-01

    We studied a family presenting 10 individuals affected by autosomal dominant deafness in all frequencies and three individuals affected by high frequency hearing loss. Genomic scanning using the 50k Affymetrix microarray technology yielded a Lod Score of 2.1 in chromosome 14 and a Lod Score of 1.9 in chromosome 22. Mapping refinement using microsatellites placed the chromosome 14 candidate region between markers D14S288 and D14S276 (8.85 cM) and the chromosome 22 near marker D22S283. Exome sequencing identified two candidate variants to explain hearing loss in chromosome 14 [PTGDR – c.G894A:p.R298R and PTGER2 – c.T247G:p.C83G], and one in chromosome 22 [MYH9, c.G2114A:p.R705H]. Pedigree segregation analysis allowed exclusion of the PTGDR and PTGER2 variants as the cause of deafness. However, the MYH9 variant segregated with the phenotype in all affected members, except the three individuals with different phenotype. This gene has been previously described as mutated in autosomal dominant hereditary hearing loss and corresponds to DFNA17. The mutation identified in our study is the same described in the prior report. Thus, although linkage studies suggested a candidate gene in chromosome 14, we concluded that the mutation in chromosome 22 better explains the hearing loss phenotype in the Brazilian family. PMID:25505834

  11. Targeted gene capture and massively parallel sequencing identify TMC1 as the causative gene in a six-generation Chinese family with autosomal dominant hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xue; Huang, Sha-Sha; Yuan, Yong-Yi; Wang, Guo-Jian; Xu, Jin-Cao; Ji, Yu-Bin; Han, Ming-Yu; Yu, Fei; Kang, Dong-Yang; Lin, Xi; Dai, Pu

    2015-10-01

    Hereditary nonsyndromic hearing loss is extremely heterogeneous. Mutations in the transmembrane channel-like gene1 (TMC1) are known to cause autosomal dominant and recessive forms of nonsyndromic hearing loss linked to the loci of DFNA36 and DFNB7/11, respectively. We characterized a six-generation Chinese family (5315) with progressive, postlingual autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss (ADNSHL). By combining targeted capture of 82 known deafness genes, next-generation sequencing and bioinformatic analysis, we identified TMC1 c.1714G>A (p. D572N) as the disease-causing mutation. This mutation co-segregated with hearing loss in other family members and was not detected in 308 normal controls. In order to determine the prevalence of TMC1 c.1714G>A in Chinese ADNSHL families, we used DNA samples from 67 ADNSHL families with sloping audiogram and identified two families carry this mutation. To determine whether it arose from a common ancestor, we analyzed nine STR markers. Our results indicated that TMC1 c.1714G>A (p.D572N) account for about 4.4% (3/68) of ADNSHL in the Chinese population.

  12. Autosomal P[ovoD1] dominant female-sterile insertions in Drosophila and their use in generating germ-line chimeras.

    PubMed

    Chou, T B; Noll, E; Perrimon, N

    1993-12-01

    The 'dominant female-sterile' technique used to generate germ-line mosaics in Drosophila is a powerful tool to determine the tissue specificity (germ line versus somatic) of recessive female-sterile mutations as well as to analyze the maternal effect of recessive zygotic lethal mutations. This technique requires the availability of germ-line-dependent, dominant female-sterile (DFS) mutations that block egg laying but do not affect viability. To date only one X-linked mutation, ovoD1 has been isolated that completely fulfills these criteria. Thus the 'DFS technique' has been largely limited to the X-chromosome. To extend this technique to the autosomes, we have cloned the ovoD1 mutation into a P-element vector and recovered fully expressed P[ovoD1] insertions on each autosomal arm. We describe the generation of these P[ovoD1] strains as well as demonstrate their use in generating germ-line chimeras. Specifically, we show that the Gap1 gene, which encodes a Drosophila homologue of mammalian GTPase-activating protein, is required in somatic follicle cells for embryonic dorsoventral polarity determination.

  13. [Hypomagnesemia in patients of gynecologic neoplasms following chemotherapy with cisplatin].

    PubMed

    Li, L; Huang, W; Zhu, B

    1995-06-01

    Serum magnesium in 79 patients of gynecologic neoplasms treated with cisplatin and their controls was measured. The results showed: (1) the average value of serum magnesium in patients following chemotherapy with cisplatin was significantly lower than in the controls; (2) the incidence of hypomagnesemia was positively correlated with the number of the courses and the total dosages of chemotherapy, being 52.9% after one to three courses of treatment and 92.0% after more than six courses of treatment; (3) the incidence of hypomagnesemia was directly related with the severity of gastrointestinal disorders; (4) serum magnesium following cisplatin chemotherapy was not correlated with serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN). Hypomagnesemia is clinically characterized by symptoms of the nervous system which are found in 14.0% of hypomagnesemic patients. PMID:7555373

  14. Report of a kindred with x-linked (or autosomal dominant sex-limited) 46, XY partial gonadal dysgenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fechner, P.Y.; Marcantonio, S.M.; Ogata, T.; Rosales, T.O.; Smith, K.D.; Goodfellow, P.N.; Migeon, C.J.; Berkovitz, G.D. )

    1993-05-01

    The condition termed 46, XY complete gonadal dysgenesis is characterized by the lack of testicular determination with resulting streak gonads, normal Mullerian structures, and female external genitalia. In the partial form, there is incomplete testicular determination with a wide range in the degree of ambiguous genitalia and sexual duct development. The authors evaluated a kindred in which a partial form of 46, XY gonadal dysgenesis occurred in four subjects from two generations. Pedigree analysis indicated an X-linked or possibly an autosomal sex-limited mode of inheritance. All affected subjects were ascertained because of ambiguous genitalia with minimal virilization. At 10 days of age, the proband had a subnormal plasma level of testosterone, and at 4 months, there was no rise in plasma T after stimulation with hCG. At laparotomy, a dysgenetic gonad was found on the right side, but no gonad was found on the left side. A vas deferens was present on the right, indicating the presence of functional leydig cells early in fetal life. In the other affected subjects, gonadal tissue was also limited to one side of the abdomen and showed poorly developed seminiferous tubules. The sex-determining region Y gene, which encodes the testis-determining factor, was present and unaltered in the genomic DNA of all affected subjects. Duplication of the distal short arm of the X-chromosome has been associated with 46, XY complete gonadal dysgenesis in some patients. In the authors studies, Southern blot analysis revealed that sequences of the distal short arm of the X-chromosome were present in single copy, excluding a large duplication in this area of the X. Several kindreds with familial 46, XY complete gonadal dysgenesis have been reported; five of them had evidence of an X-linked mode of inheritance. The authors study of a kindred with 46, XY partial gonadal dysgenesis further supports the role of an X chromosome gene in testicular determination. 44 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Proton pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemia: A new challenge.

    PubMed

    Florentin, Matilda; Elisaf, Moses S

    2012-12-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are commonly used in clinical practice for the prevention and treatment of peptic ulcer, gastritis, esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux. Hypomagnesemia has recently been recognized as a side effect of PPIs. Low magnesium levels may cause symptoms from several systems, some of which being potentially serious, such as tetany, seizures and arrhythmias. It seems that PPIs affect the gastrointestinal absorption of magnesium. Clinicians should be vigilant in order to timely consider and prevent or reverse hypomagnesemia in patients who take PPIs, especially if they are prone to this electrolyte disorder.

  16. Proton pump inhibitors and hypomagnesemia: a rare but serious complication.

    PubMed

    Perazella, Mark A

    2013-04-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) promote hypomagnesemia through loss of active Mg(2+) absorption via transient receptor potential melastatin-6 and -7 (TRPM6/7). Danziger et al. confirm the association of PPIs with hypomagnesemia in patients hospitalized at a tertiary medical center. They found that patients taking PPIs, compared with those receiving histamine-2 antagonists or no acid-suppressive medications, had a decline in serum Mg(2+) after adjusting for several clinical and laboratory factors. The effect was seen only in those concomitantly receiving diuretics.

  17. Clinical variability of the cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy phenotype in two siblings of a large family showing the same mutation

    PubMed Central

    Vyshka, Gentian; Kruja, Jera

    2013-01-01

    A 44-year-old Albanian male was consulted and diagnosed with dementia. His magnetic resonance imaging suggested diffuse white matter changes. The suspicion of cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) was raised, and a genetic analysis confirmed such a suspicion through uncovering a pathogenic mutation at the level of exon 4 (c.475C>T) of chromosome 19. The patient came from a large family of 13 children, all of whom underwent clinical, genetic, and imaging examination. The pathogenic mutation was found present only in his eldest sister (50 years old), and she presented also very suggestive signs of CADASIL in her respective imaging study, but without any clinically significant counterpart. All other siblings were free from clinical and radiological signs of the disorder. Our opinion was that we were dealing with a mutation showing a very low level of penetrance, with only two siblings affected in a large Albanian family with 13 children. PMID:24124395

  18. Targeted deletion of the Nesp55 DMR defines another Gnas imprinting control region and provides a mouse model of autosomal dominant PHP-Ib.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Leopold F; Mrakovcic, Maria; Steinborn, Ralf; Chung, Ung-Il; Bastepe, Murat; Jüppner, Harald

    2010-05-18

    Approximately 100 genes undergo genomic imprinting. Mutations in fewer than 10 imprinted genetic loci, including GNAS, are associated with complex human diseases that differ phenotypically based on the parent transmitting the mutation. Besides the ubiquitously expressed Gsalpha, which is of broad biological importance, GNAS gives rise to an antisense transcript and to several Gsalpha variants that are transcribed from the nonmethylated parental allele. We previously identified two almost identical GNAS microdeletions extending from exon NESP55 to antisense (AS) exon 3 (delNESP55/delAS3-4). When inherited maternally, both deletions are associated with erasure of all maternal GNAS methylation imprints and autosomal-dominant pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib, a disorder characterized by parathyroid hormone-resistant hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia. As for other imprinting disorders, the mechanisms resulting in abnormal GNAS methylation are largely unknown, in part because of a paucity of suitable animal models. We now showed in mice that deletion of the region equivalent to delNESP55/delAS3-4 on the paternal allele (DeltaNesp55(p)) leads to healthy animals without Gnas methylation changes. In contrast, mice carrying the deletion on the maternal allele (DeltaNesp55(m)) showed loss of all maternal Gnas methylation imprints, leading in kidney to increased 1A transcription and decreased Gsalpha mRNA levels, and to associated hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Besides representing a murine autosomal-dominant pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib model and one of only few animal models for imprinted human disorders, our findings suggest that the Nesp55 differentially methylated region is an additional principal imprinting control region, which directs Gnas methylation and thereby affects expression of all maternal Gnas-derived transcripts.

  19. Autosomal dominant hereditary sensory neuropathy with chronic cough and gastro-oesophageal reflux: clinical features in two families linked to chromosome 3p22-p24.

    PubMed

    Spring, Penelope J; Kok, Cindy; Nicholson, Garth A; Ing, Alvin J; Spies, Judith M; Bassett, Mark L; Cameron, John; Kerlin, Paul; Bowler, Simon; Tuck, Roger; Pollard, John D

    2005-12-01

    Autosomal dominant hereditary sensory neuropathy (HSN I) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, and in some families it is due to mutations in the serine palmitoyltransferase (SPTLC1) gene. We have characterized two families with HSN I associated with cough and gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR). From a large Australian family, 27 individuals and from a smaller family, 11 individuals provided clinical information and blood for genetic analysis. Affected individuals had an adult onset of paroxysmal cough, GOR and distal sensory loss. Cough could be triggered by noxious odours or by pressure in the external auditory canal (Arnold's ear-cough reflex). Other features included throat clearing, hoarse voice, cough syncope and sensorineural hearing loss. Neurophysiological and pathological studies demonstrated a sensory axonal neuropathy. Gastric emptying studies were normal, and autonomic function and sweat tests were either normal or showed distal hypohidrosis. Cough was likely to be due to a combination of denervation hypersensitivity of the upper airways and oesophagus, and prominent GOR. Most affected individuals were shown on 24 h ambulatory oesophageal pH monitoring to have multiple episodes of GOR, closely temporally associated with coughing. Hoarse voice was probably attributable to acid-induced laryngeal damage, and there was no evidence of vocal cord palsy. No other cause for cough was found on most respiratory or otorhinological studies. Linkage to chromosome 3p22-p24 has been found in both families, with no evidence of linkage to loci for known HSN I, autosomal dominant hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, hereditary GOR or triple A syndrome. These families represent a genetically novel variant of HSN I, with a distinctive cough owing to involvement of the upper aerodigestive tract. PMID:16311270

  20. Heterozygous Loss-of-Function SEC61A1 Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Tubulo-Interstitial and Glomerulocystic Kidney Disease with Anemia.

    PubMed

    Bolar, Nikhita Ajit; Golzio, Christelle; Živná, Martina; Hayot, Gaëlle; Van Hemelrijk, Christine; Schepers, Dorien; Vandeweyer, Geert; Hoischen, Alexander; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Raes, Ann; Matthys, Erve; Sys, Emiel; Azou, Myriam; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Praet, Marleen; Van Camp, Guy; McFadden, Kelsey; Pediaditakis, Igor; Přistoupilová, Anna; Hodaňová, Kateřina; Vyleťal, Petr; Hartmannová, Hana; Stránecký, Viktor; Hůlková, Helena; Barešová, Veronika; Jedličková, Ivana; Sovová, Jana; Hnízda, Aleš; Kidd, Kendrah; Bleyer, Anthony J; Spong, Richard S; Vande Walle, Johan; Mortier, Geert; Brunner, Han; Van Laer, Lut; Kmoch, Stanislav; Katsanis, Nicholas; Loeys, Bart L

    2016-07-01

    Autosomal-dominant tubulo-interstitial kidney disease (ADTKD) encompasses a group of disorders characterized by renal tubular and interstitial abnormalities, leading to slow progressive loss of kidney function requiring dialysis and kidney transplantation. Mutations in UMOD, MUC1, and REN are responsible for many, but not all, cases of ADTKD. We report on two families with ADTKD and congenital anemia accompanied by either intrauterine growth retardation or neutropenia. Ultrasound and kidney biopsy revealed small dysplastic kidneys with cysts and tubular atrophy with secondary glomerular sclerosis, respectively. Exclusion of known ADTKD genes coupled with linkage analysis, whole-exome sequencing, and targeted re-sequencing identified heterozygous missense variants in SEC61A1-c.553A>G (p.Thr185Ala) and c.200T>G (p.Val67Gly)-both affecting functionally important and conserved residues in SEC61. Both transiently expressed SEC6A1A variants are delocalized to the Golgi, a finding confirmed in a renal biopsy from an affected individual. Suppression or CRISPR-mediated deletions of sec61al2 in zebrafish embryos induced convolution defects of the pronephric tubules but not the pronephric ducts, consistent with the tubular atrophy observed in the affected individuals. Human mRNA encoding either of the two pathogenic alleles failed to rescue this phenotype as opposed to a complete rescue by human wild-type mRNA. Taken together, these findings provide a mechanism by which mutations in SEC61A1 lead to an autosomal-dominant syndromic form of progressive chronic kidney disease. We highlight protein translocation defects across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, the principal role of the SEC61 complex, as a contributory pathogenic mechanism for ADTKD. PMID:27392076

  1. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, genetic homogeneity, and mapping of the locus within a 2-cM interval

    SciTech Connect

    Ducros, A.; Alamowitch, S.; Nagy, T.

    1996-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a recently identified autosomal dominant cerebral arteriopathy characterized by the recurrence of subcortical infarcts leading to dementia. A genetic linkage analysis conducted in two large families recently allowed us to map the affected gene on chromosome 19 in a 12-cM interval bracketed by D19S221 and D19S215. In the present study, these first 2 families and 13 additional ones, including a total of 199 potentially informative meiosis, have been genotyped with eight polymorphic markers located between D19S221 and D19S215. All families were linked to chromosome 19. The highest combined lod score (Z{sub max} = 37.24 at {theta} = .01) was obtained with marker D19S841, a new CA{sub n} microsatellite marker that we isolated from chromosome 19 cosmids. The recombinant events observed within these families were used to refine the genetic mapping of CADASIL within a 2-cM interval that is now bracketed by D19S226 and D19S199 on 19p13.1. These data strongly suggest the genetic homogeneity of this recently identified condition and establish the value of its clinical and neuroimaging diagnostic criteria. Besides their importance for the ongoing positional cloning of the CADASIL gene, these data help to refine the genetic mapping of CADASIL relative to familial hemiplegic migraine and hereditary paroxysmal cerebellar ataxia, conditions that we both mapped within the same chromosome 19 region. 35 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Autosomal dominant Kufs` disease: Clinical heterogeneity in nine families, and exclusion of linkage to CLN1 and CLN3 markers in a large American kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Andermann, F.; Andermann, E.; Carpenter, S.

    1994-09-01

    Most forms of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) are autosomal recessive, and three genes have already been mapped: the infantile form (CLN 1); the juvenile form (CLN 3); and the early juvenile variant (CLN 5) on chromosomes 1, 16 and 13, respectively. Kufs` disease or adolescent-adult onset NCL is usually inherited as an autosomal recessive trait, and presents as three distinct clinical syndromes: progressive myoclonus epilepsy (PME) with onset in the early teens or around age 30; and onset of dementia with motor disability in the 30s. We have studied three families originating from different parts of the USA manifesting dominantly inherited Kufs` disease. Granular osmophilic deposits (GROD) were found in brain, but storage in skin was not an obligatory feature. Six dominantly inherited PME families have been ascertained from three different regions of Spain. No storage was found in skin or muscle in any of these families. The mean age of onset in the American families is earlier, the clinical manifestations more severe, and the progression much more rapid that in the Spanish families. These findings would suggest the possibility of genetic heterogeneity involving two or more loci, or different mutations at the same gene locus. Genetic linkage studies have been carried out in a six-generation New Jersey family in an attempt to characterize the gene(s) responsible for this disorder. The infantile NCL locus on chromosome 1p (CLN1) and the juvenile NCL locus on chromosome 16p (CLN 3) have been excluded in this family. Further clinical, pathological and molecular genetic studies should lead to the clarification of the diagnostic approaches in this disorder.

  3. Novel heterozygous C243Y A20/TNFAIP3 gene mutation is responsible for chronic inflammation in autosomal-dominant Behçet's disease

    PubMed Central

    Shigemura, Tomonari; Kaneko, Naoe; Kobayashi, Norimoto; Kobayashi, Keiko; Takeuchi, Yusuke; Nakano, Naoko; Masumoto, Junya; Agematsu, Kazunaga

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although Behçet's disease (BD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of uncertain aetiology, the existence of familial BD with autosomal-dominant traits suggests that a responsibility gene (or genes) exists. We investigated a Japanese family with a history of BD to search for pathogenic mutations underlying the biological mechanisms of BD. Methods 6 patients over 4 generations who had suffered from frequent oral ulcers, genital ulcers and erythaema nodosum-like lesions in the skin were assessed. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on genomic DNA, and cytokine production was determined from stimulated mononuclear cells. Inflammatory cytokine secretion and Nod2-mediated NF-κB activation were analysed using the transfected cells. Results By whole-exome sequencing, we identified a common heterozygous missense mutation in A20/TNFAIP3, a gene known to regulate NF-κB signalling, for which all affected family members carried a heterozygous C243Y mutation in the ovarian tumour domain. Mononuclear cells obtained from the proband and his mother produced large amounts of interleukin 1β, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-a) on stimulation as compared with those from normal controls. Although inflammatory cytokine secretion was suppressed by wild-type transfected cells, it was suppressed to a much lesser extent by mutated C243Y A20/TNFAIP3-transfected cells. In addition, impaired suppression of Nod2-mediated NF-κB activation by C243Y A20/TNFAIP3 was observed. Conclusions A C243Y mutation in A20/TNFAIP3 was likely responsible for increased production of human inflammatory cytokines by reduced suppression of NF-κB activation, and may have accounted for the autosomal-dominant Mendelian mode of BD transmission in this family. PMID:27175295

  4. Repair of rhodopsin mRNA by spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing: a new approach for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Berger, Adeline; Lorain, Stéphanie; Joséphine, Charlène; Desrosiers, Melissa; Peccate, Cécile; Voit, Thomas; Garcia, Luis; Sahel, José-Alain; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre

    2015-05-01

    The promising clinical results obtained for ocular gene therapy in recent years have paved the way for gene supplementation to treat recessively inherited forms of retinal degeneration. The situation is more complex for dominant mutations, as the toxic mutant gene product must be removed. We used spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing as a strategy for repairing the transcript of the rhodopsin gene, the gene most frequently mutated in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We tested 17 different molecules targeting the pre-mRNA intron 1, by transient transfection of HEK-293T cells, with subsequent trans-splicing quantification at the transcript level. We found that the targeting of some parts of the intron promoted trans-splicing more efficiently than the targeting of other areas, and that trans-splicing rate could be increased by modifying the replacement sequence. We then developed cell lines stably expressing the rhodopsin gene, for the assessment of phenotypic criteria relevant to the pathogenesis of retinitis pigmentosa. Using this model, we showed that trans-splicing restored the correct localization of the protein to the plasma membrane. Finally, we tested our best candidate by AAV gene transfer in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa that expresses a mutant allele of the human rhodopsin gene, and demonstrated the feasibility of trans-splicing in vivo. This work paves the way for trans-splicing gene therapy to treat retinitis pigmentosa due to rhodopsin gene mutation and, more generally, for the treatment of genetic diseases with dominant transmission.

  5. GABAA Receptor α1 Subunit Mutation A322D Associated with Autosomal Dominant Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy Reduces the Expression and Alters the Composition of Wild Type GABAA Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Li; Feng, Hua-Jun; Macdonald, Robert L.; Botzolakis, Emanuel J.; Hu, Ningning; Gallagher, Martin J.

    2010-01-01

    A GABAA receptor (GABAAR) α1 subunit mutation, A322D (AD), causes an autosomal dominant form of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (ADJME). Previous studies demonstrated that the mutation caused α1(AD) subunit misfolding and rapid degradation, reducing its total and surface expression substantially. Here, we determined the effects of the residual α1(AD) subunit expression on wild type GABAAR expression to determine whether the AD mutation conferred a dominant negative effect. We found that although the α1(AD) subunit did not substitute for wild type α1 subunits on the cell surface, it reduced the surface expression of α1β2γ2 and α3β2γ2 receptors by associating with the wild type subunits within the endoplasmic reticulum and preventing them from trafficking to the cell surface. The α1(AD) subunit reduced surface expression of α3β2γ2 receptors by a greater amount than α1β2γ2 receptors, thus altering cell surface GABAAR composition. When transfected into cultured cortical neurons, the α1(AD) subunit altered the time course of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current kinetics and reduced miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current amplitudes. These findings demonstrated that, in addition to causing a heterozygous loss of function of α1(AD) subunits, this epilepsy mutation also elicited a modest dominant negative effect that likely shapes the epilepsy phenotype. PMID:20551311

  6. DVL3 Alleles Resulting in a -1 Frameshift of the Last Exon Mediate Autosomal-Dominant Robinow Syndrome.

    PubMed

    White, Janson J; Mazzeu, Juliana F; Hoischen, Alexander; Bayram, Yavuz; Withers, Marjorie; Gezdirici, Alper; Kimonis, Virginia; Steehouwer, Marloes; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; van Bon, Bregje W M; Sutton, V Reid; Lupski, James R; Brunner, Han G; Carvalho, Claudia M B

    2016-03-01

    Robinow syndrome is a rare congenital disorder characterized by mesomelic limb shortening, genital hypoplasia, and distinctive facial features. Recent reports have identified, in individuals with dominant Robinow syndrome, a specific type of variant characterized by being uniformly located in the penultimate exon of DVL1 and resulting in a -1 frameshift allele with a premature termination codon that escapes nonsense-mediated decay. Here, we studied a cohort of individuals who had been clinically diagnosed with Robinow syndrome but who had not received a molecular diagnosis from variant studies of DVL1, WNT5A, and ROR2. Because of the uniform location of frameshift variants in DVL1-mediated Robinow syndrome and the functional redundancy of DVL1, DVL2, and DVL3, we elected to pursue direct Sanger sequencing of the penultimate exon of DVL1 and its paralogs DVL2 and DVL3 to search for potential disease-associated variants. Remarkably, targeted sequencing identified five unrelated individuals harboring heterozygous, de novo frameshift variants in DVL3, including two splice acceptor mutations and three 1 bp deletions. Similar to the variants observed in DVL1-mediated Robinow syndrome, all variants in DVL3 result in a -1 frameshift, indicating that these highly specific alterations might be a common cause of dominant Robinow syndrome. Here, we review the current knowledge of these peculiar variant alleles in DVL1- and DVL3-mediated Robinow syndrome and further elucidate the phenotypic features present in subjects with DVL1 and DVL3 frameshift mutations. PMID:26924530

  7. DVL3 Alleles Resulting in a −1 Frameshift of the Last Exon Mediate Autosomal-Dominant Robinow Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    White, Janson J.; Mazzeu, Juliana F.; Hoischen, Alexander; Bayram, Yavuz; Withers, Marjorie; Gezdirici, Alper; Kimonis, Virginia; Steehouwer, Marloes; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; van Bon, Bregje W.M.; Sutton, V. Reid; Lupski, James R.; Brunner, Han G.; Carvalho, Claudia M.B.

    2016-01-01

    Robinow syndrome is a rare congenital disorder characterized by mesomelic limb shortening, genital hypoplasia, and distinctive facial features. Recent reports have identified, in individuals with dominant Robinow syndrome, a specific type of variant characterized by being uniformly located in the penultimate exon of DVL1 and resulting in a −1 frameshift allele with a premature termination codon that escapes nonsense-mediated decay. Here, we studied a cohort of individuals who had been clinically diagnosed with Robinow syndrome but who had not received a molecular diagnosis from variant studies of DVL1, WNT5A, and ROR2. Because of the uniform location of frameshift variants in DVL1-mediated Robinow syndrome and the functional redundancy of DVL1, DVL2, and DVL3, we elected to pursue direct Sanger sequencing of the penultimate exon of DVL1 and its paralogs DVL2 and DVL3 to search for potential disease-associated variants. Remarkably, targeted sequencing identified five unrelated individuals harboring heterozygous, de novo frameshift variants in DVL3, including two splice acceptor mutations and three 1 bp deletions. Similar to the variants observed in DVL1-mediated Robinow syndrome, all variants in DVL3 result in a −1 frameshift, indicating that these highly specific alterations might be a common cause of dominant Robinow syndrome. Here, we review the current knowledge of these peculiar variant alleles in DVL1- and DVL3-mediated Robinow syndrome and further elucidate the phenotypic features present in subjects with DVL1 and DVL3 frameshift mutations. PMID:26924530

  8. Recurrent De Novo Mutations Affecting Residue Arg138 of Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Synthase Cause a Progeroid Form of Autosomal-Dominant Cutis Laxa

    PubMed Central

    Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Escande-Beillard, Nathalie; Ganesh, Jaya; Tan, Yu Xuan; Al Bughaili, Mohammed; Lin, Angela E.; Sahai, Inderneel; Bahena, Paulina; Reichert, Sara L.; Loh, Abigail; Wright, Graham D.; Liu, Jaron; Rahikkala, Elisa; Pivnick, Eniko K.; Choudhri, Asim F.; Krüger, Ulrike; Zemojtel, Tomasz; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Mostafavi, Roya; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Symoens, Sofie; Pajunen, Leila; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Meierhofer, David; Robinson, Peter N.; Mundlos, Stefan; Villarroel, Camilo E.; Byers, Peter; Masri, Amira; Robertson, Stephen P.; Schwarze, Ulrike; Callewaert, Bert; Reversade, Bruno; Kornak, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Progeroid disorders overlapping with De Barsy syndrome (DBS) are collectively denoted as autosomal-recessive cutis laxa type 3 (ARCL3). They are caused by biallelic mutations in PYCR1 or ALDH18A1, encoding pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 and pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase (P5CS), respectively, which both operate in the mitochondrial proline cycle. We report here on eight unrelated individuals born to non-consanguineous families clinically diagnosed with DBS or wrinkly skin syndrome. We found three heterozygous mutations in ALDH18A1 leading to amino acid substitutions of the same highly conserved residue, Arg138 in P5CS. A de novo origin was confirmed in all six probands for whom parental DNA was available. Using fibroblasts from affected individuals and heterologous overexpression, we found that the P5CS-p.Arg138Trp protein was stable and able to interact with wild-type P5CS but showed an altered sub-mitochondrial distribution. A reduced size upon native gel electrophoresis indicated an alteration of the structure or composition of P5CS mutant complex. Furthermore, we found that the mutant cells had a reduced P5CS enzymatic activity leading to a delayed proline accumulation. In summary, recurrent de novo mutations, affecting the highly conserved residue Arg138 of P5CS, cause an autosomal-dominant form of cutis laxa with progeroid features. Our data provide insights into the etiology of cutis laxa diseases and will have immediate impact on diagnostics and genetic counseling. PMID:26320891

  9. Recovery of Dominant, Autosomal Flightless Mutants of Drosophila Melanogaster and Identification of a New Gene Required for Normal Muscle Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Cripps, R. M.; Ball, E.; Stark, M.; Lawn, A.; Sparrow, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    To identify further mutations affecting muscle function and development in Drosophila melanogaster we recovered 22 autosomal dominant flightless mutations. From these we have isolated eight viable and lethal alleles of the muscle myosin heavy chain gene, and seven viable alleles of the indirect flight muscle (IFM)-specific Act88F actin gene. The Mhc mutations display a variety of phenotypic effects, ranging from reductions in myosin heavy chain content in the indirect flight muscles only, to reductions in the levels of this protein in other muscles. The Act88F mutations range from those which produce no stable actin and have severely abnormal myofibrillar structure, to those which accumulate apparently normal levels of actin in the flight muscles but which still have abnormal myofibrils and fly very poorly. We also recovered two recessive flightless mutants on the third chromosome. The remaining five dominant flightless mutations are all lethal alleles of a gene named lethal(3)Laker. The Laker alleles have been characterized and the gene located in polytene bands 62A10,B1-62B2,4. Laker is a previously unidentified locus which is haplo-insufficient for flight. In addition, adult wild-type heterozygotes and the lethal larval trans-heterozygotes show abnormalities of muscle structure indicating that the Laker gene product is an important component of muscle. PMID:8056306

  10. Autosomal-dominant Meesmann epithelial corneal dystrophy without an exon mutation in the keratin-3 or keratin-12 gene in a Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wei; Yan, Ming; Hao, QianYun; Wang, ShuLin; Wu, LiHua; Liu, Qing; Li, MingYan; Biddle, Fred G; Wu, Wei

    2013-04-01

    Meesmann epithelial corneal dystrophy (MECD) is a dominantly inherited disorder, characterized by fragility of the anterior corneal epithelium and formation of intraepithelial microcysts. It has been described in a number of different ancestral groups. To date, all reported cases of MECD have been associated with either a single mutation in one exon of the keratin-3 gene (KRT3) or a single mutation in one of two exons of the keratin-12 gene (KRT12). Each mutation leads to a predicted amino acid change in the respective keratin-3 or keratin-12 proteins that combine to form the corneal-specific heterodimeric intermediate filament protein. This case report describes a four-generation Chinese kindred with typical autosomal-dominant MECD. Exon sequencing of KRT3 and KRT12 in six affected and eight unaffected individuals (including two spouses) did not detect any mutations or nucleotide sequence variants. This kindred demonstrates that single mis-sense mutations may be sufficient but are not required in all individuals with the MECD phenotype. It provides a unique opportunity to investigate further genomic and functional heterogeneity in MECD. PMID:23569037

  11. U1 small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) aggregate in Alzheimer’s disease due to autosomal dominant genetic mutations and trisomy 21

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We recently identified U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) tangle-like aggregates and RNA splicing abnormalities in sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However little is known about snRNP biology in early onset AD due to autosomal dominant genetic mutations or trisomy 21 in Down syndrome. Therefore we investigated snRNP biochemical and pathologic features in these disorders. Findings We performed quantitative proteomics and immunohistochemistry in postmortem brain from genetic AD cases. Electron microscopy was used to characterize ultrastructural features of pathologic aggregates. U1-70k and other snRNPs were biochemically enriched in the insoluble fraction of human brain from subjects with presenilin 1 (PS1) mutations. Aggregates of U1 snRNP-immunoreactivity formed cytoplasmic tangle-like structures in cortex of AD subjects with PS1 and amyloid precursor protein (APP) mutations as well as trisomy 21. Ultrastructural analysis with electron microscopy in an APP mutation case demonstrated snRNP immunogold labeling of paired helical filaments (PHF). Conclusions These studies identify U1 snRNP pathologic changes in brain of early onset genetic forms of AD. Since dominant genetic mutations and trisomy 21 result in dysfunctional amyloid processing, the findings suggest that aberrant β-amyloid processing may influence U1 snRNP aggregate formation. PMID:24773620

  12. Application of Whole Exome Sequencing in Six Families with an Initial Diagnosis of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Almoguera, Berta; Li, Jiankang; Fernandez-San Jose, Patricia; Liu, Yichuan; March, Michael; Pellegrino, Renata; Golhar, Ryan; Corton, Marta; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; López-Molina, Maria Isabel; García-Sandoval, Blanca; Guo, Yiran; Tian, Lifeng; Liu, Xuanzhu; Guan, Liping; Zhang, Jianguo; Keating, Brendan; Xu, Xun; Hakonarson, Hakon; Ayuso, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the genetics underlying dominant forms of inherited retinal dystrophies using whole exome sequencing (WES) in six families extensively screened for known mutations or genes. Thirty-eight individuals were subjected to WES. Causative variants were searched among single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and insertion/deletion variants (indels) and whenever no potential candidate emerged, copy number variant (CNV) analysis was performed. Variants or regions harboring a candidate variant were prioritized and segregation of the variant with the disease was further assessed using Sanger sequencing in case of SNVs and indels, and quantitative PCR (qPCR) for CNVs. SNV and indel analysis led to the identification of a previously reported mutation in PRPH2. Two additional mutations linked to different forms of retinal dystrophies were identified in two families: a known frameshift deletion in RPGR, a gene responsible for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and p.Ser163Arg in C1QTNF5 associated with Late-Onset Retinal Degeneration. A novel heterozygous deletion spanning the entire region of PRPF31 was also identified in the affected members of a fourth family, which was confirmed with qPCR. This study allowed the identification of the genetic cause of the retinal dystrophy and the establishment of a correct diagnosis in four families, including a large heterozygous deletion in PRPF31, typically considered one of the pitfalls of this method. Since all findings in this study are restricted to known genes, we propose that targeted sequencing using gene-panel is an optimal first approach for the genetic screening and that once known genetic causes are ruled out, WES might be used to uncover new genes involved in inherited retinal dystrophies.

  13. Associations Between Biomarkers and Age in the Presenilin 1 E280A Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer Disease Kindred A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Fleisher, Adam S.; Chen, Kewei; Quiroz, Yakeel T.; Jakimovich, Laura J.; Gomez, Madelyn Gutierrez; Langois, Carolyn M.; Langbaum, Jessica B. S.; Roontiva, Auttawut; Thiyyagura, Pradeep; Lee, Wendy; Ayutyanont, Napatkamon; Lopez, Liliana; Moreno, Sonia; Muñoz, Claudia; Tirado, Victoria; Acosta-Baena, Natalia; Fagan, Anne M.; Giraldo, Margarita; Garcia, Gloria; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Tariot, Pierre N.; Lopera, Francisco; Reiman, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Age-associated changes in brain imaging and fluid biomarkers are characterized and compared in presenilin 1 (PSEN1) E280A mutation carriers and noncarriers from the world’s largest known autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (AD) kindred. OBJECTIVE To characterize and compare age-associated changes in brain imaging and fluid biomarkers in PSEN1 E280A mutation carriers and noncarriers. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Cross-sectional measures of 18F-florbetapir positron emission tomography, 18F-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, structural magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and plasma biomarkers of AD were assessed from 54 PSEN1 E280A kindred members (age range, 20-59 years). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We used brain mapping algorithms to compare regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose and gray matter volumes in cognitively unimpaired mutation carriers and noncarriers. We used regression analyses to characterize associations between age and the mean cortical to pontine 18F-florbetapir standard uptake value ratios, precuneus cerebral metabolic rates for glucose, hippocampal gray matter volume, CSF Aβ1-42, total tau and phosphorylated tau181, and plasma Aβ measurements. Age at onset of progressive biomarker changes that distinguish carriers from noncarriers was estimated using best-fitting regression models. RESULTS Compared with noncarriers, cognitively unimpaired mutation carriers had significantly lower precuneus cerebral metabolic rates for glucose, smaller hippocampal volume, lower CSF Aβ1-42, higher CSF total tau and phosphorylated tau181, and higher plasma Aβ1-42 measurements. Sequential changes in biomarkers were seen at age 20 years (95% CI, 14-24 years) for CSF Aβ1-42, age 16 years (95% CI, 11-24 years) for the mean cortical 18F-florbetapir standard uptake value ratio, age 15 years (95% CI, 10-24 years) for precuneus cerebral metabolic rate for glucose, age 15 years (95% CI, 7-20 years) for CSF total tau

  14. The disruption of a novel limb cis-regulatory element of SHH is associated with autosomal dominant preaxial polydactyly-hypertrichosis.

    PubMed

    Petit, Florence; Jourdain, Anne-Sophie; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Keren, Boris; Andrieux, Joris; Duterque-Coquillaud, Martine; Porchet, Nicole; Manouvrier-Hanu, Sylvie; Escande, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    The expression gradient of the morphogen Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) is crucial in establishing the number and the identity of the digits during anteroposterior patterning of the limb. Its anterior ectopic expression is responsible for preaxial polydactyly (PPD). Most of these malformations are due to the gain-of-function of the Zone of Polarizing Activity Regulatory Sequence, the only limb-specific enhancer of SHH known to date. We report a family affected with a novel condition associating PPD and hypertrichosis of the upper back, following an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. This phenotype is consistent with deregulation of SHH expression during limb and follicle development. In affected members, we identified a 2 kb deletion located ~240 kb upstream from the SHH promoter. The deleted sequence is capable of repressing the transcriptional activity of the SHH promoter in vitro, consistent with a silencer activity. We hypothesize that the deletion of this silencer could be responsible for SHH deregulation during development, leading to a PPD-hypertrichosis phenotype.

  15. Mapping one form of autosomal dominant postaxial polydactyly type A to chromosome 7p15-q11.23 by linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishna, U.; Mehenni, H.; Antonarakis, S.E.

    1997-03-01

    Postaxial polydactyly type-A (PAP-A) in humans is an autosomal dominant trait characterized by an extra digit in the ulnar and/or fibular side of the upper and/or lower extremities. The extra digit is well formed and articulates with the fifth, or extra, metacarpal/metatarsal, and thus it is usually functional. In order to map the gene responsible for PAP-A, we studied a five-generation Indian family of 37 individuals (15 of whom were affected). A genomewide search with highly informative polymorphic markers on part of the pedigree showed linkage between the PAP-A phenotype and markers on chromosome 7p15-q11.23 (no crossovers were found with D7S526, D7S795, D7S528, D7S521, D7S691, D7S667, D7S478, D7S1830, D7S803, D7S801, or ELN). The highest LOD score was obtained with marker D7S801 (Z{sub max} = 4.21; {theta} = 0). Haplotype analysis enabled the mapping of the PAP-A phenotype in this family between markers D7S2848 and D7S669. Analysis of additional families with PAP-A will narrow down the critical genomic region, facilitate positional cloning of the PAP-A gene, and/or uncover potential genetic heterogeneity. 42 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Mutational analysis of CHRNB2, CHRNA2 and CHRNA4 genes in Chinese population with autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhihong; Wang, Lingan; Wang, Chun; Chen, Qian; Zhai, Qiongxiang; Guo, Yuxiong; Zhang, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The present study aims to investigate the gene mutations of CHRNB2, CHRNA2 and CHRNA4 in Chinese population with autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE). Methods: 257 ADNFLE patients (74 sporadic and 32 familial) were collected, including 42 pedigree patients and 215 sporadic cases. Exon mutational screening of CHRNB2, CHRNA2 and CHRNA4 was performed by direct PCR sequencing. Results: No published mutations of CHRNB2, CHRNA4 and CHRNA2 genes were detected in this study. Three kinds of c.SNP (c.66C> T, c.249C> T, c.375A> G) were detected on the 2nd and 5th exons of CHRNA2; six kinds of c.SNP (c.639T> C, c.678T> C, c.1209G> T, c.1227T> C, c.1659G> A, c.1629C> T) were detected on the 5th exon of CHRNA4. Three novel mutations were discovered, respectively locating on the exon 5 of CHRNA4 gene (c.570C> T), 5th and 6th exons of CHRNB2 gene (c.483C> T and c.1407C> G). The three mutations were absent in 200 healthy controls, indicating that the mutations were very rare. Conclusion: CHRNA4, CHRNB2 and CHRNA2 may be not the causative genes of Chinese ADNFLE population. Whether the three novel synonymous mutations were genetic factors of ADNFLE pathogenesis in Chinese Han population needs to be further studied. PMID:26309560

  17. The Impact of the Availability of Prevention Studies on the Desire to Undergo Predictive Testing in Persons at-risk for Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Megan; Grill, Joshua D.; Rodriguez-Agudelo, Yaneth; Medina, Luis D.; Fox, Michelle; Alvarez-Retuerto, Ana Isabel; Wharton, David; Brook, Jenny; Ringman, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Persons at-risk for autosomal dominant neurodegenerative diseases provide the opportunity to efficiently test preventive interventions. Only a minority of such persons, however, choose to undergo revealing genetic testing, presenting a challenge to enrollment. Thirty-four preclinical Latinos (n = 26) and non-Latinos at-risk for familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD) unaware of their genetic status were administered a questionnaire exploring their interest in undergoing revealing genetic testing at baseline and in the context of eligibility for four prevention trials of increasing invasiveness. Forty-four percent of subjects expressed a baseline interest in undergoing revealing testing which increased to 85% in order to be eligible for a study of an oral drug "felt to be very safe.” If there were a 50% chance of receiving placebo, this number dropped to 62% (p = 0.02). For those not interested in a study involving a 50% chance of receiving placebo, a range of 5% to 40% chance of receiving placebo was given as acceptable. For more invasive studies, living in the U.S. (as opposed to Mexico) positively influenced the likelihood of participating. Our data suggests that clinical trial designs in which persons must confront their genetic status prior to enrollment are feasible. Study designs to minimize the likelihood of being placed on placebo or provide the eventual administration of the drug through open-label extensions should be considered. PMID:23876673

  18. Autosomal dominant Marfan-like connective-tissue disorder with aortic dilation and skeletal anomalies not linked to the fibrillin genes

    PubMed Central

    Boileau, Catherine; Jondeau, Guillaume; Babron, Marie-Claude; Coulon, Monique; Alexandre, Jeanne-Armelle; Sakai, Lynn; Melki, Judith; Delorme, Gabriel; Dubourg, Olivier; Bonaïti-Pellié, Catherine; Bourdarias, Jean-Pierre; Junien, Claudine

    1993-01-01

    We describe a large family with a connective-tissue disorder that exhibits some of the skeletal and cardiovascular features seen in Marfan syndrome. However, none of the 19 affected individuals displayed ocular abnormalities and therefore did not comply with recognized criteria for this disease. These patients could alternatively be diagnosed as MASS (mitral valve, aorta, skeleton, and skin) phenotype patients or represent a distinct clinical entity, i.e., a new autosomal dominant connective-tissue disorder. The fibrillin genes located on chromosomes 15 and 5 are clearly involved in the classic form of Marfan syndrome and a clinically related disorder (congenital contractural arachnodactyly), respectively. To test whether one of these genes was also implicated in this French family, we performed genetic analyses. Blood samples were obtained for 56 family members, and four polymorphic fibrillin gene markers, located on chromosomes 15 (Fibl5) and 5 (Fib5), respectively, were tested. Linkage between the disease allele and the markers of these two genes was excluded with lod scores of –11.39 (for Fibl5) and –13.34 (for Fib5), at θ = .001, indicating that the mutation is at a different locus. This phenotype thus represents a new connective-tissue disorder, overlapping but different from classic Marfan syndrome. PMID:8317497

  19. Detection of the single nucleotide polymorphism causing feline autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease in Persians from the UK using a novel real-time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Helps, Chris R; Tasker, Séverine; Barr, Frances J; Wills, Sheila J; Gruffydd-Jones, Timothy J

    2007-02-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (AD-PKD) is the most prevalent inherited genetic disease of cats, particularly affecting Persians. Until recently the condition has been diagnosed by renal ultrasound screening. With the identification of the genetic mutation responsible for AD-PKD it is now possible to use advanced molecular techniques to screen for the disease. We have developed a rapid, sensitive and specific real-time PCR genotyping assay that can detect the single nucleotide polymorphism responsible for AD-PKD. Of 72 UK Persian and Exotic Shorthair cats submitted for AD-PKD ultrasound screening, 29 were found to have the disease, 41 were negative and 2 were equivocal. The recently published PCR-RFLP method showed the AD-PKD mutation to be present in all 29 diseased cats and absent in the 41 negative and 2 equivocal cats. Our real-time PCR genotyping assay was in complete agreement with the PCR-RFLP results. Of 600 blood or buccal swabs analysed from April 2005 to January 2006, 165 were found to be AD-PKD positive and 435 were negative, giving a prevalence of 27.5%. All 194 cats with AD-PKD were found to be heterozygous for the mutation. PMID:16950597

  20. Whole exome sequencing links dental tumor to an autosomal-dominant mutation in ANO5 gene associated with gnathodiaphyseal dysplasia and muscle dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Andreeva, T. V.; Tyazhelova, T. V.; Rykalina, V. N.; Gusev, F. E.; Goltsov, A. Yu.; Zolotareva, O. I.; Aliseichik, M. P.; Borodina, T. A.; Grigorenko, A. P.; Reshetov, D. A.; Ginter, E. K.; Amelina, S. S.; Zinchenko, R. A.; Rogaev, E. I.

    2016-01-01

    Tumors of the jaws may represent different human disorders and frequently associate with pathologic bone fractures. In this report, we analyzed two affected siblings from a family of Russian origin, with a history of dental tumors of the jaws, in correspondence to original clinical diagnosis of cementoma consistent with gigantiform cementoma (GC, OMIM: 137575). Whole exome sequencing revealed the heterozygous missense mutation c.1067G > A (p.Cys356Tyr) in ANO5 gene in these patients. To date, autosomal-dominant mutations have been described in the ANO5 gene for gnathodiaphyseal dysplasia (GDD, OMIM: 166260), and multiple recessive mutations have been described in the gene for muscle dystrophies (OMIM: 613319, 611307); the same amino acid (Cys) at the position 356 is mutated in GDD. These genetic data and similar clinical phenotypes demonstrate that the GC and GDD likely represent the same type of bone pathology. Our data illustrate the significance of mutations in single amino-acid position for particular bone tissue pathology. Modifying role of genetic variations in another gene on the severity of the monogenic trait pathology is also suggested. Finally, we propose the model explaining the tissue-specific manifestation of clinically distant bone and muscle diseases linked to mutations in one gene. PMID:27216912

  1. Mutation in the PCSK9 Gene in Omani Arab Subjects with Autosomal Dominant Hypercholesterolemia and its Effect on PCSK9 Protein Structure.

    PubMed

    Al-Waili, Khalid; Al-Zidi, Ward Al-Muna; Al-Abri, Abdul Rahim; Al-Rasadi, Khalid; Al-Sabti, Hilal Ali; Shah, Karna; Al-Futaisi, Abdullah; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Banerjee, Yajnavalka

    2013-01-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type (PCSK9) is a crucial protein in LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) metabolism by virtue of its pivotal role in the degradation of the LDL receptor. Mutations in the PCSK9 gene have previously been found to segregate with autosomal dominant familial hypercholesterolemia (ADFH). In this study, DNA sequencing of the 12 exons of the PCSK9 gene has been performed for two patients with a clinical diagnosis of familial hypercholesterolemia where mutation in the LDL-receptor gene hasn't been excluded. One missense mutation was detected in the exon 9 PCSK9 gene in the two ADFH patients. The patients were found to be heterozygote for Ile474Val (SNP rs562556). Using an array of in silico tools, we have investigated the effect of the above mutation on different structural levels of the PCSK9 protein. Although, the mutation has already been reported in the literature for other populations, to the best of our knowledge this is the first report of a mutation in the PCSK9 gene from the Arab population, including the Omani population. PMID:23386946

  2. G-protein signaling modulator 1 deficiency accelerates cystic disease in an orthologous mouse model of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Michelle; Pavlov, Tengis S; Nozu, Kandai; Rasmussen, Shauna A; Ilatovskaya, Daria V; Lerch-Gaggl, Alexandra; North, Lauren M; Kim, Hyunho; Qian, Feng; Sweeney, William E; Avner, Ellis D; Blumer, Joe B; Staruschenko, Alexander; Park, Frank

    2012-12-26

    Polycystic kidney diseases are the most common genetic diseases that affect the kidney. There remains a paucity of information regarding mechanisms by which G proteins are regulated in the context of polycystic kidney disease to promote abnormal epithelial cell expansion and cystogenesis. In this study, we describe a functional role for the accessory protein, G-protein signaling modulator 1 (GPSM1), also known as activator of G-protein signaling 3, to act as a modulator of cyst progression in an orthologous mouse model of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). A complete loss of Gpsm1 in the Pkd1(V/V) mouse model of ADPKD, which displays a hypomorphic phenotype of polycystin-1, demonstrated increased cyst progression and reduced renal function compared with age-matched cystic Gpsm1(+/+) and Gpsm1(+/-) mice. Electrophysiological studies identified a role by which GPSM1 increased heteromeric polycystin-1/polycystin-2 ion channel activity via Gβγ subunits. In summary, the present study demonstrates an important role for GPSM1 in controlling the dynamics of cyst progression in an orthologous mouse model of ADPKD and presents a therapeutic target for drug development in the treatment of this costly disease.

  3. Absence of mTOR Inhibitor Effect on Hepatic Cyst Growth: A Case Report of a Kidney Transplant Recipient with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, L.; Barbey, F.; Pascual, M.; Venetz, J.-P.

    2012-01-01

    Some experimental studies have suggested a beneficial effect of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor use on hepatic and renal cyst growth in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). However, the results of clinical studies are conflicting and the role of mTOR inhibitors is still uncertain. We report the case of a patient with ADPKD who underwent deceased kidney transplantation because of an end-stage renal disease. The evolution was uneventful with an excellent graft function under cyclosporine (CsA) monotherapy. Some years later, the patient developed a symptomatic hepatomegaly due to growth of cysts. CsA was replaced by sirolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, in order to reduce or control the increase in the cyst and liver volume. Despite the switch, the hepatic volume increased by 25% in two years. Finally sirolimus was stopped because of the lack of effect on hepatic cyst growth and the presence of sirolimus side effects. The interest of our case resides in the followup by MRI imaging during the mTOR inhibitor treatment and 15 months after the restart of the initial immunosuppressive therapy. This observation indicates that mTOR inhibitors did not have significant effect on cyst-associated hepatic growth in our patient, which is consistent with some results of recent large clinical studies. PMID:23304619

  4. Intermediate Volume on Computed Tomography Imaging Defines a Fibrotic Compartment that Predicts Glomerular Filtration Rate Decline in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Caroli, Anna; Antiga, Luca; Conti, Sara; Sonzogni, Aurelio; Fasolini, Giorgio; Ondei, Patrizia; Perico, Norberto; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Remuzzi, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Total kidney and cyst volumes have been used to quantify disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), but a causal relationship with progression to renal failure has not been demonstrated. Advanced image processing recently allowed to quantify extracystic tissue, and to identify an additional tissue component named “intermediate,” appearing hypoenhanced on contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT). The aim of this study is to provide a histological characterization of intermediate volume, investigate its relation with renal function, and provide preliminary evidence of its role in long-term prediction of functional loss. Three ADPKD patients underwent contrast-enhanced CT scans before nephrectomy. Histological samples of intermediate volume were drawn from the excised kidneys, and stained with hematoxylin and eosin and with saturated picrosirius solution for histological analysis. Intermediate volume showed major structural changes, characterized by tubular dilation and atrophy, microcysts, inflammatory cell infiltrate, vascular sclerosis, and extended peritubular interstitial fibrosis. A significant correlation (r = −0.69, P < 0.001) between relative intermediate volume and baseline renal function was found in 21 ADPKD patients. Long-term prediction of renal functional loss was investigated in an independent cohort of 13 ADPKD patients, followed for 3 to 8 years. Intermediate volume, but not total kidney or cyst volume, significantly correlated with glomerular filtration rate decline (r = −0.79, P < 0.005). These findings suggest that intermediate volume may represent a suitable surrogate marker of ADPKD progression and a novel therapeutic target. PMID:21683674

  5. A large genomic deletion leads to enhancer adoption by the lamin B1 gene: a second path to autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD)

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgio, E.; Robyr, D.; Spielmann, M.; Ferrero, E.; Di Gregorio, E.; Imperiale, D.; Vaula, G.; Stamoulis, G.; Santoni, F.; Atzori, C.; Gasparini, L.; Ferrera, D.; Canale, C.; Guipponi, M.; Pennacchio, L. A.; Antonarakis, S. E.; Brussino, A.; Brusco, A.

    2015-02-20

    Chromosomal rearrangements with duplication of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene underlie autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD), a rare neurological disorder in which overexpression of LMNB1 causes progressive central nervous system demyelination. However, we previously reported an ADLD family (ADLD-1-TO) without evidence of duplication or other mutation in LMNB1 despite linkage to the LMNB1 locus and lamin B1 overexpression. By custom array-CGH, we further investigated this family and report here that patients carry a large (~660 kb) heterozygous deletion that begins 66 kb upstream of the LMNB1 promoter. Lamin B1 overexpression was confirmed in further ADLD-1-TO tissues and in a postmortem brain sample, where lamin B1 was increased in the frontal lobe. Through parallel studies, we investigated both loss of genetic material and chromosomal rearrangement as possible causes of LMNB1 overexpression, and found that ADLD-1-TO plausibly results from an enhancer adoption mechanism. The deletion eliminates a genome topological domain boundary, allowing normally forbidden interactions between at least three forebrain-directed enhancers and the LMNB1 promoter, in line with the observed mainly cerebral localization of lamin B1 overexpression and myelin degeneration. Finally, this second route to LMNB1 overexpression and ADLD is a new example of the relevance of regulatory landscape modifications in determining Mendelian phenotypes.

  6. A large genomic deletion leads to enhancer adoption by the lamin B1 gene: a second path to autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD)

    DOE PAGES

    Giorgio, E.; Robyr, D.; Spielmann, M.; Ferrero, E.; Di Gregorio, E.; Imperiale, D.; Vaula, G.; Stamoulis, G.; Santoni, F.; Atzori, C.; et al

    2015-02-20

    Chromosomal rearrangements with duplication of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene underlie autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD), a rare neurological disorder in which overexpression of LMNB1 causes progressive central nervous system demyelination. However, we previously reported an ADLD family (ADLD-1-TO) without evidence of duplication or other mutation in LMNB1 despite linkage to the LMNB1 locus and lamin B1 overexpression. By custom array-CGH, we further investigated this family and report here that patients carry a large (~660 kb) heterozygous deletion that begins 66 kb upstream of the LMNB1 promoter. Lamin B1 overexpression was confirmed in further ADLD-1-TO tissues and in amore » postmortem brain sample, where lamin B1 was increased in the frontal lobe. Through parallel studies, we investigated both loss of genetic material and chromosomal rearrangement as possible causes of LMNB1 overexpression, and found that ADLD-1-TO plausibly results from an enhancer adoption mechanism. The deletion eliminates a genome topological domain boundary, allowing normally forbidden interactions between at least three forebrain-directed enhancers and the LMNB1 promoter, in line with the observed mainly cerebral localization of lamin B1 overexpression and myelin degeneration. Finally, this second route to LMNB1 overexpression and ADLD is a new example of the relevance of regulatory landscape modifications in determining Mendelian phenotypes.« less

  7. A novel mutation (ASn244Lys) in the peripherin/RDS gene causing autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa associated with bull's eye maculopathy detected by nonradioisotopic SSCP

    SciTech Connect

    Kikawa, Emi; Nakazawa, Mitsuru; Chida, Yasushi; Shiono, Takashi; Tamai, Makota )

    1994-03-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is characterized by night blindness, an eventual loss of visual field, a diminished response on the electroretinogram, and pigmentary retinal degeneration. These features are primarily explained by the degeneration of photoreceptors. The recent development of the molecular genetic approach has enabled the identification of genes responsible for parts of autosomal dominant RP (ADRP). Rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS genes, in particular, have been successfully shown to cosegregate with ADRP. The authors, therefore, screened 42 unrelated Japanese patients with ADRP to search for mutations in the peripherin/RDS gene. The method we employed for screening was a nonradioisotopic modification of single-strand conformation polymorphism. Among 42 unrelated patients with ADRP, the DNA from one patient (SY) showed an abnormal pattern in exon 2 on SSCP. The DNA fragments were then amplified from affected and nonaffected members of the same family as SY. The alteration in the DNA sequence that was commonly found in the affected members of the family was identified as a heterozygous transversional change of C to A at the third nucleotide in codon 244, resulting in the amino acid replacement of asparagine residue with lysine residue. None of unaffected family members or 30 normal control individuals had this alteration.

  8. Phenotypic variability in a seven-generation Swedish family segregating autosomal dominant hearing impairment due to a novel EYA4 frameshift mutation.

    PubMed

    Frykholm, Carina; Klar, Joakim; Arnesson, Hanna; Rehnman, Anna-Carin; Lodahl, Marianne; Wedén, Ulla; Dahl, Niklas; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Rendtorff, Nanna D

    2015-05-25

    Linkage to an interval overlapping the DFNA10 locus on chromosome 6q22-23 was found through genome wide linkage analysis in a seven-generation Swedish family segregating postlingual, autosomal dominant nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing impairment. A novel heterozygous frame-shift mutation (c.579_580insTACC, p.(Asp194Tyrfs*52)) in EYA4 was identified that truncates the so-called variable region of the protein. The mutation is predicted to result in haploinsufficiency of the EYA4 product. No evidence for dilated cardiomyopathy was found in the family, contrasting to a previous family with a deletion resulting in a similar truncation in the variable region. A highly variable age of onset was seen in the mutation carriers. For assessment of the aetiology of this variability, clinical and audiometric data analyses were performed. The affected family members all had similar cross-sectional and longitudinal deterioration of pure tone average (PTA) once the process of hearing deterioration had started, and no gender, parent-of-origin or family branch differences on PTA could be found. Age at onset varied between the family branches. In summary, this is the ninth published genetically verified DFNA10 family. The results imply that unidentified factors, genetic or environmental, other than the EYA4 mutation, are of importance for the age at onset of DFNA10, and that mutation early in the variable region of the EYA4 protein can occur in the absence of dilated cardiomyopathy.

  9. Exome sequencing identifies a novel frameshift mutation of MYO6 as the cause of autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss in a Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing; Zhou, Xueya; Lu, Yu; Chen, Jing; Han, Bing; Zhu, Yuhua; Liu, Liyang; Choy, Kwong-Wai; Han, Dongyi; Sham, Pak C; Zhang, Michael Q; Zhang, Xuegong; Yuan, Huijun

    2014-11-01

    Autosomal dominant types of nonsyndromic hearing loss (ADNSHL) are typically postlingual in onset and progressive. High genetic heterogeneity, late onset age, and possible confounding due to nongenetic factors hinder the timely molecular diagnoses for most patients. In this study, exome sequencing was applied to investigate a large Chinese family segregating ADNSHL in which we initially failed to find strong evidence of linkage to any locus by whole-genome linkage analysis. Two affected family members were selected for sequencing. We identified two novel mutations disrupting known ADNSHL genes and shared by the sequenced samples: c.328C>A in COCH (DFNA9) resulting in a p.Q110K substitution and a deletion c. 2814_2815delAA in MYO6 (DFNA22) causing a frameshift alteration p.R939Tfs*2. The pathogenicity of novel coding variants in ADNSHL genes was carefully evaluated by analysis of co-segregation with phenotype in the pedigree and in light of established genotype-phenotype correlations. The frameshift deletion in MYO6 was confirmed as the causative variant for this pedigree, whereas the missense mutation in COCH had no clinical significance. The results allowed us to retrospectively identify the phenocopy in one patient that contributed to the negative finding in the linkage scan. Our clinical data also supported the emerging genotype-phenotype correlation for DFNA22.

  10. A SPRY2 mutation leading to MAPK/ERK pathway inhibition is associated with an autosomal dominant form of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Milillo, Annamaria; La Carpia, Francesca; Costanzi, Stefano; D'Urbano, Vanessa; Martini, Maurizio; Lanuti, Paola; Vischini, Gisella; Larocca, Luigi M; Marchisio, Marco; Miscia, Sebastiano; Amoroso, Antonio; Gurrieri, Fiorella; Sangiorgi, Eugenio

    2015-12-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) represents the most common primary glomerulonephritis worldwide with a prevalence of 25-50% among patients with primary glomerulopathies. In ~5-10% of the patients the disease segregates with an autosomal dominant (AD) pattern. Association studies identified loci on chromosomes 1q32, 6p21, 8p23, 17p13, 22q12, whereas classical linkage studies on AD families identified loci on chromosomes 2q36, 4q26-31, 6q22, 17q12-22. We have studied a large Sicilian family where IgAN segregates with an AD transmission. To identify the causal gene, the exomes of two affected and one unaffected individual have been sequenced. From the bioinformatics analysis a p.(Arg119Trp) variant in the SPRY2 gene was identified as the probable disease-causing mutation. Moreover, functional characterization of this variant showed that it is responsible for the inhibition of the MAPK/ERK1/2 pathway. The same effect was observed in two sporadic IgAN patients carriers of wild-type SPRY2, suggesting that downregulation of the MAPK/ERK1/2 pathway represents a common mechanism leading to IgAN.

  11. RHO Mutations (p.W126L and p.A346P) in Two Japanese Families with Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Akahori, Masakazu; Itabashi, Takeshi; Nishino, Jo; Yoshitake, Kazutoshi; Ikeo, Kazuho; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate genetic and clinical features of patients with rhodopsin (RHO) mutations in two Japanese families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). Methods. Whole-exome sequence analysis was performed in ten adRP families. Identified RHO mutations for the cosegregation analysis were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Ophthalmic examinations were performed to evaluate the RP phenotypes. The impact of the RHO mutation on the rhodopsin conformation was examined by molecular modeling analysis. Results. In two adRP families, we identified two RHO mutations (c.377G>T (p.W126L) and c.1036G>C (p.A346P)), one of which was novel. Complete cosegregation was confirmed for each mutation exhibiting the RP phenotype in both families. Molecular modeling predicted that the novel mutation (p.W126L) might impair rhodopsin function by affecting its conformational transition in the light-adapted form. Clinical phenotypes showed that patients with p.W126L exhibited sector RP, whereas patients with p.A346P exhibited classic RP. Conclusions. Our findings demonstrated that the novel mutation (p.W126L) may be associated with the phenotype of sector RP. Identification of RHO mutations is a very useful tool for predicting disease severity and providing precise genetic counseling. PMID:25485142

  12. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Missense Variant in EFEMP1 Co-Segregating in a Family with Autosomal Dominant Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Donna S; Bennett, Thomas M; Shiels, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is a clinically important and genetically heterogeneous cause of progressive vision loss as a result of retinal ganglion cell death. Here we have utilized trio-based, whole-exome sequencing to identify the genetic defect underlying an autosomal dominant form of adult-onset POAG segregating in an African-American family. Exome sequencing identified a novel missense variant (c.418C>T, p.Arg140Trp) in exon-5 of the gene coding for epidermal growth factor (EGF) containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (EFEMP1) that co-segregated with disease in the family. Linkage and haplotype analyses with microsatellite markers indicated that the disease interval overlapped a known POAG locus (GLC1H) on chromosome 2p. The p.Arg140Trp substitution was predicted in silico to have damaging effects on protein function and transient expression studies in cultured cells revealed that the Trp140-mutant protein exhibited increased intracellular accumulation compared with wild-type EFEMP1. In situ hybridization of the mouse eye with oligonucleotide probes detected the highest levels of EFEMP1 transcripts in the ciliary body, cornea, inner nuclear layer of the retina, and the optic nerve head. The recent finding that a common variant near EFEMP1 was associated with optic nerve-head morphology supports the possibility that the EFEMP1 variant identified in this POAG family may be pathogenic. PMID:26162006

  13. Fine mapping of the autosomal dominant split hand/split foot locus on chromosome 7, band q21. 3-q. 22. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, S.W.; Tsui, L.C. ); Allen, T.; Kim, J.; Soder, S. ); Poorkaj, P.; Geshuri, D.; Nunes, M.; Stephens, K.; Pagon, R.A. )

    1994-07-01

    Split hand/split foot (SHFD) is a human developmental defect characterized by missing digits, fusion of remaining digits, and a deep median cleft in the hands and feet. Cytogenetic studies of deletions and translocations associated with this disorder have indicated that an autosomal dominant split hand/split foot locus (gene SHFD1) maps to 7q21-q22. To characterize the SHFD1 locus, somatic cell hybrid lines were constructed from cytogenetically abnormal individuals with SHFD. Molecular analysis resulted in the localization of 93 DNA markers to one of 10 intervals surrounding the SHFD1 locus. The translocation breakpoints in four SHFD patients were encompassed by the smallest region of overlap among the SHFD-associated deletions. The order of DNA markers in the SHFD1 critical region has been defined as PON-D7S812-SHFD1-D7S811-ASNS. One DNA marker, D7S811, detected altered restriction enzyme fragments in three patients with translocations when examined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). These data map SHFD1, a gene that is crucial for human limb differentiation, to a small interval in the q21.3-q.22.1 region of human chromosome 7. 54 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Mutation in the PCSK9 Gene in Omani Arab Subjects with Autosomal Dominant Hypercholesterolemia and its Effect on PCSK9 Protein Structure.

    PubMed

    Al-Waili, Khalid; Al-Zidi, Ward Al-Muna; Al-Abri, Abdul Rahim; Al-Rasadi, Khalid; Al-Sabti, Hilal Ali; Shah, Karna; Al-Futaisi, Abdullah; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Banerjee, Yajnavalka

    2013-01-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type (PCSK9) is a crucial protein in LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) metabolism by virtue of its pivotal role in the degradation of the LDL receptor. Mutations in the PCSK9 gene have previously been found to segregate with autosomal dominant familial hypercholesterolemia (ADFH). In this study, DNA sequencing of the 12 exons of the PCSK9 gene has been performed for two patients with a clinical diagnosis of familial hypercholesterolemia where mutation in the LDL-receptor gene hasn't been excluded. One missense mutation was detected in the exon 9 PCSK9 gene in the two ADFH patients. The patients were found to be heterozygote for Ile474Val (SNP rs562556). Using an array of in silico tools, we have investigated the effect of the above mutation on different structural levels of the PCSK9 protein. Although, the mutation has already been reported in the literature for other populations, to the best of our knowledge this is the first report of a mutation in the PCSK9 gene from the Arab population, including the Omani population.

  15. A third locus for autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia Type I maps to chromosome 14q24. 3-qter: Evidence for the existence of a fourth locus

    SciTech Connect

    Stevanin, G.; Guern, E.L.; Ravise, N.; Chneiweiss, H.; Duerr, A.; Cancel, G.; Vignal, A.; Boch, A.L.; Ruberg, M.; Penet, C.; Pothin, Y.; Lagroua, I.; Haguenau, M.; Rancurel, G.; Weissenbach, J.; Agid, Y.; Brice, A.

    1994-01-01

    The autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (ADCA) type I are a group of neurological disorders that are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Two genes implicated in the disease, SCA1 (spinal cerebellar ataxia 1) and SCA2, are already localized. The authors have mapped a third locus to chromosome 14q24.3-qter, by linkage analysis in a non-SCA1/non-SCA2 family and have confirmed its existence in a second such family. The authors suggest designating this new locus [open quotes]SCA3.[close quotes] Combined analysis of the two families restricted the SCA3 locus to a 15-cM interval between markers D14S67 and D14S81. The gene for Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), a clinically different form of ADCA type I, has been recently assigned to chromosome 14q24.3-q32. Although the SCA3 locus is within the MJD region, linkage analyses cannot yet demonstrate whether they result from mutations of the same gene. Linkage to all three loci (SCA1, SCA2, and SCA3) was excluded in another family, which indicates the existence of a fourth ADCA type I locus. 36 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Deciphering Variability of PKD1 and PKD2 in an Italian Cohort of 643 Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD).

    PubMed

    Carrera, Paola; Calzavara, Silvia; Magistroni, Riccardo; den Dunnen, Johan T; Rigo, Francesca; Stenirri, Stefania; Testa, Francesca; Messa, Piergiorgio; Cerutti, Roberta; Scolari, Francesco; Izzi, Claudia; Edefonti, Alberto; Negrisolo, Susanna; Benetti, Elisa; Alibrandi, Maria Teresa Sciarrone; Manunta, Paolo; Boletta, Alessandra; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary kidney disease. We analysed PKD1 and PKD2, in a large cohort of 440 unrelated Italian patients with ADPKD and 203 relatives by direct sequencing and MLPA. Molecular and detailed phenotypic data have been collected and submitted to the PKD1/PKD2 LOVD database. This is the first large retrospective study in Italian patients, describing 701 variants, 249 (35.5%) already associated with ADPKD and 452 (64.5%) novel. According to the criteria adopted, the overall detection rate was 80% (352/440). Novel variants with uncertain significance were found in 14% of patients. Among patients with pathogenic variants, in 301 (85.5%) the disease is associated with PKD1, 196 (55.7%) truncating, 81 (23%) non truncating, 24 (6.8%) IF indels, and in 51 (14.5%) with PKD2. Our results outline the high allelic heterogeneity of variants, complicated by the presence of variants of uncertain significance as well as of multiple variants in the same subject. Classification of novel variants may be particularly cumbersome having an important impact on the genetic counselling. Our study confirms the importance to improve the assessment of variant pathogenicity for ADPKD; to this point databasing of both clinical and molecular data is crucial. PMID:27499327

  17. Linkage to D3S47 (C17) in one large autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa family and exclusion in another: confirmation of genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed Central

    Lester, D H; Inglehearn, C F; Bashir, R; Ackford, H; Esakowitz, L; Jay, M; Bird, A C; Wright, A F; Papiha, S S; Bhattacharya, S S

    1990-01-01

    Recently Dryja and his co-workers observed a mutation in the 23d codon of the rhodopsin gene in a proportion of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) patients. Linkage analysis with a rhodopsin-linked probe C17 (D3S47) was carried out in two large British ADRP families, one with diffuse-type (D-type) RP and the other with regional-type (R-type) RP. Significantly positive lod scores (lod score maximum [Zmax] = +5.58 at recombination fraction [theta] = .0) were obtained between C17 and our D-type ADRP family showing complete penetrance. Sequence and oligonucleotide analysis has, however, shown that no point mutation at the 23d codon exists in affected individuals in our complete-penetrance pedigree, indicating that another rhodopsin mutation is probably responsible for ADRP in this family. Significantly negative lod scores (Z less than -2 at theta = .045) were, however, obtained between C17 and our R-type family which showed incomplete penetrance. Previous results presented by this laboratory also showed no linkage between C17 and another large British R-type ADRP family with incomplete penetrance. This confirms genetic heterogeneity. Some types of ADRP are being caused by different mutations in the rhodopsin locus (3q21-24) or another tightly linked gene in this region, while other types of ADRP are the result of mutations elsewhere in the genome. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2393026

  18. Refining the localization of the PKD2 locus on chromosome 4q by linkage analysis in Spanish families with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease type 2

    SciTech Connect

    San Millan, J.L.; Viribay, M.; Peral, B.; Moreno, F.; Martinez, I.; Weissenbach, J.

    1995-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. At least two distinct forms of ADPKD are now well defined. In {approximately}86% of affected European families, a gene defect localized to 16p13.3 was responsible for ADPKD, while a second locus has been recently localized to 4q13-q23 as candidate for the disease in the remaining families. We present confirmation of linkage to microsatellite markers on chromosome 4q in eight Spanish families with ADPKD, in which the disease was not linked to 16p13.3. By linkage analysis with marker D4S423, a maximum lod score of 9.03 at a recombination fraction of .00 was obtained. Multipoint linkage analysis, as well as a study of recombinant haplotypes, placed the PKD2 locus between D4S1542 and D4S1563, thereby defining a genetic interval of {approximately}1 cM. The refined map will serve as a genetic framework for additional genetic and physical mapping of the region and will improve the accuracy of presymptomatic diagnosis of PKD2. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Mislocalisation of BEST1 in iPSC-derived retinal pigment epithelial cells from a family with autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy (ADVIRC)

    PubMed Central

    Carter, David A.; Smart, Matthew J. K.; Letton, William V. G.; Ramsden, Conor M.; Nommiste, Britta; Chen, Li Li; Fynes, Kate; Muthiah, Manickam N.; Goh, Pollyanna; Lane, Amelia; Powner, Michael B.; Webster, Andrew R.; da Cruz, Lyndon; Moore, Anthony T.; Coffey, Peter J.; Carr, Amanda-Jayne F.

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy (ADVIRC) is a rare, early-onset retinal dystrophy characterised by distinct bands of circumferential pigmentary degeneration in the peripheral retina and developmental eye defects. ADVIRC is caused by mutations in the Bestrophin1 (BEST1) gene, which encodes a transmembrane protein thought to function as an ion channel in the basolateral membrane of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Previous studies suggest that the distinct ADVIRC phenotype results from alternative splicing of BEST1 pre-mRNA. Here, we have used induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology to investigate the effects of an ADVIRC associated BEST1 mutation (c.704T > C, p.V235A) in patient-derived iPSC-RPE. We found no evidence of alternate splicing of the BEST1 transcript in ADVIRC iPSC-RPE, however in patient-derived iPSC-RPE, BEST1 was expressed at the basolateral membrane and the apical membrane. During human eye development we show that BEST1 is expressed more abundantly in peripheral RPE compared to central RPE and is also expressed in cells of the developing retina. These results suggest that higher levels of mislocalised BEST1 expression in the periphery, from an early developmental stage, could provide a mechanism that leads to the distinct clinical phenotype observed in ADVIRC patients. PMID:27653836

  20. [AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE: HOW AND WHY SHOULD WE IDENTIFY THE PATIENTS "RAPIDLY PROGRESSING" TO END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE?].

    PubMed

    Bodson, A; Meunier, P; Krzesinski, J-M; Jouret, F

    2016-04-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common inherited disease characterised by the progressive development of multiple and bilateral cysts in kidneys and other organs. Most patients with ADPKD will develop, sooner or later, end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The morbidity and mortality associated with ESRD prompt physicians to identify early ADPKD patients considered as "rapid progressors", who have the greatest risk to rapidly develop ESRD. The rate of progression can be assessed by clinical--especially with the "predicting renal outcome in polycystic kidney disease score" (PROPKD-Score)-, biological (a decline of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of 4.4-5.9 ml/min/year and/or the doubling of serum creatinine within a 36-month period), or radiological criteria (total kidney volume (TKV) adjusted for the size > 600 cc/m and/or TKV annual growth rate > 5 %). Nowadays, there is no curative treatment for ADPKD. However, vasopressin-2 receptor antagonists, such as tolvaptan, appear to slow down the growth of renal cysts and the slope of GFR decline. The current management of ADPKD patients is mostly based on correcting the risk factors for progression, i.e. encouraging (over)-hydration, normalizing blood pressure, stimulating smoking cessation. PMID:27295898

  1. Identification of 13 new mutations in the vasopressin-neurophysin II gene in 17 kindreds with familial autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    SciTech Connect

    Rittig, S.; Siggaard, C.; Pedersen, E.B.

    1996-01-01

    Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by progressive postnatal deficiency of arginine vasopressin as a result of mutation in the gene that encodes the hormone. To determine the extent of mutations in the coding region that produce the phenotype, we studied members of 17 unrelated kindreds with the disorder. We sequenced all 3 exons of the gene by using a rapid, direct dye-terminator method and found the causative mutation in each kindred. In four kindreds, the mutations were each identical to mutations described in other affected families. In the other 13 kindreds each mutation was unique. There were two missense mutations that altered the cleavage region of the signal peptide, seven missense mutations in exon 2, which codes for the conserved portion of the protein, one nonsense mutation in exon 2, and three nonsense mutations in exon 3. These findings, together with the clinical features of FNDI, suggest that each of the mutations exerts an effect by directing the production of a pre-prohormone that cannot be folded, processed, or degraded properly and eventually destroys vasopressinergic neurons. 63 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Deciphering Variability of PKD1 and PKD2 in an Italian Cohort of 643 Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD)

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Paola; Calzavara, Silvia; Magistroni, Riccardo; den Dunnen, Johan T.; Rigo, Francesca; Stenirri, Stefania; Testa, Francesca; Messa, Piergiorgio; Cerutti, Roberta; Scolari, Francesco; Izzi, Claudia; Edefonti, Alberto; Negrisolo, Susanna; Benetti, Elisa; Alibrandi, Maria Teresa Sciarrone; Manunta, Paolo; Boletta, Alessandra; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary kidney disease. We analysed PKD1 and PKD2, in a large cohort of 440 unrelated Italian patients with ADPKD and 203 relatives by direct sequencing and MLPA. Molecular and detailed phenotypic data have been collected and submitted to the PKD1/PKD2 LOVD database. This is the first large retrospective study in Italian patients, describing 701 variants, 249 (35.5%) already associated with ADPKD and 452 (64.5%) novel. According to the criteria adopted, the overall detection rate was 80% (352/440). Novel variants with uncertain significance were found in 14% of patients. Among patients with pathogenic variants, in 301 (85.5%) the disease is associated with PKD1, 196 (55.7%) truncating, 81 (23%) non truncating, 24 (6.8%) IF indels, and in 51 (14.5%) with PKD2. Our results outline the high allelic heterogeneity of variants, complicated by the presence of variants of uncertain significance as well as of multiple variants in the same subject. Classification of novel variants may be particularly cumbersome having an important impact on the genetic counselling. Our study confirms the importance to improve the assessment of variant pathogenicity for ADPKD; to this point databasing of both clinical and molecular data is crucial. PMID:27499327

  3. A pedigree with autosomal dominant thrombocytopenia, red cell macrocytosis, and an occurrence of t(12:21) positive pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Escher, Robert; Wilson, Peter; Carmichael, Catherine; Suppiah, Ram; Liu, Marjorie; Kavallaris, Maria; Cannon, Ping; Michaud, Joelle; Scott, Hamish S

    2007-01-01

    Sampling and analyzing new families with inherited blood disorders are major steps contributing to the identification of gene(s) responsible for normal and pathologic hematopoiesis. Familial occurrences of hematological disorders alone, or as part of a syndromic disease, have been reported, and for some the underlying genetic mutation has been identified. Here we describe a new autosomal dominant inherited phenotype of thrombocytopenia and red cell macrocytosis in a four-generation pedigree. Interestingly, in the youngest generation, a 2-year-old boy presenting with these familial features has developed acute lymphoblastic leukemia characterized by a t(12;21) translocation. Tri-lineage involvement of platelets, red cells and white cells may suggest a genetic defect in an early multiliear progenitor or a stem cell. Functional assays in EBV-transformed cell lines revealed a defect in cell proliferation and tubulin dynamics. Two candidate genes, RUNX1 and FOG1, were sequenced but no pathogenic mutation was found. Identification of the underlying genetic defect(s) in this family may help in understanding the complex process of hematopoiesis.

  4. Intermediate volume on computed tomography imaging defines a fibrotic compartment that predicts glomerular filtration rate decline in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Caroli, Anna; Antiga, Luca; Conti, Sara; Sonzogni, Aurelio; Fasolini, Giorgio; Ondei, Patrizia; Perico, Norberto; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Remuzzi, Andrea

    2011-08-01

    Total kidney and cyst volumes have been used to quantify disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), but a causal relationship with progression to renal failure has not been demonstrated. Advanced image processing recently allowed to quantify extracystic tissue, and to identify an additional tissue component named "intermediate," appearing hypoenhanced on contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT). The aim of this study is to provide a histological characterization of intermediate volume, investigate its relation with renal function, and provide preliminary evidence of its role in long-term prediction of functional loss. Three ADPKD patients underwent contrast-enhanced CT scans before nephrectomy. Histological samples of intermediate volume were drawn from the excised kidneys, and stained with hematoxylin and eosin and with saturated picrosirius solution for histological analysis. Intermediate volume showed major structural changes, characterized by tubular dilation and atrophy, microcysts, inflammatory cell infiltrate, vascular sclerosis, and extended peritubular interstitial fibrosis. A significant correlation (r = -0.69, P < 0.001) between relative intermediate volume and baseline renal function was found in 21 ADPKD patients. Long-term prediction of renal functional loss was investigated in an independent cohort of 13 ADPKD patients, followed for 3 to 8 years. Intermediate volume, but not total kidney or cyst volume, significantly correlated with glomerular filtration rate decline (r = -0.79, P < 0.005). These findings suggest that intermediate volume may represent a suitable surrogate marker of ADPKD progression and a novel therapeutic target.

  5. A large genomic deletion leads to enhancer adoption by the lamin B1 gene: a second path to autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD)

    PubMed Central

    Giorgio, Elisa; Robyr, Daniel; Spielmann, Malte; Ferrero, Enza; Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Imperiale, Daniele; Vaula, Giovanna; Stamoulis, Georgios; Santoni, Federico; Atzori, Cristiana; Gasparini, Laura; Ferrera, Denise; Canale, Claudio; Guipponi, Michel; Pennacchio, Len A.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Brussino, Alessandro; Brusco, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements with duplication of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene underlie autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD), a rare neurological disorder in which overexpression of LMNB1 causes progressive central nervous system demyelination. However, we previously reported an ADLD family (ADLD-1-TO) without evidence of duplication or other mutation in LMNB1 despite linkage to the LMNB1 locus and lamin B1 overexpression. By custom array-CGH, we further investigated this family and report here that patients carry a large (∼660 kb) heterozygous deletion that begins 66 kb upstream of the LMNB1 promoter. Lamin B1 overexpression was confirmed in further ADLD-1-TO tissues and in a postmortem brain sample, where lamin B1 was increased in the frontal lobe. Through parallel studies, we investigated both loss of genetic material and chromosomal rearrangement as possible causes of LMNB1 overexpression, and found that ADLD-1-TO plausibly results from an enhancer adoption mechanism. The deletion eliminates a genome topological domain boundary, allowing normally forbidden interactions between at least three forebrain-directed enhancers and the LMNB1 promoter, in line with the observed mainly cerebral localization of lamin B1 overexpression and myelin degeneration. This second route to LMNB1 overexpression and ADLD is a new example of the relevance of regulatory landscape modifications in determining Mendelian phenotypes. PMID:25701871

  6. Ocular findings in a family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa and a frameshift mutation altering the carboxyl terminal sequence of rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Apfelstedt-Sylla, E; Kunisch, M; Horn, M; Rüther, K; Gerding, H; Gal, A; Zrenner, E

    1993-08-01

    A family is described in which an 8 base pair deletion (nucleotides 5252-5259, codons 341-343) of the rhodopsin gene cosegregates with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). The deletion results in a shift in the reading frame, causing a rhodopsin molecule extended by one residue and substantially altered at the carboxyl terminus. Phenotypic expression is relatively mild. In affected members, night blindness did not occur before the age of 16, and late onset of visual field loss was consistently reported. Even older individuals (59 and 76 years) had preserved central islands in the visual field; a younger female patient had normal visual fields until the age of 34. ERG and psychophysical tests showed well preserved cone function at stages of virtually abolished rod function. Phenotypic differences and similarities between this form of adRP and others associated with mutations at the carboxyl terminus of the rhodopsin molecule are discussed. The cause of RP by mutations in this region remains to be clarified.

  7. A pedigree with autosomal dominant thrombocytopenia, red cell macrocytosis, and an occurrence of t(12:21) positive pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Escher, Robert; Wilson, Peter; Carmichael, Catherine; Suppiah, Ram; Liu, Marjorie; Kavallaris, Maria; Cannon, Ping; Michaud, Joelle; Scott, Hamish S

    2007-01-01

    Sampling and analyzing new families with inherited blood disorders are major steps contributing to the identification of gene(s) responsible for normal and pathologic hematopoiesis. Familial occurrences of hematological disorders alone, or as part of a syndromic disease, have been reported, and for some the underlying genetic mutation has been identified. Here we describe a new autosomal dominant inherited phenotype of thrombocytopenia and red cell macrocytosis in a four-generation pedigree. Interestingly, in the youngest generation, a 2-year-old boy presenting with these familial features has developed acute lymphoblastic leukemia characterized by a t(12;21) translocation. Tri-lineage involvement of platelets, red cells and white cells may suggest a genetic defect in an early multiliear progenitor or a stem cell. Functional assays in EBV-transformed cell lines revealed a defect in cell proliferation and tubulin dynamics. Two candidate genes, RUNX1 and FOG1, were sequenced but no pathogenic mutation was found. Identification of the underlying genetic defect(s) in this family may help in understanding the complex process of hematopoiesis. PMID:17434765

  8. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the U.S. The high cardiovascular death rate in dialysis patients with ADPKD remains a problem. Kidney transplantation ... who develop ESRD receive a transplant before beginning dialysis therapy. Limited organ availability has resulted in longer ...

  9. Autosomal-Dominant Corneal Endothelial Dystrophies CHED1 and PPCD1 Are Allelic Disorders Caused by Non-coding Mutations in the Promoter of OVOL2

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Alice E.; Liskova, Petra; Evans, Cerys J.; Dudakova, Lubica; Nosková, Lenka; Pontikos, Nikolas; Hartmannová, Hana; Hodaňová, Kateřina; Stránecký, Viktor; Kozmík, Zbyněk; Levis, Hannah J.; Idigo, Nwamaka; Sasai, Noriaki; Maher, Geoffrey J.; Bellingham, James; Veli, Neyme; Ebenezer, Neil D.; Cheetham, Michael E.; Daniels, Julie T.; Thaung, Caroline M.H.; Jirsova, Katerina; Plagnol, Vincent; Filipec, Martin; Kmoch, Stanislav; Tuft, Stephen J.; Hardcastle, Alison J.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy 1 (CHED1) and posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy 1 (PPCD1) are autosomal-dominant corneal endothelial dystrophies that have been genetically mapped to overlapping loci on the short arm of chromosome 20. We combined genetic and genomic approaches to identify the cause of disease in extensive pedigrees comprising over 100 affected individuals. After exclusion of pathogenic coding, splice-site, and copy-number variations, a parallel approach using targeted and whole-genome sequencing facilitated the identification of pathogenic variants in a conserved region of the OVOL2 proximal promoter sequence in the index families (c.−339_361dup for CHED1 and c.−370T>C for PPCD1). Direct sequencing of the OVOL2 promoter in other unrelated affected individuals identified two additional mutations within the conserved proximal promoter sequence (c.−274T>G and c.−307T>C). OVOL2 encodes ovo-like zinc finger 2, a C2H2 zinc-finger transcription factor that regulates mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition and acts as a direct transcriptional repressor of the established PPCD-associated gene ZEB1. Interestingly, we did not detect OVOL2 expression in the normal corneal endothelium. Our in vitro data demonstrate that all four mutated OVOL2 promoters exhibited more transcriptional activity than the corresponding wild-type promoter, and we postulate that the mutations identified create cryptic cis-acting regulatory sequence binding sites that drive aberrant OVOL2 expression during endothelial cell development. Our data establish CHED1 and PPCD1 as allelic conditions and show that CHED1 represents the extreme of what can be considered a disease spectrum. They also implicate transcriptional dysregulation of OVOL2 as a common cause of dominantly inherited corneal endothelial dystrophies. PMID:26749309

  10. Characterization of a Recurrent In-frame UMOD Indel Mutation Causing Late-onset Autosomal Dominant End-Stage Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Graham D.; Robinson, Caroline; Stewart, Andrew P.; Edwards, Emily L.; Karet, Hannah I.; Norden, Anthony G. W.; Sandford, Richard N.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives In a single-center renal clinic, we have established routine mutation testing to diagnose UMOD-associated kidney disease (UAKD), an autosomal dominant disorder typically characterized by gout, hyperuricemia, and renal failure in the third to sixth decades. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Four probands and their multigeneration kindreds were assessed by clinical, historical, and biochemical means. Diagnostic UMOD sequencing was performed, and mutant uromodulin was characterized in vitro. Results All available affected members of the four kindreds harbored the same complex indel change in UMOD, which was associated with almost complete absence of gout and a later onset of CKD; the youngest age at ESRD or death was 38 years (range, 38 to 68 years) compared with 3 to 70 years in other reports. Three mutation carriers (all ≤35 years) are currently asymptomatic. The indel sequence (c.278_289del TCTGCCCCGAAGinsCCGCCTCCT; p.V93_G97del/ins AASC) results in the replacement of five amino acids, including one cysteine, by four novel residues, also including a cysteine. Uromodulin staining of the only available patient biopsy suggested disorganized intracellular trafficking with cellular accumulation. Functional characterization of the mutant isoform revealed retarded intracellular trafficking associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention and reduced secretion into cell culture media, but to a lesser extent than we observed with the previously reported C150S mutation. Conclusions The indel mutation is associated with a relatively mild clinical UAKD phenotype, consistent with our in vitro analysis. UAKD should be routinely considered as a causative gene for ESRD of unknown cause, especially where there is an associated family history or where biopsy reveals interstitial fibrosis. PMID:22034507

  11. [The first Japanese case of autosomal dominant Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy with a novel mutation in the lamin A/C gene].

    PubMed

    Onishi, Yasushi; Higuchi, Jun; Ogawa, Tatuji; Namekawa, Akio; Hayashi, Hidemori; Odakura, Hironori; Goto, Kanako; Hayashi, Yukiko K

    2002-02-01

    Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) is a muscular disorder characterized by 1) early contracture of the elbows. Achilles tendons and post-cervical muscles, 2) slowly progressive muscle wasting and weakness with a humeroperoneal distribution, and 3) life-threatening cardiomyopathy with conduction block. Most of families with EDMD show X-linked recessive inheritance with mutations in the STA gene on chromosome Xq28, which encodes a protein named emerin. A rare autosomal dominant form of EDMD (AD-EDMD) is caused by mutations in lamin A/C gene (LMNA) on chromosome 1q21. Both emerin and lamin A/C are located in the inner surface membrane of the nucleus. A 49-year-old woman was skinny and slow runner from childhood and suspected as having a certain muscular disorder. At 35 years, she was found to have the second degree atrioventricular block. At 45 years, she was admitted to a hospital for right-side hemiplegia after cerebral infarction. Cardiac involvement was also observed including high degree atrioventricular block with chronic atrial fibrillation and frequent paroxysmal ventricular contraction on the electrocardiogram. At 49 years, she was referred to our hospital for further evaluation. She had possible dilated cardiomyopathy with conduction block. She also had muscular atrophy and weakness in all extremities, predominantly in the right-side, and contracture of bilateral Achilles tendon, knee and elbow joints, and postcervical muscles. Biopsied skeletal muscle and electromyogram showed myopathic changes. Since a novel point mutation of Ser303Pro was found in exon 5 of LMNA gene, she was diagnosed as having AD-EDMD and had a permanent pacemaker implantation. Her daughter also had some abnormalities on electrocardiogram. This is the first Japanese case of AD-EDMD. Amiodaron was effective for non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. Early diagnosis and following cardiological examinations and treatments are important and necessary to improve the prognosis of the

  12. Network Analysis of a Pkd1-Mouse Model of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease Identifies HNF4α as a Disease Modifier

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Luis F.; Zhou, Fang; Patterson, Andrew D.; Piontek, Klaus B.; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Germino, Gregory G.

    2012-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD; MIM ID's 173900, 601313, 613095) leads to end-stage kidney disease, caused by mutations in PKD1 or PKD2. Inactivation of Pkd1 before or after P13 in mice results in distinct early- or late-onset disease. Using a mouse model of ADPKD carrying floxed Pkd1 alleles and an inducible Cre recombinase, we intensively analyzed the relationship between renal maturation and cyst formation by applying transcriptomics and metabolomics to follow disease progression in a large number of animals induced before P10. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis suggests that Pkd1-cystogenesis does not cause developmental arrest and occurs in the context of gene networks similar to those that regulate/maintain normal kidney morphology/function. Knowledge-based Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software identifies HNF4α as a likely network node. These results are further supported by a meta-analysis of 1,114 published gene expression arrays in Pkd1 wild-type tissues. These analyses also predict that metabolic pathways are key elements in postnatal kidney maturation and early steps of cyst formation. Consistent with these findings, urinary metabolomic studies show that Pkd1 cystic mutants have a distinct profile of excreted metabolites, with pathway analysis suggesting altered activity in several metabolic pathways. To evaluate their role in disease, metabolic networks were perturbed by inactivating Hnf4α and Pkd1. The Pkd1/Hnf4α double mutants have significantly more cystic kidneys, thus indicating that metabolic pathways could play a role in Pkd1-cystogenesis. PMID:23209428

  13. Autosomal Dominant Retinal Dystrophies Caused by a Founder Splice Site Mutation, c.828+3A>T, in PRPH2 and Protein Haplotypes in trans as Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Suma P.; Hughbanks-Wheaton, Dianna K.; Birch, David G.; Sullivan, Lori S.; Conneely, Karen N.; Bowne, Sara J.; Stone, Edwin M.; Daiger, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We determined the phenotypic variation, disease progression, and potential modifiers of autosomal dominant retinal dystrophies caused by a splice site founder mutation, c.828+3A>T, in the PRPH2 gene. Methods A total of 62 individuals (19 families) harboring the PRPH2 c.828+3A>T mutation, had phenotype analysis by fundus appearance, electrophysiology, and visual fields. The PRPH2 haplotypes in trans were sequenced for potential modifying variants and generalized estimating equations (GEE) used for statistical analysis. Results Several distinct phenotypes caused by the PRPH2 c.828+3A>T mutation were observed and fell into two clinical categories: Group I (N = 44) with mild pattern dystrophies (PD) and Group II (N = 18) with more severe cone-rod dystrophy (CRD), retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and central areolar chorioretinal dystrophy (CACD). The PRPH2 Gln304-Lys310-Asp338 protein haplotype in trans was found in Group I only (29.6% vs. 0%), whereas the Glu304-Lys310-Gly338 haplotype was predominant in Group II (94.4% vs. 70.4%). Generalized estimating equations analysis for PD versus the CRD/CACD/RP phenotypes in individuals over 43 years alone with the PRPH2 haplotypes in trans and age as predictors, adjusted for correlation within families, confirmed a significant effect of haplotype on severity (P = 0.03) with an estimated odds ratio of 7.16 (95% confidence interval [CI] = [2.8, 18.4]). Conclusions The PRPH2 c.828+3A>T mutation results in multiple distinct phenotypes likely modified by protein haplotypes in trans; the odds of having the CACD/RP-like phenotype (versus the PD phenotype) are 7.16 times greater with a Glu304-Lys310-Gly338 haplotype in trans. Further functional studies of the modifying haplotypes in trans and PRPH2 splice variants may offer therapeutic targets. PMID:26842753

  14. A Recurrent Mutation in CACNA1G Alters Cav3.1 T-Type Calcium-Channel Conduction and Causes Autosomal-Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia.

    PubMed

    Coutelier, Marie; Blesneac, Iulia; Monteil, Arnaud; Monin, Marie-Lorraine; Ando, Kunie; Mundwiller, Emeline; Brusco, Alfredo; Le Ber, Isabelle; Anheim, Mathieu; Castrioto, Anna; Duyckaerts, Charles; Brice, Alexis; Durr, Alexandra; Lory, Philippe; Stevanin, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    Hereditary cerebellar ataxias (CAs) are neurodegenerative disorders clinically characterized by a cerebellar syndrome, often accompanied by other neurological or non-neurological signs. All transmission modes have been described. In autosomal-dominant CA (ADCA), mutations in more than 30 genes are implicated, but the molecular diagnosis remains unknown in about 40% of cases. Implication of ion channels has long been an ongoing topic in the genetics of CA, and mutations in several channel genes have been recently connected to ADCA. In a large family affected by ADCA and mild pyramidal signs, we searched for the causative variant by combining linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing. In CACNA1G, we identified a c.5144G>A mutation, causing an arginine-to-histidine (p.Arg1715His) change in the voltage sensor S4 segment of the T-type channel protein Cav3.1. Two out of 479 index subjects screened subsequently harbored the same mutation. We performed electrophysiological experiments in HEK293T cells to compare the properties of the p.Arg1715His and wild-type Cav3.1 channels. The current-voltage and the steady-state activation curves of the p.Arg1715His channel were shifted positively, whereas the inactivation curve had a higher slope factor. Computer modeling in deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) neurons suggested that the mutation results in decreased neuronal excitability. Taken together, these data establish CACNA1G, which is highly expressed in the cerebellum, as a gene whose mutations can cause ADCA. This is consistent with the neuropathological examination, which showed severe Purkinje cell loss. Our study further extends our knowledge of the link between calcium channelopathies and CAs. PMID:26456284

  15. Limited ATF4 Expression in Degenerating Retinas with Ongoing ER Stress Promotes Photoreceptor Survival in a Mouse Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Bhootada, Yogesh; Kotla, Pravallika; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Gorbatyuk, Oleg; Bebok, Zsuzsanna; Athar, Mohammad; Gorbatyuk, Marina

    2016-01-01

    T17M rhodopsin expression in rod photoreceptors leads to severe retinal degeneration and is associated with the activation of ER stress related Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) signaling. Here, we show a novel role of a UPR transcription factor, ATF4, in photoreceptor cellular pathology. We demonstrated a pro-death role for ATF4 overexpression during autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP). Based on our results in ATF4 knockout mice and adeno-associated viral (AAV) delivery of ATF4 to the retina, we validated a novel therapeutic approach targeting ATF4 over the course of retinal degeneration. In T17M rhodopsin retinas, we observed ATF4 overexpression concomitantly with reduction of p62 and elevation of p53 levels. These molecular alterations, together with increased CHOP and caspase-3/7 activity, possibly contributed to the mechanism of photoreceptor cell loss. Conversely, ATF4 knockdown retarded retinal degeneration in 1-month-old T17M Rhodopsin mice and promoted photoreceptor survival, as measured by scotopic and photopic ERGs and photoreceptor nuclei row counts. Similarly, ATF4 knockdown also markedly delayed retinal degeneration in 3-month-old ADRP animals. This delay was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in UPR signaling, the launching of anti-oxidant defense, initiation of autophagy, and improvement of rhodopsin biosynthesis which together perhaps combat the cellular stress associated with T17M rhodopsin. Our data indicate that augmented ATF4 signals during retinal degeneration plays a cytotoxic role by triggering photoreceptor cell death. Future ADRP therapy regulating ATF4 expression can be developed to treat retinal degenerative disorders associated with activated UPR. PMID:27144303

  16. Modeling of autosomal-dominant retinitis pigmentosa in Caenorhabditis elegans uncovers a nexus between global impaired functioning of certain splicing factors and cell type-specific apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Peña, Karinna; Fontrodona, Laura; Aristizábal-Corrales, David; Torres, Silvia; Cornes, Eric; García-Rodríguez, Francisco J; Serrat, Xènia; González-Knowles, David; Foissac, Sylvain; Porta-De-La-Riva, Montserrat; Cerón, Julián

    2015-12-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a rare genetic disease that causes gradual blindness through retinal degeneration. Intriguingly, seven of the 24 genes identified as responsible for the autosomal-dominant form (adRP) are ubiquitous spliceosome components whose impairment causes disease only in the retina. The fact that these proteins are essential in all organisms hampers genetic, genomic, and physiological studies, but we addressed these difficulties by using RNAi in Caenorhabditis elegans. Our study of worm phenotypes produced by RNAi of splicing-related adRP (s-adRP) genes functionally distinguishes between components of U4 and U5 snRNP complexes, because knockdown of U5 proteins produces a stronger phenotype. RNA-seq analyses of worms where s-adRP genes were partially inactivated by RNAi, revealed mild intron retention in developing animals but not in adults, suggesting a positive correlation between intron retention and transcriptional activity. Interestingly, RNAi of s-adRP genes produces an increase in the expression of atl-1 (homolog of human ATR), which is normally activated in response to replicative stress and certain DNA-damaging agents. The up-regulation of atl-1 correlates with the ectopic expression of the pro-apoptotic gene egl-1 and apoptosis in hypodermal cells, which produce the cuticle, but not in other cell types. Our model in C. elegans resembles s-adRP in two aspects: The phenotype caused by global knockdown of s-adRP genes is cell type-specific and associated with high transcriptional activity. Finally, along with a reduced production of mature transcripts, we propose a model in which the retina-specific cell death in s-adRP patients can be induced through genomic instability.

  17. A comparison of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging shows that kidney length predicts chronic kidney disease in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, Harpreet; Smith, Vikram; Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic; Mittal, Ankush; Grantham, Jared J; Torres, Vicente E; Mrug, Michal; Bae, Kyongtae T; Wu, Zhiyuan; Ge, Yinghui; Landslittel, Doug; Gibbs, Patrice; O'Neill, W Charles; Chapman, Arlene B

    2015-07-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is marked by gradual renal cyst and kidney enlargement and ultimately renal failure. Magnetic resonance-based, height-adjusted total kidney volume (htTKV) over 600 cc/m predicts the development of CKD stage 3 within 8 years in the Consortium for Radiologic Imaging in Polycystic Kidney Disease cohort. Here we compared simultaneous ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging to determine whether ultrasound and kidney length (KL) predict future CKD stage 3 over longer periods of follow-up. A total of 241 ADPKD patients, 15-46 years, with creatinine clearance of 70 ml/min and above had iothalamate clearance, magnetic resonance, and ultrasound evaluations. Participants underwent an average of five repeat clearance measurements over a mean follow-up of 9.3 years. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance-based TKV and KL were compared using Bland-Altman plots and intraclass correlations. Each measure was tested to predict future CKD stage 3. Relatively strong intraclass correlations between ultrasound and magnetic resonance were found for both htTKV and KL (0.81 and 0.85, respectively). Ultrasound and magnetic resonance-based htTKV and KL predicted future CKD stage 3 similarly (AUC of 0.87, 0.88, 0.87, and 0.88, respectively). An ultrasound kidney length over 16.5 cm and htTKV over 650 ml/min had the best cut point for predicting the development of CKD stage 3. Thus, kidney length alone is sufficient to stratify the risk of progression to renal insufficiency early in ADPKD using either ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging.

  18. Early atherosclerosis in normotensive patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: the relation between epicardial adipose tissue thickness and carotid intima-media thickness.

    PubMed

    Sag, Saim; Yildiz, Abdulmecit; Gullulu, Sumeyye; Gungoren, Fatih; Ozdemir, Bulent; Cegilli, Ercan; Oruc, Aysegul; Ersoy, Alparslan; Gullulu, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Epicardial adipose tissue thickness (EATT) is suggested as a novel marker of subclinical atherosclerosis. Despite increased carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients, the extent of the relationship between CIMT and EATT is unknown. The main purpose of our study was to evaluate the relation between EATT and CIMT in normotensive ADPKD patients with well-preserved renal function. Fifty-five normotensive ADPKD patients with normal renal function and 50 healthy control subjects were included in the study. EATT and CIMT were measured by echocardiography in all subjects. Correlation between EATT and CIMT was evaluated in ADPKD patients, while multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to determine factors predicting EATT and CIMT. ADPKD patients had significantly higher levels CIMT [0.7 (0.4-1.2) vs. 0.5 (0.4-0.8) mm, p < 0.001] and EATT (6.8 ± 2.7 vs. 4.8 ± 1.2 mm, p < 0.001) as compared with control subjects. Significant positive correlation was found between EATT and CIMT (r = 0.58, p < 0.001). Higher CRP levels (OR 54.7, 95 % CI 37.44-72.01, p < 0.001) and having ADPKD (OR 10.2, 95 % CI 2.53-17.86, p = 0.01) were the only independent factors associated with a higher EATT. A higher age (OR 0.35, 95 % CI -0.02 to 0.71, p = 0.06) tended to be independently associated with a higher EATT. In conclusion, our findings suggest that EATT, being simply measured by echocardiography and correlated with CIMT, can be used to detect subclinical atherosclerosis in normotensive ADPKD patients. PMID:27026905

  19. Combination of Whole Genome Sequencing, Linkage, and Functional Studies Implicates a Missense Mutation in Titin as a Cause of Autosomal Dominant Cardiomyopathy With Features of Left Ventricular Noncompaction

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Robert; de Villiers, Carin P.; Hooper, Charlotte; Ormondroyd, Liz; Pagnamenta, Alistair; Lise, Stefano; Salatino, Silvia; Knight, Samantha J.L.; Taylor, Jenny C.; Thomson, Kate L.; Arnold, Linda; Chatziefthimiou, Spyros D.; Konarev, Petr V.; Wilmanns, Matthias; Ehler, Elisabeth; Ghisleni, Andrea; Gautel, Mathias; Blair, Edward; Watkins, Hugh

    2016-01-01

    Background— High throughput next-generation sequencing techniques have made whole genome sequencing accessible in clinical practice; however, the abundance of variation in the human genomes makes the identification of a disease-causing mutation on a background of benign rare variants challenging. Methods and Results— Here we combine whole genome sequencing with linkage analysis in a 3-generation family affected by cardiomyopathy with features of autosomal dominant left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy. A missense mutation in the giant protein titin is the only plausible disease-causing variant that segregates with disease among the 7 surviving affected individuals, with interrogation of the entire genome excluding other potential causes. This A178D missense mutation, affecting a conserved residue in the second immunoglobulin-like domain of titin, was introduced in a bacterially expressed recombinant protein fragment and biophysically characterized in comparison to its wild-type counterpart. Multiple experiments, including size exclusion chromatography, small-angle x ray scattering, and circular dichroism spectroscopy suggest partial unfolding and domain destabilization in the presence of the mutation. Moreover, binding experiments in mammalian cells show that the mutation markedly impairs binding to the titin ligand telethonin. Conclusions— Here we present genetic and functional evidence implicating the novel A178D missense mutation in titin as the cause of a highly penetrant familial cardiomyopathy with features of left ventricular noncompaction. This expands the spectrum of titin’s roles in cardiomyopathies. It furthermore highlights that rare titin missense variants, currently often ignored or left uninterpreted, should be considered to be relevant for cardiomyopathies and can be identified by the approach presented here. PMID:27625337

  20. Brief Screening of Vascular Cognitive Impairment in Patients With Cerebral Autosomal-Dominant Arteriopathy With Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy Without Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Hollocks, Matthew J.; Tan, Rhea Y.Y.; Morris, Robin G.; Markus, Hugh S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a monogenic form of cerebral small vessel disease leading to early-onset stroke and dementia, with younger patients frequently showing subclinical deficits in cognition. At present, there are no targeted cognitive screening measures for this population. However, the Brief Memory and Executive Test (BMET) and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) have shown utility in detecting cognitive impairment in sporadic small vessel disease. This study assesses the BMET and the MoCA as clinical tools for detecting mild cognitive deficits in CADASIL. Methods— Sixty-six prospectively recruited patients with CADASIL, and 66 matched controls completed the BMET, with a subset of these also completing the MoCA. Receiver operating characteristic curves were calculated to examine the sensitivity and specificity of clinical cutoffs for the detection of vascular cognitive impairment and reduced activities of daily living. Results— Patients with CADASIL showed more cognitive impairment overall and were poorer on both executive/processing and memory indices of the BMET relative to controls. The BMET showed good accuracy in predicting vascular cognitive impairment (85% sensitivity and 84% specificity) and impaired instrumental activities of daily living (92% sensitivity and 77% specificity). The MoCA also showed good predictive validity for vascular cognitive impairment (80% sensitivity and 78% specificity) and instrumental activities of daily living (75% sensitivity and 76% specificity). The most important background predictor of vascular cognitive impairment was a history of stroke. Conclusions— The results indicate that the BMET and the MoCA are clinically useful and sensitive screening measures for early cognitive impairment in patients with CADASIL. PMID:27625375

  1. Urinary Biomarkers for Monitoring Disease Progression in the Han:SPRD-cy Rat Model of Autosomal-Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wiedmeyer, Charles E; Royal, Angela B

    2010-01-01

    The Han:SRPD-cy rat is a well-recognized model of human autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease. The disease is characterized by the development of progressive renal cysts, leading to declining renal function. Disease progression typically is monitored by measurement of plasma urea concentration. Although plasma urea may be an adequate measure of overall renal function, urinary biomarkers capable of accurately monitoring disease progression may be equally useful. The goal of this study was to assess several urinary biomarkers as potential markers of disease progression in male and female Han:SPRD-cy rats. These biomarkers were compared with changes in plasma urea concentration and morphometric changes as the disease progressed. Urinary activity of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and concentration of α-glutathione S-transferase were measured as markers of proximal tubular dysfunction, glutathione S-transferase Yb1 as a distal tubular marker, and collagen IV as a biomarker for glomerular lesions. Urinary albumin was used as biomarker of glomerular or proximal tubular lesions. Albuminuria increased in male rats as the disease progressed, correlating with increasing plasma urea and morphologic changes. Urine concentrations of α-glutathione S-transferase decreased significantly in the male heterozygotic compared with wildtype rats in the later stages of the disease. Urinary concentrations of glutathione S-transferase Yb1 and collagen IV and activity of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase did not change during disease progression. Measurement of urinary albumin and concentrations of α-glutathione S-transferase may be useful for monitoring disease progression in the male Han:SPRD-cy rat model in future experiments. PMID:21262131

  2. A new locus on 3p23–p25 for an autosomal-dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, LGMD1H

    PubMed Central

    Bisceglia, Luigi; Zoccolella, Stefano; Torraco, Alessandra; Piemontese, Maria Rosaria; Dell'Aglio, Rosa; Amati, Angela; De Bonis, Patrizia; Artuso, Lucia; Copetti, Massimiliano; Santorelli, Filippo Maria; Serlenga, Luigi; Zelante, Leopoldo; Bertini, Enrico; Petruzzella, Vittoria

    2010-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) are a genetically heterogeneous group of neuromuscular disorders with a selective or predominant involvement of shoulder and pelvic girdles. We clinically examined 19 members in a four-generation Italian family with autosomal-dominant LGMD. A total of 11 subjects were affected. Clinical findings showed variable expressivity in terms of age at onset and disease severity. Five subjects presented with a slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness, in both upper and lower limbs, with onset during the fourth–fifth decade of life, which fulfilled the consensus diagnostic criteria for LGMD. Earlier onset of the disease was observed in a group of patients presenting with muscle weakness and/or calf hypertrophy, and/or occasionally high CK and lactate serum levels. Two muscle biopsies showed morphological findings compatible with MD associated with subsarcolemmal accumulation of mitochondria and the presence of multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions. A genome-wide scan performed using microsatellite markers mapped the disease on chromosome 3p23–p25.1 locus in a 25-cM region between markers D3S1263 and D3S3685. The highest two-point LOD score was 3.26 (θ=0) at marker D3S1286 and D3S3613, whereas non-parametric analysis reached a P-value=0.0004. Four candidate genes within the refined region were analysed but did not reveal any mutations. Our findings further expand the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of LGMDs. PMID:20068593

  3. Calcilytic Ameliorates Abnormalities of Mutant Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR) Knock-In Mice Mimicking Autosomal Dominant Hypocalcemia (ADH).

    PubMed

    Dong, Bingzi; Endo, Itsuro; Ohnishi, Yukiyo; Kondo, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Amizuka, Norio; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Shioi, Go; Abe, Masahiro; Fukumoto, Seiji; Matsumoto, Toshio

    2015-11-01

    Activating mutations of calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) cause autosomal dominant hypocalcemia (ADH). ADH patients develop hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and hypercalciuria, similar to the clinical features of hypoparathyroidism. The current treatment of ADH is similar to the other forms of hypoparathyroidism, using active vitamin D3 or parathyroid hormone (PTH). However, these treatments aggravate hypercalciuria and renal calcification. Thus, new therapeutic strategies for ADH are needed. Calcilytics are allosteric antagonists of CaSR, and may be effective for the treatment of ADH caused by activating mutations of CaSR. In order to examine the effect of calcilytic JTT-305/MK-5442 on CaSR harboring activating mutations in the extracellular and transmembrane domains in vitro, we first transfected a mutated CaSR gene into HEK cells. JTT-305/MK-5442 suppressed the hypersensitivity to extracellular Ca(2+) of HEK cells transfected with the CaSR gene with activating mutations in the extracellular and transmembrane domains. We then selected two activating mutations locating in the extracellular (C129S) and transmembrane (A843E) domains, and generated two strains of CaSR knock-in mice to build an ADH mouse model. Both mutant mice mimicked almost all the clinical features of human ADH. JTT-305/MK-5442 treatment in vivo increased urinary cAMP excretion, improved serum and urinary calcium and phosphate levels by stimulating endogenous PTH secretion, and prevented renal calcification. In contrast, PTH(1-34) treatment normalized serum calcium and phosphate but could not reduce hypercalciuria or renal calcification. CaSR knock-in mice exhibited low bone turnover due to the deficiency of PTH, and JTT-305/MK-5442 as well as PTH(1-34) increased bone turnover and bone mineral density (BMD) in these mice. These results demonstrate that calcilytics can reverse almost all the phenotypes of ADH including hypercalciuria and renal calcification, and suggest that calcilytics can become a

  4. Modeling of autosomal-dominant retinitis pigmentosa in Caenorhabditis elegans uncovers a nexus between global impaired functioning of certain splicing factors and cell type-specific apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Peña, Karinna; Fontrodona, Laura; Aristizábal-Corrales, David; Torres, Silvia; Cornes, Eric; García-Rodríguez, Francisco J; Serrat, Xènia; González-Knowles, David; Foissac, Sylvain; Porta-De-La-Riva, Montserrat; Cerón, Julián

    2015-12-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a rare genetic disease that causes gradual blindness through retinal degeneration. Intriguingly, seven of the 24 genes identified as responsible for the autosomal-dominant form (adRP) are ubiquitous spliceosome components whose impairment causes disease only in the retina. The fact that these proteins are essential in all organisms hampers genetic, genomic, and physiological studies, but we addressed these difficulties by using RNAi in Caenorhabditis elegans. Our study of worm phenotypes produced by RNAi of splicing-related adRP (s-adRP) genes functionally distinguishes between components of U4 and U5 snRNP complexes, because knockdown of U5 proteins produces a stronger phenotype. RNA-seq analyses of worms where s-adRP genes were partially inactivated by RNAi, revealed mild intron retention in developing animals but not in adults, suggesting a positive correlation between intron retention and transcriptional activity. Interestingly, RNAi of s-adRP genes produces an increase in the expression of atl-1 (homolog of human ATR), which is normally activated in response to replicative stress and certain DNA-damaging agents. The up-regulation of atl-1 correlates with the ectopic expression of the pro-apoptotic gene egl-1 and apoptosis in hypodermal cells, which produce the cuticle, but not in other cell types. Our model in C. elegans resembles s-adRP in two aspects: The phenotype caused by global knockdown of s-adRP genes is cell type-specific and associated with high transcriptional activity. Finally, along with a reduced production of mature transcripts, we propose a model in which the retina-specific cell death in s-adRP patients can be induced through genomic instability. PMID:26490224

  5. A Recurrent Mutation in CACNA1G Alters Cav3.1 T-Type Calcium-Channel Conduction and Causes Autosomal-Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Coutelier, Marie; Blesneac, Iulia; Monteil, Arnaud; Monin, Marie-Lorraine; Ando, Kunie; Mundwiller, Emeline; Brusco, Alfredo; Le Ber, Isabelle; Anheim, Mathieu; Castrioto, Anna; Duyckaerts, Charles; Brice, Alexis; Durr, Alexandra; Lory, Philippe; Stevanin, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary cerebellar ataxias (CAs) are neurodegenerative disorders clinically characterized by a cerebellar syndrome, often accompanied by other neurological or non-neurological signs. All transmission modes have been described. In autosomal-dominant CA (ADCA), mutations in more than 30 genes are implicated, but the molecular diagnosis remains unknown in about 40% of cases. Implication of ion channels has long been an ongoing topic in the genetics of CA, and mutations in several channel genes have been recently connected to ADCA. In a large family affected by ADCA and mild pyramidal signs, we searched for the causative variant by combining linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing. In CACNA1G, we identified a c.5144G>A mutation, causing an arginine-to-histidine (p.Arg1715His) change in the voltage sensor S4 segment of the T-type channel protein Cav3.1. Two out of 479 index subjects screened subsequently harbored the same mutation. We performed electrophysiological experiments in HEK293T cells to compare the properties of the p.Arg1715His and wild-type Cav3.1 channels. The current-voltage and the steady-state activation curves of the p.Arg1715His channel were shifted positively, whereas the inactivation curve had a higher slope factor. Computer modeling in deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) neurons suggested that the mutation results in decreased neuronal excitability. Taken together, these data establish CACNA1G, which is highly expressed in the cerebellum, as a gene whose mutations can cause ADCA. This is consistent with the neuropathological examination, which showed severe Purkinje cell loss. Our study further extends our knowledge of the link between calcium channelopathies and CAs. PMID:26456284

  6. Familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis: variable phenotypic expression in three affected sisters from Mexican ancestry.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, María E; Hunziker, Walter; Teo, Audrey S M; Hillmer, Axel M; Mutchinick, Osvaldo M

    2015-02-01

    Familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis is a rare autosomal recessive renal disease caused by mutations in genes for the tight junction transmembrane proteins Claudin-16 (CLDN16) and Claudin-19 (CLDN19). We present the first case report of a Mexican family with three affected sisters carrying a p.Gly20Asp mutation in CLDN19 whose heterozygous mother showed evident hypercalciuria and normal low magnesemia without any other clinical, laboratory, and radiological symptoms of renal disease making of her an unsuitable donor. The affected sisters showed variable phenotypic expression including age of first symptoms, renal urinary tract infections, nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, and eye symptoms consisting in retinochoroiditis, strabismus, macular scars, bilateral anisocoria, and severe myopia and astigmatism. End stage renal disease due to renal failure needed kidney transplantation in the three of them. Interesting findings were a heterozygous mother with asymptomatic hypercalciuria warning on the need of carefully explore clinical, laboratory, kidney ultrasonograpy, and mutation status in first degree asymptomatic relatives to avoid inappropriate kidney donors; an evident variable phenotypic expression among patients; the identification of a mutation almost confined to Spanish cases and a 3.5 Mb block of genomic homozygosis strongly suggesting a common remote parental ancestor for the gene mutation reported.

  7. Mutations in PCBD1 Cause Hypomagnesemia and Renal Magnesium Wasting

    PubMed Central

    Ferrè, Silvia; de Baaij, Jeroen H.F.; Ferreira, Patrick; Germann, Roger; de Klerk, Johannis B.C.; Lavrijsen, Marla; van Zeeland, Femke; Venselaar, Hanka; Kluijtmans, Leo A.J.; Hoenderop, Joost G.J.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in PCBD1 are causative for transient neonatal hyperphenylalaninemia and primapterinuria (HPABH4D). Until now, HPABH4D has been regarded as a transient and benign neonatal syndrome without complications in adulthood. In our study of three adult patients with homozygous mutations in the PCBD1 gene, two patients were diagnosed with hypomagnesemia and renal Mg2+ loss, and two patients developed diabetes with characteristics of maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY), regardless of serum Mg2+ levels. Our results suggest that these clinical findings are related to the function of PCBD1 as a dimerization cofactor for the transcription factor HNF1B. Mutations in the HNF1B gene have been shown to cause renal malformations, hypomagnesemia, and MODY. Gene expression studies combined with immunohistochemical analysis in the kidney showed that Pcbd1 is expressed in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT), where Pcbd1 transcript levels are upregulated by a low Mg2+-containing diet. Overexpression in a human kidney cell line showed that wild-type PCBD1 binds HNF1B to costimulate the FXYD2 promoter, the activity of which is instrumental in Mg2+ reabsorption in the DCT. Of seven PCBD1 mutations previously reported in HPABH4D patients, five mutations caused proteolytic instability, leading to reduced FXYD2 promoter activity. Furthermore, cytosolic localization of PCBD1 increased when coexpressed with HNF1B mutants. Overall, our findings establish PCBD1 as a coactivator of the HNF1B-mediated transcription necessary for fine tuning FXYD2 transcription in the DCT and suggest that patients with HPABH4D should be monitored for previously unrecognized late complications, such as hypomagnesemia and MODY diabetes. PMID:24204001

  8. Cyst infection in hospital-admitted autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients is predominantly multifocal and associated with kidney and liver volume.

    PubMed

    Balbo, B E P; Sapienza, M T; Ono, C R; Jayanthi, S K; Dettoni, J B; Castro, I; Onuchic, L F

    2014-07-01

    Positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has improved cyst infection (CI) management in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The determinants of kidney and/or liver involvement, however, remain uncertain. In this study, we evaluated clinical and imaging factors associated with CI in kidney (KCI) and liver (LCI) in ADPKD. A retrospective cohort study was performed in hospital-admitted ADPKD patients with suspected CI. Clinical, imaging and surgical data were analyzed. Features of infected cysts were evaluated by PET/CT. Total kidney (TKV) and liver (TLV) volumes were measured by CT-derived multiplanar reconstruction. CI was detected in 18 patients who experienced 24 episodes during an interval of 30 months (LCI in 12, KCI in 10 and concomitant infection in 2). Sensitivities of CT, magnetic resonance imaging and PET/CT were 25.0, 71.4, and 95.0%. Dysuria (P<0.05), positive urine culture (P<0.01), and previous hematuria (P<0.05) were associated with KCI. Weight loss (P<0.01) and increased C-reactive protein levels (P<0.05) were associated with LCI. PET/CT revealed that three or more infected cysts were present in 70% of the episodes. TKV was higher in kidney-affected than in LCI patients (AUC=0.91, P<0.05), with a cut-off of 2502 mL (72.7% sensitivity, 100.0% specificity). TLV was higher in liver-affected than in KCI patients (AUC=0.89, P<0.01) with a cut-off of 2815 mL (80.0% sensitivity, 87.5% specificity). A greater need for invasive procedures was observed in LCI (P<0.01), and the overall mortality was 20.8%. This study supports PET/CT as the most sensitive imaging method for diagnosis of cyst infection, confirms the multifocal nature of most hospital-admitted episodes, and reveals an association of kidney and liver volumes with this complication.

  9. Hypomagnesemia Is Associated with Increased Mortality among Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhiwei; Zhu, Beixia; Fei, Jinping; Xue, Congping; Wu, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hypomagnesemia has been associated with an increase in mortality among the general population as well as patients with chronic kidney disease or those on hemodialysis. However, this association has not been thoroughly studied in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between serum magnesium concentrations and all-cause and cardiovascular mortalities in peritoneal dialysis patients. Methods This single-center retrospective study included 253 incident peritoneal dialysis patients enrolled between July 1, 2005 and December 31, 2014 and followed to June 30, 2015. Patient’s demographic characteristics as well as clinical and laboratory measurements were collected. Results Of 253 patients evaluated, 36 patients (14.2%) suffered from hypomagnesemia. During a median follow-up of 29 months (range: 4–120 months), 60 patients (23.7%) died, and 35 (58.3%) of these deaths were attributed to cardiovascular causes. Low serum magnesium was positively associated with peritoneal dialysis duration (r = 0.303, p < 0.001) as well as serum concentrations of albumin (r = 0.220, p < 0.001), triglycerides (r = 0.160, p = 0.011), potassium (r = 0.156, p = 0.013), calcium(r = 0.299, p < 0.001)and phosphate (r = 0.191, p = 0.002). Patients in the hypomagnesemia group had a lower survival rate than those in the normal magnesium groups (p < 0.001). In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, serum magnesium was an independent negative predictor of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.075, p = 0.011) and cardiovascular mortality (HR = 0.003, p < 0.001), especially in female patients. However, in univariate and multivariate Cox analysis, △Mg(difference between 1-year magnesium and baseline magnesium) was not an independent predictor of all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality. Conclusion Hypomagnesemia was common among peritoneal dialysis patients and was independently associated with all

  10. Autosomal recessive

    MedlinePlus

    ... and the other gene comes from the father. Recessive inheritance means both genes in a pair must be abnormal to cause ... born to parents who carry the same autosomal recessive change ... abnormal gene from both parents and developing the disease. You ...

  11. Autosomal recessive epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

    PubMed

    Alsaleh, Q A; Teebi, A S

    1990-08-01

    Palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK) is a heterogeneous group of disorders. Epidermolytic PPK is a well delineated autosomal dominant entity, but no recessive form is known. Here we report two sons of phenotypically normal, consanguineous, Arab parents with features suggestive of PPK. They presented with patchy eczematous skin lesions followed by PPK and raised serum levels of IgE. Skin biopsy from the keratotic lesions showed the features of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. Autosomal recessive inheritance is suggested and the differential diagnosis is discussed.

  12. Sex-linked dominant

    MedlinePlus

    Inheritance - sex-linked dominant; Genetics - sex-linked dominant; X-linked dominant; Y-linked dominant ... can be either an autosomal chromosome or a sex chromosome. It also depends on whether the trait ...

  13. Hypomagnesemia Induced by Long-Term Treatment with Proton-Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Janett, Simone; Camozzi, Pietro; Peeters, Gabriëlla G. A. M.; Lava, Sebastiano A. G.; Simonetti, Giacomo D.; Goeggel Simonetti, Barbara; Bianchetti, Mario G.; Milani, Gregorio P.

    2015-01-01

    In 2006, hypomagnesemia was first described as a complication of proton-pump inhibitors. To address this issue, we systematically reviewed the literature. Hypomagnesemia, mostly associated with hypocalcemic hypoparathyroidism and hypokalemia, was reported in 64 individuals on long-term proton-pump inhibitors. Hypomagnesemia recurred following replacement of one proton-pump inhibitor with another but not with a histamine type-2 receptor antagonist. The association between proton-pump inhibitors and magnesium metabolism was addressed in 14 case-control, cross-sectional studies. An association was found in 11 of them: 6 reports found that the use of proton-pump inhibitors is associated per se with a tendency towards hypomagnesemia, 2 found that this tendency is more pronounced in patients concurrently treated with diuretics, carboplatin, or cisplatin, and 2 found a relevant tendency to hypomagnesemia in patients with poor renal function. Finally, findings likely reflecting decreased intestinal magnesium uptake were observed on treatment with proton-pump inhibitors. Three studies did not disclose any relationship between magnesium metabolism and treatment with histamine type-2 receptor antagonists. In conclusion, proton-pump inhibitors may cause hypomagnesemia. In these cases, switching to a histamine type-2 receptor antagonist is advised. PMID:26064102

  14. Hypomagnesemia as a potentially life-threatening adverse effect of omeprazole

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Bent-Are; Bruserud, Øyvind

    2016-01-01

    Hypomagnesemia can be caused by a wide range of diseases (e.g. gastrointestinal disorders, kidney diseases or endocrine disorders), but it can also be a side effect of several drugs. It can be asymptomatic or cause many different clinical symptoms, and the clinical manifestations mainly depend on the rate of development rather than the actual serum magnesium concentration. We here present a 40-year-old female patient with Torsade de pointes ventricular tachycardia and cardiac arrest caused by severe hypomagnesemia as an adverse effect of the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole. PMID:27471598

  15. Autosomal recessive epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

    PubMed Central

    Alsaleh, Q A; Teebi, A S

    1990-01-01

    Palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK) is a heterogeneous group of disorders. Epidermolytic PPK is a well delineated autosomal dominant entity, but no recessive form is known. Here we report two sons of phenotypically normal, consanguineous, Arab parents with features suggestive of PPK. They presented with patchy eczematous skin lesions followed by PPK and raised serum levels of IgE. Skin biopsy from the keratotic lesions showed the features of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. Autosomal recessive inheritance is suggested and the differential diagnosis is discussed. Images PMID:2145438

  16. Keratohyalin granules are heterogeneous in ridged and non-ridged human skin: evidence from anti-filaggrin immunogold labelling of normal skin and skin of autosomal dominant ichthyosis vulgaris patients.

    PubMed

    Günzel, S; Weidenthaler, B; Hausser, I; Anton-Lamprecht, I

    1991-01-01

    Recent biochemical and morphological investigations have provided evidence for a heterogeneous composition of keratohyalin in human skin. A major component is filaggrin. In interfollicular epidermis the heterogeneity of keratohyalin is not directly visible, whereas in normal ridged skin bicomponent keratohyalin is revealed by electron microscopy. Skin biopsies of ridged and non-ridged skin of normal individuals and patients with autosomal dominant ichthyosis vulgaris (ADI)--characterized by defective keratohyalin synthesis and lack of filaggrin--were investigated by routine transmission electron microscopy and immunogold postembedding techniques using a commercial monoclonal anti-filaggrin antibody. In normal interfollicular epidermis filaggrin labelling was demonstrated on keratohyalin granules and in the lowermost cornified cells, whereas in ADI patients crumbly keratohyalin granules were present that did not show specific labelling for filaggrin. In normal ridged skin only the major (more electron-dense) component reacted with anti-filaggrin, whereas the attached (less electron-dense) component did not react. Ridged skin of ADI patients contained globular keratohyalin that did not react with anti-filaggrin, thus corresponding to the attached keratohyalin component in normal ridged skin. Our results provide a visible counterpart to the recent biochemical investigations of keratohyalin protein heterogeneity and contribute to the understanding of terminal differentiation in human skin and of the defective keratohyalin synthesis in ADI.

  17. A gene for autosomal dominant paroxysmal choreoathetosis/spasticity (CSE) maps to the vicinity of a potassium channel gene cluster on chromosome 1p, probably within 2 cM between D1S443 and D1S197

    SciTech Connect

    Auburger, G.; Ratzlaff, T.; Lunkes, A.; Nelles, H.W.

    1996-01-01

    Paroxysmal choreoathetosis/episodic ataxia is a heterogeneous neurological syndrome usually inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Recently, the association of one form of episodic ataxia (defined by the presence of additional myokymia) with point mutations in the potassium channel gene KCNA1 was described. This gene locus on chromosome 12p (HGMW-approved symbol CSE) was excluded in a large pedigree with paroxysmal choreoathetosis and additional spasticity. Linkage to chromosome 1p where a cluster of related potassium channel genes is located, was demonstrated. Genotyping of 18 affected and 11 unaffected family members with 28 microsatellites over a region of 45 cM proved linkage with a lod score of 7.2 at a recombination fraction {theta}=0 to D1S451/421/447/GGAT4C11. Crossing-over events in 9 patients and 4 unaffected offspring suggested a probable assignment of the gene to a region of 2 cM between D1S443 and D1S197. 24 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Recommendations for the use of tolvaptan in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: a position statement on behalf of the ERA-EDTA Working Groups on Inherited Kidney Disorders and European Renal Best Practice.

    PubMed

    Gansevoort, Ron T; Arici, Mustafa; Benzing, Thomas; Birn, Henrik; Capasso, Giovambattista; Covic, Adrian; Devuyst, Olivier; Drechsler, Christiane; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Emma, Francesco; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Le Meur, Yannick; Massy, Ziad A; Ong, Albert C M; Ortiz, Alberto; Schaefer, Franz; Torra, Roser; Vanholder, Raymond; Więcek, Andrzej; Zoccali, Carmine; Van Biesen, Wim

    2016-03-01

    Recently, the European Medicines Agency approved the use of the vasopressin V2 receptor antagonist tolvaptan to slow the progression of cyst development and renal insufficiency of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in adult patients with chronic kidney disease stages 1-3 at initiation of treatment with evidence of rapidly progressing disease. In this paper, on behalf of the ERA-EDTA Working Groups of Inherited Kidney Disorders and European Renal Best Practice, we aim to provide guidance for making the decision as to which ADPKD patients to treat with tolvaptan. The present position statement includes a series of recommendations resulting in a hierarchical decision algorithm that encompasses a sequence of risk-factor assessments in a descending order of reliability. By examining the best-validated markers first, we aim to identify ADPKD patients who have documented rapid disease progression or are likely to have rapid disease progression. We believe that this procedure offers the best opportunity to select patients who are most likely to benefit from tolvaptan, thus improving the benefit-to-risk ratio and cost-effectiveness of this treatment. It is important to emphasize that the decision to initiate treatment requires the consideration of many factors besides eligibility, such as contraindications, potential adverse events, as well as patient motivation and lifestyle factors, and requires shared decision-making with the patient. PMID:26908832

  19. Three Japanese patients (mother and two children) with familial Mediterranean fever associated with compound heterozygosity for L110P/E148Q/M694I and an autosomal true dominant inheritance pattern.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Yasutsugu; Obara, Kazuki; Hirata, Hirokuni; Sugiyama, Kumiya; Fukuda, Takeshi; Takabe, Kazuhiko

    2013-12-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is characterized by repeated episodes of fever, peritonitis, pleuritis, and synovitis. We describe here 3 Japanese patients (a mother and 2 children) in whom FMF was diagnosed on analysis of MEFV. A 40-year-old woman presented with fever and abdominal pain. The patient had had these symptoms on and off since childhood and consulted many hospitals. A 38-year-old man had abdominal pain and fever since the age of 30 years. A 59-year-old woman had had episodes of fever, abdominal pain, and chest pain for more than 20 years. MEFV gene analysis showed compound heterozygosity for L110P, E148Q, and M694I in all three patients. In Japanese patients with FMF, this mode of autosomal true dominant inheritance has not yet been reported. FMF is difficult to diagnose unless it is included in the differential diagnosis by physicians. We hope that our valuable experience will promote increased awareness and understanding of FMF.

  20. Recommendations for the use of tolvaptan in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: a position statement on behalf of the ERA-EDTA Working Groups on Inherited Kidney Disorders and European Renal Best Practice

    PubMed Central

    Gansevoort, Ron T.; Arici, Mustafa; Benzing, Thomas; Birn, Henrik; Capasso, Giovambattista; Covic, Adrian; Devuyst, Olivier; Drechsler, Christiane; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Emma, Francesco; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Le Meur, Yannick; Massy, Ziad A.; Ong, Albert C.M.; Ortiz, Alberto; Schaefer, Franz; Torra, Roser; Vanholder, Raymond; Więcek, Andrzej; Zoccali, Carmine; Van Biesen, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the European Medicines Agency approved the use of the vasopressin V2 receptor antagonist tolvaptan to slow the progression of cyst development and renal insufficiency of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in adult patients with chronic kidney disease stages 1–3 at initiation of treatment with evidence of rapidly progressing disease. In this paper, on behalf of the ERA-EDTA Working Groups of Inherited Kidney Disorders and European Renal Best Practice, we aim to provide guidance for making the decision as to which ADPKD patients to treat with tolvaptan. The present position statement includes a series of recommendations resulting in a hierarchical decision algorithm that encompasses a sequence of risk-factor assessments in a descending order of reliability. By examining the best-validated markers first, we aim to identify ADPKD patients who have documented rapid disease progression or are likely to have rapid disease progression. We believe that this procedure offers the best opportunity to select patients who are most likely to benefit from tolvaptan, thus improving the benefit-to-risk ratio and cost-effectiveness of this treatment. It is important to emphasize that the decision to initiate treatment requires the consideration of many factors besides eligibility, such as contraindications, potential adverse events, as well as patient motivation and lifestyle factors, and requires shared decision-making with the patient. PMID:26908832

  1. A novel point mutation in the translation initiation codon of the pre-pro-vasopressin-neurophysin II gene: Cosegregation with morphological abnormalities and clinical symptoms in autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    SciTech Connect

    Rutishauser, J.; Boeni-Schnetzler, M.; Froesch, E.R.; Wichmann, W.; Huisman, T.

    1996-01-01

    Autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (ADNDI) is a rare variant of idiopathic central diabetes insipidus. Several different mutations in the human vasopressin-neurophysin II (AVP-NP II) gene have been described. We studied nine family members from three generations of an ADNDI pedigree at the clinical, morphological, and molecular levels. AVP concentrations were measured during diagnostic fluid restriction tests. Coronal and sagittal high resolution T1-weighted images of the pituitary were obtained from affected and healthy family members. PCR was used to amplify the AVP-NP II precursor gene, and PCR products were directly sequenced. Under maximal osmotic stimulation, AVP serum levels were close to or below the detection limit in affected individuals. Magnetic resonance imaging studies revealed the characteristic hyperintense ({open_quotes}bright spot{close_quotes}) appearance of the posterior pituitary in two healthy family members. This signal was absent in all four ADNDI patients examined. The coding sequences of AVP and its carrier protein, neurophysin II, were normal in all family members examined. Affected individuals showed a novel single base deletion (G 227) in the translation initiation codon of the AVP-NP II signal peptide on one allele. The mutation in the AVP-NP II leader sequence appears to be responsible for the disease in this kindred, possibly by interfering with protein translocation. The absence of the hyperintense posterior pituitary signal in affected individuals could reflect deficient posterior pituitary function. 56 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. A de Novo mutation in the coding sequence for neurophysin-II (Pro{sup 24} {yields} Leu) is associated with onset and transmission of autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    SciTech Connect

    Repaske, D.R.; Browning, J.E.

    1994-08-01

    The molecular basis of autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus, a hereditary deficiency of vasopressin, was determined by nucleotide sequence analysis of the arginine vasopressin-neurophysin-II gene. A C{yields}T mutation at nucleotide 1761 was detected in one allele of this gene in each affected individual in three generations of one family. This mutant gene encodes a normal arginine vasopressin peptide, but predicts a substitution of leucine for proline at amino acid 24 of neurophysin-II, the arginine vasopressin carrier protein. This mutation was not detected in 50 control individuals, thus demonstrating that it is not a common silent genetic polymorphism. The disease arose in the second generation of the studied family, and the chromosome 20 carrying this new mutation was identified by polymorphic CA microsatellite haplotype analysis. The first affected individual inherited this chromosome segment from her mother, who had neither the disease nor this mutation in her somatic cell DNA. Third generation individuals who subsequently inherited this mutation were affected. These data demonstrate that this amino acid substitution in neurophysin-II causes this disease. Two possibilities to explain the mechanism by which clinical deficiency of arginine vasopressin develops even in the presence of one normal arginine vasopressin-neurophysin-II allele are discussed. 40 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Localization of a gene for autosomal dominant Larsen syndrome to chromosome region 3p21.1-14.1 in the proximity of, but distinct from the COL7A1 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Vujic, M.; Hallstensson, K.; Wahlstroem, J.

    1995-11-01

    Larsen syndrome (LS) is a skeletal dysplasia (osteochondrodysplasia) in which multiple dislocations of the large joints are the major feature. Nosology in this group of diseases, which constitutes 8% of Mendelian disorders in man, is primarily based on clinical and radiographic features. Hopes for more accurate classification grounds are currently being met by progress in elucidation of underlying genetic defects. We have performed linkage analysis in a large Swedish kindred with autosomal dominant LS and found the gene (LAR1) to be strongly linked to chromosome 3p markers (Z{sub max} = 13.4 at {theta} = .00). Recombination analysis indicates that the LAR1 locus is located in a region defined distally by D3S1581 and proximally by D3S1600, which cytogenetically maps to chromosome region 3p21.1-14.1. Linkage and recombination analysis of a COL7A1 PvuII intragenic polymorphism versus LS and chromosome 3 markers indicate that COL7A1 is located close to, but distinct from, the LAR1 locus. 33 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. The gene for autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia (SCAI) maps centromeric to D6S89 and shows no recombination, in nine large kindreds, with a dinucleotide repeat at the AM10 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Kwiatkowski, T.J. Jr.; Zoghbi, H.Y.; Beaudet, A.L.; Banfi, S.; McCall, A.E. ); Orr, H.T.; Duvick, L.A.; Ranum, L.P.W. ); Jodice, C.; Persichetti, F.; Novelletto, A.; Terrenato, L. ); LeBorgne-DeMarquoy, F. ); Subramony, S.H. )

    1993-08-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is an autosomal dominant disorder which is genetically linked to the short arm of chromosome 6, telomeric to the human major histocompatibility complex (HLA) and very close to D6S89. Previous multipoint linkage analysis using HLA, D6S89, and SCA1 suggested that SCA1 maps centromeric to D5S89. Data from this study using nine large kindreds indicate a maximum lod score between SCA1 and D6S89 of 67.58 at a maximum recombination fraction of .004. To localize SCA1 more precisely, the authors identified five dinucleotide polymorphisms near D6S89. Genotypic analyses at these polymorphic loci were carried out in nine multigeneration SCA1 kindreds and in the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain reference families. A new marker, AM10GA, demonstrates no recombination with SCA1. The maximum lod score for AM10GA linkage to SCA1 is 42.14 at a recombination fraction of 0. Linkage analysis and analysis of recombination events confirm that SCA1 maps centromeric to D6S89 and establish the following order: CEN-D6S109-AM10GA/SCA1-D6S89-LR40-D6S202-TEL. 20 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant hypocalcemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormone (hypoparathyroidism). This hormone is involved in the regulation of calcium levels in the blood. Abnormal levels ... that increase calcium can also disrupt the normal regulation of other molecules, such as phosphate and magnesium, ...

  6. Amino Alcohol- (NPS-2143) and Quinazolinone-Derived Calcilytics (ATF936 and AXT914) Differentially Mitigate Excessive Signalling of Calcium-Sensing Receptor Mutants Causing Bartter Syndrome Type 5 and Autosomal Dominant Hypocalcemia

    PubMed Central

    Letz, Saskia; Haag, Christine; Schulze, Egbert; Frank-Raue, Karin; Raue, Friedhelm; Hofner, Benjamin; Mayr, Bernhard; Schöfl, Christof

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Activating calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) mutations cause autosomal dominant hypocalcemia (ADH) characterized by low serum calcium, inappropriately low PTH and relative hypercalciuria. Four activating CaSR mutations cause additional renal wasting of sodium, chloride and other salts, a condition called Bartter syndrome (BS) type 5. Until today there is no specific medical treatment for BS type 5 and ADH. We investigated the effects of different allosteric CaSR antagonists (calcilytics) on activating CaSR mutants. Methods All 4 known mutations causing BS type 5 and five ADH mutations were expressed in HEK 293T cells and receptor signalling was studied by measurement of intracellular free calcium in response to extracellular calcium ([Ca2+]o). To investigate the effect of calcilytics, cells were stimulated with 3 mM [Ca2+]o in the presence or absence of NPS-2143, ATF936 or AXT914. Results All BS type 5 and ADH mutants showed enhanced signalling activity to [Ca2+]o with left shifted dose response curves. In contrast to the amino alcohol NPS-2143, which was only partially effective, the quinazolinone calcilytics ATF936 and AXT914 significantly mitigated excessive cytosolic calcium signalling of all BS type 5 and ADH mutants studied. When these mutants were co-expressed with wild-type CaSR to approximate heterozygosity in patients, ATF936 and AXT914 were also effective on all mutants. Conclusion The calcilytics ATF936 and AXT914 are capable of attenuating enhanced cytosolic calcium signalling activity of CaSR mutations causing BS type 5 and ADH. Quinazolinone calcilytics might therefore offer a novel treatment option for patients with activating CaSR mutations. PMID:25506941

  7. Autosomal dominant transmission of a Goldenhar-like syndrome: Description of a family and report of a sporadic case with a de novo 4p16;8q24.11 translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Graganm H.N. Jr.; Hixon, H.; Bacino, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    We report vertical transmission of a Goldenhar-like syndrome, including a father and 5 offspring, with male-to-male transmission and variable features that include hearing loss, ear anomalies (microtia, ear tags/pits), branchial cysts, ocular/periocular dermoids, micrognathia and seizures. We also report an individual with an apparently balanced de novo reciprocal translocation with breakpoints at 4p16 and 8q24.11. This individual has unilateral microtia, an epibulbar dermoid cyst, facial asymmetry with a small chin, and seizures. In addition to these features resembling those seen in the family above, she has multiple exostoses, supraventricular tachycardia, hypoglycemia and mild developmental delays. Based on the overlap in physical findings between this family and the individual with the de novo reciprocal translocation, linkage studies on the family were intiated. Preliminary results exclude linkage to HOX 7 at 4p16.1 but not to 8q. The brancho-oto-renal syndrome has previously been localized to 8q11-8q13, but linkage to this region appears unlikely. Although most cases of Goldenhar syndrome appear to be sporadic, there are a few reports of autosomal dominant inheritance (MIM No. 164210). One such family showed vertical transmission of dermoids, ear anomalies, hearing loss, micrognathia and vertebral anomalies, but no branchial cysts. Another family showed sensorineural deafness, preauricular pits, and branchial fistulae, and other families reveal ear anomalies, branchial fistulas, and hearing loss. These latter families appear to lack ocular/periocular dermoids, and appear to be affected by a different disorder (MIM No. 125100). Further clinical delineation of such families, combined with genetic linkage analysis, should help to sort out this heterogeneity.

  8. A Point Mutation in the Ubiquitin Ligase RNF170 That Causes Autosomal Dominant Sensory Ataxia Destabilizes the Protein and Impairs Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor-mediated Ca2+ Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wright, Forrest A; Lu, Justine P; Sliter, Danielle A; Dupré, Nicolas; Rouleau, Guy A; Wojcikiewicz, Richard J H

    2015-05-29

    RNF170 is an endoplasmic reticulum membrane ubiquitin ligase that contributes to the ubiquitination of activated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors, and also, when point mutated (arginine to cysteine at position 199), causes autosomal dominant sensory ataxia (ADSA), a disease characterized by neurodegeneration in the posterior columns of the spinal cord. Here we demonstrate that this point mutation inhibits RNF170 expression and signaling via IP3 receptors. Inhibited expression of mutant RNF170 was seen in cells expressing exogenous RNF170 constructs and in ADSA lymphoblasts, and appears to result from enhanced RNF170 autoubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. The basis for these effects was probed via additional point mutations, revealing that ionic interactions between charged residues in the transmembrane domains of RNF170 are required for protein stability. In ADSA lymphoblasts, platelet-activating factor-induced Ca(2+) mobilization was significantly impaired, whereas neither Ca(2+) store content, IP3 receptor levels, nor IP3 production were altered, indicative of a functional defect at the IP3 receptor locus, which may be the cause of neurodegeneration. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genetic deletion of RNF170 showed that RNF170 mediates the addition of all of the ubiquitin conjugates known to become attached to activated IP3 receptors (monoubiquitin and Lys(48)- and Lys(63)-linked ubiquitin chains), and that wild-type and mutant RNF170 have apparently identical ubiquitin ligase activities toward IP3 receptors. Thus, the Ca(2+) mobilization defect seen in ADSA lymphoblasts is apparently not due to aberrant IP3 receptor ubiquitination. Rather, the defect likely reflects abnormal ubiquitination of other substrates, or adaptation to the chronic reduction in RNF170 levels.

  9. Analysis of data from the ERA-EDTA Registry indicates that conventional treatments for chronic kidney disease do not reduce the need for renal replacement therapy in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Spithoven, Edwin M; Kramer, Anneke; Meijer, Esther; Orskov, Bjarne; Wanner, Christoph; Caskey, Fergus; Collart, Frederic; Finne, Patrik; Fogarty, Damian G; Groothoff, Jaap W; Hoitsma, Andries; Nogier, Marie-Béatrice; Postorino, Maurizio; Ravani, Pietro; Zurriaga, Oscar; Jager, Kitty J; Gansevoort, Ron T

    2014-12-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a major cause of end-stage kidney failure, but is often identified early and therefore amenable to timely treatment. Interventions known to postpone the need for renal replacement therapy (RRT) in non-ADPKD patients have also been tested in ADPKD patients, but with inconclusive results. To help resolve this we determined changes in RRT incidence rates as an indicator for increasing effective renoprotection over time in ADPKD. We analyzed data from the European Renal Association-European Dialyses and Transplant Association Registry on 315,444 patients starting RRT in 12 European countries between 1991 and 2010, grouped into four 5-year periods. Of them, 20,596 were due to ADPKD. Between the first and last period the mean age at onset of RRT increased from 56.6 to 58.0 years. The age- and gender-adjusted incidence rate of RRT for ADPKD increased slightly over the four periods from 7.6 to 8.3 per million population. No change over time was found in the incidence of RRT for ADPKD up to age 50, whereas in recent time periods the incidence in patients above the age of 70 clearly increased. Among countries there was a significant positive association between RRT take-on rates for non-ADPKD kidney disease and ADPKD. Thus, the increased age at onset of RRT is most likely due to an increased access for elderly ADPKD patients or lower competing risk prior to the start of RRT rather than the consequence of effective emerging renoprotective treatments for ADPKD.

  10. Congenital insensitivity to pain: Fracturing without apparent skeletal pathobiology caused by an autosomal dominant, second mutation in SCN11A encoding voltage-gated sodium channel 1.9.

    PubMed

    Phatarakijnirund, Voraluck; Mumm, Steven; McAlister, William H; Novack, Deborah V; Wenkert, Deborah; Clements, Karen L; Whyte, Michael P

    2016-03-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP) comprises the rare heritable disorders without peripheral neuropathy that feature inability to feel pain. Fracturing and joint destruction are common complications, but lack detailed studies of mineral and skeletal homeostasis and bone histology. In 2013, discovery of a heterozygous gain-of-function mutation in SCN11A encoding voltage-gated sodium channel 1.9 (Nav1.9) established a distinctive CIP in three unrelated patients who suffered multiple painless fractures, self-inflicted mutilation, chronic diarrhea, and hyperhidrosis. Here, we studied a mother and two children with CIP by physical examination, biochemical testing, radiological imaging including DXA, iliac crest histology, and mutation analysis. She suffered fractures primarily of her lower extremities beginning at age two years, and had Charcot deformity of both ankles and joint hypermobility. Nerve conduction velocity together with electromyography were normal. Her children had recurrent major fractures beginning in early childhood, joint hypermobility, and chronic diarrhea. She had an excoriated external nare, and both children had hypertrophic scars from scratching. Skin collagen studies were normal. Radiographs revealed fractures and deformities. However, lumbar spine and total hip BMD Z-scores, biochemical parameters of mineral and skeletal homeostasis, and iliac crest histology of the mother (after in vivo tetracycline labeling) were normal. Genomic DNA from the children revealed a unique heterozygous missense mutation in exon 23 (c.3904C>T, p.Leu1302Phe) of SCN11A that is absent in SNP databases and alters an evolutionarily conserved amino acid. This autosomal dominant CIP reflects the second gain-of-function mutation of SCN11A. Perhaps joint hypermobility is an unreported feature. How mutation of Nav1.9 causes fracturing remains unexplained. Lack of injury awareness is typically offered as the reason, and was supported by our unremarkable biochemical

  11. Lower Incidence of Hypo-Magnesemia in Surgical Intensive Care Unit Patients in 2011 Versus 2001

    PubMed Central

    Denny, John T.; Pantin, Enrique; Chiricolo, Antonio; Tse, James; Jan, Thomas; Chaudhry, Mohammad; Barsoum, Sylviana; Denny, Angela M.; Papp, Denes; Morgan, Sharon L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypo-magnesemia is described to occur in as many as 65% of intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Magnesium (Mg) is a cofactor in over 300 enzymatic reactions involving energy metabolism, protein, and nucleic acid synthesis. The membrane pump that creates the electrical gradient across the cell membrane is dependent on Mg, and it is important in the activity of electrically excitable tissues. Since Mg regulates the movement of calcium in smooth muscle cells, it is also important in peripheral vascular tone and blood pressure. Studies have linked hypo-magnesemia to multiple chronic diseases and to a higher mortality rate. Methods To explore trends within our own tertiary care surgical ICU, we sampled our patients’ laboratory records in 2001 and in 2011. Hypo-magnesemia in our ICU is defined as an Mg less than 2.0 mg/dL. Results This retrospective review of all SICU patients from October to December revealed that there was a significant increase (P < 0.01) in the patients with their serum Mg level measured between 2001 (89%) and 2011 (95%). There was a significant decrease (P < 0.001) in patients with hypomagnesemia (< 2 mg/dL) between 2001 (47.5%) and 2011 (33.0%). On the other hand, there was a significant increase (P < 0.001) in patients with normal serum Mg level (> 2 mg/dL) between 2001 (52.5%) and 2011 (67.0%). Conclusions There was not only more monitoring of Mg in 2011, but a lower incidence of hypo-Mg compared to 2001. Possible explanations include changing patterns of antibiotic and diuretic use, less amphotericin use, more frequent laboratory surveillance, and better trained ICU practitioners. PMID:25699122

  12. Identification of a G‐Protein Subunit‐α11 Gain‐of‐Function Mutation, Val340Met, in a Family With Autosomal Dominant Hypocalcemia Type 2 (ADH2)

    PubMed Central

    Piret, Sian E; Gorvin, Caroline M; Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Howles, Sarah A; Cranston, Treena; Rust, Nigel; Nesbit, M Andrew; Glaser, Ben; Taylor, Jenny C; Buchs, Andreas E; Hannan, Fadil M

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autosomal dominant hypocalcemia (ADH) is characterized by hypocalcemia, inappropriately low serum parathyroid hormone concentrations and hypercalciuria. ADH is genetically heterogeneous with ADH type 1 (ADH1), the predominant form, being caused by germline gain‐of‐function mutations of the G‐protein coupled calcium‐sensing receptor (CaSR), and ADH2 caused by germline gain‐of‐function mutations of G‐protein subunit α‐11 (Gα11). To date Gα11 mutations causing ADH2 have been reported in only five probands. We investigated a multigenerational nonconsanguineous family, from Iran, with ADH and keratoconus which are not known to be associated, for causative mutations by whole‐exome sequencing in two individuals with hypoparathyroidism, of whom one also had keratoconus, followed by cosegregation analysis of variants. This identified a novel heterozygous germline Val340Met Gα11 mutation in both individuals, and this was also present in the other two relatives with hypocalcemia that were tested. Three‐dimensional modeling revealed the Val340Met mutation to likely alter the conformation of the C‐terminal α5 helix, which may affect G‐protein coupled receptor binding and G‐protein activation. In vitro functional expression of wild‐type (Val340) and mutant (Met340) Gα11 proteins in HEK293 cells stably expressing the CaSR, demonstrated that the intracellular calcium responses following stimulation with extracellular calcium, of the mutant Met340 Gα11 led to a leftward shift of the concentration‐response curve with a significantly (p < 0.0001) reduced mean half‐maximal concentration (EC50) value of 2.44 mM (95% CI, 2.31 to 2.77 mM) when compared to the wild‐type EC50 of 3.14 mM (95% CI, 3.03 to 3.26 mM), consistent with a gain‐of‐function mutation. A novel His403Gln variant in transforming growth factor, beta‐induced (TGFBI), that may be causing keratoconus was also identified, indicating likely digenic

  13. Identification of a G-Protein Subunit-α11 Gain-of-Function Mutation, Val340Met, in a Family With Autosomal Dominant Hypocalcemia Type 2 (ADH2).

    PubMed

    Piret, Sian E; Gorvin, Caroline M; Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Howles, Sarah A; Cranston, Treena; Rust, Nigel; Nesbit, M Andrew; Glaser, Ben; Taylor, Jenny C; Buchs, Andreas E; Hannan, Fadil M; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2016-06-01

    Autosomal dominant hypocalcemia (ADH) is characterized by hypocalcemia, inappropriately low serum parathyroid hormone concentrations and hypercalciuria. ADH is genetically heterogeneous with ADH type 1 (ADH1), the predominant form, being caused by germline gain-of-function mutations of the G-protein coupled calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), and ADH2 caused by germline gain-of-function mutations of G-protein subunit α-11 (Gα11 ). To date Gα11 mutations causing ADH2 have been reported in only five probands. We investigated a multigenerational nonconsanguineous family, from Iran, with ADH and keratoconus which are not known to be associated, for causative mutations by whole-exome sequencing in two individuals with hypoparathyroidism, of whom one also had keratoconus, followed by cosegregation analysis of variants. This identified a novel heterozygous germline Val340Met Gα11 mutation in both individuals, and this was also present in the other two relatives with hypocalcemia that were tested. Three-dimensional modeling revealed the Val340Met mutation to likely alter the conformation of the C-terminal α5 helix, which may affect G-protein coupled receptor binding and G-protein activation. In vitro functional expression of wild-type (Val340) and mutant (Met340) Gα11 proteins in HEK293 cells stably expressing the CaSR, demonstrated that the intracellular calcium responses following stimulation with extracellular calcium, of the mutant Met340 Gα11 led to a leftward shift of the concentration-response curve with a significantly (p < 0.0001) reduced mean half-maximal concentration (EC50 ) value of 2.44 mM (95% CI, 2.31 to 2.77 mM) when compared to the wild-type EC50 of 3.14 mM (95% CI, 3.03 to 3.26 mM), consistent with a gain-of-function mutation. A novel His403Gln variant in transforming growth factor, beta-induced (TGFBI), that may be causing keratoconus was also identified, indicating likely digenic inheritance of keratoconus and ADH2 in this family. In

  14. Hypomagnesemia in the intensive care unit: Choosing your gastrointestinal prophylaxis, a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Aileen K.; Sharma, Shweta; Kim, Paul; Mrejen-Shakin, Karen

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of symptomatic hypomagnesaemia in medical intensive care unit that is strongly related to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and provide literature review. A 65-year-old male with severe gastroesophageal reflux on omeprazole 20 mg orally twice a day, who presented to the hospital with abdominal pain, nausea, diarrhea, and new onset seizures. On admission, his serum magnesium level was undetectable. Electrocardiogram showed a new right bundle branch block with a prolonged QT interval. The hypomagnesemia was corrected with aggressive magnesium supplementation and hypomagnesemia resolved only after the PPI was stopped. Neurologic and cardiac abnormalities were corrected. This is a life-threatening case of an undetectable magnesium level strongly associated with PPI use. In critically, ill patients with refractory hypomagnesemia, we advocate considering changing gastrointestinal prophylaxis from a PPI to a histamine-receptor blocker. PMID:25097359

  15. Mutation Linked to Autosomal Dominant Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy Reduces Low-Sensitivity α4β2, and Increases α5α4β2, Nicotinic Receptor Surface Expression

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Weston A.; Henderson, Brandon J.; Marotta, Christopher B.; Yu, Caroline Y.; Richards, Chris; Dougherty, Dennis A.; Lester, Henry A.

    2016-01-01

    A number of mutations in α4β2-containing (α4β2*) nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (nAChRs) are linked to autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE), including one in the β2 subunit called β2V287L. Two α4β2* subtypes with different subunit stoichiometries and ACh sensitivities co-exist in the brain, a high-sensitivity subtype with (α4)2(β2)3 subunit stoichiometry and a low-sensitivity subtype with (α4)3(β2)2 stoichiometry. The α5 nicotinic subunit also co-assembles with α4β2 to form a high-sensitivity α5α4β2 nAChR. Previous studies suggest that the β2V287L mutation suppresses low-sensitivity α4β2* nAChR expression in a knock-in mouse model and also that α5 co-expression improves the surface expression of ADNFLE mutant nAChRs in a cell line. To test these hypotheses further, we expressed mutant and wild-type (WT) nAChRs in oocytes and mammalian cell lines, and measured the effects of the β2V287L mutation on surface receptor expression and the ACh response using electrophysiology, a voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye, and superecliptic pHluorin (SEP). The β2V287L mutation reduced the EC50 values of high- and low-sensitivity α4β2 nAChRs expressed in Xenopus oocytes for ACh by a similar factor and suppressed low-sensitivity α4β2 expression. In contrast, it did not affect the EC50 of α5α4β2 nAChRs for ACh. Measurements of the ACh responses of WT and mutant nAChRs expressed in mammalian cell lines using a voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye and whole-cell patch-clamping confirm the oocyte data. They also show that, despite reducing the maximum response, β2V287L increased the α4β2 response to a sub-saturating ACh concentration (1 μM). Finally, imaging SEP-tagged α5, α4, β2, and β2V287L subunits showed that β2V287L reduced total α4β2 nAChR surface expression, increased the number of β2 subunits per α4β2 receptor, and increased surface α5α4β2 nAChR expression. Thus, the β2V287L mutation alters the subunit

  16. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  17. Hypomagnesemia is a risk factor for nonrecovery of renal function and mortality in AIDS patients with acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Santos, M S Biagioni; Seguro, A C; Andrade, L

    2010-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the prevalence of electrolyte disturbances in AIDS patients developing acute kidney injury in the hospital setting, as well as to determine whether such disturbances constitute a risk factor for nephrotoxic and ischemic injury. A prospective, observational cohort study was carried out. Hospitalized AIDS patients were evaluated for age; gender; coinfection with hepatitis; diabetes mellitus; hypertension; time since HIV seroconversion; CD4 count; HIV viral load; proteinuria; serum levels of creatinine, urea, sodium, potassium and magnesium; antiretroviral use; nephrotoxic drug use; sepsis; intensive care unit (ICU) admission, and the need for dialysis. Each of these characteristics was correlated with the development of acute kidney injury, with recovery of renal function and with survival. Fifty-four patients developed acute kidney injury: 72% were males, 59% had been HIV-infected for >5 years, 72% had CD4 counts <200 cells/mm(3), 87% developed electrolyte disturbances, 33% recovered renal function, and 56% survived. ICU admission, dialysis, sepsis and hypomagnesemia were all significantly associated with nonrecovery of renal function and with mortality. Nonrecovery of renal function was significantly associated with hypomagnesemia, as was mortality in the multivariate analysis. The risks for nonrecovery of renal function and for death were 6.94 and 6.92 times greater, respectively, for patients with hypomagnesemia. In hospitalized AIDS patients, hypomagnesemia is a risk factor for nonrecovery of renal function and for in-hospital mortality. To determine whether hypomagnesemia is a determinant or simply a marker of critical illness, further studies involving magnesium supplementation in AIDS patients are warranted.

  18. Proton-pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemia: Current research and proposed mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    William, Jeffrey H; Danziger, John

    2016-01-01

    Since the early reports nearly a decade ago, proton-pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemia (PPIH) has become a well-recognized phenomenon. While many observational studies in the inpatient and outpatient populations have confirmed the association of PPI exposure and serum magnesium concentrations, there are no prospective, controlled studies to support causation. Molecular mechanisms of magnesium transporters, including the pH-dependent regulation of transient receptor potential melastatin-6 transporters in the colonic enterocyte, have been proposed to explain the effect of PPIs on magnesium reabsorption, but may be a small part of a more complicated interplay of molecular biology, pharmacology, and genetic predisposition. This review explores the current state of research in the field of PPIH and the proposed mechanisms of this effect. PMID:26981439

  19. CNNM2 mutations cause impaired brain development and seizures in patients with hypomagnesemia.

    PubMed

    Arjona, Francisco J; de Baaij, Jeroen H F; Schlingmann, Karl P; Lameris, Anke L L; van Wijk, Erwin; Flik, Gert; Regele, Sabrina; Korenke, G Christoph; Neophytou, Birgit; Rust, Stephan; Reintjes, Nadine; Konrad, Martin; Bindels, René J M; Hoenderop, Joost G J

    2014-04-01

    Intellectual disability and seizures are frequently associated with hypomagnesemia and have an important genetic component. However, to find the genetic origin of intellectual disability and seizures often remains challenging because of considerable genetic heterogeneity and clinical variability. In this study, we have identified new mutations in CNNM2 in five families suffering from mental retardation, seizures, and hypomagnesemia. For the first time, a recessive mode of inheritance of CNNM2 mutations was observed. Importantly, patients with recessive CNNM2 mutations suffer from brain malformations and severe intellectual disability. Additionally, three patients with moderate mental disability were shown to carry de novo heterozygous missense mutations in the CNNM2 gene. To elucidate the physiological role of CNNM2 and explain the pathomechanisms of disease, we studied CNNM2 function combining in vitro activity assays and the zebrafish knockdown model system. Using stable Mg(2+) isotopes, we demonstrated that CNNM2 increases cellular Mg2+ uptake in HEK293 cells and that this process occurs through regulation of the Mg(2+)-permeable cation channel TRPM7. In contrast, cells expressing mutated CNNM2 proteins did not show increased Mg(2+) uptake. Knockdown of cnnm2 isoforms in zebrafish resulted in disturbed brain development including neurodevelopmental impairments such as increased embryonic spontaneous contractions and weak touch-evoked escape behaviour, and reduced body Mg content, indicative of impaired renal Mg(2+) absorption. These phenotypes were rescued by injection of mammalian wild-type Cnnm2 cRNA, whereas mammalian mutant Cnnm2 cRNA did not improve the zebrafish knockdown phenotypes. We therefore concluded that CNNM2 is fundamental for brain development, neurological functioning and Mg(2+) homeostasis. By establishing the loss-of-function zebrafish model for CNNM2 genetic disease, we provide a unique system for testing therapeutic drugs targeting CNNM2 and

  20. CNNM2 mutations cause impaired brain development and seizures in patients with hypomagnesemia.

    PubMed

    Arjona, Francisco J; de Baaij, Jeroen H F; Schlingmann, Karl P; Lameris, Anke L L; van Wijk, Erwin; Flik, Gert; Regele, Sabrina; Korenke, G Christoph; Neophytou, Birgit; Rust, Stephan; Reintjes, Nadine; Konrad, Martin; Bindels, René J M; Hoenderop, Joost G J

    2014-04-01

    Intellectual disability and seizures are frequently associated with hypomagnesemia and have an important genetic component. However, to find the genetic origin of intellectual disability and seizures often remains challenging because of considerable genetic heterogeneity and clinical variability. In this study, we have identified new mutations in CNNM2 in five families suffering from mental retardation, seizures, and hypomagnesemia. For the first time, a recessive mode of inheritance of CNNM2 mutations was observed. Importantly, patients with recessive CNNM2 mutations suffer from brain malformations and severe intellectual disability. Additionally, three patients with moderate mental disability were shown to carry de novo heterozygous missense mutations in the CNNM2 gene. To elucidate the physiological role of CNNM2 and explain the pathomechanisms of disease, we studied CNNM2 function combining in vitro activity assays and the zebrafish knockdown model system. Using stable Mg(2+) isotopes, we demonstrated that CNNM2 increases cellular Mg2+ uptake in HEK293 cells and that this process occurs through regulation of the Mg(2+)-permeable cation channel TRPM7. In contrast, cells expressing mutated CNNM2 proteins did not show increased Mg(2+) uptake. Knockdown of cnnm2 isoforms in zebrafish resulted in disturbed brain development including neurodevelopmental impairments such as increased embryonic spontaneous contractions and weak touch-evoked escape behaviour, and reduced body Mg content, indicative of impaired renal Mg(2+) absorption. These phenotypes were rescued by injection of mammalian wild-type Cnnm2 cRNA, whereas mammalian mutant Cnnm2 cRNA did not improve the zebrafish knockdown phenotypes. We therefore concluded that CNNM2 is fundamental for brain development, neurological functioning and Mg(2+) homeostasis. By establishing the loss-of-function zebrafish model for CNNM2 genetic disease, we provide a unique system for testing therapeutic drugs targeting CNNM2 and

  1. Sevelamer carbonate reduces the risk of hypomagnesemia in hemodialysis-requiring end-stage renal disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Rosa-Diez, Guillermo; Negri, Armando Luis; Crucelegui, Maria Soledad; Philippi, Romina; Perez-Teysseyre, Hernán; Sarabia-Reyes, Carmen; Loor-Navarrete, Henry; Heguilen, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Sevelamer has been associated with less progression of vascular calcifications. This effect could be due to a reduction in serum phosphate levels but also to other additive effects. Magnesium has been also shown to prevent vascular calcification but the effect of sevelamer on serum magnesium levels has not been thoroughly evaluated. Our aim was to analyze whether the use of sevelamer reduces the risk of hypomagnesemia in hemodialysis (HD)-requiring end-stage renal disease patients. Methods All prevalent patients from the dialysis unit of the Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires as of 1 June 2015 were evaluated. They were on three times per week bicarbonate/citrate-buffered HD. They were not receiving phosphate binders or magnesium-containing drugs. The average of three successive monthly magnesium serum levels was considered as the baseline magnesium concentration. Sevelamer carbonate use was retrieved from the patient's clinical records. Results One hundred and fifty-one patients were included. A large proportion of individuals were on proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) (66%) and more than 50% were using sevelamer carbonate. Serum magnesium levels were significantly higher in those receiving sevelamer compared with those who did not (2.05 ± 0.3 versus 1.8 ± 0.4 mg/dL; P < 0.05). A larger proportion of individuals receiving sevelamer were among those with normal serum magnesium (P = 0.02), while among those with hypomagnesemia, a larger proportion were on PPIs. In the multivariate model including the use of PPIs, sevelamer carbonate resulted in an independent protective factor for hypomagnesemia (odds ratio: 0.44; 95% confidence interval: 0.21–0.87). Conclusions Hemodialysis patients receiving sevelamer show higher serum magnesium levels and a reduced risk of hypomagnesemia. This effect remains even after adjustment for PPI use. This effect could contribute to the still controversial superiority of sevelamer in preventing vascular calcifications. PMID

  2. Congenital vocal cord paralysis with possible autosomal recessive inheritance: Case report and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Koppel, R.; Friedman, S.; Fallet, S.

    1996-08-23

    We describe an infant with congenital vocal cord paralysis born to consanguineous parents. While autosomal dominant and X-linked inheritance have been previously reported in this condition, we conclude that the degree of parental consanguinity in this case strongly suggests autosomal recessive inheritance. Although we cannot exclude X-linked inheritance, evidence from animal studies demonstrates autosomal recessive inheritance and provides a possible molecular basis for congenital vocal cord paralysis. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Progeria (Hutchison-Gilford syndrome) in siblings: in an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance.

    PubMed

    Raghu, T Y; Venkatesulu, G A; Kantharaj, G R; Suresh, T; Veeresh, V; Hanumanthappa, Y

    2001-01-01

    Progeria is an autosomal dominant, premature aging syndrome. Six and three year old female siblings had sclerodermatous changes over the extremities, alopecia, beaked nose, prominent veins and bird-like facies. Radiological features were consistent with features of progeria. The present case highlights rarity of progeria in siblings with a possible autosomal recessive pattern.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant hyper-IgE syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... movement ( hyperextensibility ), an abnormal curvature of the spine ( scoliosis ), reduced bone density (osteopenia), and a tendency for ... health conditions: Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Surgery and Rehabilitation Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Related Information How are ...

  5. Thoracic-pelvic dysostosis: a 'new' autosomal dominant form.

    PubMed Central

    Bankier, A; Danks, D M

    1983-01-01

    A form of thoracic and pelvic dysostosis is reported in a mother and her son. The short ribs caused respiratory distress in the baby and raised the possibility of asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD). The radiological features, however, distinguish this benign condition from ATD and other described skeletal dysplasias. Images PMID:6620328

  6. Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infacts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL)

    MedlinePlus

    ... functions such as sensation, voluntary muscle movement, thought, reasoning, memory, etc. Infarcts : areas of tissue that have ... therapy are instituted for rehabilitation from stroke. Other Clinical Names for CADASIL Hereditary multi-infarct dementia Chronic ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain are involved in many critical functions, including reasoning, planning, judgment, and problem-solving. It is unclear ... E, Montagna P. Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy. A clinical and polygraphic overview of 100 consecutive cases. Brain. ...

  8. Frontometaphyseal dysplasia: autosomal dominant or X-linked?

    PubMed Central

    Beighton, P; Hamersma, H

    1980-01-01

    The clinical and radiographic manifestations in a 45-year-old male with frontometaphyseal dysplasia (FMD) are documented and depicted. Deafness and degenerative osteoarthropathy in weight-bearing joints were the main clinical problems. Widespread patchy cranial sclerosis was reminiscent of Paget's disease, while digital deformity resembled rheumatoid arthritis. On the basis of a review and tabulation of published reports, evidence emerges to support the concept of X-linked inheritance. The relationship between FMD and osteodysplasty remains a matter for speculation. Images PMID:7189217

  9. Ataxias with autosomal, X-chromosomal or maternal inheritance.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2009-07-01

    Heredoataxias are a group of genetic disorders with a cerebellar syndrome as the leading clinical manifestation. The current classification distinguishes heredoataxias according to the trait of inheritance into autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked, and maternally inherited heredoataxias. The autosomal dominant heredoataxias are separated into spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA1-8, 10-15, 17-23, 25-30, and dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy), episodic ataxias (EA1-7), and autosomal dominant mitochondrial heredoataxias (Leigh syndrome, MIRAS, ADOAD, and AD-CPEO). The autosomal recessive ataxias are separated into Friedreich ataxia, ataxia due to vitamin E deficiency, ataxia due to Abeta-lipoproteinemia, Refsum disease, late-onset Tay-Sachs disease, cerebrotendineous xanthomatosis, spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy, ataxia telangiectasia, ataxia telangiectasia-like disorder, ataxia with oculomotor apraxia 1 and 2, spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay, Cayman ataxia, Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome, and autosomal recessive mitochondrial ataxias (AR-CPEO, SANDO, SCAE, AHS, IOSCA, MEMSA, LBSL CoQ-deficiency, PDC-deficiency). Only two of the heredoataxias, fragile X/tremor/ataxia syndrome, and XLSA/A are transmitted via an X-linked trait. Maternally inherited heredoataxias are due to point mutations in genes encoding for tRNAs, rRNAs, respiratory chain subunits or single large scale deletions/duplications of the mitochondrial DNA and include MELAS, MERRF, KSS, PS, MILS, NARP, and non-syndromic mitochondrial disorders. Treatment of heredoataxias is symptomatic and supportive and may have a beneficial effect in single patients. **Please see page 424 for abbreviation list. PMID:19650351

  10. Mutations in SYNGAP1 in Autosomal Nonsyndromic Mental Retardation

    PubMed Central

    Hamdan, Fadi F.; Gauthier, Julie; Spiegelman, Dan; Noreau, Anne; Yang, Yan; Pellerin, Stéphanie; Dobrzeniecka, Sylvia; Côté, Mélanie; Perreau-Linck, Elizabeth; Carmant, Lionel; D’Anjou, Guy; Fombonne, Éric; Addington, Anjene M.; Rapoport, Judith L.; Delisi, Lynn E.; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Mouaffak, Faycal; Joober, Ridha; Mottron, Laurent; Drapeau, Pierre; Marineau, Claude; Lafrenière, Ronald G.; Lacaille, Jean Claude; Rouleau, Guy A.; Michaud, Jacques L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Although autosomal forms of nonsyndromic mental retardation account for the majority of cases of mental retardation, the genes that are involved remain largely unknown. We sequenced the autosomal gene SYNGAP1, which encodes a ras GTPase-activating protein that is critical for cognition and synapse function, in 94 patients with nonsyndromic mental retardation. We identified de novo truncating mutations (K138X, R579X, and L813RfsX22) in three of these patients. In contrast, we observed no de novo or truncating mutations in SYNGAP1 in samples from 142 subjects with autism spectrum disorders, 143 subjects with schizophrenia, and 190 control subjects. These results indicate that SYNGAP1 disruption is a cause of autosomal dominant nonsyndromic mental retardation. PMID:19196676

  11. Autosomal recessive primary microcephalies (MCPH).

    PubMed

    Kaindl, Angela M

    2014-07-01

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by a pronounced reduction in volume of otherwise architectonical normal brains and intellectual deficit. Here, we summarize the genetic causes of MCPH types 1-12 known to date. PMID:24780602

  12. The Relationship between Hypomagnesemia, Metformin Therapy and Cardiovascular Disease Complicating Type 2 Diabetes: The Fremantle Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Kirsten E.; Chubb, S. A. Paul; Davis, Wendy A.; Davis, Timothy M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Low serum magnesium concentrations have been associated with cardiovascular disease risk and outcomes in some general population studies but there are no equivalent studies in diabetes. Metformin may have cardiovascular benefits beyond blood glucose lowering in type 2 diabetes but its association with hypomagnesemia appears paradoxical. The aim of this study was to examine relationships between metformin therapy, magnesium homoeostasis and cardiovascular disease in well-characterized type 2 patients from the community. Methods and Findings We studied 940 non-insulin-treated patients (mean±SD age 63.4±11.6 years, 49.0% males) from the longitudinal observational Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase I (FDS1) who were followed for 12.3±5.3 years. Baseline serum magnesium was measured using stored sera. Multivariate methods were used to determine associates of prevalent and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and cerebrovascular disease (CVD) as ascertained from self-report and linked morbidity/mortality databases. 19% of patients were hypomagnesemic (serum magnesium <0.70 mmol/L). Patients on metformin, alone or combined with a sulfonylurea, had lower serum magnesium concentrations than those on diet alone (P<0.05). There were no independent associations between serum magnesium or metformin therapy and either CHD or CVD at baseline. Incident CVD, but not CHD, was independently and inversely associated with serum magnesium (hazard ratio (95% CI) 0.28 (0.11–0.74); P = 0.010), but metformin therapy was not a significant variable in these models. Conclusions Since hypomagnesemia appears to be an independent risk factor for CVD complicating type 2 diabetes, the value of replacement therapy should be investigated further, especially in patients at high CVD risk. PMID:24019966

  13. The population genetics of X-autosome synthetic lethals and steriles.

    PubMed

    Lachance, Joseph; Johnson, Norman A; True, John R

    2011-11-01

    Epistatic interactions are widespread, and many of these interactions involve combinations of alleles at different loci that are deleterious when present in the same individual. The average genetic environment of sex-linked genes differs from that of autosomal genes, suggesting that the population genetics of interacting X-linked and autosomal alleles may be complex. Using both analytical theory and computer simulations, we analyzed the evolutionary trajectories and mutation-selection balance conditions for X-autosome synthetic lethals and steriles. Allele frequencies follow a set of fundamental trajectories, and incompatible alleles are able to segregate at much higher frequencies than single-locus expectations. Equilibria exist, and they can involve fixation of either autosomal or X-linked alleles. The exact equilibrium depends on whether synthetic alleles are dominant or recessive and whether fitness effects are seen in males, females, or both sexes. When single-locus fitness effects and synthetic incompatibilities are both present, population dynamics depend on the dominance of alleles and historical contingency (i.e., whether X-linked or autosomal mutations occur first). Recessive synthetic lethality can result in high-frequency X-linked alleles, and dominant synthetic lethality can result in high-frequency autosomal alleles. Many X-autosome incompatibilities in natural populations may be cryptic, appearing to be single-locus effects because one locus is fixed. We also discuss the implications of these findings with respect to standing genetic variation and the origins of Haldane's rule.

  14. A novel approach identifying hybrid sterility QTL on the autosomes of Drosophila simulans and D. mauritiana.

    PubMed

    Dickman, Christopher T D; Moehring, Amanda J

    2013-01-01

    When species interbreed, the hybrid offspring that are produced are often sterile. If only one hybrid sex is sterile, it is almost always the heterogametic (XY or ZW) sex. Taking this trend into account, the predominant model used to explain the genetic basis of F1 sterility involves a deleterious interaction between recessive sex-linked loci from one species and dominant autosomal loci from the other species. This model is difficult to evaluate, however, as only a handful of loci influencing interspecies hybrid sterility have been identified, and their autosomal genetic interactors have remained elusive. One hindrance to their identification has been the overwhelming effect of the sex chromosome in mapping studies, which could 'mask' the ability to accurately map autosomal factors. Here, we use a novel approach employing attached-X chromosomes to create reciprocal backcross interspecies hybrid males that have a non-recombinant sex chromosome and recombinant autosomes. The heritable variation in phenotype is thus solely caused by differences in the autosomes, thereby allowing us to accurately identify the number and location of autosomal sterility loci. In one direction of backcross, all males were sterile, indicating that sterility could be entirely induced by the sex chromosome complement in these males. In the other direction, we identified nine quantitative trait loci that account for a surprisingly large amount (56%) of the autosome-induced phenotypic variance in sterility, with a large contribution of autosome-autosome epistatic interactions. These loci are capable of acting dominantly, and thus could contribute to F1 hybrid sterility.

  15. NEW BEST1 MUTATIONS IN AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE BESTROPHINOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    FUNG, ADRIAN T.; YZER, SUZANNE; GOLDBERG, NAOMI; WANG, HAO; NISSEN, MICHAEL; GIOVANNINI, ALFONSO; MERRIAM, JOANNA E.; BUKANOVA, ELENA N.; CAI, CAROLYN; YANNUZZI, LAWRENCE A.; TSANG, STEPHEN H.; ALLIKMETS, RANDO

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report the ocular phenotype in patients with autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy and carriers, and to describe novel BEST1 mutations. Methods Patients with clinically suspected and subsequently genetically proven autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy underwent full ophthalmic examination and investigation with fundus autofluorescence imaging, spectral domain optical coherence tomography, electroretinography, and electrooculography. Mutation analysis of the BEST1 gene was performed through direct Sanger sequencing. Results Five affected patients from four families were identified. Mean age was 16 years (range, 6–42 years). All affected patients presented with reduced visual acuity and bilateral, hyperautofluorescent subretinal yellowish deposits within the posterior pole. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography demonstrated submacular fluid and subretinal vitelliform material in all patients. A cystoid maculopathy was seen in all but one patient. In 1 patient, the location of the vitelliform material was seen to change over a follow-up period of 3 years despite relatively stable vision. Visual acuity and fundus changes were unresponsive to topical and systemic carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and systemic steroids. Carriers had normal ocular examinations including normal fundus autofluorescence. Three novel mutations were detected. Conclusion Three novel BEST1 mutations are described, suggesting that many deleterious variants in BEST1 resulting in haploinsufficiency are still unknown. Mutations causing autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy are mostly located outside of the exons that usually harbor vitelliform macular dystrophy–associated dominant mutations. PMID:25545482

  16. Behavioral Retardation in a Macaque with Autosomal Trisomy and Aging Mother.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waal, Frans B. M. de; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The social development of a female rhesus monkey was followed from birth until death, age 32 months. The monkey had an extra autosome and was hydrocephalic. The monkey showed serious motor deficiencies, delayed social development, poorly established dominance relationships, and heavy dependence on mother and kin. The monkey was, however, well…

  17. Orofacial Manifestations of Autosomal Recessive Robinow's Syndrome: A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mali, Santosh; Bansal, Neha; Dhokar, Amol; Yadav, Monica

    2016-03-01

    Robinow's syndrome is a very rare genetic disorder which bears a resemblance to a foetal face. It is characterized by short-limbed dwarfism, defects in vertebral segmentation and abnormalities in the head, face and external genitalia. It has a genetic heterogeneity with autosomal dominant and recessive forms which relates to the severity of phenotype presentation. A rare case of an autosomal recessive form of Robinow's syndrome is presented with emphasis on, characteristic craniofacial and intraoral manifestations to aid in diagnosis and dental management of this patient. PMID:27135013

  18. Orofacial Manifestations of Autosomal Recessive Robinow’s Syndrome: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mali, Santosh; Dhokar, Amol; Yadav, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Robinow’s syndrome is a very rare genetic disorder which bears a resemblance to a foetal face. It is characterized by short-limbed dwarfism, defects in vertebral segmentation and abnormalities in the head, face and external genitalia. It has a genetic heterogeneity with autosomal dominant and recessive forms which relates to the severity of phenotype presentation. A rare case of an autosomal recessive form of Robinow’s syndrome is presented with emphasis on, characteristic craniofacial and intraoral manifestations to aid in diagnosis and dental management of this patient. PMID:27135013

  19. Novel large deletion in the ACTA1 gene in a child with autosomal recessive nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Bethany; Simpson, Kara; Tesi-Rocha, Carolina; Zhou, Delu; Palmer, Cheryl A; Suchy, Sharon F

    2014-04-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorder resulting from a disruption of the thin filament proteins of the striated muscle sarcomere. The disorder is typically characterized by muscle weakness including the face, neck, respiratory, and limb muscles and is clinically classified based on the age of onset and severity. Mutations in the ACTA1 gene contribute to a significant proportion of NM cases. The majority of ACTA1 gene mutations are missense mutations causing autosomal dominant NM by producing an abnormal protein. However, approximately 10% of ACTA1 gene mutations are associated with autosomal recessive NM; these mutations are associated with loss of protein function. We report the first case of a large deletion in the ACTA1 gene contributing to autosomal recessive NM. This case illustrates the importance of understanding disease mechanisms at the molecular level to accurately infer the inheritance pattern and potentially aid with clinical management. PMID:24447884

  20. Fine genetic mapping of a gene for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa on chromosome 6p21

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, Yin Y.; Banerjee, P.; Knowles, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    The inherited retinal degenerations known as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) can be caused by mutations at many different loci and can be inherited as an autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, or X-linked recessive trait. Two forms of autosomal recessive (arRP) have been reported to cosegregate with mutations in the rhodopsin gene and the beta-subunit of rod phosphodiesterase on chromosome 4p. Genetic linkage has been reported on chromosomes 6p and 1q. In a large Dominican family, we reported an arRp gene near the region of the peripherin/RDS gene. Four recombinations were detected between the disease locus and an intragenic marker derived from peripherin/RDS. 26 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. FOXE3 plays a significant role in autosomal recessive microphthalmia.

    PubMed

    Reis, Linda M; Tyler, Rebecca C; Schneider, Adele; Bardakjian, Tanya; Stoler, Joan M; Melancon, Serge B; Semina, Elena V

    2010-03-01

    FOXE3 forkhead transcription factor is essential to lens development in vertebrates. The eyes of Foxe3/foxe3-deficient mice and zebrafish fail to develop normally. In humans, autosomal dominant and recessive mutations in FOXE3 have been associated with variable phenotypes including anterior segment anomalies, cataract, and microphthalmia. We undertook sequencing of FOXE3 in 116 probands with a spectrum of ocular defects ranging from anterior segment dysgenesis and cataract to anophthalmia/microphthalmia. Recessive mutations in FOXE3 were found in four of 26 probands affected with bilateral microphthalmia (15% of all bilateral microphthalmia and 100% of consanguineous families with this phenotype). FOXE3-positive microphthalmia was accompanied by aphakia and/or corneal defects; no other associated systemic anomalies were observed in FOXE3-positive families. The previously reported c.720C > A (p.C240X) nonsense mutation was identified in two additional families in our sample and therefore appears to be recurrent, now reported in three independent microphthalmia families of varied ethnic backgrounds. Several missense variants were identified at varying frequencies in patient and control groups with some apparently being race-specific, which underscores the importance of utilizing race/ethnicity-matched control populations in evaluating the relevance of genetic screening results. In conclusion, FOXE3 mutations represent an important cause of nonsyndromic autosomal recessive bilateral microphthalmia.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions ARCA1 autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Close All Description Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 ( ARCA1 ) is a condition characterized by progressive problems ...

  3. A novel homozygous mutation in HSF4 causing autosomal recessive congenital cataract.

    PubMed

    Behnam, Mahdiyeh; Imagawa, Eri; Chaleshtori, Ahmad Reza Salehi; Ronasian, Firooze; Salehi, Mansoor; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2016-02-01

    Cataract is defined as opacity in the crystalline lens and congenital cataract occurs during the first year of life. Until now, mutations of more than 50 genes in congenital cataract have been reported with various modes of inheritance. Among them, HSF4 mutations have been reported in autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive and age-related forms of cataract. The inheritance patterns of these mutations depend on their mutational positions in HSF4: autosomal dominant or recessive mutations are respectively found either in a DNA-binding domain or in (or downstream of) hydrophobic repeats. Here we report a novel homozygous HSF4 mutation (c.521T>C, p.Leu174Pro) in two affected sibs of an Iranian consanguineous family using whole exome sequencing. The mutation is predicted as highly pathogenic by in silico analysis (SIFT, Polyphen2 and MutationTaster) and is not found in any of control databases. This mutation is located in a hydrophobic repeat of the HSF4 protein, which is consistent with the mode of inheritance as an autosomal recessive trait. PMID:26490182

  4. Inhabitual autosomal recessive form of dentin dysplasia type I in a large consanguineous Moroccan family.

    PubMed

    Cherkaoui Jaouad, I; El Alloussi, M; Laarabi, F Z; Bouhouche, A; Ameziane, R; Sefiani, A

    2013-08-01

    Dentin dysplasia is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by defect of dentin development and the causal gene is DSPP (Dentin Sialophosphoprotein gene). We report in the present study a large Moroccan family in which dentin dysplasia is clearly transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. Four males and females family members born from healthy consanguineous parents are carriers of the typical features of the dentin dysplasia type I. Polymorphic markers that span the DSPP gene, allowed us to show that this locus is not linked to dentin dysplasia in our family. We also excluded in our family the SMOC2 gene (Sparc Related Modular Calcium Binding Protein 2) which was recently identified as a causal gene in dentin dysplasia type I with microdontia and misshapen teeth. This family represents, a new description of autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance of dentin dysplasia type I. Moreover, this form of dentin dysplasia is not allelic to the autosomal dominant dentin dysplasia and the genetic cause is to be discovered.

  5. Associations between STR autosomal markers and longevity.

    PubMed

    Bediaga, N G; Aznar, J M; Elcoroaristizabal, X; Albóniga, O; Gómez-Busto, F; Artaza Artabe, I; Rocandio, Ana; de Pancorbo, M M

    2015-10-01

    Life span is a complex and multifactorial trait, which is shaped by genetic, epigenetic, environmental, and stochastic factors. The possibility that highly hypervariable short tandem repeats (STRs) associated with longevity has been largely explored by comparing the genotypic pools of long lived and younger individuals, but results so far have been contradictory. In view of these contradictory findings, the present study aims to investigate whether HUMTHO1 and HUMCSF1PO STRs, previously associated with longevity, exert a role as a modulator of life expectancy, as well as to assess the extent to which other autosomal STR markers are associated with human longevity in population from northern Spain. To that end, 21 autosomal microsatellite markers have been studied in 304 nonagenarian individuals (more than 90 years old) and 516 younger controls of European descent. Our results do not confirm the association found in previous studies between longevity and THO1 and CSF1PO loci. However, significant association between longevity and autosomal STR markers D12S391, D22S1045, and DS441 was observed. Even more, when we compared allelic frequency distribution of the 21 STR markers between cases and controls, we found that 6 out of the 21 STRs studied showed different allelic frequencies, thus suggesting that the genomic portrait of the human longevity is far complex and probably shaped by a high number of genomic loci. PMID:26335621

  6. COL11A2 mutation associated with autosomal recessive Weissenbacher-Zweymuller syndrome: molecular and clinical overlap with otospondylomegaepiphyseal dysplasia (OSMED).

    PubMed

    Harel, Tamar; Rabinowitz, Ronen; Hendler, Netta; Galil, Aharon; Flusser, Hagit; Chemke, Juan; Gradstein, Libe; Lifshitz, Tova; Ofir, Rivka; Elbedour, Khalil; Birk, Ohad S

    2005-01-01

    Autosomal recessive Weissenbacher-Zweymuller syndrome (WZS) is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by rhizomelic dwarfism and severe hearing loss. Mutations in the COL11A2 gene have been implicated in causing the autosomal dominant form of this syndrome as well as non-ocular Stickler syndrome and the autosomal recessive syndrome otospondylomegaepiphyseal dysplasia (OSMED). In a consanguineous Bedouin tribe living in Southern Israel, five individuals affected by autosomal recessive WZS were available for genetic analysis. Homozygosity of a mutation in the COL11A2 gene was found in all affected individuals. This finding lends molecular support to the clinical notion that autosomal recessive WZS and OSMED are a single entity. PMID:15558753

  7. Late infantile autosomal recessive myotonia, mental retardation, and skeletal abnormalities: a new autosomal recessive syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Richieri-Costa, A; Garcia da Silva, S M; Frota-Pessoa, O

    1984-01-01

    Four sibs of non-consanguineous parents who had myotonia from late infancy are described. Mild to moderate mental retardation, severe bone abnormalities of the vertebral column (mainly in the thoracolumbar region), and short stature were also observed. Autosomal recessive inheritance is demonstrated. These cases are compared with reported cases of the Schwartz-Jampel syndrome. Images PMID:6716408

  8. Autosomal recessive brachyolmia: early radiological findings.

    PubMed

    Handa, Atsuhiko; Tham, Emma; Wang, Zheng; Horemuzova, Eva; Grigelioniene, Giedre

    2016-11-01

    Brachyolmia (BO) is a heterogeneous group of skeletal dysplasias with skeletal changes limited to the spine or with minimal extraspinal features. BO is currently classified into types 1, 2, 3, and 4. BO types 1 and 4 are autosomal recessive conditions caused by PAPSS2 mutations, which may be merged together as an autosomal recessive BO (AR-BO). The clinical and radiological signs of AR-BO in late childhood have already been reported; however, the early manifestations and their age-dependent evolution have not been well documented. We report an affected boy with AR-BO, whose skeletal abnormalities were detected in utero and who was followed until 10 years of age. Prenatal ultrasound showed bowing of the legs. In infancy, radiographs showed moderate platyspondyly and dumbbell deformity of the tubular bones. Gradually, the platyspondyly became more pronounced, while the bowing of the legs and dumbbell deformities of the tubular bones diminished with age. In late childhood, the overall findings were consistent with known features of AR-BO. Genetic testing confirmed the diagnosis. Being aware of the initial skeletal changes may facilitate early diagnosis of PAPSS2-related skeletal dysplasias. PMID:27544198

  9. A novel frameshift mutation in KCNQ4 in a family with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Wasano, Koichiro; Mutai, Hideki; Obuchi, Chie; Masuda, Sawako; Matsunaga, Tatsuo

    2015-08-01

    Mutation of KCNQ4 has been reported to cause autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss (DFNA2A) that usually presents as progressive hearing loss starting from mild to moderate hearing loss during childhood. Here, we identified a novel KCNQ4 mutation, c.1044_1051del8, in a family with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss. The proband was homozygous for the mutation and was born to consanguineous parents; she showed severe hearing loss that was either congenital or of early childhood onset. The proband had a sister who was heterozygous for the mutation but showed normal hearing. The mutation caused a frameshift that eliminated most of the cytoplasmic C-terminus, including the A-domain, which has an important role for protein tetramerization, and the B-segment, which is a binding site for calmodulin (CaM) that regulates channel function via Ca ions. The fact that the heterozygote had normal hearing indicates that sufficient tetramerization and CaM binding sites were present to preserve a normal phenotype even when only half the proteins contained an A-domain and B-segment. On the other hand, the severe hearing loss in the homozygote suggests that complete loss of the A-domain and B-segment in the protein caused loss of function due to the failure of tetramer formation and CaM binding. This family suggests that some KCNQ4 mutations can cause autosomal recessive hearing loss with more severe phenotype in addition to autosomal dominant hearing loss with milder phenotype. This genotype-phenotype correlation is analogous to that in KCNQ1 which causes autosomal dominant hereditary long QT syndrome 1 with milder phenotype and the autosomal recessive Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome 1 with more severe phenotype due to deletion of the cytoplasmic C-terminus of the potassium channel.

  10. Apparent autosomal recessive inheritance in families with proximal spinal muscular atrophy affecting individuals in two generations

    SciTech Connect

    Rudnik-Schoeneborn, S.; Zerres, K.; Hahnen, E.

    1996-11-01

    With the evidence that deletions in the region responsible for childhood- and juvenile-onset proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) are on chromosome 5 it is now possible to confirm autosomal recessive inheritance in most patients (denoted {open_quotes}SMA 5q{close_quotes}). Homozygous deletions in the telomeric copy of the survival motor neuron (SMN) gene can be detected in 95%-98% of patients with early-onset SMA (types I and II), whereas as many as 10%-20% of patients with the milder, juvenile-onset form (type III SMA) do not show deletions. In families with affected subjects in two generations, it is difficult to decide whether they are autosomal dominantly inherited or caused by three independent recessive mutations (pseudodominant inheritance). Given an incidence of >1/10,000 of SMA 5q, patients with autosomal recessive SMA have an {approximately}1% recurrence risk to their offspring. Although the dominant forms are not linked to chromosome 5q, pseudodominant families can now be identified by the presence of homozygous deletions in the SMN gene. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Dominant syndrome with isolated cryptophthalmos and ocular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Saal, H M; Traboulsi, E I; Gavaris, P; Samango-Sprouse, C A; Parks, M

    1992-07-15

    We report on a mother and daughter with nonsyndromal cryptophthalmos. Both patients have additional ocular anomalies, including microphthalmia, retinal dysplasia, and Peters anomaly. The periocular and lid changes seen in these individuals are distinct from those seen in typical cryptophthalmos. The apparent dominant mode of inheritance in this family distinguishes this condition from autosomal recessive isolated cryptophthalmos and from the Fraser or cryptophthalmos syndrome.

  12. Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia caused by mutations in a putative LDL receptor adaptor protein.

    PubMed

    Garcia, C K; Wilund, K; Arca, M; Zuliani, G; Fellin, R; Maioli, M; Calandra, S; Bertolini, S; Cossu, F; Grishin, N; Barnes, R; Cohen, J C; Hobbs, H H

    2001-05-18

    Atherogenic low density lipoproteins are cleared from the circulation by hepatic low density lipoprotein receptors (LDLR). Two inherited forms of hypercholesterolemia result from loss of LDLR activity: autosomal dominant familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), caused by mutations in the LDLR gene, and autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH), of unknown etiology. Here we map the ARH locus to an approximately 1-centimorgan interval on chromosome 1p35 and identify six mutations in a gene encoding a putative adaptor protein (ARH). ARH contains a phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain, which in other proteins binds NPXY motifs in the cytoplasmic tails of cell-surface receptors, including the LDLR. ARH appears to have a tissue-specific role in LDLR function, as it is required in liver but not in fibroblasts. PMID:11326085

  13. Brachmann-de Lange syndrome: Autosomal dominant inheritance and male-to-male transmission

    SciTech Connect

    McKenney, R.R.; Elder, F.F.B.; Northrup, H.; Garcia, J.

    1996-12-30

    We report on familial occurrence of the Brachmann-de Lange syndrome (BDLS): a mildly affected father and his severely affected son and daughter who have different mothers. Both children are severely affected while the father has a much milder but definite BDLS phenotype. Our report documents the third example of male-to-male transmission and adds to the argument against exclusively maternal transmission in familial cases. In addition, our findings illustrate the occurrence of severe manifestations in cases of familial BDLS. 29 refs., 3 figs.

  14. LMNA-associated cardiocutaneous progeria: an inherited autosomal dominant premature aging syndrome with late onset.

    PubMed

    Kane, Megan S; Lindsay, Mark E; Judge, Daniel P; Barrowman, Jemima; Ap Rhys, Colette; Simonson, Lisa; Dietz, Harry C; Michaelis, Susan

    2013-07-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in LMNA, which encodes the nuclear scaffold proteins lamin A and C. In HGPS and related progerias, processing of prelamin A is blocked at a critical step mediated by the zinc metalloprotease ZMPSTE24. LMNA-linked progerias can be grouped into two classes: (1) the processing-deficient, early onset "typical" progerias (e.g., HGPS), and (2) the processing-proficient "atypical" progeria syndromes (APS) that are later in onset. Here we describe a previously unrecognized progeria syndrome with prominent cutaneous and cardiovascular manifestations belonging to the second class. We suggest the name LMNA-associated cardiocutaneous progeria syndrome (LCPS) for this disorder. Affected patients are normal at birth but undergo progressive cutaneous changes in childhood and die in middle age of cardiovascular complications, including accelerated atherosclerosis, calcific valve disease, and cardiomyopathy. In addition, the proband demonstrated cancer susceptibility, a phenotype rarely described for LMNA-based progeria disorders. The LMNA mutation that caused LCPS in this family is a heterozygous c.899A>G (p.D300G) mutation predicted to alter the coiled-coil domain of lamin A/C. In skin fibroblasts isolated from the proband, the processing and levels of lamin A and C are normal. However, nuclear morphology is aberrant and rescued by treatment with farnesyltransferase inhibitors, as is also the case for HGPS and other laminopathies. Our findings advance knowledge of human LMNA progeria syndromes, and raise the possibility that typical and atypical progerias may converge upon a common mechanism to cause premature aging disease.

  15. A novel frameshift mutation in FGF14 causes an autosomal dominant episodic ataxia.

    PubMed

    Choquet, Karine; La Piana, Roberta; Brais, Bernard

    2015-07-01

    Episodic ataxias (EAs) are a heterogeneous group of neurological disorders characterized by recurrent attacks of ataxia. Mutations in KCNA1 and CACNA1A account for the majority of EA cases worldwide. We recruited a two-generation family affected with EA of unknown subtype and performed whole-exome sequencing on two affected members. This revealed a novel heterozygous mutation c.211_212insA (p.I71NfsX27) leading to a premature stop codon in FGF14. Mutations in FGF14 are known to cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 27 (SCA27). Sanger sequencing confirmed segregation within the family. Our findings expand the phenotypic spectrum of SCA27 by underlining the possible episodic nature of this ataxia.

  16. Novel CLCN7 mutation identified in a Han Chinese family with autosomal dominant osteopetrosis-2

    PubMed Central

    He, Dan; Rong, Pengfei; Xu, Hongbo; Yuan, Lamei; Li, Liu; Lu, Qian; Guo, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a heritable bone condition featuring increased bone density due to defective osteoclastic bone resorption. Exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing were conducted in Han Chinese family members, some of whom had typical osteopetrosis, and a novel missense variant c.2350A>T (p.R784W) in the chloride channel 7 gene (CLCN7) was identified. This variant cosegregated with the disorder in the family but was not observed in 800 controls. The data indicate that exome sequencing is a powerful and effective molecular diagnostic tool for detecting mutations in osteopetrosis, which is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorder. This discovery broadens the CLCN7 gene mutation spectrum and has important implications for clinical therapeutic regimen decisions, prognosis evaluations, and antenatal diagnoses. PMID:27325559

  17. Novel CLCN7 mutation identified in a Han Chinese family with autosomal dominant osteopetrosis-2.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hao; He, Dan; Rong, Pengfei; Xu, Hongbo; Yuan, Lamei; Li, Liu; Lu, Qian; Guo, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a heritable bone condition featuring increased bone density due to defective osteoclastic bone resorption. Exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing were conducted in Han Chinese family members, some of whom had typical osteopetrosis, and a novel missense variant c.2350A>T (p.R784W) in the chloride channel 7 gene (CLCN7) was identified. This variant cosegregated with the disorder in the family but was not observed in 800 controls. The data indicate that exome sequencing is a powerful and effective molecular diagnostic tool for detecting mutations in osteopetrosis, which is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorder. This discovery broadens the CLCN7 gene mutation spectrum and has important implications for clinical therapeutic regimen decisions, prognosis evaluations, and antenatal diagnoses. PMID:27325559

  18. Bilineal inheritance of type 1 autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and recurrent fetal loss.

    PubMed

    Peces, Ramón; Peces, Carlos; Coto, Eliecer; Selgas, Rafael

    2008-10-01

    We report for the first time a family with type 1 ADPKD in which the marriage between affected non-consanguinous individuals resulted in two live-born heterozygous offspring and two fetuses lost in mid-pregnancy. Given a 25% chance for mutant compound heterozygosity in the offspring of this family, our findings suggest that compound heterozygosity of PKD1 mutations in humans may be embryonically lethal. PMID:25983914

  19. Maternally inherited autosomal dominant intellectual disability caused by 16p13.3 microduplication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cha Gon; Cho, Eunhae; Ahn, Young Min

    2016-04-01

    A 16p13.3 duplication syndrome has been recently suggested to be a novel recognizable syndrome as a reciprocal microduplication disease of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. The CREBBP gene is believed to be the dosage-sensitive critical gene responsible for the reciprocal duplication and deletion syndrome. Descriptions so far have been de novo. Here, we report a very rare case of a maternally inherited a -1 Mb sized duplication on 16p13.3 identified by SNP array testing. The patient showed moderate intellectual disability, normal growth, and characteristic facial features. The patient's mother also had mild intellectual disability, normal growth, camptodactyly, proximally implanted small thumbs, and distinctive facial features. The study provides additional information that furthers the understanding and delineation of 16p13.3 duplication syndrome.

  20. Complexity of the Class B Phenotype in Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa Due to Rhodopsin Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Samuel G.; McGuigan, David B.; Sumaroka, Alexander; Roman, Alejandro J.; Gruzensky, Michaela L.; Sheplock, Rebecca; Palma, Judy; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Aleman, Tomas S.; Cideciyan, Artur V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Previously, patients with RHO mutations and a class A phenotype were found to have severe early-onset loss of rod function, whereas patients with a class B phenotype retained rod function at least in certain retinal regions. Here class B patients were studied at different disease stages to understand the topographic details of the phenotype in preparation for therapies of this regionalized retinopathy. Methods A cohort of patients with RHO mutations and class B phenotype (n = 28; ages 10–80 years) were studied with rod and cone perimetry and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Results At least three components of the phenotype were identified in these cross-sectional studies. Patients could have hemifield dysfunction, pericentral loss of function, or a diffuse rod sensitivity loss across the visual field. Combinations of these different patterns were also found. Colocalized photoreceptor layer thicknesses were in agreement with the psychophysical results. Conclusions These disorders with regional retinal variation of severity require pre-evaluations before enrollment into clinical trials to seek answers to questions about where in the retina would be appropriate to deliver focal treatments, and, for retina-wide treatment strategies, where in the retina should be monitored for therapeutic efficacy (or safety). PMID:27654411

  1. A Point Mutation in PDGFRB Causes Autosomal-Dominant Penttinen Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jennifer J.; Sanchez-Contreras, Monica Y.; Keppler-Noreuil, Kim M.; Sapp, Julie; Crenshaw, Molly; Finch, NiCole A.; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Rademakers, Rosa; Sybert, Virginia P.; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2015-01-01

    Penttinen syndrome is a distinctive disorder characterized by a prematurely aged appearance with lipoatrophy, epidermal and dermal atrophy along with hypertrophic lesions that resemble scars, thin hair, proptosis, underdeveloped cheekbones, and marked acro-osteolysis. All individuals have been simplex cases. Exome sequencing of an affected individual identified a de novo c.1994T>C p.Val665Ala variant in PDGFRB, which encodes the platelet-derived growth factor receptor β. Three additional unrelated individuals with this condition were shown to have the identical variant in PDGFRB. Distinct mutations in PDGFRB have been shown to cause infantile myofibromatosis, idiopathic basal ganglia calcification, and an overgrowth disorder with dysmorphic facies and psychosis, none of which overlaps with the clinical findings in Penttinen syndrome. We evaluated the functional consequence of this causative variant on the PDGFRB signaling pathway by transfecting mutant and wild-type cDNA into HeLa cells, and transfection showed ligand-independent constitutive signaling through STAT3 and PLCγ. Penttinen syndrome is a clinically distinct genetic condition caused by a PDGFRB gain-of-function mutation that is associated with a specific and unusual perturbation of receptor function. PMID:26279204

  2. Loss-of-function Mutation in PMVK Causes Autosomal Dominant Disseminated Superficial Porokeratosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiuxiang; Liu, Ying; Liu, Fei; Huang, Changzheng; Han, Shanshan; Lv, Yuexia; Liu, Chun-Jie; Zhang, Su; Qin, Yayun; Ling, Lei; Gao, Meng; Yu, Shanshan; Li, Chang; Huang, Mi; Liao, Shengjie; Hu, Xuebin; Lu, Zhaojing; Liu, Xiliang; Jiang, Tao; Tang, Zhaohui; Zhang, Huiping; Guo, An-Yuan; Liu, Mugen

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated superficial porokeratosis (DSP) is a rare keratinization disorder of the epidermis. It is characterized by keratotic lesions with an atrophic center encircled by a prominent peripheral ridge. We investigated the genetic basis of DSP in two five-generation Chinese families with members diagnosed with DSP. By whole-exome sequencing, we sequencing identified a nonsense variation c.412C > T (p.Arg138*) in the phosphomevalonate kinase gene (PMVK), which encodes a cytoplasmic enzyme catalyzing the conversion of mevalonate 5-phosphate to mevalonate 5-diphosphate in the mevalonate pathway. By co-segregation and haplotype analyses as well as exclusion testing of 500 normal control subjects, we demonstrated that this genetic variant was involved in the development of DSP in both families. We obtained further evidence from studies using HaCaT cells as models that this variant disturbed subcellular localization, expression and solubility of PMVK. We also observed apparent apoptosis in and under the cornoid lamella of PMVK-deficient lesional tissues, with incomplete differentiation of keratinocytes. Our findings suggest that PMVK is a potential novel gene involved in the pathogenesis of DSP and PMVK deficiency or abnormal keratinocyte apoptosis could lead to porokeratosis. PMID:27052676

  3. Four Copies of SNCA Responsible for Autosomal Dominant Parkinson's Disease in Two Italian Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Ferese, Rosangela; Modugno, Nicola; Campopiano, Rosa; Santilli, Marco; Zampatti, Stefania; Giardina, Emiliano; Nardone, Annamaria; Postorivo, Diana; Fornai, Francesco; Novelli, Giuseppe; Romoli, Edoardo; Ruggieri, Stefano; Gambardella, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Background. Parkinson's disease (PD) is mostly characterized by alpha-synuclein (SNCA) aggregation and loss of nigrostriatal dopamine-containing neurons. In this study a novel SNCA multiplication is described in two siblings affected by severe parkinsonism featuring early onset dyskinesia, psychiatric symptoms, and cognitive deterioration. Methods. SNCA dosage was performed using High-Density Comparative Genomic Hybridization Array (CGH-Array), Multiple Ligation Dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA), and Quantitative PCR (qPCR). Genetic analysis was associated with clinical evaluation. Results. Genetic analysis of siblings showed for the first time a 351 Kb triplication containing SNCA gene along with 6 exons of MMRN1 gene in 4q22.1 and a duplication of 1,29 Mb of a genomic region flanking the triplication. Conclusions. The identification of this family indicates a novel mechanism of SNCA gene multiplication, which confirms the genomic instability in this region and provides data on the genotype-phenotype correlation in PD patients. PMID:26635992

  4. [Autosomal recessive ethnic diseases of Czech Gypsies].

    PubMed

    Seeman, P; Sisková, D

    2006-01-01

    Roma (Gypsy ethnic) form a genetically isolated ethnical group of the identical origin with the world population of 10 to 14 millions derived from a limited number of so-called founders. Majority (about 8 millions) of Roma ethnic live in Europe, namely at Balkan and in the southwest of Europe. Roma have specific hereditary diseases, namely those caused by recessive genetic mutations. The molecular-genetic mechanism has been recently elucidated and confirmed in several diseases of the Roma population. Owing to the significant proportion of Roma in the population, patients with those diseases are possible to meet also in the Czech Republic. However, the diagnostics of those diseases is frequently difficult and they are often under diagnosed or misdiagnosed. The article gives examples of autosomal recessive diseases, which can be confirmed at the DNA level which occur in Roma population of the Czech Republic: syndrome of congenital cataract, facial dysmorphism and demyelinating neuropathy, non-syndromic prelingual deafness with GJB2 gene impairment and the congenital myastenic syndrome. PMID:16921785

  5. Evidence for autosomal recessive inheritance in SPG3A caused by homozygosity for a novel ATL1 missense mutation

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Tahir Naeem; Klar, Joakim; Tariq, Muhammad; Anjum Baig, Shehla; Malik, Naveed Altaf; Yousaf, Raja; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Dahl, Niklas

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) comprise a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs. Autosomal dominant and ‘pure' forms of HSP account for ∼80% of cases in Western societies of whom 10% carry atlastin-1 (ATL1) gene mutations. We report on a large consanguineous family segregating six members with early onset HSP. The pedigree was compatible with both autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance. Whole-exome sequencing and segregation analysis revealed a homozygous novel missense variant c.353G>A, p.(Arg118Gln) in ATL1 in all six affected family members. Seven heterozygous carriers, five females and two males, showed no clinical signs of HSP with the exception of sub-clinically reduced vibration sensation in one adult female. Our combined findings show that homozygosity for the ATL1 missense variant remains the only plausible cause of HSP, whereas heterozygous carriers are asymptomatic. This apparent autosomal recessive inheritance adds to the clinical complexity of spastic paraplegia 3A and calls for caution using directed genetic screening in HSP. PMID:24473461

  6. X chromosome regulation of autosomal gene expression in bovine blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Yuichiro; Arnold, Arthur P

    2014-10-01

    Although X chromosome inactivation in female mammals evolved to balance the expression of X chromosome and autosomal genes in the two sexes, female embryos pass through developmental stages in which both X chromosomes are active in somatic cells. Bovine blastocysts show higher expression of many X genes in XX than XY embryos, suggesting that X inactivation is not complete. Here, we reanalyzed bovine blastocyst microarray expression data from a network perspective with a focus on interactions between X chromosome and autosomal genes. Whereas male-to-female ratios of expression of autosomal genes were distributed around a mean of 1, X chromosome genes were clearly shifted towards higher expression in females. We generated gene coexpression networks and identified a major module of genes with correlated gene expression that includes female-biased X genes and sexually dimorphic autosomal genes for which the sexual dimorphism is likely driven by the X genes. In this module, expression of X chromosome genes correlates with autosome genes, more than the expression of autosomal genes with each other. Our study identifies correlated patterns of autosomal and X-linked genes that are likely influenced by the sexual imbalance of X gene expression when X inactivation is inefficient.

  7. Chronic subdural haematoma and autosomal polycystic kidney disease: report of two new cases.

    PubMed

    Abderrahim, Ezzedine; Hedri, Hafedh; Lâabidi, Jannette; Raies, Lamia; Kheder, Adel; Abdallah, Taieb Ben; Moussa, Fatma Ben; Maïz, Hédi Ben

    2004-10-01

    Chronic subdural haematoma (SDH) was recently described in some patients who were suffering from autosomic dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). It results in various neurological symptoms mimicking those related to intracranial aneurysms, which are relatively frequent in such patients. The authors report two cases of chronic SDH observed in two patients known to have advanced renal failure attributed to ADPKD. Medical imaging failed to reveal features of associated intracranial abnormalities such as aneurysms or arachnoid cysts. Surgical drainage resulted in a good recovery without relapse during a long period of follow up that exceeded 10 years in the first case.

  8. AIPL1 implicated in the pathogenesis of two cases of autosomal recessive retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, David; Jin, Chongfei; Jiao, Xiaodong; Li, Lin; Bushra, Tahmina; Naeem, Muhammad Asif; Butt, Nadeem H.; Husnain, Tayyab; Sieving, Paul A.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Riazuddin, S. Amer

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To localize and identify the gene and mutations causing autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy in two consanguineous Pakistani families. Methods Consanguineous families from Pakistan were ascertained to be affected with autosomal recessive retinal degeneration. All affected individuals underwent thorough ophthalmologic examinations. Blood samples were collected, and genomic DNA was extracted using a salting out procedure. Genotyping was performed using microsatellite markers spaced at approximately 10 cM intervals. Two-point linkage analysis was performed with the lod score method. Direct DNA sequencing of amplified genomic DNA was performed for mutation screening of candidate genes. Results Genome-wide linkage scans yielded a lod score of 3.05 at θ=0 for D17S1832 and 3.82 at θ=0 for D17S938, localizing the disease gene to a 12.22 cM (6.64 Mb) region flanked by D17S1828 and D17S1852 for family 61032 and family 61227, which contains aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein-like 1 (AIPL1), a gene previously implicated in recessive Leber congenital amaurosis and autosomal dominant cone-rod dystrophy. Sequencing of AIPL1 showed a homozygous c.773G>C (p.Arg258Pro) sequence change in all affected individuals of family 61032 and a homozygous c.465G>T (p.(H93_Q155del)) change in all affected members of family 61227. Conclusions The results strongly suggest that the c.773G>C (p.R258P) and c.465G>T (p.(H93_Q155del)) mutations in AIPL1 cause autosomal recessive retinal degeneration in these consanguineous Pakistani families. PMID:24426771

  9. Molecular mechanisms of autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Wilund, Kenneth R; Yi, Ming; Campagna, Filomena; Arca, Marcello; Zuliani, Giovanni; Fellin, Renato; Ho, Yiu-Kee; Garcia, J Victor; Hobbs, Helen H; Cohen, Jonathan C

    2002-11-15

    Mutations in the phosphotyrosine-binding domain protein ARH cause autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH), an inherited form of hypercholesterolemia due to a tissue-specific defect in the removal of low density lipoproteins (LDL) from the circulation. LDL uptake by the LDL receptor (LDLR) is markedly reduced in the liver but is normal or only moderately impaired in cultured fibroblasts of ARH patients. To define the molecular mechanism underlying ARH we examined ARH mRNA and protein in fibroblasts and lymphocytes from six probands with different ARH mutations. None of the probands had detectable full-length ARH protein in fibroblasts or lymphoblasts. Five probands were homozygous for mutations that introduced premature termination codons. No relationship was apparent between the site of the mutation in ARH and the amount of mRNA. The only mutation identified in the remaining proband was a SINE VNTR Alu (SVA) retroposon insertion in intron 1, which was associated with no detectable ARH mRNA. (125)I-LDL degradation was normal in ARH fibroblasts, as previously reported. In contrast, LDLR function was markedly reduced in ARH lymphoblasts, despite a 2-fold increase in LDL cell surface binding in these cells. These data indicate that all ARH mutations characterized to date preclude the synthesis of full-length ARH and that ARH is required for normal LDLR function in lymphocytes and hepatocytes, but not in fibroblasts. Residual LDLR function in cells that do not require ARH may explain why ARH patients have lower plasma LDL levels than do patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia who have no functional LDLRs. PMID:12417523

  10. X Chromosome and Autosome Dosage Responses in Drosophila melanogaster Heads

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhen-Xia; Oliver, Brian

    2015-01-01

    X chromosome dosage compensation is required for male viability in Drosophila. Dosage compensation relative to autosomes is two-fold, but this is likely to be due to a combination of homeostatic gene-by-gene regulation and chromosome-wide regulation. We have baseline values for gene-by-gene dosage compensation on autosomes, but not for the X chromosome. Given the evolutionary history of sex chromosomes, these baseline values could differ. We used a series of deficiencies on the X and autosomes, along with mutations in the sex-determination gene transformer-2, to carefully measure the sex-independent X-chromosome response to gene dosage in adult heads by RNA sequencing. We observed modest and indistinguishable dosage compensation for both X chromosome and autosome genes, suggesting that the X chromosome is neither inherently more robust nor sensitive to dosage change. PMID:25850426

  11. X Chromosome and Autosome Dosage Responses in Drosophila melanogaster Heads.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen-Xia; Oliver, Brian

    2015-04-07

    X chromosome dosage compensation is required for male viability in Drosophila. Dosage compensation relative to autosomes is two-fold, but this is likely to be due to a combination of homeostatic gene-by-gene regulation and chromosome-wide regulation. We have baseline values for gene-by-gene dosage compensation on autosomes, but not for the X chromosome. Given the evolutionary history of sex chromosomes, these baseline values could differ. We used a series of deficiencies on the X and autosomes, along with mutations in the sex-determination gene transformer-2, to carefully measure the sex-independent X-chromosome response to gene dosage in adult heads by RNA sequencing. We observed modest and indistinguishable dosage compensation for both X chromosome and autosome genes, suggesting that the X chromosome is neither inherently more robust nor sensitive to dosage change.

  12. Meiotic behaviour of evolutionary sex-autosome translocations in Bovidae.

    PubMed

    Vozdova, Miluse; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora; Fernandez, Jonathan; Cernohorska, Halina; Frohlich, Jan; Sebestova, Hana; Kubickova, Svatava; Rubes, Jiri

    2016-09-01

    The recurrent occurrence of sex-autosome translocations during mammalian evolution suggests common mechanisms enabling a precise control of meiotic synapsis, recombination and inactivation of sex chromosomes. We used immunofluorescence and FISH to study the meiotic behaviour of sex chromosomes in six species of Bovidae with evolutionary sex-autosome translocations (Tragelaphus strepsiceros, Taurotragus oryx, Tragelaphus imberbis, Tragelaphus spekii, Gazella leptoceros and Nanger dama ruficollis). The autosomal regions of fused sex chromosomes showed normal synapsis with their homologous counterparts. Synapsis in the pseudoautosomal region (PAR) leads to the formation of characteristic bivalent (in T. imberbis and T. spekii with X;BTA13/Y;BTA13), trivalent (in T. strepsiceros and T. oryx with X/Y;BTA13 and G. leptoceros with X;BTA5/Y) and quadrivalent (in N. dama ruficollis with X;BTA5/Y;BTA16) structures at pachynema. However, when compared with other mammals, the number of pachynema lacking MLH1 foci in the PAR was relatively high, especially in T. imberbis and T. spekii, species with both sex chromosomes involved in sex autosome translocations. Meiotic transcriptional inactivation of the sex-autosome translocations assessed by γH2AX staining was restricted to their gonosomal regions. Despite intraspecies differences, the evolutionary fixation of sex-autosome translocations among bovids appears to involve general mechanisms ensuring sex chromosome pairing, synapsis, recombination and inactivation. PMID:27136937

  13. Meiotic behaviour of evolutionary sex-autosome translocations in Bovidae.

    PubMed

    Vozdova, Miluse; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora; Fernandez, Jonathan; Cernohorska, Halina; Frohlich, Jan; Sebestova, Hana; Kubickova, Svatava; Rubes, Jiri

    2016-09-01

    The recurrent occurrence of sex-autosome translocations during mammalian evolution suggests common mechanisms enabling a precise control of meiotic synapsis, recombination and inactivation of sex chromosomes. We used immunofluorescence and FISH to study the meiotic behaviour of sex chromosomes in six species of Bovidae with evolutionary sex-autosome translocations (Tragelaphus strepsiceros, Taurotragus oryx, Tragelaphus imberbis, Tragelaphus spekii, Gazella leptoceros and Nanger dama ruficollis). The autosomal regions of fused sex chromosomes showed normal synapsis with their homologous counterparts. Synapsis in the pseudoautosomal region (PAR) leads to the formation of characteristic bivalent (in T. imberbis and T. spekii with X;BTA13/Y;BTA13), trivalent (in T. strepsiceros and T. oryx with X/Y;BTA13 and G. leptoceros with X;BTA5/Y) and quadrivalent (in N. dama ruficollis with X;BTA5/Y;BTA16) structures at pachynema. However, when compared with other mammals, the number of pachynema lacking MLH1 foci in the PAR was relatively high, especially in T. imberbis and T. spekii, species with both sex chromosomes involved in sex autosome translocations. Meiotic transcriptional inactivation of the sex-autosome translocations assessed by γH2AX staining was restricted to their gonosomal regions. Despite intraspecies differences, the evolutionary fixation of sex-autosome translocations among bovids appears to involve general mechanisms ensuring sex chromosome pairing, synapsis, recombination and inactivation.

  14. Autosomal Translocation Patient Who Experienced Premature Menopause: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yesol; Jeong, Do-won; Lee, Eun-gyeong; Jeon, Dong-Su; Kim, Jun-Mo

    2015-01-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a condition in which the ovarian functions of hormone production and oocyte development become impaired before the typical age for menopause. POF and early menopause are present in a broad spectrum of gonad dysgenesis, from a complete cessation of ovarian function to an intermittent follicle maturation failure. Actually POF has been identified as a genetic entity (especially chromosome X), but data on genetic factors of premature menopause are limited. Until now, several cases revealed that inactivation of X chromosomes has an effect on ages of premature menopause and females with balanced or unbalanced X-autosome translocations can have several reproductive problems. On the other hand, there have been a few data that was caused by autosome-autosome translocation can lead. Therefore we report a relevant case of POF with translocation between chromosomes 1 and 4. She had her first menstrual period at the age of 12, and after 7 years she stopped menstruation. Chromosomal analysis showed 46, XX, t (1;4) (p22.3;q31.3). While evaluating this rare case, we could review various causes (especially genetic factors) of POF. To remind clinicians about this disease, we report a case of POF caused by autosome-autosome translocation with a literature review. PMID:26356509

  15. Autosomal Translocation Patient Who Experienced Premature Menopause: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Kim, Yesol; Jeong, Do-Won; Lee, Eun-Gyeong; Jeon, Dong-Su; Kim, Jun-Mo

    2015-08-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a condition in which the ovarian functions of hormone production and oocyte development become impaired before the typical age for menopause. POF and early menopause are present in a broad spectrum of gonad dysgenesis, from a complete cessation of ovarian function to an intermittent follicle maturation failure. Actually POF has been identified as a genetic entity (especially chromosome X), but data on genetic factors of premature menopause are limited. Until now, several cases revealed that inactivation of X chromosomes has an effect on ages of premature menopause and females with balanced or unbalanced X-autosome translocations can have several reproductive problems. On the other hand, there have been a few data that was caused by autosome-autosome translocation can lead. Therefore we report a relevant case of POF with translocation between chromosomes 1 and 4. She had her first menstrual period at the age of 12, and after 7 years she stopped menstruation. Chromosomal analysis showed 46, XX, t (1;4) (p22.3;q31.3). While evaluating this rare case, we could review various causes (especially genetic factors) of POF. To remind clinicians about this disease, we report a case of POF caused by autosome-autosome translocation with a literature review. PMID:26356509

  16. Autosomal-recessive SASH1 variants associated with a new genodermatosis with pigmentation defects, palmoplantar keratoderma and skin carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Courcet, Jean- Benoît; Elalaoui, Siham Chafai; Duplomb, Laurence; Tajir, Mariam; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Thevenon, Julien; Gigot, Nadège; Marle, Nathalie; Aral, Bernard; Duffourd, Yannis; Sarasin, Alain; Naim, Valeria; Courcet-Degrolard, Emilie; Aubriot-Lorton, Marie- Hélène; Martin, Laurent; Abrid, Jamal Eddin; Thauvin, Christel; Sefiani, Abdelaziz; Vabres, Pierre; Faivre, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    SASH1 (SAM and SH3 domain-containing protein 1) is a tumor suppressor gene involved in the tumorigenesis of a spectrum of solid cancers. Heterozygous SASH1 variants are known to cause autosomal-dominant dyschromatosis. Homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing were performed in a consanguineous Moroccan family with two affected siblings presenting an unclassified phenotype associating an abnormal pigmentation pattern (hypo- and hyperpigmented macules of the trunk and face and areas of reticular hypo- and hyperpigmentation of the extremities), alopecia, palmoplantar keratoderma, ungueal dystrophy and recurrent spinocellular carcinoma. We identified a homozygous variant in SASH1 (c.1849G>A; p.Glu617Lys) in both affected individuals. Wound-healing assay showed that the patient's fibroblasts were better able than control fibroblasts to migrate. Following the identification of SASH1 heterozygous variants in dyschromatosis, we used reverse phenotyping to show that autosomal-recessive variants of this gene could be responsible for an overlapping but more complex phenotype that affected skin appendages. SASH1 should be added to the list of genes responsible for autosomal-dominant and -recessive genodermatosis, with no phenotype in heterozygous patients in the recessive form, and to the list of genes responsible for a predisposition to skin cancer. PMID:25315659

  17. Autosomal Recessive Anhidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia: A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sangita; Ghosh, Epsita; Dayal, Surabhi

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (AED) with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance, a very rare entity, in a 2-year-old female child of two asymptomatic, consanguineous parents. Their previous child also had a similar condition. Autosomal recessive AED (AR-AED) can have its full expression both in males and females and it is clinically indistinguishable from the x-linked recessive AED (XL-AED), which is the most common type of ectodermal dysplasia. Unlike the partially symptomatic carriers of XL-AED, the heterozygotes of AR-AED are phenotypically asymptomatic. PMID:25071285

  18. Mutations in GRHL2 result in an autosomal-recessive ectodermal Dysplasia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Petrof, Gabriela; Nanda, Arti; Howden, Jake; Takeichi, Takuya; McMillan, James R; Aristodemou, Sophia; Ozoemena, Linda; Liu, Lu; South, Andrew P; Pourreyron, Celine; Dafou, Dimitra; Proudfoot, Laura E; Al-Ajmi, Hejab; Akiyama, Masashi; McLean, W H Irwin; Simpson, Michael A; Parsons, Maddy; McGrath, John A

    2014-09-01

    Grainyhead-like 2, encoded by GRHL2, is a member of a highly conserved family of transcription factors that play essential roles during epithelial development. Haploinsufficiency for GRHL2 has been implicated in autosomal-dominant deafness, but mutations have not yet been associated with any skin pathology. We investigated two unrelated Kuwaiti families in which a total of six individuals have had lifelong ectodermal defects. The clinical features comprised nail dystrophy or nail loss, marginal palmoplantar keratoderma, hypodontia, enamel hypoplasia, oral hyperpigmentation, and dysphagia. In addition, three individuals had sensorineural deafness, and three had bronchial asthma. Taken together, the features were consistent with an unusual autosomal-recessive ectodermal dysplasia syndrome. Because of consanguinity in both families, we used whole-exome sequencing to search for novel homozygous DNA variants and found GRHL2 mutations common to both families: affected subjects in one family were homozygous for c.1192T>C (p.Tyr398His) in exon 9, and subjects in the other family were homozygous for c.1445T>A (p.Ile482Lys) in exon 11. Immortalized keratinocytes (p.Ile482Lys) showed altered cell morphology, impaired tight junctions, adhesion defects, and cytoplasmic translocation of GRHL2. Whole-skin transcriptomic analysis (p.Ile482Lys) disclosed changes in genes implicated in networks of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. Our clinical findings of an autosomal-recessive ectodermal dysplasia syndrome provide insight into the role of GRHL2 in skin development, homeostasis, and human disease.

  19. A Lebanese family with autosomal recessive oculo-auriculo-vertebral (OAV) spectrum and review of the literature: is OAV a genetically heterogeneous disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Farra, Chantal; Yunis, Khaled; Yazbeck, Nadine; Majdalani, Marianne; Charafeddine, Lama; Wakim, Rima; Awwad, Johnny

    2011-01-01

    Oculo-auriculo-vertebral (OAV) spectrum summarizes a continuum of ocular, auricular, and vertebral anomalies. Goldenhar syndrome is a variant of this spectrum and is characterized by pre-auricular skin tags, microtia, facial asymmetry, ocular abnormalities, and vertebral anomalies of different sizes and shapes. Most cases are thought to be sporadic. However, a few families were reported to have an autosomal recessive inheritance and other families’ presentation of the syndrome strongly supported an autosomal dominant inheritance. We report OAV in a female infant presenting with tracheomalacia, diaphragmatic hernia, encephalomeningocele, sacral neural tube defect, and cardiac defect and her brother having no more than dysmorphic features. The mode of inheritance in this family supports an autosomal recessive inheritance where the transmission was from normal first-degree consanguineous parents to one of the sons and to the daughter. This report further broadens the clinical presentation and symptoms of OAV and supports the hypothesis advancing OAV as a genetically heterogeneous disorder. PMID:23776370

  20. Autosomal recessive postaxial polydactyly type A in a Sicilian family.

    PubMed Central

    Mollica, F; Volti, S L; Sorge, G

    1978-01-01

    Postaxial polydactyly type A was present in several members of a Sicilian family. The anomaly was probably transmitted as an autosomal recessive character. Two polydactylous subjects were also beta-thalassaemia carriers, but a linkage between the two mutant genes could be excluded. Two patients with hexadactyly had a fifth digital triradius. Images PMID:27639

  1. Identification and Characterization of Autosomal Genes That Interact with Glass in the Developing Drosophila Eye

    PubMed Central

    Ma, C.; Liu, H.; Zhou, Y.; Moses, K.

    1996-01-01

    The glass gene encodes a zinc finger, DNA-binding protein that is required for photoreceptor cell development in Drosophila melanogaster. In the developing compound eye, glass function is regulated at two points: (1) the protein is expressed in all cells' nuclei posterior to the morphogenetic furrow and (2) the ability of the Glass protein to regulate downstream genes is largely limited to the developing photoreceptor cells. We conducted a series of genetic screens for autosomal dominant second-site modifiers of the weak allele glass(3), to discover genes with products that may regulate glass function at either of these levels. Seventy-six dominant enhancer mutations were recovered (and no dominant suppressors). Most of these dominant mutations are in essential genes and are associated with recessive lethality. We have assigned these mutations to 23 complementation groups that include multiple alleles of Star and hedgehog as well as single alleles of Delta, roughened eye, glass and hairy. Mutations in 18 of the complementation groups are embryonic lethals, and of these, 13 show abnormal adult retinal phenotypes in homozygous clones, usually with altered numbers of photoreceptor cells in some of the ommatidia. PMID:8846898

  2. Identification and characterization of autosomal genes that interact with glass in the developing Drosophila eye

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Chaoyong; Liu, Hui; Zhou, Ying; Moses, K.

    1996-04-01

    The glass gene encodes a zinc finger, DNA-binding protein that is required for photoreceptor cell development in Drosophila melanogaster. In the developing compound eye, glass function is regulated at two points: (1) the protein is expressed in all cells` nuclei posterior to the morphogenetic furrow and (2) the ability of the Glass protein to regulate downstream genes is largely limited to the developing photoreceptor cells. We conducted a series of genetic screen for autosomal dominant second-site modifiers of the weak allele glass, to discover genes with products that may regulate glass function at either of these levels. Seventy-six dominant enhancer mutations were recovered (and no dominant suppressors). Most of these dominant mutations are in essential genes and are associated with recessive lethality. We have assigned these mutations to 23 complementation groups that include multiple alleles of Star and hedgehog as well as single alleles of Delta, roughened eye, glass and hairy. Mutations in 18 of the complementation groups are embryonic lethals, and of these, 13 show abnormal adult retinal phenotypes in homozygous clones, usually with altered numbers of photoreceptor cells in some of the ommatidia. 116 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. The social dominance paradox.

    PubMed

    Cook, Jennifer Louise; den Ouden, Hanneke E M; Heyes, Cecilia M; Cools, Roshan

    2014-12-01

    Dominant individuals report high levels of self-sufficiency, self-esteem, and authoritarianism. The lay stereotype suggests that such individuals ignore information from others, preferring to make their own choices. However, the nonhuman animal literature presents a conflicting view, suggesting that dominant individuals are avid social learners, whereas subordinates focus on learning from private experience. Whether dominant humans are best characterized by the lay stereotype or the animal view is currently unknown. Here, we present a "social dominance paradox": using self-report scales and computerized tasks, we demonstrate that socially dominant people explicitly value independence, but, paradoxically, in a complex decision-making task, they show an enhanced reliance (relative to subordinate individuals) on social learning. More specifically, socially dominant people employed a strategy of copying other agents when the agents' responses had a history of being correct. However, in humans, two subtypes of dominance have been identified: aggressive and social. Aggressively dominant individuals, who are as likely to "get their own way" as socially dominant individuals but who do so through the use of aggressive or Machiavellian tactics, did not use social information, even when it was beneficial to do so. This paper presents the first study of dominance and social learning in humans and challenges the lay stereotype in which all dominant individuals ignore others' views. The more subtle perspective we offer could have important implications for decision making in both the boardroom and the classroom. PMID:25454588

  4. Exclusion of the locus for autosomal recessive pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 from the mineralocorticoid receptor gene region on human chromosome 4q by linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, E.; Hanukoglu, A.; Rees, M.; Thompson, R.; Gardiner, R.M.

    1995-10-01

    Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA1) is an uncommon inherited disorder characterized by salt-wasting in infancy arising from target organ unresponsiveness to mineralocorticoids. Clinical expression of the disease varies from severely affected infants who may die to apparently asymptomatic individuals. Inheritance is Mendelian and may be either autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive. A defect in the mineralocortiocoid receptor has been implicated as a likely cause of PHA1. The gene for human mineralocorticoid receptor (MLR) has been cloned and physically mapped to human chromosome 4q31.1-31.2. The etiological role of MLR in autosomal recessive PHA1 was investigated by performing linkage analysis between PHA1 and three simple sequence length polymorphisms (D4S192, D4S1548, and D4S413) on chromosome 4q in 10 consanguineous families. Linkage analysis was carried out assuming autosomal recessive inheritance with full penetrance and zero phenocopy rate using the MLINK program for two-point analysis and the HOMOZ program for multipoint analysis. Lod scores of less than -2 were obtained over the whole region from D4S192 to D4S413 encompassing MLR. This provides evidence against MLR as the site of mutations causing PHA1 in the majority of autosomal recessive families. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. X-linked dominant retinitis pigmentosa in an American family

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, R.E.; Daiger, S.P.; Blanton, S.H.

    1994-09-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a genetically heterogeneous disease with autosomal dominant (adRP), autosomal recessive and X-linked forms. At least 3 forms of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa have been reported: RP2 which maps to Xp11.4-p 11.23, RP3 which maps to Xp21.1 and RP6, which maps to Xp21.3-p21.1. The X-linked forms of retinitis pigmentosa are generally considered to be recessive as female carriers are not affected or are much less affected than males. Here we report a five generation American family with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa in which both males and females are significantly affected. The disease locus in this family appears to be distinct from RP2 and RP3. The American family (UTAD054) presents with early-onset retinitis pigmentosa. The family appeared to fit an autosomal dominant pattern; however, linkage testing excluded all known adRP loci. Absence of male-to-male transmission in the pedigree suggested the possibility of X-linked dominant inheritance. Thus we tested six microsatellite markers that map to Xp (DXS987, DXS989, DXS993, DXS999, DXS1003 and DXS1110). Of these, DXS989 showed tight linkage with one allele (199) showing a 100% concordance with disease status. The odds favoring an X-linked dominant mode of inheritance in this family, versus autosomal dominant, are 10{sup 5}:1. In addition, recombinations for DXS999, and dXS1110, the two markers flanking DXS989, were observed in affected individuals. These data map the disease locus in this family to a 9 mb region on the X chromosome between Xp22.11 and Xp21.41. In addition, the recombinant individuals exclude close linkage to RP2 and RP3. The observance of high penetrance in females indicates that this family has X-linked dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We suggest that this mode of inheritance should be considered in other families with dominant retinitis pigmentosa but an absence of male-to-male transmission.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of dominant expression in porphyria.

    PubMed

    Badminton, M N; Elder, G H

    2005-01-01

    Partial deficiency of enzymes in the haem synthetic pathway gives rise to a group of seven inherited metabolic disorders, the porphyrias. Each deficiency is associated with a characteristic increase in haem precursors that correlates with the symptoms associated with individual porphyrias and allows accurate diagnosis. Two types of clinical presentation occur separately or in combination; acute life-threatening neurovisceral attacks and/or cutaneous symptoms. Five of the porphyrias are low-penetrance autosomal dominant conditions in which clinical expression results from additional factors that act by increasing demand for haem or by causing an additional decrease in enzyme activity or by a combination of these effects. These include both genetic and environmental factors. In familial porphyria cutanea tarda (PCTF), environmental factors that include alcohol, exogenous oestrogens and hepatotropic viruses result in inhibition of hepatic enzyme activity via a mechanism that involves excess iron accumulation. In erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP), co-inheritance of a functional polymorphism in trans to a null ferrochelatase allele accounts for most clinically overt cases. In the autosomal dominant acute hepatic porphyrias (acute intermittent porphyria, variegate porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria), acute neurovisceral attacks occur in a minority of those who inherit one of these disorders. Although various exogenous (e.g. drugs, alcohol) and endogenous factors (e.g. hormones) have been identified as provoking acute attacks, these do not provide a full explanation for the low penetrance of these disorders. It seems probable that genetic background influences susceptibility to acute attacks, but the genes that are involved have not yet been identified.

  7. Somatic Expression and Autosomal Inheritance of Phosphoglycerate Kinase B in Kangaroos

    PubMed Central

    Vandeberg, J. L.; Cooper, D. W.; Sharman, G. B.; Poole, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    The PGK-B isozyme, currently known as PGK-2 in the mouse nomenclature, is the predominant PGK isozyme in mammalian sperm. In many species it is detectable only in sperm, in spermatogenic testes and in epididymides containing sperm. In this paper, we provide evidence that some kangaroo species express low PGK-B activity in somatic tissues, in addition to high activity in testes. Three kangaroo species, M. rufogriseus, M. robustus and M. giganteus, exhibit polymorphism of PGK-B. Breeding data support the hypothesis of autosomal co-dominant inheritance, as is the case in mice. Population data for the three polymorphisms are discussed. PGK-B is not detectable in somatic tissues or spermatogenic testis extracts of monotreme mammals, birds or lizards; it is probably restricted to therian mammals. PMID:7203002

  8. Impaired PIEZO1 function in patients with a novel autosomal recessive congenital lymphatic dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Lukacs, Viktor; Mathur, Jayanti; Mao, Rong; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Procter, Melinda; Cahalan, Stuart M; Kim, Helen J; Bandell, Michael; Longo, Nicola; Day, Ronald W; Stevenson, David A; Patapoutian, Ardem; Krock, Bryan L

    2015-01-01

    Piezo1 ion channels are mediators of mechanotransduction in several cell types including the vascular endothelium, renal tubular cells and erythrocytes. Gain-of-function mutations in PIEZO1 cause an autosomal dominant haemolytic anaemia in humans called dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis. However, the phenotypic consequence of PIEZO1 loss of function in humans has not previously been documented. Here we discover a novel role of this channel in the lymphatic system. Through whole-exome sequencing, we identify biallelic mutations in PIEZO1 (a splicing variant leading to early truncation and a non-synonymous missense variant) in a pair of siblings affected with persistent lymphoedema caused by congenital lymphatic dysplasia. Analysis of patients' erythrocytes as well as studies in a heterologous system reveal greatly attenuated PIEZO1 function in affected alleles. Our results delineate a novel clinical category of PIEZO1-associated hereditary lymphoedema. PMID:26387913

  9. Impaired PIEZO1 function in patients with a novel autosomal recessive congenital lymphatic dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lukacs, Viktor; Mathur, Jayanti; Mao, Rong; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Procter, Melinda; Cahalan, Stuart M.; Kim, Helen J.; Bandell, Michael; Longo, Nicola; Day, Ronald W.; Stevenson, David A.; Patapoutian, Ardem; Krock, Bryan L.

    2015-01-01

    Piezo1 ion channels are mediators of mechanotransduction in several cell types including the vascular endothelium, renal tubular cells and erythrocytes. Gain-of-function mutations in PIEZO1 cause an autosomal dominant haemolytic anaemia in humans called dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis. However, the phenotypic consequence of PIEZO1 loss of function in humans has not previously been documented. Here we discover a novel role of this channel in the lymphatic system. Through whole-exome sequencing, we identify biallelic mutations in PIEZO1 (a splicing variant leading to early truncation and a non-synonymous missense variant) in a pair of siblings affected with persistent lymphoedema caused by congenital lymphatic dysplasia. Analysis of patients' erythrocytes as well as studies in a heterologous system reveal greatly attenuated PIEZO1 function in affected alleles. Our results delineate a novel clinical category of PIEZO1-associated hereditary lymphoedema. PMID:26387913

  10. A Missense Mutation in a Highly Conserved Region of CASQ2 Is Associated with Autosomal Recessive Catecholamine-Induced Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia in Bedouin Families from Israel

    PubMed Central

    Lahat, Hadas; Pras, Elon; Olender, Tsviya; Avidan, Nili; Ben-Asher, Edna; Man, Orna; Levy-Nissenbaum, Etgar; Khoury, Asad; Lorber, Avraham; Goldman, Boleslaw; Lancet, Doron; Eldar, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Catecholamine-induced polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (PVT) is characterized by episodes of syncope, seizures, or sudden death, in response to physical activity or emotional stress. Two modes of inheritance have been described: autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive. Mutations in the ryanodine receptor 2 gene (RYR2), which encodes a cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+-release channel, were recently shown to cause the autosomal dominant form of the disease. In the present report, we describe a missense mutation in a highly conserved region of the calsequestrin 2 gene (CASQ2) as the potential cause of the autosomal recessive form. The CASQ2 protein serves as the major Ca2+ reservoir within the SR of cardiac myocytes and is part of a protein complex that contains the ryanodine receptor. The mutation, which is in full segregation in seven Bedouin families affected by the disorder, converts a negatively charged aspartic acid into a positively charged histidine, in a highly negatively charged domain, and is likely to exert its deleterious effect by disrupting Ca2+ binding. PMID:11704930

  11. A new locus for autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia maps to chromosome 16q24.3.

    PubMed Central

    De Michele, G; De Fusco, M; Cavalcanti, F; Filla, A; Marconi, R; Volpe, G; Monticelli, A; Ballabio, A; Casari, G; Cocozza, S

    1998-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia is a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous disorder. Both pure and complicated forms have been described, with autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked inheritance. Various loci (SPG1-SPG6) associated with this disorder have been mapped. Here, we report linkage analysis of a large consanguineous family affected with autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia with age at onset of 25-42 years. Linkage analysis of this family excluded all previously described spastic paraplegia loci. A genomewide linkage analysis showed evidence of linkage to chromosome 16q24.3, with markers D16S413 (maximum LOD score 3.37 at recombination fraction [theta] of .00) and D16S303 (maximum LOD score 3.74 at straight theta=.00). Multipoint analysis localized the disease gene in the most telomeric region, with a LOD score of 4.2. These data indicate the presence of a new locus linked to pure recessive spastic paraplegia, on chromosome 16q24.3, within a candidate region of 6 cM. PMID:9634528

  12. Autosomal recessive MFN2-related Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with diaphragmatic weakness: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Christopher A; Rabideau, Marina; Blevins, Amy; Westbrook, Marjorie Jody; Ekstein, Tali; Nykamp, Keith; Deucher, Anne; Harper, Amy; Demmer, Laurie

    2016-06-01

    Pathogenic variants in the mitofusin 2 gene (MFN2) are the most common cause of autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT2) disease, which is typically characterized by axonal sensorimotor neuropathy. We report on a 7-month-old white female with hypotonia, motor delay, distal weakness, and motor/sensory axonal neuropathy in which next-generation sequencing analysis identified compound heterozygous pathogenic variants (c.2054_2069_1170del and c.392A>G) in MFN2. A review of the literature reveals that sporadic and familial cases of compound heterozygous or homozygous pathogenic MFN2 variants have been infrequently described, which indicates that MFN2 can also be inherited in a recessive manner. This case highlights several clinical findings not typically associated with MFN2 pathogenic variants, including young age of onset and rapidly progressing diaphragmatic paresis that necessitated tracheostomy and mechanical ventilation, and adds to the growing list of features identified in autosomal recessive MFN2-related CMT2. Our patient with MFN2-related CMT2 expands the clinical and mutational spectrum of individuals with autosomal recessive CMT2 and identifies a new clinical feature that warrants further observation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Genetic Dominance & Cellular Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seager, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    In learning genetics, many students misunderstand and misinterpret what "dominance" means. Understanding is easier if students realize that dominance is not a mechanism, but rather a consequence of underlying cellular processes. For example, metabolic pathways are often little affected by changes in enzyme concentration. This means that…

  14. Dosage compensation of the sex chromosomes and autosomes.

    PubMed

    Disteche, Christine M

    2016-08-01

    Males are XY and females are XX in most mammalian species. Other species such as birds have a different sex chromosome make-up: ZZ in males and ZW in females. In both types of organisms one of the sex chromosomes, Y or W, has degenerated due to lack of recombination with its respective homolog X or Z. Since autosomes are present in two copies in diploid organisms the heterogametic sex has become a natural "aneuploid" with haploinsufficiency for X- or Z-linked genes. Specific mechanisms have evolved to restore a balance between critical gene products throughout the genome and between males and females. Some of these mechanisms were co-opted from and/or added to compensatory processes that alleviate autosomal aneuploidy. Surprisingly, several modes of dosage compensation have evolved. In this review we will consider the evidence for dosage compensation and the molecular mechanisms implicated.

  15. Parkin gene causing benign autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Nisipeanu, P; Inzelberg, R; Abo Mouch, S; Carasso, R L; Blumen, S C; Zhang, J; Matsumine, H; Hattori, N; Mizuno, Y

    2001-06-12

    Autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (AR-JP) is an early-onset parkinsonism caused by exonic deletions or point mutations in the parkingene. The relationship between the type of the genetic defect and the clinical presentation, the response to therapy, and the evolution have not been yet determined. The authors describe a single-basepair deletion at nucleotide 202 in exon 2 of the parkin gene in a kindred with a benign clinical course. PMID:11402119

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