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Sample records for auxiliary heating system

  1. Heat exchanger with auxiliary cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Coleman, John H.

    1980-01-01

    A heat exchanger with an auxiliary cooling system capable of cooling a nuclear reactor should the normal cooling mechanism become inoperable. A cooling coil is disposed around vertical heat transfer tubes that carry secondary coolant therethrough and is located in a downward flow of primary coolant that passes in heat transfer relationship with both the cooling coil and the vertical heat transfer tubes. A third coolant is pumped through the cooling coil which absorbs heat from the primary coolant which increases the downward flow of the primary coolant thereby increasing the natural circulation of the primary coolant through the nuclear reactor.

  2. Auxiliary ECR heating system for the gas dynamic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Shalashov, A. G.; Gospodchikov, E. D.; Smolyakova, O. B.; Malygin, V. I.; Bagryansky, P. A.; Thumm, M.

    2012-05-15

    Physics aspects of a new system for electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) at the magnetic mirror device Gas Dynamic Trap (GDT, Budker Institute, Novosibirsk) are discussed. This system based on two 400 kW/54.5 GHz gyrotrons is aimed at increasing the electron temperature up to the range 250-350 eV for improved energy confinement of hot ions. The key physical issue of the GDT magnetic field topology is that conventional ECRH geometries are not accessible. The proposed solution is based on a peculiar effect of radiation trapping in inhomogeneous magnetized plasma. Under specific conditions, oblique launch of gyrotron radiation results in generation of right-hand-polarized (R) electromagnetic waves propagating with high N{sub Double-Vertical-Line Double-Vertical-Line} in the vicinity of the cyclotron resonance layer, which leads to effective single-pass absorption of the injected microwave power. In the present paper, we investigate numerically an optimized ECRH scenario based on the proposed mechanism of wave propagation and discuss the design of the ECRH system, which is currently under construction at the Budker Institute.

  3. New Developments in Auxiliary Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norreys, Peter

    2016-10-01

    The role of heating arising from the propagation of orthogonal petawatt-laser driven relativistic electron beams in dense plasma will be discussed. The energy cascade mechanism begins first with the rapid growth at 45 degrees to the two beams of electrostatic waves near the electron plasma frequency. These waves reach high amplitudes and break, which then results in the generation of a strongly driven turbulent Langmuir spectrum. Parametric decay of these waves, particularly via the modulational instability, then gives rise to a coupled turbulent ion acoustic spectrum. The resulting waves also give rise to ion heating through collisions via equilibration of both electrons and ions. In this talk, I will present the most recent analytic modelling, and particle-in-cell / Vlasov-Poisson simulation results from my team within Oxford Physics and the Central Laser Facility that explores the optimum parameter space for this process, focusing in particular on the requirements for auxiliary heating of the central hot spot in inertial confinement fusion target experiments. I will also describe new methods for hole-boring through the coronal plasma surrounding the fuel using strongly relativistic laser beams that demonstrates the strong suppression of the hosing instability under these conditions. Proof-of-concept experiments are under design for the Orion and OMEGA EP facilities.

  4. Holistic Modeling, Design & Analysis of Integrated Stirling and Auxiliary Clean Energy Systems for Combined Heat and Power Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Amrit Om

    The research revolves around the development of a model to design and analyze Stirling systems. Lack of a standard approach to study Stirling systems and difficulty in generalizing existing approaches pose stiff challenges. A stable mathematical model (integrated second order adiabatic and dynamic model) is devised and validated for general use. The research attempts to design compact combined heat and power (CHP) system to run on multiple biomass fuels and solar energy. Analysis is also carried out regarding the design of suitable auxiliary systems like thermal energy storage system, biomass moisture removal system and Fresnel solar collector for the CHP Stirling system.

  5. Performance improvement of a solar heating system utilizing off-peak electric auxiliary

    SciTech Connect

    Eltimsahy, A.H.

    1980-06-01

    The design and construction of a heat pump system suitable for incorporating in a space solar heating system utilizing off-peak storage from the electric utility are described. The performance of the system is evaluated. The refrigerating capacity, heating capacity and compressor horsepower for a heat pump system using a piston type compressor are first determined. The heat pump design is also matched with the existing University of Toledo solar house heating system. The refrigerant is Freon-12 working between a condensing temperature of up to 172/sup 0/F and evaporator temperature between 0/sup 0/F and 75/sup 0/F. The heat pump is then installed. Performance indices for the heat pump and the heating system in general are defined and generated by the on-line computer monitoring system for the 1979/80 heating season operation. Monthly and seasonal indices such as heat pump coefficient of performance, collector efficiency, percent of heating load supplied by solar energy and individual components efficiencies in general are recorded. The data collected is then analyzed and compared with previously collected data. The improvement in the performance resulting from the addition of a piston type compressor with an external motor belt drive is then evaluated. Data collected points to the potentially improved operating performance of a solar heating system utilizing off-peak storage from the electric utility. Data shows that the seasonal percent of space heating load supplied by solar is 60% and the seasonal percent cost of space heating load supplied by solar is 82% with a solar collection coefficient of performance of 4.6. Data also indicates that such a system would pay for itself in 14 years when used in Northwest Ohio.

  6. Performance of a drain-back solar heating and hot water system with auxiliary heat pump. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karaki, S.

    1984-03-01

    The principal objective of the project was to test and evaluate the BNL collectors in a space heating system. When the BNL collectors delaminated under stagnation conditions, they were replaced with the Chamberlain collectors which were previously used on solar house III, and tests were continued to evaluate performance of a drain-back system. Results leading to the following conclusions are discussed. (1) The Chamberlain collectors have deteriorated in performance compared to previous seasons. Where daily efficiency of 41% were attained in 1978 to 1979 and 1979 to 1980, efficiency was 37%. System efficiency of 29% compares to 30% in prior years. (2) Solar contribution to DHW heating is low, and is probably the result of the artificially imposed load profile and the low recovery rate of the double-wall heat exchanger. (3) System efficiency can be improved by reducing thermal losses from storage.

  7. Cogeneration technology alternatives study. Volume 4: Heat Sources, balance of plant and auxiliary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Data and information established for heat sources balance of plant items, thermal energy storage, and heat pumps are presented. Design case descriptions are given along with projected performance values. Capital cost estimates for representative cogeneration plants are also presented.

  8. Auxiliary reactor for a hydrocarbon reforming system

    DOEpatents

    Clawson, Lawrence G.; Dorson, Matthew H.; Mitchell, William L.; Nowicki, Brian J.; Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Davis, Robert; Rumsey, Jennifer W.

    2006-01-17

    An auxiliary reactor for use with a reformer reactor having at least one reaction zone, and including a burner for burning fuel and creating a heated auxiliary reactor gas stream, and heat exchanger for transferring heat from auxiliary reactor gas stream and heat transfer medium, preferably two-phase water, to reformer reaction zone. Auxiliary reactor may include first cylindrical wall defining a chamber for burning fuel and creating a heated auxiliary reactor gas stream, the chamber having an inlet end, an outlet end, a second cylindrical wall surrounding first wall and a second annular chamber there between. The reactor being configured so heated auxiliary reactor gas flows out the outlet end and into and through second annular chamber and conduit which is disposed in second annular chamber, the conduit adapted to carry heat transfer medium and being connectable to reformer reaction zone for additional heat exchange.

  9. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  10. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  11. Radiant vessel auxiliary cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Germer, J.H.

    1987-07-07

    This patent describes an improved radiant vessel passive cooling system for liquid-metal poor-type modular nuclear reactors having a reactor vessel and a surrounding containment vessel spaced apart from the reactor vessel to form a first interstitial region containing an inert gas, the improvement comprising: a shell spaced apart from and surrounding the containment vessel to form a second interstitial region comprising a circulatory air passage. The circulatory air passage has an air inlet at a first position and an air outlet at a second position which is vertically higher than the first position. The second interstitial region lies between the shell and the containment vessel; and surface area extension means in the shell is longitudinally disposed from the shell into the second interstitial region towards the containment vessel to receive thermal radiation from the containment vessel. The surface area extension means is spaced apart from the external surface of the containment vessel where heat radiated form the containment vessel is received at the surface extension means for convection, conduction and radiation to air in the circulatory passage.

  12. Analysis of Heat Transfers inside Counterflow Plate Heat Exchanger Augmented by an Auxiliary Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Khaled, A.-R. A.

    2014-01-01

    Enhancement of heat transfers in counterflow plate heat exchanger due to presence of an intermediate auxiliary fluid flow is investigated. The intermediate auxiliary channel is supported by transverse conducting pins. The momentum and energy equations for the primary fluids are solved numerically and validated against a derived approximate analytical solution. A parametric study including the effect of the various plate heat exchanger, and auxiliary channel dimensionless parameters is conducted. Different enhancement performance indicators are computed. The various trends of parameters that can better enhance heat transfer rates above those for the conventional plate heat exchanger are identified. Large enhancement factors are obtained under fully developed flow conditions. The maximum enhancement factors can be increased by above 8.0- and 5.0-fold for the step and exponential distributions of the pins, respectively. Finally, counterflow plate heat exchangers with auxiliary fluid flows are recommended over the typical ones if these flows can be provided with the least cost. PMID:24719572

  13. Analysis of heat transfers inside counterflow plate heat exchanger augmented by an auxiliary fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Khaled, A-R A

    2014-01-01

    Enhancement of heat transfers in counterflow plate heat exchanger due to presence of an intermediate auxiliary fluid flow is investigated. The intermediate auxiliary channel is supported by transverse conducting pins. The momentum and energy equations for the primary fluids are solved numerically and validated against a derived approximate analytical solution. A parametric study including the effect of the various plate heat exchanger, and auxiliary channel dimensionless parameters is conducted. Different enhancement performance indicators are computed. The various trends of parameters that can better enhance heat transfer rates above those for the conventional plate heat exchanger are identified. Large enhancement factors are obtained under fully developed flow conditions. The maximum enhancement factors can be increased by above 8.0- and 5.0-fold for the step and exponential distributions of the pins, respectively. Finally, counterflow plate heat exchangers with auxiliary fluid flows are recommended over the typical ones if these flows can be provided with the least cost.

  14. Neoclassical offset toroidal velocity and auxiliary ion heating in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzaro, E.

    2016-05-01

    In conditions of ideal axisymmetry, for a magnetized plasma in a generic bounded domain, necessarily toroidal, the uniform absorption of external energy (e.g., RF or any isotropic auxiliary heating) cannot give rise to net forces or torques. Experimental evidence on contemporary tokamaks shows that the near central absorption of RF heating power (ICH and ECH) and current drive in presence of MHD activity drives a bulk plasma rotation in the co- I p direction, opposite to the initial one. Also the appearance of classical or neoclassical tearing modes provides a nonlinear magnetic braking that tends to clamp the rotation profile at the q-rational surfaces. The physical origin of the torque associated with P RF absorption could be due the effects of asymmetry in the equilibrium configuration or in power deposition, but here we point out also an effect of the response of the so-called neoclassical offset velocity to the power dependent heat flow increment. The neoclassical toroidal viscosity due to internal magnetic kink or tearing modes tends to relax the plasma rotation to this asymptotic speed, which in absence of auxiliary heating is of the order of the ion diamagnetic velocity. It can be shown by kinetic and fluid calculations, that the absorption of auxiliary power by ions modifies this offset proportionally to the injected power thereby forcing the plasma rotation in a direction opposite to the initial, to large values. The problem is discussed in the frame of the theoretical models of neoclassical toroidal viscosity.

  15. RVACS/RACS (reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system/reactor air cooling system) shutdown heat removal in a modular sized LMR (liquid metal reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, F.E.; Wigeland, R.A.; Lo, R.K.

    1988-01-01

    Shutdown heat removal by a RVACS for an unprotected loss of flow case in a modular sized LMR has been analyzed with the SASSYS-1 LMR systems analysis code. For this case it was assumed that all power was lost to the primary and intermediate sodium pumps, and feedwater flow to the steam generators was lost. The control rods failed to scram, but reactivity feedback shut down the power to decay heat levels. The only heat removal was by sodium natural circulation from the core to the vessel wall and by cooling of the vessel wall by radiation and air natural circulation in the Reactor Air Cooling System. The case was run until the system temperatures peaked when the decay heat power level dropped below the heat removal rate.

  16. 30 CFR 57.8529 - Auxiliary fan systems

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Auxiliary fan systems 57.8529 Section 57.8529 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Underground Only § 57.8529 Auxiliary fan systems When auxiliary fan systems are used, such systems...

  17. 30 CFR 57.8529 - Auxiliary fan systems

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Auxiliary fan systems 57.8529 Section 57.8529 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Underground Only § 57.8529 Auxiliary fan systems When auxiliary fan systems are used, such systems...

  18. Computer Simulation of Auxiliary Power Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    reverse side if necessary and iden~ffy by block number) gas turbine engine turbine engine computer programs auxiliary power unit aircraft engine starter ,i...printed to that effect . d. Turbines There are three choices for the turbine configuration, see Figure 2: 1) a one-stage turbine, 2) a two-stage turbine...07000 MAIN CO!RBUSTION EFF = .99500 DESIGN FUEL FLOW (LB/IHR) 150.00 MAIN COMB FUEL HEATING VALUE AT T4 FOR JP4 * 18400. COMB DISCHARGE TEMP

  19. System Study: Auxiliary Feedwater 1998-2014

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-12-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at 69 U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2014 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the AFW results.

  20. System Study: Auxiliary Feedwater 1998–2013

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2014-12-31

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at 69 U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2013 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10-year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the AFW results.

  1. LOX/hydrocarbon auxiliary propulsion system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orton, G. F.; Mark, T. D.; Weber, D. D.

    1982-01-01

    Liquid oxygen (LOX)/hydrocarbon propulsion concepts for a "second generation' orbiter auxiliary propulsion system was evaluated. The most attractive fuel and system design approach identified, and the technology advancements that are needed to provide high confidence for a subsequent system development were determined. The fuel candidates were ethanol, methane, propane, and ammonia. Even though ammonia is not a hydrocarbon, it was included for evaluation because it is clean burning and has a good technology base. The major system design options were pump versus pressure feed, cryogenic versus ambient temperature RCS propellant feed, and the degree of OMS-RCS integration. Ethanol was determined to be the best fuel candidate. It is an earth-storable fuel with a vapor pressure slightly higher than monomethyl hydrazine. A pump-fed OMS was recommended because of its high specific impulse, enabling greater velocity change and greater payload capability than a pressure fed system.

  2. Auxiliary propulsion requirements for large space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloy, J. E.; Smith, W. W.; Machles, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    An insight into auxiliary propulsion systems (APS) requirements for large space systems (LSS) launchable by a single shuttle is presented. In an effort to scope the APS requirements for LSS, a set of generic LSSs were defined. For each generic LSS class a specific structural configuration, representative of that most likely to serve the needs of the 1980's and 1990's was defined. The environmental disturbance forces and torques which would be acting on each specific structural configuration in LEO and GEO orbits were then determined. Auxiliary propulsion requirements were determined as a function of: generic class specific configuration, size and openness of structure, orbit, angle of orientation, correction frequency, duty cycle, number and location of thrusters and direction of thrusters and APS/LSS interactions. The results of this analysis were used to define the APS characteristics of: (1) number and distribution of thrusters, (2) thruster modulation, (3) thrust level, (4) mission energy requirements, (5) total APS mass component breakdown, and (6) state of the art adequacy/deficiency. Previously announced in STAR as N83-26922

  3. Auxiliary propulsion requirements for large space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloy, J. E.; Smith, W. W.; Machles, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    An insight into auxiliary propulsion systems (APS) requirements for large space systems (LSS) launchable by a single shuttle is presented. In an effort to scope the APS requirements for LSS, a set of generic LSSs were defined. For each generic LSS class a specific structural configuration, representative of that most likely to serve the needs of the 1980's and 1990's was defined. The environmental disturbance forces and torques which would be acting on each specific structural configuration in LEO and GEO orbits were then determined. Auxiliary propulsion requirements were determined as a function of: generic class specific configuration, size and openness of structure, orbit, angle of orientation, correction frequency, duty cycle, number and location of thrusters and direction of thrusters and APS/LSS interactions. The results of this analysis were used to define the APS characteristics of: (1) number and distribution of thrusters, (2) thruster modulation, (3) thrust level, (4) mission energy requirements, (5) total APS mass component breakdown, and (6) state of the art adequacy/deficiency.

  4. The German and English Auxiliary Systems and Complex Predicates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Terrence C.

    1976-01-01

    This paper explores the auxiliary systems of English and German and the use of the auxiliary verbs in various complex predicate structures in the two languages. It aims at alleviating two types of problems in learning German involving governing patterns and ordering problems in clauses. (CHK)

  5. 46 CFR 52.01-35 - Auxiliary, donkey, fired thermal fluid heater, and heating boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Auxiliary, donkey, fired thermal fluid heater, and... requirements for miscellaneous boiler types, such as donkey, fired thermal fluid heater, heating boiler, etc... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-35 Auxiliary, donkey, fired...

  6. Heat Pipe Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Solar Fundamentals, Inc.'s hot water system employs space-derived heat pipe technology. It is used by a meat packing plant to heat water for cleaning processing machinery. Unit is complete system with water heater, hot water storage, electrical controls and auxiliary components. Other than fans and a circulating pump, there are no moving parts. System's unique design eliminates problems of balancing, leaking, corroding, and freezing.

  7. Auxiliary Payload Power System thermal control. [for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagel, R. G.

    1976-01-01

    The Auxiliary Payload Power System (APPS) provides supplementary power and cooling to Space Processing Application (SPA) experiments to be mounted in the APPS and the Spacelab in the Shuttle Payload Bay. SPA experiment operations are planned for early Shuttle flights. This paper presents thermal control study results for preliminary analysis and design definition of the APPS. A 100/sq m, three-wing, pumped-fluid, deployable radiator with separate APPS equipment and SPA experiments coolant loops was selected as the baseline. The system is capable of rejecting the heat (approximately 26 kw) associated with the production and consumption of approximately 16 kw of electrical power produced by the APPS fuel cells for a worst case radiator orientation. For the most favorable orientation, the heat rejection and power capability approach 38 and 24 kw, respectively. Alternate approaches were evaluated, such as heat pipes for the radiator and alternate fluids for the coolant loops. Emphasis was placed on using Shuttle developed hardware: coolant pumps, heat exchangers, fluids, and radiator technology.

  8. 46 CFR 52.01-35 - Auxiliary, donkey, fired thermal fluid heater, and heating boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... heating boilers. 52.01-35 Section 52.01-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-35 Auxiliary, donkey, fired thermal fluid heater, and heating boilers. (a) To determine the appropriate part of the regulations...

  9. 46 CFR 52.01-35 - Auxiliary, donkey, fired thermal fluid heater, and heating boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... heating boilers. 52.01-35 Section 52.01-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-35 Auxiliary, donkey, fired thermal fluid heater, and heating boilers. (a) To determine the appropriate part of the regulations...

  10. 46 CFR 52.01-35 - Auxiliary, donkey, fired thermal fluid heater, and heating boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... heating boilers. 52.01-35 Section 52.01-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-35 Auxiliary, donkey, fired thermal fluid heater, and heating boilers. (a) To determine the appropriate part of the regulations...

  11. 46 CFR 52.01-35 - Auxiliary, donkey, fired thermal fluid heater, and heating boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... heating boilers. 52.01-35 Section 52.01-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-35 Auxiliary, donkey, fired thermal fluid heater, and heating boilers. (a) To determine the appropriate part of the regulations...

  12. Reliability model of a monopropellant auxiliary propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, J. S.

    1971-01-01

    A mathematical model and associated computer code has been developed which computes the reliability of a monopropellant blowdown hydrazine spacecraft auxiliary propulsion system as a function of time. The propulsion system is used to adjust or modify the spacecraft orbit over an extended period of time. The multiple orbit corrections are the multiple objectives which the auxiliary propulsion system is designed to achieve. Thus the reliability model computes the probability of successfully accomplishing each of the desired orbit corrections. To accomplish this, the reliability model interfaces with a computer code that models the performance of a blowdown (unregulated) monopropellant auxiliary propulsion system. The computer code acts as a performance model and as such gives an accurate time history of the system operating parameters. The basic timing and status information is passed on to and utilized by the reliability model which establishes the probability of successfully accomplishing the orbit corrections.

  13. Solar heating and cooling systems design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Solar heating and heating/cooling systems were designed for single family, multifamily, and commercial applications. Subsystems considered included solar collectors, heat storage systems, auxiliary energy sources, working fluids, and supplementary controls, piping, and pumps.

  14. Oxygen-hydrogen thrusters for Space Station auxiliary propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkman, D. K.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility and technology requirements of a low-thrust, high-performance, long-life, gaseous oxygen (GO2)/gaseous hydrogen (GH2) thruster were examined. Candidate engine concepts for auxiliary propulsion systems for space station applications were identified. The low-thrust engine (5 to 100 lb sub f) requires significant departure from current applications of oxygen/hydrogen propulsion technology. Selection of the thrust chamber material and cooling method needed or long life poses a major challenge. The use of a chamber material requiring a minimum amount of cooling or the incorporation of regenerative cooling were the only choices available with the potential of achieving very high performance. The design selection for the injector/igniter, the design and fabrication of a regeneratively cooled copper chamber, and the design of a high-temperature rhenium chamber were documented and the performance and heat transfer results obtained from the test program conducted at JPL using the above engine components presented. Approximately 115 engine firings were conducted in the JPL vacuum test facility, using 100:1 expansion ratio nozzles. Engine mixture ratio and fuel-film cooling percentages were parametrically investigated for each test configuration.

  15. Comparative assessment of selected PWR auxiliary feedwater system reliability analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, R.; Fresco, A.; Papazoglou, I.A.; Tsao, J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents a sample of results obtained in reviewing utility submittals of Auxiliary Feedwater System reliability studies. These results are then used to illustrate a few general points regarding such studies. The submittals and reviews for operating license applications are quite significant in that they represent an application of probabilistic risk assessment techniques in the licensing process.

  16. Space shuttle auxiliary propulsion system design study. Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, P. J.; Schweickert, T. F.

    1972-01-01

    The development and characteristics of an auxiliary propulsion system for space shuttle applications are presented. The system design data necessary for selection of preferred system concepts and the requirements for complementing component design and test programs are analyzed. The use of cryogenic oxygen and hydrogen as a propellant combination is explained on the basis of high vehicle impulse requirements, safety factors, reuse, and logistics considerations. The final configurations for the alternate propellant system, with primary emphasis on earth storable propellants is described.

  17. LOX/hydrocarbon auxiliary propulsion system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orton, G. F.; Mark, T. D.; Weber, D. D.

    1982-01-01

    Liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon propulsion systems applicable to a second generation orbiter OMS/RCS were compared, and major system/component options were evaluated. A large number of propellant combinations and system concepts were evaluated. The ground rules were defined in terms of candidate propellants, system/component design options, and design requirements. System and engine component math models were incorporated into existing computer codes for system evaluations. The detailed system evaluations and comparisons were performed to identify the recommended propellant combination and system approach.

  18. Fusion Plasma Theory: Task 3, Auxiliary radiofrequency heating of tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Scharer, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The research performed under this grant during the past year has been concentrated on the following several key tokamak ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) coupling, heating and current drive issues: Efficient coupling during the L- to H- mode transition by analysis and computer simulation of ICRF antennas; analysis of ICRF cavity-backed coil antenna coupling to plasma edge profiles including fast and ion Bernstein wave coupling for heating and current drive; benchmarking the codes to compare with current JET, D-IIID and ASDEX experimental results and predictions for advanced tokamaks such as BPX and SSAT (Steady-State Advanced Tokamak); ICRF full-wave field solutions, power conservation, heating analyses and minority ion current drive; and the effects of fusion alpha particle or ion tail populations on the ICRF absorption. Research progress, publications, and conference and workshop presentations are summarized in this report.

  19. Fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Ren, Y.; Wang, W. X.; LeBlanc, B. P.; ...

    2015-11-03

    In this letter, we report the first observation of the fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus eXperiment [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. The observation was made in a set of RF-heated L-mode plasmas with toroidal magnetic field of 0.55 T and plasma current of 300 kA. It is observed that electron-scale turbulence spectral power (measured with a high-k collective microwave scattering system) decreases significantly following fast cessation of RF heating that occurs in less than 200 μs. The large drop in the turbulence spectral power has a short time delaymore » of about 1–2 ms relative to the RF cessation and happens on a time scale of 0.5–1 ms, much smaller than the energy confinement time of about 10 ms. Power balance analysis shows a factor of about 2 decrease in electron thermal diffusivity after the sudden drop of turbulence spectral power. Measured small changes in equilibrium profiles across the RF cessation are unlikely able to explain this sudden reduction in the measured turbulence and decrease in electron thermal transport, supported by local linear stability analysis and both local and global nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. Furthermore, the observations imply that nonlocal flux-driven mechanism may be important for the observed turbulence and electron thermal transport.« less

  20. Fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Y.; Wang, W. X.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Ethier, S.; Mazzucato, E.; Bell, R.; Lee, K. C.; Domier, C. W.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H.

    2015-11-15

    In this letter, we report the first observation of the fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus eXperiment [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. The observation was made in a set of RF-heated L-mode plasmas with toroidal magnetic field of 0.55 T and plasma current of 300 kA. It is observed that electron-scale turbulence spectral power (measured with a high-k collective microwave scattering system) decreases significantly following fast cessation of RF heating that occurs in less than 200 μs. The large drop in the turbulence spectral power has a short time delay of about 1–2 ms relative to the RF cessation and happens on a time scale of 0.5–1 ms, much smaller than the energy confinement time of about 10 ms. Power balance analysis shows a factor of about 2 decrease in electron thermal diffusivity after the sudden drop of turbulence spectral power. Measured small changes in equilibrium profiles across the RF cessation are unlikely able to explain this sudden reduction in the measured turbulence and decrease in electron thermal transport, supported by local linear stability analysis and both local and global nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. The observations imply that nonlocal flux-driven mechanism may be important for the observed turbulence and electron thermal transport.

  1. Fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Y.; Wang, W. X.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Ethier, S.; Mazzucato, E.; Lee, K. C.; Domier, C. W.; Bell, R.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H.

    2015-11-03

    In this letter, we report the first observation of the fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus eXperiment [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. The observation was made in a set of RF-heated L-mode plasmas with toroidal magnetic field of 0.55 T and plasma current of 300 kA. It is observed that electron-scale turbulence spectral power (measured with a high-k collective microwave scattering system) decreases significantly following fast cessation of RF heating that occurs in less than 200 μs. The large drop in the turbulence spectral power has a short time delay of about 1–2 ms relative to the RF cessation and happens on a time scale of 0.5–1 ms, much smaller than the energy confinement time of about 10 ms. Power balance analysis shows a factor of about 2 decrease in electron thermal diffusivity after the sudden drop of turbulence spectral power. Measured small changes in equilibrium profiles across the RF cessation are unlikely able to explain this sudden reduction in the measured turbulence and decrease in electron thermal transport, supported by local linear stability analysis and both local and global nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. Furthermore, the observations imply that nonlocal flux-driven mechanism may be important for the observed turbulence and electron thermal transport.

  2. Neoclassical toroidal torque generation by auxiliary heating in non-axisymmetric tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzaro, E.; Nowak, S.; Sauter, O.

    2016-12-01

    In conditions of ideal axisymmetry, for a magnetized plasma in a generic bounded domain, necessarily toroidal, the uniform absorption of external energy (e.g. rf or isotropic alpha heating) clearly cannot give rise to net forces or torques. A rather common experimental observation on contemporary tokamaks is that the near central absorption of auxiliary heating power (often ICH, ECH, and LHCD) and current drive in presence of non axisymmetric magnetic perturbations, including tearing modes, drives a bulk plasma rotation in the co  -  I p direction. Also growing tearing modes provide a nonlinear magnetic braking that tends to flatten the rotation profile and clamp it at the q-rational surfaces. The physical origin of the torque associated with P aux absorption could be due the effects of asymmetry in deposition or in the equilibrium configuration, but here we consider also the effect of the response of the so called neoclassical offset velocity to the power dependent heat flow increment. The neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV), due to error fields, internal magnetic kink or tearing modes tends to relax the plasma rotation to this asymptotic speed, which in absence of auxiliary heating is of the order of the ion diamagnetic velocity. It can be shown by a kinetic calculation, this offset velocity is a function of the absorbed heat and therefore of the injected auxiliary power, thereby forcing the plasma rotation in a direction opposite to the initial, to large values. The problem is discussed in the frame of the theoretical models of neoclassical toroidal viscosity.

  3. Assembly auxiliary system for narrow cabins of spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Li, Shiqi; Wang, Junfeng

    2015-09-01

    Due to the narrow space and complex structure of spacecraft cabin, the existing asssembly systems can not well suit for the assembly process of cabin products. This paper aims to introduce an assembly auxiliary system for cabin products. A hierarchical-classification method is proposed to re-adjust the initial assembly relationship of cabin into a new hierarchical structure for efficient assembly planning. An improved ant colony algorithm based on three assembly principles is established for searching a optimizational assembly sequence of cabin parts. A mixed reality assembly environment is constructed with enhanced information to promote interaction efficiency of assembly training and guidance. Based on the machine vision technology, the inspection of left redundant objects and measurement of parts distance in inner cabin are efficiently performed. The proposed system has been applied to the assembly work of a spacecraft cabin with 107 parts, which includes cabin assembly planning, assembly training and assembly quality inspection. The application result indicates that the proposed system can be an effective assistant tool to cabin assembly works and provide an intuitive and real assembly experience for workers. This paper presents an assembly auxiliary system for spacecraft cabin products, which can provide technical support to the spacecraft cabin assembly industry.

  4. High-performance space shuttle auxiliary propellant valve system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. M.

    1973-01-01

    Several potential valve closures for the space shuttle auxiliary propulsion system (SS/APS) were investigated analytically and experimentally in a modeling program. The most promising of these were analyzed and experimentally evaluated in a full-size functional valve test fixture of novel design. The engineering investigations conducted for both model and scale evaluations of the SS/APS valve closures and functional valve fixture are described. Preliminary designs, laboratory tests, and overall valve test fixture designs are presented, and a final recommended flightweight SS/APS valve design is presented.

  5. Enhancing VHTR passive safety and economy with thermal radiation based direct reactor auxiliary cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, H.; Zhang, H.; Zou, L.; Sun, X.

    2012-07-01

    One of the most important requirements for Gen. IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is passive safety. Currently all the gas cooled version of VHTR designs use Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) for passive decay heat removal. The RVACS can be characterized as a surface-based decay heat removal system. It is especially suitable for smaller power reactors since small systems have relatively larger surface area to volume ratio. However, RVACS limits the maximum achievable power level for modular VHTRs due to the mismatch between the reactor power (proportional to the core volume) and decay heat removal capability (proportional to the vessel surface area). Besides the safety considerations, VHTRs also need to be economical in order to compete with other reactor concepts and other types of energy sources. The limit of decay heat removal capability set by using RVACS has affected the economy of VHTRs. A potential alternative solution is to use a volume-based passive decay heat removal system, called Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling Systems (DRACS), to remove or mitigate the limitation on decay heat removal capability. DRACS composes of natural circulation loops with two sets of heat exchangers, one on the reactor side and another on the environmental side. For the reactor side, cooling pipes will be inserted into holes made in the outer or inner graphite reflector blocks. There will be gaps or annular regions formed between these cooling pipes and their corresponding surrounding graphite surfaces. Graphite has an excellent heat conduction property. By taking advantage of this feature, we can have a volume-based method to remove decay heat. The scalability can be achieved, if needed, by employing more rows of cooling pipes to accommodate higher decay heat rates. Since heat can easily conduct through the graphite regions among the holes made for the cooling pipes, those cooling pipes located further away from the active core region can still be very

  6. High voltage bus and auxiliary heater control system for an electric or hybrid vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Murty, Balarama Vempaty

    2000-01-01

    A control system for an electric or hybrid electric vehicle includes a vehicle system controller and a control circuit having an electric immersion heater. The heater is electrically connected to the vehicle's high voltage bus and is thermally coupled to a coolant loop containing a heater core for the vehicle's climate control system. The system controller responds to cabin heat requests from the climate control system by generating a pulse width modulated signal that is used by the control circuit to operate the heater at a duty cycle appropriate for the amount of cabin heating requested. The control system also uses the heater to dissipate excess energy produced by an auxiliary power unit and to provide electric braking when regenerative braking is not desirable and manual braking is not necessary. The control system further utilizes the heater to provide a safe discharge of a bank of energy storage capacitors following disconnection of the battery or one of the high voltage connectors used to transmit high voltage operating power to the various vehicle systems. The control circuit includes a high voltage clamping circuit that monitors the voltage on the bus and operates the heater to clamp down the bus voltage when it exceeds a pre-selected maximum voltage. The control system can also be used to phase in operation of the heater when the bus voltage exceeds a lower threshold voltage and can be used to phase out the auxiliary power unit charging and regenerative braking when the battery becomes fully charged.

  7. High voltage bus and auxiliary heater control system for an electric or hybrid vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Murty, B.V.

    2000-03-21

    A control system for an electric or hybrid electric vehicle includes a vehicle system controller and a control circuit having an electric immersion heater. The heater is electrically connected to the vehicle's high voltage bus and is thermally coupled to a coolant loop containing a heater core for the vehicle's climate control system. The system controller responds to cabin heat requests from the climate control system by generating a pulse width modulated signal that is used by the control circuit to operate the heater at a duty cycle appropriate for the amount of cabin heating requested. The control system also uses the heater to dissipate excess energy produced by an auxiliary power unit and to provide electric braking when regenerative braking is not desirable and manual braking is not necessary. The control system further utilizes the heater to provide a safe discharge of a bank of energy storage capacitors following disconnection of the battery or one of the high voltage connectors used to transmit high voltage operating power to the various vehicle systems. The control circuit includes a high voltage clamping circuit that monitors the voltage on the bus and operates the heater to clamp down the bus voltage when it exceeds a pre-selected maximum voltage. The control system can also be used to phase in operation of the heater when the bus voltage exceeds a lower threshold voltage and can be used to phase out the auxiliary power unit charging and regenerative braking when the battery becomes fully charged.

  8. Water chemistry of a combined-cycle power plant's auxiliary equipment cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, B. M.; Korotkov, A. N.; Oparin, M. Yu.; Larin, A. B.

    2013-04-01

    Results from an analysis of methods aimed at reducing the corrosion rate of structural metal used in heat-transfer systems with water coolant are presented. Data from examination of the closed-circuit system for cooling the auxiliary mechanisms of a combined-cycle plant-based power unit and the results from adjustment of its water chemistry are given. A conclusion is drawn about the possibility of using a reagent prepared on the basis of sodium sulfite for reducing the corrosion rate when the loss of coolant is replenished with nondeaerated water.

  9. Integrated hydrogen/oxygen technology applied to auxiliary propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhardt, David L.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the Integrated Hydrogen/Oxygen Technology (IHOT) study was to determine if the vehicle/mission needs and technology of the 1990's support development of an all cryogenic H2/O2 system. In order to accomplish this, IHOT adopted the approach of designing Integrated Auxiliary Propulsion Systems (IAPS) for a representative manned vehicle; the advanced manned launch system. The primary objectives were to develop IAPS concepts which appeared to offer viable alternatives to state-of-the-art (i.e., hypergolic, or earth-storable) APS approaches. The IHOT study resulted in the definition of three APS concepts; two cryogenic IAPS, and a third concept utilizing hypergolic propellants.

  10. Design, Fabrication, and Testing of an Auxiliary Cooling System for Jet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leamy, Kevin; Griffiths, Jim; Andersen, Paul; Joco, Fidel; Laski, Mark; Balser, Jeffrey (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the technical effort of the Active Cooling for Enhanced Performance (ACEP) program sponsored by NASA. It covers the design, fabrication, and integrated systems testing of a jet engine auxiliary cooling system, or turbocooler, that significantly extends the use of conventional jet fuel as a heat sink. The turbocooler is designed to provide subcooled cooling air to the engine exhaust nozzle system or engine hot section. The turbocooler consists of three primary components: (1) a high-temperature air cycle machine driven by engine compressor discharge air, (2) a fuel/ air heat exchanger that transfers energy from the hot air to the fuel and uses a coating to mitigate fuel deposits, and (3) a high-temperature fuel injection system. The details of the turbocooler component designs and results of the integrated systems testing are documented. Industry Version-Data and information deemed subject to Limited Rights restrictions are omitted from this document.

  11. Apparatus and methods for supplying auxiliary steam in a combined cycle system

    DOEpatents

    Gorman, William G.; Carberg, William George; Jones, Charles Michael

    2002-01-01

    To provide auxiliary steam, a low pressure valve is opened in a combined cycle system to divert low pressure steam from the heat recovery steam generator to a header for supplying steam to a second combined cycle's steam turbine seals, sparging devices and cooling steam for the steam turbine if the steam turbine and gas turbine lie on a common shaft with the generator. Cooling steam is supplied the gas turbine in the combined cycle system from the high pressure steam turbine. Spent gas turbine cooling steam may augment the low pressure steam supplied to the header by opening a high pressure valve whereby high and low pressure steam flows are combined. An attemperator is used to reduce the temperature of the combined steam in response to auxiliary steam flows above a predetermined flow and a steam header temperature above a predetermined temperature. The auxiliary steam may be used to start additional combined cycle units or to provide a host unit with steam turbine cooling and sealing steam during full-speed no-load operation after a load rejection.

  12. Standardization - A method of reducing auxiliary propulsion systems costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, L. W.

    1977-01-01

    This paper deals with the efforts of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to take advantage of the economies made possible by the Space Shuttle by reducing the costs of acquiring and flying payloads for the Shuttle. Specifically, the paper addresses the route that NASA's Low Cost Systems Office is following in order to reduce the cost of auxiliary propulsion systems. This approach emphasizes the establishment of standard hardware items, which will be used on as many spacecraft as possible. The method by which a standard is selected and how it is maintained as a standard are discussed. The process by which the 5 Newton hydrazine thruster was adopted is described, as a typical example.

  13. Study of electrical and chemical propulsion systems for auxiliary propulsion of large space systems, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. W.

    1981-01-01

    The five major tasks of the program are reported. Task 1 is a literature search followed by selection and definition of seven generic spacecraft classes. Task 2 covers the determination and description of important disturbance effects. Task 3 applies the disturbances to the generic spacecraft and adds maneuver and stationkeeping functions to define total auxiliary propulsion systems requirements for control. The important auxiliary propulsion system characteristics are identified and sensitivities to control functions and large space system characteristics determined. In Task 4, these sensitivities are quantified and the optimum auxiliary propulsion system characteristics determined. Task 5 compares the desired characteristics with those available for both electrical and chemical auxiliary propulsion systems to identify the directions technology advances should take.

  14. Installation package for a domestic solar heating and hot water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The installation of two prototype solar heating and hot water systems is described. The systems consists of the following subsystems: solar collector, storage, control, transport, and auxiliary energy.

  15. Design, Testing and Modeling of the Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System for AHTRs

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Quiping; Sun, Xiaodong; Chtistensen, Richard; Blue, Thomas; Yoder, Graydon; Wilson, Dane

    2015-05-08

    The principal objective of this research is to test and model the heat transfer performance and reliability of the Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System (DRACS) for AHTRs. In addition, component testing of fluidic diodes is to be performed to examine the performance and viability of several existing fluidic diode designs. An extensive database related to the thermal performance of the heat exchangers involved will be obtained, which will be used to benchmark a computer code for the DRACS design and to evaluate and improve, if needed, existing heat transfer models of interest. The database will also be valuable for assessing the viability of the DRACS concept and benchmarking any related computer codes in the future. The experience of making a liquid fluoride salt test facility available, with lessons learned, will greatly benefit the development of the Fluoride Salt-cooled High-temperature Reactor (FHR) and eventually the AHTR programs.

  16. Interaction region design and auxiliary detector systems for an EIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petti, R.

    2016-03-01

    There are a number of exciting physics opportunities at a future electron-ion collider facility. One possible design for such a facility is eRHIC, where the current RHIC facility located at Brookhaven National Lab would be transformed into an electron-ion collider. It is imperative for a seamless integration of auxiliary detector systems into the interaction region design to have a machine that meets the needs for the planned physics analyses, as well as take into account the space constraints due to the tunnel geometry and the necessary beam line elements. In this talk, we describe the current ideas for integrating a luminosity detector, electron polarimeter, roman pots, and a low Q2-tagger into the interaction region for eRHIC.

  17. Auxiliary signal processing system for a multiparameter radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekar, V.; Gray, G. R.; Caylor, I. J.

    1993-01-01

    The design of an auxiliary signal processor for a multiparameter radar is described with emphasis on low cost, quick development, and minimum disruption of radar operations. The processor is based around a low-cost digital signal processor card and personal computer controller. With the use of such a concept, an auxiliary processor was implemented for the NCAR CP-2 radar during a 1991 summer field campaign and allowed measurement of additional polarimetric parameters, namely, the differential phase and the copolar cross correlation. Sample data are presented from both the auxiliary and existing radar signal processors.

  18. Enhancing VHTR Passive Safety and Economy with Thermal Radiation Based Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Ling Zou; Xiaodong Sun

    2012-06-01

    One of the most important requirements for Gen. IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is passive safety. Currently all the gas cooled version of VHTR designs use Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) for passive decay heat removal. The decay heat first is transferred to the core barrel by conduction and radiation, and then to the reactor vessel by thermal radiation and convection; finally the decay heat is transferred to natural circulated air or water systems. RVACS can be characterized as a surface based decay heat removal system. The RVACS is especially suitable for smaller power reactors since small systems have relatively larger surface area to volume ratio. However, RVACS limits the maximum achievable power level for modular VHTRs due to the mismatch between the reactor power (proportional to volume) and decay heat removal capability (proportional to surface area). When the relative decay heat removal capability decreases, the peak fuel temperature increases, even close to the design limit. Annular core designs with inner graphite reflector can mitigate this effect; therefore can further increase the reactor power. Another way to increase the reactor power is to increase power density. However, the reactor power is also limited by the decay heat removal capability. Besides the safety considerations, VHTRs also need to be economical in order to compete with other reactor concepts and other types of energy sources. The limit of decay heat removal capability set by using RVACS has affected the economy of VHTRs. A potential alternative solution is to use a volume-based passive decay heat removal system, called Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling Systems (DRACS), to remove or mitigate the limitation on decay heat removal capability. DRACS composes of natural circulation loops with two sets of heat exchangers, one on the reactor side and another on the environment side. For the reactor side, cooling pipes will be inserted into holes made in the outer or

  19. Liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen auxiliary power system thruster investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberle, E. E.; Kusak, L.

    1979-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and demonstration of a 111 newton (25 lb) thrust, integrated auxiliary propulsion system (IAPS) thruster for use with LH2/LO2 propellants is described. Hydrogen was supplied at a temperature range of 22 to 33 K (40 to 60 R), and oxygen from 89 to 122 K (160 to 220 R). The thruster was designed to operate in both pulse mode and steady-state modes for vehicle attitude control, space maneuvering, and as an abort backup in the event of failure of the main propulsion system. A dual-sleeve, tri-axial injection system was designed that utilizes a primary injector/combustor where 100 percent of the oxygen and 8 percent of the hydrogen is introduced; a secondary injector/combustor where 45 percent of the hydrogen is introduced to mix with the primary combustor gases; and a boundary layer injector that uses the remaining 45 percent of the hydrogen to cool the thrust throat/nozzle design. Hot-fire evaluation of this thruster with a BLC injection distance of 2.79 cm (1.10 in.) indicated that a specific impulse value of 390 sec can be attained using a coated molybdenum thrust chamber. Pulse mode tests indicated that a chamber pressure buildup to 90 percent thrust can be achieved in a time on the order of 48 msec. Some problems were encountered in achieving ignition of each pulse during pulse trains. This was interpreted to indicate that a higher delivered spark energy level ( 100 mJ) would be required to maintain ignition reliability of the plasma torch ignition system under the extra 'cold' conditions resulting during pulsing.

  20. Auxiliary Heating of Geothermally Preheated Water or CO2 - A Potential Solution for Low- to Moderate-Temperature Geothermal Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, X.; Garapati, N.; Adams, B. M.; Randolph, J.; Kuehn, T. H.; Saar, M. O.

    2015-12-01

    Typically, low- to moderate-temperature geothermal resources are more effectively used for direct heat energy applications. However, due to high thermal losses during transport, direct use requires that the heat resource is located near the user. Alternatively, we show here that if such a low-temperature geothermal resource is combined with an additional or secondary energy resource, the power production is increased compared to the sum from two separate (geothermal and secondary fuel) power plants (DiPippo et al. 1978) and the thermal losses are minimized because the thermal energy is utilized where it is produced. Since Adams et al. (2015) found that using CO2 as a subsurface working fluid produces more net power than brine at low- to moderate-temperature geothermal resource conditions, we compare over a range of parameters the net power and efficiencies of hybrid geothermal power plants that use brine or CO2 as the subsurface working fluid, that are then heated further with a secondary energy source that is unspecified here. Parameters varied include the subsurface working fluid (brine vs. CO2), geothermal reservoir depth (2.5-4.5 km), and turbine inlet temperature (200-600°C) after auxiliary heating. The hybrid power plant is numerically modeled using an iterative coupling approach of TOUGH2-ECO2N/ECO2H (Pruess, 2004) for simulation of the subsurface reservoir and Engineering Equation Solver for well bore fluid flow and surface power plant performance. We find that hybrid power plants that are CO2-based (subsurface) systems have higher thermal efficiencies than the brine based systems at low turbine inlet temperatures. Specifically, our results indicate that geothermal hybrid plants that are CO2-based are more efficient than brine-based systems when the contribution of the geothermal resource energy is higher than 48%.

  1. Compact Reliable Robust (CORE) Power System for Auxiliary Power Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-17

    1,000 hour demonstration. This paper summarizes the results of Segment I and some of the activities of Segment II. The power system builds upon and...FPP removes sulfur and the majority of carbon -producing compounds in the fuel and diverts them to a burner to produce heat needed by the reformer...qualification activities are presented in Figure 2. Presented in Figure 2a are data from the qualification of the regenerable adsorbent that is

  2. Heat pump system for residential use

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsell, R.C.; Noe, J.C.

    1984-05-01

    An air conditioning system of the air cycle heat pump type is disclosed for selectively heating and cooling a residence or similar space environment. In one embodiment, a combustor and associated Brayton cycle turbine provide the primary drive to a compessor constituting the heat pump. In a second embodiment, the Brayton turbine is replaced by an electric motor coupled to drive the compressor shaft. An auxiliary turbine is also coupled to the drive shaft to provide auxiliary drive derived from the operation of a portion of the system at sub-atmospheric pressure. In this portion, during the cooling mode, water is evaporated into the system to further assist in cooling by removing the latent heat of vaporization.

  3. Heat pump systems for residential use

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsell, R.C.; Noe, J.C.

    1984-04-24

    An air conditioning system of the air cycle heat pump type for selectively heating and cooling a residence or similar space environment. In one embodiment, a combustor and associated Brayton cycle turbine provide the primary drive to a compressor constituting the heat pump. In a second embodiment, the Brayton turbine is replaced by an electric motor coupled to drive the compressor shaft. An auxiliary turbine is also coupled to the drive shaft to provide auxiliary drive derived from the operation of a portion of the system at sub-atmospheric pressure. In this portion, during the cooling mode, water is evaporated into the system to further assist in cooling by removing the latent heat of vaporization.

  4. System design package: Maxi-therm S-101 heating module, passive heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    This document is the specification which establishes the requirements for the design, installation, and performance of a passive heat exchanger module with auxiliary heaters for use with solar heating systems. It designates the Interim Performance Criteria applicable to the subsystem and defines any deviations. This document also includes the manufacturing instructions and required materials and parts for the Maxitherm S101 Heating Module.

  5. Scaling analysis for the direct reactor auxiliary cooling system for FHRs

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Q.; Kim, I. H.; Sun, X.; Christensen, R. N.; Blue, T. E.; Yoder, G.; Wilson, D.; Sabharwall, P.

    2015-04-01

    The Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System (DRACS) is a passive residual heat removal system proposed for the Fluoride-salt-cooled High-temperature Reactor (FHR) that combines the coated particle fuel and graphite moderator with a liquid fluoride salt as the coolant. The DRACS features three natural circulation/convection loops that rely on buoyancy as the driving force and are coupled via two heat exchangers, namely, the DRACS heat exchanger and the natural draft heat exchanger. A fluidic diode is employed to minimize the parasitic flow into the DRACS primary loop and correspondingly the heat loss to the DRACS during reactor normal operation, and to activate the DRACS in accidents when the reactor is shut down. While the DRACS concept has been proposed, there are no actual prototypic DRACS systems for FHRs built or tested in the literature. In this paper, a detailed scaling analysis for the DRACS is performed, which will provide guidance for the design of scaled-down DRACS test facilities. Based on the Boussinesq assumption and one-dimensional flow formulation, the governing equations are non-dimensionalized by introducing appropriate dimensionless parameters. The key dimensionless numbers that characterize the DRACS system are obtained from the non-dimensional governing equations. Based on the dimensionless numbers and non-dimensional governing equations, similarity laws are proposed. In addition, a scaling methodology has been developed, which consists of a core scaling and a loop scaling. The consistency between the core and loop scaling is examined via the reference volume ratio, which can be obtained from both the core and loop scaling processes. The scaling methodology and similarity laws have been applied to obtain a scientific design of a scaled-down high-temperature DRACS test facility.

  6. Installation package for a solar heating and hot water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Development and installation of two commercial solar heating and hot water systems are reported. The systems consist of the following subsystems: collector, storage, transport, hot water, auxiliary energy and controls. General guidelines are provided which may be utilized in development of detailed installation plans and specifications. In addition, operation, maintenance and repair of a solar heating and hot water system instructions are included.

  7. LOX/LH2 vane pump for auxiliary propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemminger, J. A.; Ulbricht, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    Positive displacement pumps offer potential efficiency advantages over centrifugal pumps for future low thrust space missions. Low flow rate applications, such as space station auxiliary propulsion or dedicated low thrust orbiter transfer vehicles, are typical of missions where low flow and high head rise challenge centrifugal pumps. The positive displacement vane pump for pumping of LOX and LH2 is investigated. This effort has included: (1) a testing program in which pump performance was investigated for differing pump clearances and for differing pump materials while pumping LN2, LOX, and LH2; and (2) an analysis effort, in which a comprehensive pump performance analysis computer code was developed and exercised. An overview of the theoretical framework of the performance analysis computer code is presented, along with a summary of analysis results. Experimental results are presented for pump operating in liquid nitrogen. Included are data on the effects on pump performance of pump clearance, speed, and pressure rise. Pump suction performance is also presented.

  8. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems, including potable hot water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomquist, D.; Oonk, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    Progress made in the development, delivery, and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water is reported. The system consists of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition. A comparison of the proposed Solaron Heat Pump and Solar Desiccant Heating and Cooling Systems, installation drawings, data on the Akron House at Akron, Ohio, and other program activities are included.

  9. Dynamic modelling and response characteristics of a magnetic bearing rotor system including auxiliary bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Free, April M.; Flowers, George T.; Trent, Victor S.

    1993-01-01

    Auxiliary bearings are a critical feature of any magnetic bearing system. They protect the soft iron core of the magnetic bearing during an overload or failure. An auxiliary bearing typically consists of a rolling element bearing or bushing with a clearance gap between the rotor and the inner race of the support. The dynamics of such systems can be quite complex. It is desired to develop a rotor-dynamic model and assess the dynamic behavior of a magnetic bearing rotor system which includes the effects of auxiliary bearings. Of particular interest is the effects of introducing sideloading into such a system during failure of the magnetic bearing. A model is developed from an experimental test facility and a number of simulation studies are performed. These results are presented and discussed.

  10. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Progress is reviewed in the development, delivery, and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. The system consisted of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

  11. Preliminary design package for Sunspot Domestic Hot Water Heating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design review includes a drawing list, auto-control logic, measurement definitions, and other document pertaining to the solar heated prototype hot water systems and two heat exchangers. The hot water systems consist of the following subsystems: collector, storage, control transport, auxiliary energy, and site data acquisition.

  12. Dynamic modelling and response characteristics of a magnetic bearing rotor system with auxiliary bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Free, April M.; Flowers, George T.; Trent, Victor S.

    1995-01-01

    Auxiliary bearings are a critical feature of any magnetic bearing system. They protect the soft iron core of the magnetic bearing during an overload or failure. An auxiliary bearing typically consists of a rolling element bearing or bushing with a clearance gap between the rotor and the inner race of the support. The dynamics of such systems can be quite complex. It is desired to develop a rotordynamic model which describes the dynamic behavior of a flexible rotor system with magnetic bearings including auxiliary bearings. The model is based upon an experimental test facility. Some simulation studies are presented to illustrate the behavior of the model. In particular, the effects of introducing sideloading from the magnetic bearing when one coil fails is studied.

  13. A comparison of air leakage prediction techniques for auxiliary ventilation ducting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gillies, A.D.S.; Wu, H.W.

    1999-07-01

    This paper briefly reviews prediction techniques for determination of leakage and friction along auxiliary ventilation ducting systems. In order to compare various prediction techniques that have been developed over the past, a macroscopic investigation of air leakage and friction resistance of auxiliary ventilation ducting systems has been undertaken. Measurements were conducted on 450 and 915 mm diameter fabric ducting over 100 m duct length to determine frictional resistances and the extent of leakage. Due to the high degree of accuracy required and the large volume of data that needed to be collected, electronic auxiliary ventilation ducting systems were developed based on this information. It was found that these models provided good correlation with most the existing prediction techniques. The experimental methodology relying on computer data acquisition has allowed the accuracy of measured values to be treated with a high degree of confidence. The reliability of the developed models allows prediction of leakage, frictional impedance and airflow with enhanced confidence.

  14. Heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

    1982-01-01

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion-type refrigeration circuit and a heat engine. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The heat engine includes a heat rejection circuit having a source of rejected heat and a primary heat exchanger connected to the source of rejected heat. The heat rejection circuit also includes an evaporator in heat exchange relation with the primary heat exchanger, a heat engine indoor heat exchanger, and a heat engine outdoor heat exchanger. The indoor heat exchangers are disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine indoor heat exchanger being disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit indoor heat exchanger. The outdoor heat exchangers are also disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine outdoor heat exchanger disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit outdoor heat exchanger. A common fluid is used in both of the indoor heat exchanges and in both of the outdoor heat exchangers. In a first embodiment, the heat engine is a Rankine cycle engine. In a second embodiment, the heat engine is a non-Rankine cycle engine.

  15. Heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

    1979-01-01

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion-type refrigeration circuit and a heat engine. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The heat engine includes a heat rejection circuit having a source of rejected heat and a primary heat exchanger connected to the source of rejected heat. The heat rejection circuit also includes an evaporator in heat exchange relation with the primary heat exchanger, a heat engine indoor heat exchanger, and a heat engine outdoor heat exchanger. The indoor heat exchangers are disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine indoor heat exchanger being disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit indoor heat exchanger. The outdoor heat exchangers are also disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine outdoor heat exchanger disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit outdoor heat exchanger. A common fluid is used in both of the indoor heat exchangers and in both of the outdoor heat exchangers. In a first embodiment, the heat engine is a Rankine cycle engine. In a second embodiment, the heat engine is a non-Rankine cycle engine.

  16. Review of the Shearon Harris Unit 1 auxiliary feedwater system reliability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fresco, A.; Youngblood, R.; Papazoglou, I.A.

    1986-02-01

    This report presents the results of a review of the Auxiliary Feedwater System Reliability Analysis for the Shearon Harris Nuclear Power Plant (SHNPP) Unit 1. The objective of this report is to estimate the probability that the Auxiliary Feedwater System will fail to perform its mission for each of three different initiators: (1) loss of main feedwater with offsite power available, (2) loss of offsite power, (3) loss of all ac power except vital instrumentation and control 125-V dc/120-V ac power. The scope, methodology, and failure data are prescribed by NUREG-0611 for other Westinghouse plants.

  17. Review of the Vogtle Units 1 and 2 Auxiliary Feedwater System reliability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fresco, A.; Youngblood, R.; Papazoglou, I.A.

    1985-10-01

    This report presents the results of the review of the Auxiliary Feedwater System reliability analysis for the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant (VEGP) Units 1 and 2. The objective of this report is to estimate the probability that the Auxiliary Feedwater System will fail to perform its mission for each of three different initiators: (1) loss of main feedwater with offsite power available, (2) loss of offsite power, (3) loss of all ac power except vital instrumentation and control 125-V dc/120-V ac power. The scope, methodology, and failure data are prescribed by NUREG-0611, Appendix III. The results are compared with those obtained in NUREG-0611 for other Westinghouse plants.

  18. Review of the Catawba Units 1 and 2 auxiliary feedwater system reliability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fresco, A.; Youngblood, R.; Papazoglou, I.A.

    1983-10-01

    This report presents the results of a review of the Auxiliary Feedwater System Reliability Analysis for Catawba Units 1 and 2. The objective of this report is to estimate the probability that the Auxiliary Feedwater System will fail to perform its mission for each of three different initiators: (1) loss of main feedwater with offsite power available, (2) loss of offsite power, (3) loss of all ac power except for vital instrumentation and control power. The scope, methodology, and failure data are prescribed by NUREG-0611, Appendix III. The results are compared with those obtained in NUREG-0611 for other Westinghouse plants.

  19. Recent advances in the management of obstructive airways disease. Auxiliary MDI aerosol delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Sackner, M A; Kim, C S

    1985-08-01

    Aerosol delivered through metered-dose inhalers (MDI) offers a potentially convenient way to deliver bronchodilator agents and corticosteroids to the lungs of patients with asthma and COPD. Unfortunately, most patients are unable to coordinate satisfactorily their actuation with inhalation, a problem overcome by using auxiliary MDI aerosol delivery systems. Left to their own judgment, patients often inhale the aerosol with a high inspiratory flow rather than slowly to produce optimal aerosol deposition within the airways. This problem has been corrected by one of the auxiliary MDI aerosol delivery systems (InspirEase) through auditory, visual, and tactile feedback mechanisms. MDI devices release aerosol at a high jet velocity in large particle sizes, depositing most of the aerosol in the oropharynx which can lead to potential systemic absorption of adrenergic agonists with CNS and cardiovascular side effects, oral thrush, and suppression of adrenocortical activity. All the auxiliary MDI aerosol systems promote delivery of small aerosol particles and markedly diminish oropharyngeal impaction. Of all the systems, only InspirEase provides volume and flow feedback controls to ensure an optimal inhalation maneuver. Auxiliary MDI aerosol systems should always be used for aerosolized corticosteroid administration because they minimize oropharyngeal deposition and improve aerosol delivery efficiency.

  20. Window-mounted auxiliary solar heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, K. G.; Herndon, E. P.

    1977-01-01

    System uses hot-air collectors, no thermal storage, and fan with thermostat switches. At cost of heating efficiency, unit could be manufactured and sold at price allowing immediate entry to market as auxiliary heating system. Its simplicity allows homeowner installation, and maintenance is minimal.

  1. Comparison of Air Shower and Vest Auxiliary Cooling during Simulated Tank Operations in the Heat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    would suggest that the crews’ thermal comfort was greater during vest auxiliary cooling. Despite the fact that the environmental conditions were...effective use of the turbine bleed air than is provided by an air shower. The vest approach seems to improve the thermal comfort of these tank crew members...in an environment which normally would be thermally stressful. This improved thermal comfort from vest cooling is probably associated with the reduced

  2. First results of an auxiliary electron cyclotron resonance heating experiment in the GDT magnetic mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagryansky, P. A.; Kovalenko, Yu. V.; Savkin, V. Ya.; Solomakhin, A. L.; Yakovlev, D. V.

    2014-08-01

    The axially symmetric magnetic mirror device gas-dynamic trap (GDT, Budker Institute, Novosibirsk) has recently demonstrated a tangible increase in plasma electron temperature. According to laser scattering, a value of 0.4 keV has been achieved (a twofold increase). In addition to standard machine operation, utilizing a 5 MW neutral beam injection, a newly installed electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) system was employed (54.5 GHz, 0.4 MW). The reported progress in electron temperature, along with previous experiments, which demonstrated plasma confinement at beta as high as 60%, is a significant advancement towards an energy efficient fusion neutron source based on GDT physics.

  3. Auxiliary control systems for Pachmarhi array of Cverenkov telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gothe, K. S.; Acharya, B. S.; Bhat, P. N.; Chitnis, V. R.; D'Souza, A. I.; Francis, P. J.; John, A. V.; Joshi, S. R.; Majumdar, P.; Nagesh, B. K.; Pose, M. S.; Purohit, P. N.; Rahman, M. A.; Rao, K. K.; Rao, S. K.; Sharma, S. K.; Singh, B. B.; Stanislaus, A. J.; Sudershanan, P. V.; Upadhya, S. S.; Venkateshmurthy, B. L.; Vishwanath, P. R.

    2002-03-01

    Pachmarhi Array of Cverenkov Telescopes (PACT) consists of 25 Telescopes deployed over an area of 100m x 80m. The experiment is based on atmospheric Cverenkov technique to detect Very High Energy celestial gamma-rays using wavefront sampling method. Each telescope consists of 7 large area parabolic mirrors mounted para-axially on an equatorial mount and a fast photo-multiplier tube at the focus of each mirror. For efficient operation of the experiment 3 automated control systems were developed and installed, viz. Automated Computerized Telescope Orientation System (ACTOS) to control the pointing and tracking of individual telescopes, Automatic Photo-multiplier Exposure System (APES) to facilitate the exposure of photo-tubes only during observations, and Computerized Automated Rate Adjustment and Monitoring System (CARAMS) to ensure uniform gains for all the phototube - mirror systems. The design features and performance of each of these systems are discussed.

  4. Study of liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen auxiliary propulsion systems for the space tug

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Design concepts are considered that permit use of a liquid-liquid (as opposed to gas-gas) oxygen/hydrogen thrust chamber for attitude control and auxiliary propulsion thrusters on the space tug. The best of the auxiliary propulsion system concepts are defined and their principal characteristics, including cost as well as operational capabilities, are established. Design requirements for each of the major components of the systems, including thrusters, are developed at the conceptual level. The competitive concepts considered use both dedicated (separate tanks) and integrated (propellant from main propulsion tanks) propellant supply. The integrated concept is selected as best for the space tug after comparative evaluation against both cryogenic and storable propellant dedicated systems. A preliminary design of the selected system is established and recommendations for supporting research and technology to further the concept are presented.

  5. Passive shut-down heat removal system

    DOEpatents

    Hundal, Rolv; Sharbaugh, John E.

    1988-01-01

    An improved shut-down heat removal system for a liquid metal nuclear reactor of the type having a vessel for holding hot and cold pools of liquid sodium is disclosed herein. Generally, the improved system comprises a redan or barrier within the reactor vessel which allows an auxiliary heat exchanger to become immersed in liquid sodium from the hot pool whenever the reactor pump fails to generate a metal-circulating pressure differential between the hot and cold pools of sodium. This redan also defines an alternative circulation path between the hot and cold pools of sodium in order to equilibrate the distribution of the decay heat from the reactor core. The invention may take the form of a redan or barrier that circumscribes the inner wall of the reactor vessel, thereby defining an annular space therebetween. In this embodiment, the bottom of the annular space communicates with the cold pool of sodium, and the auxiliary heat exchanger is placed in this annular space just above the drawn-down level that the liquid sodium assumes during normal operating conditions. Alternatively, the redan of the invention may include a pair of vertically oriented, concentrically disposed standpipes having a piston member disposed between them that operates somewhat like a pressure-sensitive valve. In both embodiments, the cessation of the pressure differential that is normally created by the reactor pump causes the auxiliary heat exchanger to be immersed in liquid sodium from the hot pool. Additionally, the redan in both embodiments forms a circulation flow path between the hot and cold pools so that the decay heat from the nuclear core is uniformly distributed within the vessel.

  6. [Participation of dental auxiliary personnel in local health systems].

    PubMed

    Frazão, P; Castellanos, R A

    1999-02-01

    Though numerous local health systems (sistemas locales de salud, or SILOS) in Brazil employ dental assistants, there is little information on the contributions these workers make to oral health programs. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of such workers in 10 SILOS in five municipalities in the state of São Paulo. Of the 325 dental assistants and dental hygienists employed in those systems, 245 (75.4%) answered a questionnaire that had been prepared. The results showed variations in the degree to which dental assistants participated in oral health promotion activities in the SILOS studied. In some SILOS, these workers devoted more time to dental health promotion activities than to helping perform dental tasks with individual patients. The most frequent oral health promotion activities were fluoride rinses, plaque detection followed by supervised brushing, and educational activities at basic health units and schools. In all cases, dental assistants working in the SILOS played a significant role in helping transform the practice of dentistry within the sphere of public health.

  7. Creating and manipulating non-Abelian anyons in cold atom systems using auxiliary bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuhe; Sreejith, G. J.; Jain, J. K.

    2015-08-01

    The possibility of realizing bosonic fractional quantum Hall effect in ultracold atomic systems suggests a new route to producing and manipulating anyons, by introducing auxiliary bosons of a different species that capture quasiholes and thus inherit their nontrivial braiding properties. States with localized quasiholes at any desired locations can be obtained by annihilating the auxiliary bosons at those locations. We explore how this method can be used to generate non-Abelian quasiholes of the Moore-Read Pfaffian state for bosons at filling factor ν =1 . We show that a Hamiltonian with an appropriate three-body interaction can produce two-quasihole states in two distinct fusion channels of the topological "qubit." Characteristics of these states that are related to the non-Abelian nature can be probed and verified by a measurement of the effective relative angular momentum of the auxiliary bosons, which is directly related to their pair distribution function. Moore-Read states of more than two quasiholes can also be produced in a similar fashion. We investigate some issues related to the experimental feasibility of this approach, in particular, how large the systems should be for a realization of this physics and to what extent this physics carries over to systems with the more standard two-body contact interaction.

  8. Space shuttle auxiliary propulsion system design study. Phase D report: Oxygen-hydrogen special RCS studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, T. L.; Pattern, T. C.; Mckee, H. B.

    1972-01-01

    Two alternate oxygen-hydrogen auxiliary propulsion system concepts for use with the space shuttle vehicle were evaluated. The two concepts considered were: (1) gaseous oxygen-hydrogen systems with electric or hydraulic motor driven pumps to provide system pressure and (2) liquid oxygen-hydrogen systems which delivered propellants to the engines in a liquid state without the need for pumps. The various means of implementing each of the concepts are compared on the basis of weight, technology requirements, and operational considerations. It was determined that the liquid oxygen-hydrogen system concepts have the potential to produce substantial weight reductions in the space shuttle orbiter total impulse range.

  9. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  10. Fusion plasma theory. Task 3: Auxiliary heating in Tokamaks and tandem mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharer, J. E.

    1984-06-01

    The ICRF coupling, heating and breakeven studies for Tokamaks and ECRF fundamental second harmonic heating in tandem mirrors are examined. The studies have included ICRF Fokker-Planck heating and breakeven studies for large Tokamaks such as JET, fundamental work on a new wave power absorption and conservation relation for ICRF in inhomogeneous plasmas, a formulation and code development for ICRF waveguide coupling in Tokamak edge regions. The ECRF ray tracing studies were carried out for fundamental and second harmonic propagation, absorption and whistler microinstabilities in tandem mirror plug and barrier regions of Phaedrus, TMX-U and TASKA. The two-dimensional velocity space, time dependent Fokker-Planck heating studies have concentrated on D-T breakeven scenarios for fundamental minority deuterium and second harmonic tritium regimes.

  11. Heat transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-03-07

    A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor is described. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

  12. Heating systems for heating subsurface formations

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh; Vinegar, Harold J.

    2011-04-26

    Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

  13. Design, Testing and Modeling of the Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System for FHRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qiuping

    Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System (DRACS) is a passive decay heat removal system proposed for the Fluoride-salt-cooled High-temperature Reactor (FHR) that combines coated particle fuel and a graphite moderator with a liquid fluoride salt as the coolant. The DRACS features three coupled natural circulation/convection loops, relying completely on buoyancy as the driving force. These loops are coupled through two heat exchangers, namely, the DRACS Heat Exchanger (DHX) and the Natural Draft Heat Exchanger (NDHX). In addition, a fluidic diode is employed to minimize the parasitic flow into the DRACS primary loop and correspondingly the heat loss to the DRACS during normal operation of the reactor, but to keep the DRACS ready for activation, if needed, during accidents. While the DRACS concept has been proposed, there are no actual prototypic DRACS systems for FHRs built or tested in the literature. The primary goal of the present research is to design, test, and model the DRACS for FHR applications. Previously, a detailed modular design of the DRACS for a 20-MWth FHR was developed. As a starting point, the DRACS was designed to remove 1% of the reactor nominal power, i.e., 200 kW decay power. In addition, a detailed scaling analysis has been performed to develop the key non-dimensional numbers that characterize the DRACS system. Based on the previous work on the prototypic DRACS design and scaling analysis, two scaled-down test facilities have been designed and constructed, namely, Low-temperature DRACS Test Facility (LTDF) and High-temperature DRACS Test Facility (HTDF). The LTDF has a nominal power capacity of 6 kW. It uses 1.0-MPa water as the primary coolant, 0.1-MPa water as the secondary coolant, and ambient air as the ultimate heat sink. The main purpose of the LTDF is to examine the couplings among the three natural circulation/convection loops in the DRACS, as well as to provide design and operation experience for the HTDF. An extensive test matrix has

  14. Heat Recovery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Ball Metal's design of ducting and controls for series of roof top heat exchangers was inspired by Tech Briefs. Heat exchangers are installed on eight press and coating lines used to decorate sheet metal. The heat recovery system provides an estimated energy savings of more than $250,000 per year.

  15. Induction Heating Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Induction heating technology, a magnetic non-deforming process, was developed by Langley researchers to join plastic and composite components in space. Under NASA license, Inductron Corporation uses the process to produce induction heating systems and equipment for numerous applications. The Torobonder, a portable system, comes with a number of interchangeable heads for aircraft repair. Other developments are the E Heating Head, the Toroid Joining Gun, and the Torobrazer. These products perform bonding applications more quickly, safely and efficiently than previous methods.

  16. Exertional thermal strain, protective clothing and auxiliary cooling in dry heat: evidence for physiological but not cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Joanne N; Patterson, Mark J; Taylor, Nigel A S

    2012-10-01

    Individuals exposed to extreme heat may experience reduced physiological and cognitive performance, even during very light work. This can have disastrous effects on the operational capability of aircrew, but such impairment could be prevented by auxiliary cooling devices. This hypothesis was tested under very hot-dry conditions, in which eight males performed 2 h of low-intensity exercise (~30 W) in three trials, whilst wearing biological and chemical protective clothing: temperate (control: 20°C, 30% relative humidity) and two hot-dry trials (48°C, 20% relative humidity), one without (experimental) and one with liquid cooling (water at 15°C). Physiological strain and six cognitive functions were evaluated (MiniCog Rapid Assessment Battery), and participants drank to sustain hydration state. Maximal core temperatures averaged 37.0°C (±0.1) in the control trial, and were significantly elevated in the experimental trial (38.9°C ± 0.3; P < 0.05). Similarly, heart rates peaked at 92 beats min(-1) (±7) and 133 beats min(-1) (±4; P < 0.05), respectively. Liquid cooling reduced maximal core temperatures (37.3°C ± 0.1; P < 0.05) and heart rates 87 beats min(-1) (±3; P < 0.05) in the heat, such that neither now differed significantly from the control trial (P > 0.05). However, despite inducing profound hyperthermia and volitional fatigue, no cognitive degradation was evident in the heat (P > 0.05). Since extensive dehydration was prevented, it appears that thermal strain in the absence of dehydration may have minimal impact upon cognitive function, at least as evaluated within this experiment.

  17. A data acquisition and storage system for the ion auxiliary propulsion system cyclic thruster test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamley, John A.

    1989-01-01

    A nine-track tape drive interfaced to a standard personal computer was used to transport data from a remote test site to the NASA Lewis mainframe computer for analysis. The Cyclic Ground Test of the Ion Auxiliary Propulsion System (IAPS), which successfully achieved its goal of 2557 cycles and 7057 hr of thrusting beam on time generated several megabytes of test data over many months of continuous testing. A flight-like controller and power supply were used to control the thruster and acquire data. Thruster data was converted to RS232 format and transmitted to a personal computer, which stored the raw digital data on the nine-track tape. The tape format was such that with minor modifications, mainframe flight data analysis software could be used to analyze the Cyclic Ground Test data. The personal computer also converted the digital data to engineering units and displayed real time thruster parameters. Hardcopy data was printed at a rate dependent on thruster operating conditions. The tape drive provided a convenient means to transport the data to the mainframe for analysis, and avoided a development effort for new data analysis software for the Cyclic test. This paper describes the data system, interfacing and software requirements.

  18. Core Fueling and Edge Particle Flux Analysis in Ohmically and Auxiliary Heated NSTX Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    V.A. Soukhanovskii; R. Maingi; R. Raman; H.W. Kugel; B.P. LeBlanc; L. Roquemore; C.H. Skinner; NSTX Research Team

    2002-06-12

    The Boundary Physics program of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is focusing on optimization of the edge power and particle flows in b * 25% L- and H-mode plasmas of t {approx} 0.8 s duration heated by up to 6 MW of high harmonic fast wave and up to 5 MW of neutral beam injection. Particle balance and core fueling efficiencies of low and high field side gas fueling of L-mode homic and NBI heated plasmas have been compared using an analytical zero dimensional particle balance model and measured ion and neutral fluxes. Gas fueling efficiencies are in the range of 0.05-0.20 and do not depend on discharge magnetic configuration, density or poloidal location of the injector. The particle balance modeling indicates that the addition of HFS fueling results in a reversal of the wall loading rate and higher wall inventories. Initial particle source estimates obtained from neutral pressure and spectroscopic measurements indicate that ion flux into the divertor greatly exceeds midplane ion flux from the main plasma, suggesting that the scrape-off cross-field transport plays a minor role in diverted plasmas. Present analysis provides the basis for detailed fluid modeling of core and edge particle flows and particle confinement properties of NSTX plasmas. This research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under contracts No. DE-AC02-76CH03073, DE-AC05-00OR22725, and W-7405-ENG-36.

  19. Solar heating system

    DOEpatents

    Schreyer, James M.; Dorsey, George F.

    1982-01-01

    An improved solar heating system in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75.degree. to 180.degree. F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing and releasing heat for distribution.

  20. Improved solar heating systems

    DOEpatents

    Schreyer, J.M.; Dorsey, G.F.

    1980-05-16

    An improved solar heating system is described in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75 to 180/sup 0/F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing ad releasing heat for distribution.

  1. Thermal design of the IUE hydrazine auxiliary propulsion system. [International Ultraviolet Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skladany, J. T.; Kelly, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    The International Ultraviolet Explorer is a large astronomical observatory scheduled to be placed in a three-axis stabilized synchronous orbit in the fourth quarter of 1977. The Hydrazine Auxiliary Propulsion System (HAPS) must perform a number of spacecraft maneuvers to achieve a successful mission. This paper describes the thermal design which accomplishes temperature control between 5 and 65 C for all orbital conditions by utilizing multilayer insulation and commandable component heaters. A primary design criteria was the minimization of spacecraft power by the selective use of the solar environment. The thermal design was carefully assessed and verified in both spacecraft thermal balance and subsystem solar simulation testing.

  2. Solar heating system at Security State Bank, Starkville, Mississippi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The 312 square feet of Solaron flat plate air collectors provide for 788 square feet of space heating, an estimated 55 percent of the heating load. Solar heated air is distributed to the 96 cubic foot steel cylinder, which contains two inch diameter rocks. An air handler unit moves the air over the collector and into the steel cylinder. Four motorized dampers and two gravity dampers are also part of the system. A Solaron controller which has sensors located at the collectors, rock storage, and at the return air, automatically controls the system. Auxiliary heating energy is provided by electric resistance duct heaters.

  3. Heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

    1977-01-01

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion type refrigeration circuit and a vapor power circuit. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The vapor power circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the indoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger and the other of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the outdoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger. Fans powered by electricity generated by a vapor power circuit alternator circulate indoor air through the two indoor heat exchangers and circulate outside air through the two outdoor heat exchangers. The system is assembled as a single roof top unit, with a vapor power generator and turbine and compressor thermally insulated from the heat exchangers, and with the indoor heat exchangers thermally insulated from the outdoor heat exchangers.

  4. Heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

    1983-01-01

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion type refrigeration circuit and a vapor power circuit. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The vapor power circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the indoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger and the other of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the outdoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger. Fans powered by electricity generated by a vapor power circuit alternator circulate indoor air through the two indoor heat exchangers and circulate outside air through the two outdoor heat exchangers. The system is assembled as a single roof top unit, with a vapor power generator and turbine and compressor thermally insulated from the heat exchangers, and with the indoor heat exchangers thermally insulated from the outdoor heat exchangers.

  5. Heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

    1983-06-21

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion type refrigeration circuit and a vapor power circuit. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The vapor power circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the indoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger and the other of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the outdoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger. Fans powered by electricity generated by a vapor power circuit alternator circulate indoor air through the two indoor heat exchangers and circulate outside air through the two outdoor heat exchangers. The system is assembled as a single roof top unit, with a vapor power generator and turbine and compressor thermally insulated from the heat exchangers, and with the indoor heat exchangers thermally insulated from the outdoor heat exchangers.

  6. Heat rejection system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Gregory C.; Tokarz, Richard D.; Parry, Jr., Harvey L.; Braun, Daniel J.

    1980-01-01

    A cooling system for rejecting waste heat consists of a cooling tower incorporating a plurality of coolant tubes provided with cooling fins and each having a plurality of cooling channels therein, means for directing a heat exchange fluid from the power plant through less than the total number of cooling channels to cool the heat exchange fluid under normal ambient temperature conditions, means for directing water through the remaining cooling channels whenever the ambient temperature rises above the temperature at which dry cooling of the heat exchange fluid is sufficient and means for cooling the water.

  7. The VLTI Auxiliary Telescope System: a big challenge for a small company

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flebus, Carlo; Gloesener, Pierre; Koehler, Bertrand

    2004-09-01

    AMOS S.A. is a small company specialised in the fields of opto-mechanical, thermal and vacuum technology. To develop, manufacture and test the ESO VLTI Auxiliary Telescope System (ATS) was considered internally as a big challenge. ATS is a large-sized project and difficult to manage for a small company (since ATS, AMOS has hired about 25 people and now employs about 60 people). ATS is also technically a very complex system because of the following reasons: Unusual telescope (mobile telescope) Very tight system performances (e.g. Image quality, OPD, Pointing) Severe design constraints because of existing site interfaces (e.g. volume, mass) and environment (including wind and earthquake) Multidisciplinary engineering system (mechanical, optical, electrical, thermal, pneumatic, hydraulic) This paper describes how this project has been managed in practice by AMOS and also the important role of the system engineering. The last paragraph will be dedicated to the main lessons learned.

  8. Preliminary design of an auxiliary power unit for the space shuttle: Component and system configuration screening analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binsley, R. L.; Maddox, J. P.; Marcy, R. D.; Siegler, R. S.; Spies, R.

    1971-01-01

    The auxiliary power unit (APU) for the space shuttle is required to provide hydraulic and electrical power on board the booster and orbiter vehicles. Five systems and their associated components, which utilize hot gas turbines to supply horsepower at gearbox output pads, were studied. Hydrogen-oxygen and storable propellants were considered for the hot gas supply. All APU's were required to be self-contained with respect to dissipating internally generated heat. These five systems were evaluated relative to a consistent criteria. The system supplied with high pressure gaseous hydrogen and oxygen was recommended as the best approach. It included a two-stage pressure-compounded partial-admission turbine, a propellant conditioning system with recuperation, a control system, and a gearbox. The gearbox output used was 240 hp. At the close of the study a 400 hp level was considered more appropriate for meeting the prime shuttle vehicle needs, and an in-depth analysis of the system at the 400 hp output level was recommended.

  9. Steady-state dynamic behavior of an auxiliary bearing supported rotor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Huajun; Flowers, George T.; Lawrence, Charles

    1995-01-01

    This paper investigates the steady-state responses of a rotor system supported by auxiliary bearings in which there is a clearance between the rotor and the inner race of the bearing. A simulation model based upon the rotor of a production jet engine is developed and its steady-state behavior is explored over a wide range of operating conditions for various parametric configurations. Specifically, the influence of rotor imbalance, support stiffness, and damping is studied. It is found that imbalance may change the rotor responses dramatically in terms of frequency contents at certain operating speeds. Subharmonic responses of 2nd order through 10th order are all observed except the 9th order. Chaotic phenomenon is also observed. Jump phenomena (or double-valued responses) of both hard-spring type and soft-spring type are shown to occur at low operating speeds for systems with low auxiliary bearing damping or large clearance even with relatively small imbalance. The effect of friction between the shaft and the inner race of the bearing is also discussed.

  10. Study of auxiliary propulsion requirements for large space systems. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. W.; Machles, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    An insight into auxiliary propulsion systems (APS) requirements for large space systems (LSS) launchable by a single shuttle is presented. In an effort to scope the APS requirements for LSS, a set of generic LSSs were defined. For each generic LSS class a specific structural configuration, representative of that most likely to serve the needs of the 1980's and 1990's was defined. The environmental disturbance forces and torques which would be acting on each specific structural configuration in LEO and GEO orbits were then determined. Auxiliary propulsion requirements were determined as a function of: generic class specific configuration, size and openness of structure, orbit, angle of orientation, correction frequency, duty cycle, number and location of thrusters and direction of thrusters and APS/LSS interactions. The results of this analysis were used to define the APS characteristics of: (1) number and distribution of thrusters, (2) thruster modulation, (3) thrust level, (4) mission energy requirements, (5) total APS mass component breakdown, and (6) state of the art adequacy/deficiency.

  11. Linear CCD attitude measurement system based on the identification of the auxiliary array CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yinghui; Yuan, Feng; Li, Kai; Wang, Yan

    2015-10-01

    Object to the high precision flying target attitude measurement issues of a large space and large field of view, comparing existing measurement methods, the idea is proposed of using two array CCD to assist in identifying the three linear CCD with multi-cooperative target attitude measurement system, and to address the existing nonlinear system errors and calibration parameters and more problems with nine linear CCD spectroscopic test system of too complicated constraints among camera position caused by excessive. The mathematical model of binocular vision and three linear CCD test system are established, co-spot composition triangle utilize three red LED position light, three points' coordinates are given in advance by Cooperate Measuring Machine, the red LED in the composition of the three sides of a triangle adds three blue LED light points as an auxiliary, so that array CCD is easier to identify three red LED light points, and linear CCD camera is installed of a red filter to filter out the blue LED light points while reducing stray light. Using array CCD to measure the spot, identifying and calculating the spatial coordinates solutions of red LED light points, while utilizing linear CCD to measure three red LED spot for solving linear CCD test system, which can be drawn from 27 solution. Measured with array CCD coordinates auxiliary linear CCD has achieved spot identification, and has solved the difficult problems of multi-objective linear CCD identification. Unique combination of linear CCD imaging features, linear CCD special cylindrical lens system is developed using telecentric optical design, the energy center of the spot position in the depth range of convergence in the direction is perpendicular to the optical axis of the small changes ensuring highprecision image quality, and the entire test system improves spatial object attitude measurement speed and precision.

  12. Heat Pipe Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The heat pipe was developed to alternately cool and heat without using energy or any moving parts. It enables non-rotating spacecraft to maintain a constant temperature when the surface exposed to the Sun is excessively hot and the non Sun-facing side is very cold. Several organizations, such as Tropic-Kool Engineering Corporation, joined NASA in a subsequent program to refine and commercialize the technology. Heat pipes have been installed in fast food restaurants in areas where humid conditions cause materials to deteriorate quickly. Moisture removal was increased by 30 percent in a Clearwater, FL Burger King after heat pipes were installed. Relative humidity and power consumption were also reduced significantly. Similar results were recorded by Taco Bell, which now specifies heat pipe systems in new restaurants in the Southeast.

  13. 46 CFR 63.25-1 - Small automatic auxiliary boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Small automatic auxiliary boilers. 63.25-1 Section 63.25... AUXILIARY BOILERS Requirements for Specific Types of Automatic Auxiliary Boilers § 63.25-1 Small automatic auxiliary boilers. Small automatic auxiliary boilers defined as having heat-input ratings of 400,000...

  14. 46 CFR 63.25-1 - Small automatic auxiliary boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Small automatic auxiliary boilers. 63.25-1 Section 63.25... AUXILIARY BOILERS Requirements for Specific Types of Automatic Auxiliary Boilers § 63.25-1 Small automatic auxiliary boilers. Small automatic auxiliary boilers defined as having heat-input ratings of 400,000...

  15. 46 CFR 63.25-1 - Small automatic auxiliary boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Small automatic auxiliary boilers. 63.25-1 Section 63.25... AUXILIARY BOILERS Requirements for Specific Types of Automatic Auxiliary Boilers § 63.25-1 Small automatic auxiliary boilers. Small automatic auxiliary boilers defined as having heat-input ratings of 400,000...

  16. 46 CFR 63.25-1 - Small automatic auxiliary boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Small automatic auxiliary boilers. 63.25-1 Section 63.25... AUXILIARY BOILERS Requirements for Specific Types of Automatic Auxiliary Boilers § 63.25-1 Small automatic auxiliary boilers. Small automatic auxiliary boilers defined as having heat-input ratings of 400,000...

  17. 46 CFR 63.25-1 - Small automatic auxiliary boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Small automatic auxiliary boilers. 63.25-1 Section 63.25... AUXILIARY BOILERS Requirements for Specific Types of Automatic Auxiliary Boilers § 63.25-1 Small automatic auxiliary boilers. Small automatic auxiliary boilers defined as having heat-input ratings of 400,000...

  18. 46 CFR 61.20-3 - Main and auxiliary machinery and associated equipment, including fluid control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., including fluid control systems. 61.20-3 Section 61.20-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Equipment § 61.20-3 Main and auxiliary machinery and associated equipment, including fluid control systems... equipment, including the fluid control systems, as he feels necessary to check safe operation. (b)...

  19. 46 CFR 61.20-3 - Main and auxiliary machinery and associated equipment, including fluid control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., including fluid control systems. 61.20-3 Section 61.20-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Equipment § 61.20-3 Main and auxiliary machinery and associated equipment, including fluid control systems... equipment, including the fluid control systems, as he feels necessary to check safe operation. (b)...

  20. Acupuncture Meridian of Traditional Chinese Medical Science: An Auxiliary Respiratory System.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang-Ju

    2015-08-01

    The acupuncture meridian system (AMS) is the key concept of Traditional Chinese Medical Science (TCMS). It is a natural network formed by the tissue space that connects human viscera and skin. In this article, a new hypothesis that the AMS is an auxiliary respiratory system is presented. The AMS collects the CO2 that is produced by tissue supersession and that cannot be excreted via blood circulation, and discharges the CO2 through the body's pores, thus preventing a pressure increase in the internal environment. Thus, local blood circulation will not be blocked, and the body will remain healthy. In addition to neuroregulation and humoral regulation, AMS regulation is an important method of physiological regulation. Furthermore, the pathological principle of the AMS, therapies of TCMS, and the excellent future of the AMS are discussed.

  1. Auxiliary feedwater system aging study. Volume 2, Phase 1: Follow-on study

    SciTech Connect

    Kueck, J.D.

    1993-07-01

    This report documents the results of a Phase I follow-on study of the Auxiliary Feedwater (AFW) System that has been conducted for the US Regulatory Commission`s Nuclear Plant Aging research Program. The Phase I study found a number of significant AFW System functions that are not being adequately tested by conventional test methods and some that are actually being degraded by conventional testing. Thus, it was decided that this follow-on study would focus on these testing omissions nd equipment degradation. The deficiencies in current monitoring and operating practice are categorized and evaluated. Areas of component degradation caused by current practice are discussed. Recommendations are made for improved diagnostic methods and test procedures.

  2. Magnetic heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, J.E.

    1993-08-03

    A method is described for pumping heat for heating or refrigeration, comprising the steps of: exposing a system comprising a magnetic fluid to a magnetic field; causing the magnetic fluid to absorb heat of magnetization; transferring heat from the system to a heat sink; causing the magnetic fluid to exit the magnetic field, undergoing the cooling effect therefrom; and transferring heat to the system from a heat source.

  3. Summary of ACSL Simulations of the MSRE Auxiliary Charcoal Bed Vacuum System

    SciTech Connect

    Damiano, B

    2000-10-26

    The simulation of the Auxiliary Charcoal Bed (ACB) Vacuum System was performed to evaluate the original vacuum system design, detect and identify design deficiencies, investigate the effects of proposed corrections on system performance, and generally aid in refining the system design before construction and mockup testing. The simulation was performed by using the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL). The vacuum system design goals are to provide approximately 20 SCFM of both booster gas and purge gas through the system and maintain a flow of approximately 40 SCFM with a velocity of 50 to 75 f/sec at the entrance to the cyclone separator. The model results showed that the original system design was incapable of meeting the system performance goals. Further simulations showed that the following modifications to the original vacuum system design were required to make the system performance acceptable; (1) Remove valve PCV4. (2) Modify the flow controllers FTC3 and FTC4 from the original flow range of 0-17.6 SCFM (0-500 SLM) to 0-35.3 SCFM (0-1000 SLM). (3) Replace the bellows sealed valves SV-1, SV-3A, SV-3B, SV-4A, and SV-4B with less restrictive ball valves. The simulation results saved considerable time and effort by identifying flaws in the original system design. Early identification of these flaws and the use of the simulation model to investigate possible solutions allowed corrective modifications to be made before construction of the mock up test facility.

  4. Fluidized bed heat treating system

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B; Pfennigwerth, Glenn L

    2014-05-06

    Systems for heat treating materials are presented. The systems typically involve a fluidized bed that contains granulated heat treating material. In some embodiments a fluid, such as an inert gas, is flowed through the granulated heat treating medium, which homogenizes the temperature of the heat treating medium. In some embodiments the fluid may be heated in a heating vessel and flowed into the process chamber where the fluid is then flowed through the granulated heat treating medium. In some embodiments the heat treating material may be liquid or granulated heat treating material and the heat treating material may be circulated through a heating vessel into a process chamber where the heat treating material contacts the material to be heat treated. Microwave energy may be used to provide the source of heat for heat treating systems.

  5. Solar-heating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Report describes solar modular domestic-hot-water and space-heating system intended for use in small single family dwelling where roof-mounted collectors are not feasible. Contents include design, performance, and hardware specifications for assembly, installation, operation, and maintenance of system.

  6. Heating Systems Specialist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Air Force Training Command, Sheppard AFB, TX.

    This instructional package is intended for use in training Air Force personnel enrolled in a program for apprentice heating systems specialists. Training includes instruction in fundamentals and pipefitting; basic electricity; controls, troubleshooting, and oil burners; solid and gas fuel burners and warm air distribution systems; hot water…

  7. Textile dryer heat recovery system

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, J. S.

    1985-08-06

    A textile dryer heat recovery system includes a textile dryer and a heat exchanger. A duct is provided for directing dryer exhaust gas to the heat exchanger for preheating dryer input air. A cleaning system within the heat exchanger removes dryer exhaust gas contaminants deposited in the heat exchanger.

  8. Space shuttle auxiliary propulsion system design study. Phase C report: Oxygen-hydrogen RCS/OMS integration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruns, A. E.; Regnier, W. W.

    1972-01-01

    A comparison of the concepts of auxiliary propulsion systems proposed for the space shuttle vehicle is discussed. An evaluation of the potential of integration between the reaction control system and the orbit maneuvering system was conducted. Numerous methods of implementing the various levels of integration were evaluated. Preferred methods were selected and design points were developed for two fully integrated systems, one partially integrated system, and one separate system.

  9. Preliminary design package for solar heating and hot water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Two prototype solar heating and hot water systems for use in single-family dwellings or commercial buildings were designed. Subsystems included are: collector, storage, transport, hot water, auxiliary energy, and government-furnished site data acquisition. The systems are designed for Yosemite, California, and Pueblo, Colorado. The necessary information to evaluate the preliminary design for these solar heating and hot water systems is presented. Included are a proposed instrumentation plan, a training program, hazard analysis, preliminary design drawings, and other information about the design of the system.

  10. Solar heating system at Quitman County Bank, Marks, Mississippi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Information on the Solar Energy Heating System installed in a single story wood frame, cedar exterior, sloped roof building is presented. The system has on-site temperature and power measurements readouts. The 468 square feet of Solaron air flat plate collectors provide for 2,000 square feet of space heating, an estimated 60 percent of the heating load. Solar heated air is distributed to the 235 cubic foot rock storage box or to the load (space heating) by a 960 cubic feet per minute air handler unit. A 7.5 ton Carrier air-to-air heat pump with 15 kilowatts of electric booster strips serve as a back-up (auxiliary) to the solar system. Motorized dampers control the direction of airflow and back draft dampers prevent thermal siphoning of conditioned air.

  11. Space shuttle auxiliary propulsion system design study. Phase C and E report: Storable propellants, RCS/OMS/APU integration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anglim, D. D.; Bruns, A. E.; Perryman, D. C.; Wieland, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    Auxiliary propulsion concepts for application to the space shuttle are compared. Both monopropellant and bipropellant earth storable reaction control systems were evaluated. The fundamental concepts evaluated were: (1) monopropellant and bipropellant systems installed integrally within the vehicle, (2) fuel systems installed modularly in nose and wing tip pods, and (3) fuel systems installed modularly in nose and fuselage pods. Numerous design variations within these three concepts were evaluated. The system design analysis and methods for implementing each of the concepts are reported.

  12. Reliability evaluation of auxiliary feedwater system by mapping GO-FLOW models into Bayesian networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zengkai; Liu, Yonghong; Wu, Xinlei; Yang, Dongwei; Cai, Baoping; Zheng, Chao

    2016-09-01

    Bayesian network (BN) is a widely used formalism for representing uncertainty in probabilistic systems and it has become a popular tool in reliability engineering. The GO-FLOW method is a success-oriented system analysis technique and capable of evaluating system reliability and risk. To overcome the limitations of GO-FLOW method and add new method for BN model development, this paper presents a novel approach on constructing a BN from GO-FLOW model. GO-FLOW model involves with several discrete time points and some signals change at different time points. But it is a static system at one time point, which can be described with BN. Therefore, the developed BN with the proposed method in this paper is equivalent to GO-FLOW model at one time point. The equivalent BNs of the fourteen basic operators in the GO-FLOW methodology are developed. Then, the existing GO-FLOW models can be mapped into equivalent BNs on basis of the developed BNs of operators. A case of auxiliary feedwater system of a pressurized water reactor is used to illustrate the method. The results demonstrate that the GO-FLOW chart can be successfully mapped into equivalent BNs.

  13. Air heating system

    DOEpatents

    Primeau, John J.

    1983-03-01

    A self-starting, fuel-fired, air heating system including a vapor generator, a turbine, and a condenser connected in a closed circuit such that the vapor output from the vapor generator is conducted to the turbine and then to the condenser where it is condensed for return to the vapor generator. The turbine drives an air blower which passes air over the condenser for cooling the condenser. Also, a condensate pump is driven by the turbine. The disclosure is particularly concerned with the provision of heat exchanger and circuitry for cooling the condensed fluid output from the pump prior to its return to the vapor generator.

  14. Geothermal district heating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budney, G. S.; Childs, F.

    1982-06-01

    Ten district heating demonstration projects and their present status are described. The projects are Klamath County YMCA, Susanville District Heating, Klamath Falls District Heating, Reno Salem Plaza Condominium, El Centro Community Center Heating/Cooling, Haakon School and Business District Heating, St. Mary's Hospital, Diamond Ring Ranch, Pagosa Springs District Heating, and Boise District Heating.

  15. Heat transport system

    DOEpatents

    Pierce, Bill L.

    1978-01-01

    A heat transport system of small size which can be operated in any orientation consists of a coolant loop containing a vaporizable liquid as working fluid and includes in series a vaporizer, a condenser and two one-way valves and a pressurizer connected to the loop between the two valves. The pressurizer may be divided into two chambers by a flexible diaphragm, an inert gas in one chamber acting as a pneumatic spring for the system.

  16. Fireplace heat generating system

    SciTech Connect

    Emmendorfer, C.

    1981-03-10

    A fireplace heat generating system includes a plurality of conduits which cooperate to define a grate for seating logs or other combustible material there atop. The conduits are in communication with a heat deflector or shield at the base thereof. Discharge or heat issuing conduits or other suitable conveyances are disposed at the top of the shield and are in fluid communication with the shield. Intermediate discharge or heat issuing conduits are disposed between the upper discharge conduits and the grate conduits. The intermediate conduits are disposed in fluid communication with the deflector at one end thereof and are pivotal about the one end so as to be adapted to rest on and follow the top of the pile of combustible material seated on the grate downward as the combustible material is consumed. According to the present invention, cold air is transported through the device via the grate conduits whereat it is heated and transported through the deflector and exits out of the discharge conduits. A hollow container having an aperture therein in communication with an air duct is disposed within an ash dump in the fireplace. A retractable door is carried by the container for selectively blocking or opening the aperture in the container to prohibit or permit entry of air into the fireplace.

  17. A cyclic ground test of an ion auxiliary propulsion system: Description and operational considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Jerri S.; Kramer, Edward H.

    1988-01-01

    The Ion Auxiliary Propulsion System (IAPS) experiment is designed for launch on an Air Force Space Test Program satellite (NASA-TM-78859; AIAA Paper No. 78-647). The primary objective of the experiment is to flight qualify the 8 cm mercury ion thruster system for stationkeeping applications. Secondary objectives are measuring the interactions between operating ion thruster systems and host spacecraft, and confirming the design performance of the thruster systems. Two complete 8 cm mercury ion thruster subsystems will be flown. One of these will be operated for 2557 on and off cycles and 7057 hours at full thrust. Tests are currently under way in support of the IAPS flight experiment. In this test an IAPS thruster is being operated through a series of startup/run/shut-down cycles which simulate thruster operation during the planned flight experiment. A test facility description and operational considerations of this testing using an engineering model 8 cm thruster (S/N 905) is the subject of this paper. Final results will be published at a later date when the ground test has been concluded.

  18. Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the South Texas Project nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bumgardner, J.D.; Nickolaus, J.R.; Moffitt, N.E.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V.

    1993-12-01

    In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. South Texas Project was selected as a plant for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by the NRC inspectors in preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk important components at the South Texas Project plant.

  19. Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the McGuire nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bumgardner, J.D.; Lloyd, R.C.; Moffitt, N.E.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V.

    1994-05-01

    In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. McGuire was selected as one of a series of plants for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at the McGuire plant.

  20. Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the H. B. Robinson nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Moffitt, N.E.; Lloyd, R.C.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V.; Garner, L.W.

    1993-08-01

    In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. H. B. Robinson was selected as one of a series of plants for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at the H. B. Robinson plant.

  1. Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the Ginna Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, R.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V.; Moffitt, N.E. )

    1991-09-01

    In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. Ginna was selected as the eighth plant for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at the Ginna plant. 23 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  2. Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the Point Beach nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, R C; Moffitt, N E; Gore, B F; Vo, T V; Vehec, T A

    1993-02-01

    In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. Point Beach was selected as one of a series of plants for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRS. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at the Point Beach plant.

  3. Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the Byron and Braidwood nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Moffitt, N.E.; Gore, B.F.: Vo, T.V. )

    1991-07-01

    In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. Byron and Braidwood were selected for the fourth study in this program. The produce of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plants and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at the Byron/Braidwood plants. 23 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Active mass damper system for high-rise buildings using neural oscillator and position controller considering stroke limitation of the auxiliary mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongu, J.; Iba, D.; Nakamura, M.; Moriwaki, I.

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes a problem-solving method for the stroke limitation problem, which is related to auxiliary masses of active mass damper systems for high-rise buildings. The proposed method is used in a new simple control system for the active mass dampers mimicking the motion of bipedal mammals, which has a neural oscillator synchronizing with the acceleration response of structures and a position controller. In the system, the travel distance and direction of the auxiliary mass of the active mass damper is determined by reference to the output of the neural oscillator, and then, the auxiliary mass is transferred to the decided location by using a PID controller. The one of the purpose of the previouslyproposed system is stroke restriction problem avoidance of the auxiliary mass during large earthquakes by the determination of the desired value within the stroke limitation of the auxiliary mass. However, only applying the limited desired value could not rigorously restrict the auxiliary mass within the limitation, because the excessive inertia force except for the control force produced by the position controller affected on the motion of the auxiliary mass. In order to eliminate the effect on the auxiliary mass by the structural absolute acceleration, a cancellation method is introduced by adding a term to the control force of the position controller. We first develop the previously-proposed system for the active mass damper and the additional term for cancellation, and verity through numerical experiments that the new system is able to operate the auxiliary mass within the restriction during large earthquakes. Based on the comparison of the proposed system with the LQ system, a conclusion was drawn regarding which the proposed neuronal system with the additional term appears to be able to limit the stroke of the auxiliary mass of the AMD.

  5. A hybrid grid method in an auxiliary coordinate system for irregular fluid-solid interface modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yingming; Huang, Jianping; Li, Zhenchun; Li, Jinli

    2016-11-01

    Seismic wave propagation in a fluid-solid environment cannot be simulated with a single wave equation, but can be described by use of the acoustic and viscoelastic wave equations for their respective fluid and solid parts. Proper boundary conditions at the fluid-solid interface based on the relationship between pressure and stress are crucial when combining the two different wave equations. Traditional finite difference methods (FDM) have had difficulties in dealing with the irregular fluid-solid interface topography. The Cartesian grids discretization leads to artificial reflections and diffractions during the conversion between acoustic wave and elastic waves. We propose a variable coordinate transformation methodology to simulate seismic waves in a fluid-solid environment. An irregular fluid-solid interface can be transformed into a horizontal interface, so that pressure and stress can be well converted. We also introduce a multi-block coordinate transformation (MCT) method which meshes each layer with curvilinear grids to transform the interface topography into a horizontal one, thereby allocating vertical sampling points adaptively. The grid size is determined adaptively based on the shape and the parameters of the target area, which reduces in size in when the layers are thin or exhibit low velocities. A Lebedev-standard staggered grid (LSSG) scheme is applied to the MCT method to reduce both the computational cost associated with the Lebedev grid (LG) scheme and the instability in the auxiliary coordinate system when using a standard staggered grid scheme.

  6. A hybrid grid method in an auxiliary coordinate system for irregular fluid-solid interface modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yingming; Huang, Jianping; Li, Zhenchun; Li, Jinli

    2017-03-01

    Seismic wave propagation in a fluid-solid environment cannot be simulated with a single wave equation, but can be described by use of the acoustic and viscoelastic wave equations for their respective fluid and solid parts. Proper boundary conditions at the fluid-solid interface based on the relationship between pressure and stress are crucial when combining the two different wave equations. Traditional finite difference methods have had difficulties in dealing with the irregular fluid-solid interface topography. The Cartesian grids discretization leads to artificial reflections and diffractions during the conversion between acoustic wave and elastic waves. We propose a variable coordinate transformation methodology to simulate seismic waves in a fluid-solid environment. An irregular fluid-solid interface can be transformed into a horizontal interface, so that pressure and stress can be well converted. We also introduce a multiblock coordinate transformation (MCT) method which meshes each layer with curvilinear grids to transform the interface topography into a horizontal one, thereby allocating vertical sampling points adaptively. The grid size is determined adaptively based on the shape and the parameters of the target area, which reduces in size in when the layers are thin or exhibit low velocities. A Lebedev-standard staggered grid scheme is applied to the MCT method to reduce both the computational cost associated with the Lebedev grid scheme and the instability in the auxiliary coordinate system when using a standard staggered grid scheme.

  7. A hybrid geothermal energy conversion technology: Auxiliary heating of geothermally preheated water or CO2 - a potential solution for low-temperature resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saar, Martin; Garapati, Nagasree; Adams, Benjamin; Randolph, Jimmy; Kuehn, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    compare over a range of parameters the net power and efficiencies of hybrid geothermal power plants that use brine or CO2 as the subsurface working fluid, that are then heated further with a secondary energy source that is unspecified here. Parameters varied include the subsurface working fluid (brine vs. CO2), geothermal reservoir depth (2.5-4.5 km), and turbine inlet temperature (200-600°C) after auxiliary heating. The hybrid power plant is numerically modeled using an iterative coupling approach of TOUGH2-ECO2N/ECO2H (Pruess, 2004) for simulation of the subsurface reservoir and Engineering Equation Solver for well bore fluid flow and surface power plant performance. We find that hybrid power plants that are CO2-based (subsurface) systems produce more net power than the sum of the power produced by individual power plants at low turbine inlet temperatures and brine based systems produce more power at high turbine inlet temperatures. Specifically, our results indicate that geothermal hybrid plants that are CO2-based are more efficient than brine-based systems when the contribution of the geothermal resource energy is higher than 48%.

  8. Planned flight test of a mercury ion auxiliary propulsion system. 1: Objectives, systems descriptions, and mission operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    A planned flight test of an 8 cm diameter, electron-bombardment mercury ion thruster system is described. The primary objective of the test is to flight qualify the 5 mN (1 mlb.) thruster system for auxiliary propulsion applications. A seven year north-south stationkeeping mission was selected as the basis for the flight test operating profile. The flight test, which will employ two thruster systems, will also generate thruster system space performance data, measure thruster-spacecraft interactions, and demonstrate thruster operation in a number of operating modes. The flight test is designated as SAMSO-601 and will be flown aboard the shuttle-launched Air Force space test program P80-1 satellite in 1981. The spacecraft will be 3- axis stabilized in its final 740 km circular orbit, which will have an inclination of approximately greater than 73 degrees. The spacecraft design lifetime is three years.

  9. Planned flight test of a mercury ion auxiliary propulsion system. I - Objectives, systems descriptions, and mission operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    A planned flight test of an 8-cm diameter, electron-bombardment mercury ion thruster system is described. The primary objective of the test is to flight qualify the 5 mN thruster system for auxiliary propulsion applications. A seven year north-south stationkeeping mission was selected as the basis for the flight test operating profile. The flight test, which will employ two thruster systems, will also generate thruster system space performance data, measure thruster-spacecraft interactions, and demonstrate thruster operation in a number of operating modes. The flight test is designated as SAMSO-601 and will be flown aboard the Shuttle-launched Air Force Space Test Program P80-1 satellite in 1981. The spacecraft will be 3-axis stabilized in its final 740 km circular orbit, which will have an inclination of at least 73 degrees. The spacecraft design lifetime is three years.

  10. Helicopter vibration reduction using steady fixed-system auxiliary moments and forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekula, Martin Krystian

    An aeroelastic analysis was developed to examine the vibration reduction ability of steady auxiliary forces and moments applied to a helicopter fuselage. The blade dynamics were modeled using coupled flap-lag-torsion equations of motion, with elastic blade deformations incorporated into the analysis using finite elements. The quasi-steady stall, post-stall, and compressibility effects were captured using a table lookup routine. The equations of equilibrium were modified to include steady force and moment terms that model auxiliary lifting, propulsive, and moment generating devices. Using this methodology, the effect of lift and thrust compounding on hub vibration was examined for a BO-105 type helicopter flying at an advance ratio of 0.35. Auxiliary lift combined with auxiliary thrust greater than the vehicle drag produced over 90 percent reductions in the 4/rev hub load components, significantly affected trim, and decreased rotor power by placing the rotor in a near autorotative state. Effects of auxiliary moments on rotor vibration were examined for UH-60 and BO-105 type helicopters flying at advance ratios of 0.25 and 0.35, respectively. Roll-right, nose-down auxiliary moments reduced all components of rotor vibration of the UH-60 type helicopter by 15 to 60 percent as well as significantly decreased the rotor power. Roll-left, nose-down auxiliary moments reduced the in-plane vibratory forces of the BO-105 type helicopter by 90 percent, with small increases in the remaining loads. The horizontal tails of both aircraft were modified to generate auxiliary pitching and rolling moments through independently controllable incidence angles of either half of the horizontal tail. Smaller vibration reductions were seen due to limited pitch and roll authority resulting from the onset of stall on the horizontal tail. Both aircraft experienced an 8 to 9 percent reduction in rotor power as well as a decrease in rotor thrust resulting from a horizontal tail upload necessary to

  11. Residential solar-heating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Complete residential solar-heating and hot-water system, when installed in highly-insulated energy-saver home, can supply large percentage of total energy demand for space heating and domestic hot water. System which uses water-heating energy storage can be scaled to meet requirements of building in which it is installed.

  12. Synchronous dynamics of a coupled shaft/bearing/housing system with auxiliary support from a clearance bearing: Analysis and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawen, James, Jr.; Flowers, George T.

    1992-01-01

    This study examines the response of a flexible rotor supported by load sharing between linear bearings and an auxiliary clearance bearing. The objective of the work is to develop a better understanding of the dynamical behavior of a magnetic bearing supported rotor system interacting with auxiliary bearings during a critical operating condition. Of particular interest is the effect of coupling between the bearing/housing and shaft vibration on the rotordynamical responses. A simulation model is developed and a number of studies are performed for various parametric configurations. An experimental investigation is also conducted to compare and verify the rotordynamic behavior predicted by the simulation studies. A strategy for reducing synchronous shaft vibration through appropriate design of coupled shaft/bearing/housing vibration modes is identified. The results are presented and discussed.

  13. Synchronous dynamics of a coupled shaft/bearing/housing system with auxiliary support from a clearance bearing: Analysis and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawen, James L., Jr.; Flowers, George T.

    1995-01-01

    This study examines the response of a flexible rotor supported by load sharing between linear bearings and an auxiliary clearance bearing. The objective is to develop a better understanding of the dynamical behavior of a magnetic bearing supported rotor system interacting with auxiliary bearings during a critical operating condition. Of particular interest is the effect of coupling between the bearing/housing and shaft vibration on the rotordynamical responses. A simulation model is developed and a number of studies are performed for various parametric configurations. An experimental investigation is also conducted to compare and verify the rotordynamic behavior predicted by the simulation studies. A strategy for reducing synchronous shaft vibration through appropriate design of coupled shaft/bearing/housing vibration modes is identified.

  14. Heat pipe cooling system with sensible heat sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverstein, Calvin C.

    1988-01-01

    A heat pipe cooling system which employs a sensible heat sink is discussed. With this type of system, incident aerodynamic heat is transported via a heat pipe from the stagnation region to the heat sink and absorbed by raising the temperature of the heat sink material. The use of a sensible heat sink can be advantageous for situations where the total mission heat load is limited, as it is during re-entry, and a suitable radiation sink is not available.

  15. Absorption-heat-pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.; Perez-Blanco, H.

    1983-06-16

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  16. Heat generating and recycling system for utilizing waste heat

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, Yuji; Tanaka, Tadayoshi; Takashima, Takumi

    1999-07-01

    The authors proposed an efficient utilization system of low temperature waste heat. It converts the low temperature thermal energy below 573 K into electric energy by using chemical heat pump systems and thermoelectric devices. They named this system a heat regenerating and recycling system. In this system, low temperature heat is recovered and its temperature is raised by the heat pump systems. They conducted the system analysis to clarify its performance. Two kinds of thermoelectric devices and two kinds of chemical heat pump systems are arranged in their analytical model. The authors examined how the efficiency of the chemical heat pumps, that of the thermoelectric devices, and heat flow influenced the efficiency of the system. By using the chemical heat pump system, the efficiency of the system not only is improved but also it is possible to store thermal energy as chemical energy. The authors show that the heat regenerating and recycling system contributes to use low temperature waste heat effectively.

  17. Approach to prevent locking in a spring-damper system by adaptive load redistribution with auxiliary kinematic guidance elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehb, Christopher M.; Platz, Roland; Melz, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    In many applications, kinematic structures are used to enable and disable degrees of freedom. The relative movement between a wheel and the body of a car or a landing gear and an aircraft fuselage are examples for a defined movement. In most cases, a spring-damper system determines the kinetic properties of the movement. However, unexpected high load peaks may lead to maximum displacements and maybe to locking. Thus, a hard clash between two rigid components may occur, causing acceleration peaks. This may have harmful effects for the whole system. For example a hard landing of an aircraft can result in locking the landing gear and thus damage the entire aircraft. In this paper, the potential of adaptive auxiliary kinematic guidance elements in a spring-damper system to prevent locking is investigated numerically. The aim is to provide additional forces in the auxiliary kinematic guidance elements in case of overloading the spring-damper system and thus to absorb some of the impact energy. To estimate the potential of the load redistribution in the spring-damper system, a numerical model of a two-mass oscillator is used, similar to a quarter-car-model. In numerical calculations, the reduction of the acceleration peaks of the masses with the adaptive approach is compared to the Acceleration peaks without the approach, or, respectively, when locking is not prevented. In addition, the required force of the adaptive auxiliary kinematic guidance elements is calculated as a function of the masses of the system and the drop height, or, respectively, the impact energy.

  18. Modular passive solar heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, B.D.

    1985-03-19

    A modular passive solar energy storage system comprises a plurality of heat tubes which are arranged to form a flat plate solar collector and are releasably connected to a water reservoir by, and are part of, double-walled heat exchangers which penetrate to the water reservoir and enhance the heat transfer characteristics between the collector and the reservoir. The flat plate collector-heat exchanger disassembly, the collector housing, and the reservoir are integrated into a relatively light weight, unitary structural system in which the reservoir is a primary structural element. In addition to light weight, the system features high efficiency and ease of assembly and maintenance.

  19. Heat transfer in aeropropulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoneau, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Aeropropulsion heat transfer is reviewed. A research methodology based on a growing synergism between computations and experiments is examined. The aeropropulsion heat transfer arena is identified as high Reynolds number forced convection in a highly disturbed environment subject to strong gradients, body forces, abrupt geometry changes and high three dimensionality - all in an unsteady flow field. Numerous examples based on heat transfer to the aircraft gas turbine blade are presented to illustrate the types of heat transfer problems which are generic to aeropropulsion systems. The research focus of the near future in aeropropulsion heat transfer is projected.

  20. Heat transfer in aeropropulsion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoneau, R. J.

    1985-07-01

    Aeropropulsion heat transfer is reviewed. A research methodology based on a growing synergism between computations and experiments is examined. The aeropropulsion heat transfer arena is identified as high Reynolds number forced convection in a highly disturbed environment subject to strong gradients, body forces, abrupt geometry changes and high three dimensionality - all in an unsteady flow field. Numerous examples based on heat transfer to the aircraft gas turbine blade are presented to illustrate the types of heat transfer problems which are generic to aeropropulsion systems. The research focus of the near future in aeropropulsion heat transfer is projected.

  1. Ground coupled heat-pump-system experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, P. D.

    1983-06-01

    Since October 1980, a small house in Upton, Long Island, New York has been heated and cooled by a liquid source heat pump using a shallow serpentine earth coil as a heat source/sink. After a brief introduction and system description, system performance data are presented, for the winter of 1981-82 and the summer of 1982, followed by a discussion of these results. The experimental test house is a 104 m(2) (1120 ft(2)) 3 bedroom ranch of energy saving construction with a heating load of 7.8 x 10 to the 6th power J/0C-day (4.1 x 10 to the 3rd power Btu/0F-day). The heat pump used during most of the period reported on here is a commercially available water to air unit sized to just meet the building design heating load with no auxiliary heat. The earth coil contains 155 m (507 ft) of nominal 1-1/2 in. medium density polyethylene pipe, and is approximately 25% ethylene glycol in water, is employed to permit subfreezing earth coil operation. Two independent data acquisition systems, a datalogger microcomputer system backed up by a Btu meter, monitor the space conditioning system performance.

  2. Prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems are being developed. The effort includes development, manufacture, test, installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation.

  3. Prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems are considered. This effort includes development, manufacture, test, installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation.

  4. Heat pump system with selective space cooling

    DOEpatents

    Pendergrass, J.C.

    1997-05-13

    A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve. 4 figs.

  5. Heat pump system with selective space cooling

    DOEpatents

    Pendergrass, Joseph C.

    1997-01-01

    A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve.

  6. Fusion Plasma Theory: Task 3, Auxiliary radiofrequency heating of tokamaks. Annual report, November 16, 1991--November 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Scharer, J.E.

    1992-12-31

    The research performed under this grant during the past year has been concentrated on the following several key tokamak ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) coupling, heating and current drive issues: Efficient coupling during the L- to H- mode transition by analysis and computer simulation of ICRF antennas; analysis of ICRF cavity-backed coil antenna coupling to plasma edge profiles including fast and ion Bernstein wave coupling for heating and current drive; benchmarking the codes to compare with current JET, D-IIID and ASDEX experimental results and predictions for advanced tokamaks such as BPX and SSAT (Steady-State Advanced Tokamak); ICRF full-wave field solutions, power conservation, heating analyses and minority ion current drive; and the effects of fusion alpha particle or ion tail populations on the ICRF absorption. Research progress, publications, and conference and workshop presentations are summarized in this report.

  7. 46 CFR 58.01-35 - Main propulsion auxiliary machinery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Main propulsion auxiliary machinery. 58.01-35 Section 58... AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-35 Main propulsion auxiliary machinery. Auxiliary machinery vital to the main propulsion system must be provided in duplicate unless the...

  8. 46 CFR 58.01-35 - Main propulsion auxiliary machinery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Main propulsion auxiliary machinery. 58.01-35 Section 58... AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-35 Main propulsion auxiliary machinery. Auxiliary machinery vital to the main propulsion system must be provided in duplicate unless the...

  9. 46 CFR 58.01-35 - Main propulsion auxiliary machinery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Main propulsion auxiliary machinery. 58.01-35 Section 58... AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-35 Main propulsion auxiliary machinery. Auxiliary machinery vital to the main propulsion system must be provided in duplicate unless the...

  10. 46 CFR 58.01-35 - Main propulsion auxiliary machinery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Main propulsion auxiliary machinery. 58.01-35 Section 58... AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-35 Main propulsion auxiliary machinery. Auxiliary machinery vital to the main propulsion system must be provided in duplicate unless the...

  11. 46 CFR 58.01-35 - Main propulsion auxiliary machinery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Main propulsion auxiliary machinery. 58.01-35 Section 58... AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-35 Main propulsion auxiliary machinery. Auxiliary machinery vital to the main propulsion system must be provided in duplicate unless the...

  12. Sodium heat transfer system modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, A. F.; Fewell, M. E.

    1983-11-01

    The sodium heat transfer system of the international energy agency (IEA) small solar power systems (SSPS) central receiver system (CRS), which includes the heliostat field, receiver, hot and cold storage vessels, and sodium/water steam generator was modeled. The computer code SOLTES (simulator of large thermal energy systems), was used to model this system. The results from SOLTES are compared to measured data.

  13. Fusion Plasma Theory Grant: Task 3, Auxiliary Radiofrequency Heating of Tokamaks. Annual report, November 16, 1992--November 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Scharer, J.E.

    1993-06-01

    The research performed under this grant during the past year has been concentrated on the following several key tokamak ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) coupling, heating and current drive issues. We have made progress in developing a ``3-D`` cavity backed antenna array code to examine ICRF coupling to general plasma edge profiles. The effects of the finite antenna length and feeders as well as Faraday shield blade angle are being examined. We are also developing an analysis to examine large k{perpendicular}{rho} gyroradius interaction between alpha or beam particles and ICRF waves. This topic has important applications in the areas of ICRF heating for deuterium-tritium fusion plasmas, TAE modes, ash removal and minority ion current drive. Research progress, publications, and conference and workshop presentations are summarized in this report.

  14. Heat transport system

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, Samuel D.

    1982-01-01

    A falling bed of ceramic particles receives neutron irradiation from a neutron-producing plasma and thereby transports energy as heat from the plasma to a heat exchange location where the ceramic particles are cooled by a gas flow. The cooled ceramic particles are elevated to a location from which they may again pass by gravity through the region where they are exposed to neutron radiation. Ceramic particles of alumina, magnesia, silica and combinations of these materials are contemplated as high-temperature materials that will accept energy from neutron irradiation. Separate containers of material incorporating lithium are exposed to the neutron flux for the breeding of tritium that may subsequently be used in neutron-producing reactions. The falling bed of ceramic particles includes velocity partitioning between compartments near to the neutron-producing plasma and compartments away from the plasma to moderate the maximum temperature in the bed.

  15. Heat transport system

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, S.D.

    A falling bed of ceramic particles receives neutron irradiation from a neutron-producing plasma and thereby transports energy as heat from the plasma to a heat exchange location where the ceramic particles are cooled by a gas flow. The cooled ceramic particles are elevated to a location from which they may again pass by gravity through the region where they are exposed to neutron radiation. Ceramic particles of alumina, magnesia, silica and combinations of these materials are contemplated as high-temperature materials that will accept energy from neutron irradiation. Separate containers of material incorporating lithium are exposed to the neutron flux for the breeding of tritium that may subsequently be used in neutron-producing reactions. The falling bed of ceramic particles includes velocity partitioning between compartments near to the neutron-producing plasma and compartments away from the plasma to moderate the maximum temperature in the bed.

  16. Auxiliary principle technique and iterative algorithm for a perturbed system of generalized multi-valued mixed quasi-equilibrium-like problems.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Mijanur; Pang, Chin-Tzong; Ishtyak, Mohd; Ahmad, Rais

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we introduce a perturbed system of generalized mixed quasi-equilibrium-like problems involving multi-valued mappings in Hilbert spaces. To calculate the approximate solutions of the perturbed system of generalized multi-valued mixed quasi-equilibrium-like problems, firstly we develop a perturbed system of auxiliary generalized multi-valued mixed quasi-equilibrium-like problems, and then by using the celebrated Fan-KKM technique, we establish the existence and uniqueness of solutions of the perturbed system of auxiliary generalized multi-valued mixed quasi-equilibrium-like problems. By deploying an auxiliary principle technique and an existence result, we formulate an iterative algorithm for solving the perturbed system of generalized multi-valued mixed quasi-equilibrium-like problems. Lastly, we study the strong convergence analysis of the proposed iterative sequences under monotonicity and some mild conditions. These results are new and generalize some known results in this field.

  17. Boise geothermal district heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, P.J.

    1985-10-01

    This document describes the Boise geothermal district heating project from preliminary feasibility studies completed in 1979 to a fully operational system by 1983. The report includes information about the two local governments that participated in the project - the City of Boise, Idaho and the Boise Warm Springs Water District. It also discusses the federal funding sources; the financial studies; the feasibility studies conducted; the general system planning and design; design of detailed system components; the legal issues involved in production; geological analysis of the resource area; distribution and disposal; the program to market system services; and the methods of retrofitting buildings to use geothermal hot water for space heating. Technically this report describes the Boise City district heating system based on 170/sup 0/F water, a 4000 gpm production system, a 41,000 foot pipeline system, and system economies. Comparable data are also provided for the Boise Warm Springs Water District. 62 figs., 31 tabs.

  18. Makeup water treatment and auxiliary boiler building structural design description: 4 x 350 MW(t) Modular HTGR [High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor] Plant

    SciTech Connect

    1986-06-01

    The Makeup Water Treatment and Auxiliary Boiler Building (MWABB) is a grade-founded, single-story, steel-framed structure with insulated sheet metal exterior walls and roof decking. It houses the electrically-heated auxiliary boiler and related equipment, and the Raw Water Treatment System. The Makeup Water Treatment and Auxiliary Boiler building is located adjacent to the Maintenance Building in the Energy Conversion Area of the plant.

  19. Prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    System analysis activities were directed toward refining the heating system parameters. Trade studies were performed to support hardware selections for all systems and for the heating only operational test sites in particular. The heating system qualification tests were supported by predicting qualification test component performance prior to conducting the test.

  20. The Acquisition of Auxiliary Syntax: A Longitudinal Elicitation Study. Part 1: Auxiliary BE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theakston, Anna L.; Rowland, Caroline F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The question of how and when English-speaking children acquire auxiliaries is the subject of extensive debate. Some researchers posit the existence of innately given Universal Grammar principles to guide acquisition, although some aspects of the auxiliary system must be learned from the input. Others suggest that auxiliaries can be…

  1. Prototype solar heating and combined heating cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The design and development of eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems is discussed. The program management and systems engineering are reported, and operational test sites are identified.

  2. Heat Transfer Parametric System Identification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    Transfer Parametric System Identification 6. AUTHOR(S Parker, Gregory K. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND AOORESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...distribution is unlimited. Heat Transfer Parametric System Identification by Gregory K. Parker Lieutenant, United States Navy BS., DeVry Institute of...Modeling Concept ........ ........... 3 2. Lumped Parameter Approach ...... ......... 4 3. Parametric System Identification ....... 4 B. BASIC MODELING

  3. Research and Development of a New Field Enhanced Low Temperature Thermionic Cathode that Enables Fluorescent Dimming and Loan Shedding without Auxiliary Cathode Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Jin

    2009-01-07

    This is the final report for project entitled 'Research and development of a new field enhanced low temperature thermionic cathode that enables fluorescent dimming and load shedding without auxiliary cathode heating', under Agreement Number: DE-FC26-04NT-42329. Under this project, a highly efficient CNT based thermionic cathode was demonstrated. This cathode is capable of emitting electron at a current density two order of magnitude stronger then a typical fluorescent cathode at same temperatures, or capable of emitting at same current density but at temperature about 300 C lower than that of a fluorescent cathode. Detailed fabrication techniques were developed including CVD growth of CNTs and sputter deposition of oxide thin films on CNTs. These are mature technologies that have been widely used in industry for large scale materials processing and device fabrications, thus, with further development work, the techniques developed in this project can be scaled-up in manufacturing environment. The prototype cathodes developed in this project were tested in lighting plasma discharge environment. In many cases, they not only lit and sustain the plasma, but also out perform the fluorescent cathodes in key parameters such like cathode fall voltages. More work will be needed to further evaluate more detailed and longer term performance of the prototype cathode in lighting plasma.

  4. Heat recovery subsystem and overall system integration of fuel cell on-site integrated energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mougin, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    The best HVAC (heating, ventilating and air conditioning) subsystem to interface with the Engelhard fuel cell system for application in commercial buildings was determined. To accomplish this objective, the effects of several system and site specific parameters on the economic feasibility of fuel cell/HVAC systems were investigated. An energy flow diagram of a fuel cell/HVAC system is shown. The fuel cell system provides electricity for an electric water chiller and for domestic electric needs. Supplemental electricity is purchased from the utility if needed. An excess of electricity generated by the fuel cell system can be sold to the utility. The fuel cell system also provides thermal energy which can be used for absorption cooling, space heating and domestic hot water. Thermal storage can be incorporated into the system. Thermal energy is also provided by an auxiliary boiler if needed to supplement the fuel cell system output. Fuel cell/HVAC systems were analyzed with the TRACE computer program.

  5. Heat recovery subsystem and overall system integration of fuel cell on-site integrated energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougin, L. J.

    1983-07-01

    The best HVAC (heating, ventilating and air conditioning) subsystem to interface with the Engelhard fuel cell system for application in commercial buildings was determined. To accomplish this objective, the effects of several system and site specific parameters on the economic feasibility of fuel cell/HVAC systems were investigated. An energy flow diagram of a fuel cell/HVAC system is shown. The fuel cell system provides electricity for an electric water chiller and for domestic electric needs. Supplemental electricity is purchased from the utility if needed. An excess of electricity generated by the fuel cell system can be sold to the utility. The fuel cell system also provides thermal energy which can be used for absorption cooling, space heating and domestic hot water. Thermal storage can be incorporated into the system. Thermal energy is also provided by an auxiliary boiler if needed to supplement the fuel cell system output. Fuel cell/HVAC systems were analyzed with the TRACE computer program.

  6. Teleporting an unknown quantum state with unit fidelity and unit probability via a non-maximally entangled channel and an auxiliary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashvand, Taghi

    2016-11-01

    We present a new scheme for quantum teleportation that one can teleport an unknown state via a non-maximally entangled channel with certainly, using an auxiliary system. In this scheme depending on the state of the auxiliary system, one can find a class of orthogonal vectors set as a basis which by performing von Neumann measurement in each element of this class Alice can teleport an unknown state with unit fidelity and unit probability. A comparison of our scheme with some previous schemes is given and we will see that our scheme has advantages that the others do not.

  7. Heat pump having improved defrost system

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Fang C.; Mei, Viung C.; Murphy, Richard W.

    1998-01-01

    A heat pump system includes, in an operable relationship for transferring heat between an exterior atmosphere and an interior atmosphere via a fluid refrigerant: a compressor; an interior heat exchanger; an exterior heat exchanger; an accumulator; and means for heating the accumulator in order to defrost the exterior heat exchanger.

  8. Heat pump having improved defrost system

    DOEpatents

    Chen, F.C.; Mei, V.C.; Murphy, R.W.

    1998-12-08

    A heat pump system includes, in an operable relationship for transferring heat between an exterior atmosphere and an interior atmosphere via a fluid refrigerant: a compressor; an interior heat exchanger; an exterior heat exchanger; an accumulator; and means for heating the accumulator in order to defrost the exterior heat exchanger. 2 figs.

  9. Classifications of central solar domestic hot water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J. Y.; Hao, B.; Peng, C.; Wang, S. S.

    2016-08-01

    Currently, there are many means by which to classify solar domestic hot water systems, which are often categorized according to their scope of supply, solar collector positions, and type of heat storage tank. However, the lack of systematic and scientific classification as well as the general disregard of the thermal performance of the auxiliary heat source is important to DHW systems. Thus, the primary focus of this paper is to determine a classification system for solar domestic hot water systems based on the positions of the solar collector and auxiliary heating device, both respectively and in combination. Field-testing data regarding many central solar DHW systems demonstrates that the position of the auxiliary heat source clearly reflects the operational energy consumption. The consumption of collective auxiliary heating hot water system is much higher than individual auxiliary heating hot water system. In addition, costs are significantly reduced by the separation of the heat storage tank and the auxiliary heating device.

  10. Surface Ship Machinery - A Survey of Propulsion, Electrical, and Auxiliary System Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-15

    oxidant level, and manual treatment adds Cie potential danger of inhalation of toxic fumes. In 1966 the Navy introduced a bromine cartridge...7 3. Advanced design features of centrifugal pumps .......................... 8 4. Comparison of zeolite and...potentially dangerous because these agents are unstable, and outgassed chlorine and the powdercd materials must be kept dry and away from heat or organic

  11. Closed loop operation eliminates need for auxiliary gas in high pressure pumping station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landy, D. G.

    1966-01-01

    Closed loop system for a liquid nitrogen high pressure pump feeds back gaseous nitrogen generated by heat leak into the reservoir to maintain the pressure in the storage tank. This safer, more efficient system eliminates the need for auxiliary gas to maintain the tank pressure and can be used on relatively high cryogenic pumping systems.

  12. Combined heat recovery and make-up water heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.Y.

    1988-05-24

    A cogeneration plant is described comprising in combination: a first stage source of hot gas; a duct having an inlet for receiving the hot gas and an outlet stack open to the atmosphere; a second stage recovery heat steam generator including an evaporator situated in the duct, and economizer in the duct downstream of the evaporator, and steam drum fluidly connected to the evaporator and the economizer; feedwater supply means including a deaerator heater and feedwater pump for supplying deaerated feedwater to the steam drum through the economizer; makeup water supply means including a makeup pump for delivering makeup water to the deaerator heater; means fluidly connected to the steam drum for supplying auxiliary steam to the deaerator heater; and heat exchanger means located between the deaerator and the economizer, for transferring heat from the feedwater to the makeup water, thereby increasing the temperature of the makeup water delivered to the deaerator and decreasing the temperature of the feedwater delivered to the economizer, without fluid exchange.

  13. Immiscible fluid: Heat of fusion heat storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edie, D. D.; Melsheimer, S. S.; Mullins, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    Both heat and mass transfer in direct contact aqueous crystallizing systems were studied as part of a program desig- ned to evaluate the feasibility of direct contact heat transfer in phase change storage using aqueous salt system. Major research areas, discussed include (1) crystal growth velocity study on selected salts; (2) selection of salt solutions; (3) selection of immiscible fluids; (4) studies of heat transfer and system geometry; and (5) system demonstration.

  14. Heat Pumping in Nanomechanical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamon, Claudio; Mucciolo, Eduardo R.; Arrachea, Liliana; Capaz, Rodrigo B.

    2011-04-01

    We propose using a phonon pumping mechanism to transfer heat from a cold to a hot body using a propagating modulation of the medium connecting the two bodies. This phonon pump can cool nanomechanical systems without the need for active feedback. We compute the lowest temperature that this refrigerator can achieve.

  15. Vapor phase heat transport systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedstrom, J. C.; Neeper, D. A.

    1985-09-01

    Progress in theoretical and experimental investigations of various forms of a vapor transport system for solar space heating is described, which could also be applied to service water heating. The refrigerant is evaporated in a solar collector, which may be located on the external wall or roof of a building. The vapor is condensed in a passively discharged thermal storage unit located within the building. The condensed liquid can be returned to the collector either by a motor-driven pump or by a completely passive self-pumping mechanism in which the vapor pressure lifts the liquid from the condenser to the collector. The theoretical investigation analyzes this self-pumping scheme. Experiments in solar test cells compared the operation of both passive and active forms of the vapor system with the operation of a passive water wall. The vapor system operates as expected, with potential advantages over other passive systems in design flexibility and energy yield.

  16. [Study on mechanism of Salvia miltiorrhiza treating cardiovascular disease through auxiliary mechanism elucidation system for Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    He, Shuai-bing; Zhang, Bai-xia; Wang, Hui-hui; Wang, Yun; Qiao, Yan-jiang

    2015-10-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and is widely used as a clinically medication for its efficiency in treating cardiovascular disease. Due to TCM is a comprehensive system, the mechanism of S. miltiorrhiza treating cardiovascular disease through integrated multiple pathways are still unclear in some aspects. With the rapid progress of bioinformatics and systems biology, network pharmacology is considered as a promising approach toward reveal the underlying complex relationship between an herb and the disease. In order to discover the mechanism of S. miltiorrhiza treating cardiovascular disease systematically, we use the auxiliary mechanism elucidation system for Chinese medicine, built up a molecule interaction network on the active component targets of S. miltiorrhiza and the therapeutic targets of cardiovascular disease to offer an opportunity for deep understanding the mechanism of S. miltiorrhiza treating cardiovascular disease from the perspective of network pharmacology. The results showed that S. miltiorrhiza treating cardiovascular disease through ten pathways as follows: improve lipid metabolism, anti-inflammation, regulate blood pressure, negatively regulates blood coagulation factor and antithrombotic, regulate cell proliferation, anti-stress injury, promoting angiogenesis, inhibited apoptosis, adjust vascular systolic and diastolic, promoting wound repair. The results of this paper provide theoretical guidance for the development of new drugs to treat cardiovascular disease and the discovery of new drugs through component compatibility.

  17. Design manual. [High temperature heat pump for heat recovery system

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, T.E.; Chancellor, P.D.; Dyer, D.F.; Maples, G.

    1980-01-01

    The design and performance of a waste heat recovery system which utilizes a high temperature heat pump and which is intended for use in those industries incorporating indirect drying processes are described. It is estimated that use of this heat recovery system in the paper, pulp, and textile industries in the US could save 3.9 x 10/sup 14/ Btu/yr. Information is included on over all and component design for the heat pump system, comparison of prime movers for powering the compressor, control equipment, and system economics. (LCL)

  18. Design tradeoffs of a reciprocating auxiliary power unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renquist, Jacob Vinod

    This thesis presents a comparison of reciprocating auxiliary power units to conventional, gas turbine auxiliary power units. A metric of interest is created to represent the specific auxiliary power system weight including the prime mover, generator, gearbox, and fuel consumed. The metric of interest is used to compare the different auxiliary power unit technologies by incorporating detailed engine simulations, auxiliary power unit system weight modeling, and flight path-realized fuel consumption modeling. Results show that reciprocating auxiliary power units can be competitive with gas turbines in near-term, more-electric aircraft applications.

  19. The Development of a General Auxiliary Diagnosis System for Common Disease of Animal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jianhua; Wang, Hongbin; Zhang, Ru; Luan, Peixian; Li, Lin; Xu, Danning

    In order to development one expert system for animal disease in china, and this expert system can help veterinary surgeon diagnose all kinds of disease of animal. The design of an intelligent medical system for diagnosis of animal diseases is presented in this paper. The system comprises three major parts: a disease case management system (DCMS), a Knowledge management system (KMS) and an Expert System (ES). The DCMS is used to manipulate patient data include all kinds of data about the animal and the symptom, diagnosis result etc. The KMS is used to acquire knowledge from disease cases and manipulate knowledge by human. The ES is used to perform diagnosis. The program is designed in N-layers system; they are data layer, security layer, business layer, appearance layer, and user interface. When diagnosis, user can select some symptoms in system group by system. One conclusion with three possibilities (final diagnosis result, suspect diagnosis result, and no diagnosis result) is output. By diagnosis some times, one most possible result can be get. By application, this system can increased the accurate of diagnosis to some extent, but the statistics result was not compute now.

  20. Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the Beaver Valley, Units 1 and 2 nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, R.C.; Vehec, T.A.; Moffitt, N.E.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V.; Rossbach, L.W.; Sena, P.P. III

    1993-02-01

    In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. Beaver Valley Units 1 and 2 were selected as two of a series of plants for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at Beaver Valley Units 1 and 2.

  1. Numerical stabilization of entanglement computation in auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo simulations of interacting many-fermion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broecker, Peter; Trebst, Simon

    2016-12-01

    In the absence of a fermion sign problem, auxiliary-field (or determinantal) quantum Monte Carlo (DQMC) approaches have long been the numerical method of choice for unbiased, large-scale simulations of interacting many-fermion systems. More recently, the conceptual scope of this approach has been expanded by introducing ingenious schemes to compute entanglement entropies within its framework. On a practical level, these approaches, however, suffer from a variety of numerical instabilities that have largely impeded their applicability. Here we report on a number of algorithmic advances to overcome many of these numerical instabilities and significantly improve the calculation of entanglement measures in the zero-temperature projective DQMC approach, ultimately allowing us to reach similar system sizes as for the computation of conventional observables. We demonstrate the applicability of this improved DQMC approach by providing an entanglement perspective on the quantum phase transition from a magnetically ordered Mott insulator to a band insulator in the bilayer square lattice Hubbard model at half filling.

  2. Numerical stabilization of entanglement computation in auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo simulations of interacting many-fermion systems.

    PubMed

    Broecker, Peter; Trebst, Simon

    2016-12-01

    In the absence of a fermion sign problem, auxiliary-field (or determinantal) quantum Monte Carlo (DQMC) approaches have long been the numerical method of choice for unbiased, large-scale simulations of interacting many-fermion systems. More recently, the conceptual scope of this approach has been expanded by introducing ingenious schemes to compute entanglement entropies within its framework. On a practical level, these approaches, however, suffer from a variety of numerical instabilities that have largely impeded their applicability. Here we report on a number of algorithmic advances to overcome many of these numerical instabilities and significantly improve the calculation of entanglement measures in the zero-temperature projective DQMC approach, ultimately allowing us to reach similar system sizes as for the computation of conventional observables. We demonstrate the applicability of this improved DQMC approach by providing an entanglement perspective on the quantum phase transition from a magnetically ordered Mott insulator to a band insulator in the bilayer square lattice Hubbard model at half filling.

  3. Infrared Camera Characterization of Bi-Propellant Reaction Control Engines during Auxiliary Propulsion Systems Tests at NASA's White Sands Test Facility in Las Cruces, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holleman, Elizabeth; Sharp, David; Sheller, Richard; Styron, Jason

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the application of a FUR Systems A40M infrared (IR) digital camera for thermal monitoring of a Liquid Oxygen (LOX) and Ethanol bi-propellant Reaction Control Engine (RCE) during Auxiliary Propulsion System (APS) testing at the National Aeronautics & Space Administration's (NASA) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) near Las Cruces, New Mexico. Typically, NASA has relied mostly on the use of ThermoCouples (TC) for this type of thermal monitoring due to the variability of constraints required to accurately map rapidly changing temperatures from ambient to glowing hot chamber material. Obtaining accurate real-time temperatures in the JR spectrum is made even more elusive by the changing emissivity of the chamber material as it begins to glow. The parameters evaluated prior to APS testing included: (1) remote operation of the A40M camera using fiber optic Firewire signal sender and receiver units; (2) operation of the camera inside a Pelco explosion proof enclosure with a germanium window; (3) remote analog signal display for real-time monitoring; (4) remote digital data acquisition of the A40M's sensor information using FUR's ThermaCAM Researcher Pro 2.8 software; and (5) overall reliability of the system. An initial characterization report was prepared after the A40M characterization tests at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to document controlled heat source comparisons to calibrated TCs. Summary IR digital data recorded from WSTF's APS testing is included within this document along with findings, lessons learned, and recommendations for further usage as a monitoring tool for the development of rocket engines.

  4. A Systems Biology Approach to Heat Stress, Heat Injury and Heat Stroke

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    A systems biology approach to heat stress, heat injury and heat stroke Jonathan D. Stallings and Danielle L. Ippolito US Army Center for...paramount importance to the military. Here, we review our recent systems biology approaches to heat stress in order to develop a 3-dimensional (3D...Transcriptomics, Proteomics, Systems biology, Protein aggregation, Metabolomics, Energetics, Computational modeling 1. HEAT ILLNESS IN THE U.S. ARMED FORCES

  5. Heat exchanger expert system logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormier, R.

    1988-01-01

    The reduction is described of the operation and fault diagnostics of a Deep Space Network heat exchanger to a rule base by the application of propositional calculus to a set of logic statements. The value of this approach lies in the ease of converting the logic and subsequently implementing it on a computer as an expert system. The rule base was written in Process Intelligent Control software.

  6. Investigations upon the effects of an auxiliary brake system on the working parameters of diesel engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suciu, Cornel; Mihai, Ioan

    2016-12-01

    Classical systems have the main disadvantage of being unable to ensure that high load diesel engine vehicles are slowed in good conditions, for the entire range of combinations of inclinations and lengths of sloped public roads. On such roads, where brakes are used repeatedly and for long periods, friction components that enter classical braking systems will overheat and lead to failure. The present paper aims to investigate, the efficiency of a braking system based on compression release, called a Jake Brake. In such a system, the exhaust valve is actuated at a certain predetermined angle of the crankshaft. The presented research was conducted on an experimental rig based on a four-stroke mono-cylinder diesel engine model Lombardini 6 LD400. Pressure and temperature evolutions were monitored before and during the use of the Jake Brake system. As the generated phonic pollution is the main disadvantage of such systems, noise generated in the vicinity of the engine was monitored as well. The monitored parameters were then plotted in diagrams that allowed evaluating the performances of the system.

  7. Review of the Seabrook Units 1 and 2 auxiliary feedwater system reliability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fresco, A.; Youngblood, R.; Papazoglou, I.A.

    1984-02-01

    This report presents the results of a review of the Emergency Feedwater System Reliability Analysis for Seabrook Nuclear Station Units 1 and 2. The objective of this report is to estimate the probability that the Emergency Feedwater System will fail to perform its mission for each of three different initiators: (1) loss of main feedwater with offsite power available, (2) loss of offsite power, (3) loss of all ac power except vital instrumentation and control 125 VDC/120 VAC power. The scope, methodology, and failure data are prescribed by NUREG-0611, Appendix III. The results are compared with those obtained in NUREG-0611 for other Westinghouse plants.

  8. European auxiliary propulsion, 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holcomb, L. B.

    1972-01-01

    The chemical and electric auxiliary propulsion technology of the United Kingdom, France, and West Germany is discussed in detail, and the propulsion technology achievements of Italy, India, Japan, and Russia are reviewed. A comparison is presented of Shell 405 catalyst and a European spontaneous hydrazine catalyst called CNESRO I. Finally, conclusions are drawn regarding future trends in European auxiliary propulsion technology development.

  9. Study of auxiliary propulsion requirements for large space systems, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. W.; Machles, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    A range of single shuttle launched large space systems were identified and characterized including a NASTRAN and loading dynamics analysis. The disturbance environment, characterization of thrust level and APS mass requirements, and a study of APS/LSS interactions were analyzed. State-of-the-art capabilities for chemical and ion propulsion were compared with the generated propulsion requirements to assess the state-of-the-art limitations and benefits of enhancing current technology.

  10. Lighting system with heat distribution face plate

    DOEpatents

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton Earl; Stecher, Thomas Elliot; Kuenzler, Glenn Howard; Wolfe, Jr., Charles Franklin; Li, Ri

    2013-09-10

    Lighting systems having a light source and a thermal management system are provided. The thermal management system includes synthetic jet devices, a heat sink and a heat distribution face plate. The synthetic jet devices are arranged in parallel to one and other and are configured to actively cool the lighting system. The heat distribution face plate is configured to radially transfer heat from the light source into the ambient air.

  11. Solar heating and domestic hot water system installed at Kansas City, Fire Stations, Kansas City, Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar system was designed to provide 47 percent of the space heating, 8,800 square feet area and 75 percent of the domestic hot water (DHW) load. The solar system consists of 2,808 square feet of Solaron, model 2001, air, flat plate collector subsystem, a concrete box storage subsystem which contains 1,428 cubic feet of 0.5 inch diameter pebbles weighing 71.5 tons, a DHW preheat tank, blowers, pumps, heat exchangers, air ducting, controls and associated plumbing. Two 120 gallon electric DHW heaters supply domestic hot water which is preheated by the solar system. Auxiliary space heating is provided by three electric heat pumps with electric resistance heaters and four 30 kilowatt electric unit heaters. There are six modes of system operation.

  12. Cost Effective, High Efficiency Integrated Systems Approach To Auxiliary Electric Motors

    SciTech Connect

    Roy Kessinger; Kanchan Angal; Steve Brewer; Steve Kraihanzel; Lenny Schrank; Jason Wolf

    2003-07-15

    The CARAT program, carried out by Kinetic Art & Technology Corporation (KAT), has been one of the most commercially successful KAT R&D programs to date. Based on previous development of its technology, KAT designed, constructed and tested a highly efficient motor and controller system under this CARAT program with supplemental commercial funding. Throughout this CARAT effort, the technical objectives have been refined and refocused. Some objectives have been greatly expanded, while others have been minimized. The determining factor in all decisions to refocus the objectives was the commercial need, primarily the needs of KAT manufacturing partners. Several companies are employing the resulting CARAT motor and controller designs in prototypes for commercial products. Two of these companies have committed to providing cost share in order to facilitate the development. One of these companies is a major manufacturing company developing a revolutionary new family of products requiring the ultra-high system efficiency achievable by the KAT motor and controller technologies (known as Segmented ElectroMagnetic Array, or SEMA technology). Another company requires the high efficiency, quiet operation, and control characteristics afforded by the same basic motor and controller for an advanced air filtration product. The combined annual production requirement projected by these two companies exceeds one million units by 2005.

  13. 14 CFR 27.859 - Heating systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Heating systems. 27.859 Section 27.859... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Fire Protection § 27.859 Heating systems. (a) General. For each heating system that involves the passage of cabin air over, or close to, the...

  14. 14 CFR 27.859 - Heating systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Heating systems. 27.859 Section 27.859... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Fire Protection § 27.859 Heating systems. (a) General. For each heating system that involves the passage of cabin air over, or close to, the...

  15. 14 CFR 27.859 - Heating systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Heating systems. 27.859 Section 27.859... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Fire Protection § 27.859 Heating systems. (a) General. For each heating system that involves the passage of cabin air over, or close to, the...

  16. 14 CFR 27.859 - Heating systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Heating systems. 27.859 Section 27.859... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Fire Protection § 27.859 Heating systems. (a) General. For each heating system that involves the passage of cabin air over, or close to, the...

  17. Definition of an auxiliary processor dedicated to real-time operating system kernels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halang, Wolfgang A.

    1988-01-01

    In order to increase the efficiency of process control data processing, it is necessary to enhance the productivity of real time high level languages and to automate the task administration, because presently 60 percent or more of the applications are still programmed in assembly languages. This may be achieved by migrating apt functions for the support of process control oriented languages into the hardware, i.e., by new architectures. Whereas numerous high level languages have already been defined or realized, there are no investigations yet on hardware assisted implementation of real time features. The requirements to be fulfilled by languages and operating systems in hard real time environment are summarized. A comparison of the most prominent languages, viz. Ada, HAL/S, LTR, Pearl, as well as the real time extensions of FORTRAN and PL/1, reveals how existing languages meet these demands and which features still need to be incorporated to enable the development of reliable software with predictable program behavior, thus making it possible to carry out a technical safety approval. Accordingly, Pearl proved to be the closest match to the mentioned requirements.

  18. Prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Schedules and technical progress in the development of eight prototype solar heating and combined solar heating and cooling systems are reported. Particular emphasis is given to the analysis and preliminary design for the cooling subsystem, and the setup and testing of a horizontal thermal energy storage tank configuration and collector shroud evaluation.

  19. Measuring system with a dual needle probe for testing the parameters of heat-insulating materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudzik, Stanislaw

    2011-07-01

    The paper presents a prototype of a measurement system with a hot probe based on a transient line heat source method, designed for testing the thermal parameters of heat insulation materials. The proposition is to use an auxiliary thermometer (dual needle probe) and a trained artificial neural network to determine the parameters of thermal insulation materials. The data extracted from the simulation of a nonstationary two-dimensional heat conduction model inside a sample of material with a dual needle probe trained the artificial neural network (ANN). The significant heat capacity of the needle probe is taken into account in the model. To solve the system of partial differential equations describing the model, the finite element method (FEM) was applied. The ANN is used to estimate the coefficients of the inverse heat conduction problem for a solid. The network determines the values of the effective thermal conductivity and effective thermal diffusivity on the basis of the temperature increases of the hot probe and the auxiliary thermometer. All calculations, such as FEM, and training and testing processes of the ANN, were carried out in the Matlab environment. The results of the experiment are also presented. The proposed measurement system for testing the parameters is suitable for temporary measurements in a building site or factory.

  20. Preliminary design study of an alternate heat source assembly for a Brayton isotope power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strumpf, H. J.

    1978-01-01

    Results are presented for a study of the preliminary design of an alternate heat source assembly (HSA) intended for use in the Brayton isotope power system (BIPS). The BIPS converts thermal energy emitted by a radioactive heat source into electrical energy by means of a closed Brayton cycle. A heat source heat exchanger configuration was selected and optimized. The design consists of a 10 turn helically wound Hastelloy X tube. Thermal analyses were performed for various operating conditions to ensure that post impact containment shell (PICS) temperatures remain within specified limits. These limits are essentially satisfied for all modes of operation except for the emergency cooling system for which the PICS temperatures are too high. Neon was found to be the best choice for a fill gas for auxiliary cooling system operation. Low cycle fatigue life, natural frequency, and dynamic loading requirements can be met with minor modifications to the existing HSA.

  1. Modelling of the District Heating System's Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigants, Girts; Blumberga, Dagnija; Vīgants, Ģirts; Blumberga, Dagnija

    2011-01-01

    The development of a district heating systems calculation model means improvement in the energy efficiency of a district heating system, which makes it possible to reduce the heat losses, thus positively affecting the tariffs on thermal energy. In this paper, a universal approach is considered, based on which the optimal flow and temperature conditions in a district heating system network could be calculated. The optimality is determined by the least operational costs. The developed calculation model has been tested on the Ludza district heating system based on the technical parameters of this system.

  2. 30 CFR 75.331 - Auxiliary fans and tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... recirculation of air. (b) If a deficiency exists in any auxiliary fan system, the deficiency shall be corrected... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Auxiliary fans and tubing. 75.331 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.331 Auxiliary fans and...

  3. 30 CFR 75.331 - Auxiliary fans and tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... recirculation of air. (b) If a deficiency exists in any auxiliary fan system, the deficiency shall be corrected... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Auxiliary fans and tubing. 75.331 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.331 Auxiliary fans and...

  4. Proposed Auxiliary Boundary Stratigraphic Section and Point (ASSP) for the base of the Ordovician System at Lawson Cove, Utah, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, James F.; Evans, Kevin R.; Ethington, Raymond L.; Freeman, Rebecca; Loch, James D.; Repetski, John E.; Ripperdan, Robert; Taylor, John F.

    2016-01-01

    The Global boundary Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) for the base of the Ordovician System is at the First Appearance Datum (FAD) of the conodont Iapetognathus fluctivagus at Green Point in Newfoundland, Canada. Strata there are typical graptolitic facies that were deposited near the base of the continental slope.We propose establishing an Auxiliary boundary Stratotype Section and Point (ASSP) at the FAD of I. fluctivagus at the Lawson Cove section in the Ibex area of Millard County, Utah, USA. There, strata consist of typical shelly facies limestones that were deposited on a tropical carbonate platform and contain abundant conodonts, trilobites, brachiopods, and other fossil groups. Cambrian and Ordovician strata in this area are ~5300m thick, with the Lawson Cove section spanning 243m in three overlapping segments. Six other measured and studied sections in the area show stratigraphic relationships similar to those at Lawson Cove. Faunas have been used to divide these strata into 14 conodont and 7 trilobite zonal units. The widespread olenid trilobite Jujuyaspis occurs ~90cm above the proposed boundary at Lawson Cove; this genus is generally regarded as earliest Ordovician. Rhynchonelliform and linguliform brachiopods are common to abundant and are useful for correlation. The FAD of Iapetognathus fluctivagus and occurrences of Jujuyaspis and the Lower Ordovician planktonic graptolite Anisograptus matanensis all occur within a 2.4m interval of strata at a nearby section. Non-biological correlation tools include a detailed sequence stratigraphic classification and a detailed carbon-isotope profile. Especially useful for correlation is a positive 13C excursion peak ~15cm below the proposed boundary horizon. All of these correlation tools form an integrated framework that makes the Lawson Cove section especially useful as an ASSP for global correlation of strata with faunas typical of shallow, warm-water, shelly facies.

  5. Heat engine generator control system

    DOEpatents

    Rajashekara, K.; Gorti, B.V.; McMullen, S.R.; Raibert, R.J.

    1998-05-12

    An electrical power generation system includes a heat engine having an output member operatively coupled to the rotor of a dynamoelectric machine. System output power is controlled by varying an electrical parameter of the dynamoelectric machine. A power request signal is related to an engine speed and the electrical parameter is varied in accordance with a speed control loop. Initially, the sense of change in the electrical parameter in response to a change in the power request signal is opposite that required to effectuate a steady state output power consistent with the power request signal. Thereafter, the electrical parameter is varied to converge the output member speed to the speed known to be associated with the desired electrical output power. 8 figs.

  6. Non-isothermal decomposition kinetics, heat capacity and thermal safety of 37.2/44/16/2.2/0.2/0.4-GAP/CL-20/Al/N-100/PCA/auxiliaries mixture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiao-Qiang; Gao, Hong-Xu; Ji, Tie-Zheng; Xu, Kang-Zhen; Hu, Rong-Zu

    2011-10-15

    The specific heat capacity (C(p)) of 37.2/44/16/2.2/0.2/0.4-GAP/CL-20/Al/N-100/PCA/auxiliaries mixture was determined with the continuous C(p) mode of microcalorimeter. The equation of C(p) with temperature was obtained. The standard molar heat capacity of GAP/CL-20/Al/N-100/PCA/auxiliaries mixture was 1.225 J mol(-1)K(-1) at 298.15K. With the help of the peak temperature (T(p)) from the non-isothermal DTG curves of the mixture at different heating rates (β), the apparent activation energy (E(k) and E(o)) and pre-exponential constant (A(K)) of thermal decomposition reaction obtained by Kissinger's method and Ozawa's method. Using density (ρ) and thermal conductivity (λ), the decomposition heat (Q(d), taking half-explosion heat), Zhang-Hu-Xie-Li's formula, the values (T(e0) and T(p0)) of T(e) and T(p) corresponding to β → 0, thermal explosion temperature (T(be) and T(bp)), adiabatic time-to-explosion (t(TIad)), 50% drop height (H(50)) of impact sensitivity, and critical temperature of hot-spot initiation (T(cr,hot spot)) of thermal explosion of the mixture were calculated. The following results of evaluating the thermal safety of the mixture were obtained: T(be) = 441.64K, T(bp) = 461.66 K, t(Tlad) = 78.0 s (n = 2), t(Tlad) = 74.87 s (n = 1), t(Tlad) = 71.85 s (n = 0), H(50) = 21.33 cm.

  7. Restoration of the plasma discharge during density limit disruptions in the T-10 tokamak using electron cyclotron heating and ohmic power supply system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savrukhin, P. V.; Shestakov, E. A.

    2016-11-01

    Experiments in the T-10 tokamak [Alikaev et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 30, 381 (1988)] have demonstrated the possibility of control of the plasma current and prevention of formation of the non-thermal (Eγ > 150 keV) electron beams after an energy quench at the density limit disruption using electron cyclotron heating (ECRH) and controlled operation of the Ohmic power supply system. Quasi-stable plasma operation with repetitive sawtooth oscillations can be restored after an energy quench using high auxiliary power Pec > 2-5 Poh. Optimal conditions of the plasma discharge recovery after an energy quench using auxiliary heating are identified. At high auxiliary power, restoration of the plasma discharge can be provided with the location of the EC resonance zone within the whole plasma cross section. The auxiliary power required for discharge restoration is minimal when the power is deposited around the m = 2, n = 1 magnetic island (here m and n poloidal and toroidal wave numbers). The threshold ECRH power increases linearly with plasma current. Prevention of the non-thermal electron beams during density limit disruption is associated with stabilization of bursts of the magnetohydrodynamic modes, creation of the saturated magnetic islands, and heating of the background plasma using ECRH. Plasma discharge recovery after an energy quench in a tokamak reactor using auxiliary heating and controllable reduction of the plasma current is discussed.

  8. Heat pump assisted geothermal heating system for Felix Spa, Romania

    SciTech Connect

    Rosca, Marcel; Maghiar, Teodor

    1996-01-24

    The paper presents a pre-feasibility type study of a proposed heat pump assisted geothermal heating system for an average hotel in Felix Spa, Romania. After a brief presentation of the geothermal reservoir, the paper gives the methodology and the results of the technical and economical calculations. The technical and economical viability of the proposed system is discussed in detail in the final part of the paper.

  9. Carbon footprints of heating oil and LPG heating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Eric P.

    2012-07-15

    For European homes without access to the natural gas grid, the main fuels-of-choice for heating are heating oil and LPG. How do the carbon footprints of these compare? Existing literature does not clearly answer this, so the current study was undertaken to fill this gap. Footprints were estimated in seven countries that are representative of the EU and constitute two-thirds of the EU-27 population: Belgium, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Poland and the UK. Novelties of the assessment were: systems were defined using the EcoBoiler model; well-to-tank data were updated according to most-recent research; and combustion emission factors were used that were derived from a survey conducted for this study. The key finding is that new residential heating systems fuelled by LPG are 20% lower carbon and 15% lower overall-environmental-impact than those fuelled by heating oil. An unexpected finding was that an LPG system's environmental impact is about the same as that of a bio heating oil system fuelled by 100% rapeseed methyl ester, Europe's predominant biofuel. Moreover, a 20/80 blend (by energy content) with conventional heating oil, a bio-heating-oil system generates a footprint about 15% higher than an LPG system's. The final finding is that fuel switching can pay off in carbon terms. If a new LPG heating system replaces an ageing oil-fired one for the final five years of its service life, the carbon footprint of the system's final five years is reduced by more than 50%.

  10. Heat pipe heat rejection system. [for electrical batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroliczek, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    A prototype of a battery heat rejection system was developed which uses heat pipes for more efficient heat removal and for temperature control of the cells. The package consists of five thermal mock-ups of 100 amp-hr prismatic cells. Highly conductive spacers fabricated from honeycomb panels into which heat pipes are embedded transport the heat generated by the cells to the edge of the battery. From there it can be either rejected directly to a cold plate or the heat flow can be controlled by means of two variable conductance heat pipes. The thermal resistance between the interior of the cells and the directly attached cold plate was measured to be 0.08 F/Watt for the 5-cell battery. Compared to a conductive aluminum spacer of equal weight the honeycomb/heat pipe spacer has approximately one-fifth of the thermal resistance. In addition, the honeycomb/heat pipe spacer virtually eliminates temperature gradients along the cells.

  11. Modeling a 5 kWe planar solid oxide fuel cell based system operating on JP-8 fuel and a comparison with tubular cell based system for auxiliary and mobile power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanim, Tanvir; Bayless, David J.; Trembly, Jason P.

    2014-01-01

    A steady state planar solid oxide fuel cell (P-SOFC) based system operating on desulfurized JP-8 fuel was modeled using Aspen Plus simulation software for auxiliary and mobile power applications. An onboard autothermal reformer (ATR) employed to reform the desulfurized JP-8 fuel was coupled with the P-SOFC stack to provide for H2 and CO as fuel, minimizing the cost and complexity associated with hydrogen storage. Characterization of the ATR reformer was conducted by varying the steam to carbon ratio (H2O/C) from 0.1 to 1.0 at different ATR operating temperatures (700-800 °C) while maintaining the P-SOFC stack temperature at 850 °C. A fraction of the anode recycle was used as the steam and heat source for autothermal reforming of the JP-8 fuel, intending to make the system lighter and compact for mobile applications. System modeling revealed a maximum net AC efficiency of 37.1% at 700 °C and 29.2% at 800 °C ATR operating temperatures, respectively. Parametric analyses with respect to fuel utilization factor (Uf) and current density (j) were conducted to determine optimum operating conditions. Finally, the P-SOFC based system was compared with a previously published [1] tubular solid oxide fuel cell based (T-SOFC) system to identify the relative advantages over one another.

  12. Stirling engine external heat system design with heat pipe heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godett, Ted M.; Ziph, Benjamin

    1986-01-01

    This final report presents the conceptual design of a liquid fueled external heating system (EHS) and the preliminary design of a heat pipe heater for the STM-4120 Stirling cycle engine, to meet the Air Force mobile electric power (MEP) requirement for units in the range of 20 to 60 kW. The EHS design had the following constraints: (1) Packaging requirements limited the overall system dimensions to about 330 mm x 250 mm x 100 mm; (2) Heat flux to the sodium heat pipe evaporator was limited to an average of 100 kW/m and a maximum of 550 kW/m based on previous experience; and (3) The heat pipe operating temperature was specified to be 800 C based on heat input requirements of the STM4-120. An analysis code was developed to optimize the EHS performance parameters and an analytical development of the sodium heat pipe heater was performed; both are presented and discussed. In addition, construction techniques were evaluated and scale model heat pipe testing performed.

  13. Commonality Study of the Pressure-Volume-Temperature Based Propellant Gaging Software Modules for the Auxiliary Power Unit, Reaction Control System, and Orbital Maneuvering System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duhon, D. D.

    1975-01-01

    Computer storage requirements can be reduced if areas of commonality exist in two or more programs placed in the same computer and identical code can be used by more than one program. The pressure-volume-temperature (P-V-T) relationship for the propellant tank pressurant agent is utilized as the basis for either a primary of a backup propellant gaging program for the auxiliary power unit (APU), the reaction control system (RCS), and the orbital maneuvering system (OMS). These three propellant gaging programs were investigated. It was revealed that a very limited degree of software commonality exits among them. An examination of this common software indicated that only the computation of the helium compressibility factor in an external function subprogram accessible to both the RCS and OMS propellant gaging programs appears to offer a savings in computer storage requirements.

  14. Implementing slab solar water heating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raveendran, S. K.; Shen, C. Q.

    2015-08-01

    Water heating contributes a significant part of energy consumption in typical household. One of the most employed technologies today that helps in reducing the energy consumption of water heating would be conventional solar water heating system. However, this system is expensive and less affordable by most family. The main objective of this project is to design and implement an alternative type of solar water heating system that utilize only passive solar energy which is known as slab solar water heating system. Slab solar water heating system is a system that heat up cold water using the solar radiance from the sun. The unique part of this system is that it does not require any form of electricity in order to operate. Solar radiance is converted into heat energy through convection method and cold water will be heated up by using conduction method [1]. The design of this system is governed by the criteria of low implementation cost and energy saving. Selection of material in the construction of a slab solar water heating system is important as it will directly affect the efficiency and performance of the system. A prototype has been built to realize the idea and it had been proven that this system was able to provide sufficient hot water supply for typical household usage at any given time.

  15. Design of Refractory Metal Heat Pipe Life Test Environment Chamber, Cooling System, and Radio Frequency Heating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. J.; Bragg-Sitton, S. M.; Reid, R. S.; Stewart, E. T.; Davis, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    A series of 16 Mo-44.5%Re alloy/sodium heat pipes will be experimentally tested to examine heat pipe aging. To support this evaluation, an environmental test chamber and a number of auxiliary subsystems are required. These subsystems include radio frequency (RF) power supplies/inductive coils, recirculation water coolant loops, and chamber gas conditioning. The heat pipes will be grouped, based on like power and gas mixture requirements, into three clusters of five units each, configured in a pentagonal arrangement. The highest powered heat pipe will be tested separately. Test chamber atmospheric purity is targeted at <0.3 ppb oxygen at an approximate operating pressure of 76 torr (.1.5 psia), maintained by active purification (oxygen level is comparable to a 10(exp -6) torr environment). Treated water will be used in two independent cooling circuits to remove .85 kW. One circuit will service the RF hardware while the other will maintain the heat pipe calorimetry. Initial procedures for the startup and operation of support systems have been identified. Each of these subsystems is outfitted with a variety of instrumentation, integrated with distributed real-time controllers and computers. A local area network provides communication between all devices. This data and control network continuously monitors the health of the test hardware, providing warning indicators followed by automatic shutdown should potentially damaging conditions develop. During hardware construction, a number of checkout tests.many making use of stainless steel prototype heat pipes that are already fabricated.will be required to verify operation.

  16. Auxiliary Power Units

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-17

    Auxiliary Power Units Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to...information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports ...1. REPORT DATE 17 NOV 2010 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Auxiliary Power Units 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  17. Sodium channel auxiliary subunits.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Tsai-Tien; McMahon, Allison M; Johnson, Victoria T; Mangubat, Erwin Z; Zahm, Robert J; Pacold, Mary E; Jakobsson, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are well known for their functional roles in excitable tissues. Excitable tissues rely on voltage-gated ion channels and their auxiliary subunits to achieve concerted electrical activity in living cells. Auxiliary subunits are also known to provide functional diversity towards the transport and biogenesis properties of the principal subunits. Recent interests in pharmacological properties of these auxiliary subunits have prompted significant amounts of efforts in understanding their physiological roles. Some auxiliary subunits can potentially serve as drug targets for novel analgesics. Three families of sodium channel auxiliary subunits are described here: beta1 and beta3, beta2 and beta4, and temperature-induced paralytic E (TipE). While sodium channel beta-subunits are encoded in many animal genomes, TipE has only been found exclusively in insects. In this review, we present phylogenetic analyses, discuss potential evolutionary origins and functional data available for each of these subunits. For each family, we also correlate the functional specificity with the history of evolution for the individual auxiliary subunits.

  18. Auxiliary incinerator apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, J.P.

    1987-08-11

    An auxiliary incinerator apparatus is described for an incinerator comprising: a main incinerator having primary and secondary chambers formed with a plurality of refractory walls, the main incinerator having a main door into the primary chamber, and the main incinerator having an outer framework and walls spaced from the refractory walls, and one refractory wall having an opening therethrough; a refractory passageway extending from the opening in the main incinerator wall to the outer wall and having an opening through the outer wall; an auxiliary incinerator attached to one side of the main incinerator adjacent to the opening from the refractory passageway through the outer wall, the auxiliary incinerator having an incineration chamber formed therein with an opening thereinto; and auxiliary door means for opening and closing over the opening from the refractory passageway through the outer wall and for opening and closing over the opening into the auxiliary incinerator, whereby partially incinerated materials can be moved from the main incinerator to the auxiliary incinerator for further combustion.

  19. Solar heating system installed at Stamford, Connecticut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The solar heating system installed at the Lutz-Sotire Partnership Executive East Office Building, Stamford, Connecticut is described. The Executive East Office Building is of moderate size with 25,000 sq ft of heated space in 2 1/2 stories. The solar system was designed to provide approximately 50 percent of the heating requirements. The system components are described. Appended data includes: the system design acceptance test, the operation and maintenance manual, and as-built drawings and photographs.

  20. Solar dynamic space power system heat rejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, A. W.; Gustafson, E.; Mclallin, K. L.

    1986-01-01

    A radiator system concept is described that meets the heat rejection requirements of the NASA Space Station solar dynamic power modules. The heat pipe radiator is a high-reliability, high-performance approach that is capable of erection in space and is maintainable on orbit. Results are present of trade studies that compare the radiator system area and weight estimates for candidate advanced high performance heat pipes. The results indicate the advantages of the dual-slot heat pipe radiator for high temperature applications as well as its weight-reduction potential over the range of temperatures to be encountered in the solar dynamic heat rejection systems.

  1. Heat transport system, method and material

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    A heat transport system, method and composite material in which a plurality of hollow spherical shells or microspheres having an outside diameter of less than or equal to 500 microns are encapsulated or embedded within a bulk material. Each shell has captured therein a volatile working fluid, such that each shell operates as a microsized heat pipe for conducting heat through the composite structure.

  2. Waste Heat Recapture from Supermarket Refrigeration Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fricke, Brian A

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this project was to determine the potential energy savings associated with improved utilization of waste heat from supermarket refrigeration systems. Existing and advanced strategies for waste heat recovery in supermarkets were analyzed, including options from advanced sources such as combined heat and power (CHP), micro-turbines and fuel cells.

  3. Auxiliary coil controls temperature of RF induction heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Auxiliary coil controls the temperature of an RF induction furnace that is powered by a relatively unstable RF generator. Manual or servoed adjustments of the relative position of the auxiliary coil, which is placed in close proximity to the RF coil, changes the looseness of the RF coil and hence the corresponding heating effect of its RF field.

  4. Solar heated fluidized bed gasification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qader, S. A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A solar-powered fluidized bed gasification system for gasifying carbonaceous material is presented. The system includes a solar gasifier which is heated by fluidizing gas and steam. Energy to heat the gas and steam is supplied by a high heat capacity refractory honeycomb which surrounds the fluid bed reactor zone. The high heat capacity refractory honeycomb is heated by solar energy focused on the honeycomb by solar concentrator through solar window. The fluid bed reaction zone is also heated directly and uniformly by thermal contact of the high heat capacity ceramic honeycomb with the walls of the fluidized bed reactor. Provisions are also made for recovering and recycling catalysts used in the gasification process. Back-up furnace is provided for start-up procedures and for supplying heat to the fluid bed reaction zone when adequate supplies of solar energy are not available.

  5. 46 CFR 58.25-10 - Main and auxiliary steering gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Main and auxiliary steering gear. 58.25-10 Section 58.25... AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-10 Main and auxiliary steering gear. (a) Power-operated main and auxiliary steering gear must be separate systems that are independent throughout...

  6. 46 CFR 58.25-10 - Main and auxiliary steering gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Main and auxiliary steering gear. 58.25-10 Section 58.25... AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-10 Main and auxiliary steering gear. (a) Power-operated main and auxiliary steering gear must be separate systems that are independent throughout...

  7. 46 CFR 58.25-10 - Main and auxiliary steering gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Main and auxiliary steering gear. 58.25-10 Section 58.25... AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-10 Main and auxiliary steering gear. (a) Power-operated main and auxiliary steering gear must be separate systems that are independent throughout...

  8. 46 CFR 58.25-10 - Main and auxiliary steering gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Main and auxiliary steering gear. 58.25-10 Section 58.25... AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-10 Main and auxiliary steering gear. (a) Power-operated main and auxiliary steering gear must be separate systems that are independent throughout...

  9. 46 CFR 58.25-10 - Main and auxiliary steering gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Main and auxiliary steering gear. 58.25-10 Section 58.25... AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-10 Main and auxiliary steering gear. (a) Power-operated main and auxiliary steering gear must be separate systems that are independent throughout...

  10. Heating systems to maximise efficiency.

    PubMed

    House, Jeff

    2013-09-01

    Jeff House, marketing and applications manager, Baxi Commercial, identifies some of the heating options available to the operators of healthcare facilities, and highlights practical examples of successful applications.

  11. Advances in Solar Heating and Cooling Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Dan S.

    1976-01-01

    Reports on technological advancements in the fields of solar collectors, thermal storage systems, and solar heating and cooling systems. Diagrams aid in the understanding of the thermodynamics of the systems. (CP)

  12. Installation package for a solar heating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Installation information is given for a solar heating system installed in Concho Indian School at El Reno, Oklahoma. This package includes a system Operation and Maintenance Manual, hardware brochures, schematics, system operating modes and drawings.

  13. Improving Process Heating System Performance v3

    SciTech Connect

    2016-04-11

    Improving Process Heating System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry is a development of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) and the Industrial Heating Equipment Association (IHEA). The AMO and IHEA undertook this project as part of an series of sourcebook publications developed by AMO on energy-consuming industrial systems, and opportunities to improve performance. Other topics in this series include compressed air systems, pumping systems, fan systems, steam systems, and motors and drives

  14. Influence of store dimensions and auxiliary volume configuration on the performance of medium-sized solar combisystems

    SciTech Connect

    Lundh, Magdalena; Zass, Katrin; Wilhelms, Claudius; Vajen, Klaus; Jordan, Ulrike

    2010-07-15

    To increase the fractional energy savings achieved with solar thermal combisystems the store volume may be increased. Installation of large stores in single-family houses is, however, often limited by space constraints. In this article the influence of the store dimensions, as well as internal and external auxiliary volume configurations, are investigated for large solar water stores by annual dynamic TRNSYS simulations. The results show that store sizes up to 4 m{sup 3} may be used in solar heating systems with 30 m{sup 2} collector area. It is further shown that well-insulated stores are rather insensitive to the geometry. Stores deviating from the conventional dimensions still yield high fractional energy savings. Furthermore, the simulations show that the performance of an internal auxiliary volume configuration in most cases exceeds that of a solution with an external auxiliary unit. The practical limitations of very thin auxiliary volumes must, however, be further investigated. (author)

  15. Performance of evacuated tubular solar collectors in a residential heating and cooling system. Final report, 1 October 1978-30 September 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, W.S.; Loef, G.O.G.

    1981-03-01

    Operation of CSU Solar House I during the heating season of 1978-1979 and during the 1979 cooling season was based on the use of systems comprising an experimental evacuated tubular solar collector, a non-freezing aqueous collection medium, heat exchange to an insulated conventional vertical cylindrical storage tank and to a built-up rectangular insulated storage tank, heating of circulating air by solar heated water and by electric auxiliary in an off-peak heat storage unit, space cooling by lithium bromide absorption chiller, and service water heating by solar exchange and electric auxiliary. Automatic system control and automatic data acquisition and computation are provided. This system is compared with others evaluated in CSU Solar Houses I, II and III, and with computer predictions based on mathematical models. Of the 69,513 MJ total energy requirement for space heating and hot water during a record cold winter, solar provided 33,281 MJ equivalent to 48 percent. Thirty percent of the incident solar energy was collected and 29 percent was delivered and used for heating and hot water. Of 33,320 MJ required for cooling and hot water during the summer, 79 percent or 26,202 MJ were supplied by solar. Thirty-five percent of the incident solar energy was collected and 26 percent was used for hot water and cooling in the summer. Although not as efficient as the Corning evacuated tube collector previously used, the Philips experimental collector provides solar heating and cooling with minimum operational problems. Improved performance, particularly for cooling, resulted from the use of a very well-insulated heat storage tank. Day time (on-peak) electric auxiliary heating was completely avoided by use of off-peak electric heat storage. A well-designed and operated solar heating and cooling system provided 56 percent of the total energy requirements for heating, cooling, and hot water.

  16. Technology Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Indirect Solar Water Heating Systems in Single-Family Homes

    SciTech Connect

    2016-04-01

    In 2011, Rural Development, Inc. (RDI) completed the construction of Wisdom Way Solar Village (WWSV), which is a development of 20 very efficient homes in Greenfield, Massachusetts. The homes feature R-40 walls, triple-pane windows, R-50 attic insulation, and airtight construction. All homes also have photovoltaic (PV) systems and solar domestic hot water (SDHW) systems. Auxiliary water heating is provided by tankless gas water heaters. With the SDHW systems, RDI hoped to eliminate most of the need for gas for water heating and get the homes closer to zero energy.

  17. Auxiliary resonant DC tank converter

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Fang Z.

    2000-01-01

    An auxiliary resonant dc tank (ARDCT) converter is provided for achieving soft-switching in a power converter. An ARDCT circuit is coupled directly across a dc bus to the inverter to generate a resonant dc bus voltage, including upper and lower resonant capacitors connected in series as a resonant leg, first and second dc tank capacitors connected in series as a tank leg, and an auxiliary resonant circuit comprising a series combination of a resonant inductor and a pair of auxiliary switching devices. The ARDCT circuit further includes first clamping means for holding the resonant dc bus voltage to the dc tank voltage of the tank leg, and second clamping means for clamping the resonant dc bus voltage to zero during a resonant period. The ARDCT circuit resonantly brings the dc bus voltage to zero in order to provide a zero-voltage switching opportunity for the inverter, then quickly rebounds the dc bus voltage back to the dc tank voltage after the inverter changes state. The auxiliary switching devices are turned on and off under zero-current conditions. The ARDCT circuit only absorbs ripples of the inverter dc bus current, thus having less current stress. In addition, since the ARDCT circuit is coupled in parallel with the dc power supply and the inverter for merely assisting soft-switching of the inverter without participating in real dc power transmission and power conversion, malfunction and failure of the tank circuit will not affect the functional operation of the inverter; thus a highly reliable converter system is expected.

  18. Basics of Solar Heating & Hot Water Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Inst. of Architects, Washington, DC.

    In presenting the basics of solar heating and hot water systems, this publication is organized from the general to the specific. It begins by presenting functional and operational descriptions of solar heating and domestic hot water systems, outlining the basic concepts and terminology. This is followed by a description of solar energy utilization…

  19. Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2015-09-22

    A waste heat recovery (WHR) system connects a working fluid to fluid passages formed in an engine block and/or a cylinder head of an internal combustion engine, forming an engine heat exchanger. The fluid passages are formed near high temperature areas of the engine, subjecting the working fluid to sufficient heat energy to vaporize the working fluid while the working fluid advantageously cools the engine block and/or cylinder head, improving fuel efficiency. The location of the engine heat exchanger downstream from an EGR boiler and upstream from an exhaust heat exchanger provides an optimal position of the engine heat exchanger with respect to the thermodynamic cycle of the WHR system, giving priority to cooling of EGR gas. The configuration of valves in the WHR system provides the ability to select a plurality of parallel flow paths for optimal operation.

  20. Heat pipe systems using new working fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F. (Inventor); Zhang, Nengli (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The performance of a heat pipe system is greatly improved by the use of a dilute aqueous solution of about 0.0005 and about 0.005 moles per liter of a long chain alcohol as the working fluid. The surface tension-temperature gradient of the long-chain alcohol solutions turns positive as the temperature exceeds a certain value, for example about 40.degree. C. for n-heptanol solutions. Consequently, the Marangoni effect does not impede, but rather aids in bubble departure from the heating surface. Thus, the bubble size at departure is substantially reduced at higher frequencies and, therefore, increases the boiling limit of heat pipes. This feature is useful in microgravity conditions. In addition to microgravity applications, the heat pipe system may be used for commercial, residential and vehicular air conditioning systems, micro heat pipes for electronic devices, refrigeration and heat exchangers, and chemistry and cryogenics.

  1. Solar residential heating and cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, D. E.; Humphries, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    System has been placed in operation to verify technical feasibility of using solar energy to provide residential heating and cooling. Complete system analysis was performed to provide design information.

  2. Auxiliary and Service Enterprises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stumph, Wayne J.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the operation of auxiliary enterprises (i.e., college-owned and operated satellite business operations); service departments (i.e., college units that provide specialized services to other college units); and other revenue-producing units at community colleges. Suggests effective management and operational practices. Discusses the…

  3. Analysis of the Pipe Heat Loss of the Water Flow Calorimetry System in EAST Neutral Beam Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chundong; Chen, Yu; Xu, Yongjian; Yu, Ling; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Weitang

    2016-11-01

    Neutral beam injection heating is one of the main auxiliary heating methods in controllable nuclear fusion research. In the EAST neutral beam injector, a water flow calorimetry (WFC) system is applied to measure the heat load on the electrode system of the ion source and the heat loading components of the beamline. Due to the heat loss in the return water pipe, there are some measuring errors for the current WFC system. In this paper, the errors were measured experimentally and analyzed theoretically, which lay a basis for the exact calculation of beam power deposition distribution and neutralization efficiency. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2013GB101001) and the International Science & Technology Cooperation Program of China (No. 2014DFG61950)

  4. Solar heating system at Quitman County Bank, Marks, Mississippi. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-06-01

    Information is provided on the solar heating system installed in a single story wood frame, cedar exterior, sloped roof building, the Quitman County Bank, a branch of the First National Bank of Clarksdale, Mississippi. It is the first solar system in the geographical area and has promoted much interest. The system has on-site temperature and power measurements readouts. The 468 square feet of Solaron air flat plate collectors provide for 2000 square feet of space heating, an estimated 60% of the heating load. Solar heated air is distributed to the 235 cubic foot rock storage box or to the load (space heating) by a 960 cubic feet per minute air handler unit. A 7.5 ton Carrier air-to-air heat pump with 15 kilowatts of electric booster strips serve as a back-up (auxiliary) to the solar system. Motorized dampers control the direction of airflow and back draft dampers prevent thermal siphoning of conditioned air. The system was turned on in September 1979, and acceptance testing completed in February 1980. This is a Pon Cycle 3 Project with the Government sharing $13,445.00 of the $24,921 Solar Energy System installation cost.

  5. Heat transport system, method and material

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, D.L.

    1987-04-28

    A heat transport system, method and composite material are disclosed in which a plurality of hollow spherical shells or microspheres having an outside diameter of less than or equal to 500 microns are encapsulated or embedded within a bulk material. Each shell has captured therein a volatile working fluid, such that each shell operates as a microsized heat pipe for conducting heat through the composite structure. 1 fig.

  6. Heat pump systems for Spring Creek, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Engen, I.A.

    1982-03-01

    The use of ground water heat pump systems for space heating in the new town of Spring Creek, Montana, is reviewed in this report. The available information, together with a review of manufacturers' specifications and guidelines, indicates ground water heat pump systems can be competitive with comparable electric space conditioning systems, if electricity cost approaches $0.02/kWh. Due to the low water temperature, large volumes of water will be required to carry the peak heat load and district-type supply systems may not be feasible for single-family residential developments. Due to the large water production rates, shallow depth of the reservoir, and proximity of a large surface reservoir, additional reservoir evaluation seems appropriate; obtaining competent hydrological consultation is recommended. If ground water heat pump systems are used in the development care must be exercised in equipment selection; the requirement for cooling capacity at the site is negligible compared to heating load. Some heat pumps designed for southern climates may not provide adequate heating performance on water below 60/sup 0/F.

  7. Stirling heat pump external heat systems: An appliance perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilakis, A. D.; Thomas, J. F.

    1992-08-01

    A major issue facing the Stirling Engine Heat Pump is system cost, and, in particular, the cost of the External Heat System (EHS). The need for high temperature at the heater head (600 C to 700 C) results in low combustion system efficiencies unless efficient heat recovery is employed. The balance between energy efficiency and use of costly high temperature materials is critical to design and cost optimization. Blower power consumption and NO(x) emissions are also important. A new approach to the design and cost optimization of the EHS system was taken by viewing the system from a natural gas-fired appliance perspective. To develop a design acceptable to gas industry requirements, American National Standards Institute (ANSI) code considerations were incorporated into the design process and material selections. A parametric engineering design and cost model was developed to perform the analysis, including the impact of design on NO(x) emissions. Analysis results and recommended EHS design and material choices are given.

  8. District Heating Systems Performance Analyses. Heat Energy Tariff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemele, Jelena; Vigants, Girts; Vitolins, Valdis; Blumberga, Dagnija; Veidenbergs, Ivars

    2014-12-01

    The paper addresses an important element of the European energy sector: the evaluation of district heating (DH) system operations from the standpoint of increasing energy efficiency and increasing the use of renewable energy resources. This has been done by developing a new methodology for the evaluation of the heat tariff. The paper presents an algorithm of this methodology, which includes not only a data base and calculation equation systems, but also an integrated multi-criteria analysis module using MADM/MCDM (Multi-Attribute Decision Making / Multi-Criteria Decision Making) based on TOPSIS (Technique for Order Performance by Similarity to Ideal Solution). The results of the multi-criteria analysis are used to set the tariff benchmarks. The evaluation methodology has been tested for Latvian heat tariffs, and the obtained results show that only half of heating companies reach a benchmark value equal to 0.5 for the efficiency closeness to the ideal solution indicator. This means that the proposed evaluation methodology would not only allow companies to determine how they perform with regard to the proposed benchmark, but also to identify their need to restructure so that they may reach the level of a low-carbon business.

  9. 40 CFR 63.654 - Heat exchange systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... section. (1) All heat exchangers that are in organic HAP service within the heat exchange system that...., the heat exchange system does not contain any heat exchangers that are in organic HAP service as... exchange system in organic HAP service or from each heat exchanger exit line for each heat exchanger...

  10. Solar heating system installed at Troy, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The completed system was composed of three basic subsystems: the collector system consisting of 3,264 square feet of Owens Illinois evacuated glass tube collectors; the storage system which included a 5,000 gallon insulated steel tank; and the distribution and control system which included piping, pumping and heat transfer components as well as the solemoid activated valves and control logic for the efficient and safe operation of the entire system. This solar heating system was installed in an existing facility and was, therefore, a retrofit system. Extracts from the site files, specifications, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

  11. Prototype solar heating and hot water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported in the development of a solar heating and hot water system which uses a pyramidal optics solar concentrator for heating, and consists of the following subsystems: collector, control, transport, and site data acquisition. Improvements made in the components and subsystems are discussed.

  12. Fuel delivery system including heat exchanger means

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffinberry, G. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A fuel delivery system is presented wherein first and second heat exchanger means are each adapted to provide the transfer of heat between the fuel and a second fluid such as lubricating oil associated with the gas turbine engine. Valve means are included which are operative in a first mode to provide for flow of the second fluid through both first and second heat exchange means and further operative in a second mode for bypassing the second fluid around the second heat exchanger means.

  13. ICR Heating in Ion Separation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, A.V.

    2005-12-15

    A systematic procedure for analyzing the physical processes that govern ICR heating in systems for ion separation is developed. The procedure is based on an analytic model of an rf antenna generating rf fields within a plasma column in a magnetic field and includes such issues as the calculation of rf fields, examination of the ICR interaction of ions with these fields, and determination of the distribution function of the ion flow at the exit from the ICR heating system. It is shown that, even in ICR heating systems with easily achievable parameter values, ions with appreciably different masses can be efficiently separated by energy.

  14. Dental Auxiliary Occupations. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingston, Richard D.

    As part of a dental auxiliaries project, a Dental Auxiliary National Technical Advisory Committee was established, and its major undertaking was to assist in the development of a functional inventory for each of the three dental auxiliary occupations (dental assisting, dental hygiene, and dental laboratory technology). The analysis consisted of…

  15. Lowering heat losses in heating systems by using effective forms of heat insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Krasheninnikov, A.N.

    1983-02-01

    The reduction of heat losses in power systems is necessary if fuel economy is to be achieved. The use of thermal insulation to reduce heat losses in power plant equipment is discussed. The types of thermal insulation considered in this study include reinforced foam concrete, bituminous perlite, mineral wool, and cellular plastics. The insulating properties of each of these materials are discussed.

  16. Stirling heat pump external heat systems - An appliance perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilakis, Andrew D.; Thomas, John F.

    A major issue facing the Stirling Engine Heat Pump is system cost, and, in particular, the cost of the External Heat System (EHS). The need for high temperature at the heater head (600 C to 700 C) results in low combustion system efficiencies unless efficient heat recovery is employed. The balance between energy efficiency and use of costly high temperature materials is critical to design and cost optimization. Blower power consumption and NO(x) emissions are also important. A new approach to the design and cost optimization of the EHS was taken by viewing the system from a natural gas-fired appliance perspective. To develop a design acceptable to gas industry requirements, American National Standards Institute (ANSI) code considerations were incorporated into the design process and material selections. A parametric engineering design and cost model was developed to perform the analysis, including the impact of design on NO(x) emissions. Analysis results and recommended EHS design and material choices are given.

  17. In situ heat treatment process utilizing a closed loop heating system

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Nguyen, Scott Vinh

    2010-12-07

    Systems and methods for an in situ heat treatment process that utilizes a circulation system to heat one or more treatment areas are described herein. The circulation system may use a heated liquid heat transfer fluid that passes through piping in the formation to transfer heat to the formation. In some embodiments, the piping may be positioned in at least two of the wellbores.

  18. Space shuttle heat pipe thermal control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alario, J.

    1973-01-01

    Heat pipe (HP) thermal control systems designed for possible space shuttle applications were built and tested under this program. They are: (1) a HP augmented cold rail, (2) a HP/phase change material (PCM) modular heat sink and (3) a HP radiating panel for compartment temperature control. The HP augmented cold rail is similar to a standard two-passage fluid cold rail except that it contains an integral, centrally located HP throughout its length. The central HP core helps to increase the local power density capability by spreading concentrated heat inputs over the entire rail. The HP/PCM modular heat sink system consists of a diode HP connected in series to a standard HP that has a PCM canister attached to its mid-section. It is designed to connect a heat source to a structural heat sink during normal operation, and to automatically decouple from it and sink to the PCM whenever structural temperatures are too high. The HP radiating panel is designed to conductively couple the panel feeder HPs directly to a fluid line that serves as a source of waste heat. It is a simple strap-on type of system that requires no internal or external line modifications to distribute the heat to a large radiating area.

  19. Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2014-08-12

    This disclosure relates to a waste heat recovery (WHR) system and to a system and method for regulation of a fluid inventory in a condenser and a receiver of a Rankine cycle WHR system. Such regulation includes the ability to regulate the pressure in a WHR system to control cavitation and energy conversion.

  20. Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2016-05-10

    This disclosure relates to a waste heat recovery (WHR) system and to a system and method for regulation of a fluid inventory in a condenser and a receiver of a Rankine cycle WHR system. Such regulation includes the ability to regulate the pressure in a WHR system to control cavitation and energy conversion.

  1. Prototype solar heating and hot water systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Progress made in the development of a solar hot water and space heating system is described in four quarterly reports. The program schedules, technical status and other program activities from 6 October 1976 through 30 September 1977 are provided.

  2. SIMS prototype system 1: Design data brochure. [solar heating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A prototype solar heating and hot water system using air as the collector fluid and a pebble bed for heat storage was designed for installation into a single family dwelling. The system, subsystem, and installation requirements are described. System operation and performance are discussed, and procedures for sizing the system to a specific site are presented.

  3. A solar heating system with annual storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzari, F.; Raffellini, G.

    1981-07-01

    A solar heated house with long term storage capability, built in Trento, Italy, is described. The one story house was built from modular components and has a total heated volume of 1130 cu m. Flat plate solar collectors with a water-antifreeze medium are located beneath the lawn, and six cylindrical underground tanks holding 130 cu m of water heated by thermal energy from the collectors are situated under the garden. The house walls have an 8 cm cavity filled with 5 cm of formaldehyde foam, yielding a heat transmission (U) of 0.37 W/sq m/deg C. The roof and ceilings are insulated with fiberglass and concrete, producing U-values of 0.46 W/sq m/deg C and 0.57 W/sq m/deg C, respectively. Heat pumps using 6 kW move thermal energy between the house and the tanks. Direct hot water heating occurs in the summer, and direct home heating when the stored water temperature exceeds 32 C. A computer model was developed which traces the annual heat flow and it is shown that the system supplies all heating requirements for the house, with electrical requirements equal to 20 percent of the annual house needs.

  4. Overview of waste heat utilization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. M.

    1984-01-01

    The heavy truck diesel engine rejects a significant fraction of its fuel energy in the form of waste heat. Historically, the Department of Energy has supported technology efforts for utilization of the diesel exhaust heat. Specifically, the Turbocompound and the Organic Rankine Cycle System (ORCS) have demonstrated that meaningful improvements in highway fuel economy can be realized through waste heat utilization. For heat recovery from the high temperature exhaust of future adiabatic diesel engines, the DOE/NASA are investigating a variety of alternatives based on the Rankine, Brayton, and Stirling power cycles. Initial screening results indicate that systems of this type offer a fuel savings advantage over the turbocompound system. Capital and maintenance cost projections, however, indicate that the alternative power cycles are not competitive on an economic payback basis. Plans call for continued analysis in an attempt to identify a cost effective configuration with adequate fuel savings potential.

  5. Optimal control studies of solar heating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, C B

    1980-01-01

    In the past few years fuel prices have seen steady increases. Also, the supply of fuel has been on the decline. Because of these two problems there has been an increase in the number of solar heated buildings. Since conventional fuel prices are increasing and as a solar heating system represents a high capital cost it is desirable to obtain the maximum performance from a solar heating system. The control scheme that is used in a solar heated building has an effect on the performance of the solar system. The best control scheme possible would, of course, be desired. This report deals with the control problems of a solar heated building. The first of these problems is to control the inside temperature of the building and to minimize the fuel consumption. This problem applies to both solar and conventionally heated buildings. The second problem considered is to control the collector fluid flow to maximize the difference between the useful energy collected and the energy required to pump the fluid. The third problem is to control the enclosure temperature of a building which has two sources of heat, one solar and the other conventional.

  6. Solar heating system at Security State Bank, Starkville, Mississippi. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-08-01

    Information is provided on the Solar Energy Heating System (airtype) installed at the branch bank building, northwest corner of Highway 12 and Spring Street, Starkville, Mississippi. This installation was completed in June, 1979. The 312 square feet of Solaron flat plate air collectors provide for 788 square feet of space heating, an estimated 55 percent of the heating load. Solar heated air is distributed to the 96 cubic foot steel cylinder, which contains two inch diameter rocks. An air handler unit moves the air over the collector and into the steel cylinder. Four motorized dampers and two gravity dampers are also part of the system. A Solaron controller which has sensors located at the collectors, rock storage, and at the return air, automatically controls the system. Auxiliary heating energy is provided by electric resistance duct heaters. This project is part of the US Department of Energy's Solar Demonstration Program with the government sharing $14,201 of the $17,498 solar energy system installation cost. This system was acceptance tested February, 1980, and the demonstration period ends in 1985.

  7. Nuclear reactor with makeup water assist from residual heat removal system

    DOEpatents

    Corletti, Michael M.; Schulz, Terry L.

    1993-01-01

    A pressurized water nuclear reactor uses its residual heat removal system to make up water in the reactor coolant circuit from an in-containment refueling water supply during staged depressurization leading up to passive emergency cooling by gravity feed from the refueling water storage tank, and flooding of the containment building. When depressurization commences due to inadvertence or a manageable leak, the residual heat removal system is activated manually and prevents flooding of the containment when such action is not necessary. Operation of the passive cooling system is not impaired. A high pressure makeup water storage tank is coupled to the reactor coolant circuit, holding makeup coolant at the operational pressure of the reactor. The staged depressurization system vents the coolant circuit to the containment, thus reducing the supply of makeup coolant. The level of makeup coolant can be sensed to trigger opening of successive depressurization conduits. The residual heat removal pumps move water from the refueling water storage tank into the coolant circuit as the coolant circuit is depressurized, preventing reaching the final depressurization stage unless the makeup coolant level continues to drop. The residual heat removal system can also be coupled in a loop with the refueling water supply tank, for an auxiliary heat removal path.

  8. Nuclear reactor with makeup water assist from residual heat removal system

    DOEpatents

    Corletti, M.M.; Schulz, T.L.

    1993-12-07

    A pressurized water nuclear reactor uses its residual heat removal system to make up water in the reactor coolant circuit from an in-containment refueling water supply during staged depressurization leading up to passive emergency cooling by gravity feed from the refueling water storage tank, and flooding of the containment building. When depressurization commences due to inadvertence or a manageable leak, the residual heat removal system is activated manually and prevents flooding of the containment when such action is not necessary. Operation of the passive cooling system is not impaired. A high pressure makeup water storage tank is coupled to the reactor coolant circuit, holding makeup coolant at the operational pressure of the reactor. The staged depressurization system vents the coolant circuit to the containment, thus reducing the supply of makeup coolant. The level of makeup coolant can be sensed to trigger opening of successive depressurization conduits. The residual heat removal pumps move water from the refueling water storage tank into the coolant circuit as the coolant circuit is depressurized, preventing reaching the final depressurization stage unless the makeup coolant level continues to drop. The residual heat removal system can also be coupled in a loop with the refueling water supply tank, for an auxiliary heat removal path. 2 figures.

  9. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A collection of monthly status reports on the development of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems is presented. The effort calls for the development, manufacture, test, system installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation. The systems are 3, 25, and 75 ton size units.

  10. Residential solar-heating system - design brochure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Design brochure for commercially-available solar-heating system is valuable to architects, engineers, and designers. It contains information on system configuration, system sizing, and mechanical layout. Drawings and specifications of all components and typical installation details are included in appendix.

  11. H2-O2 auxiliary power unit for Space Shuttle vehicles - A progress report.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, J. P.; Beremand, D. G.; Cameron, H. M.; Jefferies, K. S.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a program to establish technology readiness of hydrogen-oxygen (H2-O2) auxiliary power units for use on board the Space Shuttle orbiter vehicle. Fundamental objectives include experimentally establishing an acceptable propellant flow control method, verification of combustor stability, and adequate thermal management. An initial auxiliary power unit (APU) configuration with recycled hydrogen flow has been studied and revised toward greater simplicity and scaling ease. The selected APU is a recuperated open-cycle, turbine-driven unit. Series flow of cryogenic hydrogen removes internally-generated heat and heat from the hydraulic system. The revised configuration schematic and its calculated performance are reviewed. A weight comparison is made between the shuttle baseline hydrazine and H2-O2 APU systems, showing that hydrogen-oxygen APUs have the potential of increasing the payload of the Space Shuttle.

  12. Akranes and Borgarfjordur district heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Ragnarsson, A.; Hrolfsson, I.

    1998-12-01

    Akranes and Borgarnes are two towns in the western part of Iceland, about 100 km north of Reykjavik. Geothermal investigations for Akranes started as early as around 1950; but in spite of several attempts, a geothermal field, which could be utilized economically, was not found for a long period. After the increase in oil prices in the early 1970s, further studies were carried out. On the basis of the results of those studies, it was decided to build a combined district heating system for Akranes, Borgarnes, Hvanneyri (agricultural school) and some farms in the Borgarfjordur region. The water is piped from the hot spring Deildartunga, which is one of the largest hot springs in the world. Besides that, the system utilizes two wells at the farm Baer. The utilization of the hot spring makes the system different from most other district heating systems in Iceland, which are based on water from wells. Akranes and Borgarfjordur District Heating System was established in 1979. Before that time, space heating in this area was both by oil (93%) and electricity (7%). The system has now been split into three companies: one that is responsible for all the hot water production and transmission, and one district heating system for each of the two communities.

  13. Prototype solar heating and hot water systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Alternative approaches to solar heating and hot water system configurations were studied, parametrizing the number and location of the dampers, the number and location of the fans, the interface locations with the furnace, the size and type of subsystems, and operating modes. A two-pass air-heating collector was selected based on efficiency and ease of installation. Also, an energy transport module was designed to compactly contain all the mechanical and electrical control components. System performance calculations were carried out over a heating season for the tentative site location at Tunkhnana, Pa. Results illustrate the effect of collector size, storage capacity, and use of a reflector. Factors which affected system performance include site location, insulative quality of the house, and of the system components. A preliminary system performance specification is given.

  14. Auxiliary power unit for moving a vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Akasam, Sivaprasad; Johnson, Kris W.; Johnson, Matthew D.; Slone, Larry M.; Welter, James Milton

    2009-02-03

    A power system is provided having at least one traction device and a primary power source configured to power the at least one traction device. In addition, the power system includes an auxiliary power source also configured to power the at least one traction device.

  15. Carbon nanotube heat-exchange systems

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Terry Joseph; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-11-11

    A carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) and method for producing the same. One embodiment of the carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) comprises a microchannel structure (24) having an inlet end (30) and an outlet end (32), the inlet end (30) providing a cooling fluid into the microchannel structure (24) and the outlet end (32) discharging the cooling fluid from the microchannel structure (24). At least one flow path (28) is defined in the microchannel structure (24), fluidically connecting the inlet end (30) to the outlet end (32) of the microchannel structure (24). A carbon nanotube structure (26) is provided in thermal contact with the microchannel structure (24), the carbon nanotube structure (26) receiving heat from the cooling fluid in the microchannel structure (24) and dissipating the heat into an external medium (19).

  16. 46 CFR 154.178 - Contiguous hull structure: Heating system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Contiguous hull structure: Heating system. 154.178... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.178 Contiguous hull structure: Heating system. The heating system for... the heating capacity to meet § 154.174(b)(2) or § 154.176(b)(2); (b) Have stand-by heating to...

  17. 46 CFR 154.178 - Contiguous hull structure: Heating system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Contiguous hull structure: Heating system. 154.178... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.178 Contiguous hull structure: Heating system. The heating system for... the heating capacity to meet § 154.174(b)(2) or § 154.176(b)(2); (b) Have stand-by heating to...

  18. 46 CFR 154.178 - Contiguous hull structure: Heating system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Contiguous hull structure: Heating system. 154.178... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.178 Contiguous hull structure: Heating system. The heating system for... the heating capacity to meet § 154.174(b)(2) or § 154.176(b)(2); (b) Have stand-by heating to...

  19. 46 CFR 154.178 - Contiguous hull structure: Heating system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contiguous hull structure: Heating system. 154.178... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.178 Contiguous hull structure: Heating system. The heating system for... the heating capacity to meet § 154.174(b)(2) or § 154.176(b)(2); (b) Have stand-by heating to...

  20. 46 CFR 154.178 - Contiguous hull structure: Heating system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Contiguous hull structure: Heating system. 154.178... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.178 Contiguous hull structure: Heating system. The heating system for... the heating capacity to meet § 154.174(b)(2) or § 154.176(b)(2); (b) Have stand-by heating to...

  1. Design of panel heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bohle, J.; Klan, H.

    2000-07-01

    Panel heating and cooling systems use controlled temperature surfaces in the floor, walls, or ceiling of a conditioned space. The temperature is maintained by a circulating fluid through a circuit embedded in the panel. Heat transfer occurs by radiation and convection to or from a room. The performance of these systems may be determined by design calculations or testing. Thermal testing and system analysis by experiments are costly and inefficient. For different closed panel systems, finite element-based models and programs were developed by which temperature distribution in the construction, interdependence between performance and mean carrier fluid temperature, panel surface temperature, and room temperature can be calculated. One single power function product of all relevant parameters has been derived as an algorithm for performance calculations of panel heating and cooling systems, which can be adapted for other systems. Findings have been verified by experiment for floor heating panels with best results. These basic equations provided the design standards for German Standard DIN 4725, ''Thermal Output of Floor Heating'', which has been adopted as European Standard EN 1264. Finite element method calculation results were also compared with results from design calculations based on the ASHRAE method.

  2. Control system for fluid heated steam generator

    DOEpatents

    Boland, James F.; Koenig, John F.

    1985-01-01

    A control system for controlling the location of the nucleate-boiling region in a fluid heated steam generator comprises means for measuring the temperature gradient (change in temperature per unit length) of the heating fluid along the steam generator; means for determining a control variable in accordance with a predetermined function of temperature gradients and for generating a control signal in response thereto; and means for adjusting the feedwater flow rate in accordance with the control signal.

  3. Control system for fluid heated steam generator

    DOEpatents

    Boland, J.F.; Koenig, J.F.

    1984-05-29

    A control system for controlling the location of the nucleate-boiling region in a fluid heated steam generator comprises means for measuring the temperature gradient (change in temperature per unit length) of the heating fluid along the steam generator; means for determining a control variable in accordance with a predetermined function of temperature gradients and for generating a control signal in response thereto; and means for adjusting the feedwater flow rate in accordance with the control signal.

  4. Alkali Metal Heat Pipe Life Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Robert S.

    2004-07-01

    One approach to fission power system design uses alkali metal heat pipes for the core primary heat-transfer system. Heat pipes may also be used as radiator elements or auxiliary thermal control elements. This synopsis characterizes long-life core heat pipes. References are included where information that is more detailed can be found. Specifics shown here are for demonstration purposes and do not necessarily reflect current Nasa Project Prometheus point designs. (author)

  5. Nonstationary Heat Conduction in Atomic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amit K.

    Understanding heat at the atomistic level is an interesting exercises. It is fascinating to note how the vibration of atoms result into thermodynamic concept of heat. This thesis aims to bring insights into different constitutive laws of heat conduction. We also develop a framework in which the interaction of thermostats to the system can be studied and a well known Kapitza effect can be reduced. The thesis also explores stochastic and continuum methods to model the latent heat release in the first order transition of ideal silicon surfaces into dimers. We divide the thesis into three works which are connected to each other: 1. Fourier's law leads to a diffusive model of heat transfer in which a thermal signal propagates infinitely fast and the only material parameter is the thermal conductivity. In micro- and nano-scale systems, non-Fourier effects involving coupled diffusion and wavelike propagation of heat can become important. An extension of Fourier's law to account for such effects leads to a Jeffreys-type model for heat transfer with two relaxation times. In this thesis, we first propose a new Thermal Parameter Identification (TPI) method for obtaining the Jeffreys-type thermal parameters from molecular dynamics simulations. The TPI method makes use of a nonlinear regression-based approach for obtaining the coefficients in analytical expressions for cosine and sine-weighted averages of temperature and heat flux over the length of the system. The method is applied to argon nanobeams over a range of temperature and system sizes. The results for thermal conductivity are found to be in good agreement with standard Green-Kubo and direct method calculations. The TPI method is more efficient for systems with high diffusivity and has the advantage, that unlike the direct method, it is free from the influence of thermostats. In addition, the method provides the thermal relaxation times for argon. Using the determined parameters, the Jeffreys-type model is able to

  6. Effect of Modifications to Induction System on Altitude Performance of V-1710-93 Engine III : Use of Parabolic Rotating Guide Vanes and NACA Designed Auxiliary-stage Inlet Elbow and Interstage Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Standahar, Ray M; Mccarty, James S

    1947-01-01

    Bench runs of a modified V-1710-93 engine equipped with a two-stage supercharger, interstage carburetor, aftercooler assembly, and backfire screens have been made at a simulated altitude of 29,000 feet to determine the effect of several induction-system modifications on the engine and supercharger performance. The standard guide vanes on the auxiliary- and engine-stage superchargers were replaced by rotating guide vanes with a parabolic blade profile. The auxiliary-stage inlet elbow and interstage duct were replaced with new units of NACA design. These modifications were made one at a time and data were obtained after each change to determine the effect of each modification. All runs were made at a constant engine speed of 3000 rpm at a simulated altitude of 29,000 feet and all changes in engine power were made by varying the speed of the auxiliary-stage supercharger.

  7. Manual with auxiliary transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, S.

    1987-06-23

    This patent describes a vehicular transmission of the type in which a manual transmission has two parallel shafts. One shaft is connected through a transmission clutch to an engine in which manual transmission is connected in series to an auxiliary transmission having high and low speed transmission lines. The auxiliary transmission has a high speed transmission line equipped with a hydraulic clutch and a low speed transmission line equipped with a one-way clutch for allowing the overrun of the output side of the low speed transmission line so that the low speed transmission line is established when the hydraulic clutch is released. The high speed transmission is established when the hydraulic clutch is applied. A sleeve shaft is on one of the two shafts. A transmission gear mechanism connects the sleeve shaft to the other shaft. One shaft has an extension with a fixed gear. A coacting gear is fixed on the sleeve shaft, the hydraulic clutch and coacting gear positioned on the extension of one shaft, an idle gear mechanism in meshing engagement with both the coacting gear and the fixed gear. The idle gear mechanism has a low speed transmission line one-way clutch, and the hydraulic clutch is operable to connect and disconnect the sleeve shaft to and from the one shaft.

  8. Asymmetric Heat Conduction in Nonlinear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bambi

    2008-12-01

    Heat conduction is an old yet important problem. Since Fourier introduced the law bearing his name two hundred years ago, a first-principle derivation of this law from statistical mechanics is still lacking. Worse still, the validity of this law in low dimensions, and the necessary and sufficient conditions for its validity are still far from clear. In this talk I'll give a review of recent works done on this subject. I'll also report our latest work on asymmetric heat conduction in nonlinear systems. The study of heat condution is not only of theoretical interest but also of practical interest. The study of electric conduction has led to the invention of such important electric devices such as electric diodes and transistors. The study of heat conduction may also lead to the invention of thermal diodes and transistors in the future. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  9. Radiation detector system having heat pipe based cooling

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Saveliev, Valeri D.; Barkan, Shaul

    2006-10-31

    A radiation detector system having a heat pipe based cooling. The radiation detector system includes a radiation detector thermally coupled to a thermo electric cooler (TEC). The TEC cools down the radiation detector, whereby heat is generated by the TEC. A heat removal device dissipates the heat generated by the TEC to surrounding environment. A heat pipe has a first end thermally coupled to the TEC to receive the heat generated by the TEC, and a second end thermally coupled to the heat removal device. The heat pipe transfers the heat generated by the TEC from the first end to the second end to be removed by the heat removal device.

  10. Joule heating scanning structure system.

    PubMed

    Moya, J A

    2016-08-01

    A method and its system to study the structural evolution on soft magnetic amorphous and nanocrystalline ribbon shaped alloys are presented. With only one sample, a complete set of magnetic and electric data at room and at high temperature are obtained in a relatively short period of time, allowing us to elucidate the structural changes occurring in the alloy and to determine the optimal soft magnetic properties annealing conditions.

  11. 14 CFR 25.445 - Auxiliary aerodynamic surfaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Auxiliary aerodynamic surfaces. 25.445... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.445 Auxiliary aerodynamic surfaces. (a) When significant, the aerodynamic influence...

  12. Solar heating and cooling system design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The development of eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems is reported. Manufacture, test, installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and monitoring the operation of prototype systems is included. Heating and cooling equipment for single family residential and commercial applications and eight operational test sites (four heating and four heating and cooling) is described.

  13. Diesel-fueled solid oxide fuel cell auxiliary power units for heavy-duty vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, T.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    2000-05-15

    This paper explores the potential of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCS) as 3--10 kW auxiliary power units for trucks and military vehicles operating on diesel fuel. It discusses the requirements and specifications for such units, and the advantages, challenges, and development issues for SOFCS used in this application. Based on system design and analysis, such systems should achieve efficiencies approaching 40% (lower heating value), with a relatively simple system configuration. The major components of such a system are the fuel cell stack, a catalytic autothermal reformer, and a spent gas burner/air preheater. Building an SOFC-based auxiliary power unit is not straightforward, however, and the tasks needed to develop a 3--10 kW brassboard demonstration unit are outlined.

  14. Preliminary design package for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Summarized preliminary design information on activities associated with the development, delivery and support of solar heating and cooling systems is given. These systems are for single family dwellings and commercial applications. The heating/cooling system use a reversible vapor compression heat pump that is driven in the cooling mode by a Rankine power loop, and in the heating mode by a variable speed electric motor. The heating/cooling systems differ from the heating-only systems in the arrangement of the heat pump subsystem and the addition of a cooling tower to provide the heat sink for cooling mode operation.

  15. Passive vapor transport solar heating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hedstrom, J.C.; Neeper, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    In the systems under consideration, refrigerant is evaporated in a solar collector and condensed in thermal storage for space or water heating located within the building at a level below that of the collector. Condensed liquid is lifted to an accumulator above the collector by the vapor pressure generated in the collector. Tests of two systems are described, and it is concluded that one of these systems offers distinct advantages.

  16. Vapor-phase heat-transport system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedstrom, J. C.

    1983-11-01

    A vapor-phase heat-transport system is being tested in one of the passive test cells at Los Alamos. The system consists of one selective-surface collector and a condenser inside a water storage tank. The refrigerant, R-11, can be returned to the collector by gravity or with a pump. Results from several operating configurations are presented, together with a comparison with other passive systems. A new self-pumping concept is presented.

  17. Vapor-phase heat-transport system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedstrom, J. C.

    A vapor-phase heat-transport system is being tested in one of the passive test cells at Los Alamos. The system consists of one selective-surface collector and a condenser inside a water storage tank. The refrigerant, R-11, can be returned to the collector by gravity or with a pump. Results from several operating configurations are presented, together with a comparison with other passive systems. A new self-pumping concept is presented.

  18. Heat-Flux Gage thermophosphor system

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, K.W.

    1991-08-01

    This document describes the installation, hardware requirements, and application of the Heat-Flux Gage (Version 1.0) software package developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Applied Technology Division. The developed software is a single component of a thermographic phosphor-based temperature and heat-flux measurement system. The heat-flux transducer was developed by EG G Energy Measurements Systems and consists of a 1- by 1-in. polymethylpentene sheet coated on the front and back with a repeating thermographic phosphor pattern. The phosphor chosen for this application is gadolinium oxysulphide doped with terbium. This compound has a sensitive temperature response from 10 to 65.6{degree}C (50--150{degree}F) for the 415- and 490-nm spectral emission lines. 3 refs., 17 figs.

  19. Solar heating, cooling, and domestic hot water system installed at Kaw Valley State Bank and Trust Company, Topeka, Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The building has approximately 5600 square feet of conditioned space. Solar energy was used for space heating, space cooling, and preheating domestic hot water (DHW). The solar energy system had an array of evacuated tube-type collectors with an area of 1068 square feet. A 50/50 solution of ethylene glycol and water was the transfer medium that delivered solar energy to a tube-in-shell heat exchanger that in turn delivered solar heated water to a 1100 gallon pressurized hot water storage tank. When solar energy was insufficient to satisfy the space heating and/or cooling demand, a natural gas-fired boiler provided auxiliary energy to the fan coil loops and/or the absorption chillers. Extracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, and installation, operation and maintenance instructions are presented.

  20. Solar heating and cooling system design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The progress made in the manufacture, test, evaluation, installation, problem resolution, performance evaluation, and development of eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems is described.

  1. Energy Integrated Lighting-Heating-Cooling System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meckler, Gershon; And Others

    1964-01-01

    Energy balance problems in the design of office buildings are analyzed. Through the use of integrated systems utilizing dual purpose products, a controlled environment with minimum expenditure of energy, equipment and space can be provided. Contents include--(1) office building occupancy loads, (2) office building heating load analysis, (3) office…

  2. Student Services and Auxiliary Enterprises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Jeffrey S.

    2012-01-01

    A greater number of campuses have broadened concepts related to student development connecting traditional student affairs and campus auxiliary services. This connection is increasingly evident in the evolution of sustainability concerns and activities. This chapter explores the role of campus auxiliaries in the promotion of campus environmental…

  3. Emergency heat removal system for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Dunckel, Thomas L.

    1976-01-01

    A heat removal system for nuclear reactors serving as a supplement to an Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) during a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) comprises a plurality of heat pipes having one end in heat transfer relationship with either the reactor pressure vessel, the core support grid structure or other in-core components and the opposite end located in heat transfer relationship with a heat exchanger having heat transfer fluid therein. The heat exchanger is located external to the pressure vessel whereby excessive core heat is transferred from the above reactor components and dissipated within the heat exchanger fluid.

  4. Acquisition systems for heat transfer measurement

    SciTech Connect

    De Witt, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Practical heat transfer data acquisition systems are normally characterized by the need for high-resolution, low-drift, low-speed recording devices. Analog devices such as strip chart or circular recorders and FM analog magnetic tape have excellent resolution and work well when data will be presented in temperature versus time format only and need not be processed further. Digital systems are more complex and require an understanding of the following components: digitizing devices, interface bus types, processor requirements, and software design. This paper discusses all the above components of analog and digital data acquisition, as they are used in current practice. Additional information on thermocouple system analysis will aid the user in developing accurate heat transfer measuring systems.

  5. Cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system

    DOEpatents

    Metz, Philip D.

    1982-01-01

    A cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system wherein collected solar heat energy is ground stored and permitted to radiate into the adjacent ground for storage therein over an extended period of time when such heat energy is seasonally maximally available. Thereafter, when said heat energy is seasonally minimally available and has propagated through the adjacent ground a substantial distance, the stored heat energy may be retrieved by a circumferentially arranged heat transfer means having a high rate of heat transfer.

  6. Cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system

    DOEpatents

    Metz, P.D.

    A cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system wherein collected solar heat energy is ground stored and permitted to radiate into the adjacent ground for storage therein over an extended period of time when such heat energy is seasonally maximally available. Thereafter, when said heat energy is seasonally minimally available and has propagated through the adjacent ground a substantial distance, the stored heat energy may be retrieved by a circumferentially arranged heat transfer means having a high rate of heat transfer.

  7. 14 CFR 135.158 - Pitot heat indication systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pitot heat indication systems. 135.158... Equipment § 135.158 Pitot heat indication systems. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section... instrument pitot heating system unless the airplane is also equipped with an operable pitot heat...

  8. 14 CFR 135.158 - Pitot heat indication systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pitot heat indication systems. 135.158... Equipment § 135.158 Pitot heat indication systems. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section... instrument pitot heating system unless the airplane is also equipped with an operable pitot heat...

  9. Heating and current drive systems for TPX

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, D.; Goranson, P.; Halle, A. von; Bernabei, S.; Greenough, N.

    1994-05-24

    The heating and current drive (H and CD) system proposed for the TPX tokamak will consist of ion cyclotron, neutral beam, and lower hybrid systems. It will have 17.5 MW of installed H and CD power initially, and can be upgraded to 45 MW. It will be used to explore advanced confinement and fully current-driven plasma regimes with pulse lengths of up to 1,000 s.

  10. 46 CFR 153.430 - Heat transfer systems; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Heat transfer systems; general. 153.430 Section 153.430... Temperature Control Systems § 153.430 Heat transfer systems; general. Each cargo cooling system required by... separated from all other cooling and heating systems; and (c) Allow manual regulation of the system's...

  11. 46 CFR 153.430 - Heat transfer systems; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Heat transfer systems; general. 153.430 Section 153.430... Temperature Control Systems § 153.430 Heat transfer systems; general. Each cargo cooling system required by... separated from all other cooling and heating systems; and (c) Allow manual regulation of the system's...

  12. 46 CFR 153.430 - Heat transfer systems; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Heat transfer systems; general. 153.430 Section 153.430... Temperature Control Systems § 153.430 Heat transfer systems; general. Each cargo cooling system required by... separated from all other cooling and heating systems; and (c) Allow manual regulation of the system's...

  13. 46 CFR 153.430 - Heat transfer systems; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Heat transfer systems; general. 153.430 Section 153.430... Temperature Control Systems § 153.430 Heat transfer systems; general. Each cargo cooling system required by... separated from all other cooling and heating systems; and (c) Allow manual regulation of the system's...

  14. 46 CFR 153.430 - Heat transfer systems; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Heat transfer systems; general. 153.430 Section 153.430... Temperature Control Systems § 153.430 Heat transfer systems; general. Each cargo cooling system required by... separated from all other cooling and heating systems; and (c) Allow manual regulation of the system's...

  15. Solar heating and cooling systems design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The development and delivery of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems for installation and operational test was reported. Two heating and six heating and cooling units will be delivered for single family residences, multiple family residences and commercial applications.

  16. Cyclotron resonance heating systems for SST-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, D.; Kumar, Sunil; Singh, Raj; Sathyanarayana, K.; Kulkarni, S. V.; Mukherjee, A.; Shukla, B. K.; Singh, J. P.; Srinivas, Y. S. S.; Khilar, P.; Kushwah, M.; Kumar, Rajnish; Sugandhi, R.; Chattopadhyay, P.; Raghuraj, Singh; Jadav, H. M.; Kadia, B.; Singh, Manoj; Babu, Rajan; Jatin, P.; Agrajit, G.; Biswas, P.; Bhardwaj, A.; Rathi, D.; Siju, G.; Parmar, K.; Varia, A.; Dani, S.; Pragnesh, D.; Virani, C.; Patel, Harsida; Dharmesh, P.; Makwana, A. R.; Kirit, P.; Harsha, M.; Soni, J.; Yadav, V.; Bhattacharya, D. S.; Shmelev, M.; Belousov, V.; Kurbatov, V.; Belov, Yu.; Tai, E.

    2006-03-01

    RF systems in the ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) range and electron cyclotron resonance frequency (ECRF) range are in an advanced stage of commissioning, to carry out pre-ionization, breakdown, heating and current drive experiments on the steady-state superconducting tokamak SST-1. Initially the 1.5 MW continuous wave ICRF system would be used to heat the SST-1 plasma to 1.0 keV during a pulse length of 1000 s. For different heating scenarios at 1.5 and 3.0 T, a wide band of operating frequencies (20-92 MHz) is required. To meet this requirement two CW 1.5 MW rf generators are being developed in-house. A pressurized as well as vacuum transmission line and launcher for the SST-1-ICRF system has been commissioned and tested successfully. A gyrotron for the 82.6 GHz ECRF system has been tested for a 200 kW/1000 s operation on a water dummy load with 17% duty cycle. High power tests of the transmission line have been carried out and the burn pattern at the exit of transmission line shows a gaussian nature. Launchers used to focus and steer the microwave beam in plasma volume are characterized by a low power microwave source and tested for UHV compatibility. Long pulse operation has been made feasible by actively cooling both the systems. In this paper detailed test results and the present status of both the systems are reported.

  17. Heat exchange mediated by a quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasyuk, George Y.; Levin, George A.; Yerkes, Kirk L.

    2012-08-01

    We consider heat transfer between two thermal reservoirs mediated by a quantum system using the generalized quantum Langevin equation. The thermal reservoirs are treated as ensembles of oscillators within the framework of the Drude-Ullersma model. General expressions for the heat current and thermal conductance are obtained for arbitrary coupling strength between the reservoirs and the mediator and for different temperature regimes. As an application of these results we discuss the origin of Fourier's law in a chain of large but finite subsystems coupled to each other by the quantum mediators. We also address a question of anomalously large heat current between the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip and substrate found in a recent experiment. The question of minimum thermal conductivity is revisited in the framework of scaling theory as a potential application of the developed approach.

  18. Heat exchange mediated by a quantum system.

    PubMed

    Panasyuk, George Y; Levin, George A; Yerkes, Kirk L

    2012-08-01

    We consider heat transfer between two thermal reservoirs mediated by a quantum system using the generalized quantum Langevin equation. The thermal reservoirs are treated as ensembles of oscillators within the framework of the Drude-Ullersma model. General expressions for the heat current and thermal conductance are obtained for arbitrary coupling strength between the reservoirs and the mediator and for different temperature regimes. As an application of these results we discuss the origin of Fourier's law in a chain of large but finite subsystems coupled to each other by the quantum mediators. We also address a question of anomalously large heat current between the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip and substrate found in a recent experiment. The question of minimum thermal conductivity is revisited in the framework of scaling theory as a potential application of the developed approach.

  19. Thermal performance of horizontal closed-loop ground-coupled heat pump systems using flowable-fill

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.V. Jr.; Beard, J.T.; Ribando, R.J.; Wilhelm, B.K.

    1996-12-31

    This research evaluates the use of flowable-fill containing fly-ash in place of conventional dirt back-fill in horizontal closed-loop heat exchangers used in ground-source heat pump systems. A computer model was developed to simulate the transient heat transfer response in the fill material and native soil surrounding the heat exchangers. The model consists of a two-dimensional transient conduction model based on the finite-volume method. It simulates the energy extraction from the soil during the heating season and energy addition during the cooling season. A daily system load curve was used to approximate the daily heating and cooling load for a nominal two ton residential application in central Virginia. The computer model determined the thermal performance of various configurations when subjected to seasonal weather conditions. The variation in overall system performance was influenced by earth and fill thermal properties as well as geometric design parameters, such as trench length and depth. Ground-coupled heat pump systems with straight pipe and horizontal Slinky{trademark} configurations were installed at several residential demonstration-sites in Virginia. Temperature measurements were recorded at selected locations surrounding the ground heat exchanger, allowing evaluation of heat exchanger performance. Electrical measurements including heat pump compressor, air handler, and auxiliary electrical resistance energy were used to characterize overall system performance. Experimental measurements and model simulation studies have shown that encasing the ground-loop heat exchangers in flowable-fill rather than in earth backfill improves the overall thermal performance of ground source heat pump systems. Improved performance has been indicated by less extreme fill and soil temperatures and by lower annual electrical energy costs.

  20. Miniature Heat Transport System for Nanosatellite Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Donya M,

    1999-01-01

    The scientific understanding of key physical processes between the Sun and the Earth require simultaneous measurements from many vantage points in space. Nano-satellite technologies will enable a class of constellation missions for the NASA Space Science Sun-Earth Connections. This recent emphasis on the implementation of smaller satellites leads to a requirement for development of smaller subsystems in several areas. Key technologies under development include: advanced miniaturized chemical propulsion; miniaturized sensors; highly integrated, compact electronics; autonomous onboard and ground operations; miniatures low power tracking techniques for orbit determination; onboard RF communications capable of transmitting data to the ground from far distances; lightweight efficient solar array panels; lightweight, high output battery cells; lightweight yet strong composite materials for the nano-spacecraft and deployer-ship structures. These newer smaller systems may have higher power densities and higher thermal transport requirements than seen on previous small satellites. Furthermore, the small satellites may also have a requirement to maintain thermal control through extended earth shadows, possibly up to 8 hours long. Older thermal control technology, such as heaters, thermostats, and heat pipes, may not be sufficient to meet the requirements of these new systems. Conversely, a miniature two-phase heat transport system (Mini-HTS) such as a Capillary Pumped Loop (CPL) or Loop Heat Pipe (LBP) is a viable alternative. A Mini-HTS can provide fine temperature control, thermal diode action, and a highly efficient means of heat transfer. The Mini-HTS would have power capabilities in the range of tens of watts or less and provide thermal control over typical spacecraft ranges. The Mini-HTS would allow the internal portion of the spacecraft to be thermally isolated from the external radiator, thus protecting the internal components from extreme cold temperatures during an

  1. Exergy analysis of the performance of low-temperature district heating system with geothermal heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekret, Robert; Nitkiewicz, Anna

    2014-03-01

    Exergy analysis of low temperature geothermal heat plant with compressor and absorption heat pump was carried out. In these two concepts heat pumps are using geothermal water at 19.5 oC with spontaneous outflow 24 m3/h as a heat source. The research compares exergy efficiency and exergy destruction of considered systems and its components as well. For the purpose of analysis, the heating system was divided into five components: geothermal heat exchanger, heat pump, heat distribution, heat exchanger and electricity production and transportation. For considered systems the primary exergy consumption from renewable and non-renewable sources was estimated. The analysis was carried out for heat network temperature at 50/40 oC, and the quality regulation was assumed. The results of exergy analysis of the system with electrical and absorption heat pump show that exergy destruction during the whole heating season is lower for the system with electrical heat pump. The exergy efficiencies of total system are 12.8% and 11.2% for the system with electrical heat pump and absorption heat pump, respectively.

  2. Convective heat transport in geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1986-08-01

    Most geothermal systems under exploitation for direct use or electrical power production are of the hydrothermal type, where heat is transferred essentially by convection in the reservoir, conduction being secondary. In geothermal systems, buoyancy effects are generally important, but often the fluid and heat flow patterns are largely controlled by geologic features (e.g., faults, fractures, continuity of layers) and location of recharge and discharge zones. During exploitation, these flow patterns can drastically change in response to pressure and temperature declines, and changes in recharge/discharge patterns. Convective circulation models of several geothermal systems, before and after start of fluid production, are described, with emphasis on different characteristics of the systems and the effects of exploitation on their evolution. Convective heat transport in geothermal fields is discussed, taking into consideration (1) major geologic features; (2) temperature-dependent rock and fluid properties; (3) fracture- versus porous-medium characteristics; (4) single- versus two-phase reservoir systems; and (5) the presence of noncondensible gases.

  3. Transient analysis and energy optimization of solar heating and cooling systems in various configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Calise, F.; Dentice d'Accadia, M.; Palombo, A.

    2010-03-15

    In this paper, a transient simulation model of solar-assisted heating and cooling systems (SHC) is presented. A detailed case study is also discussed, in which three different configurations are considered. In all cases, the SHC system is based on the coupling of evacuated solar collectors with a single-stage LiBr-H{sub 2}O absorption chiller, and a gas-fired boiler is also included for auxiliary heating, only during the winter season. In the first configuration, the cooling capacity of the absorption chiller and the solar collector area are designed on the basis of the maximum cooling load, and an electric chiller is used as the auxiliary cooling system. The second layout is similar to the first one, but, in this case, the absorption chiller and the solar collector area are sized in order to balance only a fraction of the maximum cooling load. Finally, in the third configuration, there is no electric chiller, and the auxiliary gas-fired boiler is also used in summer to feed the absorption chiller, in case of scarce solar irradiation. The simulation model was developed using the TRNSYS software, and included the analysis of the dynamic behaviour of the building in which the SHC systems were supposed to be installed. The building was simulated using a single-lumped capacitance model. An economic model was also developed, in order to assess the operating and capital costs of the systems under analysis. Furthermore, a mixed heuristic-deterministic optimization algorithm was implemented, in order to determine the set of the synthesis/design variables that maximize the energy efficiency of each configuration under analysis. The results of the case study were analyzed on monthly and weekly basis, paying special attention to the energy and monetary flows of the standard and optimized configurations. The results are encouraging as for the potential of energy saving. On the contrary, the SHC systems appear still far from the economic profitability: however, this is

  4. Advanced two-phase heat transfer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Theodore D.

    1992-01-01

    Future large spacecraft, such as the Earth Observing System (EOS) platforms, will require a significantly more capable thermal control system than is possible with current 'passive' technology. Temperatures must be controlled much more tightly over a larger surface area. Numerous heat load sources will often be located inside the body of the spacecraft without a good view to space. Power levels and flux densities may be higher than can be accommodated with traditional technology. Integration and ground testing will almost certainly be much more difficult with such larger, more complex spacecraft. For these and similar reasons, the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been developing a new, more capable thermal control technology called capillary pumped loops (CPL's). CPL's represent an evolutionary improvement over heat pipes; they can transport much greater quantities of heat over much longer distances and can serve numerous heat load sources. In addition, CPL's can be fabricated into large cold plates that can be held to tight thermal gradients. Development of this technology began in the early 1980's and is now reaching maturity. CPL's have recently been baselined for the EOS-AM platform (1997 launch) and the COMET spacecraft (1992 launch). This presentation describes this new technology and its applications. Most of the viewgraphs are self descriptive. For those that are less clear additional comments are provided.

  5. Preliminary design activities for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Information on the development of solar heating and cooling systems is presented. The major emphasis is placed on program organization, system size definition, site identification, system approaches, heat pump and equipment design, collector procurement, and other preliminary design activities.

  6. Ejector Noise Suppression with Auxiliary Jet Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, Charles H.; Andersen, Otto P., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    An experimental program to reduce aircraft jet turbulence noise investigated the interaction of small auxiliary jets with a larger main jet. Significant reductions in the far field jet noise were obtained over a range of auxiliary jet pressures and flow rates when used in conjunction with an acoustically lined ejector. While the concept is similar to that of conventional ejector suppressors that use mechanical mixing devices, the present approach should improve thrust and lead to lower weight and less complex noise suppression systems since no hardware needs to be located in the main jet flow. A variety of auxiliary jet and ejector configurations and operating conditions were studied. The best conditions tested produced peak to peak noise reductions ranging from 11 to 16 dB, depending on measurement angle, for auxiliary jet mass flows that were 6.6% of the main jet flow with ejectors that were 8 times the main jet diameter in length. Much larger reductions in noise were found at the original peak frequencies of the unsuppressed jet over a range of far field measurement angles.

  7. Energy-conserving heat pump-boiler systems for district heating

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, H.; Giedt, W.H.; Kasahara, K.; Kawamura, K.; Kudo, K.; Ohta, J.

    1983-08-01

    The energy saving potential of a proposed heat pump-boiler system for district heating is analyzed. Fuel is supplied to a boiler which generates steam to drive a turbine. The turbine output is used to power a heat pump which takes energy from the environment. Introduction of a screw type expander in place of the throttling valve in the heat pump cycle is planned to increase the system performance. District heating is provided by hot water which is heated as it flows through the condensers in the heat pump and turbine cycles. Both series and parallel connected condenser arrangements are considered. Results show that the heat supplied to the water for district heating can be as high as 200 percent of the heating that would be provided by use of the fuel supplied to a conventional boiler system with a thermal efficiency of 90 percent.

  8. Performance of Integrated Hydronic Heating Systems.

    SciTech Connect

    BUTCHER,T.A.

    2007-12-20

    A variety of system configurations are used in North America to meet the heating and domestic hot water needs of single-family homes. This includes, for example: warm air furnaces with electric water heaters; boilers with integrated hot water coils; and boilers with 'indirect' hot water storage tanks. Integrated hydronic systems which provide both heat and hot water are more popular only in the Northeast and mid-Atlantic regions. For those making decisions about configurations of these integrated hydronic systems, including control options, little information is available concerning the annual energy cost implications of these decisions. This report presents results of a project to use a direct load emulation approach to measure the performance of hydronic systems, develop performance curves, and to provide decision tools to consumers. This is a laboratory measurement system involving direct energy input and output measurements under different load patterns. These results are then used to develop performance correlations for specific systems that can be used to predict energy use in specific applications. A wide range of system types have been tested under this project including conventional boilers with 'tankless' internal coils for domestic hot water production, boilers with indirect external storage tanks, tank type water heaters which may also be used for space heating, condensing oil- and gas-fired systems, and systems with custom control features. It is shown that low load and idle energy losses can have a very large impact on the total annual energy use and that the potential energy savings associated with replacing old equipment with newer, high efficiency equipment with low losses at idle or low load can be in the 25% range. These savings are larger than simple combustion efficiency measurements would indicate.

  9. Space and water heating in UK multi-residential buildings: comparison of heating systems and heating design parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolakis, Konstantinos

    2007-05-01

    Space and water heating comprise a large part of the energy needs of a domestic building. The energy performance of the heating systems depends directly on their operating efficiency and indirectly on the heat losses of the building. This study examines the energy performance of various space and water heating systems in a multi-residential building in the UK. Multi-residential buildings are characterised by diverse use of the spaces and the services by the occupants with consequent varying heating loads and operation schedules that the heating systems have to deal with. The energy performance of the systems is analysed in terms of energy consumption, C02 emissions and running cost. Heating design parameters such as localisation or centralisation of the installation of the systems, ventilation rate and heating set point temperature are also examined and their potential of saving heating energy is estimated. Results showed that a ground source heat pump system produces the lowest C02 emissions (5.92 tnC02 per annum) amongst the systems examined (9.76 tnC02 per annum in average). A localised gas-fired warm air system can save 8% of C02 emissions compared to a centralised version of the same system. Great savings can be achieved by lowering the ventilation rate (23%-26% C02 reduction) and lowering the heating set point temperature (23%-27% CQ2 reduction).

  10. 46 CFR 61.20-3 - Main and auxiliary machinery and associated equipment, including fluid control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... control for the means of stopping machinery driving forced and induced draft fans, fuel oil transfer pumps, fuel oil unit pumps, and fans in the ventilation systems serving machinery and cargo spaces shall...

  11. 46 CFR 61.20-3 - Main and auxiliary machinery and associated equipment, including fluid control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... control for the means of stopping machinery driving forced and induced draft fans, fuel oil transfer pumps, fuel oil unit pumps, and fans in the ventilation systems serving machinery and cargo spaces shall...

  12. 46 CFR 61.20-3 - Main and auxiliary machinery and associated equipment, including fluid control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... control for the means of stopping machinery driving forced and induced draft fans, fuel oil transfer pumps, fuel oil unit pumps, and fans in the ventilation systems serving machinery and cargo spaces shall...

  13. Optimal Ground Source Heat Pump System Design

    SciTech Connect

    Ozbek, Metin; Yavuzturk, Cy; Pinder, George

    2015-04-01

    Despite the facts that GSHPs first gained popularity as early as the 1940’s and they can achieve 30 to 60 percent in energy savings and carbon emission reductions relative to conventional HVAC systems, the use of geothermal energy in the U.S. has been less than 1 percent of the total energy consumption. The key barriers preventing this technically-mature technology from reaching its full commercial potential have been its high installation cost and limited consumer knowledge and trust in GSHP systems to deliver the technology in a cost-effective manner in the market place. Led by ENVIRON, with support from University Hartford and University of Vermont, the team developed and tested a software-based a decision making tool (‘OptGSHP’) for the least-cost design of ground-source heat pump (‘GSHP’) systems. OptGSHP combines state of the art optimization algorithms with GSHP-specific HVAC and groundwater flow and heat transport simulation. The particular strength of OptGSHP is in integrating heat transport due to groundwater flow into the design, which most of the GSHP designs do not get credit for and therefore are overdesigned.

  14. Final design of the control and auxiliary systems for the Balcones 60 MJ homopolar pulse power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildenbrand, D. J.; Pichot, M. A.; Price, J. H.

    1986-11-01

    Design criteria and features of a 60 MJ pulse power supply to be operated at the Center for Electromechanics at the University of Texas are described. The system is driven by six 10 MJ homopolar generators (HPG) which can be operated in series, in parallel, or in combination configurations. Component modularity, operational dependability, repetition rate, maintainability, drive train simplicity and failsafe operation criteria were met in the final design. The generators have removable brush assemblies and water cooled field coil assemblies and hydrostatic bearings. A block diagram is provided of the control I-O architecture and back-up systems and operational procedures are outlined.

  15. Vehicle hydraulic system that provides heat for passenger compartment

    DOEpatents

    Bartley, Bradley E.; Blass, James R.; Gibson, Dennis H.

    2001-01-01

    A vehicle includes a vehicle housing which defines a passenger compartment. Attached to the vehicle housing is a hydraulic system, that includes a hydraulic fluid which flows through at least one passageway within the hydraulic system. Also attached to the vehicle housing is a passenger compartment heating system. The passenger compartment heating system includes a heat exchanger, wherein a portion of the heat exchanger is a segment of the at least one passageway of the hydraulic system.

  16. Solution to problems of bacterial impurity of heating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharapov, V. I.; Zamaleev, M. M.

    2015-09-01

    The article describes the problems of the operation of open and closed district heating systems related to the bacteriological contamination of heating-system water. It is noted that district heating systems are basically safe in sanitary epidemiological terms. Data on the dangers of sulfide contamination of heating systems are given. It is shown that the main causes of the development of sulfate-reducing and iron bacteria in heating systems are a significant biological contamination of source water to fuel heating systems, which is determined by water oxidizability, and a low velocity of the motion of heating-system water in the heating system elements. A case of sulfide contamination of a part of the outdoor heat-supply system of the city of Ulyanovsk is considered in detail. Measures for cleaning pipelines and heating system equipment from the waste products of sulfate-reducing bacteria and iron bacteria and for improving the quality of heating-system water by organizing the hydraulic and water-chemistry condition that makes it possible to avoid the bacteriological contamination of heating systems are proposed. The positive effect of sodium silicate on the prevention of sulfide contamination of heating systems is shown.

  17. Prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Designs were completed, hardware was received, and hardware was shipped to two sites. A change was made in the heat pump working fluid. Problem investigation of shroud coatings for the collector received emphasis.

  18. Reno Industrial Park geothermal district heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Lienau, P.J.

    1997-04-01

    Ten miles south of Reno, on U.S. 395 near the junction of the road to historic Virginia City, is Steamboat Hot Springs, a popular stop for travelers since the mid-1800s. Legend has it that Mark Twain named the geothermal area because it looked and sounded like a chugging Mississippi River paddle-wheeler. It is said when he first saw the steam rising from the ground he exclaimed, {open_quotes}Behold! A Steamboat in the desert.{close_quotes} Over the years, the area has been used for its relaxing and curative qualities by Indians, settlers, and geothermal experts. Since the mid-1980s five geothermal power plants have been built at Steamboat Springs and in December 1996 it was announced that the proposed largest geothermal district heating system in the U.S. would supply an industrial park in the area. The active geothermal area is located within the north-south trending graben like trough between the Carson and Virginia Ranges at the southern end of Truckee Meadows. Hot springs and other geothermal features occur over an area of about one square mile. The mid-basin location is controlled by faulting more or less parallel to the major mountain-front faults. It is believed that the heat source for the system is a cooling magmatic body at depth. The Steamboat geothermal area consists of a deep, high-temperature (215{degrees}C to 240{degrees} C) geothermal system, a shallower, moderate-temperature (160{degrees}C to 18{degrees} C) system, and a number of shallow low-temperature (30{degrees}C to 80{degrees}C) subsystems. The higher temperature systems are used for electric-power generation. It is proposed that the exit fluids from the electric power plants be used for the geothermal district heating system.

  19. Space shuttle auxiliary power unit study, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binsley, R. L.; Krause, A. A.; Maddox, R. D.; Marcy, R. D.; Siegler, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    A study was performed to establish the preliminary design of the space shuttle auxiliary power unit. Details of the analysis, optimizations, and design of the components, subsystems and systems are presented.

  20. Auxiliary power controls on the Nelson River HVDC scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Chand, J. )

    1992-02-01

    This paper describes the auxiliary power controls on the Nelson River HVDC scheme. It shows how the fast control feature of the HVDC link can be utilized to enhance the operation of an integrated ac/dc power system.

  1. System Analysis for Decay Heat Removal in Lead-Bismuth Cooled Natural Circulated Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Takaaki Sakai; Yasuhiro Enuma; Takashi Iwasaki; Kazuhiro Ohyama

    2002-07-01

    Decay heat removal analyses for lead-bismuth cooled natural circulation reactors are described in this paper. A combined multi-dimensional plant dynamics code (MSG-COPD) has been developed to conduct the system analysis for the natural circulation reactors. For the preliminary study, transient analysis has been performed for a 100 MWe lead-bismuth-cooled reactor designed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). In addition, decay heat removal characteristics of a 400 MWe lead-bismuth-cooled natural circulation reactor designed by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has been evaluated by using MSG-COPD. PRACS (Primary Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System) is prepared for the JNC's concept to get sufficient heat removal capacity. During 2000 sec after the transient, the outlet temperature shows increasing tendency up to the maximum temperature of 430 Centigrade, because the buoyancy force in a primary circulation path is temporary reduced. However, the natural circulation is recovered by the PRACS system and the out let temperature decreases successfully. (authors)

  2. System Analysis for Decay Heat Removal in Lead-Bismuth-Cooled Natural-Circulation Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Takaaki; Enuma, Yasuhiro; Iwasaki, Takashi

    2004-03-15

    Decay heat removal analyses for lead-bismuth-cooled natural-circulation reactors are described in this paper. A combined multidimensional plant dynamics code (MSG-COPD) has been developed to conduct the system analysis for the natural-circulation reactors. For the preliminary study, transient analysis has been performed for a 300-MW(thermal) lead-bismuth-cooled reactor designed by Argonne National Laboratory. In addition, decay heat removal characteristics of a 400-MW(electric) lead-bismuth-cooled natural-circulation reactor designed by the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has been evaluated by using MSG-COPD. The primary reactor auxiliary cooling system (PRACS) is prepared for the JNC concept to get sufficient heat removal capacity. During 2000 s after the transient, the outlet temperature shows increasing tendency up to the maximum temperature of 430 deg. C because the buoyancy force in a primary circulation path is temporarily reduced. However, the natural circulation is recovered by the PRACS system, and the outlet temperature decreases successfully.

  3. Town of Pagosa Springs geothermal heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.B.

    1997-08-01

    The Town of Pagosa Springs has owned and operated a geothermal heating system since December 1982 to provide geothermal heating during the fall, winter and spring to customers in this small mountain town. Pagosa Springs is located in Archuleta County, Colorado in the southwestern corner of the State. The Town, nestled in majestic mountains, including the Continental Divide to the north and east, has an elevation of 7,150 feet. The use of geothermal water in the immediate area, however, dates back to the 1800`s, with the use of Ute Bands and the Navajo Nation and later by the U.S. Calvery in the 1880`s (Lieutenant McCauley, 1878). The Pagosa area geothermal water has been reported to have healing and therapeutic qualities.

  4. Design and installation of solar heating and hot water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    A no-nonsense explanation of information on the use of solar energy for heating, cooling, and producing hot water. The work is both scholarly and practical. Background of high school algebra is the only mathematics expected. Worked examples but no exercises. Contents: Solar radiation. Heating loads. Design and analysis of flat-place liquid-heating collectors. Flat-plate air-heating collectors. Evacuated solar collectors. Solar hot water systems. Solar ponds. Active solar heating and cooling systems.

  5. Experimental Investigation of A Heat Pipe-Assisted Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiari, Saeed; Mahdavi, Mahboobe; Qiu, Songgang

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, different operation modes of a latent heat thermal energy storage system assisted by a heat pipe network were studied experimentally. Rubitherm RT55 enclosed by a vertical cylindrical container was used as the Phase Change Material (PCM). The embedded heat pipe network consisting of a primary heat pipe and an array of four secondary heat pipes were employed to transfer heat to the PCM. The primary heat pipe transports heat from the heat source to the heat sink. The secondary heat pipes transfer the extra heat from the heat source to PCM during charging process or retrieve thermal energy from PCM during discharging process. The effects of heat transfer fluid (HTF) flow rate and temperature on the thermal performance of the system were investigated for both charging and discharging processes. It was found that the HTF flow rate has a significant effect on the total charging time of the system. Increasing the HTF flow rate results in a remarkable increase in the system input thermal power. The results also showed that the discharging process is hardly affected by the HTF flow rate but HTF temperature plays an important role in both charging and discharging processes. The authors would like to acknowledge the financial supports by Temple University for the project.

  6. Method for Identification of Results of Dynamic Overloads in Assessment of Safety Use of the Mine Auxiliary Transportation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokarczyk, Jarosław

    2016-12-01

    Method for identification the effects of dynamic overload affecting the people, which may occur in the emergency state of suspended monorail is presented in the paper. The braking curve using MBS (Multi-Body System) simulation was determined. For this purpose a computational model (MBS) of suspended monorail was developed and two different variants of numerical calculations were carried out. An algorithm of conducting numerical simulations to assess the effects of dynamic overload acting on the suspended monorails' users is also posted in the paper. An example of computational model FEM (Finite Element Method) composed of technical mean and the anthropometrical model ATB (Articulated Total Body) is shown. The simulation results are presented: graph of HIC (Head Injury Criterion) parameter and successive phases of dislocation of ATB model. Generator of computational models for safety criterion, which enables preparation of input data and remote starting the simulation, is proposed.

  7. Solar heating and domestic hot water system installed at Kansas City, Fire Station, Kansas City, Missouri. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    This document is the final report of the solar energy heating and hot water system installed at the Kansas City Fire Station, Number 24, 2309 Hardesty Street, Kansas City, Missouri. The solar system was designed to provide 47 percent of the space heating, 8800 square feet area and 75 percent of the domestic hot water (DHW) load. The solar system consists of 2808 square feet of Solaron, model 2001, air, flat plate collector subsystem, a concrete box storage subsystem which contains 1428 cubic feet of 1/2 inch diameter pebbles weighing 71 1/2 tons, a DHW preheat tank, blowers, pumps, heat exchangers, air ducting, controls and associated plumbing. Two 120-gallon electric DHW heaters supply domestic hot water which is preheated by the solar system. Auxiliary space heating is provided by three electric heat pumps with electric resistance heaters and four 30-kilowatt electric unit heaters. There are six modes of system operation. This project is part of the Department of Energy PON-1 Solar Demonstration Program with DOE cost sharing $154,282 of the $174,372 solar system cost. The Final Design Review was held March 1977, the system became operational March 1979 and acceptance test was completed in September 1979.

  8. Development and testing of heat transport fluids for use in active solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Work on heat transport fluids for use with active solar heating and cooling systems is described. Program objectives and how they were accomplished including problems encountered during testing are discussed.

  9. Weather network computer to control deck-heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Roe, A.

    1997-04-07

    A ground-source heating system for bridge deicing is briefly described in this article. The deck heating system will be controlled by the Oklahoma state weather network. Warm ground air will be pumped from more than 100 boreholes at least 200 feet deep. The heat transfer fluid, possibly propylene glycol, will be circulated through a sealed tube system in the bridge deck. Costs are estimated at $200,000 for the heating system and $840,000 for the total redecking project.

  10. Submersible pumping system with heat transfer mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Daniel Francis Alan; Prenger, F. Coyne; Hill, Dallas D; Jankowski, Todd Andrew

    2014-04-15

    A submersible pumping system for downhole use in extracting fluids containing hydrocarbons from a well. In one embodiment, the pumping system comprises a rotary induction motor, a motor casing, one or more pump stages, and a cooling system. The rotary induction motor rotates a shaft about a longitudinal axis of rotation. The motor casing houses the rotary induction motor such that the rotary induction motor is held in fluid isolation from the fluid being extracted. The pump stages are attached to the shaft outside of the motor casing, and are configured to impart fluid being extracted from the well with an increased pressure. The cooling system is disposed at least partially within the motor casing, and transfers heat generated by operation of the rotary induction motor out of the motor casing.

  11. Solar powered actuator with continuously variable auxiliary power control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A solar powered system is disclosed in which a load such as a compressor is driven by a main induction motor powered by a solar array. An auxiliary motor shares the load with the solar powered motor in proportion to the amount of sunlight available, is provided with a power factor controller for controlling voltage applied to the auxiliary motor in accordance with the loading on that motor. In one embodiment, when sufficient power is available from the solar cell, the auxiliary motor is driven as a generator by excess power from the main motor so as to return electrical energy to the power company utility lines.

  12. Heat-Transfer Fluids for Solar-Energy Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    43-page report investigates noncorrosive heat-transport fluids compatible with both metallic and nonmetallic solar collectors and plumbing systems. Report includes tables and figures of X-ray inspections for corrosion and schematics of solar-heat transport systems and heat rejection systems.

  13. 24 CFR 3285.905 - Heating oil systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Heating oil systems. 3285.905... Installation Instructions § 3285.905 Heating oil systems. It is recommended that the installation instructions include the following information related to heating oil systems, when applicable: (a) Homes equipped...

  14. 24 CFR 3285.905 - Heating oil systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Heating oil systems. 3285.905... Installation Instructions § 3285.905 Heating oil systems. It is recommended that the installation instructions include the following information related to heating oil systems, when applicable: (a) Homes equipped...

  15. 24 CFR 3285.905 - Heating oil systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Heating oil systems. 3285.905... Installation Instructions § 3285.905 Heating oil systems. It is recommended that the installation instructions include the following information related to heating oil systems, when applicable: (a) Homes equipped...

  16. 24 CFR 3285.905 - Heating oil systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Heating oil systems. 3285.905... Installation Instructions § 3285.905 Heating oil systems. It is recommended that the installation instructions include the following information related to heating oil systems, when applicable: (a) Homes equipped...

  17. 24 CFR 3285.905 - Heating oil systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Heating oil systems. 3285.905... Installation Instructions § 3285.905 Heating oil systems. It is recommended that the installation instructions include the following information related to heating oil systems, when applicable: (a) Homes equipped...

  18. 14 CFR 25.1326 - Pitot heat indication systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pitot heat indication systems. 25.1326 Section 25.1326 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION....1326 Pitot heat indication systems. If a flight instrument pitot heating system is installed,...

  19. 14 CFR 121.342 - Pitot heat indication systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pitot heat indication systems. 121.342... heat indication systems. No person may operate a transport category airplane or, after December 20... heat indication system that complies § 25.1326 of this chapter in effect on April 12, 1978....

  20. 14 CFR 125.206 - Pitot heat indication systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pitot heat indication systems. 125.206... Equipment Requirements § 125.206 Pitot heat indication systems. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of... flight instrument pitot heating system unless the airplane is equipped with an operable pitot...

  1. 14 CFR 121.342 - Pitot heat indication systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pitot heat indication systems. 121.342... heat indication systems. No person may operate a transport category airplane or, after December 20... heat indication system that complies § 25.1326 of this chapter in effect on April 12, 1978....

  2. 14 CFR 125.206 - Pitot heat indication systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pitot heat indication systems. 125.206... Equipment Requirements § 125.206 Pitot heat indication systems. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of... flight instrument pitot heating system unless the airplane is equipped with an operable pitot...

  3. 14 CFR 25.1326 - Pitot heat indication systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pitot heat indication systems. 25.1326 Section 25.1326 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION....1326 Pitot heat indication systems. If a flight instrument pitot heating system is installed,...

  4. Acoustothermal heating of polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Byung Hang; Lee, Kang Soo; Destgeer, Ghulam; Park, Jinsoo; Choung, Jin Seung; Jung, Jin Ho; Shin, Jennifer Hyunjong; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2015-07-01

    We report an observation of rapid (exceeding 2,000 K/s) heating of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), one of the most popular microchannel materials, under cyclic loadings at high (~MHz) frequencies. A microheater was developed based on the finding. The heating mechanism utilized vibration damping in PDMS induced by sound waves that were generated and precisely controlled using a conventional surface acoustic wave (SAW) microfluidic system. The refraction of SAW into the PDMS microchip, called the leaky SAW, takes a form of bulk wave and rapidly heats the microchannels in a volumetric manner. The penetration depths were measured to range from 210 μm to 1290 μm, enough to cover most sizes of microchannels. The energy conversion efficiency was SAW frequency-dependent and measured to be the highest at around 30 MHz. Independent actuation of each interdigital transducer (IDT) enabled independent manipulation of SAWs, permitting spatiotemporal control of temperature on the microchip. All the advantages of this microheater facilitated a two-step continuous flow polymerase chain reaction (CFPCR) to achieve the billion-fold amplification of a 134 bp DNA amplicon in less than 3 min.

  5. Use of a turboexpander in steam power units for heat energy recovery in heat supply systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadykov, R. A.; Daminov, A. Z.; Solomin, I. N.; Futin, V. A.

    2016-05-01

    A method for raising the efficiency of a boiler plant by installing a unit operating by the organic Rankine cycle is presented. Such units allow one to generate electricity to cover the auxiliaries of a heat source at a heat-transfer fluid temperature of no more than 130°C. The results of commissioning tests of boilers revealed that their efficiency is maximized under a load that is close or corresponds to the nominal one. If this load is maintained constantly, excess heat energy is produced. This excess may be used to generate electric energy in a steam power unit with a turboexpander. A way to insert this unit into the flow diagram of a boiler plant is proposed. The results of analysis of turbine types (turboexpanders included) with various capacities are presented, and the optimum type for the proposed flow diagram is chosen. The methodology for the design of turboexpanders and compressors used in the oil and gas industry and their operational data were applied in the analysis of a turboexpander. The results of the thermogasdynamic analysis of a turboexpander and the engineered shape of an axial-radial impeller are presented. Halocarbon R245fa is chosen as the working medium based on its calorimetric properties.

  6. Electrochemical systems configured to harvest heat energy

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Seok Woo; Yang, Yuan; Ghasemi, Hadi; Chen, Gang; Cui, Yi

    2017-01-31

    Electrochemical systems for harvesting heat energy, and associated electrochemical cells and methods, are generally described. The electrochemical cells can be configured, in certain cases, such that at least a portion of the regeneration of the first electrochemically active material is driven by a change in temperature of the electrochemical cell. The electrochemical cells can be configured to include a first electrochemically active material and a second electrochemically active material, and, in some cases, the absolute value of the difference between the first thermogalvanic coefficient of the first electrochemically active material and the second thermogalvanic coefficient of the second electrochemically active material is at least about 0.5 millivolts/Kelvin.

  7. Solar-powered turbocompressor heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Landerman, A.M.; Biancardi, F.R.; Melikian, G.; Meader, M.D.; Kepler, C.E.; Anderson, T.J.; Sitler, J.W.

    1982-08-12

    The turbocompressor comprises a power turbine and a compressor turbine having respective rotors and on a common shaft, rotatably supported by bearings. A first working fluid is supplied by a power loop and is expanded in the turbine. A second working fluid is compressed in the turbine and is circulated in a heat pump loop. A lubricant is mixed with the second working fluid but is excluded from the first working fluid. The bearings are cooled and lubricated by a system which circulates the second working fluid and the intermixed lubricant through the bearings. Such system includes a pump, a thermostatic expansion valve for expanding the working fluid into the space between the bearings, and a return conduit system for withdrawing the expanded working fluid after it passes through the bearings and for returning the working fluid to the evaporator. A shaft seal excludes the lubricant from the power turbine. The power loop includes a float operable by liquid working fluid in the condenser for controlling a recirculation valve so as to maintain a minimum liquid level in the condenser, while causing a feed pump to pump most of the working fluid into the vapor generator. The heat pump compressor loop includes a float in the condenser for operating and expansion valve to maintain a minimum liquid working fluid level in the condenser while causing most of the working fluid to be expanded into the evaporator.

  8. Solar-powered turbocompressor heat pump system

    SciTech Connect

    Landerman, A.M.; Anderson, T.J.; Biancardi, F.; Kepler, C.E.; Meader, M.D.; Melikian, G.; Sitler, J.W.

    1984-08-14

    The turbocompressor comprises a power turbine and a compressor turbine having respective rotors on a common shaft, rotatably supported by bearings. A first working fluid is supplied by a power loop and is expanded in the turbine. A second working fluid is compressed in the turbine and is circulated in a heat pump loop. A lubricant is mixed with the second working fluid but is excluded from the first working fluid. Bearings are cooled and lubricated by a system which circulates the second working fluid and the intermixed lubricant through the bearings. Such system includes a pump, a thermostatic expansion valve for expanding the working fluid into the space between the bearings, and a return conduit system for withdrawing the expanded working fluid after it passes through the bearings and for returning the working fluid to the evaporator. A shaft seal excludes the lubricant from the power turbine. The power loop includes a float operable by liquid working fluid in the condenser for controlling a recirculation valve so as to maintain a minimum liquid level in the condenser, while causing a feed pump to pump most of the working fluid into the vapor generator. The heat pump compressor loop includes a float in the condenser for operating an expansion valve to maintain a minimum liquid working fluid level in the condenser while causing most of the working fluid to be expanded into the evaporator.

  9. 47 CFR 74.6 - Licensing of broadcast auxiliary and low power auxiliary stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... low power auxiliary stations. Applicants for and licensees of remote pickup broadcast stations, aural broadcast auxiliary stations, television broadcast auxiliary stations, and low power auxiliary stations... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Licensing of broadcast auxiliary and low...

  10. 47 CFR 74.6 - Licensing of broadcast auxiliary and low power auxiliary stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... low power auxiliary stations. Applicants for and licensees of remote pickup broadcast stations, aural broadcast auxiliary stations, television broadcast auxiliary stations, and low power auxiliary stations... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Licensing of broadcast auxiliary and low...

  11. 47 CFR 74.6 - Licensing of broadcast auxiliary and low power auxiliary stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... low power auxiliary stations. Applicants for and licensees of remote pickup broadcast stations, aural broadcast auxiliary stations, television broadcast auxiliary stations, and low power auxiliary stations... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Licensing of broadcast auxiliary and low...

  12. 47 CFR 74.6 - Licensing of broadcast auxiliary and low power auxiliary stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... low power auxiliary stations. Applicants for and licensees of remote pickup broadcast stations, aural broadcast auxiliary stations, television broadcast auxiliary stations, and low power auxiliary stations... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Licensing of broadcast auxiliary and low...

  13. 47 CFR 74.6 - Licensing of broadcast auxiliary and low power auxiliary stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Licensing of broadcast auxiliary and low power... low power auxiliary stations. Applicants for and licensees of remote pickup broadcast stations, aural broadcast auxiliary stations, television broadcast auxiliary stations, and low power auxiliary...

  14. Comparison of solar heat pump systems to conventional methods for residential heating, cooling, and water heating, volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, P. J.; Morehouse, J. H.

    1980-04-01

    The series and parallel combined solar heat pump systems investigated are at best marginally competitive, on a 20 year life cycle cost basis, with conventional oil and electric furnace systems. The combined solar heat pump systems are not economically competitive with conventional gas furnace or stand alone heat pump systems for residential space heating, cooling and water heating. The combined solar heat pump systems do offer the potential for significant energy savings as compared to conventional furnace systems and the stand alone heat pump. The cost of that savings, however, is beyond that which the average consumer can be expected to pay. Barring unforeseen manufacturing process or materials breakthroughs, parallel systems prices are firm. The prices listed for series systems already include low cost site built collectors and an optimistic estimate of the liquid to air heat pump costs, and prices on other series system components are firm. A collector cost sensitivity analysis did not offer any encouraging directions towards significant systems cost reduction.

  15. Metal Hydride Heat Storage Technology for Directed Energy Weapon Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-16

    over time after the pulse operation. A compressor -driven metal hydride heat storage system was developed for efficient, compact heat storage and...principle and heat storage performance results of the compressor -driven metal hydride heat storage system through system modeling and prototype testing. The...hyd/m³] Subscripts A Metal hydride reactor B Hydrogen container C Hydrogen compressor s Hydrogen solid phase in hydride f Hydrogen fluid phase

  16. Waste heat driven absorption refrigeration process and system

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, William H.

    1982-01-01

    Absorption cycle refrigeration processes and systems are provided which are driven by the sensible waste heat available from industrial processes and other sources. Systems are disclosed which provide a chilled water output which can be used for comfort conditioning or the like which utilize heat from sensible waste heat sources at temperatures of less than 170.degree. F. Countercurrent flow equipment is also provided to increase the efficiency of the systems and increase the utilization of available heat.

  17. Multimode solar-heating system--Columbia, South Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Report describes failure of six-mode pyramidal-optics system to reduce winter energy savings. Over 12 month period, control problems, energy dissipation, and high operating-energy requirements undermined system efficiency. Energy savings were maximal when system in direct space-heating or hot-water preheating mode. In least efficient mode, heat pumps alternatively mingled storage or collector energy, and space heating was provided by electric heat strip.

  18. Passive integral solar heat collector system

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman Jr., K. T.

    1985-04-30

    The present invention relates to an improved apparatus for collecting, absorbing, transferring, and storing solar heat energy, economically and passively, without pumps or electric power. The apparatus comprises a solar collector with a flat finned heat pipe absorber and an attached integral insulated storage tank with a double wall heat exchanger. The absorber, made of one or more slightly tilted gravity assisted heat pipes with flat absorber fins, absorbs and transfers solar heat by evaporation, vapor transport, and condensation to the slightly elevated heat storage tank. The one or more heat pipes turn on when the sun is shining and turn off automatically when the sun is not shining.

  19. Triple loop heat exchanger for an absorption refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1984-01-01

    A triple loop heat exchanger for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. The triple loop heat exchanger comprises portions of a strong solution line for conducting relatively hot, strong solution from a generator to a solution heat exchanger of the absorption refrigeration system, conduit means for conducting relatively cool, weak solution from the solution heat exchanger to the generator, and a bypass system for conducting strong solution from the generator around the strong solution line and around the solution heat exchanger to an absorber of the refrigeration system when strong solution builds up in the generator to an undesirable level. The strong solution line and the conduit means are in heat exchange relationship with each other in the triple loop heat exchanger so that, during normal operation of the refrigeration system, heat is exchanged between the relatively hot, strong solution flowing through the strong solution line and the relatively cool, weak solution flowing through the conduit means. Also, the strong solution line and the bypass system are in heat exchange relationship in the triple loop heat exchanger so that if the normal flow path of relatively hot, strong solution flowing from the generator to an absorber is blocked, then this relatively, hot strong solution which will then be flowing through the bypass system in the triple loop heat exchanger, is brought into heat exchange relationship with any strong solution which may have solidified in the strong solution line in the triple loop heat exchanger to thereby aid in desolidifying any such solidified strong solution.

  20. Mathematical model for calculation of the heat-hydraulic modes of heating points of heat-supplying systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalaginova, Z. I.

    2016-03-01

    The mathematical model and calculation method of the thermal-hydraulic modes of heat points, based on the theory of hydraulic circuits, being developed at the Melentiev Energy Systems Institute are presented. The redundant circuit of the heat point was developed, in which all possible connecting circuits (CC) of the heat engineering equipment and the places of possible installation of control valve were inserted. It allows simulating the operating modes both at central heat points (CHP) and individual heat points (IHP). The configuration of the desired circuit is carried out automatically by removing the unnecessary links. The following circuits connecting the heating systems (HS) are considered: the dependent circuit (direct and through mixing elevator) and independent one (through the heater). The following connecting circuits of the load of hot water supply (HWS) were considered: open CC (direct water pumping from pipelines of heat networks) and a closed CC with connecting the HWS heaters on single-level (serial and parallel) and two-level (sequential and combined) circuits. The following connecting circuits of the ventilation systems (VS) were also considered: dependent circuit and independent one through a common heat exchanger with HS load. In the heat points, water temperature regulators for the hot water supply and ventilation and flow regulators for the heating system, as well as to the inlet as a whole, are possible. According to the accepted decomposition, the model of the heat point is an integral part of the overall heat-hydraulic model of the heat-supplying system having intermediate control stages (CHP and IHP), which allows to consider the operating modes of the heat networks of different levels connected with each other through CHP as well as connected through IHP of consumers with various connecting circuits of local systems of heat consumption: heating, ventilation and hot water supply. The model is implemented in the Angara data

  1. The medical auxiliary in rural Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chen, P C

    1973-05-05

    One of the steps taken by the government to break the cycle of poverty and ill-health in rural Malaysia is the establishment of a rural health service. Initially, the health unit served 50,000 people; it consisted of 1 main health center; 4 health subcenters, and 20 midwife stations. By the end of 1970, 44 main health centers, 180 health subcenters, and 943 midwife stations were in operation, creating a great demand for all types of health personnel: professional, paramedical, and auxiliary. Doctors are unevenly distributed in West Malaysia: in urban areas, the ratio of doctors to population is 1 to 1500; in rural areas, the ratio is 1 to 25,000. Paramedicals are unevenly distributed too. The scarcity of professionals in rural areas is attributed to professionals' demand for high salaries and the corresponding requirement of professional and social settings which rural areas cannot provide. The rural health unit utilized the tiered pyramidal system for staffing, with heavy reliance on auxiliary personnel. This system enabled the rapid expansion of rural health services, helping reach over a third of the population in just 15 years. As a consequence, infant, toddler and maternal mortality rates declined substantially. Traditional birth attendants, or kampong bidans, are currently being trained, on an experimental basis, simple principles of hygiene and family planning. With the enforcement of the Midwives Act in 1971, indigenous midwives have not been permitted to register as legitimate midwives and are now subject to supervision by health authorities. Future plans include retraining single-purpose midwives in child health and nursing, and giving all assistant nurses midwifery training. The aim is to make these 2 auxiliaries multipurpose community nurse-midwives. Experiences of developed countries show that demand for auxiliaries will continue to increase with the growth of professional personnel.

  2. Optimum Organization and Maximum Capabilities of Heat-Pump Heating Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsirlin, A. M.; Kuz‧min, V. A.

    2016-05-01

    The authors obtained a lower bound for the energy consumption in heating (maintaining an assigned temperature distribution in the system of intercommunicating chambers) and the corresponding distributions of the total heat-transfer coefficients and the temperature of the working medium of a heat pump in contact with the chambers and the environment.

  3. Heat pipe heat rejection system and demonstration model for the nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, D. M.

    1981-01-01

    The critical evaluation and subsequent redesign of the power conversion subsystem of the spacecraft are covered. As part of that evaluation and redesign, prototype heat pipe components for the heat rejection system were designed fabricated and tested. Based on the results of these tests in conjunction with changing mission requirements and changing energy conversion devices, new system designs were investigated. The initial evaluation and redesign was based on state-of-the-art fabrication and assembly techniques for high temperature liquid metal heat pipes and energy conversion devices. The hardware evaluation demonstrated the validity of several complicated heat pipe geometries and wick structures, including an annular-to-circular transition, bends in the heat pipe, long heat pipe condensers and arterial wicks. Additionally, a heat pipe computer model was developed which describes the end point temperature profile of long radiator heat pipes to within several degrees celsius.

  4. Demonstration of an on-site PAFC cogeneration system with waste heat utilization by a new gas absorption chiller

    SciTech Connect

    Urata, Tatsuo

    1996-12-31

    Analysis and cost reduction of fuel cells is being promoted to achieve commercial on-site phosphoric acid fuel cells (on-site FC). However, for such cells to be effectively utilized, a cogeneration system designed to use the heat generated must be developed at low cost. Room heating and hot-water supply are the most simple and efficient uses of the waste heat of fuel cells. However, due to the short room-heating period of about 4 months in most areas in Japan, the sites having demand for waste heat of fuel cells throughout the year will be limited to hotels and hospitals Tokyo Gas has therefore been developing an on-site FC and the technology to utilize tile waste heat of fuel cells for room cooling by means of an absorption refrigerator. The paper describes the results of fuel cell cogeneration tests conducted on a double effect gas absorption chiller heater with auxiliary waste heat recovery (WGAR) that Tokyo Gas developed in its Energy Technology Research Laboratory.

  5. Solar heating and cooling systems design and development. [prototype development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The development of twelve prototype solar heating/cooling systems, six heating and six heating and cooling systems, two each for single family, multi-family, and commercial applications, is reported. Schedules and technical discussions, along with illustrations on the progress made from April 1, 1977 through June 30, 1977 are detailed.

  6. Cradle/pump heating system operation and maintenance manual

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, S.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-01

    This is the operation and maintenance manual for the 241-SY-101 Cradle/Pump Heating System. The Heating System provides the means to heat the pump (HMT {number_sign}2) during cold weather to assure safe and smooth pump installation.

  7. 14 CFR 25.833 - Combustion heating systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Combustion heating systems. 25.833 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Ventilation and Heating § 25.833 Combustion heating systems. Combustion heaters must be approved. Pressurization...

  8. 14 CFR 25.833 - Combustion heating systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Combustion heating systems. 25.833 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Ventilation and Heating § 25.833 Combustion heating systems. Combustion heaters must be approved. Pressurization...

  9. 14 CFR 25.833 - Combustion heating systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Combustion heating systems. 25.833 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Ventilation and Heating § 25.833 Combustion heating systems. Combustion heaters must be approved. Pressurization...

  10. 36. VIEW EAST OF WASTE HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEM IN BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. VIEW EAST OF WASTE HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEM IN BUILDING 43A; THIS WAS PART OF A SYSTEM WHICH PROVIDED HOT WATER FOR OFFICE AND FACTORY BUILDING HEATING IN THE WEST PLANT; NOTE FACTORY WHISTLE TIMER ON TOP OF HEAT EXCHANGER - Scovill Brass Works, 59 Mill Street, Waterbury, New Haven County, CT

  11. Inductively heated particulate matter filter regeneration control system

    SciTech Connect

    Gonze, Eugene V; Paratore Jr., Michael J; Kirby, Kevin W; Phelps, Amanda; Gregoire, Daniel J

    2012-10-23

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter with an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas, a downstream end and zones. The system also includes a heating element. A control module selectively activates the heating element to inductively heat one of the zones.

  12. 14 CFR 23.1326 - Pitot heat indication systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pitot heat indication systems. 23.1326 Section 23.1326 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Instruments: Installation § 23.1326 Pitot heat indication systems. If a flight instrument pitot heating...

  13. 40 CFR 63.1328 - Heat exchange systems provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Heat exchange systems provisions. 63... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers and Resins § 63.1328 Heat exchange... of this subpart. (h) The compliance date for heat exchange systems subject to the provisions of...

  14. 14 CFR 23.1326 - Pitot heat indication systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pitot heat indication systems. 23.1326 Section 23.1326 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Instruments: Installation § 23.1326 Pitot heat indication systems. If a flight instrument pitot heating...

  15. 40 CFR 63.654 - Heat exchange systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Heat exchange systems. 63.654 Section... Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum Refineries § 63.654 Heat exchange systems. (a) Except as specified in paragraph (b) of this section, the owner or operator of a heat...

  16. Heat exchanger bypass system for an absorption refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1984-01-01

    A heat exchanger bypass system for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. The bypass system operates to pass strong solution from the generator around the heat exchanger to the absorber of the absorption refrigeration system when strong solution builds up in the generator above a selected level indicative of solidification of strong solution in the heat exchanger or other such blockage. The bypass system includes a bypass line with a gooseneck located in the generator for controlling flow of strong solution into the bypass line and for preventing refrigerant vapor in the generator from entering the bypass line during normal operation of the refrigeration system. Also, the bypass line includes a trap section filled with liquid for providing a barrier to maintain the normal pressure difference between the generator and the absorber even when the gooseneck of the bypass line is exposed to refrigerant vapor in the generator. Strong solution, which may accumulate in the trap section of the bypass line, is diluted, to prevent solidification, by supplying weak solution to the trap section from a purge system for the absorption refrigeration system.

  17. Thermal Propulsion Capture System Heat Exchanger Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, Evan M.

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges of manned spaceflight beyond low earth orbit and the moon is harmful radiation that astronauts would be exposed to on their long journey to Mars and further destinations. Using nuclear energy has the potential to be a more effective means of propulsion compared to traditional chemical engines (higher specific impulse). An upper stage nuclear engine would allow astronauts to reach their destination faster and more fuel efficiently. Testing these engines poses engineering challenges due to the need to totally capture the engine exhaust. The Thermal Propulsion Capture System is a concept for cost effectively and safely testing Nuclear Thermal Engines. Nominally, hydrogen exhausted from the engine is not radioactive, but is treated as such in case of fuel element failure. The Thermal Propulsion Capture System involves injecting liquid oxygen to convert the hydrogen exhaust into steam. The steam is then cooled and condensed into liquid water to allow for storage. The Thermal Propulsion Capture System concept for ground testing of a nuclear powered engine involves capturing the engine exhaust to be cooled and condensed before being stored. The hydrogen exhaust is injected with liquid oxygen and burned to form steam. That steam must be cooled to saturation temperatures before being condensed into liquid water. A crossflow heat exchanger using water as a working fluid will be designed to accomplish this goal. Design a cross flow heat exchanger for the Thermal Propulsion Capture System testing which: Eliminates the need for water injection cooling, Cools steam from 5800 F to saturation temperature, and Is efficient and minimizes water requirement.

  18. Indoor air pollution by different heating systems: coal burning, open fireplace and central heating.

    PubMed

    Moriske, H J; Drews, M; Ebert, G; Menk, G; Scheller, C; Schöndube, M; Konieczny, L

    1996-11-01

    Investigations of indoor air pollution by different heating systems in private homes are described. Sixteen homes, 7 with coal burning, 1 with open fireplace (wood burning) and 8 with central heating have been investigated. We measured the concentrations of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and sedimented dust in indoor air, of total suspended particulates, heavy metals and of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in indoor and outdoor air. Measurements were taken during winter (heating period) and during summer (non-heating period). Generally, we found higher indoor air pollution in homes with coal burning and open fireplace than in homes with central heating. Especially, the concentrations of carbon monoxide, sedimented dust and of some heavy metals were higher. In one case, we found also high indoor air pollution in a home with central heating. This apartment is on the ground floor of a block of flats, and the central heating system in the basement showed a malfunctioning of the exhaust system.

  19. Studies on solar heating systems with long-term heat storage for northern high latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, P.

    The feasibility of liquid-based solar heating systems with seasonal heat storage for cold climates is addressed using thermal performance studies. The thermal analyses are based on several new computer models comprising three different types of seasonal storage: duct storage, rock caverns, and solar ponds. These are employed in a community solar heating system and are mainly charged by solar energy. Simulation models are used to investigate the effects of the system dimensioning on the thermal performance. Different methods used to study the feasibility of a district solar heating system for the Finnish climate are presented. Finally, the computer models are used to determine the expected performance of the first Finnish community solar heating system with seasonal heat storage, the Kerava solar village. Preliminary measurement results from the village are given.

  20. Concerning the improvement of solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidov, Iu. K.

    It is suggested that systems of solar heating and cooling can be simplified by the use of 'organized hydrothermal processes' (OHP) in the elements (e.g., circulation systems and heat storage units) of such systems. This paper defines and classifies such processes. Design diagrams are presented for two types of systems: (1) a heating, hot-water, and storage system with one-phase OHPs; and (2) a gravity-assisted heat pipe and an adsorption-type solar refrigeration system with two-phase OHPs.

  1. 14 CFR 27.859 - Heating systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... must be means for safe drainage of any fuel that might accumulate in the combustion chamber or the heat...) Heat exchangers. Each heat exchanger must be— (1) Of suitable materials; (2) Adequately cooled under all conditions; and (3) Easily disassembled for inspection. (c) Combustion heater fire...

  2. HEAT TRANSFER AND TRITIUM PRODUCING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, E.F.

    1962-06-01

    This invention related to a circulating lithium-containing blanket system in a neution source hav'ing a magnetic field associated therewith. The blanket serves simultaneously and efficiently as a heat transfer mediunm and as a source of tritium. The blanket is composed of a lithium-6-enriched fused salt selected from the group consisting of lithium nitrite, lithium nitrate, a mixture of said salts, a mixture of each of said salts with lithium oxide, and a mixture of said salts with each other and with lithium oxide. The moderator, which is contained within the blanket in a separate conduit, can be water. A stellarator is one of the neutron sources which can be used in this invention. (AEC)

  3. Heating and Cooling System Design for a Modern Transportable Container

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Jason E.

    2015-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been tasked with the design of a modern transportable container (MTC) for use in high reliability transportation environments. The container is required to transport cargo capable of generating its own heat and operate under the United States’ climatic extremes. In response to these requirements, active heating and cooling is necessary to maintain a controlled environment inside the container. The following thesis project documents the design of an active heating, active cooling, and combined active heating and cooling system (now referred to as active heating and cooling systems) through computational thermal analyses, scoping of commercial system options, and mechanical integration with the container’s structure.

  4. Heat pipe heat transport system for the Stirling Space Power Converter (SSPC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alger, Donald L.

    1992-01-01

    Life issues relating to a sodium heat pipe heat transport system are described. The heat pipe system provides heat, at a temperature of 1050 K, to a 50 kWe Stirling engine/linear alternator power converter called the Stirling Space Power Converter (SSPC). The converter is being developed under a National Aeronautics and Space Administration program. Since corrosion of heat pipe materials in contact with sodium can impact the life of the heat pipe, a literature review of sodium corrosion processes was performed. It was found that the impurity reactions, primarily oxygen, and dissolution of alloy elements were the two corrosion process likely to be operative in the heat pipe. Approaches that are being taken to minimize these corrosion processes are discussed.

  5. Precision control of high temperature furnaces using an auxiliary power supply and charged practice current flow

    DOEpatents

    Pollock, George G.

    1997-01-01

    Two power supplies are combined to control a furnace. A main power supply heats the furnace in the traditional manner, while the power from the auxiliary supply is introduced as a current flow through charged particles existing due to ionized gas or thermionic emission. The main power supply provides the bulk heating power and the auxiliary supply provides a precise and fast power source such that the precision of the total power delivered to the furnace is improved.

  6. Precision control of high temperature furnaces using an auxiliary power supply and charged particle current flow

    DOEpatents

    Pollock, G.G.

    1997-01-28

    Two power supplies are combined to control a furnace. A main power supply heats the furnace in the traditional manner, while the power from the auxiliary supply is introduced as a current flow through charged particles existing due to ionized gas or thermionic emission. The main power supply provides the bulk heating power and the auxiliary supply provides a precise and fast power source such that the precision of the total power delivered to the furnace is improved. 5 figs.

  7. MSNJ Auxiliary: responsibility on water.

    PubMed

    Propsner, N M

    1992-07-01

    The Medical Society of New Jersey Auxiliary kicked off its Responsibility on Water program. Designed and planned by MSNJA President Marion H. Geib, the program is intended to make children and adults aware of the deadly mix of alcohol and water activities.

  8. A regional comparison of solar, heat pump, and solar-heat pump systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manton, B. E.; Mitchell, J. W.

    1982-08-01

    A comparative study of the thermal and economic performance of the parallel and series solar heat pump systems, stand alone solar and stand alone heat pump systems for residential space and domestic hot water heating for the U.S. using FCHART 4.0 is presented. Results show that the parallel solar heat pump system yields the greatest energy savings in the south. Very low cost collectors (50-150 dollars/sq m) are required for a series solar heat pump system in order for it to compete economically with the better of the parallel or solar systems. Conventional oil or gas furnaces need to have a seasonal efficiency of at least 70-85% in order to save as much primary energy as the best primary system in the northeast. In addition, the implications of these results for current or proposed federal tax credit measures are discussed.

  9. Sensible heat receiver for solar dynamic space power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Gaier, James R.; Petrefski, Chris

    1991-01-01

    A sensible heat receiver considered in this study uses a vapor grown carbon fiber-carbon (VGCF/C) composite as the thermal storage media and was designed for a 7 kW Brayton engine. The proposed heat receiver stores the required energy to power the system during eclipse in the VGCF/C composite. The heat receiver thermal analysis was conducted through the Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer and Fluid Integrator (SINDA) software package. The sensible heat receiver compares well with other latent and advanced sensible heat receivers analyzed in other studies while avoiding the problems associated with latent heat storage salts and liquid metal heat pipes. The concept also satisfies the design requirements for a 7 kW Brayton engine system. The weight and size of the system can be optimized by changes in geometry and technology advances for this new material.

  10. Sensible heat receiver for solar dynamic space power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Gaier, James R.; Petrefski, Chris

    1991-01-01

    A sensible heat receiver is considered which uses a vapor grown carbon fiber-carbon (VGCF/C) composite as the thermal storage medium and which was designed for a 7-kW Brayton engine. This heat receiver stores the required energy to power the system during eclipse in the VGCF/C composite. The heat receiver thermal analysis was conducted through the Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer and Fluid Integrator (SINDA) software package. The sensible heat receiver compares well with other latent and advanced sensible heat receivers analyzed in other studies, while avoiding the problems associated with latent heat storage salts and liquid metal heat pipes. The concept also satisfies the design requirements for a 7-kW Brayton engine system. The weight and size of the system can be optimized by changes in geometry and technology advances for this new material.

  11. Hydrogen/oxygen auxiliary propulsion technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.; Schneider, Steven J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper provides a survey of hydogen/oxygen (H/O) auxiliary propulsion system (APS) concepts and low thrust H/O rocket technology. A review of H/O APS studies performed for the Space Shuttle, Space Tug, Space Station Freedom, and Advanced Manned Launch System programs is given. The survey also includes a review of low thrust H/O rocket technology programs, covering liquid H/O and gaseous H/O thrusters, ranging from 6600 N to 440 mN thrust. Ignition concepts for H/O thrusters and high-temperature, oxidation-resistant chamber materials are also reviewed.

  12. Hydrogen/oxygen auxiliary propulsion technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.; Schneider, Steven J.

    1991-01-01

    A survey is provided of hydrogen/oxygen (H/O) auxiliary propulsion system (APS) concepts and low thrust H/O rocket technology. A review of H/O APS studies performed for the Space Shuttle, Space Tug, Space Station Freedom, and Advanced Manned Launch System programs is given. The survey also includes a review of low thrust H/O rocket technology programs, covering liquid H/O and gaseous H/O thrusters, ranging from 6600 N (1500 lbf) to 440 mN (0.1 lbf) thrust. Ignition concepts for H/O thrusters and high temperature, oxidation resistant chamber materials are also reviewed.

  13. Sodium heat pipe use in solar Stirling power conversion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, W. F.; Divakaruni, S. M.; Won, Y. S.

    1980-01-01

    Sodium heat pipes were selected for use as a thermal transport method in a focus-mounted, distributed concentrator solar Stirling power conversion system intended to produce 15-20 kWe per unit. Heat pipes were used both to receive thermal power in the solar receiver and to transmit it to a secondary heat pipe containing both latent heat salt (for up to 1.25 hours of thermal storage) and the heat exchanger of the Stirling engine. Experimental tests were performed on five solar receiver heat pipes with various internal wicking configurations. The performance of the heat pipes at various power levels and operating attitudes was investigated at temperatures near 1550 F; the unidirectional heat transfer in these heat pipes was demonstrated in normal operating attitudes and particularly in the inverted position required during overnight stowage of the concentrator.

  14. Heat pipe radiation cooling of advanced hypersonic propulsion system components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. A.; Keddy, M.; Merrigan, M. A.; Silverstein, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    Heat transfer, heat pipe, and system studies were performed to assess the newly proposed heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC) concept. With an HPRC system, heat is removed from the ramburner and nozzle of a hypersonic aircraft engine by a surrounding, high-temperature, heat pipe nacelle structure, transported to nearby external surfaces, and rejected to the environment by thermal radiation. With HPRC, the Mach number range available for using hydrocarbon fuels for aircraft operation extends into the Mach 4 to Mach 6 range, up from the current limit of about Mach 4. Heat transfer studies using a newly developed HPRC computer code determine cooling system and ramburner and nozzle temperatures, heat loads, and weights for a representative combined-cycle engine cruising at Mach 5 at 80,000 ft altitude. Heat pipe heat transport calculations, using the Los Alamos code HTPIPE, reveal that adequate heat trasport capability is available using molybdenum-lithium heat pipe technology. Results show that the HPRC system radiator area is limited in size to the ramburner-nozzle region of the engine nacelle; reasonable system weights are expected; hot section temperatures are consistent with advanced structural materials development goals; and system impact on engine performance is minimal.

  15. New technologies in lighting systems for high-speed film and photography regarding high-intensity and heat problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severon, Burkhard

    1991-04-01

    Increasing frame rates and the heat sensibility of test objects forced the development of new lighting systems. For example at the automotive industry, where continuous light sources are indispensable for the high speed photography of car crash tests and automobile components tests, the further development of high efficient safety systems, so as Air-Bag systems, needs very datailed analysis of the accelerated motions. Frame rates from 2.000 up to 10.000 frames per second are requested and beside adequate camera systems and film material, this also means high intensive lighting systems. The need for high intensity could be easy achieved by the use of additional light fixtures but the request for more intensity comes along with the problem of heat. The test objects and the auxiliary materials become more and more temperature- sensitive. Very offen they have to be used under strict climate conditions. Mainly there where the test objects are already placed inside the illuminated area, the heat radiation of the light sources to the test objects have to be reduced. So high intensive, flicker free and less heat are today's requirements of light performance. This paper will present solutions to meet those demands.

  16. Power systems utilizing the heat of produced formation fluid

    DOEpatents

    Lambirth, Gene Richard [Houston, TX

    2011-01-11

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method includes treating a hydrocarbon containing formation. The method may include providing heat to the formation; producing heated fluid from the formation; and generating electricity from at least a portion of the heated fluid using a Kalina cycle.

  17. Optimal heat pumps for solar-assisted heat-pump systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catan, M. A.

    Work at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigates the design of optimal heat pumps for solar assisted heat pump (SAPH) systems. Heat pump designs suitable for two generic systems, identified in the course of recent analytical work, are being studied. These are series SAHP systems operating at evaporator temperatures in the -5 to 10 C range and those operating at evaporator temperatures in the 10 to 35 C range. A heat pump simulator has been constructed with liquid based source subsystem and two load subsystems, one for testing air cooled condensers and one for testing water cooled condensers. Heat pumps tested were composed of various components including several types of variable and fixed capacity compressors, two types of expansion devices, and heat exchangers varying in size and type.

  18. Chemical heat pump and chemical energy storage system

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Edward C.; Huxtable, Douglas D.

    1985-08-06

    A chemical heat pump and storage system employs sulfuric acid and water. In one form, the system includes a generator and condenser, an evaporator and absorber, aqueous acid solution storage and water storage. During a charging cycle, heat is provided to the generator from a heat source to concentrate the acid solution while heat is removed from the condenser to condense the water vapor produced in the generator. Water is then stored in the storage tank. Heat is thus stored in the form of chemical energy in the concentrated acid. The heat removed from the water vapor can be supplied to a heat load of proper temperature or can be rejected. During a discharge cycle, water in the evaporator is supplied with heat to generate water vapor, which is transmitted to the absorber where it is condensed and absorbed into the concentrated acid. Both heats of dilution and condensation of water are removed from the thus diluted acid. During the discharge cycle the system functions as a heat pump in which heat is added to the system at a low temperature and removed from the system at a high temperature. The diluted acid is stored in an acid storage tank or is routed directly to the generator for reconcentration. The generator, condenser, evaporator, and absorber all are operated under pressure conditions specified by the desired temperature levels for a given application. The storage tanks, however, can be maintained at or near ambient pressure conditions. In another form, the heat pump system is employed to provide usable heat from waste process heat by upgrading the temperature of the waste heat.

  19. Solar technology assessment project. Volume 3: Active space heating and hot water supply with solar energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaki, S.; Loef, G. O. G.

    1981-04-01

    Several types of solar water heaters are described and assessed. These include thermosiphon water heaters and pump circulation water heaters. Auxiliary water heating is briefly discussed, and new and retrofit systems are compared. Liquid-based space heating systems and solar air heaters are described and assessed, auxiliary space heating are discussed, and new and retrofit solar space heating systems are compared. The status of flat plate collectors, evacuated tube collectors, and thermal storage systems is examined. Systems improvements, reliability, durability and maintenance are discussed. The economic assessment of space and water heating systems includes a comparison of new systems costs with conventional fuels, and sales history and projections. The variety of participants in the solar industry and users of solar heat is discussed, and various incentives and barriers to solar heating are examined. Several policy implications are discussed, and specific government actions are recommended.

  20. Heat-Pipe-Associated Localized Thermoelectric Power Generation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pan-Jo; Rhi, Seok-Ho; Lee, Kye-Bock; Hwang, Hyun-Chang; Lee, Ji-Su; Jang, Ju-Chan; Lee, Wook-Hyun; Lee, Ki-Woo

    2014-06-01

    The present study focused on how to improve the maximum power output of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) system and move heat to any suitable space using a TEG associated with a loop thermosyphon (loop-type heat pipe). An experimental study was carried out to investigate the power output, the temperature difference of the thermoelectric module (TEM), and the heat transfer performance associated with the characteristic of the researched heat pipe. Currently, internal combustion engines lose more than 35% of their fuel energy as recyclable heat in the exhaust gas, but it is not easy to recycle waste heat using TEGs because of the limited space in vehicles. There are various advantages to use of TEGs over other power sources, such as the absence of moving parts, a long lifetime, and a compact system configuration. The present study presents a novel TEG concept to transfer heat from the heat source to the sink. This technology can transfer waste heat to any location. This simple and novel design for a TEG can be applied to future hybrid cars. The present TEG system with a heat pipe can transfer heat and generate power of around 1.8 V with T TEM = 58°C. The heat transfer performance of a loop-type heat pipe with various working fluids was investigated, with water at high heat flux (90 W) and 0.05% TiO2 nanofluid at low heat flux (30 W to 70 W) showing the best performance in terms of power generation. The heat pipe can transfer the heat to any location where the TEM is installed.

  1. Solar-heating and cooling system design package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Package of information includes design data, performance specifications, drawings, hazard analysis, and spare parts list for commercially produced system installed in single-family dwelling in Akron, Ohio. System uses air flat-plate collectors, 12000 kg rock storage and backup heat pump. Solar portion requires 0.7 kW, and provides 35% of average total heating load including hot water. Information aids persons considering installing solar home-heating systems.

  2. Thaw flow control for liquid heat transport systems

    DOEpatents

    Kirpich, Aaron S.

    1989-01-01

    In a liquid metal heat transport system including a source of thaw heat for use in a space reactor power system, the thaw flow throttle or control comprises a fluid passage having forward and reverse flow sections and a partition having a plurality of bleed holes therein to enable fluid flow between the forward and reverse sections. The flow throttle is positioned in the system relatively far from the source of thaw heat.

  3. Heat Rejection Concepts for Brayton Power Conversion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siamidis, John; Mason, Lee; Beach, Duane; Yuko, James

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes potential heat rejection design concepts for closed Brayton cycle (CBC) power conversion systems. Brayton conversion systems are currently under study by NASA for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) applications. The Heat Rejection Subsystem (HRS) must dissipate waste heat generated by the power conversion system due to inefficiencies in the thermal-to-electric conversion process. Space Brayton conversion system designs tend to optimize at efficiencies of about 20 to 25 percent with radiator temperatures in the 400 to 600 K range. A notional HRS was developed for a 100 kWe-class Brayton power system that uses a pumped sodium-potassium (NaK) heat transport loop coupled to a water heat pipe radiator. The radiator panels employ a sandwich construction consisting of regularly-spaced circular heat pipes contained within two composite facesheets. Heat transfer from the NaK fluid to the heat pipes is accomplished by inserting the evaporator sections into the NaK duct channel. The paper evaluates various design parameters including heat pipe diameter, heat pipe spacing, and facesheet thickness. Parameters were varied to compare design options on the basis of NaK pump pressure rise and required power, heat pipe unit power and radial flux, radiator panel areal mass, and overall HRS mass.

  4. Vapor Compression and Thermoelectric Heat Pump Heat Exchangers for a Condensate Distillation System: Design and Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Lisa R.; Ungar, Eugene K.

    2013-01-01

    Maximizing the reuse of wastewater while minimizing the use of consumables is critical in long duration space exploration. One of the more promising methods of reclaiming urine is the distillation/condensation process used in the cascade distillation system (CDS). This system accepts a mixture of urine and toxic stabilizing agents, heats it to vaporize the water and condenses and cools the resulting water vapor. The CDS wastewater flow requires heating and its condensate flow requires cooling. Performing the heating and cooling processes separately requires two separate units, each of which would require large amounts of electrical power. By heating the wastewater and cooling the condensate in a single heat pump unit, mass, volume, and power efficiencies can be obtained. The present work describes and compares two competing heat pump methodologies that meet the needs of the CDS: 1) a series of mini compressor vapor compression cycles and 2) a thermoelectric heat exchanger. In the paper, the system level requirements are outlined, the designs of the two heat pumps are described in detail, and the results of heat pump performance tests are provided. A summary is provided of the heat pump mass, volume and power trades and a selection recommendation is made.

  5. Heat Rejection Systems Utilizing Composites and Heat Pipes: Design and Performance Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Beach, Duane E.; Sanzi, James L.

    2007-01-01

    Polymer matrix composites offer the promise of reducing the mass and increasing the performance of future heat rejection systems. With lifetimes for heat rejection systems reaching a decade or more in a micrometeoroid environment, use of multiple heat pipes for fault tolerant design is compelling. The combination of polymer matrix composites and heat pipes is of particular interest for heat rejection systems operating on the lunar surface. A technology development effort is under way to study the performance of two radiator demonstration units manufactured with different polymer matrix composite face sheet resin and bonding adhesives, along with different titanium-water heat pipe designs. Common to the two radiator demonstration units is the use of high thermal conductivity fibers in the face sheets and high thermal conductivity graphite saddles within a light weight aluminum honeycomb core. Testing of the radiator demonstration units included thermal vacuum exposure and thermal vacuum exposure with a simulated heat pipe failure. Steady state performance data were obtained at different operating temperatures to identify heat transfer and thermal resistance characteristics. Heat pipe failure was simulated by removing the input power from an individual heat pipe in order to identify the diminished performance characteristics of the entire panel after a micrometeoroid strike. Freeze-thaw performance was also of interest. This paper presents a summary of the two radiator demonstration units manufactured to support this technology development effort along with the thermal performance characteristics obtained to date. Future work will also be discussed.

  6. ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) current drive and heating physics

    SciTech Connect

    Nevins, W.M.; Lindquist, W. ); Fujisawa, N.; Kimura, H. ); Hopman, H.; Rebuffi, L.; Wegrowe, J.G. . NET Design Team); Parail, V.; Vdovin, V. . Inst. Atomnoj Ehn

    1990-01-01

    The ITER Current Drive and Heating (CD H) systems are required for: Ionization and current initiation; Non-inductive current ramp-up assist; Heating of the plasma; Steady-state operation with full non-inductive current drive; Current profile control; and Burn control by modulation of the auxiliary power. Steady-state current drive is the most demanding requirement, so this has driven the choice of the ITER current drive and heating systems.

  7. Solar heating, cooling, and domestic hot water system installed at Kaw Valley State Bank and Trust Company, Topeka, Kansas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-11-01

    The building has approximately 5600 square feet of conditioned space. Solar energy is used for space heating, space cooling, and preheating domestic hot water (DHW). The solar energy system has an array of evacuated tube-type collectors with an area of 1068 square feet. A 50/50 solution of ethylene glycol and water is the transfer medium that delivers solar energy to a tube-in-shell heat exchanger that in turn delivers solar-heated water to a 1100 gallon pressurized hot water storage tank. When solar energy is insufficient to satisfy the space heating and/or cooling demand, a natural gas-fired boiler provides auxiliary energy to the fan coil loops and/or the absorption chillers. Extracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, and installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

  8. Retrofitting Combined Space and Water Heating Systems: Laboratory Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbauer, B.; Bohac, D.; Huelman, P.; Olson, R.; Hewitt, M.

    2012-10-01

    Better insulated and tighter homes can often use a single heating plant for both space and domestic water heating. These systems, called dual integrated appliances (DIA) or combination systems, can operate at high efficiency and eliminate combustion safety issues associated by using a condensing, sealed combustion heating plant. Funds were received to install 400 DIAs in Minnesota low-income homes. The NorthernSTAR DIA laboratory was created to identify proper system components, designs, operating parameters, and installation procedures to assure high efficiency of field installed systems. Tests verified that heating loads up to 57,000 Btu/hr can be achieved with acceptable return water temperatures and supply air temperatures.

  9. Retrofitting Combined Space and Water Heating Systems. Laboratory Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbauer, B.; Bohac, D.; Huelman, P.; Olsen, R.; Hewett, M.

    2012-10-01

    Better insulated and tighter homes can often use a single heating plant for both space and domestic water heating. These systems, called dual integrated appliances (DIA) or combination systems, can operate at high efficiency and eliminate combustion safety issues associated by using a condensing, sealed combustion heating plant. Funds were received to install 400 DIAs in Minnesota low-income homes. The NorthernSTAR DIA laboratory was created to identify proper system components, designs, operating parameters, and installation procedures to assure high efficiency of field installed systems. Tests verified that heating loads up to 57,000 Btu/hr can be achieved with acceptable return water temperatures and supply air temperatures.

  10. 40 CFR 63.1409 - Heat exchange system provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Heat exchange system provisions. 63... exchange system provisions. (a) Unless one or more of the conditions specified in paragraphs (a)(1) through... each heat exchange system used to cool process equipment in an affected source, according to...

  11. Data mining of space heating system performance in affordable housing

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Xiaoxin; Yan, Da; Hong, Tianzhen

    2015-02-16

    The space heating in residential buildings accounts for a considerable amount of the primary energy use. Therefore, understanding the operation and performance of space heating systems becomes crucial in improving occupant comfort while reducing energy use. This study investigated the behavior of occupants adjusting their thermostat settings and heating system operations in a 62-unit affordable housing complex in Revere, Massachusetts, USA. The data mining methods, including clustering approach and decision trees, were used to ascertain occupant behavior patterns. Data tabulating ON/OFF space heating states was assessed, to provide a better understanding of the intermittent operation of space heating systems in terms of system cycling frequency and the duration of each operation. The decision tree was used to verify the link between room temperature settings, house and heating system characteristics and the heating energy use. The results suggest that the majority of apartments show fairly constant room temperature profiles with limited variations during a day or between weekday and weekend. Data clustering results revealed six typical patterns of room temperature profiles during the heating season. Space heating systems cycled more frequently than anticipated due to a tight range of room thermostat settings and potentially oversized heating capacities. In conclusion, from this study affirm data mining techniques are an effective method to analyze large datasets and extract hidden patterns to inform design and improve operations.

  12. Data mining of space heating system performance in affordable housing

    DOE PAGES

    Ren, Xiaoxin; Yan, Da; Hong, Tianzhen

    2015-02-16

    The space heating in residential buildings accounts for a considerable amount of the primary energy use. Therefore, understanding the operation and performance of space heating systems becomes crucial in improving occupant comfort while reducing energy use. This study investigated the behavior of occupants adjusting their thermostat settings and heating system operations in a 62-unit affordable housing complex in Revere, Massachusetts, USA. The data mining methods, including clustering approach and decision trees, were used to ascertain occupant behavior patterns. Data tabulating ON/OFF space heating states was assessed, to provide a better understanding of the intermittent operation of space heating systems inmore » terms of system cycling frequency and the duration of each operation. The decision tree was used to verify the link between room temperature settings, house and heating system characteristics and the heating energy use. The results suggest that the majority of apartments show fairly constant room temperature profiles with limited variations during a day or between weekday and weekend. Data clustering results revealed six typical patterns of room temperature profiles during the heating season. Space heating systems cycled more frequently than anticipated due to a tight range of room thermostat settings and potentially oversized heating capacities. In conclusion, from this study affirm data mining techniques are an effective method to analyze large datasets and extract hidden patterns to inform design and improve operations.« less

  13. System Analysis on Absorption Chiller Utilizing Intermediate Wasted Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Miki; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Usui, Hiromoto

    A system analysis has been performed for the multi-effect absorption chiller (MEAC) applied as a bottoming system of 30kW class hybrid system including micro gas turbine (MGT) and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) hybrid system. In this paper, an intermediate wasted heat utilization (IWHU) system is suggested for lifting up the energy efficiency of the whole system and coefficient of performance (COP) of MEAC. From the results, the suggested IWHU system was found to show the very high energy efficiency compared with a terminal wasted heat utilization (TWHU) system that uses only the heat exhausted from the terminal of MGT/SOFC system. When TWHU system is applied for MEAC, the utilized heat from the MGT/SOFC system is found to remain low because the temperature difference between the high temperature generator and the wasted heat becomes small. Then, the energy efficiency does not become high in spite of high COP of MEAC. On the other hand, the IWHU system could increase the utilized heat for MEAC as performs effectively. The exergy efficiency of IWHU system is also revealed to be higher than that of a direct gas burning system of MEAC, because the wasted heat is effectively utilized in the IWHU system.

  14. Simulation of lakes and surface water heat exchangers for design of surface water heat pump systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conjeevaram Bashyam, Krishna

    Surface Water Heat Pump (SWHP) system utilize surface water bodies, such as ponds, lakes, rivers, and the sea, as heat sources and/or sinks. These systems may be open-loop, circulating water between the surface water body and a heat exchanger on dry land, or closed-loop, utilizing a submerged surface water heat exchanger (SWHE). Both types of SWHP systems have been widely used, but little in the way of design data, design procedures, or energy calculation procedures is available to aid engineers in the design and analysis of these systems. For either type of SWHP system, the ability to predict the evolution of lake temperature with time is an important aspect of needed design and energy analysis procedures. This thesis describes the development and validation of a lake model that is coupled with a surface water heat exchanger model to predict both the lake dynamics (temperature, stratification, ice/snow cover) and the heat transfer performance of different types of SWHE. This one-dimensional model utilizes a detailed surface heat balance model at the upper boundary, a sediment conduction heat transfer model at the lower boundary, and an eddy diffusion model to predict transport within the lake. The lake model is implemented as part of the developed software design tool, which can be used as an aid in the sizing of SWHE used in closed loop SWHP systems.

  15. 33 CFR 5.47 - Auxiliary ensign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the Auxiliary ensign is medium blue (Coast Guard blue) with a broad diagonal white slash upon which a matching blue Coast Guard Auxiliary emblem is centered. The white slash shall be at a 70 degree angle, rising away from the hoist. (c) The Auxiliary emblem consists of a disk with the shield of the Coat...

  16. 47 CFR 73.1675 - Auxiliary antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Auxiliary antennas. 73.1675 Section 73.1675... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1675 Auxiliary antennas. (a)(1) An auxiliary antenna is one that is permanently installed and available for use when the main antenna is out of service...

  17. 47 CFR 73.1675 - Auxiliary antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Auxiliary antennas. 73.1675 Section 73.1675... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1675 Auxiliary antennas. (a)(1) An auxiliary antenna is one that is permanently installed and available for use when the main antenna is out of service...

  18. 47 CFR 73.1675 - Auxiliary antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Auxiliary antennas. 73.1675 Section 73.1675... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1675 Auxiliary antennas. (a)(1) An auxiliary antenna is one that is permanently installed and available for use when the main antenna is out of service...

  19. 47 CFR 73.1675 - Auxiliary antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Auxiliary antennas. 73.1675 Section 73.1675... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1675 Auxiliary antennas. (a)(1) An auxiliary antenna is one that is permanently installed and available for use when the main antenna is out of service...

  20. 47 CFR 73.1675 - Auxiliary antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Auxiliary antennas. 73.1675 Section 73.1675... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1675 Auxiliary antennas. (a)(1) An auxiliary antenna is one that is permanently installed and available for use when the main antenna is out of service...

  1. 30 CFR 57.6161 - Auxiliary facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Auxiliary facilities. 57.6161 Section 57.6161...-Underground Only § 57.6161 Auxiliary facilities. (a) Auxiliary facilities used to store explosive material near work places shall be wooden, box-type containers equipped with covers or doors, or...

  2. 45 CFR 707.10 - Auxiliary aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Auxiliary aids. 707.10 Section 707.10 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS ENFORCEMENT OF... § 707.10 Auxiliary aids. (a) The Agency shall furnish appropriate auxiliary aids where necessary...

  3. 45 CFR 707.10 - Auxiliary aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Auxiliary aids. 707.10 Section 707.10 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS ENFORCEMENT OF... § 707.10 Auxiliary aids. (a) The Agency shall furnish appropriate auxiliary aids where necessary...

  4. 7 CFR 15b.37 - Auxiliary aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Auxiliary aids. 15b.37 Section 15b.37 Agriculture... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Other Aid, Benefits, or Services § 15b.37 Auxiliary aids... appropriate auxiliary aids to persons with impaired sensory, manual, or speaking skills, where necessary...

  5. 7 CFR 15b.37 - Auxiliary aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Auxiliary aids. 15b.37 Section 15b.37 Agriculture... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Other Aid, Benefits, or Services § 15b.37 Auxiliary aids... appropriate auxiliary aids to persons with impaired sensory, manual, or speaking skills, where necessary...

  6. 7 CFR 15b.37 - Auxiliary aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Auxiliary aids. 15b.37 Section 15b.37 Agriculture... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Other Aid, Benefits, or Services § 15b.37 Auxiliary aids... appropriate auxiliary aids to persons with impaired sensory, manual, or speaking skills, where necessary...

  7. 45 CFR 707.10 - Auxiliary aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Auxiliary aids. 707.10 Section 707.10 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS ENFORCEMENT OF... § 707.10 Auxiliary aids. (a) The Agency shall furnish appropriate auxiliary aids where necessary...

  8. 7 CFR 15b.37 - Auxiliary aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Auxiliary aids. 15b.37 Section 15b.37 Agriculture... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Other Aid, Benefits, or Services § 15b.37 Auxiliary aids... appropriate auxiliary aids to persons with impaired sensory, manual, or speaking skills, where necessary...

  9. 45 CFR 707.10 - Auxiliary aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Auxiliary aids. 707.10 Section 707.10 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS ENFORCEMENT OF... § 707.10 Auxiliary aids. (a) The Agency shall furnish appropriate auxiliary aids where necessary...

  10. 45 CFR 707.10 - Auxiliary aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Auxiliary aids. 707.10 Section 707.10 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS ENFORCEMENT OF... § 707.10 Auxiliary aids. (a) The Agency shall furnish appropriate auxiliary aids where necessary...

  11. 7 CFR 15b.37 - Auxiliary aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Auxiliary aids. 15b.37 Section 15b.37 Agriculture... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Other Aid, Benefits, or Services § 15b.37 Auxiliary aids... appropriate auxiliary aids to persons with impaired sensory, manual, or speaking skills, where necessary...

  12. Method of measuring heat influx of a cryogenic transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Niemann, Ralph C.; Zelipsky, Steven A.; Rezmer, Ronald R.; Smelser, Peter

    1981-01-01

    A method is provided for measuring the heat influx of a cryogenic transfer system. A gaseous phase of the cryogen used during normal operation of the system is passed through the system. The gaseous cryogen at the inlet to the system is tempered to duplicate the normal operating temperature of the system inlet. The temperature and mass flow rate of the gaseous cryogen is measured at the outlet of the system, and the heat capacity of the cryogen is determined. The heat influx of the system is then determined from known thermodynamic relationships.

  13. AMBIPOLAR DIFFUSION HEATING IN TURBULENT SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Pak Shing; Myers, Andrew; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: atmyers@berkeley.edu

    2012-11-20

    The temperature of the gas in molecular clouds is a key determinant of the characteristic mass of star formation. Ambipolar diffusion (AD) is considered one of the most important heating mechanisms in weakly ionized molecular clouds. In this work, we study the AD heating rate using two-fluid turbulence simulations and compare it with the overall heating rate due to turbulent dissipation. We find that for observed molecular clouds, which typically have Alfven Mach numbers of {approx}1 and AD Reynolds numbers of {approx}20, about 70% of the total turbulent dissipation is in the form of AD heating. AD has an important effect on the length scale where energy is dissipated: when AD heating is strong, most of the energy in the cascade is removed by ion-neutral drift, with a comparatively small amount of energy making it down to small scales. We derive a relation for the AD heating rate that describes the results of our simulations to within a factor of two. Turbulent dissipation, including AD heating, is generally less important than cosmic-ray heating in molecular clouds, although there is substantial scatter in both.

  14. The heat recovery with heat transfer methods from solar photovoltaic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özakın, A. N.; Karsli, S.; Kaya, F.; Güllüce, H.

    2016-04-01

    Although there are many fluctuations in energy prices, they seems like rising day by day. Thus energy recovery systems have increasingly trend. Photovoltaic systems converts solar radiation directly into electrical energy thanks to semiconductors. But due to the nature of semiconductors, whole of solar energy cannot turn into electrical energy and the remaining energy turns into waste heat. The aim of this research is evaluate this waste heat energy by air cooling system. So, the energy efficiency of the system will be increased using appropriate heat transfer technologies such as fin, turbulator etc.

  15. Auxiliary Power Systems: Conference Proceedings of the Propulsion and Energetics Panel B Specialists’ Meeting (61st) Held at Copenhagen, Denmark on 30-31 May 1983

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    poulr In groupe. centre ; ) 2 poutt Is neitotrl. Dn pirint In vInesse is retation tu inI-ups sat nttttsnstt pins tic - nie qu. call. do rotour prittcipai...requirements for the next generation of military aircraft ’in --r -r tic laF regarding th, distribution and use of the on board auxiliary power. o Energy...talilit~y of the electrical. power generationl channel to usually itetLer than the bydraul in ejeitec mod tic , primary demood. calt he art by a single

  16. Space Shuttle Orbiter auxiliary power unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenna, R.; Wicklund, L.; Baughman, J.; Weary, D.

    1982-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter auxiliary power units (APUs) provide hydraulic power for the Orbiter vehicle control surfaces (rudder/speed brake, body flap, and elevon actuation systems), main engine gimbaling during ascent, landing gear deployment and steering and braking during landing. Operation occurs during launch/ascent, in-space exercise, reentry/descent, and landing/rollout. Operational effectiveness of the APU is predicated on reliable, failure-free operation during each flight, mission life (reusability) and serviceability between flights (turnaround). Along with the accumulating flight data base, the status and results of efforts to achieve these long-run objectives is presented.

  17. Solar dynamic heat rejection technology. Task 1: System concept development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustafson, Eric; Carlson, Albert W.

    1987-01-01

    The results are presented of a concept development study of heat rejection systems for Space Station solar dynamic power systems. The heat rejection concepts are based on recent developments in high thermal transport capacity heat pipe radiators. The thermal performance and weights of each of the heat rejection subsystems is addressed in detail, and critical technologies which require development tests and evaluation for successful demonstration are assessed and identified. Baseline and several alternate heat rejection system configurations and optimum designs are developed for both Brayton and Rankine cycles. The thermal performance, mass properties, assembly requirements, reliability, maintenance requirements and life cycle cost are determined for each configuration. A specific design was then selected for each configuration which represents an optimum design for that configuration. The final recommendations of heat rejection system configuration for either the Brayton or Rankine cycles depend on the priorities established for the evaluation criteria.

  18. Heat pump system for the LDS church office building

    SciTech Connect

    Wagstaff, W.

    1982-12-01

    The headquarters building for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (LDS) is a 28-story office building in downtown Salt Lake City, Utah. Completed in 1972, the building is heated and cooled by ground-water heat pumps. The heat-pump system allows considerable flexibility in balancing heating and cooling requirements, and allows for the recovery and use of heat which otherwise would be lost. Although there are a few problems associated with the system, officials in the Operations and Maintenance Division express general satisfaction with it and with the equipment. No firm figures are available on the economics of the heat-pump system, but it appears to be more economic than a comparable conventional system.

  19. [Carbon monoxide poisoning by a heating system].

    PubMed

    Dietz, Eric; Gehl, Axel; Friedrich, Peter; Kappus, Stefan; Petter, Franz; Maurer, Klaus; Püschel, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    A case of accidental carbon monoxide poisoning in several occupants of two neighboring residential buildings in Hamburg-Harburg (Germany) caused by a defective gas central heating system is described. Because of leaks in one of the residential buildings and the directly adjacent wall of the neighboring house, the gas could spread and accumulated in both residential buildings, which resulted in a highly dangerous situation. Exposure to the toxic gas caused mild to severe intoxication in 15 persons. Three victims died still at the site of the accident. Measures to protect the occupants were taken only with a great delay. As symptoms were unspecific, it was not realized that the various alarms given by persons involved in the accident were related to the same cause. In order to take appropriate measures in time it is indispensible to recognize, assess and check potential risks, which can be done by using carbon monoxide warning devices and performing immediate COHb measurements with special pulse oximeters on site. Moreover, the COHb content in the blood should be routinely determined in all patients admitted to an emergency department with unspecific symptoms.

  20. Negative heat capacity in a left-handed system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palma-Chilla, L.; Flores, J. C.

    2017-04-01

    This paper models a left-handed system by finite inductively interacting elements. To separate the internal energy a generic double spectral parametrization is proposed. The microcanonical formalism analytically allows to derive the entropy, temperature and heat capacity in each energy set. Particularly, the heat capacity was found to be negative at high energies. These analytical findings are supported through numerical results. Interestingly, numerically the heat capacity of the system seems to decline when increasing internal energy in both sets.

  1. Some heat pump concepts for residual heat utilization. [Absorption-cycle and open-cycle systems

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Blanco, H.; Chen, F. C.

    1980-01-01

    Large quantities of low temperature heat in the industrial sector are rejected in the cooling water, condensate, and process water streams. While the energy rejected in these streams at temperatures between 40 and 80/sup 0/C amounts to 2.95 x 10/sup 9/ GJ/y, 2.42 x 10/sup 9/ GJ/y of process energy in the form of hot water and steam are needed in the United States. Industrial heat pumps, that recover the low temperature heat energy and upgrade it to a more usable temperature level, may improve the energy supply and demand situation. Two heat activated heat pump concepts - an absorption cycle system and an open cycle system are analyzed from the conceptual systems design and energy savings point of view. The results of the analysis and further research needs are presented.

  2. An inexpensive economical solar heating system for homes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, J. W.; Shinn, J. M., Jr.; Kirby, C. E.; Barringer, S. R.

    1976-01-01

    A low-cost solar home heating system to supplement existing warm-air heating systems is described. The report is written in three parts: (1) a brief background on solar heating, (2) experience with a demonstration system, and (3) information for the homeowner who wishes to construct such a system. Instructions are given for a solar heating installation in which the homeowner supplies all labor necessary to install off-the-shelf components estimated to cost $2,000. These components, which include solar collector, heat exchanger, water pump, storage tank, piping, and controls to make the system completely automatic, are available at local lumber yards, hardware stores, and plumbing supply stores, and are relatively simple to install. Manufacturers and prices of each component used and a rough cost analysis based on these prices are included. This report also gives performance data obtained from a demonstration system which was built and tested at the Langley Research Center.

  3. Passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with backup coolant flow path

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Boardman, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear fission reactor plant having a passive auxiliary safety cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. This reactor plant is enhanced by a backup or secondary passive safety cooling system which augments the primary passive auxiliary cooling system when in operation, and replaces the primary system when rendered inoperable.

  4. Passive cooling system for top entry liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Boardman, Charles E.; Hunsbedt, Anstein; Hui, Marvin M.

    1992-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear fission reactor plant having a top entry loop joined satellite assembly with a passive auxiliary safety cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. This satellite type reactor plant is enhanced by a backup or secondary passive safety cooling system which augments the primary passive auxiliary cooling system when in operation, and replaces the primary cooling system when rendered inoperative.

  5. History of Sandia National Laboratories` auxiliary closure mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Weydert, J.C.; Ponder, G.M.

    1993-12-01

    An essential component of a horizontal, underground nuclear test setup at the Nevada Test Site is the auxiliary closure system. The massive gates that slam shut immediately after a device has been detonated allow the prompt radiation to pass, but block debris and hot gases from continuing down the tunnel. Thus, the gates protect experiments located in the horizontal line-of-sight steel pipe. Sandia National Laboratories has been the major designer and developer of these closure systems. This report records the history of SNL`s participation in and contributions to the technology of auxiliary closure systems used in horizontal tunnel tests in the underground test program.

  6. Desiccant Humidity Control System Using Waste Heat of Water Source Heat Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Kazuki; Mashimo, Kouichi; Takahashi, Mikio; Tanaka, Kitoshi; Toya, Saburo; Tateyama, Ryotaro; Miyamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    The authors hope to develop an air-conditioning system that processes the latent heat load and the sensible heat load separately. This would enable the efficiency of the chilling unit to be improved because the temperature of the chilled water used for cooling would be higher than normal. However, if lukewarm water is used, there is insufficient cooling and dehumidification. Therefore, a dehumidifier such as a desiccant air-conditioning system is needed. Using the waste heat generated when the desiccant air-conditioning system is in operation increases efficiency. The authors are developing a prototype desiccant humidity control system that makes use of the waste heat generated by a water source heat pump. This paper describes the results of an experiment that was conducted for this prototype based on the assumption that it would be installed in an office building. The dehumidification performance achieved was sufficient to process the indoor latent heat load. The prototype was able to adjust the indoor relative humidity from 40% to 60% under conditions in which the indoor latent heat load varied. Humidification without the use of water was possible even in the absence of an indoor latent heat load when the outdoor absolute humidity was 3.5 g/kg' or more.

  7. System optimization of a heat-switch-based electrocaloric heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smullin, Sylvia J.; Wang, Yunda; Schwartz, David E.

    2015-08-01

    Realization of the potential of electrocaloric heat pumps includes consideration of not only material properties but also device characteristics and cycle operation. We present detailed models and analysis that elucidate the key parameters for performance optimization. We show that the temperature lift, cooling power, and efficiency of a system driven by heat switches depend on system operating conditions and the combined thermal properties of both the heat switches and the electrocaloric capacitor. We show experimental results that validate the models and draw conclusions about building high-performance systems.

  8. 14 CFR 25.833 - Combustion heating systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Combustion heating systems. 25.833 Section 25.833 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Combustion heating systems. Combustion heaters must be approved. Pressurization...

  9. 14 CFR 25.833 - Combustion heating systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Combustion heating systems. 25.833 Section 25.833 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Combustion heating systems. Combustion heaters must be approved. Pressurization...

  10. Energy resource requirements of a solar heating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, D. W. O.

    1980-01-01

    The paper addresses the question of the total energy resource use of a solar hot water and space heating system compared to the traditional oil, gas and electric heating options. The methods of energy analysis have been applied to a liquid-based, short-term storage solar space and water heating system for a dwelling in Toronto, and the results indicate that the indirect use of energy resources does not have a major impact on the overall energy conservation characteristics of the system which, being in many respects a worst case, takes 1.0-3.5 years of operation to conserve the energy resources, required to build, operate and maintain the system. Over the assumed 20-year lifetime the solar heating system, sized to provide 50% of the heating requirement to a house, uses between 53 and 62% as many energy resources as a conventional system, heating the same house. The energy-conservation characteristics of the system can be completely negated by the use of thermally generated electricity as backup in a 50% solar heating system which replaces oil or gas heating. The collectors and annual operating energy for the pumps were found to be the two most significant factors in the analysis.

  11. Performance of a Heating Block System Designed for Studying the Heat Resistance of Bacteria in Foods

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Xiao-xi; Li, Rui; Hou, Li-xia; Huang, Zhi; Ling, Bo; Wang, Shao-jin

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of bacteria’s heat resistance is essential for developing effective thermal treatments. Choosing an appropriate test method is important to accurately determine bacteria’s heat resistances. Although being a major factor to influence the thermo-tolerance of bacteria, the heating rate in samples cannot be controlled in water or oil bath methods due to main dependence on sample’s thermal properties. A heating block system (HBS) was designed to regulate the heating rates in liquid, semi-solid and solid foods using a temperature controller. Distilled water, apple juice, mashed potato, almond powder and beef were selected to evaluate the HBS’s performance by experiment and computer simulation. The results showed that the heating rates of 1, 5 and 10 °C/min with final set-point temperatures and holding times could be easily and precisely achieved in five selected food materials. A good agreement in sample central temperature profiles was obtained under various heating rates between experiment and simulation. The experimental and simulated results showed that the HBS could provide a sufficiently uniform heating environment in food samples. The effect of heating rate on bacterial thermal resistance was evaluated with the HBS. The system may hold potential applications for rapid and accurate assessments of bacteria’s thermo-tolerances. PMID:27465120

  12. Performance of a Heating Block System Designed for Studying the Heat Resistance of Bacteria in Foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Xiao-Xi; Li, Rui; Hou, Li-Xia; Huang, Zhi; Ling, Bo; Wang, Shao-Jin

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of bacteria’s heat resistance is essential for developing effective thermal treatments. Choosing an appropriate test method is important to accurately determine bacteria’s heat resistances. Although being a major factor to influence the thermo-tolerance of bacteria, the heating rate in samples cannot be controlled in water or oil bath methods due to main dependence on sample’s thermal properties. A heating block system (HBS) was designed to regulate the heating rates in liquid, semi-solid and solid foods using a temperature controller. Distilled water, apple juice, mashed potato, almond powder and beef were selected to evaluate the HBS’s performance by experiment and computer simulation. The results showed that the heating rates of 1, 5 and 10 °C/min with final set-point temperatures and holding times could be easily and precisely achieved in five selected food materials. A good agreement in sample central temperature profiles was obtained under various heating rates between experiment and simulation. The experimental and simulated results showed that the HBS could provide a sufficiently uniform heating environment in food samples. The effect of heating rate on bacterial thermal resistance was evaluated with the HBS. The system may hold potential applications for rapid and accurate assessments of bacteria’s thermo-tolerances.

  13. Performance of a Heating Block System Designed for Studying the Heat Resistance of Bacteria in Foods.

    PubMed

    Kou, Xiao-Xi; Li, Rui; Hou, Li-Xia; Huang, Zhi; Ling, Bo; Wang, Shao-Jin

    2016-07-28

    Knowledge of bacteria's heat resistance is essential for developing effective thermal treatments. Choosing an appropriate test method is important to accurately determine bacteria's heat resistances. Although being a major factor to influence the thermo-tolerance of bacteria, the heating rate in samples cannot be controlled in water or oil bath methods due to main dependence on sample's thermal properties. A heating block system (HBS) was designed to regulate the heating rates in liquid, semi-solid and solid foods using a temperature controller. Distilled water, apple juice, mashed potato, almond powder and beef were selected to evaluate the HBS's performance by experiment and computer simulation. The results showed that the heating rates of 1, 5 and 10 °C/min with final set-point temperatures and holding times could be easily and precisely achieved in five selected food materials. A good agreement in sample central temperature profiles was obtained under various heating rates between experiment and simulation. The experimental and simulated results showed that the HBS could provide a sufficiently uniform heating environment in food samples. The effect of heating rate on bacterial thermal resistance was evaluated with the HBS. The system may hold potential applications for rapid and accurate assessments of bacteria's thermo-tolerances.

  14. Carbon Fibers for Electrically Heated System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-05-01

    evaluated by several techniques. Samples of the yarn and fabric were enclosed in clean polyethylene bags which were subsequently heat-seaied and tumbled in...a home clothes dryer without heat. The result- of this test on PVA-sized polyacrylonitrile and rayon precursor yarn and PAN and rayon based fabrics...fabrics which were treated with PVA showed little or no accumulation of carbon/graphite dust within the sealed bag after an hour of tumbling , Fabrics

  15. Note: Heated flyer-plate impact system.

    PubMed

    Dolan, D H; Seagle, C T; Ao, T; Hacking, R G

    2014-07-01

    A technique for launching heated flyer plates was developed on a single-stage gas gun. This type of impact creates a well-posed mechanical state and a tunable thermal state, which is useful for calibrating dynamic temperature measurements. Proof-of-principle thermoreflectance measurements were performed using this technique. Since the target remains at room temperature until the moment of impact, heated flyers avoid differential expansion and annealing issues, allowing novel impact experiments to be performed.

  16. Life cycle assessment of base-load heat sources for district heating system options

    SciTech Connect

    Ghafghazi, Saeed; Sowlati, T.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Melin, Staffan

    2011-03-01

    Purpose There has been an increased interest in utilizing renewable energy sources in district heating systems. District heating systems are centralized systems that provide heat for residential and commercial buildings in a community. While various renewable and conventional energy sources can be used in such systems, many stakeholders are interested in choosing the feasible option with the least environmental impacts. This paper evaluates and compares environmental burdens of alternative energy source options for the base load of a district heating center in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC) using the life cycle assessment method. The considered energy sources include natural gas, wood pellet, sewer heat, and ground heat. Methods The life cycle stages considered in the LCA model cover all stages from fuel production, fuel transmission/transportation, construction, operation, and finally demolition of the district heating system. The impact categories were analyzed based on the IMPACT 2002+ method. Results and discussion On a life-cycle basis, the global warming effect of renewable energy options were at least 200 kgeqCO2 less than that of the natural gas option per MWh of heat produced by the base load system. It was concluded that less than 25% of the upstream global warming impact associated with the wood pellet energy source option was due to transportation activities and about 50% of that was resulted from wood pellet production processes. In comparison with other energy options, the wood pellets option has higher impacts on respiratory of inorganics, terrestrial ecotoxicity, acidification, and nutrification categories. Among renewable options, the global warming impact of heat pump options in the studied case in Vancouver, BC, were lower than the wood pellet option due to BC's low carbon electricity generation profile. Ozone layer depletion and mineral extraction were the highest for the heat pump options due to extensive construction required for these

  17. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefrois, R. T.; Knowles, G. R.; Mathur, A. K.; Budimir, J.

    1979-01-01

    Active heat exchange concepts for use with thermal energy storage systems in the temperature range of 250 C to 350 C, using the heat of fusion of molten salts for storing thermal energy are described. Salt mixtures that freeze and melt in appropriate ranges are identified and are evaluated for physico-chemical, economic, corrosive and safety characteristics. Eight active heat exchange concepts for heat transfer during solidification are conceived and conceptually designed for use with selected storage media. The concepts are analyzed for their scalability, maintenance, safety, technological development and costs. A model for estimating and scaling storage system costs is developed and is used for economic evaluation of salt mixtures and heat exchange concepts for a large scale application. The importance of comparing salts and heat exchange concepts on a total system cost basis, rather than the component cost basis alone, is pointed out. The heat exchange concepts were sized and compared for 6.5 MPa/281 C steam conditions and a 1000 MW(t) heat rate for six hours. A cost sensitivity analysis for other design conditions is also carried out.

  18. Solar heating and cooling technical data and systems analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    The research activities described herein were concentrated on the areas of economics, heating and cooling systems, architectural design, materials characteristics, climatic conditions, educational information packages, and evaluation of solar energy systems and components.

  19. Residential solar-heating system uses pyramidal optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Report describes reflective panels which optimize annual solar energy collection in attic installation. Subunits include collection, storage, distribution, and 4-mode control systems. Pyramid optical system heats single-family and multi-family dwellings.

  20. Solar heating and cooling systems design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Progress in the development of prototype solar heating/cooling systems is reported. Results obtained from refinement/improvement of the single family, multifamily, and commercial systems configurations and generalized studies on several of the subsystems are presented.