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Sample records for avalanches branching ratios

  1. A branching process model for sand avalanches

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Pelayo, R.; Salazar, I.; Schieve, W.C. )

    1993-07-01

    An analytically solvable model for sand avalanches of noninteracting grains of sand, based on the Chapman-Kolmogorov equations, is presented. For a single avalanche, distributions of lifetimes, sizes of overflows and avalanches, and correlation functions are calculated. Some of these are exponentials, some are power laws. Spatially homogeneous distributions of avalanches are also studied. Computer simulations of avalanches of interacting grains of sand are compared to the solutions to the Chapman-Kolmogorov equations. It is found that within the range of parameters explored in the simulation, the approximation of noninteracting grains of sand is a good one. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Undersampled critical branching processes on small-world and random networks fail to reproduce the statistics of spike avalanches.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Tiago L; Ribeiro, Sidarta; Belchior, Hindiael; Caixeta, Fábio; Copelli, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    The power-law size distributions obtained experimentally for neuronal avalanches are an important evidence of criticality in the brain. This evidence is supported by the fact that a critical branching process exhibits the same exponent [Formula: see text]. Models at criticality have been employed to mimic avalanche propagation and explain the statistics observed experimentally. However, a crucial aspect of neuronal recordings has been almost completely neglected in the models: undersampling. While in a typical multielectrode array hundreds of neurons are recorded, in the same area of neuronal tissue tens of thousands of neurons can be found. Here we investigate the consequences of undersampling in models with three different topologies (two-dimensional, small-world and random network) and three different dynamical regimes (subcritical, critical and supercritical). We found that undersampling modifies avalanche size distributions, extinguishing the power laws observed in critical systems. Distributions from subcritical systems are also modified, but the shape of the undersampled distributions is more similar to that of a fully sampled system. Undersampled supercritical systems can recover the general characteristics of the fully sampled version, provided that enough neurons are measured. Undersampling in two-dimensional and small-world networks leads to similar effects, while the random network is insensitive to sampling density due to the lack of a well-defined neighborhood. We conjecture that neuronal avalanches recorded from local field potentials avoid undersampling effects due to the nature of this signal, but the same does not hold for spike avalanches. We conclude that undersampled branching-process-like models in these topologies fail to reproduce the statistics of spike avalanches.

  3. Stability of earthquake clustering models: criticality and branching ratios.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Jiancang; Werner, Maximilian J; Harte, David S

    2013-12-01

    We study the stability conditions of a class of branching processes prominent in the analysis and modeling of seismicity. This class includes the epidemic-type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model as a special case, but more generally comprises models in which the magnitude distribution of direct offspring depends on the magnitude of the progenitor, such as the branching aftershock sequence (BASS) model and another recently proposed branching model based on a dynamic scaling hypothesis. These stability conditions are closely related to the concepts of the criticality parameter and the branching ratio. The criticality parameter summarizes the asymptotic behavior of the population after sufficiently many generations, determined by the maximum eigenvalue of the transition equations. The branching ratio is defined by the proportion of triggered events in all the events. Based on the results for the generalized case, we show that the branching ratio of the ETAS model is identical to its criticality parameter because its magnitude density is separable from the full intensity. More generally, however, these two values differ and thus place separate conditions on model stability. As an illustration of the difference and of the importance of the stability conditions, we employ a version of the BASS model, reformulated to ensure the possibility of stationarity. In addition, we analyze the magnitude distributions of successive generations of the BASS model via analytical and numerical methods, and find that the compound density differs substantially from a Gutenberg-Richter distribution, unless the process is essentially subcritical (branching ratio less than 1) or the magnitude dependence between the parent event and the direct offspring is weak.

  4. Branching ratio deviations from statistical behavior in core photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Tommaso, Devis; Decleva, Piero

    2005-08-01

    Accurate calculations of carbon 1s photoionization cross sections have been performed at the density functional level with the B-spline linear combination of atomic orbitals approach. The molecules considered are FCCH, FCCCH3, FCCCN, F2CCH2, CF3COOCH2CH3, and C3H5O. The variation of the branching ratios relative to inequivalent C 1s ionizations have been evaluated from threshold to about 100 eV photoelectron kinetic energy. Large deviations from the statistical ratios are observed at low energies, which remain often significant several tens of eV above threshold. The importance of taking into account core branching ratios for peak deconvolution and quantitative analysis, as well as an additional tool for structural information, is pointed out. Strong shape resonant effects are found to largely cancel in branching ratios. Their nature and variation along the series is analyzed in the framework of excitations into σ* valence orbitals.

  5. Measurement of the K+ --> pi+ nu nu branching ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, S.; Anisimovsky, V.V.; Aoki, M.; Ardebili, M.; Artamonov, A.V.; Atiya, M.; Bassalleck, B.; Bazarko, A.O.; Bhuyan, B.; Blackmore, E.W.; Bryman, D.A.; /British Columbia U. /Tsinghua U., Beijing /TRIUMF

    2008-03-01

    Experiment E949 at Brookhaven National Laboratory studied the rare decay K{sup +}-->pi{sup +} nu{ovr {nu}} and other processes with an exposure of 1.77 x 10{sup 12} k{sup +}'s. The data were analyzed using a blind analysis technique yielding one candidate event with an estimated background of 0.30 {+-} 0.03 events. Combining this result with the observation of two candidate events by the predecessor experiment E787 gave the branching ratio B(K{sup +}-->pi{sup +} nu{ovr {nu}}) = (1.47{sub -0.89}{sup +1.30}) x 10{sup -10}, consistent with the standard model prediction of (0.74 {+-} 0.20) x 10{sup -10}. This is a more detailed report of results previously published [V.V. Anisimovsky et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 031801 (2004)].

  6. Photodissociation and photoionization and their branching ratio in bisbenzene chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, A.; Amirav, A. ); Tasaki, S.; Bersohn, R. )

    1993-07-01

    Bisbenzene chromium (BBC) with an unusually low ionization potential, 5.45 eV is a model molecule to study phenomena near the ionization potential. A beam of BBC molecules cooled by a supersonic expansion was used to measure the absorption spectrum and the excitation spectra for ionization and Cr atom production. The uv spectrum is mainly a Rydberg series terminating at the ionization potential together with progressions in the symmetric benzene--Cr stretch. In the range from 320 to 282 nm, the region of a non-Rydberg absorption band, the excitation spectrum for Cr atom production is quite different from the absorption spectrum. In contrast, in the range 282--227 nm the excitation spectrum for Cr atom production is practically identical with the absorption spectrum. This identity suggests a close to 100% yield of Cr atoms. Near the ionization energy of BBC the yield of Cr atoms decreases while the ionization yield increases until a quite steady branching ratio of three Cr[sup +] ions to one Cr atom is reached. The rates of dissociation of excited BBC into Cr atoms are 0.70[plus minus]0.02[times]10[sup 6] s[sup [minus]1] and 4.2[plus minus]0.1[times]10[sup 6] s[sup [minus]1] at 279.8 and 248 nm, respectively.

  7. Branching Ratios for The Radiometric Calibration of EUNIS-2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daw, Adrian N.; Bhatia, A. K.; Rabin, Douglas M.

    2012-01-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Normal Incidence Spectrograph (EUNIS) sounding rocket instrument is a two-channel imaging spectrograph that observes the solar corona and transition region with high spectral resolution and a rapid cadence made possible by unprecedented sensitivity. The upcoming flight will incorporate a new wavelength channel covering the range 524-630 Angstroms, the previously-flown 300-370 Angstroms channel, and the first flight demonstration of cooled active pixel sensor (APS) arrays. The new 524-630 Angstrom channel incorporates a Toroidal Varied Line Space (TVLS) grating coated with B4C/Ir, providing broad spectral coverage and a wide temperature range of 0.025 to 10 MK. Absolute radiometric calibration of the two channels is being performed using a hollow cathode discharge lamp and NIST-calibrated AXUV-100G photodiode. Laboratory observations of He I 584 Angstroms and He II 304 Angstroms provide absolute radiometric calibrations of the two channels at those two respective wavelengths by using the AXUV photodiode as a transfer standard. The spectral responsivity is being determined by observing line pairs with a common upper state in the spectra of Ne I-III and Ar II-III. Calculations of A-values for the observed branching ratios are in progress.

  8. Partial branching enzyme treatment increases the low glycaemic property and α-1,6 branching ratio of maize starch.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingfeng; Miao, Ming; Jiang, Huan; Xue, Jiangchao; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Tao; Gao, Yaqi; Jia, Yingmin

    2014-12-01

    Partial branching enzyme treatment was used to modulate the starch fine chain structure responsible for a high content of slowly digestible starch fraction. Normal maize starch modified using branching enzyme for 4h showed a maximum slowly digestible starch content of 23.90%. The branching enzyme hydrolysis decreased the amylose content from 32.8% to 12.8%. The molecular weight distribution of enzyme-treated starches showed a larger proportion of low molecular weight fractions appeared in the enzyme treated starch sample compare to native starch. The number of shorter chains (DP<13) increased from 18.71% to 28.23.1%, accompanied by a reduction of longer chains (DP>30) from 20.11% to 11.95%. (1)H NMR spectra showed an increase of α-1,6 branching ratio from 4.7% to 9.4% during enzyme treatment. The increase in the amount of shorter chains and more α-1,6 linkages likely contribute to their slow digestion property. These results suggest that starches treated with partial branching enzyme synthesis a novel branched structure with slowly digestible character.

  9. Measurement of the ratios of branching fractions and.

    PubMed

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cruz, A; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; Daronco, S; D'Auria, S; D'onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Sciverez, M Garcia; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz-Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecci, C; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P; McNamara, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Papikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Salto, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; Denis, R St; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, Y; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-05-19

    We report an observation of the decay B(O)(S) --> D(-)(s)pi(+) in pp collisions at radical S = 1.96 TeV using 115 pb(-1) of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We observe 83 +/- 11(stat) B(O)(s) --> D(-)(s)pi(+) candidates, representing a large increase in statistics over previous measurements and the first observation of this decay at a pp collider. We present the first measurement of the relative branching fraction Beta(B(O)(s) --> D(-)(s)pi(+))/Beta(B(0) --> D(-)(pi)(+)) = 1.32 +/- 0.18(stat) +/- 0.38(syst). We also measure Beta(B(+) --> D(0)pi(+))/Beta(B(0) -->D(-)pi(+)) = 1.97 +/- 0.10(stat) +/- 0.21(syst), which is consistent with previous measurements.

  10. Measurement of the ratios of branching fractions and.

    PubMed

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cruz, A; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; Daronco, S; D'Auria, S; D'onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Sciverez, M Garcia; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz-Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecci, C; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P; McNamara, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Papikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Salto, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; Denis, R St; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, Y; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-05-19

    We report an observation of the decay B(O)(S) --> D(-)(s)pi(+) in pp collisions at radical S = 1.96 TeV using 115 pb(-1) of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We observe 83 +/- 11(stat) B(O)(s) --> D(-)(s)pi(+) candidates, representing a large increase in statistics over previous measurements and the first observation of this decay at a pp collider. We present the first measurement of the relative branching fraction Beta(B(O)(s) --> D(-)(s)pi(+))/Beta(B(0) --> D(-)(pi)(+)) = 1.32 +/- 0.18(stat) +/- 0.38(syst). We also measure Beta(B(+) --> D(0)pi(+))/Beta(B(0) -->D(-)pi(+)) = 1.97 +/- 0.10(stat) +/- 0.21(syst), which is consistent with previous measurements. PMID:16803097

  11. Tables of branching ratios for electric dipole transitions between arbitrary levels of hydrogen-like atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.

    1977-01-01

    The branching ratios in hydrogen-like atoms due to the electric-dipole transitions are tabulated for the initial principal and azimuthal quantum numbers n prime l prime, and final principal and azimuthal quantum numbers n l. Average values with respect to l prime are given. The branching ratios not tabulated, including the initial states n prime yields infinity l prime corresponding to the threshold of the continuum, could be obtained by extrapolation.

  12. The sensitivity of the Higgs boson branching ratios to the W boson width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, William

    2016-07-01

    The Higgs boson branching ratio into vector bosons is sensitive to the decay widths of those vector bosons because they are produced with at least one boson significantly off-shell. Γ (H → VV) is approximately proportional to the product of the Higgs boson coupling and the vector boson width. ΓZ is well measured, but ΓW gives an uncertainty on Γ (H → WW) which is not negligible. The ratio of branching ratios, BR (H → WW) / BR (H → ZZ) measured by a combination of ATLAS and CMS at LHC is used herein to extract a width for the W boson of ΓW =1.8-0.3+0.4 GeV by assuming Standard Model couplings of the Higgs bosons. This dependence of the branching ratio on ΓW is not discussed in most Higgs boson coupling analyses.

  13. Avalanche characteristics of single heterojunction avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, L. C.; You, A. H.; Andy, L. L. Y.; Tan, S. L.

    2009-03-01

    A simple Monte Carlo (MC) model is proposed to study the avalanche characteristics of heterojunction avalanche photodiode (HAPD). This model is capable to simulate the avalanche multiplication and excess noise factor in HAPDs by including the dead-space effect, hole to electron ionization ratio and heterointerface probability. The dead-space effect showed a vital role in reducing noise in single junction HAPDs based on the statistical determination in our model. It is shown that the dead-space effect reduces the avalanche noise in heterojunction device due to the localized ionization events. We found that the dead-space effect and the number of hole feedback impact ionizations are still the dominant effects to improve the excess noise factor especially in the injection layer of the device. In addition, the probability of electron and hole to cross the heterointerface will eliminate the secondary impact ionizations in the device.

  14. Vibrational branching ratios and photoelectron angular distributions in 5σ photoionisation of CO

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J. A.; Dill, Dan; Dehmer, Joseph L.

    1981-10-28

    Vibrationally resolved photoelectron angular distributions have been calculated for the 5σ photoionisation channel of CO using the multiple-scattering method. Vibrational branching ratios and vibrationally unresolved integrated cross sections and photoelectron angular distributions are also reported and compared with available measurements. Both angular distributions and branching ratios exhibit striking non-Franck-Condon behaviour caused primarily by the f-wave shape resonance in the sigma photoionisation continuum. Significant discrepancies between theory and experiment exist for the weaker vf=2,3 vibrational levels and interaction with nearby two-electron excitation is proposed as a likely cause.

  15. Delayed-neutron branching ratios of precursors in the fission product region

    SciTech Connect

    Rudstam, G.; Aleklett, K.; Sihver, L. )

    1993-01-01

    Delayed-neutron branching ratios in the fission product region have been tabulated, and average values have been determined. In order to provide data complementary to published values an experiment covering the mass range 79-150 has been carried out at the OSIRIS isotope-separator on-line facility at Studsvik. This experiment has resulted in branching ratios for some precursors ([sup 84]Ge, [sup 133]Sn, and [sup 150]La) for which such data have not been reported before. In several other cases the new results are accurate than older determinations. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. The branching ratio in the infrared predissociation of aniline-water-methanol + ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alauddin, Md.; Song, Jae Kyu; Park, Seung Min

    2010-09-01

    The infrared (IR) photodissociation of aniline-water-methanol cluster ion was investigated in the 2600-3900 cm -1 region to examine the factors which play key roles in determining the branching ratio of a concurrent predissociation reaction. The dominant channel in the IR predissociation of AWM + (A: aniline, W: water, M: methanol) was AWM + → AM + at all vibrational modes although the calculated binding energies of water and methanol were nearly the same. Also, the branching ratio was slightly dependent on the specific excited mode, ranging from 0.036 to 0.074; the most effective mode to kick out methanol was OH vibration of methanol.

  17. Precision Branching Ratio Measurement for the Superallowed &+circ; Emitter ^62Ga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, Paul; Svensson, C. E.; Austin, R. A. E.; Ball, G. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Chaffey, A.; Chakrawarthy, R. S.; Garrett, P. E.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hackman, G.; Hyland, B.; Kanungo, R.; Leslie, J. R.; Mattoon, C.; Morton, A. C.; Pearson, C. J.; Ressler, J. J.; Sarazin, F.; Savajols, H.

    2007-10-01

    A high-precision branching ratio measurement for the superallowed &+circ; emitter ^62Ga has been made using the 8π γ-ray spectrometer in conjunction with the SCintillating Electron-Positron Tagging ARray (SCEPTAR) as part of an ongoing experimental program in superallowed Fermi beta decay studies at the Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC) facility at TRIUMF in Vancouver, Canada, which delivered a high-purity beam of ˜10^4 ^62Ga/s in December 2005. The present work represents the highest statistics measurement of the ^62Ga superallowed branching ratio to date. 25 γ rays emitted following non-superallowed decay branches of ^62Ga have been identified and their intensities determined. These data yield a superallowed branching ratio with 10-4 precision, and our observed branch to the first nonanalogue 0^+ state sets a new upper limit on the isospin-mixing correction δC1^1. By comparing our ft value with the world average Ft, we make stringent tests of the different calculations for the isospin-symmetry-breaking correction δC, which is predicted to be large for ^62Ga.

  18. High-precision branching-ratio measurement for the superallowed β+ emitter 74Rb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlop, R.; Ball, G. C.; Leslie, J. R.; Svensson, C. E.; Towner, I. S.; Andreoiu, C.; Chagnon-Lessard, S.; Chester, A.; Cross, D. S.; Finlay, P.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Garrett, P. E.; Glister, J.; Hackman, G.; Hadinia, B.; Leach, K. G.; Rand, E. T.; Starosta, K.; Tardiff, E. R.; Triambak, S.; Williams, S. J.; Wong, J.; Yates, S. W.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2013-10-01

    A high-precision branching-ratio measurement for the superallowed β+ decay of 74Rb was performed at the TRIUMF Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC) radioactive ion-beam facility. The scintillating electron-positron tagging array (SCEPTAR), composed of 10 thin plastic scintillators, was used to detect the emitted β particles; the 8π spectrometer, an array of 20 Compton-suppressed HPGe detectors, was used for detecting γ rays that were emitted following Gamow-Teller and nonanalog Fermi β+ decays of 74Rb; and the Pentagonal Array of Conversion Electron Spectrometers (PACES), an array of 5 Si(Li) detectors, was employed for measuring β-delayed conversion electrons. Twenty-three excited states were identified in 74Kr following 8.241(4)×108 detected 74Rb β decays. A total of 58 γ-ray and electron transitions were placed in the decay scheme, allowing the superallowed branching ratio to be determined as B0=99.545(31)%. Combined with previous half-life and Q-value measurements, the superallowed branching ratio measured in this work leads to a superallowed ft value of 3082.8(65) s. Comparisons between this superallowed ft value and the world-average-corrected Ft¯ value, as well as the nonanalog Fermi branching ratios determined in this work, provide guidance for theoretical models of the isospin-symmetry-breaking corrections in this mass region.

  19. Branching ratios of B{sub c} meson decays into tensor meson in the final state

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Neelesh

    2010-01-01

    Two-body hadronic weak decays of B{sub c} meson involving tensor meson in the final state are studied by using the Isgur-Scora-Grinstein-Wise II model. Decay amplitudes are obtained using the factorization scheme in the spectator quark model. Branching ratios for the charm changing and bottom changing decay modes are predicted.

  20. The sensitivity of gas-phase models of dense interstellar clouds to changes in dissociative recombination branching ratios.

    PubMed

    Millar, T J; DeFrees, D J; McLean, A D; Herbst, E

    1988-01-01

    The approach of Bates to the determination of neutral product branching ratios in ion-electron dissociative recombination reactions has been utilised in conjunction with quantum chemical techniques to redetermine branching ratios for a wide variety of important reactions of this class in dense interstellar clouds. The branching ratios have then been used in a pseudo time-dependent model calculation of the gas phase chemistry of a dark cloud resembling TMC-1 and the results compared with an analogous model containing previously used branching ratios. In general, the changes in branching ratios lead to stronger effects on calculated molecular abundances at steady state than at earlier times and often lead to reductions in the calculated abundances of complex molecules. However, at the so-called "early time" when complex molecule synthesis is most efficient, the abundances of complex molecules are hardly affected by the newly used branching ratios.

  1. Approximate likelihood-ratio test for branches: A fast, accurate, and powerful alternative.

    PubMed

    Anisimova, Maria; Gascuel, Olivier

    2006-08-01

    We revisit statistical tests for branches of evolutionary trees reconstructed upon molecular data. A new, fast, approximate likelihood-ratio test (aLRT) for branches is presented here as a competitive alternative to nonparametric bootstrap and Bayesian estimation of branch support. The aLRT is based on the idea of the conventional LRT, with the null hypothesis corresponding to the assumption that the inferred branch has length 0. We show that the LRT statistic is asymptotically distributed as a maximum of three random variables drawn from the chi(0)2 + chi(1)2 distribution. The new aLRT of interior branch uses this distribution for significance testing, but the test statistic is approximated in a slightly conservative but practical way as 2(l1- l2), i.e., double the difference between the maximum log-likelihood values corresponding to the best tree and the second best topological arrangement around the branch of interest. Such a test is fast because the log-likelihood value l2 is computed by optimizing only over the branch of interest and the four adjacent branches, whereas other parameters are fixed at their optimal values corresponding to the best ML tree. The performance of the new test was studied on simulated 4-, 12-, and 100-taxon data sets with sequences of different lengths. The aLRT is shown to be accurate, powerful, and robust to certain violations of model assumptions. The aLRT is implemented within the algorithm used by the recent fast maximum likelihood tree estimation program PHYML (Guindon and Gascuel, 2003).

  2. Quantum-state Dependence of Product Branching Ratios in Vacuum Ultraviolet Photodissociation of N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yu; Gao, Hong; Chung Chang, Yih; Hammouténe, D.; Ndome, H.; Hochlaf, M.; Jackson, William M.; Ng, C. Y.

    2016-03-01

    The branching ratios for the N(4S) + N(2D), N(4S) + N(2P), and N(2D) + N(2D) channels are measured for the photodissociation of {{{N}}}2({X}1{{{{Σ }}}g}+;v\\prime\\prime =0,J\\prime\\prime ) in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region of 100,808-122,159 cm-1 using the VUV-VUV pump-probe approach combined with velocity-map-imaging-photoion detection. No evidence of forming the ground-state N(4S) + N(4S) products is found. No potential barrier is observed for the N(2D) + N(2D) channel, but the N(4S) + N(2P) channel has a small potential barrier of ≈740 cm-1. The branching ratios are found to depend on the symmetry of predissociative N2 states instead of the total VUV excitation energy, indicating that N2 photodissociation is nonstatistical. When the branching ratios for N(4S) + N(2D) and N(4S) + N(2P) products are plotted as a function of the VUV excitation energy for the valence N2 1Πu and {}1{{{{Σ }}}{{u}}}+ states, oscillations in these ratios are observed demonstrating how these channels are competing with each other. These data can be used to select both the velocity and internal states of the atomic products by picking the quantum state that is excited. High-level ab initio potential energy curves of the excited N2 states are calculated to provide insight into the mechanisms for the observed branching ratios. The calculations predict that the formation of both N(4S) + N(2D) and N(4S) + N(2P) channels involves potential energy barriers, in agreement with experimental observations. A discussion of the application of the present results to astronomy, planetary sciences, and comets is given.

  3. Half-life of Th232 and the branching ratio of Bi212

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Farley, T.A.; Lazar, N.

    1956-01-01

    The half-life of Th232 has been calculated by determining an absolute gamma-disintegration rate for Tl208 in equilibrium with Th232 for three old thorium nitrate salts and one natural thorite sample. The branching ratio, ??(??+??), for Bi212, a necessary parameter in the calculation, was also measured. The half-life of Th232 was found to be 1.42??1010 years within an estimated error of 5%, which is essentially in agreement with the presently accepted value. The branching ratio, ??(??+??), of Bi212 was found to be 0.362??0.006, about 7.4% higher than the currently accepted value. ?? 1956 The American Physical Society.

  4. Measurement of the branching ratio for β-delayed α decay of 16N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refsgaard, J.; Kirsebom, O. S.; Dijck, E. A.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Lund, M. V.; Portela, M. N.; Raabe, R.; Randisi, G.; Renzi, F.; Sambi, S.; Sytema, A.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H. W.

    2016-01-01

    While the 12C(α , γ) 16 O reaction plays a central role in nuclear astrophysics, the cross section at energies relevant to hydrostatic helium burning is too small to be directly measured in the laboratory. The β-delayed α spectrum of 16N can be used to constrain the extrapolation of the E1 component of the S-factor; however, with this approach the resulting S-factor becomes strongly correlated with the assumed βα branching ratio. We have remeasured the βα branching ratio by implanting 16N ions in a segmented Si detector and counting the number of βα decays relative to the number of implantations. Our result, 1.49 (5) ×10-5, represents a 24% increase compared to the accepted value and implies an increase of ≈ 10% in the extrapolated S-factor.

  5. Millimeter/submillimeter Spectroscopy to Measure the Branching Ratios for Methanol Photolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, Morgan N.; Powers, Carson Reed; Zinga, Samuel; Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.

    2016-06-01

    Methanol is one of the most abundant and important molecules in the interstellar medium, playing a key role in driving more complex organic chemistry both on grain surfaces and through gas-phase ion-molecule reactions. Methanol photolysis produces many radicals such as hydroxyl, methoxy, hydroxymethyl, and methyl that may serve as the building blocks for more complex organic chemistry in star-forming regions. The branching ratios for methanol photolysis may govern the relative abundances of many of the more complex species already detected in these environments. However, no direct, comprehensive, quantitative measurement of methanol photolysis branching ratios is available. Using a 193 nm excimer laser, the gas phase photolysis of methanol was studied in the (sub)millimeter range, where the rotational spectroscopic signatures of the photolysis products were probed. Here we present preliminary results from this experiment.

  6. Branching-ratio approximation for the self-exciting Hawkes process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardiman, Stephen J.; Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe

    2014-12-01

    We introduce a model-independent approximation for the branching ratio of Hawkes self-exciting point processes. Our estimator requires knowing only the mean and variance of the event count in a sufficiently large time window, statistics that are readily obtained from empirical data. The method we propose greatly simplifies the estimation of the Hawkes branching ratio, recently proposed as a proxy for market endogeneity and formerly estimated using numerical likelihood maximization. We employ our method to support recent theoretical and experimental results indicating that the best fitting Hawkes model to describe S&P futures price changes is in fact critical (now and in the recent past) in light of the long memory of financial market activity.

  7. Estimates of the branching ratios for hadronic decays of heavy resonances using quark combinatorics

    SciTech Connect

    Voloshin, S.A.; Nikitin, Y.P.; Porfirov, P.I.

    1983-03-01

    The quark combinatorics method (V. V. Anisovich et al., Nucl. Phys. B55, 455 (1973); J. D. Bjorken et al., Phys. Rev. D9, 1449 (1974)) at finite energies (V. N. Guman et al., Nucl. Phys. B99, 532 (1975), S. A. Voloshin et al., Sov. J. Nucl. Phys. 35, 586, 738 (1982)) is used to estimate the branching ratios for hadronic decays of the heavy resonances J/psi, D/sup +/, D/sup 0/, F/sup +/, and ..lambda../sup +//sub c/. The results are compared to the experimental data on the known hadronic decay channels of the J/psi, D/sup +/, and D/sup 0/ mesons. The branching ratios for the hadronic decays of the F/sup +/ meson and the ..lambda../sup +//sub c/ hyperon are predicted.

  8. B^0_s and lambda^0_b lifetimes and branching ratios at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Behari, S.; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2006-12-01

    The authors review B{sub s}{sup 0} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} lifetime and branching ratio measurements from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron Run II. Using up to 1 fb{sup -1} data samples per experiment, {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} lifetime in J/{Psi}{Lambda}{sup 0} decays, B{sub s}{sup 0} lifetime difference in K{sup +}K{sup -} and D{sub s}{sup (*)+} D{sub s}{sup (*)-} decays and B{sub s}{sup 0} branching ratio in D{sub s1}{sup -}(2536){mu}{sup +} {nu}X decays are reported.

  9. B {sup {yields}} {pi}{pi} decays: Branching ratios and CP asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Kaidalov, A. B. Vysotsky, M. I.

    2007-04-15

    Theoretically motivated smallness of the penguin amplitude in B {sup {yields}} {pi}{pi} decays allows one to calculate the value of the unitarity-triangle angle {alpha}(o{sub 2}) with good accuracy. The relatively large branching ratio of the decay into {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} is explained by the large value of FSI phase difference between decay amplitudes with I = 0 and I = 2.

  10. Relative branching ratio of the η→ π0γγ decay channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knecht, N.; Papandreou, Z.; Lolos, G. J.; Benslama, K.; Huber, G. M.; Li, S.; Bekrenev, V.; Briscoe, W. J.; Grosnick, D.; Isenhower, D.; Koetke, D. D.; Kozlenko, N. G.; Kruglov, S.; Manley, D. M.; Manweiler, R.; McDonald, S.; Olmsted, J.; Shafi, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.

    2004-06-01

    The η→π0γγ rare decay was measured at the AGS with the Crystal Ball photon spectrometer and its relative branching ratio was extracted to be B1=(8.3±2.8±1.4)×10-4, based on the analysis of 3×107 detected η mesons. This leads to a lower partial width for this eta channel than past measurements and is in line with chiral perturbation theory calculations.

  11. Improved Measurement of the π→eν Branching Ratio

    DOE PAGES

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Britton, D. I.; Bryman, D. A.; vom Bruch, D.; Chen, S.; Comfort, J.; Ding, M.; Doria, L.; et al

    2015-08-01

    A new measurement of the branching ratio Re/μ=Γ(π+ → e+ν + π+ → e+νγ)/Γ(π+ → μ+ν + π+→μ+νγ) resulted in Rexpe/μ=[1.2344±0.0023(stat)±0.0019(syst)] x 10-4. This is in agreement with the standard model prediction and improves the test of electron-muon universality to the level of 0.1%.

  12. Factors Affecting the Branching Ratio of Photodissociation: Thiophenol Studied through Quantum Wavepacket Dynamics.

    PubMed

    An, Heesun; Choi, Heechol; Lee, Yoon Sup; Baeck, Kyoung Koo

    2015-05-18

    The photodissociation dynamics of thiophenol (PhSH) excited to the 1(1) ππ* state was investigated by time-dependent quantum wavepacket propagation within two-dimensional (2D) space consisting of the S-H bond and -SH torsion. We systematically studied the dependence of the branching ratio (Ã/X(~)) between the two electronic states of the phenylthiyl radical (PhS(.) ) on several factors of the 2D potential energy surfaces (PESs). The effect of a reduced initial barrier to the first ππ*/πσ* conical intersection (CI) was found to be marginal, whereas the effects of a reduced torsional barrier of -SH on the excited ππ* state and the mitigated slope of the πσ* PES between the first (ππ*/πσ*) and the second (πσ*/S0 ) CIs were noticeable. The effect of the slope on the branching ratio has never been previously noticed. It was shown that the branching ratio can be sufficiently above unity without pre-excitation of the torsion mode of -SH, which has been assumed so far. PMID:25756225

  13. Recent Measurements of DT Gamma to Neutron Branching Ratio at ICF Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yongho

    2011-10-01

    The total T(d,g)5He/T(d,n)4He branching ratio of (4.5 +/- 0.5)E-5 has been measured on Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions at the OMEGA laser facility. Recent measurements have shown that the DT branching ratio at ICF is 2 - 3 times less than that of previously measured at particle accelerator facilities. Measurements were done at ion temperatures of (5 +/- 2) keV, which is quite low compared to previous measurements. Implication of the recent founding is that nuclear properties such as DT branching ratio might be reconsidered at low temperature ICF and stellar conditions. In practical sense, precise measurements of the branching ratio T(d,g)5He relative to T(d,n)4He are important in order to diagnose target areal density and resultant fusion yield of cryogenically-layered implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In this work, we have used LANL's Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD), which provides a high bandwidth, energy thresholding capability for gamma-ray detection using gamma/electron/Cherenkov conversion. High-bandwidth aids the detection of D-T fusion gamma rays before the arrival of associated 14.1 MeV neutron-induced gammas; energy thresholding gives further protection against such undesirable backgrounds. In addition, to reduce systematic uncertainty, we have applied three independent calibration methods to characterize GCD response such as (1) D-3He gamma-rays generated at Omega laser where no absolute detector calibration was required because quite similar gamma spectrum from D3He and DT, (2) mono-energetic gamma rays generated at Duke University's High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIgS), and (3) 14-MeV neutron-induced inelastic gamma-rays generated at OMEGA using puck materials of known areal density placed near target center. In conjunction with an independent neutron yield measurements and ACCEPT and GEANT4 simulation codes, the resultant DT branching ratio was inferred. This work was performed by Los Alamos National Laboratory under the

  14. Pressure-Dependent Yields and Product Branching Ratios in the Broadband Photolysis of Chlorine Nitrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickolaisen, Scott L.; Sander, Stanley P.; Friedl, Randall R.

    1996-01-01

    The photolysis of chlorine nitrate was studied using broadband flash photolysis coupled with long-path ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy. Branching ratios for the Cl + NO3 and ClO + NO2 product channels were determined from time-dependent measurements of ClO and NO3 concentrations. Yields of the ClO and NO3 products displayed a dependence on the bath gas density and the spectral distribution of the photolysis pulse. Product yields decreased with increasing bath gas density regardless of the spectral distribution of the photolysis pulse; however, the decrease in product yield was much more pronounced when photolysis was limited to longer wavelengths. For photolysis in a quartz cell (lambda > 200 nm) the yield decreased by a factor of 2 over the pressure 10-100 Torr. In a Pyrex cell (lambda > 300 nm), the yield decreased by a factor of 50 over the same pressure range. When photolysis was limited to lambda > 350 nm, the yield decreased by a factor of 250. Branching ratios for the photolysis channels [ClONO2 + h.nu yields ClO + NO2 (1a) and ClONO2 + h.nu yields Cl + NO3 (lb)] were determined from the relative ClO and NO3 product yields at various pressures. Although the absolute product yield displayed a pressure dependence, the branching between the two channels was independent of pressure. The relative branching ratios (assuming negligible contributions from other channels) are 0.61 +/- 0.20 for channel 1a and 0.39 +/- 0.20 for channel lb for photolysis with lambda > 200 nm and 0.44 +/- 0.08 for channel 1a and 0.56 +/- 0.08 for channel 1b for photolysis with lambda > 300 nm. The implications of these results for the chemistry of the lower stratosphere are discussed.

  15. Measurement of the Lambda 0(b) -> Lambda +(c) pi- branching ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Yi; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2003-01-01

    The authors present a measurement of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {pi}{sup -} branching ratio in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using 65 pb{sup -1} data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The measurement starts from reconstructing two decay modes: {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, where {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}; and {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, where D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}. The authors obtained 96 {+-} 13 {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} and 321 {+-} 22 {bar B}{sup 0} candidates from the CDF Run II Two-Track Hadronic Trigger data sample. The relative branching ratio of the two decays is then measured based on the equation: f{sub {Lambda}{sub b}} BR({Lambda}{sub b} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {pi}{sup -})/f{sub d} BR({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup +} {pi}{sup -}) = BR(D{sup +} {yields} K{pi}{pi}) N{sub {Lambda}{sub b}} {epsilon}{sub B{sup 0}}/BR({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{pi}) N{sub {bar B}{sup 0}} {epsilon}{sub {Lambda}{sub b}}. The measurement gives f{sub {Lambda}{sub b}} BR({Lambda}{sub b} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/f{sub d} BR({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = 0.66 {+-} 0.11(stat) {+-} 0.09(syst) {+-} 0.18(BR). The {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} branching ratio is then extracted, giving BR({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (6.6 {+-} 1.2(stat.) {+-} 0.9(syst.) {+-} 2.3(BR+FR)) x 10{sup -3}. The {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} sample they reconstructed in this analysis is the largest fully reconstructed {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} sample in existence. The result they report here on the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} branching ratio is the world's first such measurement.

  16. Branching ratios from B{sub s} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew S. Martin

    2004-05-28

    CDF Run II relative branching ratio measurements for 65 pb{sup -1} of data in the channels B{sub s} {yields} D{sub s}{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup {-+}}, {Lambda} {sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} and B {yields} h{sup +}h{sup -} are presented. Further, an observation of B{sub s} {yields} K{sup {+-}} K{sup {-+}} and a measurement of A{sub CP} are presented.

  17. D-T gamma-to-neutron branching ratio determined from inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.; Mack, J. M.; Herrmann, H. W.; Young, C. S.; Hale, G. M.; Caldwell, S.; Hoffman, N. M.; Evans, S. C.; Sedillo, T. J.; McEvoy, A.; Langenbrunner, J.; Hsu, H. H.; Huff, M. A.; Batha, S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Garbett, W. J.; Stoeffl, W.; Grafil, E.; Bernstein, L.; and others

    2012-05-15

    A new deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion gamma-to-neutron branching ratio [{sup 3}H(d,{gamma}){sup 5}He/{sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}He] value of (4.2 {+-} 2.0) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} was recently reported by this group [Y. Kim et al. Phys. Rev. C (submitted)]. This measurement, conducted at the OMEGA laser facility located at the University of Rochester, was made for the first time using inertial confinement fusion (ICF) plasmas. Neutron-induced backgrounds are significantly reduced in these experiments as compared to traditional beam-target accelerator-based experiments due to the short pulse nature of ICF implosions and the use of gas Cherenkov {gamma}-ray detectors with fast temporal responses and inherent energy thresholds. It is expected that this ICF-based measurement will help resolve the large and long-standing inconsistencies in previously reported accelerator-based values, which vary by a factor of approximately 30. The reported value at ICF conditions was determined by averaging the results of two methods: (1) a direct measurement of ICF D-T {gamma}-ray and neutron emissions using absolutely calibrated detectors and (2) a separate cross-calibration against the better known D-{sup 3}He gamma-to-proton branching ratio [{sup 3}He(d, {gamma}){sup 5}Li/{sup 3}He(d,p){sup 4}He]. Here we include a detailed explanation of these results, and introduce as a corroborative method an in-situ{gamma}-ray detector calibration using neutron-induced {gamma}-rays. Also, by extending the established techniques to two additional series of implosions with significantly different ion temperatures, we test the branching ratio dependence on ion temperature. The data show a D-T branching ratio is nearly constant over the temperature range 2-9 keV. These studies motivate further investigation into the {sup 5}He and {sup 5}Li systems resulting from D-T and D-{sup 3}He fusion, respectively, and result in improved ICF {gamma}-ray reaction history diagnosis at the National Ignition

  18. Improved Measurement of the π→eν Branching Ratio.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A; Aoki, M; Blecher, M; Britton, D I; Bryman, D A; Vom Bruch, D; Chen, S; Comfort, J; Ding, M; Doria, L; Cuen-Rochin, S; Gumplinger, P; Hussein, A; Igarashi, Y; Ito, S; Kettell, S H; Kurchaninov, L; Littenberg, L S; Malbrunot, C; Mischke, R E; Numao, T; Protopopescu, D; Sher, A; Sullivan, T; Vavilov, D; Yamada, K

    2015-08-14

    A new measurement of the branching ratio R_{e/μ}=Γ(π^{+}→e^{+}ν+π^{+}→e^{+}νγ)/Γ(π^{+}→μ^{+}ν+π^{+}→μ^{+}νγ) resulted in R_{e/μ}^{exp}=[1.2344±0.0023(stat)±0.0019(syst)]×10^{-4}. This is in agreement with the standard model prediction and improves the test of electron-muon universality to the level of 0.1%. PMID:26317713

  19. High-precision calculation of the branching ratio of the 40K decay constant.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, F.

    2008-12-01

    40K is of great importance in Earth science, particularly for K/Ar, 40Ar/39Ar and K/Ca geochronology. The decay scheme of the 40K includes two different modes of decay, beta and electron capture followed by gamma-ray emission, which yield two different products, 40Ca* and 40Ar*. The relative probability that 40K decay following one of the two schemes is known as the branching ratio. An original method of calculation to obtain the value of the 40K branching ratio (λβ- /λtot) based on the K/Ar technique, is proposed. λβ- /λtot is obtained by combining the 40Ar*/40K value of Fish Canyon sanidine (FCs) secondary standard derived from four primary 40Ar/39Ar standards, with the current best estimates of the age of FCs and the value of the 40K total decay constant. The latest estimation of the 40K total decay constant and the age of FCs by Mundil et al. (2006), through comparison with U/Pb ages, yields a λβ- /λtot value of 89.59 ± 0.03% (1σ; relative error = ± 0.035%). Indirect measurement of the age of FCs by orbital tuning (Kuiper et al., 2008) combined with the value of 40K total decay constant measured by liquid scintillation counting by Kossert and Gunther (2004) yields a statistically indistinguishable value for the branching ratio of 89.61 ± 0.03%, with an average between the two values of 89.60 ± 0.04%. The method proposed here allows can easily be applied to further constrain the value of the 40K branching ratio as future refinements of the 40K decay constant and FCs age are produced, although it is expected that the adopted value will be close to λβ- /λtot = 89.60 ± 0.04%. Kossert and Gunther, 2004. Appl. Radiat. Isot. 60, 459-464. Kuiper et al., 2008. Science 320, 500-504. Mundil et al. 2006, Eos Trans. AGU, 87(52)

  20. Measurement of the inclusive charmless semileptonic branching ratio of B mesons and determination of |V ub|.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Morgan, S E; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Schwanke, U; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Barillari, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Tinslay, J; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Aspinwall, M L; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Forti, A C; Hart, P A; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Hast, C; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Pulliam, T; Brau, J; Frey, R; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Grauges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Tanaka, H A; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-02-20

    We report a measurement of the inclusive charmless semileptonic branching fraction of B mesons in a sample of 89 x 10(6) (-)BB events recorded with the BABAR detector at the Upsilon(4S) resonance. Events are selected by fully reconstructing the decay of one B meson and identifying a charged lepton from the decay of the other B meson. The number of signal events is extracted from the mass distribution of the hadronic system accompanying the lepton and is used to determine the ratio of branching fractions B((-)B-->X(u)lnu;)/B((-)B-->Xlnu;)=[2.06+/-0.25(stat)+/-0.23(syst)+/-0.36(theo)]x10(-2). Using the measured branching fraction for inclusive semileptonic B decays, we find B((-)B-->X(u)lnu;)=[2.24+/-0.27(stat)+/-0.26(syst)+/-0.39(theo)]x10(-3) and derive the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |V(ub)|=[4.62+/-0.28(stat)+/-0.27(syst)+/-0.48(theo)]x10(-3).

  1. Branching ratios and direct CP asymmetries in D→PV decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Qin; Li, Hsiang-nan; Lü, Cai-Dian; Yu, Fu-Sheng

    2014-03-01

    We study the two-body hadronic D→PV decays, where P (V) denotes a pseudoscalar (vector) meson, in the factorization-assisted topological-amplitude approach proposed in our previous work. This approach is based on the factorization of short-distance and long-distance dynamics into Wilson coefficients and hadronic matrix elements of four-fermion operators, respectively, with the latter being parametrized in terms of several nonperturbative quantities. We further take into account the ρ-ω mixing effect, which improves the global fit to the branching ratios involving the ρ0 and ω mesons. Combining short-distance dynamics associated with penguin operators and the hadronic parameters determined from the global fit to branching ratios, we predict direct CP asymmetries. In particular, the direct CP asymmetries in the D0→K0K¯*0, K¯0K*0, D+→π+ρ0, and Ds+→K+ω, K+ϕ decays are found to be of O(10-3), which can be observed at the LHCb and future Belle II experiment. We also predict the CP asymmetry observables of some neutral D meson decays.

  2. Snow Avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancey, C.

    Over the last century, mountain ranges in Europe and North America have seen substantial development due to the increase in recreational activities, transportation, construction in high altitude areas, etc. In these mountain ranges, avalanches often threaten man's activities and life. Typical examples include recent disasters, such as the avalanche at Val d'Isère in 1970 (39 people were killed in a hostel) or the series of catastrophic avalanches throughout the Northern Alps in February 1999 (62 residents killed). The rising demand for higher safety measures has given new impetus to the development of mitigation technology and has given rise to a new scientific area entirely devoted to snow and avalanches. This paper summarises the paramount features of avalanches (formation and motion) and outlines the main approaches used for describing their movement. We do not tackle specific problems related to snow mechanics and avalanche forecasting. For more information on the subject, the reader is referred to the main textbooks published in Alpine countries [1-8].

  3. Branching ratios between the abstraction and addition channels in the reactions of OH radicals with monoterpenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rio, C.; Loison, J. C.; Caralp, F.; Flaud, P. M.; Villenave, E.

    2009-04-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) formation in the atmosphere is described as a mass transfer of volatile organic compound oxidation products with low vapour pressures in particular phases. Among the different aerosol components, the SOA represent an important fraction, but, the fundamental processes governing their physics and chemistry in the atmosphere are poorly understood. So it is important to characterize and understand the mechanisms of their formation. It is well-known that atmospheric oxidation of monoterpenes is an important process in tropospheric SOA formation. Consequently, the identification and quantification of reaction products from the oxidation of monoterpenes in the gas phase have been receiving great attention over the past years. However, the atmospheric degradation leads to the formation of a plethora of reaction products and proceeds through a very complex mechanism that is still not fully characterised. In our study, we have focused on SOA formation from OH + monoterpene reactions and more precisely on the primary oxidation steps of γ-terpinene and d-limonene by OH radicals. Indeed, the primary reaction of monoterpenes with hydroxyl radicals can in principle occur by two reaction pathways: OH-addition and H-abstraction. In this work, we have determined branching ratios of these reactions. Although there seems to be a consensus in the literature that OH-monoterpene reactions proceed almost exclusively by addition, several measurements have shown that in some case H-abstraction can represent up to 30% of the total reaction rate constant. Therefore it is necessary to determine this branching ratio in order to know, in particular, the main peroxy radicals formed and propose a mechanism for the gas phase oxidation of terpene by hydroxyl radicals. (γ-terpinene + OH) and (d-limonene + OH) reactions have been studied i) at atmospheric pressure, using laser photolysis coupled with UV absorption radical detection, and ii) at low pressure, using

  4. Measurement of the Branching Ratio Lambda_c+ -> p pi+ pi-

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Hinojosa, Guillermo; /San Luis Potosi U.

    2008-03-01

    The confirmation of the Cabibbo-suppressed charm baryon decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} is reported. All data analyzed are from SELEX, a fixed target experiment at Fermilab that took data during 1996 and 1997, mainly with a 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -} beam. The branching ratio of the Cabibbo-suppressed decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} relative to the Cabibbo-favored mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +} is measured to be: {Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.103 {+-} 0.022.

  5. Knowledge-based probabilistic representations of branching ratios in chemical networks: The case of dissociative recombinations

    SciTech Connect

    Plessis, Sylvain; Carrasco, Nathalie; Pernot, Pascal

    2010-10-07

    Experimental data about branching ratios for the products of dissociative recombination of polyatomic ions are presently the unique information source available to modelers of natural or laboratory chemical plasmas. Yet, because of limitations in the measurement techniques, data for many ions are incomplete. In particular, the repartition of hydrogen atoms among the fragments of hydrocarbons ions is often not available. A consequence is that proper implementation of dissociative recombination processes in chemical models is difficult, and many models ignore invaluable data. We propose a novel probabilistic approach based on Dirichlet-type distributions, enabling modelers to fully account for the available information. As an application, we consider the production rate of radicals through dissociative recombination in an ionospheric chemistry model of Titan, the largest moon of Saturn. We show how the complete scheme of dissociative recombination products derived with our method dramatically affects these rates in comparison with the simplistic H-loss mechanism implemented by default in all recent models.

  6. Higgs branching ratios in constrained minimal and next-to-minimal supersymmetry scenarios surveyed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskidt, C.; de Boer, W.; Kazakov, D. I.; Wayand, S.

    2016-08-01

    In the CMSSM the heaviest scalar and pseudo-scalar Higgs bosons decay largely into b-quarks and tau-leptons because of the large tan ⁡ β values favored by the relic density. In the NMSSM the number of possible decay modes is much richer. In addition to the CMSSM-like scenarios, the decay of the heavy Higgs bosons is preferentially into top quark pairs (if kinematically allowed), lighter Higgs bosons or neutralinos, leading to invisible decays. We provide a scan over the NMSSM parameter space to project the 6D parameter space of the Higgs sector on the 3D space of the Higgs masses to determine the range of branching ratios as function of the Higgs boson mass for all Higgs bosons. Specific LHC benchmark points are proposed, which represent the salient NMSSM features.

  7. Measurement of the K{sup +}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{nu}{nu} branching ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, S.; Atiya, M.; Bhuyan, B.; Chiang, I-H.; Diwan, M. V.; Frank, J. S.; Haggerty, J.; Jaffe, D. E.; Kettell, S. H.; Li, K. K.; Littenberg, L. S.; Redlinger, G.; Strand, R. C.; Viren, B.; Anisimovsky, V. V.; Ivashkin, A. P.; Khabibullin, M. M.; Khotjantsev, A. N.; Kudenko, Yu. G.; Mineev, O. V.

    2008-03-01

    Experiment E949 at Brookhaven National Laboratory studied the rare decay K{sup +}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{nu}{nu} and other processes with an exposure of 1.77x10{sup 12} K{sup +}'s. The data were analyzed using a blind analysis technique yielding one candidate event with an estimated background of 0.30{+-}0.03 events. Combining this result with the observation of two candidate events by the predecessor experiment E787 gave the branching ratio B(K{sup +}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{nu}{nu})=(1.47{sub -0.89}{sup +1.30})x10{sup -10}, consistent with the standard model prediction of (0.74{+-}0.20)x10{sup -10}. This is a more detailed report of results previously published [V. V. Anisimovsky et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 031801 (2004)].

  8. Strong-field control over the product branching ratios in molecular dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigsbee, Brandon; Zohrabi, Mohammad; Ablikim, Utuq; Guevara, Nicolais; Carnes, Kevin; Ben-Itzhak, Itzik; Esry, Brett

    2012-06-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of strong-field control over the fragmentation channel in molecular dissociation by intense, single-color laser fields with emphasis on the effect of chirped pulses. In particular, the branching ratio between H+D^+ and H^++D from an HD^+ target is examined as a function of kinetic energy release for 790 nm pulses with intensities on the order of 10^14 W/cm^2 and pulse lengths ranging from 25 to 65 fs. Theoretical calculations based on numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation are compared to measurements using a coincidence 3-D momentum imaging technique. Both demonstrate that control is indeed possible and depends, as expected, on details of the laser pulse such as its chirp.

  9. Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-rule violation and B{yields}{eta}{sup (')}K branching ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.-F.; Charng, Y.-Y.; Li, Hsiang-nan

    2008-07-01

    We show that the few-percent Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-rule violating effects in the quark-flavor basis for the {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing can enhance the chiral scale associated with the {eta}{sub q} meson a few times. This enhancement is sufficient for accommodating the dramatically different data of the B{yields}{eta}{sup '}K and B{yields}{eta}K branching ratios. We comment on other proposals for resolving this problem, including flavor-singlet contributions, axial U(1) anomaly, and nonperturbative charming penguins. Discrimination of the above proposals by means of the B{yields}{eta}{sup (')}l{nu} and B{sub s}{yields}{eta}{sup (')}ll data is suggested.

  10. First observation of the decay Bs0-->Ds-Ds+ and measurement of its branching ratio.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giakoumopolou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyria, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2008-01-18

    We report the observation of the exclusive decay Bs0-->Ds-Ds+ at the 7.5 standard deviation level using 355 pb(-1) of data collected by the CDF II detector in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. We measure the relative branching ratio B(Bs0-->Ds-Ds+)/B(B0-->D-Ds+)=1.44(-0.44)(+0.48). Using the world average value for B(B0-->D-Ds+), we find B(Bs0-->Ds-Ds+)=(9.4(-4.2)(+4.4))x10(-3). This provides a lower bound DeltaGammasCP/Gammas>or=2B(Bs0-->Ds-Ds+)>1.2x10(-2) at 95% C.L.

  11. Reaction mechanism and product branching ratios of the CH + C₃H₈ reaction: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Joao Marcelo; Mebel, Alexander M

    2014-10-01

    The C4H9 potential energy surface accessed by the reaction of methylidyne radical, CH (X(2)Π), with propane, C3H8, including possible intermediates, transition states and dissociation products, has been studied by ab initio and density functional calculations at the CCSD(T)/CBS//B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level of theory. The computed relative energies and molecular parameters were utilized to calculate collision-energy-dependent unimolecular rate constants at the zero-pressure limit for isomerization and dissociation channels of the C4H9 adducts formed in the entrance reaction channels. The rate constants were used to evaluate the product branching ratios in the CH + C3H8 reaction under single-collision conditions. The results show that the reaction can produce mostly ethene (C2H4) + ethyl radical (C2H5) and propene (C3H6) + methyl radical (CH3), and up to 14% of various butene isomers (C4H8) + H. The product branching ratios are sensitive to the initial reaction adduct (a butyl radical, C4H9) formed in the entrance channels via barrierless insertion of the CH radical into the terminal and middle C-H bonds of propane or, possibly, into the single C-C bonds. A more definite answer on relative contributions of various available CH insertion channels can be obtained through ab initio quasiclassical trajectory calculations, which are proposed for the future. The results allowed us to conclude that the CH + C3H8 reaction does not result in major amounts in the direct growth of the carbon-skeleton to four-carbon C4H8 products via the CH-for-H exchange because C-C bond cleavages in C4H9 radicals are generally more preferable than C-H bond cleavages.

  12. Direct CP Violation, Branching Ratios and Form Factors B --> pi, B --> K in B decays

    SciTech Connect

    O. Leitner; X.-H. Guo; A.W. Thomas

    2004-11-01

    The B {yields} {pi} and B {yields} K transitions involved in hadronic B decays are investigated in a phenomenological way through the framework of QCD factorization. By comparing our results with experimental branching ratios from the BELLE, BABAR and CLEO collaborations for all the B decays including either a pion or a kaon, we propose boundaries for the transition form factors B {yields} {pi} and B {yields} K depending on the CKM matrix element parameters {rho} and {eta}. From this analysis, the form factors required to reproduce the experimental data for branching ratios are F{sup B {yields} {pi}} = 0.31 {+-} 0.12 and F{sup B {yields} K} = 0.37 {+-} 0.13. We calculate the direct CP violating asymmetry parameter, a{sub CP}, for B {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi} and B {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} K decays, in the case where {rho} - {omega} mixing effects are taken into account. Based on these results, we find that the direct CP asymmetry for B{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}, {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, B{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}K{sup -}, and {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {bar K}{sup 0}, reaches its maximum when the invariant mass {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} is in the vicinity of the {omega} meson mass. The inclusion of {rho} - {omega} mixing provides an opportunity to erase, without ambiguity, the phase uncertainty mod{pi} in the determination of th CKM angles {alpha} in case of b {yields} u and {gamma} in case of b {yields} s.

  13. Energy levels, Auger branching ratios, and radiative rates of the core-excited states of B-like carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yan; Gou Bingcong; Chen Feng

    2011-09-28

    Energy levels, Auger branching ratios, and radiative rates of the core-excited states of B-like carbon are calculated by the saddle-point variation and saddle-point complex-rotation methods. Relativistic and mass polarization corrections are included using first-order perturbation theory. Calculated Auger channel energies and branching ratios are used to identify high-resolution Auger spectrum in the 300-keV C{sup +}{yields} CH{sub 4} collision experiment. It is found that Auger decay of these five-electron core-excited states gives significant contributions to Auger spectrum in the range of 238-280 eV.

  14. Low-temperature branching ratios for the reaction of state-prepared N2(+) with acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Gichuhi, Wilson K; Suits, Arthur G

    2012-01-26

    In this work, the primary product branching ratio (BR) for the reaction of state-prepared nitrogen cation (N(2)(+)) with acetonitrile (CH(3)CN), a possible minor constituent of Titan's upper atmosphere, is reported. The ion-molecule reaction occurs in the collision region of the supersonic nozzle expansion that is characterized by a rotational temperature of 45 ± 5 K. A BR of 0.86 ± 0.01/0.14 ± 0.01 is obtained for the formation CH(2)CN(+) and the CH(3)CN(+) product ions, respectively. The reported BR overwhelmingly favors the formation of CH(2)CN(+) product channel and is consistent with a simple capture process that is accompanied by a nonresonant dissociative charge transfer reaction. The BRs are independent of the N(2) rotational levels excited. Apart from providing insights onto the dynamics of the title ion-molecule reaction, the reported BR represents the most accurate available low-temperature experimental measurement for the reaction useful to aid in the accurate modeling of Titan's nitrile chemistry.

  15. Vibrational branching ratios in the (b(2u))(-1) photoionization of C6F6.

    PubMed

    Lucchese, Robert R; Bozek, John D; Das, Aloke; Poliakoff, E D

    2009-07-28

    The vibrational branching ratios in the photoionization of C(6)F(6) leading to the C (2)B(2u) state of C(6)F(6)(+) are considered. Computational and experimental data are compared for the excitation of two totally symmetric modes. Resonant features at photon energies near 19 and 21 eV are found. A detailed analysis of the computed results shows that the two resonance states have different responses to changes in the C-C and C-F bond lengths. We find that the energies of both of the resonant states decrease with increasing bond lengths. In contrast to the energy positions, however, the resonant widths and the integrated oscillator strength of the resonances can either increase or decrease with increasing bond length depending on the nature and location of the resonant state and the location of the bond under consideration. With increasing C-F bond length, we find that the energy of the antibonding sigma resonance localized on the ring has a decreasing resonance energy and also a decreasing lifetime. This behavior is in contrast to the usual behavior of shape resonance energies where increasing a bond length leads to decreasing resonance energies and increasing resonance lifetimes. Finally, for the first time, we examine the effect of simultaneously occurring multiple vibrations on the resonance profile for valence photoionization, and we find that the inclusion of more than a single vibrational mode substantially attenuates the strength of resonance.

  16. Determination of the 242Pu Branching Ratio via Alpha-Gamma Coincidence

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T F

    2012-05-24

    When the burn-up is high, the {sup 242}Pu isotopic content becomes more important. The traditional correlation method will fail. The {sup 242}Pu isotopic content in the sample plays an essential role if the neutron coincidence method is used to quantify the total amount of plutonium. In one of the earlier measurements we had a chance to measure an isotopic pure (> 99.95 %) {sup 242}Pu thick sample and realized that the difference in the branching ratio (BR) value among current nuclear data3) for the two important gamma-rays at 103.5-keV and 158.8-keV. In this study, the thick sample was counted on a 15% ORTEC safeguards type HPGe to further improve BR determination of the 159-keV gamma-ray. Furthermore, we have made a thin {sup 242}Pu sample from the thick sample and performed alpha-gamma coincidence measurements. Our preliminary gamma-ray BR results are 4.37(6) E-4, 2.79(8) E-5, and 2.25(8) E-6 for 44.9-keV, 103.5-keV, and 158.9-keV, respectively.

  17. Photodissociation studies of HNCO: heat of formation and product branching ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Spiglanin, T.A.; Perry, R.A.; Chandler, D.W.

    1986-11-06

    The heat of formation (..delta..H/sub f/(298 K)) of HNCO is determined to be -24.9/sub -2.8//sup +0.7/ kcal/mol (based on ..delta..H/sub f/(NH) = 85.2 kcal/mol). This value is obtained by measuring the threshold for the production of NH(a/sup 1/..delta..) and by determining the energy contents of the NH fragment and the CO cofragment produced by photolysis of HNCO at wavelengths near the threshold. Saturated laser-induced fluorescence is used to determine the internal state distribution of NH(a/sup 1/..delta..), and multiphoton ionization is used to measure the internal state distribution of CO. An upper limit for the branching ratio of NCO/NH production from photodissociation of HNCO at 193 nm is determined from an analysis of kinetic experiments to be 0.10. To clarify the mechanism of photodissociation, HNCO fluorescence-excitation and NH(a/sup 1/..delta..) action spectra are also measured. They imply that two excited states of HNCO are present where only one had previously been considered.

  18. Avalanche dynamics on a rough inclined plane.

    PubMed

    Börzsönyi, Tamás; Halsey, Thomas C; Ecke, Robert E

    2008-07-01

    The avalanche behavior of gravitationally forced granular layers on a rough inclined plane is investigated experimentally for different materials and for a variety of grain shapes ranging from spherical beads to highly anisotropic particles with dendritic shape. We measure the front velocity, area, and height of many avalanches and correlate the motion with the area and height. We also measure the avalanche profiles for several example cases. As the shape irregularity of the grains is increased, there is a dramatic qualitative change in avalanche properties. For rough nonspherical grains, avalanches are faster, bigger, and overturning in the sense that individual particles have down-slope speeds u p that exceed the front speed uf as compared with avalanches of spherical glass beads that are quantitatively slower and smaller and where particles always travel slower than the front speed. There is a linear increase of three quantities: (i) dimensionless avalanche height, (ii) ratio of particle to front speed, and (iii) the growth rate of avalanche speed with increasing avalanche size with increasing tan theta r where theta r is the bulk angle of repose, or with increasing beta P, the slope of the depth averaged flow rule, where both theta r and beta P reflect the grain shape irregularity. These relations provide a tool for predicting important dynamical properties of avalanches as a function of grain shape irregularity. A relatively simple depth-averaged theoretical description captures some important elements of the avalanche motion, notably the existence of two regimes of this motion.

  19. Determination of photoionization branching ratios and total photoionization cross sections at 304 A from experimental ionospheric photoelectron fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, P. G.; Torr, D. G.; Espy, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    High-resolution measurements of the ionospheric photoelectron spectrum are used to derive photoionization cross sections and branching ratios for N2 and O at 304 A, the wavelength of the intense He II solar radiation. Based on a theory in which the measured fluxes at energies 22.5, 24.5, 25.5 and 27.5 eV are determined by the ratio of the production rate and the loss rate coefficient, values are obtained for the ratio of molecular nitrogen density to atomic oxygen density as a function of altitude, the sum of the total photoionization cross sections, the 2P/4S and 2D/4S branching ratios for O and the B/X and A/X branching ratios for N2 photoionization and the ratios and the interspecies cross section ratios 2D/A, 4S/X and 2P/B. The values obtained are in accord with the photoionization cross sections of Kirby et al. (1979).

  20. Measurement of the Ratio of Branching Fractions of the Υ(4S) to Charged and Neutral B Mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godang, Romulus; Kinoshita, Kay

    2002-04-01

    Using 2.73 fb-1 of CLEO II data taken on the Υ(4S) and 1.43 fb-1 taken at a center of mass energy 60 MeV below the Υ(4S), we measure the ratio of production fractions times the ratio of semileptonic branching fractions, f_+-b_+\\over f_00b0 through the decays barB arrow D^*l^- barν_l, reconstructed using a partial reconstruction method. Assuming that b_+\\over b0 is equal to the lifetime ratio τ_+\\overτ0 and using the world average value of τ_+\\overτ_0, the ratio of branching fractions of the Υ(4S) to charged and neutral B mesons will be presented.

  1. A measurement of the branching ratio of K+-- ->pi+--mu+mu- decays in the Hyper CP experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Zyla, Piotr; other HyperCP Collaborators

    2001-11-26

    Large samples of hyperon and kaon decays were collected with the Hyper CP spectrometer during two fixed-target runs at Fermilab. Based on an analysis of 110 million K pm decays from the 1997 data sample we present a branching ratio for K pm right arrow pi pm mu+ mu-. This is the first observation of K- right arrow pi- mu+ mu- decay.

  2. Measurement of the absolute branching ratio of the K+ →π+π-π+ (γ) decay with the KLOE detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babusci, D.; Balwierz-Pytko, I.; Bencivenni, G.; Bloise, C.; Bossi, F.; Branchini, P.; Budano, A.; Caldeira Balkeståhl, L.; Ceradini, F.; Ciambrone, P.; Curciarello, F.; Czerwiński, E.; Danè, E.; De Leo, V.; De Lucia, E.; De Robertis, G.; De Santis, A.; De Simone, P.; Di Cicco, A.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Salvo, R.; Domenici, D.; Erriquez, O.; Fanizzi, G.; Fantini, A.; Felici, G.; Fiore, S.; Franzini, P.; Gajos, A.; Gauzzi, P.; Giardina, G.; Giovannella, S.; Graziani, E.; Happacher, F.; Heijkenskjöld, L.; Höistad, B.; Johansson, T.; Kamińska, D.; Krzemien, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Loddo, F.; Loffredo, S.; Mandaglio, G.; Martemianov, M.; Martini, M.; Mascolo, M.; Messi, R.; Miscetti, S.; Morello, G.; Moricciani, D.; Moskal, P.; Palladino, A.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Prado Longhi, I.; Ranieri, A.; Santangelo, P.; Sarra, I.; Schioppa, M.; Sciascia, B.; Silarski, M.; Tortora, L.; Venanzoni, G.; Wiślicki, W.; Wolke, M.

    2014-11-01

    The absolute branching ratio of the K+ →π+π-π+ (γ) decay, inclusive of final-state radiation, has been measured using ∼17 million tagged K+ mesons collected with the KLOE detector at DAΦNE, the Frascati ϕ-factory.

  3. Branching ratios and polarization in B{yields}VV,VA,AA decays

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H.-Y.; Yang, K.-C.

    2008-11-01

    We present a detailed study of charmless two-body B decays into final states involving two vector mesons (VV) or two axial-vector mesons (AA) or one vector and one axial-vector meson (VA), within the framework of QCD factorization, where A is either a {sup 3}P{sub 1} or {sup 1}P{sub 1} axial-vector meson. The main results are as follows. (i) In the presence of next-to-leading-order nonfactorizable corrections, effective Wilson coefficients a{sub i}{sup h} are helicity-dependent. For some penguin-dominated modes, the constructive (destructive) interference in the negative-helicity (longitudinal-helicity) amplitude of the B{yields}VV decay will render the former comparable to the latter and push up the transverse polarization. (ii) In QCD factorization, the transverse polarization fraction can be large for penguin-dominated charmless VV modes by allowing for sizable penguin-annihilation contributions. (iii) Using the measured K*{sup 0}{rho}{sup -} channel as an input, we predict the branching ratios and polarization fractions for other B{yields}K*{rho} decays. (iv) The smallness of the axial-vector decay constant of the {sup 1}P{sub 1} axial-vector meson can be tested by measuring various b{sub 1}{rho} modes to see if {gamma}(B{sup 0}{yields}b{sub 1}{sup -}{rho}{sup +})<<{gamma}(B{sup 0}{yields}b{sub 1}{sup +}{rho}{sup -}) and {gamma}(B{sup -}{yields}b{sub 1}{sup -}{rho}{sup 0})<<{gamma}(B{sup -}{yields}b{sub 1}{sup 0}{rho}{sup -}). (v) For the penguin-dominated modes a{sub 1}K* and b{sub 1}K*, it is found that the former are dominated by transverse polarization amplitudes, whereas the latter are governed by longitudinal polarization states. (vi) The rates of B{yields}K{sub 1}(1270)K* and K{sub 1}(1400)K* are generally very small. The decay modes K{sub 1}{sup -}K*{sup +} and K{sub 1}{sup +}K*{sup -} are of particular interest as they are the only AV modes which receive contributions solely from weak annihilation. (vii) For tree-dominated B{yields}AA decays, the a

  4. Measurement of $B_s^0 \\to D_s^{(*)+} D_s^{(*)-}$ Branching Ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-04-01

    The decays B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+}D{sub s}{sup (*)-}s are reconstructed in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.8 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider. All decay modes are observed with a significance of more than 10 {sigma}, and we measure the B{sub s}{sup 0} production rate times B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+} D{sub s}{sup (*)-} branching ratios relative to the normalization mode B{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}d{sup -} to be 0.183 {+-} 0.021 {+-} 0.017 for B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}D{sub s}{sup -}, 0.424 {+-} 0.046 {+-} 0.035 for B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup {+-}} D{sub s}{sup {-+}}, 0.654 {+-} 0.072 {+-} 0.065 for B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup *+} D{sub s}{sup *-}, and 1.261 {+-} 0.095 {+-} 0.112 for the inclusive decay B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+}D{sub s}{sup (*)-}, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic. These results are the most precise single measurements to date and provide important constraints for indirect searches for non-standard model physics in B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing.

  5. [Avalanche accidents and treatment of avalanche victims].

    PubMed

    Skaiaa, Sven Christjar; Thomassen, Øyvind

    2016-03-15

    Avalanches may be provoked spontaneously or as a result of human activity, and they trigger the need for considerable rescue resources. Avalanche search and rescue operations are complex and characterised by physical and mental stress. The guidelines for resuscitation of avalanche victims may be perceived as complex and abstruse, which can lead to suboptimal treatment and an increased strain on rescue teams. The purpose of this article is to summarise the principles for medical treatment of avalanche victims.

  6. [Avalanche accidents and treatment of avalanche victims].

    PubMed

    Skaiaa, Sven Christjar; Thomassen, Øyvind

    2016-03-15

    Avalanches may be provoked spontaneously or as a result of human activity, and they trigger the need for considerable rescue resources. Avalanche search and rescue operations are complex and characterised by physical and mental stress. The guidelines for resuscitation of avalanche victims may be perceived as complex and abstruse, which can lead to suboptimal treatment and an increased strain on rescue teams. The purpose of this article is to summarise the principles for medical treatment of avalanche victims. PMID:26983147

  7. Precise Branching Ratios to Unbound 12C States from 12N and 12B (beta)-Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Hyldegaard, S; Forssen, C; Alcorta, M; Barker, F C; Bastin, B; Borge, M G; Boutami, R; Brandenburg, S; Buscher, J; Dendooven, P; Diget, C A; Van Duppen, P; Eronen, T; Fox, S; Fulton, B R; Fynbo, H U; Huikari, J; Huyse, M; Jeppesen, H B; Jokinen, A; Jonson, B; Jungmann, K; Kankainen, A; Kirsebom, O; Madurga, M; Moore, I; Navratil, P; Nilsson, T; Nyman, G; Onderwater, G G; Penttila, H; Perajarvi, K; Raabe, R; Riisager, K; Rinta-Antila, S; Rogachevskiy, A; Saastamoinen, A; Sohani, M; Tengblad, O; Traykov, E; Vary, J P; Wang, Y; Wilhelmsen, K; Wilschut, H W; Aysto, J

    2008-08-20

    Two complementary experimental techniques have been used to extract precise branching ratios to unbound states in {sup 12}C from {sup 12}N and {sup 12}B {beta}-decays. In the first the three {alpha}-particles emitted after {beta}-decay are measured in coincidence in separate detectors, while in the second method {sup 12}N and {sup 12}B are implanted in a detector and the summed energy of the three {alpha}-particles is measured directly. For the narrow states at 7.654 MeV (0{sup +}) and 12.71 MeV (1{sup +}) the resulting branching ratios are both smaller than previous measurements by a factor of {approx_equal} 2. The experimental results are compared to no-core shell model calculations with realistic interactions from chiral perturbation theory, and inclusion of three-nucleon forces is found to give improved agreement.

  8. Tables of Transition Probabilities and Branching Ratios for Electric Dipole Transitions Between Arbitrary Levels of Hydrogen-Like Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.

    1980-01-01

    Branching ratios in hydrogen-like atoms due to electric-dipole transitions are tabulated for the initial principal and angular momentum quantum number n, lambda, and final principal and angular momentum quantum numbers n, lambda. In table 1, transition probabilities are given for transitions n, lambda, yields n, where sums have been made with respect to lambda. In this table, 2 or = n' or = 10, o or = lambda' or = n'-1, and 1 or = n or = n'-1. In addition, averages with respect to lambda' and sums with respect to n, and lifetimes are given. In table 2, branching ratios are given for transitions n' lambda' yields ni, where sums have been made with respect to lambda. In these tables, 2 or = n' or = 10, 0 or = lambda', n'-1, and 1 or = n or = n'-1. Averages with respect to lambda' are also given. In table 3, branching ratios are given for transitions n' lambda' yields in lambda, where 1 or = n or = 5, 0 or = lambda or = n-1, n n' or = 15, and 0 or = lambda' or = n(s), where n(s), is the smaller of the two numbers n'-1 and 6. Averages with respect to lambda' are given.

  9. Dust Avalanches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Crater wall dust avalanches in southern Arabia Terra.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 10.3, Longitude 24.5 East (335.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  10. A Measurement of the holographic minimum observable beam branching ratio in the Fermilab 15-foot bubble chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Aderholz, M.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Akbari, H.; Allport, P.P.; Badyal, S.K.; Ballagh, H.C.; Barth, M.; Baton, J.P.; Bingham, H.H.; Bjelkhagen, H.; Brucker, E.B.; Burnstein, R.A.; Campbell, J.R.; Cence, R.J.; Chatterjee, T.K.; Clayton, E.F.; Corrigan, G.; Coutures, C.; DeProspo, D.; Devanand,; De Wolf, E.A.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Brussels U., IIHE /CERN /Punjab U. /Fermilab /Hawaii U. /Imperial Coll., London /IIT, Chicago /Jammu U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Oxford U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /Stevens Tech. /Tufts U.

    1997-01-01

    Holography has been used successfully in combination with conventional optics for the first time in a large cryogenic bubble chamber, the 15-Foot Bubble Chamber at Fermilab, during a physics run. The innovative system combined the reference beam with the object beam, illuminating a conical volume of {approx} 1.4 m{sup 3}. Bubble tracks from neutrino interactions with a width of {approx} 120 {micro}m have been recorded with good contrast. The ratio of intensities of the object light to the reference light striking the film is called the Beam Branching Ratio. We obtained in our experiment an exceedingly small minimum-observable ratio of (0.54 {+-} 0.21) x 10{sup -7}. The technology has the potential for a wide range of applications.

  11. Measurement of W and Z boson production and extraction of the W width and branching ratios at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Badgett, W.F.; CDF Collaboration

    1994-08-01

    We present results from W and Z boson production in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV using the CDF detector. We measure the W and Z cross sections times lepton branching ratio, {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} W){center_dot}B(W {yields} l{nu}{sub l}) and {sigma}(p {bar p} {yields} Z){center_dot} B(Z {yields} k{sup +}l{sup {minus}}) l = e, {mu}. We also measure the ratio: R{sub l} = {sigma} {center_dot} B(W {yields} l{nu}{sub l})/{sigma} {center_dot} B(Z {yields} ll). From R{sub l}, we extract the W electron and muon branching ratios, BR(W {yields} l{nu}{sub l}, and the total W width, {Gamma}{sub W}. In addition, high transverse mass W {yields}e{nu}{sub e}, candidates provide an alternate, direct measurement of {Gamma}{sub W}.

  12. Statistical properties of avalanches in networks.

    PubMed

    Larremore, Daniel B; Carpenter, Marshall Y; Ott, Edward; Restrepo, Juan G

    2012-06-01

    We characterize the distributions of size and duration of avalanches propagating in complex networks. By an avalanche we mean the sequence of events initiated by the externally stimulated excitation of a network node, which may, with some probability, then stimulate subsequent excitations of the nodes to which it is connected, resulting in a cascade of excitations. This type of process is relevant to a wide variety of situations, including neuroscience, cascading failures on electrical power grids, and epidemiology. We find that the statistics of avalanches can be characterized in terms of the largest eigenvalue and corresponding eigenvector of an appropriate adjacency matrix that encodes the structure of the network. By using mean-field analyses, previous studies of avalanches in networks have not considered the effect of network structure on the distribution of size and duration of avalanches. Our results apply to individual networks (rather than network ensembles) and provide expressions for the distributions of size and duration of avalanches starting at particular nodes in the network. These findings might find application in the analysis of branching processes in networks, such as cascading power grid failures and critical brain dynamics. In particular, our results show that some experimental signatures of critical brain dynamics (i.e., power-law distributions of size and duration of neuronal avalanches) are robust to complex underlying network topologies.

  13. Branching ratios and CP asymmetries of B{yields}K{eta}{sup (')} decays in the perturbative QCD approach

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Zhenjun; Zhang Zhiqing; Liu Xin; Guo Libo

    2008-12-01

    We calculate the branching ratios and CP-violating asymmetries of the four B{yields}K{eta}{sup (')} decays in the perturbative QCD (pQCD) factorization approach. Besides the full leading-order contributions, the partial next-to-leading-order (NLO) contributions from the QCD vertex corrections, the quark-loops, and the chromomagnetic penguins are also taken into account. The NLO pQCD predictions for the CP-averaged branching ratios are Br(B{sup +}{yields}K{sup +}{eta}){approx_equal}3.2x10{sup -6}, Br(B{sup {+-}}{yields}K{sup {+-}}{eta}{sup '}){approx_equal}51.0x10{sup -6}, Br(B{sup 0}{yields}K{sup 0}{eta}){approx_equal}2.1x10{sup -6}, and Br(B{sup 0}{yields}K{sup 0}{eta}{sup '}){approx_equal}50.3x10{sup -6}. The NLO contributions can provide a 70% enhancement to the LO Br(B{yields}K{eta}{sup '}), but a 30% reduction to the LO Br(B{yields}K{eta}), which play the key role in understanding the observed pattern of branching ratios. The NLO pQCD predictions for the CP-violating asymmetries, such as A{sub CP}{sup dir}(K{sub S}{sup 0}{eta}{sup '}){approx}2.3% and A{sub CP}{sup mix}(K{sub S}{sup 0}{eta}{sup '}){approx}63%, agree very well with currently available data. This means that the deviation {delta}S=A{sub CP}{sup mix}(K{sub S}{sup 0}{eta}{sup '})-sin2{beta} in pQCD approach is also very small.

  14. Absorption and scattering of light by Pt, Pd, Ag, and Au nanodisks: absolute cross sections and branching ratios.

    PubMed

    Langhammer, Christoph; Kasemo, Bengt; Zorić, Igor

    2007-05-21

    Localized surface plasmons (LSPs) of metallic nanoparticles decay either radiatively or via an electron-hole pair cascade. In this work, the authors have experimentally and theoretically explored the branching ratio of the radiative and nonradiative LSP decay channels for nanodisks of Ag, Au, Pt, and Pd, with diameters D ranging from 38 to 530 nm and height h=20 nm, supported on a fused silica substrate. The branching ratio for the two plasmon decay channels was obtained by measuring the absorption and scattering cross sections as a function of photon energy. The former was obtained from measured extinction and scattering coefficients, using an integrating sphere detector combined with particle density measurements obtained from scanning electron microscopy images of the nanoparticles. Partly angle-resolved measurements of the scattered light allowed the authors to clearly identify contributions from dipolar and higher plasmonic modes to the extinction, scattering, and absorption cross sections. Based on these experiments they find that absorption dominates the total scattering cross section in all the examined cases for small metallic nanodisks (D<100 nm). For D>100 nm absorption still dominates for Pt and Pd nanodisks, while scattering dominates for Au and Ag. A theoretical approach, where the metal disks are approximated as oblate spheroids, is used to account for the trends in the measured cross sections. The field problem is solved in the electrostatic limit. The spheroid is treated as an induced dipole for which the dipolar polarizability is calculated based on spheroid geometry and the (bulk) dielectric response function of the metal the spheroid consists of and the dielectric medium surrounding it. One might expect this model to be inappropriate for disks with D>100 nm since effects due to the retardation of the incoming field across the metallic nanodisk and contributions from higher plasmonic modes are neglected. However, this model describes quite well

  15. Precise measurement of Ke4 form factors and branching ratios at the NA48/2 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venditti, S.; NA48/2 Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    The NA48/2 experiment at CERN [V. Fanti et al., Nucl. Instrum. Meth.A574 433-471 (2007).] collected ˜18ṡ10 charged kaon decays during the years 2003/4. Along with the primary goals of the collaboration, i.e., the measurement of the CP-violating asymmetry in the K→πππ and K→πππ channels, the collected data allowed to perform many other interesting analyses. In this paper the measurement of the K→eνππ and K→eνππ decays' branching ratios (BR) and form factors will be reviewed.

  16. Microscopic Calculation of Astrophysical S-factor and Branching Ratio for the 3H(α, γ)7Li Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovyev, Alexander S.; Igashov, Sergey Yu.; Tchuvill'sky, Yury M.

    2015-01-01

    In the present work the radiative capture reaction 3H(α, γ)7Li has been investigated. The astrophysical S-factor and the branching ratio of the reaction have been calculated within a microscopic approach - the algebraic version of the resonating-group model. The lowest compatible with the Pauli exclusion principle wave functions of the translation-invariant oscillator shell model are adopted as the internal wave functions of the colliding clusters. The modified Hasegawa-Nagata NN-potential was employed in the calculations. The results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  17. Photoionization branching ratios and vibrational intensity distribution for N2, CO; and CO2 between 53 and 75 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Gardner, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    The probability of radiation producing ions in specific electronic and vibrational levels was documented. For example, when a narrow band-pass of solar ionizing photons is incident on an atmospheric species it is now possible to describe, accurately, how the radiant energy is shared among the various electronic states of the ions produced. The molecules studied were N2, CO, and CO2. These molecules were photoionized by radiation between 53 and 75 nm. The effects of autoionization are discussed and continuum vibrational intensities are tabulated and compared with theoretical Franck-Condon factors where available. The branching ratios and partial cross sections for ionization into various electronic states are tabulated.

  18. Negative feedback avalanche diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Itzler, Mark Allen (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A single-photon avalanche detector is disclosed that is operable at wavelengths greater than 1000 nm and at operating speeds greater than 10 MHz. The single-photon avalanche detector comprises a thin-film resistor and avalanche photodiode that are monolithically integrated such that little or no additional capacitance is associated with the addition of the resistor.

  19. Mm-Wave Spectroscopy and Determination of the Radiative Branching Ratios of 11BH for Laser Cooling Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truppe, Stefan; Holland, Darren; Hendricks, Richard James; Hinds, Ed; Tarbutt, Michael

    2014-06-01

    We aim to slow a supersonic, molecular beam of 11BH using a Zeeman slower and subsequently cool the molecules to sub-millikelvin temperatures in a magneto-optical trap. Most molecules are not suitable for direct laser cooling because the presence of rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom means there is no closed-cycle transition which is necessary to scatter a large number of photons. As was pointed out by Di Rosa, there exists a class of molecules for which the excitation of vibrational modes is suppressed due to highly diagonal Franck-Condon factors. Furthermore, Stuhl et al. showed that angular momentum selection rules can be used to suppress leakage to undesired rotational states. Here we present a measurement of the radiative branching ratios of the A^1Π→ X^1Σ transition in 11BH - a necessary step towards subsequent laser cooling experiments. We also perform high-resolution mm-wave spectroscopy of the J'=1← J=0 rotational transition in the X^1Σ (v=0) state near 708 GHz. From this measurement we derive new, accurate hyper fine constants and compare these to theoretical descriptions. The measured branching ratios suggest that it is possible to laser cool 11BH molecules close to the recoil temperature of 4 μK using three laser frequencies only. M. D. Di Rosa, The European Physical Journal D, 31, 395, 2004 B. K. Stuhl et al., Physical Review Letters, 101, 243002, 2008

  20. Time-Resolved Frequency Comb Spectroscopy for Studying the Kinetics and Branching Ratio of OD+CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Thinh Quoc; Bjork, Bryce J.; Heckl, Oliver H.; Changala, Bryan; Spaun, Ben; Okumura, Mitchio; Ye, Jun

    2016-06-01

    The chemical kinetics of the OH+CO reaction plays important roles in combustion and atmospheric processes. OH+CO has two product channels, H+CO_2 and the stabilized HOCO intermediate, with a branching ratio that is highly pressure dependent. Therefore, establishing an accurate kinetic model for this chemical system requires knowledge of the reaction rates and product yields, and the lifetimes of all molecules along a particular reaction pathway. We report the application of time-resolved frequency comb spectroscopy (TRFCS) in the mid-infrared (3.7 μm) spectral region to address the complex reaction kinetics of OD+CO at room temperature. We use the deuterated forms to avoid atmospheric water interference. This technique allows us to detect the lowest energy conformer trans-DOCO intermediate with high time-resolution and sensitivity while also permitting the direct determination of rotational state distributions of all relevant molecules. We simultaneously observe the time-dependent concentrations of trans-DOCO, OD, and D_2O which are used in conjunction with kinetics modeling to obtain the pressure- and collision partner-dependent branching ratio of OD+CO.

  1. Calculation of Beta Decay Half-Lives and Delayed Neutron Branching Ratio of Fission Fragments with Skyrme-QRPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minato, Futoshi

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear β-decay and delayed neutron (DN) emission is important for the r-process nucleosynthesis after the freeze-out, and stable and safe operation of nuclear reactors. Even though radioactive beam facilities have enabled us to measure β-decay and branching ratio of neutron-rich nuclei apart from the stability line in the nuclear chart, there are still a lot of nuclei which one cannot investigate experimentally. In particular, information on DN is rather scarce than that of T1/2. To predict T1/2 and the branching ratios of DN for next JENDL decay data, we have developed a method which comprises the quasiparticle-random-phase-approximation (QRPA) and the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model (HFSM). In this work, we calculate fission fragments with T1/2 ≤ 50 sec. We obtain the rms deviation from experimental half-life of 3:71. Although the result is still worse than GT2 which has been adopted in JENDL decay data, DN spectra are newly calculated. We also discuss further subjects to be done in future for improving the present approach and making next generation of JENDL decay data.

  2. Mechanisms of evolution of avalanches in regular graphs.

    PubMed

    Handford, Thomas P; Pérez-Reche, Francisco J; Taraskin, Sergei N

    2013-06-01

    A mapping of avalanches occurring in the zero-temperature random-field Ising model to life periods of a population experiencing immigration is established. Such a mapping allows the microscopic criteria for the occurrence of an infinite avalanche in a q-regular graph to be determined. A key factor for an avalanche of spin flips to become infinite is that it interacts in an optimal way with previously flipped spins. Based on these criteria, we explain why an infinite avalanche can occur in q-regular graphs only for q>3 and suggest that this criterion might be relevant for other systems. The generating function techniques developed for branching processes are applied to obtain analytical expressions for the durations, pulse shapes, and power spectra of the avalanches. The results show that only very long avalanches exhibit a significant degree of universality.

  3. Mechanisms of evolution of avalanches in regular graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handford, Thomas P.; Pérez-Reche, Francisco J.; Taraskin, Sergei N.

    2013-06-01

    A mapping of avalanches occurring in the zero-temperature random-field Ising model to life periods of a population experiencing immigration is established. Such a mapping allows the microscopic criteria for the occurrence of an infinite avalanche in a q-regular graph to be determined. A key factor for an avalanche of spin flips to become infinite is that it interacts in an optimal way with previously flipped spins. Based on these criteria, we explain why an infinite avalanche can occur in q-regular graphs only for q>3 and suggest that this criterion might be relevant for other systems. The generating function techniques developed for branching processes are applied to obtain analytical expressions for the durations, pulse shapes, and power spectra of the avalanches. The results show that only very long avalanches exhibit a significant degree of universality.

  4. Vibrational branching ratios in the photoelectron spectra of N2 and CO: interference and diffraction effects.

    PubMed

    Plésiat, Etienne; Decleva, Piero; Martín, Fernando

    2012-08-21

    We present a detailed account of existing theoretical methods specially designed to provide vibrationally resolved photoionization cross sections of simple molecules within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, with emphasis on newly developed methods based on density functional theory. The performance of these methods is shown for the case of N(2) and CO photoionization. Particular attention is paid to the region of high photon energies, where the electron wavelength is comparable to the bond length and, therefore, two-center interferences and diffraction are expected to occur. As shown in a recent work [Canton et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2011, 108, 7302-7306], the main experimental difficulty, which is to extract the relatively small diffraction features from the rapidly decreasing cross section, can be easily overcome by determining ratios of vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectra and existing theoretical calculations. From these ratios, one can thus get direct information about the molecular geometry. In this work, results obtained in a wide range of photon energies and for many different molecular orbitals of N(2) and CO are discussed and compared with the available experimental measurements. From this comparison, limitations and further possible improvements of the existing theoretical methods are discussed. The new results presented in the manuscript confirm that the conclusions reported in the above reference are of general validity.

  5. Reaction Mechanism and Product Branching Ratios of the CH + C3H6 Reaction: A Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Joao Marcelo; Mebel, Alexander M

    2016-03-24

    The mechanism of CH(X(2)Π) reaction with propene has been studied with ab initio CCSD(T)-F12/CBS//B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) calculations of the C4H7 potential energy surface and RRKM/master equation calculations of unimolecular rate constants for the various isomerization and dissociation steps available to the C4H7 radicals. Product branching ratios were calculated and were found to strongly depend on the initial chemically activated C4H7 complex formed in a barrierless entrance channel. If the reaction is initiated via either CH addition to the double bond in propene or CH insertions into the terminal sp(2) C-H or single C-C bonds, then 1,3-butadiene + H are predicted to be the dominant products, ethene + C2H3 radical are minor but non-negligible products, and a small amount of 1,2-butadiene + H is also produced. The reaction then proceeds through a key CH3CHCH(•)CH2 intermediate, which loses an H atom to form either 1,3- or 1,2-butadiene or isomerizes to (•)CH2CH2CHCH2 and then dissociates to ethene + C2H3 radical. If CH inserts into a C-H bond in the CH3 group the (•)CH2CH2CHCH2 complex is formed directly and then the major reaction products are predicted to be ethene + C2H3 radical and 1,3-butadiene + H. Finally, if CH inserts into the middle sp(2) C-H bond, a branched CH3C((•)CH2)CH2 complex is produced, which predominantly decomposes to allene + CH3 radical. A comparison of the calculated reaction mechanism with available experimental data indicates that the CH addition entrance channel is favorable, in which case the computed branching ratios are in agreement with the experimental result of Loison and Bergeat, who measured the H elimination branching ratio of 78 ± 10%. However, the computed branching ratios quantitatively disagree with the experimental data by Trevitt et al., who observed a nearly 100% yield of the C4H6 + H products and also larger yields of 1,2-butadiene and 1-butyne than the calculations predict. The deviation of the theoretical results

  6. Branching ratio measurement of a Λ system in Tm3+:YAG under a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louchet, A.; Habib, J. S.; Crozatier, V.; Lorgeré, I.; Goldfarb, F.; Bretenaker, F.; Gouët, J.-L. Le; Guillot-Noël, O.; Goldner, Ph.

    2007-01-01

    A three-level Λ system in Tm3+ doped YAG crystal is experimentally investigated in the prospect of quantum information processing. Zeeman effect is used to lift the nuclear spin degeneracy of this ion. In a previous paper [de Seze , Phys. Rev. B 73, 085112 (2006)] we measured the gyromagnetic tensor components and concluded that adequate magnetic field orientation could optimize the optical connection of both ground state sublevels to each one of the excited state sublevels, thus generating Λ systems. Here we report on the direct measurement of the transition probability ratio along the two legs of the Λ . Measurement techniques combine frequency selective optical pumping with optical nutation or photon echo processes.

  7. Product branching ratios in photodissociation of phenyl radical: A theoretical ab initio/Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mebel, Alexander M.; Landera, Alexander

    2012-06-01

    Ab initio CCSD(T)/CBS//B3LYP/6-311G** calculations of the potential energy surface for possible dissociation channels of the phenyl radical are combined with microcanonical Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus calculations of reaction rate constants in order to predict statistical product branching ratios in photodissociation of c-C6H5 at various wavelengths. The results indicate that at 248 nm the photodissociation process is dominated by the production of ortho-benzyne via direct elimination of a hydrogen atom from the phenyl radical. At 193 nm, the statistical branching ratios are computed to be 63.4%, 21.1%, and 14.4% for the o-C6H4 + H, l-C6H4 ((Z)-hexa-3-ene-1,5-diyne) + H, and n-C4H3 + C2H2 products, respectively, in a contradiction with recent experimental measurements, which showed C4H3 + C2H2 as the major product. Although two lower energy pathways to the i-C4H3 + C2H2 products are identified, they appeared to be kinetically unfavorable and the computed statistical branching ratio of i-C4H3 + C2H2 does not exceed 1%. To explain the disagreement with experiment, we optimized conical intersections between the ground and the first excited electronic states of C6H5 and, based on their structures and energies, suggested the following photodissociation mechanism at 193 nm: c-C6H5 1 → absorption of a photon → electronically excited 1 → internal conversion to the lowest excited state → conversion to the ground electronic state via conical intersections at CI-2 or CI-3 → non-statistical decay of the vibrationally excited radical favoring the formation of the n-C4H3 + C2H2 products. This scenario can be attained if the intramolecular vibrational redistribution in the CI-2 or CI-3 structures in the ground electronic state is slower than their dissociation to n-C4H3 + C2H2 driven by the dynamical preference.

  8. Product branching ratios in photodissociation of phenyl radical: A theoretical ab initio/Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus study

    SciTech Connect

    Mebel, Alexander M.; Landera, Alexander

    2012-06-21

    Ab initio CCSD(T)/CBS//B3LYP/6-311G** calculations of the potential energy surface for possible dissociation channels of the phenyl radical are combined with microcanonical Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus calculations of reaction rate constants in order to predict statistical product branching ratios in photodissociation of c-C{sub 6}H{sub 5} at various wavelengths. The results indicate that at 248 nm the photodissociation process is dominated by the production of ortho-benzyne via direct elimination of a hydrogen atom from the phenyl radical. At 193 nm, the statistical branching ratios are computed to be 63.4%, 21.1%, and 14.4% for the o-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}+ H, l-C{sub 6}H{sub 4} ((Z)-hexa-3-ene-1,5-diyne) + H, and n-C{sub 4}H{sub 3}+ C{sub 2}H{sub 2} products, respectively, in a contradiction with recent experimental measurements, which showed C{sub 4}H{sub 3}+ C{sub 2}H{sub 2} as the major product. Although two lower energy pathways to the i-C{sub 4}H{sub 3}+ C{sub 2}H{sub 2} products are identified, they appeared to be kinetically unfavorable and the computed statistical branching ratio of i-C{sub 4}H{sub 3}+ C{sub 2}H{sub 2} does not exceed 1%. To explain the disagreement with experiment, we optimized conical intersections between the ground and the first excited electronic states of C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and, based on their structures and energies, suggested the following photodissociation mechanism at 193 nm: c-C{sub 6}H{sub 5} 1{yields} absorption of a photon {yields} electronically excited 1{yields} internal conversion to the lowest excited state {yields} conversion to the ground electronic state via conical intersections at CI-2 or CI-3{yields} non-statistical decay of the vibrationally excited radical favoring the formation of the n-C{sub 4}H{sub 3}+ C{sub 2}H{sub 2} products. This scenario can be attained if the intramolecular vibrational redistribution in the CI-2 or CI-3 structures in the ground electronic state is slower than their dissociation to n-C{sub 4}H

  9. The branching ratio of anions in thermal electron attachment to halogenated fluorocompounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Seiko

    2002-08-01

    The temperature dependence of the formation of negative ions from C6F5X, C6F4X2 ( X= Cl, Br, I) , XC6F4Br ( X= Cl, CF3, BrC6F4, CN) , and NC 5F 4Br was studied using negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Cl - and the parent negative ion for chlorofluorobenzene, Br-, ( M- Br) - (M=parent molecule), and the parent negative ion for bromofluorocarbon, and I - and (M-I) - for iodofluorobenzene were observed. The intensity of (M-X) - and the parent negative ion relative to that of halide ion changes with temperature. The relative intensity, C6F4X-/ X- ( X= Br, I) of 1,2-C 6F 4X 2 is smaller than that of 1,4-C 6F 4X 2. It seems that the heat of formation of (M-X) -+X relative to that of (M-X)+X - in 1,2-C 6F 4X 2 would be higher than in 1,4-C 6F 4X 2 and C 6F 5X. The temperature dependence of the relative ratio, (M-Br) -/Br -, can lead the relative trend of the electron affinity of M-Br, as C 6F 4CN>CF 3C 6F 4>C 6F 4C 6F 4Br>C 5F 4N>C 6F 4Cl>C 6F 4Br>C 6F 5. This is correlated with the atomic charge distribution of (M-Br) - calculated using the Hartree-Fock method.

  10. Study of Branching Ratio And Polarization Fraction in Neutral B Meson Decays to Negative Rho Meson Positive Kaon Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Baosen; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-03-07

    We present the preliminary results on the search for B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup -}K*{sup +}. The data sample comprises 122.7 million B{bar B} pairs in the e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation through the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance collected during 1999-2003 with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy collider at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). We obtain an upper limit of the branching ratio at 90% confidence level as {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup -}K*{sup +}) < 17.2 x 10{sup -6}. The fitted result on the polarization fraction shows no evidence that the decay is longitudinally dominated as predicted by various theoretical models.

  11. Measurement of the K{sup +{yields}{pi}0{mu}+{nu}}{sub {mu}{gamma}}branching ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, S.; Chiang, I-H.; Diwan, M. V.; Frank, J. S.; Haggerty, J. S.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jain, V.; Kettell, S. H.; Li, K. K.; Littenberg, L. S.; Ng, C.; Strand, R. C.; Witzig, C.; Bazarko, A. O.; Ito, M. M.; Meyers, P. D.; Shoemaker, F. C.; Stone, J. R.; Bergbusch, P. C.; Bryman, D. A.

    2010-05-01

    A measurement of the decay K{sup +{yields}{pi}0{mu}+{nu}}{sub {mu}{gamma}}has been performed with the E787 detector at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Forty events were observed in the signal region with the background expectation of (16.5{+-}2.7) events. The branching ratio was measured to be (1.58{+-}0.46(stat.){+-}0.08(syst.))x10{sup -5} in the kinematic region E{sub {gamma}>}30 MeV and {theta}{sub {mu}{gamma}>}20 deg., where E{sub {gamma}}is the energy of the emitted photon and {theta}{sub {mu}{gamma}}is the angle between the muon and the photon in the K{sup +} rest frame. The results were consistent with theoretical predictions.

  12. Activity-dependent branching ratios in stocks, solar x-ray flux, and the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld sandpile model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Elliot; Shreim, Amer; Paczuski, Maya

    2010-01-01

    We define an activity-dependent branching ratio that allows comparison of different time series Xt . The branching ratio bx is defined as bx=E[ξx/x] . The random variable ξx is the value of the next signal given that the previous one is equal to x , so ξx={Xt+1∣Xt=x} . If bx>1 , the process is on average supercritical when the signal is equal to x , while if bx<1 , it is subcritical. For stock prices we find bx=1 within statistical uncertainty, for all x , consistent with an “efficient market hypothesis.” For stock volumes, solar x-ray flux intensities, and the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld (BTW) sandpile model, bx is supercritical for small values of activity and subcritical for the largest ones, indicating a tendency to return to a typical value. For stock volumes this tendency has an approximate power-law behavior. For solar x-ray flux and the BTW model, there is a broad regime of activity where bx≃1 , which we interpret as an indicator of critical behavior. This is true despite different underlying probability distributions for Xt and for ξx . For the BTW model the distribution of ξx is Gaussian, for x sufficiently larger than 1, and its variance grows linearly with x . Hence, the activity in the BTW model obeys a central limit theorem when sampling over past histories. The broad region of activity where bx is close to one disappears once bulk dissipation is introduced in the BTW model—supporting our hypothesis that it is an indicator of criticality.

  13. Avalanche speed in thin avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, D. S.; Rees, G. J.; David, J. P. R.

    2003-04-01

    The duration of the avalanche multiplication process in thin GaAs avalanche photodiodes is investigated using a full band Monte Carlo (FBMC) model. The results are compared with those of a simple random path length (RPL) model which makes the conventional assumptions of a displaced exponential for the ionization path length probability distribution function and that carriers always travel at their saturated drift velocities. We find that the avalanche duration calculated by the RPL model is almost twice of that predicted by the FBMC model, although the constant drift velocities used in the former model are estimated using the latter. The faster response predicted by FBMC model arises partly from the reduced dead space but mainly from the velocity overshoot of ionizing carriers. While the feedback multiplication processes forced by the effects of dead space extend the avalanche duration in short structures, the effects of velocity overshoot in the realistic model more than compensate, significantly improving multiplication bandwidth.

  14. Simulations of avalanche breakdown statistics: probability and timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Jo Shien; Tan, Chee Hing; David, John P. R.

    2010-04-01

    Important avalanche breakdown statistics for Single Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs), such as avalanche breakdown probability, dark count rate, and the distribution of time taken to reach breakdown (providing mean time to breakdown and jitter), were simulated. These simulations enable unambiguous studies on effects of avalanche region width, ionization coefficient ratio and carrier dead space on the avalanche statistics, which are the fundamental limits of the SPADs. The effects of quenching resistor/circuit have been ignored. Due to competing effects between dead spaces, which are significant in modern SPADs with narrow avalanche regions, and converging ionization coefficients, the breakdown probability versus overbias characteristics from different avalanche region widths are fairly close to each other. Concerning avalanche breakdown timing at given value of breakdown probability, using avalanche material with similar ionization coefficients yields fast avalanche breakdowns with small timing jitter (albeit higher operating field), compared to material with dissimilar ionization coefficients. This is the opposite requirement for abrupt breakdown probability versus overbias characteristics. In addition, by taking band-to-band tunneling current (dark carriers) into account, minimum avalanche region width for practical SPADs was found to be 0.3 and 0.2 μm, for InP and InAlAs, respectively.

  15. A Limit on the Branching Ratio of the Flavor-Changing Top Quark Decay T→Zc

    SciTech Connect

    Paramonov, Alexander Andreevich

    2009-06-01

    We have used the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF-II) to set upper limits on the branching ratio of the flavor-changing neutral-current (FCNC) top quark decay t → Zc using a technique employing ratios of W and Z production, measured in 1.52 fb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ data. The analysis uses a comparison of two decay chains, p$\\bar{p}$ → t$\\bar{t}$ → WbWb → ℓvbjjb and p$\\bar{p}$ → t$\\bar{t}$ ZcWb → ℓ+- cjjb, to cancel systematic uncertainties in acceptance, efficiency, and luminosity. We validate the MC modeling of acceptance and efficiency for lepton identification over the multi-year dataset also using a ratio of W and Z production, in this case the observed ratio of inclusive production of W to Z-bosons, a technique that will be essential for precision comparisons with the standard model at the LHC. We introduce several methods of determining backgrounds to the W and Z samples. To improve the discrimination against SM backgrounds to top quark decays, we calculate the top mass for each event with two leptons and four jets assuming it is a t$\\bar{t}$ event with one of the top quarks decaying to Zc. The upper limit on the Br(t → Zc) is estimated from a likelihood constructed with the {ell}+- cjjb top mass distribution and the number of ℓvbjjb events. Limits are set as a function of the helicity of the Z-boson produced in the FCNC decay. For 100%-longitudinally-polarized Z-bosons we find a limit of 8.3% (95% C.L.).

  16. Gas/solid carbon branching ratios in surface-mediated reactions and the incorporation of carbonaceous material into planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuth, Joseph A.; Johnson, Natasha M.; Ferguson, Frank T.; Carayon, Alicia

    2016-07-01

    We report the ratio of the initial carbon available as CO that forms gas-phase compounds compared to the fraction that deposits as a carbonaceous solid (the gas/solid branching ratio) as a function of time and temperature for iron, magnetite, and amorphous iron silicate smoke catalysts during surface-mediated reactions in an excess of hydrogen and in the presence of N2. This fraction varies from more than 99% for an amorphous iron silicate smoke at 673 K to less than 40% for a magnetite catalyst at 873 K. The CO not converted into solids primarily forms methane, ethane, water, and CO2, as well as a very wide range of organic molecules at very low concentration. Carbon deposits do not form continuous coatings on the catalytic surfaces, but instead form extremely high surface area per unit volume "filamentous" structures. While these structures will likely form more slowly but over much longer times in protostellar nebulae than in our experiments due to the much lower partial pressure of CO, such fluffy coatings on the surfaces of chondrules or calcium aluminum inclusions could promote grain-grain sticking during low-velocity collisions.

  17. Acute Administration of Branched-Chain Amino Acids Increases the Pro-BDNF/Total-BDNF Ratio in the Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Scaini, Giselli; Morais, Meline O S; Furlanetto, Camila B; Kist, Luiza W; Pereira, Talita C B; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Pasquali, Matheus A B; Gelain, Daniel P; Moreira, José Cláudio F; Bogo, Maurício R; Streck, Emilio L

    2015-05-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is caused by an inborn error in metabolism resulting from a deficiency in the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase complex activity. This blockage leads to accumulation of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) leucine, isoleucine and valine, as well as their corresponding α-keto acids and α-hydroxy acids. High levels of BCAAs are associated with neurological dysfunction and the role of pro- and mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the neurological dysfunction of MSUD is still unclear. Thus, in the present study we investigated the effect of an acute BCAA pool administration on BDNF levels and on the pro-BDNF cleavage-related proteins S100A10 and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in rat brains. Our results demonstrated that acute Hyper-BCAA (H-BCAA) exposure during the early postnatal period increases pro-BDNF and total-BDNF levels in the hippocampus and striatum. Moreover, tPA levels were significantly decreased, without modifications in the tPA transcript levels in the hippocampus and striatum. On the other hand, the S100A10 mRNA and S100A10 protein levels were not changed in the hippocampus and striatum. In the 30-day-old rats, we observed increased pro-BDNF, total-BDNF and tPA levels only in the striatum, whereas the tPA and S100A10 mRNA expression and the immunocontent of S100A10 were not altered. In conclusion, we demonstrated that acute H-BCAA administration increases the pro-BDNF/total-BDNF ratio and decreases the tPA levels in animals, suggesting that the BCAA effect may depend, at least in part, on changes in BDNF post-translational processing. PMID:25681161

  18. Study of the branching ratio of {psi}(3770){yields}DD in e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}}DD scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Li Haibo; Qin Xiaoshuai; Yang Maozhi

    2010-01-01

    Based on the data of BES and Belle, the production of DD in the e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}}DD scattering process is studied in this paper. We analyze the continuum and resonant contributions in the energy region from 3.7 to 4.4 GeV. In the {chi}{sup 2} fit to data, we obtain the resonance parameters of {psi}(3770), the branching ratio of {psi}(3770){yields}DD decay by confronting the data to the theoretical formula where both the contributions of the resonances, continuum and interference effects are included. We obtain the branching ratio of {psi}(3770){yields}DD decay is 97.2%{+-}8.9%, as well as the branching ratio of {psi}(4040), {psi}(4160){yields}DD decays.

  19. Measurement of the branching ratio for D{sup +} {yields} {bar K}*(892){degrees} {mu}{sup +}{nu}

    SciTech Connect

    Fermilab E653 Collaboration

    1992-11-01

    The branching ratio for the decay mode D{sup +} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0} {mu}{sup +}{nu} has been measured with two methods. The first uses D{sup 0} {yields} {bar K} {sup {minus}}{mu}{sup +}{nu} for normalization, and yields the result B(D{sup +} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0} {mu}{sup +}{nu} = (3.25 {plus_minus} 0.71 {plus_minus} 0.75)%. From this method we also obtain the direct measurement {Gamma}(D{sup +} {yields}{bar K}*{sup 0}{mu}{sup +} {nu}/{Gamma}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup {minus}} {mu}{sup +} {nu}) = 0.43 {plus_minus} 0.09 {plus_minus} 0.09. The second method uses the mode D{sup +} {yields} K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +} {pi}{sup +} for normalization and yields B(D{sup +} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0} {mu}{sup +}{nu}) = 4.18 {plus_minus} 0.66 {plus_minus}0.96)%. Combining the results of the two methods yields B(D{sup +} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0}{mu}{sup +}{nu}) = 3.57 {plus_minus} 0.96)%.

  20. The mechanical influences of the graded distribution in the cross-sectional shape, the stiffness and Poisson׳s ratio of palm branches.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wangyu; Wang, Ningling; Jiang, Xiaoyong; Peng, Yujian

    2016-07-01

    The branching system plays an important role in maintaining the survival of palm trees. Due to the nature of monocots, no additional vascular bundles can be added in the palm tree tissue as it ages. Therefore, the changing of the cross-sectional area in the palm branch creates a graded distribution in the mechanical properties of the tissue. In the present work, this graded distribution in the tissue mechanical properties from sheath to petiole were studied with a multi-scale modeling approach. Then, the entire palm branch was reconstructed and analyzed using finite element methods. The variation of the elastic modulus can lower the level of mechanical stress in the sheath and also allow the branch to have smaller values of pressure on the other branches. Under impact loading, the enhanced frictional dissipation at the surfaces of adjacent branches benefits from the large Poisson׳s ratio of the sheath tissue. These findings can help to link the wind resistance ability of palm trees to their graded materials distribution in the branching system. PMID:26807774

  1. Determination of rate constants and branching ratios for TCE degradation by zero-valent iron using a chain decay multispecies model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Jeen, Sung-Wook; Sudicky, Edward A.; Illman, Walter A.

    2015-06-01

    The applicability of a newly-developed chain-decay multispecies model (CMM) was validated by obtaining kinetic rate constants and branching ratios along the reaction pathways of trichloroethene (TCE) reduction by zero-valent iron (ZVI) from column experiments. Changes in rate constants and branching ratios for individual reactions for degradation products over time for two columns under different geochemical conditions were examined to provide ranges of those parameters expected over the long-term. As compared to the column receiving deionized water, the column receiving dissolved CaCO3 showed higher mean degradation rates for TCE and all of its degradation products. However, the column experienced faster reactivity loss toward TCE degradation due to precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals, as indicated by a higher value for the ratio of maximum to minimum TCE degradation rate observed over time. From the calculated branching ratios, it was found that TCE and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) were dominantly dechlorinated to chloroacetylene and acetylene, respectively, through reductive elimination for both columns. The CMM model, validated by the column test data in this study, provides a convenient tool to determine simultaneously the critical design parameters for permeable reactive barriers and natural attenuation such as rate constants and branching ratios.

  2. Functional ratios among leaf, xylem and phloem areas in branches change with shade tolerance, but not with local light conditions, across temperate tree species.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lan; Copini, Paul; Weemstra, Monique; Sterck, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Leaf, xylem and phloem areas drive the water and carbon fluxes within branches and trees, but their mutual coordination is poorly understood. We test the hypothesis that xylem and phloem areas increase relative to leaf area when species are selected for, or branches are exposed to, higher levels of light intensity. Trees of 10 temperate, broadleaved and deciduous, tree species were selected. Fifty-centimetre-long branches were collected from shaded and exposed conditions at a height of 3-4 m. We measured the total leaf area, xylem area, phloem area and leaf traits, as well as the area of the constituent cell types, for a stem section at the branch base. Xylem area : leaf area and phloem area : leaf area ratios did not differ consistently between sun and shade branches, but, as expected, they decreased with species' shade tolerance. Similar trends were observed for conductive cell areas in xylem and phloem. Trees of light-demanding species maintain higher water loss and carbon gain rates per leaf area by producing more xylem area and phloem area than shade-tolerant species. We call for more comparative branch studies as they provide an integrated biological perspective on functional traits and their role in the ecology of tree species.

  3. Photon counting: Avalanche inspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milburn, Gerard

    2008-07-01

    The ability of a customized avalanche-photodiode detector to distinguish the exact number of photons that it receives will simplify the tools required to perform reliable experiments in quantum optics.

  4. Fractal avalanche ruptures in biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gözen, Irep; Dommersnes, Paul; Czolkos, Ilja; Jesorka, Aldo; Lobovkina, Tatsiana; Orwar, Owe

    2010-11-01

    Bilayer membranes envelope cells as well as organelles, and constitute the most ubiquitous biological material found in all branches of the phylogenetic tree. Cell membrane rupture is an important biological process, and substantial rupture rates are found in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells under a mechanical load. Rupture can also be induced by processes such as cell death, and active cell membrane repair mechanisms are essential to preserve cell integrity. Pore formation in cell membranes is also at the heart of many biomedical applications such as in drug, gene and short interfering RNA delivery. Membrane rupture dynamics has been studied in bilayer vesicles under tensile stress, which consistently produce circular pores. We observed very different rupture mechanics in bilayer membranes spreading on solid supports: in one instance fingering instabilities were seen resulting in floral-like pores and in another, the rupture proceeded in a series of rapid avalanches causing fractal membrane fragmentation. The intermittent character of rupture evolution and the broad distribution in avalanche sizes is consistent with crackling-noise dynamics. Such noisy dynamics appear in fracture of solid disordered materials, in dislocation avalanches in plastic deformations and domain wall magnetization avalanches. We also observed similar fractal rupture mechanics in spreading cell membranes.

  5. Fractal avalanche ruptures in biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Gözen, Irep; Dommersnes, Paul; Czolkos, Ilja; Jesorka, Aldo; Lobovkina, Tatsiana; Orwar, Owe

    2010-11-01

    Bilayer membranes envelope cells as well as organelles, and constitute the most ubiquitous biological material found in all branches of the phylogenetic tree. Cell membrane rupture is an important biological process, and substantial rupture rates are found in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells under a mechanical load. Rupture can also be induced by processes such as cell death, and active cell membrane repair mechanisms are essential to preserve cell integrity. Pore formation in cell membranes is also at the heart of many biomedical applications such as in drug, gene and short interfering RNA delivery. Membrane rupture dynamics has been studied in bilayer vesicles under tensile stress, which consistently produce circular pores. We observed very different rupture mechanics in bilayer membranes spreading on solid supports: in one instance fingering instabilities were seen resulting in floral-like pores and in another, the rupture proceeded in a series of rapid avalanches causing fractal membrane fragmentation. The intermittent character of rupture evolution and the broad distribution in avalanche sizes is consistent with crackling-noise dynamics. Such noisy dynamics appear in fracture of solid disordered materials, in dislocation avalanches in plastic deformations and domain wall magnetization avalanches. We also observed similar fractal rupture mechanics in spreading cell membranes.

  6. Evidence for a host-material dependence of the n/p branching ratio of low-energy d+d reactions within metallic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huke, A.; Czerski, K.; Dorsch, T.; Biller, A.; Heide, P.; Ruprecht, G.

    2006-03-01

    Angular distributions and the neutron-proton branching ratio of the mirror reactions 2H(d, p)3H and 2H(d, n)3He have been investigated using different self-implanted deuterized metallic targets at projectile energies between 5 and 60. Whereas the experimental results obtained for the transition metals Zr, Pd, Ta and also Al do not differ from those known from gas-target experiments, an enhancement of the angular anisotropy in the neutron channel and an attenuation of the neutron-proton branching ratio have been observed for the (earth)alkaline metals Li, Sr and Na at deuteron energies below 20. Experimental results are discussed with consideration of the special problems arising from the properties of these chemically very reactive target materials. A first theoretical effort explaining simultaneously both n/p asymmetry effects based on an induced polarization of the reacting deuterons within the crystal lattice is presented.

  7. Evidence for a Target-Material Dependence of the Neutron-Proton Branching Ratio in d + d Reactions for Deuteron Energies Below 20 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huke, A.; Czerski, K.; Dorsch, T.; Heide, P.

    2006-02-01

    Angular distributions and the neutron-proton branching ratio of the mirror reactions 2H(d,p)3H and 2H(d,n)3He have been investigated using different deuterized metallic targets at projectile energies ranging from 5 to 60 keV. Whereas the experimental results obtained for Al, Zr, Pd, and Ta targets do not differ from those known from gas-target experiments, an enhancement of the angular anisotropy in the neutron channel and a quenching of the neutron-proton branching ratio have been observed for Li and Sr targets at deuteron energies below 20 keV. Both effects can be explained assuming an induced adiabatic polarization of the reacting deuterons in the crystal lattice.

  8. Disordered artificial spin ices: Avalanches and criticality (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, Cynthia J. Olson; Chern, Gia-Wei; Libál, Andras; Reichhardt, Charles

    2015-05-01

    We show that square and kagome artificial spin ices with disconnected islands exhibit disorder-induced nonequilibrium phase transitions. The critical point of the transition is characterized by a diverging length scale and the effective spin reconfiguration avalanche sizes are power-law distributed. For weak disorder, the magnetization reversal is dominated by system-spanning avalanche events characteristic of a supercritical regime, while at strong disorder, the avalanche distributions have subcritical behavior and are cut off above a length scale that decreases with increasing disorder. The different type of geometrical frustration in the two lattices produces distinct forms of critical avalanche behavior. Avalanches in the square ice consist of the propagation of locally stable domain walls separating the two polarized ground states, and we find a scaling collapse consistent with an interface depinning mechanism. In the fully frustrated kagome ice, however, the avalanches branch strongly in a manner reminiscent of directed percolation. We also observe an interesting crossover in the power-law scaling of the kagome ice avalanches at low disorder. Our results show that artificial spin ices are ideal systems in which to study a variety of nonequilibrium critical point phenomena as the microscopic degrees of freedom can be accessed directly in experiments.

  9. Disordered artificial spin ices: Avalanches and criticality (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Cynthia J. Olson Chern, Gia-Wei; Reichhardt, Charles; Libál, Andras

    2015-05-07

    We show that square and kagome artificial spin ices with disconnected islands exhibit disorder-induced nonequilibrium phase transitions. The critical point of the transition is characterized by a diverging length scale and the effective spin reconfiguration avalanche sizes are power-law distributed. For weak disorder, the magnetization reversal is dominated by system-spanning avalanche events characteristic of a supercritical regime, while at strong disorder, the avalanche distributions have subcritical behavior and are cut off above a length scale that decreases with increasing disorder. The different type of geometrical frustration in the two lattices produces distinct forms of critical avalanche behavior. Avalanches in the square ice consist of the propagation of locally stable domain walls separating the two polarized ground states, and we find a scaling collapse consistent with an interface depinning mechanism. In the fully frustrated kagome ice, however, the avalanches branch strongly in a manner reminiscent of directed percolation. We also observe an interesting crossover in the power-law scaling of the kagome ice avalanches at low disorder. Our results show that artificial spin ices are ideal systems in which to study a variety of nonequilibrium critical point phenomena as the microscopic degrees of freedom can be accessed directly in experiments.

  10. Vibrational branching ratios and asymmetry parameters in the photoionization of CO2 in the region between 650 Å and 840 Å

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 119 Vibrational branching ratios and asymmetry parameters in the photoionization of CO2 in the region between 650 Å and 840 Å (Web, free access)   CO2 is studied using dispersed synchrotron radiation in the 650 Å to 850 Å spectral region. The vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectra are analyzed to generate relative vibrational transition amplitudes and the angular asymmetry parameters describing the various transitions observed.

  11. Branching ratio and angular distribution of ejected electrons from Eu 4f76p1/2nd auto-ionizing states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiao-Rui; Shen, Li; Zhang, Kai; Dai, Chang-Jian; Yang, Yu-Na

    2016-09-01

    The branching ratios of ions and the angular distributions of electrons ejected from the Eu 4f76p1/2nd auto-ionizing states are investigated with the velocity-map-imaging technique. To populate the above auto-ionizing states, the relevant bound Rydberg states have to be detected first. Two new bound Rydberg states are identified in the region between 41150 cm‑1 and 44580 cm‑1, from which auto-ionization spectra of the Eu 4f76p1/2nd states are observed with isolated core excitation method. With all preparations above, the branching ratios from the above auto-ionizing states to different final ionic states and the angular distributions of electrons ejected from these processes are measured systematically. Energy dependence of branching ratios and anisotropy parameters within the auto-ionization spectra are carefully analyzed, followed by a qualitative interpretation. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11174218).

  12. Branching ratio and angular distribution of ejected electrons from Eu 4f76p1/2nd auto-ionizing states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiao-Rui; Shen, Li; Zhang, Kai; Dai, Chang-Jian; Yang, Yu-Na

    2016-09-01

    The branching ratios of ions and the angular distributions of electrons ejected from the Eu 4f76p1/2nd auto-ionizing states are investigated with the velocity-map-imaging technique. To populate the above auto-ionizing states, the relevant bound Rydberg states have to be detected first. Two new bound Rydberg states are identified in the region between 41150 cm-1 and 44580 cm-1, from which auto-ionization spectra of the Eu 4f76p1/2nd states are observed with isolated core excitation method. With all preparations above, the branching ratios from the above auto-ionizing states to different final ionic states and the angular distributions of electrons ejected from these processes are measured systematically. Energy dependence of branching ratios and anisotropy parameters within the auto-ionization spectra are carefully analyzed, followed by a qualitative interpretation. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11174218).

  13. X-ray imaging using avalanche multiplication in amorphous selenium: Investigation of intrinsic avalanche noise

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, D. C.; Tanioka, Kenkichi; Rowlands, J. A.

    2007-12-15

    The flat-panel detector (FPD) is the state-of-the-art detector for digital radiography. The FPD can acquire images in real-time, has superior spatial resolution, and is free of the problems of x-ray image intensifiers--veiling glare, pin-cushion and magnetic distortion. However, FPDs suffer from poor signal to noise ratio performance at typical fluoroscopic exposure rates where the quantum noise is reduced to the point that it becomes comparable to the fixed electronic noise. It has been shown previously that avalanche multiplication gain in amorphous selenium (a-Se) can provide the necessary amplification to overcome the electronic noise of the FPD. Avalanche multiplication, however, comes with its own intrinsic contribution to the noise in the form of gain fluctuation noise. In this article a cascaded systems analysis is used to present a modified metric related to the detective quantum efficiency. The modified metric is used to study a diagnostic x-ray imaging system in the presence of intrinsic avalanche multiplication noise independently from other noise sources, such as electronic noise. An indirect conversion imaging system is considered to make the study independent of other avalanche multiplication related noise sources, such as the fluctuations arising from the depth of x-ray absorption. In this case all the avalanche events are initiated at the surface of the avalanche layer, and there are no fluctuations in the depth of absorption. Experiments on an indirect conversion x-ray imaging system using avalanche multiplication in a layer of a-Se are also presented. The cascaded systems analysis shows that intrinsic noise of avalanche multiplication will not have any deleterious influence on detector performance at zero spatial frequency in x-ray imaging provided the product of conversion gain, coupling efficiency, and optical quantum efficiency are much greater than a factor of 2. The experimental results show that avalanche multiplication in a-Se behaves as

  14. Avalanches in Wood Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkinen, T.; Miksic, A.; Ovaska, M.; Alava, Mikko J.

    2015-07-01

    Wood is a multiscale material exhibiting a complex viscoplastic response. We study avalanches in small wood samples in compression. "Woodquakes" measured by acoustic emission are surprisingly similar to earthquakes and crackling noise in rocks and laboratory tests on brittle materials. Both the distributions of event energies and of waiting (silent) times follow power laws. The stress-strain response exhibits clear signatures of localization of deformation to "weak spots" or softwood layers, as identified using digital image correlation. Even though material structure-dependent localization takes place, the avalanche behavior remains scale-free.

  15. Avalanches in Wood Compression.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, T; Miksic, A; Ovaska, M; Alava, Mikko J

    2015-07-31

    Wood is a multiscale material exhibiting a complex viscoplastic response. We study avalanches in small wood samples in compression. "Woodquakes" measured by acoustic emission are surprisingly similar to earthquakes and crackling noise in rocks and laboratory tests on brittle materials. Both the distributions of event energies and of waiting (silent) times follow power laws. The stress-strain response exhibits clear signatures of localization of deformation to "weak spots" or softwood layers, as identified using digital image correlation. Even though material structure-dependent localization takes place, the avalanche behavior remains scale-free.

  16. Dune Avalanche Scars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    05 August 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows large, low albedo (dark) sand dunes in Kaiser Crater near 47.2oS, 340.4oW. The dunes are--ever so slowly--moving east to west (right to left) as sand avalanches down the steeper, slip face slopes of each. Avalanching sand in the Kaiser dune field has left deep scars on these slopes, suggesting that the sand is not loose but is instead weakly cemented. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  17. Avalanches in Wood Compression.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, T; Miksic, A; Ovaska, M; Alava, Mikko J

    2015-07-31

    Wood is a multiscale material exhibiting a complex viscoplastic response. We study avalanches in small wood samples in compression. "Woodquakes" measured by acoustic emission are surprisingly similar to earthquakes and crackling noise in rocks and laboratory tests on brittle materials. Both the distributions of event energies and of waiting (silent) times follow power laws. The stress-strain response exhibits clear signatures of localization of deformation to "weak spots" or softwood layers, as identified using digital image correlation. Even though material structure-dependent localization takes place, the avalanche behavior remains scale-free. PMID:26274428

  18. Measurement of the branching fraction ratio B (Bc+→ψ (2 S )π+)/B (Bc+→J /ψ π+)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusardi, N.; Lusiani, A.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthieu, K.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Ninci, D.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zucchelli, S.; LHCb Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Using p p collision data collected by LHCb at center-of-mass energies √{s } =7 TeV and 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1 , the ratio of the branching fraction of the Bc+→ψ (2 S ) π+ decay relative to that of the Bc+→J /ψ π+ decay is measured to be 0.268 ±0.032 (stat ) ±0.007 (syst ) ±0.006 (BF ) . The first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third is due to the uncertainties on the branching fractions of the J /ψ →μ+μ- and ψ (2 S ) →μ+μ- decays. This measurement is consistent with the previous LHCb result, and the statistical uncertainty is halved.

  19. Reuyl Crater Dust Avalanches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 13 May 2002) The Science The rugged, arcuate rim of the 90 km crater Reuyl dominates this THEMIS image. Reuyl crater is at the southern edge of a region known to be blanketed in thick dust based on its high albedo (brightness) and low thermal inertia values. This thick mantle of dust creates the appearance of snow covered mountains in the image. Like snow accumulation on Earth, Martian dust can become so thick that it eventually slides down the face of steep slopes, creating runaway avalanches of dust. In the center of this image about 1/3 of the way down is evidence of this phenomenon. A few dozen dark streaks can be seen on the bright, sunlit slopes of the crater rim. The narrow streaks extend downslope following the local topography in a manner very similar to snow avalanches on Earth. But unlike their terrestrial counterparts, no accumulation occurs at the bottom. The dust particles are so small that they are easily launched into the thin atmosphere where they remain suspended and ultimately blow away. The apparent darkness of the avalanche scars is due to the presence of relatively dark underlying material that becomes exposed following the passage of the avalanche. Over time, new dust deposition occurs, brightening the scars until they fade into the background. Although dark slope streaks had been observed in Viking mission images, a clear understanding of this dynamic phenomenon wasn't possible until the much higher resolution images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed the details. MOC images also showed that new avalanches have occurred during the time MGS has been in orbit. THEMIS images will allow additional mapping of their distribution and frequency, contributing new insights about Martian dust avalanches. The Story The stiff peaks in this image might remind you of the Alps here on Earth, but they really outline the choppy edge of a large Martian crater over 50 miles wide (seen in the context image at right). While these aren

  20. A Combination of CDF and D0 limits on the branching ratio of B0(s)(d) ---> mu+ mu- decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard, R.; Glenzinski, D.; Herndon, M.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Landsberg, G.; Lehner, F.; Lin, C.J.; Mrenna, S.; /Zurich U. /Fermilab /Wisconsin U., Madison /Texas A-M /Brown U.

    2005-08-01

    The authors combine the results of CDF and D0 searches for the rare decays B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. The experiments use 364 pb{sup -1} and 300 pb{sup -1} of data respectively. The limits on the branching ratios are obtained by normalizing the estimated sensitivity to the decay B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup +} taking into account the fragmentation ratios f{sub u}/f{sub s(d)}. The combined results exclude branching ratios of BR(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) > 1.5 x 10{sup -7} and BR(B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) > 4.0 x 10{sup -8} at 95% confidence level. These are the most stringent limits on these decays at the present time.

  1. Upper limit for the decay B--->τ- ν¯τ and measurement of the b-->τν¯τX branching ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DELPHI Collaboration; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adye, T.; Adzic, P.; Ajinenko, I.; Albrecht, Z.; Alderweireld, T.; Alekseev, G. D.; Alemany, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Almehed, S.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anassontzis, E. G.; Andersson, P.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Åsman, B.; Augustin, J.-E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Bambade, P.; Barao, F.; Barbiellini, G.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barker, G.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Beilliere, P.; Belokopytov, Yu.; Benekos, N. C.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Bigi, M.; Bilenky, M. S.; Bizouard, M.-A.; Bloch, D.; Blom, H. M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borgland, A. W.; Borisov, G.; Bosio, C.; Botner, O.; Boudinov, E.; Bouquet, B.; Bourdarios, C.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bozovic, I.; Bozzo, M.; Bracko, M.; Branchini, P.; Brenner, R. A.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.-M.; Bugge, L.; Buran, T.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Cabrera, S.; Caccia, M.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Carroll, L.; Caso, C.; Castillo Gimenez, M. V.; Cattai, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chabaud, V.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chochula, P.; Chorowicz, V.; Chudoba, J.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cortina, E.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Crawley, H. B.; Crennell, D.; Crepe, S.; Crosetti, G.; Cuevas Maestro, J.; Czellar, S.; Davenport, M.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; Delpierre, P.; Demaria, N.; De Angelis, A.; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Min, A.; De Paula, L.; Dijkstra, H.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Dolbeau, J.; Doroba, K.; Dracos, M.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Duperrin, A.; Durand, J.-D.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ekspong, G.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Engel, J.-P.; Espirito Santo, M.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fayot, J.; Feindt, M.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Ferro, F.; Fichet, S.; Firestone, A.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fontanelli, F.; Franek, B.; Frodesen, A. G.; Fruhwirth, R.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Galloni, A.; Gamba, D.; Gamblin, S.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gaspar, C.; Gaspar, M.; Gasparini, U.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E. N.; Gele, D.; Geralis, T.; Gerdyukov, L.; Ghodbane, N.; Gil, I.; Glege, F.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Gopal, G.; Gorn, L.; Gouz, Yu.; Gracco, V.; Grahl, J.; Graziani, E.; Gris, P.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, S.; Haider, S.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hansen, J.; Harris, F. J.; Hedberg, V.; Heising, S.; Hernandez, J. J.; Herquet, P.; Herr, H.; Hessing, T. L.; Heuser, J.-M.; Higon, E.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Hoorelbeke, S.; Houlden, M.; Hrubec, J.; Huber, M.; Huet, K.; Hughes, G. J.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, J. N.; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, P.; Janik, R.; Jarlskog, Ch.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Juillot, P.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Karafasoulis, K.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E. C.; Keranen, R.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Khomenko, B. A.; Khovanski, N. N.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B.; Kinvig, A.; Kjaer, N. J.; Klapp, O.; Klein, H.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kostioukhine, V.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krammer, M.; Kriznic, E.; Krstic, J.; Krumstein, Z.; Kubinec, P.; Kurowska, J.; Kurvinen, K.; Lamsa, J. W.; Lane, D. W.; Lapin, V.; Laugier, J.-P.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Lefebure, V.; Leinonen, L.; Leisos, A.; Leitner, R.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Libby, J.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lippi, I.; Loerstad, B.; Loken, J. G.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Mahon, J. R.; Maio, A.; Malek, A.; Malmgren, T. G. M.; Maltezos, S.; Malychev, V.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthiae, G.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Cubbin, M.; Mc Kay, R.; Mc Nulty, R.; Mc Pherson, G.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W. T.; Miagkov, A.; Migliore, E.; Mirabito, L.; Mitaroff, W. A.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moeller, R.; Moenig, K.; Monge, M. R.; Moraes, D.; Moreau, X.; Morettini, P.; Morton, G.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mulet-Marquis, C.; Muresan, R.; Murray, W. J.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Naraghi, F.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F. L.; Navas, S.; Nawrocki, K.; Negri, P.; Neufeld, N.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nielsen, B. S.; Niezurawski, P.; Nikolenko, M.; Nomokonov, V.; Nygren, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A. G.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Orazi, G.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Pain, R.; Paiva, R.; Palacios, J.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Pavel, T.; Pegoraro, M.; Peralta, L.; Pernicka, M.; Perrotta, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolini, A.; Phillips, H. T.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdniakov, V.; Privitera, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Rahmani, H.; Rames, J.; Ratoff, P. N.; Read, A. L.; Rebecchi, P.; Redaelli, N. G.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P. B.; Resvanis, L. K.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rohne, O.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rosinsky, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Royon, Ch.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ruiz, A.; Saarikko, H.; Sacquin, Y.; Sadovsky, A.; Sajot, G.; Salt, J.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sannino, M.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwering, B.; Schwickerath, U.; Scuri, F.; Seager, P.; Sedykh, Y.; Segar, A. M.; Seibert, N.; Sekulin, R.; Shellard, R. C.; Siebel, M.; Simard, L.; Simonetto, F.; Sisakian, A. N.; Smadja, G.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, G. R.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Spiriti, E.; Squarcia, S.; Stanescu, C.; Stanic, S.; Stanitzki, M.; Stevenson, K.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Strub, R.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Terranova, F.; Thomas, J.; Timmermans, J.; Tinti, N.; Tkatchev, L. G.; Tobin, M.; Todorova, S.; Tomaradze, A.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortora, L.; Tortosa, P.; Transtromer, G.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallazza, E.; Van Dam, P.; Van den Boeck, W.; Van Doninck, W. K.; Van Eldik, J.; Van Lysebetten, A.; van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Ventura, L.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verlato, M.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vlasov, E.; Vodopyanov, A. S.; Voulgaris, G.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Walck, C.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J. H.; Wilkinson, G. R.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Wolf, G.; Yi, J.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zoller, Ph.; Zucchelli, G. C.; Zumerle, G.

    2000-12-01

    The branching ratio for the leptonic decay of charged B mesons (B--->τ-ν¯τ) has been measured using selected leptonic τ--->l- ντν¯l and hadronic τ--->ντX decays in /Z-->bb¯ decays recorded by DELPHI at LEP1 in 1992-1995. The result, BR(B--->τ- ν¯τ)<1.1×10-3 at the 90% confidence level, is consistent with standard model expectations and puts a constraint on the ratio tanβ/MH+/-<0.46 (GeV/c2)-1 in the framework of models with two Higgs doublets (type II Higgs doublet model). From the missing energy distribution in /Z-->bb¯ decays without identified leptons, the b-->τν¯τX branching ratio has been measured in the hadronic channel τ-->ντX'. The result, BR(b-->τν¯τX)=(2.19+/-0.24(stat)+/- 0.39(syst))%, is consistent with the Standard Model prediction and with previous experimental measurements.

  2. Demonstration of the branching ratio inversion for the electron attachment to phosphoryl chloride POCl3 in the gas phase between 300 and 200 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carles, Sophie; Saidani, Ghassen; Le Garrec, Jean-Luc; Guen, Ngary; Mitchell, James B. A.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Shuman, Nicholas S.

    2016-04-01

    Electron attachment to phosphoryl chloride (phosphorus oxychloride) POCl3 has been studied in the gas phase by mass spectrometry at several low temperatures (47.7, 74.5, 169.7 and 199.5 K) with the CRESU method. By measuring over this temperature range and data from [8], we have demonstrated the inversion of the branching ratio between the exothermic non-dissociative exit channel POCl3- and the thermo-neutral dissociative exit channel POCl2- + Cl. A kinetic model in terms of statistical theory is used to fit the experimental data.

  3. Measurement of the ratio of Bc+ branching fractions to J/ψπ+ and J/ψμ+νμ final states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, RF; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gavrilov, G.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.; LHCb Collaboration

    2014-08-01

    The first measurement that relates semileptonic and hadronic decay rates of the Bc+ meson is performed using proton-proton collision data corresponding to 1.0 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected with the LHCb detector. The measured value of the ratio of branching fractions, B(Bc+→J/ψπ+)/B(Bc+→J/ψμ+νμ)=0.0469±0.0028(stat)±0.0046(syst), is at the lower end of available theoretical predictions.

  4. B physics: first evidence for b_s0 --> phi phi decay and measurements of branching ratio and a_cp for b+ --> phi k+

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-05-31

    We present the first evidence of charmless decays of the B{sub s}{sup 0} meson, the decay B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{phi}, and a measurement of the Branching Ratio BR(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{phi}) using 180 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. In addition, the BR and direct CP asymmetry for the B{sup +} {yields} {phi}K{sup +} decay are measured.

  5. Measurement of the product of the leptonic width of the J/ψ meson and the branching ratio for its decay to hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kharlamova, T. A.; Collaboration: KEDR Collaboration

    2015-05-15

    A preliminary result of the KEDR/VEPP-4M experiment devoted to measuring the cross section for electron-positron annihilation to hadrons (e{sup +}e{sup −} → hadrons) in the energy region of J/ψ-resonance production is presented. The value found for the product of the J/ψ-meson width with respect to decay to electrons and the branching ratio for J/ψ-meson decay to hadrons is Γ{sub ee}B{sub h} = 4.67±0.04(stat.)± 0.22(syst.) keV.

  6. Avalanche Photodiode Statistics in Triggered-avalanche Detection Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, H. H.

    1984-01-01

    The output of a triggered avalanche mode avalanche photodiode is modeled as Poisson distributed primary avalanche events plus conditionally Poisson distributed trapped carrier induced secondary events. The moment generating function as well as the mean and variance of the diode output statistics are derived. The dispersion of the output statistics is shown to always exceed that of the Poisson distribution. Several examples are considered in detail.

  7. Exclusion processes with avalanches.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Uttam; Krapivsky, P L

    2014-07-01

    In an exclusion process with avalanches, when a particle hops to a neighboring empty site which is adjacent to an island the particle on the other end of the island immediately hops, and if it joins another island this triggers another hop. There are no restrictions on the length of the islands and the duration of the avalanche. This process is well defined in the low-density region ρ < 1/2. We describe the nature of steady states (on a ring) and determine all correlation functions. For the asymmetric version of the process, we compute the steady state current, and we describe shock and rarefaction waves which arise in the evolution of the step-function initial profile. For the symmetric version, we determine the diffusion coefficient and examine the evolution of a tagged particle.

  8. Flares as Avalanches?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, P.

    2003-05-01

    In 1991, E.T. Lu and R. Hamilton (ApJ 380, L89) suggested that flares could be interpreted as avalanches of reconnection events in coronal magnetic structures driven to a self-organized critical state. Physical underpinning for the simple cellular automaton model they used to illustrate their idea can be readily found in the nanoflare conjecture for coronal heating championed over the past two decades by E.N. Parker (e.g., ApJ 330, 474 [1988]). In this lecture I will give a brief overview of Lu & Hamilton's avalanche model, and describe how it can be physically interpreted in the context of Parker's nanoflare conjecture. After discussing some illustrative model results, I will focus on recent comparisons of the model's predictions with flare observations. Finally, I will discuss some recent attempts at quantitatively exploring the physical relationship between model components and the physics of magnetic reconnection.

  9. Avalanche photoconductive switching

    SciTech Connect

    Pocha, M.D.; Druce, R.L.; Wilson, M.J.; Hofer, W.W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes work being done at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on the avalanche mode of operation of laser triggered photoconductive switches. We have been able to generate pulses with amplitudes of 2 kV--35 kV and rise times of 300--500 ps, and with a switching gain (energy of output electrical pulse vs energy of trigger optical pulse) of 10{sup 3} to over 10{sup 5}. Switches with two very different physical configurations and with two different illumination wavelengths (1.06 {mu}m, 890 nm) exhibit very similar behavior. The avalanche switching behavior, therefore, appears to be related to the material parameters rather than the optical wavelength or switch geometry. Considerable further work needs to be done to fully characterize and understand this mode of operation. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Laboratory singing sand avalanches.

    PubMed

    Dagois-Bohy, Simon; Ngo, Sandrine; du Pont, Sylvain Courrech; Douady, Stéphane

    2010-02-01

    Some desert sand dunes have the peculiar ability to emit a loud sound up to 110 dB, with a well-defined frequency: this phenomenon, known since early travelers (Darwin, Marco Polo, etc.), has been called the song of dunes. But only in late 19th century scientific observations were made, showing three important characteristics of singing dunes: first, not all dunes sing, but all the singing dunes are composed of dry and well-sorted sand; second, this sound occurs spontaneously during avalanches on a slip face; third this is not the only way to produce sound with this sand. More recent field observations have shown that during avalanches, the sound frequency does not depend on the dune size or shape, but on the grain diameter only, and scales as the square root of g/d--with g the gravity and d the diameter of the grains--explaining why all the singing dunes in the same vicinity sing at the same frequency. We have been able to reproduce these singing avalanches in laboratory on a hard plate, which made possible to study them more accurately than on the field. Signals of accelerometers at the flowing surface of the avalanche are compared to signals of microphones placed above, and it evidences a very strong vibration of the flowing layer at the same frequency as on the field, responsible for the emission of sound. Moreover, other characteristics of the booming dunes are reproduced and analyzed, such as a threshold under which no sound is produced, or beats in the sound that appears when the flow is too large. Finally, the size of the coherence zones emitting sound has been measured and discussed.

  11. First Observation of the Cabibbo-suppressed Decays Xi+(c) ---> Sigma+ pi- pi+ and Xi+(c) ---> Sigma- pi+ pi+ and Measurement of their Branching Ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez-Jauregui, E.; Engelfried, J.; Akgun, U.; Alkhazov, Georgiy; Amaro-Reyes, J.; Atamantchouk, A.G.; Ayan, Ahmet Sedat; Balatz, M.Y.; Blanco-Covarrubias, A.; Bondar, N.F.; Cooper, Peter S.; /Fermilab /Michigan U., Flint

    2008-04-01

    The authors report the first observation of two Cabibbo-suppressed decay modes, {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}. They observe 56 {+-} 13 over a background of 21, and 23 {+-} 7 over a background of 12 events, respectively, for the signals. The data were accumulated using the SELEX spectrometer during the 1996-1997 fixed target run at Fermilab, chiefly from a 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -} beam. The branching ratios of the decays relative to the Cabibbo-favored {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} are measured to be B({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/B({xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.50 {+-} 0.20, and B({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +})/B({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.23 {+-} 0.11, respectively. They also report branching ratios for the same decay modes of the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} relative to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +}.

  12. Measurement of the branching ratios of D(+) and D(+)(s) hadronic decays to four-body final states containing a K(S).

    PubMed

    Link, J M; Reyes, M; Yager, P M; Anjos, J C; Bediaga, I; Göbel, C; Magnin, J; Massafferi, A; de Miranda, J M; Pepe, I M; dos Reis, A C; Simão, F R; Carrillo, S; Casimiro, E; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Uribe, C; Vázquez, F; Cinquini, L; Cumalat, J P; O'Reilly, B; Ramirez, J E; Vaandering, E W; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W; Gaines, I; Garbincius, P H; Garren, L A; Gottschalk, E; Kasper, P H; Kreymer, A E; Kutschke, R; Bianco, S; Fabbri, F L; Sarwar, S; Zallo, A; Cawlfield, C; Kim, D Y; Rahimi, A; Wiss, J; Gardner, R; Chung, Y S; Kang, J S; Ko, B R; Kwak, J W; Lee, K B; Park, H; Alimonti, G; Boschini, M; Caccianiga, B; D'Angelo, P; DiCorato, M; Dini, P; Giammarchi, M; Inzani, P; Leveraro, F; Malvezzi, S; Menasce, D; Mezzadri, M; Milazzo, L; Moroni, L; Pedrini, D; Pontoglio, C; Prelz, F; Rovere, M; Sala, A; Sala, S; Davenport, T F; Agostino, L; Arena, V; Boca, G; Bonomi, G; Gianini, G; Liguori, G; Merlo, M; Pantea, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Segoni, I; Viola, L; Vitulo, P; Hernandez, H; Lopez, A M; Mendez, H; Mendez, L; Mirles, A; Montiel, E; Olaya, D; Paris, A; Quinones, J; Rivera, C; Xiong, W; Zhang, Y; Wilson, J R; Cho, K; Handler, T; Engh, D; Hosack, M; Johns, W E; Nehring, M; Sheldon, P D; Stenson, K; Webster, M; Sheaff, M

    2001-10-15

    We have studied hadronic four-body decays of D(+) and D(+)(s) mesons with a K(S) in the final state using data recorded during the 1996-1997 fixed-target run of the Fermilab high energy photoproduction experiment FOCUS. We report a new branching ratio measurement of gamma(D(+)-->K(S)K-pi(+)pi(+))/gamma(D(+)-->K(S)pi(+)pi(+)pi(-)) = 0.0768+/-0.0041+/-0.0032. We make the first observation of three new decay modes with branching ratios gamma(D(+)-->K(S)K+pi(+)pi(-))/gamma(D(+)-->K(S)pi(+)pi(+)pi(-)) = 0.0562+/-0.0039+/-0.0040, gamma(D(+)-->K(S)K+K-pi(+))/gamma(D(+)-->K(S)pi(+)pi(+)pi(-)) = 0.0077+/-0.0015+/-0.0009, and gamma(D(+)(s)-->K(S)K+pi(+)pi(-))/gamma(D(+)(s)-->K(S)K-pi(+)pi(+)) = 0.586+/-0.052+/-0.043, where in each case the first error is statistical and the second error is systematic. PMID:11690200

  13. Vibrational Branching Ratios and Asymmetry Parameters in the Photoionization of CO2 in the Region Between 650 Å and 840 Å

    PubMed Central

    Parr, A. C.; West, J. B.; King, M. R. F.; Ueda, K.; Dehmer, P. M.; Dehmer, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    The vibrational branching ratios and asymmetry parameters for CO2 have been determined in the wavelength region of 650 Å to near the ionization onset at about 840 Å. The study was performed using synchrotron radiation from the Daresbury storage ring that was dispersed with a 5 m grating monochomator that afforded resolution of 0.1 Å to 0.2 Å. This resolution allowed the study of the branching ratios and asymmetry parameters with enough detail to see the changes in the parameters within the pronounced autoionization structure in CO2 in this wavelength region. While the electron spectrometer resolution was not sufficient to resolve the spin orbit and Renner-Teller splitting in the photoelectron spectra, we are able to fit the data with a model that identifies the major structure in terms of the symmetric stretch and elements of the asymmetric stretch and bending modes. A calculation of the expected relative vibrational excitations based upon the Franck-Condon principle clearly showed non-Franck-Condon behavior in some of the vibrational-electronic transitions. PMID:27500048

  14. Measurement of the ratio of branching fractions B(B{sup {+-}}{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup {+-}})/B(B{sup {+-}}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup {+-}})

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Budd, S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Gerberich, H.; Grundler, U.; Junk, T. R.; Kraus, J.; Marino, C. P.; Pitts, K.; Rogers, E.; Taffard, A.; Veramendi, G.; Zhang, X.; Adelman, J.; Brubaker, E.; Fedorko, W. T.; Furic, I.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.

    2009-06-01

    We report a measurement of the ratio of branching fractions of the decays B{sup {+-}}{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup {+-}} and B{sup {+-}}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup {+-}} using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The signal from the Cabbibo-suppressed B{sup {+-}}{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup {+-}} decay is separated from B{sup {+-}}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup {+-}} using the B{sup {+-}}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup {+-}} invariant mass distribution and the kinematical differences of the hadron track in the two decay modes. From a sample of 220 pb{sup -1} of pp collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV, we observe 91{+-}15 B{sup {+-}}{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup {+-}} events together with 1883{+-}34 B{sup {+-}}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup {+-}} events. The ratio of branching fractions is found to be B(B{sup {+-}}{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup {+-}})/B(B{sup {+-}}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup {+-}})=(4.86{+-}0.82(stat){+-}0.15(syst))%.

  15. Hebes Chasma Dust Avalanches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Dust avalanches, also called slope streaks, occur on many Martian terrains. The deposition of airborne dust on surfaces causes a bright tone in the THEMIS VIS images. Any movement of the dust downhill, a dust avalanche, will leave behind a streak where the darker, dust-free surface is exposed.

    These dust avalanches are located in Hebes Chasma.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -1.4, Longitude 286.6 East (73.4 West). 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  16. Branching Ratios and Vibrational Distributions in Water-Forming Reactions of OH and OD Radicals with Methylamines.

    PubMed

    Butkovskaya, N I; Setser, D W

    2016-09-01

    Reactions of OH and OD radicals with (CH3)3N, (CH3)2NH, and CH3NH2 were studied by Fourier transform infrared emission spectroscopy (FTIR) of the water product molecules from a fast-flow reactor at 298 K. The rate constants (4.4 ± 0.5) × 10(-11), (5.2 ± 0.8) × 10(-11), and (2.0 ± 0.4) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) were determined for OD + (CH3)3N, (CH3)2NH, and CH3NH2, respectively, by comparing the HOD emission intensities to the HOD intensity from the OD reaction with H2S. Abstraction from the nitrogen site competes with abstraction from the methyl group, as obtained from an analysis of the HOD and D2O emission intensities from the OD reactions with the deuterated reactants, (CD3)2NH and CD3NH2. After adjustment for the hydrogen-deuterium kinetic isotope effect, the product branching fractions of the hydrogen abstraction from the nitrogen for di- and monomethylamine were found to be 0.34 ± 0.04 and 0.26 ± 0.05, respectively. Vibrational distributions of the H2O, HOD, and D2O molecules are typical for direct hydrogen atom abstraction from polar molecules, even though activation energies are negative because of the formation of pre-transition-state complexes. Comparison is made to the reactions of hydroxyl radicals with ammonia and with other compounds with primary C-H bonds to discuss specific features of disposal of energy to water product. PMID:27504785

  17. Statistical analyses support power law distributions found in neuronal avalanches.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Andreas; Yu, Shan; Plenz, Dietmar

    2011-01-01

    The size distribution of neuronal avalanches in cortical networks has been reported to follow a power law distribution with exponent close to -1.5, which is a reflection of long-range spatial correlations in spontaneous neuronal activity. However, identifying power law scaling in empirical data can be difficult and sometimes controversial. In the present study, we tested the power law hypothesis for neuronal avalanches by using more stringent statistical analyses. In particular, we performed the following steps: (i) analysis of finite-size scaling to identify scale-free dynamics in neuronal avalanches, (ii) model parameter estimation to determine the specific exponent of the power law, and (iii) comparison of the power law to alternative model distributions. Consistent with critical state dynamics, avalanche size distributions exhibited robust scaling behavior in which the maximum avalanche size was limited only by the spatial extent of sampling ("finite size" effect). This scale-free dynamics suggests the power law as a model for the distribution of avalanche sizes. Using both the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistic and a maximum likelihood approach, we found the slope to be close to -1.5, which is in line with previous reports. Finally, the power law model for neuronal avalanches was compared to the exponential and to various heavy-tail distributions based on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov distance and by using a log-likelihood ratio test. Both the power law distribution without and with exponential cut-off provided significantly better fits to the cluster size distributions in neuronal avalanches than the exponential, the lognormal and the gamma distribution. In summary, our findings strongly support the power law scaling in neuronal avalanches, providing further evidence for critical state dynamics in superficial layers of cortex.

  18. Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Studer, Andrew J.; Manuel, James R.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2014-12-01

    Effects of basicity, B (CaO:SiO2 ratio) on the thermal range, concentration, and formation mechanisms of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter bonding phases have been investigated using an in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction-based methodology with subsequent Rietveld refinement-based quantitative phase analysis. SFCA and SFCA-I phases are the key bonding materials in iron ore sinter, and improved understanding of the effects of processing parameters such as basicity on their formation and decomposition may assist in improving efficiency of industrial iron ore sintering operations. Increasing basicity significantly increased the thermal range of SFCA-I, from 1363 K to 1533 K (1090 °C to 1260 °C) for a mixture with B = 2.48, to ~1339 K to 1535 K (1066 °C to 1262 °C) for a mixture with B = 3.96, and to ~1323 K to 1593 K (1050 °C to 1320 °C) at B = 4.94. Increasing basicity also increased the amount of SFCA-I formed, from 18 wt pct for the mixture with B = 2.48 to 25 wt pct for the B = 4.94 mixture. Higher basicity of the starting sinter mixture will, therefore, increase the amount of SFCA-I, considered to be more desirable of the two phases. Basicity did not appear to significantly influence the formation mechanism of SFCA-I. It did, however, affect the formation mechanism of SFCA, with the decomposition of SFCA-I coinciding with the formation of a significant amount of additional SFCA in the B = 2.48 and 3.96 mixtures but only a minor amount in the highest basicity mixture. In situ neutron diffraction enabled characterization of the behavior of magnetite after melting of SFCA produced a magnetite plus melt phase assemblage.

  19. Kerosene-water separation in T-junction with orientation upward branch with a 60° angle: Variation of diameter ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puspitasari, Dewi; Indarto, Purnomo, Khasani

    2016-06-01

    Research on the T-junction is still underway for the flow of liquid-liquid (kerosene-water). Some research on the characteristics of kerosene-water separation was performed using T-junction oriented upward branch with a 60° angle. To observe the effect of diameters ratio on the phase separation that produced T-junction then made a test section with a horizontal pipe diameter 36 mm, while the side arm 36 mm diameter, 26 mm and 19 mm (diameters ratio of 1, 0.7 and 0.5) by using plexiglass pipe type. Based on experimental results and visualization of data flow in the test section, to the value obtained 60% water cut, the maximum separation efficiency of 94%, FK = 0.94 and FW = 0.001 with a diameter ratio of 1. For other diameter ratio of 0.7 and 0.5 respectively separation efficiency of 66%, FK = 1 and Fw = 0.34 for 0.7 and separation efficiency of 84%, FK = 1 and Fw = 0.16 for 0.5, the best value is obtained at a water cut 60% too. All the best conditions to achieve the above-stratified flow pattern.

  20. Avalanches and clusters in planar crack front propagation.

    PubMed

    Laurson, Lasse; Santucci, Stephane; Zapperi, Stefano

    2010-04-01

    We study avalanches in a model for a planar crack propagating in a disordered medium. Due to long-range interactions, avalanches are formed by a set of spatially disconnected local clusters, the sizes of which are distributed according to a power law with an exponent tau{a}=1.5. We derive a scaling relation tau{a}=2tau-1 between the local cluster exponent tau{a} and the global avalanche exponent tau . For length scales longer than a crossover length proportional to the Larkin length, the aspect ratio of the local clusters scales with the roughness exponent of the line model. Our analysis provides an explanation for experimental results on planar crack avalanches in Plexiglas plates, but the results are applicable also to other systems with long-range interactions.

  1. Branching ratios and CP asymmetries of B{yields}a{sub 1}(1260){pi} and a{sub 1}(1260)K decays

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, K.-C.

    2007-11-01

    We present the studies of the decays B{yields}a{sub 1}(1260){pi} and a{sub 1}(1260)K within the framework of QCD factorization. Because of the G-parity, unlike the vector meson, the chiral-odd two-parton light-cone distribution amplitudes of the a{sub 1} are antisymmetric under the exchange of quark and antiquark momentum fractions in the SU(2) limit. The branching ratios for a{sub 1}{pi} modes are sensitive to tree-penguin interference. The resultant B(B{sup 0}{yields}a{sub 1}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}) are in good agreement with the data. However, using the current Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angles, {beta}=22.0 deg. and {gamma}=59.0 deg., our results for the mixing-induced parameter S and {alpha}{sub eff} differ from the measurements of the time-dependent CP asymmetries in the decay B{sup 0}{yields}a{sub 1}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}} at about the 3.7{sigma} level. This puzzle may be resolved by using a larger {gamma} > or approx. 80 deg. For a{sub 1}K modes, the annihilation topologies give sizable contributions and are sensitive to the first Gegenbauer moment of the leading-twist tensor (chiral-odd) distribution amplitude of the a{sub 1} meson. The B{yields}a{sub 1}K amplitudes resemble the corresponding B{yields}{pi}K ones very much. Taking the ratios of corresponding CP-averaged a{sub 1}K and {pi}K branching ratios, we can extract information relevant to the electroweak penguins and annihilations. The existence of new physics in the electroweak penguin sector and final-state interactions during decays can thus be explored.

  2. Experimental and theoretical studies of the O(3P) + C2H4 reaction dynamics: Collision energy dependence of branching ratios and extent of intersystem crossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Bina; Han, Yong-Chang; Bowman, Joel M.; Leonori, Francesca; Balucani, Nadia; Angelucci, Luca; Occhiogrosso, Angela; Petrucci, Raffaele; Casavecchia, Piergiorgio

    2012-12-01

    The reaction of O(3P) with C2H4, of importance in combustion and atmospheric chemistry, stands out as paradigm reaction involving not only the indicated triplet state potential energy surface (PES) but also an interleaved singlet PES that is coupled to the triplet surface. This reaction poses great challenges for theory and experiment, owing to the ruggedness and high dimensionality of these potentials, as well as the long lifetimes of the collision complexes. Crossed molecular beam (CMB) scattering experiments with soft electron ionization detection are used to disentangle the dynamics of this polyatomic multichannel reaction at a collision energy Ec of 8.4 kcal/mol. Five different primary products have been identified and characterized, which correspond to the five exothermic competing channels leading to H + CH2CHO, H + CH3CO, CH3 + HCO, CH2 + H2CO, and H2 + CH2CO. These experiments extend our previous CMB work at higher collision energy (Ec ˜ 13 kcal/mol) and when the results are combined with the literature branching ratios from kinetics experiments at room temperature (Ec ˜ 1 kcal/mol), permit to explore the variation of the branching ratios over a wide range of collision energies. In a synergistic fashion, full-dimensional, QCT surface hopping calculations of the O(3P) + C2H4 reaction using ab initio PESs for the singlet and triplet states and their coupling, are reported at collision energies corresponding to the CMB and the kinetics ones. Both theory and experiment find almost an equal contribution from the triplet and singlet surfaces to the reaction, as seen from the collision energy dependence of branching ratios of product channels and extent of intersystem crossing (ISC). Further detailed comparisons at the level of angular distributions and translational energy distributions are made between theory and experiment for the three primary radical channel products, H + CH2CHO, CH3 + HCO, and CH2 + H2CO. The very good agreement between theory and

  3. Ionic rotational branching ratios in resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization of NO via the A2Sigma(+)(3s sigma) and D2Sigma(+)(3p sigma) states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, H.; McKoy, V.; Dixit, S. N.; Huo, W. M.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented for the rotationally resolved photoelectron spectra resulting from a (2 + 1) one-color resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) of NO via the rotationally clean S21(11.5) and mixed S11(15.5) + R21(15.5) branches of the 0-0 transition in the D-X band. The calculations were done in the fixed-nuclei frozen core approximation. The resulting photoionization spectra, convoluted with a Lorentzian detection function, agree qualitatively with experimental results of Viswanathan et al. (1986) and support their conclusion that the nonspherical nature of the molecular potential creates a substantial l-mixing in the continuum, which in turn leads to the intense Delta N = 0 peak. The rather strong photoelectron energy dependence of the rotational branching ratios of the D 2Sigma(+) S21(11.5) line was investigated and compared to the weak energy dependence of the A 2Sigma(+) R22(21.5) line.

  4. Tikhonravov Crater Dust Avalanches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Dust avalanches, also called slope streaks, occur on many Martian terrains. The deposition of airborne dust on surfaces causes a bright tone in the THEMIS VIS images. Any movement of the dust downhill, a dust avalanche, will leave behind a streak where the darker, dust-free surface is exposed.

    These dust avalanches are located within a small crater inside Tikhonravov Crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 12.6, Longitude 37.1 East (322.9 West). 36 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  5. Crater Dust Avalanches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Dust avalanches, also called slope streaks, occur on many Martian terrains. The deposition of airborne dust on surfaces causes a bright tone in the THEMIS VIS images. Any movement of the dust downhill, a dust avalanche, will leave behind a streak where the darker, dust-free surface is exposed.

    These dust avalanches are located in a small canyon within a crater rim northeast of Naktong Vallis.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 7.1, Longitude 34.7 East (325.3 West). 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  6. Lycus Sulci Dust Avalanches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Dust avalanches, also called slope streaks, occur on many Martian terrains. The deposition of airborne dust on surfaces causes a bright tone in the THEMIS VIS images. Any movement of the dust downhill, a dust avalanche, will leave behind a streak where the darker, dust-free surface is exposed.

    These dust avalanches occur on the slopes of Lycus Sulci near Olympus Mons.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 28.1, Longitude 220.4 East (139.6 West). 18 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. Crater Dust Avalanches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Dust avalanches, also called slope streaks, occur on many Martian terrains. The deposition of airborne dust on surfaces causes a bright tone in the THEMIS VIS images. Any movement of the dust downhill, a dust avalanche, will leave behind a streak where the darker, dust-free surface is exposed.

    This region of dust avalanches is located in and around a crater to the west of yesterday's image.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 14.7, Longitude 32.7 East (327.3 West). 18 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. Integrated avalanche photodiode arrays

    DOEpatents

    Harmon, Eric S.

    2015-07-07

    The present disclosure includes devices for detecting photons, including avalanche photon detectors, arrays of such detectors, and circuits including such arrays. In some aspects, the detectors and arrays include a virtual beveled edge mesa structure surrounded by resistive material damaged by ion implantation and having side wall profiles that taper inwardly towards the top of the mesa structures, or towards the direction from which the ion implantation occurred. Other aspects are directed to masking and multiple implantation and/or annealing steps. Furthermore, methods for fabricating and using such devices, circuits and arrays are disclosed.

  9. New measurement of BR(D+ ---> rho0 mu+ nu) / BR(D+ ---> anti-K*0 mu+ nu) branching ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; dos Reis, A.C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vazquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J.P.; /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /North Carolina U. /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol. /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez /South Carolina U. /Tennessee U. /Vanderbilt U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-11-01

    Using data collected by the FOCUS experiment at Fermilab, the authors present a new measurement of the charm semileptonic branching ratio BR(D{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{mu}{sup +}{nu})/BR(D{sup +}{yields}{bar K}*{sup 0} {mu}{sup +}{nu}). From a sample of 320 {+-} 44 and 11,372 {+-} 161 D{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{mu}{sup +}{nu} and D{sup +} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{mu}{sup +}{nu} events respectively, they find BR(D{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{mu}{sup +}{nu})/BR(D{sup +}{yields}{bar K}*{sup 0} {mu}{sup +}{nu}) = 0.041 {+-} 0.006(stat) {+-} 0.004(syst).

  10. Measurement of the branching ratio B(D+ -> ρ0 l+ νl)/B(D+ ->K*0 l+ νl)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitala, E. M.; Amato, S.; Anjos, J. C.; Appel, J. A.; Ashery, D.; Banerjee, S.; Bediaga, I.; Blaylock, G.; Bracker, S. B.; Burchat, P. R.; Burnstein, R. A.; Carter, T.; Carvalho, H. S.; Copty, N. K.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Darling, C.; Denisenko, K.; Fernandez, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gounder, K.; Halling, A. M.; Herrera, G.; Hurvits, G.; James, C.; Kasper, P. A.; Kwan, S.; Langs, D. C.; Leslie, J.; Lundberg, B.; Maytal-Beck, S.; Meadows, B.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; Milburn, R. H.; de Miranda, J. M.; Napier, A.; Nguyen, A.; D'Oliveira, A. B.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Peng, K. C.; Perera, L. P.; Purohit, M. V.; Quinn, B.; Radeztsky, S.; Rafatian, A.; Reay, N. W.; Reidy, J. J.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Santha, A. K. S.; Santoro, A. F. S.; Schwartz, A. J.; Sheaff, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Stanton, N. R.; Stenson, K.; Summers, D. J.; Takach, S.; Thorne, K.; Tripathi, A. K.; Watanabe, S.; Weiss-Babai, R.; Wiener, J.; Witchey, N.; Wolin, E.; Yi, D.; Yoshida, S.; Zaliznyak, R.; Zhang, C.

    1997-02-01

    We report a measurement of the branching ratio B(D+ -> ρ0 l+ νl)/B(D+ -> K*0 l+ νl) from the Fermilab charm hadroproduction experiment E791. Based on signals of 49 +/- 17 events in the D+ -> ρ0 e+ νe mode and 54 +/- 18 events in the D+ -> ρ0 μ+ νμ mode, we measureB(D+ -> ρ0 e+ νe)/B(D+ -> K*0 e) νe) = 0.045 +/- 0.014 +/- 0.009,B(D+ -> ρ0 μ+ νμ)/B(D+ -> K*0 μ+ νμ) = 0.051 +/- 0.015 +/- 0.009. Combining the results from both the electronic and muonic modes, we obtainB(D+ -> ρ0 l+ νl)/B(D+ -> K*0 l+ νl) = 0.047 +/- 0.013. This result is compared to theoretical predictions.

  11. Evidence for B0 s-->phiphi decay and measurements of branching ratio and A(CP) for B+ -->phiK+.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Arguin, J-F; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G J; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Casarsa, M; Castellano, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chuang, S; Chung, K; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Cijliak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A G; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cranshaw, J; Cuevas, J; Cruz, A; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; Dagenhart, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Donini, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Erdmann, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H-C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R D; Flanagan, G; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Galyardt, J; Gallinaro, M; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D W; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Huffman, B T; Huang, Y; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kong, D J; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Lazzizzera, I; Lecci, C; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Maladinovic, N; Manca, G; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P M; McNamara, P; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miles, J; Miller, L; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P A; Muelmenstaedt, J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, T; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Napora, R; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Nielsen, J; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohsugi, T; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Orejudos, W; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pratt, T; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, M A; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spinella, F; Squillacioti, P; Stadie, H; Stanitzki, M; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takano, H; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Varganov, A; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veszpremi, V; Veramendi, G; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wolter, M; Worcester, M; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, A; Yagil, A; Yamashita, T; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2005-07-15

    We present the first evidence of charmless decays of the B(0)(s) meson, the decay B(0)(s)--> phiphi, and a measurement of the branching ratio BR(B(0)(s)--> phiphi) using 180 pb(-1) of data collected by the CDF II experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. In addition, the BR and direct CP asymmetry for the B+-->phiK+ decay are measured. We obtain BR(B(0)(s)--> phiphi)=[14(+6)(-5)(stat)+/-6(syst)] x 10(-6), BR(B+-->phiK+)=[7.6+/-1.3(stat)+/-0.6(syst)] x 10(-6), and A(CP)(B+-->phiK+)= -0.07+/-0.17(stat)+0.03 / -0.02(syst). Both decays are governed in the standard model by second order (penguin) b-->s(-)ss amplitudes.

  12. Search for D0-D0 mixing and branching-ratio measurement in the decay D0-->K+ pi- pi0.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; Briand, H; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-12-01

    We analyze 230.4 fb;{-1} of data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e;{+}e;{-} collider at SLAC to search for evidence of D0-D[over ];{0} mixing using regions of phase space in the decay D;{0}-->K;{+}pi;{-}pi;{0}. We measure the time-integrated mixing rate R_{M}=(0.023_{-0.014};{+0.018}(stat.)+/-0.004(syst.))%, and R_{M}<0.054% at the 95% confidence level, assuming CP invariance. The data are consistent with no mixing at the 4.5% confidence level. We also measure the branching ratio for D;{0}-->K;{+}pi;{-}pi;{0} relative to D;{0}-->K;{-}pi;{+}pi;{0} to be (0.214+/-0.008(stat.)+/-0.008(syst.))%. PMID:17155794

  13. Search for D0-D¯0 Mixing and Branching-Ratio Measurement in the Decay D0→K+π-π0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Gill, M. S.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadyk, J. A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Ronan, M. T.; Wenzel, W. A.; Sanchez, P. Del Amo; Barrett, M.; Ford, K. E.; Harrison, T. J.; Hart, A. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Morgan, S. E.; Watson, A. T.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schroeder, T.; Steinke, M.; Boyd, J. T.; Burke, J. P.; Cottingham, W. N.; Walker, D.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Knecht, N. S.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Saleem, M.; Sherwood, D. J.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Best, D. S.; Bondioli, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Foulkes, S. D.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Wang, K.; Zhang, L.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, S.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Cunha, A.; Dahmes, B.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Nesom, G.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spradlin, P.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dvoretskii, A.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P. C.; Chen, S.; Ford, W. T.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Kreisel, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Ruddick, W. O.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Zhang, J.; Chen, A.; Eckhart, E. A.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Winklmeier, F.; Zeng, Q.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Brandt, T.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Grenier, P.; Latour, E.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Gradl, W.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Robertson, A. I.; Xie, Y.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Prencipe, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Capra, R.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Brandenburg, G.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Wu, J.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bard, D. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Flack, R. L.; Nash, J. A.; Nikolich, M. B.; Vazquez, W. Panduro; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Meyer, N. T.; Ziegler, V.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Schott, G.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Oyanguren, A.; Pruvot, S.; Rodier, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, W. F.; Wormser, G.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Forster, I. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, K. A.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Schofield, K. C.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Lodovico, F. Di; Menges, W.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Jackson, P. S.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Lafferty, G. D.; Naisbit, M. T.; Williams, J. C.; Yi, J. I.; Chen, C.; Hulsbergen, W. D.; Jawahery, A.; Lae, C. K.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Li, X.; Moore, T. B.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Kim, H.; McLachlin, S. E.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Côté, D.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Allmendinger, T.; Benelli, G.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Rahimi, A. M.; Ter-Antonyan, R.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Pompili, A.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Chauveau, J.; Briand, H.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; Hamon, O.; Hartfiel, B. L.; John, M. J. J.; Leruste, Ph.; Malclès, J.; Ocariz, J.; Roos, L.; Therin, G.; Gladney, L.; Panetta, J.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cenci, R.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Mazur, M. A.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Wagoner, D. E.; Biesiada, J.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lau, Y. P.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; D'Orazio, A.; Del Re, D.; di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Legendre, M.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Berger, N.; Claus, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Cristinziani, M.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Halyo, V.; Hast, C.; Hryn'Ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; van Bakel, N.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Petersen, B. A.; Roat, C.; Wilden, L.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Bula, R.; Ernst, J. A.; Jain, V.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Wappler, F. R.; Zain, S. B.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Satpathy, A.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Cossutti, F.; Ricca, G. Della; Dittongo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Pappagallo, M.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Cheng, B.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Flood, K. T.; Hollar, J. J.; Kutter, P. E.; Mellado, B.; Mihalyi, A.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2006-12-01

    We analyze 230.4fb-1 of data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- collider at SLAC to search for evidence of D0-D¯0 mixing using regions of phase space in the decay D0→K+π-π0. We measure the time-integrated mixing rate RM=(0.023-0.014+0.018(stat.)±0.004(syst.))%, and RM<0.054% at the 95% confidence level, assuming CP invariance. The data are consistent with no mixing at the 4.5% confidence level. We also measure the branching ratio for D0→K+π-π0 relative to D0→K-π+π0 to be (0.214±0.008(stat.)±0.008(syst.))%.

  14. Evidence for B0 s-->phiphi decay and measurements of branching ratio and A(CP) for B+ -->phiK+.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Arguin, J-F; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G J; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Casarsa, M; Castellano, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; 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    2005-07-15

    We present the first evidence of charmless decays of the B(0)(s) meson, the decay B(0)(s)--> phiphi, and a measurement of the branching ratio BR(B(0)(s)--> phiphi) using 180 pb(-1) of data collected by the CDF II experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. In addition, the BR and direct CP asymmetry for the B+-->phiK+ decay are measured. We obtain BR(B(0)(s)--> phiphi)=[14(+6)(-5)(stat)+/-6(syst)] x 10(-6), BR(B+-->phiK+)=[7.6+/-1.3(stat)+/-0.6(syst)] x 10(-6), and A(CP)(B+-->phiK+)= -0.07+/-0.17(stat)+0.03 / -0.02(syst). Both decays are governed in the standard model by second order (penguin) b-->s(-)ss amplitudes. PMID:16090735

  15. Measurement of the ratio of branching fractions B({B}c+to J/{ψK}+)/B({B}c+to J/{ψπ}+)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Arnau Romeu, J.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Batsukh, B.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. 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M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubert, K.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Toriello, F.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhu, X.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-09-01

    The ratio of branching fractions {R}_{K/π}≡ B({B}c+to J/{ψK}+)/B({B}c+to J/{ψπ}+) is measured with pp collision data collected by the LHCb experiment at centre-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1. It is found to be R K/π = 0.079 ± 0.007 ± 0.003, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. This measurement is consistent with the previous LHCb result, while the uncertainties are significantly reduced. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Theoretical temperature-dependent branching ratios and laser thresholds of the 3F4 to 3H6 levels of Tm(3+) in ten garnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filer, Elizabeth D.; Barnes, Norman P.; Morrison, Clyde A.

    1991-01-01

    The calculated energy levels, the branching ratios, and the estimated thresholds for thulium operating on the 3F4 to 3H6 transitions are reported. Garnet materials with the general formula A3B2C3O12 are evaluated. Calculations are performed for the A side under the assumption of D2 symmetry. X-ray data available in the literature are used to evaluate the crystal-field components, A sub nm. Even-n components are employed to calculate the crystal-field splittings within the manifold. Thermal occupation factors are determined in a straightforward manner using a Boltzmann distribution for the respective manifolds. Odd-n components are applied to calculate the transition probabilities for electric field transitions. It is determined that the magnetic dipole contributions to the transition probability are comparable to the electric dipole contributions in some cases. Thresholds as a function of the density of thulium atoms are calculated.

  17. Primary branching ratios for the low-temperature reaction of state-prepared N2+ with CH4, C2H2, and C2H4.

    PubMed

    Gichuhi, Wilson K; Suits, Arthur G

    2011-06-30

    Product branching ratios (BRs) are reported for ion-molecule reactions of state-prepared nitrogen cation (N(2)(+)) with methane (CH(4)), acetylene (C(2)H(2)). and ethylene (C(2)H(4)) at low temperature using a modified ion imaging apparatus. These reactions are performed in a supersonic nozzle expansion characterized by a rotational temperature of 40 ± 5K. For the N(2)(+) + CH(4) reaction, a BR of 0.83:0.17 is obtained for the dissociative charge-transfer (CT) reaction that gives rise to the formation of CH(3)(+) and CH(2)(+) product ions, respectively. The N(2)(+) + C(2)H(2) ion-molecule reaction proceeds through a nondissociative CT process that results in the sole formation of C(2)H(2)(+) product ions. The reaction of N(2)(+) with C(2)H(4) leads to the formation of C(2)H(3)(+) and C(2)H(2)(+) product ions with a BR of 0.74:0.26, respectively. The reported BR for the N(2)(+) + C(2)H(4) reaction is supportive of a nonresonant dissociative CT mechanism similar to the one that accompanies the N(2)(+) + CH(4) reaction. No dependence of the branching ratios on N(2)(+) rotational level was observed. In addition to providing direct insight into the dynamics of the state-prepared N(2)(+) ion-molecule reactions with the target neutral hydrocarbon molecules, the reported low-temperature BRs are also important for accurate modeling of the nitrogen-dominated upper atmosphere of Saturn's moon, Titan.

  18. Measurement of Branching Ratios for Non-leptonic Cabibbo-suppressed Decays of the Charmed-Strange Baryon Ξc+

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez Jauregui, Eric

    2008-08-01

    We studied several Ξc+ decay modes, most of them with a hyperon in the final state, and determined their branching ratios. The data used in this analysis come from the fixed target experiment SELEX, a multi-stage spectrometer with high acceptance for forward interactions, that took data during 1996 and 1997 at Fermilab with 600 GeV=c (mainly Σ-, π-) and 540 GeV/c (mainly p) beams incident on copper and carbon targets. The thesis mainly details the first observation of two Cabibbo-suppressed decay modes, Ξc+ → Σ+π-π+ and Ξc+ → Σ-π+π+. The branching ratios of the decays relative to the Cabibbo-favored Ξc+ → Σ-π+π+ are measured to be: Γ(Ξc+ → Σ-π+π+)/Γ(Ξc+ → Ξ-π+π+) = 0.184 ± 0.086. Systematic studies have been performed in order to check the stability of the measurements varying all cuts used in the selection of events over a wide interval and we do not observe evidence of any trend, so the systematic error is negligible in the final results because the quadrature sum of the total error is not affected. The branching ratios for the same decay modes of the Λc+ are measured to check the methodology of the analysis. The branching ratio of the decay mode Λc+ → Σ+π-π+ is measured relative to Λc+ → pK- π+, while the one of the decay mode Λc+ → Σ-π+π+is relative to Λc+→ Σ+π-π+, as they have been reported earlier. The results for the control modes are:

  19. Dynamics of multidissociation paths of acetaldehyde photoexcited at 157 nm: Branching ratios, distributions of kinetic energy, and angular anisotropies of products

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shih-Huang

    2009-11-07

    After the photolysis of acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO) at 157.6 nm in a molecular-beam apparatus using photofragment translational spectroscopy and vacuum-ultraviolet photoionization to detect products, we observed 13 photofragments associated with six primary dissociation channels and secondary dissociation of products CH{sub 3}CO and HCO. We measured time-of-flight spectra and spatial angular anisotropies of products and evaluated the branching ratios of products. All photoproducts have nearly isotropic angular distributions with an average |{beta}| value less than 0.05. Primary dissociations to CH{sub 3}CO+H and CH{sub 3}+HCO are two major paths; most CH{sub 3}CO subsequently decomposes spontaneously to CH{sub 3}+CO and CH{sub 2}CO+H and most HCO decomposes to H+CO. The ternary dissociation to CH{sub 3}+CO+H thus accounts for approximately half of the total branching. Dissociations to CH{sub 2}CO+H{sub 2} and CH{sub 2}+CH{sub 2}O are observable, but the production of CH{sub 4}+CO is ambiguous. The productions of C{sub 2}H{sub 3}+OH and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}+H{sub 2}O indicate that isomerization from acetaldehyde to ethenol occurs before fragmentation. After photoexcitation to the n-3p state, most acetaldehyde converts into states T{sub 1} and S{sub 0} but a little isomerizes to ethenol followed by multichannel decomposition.

  20. Neuronal avalanches and learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Arcangelis, Lucilla

    2011-05-01

    Networks of living neurons represent one of the most fascinating systems of biology. If the physical and chemical mechanisms at the basis of the functioning of a single neuron are quite well understood, the collective behaviour of a system of many neurons is an extremely intriguing subject. Crucial ingredient of this complex behaviour is the plasticity property of the network, namely the capacity to adapt and evolve depending on the level of activity. This plastic ability is believed, nowadays, to be at the basis of learning and memory in real brains. Spontaneous neuronal activity has recently shown features in common to other complex systems. Experimental data have, in fact, shown that electrical information propagates in a cortex slice via an avalanche mode. These avalanches are characterized by a power law distribution for the size and duration, features found in other problems in the context of the physics of complex systems and successful models have been developed to describe their behaviour. In this contribution we discuss a statistical mechanical model for the complex activity in a neuronal network. The model implements the main physiological properties of living neurons and is able to reproduce recent experimental results. Then, we discuss the learning abilities of this neuronal network. Learning occurs via plastic adaptation of synaptic strengths by a non-uniform negative feedback mechanism. The system is able to learn all the tested rules, in particular the exclusive OR (XOR) and a random rule with three inputs. The learning dynamics exhibits universal features as function of the strength of plastic adaptation. Any rule could be learned provided that the plastic adaptation is sufficiently slow.

  1. Statistical Evaluation of Waveform Collapse Reveals Scale-Free Properties of Neuronal Avalanches

    PubMed Central

    Shaukat, Aleena; Thivierge, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Neural avalanches are a prominent form of brain activity characterized by network-wide bursts whose statistics follow a power-law distribution with a slope near 3/2. Recent work suggests that avalanches of different durations can be rescaled and thus collapsed together. This collapse mirrors work in statistical physics where it is proposed to form a signature of systems evolving in a critical state. However, no rigorous statistical test has been proposed to examine the degree to which neuronal avalanches collapse together. Here, we describe a statistical test based on functional data analysis, where raw avalanches are first smoothed with a Fourier basis, then rescaled using a time-warping function. Finally, an F ratio test combined with a bootstrap permutation is employed to determine if avalanches collapse together in a statistically reliable fashion. To illustrate this approach, we recorded avalanches from cortical cultures on multielectrode arrays as in previous work. Analyses show that avalanches of various durations can be collapsed together in a statistically robust fashion. However, a principal components analysis revealed that the offset of avalanches resulted in marked variance in the time-warping function, thus arguing for limitations to the strict fractal nature of avalanche dynamics. We compared these results with those obtained from cultures treated with an AMPA/NMDA receptor antagonist (APV/DNQX), which yield a power-law of avalanche durations with a slope greater than 3/2. When collapsed together, these avalanches showed marked misalignments both at onset and offset time-points. In sum, the proposed statistical evaluation suggests the presence of scale-free avalanche waveforms and constitutes an avenue for examining critical dynamics in neuronal systems. PMID:27092071

  2. Statistical Evaluation of Waveform Collapse Reveals Scale-Free Properties of Neuronal Avalanches.

    PubMed

    Shaukat, Aleena; Thivierge, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Neural avalanches are a prominent form of brain activity characterized by network-wide bursts whose statistics follow a power-law distribution with a slope near 3/2. Recent work suggests that avalanches of different durations can be rescaled and thus collapsed together. This collapse mirrors work in statistical physics where it is proposed to form a signature of systems evolving in a critical state. However, no rigorous statistical test has been proposed to examine the degree to which neuronal avalanches collapse together. Here, we describe a statistical test based on functional data analysis, where raw avalanches are first smoothed with a Fourier basis, then rescaled using a time-warping function. Finally, an F ratio test combined with a bootstrap permutation is employed to determine if avalanches collapse together in a statistically reliable fashion. To illustrate this approach, we recorded avalanches from cortical cultures on multielectrode arrays as in previous work. Analyses show that avalanches of various durations can be collapsed together in a statistically robust fashion. However, a principal components analysis revealed that the offset of avalanches resulted in marked variance in the time-warping function, thus arguing for limitations to the strict fractal nature of avalanche dynamics. We compared these results with those obtained from cultures treated with an AMPA/NMDA receptor antagonist (APV/DNQX), which yield a power-law of avalanche durations with a slope greater than 3/2. When collapsed together, these avalanches showed marked misalignments both at onset and offset time-points. In sum, the proposed statistical evaluation suggests the presence of scale-free avalanche waveforms and constitutes an avenue for examining critical dynamics in neuronal systems.

  3. Statistical Evaluation of Waveform Collapse Reveals Scale-Free Properties of Neuronal Avalanches.

    PubMed

    Shaukat, Aleena; Thivierge, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Neural avalanches are a prominent form of brain activity characterized by network-wide bursts whose statistics follow a power-law distribution with a slope near 3/2. Recent work suggests that avalanches of different durations can be rescaled and thus collapsed together. This collapse mirrors work in statistical physics where it is proposed to form a signature of systems evolving in a critical state. However, no rigorous statistical test has been proposed to examine the degree to which neuronal avalanches collapse together. Here, we describe a statistical test based on functional data analysis, where raw avalanches are first smoothed with a Fourier basis, then rescaled using a time-warping function. Finally, an F ratio test combined with a bootstrap permutation is employed to determine if avalanches collapse together in a statistically reliable fashion. To illustrate this approach, we recorded avalanches from cortical cultures on multielectrode arrays as in previous work. Analyses show that avalanches of various durations can be collapsed together in a statistically robust fashion. However, a principal components analysis revealed that the offset of avalanches resulted in marked variance in the time-warping function, thus arguing for limitations to the strict fractal nature of avalanche dynamics. We compared these results with those obtained from cultures treated with an AMPA/NMDA receptor antagonist (APV/DNQX), which yield a power-law of avalanche durations with a slope greater than 3/2. When collapsed together, these avalanches showed marked misalignments both at onset and offset time-points. In sum, the proposed statistical evaluation suggests the presence of scale-free avalanche waveforms and constitutes an avenue for examining critical dynamics in neuronal systems. PMID:27092071

  4. Measurement of the ratio of branching fractions B(D0 ---> K+ pi-) / B(D0 ---> K- pi+) using the CDF II Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2006-05-01

    The authors present a measurement of R{sub B}, the ratio of the branching fraction for the rare decay D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} to that for the Cabibbo-favored decay D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. Charge conjugate decays are implicitly included. A signal of 2005 {+-} 104 events for the decay D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} is obtained using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 0.35 fb{sup -1} produced in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Assuming no mixing, they find R{sub B} = [4.05 {+-} 0.21(stat) {+-} 0.11(syst)] x 10{sup -3}. This measurement is consistent with the world average, and comparable in accuracy with the best measurements from other experiments.

  5. Ab initio study of the ClO + NH2 reaction: prediction of the total rate constant and product branching ratios.

    PubMed

    Zhu, R S; Lin, M C

    2007-05-17

    The mechanism for ClO + NH2 has been investigated by ab initio molecular orbital and transition-state theory calculations. The species involved have been optimized at the B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2p) level and their energies have been refined by single-point calculations with the modified Gaussian-2 method, G2M(CC2). Ten stable isomers have been located and a detailed potential energy diagram is provided. The rate constants and branching ratios for the low-lying energy channel products including HCl + HNO, Cl + NH2O, and HOCl + 3NH (X(3)Sigma(-)) are calculated. The result shows that formation of HCl + HNO is dominant below 1000 K; over 1000 K, Cl + NH2O products become dominant. However, the formation of HOCl + 3NH (X(3)Sigma(-)) is unimportant below 1500 K. The pressure-independent individual and total rate constants can be expressed as k1(HCl + HNO) = 4.7 x 10(-8)(T(-1.08)) exp(-129/T), k(2)(Cl + NH2O) = 1.7 x 10(-9)(T(-0.62)) exp(-24/T), k3(HOCl + NH) = 4.8 x 10(-29)(T5.11) exp(-1035/T), and k(total) = 5.0 x 10(-9)(T(-0.67)) exp(-1.2/T), respectively, with units of cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), in the temperature range of 200-2500 K.

  6. Avalanche effects near nanojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandigana, Vishal V. R.; Aluru, N. R.

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we perform a computational investigation of a nanopore connected to external fluidic reservoirs of asymmetric geometries. The asymmetry between the reservoirs is achieved by changing the cross-sectional areas, and the reservoirs are designated as the micropore reservoir and macropore reservoir. When an electric field is applied, which is directed from the macropore towards the micropore reservoir, we observe local nonequilibrium chaotic current oscillations. The current oscillations originate at the micropore-nanopore interface owing to the local cascade of ions; we refer to this phenomenon as the "avalanche effects." We mathematically quantify chaos in terms of the maximum Lyapunov exponent. The maximum Lyapunov exponent exhibits a monotonic increase with the applied voltage and the macropore reservoir diameter. The temporal power spectra maps of the chaotic currents depict a low-frequency "1 /f "-type dynamics for the voltage chaos and "1 /f2 "-type dynamics for the macropore reservoir chaos. The results presented here offer avenues to manipulate ionic diodes and fluidic pumps.

  7. Avalanche effects near nanojunctions.

    PubMed

    Nandigana, Vishal V R; Aluru, N R

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we perform a computational investigation of a nanopore connected to external fluidic reservoirs of asymmetric geometries. The asymmetry between the reservoirs is achieved by changing the cross-sectional areas, and the reservoirs are designated as the micropore reservoir and macropore reservoir. When an electric field is applied, which is directed from the macropore towards the micropore reservoir, we observe local nonequilibrium chaotic current oscillations. The current oscillations originate at the micropore-nanopore interface owing to the local cascade of ions; we refer to this phenomenon as the "avalanche effects." We mathematically quantify chaos in terms of the maximum Lyapunov exponent. The maximum Lyapunov exponent exhibits a monotonic increase with the applied voltage and the macropore reservoir diameter. The temporal power spectra maps of the chaotic currents depict a low-frequency "1/f"-type dynamics for the voltage chaos and "1/f^{2}"-type dynamics for the macropore reservoir chaos. The results presented here offer avenues to manipulate ionic diodes and fluidic pumps. PMID:27575159

  8. Measuring the branching ratio of the rare decay π0→e+e-

    SciTech Connect

    Niclasen, Rune

    2006-02-01

    A precise branching ratio measurement of the rare decay π0→e+e- has been made. The measurement was made with the rare kaon decay experiment KTeV at Fermilab where the source of π0s was KL → π0π0π0 decaying in flight. A total of 794 fully reconstructed KL → 3π0 events consistent with two of the intermediate π0s decaying into ππ and one into e+e- were collected. An estimated 53.2 ± 11.0 of these events were expected to be background. Normalizing to the π0 Dalitz decay they found Br(π0 → e+e-, (me+e-/m π0)2 > 0.95) = (6.44 ± 0.25(stat) ± 0.22(syst)) x 10-8 where internal radiation, π0 → e+e-(γ), was limited by the requirement (me+e-/mπ0)2 > 0.95 which separated it from the tree level Dalitz decay, π0 → e+e-γ.

  9. EEG, temporal correlations, and avalanches.

    PubMed

    Benayoun, Marc; Kohrman, Michael; Cowan, Jack; van Drongelen, Wim

    2010-12-01

    Epileptiform activity in the EEG is frequently characterized by rhythmic, correlated patterns or synchronized bursts. Long-range temporal correlations (LRTC) are described by power law scaling of the autocorrelation function and have been observed in scalp and intracranial EEG recordings. Synchronous large-amplitude bursts (also called neuronal avalanches) have been observed in local field potentials both in vitro and in vivo. This article explores the presence of neuronal avalanches in scalp and intracranial EEG in the context of LRTC. Results indicate that both scalp and intracranial EEG show LRTC, with larger scaling exponents in scalp recordings than intracranial. A subset of analyzed recordings also show avalanche behavior, indicating that avalanches may be associated with LRTC. Artificial test signals reveal a linear relationship between the scaling exponent measured by detrended fluctuation analysis and the exponent of the avalanche size distribution. Analysis and evaluation of simulated data reveal that preprocessing of EEG (squaring the signal or applying a filter) affect the ability of detrended fluctuation analysis to reliably measure LRTC.

  10. Modeling of avalanche multiplication and noise in heterojunction avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groves, C.; David, J. P. R.; Rees, G. J.; Ong, D. S.

    2004-06-01

    A simple Monte Carlo model is used to simulate the avalanche process in a multiplication region which incorporates a heterojunction, intended to introduce localization into the ionization process and reduce excess avalanche noise. The results are compared with those of models where the ionization path length distribution is represented by an exponential decay, displaced from the origin by a ballistic dead space. While the latter results depend sensitively on the arbitrary choice of scheme used to evaluate the model parameters, they agree remarkably well with Monte Carlo, considering the simplicity of the model.

  11. Effect of avalanche build-up time on avalanche photodiode sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, H.; Kanbe, H.

    1985-03-01

    A calculation method for the receiver sensitivity of an avalanche photodiode is considered, taking into account avalanche build-up time and carrier transit time, in addition to the CR time constant. Actual receiver performance is estimated in a high data rate region of up to 10 Gbits/s for germanium avalanche photodiodes, applying the measured avalanche build-up time.

  12. Avalanche Collapse of Interdependent Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. J.; Dorogovtsev, S. N.; Goltsev, A. V.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2012-12-01

    We reveal the nature of the avalanche collapse of the giant viable component in multiplex networks under perturbations such as random damage. Specifically, we identify latent critical clusters associated with the avalanches of random damage. Divergence of their mean size signals the approach to the hybrid phase transition from one side, while there are no critical precursors on the other side. We find that this discontinuous transition occurs in scale-free multiplex networks whenever the mean degree of at least one of the interdependent networks does not diverge.

  13. Reaction Dynamics of O((3)P) + Propyne: I. Primary Products, Branching Ratios, and Role of Intersystem Crossing from Crossed Molecular Beam Experiments.

    PubMed

    Vanuzzo, Gianmarco; Balucani, Nadia; Leonori, Francesca; Stranges, Domenico; Nevrly, Vaclav; Falcinelli, Stefano; Bergeat, Astrid; Casavecchia, Piergiorgio; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2016-07-14

    We performed synergic experimental/theoretical studies on the mechanism of the O((3)P) + propyne reaction by combining crossed molecular beams experiments with mass-spectrometric detection and time-of-flight analysis at 9.2 kcal/mol collision energy (Ec) with ab initio electronic structure calculations at a high level of theory of the relevant triplet and singlet potential energy surfaces (PESs) and statistical calculations of branching ratios (BRs) taking into account intersystem crossing (ISC). In this paper (I) we report the results of the experimental investigation, while the accompanying paper (II) shows results of the theoretical investigation with comparison to experimental results. By exploiting soft electron ionization detection to suppress/mitigate the effects of the dissociative ionization of reactants, products, and background gases, product angular and velocity distributions at different charge-to-mass ratios were measured. From the laboratory data angular and translational energy distributions in the center-of-mass system were obtained for the five competing most important product channels, and product BRs were derived. The reactive interaction of O((3)P) with propyne under single collision conditions is mainly leading to the rupture of the three-carbon atom chain, with production of the radical products methylketenyl + atomic hydrogen (BR = 0.04), methyl + ketenyl (BR = 0.10), and vinyl + formyl (BR = 0.11) and the molecular products ethylidene/ethylene + carbon monoxide (BR = 0.74) and propandienal + molecular hydrogen (BR = 0.01). Because some of the products can only be formed via ISC from the entrance triplet to the low-lying singlet PES, we infer from their BRs an amount of ISC larger than 80%. This value is dramatically large when compared to the negligible ISC reported for the O((3)P) reaction with the simplest alkyne, acetylene. At the same time, it is much larger than that (∼20%) recently observed in the related reaction of the three

  14. Lumped transmission line avalanche pulser

    DOEpatents

    Booth, R.

    1995-07-18

    A lumped linear avalanche transistor pulse generator utilizes stacked transistors in parallel within a stage and couples a plurality of said stages, in series with increasing zener diode limited voltages per stage and decreasing balanced capacitance load per stage to yield a high voltage, high and constant current, very short pulse. 8 figs.

  15. Lumped transmission line avalanche pulser

    DOEpatents

    Booth, Rex

    1995-01-01

    A lumped linear avalanche transistor pulse generator utilizes stacked transistors in parallel within a stage and couples a plurality of said stages, in series with increasing zener diode limited voltages per stage and decreasing balanced capacitance load per stage to yield a high voltage, high and constant current, very short pulse.

  16. Experimental Avalanches in a Rotating Drum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubard, Aline; O'Hern, Corey; Shattuck, Mark

    We address the question of universality in granular avalanches and the system size effects on it. We set up an experiment made from a quasi-two-dimensional rotating drum half-filled with a monolayer of stainless-steel spheres. We measure the size of the avalanches created by the increased gravitational stress on the pile as we quasi-statically rotate the drum. We find two kinds of avalanches determined by the drum size. The size and duration distributions of the avalanches that do not span the whole system follow a power law and the avalanche shapes are self-similar and nearly parabolic. The distributions of the avalanches that span the whole system are limited by the maximal amount of potential energy stored in the system at the moment of the avalanche. NSF CMMI-1462439, CMMI-1463455.

  17. Shoot branching.

    PubMed

    Ward, Sally P; Leyser, Ottoline

    2004-02-01

    The mature form of a plant shoot system is an expression of several genetically controlled traits, many of which are also environmentally regulated. A major component of this architectural variation is the degree of shoot branching. Recent results indicate conserved mechanisms for shoot branch development across the monocots and eudicots. The existence of a novel long-range branch-inhibiting signal has been inferred from studies of branching mutants in pea and Arabidopsis. PMID:14732444

  18. Two-threshold model for scaling laws of noninteracting snow avalanches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faillettaz, J.; Louchet, F.; Grasso, J.-R.

    2004-01-01

    A two-threshold model was proposed for scaling laws of noninteracting snow avalanches. It was found that the sizes of the largest avalanches just preceding the lattice system were power-law distributed. The proposed model reproduced the range of power-law exponents observe for land, rock or snow avalanches, by tuning the maximum value of the ratio of the two failure thresholds. A two-threshold 2D cellular automation was introduced to study the scaling for gravity-driven systems.

  19. Measurement of the semileptonic branching ratio of B_{s};{0} to an orbitally excited D_{s};{**} state: Br(B_{s};{0}-->D_{s1};{-}(2536)mu;{+}nuX).

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, P; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, S; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chan, K; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grüendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, J; Guo, F; Gutierrez, P; Gutierrez, G; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J R; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Korablev, V M; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Leveque, J; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, L; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, J; Meyer, A; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rieger, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, J; Snow, G R; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strauss, E; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, S; Uvarov, L; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weber, G; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2009-02-01

    In a data sample of approximately 1.3 fb;{-1} collected with the D0 detector between 2002 and 2006, the orbitally excited charm state D_{s1};{+/-}(2536) has been observed with a measured mass of 2535.7+/-0.6(stat)+/-0.5(syst) MeV/c;{2} via the decay mode B_{s};{0}-->D_{s1};{-}(2536)mu;{+}nu_{mu}X. A first measurement is made of the branching ratio product Br(b[over ]-->D_{s1};{-}(2536)mu;{+}nu_{mu}X)xBr(D_{s1};{-}-->D;{*-}K_{S};{0}). Assuming that D_{s1};{-}(2536) production in semileptonic decay is entirely from B_{s};{0}, an extraction of the semileptonic branching ratio Br(B_{s};{0}-->D_{s1};{-}(2536)mu;{+}nu_{mu}X) is made. PMID:19257502

  20. Neuronal avalanches in the resting MEG of the human brain.

    PubMed

    Shriki, Oren; Alstott, Jeff; Carver, Frederick; Holroyd, Tom; Henson, Richard N A; Smith, Marie L; Coppola, Richard; Bullmore, Edward; Plenz, Dietmar

    2013-04-17

    What constitutes normal cortical dynamics in healthy human subjects is a major question in systems neuroscience. Numerous in vitro and in vivo animal studies have shown that ongoing or resting cortical dynamics are characterized by cascades of activity across many spatial scales, termed neuronal avalanches. In experiment and theory, avalanche dynamics are identified by two measures: (1) a power law in the size distribution of activity cascades with an exponent of -3/2 and (2) a branching parameter of the critical value of 1, reflecting balanced propagation of activity at the border of premature termination and potential blowup. Here we analyzed resting-state brain activity recorded using noninvasive magnetoencephalography (MEG) from 124 healthy human subjects and two different MEG facilities using different sensor technologies. We identified large deflections at single MEG sensors and combined them into spatiotemporal cascades on the sensor array using multiple timescales. Cascade size distributions obeyed power laws. For the timescale at which the branching parameter was close to 1, the power law exponent was -3/2. This relationship was robust to scaling and coarse graining of the sensor array. It was absent in phase-shuffled controls with the same power spectrum or empty scanner data. Our results demonstrate that normal cortical activity in healthy human subjects at rest organizes as neuronal avalanches and is well described by a critical branching process. Theory and experiment have shown that such critical, scale-free dynamics optimize information processing. Therefore, our findings imply that the human brain attains an optimal dynamical regime for information processing.

  1. Quantitative Scaling of Magnetic Avalanches.

    PubMed

    Durin, G; Bohn, F; Corrêa, M A; Sommer, R L; Le Doussal, P; Wiese, K J

    2016-08-19

    We provide the first quantitative comparison between Barkhausen noise experiments and recent predictions from the theory of avalanches for pinned interfaces, both in and beyond mean field. We study different classes of soft magnetic materials, including polycrystals and amorphous samples-which are characterized by long-range and short-range elasticity, respectively-both for thick and thin samples, i.e., with and without eddy currents. The temporal avalanche shape at fixed size as well as observables related to the joint distribution of sizes and durations are analyzed in detail. Both long-range and short-range samples with no eddy currents are fitted extremely well by the theoretical predictions. In particular, the short-range samples provide the first reliable test of the theory beyond mean field. The thick samples show systematic deviations from the scaling theory, providing unambiguous signatures for the presence of eddy currents.

  2. Quantitative Scaling of Magnetic Avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durin, G.; Bohn, F.; Corrêa, M. A.; Sommer, R. L.; Le Doussal, P.; Wiese, K. J.

    2016-08-01

    We provide the first quantitative comparison between Barkhausen noise experiments and recent predictions from the theory of avalanches for pinned interfaces, both in and beyond mean field. We study different classes of soft magnetic materials, including polycrystals and amorphous samples—which are characterized by long-range and short-range elasticity, respectively—both for thick and thin samples, i.e., with and without eddy currents. The temporal avalanche shape at fixed size as well as observables related to the joint distribution of sizes and durations are analyzed in detail. Both long-range and short-range samples with no eddy currents are fitted extremely well by the theoretical predictions. In particular, the short-range samples provide the first reliable test of the theory beyond mean field. The thick samples show systematic deviations from the scaling theory, providing unambiguous signatures for the presence of eddy currents.

  3. Quantitative Scaling of Magnetic Avalanches.

    PubMed

    Durin, G; Bohn, F; Corrêa, M A; Sommer, R L; Le Doussal, P; Wiese, K J

    2016-08-19

    We provide the first quantitative comparison between Barkhausen noise experiments and recent predictions from the theory of avalanches for pinned interfaces, both in and beyond mean field. We study different classes of soft magnetic materials, including polycrystals and amorphous samples-which are characterized by long-range and short-range elasticity, respectively-both for thick and thin samples, i.e., with and without eddy currents. The temporal avalanche shape at fixed size as well as observables related to the joint distribution of sizes and durations are analyzed in detail. Both long-range and short-range samples with no eddy currents are fitted extremely well by the theoretical predictions. In particular, the short-range samples provide the first reliable test of the theory beyond mean field. The thick samples show systematic deviations from the scaling theory, providing unambiguous signatures for the presence of eddy currents. PMID:27588876

  4. Circuit model for characterizing the nearly linear behavior of avalanche diodes in amplifier circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penfield, P., Jr.; Peterson, D. F.; Steinbrecher, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    A nonlinear circuit model for avalanche diodes is proposed. The model was derived by assuming that the bias dependence of the elements in a known small-signal equivalent-circuit model for existing diodes arises in a manner consistent with the theory of an idealized Read-type device. The model contains a nonlinear R-L branch, a controlled source, and a linear depletion capacitance. The model is used in the nearly linear sense to predict intermodulation distortion and gain compression in avalanche diode amplifiers. Computed results for amplifiers with existing diodes are shown to be in good agreement with experiment.

  5. Highly enhanced avalanche probability using sinusoidally-gated silicon avalanche photodiode

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Shingo; Namekata, Naoto Inoue, Shuichiro; Tsujino, Kenji

    2014-01-27

    We report on visible light single photon detection using a sinusoidally-gated silicon avalanche photodiode. Detection efficiency of 70.6% was achieved at a wavelength of 520 nm when an electrically cooled silicon avalanche photodiode with a quantum efficiency of 72.4% was used, which implies that a photo-excited single charge carrier in a silicon avalanche photodiode can trigger a detectable avalanche (charge) signal with a probability of 97.6%.

  6. Avalanche ecology and large magnitude avalanche events: Glacier National Park, Montana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fagre, Daniel B.; Peitzsch, Erich H.

    2010-01-01

    Large magnitude snow avalanches play an important role ecologically in terms of wildlife habitat, vegetation diversity, and sediment transport within a watershed. Ecological effects from these infrequent avalanches can last for decades. Understanding the frequency of such large magnitude avalanches is also critical to avalanche forecasting for the Going-to-the-Sun Road (GTSR). In January 2009, a large magnitude avalanche cycle occurred in and around Glacier National Park, Montana. The study site is the Little Granite avalanche path located along the GTSR. The study is designed to quantify change in vegetative cover immediately after a large magnitude event and document ecological response over a multi-year period. GPS field mapping was completed to determine the redefined perimeter of the avalanche path. Vegetation was inventoried using modified U.S. Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis plots, cross sections were taken from over 100 dead trees throughout the avalanche path, and an avalanche chronology was developed. Initial results indicate that the perimeter of this path was expanded by 30%. The avalanche travelled approximately 1200 vertical meters and 3 linear kilometers. Stands of large conifers as old as 150 years were decimated by the avalanche, causing a shift in dominant vegetation types in many parts of the avalanche path. Woody debris is a major ground cover up to 3 m in depth on lower portions of the avalanche path and will likely affect tree regrowth. Monitoring and measuring the post-avalanche vegetation recovery of this particular avalanche path provides a unique dataset for determining the ecological role of avalanches in mountain landscapes.

  7. GIS-aided avalanche warning in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaedicke, Christian; Syre, Egil; Sverdrup-Thygeson, Kjetil

    2014-05-01

    Avalanche warning for large areas requires the processing of an extensive amount of data. Information relating to the three basic requirements for avalanche warning - knowledge of terrain, the snow conditions, and the weather - needs to be available for the forecaster. The information is highly variable in time. The form and visualization of the data is often decisive for the use by the avalanche forecasters and therefore also for the quality of the produced forecasts. Avalanche warnings can be issued at different scales from national to regional and down to object specific. Often the same warning service is working at different scales and for different clients requiring a flexible and scalable approach. The workflow for producing avalanche forecasts must be extremely efficient - all the way from acquiring observation data, evaluating the situation, down to publishing the new forecast. In this study it has been an aim to include the entire workflow in a single web application. A Geographic Information Systems (GIS) solution was chosen to include all data needed by the forecaster for the avalanche danger evaluation. This interactive system of maps features background information for the entire country, such as topographic maps, slope steepness, aspect, hill shades and satellite images. In each avalanche warning area, all active avalanche paths are plotted including information on wind exposure. Each avalanche path is linked to a webpage with more details, such as fall height, release area elevation and pictures. The avalanche path webpage also includes information on the object at risk e.g. buildings, roads, or other objects. Thus, the forecaster can easily get an overview on the overall situation and focus on single avalanche paths to generate detailed avalanche warnings for the client.

  8. Snowfall and avalanche synchronization: beyond observational statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouzy, Benoît; Forclaz, Romain; Sovilla, Betty; Corripio, Javier; Perona, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    We present a methodology for quantifying the synchronization between snowfall and avalanches in relation to slope and terrain properties at the detachment zone. Focusing on a particular field situation (SLF study site, Vallée de la Sionne, Valais, Switzerland), we present a dataset consisting of 549 avalanche events and use a stochastic framework (Perona et al., Proceedings of the Royal Society A, 2012) for capturing the avalanche statistics with a minimal number of ingredients. Over the observation period (7 years), meteorological data was collected and pictures of the slope were taken every 30 minutes. For the avalanche events, slope, aspect, coordinates and altitude of the detachment zone are available from georeferenced images, and the timing of the events can be obtained from selecting the images before and after avalanche events. All model parameters can directly be computed from meteorological data (snow depth evolution), except for one parameter: the state-dependent avalanche release rate, which aggregates the influence of slope and terrain properties. From the timing distribution of the precipitation events and of the avalanche events, we calibrate the model and fix the value of the missing parameter by maximizing the likelihood of the field observations, conditional to the value of the model parameter. We carefully discuss confidence intervals for our parameter estimation. The calibrated model allows us to obtain statistical properties of the avalanches in our study site, beyond observational statistics. We compute the synchronization between snowfall and avalanches for low and high slopes, which in turn allows us to derive the return period of avalanche events (dependent and independent on the release depth). We obtain the critical event magnitude above which the return period of avalanche events with release depth h* is shorter than the return period of snowfall with equal deposited snow depth h*. Finally, using the concept of information entropy, we

  9. Avalanche dynamics of elastic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Le Doussal, Pierre; Wiese, Kay Jörg

    2013-08-01

    Slowly driven elastic interfaces, such as domain walls in dirty magnets, contact lines wetting a nonhomogeneous substrate, or cracks in brittle disordered material proceed via intermittent motion, called avalanches. Here we develop a field-theoretic treatment to calculate, from first principles, the space-time statistics of instantaneous velocities within an avalanche. For elastic interfaces at (or above) their (internal) upper critical dimension d≥d(uc) (d(uc)=2,4 respectively for long-ranged and short-ranged elasticity) we show that the field theory for the center of mass reduces to the motion of a point particle in a random-force landscape, which is itself a random walk [Alessandro, Beatrice, Bertotti, and Montorsi (ABBM) model]. Furthermore, the full spatial dependence of the velocity correlations is described by the Brownian-force model (BFM) where each point of the interface sees an independent Brownian-force landscape. Both ABBM and BFM can be solved exactly in any dimension d (for monotonous driving) by summing tree graphs, equivalent to solving a (nonlinear) instanton equation. We focus on the limit of slow uniform driving. This tree approximation is the mean-field theory (MFT) for realistic interfaces in short-ranged disorder, up to the renormalization of two parameters at d=d(uc). We calculate a number of observables of direct experimental interest: Both for the center of mass, and for a given Fourier mode q, we obtain various correlations and probability distribution functions (PDF's) of the velocity inside an avalanche, as well as the avalanche shape and its fluctuations (second shape). Within MFT we find that velocity correlations at nonzero q are asymmetric under time reversal. Next we calculate, beyond MFT, i.e., including loop corrections, the one-time PDF of the center-of-mass velocity u[over ·] for dimension d

  10. A fluid flow in the pipe junction with 6,25 cross-section area ratio. the influence of the adjacent branch angle on the pipe junction characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štigler, J.; Šperka, O.; Klas, R.

    2012-11-01

    This article deals with a fluid flow in the pipe junction. The comparison of the pipe junction characteristics obtained from the experiment with the pipe junction characteristics obtained from the numerical modelling using the CFD software will be discussed in this article. All measurements are done for the case of 50 mm diameter of the straight pipe and 20 mm diameter of the adjacent branch with five different angles. There are six possible flow configurations for this pipe junction. Three of them are cases of the flow combination and three of them are cases of the flow division. Only results for the flow combination are presented in this paper.

  11. Stabilization of avalanche processes on dynamical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savitskaya, N. E.

    2016-02-01

    The stabilization of avalanches on dynamical networks has been studied. Dynamical networks are networks where the structure of links varies in time owing to the presence of the individual "activity" of each site, which determines the probability of establishing links with other sites per unit time. An interesting case where the times of existence of links in a network are equal to the avalanche development times has been examined. A new mathematical model of a system with the avalanche dynamics has been constructed including changes in the network on which avalanches are developed. A square lattice with a variable structure of links has been considered as a dynamical network within this model. Avalanche processes on it have been simulated using the modified Abelian sandpile model and fixed-energy sandpile model. It has been shown that avalanche processes on the dynamical lattice under study are more stable than a static lattice with respect to the appearance of catastrophic events. In particular, this is manifested in a decrease in the maximum size of an avalanche in the Abelian sandpile model on the dynamical lattice as compared to that on the static lattice. For the fixed-energy sandpile model, it has been shown that, in contrast to the static lattice, where an avalanche process becomes infinite in time, the existence of avalanches finite in time is always possible.

  12. Forest damage and snow avalanche flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistl, T.; Bebi, P.; Christen, M.; Margreth, S.; Diefenbach, L.; Bartelt, P.

    2015-01-01

    Snow avalanches break, uproot and overturn trees causing damage to forests. The extent of forest damage provides useful information on avalanche frequency and intensity. However, impact forces depend on avalanche flow regime. In this paper, we define avalanche loading cases representing four different avalanche flow regimes: powder, intermittent, dry and wet. In the powder regime, the blast of the cloud can produce large bending moments in the tree stem because of the impact area extending over the entire tree crown. We demonstrate that intermittent granular loadings are equivalent to low-density uniform dry snow loadings under the assumption of homogeneous particle distributions. In the wet snow case, avalanche pressure is calculated using a quasi-static model accounting for the motion of plug-like wet snow flows. Wet snow pressure depends both on avalanche volume and terrain features upstream of the tree. Using a numerical model that simulates both powder and wet snow avalanches, we study documented events with forest damage. We find (1) powder clouds with velocities over 20 m s-1 can break tree stems, (2) the intermittent regime seldom controls tree breakage and (3) quasi-static pressures of wet snow avalanches can be much higher than pressures calculated using dynamic pressure formulas.

  13. Shocks generate crossover behavior in lattice avalanches.

    PubMed

    Burridge, James

    2013-11-22

    A spatial avalanche model is introduced, in which avalanches increase stability in the regions where they occur. Instability is driven globally by a driving process that contains shocks. The system is typically subcritical, but the shocks occasionally lift it into a near- or supercritical state from which it rapidly retreats due to large avalanches. These shocks leave behind a signature-a distinct power-law crossover in the avalanche size distribution. The model is inspired by landslide field data, but the principles may be applied to any system that experiences stabilizing failures, possesses a critical point, and is subject to an ongoing process of destabilization that includes occasional dramatic destabilizing events.

  14. Time Directed Avalanches in Invasion Models

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, S. Department of Physics, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 )

    1995-01-23

    We define forward and backward time-directed avalanches for a broad class of self-organized critical models including invasion percolation, interface depinning, and a simple model of evolution. Although the geometrical properties of the avalanches do not change under time reversal, their stationary state statistical distribution does. The overall distribution of forward avalanches [ital P]([ital s])[similar to][ital s][sup [minus]2] is superuniversal in this class of models. The power-law exponent [pi] for the distribution of distances between subsequent active sites is derived from the properties of backward avalanches.

  15. Measurement of branching ratio and B0s lifetime in the decay B0s → J/ψ f0(980) at CDF

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-09-30

    We present a study of Bs0 decays to the CP-odd final state J/ψ f0(980) with J/ψ → µ+µ- and f0(980) → π+π-. Using pp̄ collision data with an integrated luminosity of 3.8 fb-1 collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron we measure a Bs0 lifetime of τ(B0s → J/ψ f0(980)) = 1.70-0.11+0.12(stat) ± 0.03(syst) ps. This is the first measurement of the Bs0} lifetime in a decay to a CP eigenstate and corresponds in the standard model to the lifetime of the heavy Bs0 eigenstate. We also measure the product of branching fractions of B0s → J/ψ f0(980)more » and f0(980) → π+π- relative to the product of branching fractions of B0s → J/ψφ and φ→K+K- to be Rf0/ψ = 0.257 ± 0.020(stat) ± 0.014(syst), which is the most precise determination of this quantity to date.« less

  16. Two-threshold model for scaling laws of noninteracting snow avalanches.

    PubMed

    Faillettaz, Jerome; Louchet, Francois; Grasso, Jean-Robert

    2004-11-12

    The sizes of snow slab failure that trigger snow avalanches are power-law distributed. Such a power-law probability distribution function has also been proposed to characterize different landslide types. In order to understand this scaling for gravity-driven systems, we introduce a two-threshold 2D cellular automaton, in which failure occurs irreversibly. Taking snow slab avalanches as a model system, we find that the sizes of the largest avalanches just preceding the lattice system breakdown are power-law distributed. By tuning the maximum value of the ratio of the two failure thresholds our model reproduces the range of power-law exponents observed for land, rock, or snow avalanches. We suggest this control parameter represents the material cohesion anisotropy. PMID:15600971

  17. Remote detection of artificially triggered avalanches below a fixed avalanche control installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Herwijnen, Alec; Simioni, Stephan; Schweizer, Juerg

    2014-05-01

    Avalanche control by explosives is widely used as a temporary preventive measure to reduce avalanche hazard. The goal is to artificially trigger smaller less destructive avalanches, by detonating charges either above or on the snow surface. Hand charges are most often used, whereby the explosives are deployed by manually hand tossing or lowering onto the snow slope. Given the inherent dangers and limitations of this type of avalanche control, fixed avalanche control installations are increasingly used. These consist of strategically placed remote controlled installations that generate an explosion above the snow pack in an avalanche starting zone. While fixed installations can be used at any time and minimize the risk to avalanche control personnel, visual confirmation is still required to verify if an avalanche released. In order to remotely detect artificially triggered avalanches, we therefore developed a low-cost seismic monitoring system. We deployed the monitoring system in a ski area above the town of Davos , in the eastern Swiss Alps, below a Gazex installation, a remote controlled installation that generates an air blast by detonating a fuel-air explosive above the snow pack. The monitoring system consists of three vertical component geophones inserted in the ground at approximately 14, 27 and 46 meters from the Gazex installation. Our results show that, despite the relatively low precision of the monitoring equipment, both the detonation and the resulting avalanches can clearly be identified in the seismic data. Specifically, detonations are characterized by short, high amplitude broadband signals, while avalanches generate much longer, low frequency signals. Furthermore, information on the size of the artificially triggered avalanches is also obtained as it directly relates to the duration of the generated seismic signal. The overall goal is to assess the effectiveness of the fixed avalanche control installation with regards to yield (i.e. number of

  18. Avalanches and Dimensional Reduction Breakdown in the Critical Behavior of Disordered Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarjus, Gilles; Baczyk, Maxime; Tissier, Matthieu

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the connection between a formal property of the critical behavior of several disordered systems, known as “dimensional reduction,” and the presence in these systems at zero temperature of collective events known as “avalanches.” Avalanches generically produce nonanalyticities in the functional dependence of the cumulants of the renormalized disorder. We show that this leads to a breakdown of the dimensional reduction predictions if and only if the fractal dimension characterizing the scaling properties of the avalanches is exactly equal to the difference between the dimension of space and the scaling dimension of the primary field. This is proven by combining scaling theory and the functional renormalization group. We therefore clarify the puzzle of why dimensional reduction remains valid in random field systems above a nontrivial dimension (but fails below), always applies to the statistics of branched polymer, and is always wrong in elastic models of interfaces in a random environment.

  19. Avalanches and dimensional reduction breakdown in the critical behavior of disordered systems.

    PubMed

    Tarjus, Gilles; Baczyk, Maxime; Tissier, Matthieu

    2013-03-29

    We investigate the connection between a formal property of the critical behavior of several disordered systems, known as "dimensional reduction," and the presence in these systems at zero temperature of collective events known as "avalanches." Avalanches generically produce nonanalyticities in the functional dependence of the cumulants of the renormalized disorder. We show that this leads to a breakdown of the dimensional reduction predictions if and only if the fractal dimension characterizing the scaling properties of the avalanches is exactly equal to the difference between the dimension of space and the scaling dimension of the primary field. This is proven by combining scaling theory and the functional renormalization group. We therefore clarify the puzzle of why dimensional reduction remains valid in random field systems above a nontrivial dimension (but fails below), always applies to the statistics of branched polymer, and is always wrong in elastic models of interfaces in a random environment.

  20. On the temporal organization of neuronal avalanches.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Fabrizio; Herrmann, Hans J; Plenz, Dietmar; De Arcangelis, Lucilla

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous activity of cortex in vitro and in vivo has been shown to organize as neuronal avalanches. Avalanches are cascades of neuronal activity that exhibit a power law in their size and duration distribution, typical features of balanced systems in a critical state. Recently it has been shown that the distribution of quiet times between consecutive avalanches in rat cortex slice cultures displays a non-monotonic behavior with a power law decay at short time scales. This behavior has been attributed to the slow alternation between up and down-states. Here we further characterize the avalanche process and investigate how the functional behavior of the quiet time distribution depends on the fine structure of avalanche sequences. By systematically removing smaller avalanches from the experimental time series we show that size and quiet times are correlated and highlight that avalanche occurrence exhibits the characteristic periodicity of θ and β/γ oscillations, which jointly emerge in most of the analyzed samples. Furthermore, our analysis indicates that smaller avalanches tend to be associated with faster β/γ oscillations, whereas larger ones are associated with slower θ and 1-2 Hz oscillations. In particular, large avalanches corresponding to θ cycles trigger cascades of smaller ones, which occur at β/γ frequency. This temporal structure follows closely the one of nested θ - β/γ oscillations. Finally we demonstrate that, because of the multiple time scales characterizing avalanche dynamics, the distributions of quiet times between avalanches larger than a certain size do not collapse onto a unique function when rescaled by the average occurrence rate. However, when considered separately in the up-state and in the down-state, these distributions are solely controlled by the respective average rate and two different unique function can be identified.

  1. On the temporal organization of neuronal avalanches

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Fabrizio; Herrmann, Hans J.; Plenz, Dietmar; De Arcangelis, Lucilla

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous activity of cortex in vitro and in vivo has been shown to organize as neuronal avalanches. Avalanches are cascades of neuronal activity that exhibit a power law in their size and duration distribution, typical features of balanced systems in a critical state. Recently it has been shown that the distribution of quiet times between consecutive avalanches in rat cortex slice cultures displays a non-monotonic behavior with a power law decay at short time scales. This behavior has been attributed to the slow alternation between up and down-states. Here we further characterize the avalanche process and investigate how the functional behavior of the quiet time distribution depends on the fine structure of avalanche sequences. By systematically removing smaller avalanches from the experimental time series we show that size and quiet times are correlated and highlight that avalanche occurrence exhibits the characteristic periodicity of θ and β/γ oscillations, which jointly emerge in most of the analyzed samples. Furthermore, our analysis indicates that smaller avalanches tend to be associated with faster β/γ oscillations, whereas larger ones are associated with slower θ and 1–2 Hz oscillations. In particular, large avalanches corresponding to θ cycles trigger cascades of smaller ones, which occur at β/γ frequency. This temporal structure follows closely the one of nested θ − β/γ oscillations. Finally we demonstrate that, because of the multiple time scales characterizing avalanche dynamics, the distributions of quiet times between avalanches larger than a certain size do not collapse onto a unique function when rescaled by the average occurrence rate. However, when considered separately in the up-state and in the down-state, these distributions are solely controlled by the respective average rate and two different unique function can be identified. PMID:25389393

  2. Measurement of the relative branching ratio of B-s(0) -> J/psi f(0)(980) to B-s(0) -> J/psi phi

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

    2012-01-20

    We present a measurement of the relative branching fraction, R{sub f{sub 0}/{phi}}, of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}f{sub 0}(980), with f{sub 0}(980) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, to the process B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}, with {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}. The J/{psi}f{sub 0}(980) final state corresponds to a CP-odd eigenstate of B{sub s}{sup 0} that could be of interest in future studies of CP violation. Using 8 fb{sup -1} of data recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we find R{sub f{sub 0}/{phi}} = 0.275 {+-} 0.041(stat) {+-} 0.061(syst).

  3. Field management of avalanche victims.

    PubMed

    Brugger, H; Durrer, B; Adler-Kastner, L; Falk, M; Tschirky, F

    2001-10-01

    The median annual mortality from snow avalanches registered in Europe and North America 1981-1998 was 146 (range 82-226); trend stable in Alpine countries (r=-0.29; P=0.24), increasing in North America (r=0.68; P=0.002). Swiss data over the same period document 1886 avalanche victims, with an overall mortality rate of 52.4% in completely-buried, versus 4.2% in partially-, or non-buried, persons. Survival probability in completely-buried victims in open areas (n=638) plummets from 91% 18 min after burial to 34% at 35 min, then remains fairly constant until a second drop after 90 min. Likewise, survival probability for completely-buried victims in buildings or on roads (n=97) decreases rapidly following burial initially, but as from 35 min it is significantly higher than that for victims in open areas, with a maximum difference in respective survival probability (31% versus 7%) from 130 to 190 min (P<0.001). Standardised guidelines are introduced for the field management of avalanche victims. Strategy by rescuers confronted with the triad hypoxia, hypercapnia and hypothermia is primarily governed by the length of snow burial and victim's core temperature, in the absence of obviously fatal injuries. With a burial time < or =35 min survival depends on preventing asphyxia by rapid extrication and immediate airway management; cardiopulmonary resuscitation for unconscious victims without spontaneous respiration. With a burial time >35 min combating hypothermia becomes of paramount importance. Thus, gentle extrication, ECG and core temperature monitoring and body insulation are mandatory; unresponsive victims should be intubated and pulseless victims with core temperature <32 degrees C (89.6 degrees F) (prerequisites being an air pocket and free airways) transported with continuous cardiopulmonary resuscitation to a specialist hospital for extracorporeal re-warming. PMID:11719168

  4. Gaussian Velocity Distributions in Avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shattuck, Mark

    2004-03-01

    Imagine a world where gravity is so strong that if an ice cube is tilted the shear forces melt the surface and water avalanches down. Further imagine that the ambient temperature is so low that the water re-freezes almost immediately. This is the world of granular flows. As a granular solid is tilted the surface undergoes a sublimation phase transition and a granular gas avalanches down the surface, but the inelastic collisions rapidly remove energy from the flow lowering the granular temperature (kinetic energy per particle) until the gas solidifies again. It is under these extreme conditions that we attempt to uncover continuum granular flow properties. Typical continuum theories like Navier-Stokes equation for fluids follow the space-time evolution of the first few moments of the velocity distribution. We study continuously avalanching flow in a rotating two-dimensional granular drum using high-speed video imaging and extract the position and velocities of the particles. We find a universal near Gaussian velocity distribution throughout the flowing regions, which are characterized by a liquid-like radial distribution function. In the remaining regions, in which the radial distribution function develops sharp crystalline peaks, the velocity distribution has a Gaussian peak but is much broader in the tails. In a companion experiment on a vibrated two-dimensional granular fluid under constant pressure, we find a clear gas-solid phase transition in which both the temperature and density change discontinuously. This suggests that a low temperature crystal and a high temperature gas can coexist in steady state. This coexistence could result in a narrower, cooler, Gaussian peak and a broader, warmer, Gaussian tail like the non-Gaussian behavior seen in the crystalline portions of the rotating drum.

  5. Rate constants and branching ratios for the dissociative recombination of C{sub 3}D{sub 7}{sup +} and C{sub 4}D{sub 9}{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, M.; Ehlerding, A.; Geppert, W.D.; Hellberg, F.; Kalhori, S.; Thomas, R.D.; Djuric, N.; Oesterdahl, F.; Angelova, G.; Semaniak, J.; Novotny, O.; Arnold, S.T.; Viggiano, A.A.

    2005-04-15

    Product branching ratios and thermal rate coefficients for the dissociative recombination of C{sub 3}D{sub 7}{sup +} and C{sub 4}D{sub 9}{sup +} have been measured in the ion storage ring CRYRING. The results for C{sub 3}D{sub 7}{sup +} are believed to be slightly more accurate than those obtained earlier for C{sub 3}H{sub 7}{sup +}. Only the C-C bond breaking channels could be measured for C{sub 4}D{sub 9}{sup +} and were found to be in excellent agreement with earlier data.

  6. Improved Measurement of the πeν Branching Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Britton, D. I.; Bryman, D. A.; vom Bruch, D.; Chen, S.; Comfort, J.; Ding, M.; Doria, L.; Cuen-Rochin, S.; Gumplinger, P.; Hussein, A.; Igarashi, Y.; Ito, S.; Kettell, S. H.; Kurchaninov, L.; Littenberg, L. S.; Malbrunot, C.; Mischke, R. E.; Numao, T.; Protopopescu, D.; Sher, A.; Sullivan, T.; Vavilov, D.; Yamada, K.

    2015-08-01

    A new measurement of the branching ratio Re/μ=Γ(π+ → e+ν + π+ → e+νγ)/Γ(π+ → μ+ν + π+→μ+νγ) resulted in Rexpe/μ=[1.2344±0.0023(stat)±0.0019(syst)] x 10-4. This is in agreement with the standard model prediction and improves the test of electron-muon universality to the level of 0.1%.

  7. Macroscopic control parameter for avalanche models for bursty transport

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, S. C.; Rowlands, G.; Watkins, N. W.

    2009-01-15

    Similarity analysis is used to identify the control parameter R{sub A} for the subset of avalanching systems that can exhibit self-organized criticality (SOC). This parameter expresses the ratio of driving to dissipation. The transition to SOC, when the number of excited degrees of freedom is maximal, is found to occur when R{sub A}{yields}0. This is in the opposite sense to (Kolmogorov) turbulence, thus identifying a deep distinction between turbulence and SOC and suggesting an observable property that could distinguish them. A corollary of this similarity analysis is that SOC phenomenology, that is, power law scaling of avalanches, can persist for finite R{sub A} with the same R{sub A}{yields}0 exponent if the system supports a sufficiently large range of lengthscales, necessary for SOC to be a candidate for physical (R{sub A} finite) systems.

  8. Forest damage and snow avalanche flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistl, T.; Bebi, P.; Christen, M.; Margreth, S.; Diefenbach, L.; Bartelt, P.

    2015-06-01

    Snow avalanches break, uproot and overturn trees causing damage to forests. The extent of forest damage provides useful information on avalanche frequency and intensity. However, impact forces depend on avalanche flow regime. In this paper, we define avalanche loading cases representing four different avalanche flow regimes: powder, intermittent, dry and wet. Using a numerical model that simulates both powder and wet snow avalanches, we study documented events with forest damage. First we show that in the powder regime, although the applied impact pressures can be small, large bending moments in the tree stem can be produced due to the torque action of the blast. The impact area of the blast extends over the entire tree crown. We find that, powder clouds with velocities over 20 m s-1 can break tree stems. Second we demonstrate that intermittent granular loadings are equivalent to low-density uniform dry snow loadings under the assumption of homogeneous particle distributions. The intermittent regime seldom controls tree breakage. Third we calculate quasi-static pressures of wet snow avalanches and show that they can be much higher than pressures calculated using dynamic pressure formulas. Wet snow pressure depends both on avalanche volume and terrain features upstream of the tree.

  9. Avalanche!--Teachable Moments in Outdoor Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galloway, Shayne

    2005-01-01

    Rarely do outdoor educators get the opportunity to safely incorporate an avalanche while the topic of the day is actually avalanche awareness and forecasting. Many similar possibilities exist in the expeditionary context, but even brief excursions may result in incredible learning experiences. These "teachable moments" occur regularly in the…

  10. Avalanche in Adhesion at Metal Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjea, Amitava; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Simulations have shown that as two metal surfaces approach each other, the surface layers can avalanche together when the rigid interfacial spacing falls below a critical distance. This is accompanied by a discontinuous decrease in the adhesive energy. Here we present an examination of this phenomenon for the body centered cubic (BCC) metals Fe and W using the Equivalent Crystal Theory. In order to identify the circumstances under which avalanche might be inhibited, the effect of loss of registry between the two surfaces is investigated in detail. The avalanche is inhibited when the two surfaces are sufficiently far out of registry and when only a few layers near the surface are allowed to relax. As the relaxing slabs get thicker a sharp avalanche reappears. However, as the loss of registry increases the energy released in the avalanche decreases.

  11. A simple Monte Carlo model for prediction of avalanche multiplication process in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Ng, J. S.; Tan, C. H.

    2012-08-01

    A Simple Monte Carlo model has been developed to model the avalanche characteristics of Silicon. Good agreement with experimental results from Silicon p+-i-n+ diodes with i-regions ranging from 0.082 to 0.26 μm, an n+-i-p+ diode with an i-region of 0.82 μm and a p+n diode was obtained. Therefore our model can be used to model the avalanche process in diodes with varying electric field profiles. We also studied the competing effects of the ratio of electron to hole ionization coefficients and the dead space on excess noise factor, by varying these parameters in our simulations of ideal p+-i-n+ diodes with avalanche regions width of 0.05 to 0.3 μm to cover the electric field range in the measured devices. As avalanche region width reduces from 0.3 to 0.05 μm, the electron to hole ionisation coefficient ratio decreases from 3.42 to 1.23 while the dead space to avalanche width ratio increases from 0.19 to 0.49 for electrons. The former increases the excess noise while the latter suppresses the avalanche noise such that on balance, a weak dependence of excess noise on the avalanche width for w < 0.3 μm was observed in these p+-i-n+ diodes, consistent with the excess noise results reported in thin Silicon p+-i-n+ diodes.

  12. Maximum speeds and alpha angles of flowing avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClung, David; Gauer, Peter

    2016-04-01

    A flowing avalanche is one which initiates as a slab and, if consisting of dry snow, will be enveloped in a turbulent snow dust cloud once the speed reaches about 10 m/s. A flowing avalanche has a dense core of flowing material which dominates the dynamics by serving as the driving force for downslope motion. The flow thickness typically on the order of 1 -10 m which is on the order of about 1% of the length of the flowing mass. We have collected estimates of maximum frontal speed um (m/s) from 118 avalanche events. The analysis is given here with the aim of using the maximum speed scaled with some measure of the terrain scale over which the avalanches ran. We have chosen two measures for scaling, from McClung (1990), McClung and Schaerer (2006) and Gauer (2012). The two measures are the √H0-;√S0-- (total vertical drop; total path length traversed). Our data consist of 118 avalanches with H0 (m)estimated and 106 with S0 (m)estimated. Of these, we have 29 values with H0 (m),S0 (m)and um (m/s)estimated accurately with the avalanche speeds measured all or nearly all along the path. The remainder of the data set includes approximate estimates of um (m/s)from timing the avalanche motion over a known section of the path where approximate maximum speed is expected and with either H0or S0or both estimated. Our analysis consists of fitting the values of um/√H0--; um/√S0- to probability density functions (pdf) to estimate the exceedance probability for the scaled ratios. In general, we found the best fits for the larger data sets to fit a beta pdf and for the subset of 29, we found a shifted log-logistic (s l-l) pdf was best. Our determinations were as a result of fitting the values to 60 different pdfs considering five goodness-of-fit criteria: three goodness-of-fit statistics :K-S (Kolmogorov-Smirnov); A-D (Anderson-Darling) and C-S (Chi-squared) plus probability plots (P-P) and quantile plots (Q-Q). For less than 10% probability of exceedance the results show that

  13. Some influences of rock strength and strain rate on propagation of rock avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Elisabeth; Rait, Kim

    2016-04-01

    Rock avalanches are extreme and destructive mass movements in which large volumes of rock (typically >1 million cubic metres) travel at high speeds, covering large distances, and the occurrence of which is highly unpredictable. The "size effect" in rock avalanches, whereby those with larger volumes produce greater spreading efficiency (as defined by an increase in normalised runout) or lower farboschung angle (defined as the tangent of the ratio of fall height to runout length), is well known. Studies have shown that rock strength is a controlling factor in the mobility of rock avalanches - that is, mass movements involving lower strength rock are generally found to produce greater mobility as evidenced by the spread of deposits or low farboschung angle. However, there are conflicting ideas as to how and why this influence is manifested. This paper discusses different theories of rock comminution in light of numerical simulations of rock clasts undergoing normal and shear induced loading, experimental work on rock avalanche behaviour, and dynamic fracture mechanics. In doing so, we introduce the idea of thresholds of strain rate for the production of dynamic fragmentation (as opposed to pseudo-static clast crushing) that are based, inter alia, on static rock strength. To do this, we refer to data from physical models using rock analogue materials, field data on chalk cliff collapses, and field statistics from documented rock avalanches. The roles of normal and shear loading and loading rate within a rock avalanche are examined numerically using 3D Discrete Element Method models of rock clasts loaded to failure. Results may help to reconcile the observations that large rock avalanches in stronger materials tend not to fragment as much as those in weaker materials and also possess lower mobility, while small cliff collapses (typically > 1000 cubic metres) in weak chalk can exhibit rock avalanche-like behaviour at much smaller volumes.

  14. The Ratio of Dietary Branched-Chain Amino Acids is Associated with a Lower Prevalence of Obesity in Young Northern Chinese Adults: An Internet-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Chuan; Li, Ying; Liu, Li-Yan; Chen, Yang; Zi, Tian-Qi; Du, Shan-Shan; Jiang, Yong-Shuai; Feng, Ren-Nan; Sun, Chang-Hao

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the association between the ratio of dietary branched chain amino acids (BCAA) and risk of obesity among young northern Chinese adults. A total of 948 randomly recruited participants were asked to finish our internet-based dietary questionnaire for the Chinese (IDQC). Associations between dietary BCAA ratio and prevalence of overweight/obesity and abdominal obesity were analyzed. Furthermore, 90 subjects were randomly selected to explore the possible mechanism. Dietary BCAA ratio in obese participants was significantly lower than non-obese participants. We found negative correlations between the ratio of dietary BCAA and body mass index (BMI) (r = −0.197, p < 0.001) or waist circumference (r = −0.187, p < 0.001). Compared with those in the first quartile, the multivariable-adjusted OR (95% CI) of the 3rd and 4th quartiles of dietary BCAA ratio for overweight/obesity were 0.508 (0.265–0.972) and 0.389 (0.193–0.783), respectively (all p < 0.05). After stratification by gender, the significance still existed in the 3rd and 4th quartile in males and the 4th quartile in females. For abdominal obesity, the multivariable-adjusted OR (95% CI) of the 3rd and 4th quartile of dietary BCAA ratio were 0.351 (0.145–0.845) and 0.376 (0.161–0.876), respectively (all p < 0.05). This significance was stronger in males. Further studies indicated that dietary BCAA ratio was inversely associated with 2-h postprandial glucose (2 h-PG) and status of inflammation. In conclusion, a higher ratio of dietary BCAA is inversely associated with prevalence of obesity, postprandial glucose and status of inflammation in young northern Chinese adults. PMID:26593945

  15. The Ratio of Dietary Branched-Chain Amino Acids is Associated with a Lower Prevalence of Obesity in Young Northern Chinese Adults: An Internet-Based Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Chuan; Li, Ying; Liu, Li-Yan; Chen, Yang; Zi, Tian-Qi; Du, Shan-Shan; Jiang, Yong-Shuai; Feng, Ren-Nan; Sun, Chang-Hao

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to examine the association between the ratio of dietary branched chain amino acids (BCAA) and risk of obesity among young northern Chinese adults. A total of 948 randomly recruited participants were asked to finish our internet-based dietary questionnaire for the Chinese (IDQC). Associations between dietary BCAA ratio and prevalence of overweight/obesity and abdominal obesity were analyzed. Furthermore, 90 subjects were randomly selected to explore the possible mechanism. Dietary BCAA ratio in obese participants was significantly lower than non-obese participants. We found negative correlations between the ratio of dietary BCAA and body mass index (BMI) (r = -0.197, p < 0.001) or waist circumference (r = -0.187, p < 0.001). Compared with those in the first quartile, the multivariable-adjusted OR (95% CI) of the 3rd and 4th quartiles of dietary BCAA ratio for overweight/obesity were 0.508 (0.265-0.972) and 0.389 (0.193-0.783), respectively (all p < 0.05). After stratification by gender, the significance still existed in the 3rd and 4th quartile in males and the 4th quartile in females. For abdominal obesity, the multivariable-adjusted OR (95% CI) of the 3rd and 4th quartile of dietary BCAA ratio were 0.351 (0.145-0.845) and 0.376 (0.161-0.876), respectively (all p < 0.05). This significance was stronger in males. Further studies indicated that dietary BCAA ratio was inversely associated with 2-h postprandial glucose (2 h-PG) and status of inflammation. In conclusion, a higher ratio of dietary BCAA is inversely associated with prevalence of obesity, postprandial glucose and status of inflammation in young northern Chinese adults. PMID:26593945

  16. Branching ratio measurements of the predissociation of {sup 12}C{sup 16}O by time-slice velocity-map ion imaging in the energy region from 108 000 to 110 500 cm{sup -1}

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Hong; Song Yu; Yang Lei; Shi Xiaoyu; Ng, C. Y.; Jackson, William M.; Yin Qingzhu

    2012-07-21

    Direct branching ratio measurements of the three lowest dissociation channels of {sup 12}C{sup 16}O that produce C({sup 3}P) + O({sup 3}P), C({sup 1}D) + O({sup 3}P), and C({sup 3}P) + O({sup 1}D) are reported in the vacuum ultraviolet region from 108 000 cm{sup -1} (92.59 nm) to 110 500 cm{sup -1} (90.50 nm) using the time-slice velocity-map ion imaging and nonlinear resonant four-wave mixing techniques. Rotationally, resolved carbon ion yield spectra for both {sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +} and {sup 1}{Pi} bands of CO in this region have been obtained. Our measurements using this technique show that the branching ratio in this energy region, especially the relative percentages of the two spin-forbidden channels, is strongly dependent on the particular electronic and vibrational energy levels of CO that are excited.

  17. Measurement of the B0(s) semileptonic branching ratio to an orbitally excited D**(s) state, Br(B0(s) ---> D-(s1)(2536) mu+ nu X)

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /ABC Federal U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota

    2007-12-01

    In a data sample of approximately 1.3 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector between 2002 and 2006, the orbitally excited charm state D{sub s1}{sup {+-}}(2536) has been observed with a measured mass of 2535.7 {+-} 0.6(stat) {+-} 0.5(syst) MeV/c{sup 2} via the decay mode B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s1}{sup -}(2536){mu}{sup +} {nu}X. A first measurement is made of the branching ratio product Br({bar B} {yields} D{sub s1}{sup -}(2536){mu}{sup +}{nu}X) {center_dot} Br(D{sub s1}{sup -} {yields} D*{sup -} K{sub S}{sup 0}). Assuming that D{sub s1}{sup -}(2536) production in semileptonic decay is entirely from B{sub s}{sup 0}, an extraction of the semileptonic branching ratio Br(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s1}{sup -}(2536){mu}{sup +}{nu}X) is made.

  18. 3D avalanche multiplication in Si-Ge lateral avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Erum; Hayat, Majeed M.; Davids, Paul S.; Camacho, Ryan M.

    2016-05-01

    Si-Ge lateral avalanche photodiodes (Si-Ge LAPDs) are promising devices for single photon detection, but they also have technology challenges. Si-Ge LAPDs are CMOS compatible and capable of detecting photons near the 1550 nm telecommunications bands. However, the Si-Ge LAPD exhibits a unique avalanche multiplication process in silicon, where the electrons and holes follow curved paths in three-dimensional space. Traditional models for the analysis of the avalanche multiplication process assume one-dimensional paths for the carriers that undergo the chains of impact ionizations; therefore, they are not suitable for analyzing the avalanche properties of Si-Ge LAPDs. In this paper, the statistics of the avalanche process in the Si-Ge LAPD are modeled analytically using a method that was recently developed by our group for understanding the avalanche multiplication in nanopillar, core-shell GaAs avalanche photodiodes, for which the electric field is non-uniform in magnitude and direction. Specifically, the calculated mean avalanche gain and the excess noise are presented for the Si-Ge LAPD device. It is also shown that the avalanche characteristics depend upon the specific avalanche path taken by the carrier, which depends, in turn, on the lateral location where each photon is absorbed in the Ge absorber. This property can be exploited to achieve reduced excess noise as well as wavelength-sensitive single-photon detection.

  19. Growth-Environment Dependent Modulation of Staphylococcus aureus Branched-Chain to Straight-Chain Fatty Acid Ratio and Incorporation of Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Suranjana; Sirobhushanam, Sirisha; Johnson, Seth R.; Song, Yang; Tefft, Ryan; Gatto, Craig; Wilkinson, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    The fatty acid composition of membrane glycerolipids is a major determinant of Staphylococcus aureus membrane biophysical properties that impacts key factors in cell physiology including susceptibility to membrane active antimicrobials, pathogenesis, and response to environmental stress. The fatty acids of S. aureus are considered to be a mixture of branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs), which increase membrane fluidity, and straight-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) that decrease it. The balance of BCFAs and SCFAs in USA300 strain JE2 and strain SH1000 was affected considerably by differences in the conventional laboratory medium in which the strains were grown with media such as Mueller-Hinton broth and Luria broth resulting in high BCFAs and low SCFAs, whereas growth in Tryptic Soy Broth and Brain-Heart Infusion broth led to reduction in BCFAs and an increase in SCFAs. Straight-chain unsaturated fatty acids (SCUFAs) were not detected. However, when S. aureus was grown ex vivo in serum, the fatty acid composition was radically different with SCUFAs, which increase membrane fluidity, making up a substantial proportion of the total (<25%) with SCFAs (>37%) and BCFAs (>36%) making up the rest. Staphyloxanthin, an additional major membrane lipid component unique to S. aureus, tended to be greater in content in cells with high BCFAs or SCUFAs. Cells with high staphyloxanthin content had a lower membrane fluidity that was attributed to increased production of staphyloxanthin. S. aureus saves energy and carbon by utilizing host fatty acids for part of its total fatty acids when growing in serum, which may impact biophysical properties and pathogenesis given the role of SCUFAs in virulence. The nutritional environment in which S. aureus is grown in vitro or in vivo in an infection is likely to be a major determinant of membrane fatty acid composition. PMID:27788193

  20. Direct measurements of the total rate constant of the reaction NCN + H and implications for the product branching ratio and the enthalpy of formation of NCN.

    PubMed

    Fassheber, Nancy; Dammeier, Johannes; Friedrichs, Gernot

    2014-06-21

    The overall rate constant of the reaction (2), NCN + H, which plays a key role in prompt-NO formation in flames, has been directly measured at temperatures 962 K < T < 2425 K behind shock waves. NCN radicals and H atoms were generated by the thermal decomposition of NCN3 and C2H5I, respectively. NCN concentration-time profiles were measured by sensitive narrow-line-width laser absorption at a wavelength of λ = 329.1302 nm. The obtained rate constants are best represented by the combination of two Arrhenius expressions, k2/(cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1)) = 3.49 × 10(14) exp(-33.3 kJ mol(-1)/RT) + 1.07 × 10(13) exp(+10.0 kJ mol(-1)/RT), with a small uncertainty of ±20% at T = 1600 K and ±30% at the upper and lower experimental temperature limits.The two Arrhenius terms basically can be attributed to the contributions of reaction channel (2a) yielding CH + N2 and channel (2b) yielding HCN + N as the products. A more refined analysis taking into account experimental and theoretical literature data provided a consistent rate constant set for k2a, its reverse reaction k1a (CH + N2 → NCN + H), k2b as well as a value for the controversial enthalpy of formation of NCN, ΔfH = 450 kJ mol(-1). The analysis verifies the expected strong temperature dependence of the branching fraction ϕ = k2b/k2 with reaction channel (2b) dominating at the experimental high-temperature limit. In contrast, reaction (2a) dominates at the low-temperature limit with a possible minor contribution of the HNCN forming recombination channel (2d) at T < 1150 K.

  1. Preliminary Study on Rock Avalanche in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Y.; Wen, Y.; Hsieh, M.

    2012-12-01

    Rock avalanche is a kind of rapid (average >100 km/h) granule flow caused by crushing and pulverization of rock materials during catastrophic rock slide. Literature researches show that rock avalanches typically occur on steep, high-relief slopes underlain by hard rocks, and have volumes >10,000,000 m3. Rock avalanches also are characterized by long runout distances, which are 5 to 10 times the total fall heights. Some cases can run up the opposing valley wall. Rock avalanches generally occurred in active mountains (e.g., New Zealand) and were triggered by earthquakes or rainfall (snowmelt), but with exceptions. There were few rock avalanches in historical time in Taiwan. This could reflect: (1) intrinsic instability of hillslopes due to weak rock, frequent earthquakes/heavy rains, which resulted in landslides of high frequency/low magnitude; (2) limited runout space along deeply incised river-valley systems, which increased the likelihood of rock-slope failures to transform to debris flows. However, there are ancient rock-avalanche records, found at Shou-shan coast (SW Taiwan) and Shin-she, Chang-pin, Tu-lan along Hua-tung coast (E Taiwan), which is likely to have undergone coseismic uplift. These places, with steep slopes, underlain by hard rock, and free for materials to run, are most prone to rock avalanches in the future.

  2. Temporal correlations in neuronal avalanche occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, F.; Herrmann, H. J.; Plenz, D.; de Arcangelis, L.

    2016-04-01

    Ongoing cortical activity consists of sequences of synchronized bursts, named neuronal avalanches, whose size and duration are power law distributed. These features have been observed in a variety of systems and conditions, at all spatial scales, supporting scale invariance, universality and therefore criticality. However, the mechanisms leading to burst triggering, as well as the relationship between bursts and quiescence, are still unclear. The analysis of temporal correlations constitutes a major step towards a deeper understanding of burst dynamics. Here, we investigate the relation between avalanche sizes and quiet times, as well as between sizes of consecutive avalanches recorded in cortex slice cultures. We show that quiet times depend on the size of preceding avalanches and, at the same time, influence the size of the following one. Moreover we evidence that sizes of consecutive avalanches are correlated. In particular, we show that an avalanche tends to be larger or smaller than the following one for short or long time separation, respectively. Our analysis represents the first attempt to provide a quantitative estimate of correlations between activity and quiescence in the framework of neuronal avalanches and will help to enlighten the mechanisms underlying spontaneous activity.

  3. Temporal correlations in neuronal avalanche occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, F.; Herrmann, H. J.; Plenz, D.; de Arcangelis, L.

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing cortical activity consists of sequences of synchronized bursts, named neuronal avalanches, whose size and duration are power law distributed. These features have been observed in a variety of systems and conditions, at all spatial scales, supporting scale invariance, universality and therefore criticality. However, the mechanisms leading to burst triggering, as well as the relationship between bursts and quiescence, are still unclear. The analysis of temporal correlations constitutes a major step towards a deeper understanding of burst dynamics. Here, we investigate the relation between avalanche sizes and quiet times, as well as between sizes of consecutive avalanches recorded in cortex slice cultures. We show that quiet times depend on the size of preceding avalanches and, at the same time, influence the size of the following one. Moreover we evidence that sizes of consecutive avalanches are correlated. In particular, we show that an avalanche tends to be larger or smaller than the following one for short or long time separation, respectively. Our analysis represents the first attempt to provide a quantitative estimate of correlations between activity and quiescence in the framework of neuronal avalanches and will help to enlighten the mechanisms underlying spontaneous activity. PMID:27094323

  4. Gallium-based avalanche photodiode optical crosstalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazej, Josef; Prochazka, Ivan; Hamal, Karel; Sopko, Bruno; Chren, Dominik

    2006-11-01

    Solid-state single photon detectors based on avalanche photodiode are getting more attention in various areas of applied physics: optical sensors, quantum key distribution, optical ranging and Lidar, time-resolved spectroscopy, X-ray laser diagnostics, and turbid media imaging. Avalanche photodiodes specifically designed for single photon counting semiconductor avalanche structures have been developed on the basis of various materials: Si, Ge, GaP, GaAsP, and InGaP/InGaAs at the Czech Technical University in Prague during the last 20 years. They have been tailored for numerous applications. Trends in demand are focused on detection array construction recently. Even extremely small arrays containing a few cells are of great importance for users. Electrical crosstalk between individual gating and quenching circuits and optical crosstalk between individual detecting cells are serious limitation for array design and performance. Optical crosstalk is caused by the parasitic light emission of the avalanche which accompanies the photon detection process. We have studied in detail the optical emission of the avalanche photon counting structure in the silicon- and gallium-based photodiodes. The timing properties and spectral distribution of the emitted light have been measured for different operating conditions to quantify optical crosstalk. We conclude that optical crosstalk is an inherent property of avalanche photodiode operated in Geiger mode. The only way to minimize optical crosstalk in avalanche photodiode array is to build active quenching circuit with minimum response time.

  5. Temporal correlations in neuronal avalanche occurrence.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, F; Herrmann, H J; Plenz, D; de Arcangelis, L

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing cortical activity consists of sequences of synchronized bursts, named neuronal avalanches, whose size and duration are power law distributed. These features have been observed in a variety of systems and conditions, at all spatial scales, supporting scale invariance, universality and therefore criticality. However, the mechanisms leading to burst triggering, as well as the relationship between bursts and quiescence, are still unclear. The analysis of temporal correlations constitutes a major step towards a deeper understanding of burst dynamics. Here, we investigate the relation between avalanche sizes and quiet times, as well as between sizes of consecutive avalanches recorded in cortex slice cultures. We show that quiet times depend on the size of preceding avalanches and, at the same time, influence the size of the following one. Moreover we evidence that sizes of consecutive avalanches are correlated. In particular, we show that an avalanche tends to be larger or smaller than the following one for short or long time separation, respectively. Our analysis represents the first attempt to provide a quantitative estimate of correlations between activity and quiescence in the framework of neuronal avalanches and will help to enlighten the mechanisms underlying spontaneous activity. PMID:27094323

  6. Continuum description of avalanches in granular media.

    SciTech Connect

    Aranson, I. S.; Tsimring, L. S.

    2000-12-05

    A continuum theory of partially fluidized granular flows is proposed. The theory is based on a combination of the mass and momentum conservation equations with the order parameter equation which describes the transition between flowing and static components of the granular system. We apply this model to the dynamics of avalanches in chutes. The theory provides a quantitative description of recent observations of granular flows on rough inclined planes (Daerr and Douady 1999): layer bistability, and the transition from triangular avalanches propagating downhill at small inclination angles to balloon-shaped avalanches also propagating uphill for larger angles.

  7. Initiation of immersed granular avalanches.

    PubMed

    Mutabaruka, Patrick; Delenne, Jean-Yves; Soga, Kenichi; Radjai, Farhang

    2014-05-01

    By means of coupled molecular dynamics-computational fluid dynamics simulations, we analyze the initiation of avalanches in a granular bed of spherical particles immersed in a viscous fluid and inclined above its angle of repose. In quantitative agreement with experiments, we find that the bed is unstable for a packing fraction below 0.59 but is stabilized above this packing fraction by negative excess pore pressure induced by the effect of dilatancy. From detailed numerical data, we explore the time evolution of shear strain, packing fraction, excess pore pressures, and granular microstructure in this creeplike pressure redistribution regime, and we show that they scale excellently with a characteristic time extracted from a model based on the balance of granular stresses in the presence of a negative excess pressure and its interplay with dilatancy. The cumulative shear strain at failure is found to be ≃ 0.2, in close agreement with the experiments, irrespective of the initial packing fraction and inclination angle. Remarkably, the avalanche is triggered when dilatancy vanishes instantly as a result of fluctuations while the average dilatancy is still positive (expanding bed) with a packing fraction that declines with the initial packing fraction. Another nontrivial feature of this creeplike regime is that, in contrast to dry granular materials, the internal friction angle of the bed at failure is independent of dilatancy but depends on the inclination angle, leading therefore to a nonlinear dependence of the excess pore pressure on the inclination angle. We show that this behavior may be described in terms of the contact network anisotropy, which increases with a nearly constant connectivity and levels off at a value (critical state) that increases with the inclination angle. These features suggest that the behavior of immersed granular materials is controlled not only directly by hydrodynamic forces acting on the particles but also by the influence of the

  8. Study of B+/ --> J/psi pi+/- and B+/ -->J/psi K+/- decays: measurement of the ratio of branching fractions and search for direct CP violation.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Raven, G; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de laVassière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-06-18

    We study B+/ --> J/psi pi(+/-) and B+/ --> J/psi K+/- decays in a sample of about 89 x 10(6) BB pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B factory at SLAC. We observe a signal of 244+/-20 B+/ --> J/psi pi(+/-) events and determine the ratio B(B+/ --> J/psi pi(+/-))/B(B+/ --> J/psi K+/-) to be [5.37+/-0.45(stat)+/-0.11(syst)]%. The charge asymmetries for the B+/ --> J/psi pi(+/-) and B+/ --> J/psi K+/- decays are determined to be A(pi)=0.123+/-0.085(stat)+/-0.004(syst) and A(K)=0.030+/-0.015(stat)+/-0.006(syst), respectively.

  9. Enhancing the branching ratios in the dissociation channels for O(16)O(16)O(18) molecule by designing optimum laser pulses: A study using stochastic optimization.

    PubMed

    Talukder, Srijeeta; Sen, Shrabani; Shandilya, Bhavesh K; Sharma, Rahul; Chaudhury, Pinaki; Adhikari, Satrajit

    2015-10-14

    We propose a strategy of using a stochastic optimization technique, namely, simulated annealing to design optimum laser pulses (both IR and UV) to achieve greater fluxes along the two dissociating channels (O(18) + O(16)O(16) and O(16) + O(16)O(18)) in O(16)O(16)O(18) molecule. We show that the integrated fluxes obtained along the targeted dissociating channel is larger with the optimized pulse than with the unoptimized one. The flux ratios are also more impressive with the optimized pulse than with the unoptimized one. We also look at the evolution contours of the wavefunctions along the two channels with time after the actions of both the IR and UV pulses and compare the profiles for unoptimized (initial) and optimized fields for better understanding the results that we achieve. We also report the pulse parameters obtained as well as the final shapes they take. PMID:26472365

  10. Metal frame as local protection of superconducting films from thermomagnetic avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheenko, P.; Vestgârden, J. I.; Chaudhuri, S.; Maasilta, I. J.; Galperin, Y. M.; Johansen, T. H.

    2016-03-01

    Thermomagnetic avalanches in superconducting films propagating extremely fast while forming unpredictable patterns, represent a serious threat for the performance of devices based on such materials. It is shown here that a normal-metal frame surrounding a selected region inside the film area can provide efficient protection from the avalanches during their propagation stage. Protective behavior is confirmed by magneto-optical imaging experiments on NbN films equipped with Cu and Al frames, and also by performing numerical simulations. Experimentally, it is found that while conventional flux creep is not affected by the frames, the dendritic avalanches are partially or fully screened by them. The level of screening depends on the ratio of the sheet conductance of the metal and the superconductor in the resistive state, and for ratios much larger than unity the screening is very efficient.

  11. Superconducting vortex avalanches, voltage bursts, and vortex plastic flow: Effect of the microscopic pinning landscape on the macroscopic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, C.J.; Reichhardt, C.; Nori, F.

    1997-09-01

    Using large-scale simulations on parallel processors, we analyze in detail the dynamical behavior of superconducting vortices undergoing avalanches. In particular, we quantify the effect of the pinning landscape on the macroscopic properties of vortex avalanches and vortex plastic flow. These dynamical instabilities are triggered when the external magnetic field is increased slightly, and are thus driven by a flux gradient rather than by thermal effects. The flux profiles, composed of rigid flux lines that interact with 100 or more vortices, are maintained in the Bean critical state and do not decay away from it. By directly determining vortex positions during avalanches in the plastically moving lattice, we find that experimentally observable voltage bursts correspond to the pulsing movement of vortices along branched channels or winding chains in a manner reminiscent of lightning strikes. This kind of motion cannot be described by elastic theories. We relate the velocity field and cumulative patterns of vortex flow channels with statistical quantities, such as distributions of avalanche sizes. Samples with a high density of strong pinning sites produce very broad avalanche distributions. Easy-flow vortex channels appear in samples with a low pinning density, and typical avalanche sizes emerge in an otherwise broad distribution of sizes. We observe a crossover from interstitial motion in narrow channels to pin-to-pin motion in broad channels as pin density is increased. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Measurements of the semileptonic branching ratio Br( b→ lvX), the lifetime of B-Hadrons and a determination of | Veb|

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian-Feng; L3 Collaboration

    1992-06-01

    We present a study of the decay properties of Z 0→b overlineb using inclusive muon and electron events. From a fit to the single and dilepton p and p⊥ spectra, we determine Br( b→ℓ νX) = 0.119 ± 0.003( stat) ± 0.006( sys), assuming the Standard Model prediction of Γ b overlineb = 378±3 MeV. From the ratio of the number of dipleton events to single lepton events, we find Br( b→ℓ νX) = 0.113 ± 0.010( stat) ± 0.006( sys), without assumptions on Γ b overlineb. From a fit to the impact parameter distribution of lepton tracks from semileptonic b decay, the lifetime of B-hadrons is measured to be 1.32±0.08(stat)±0.09(sys) ps. Using these measurements, the CKM matrix element | Vcb | is determined to be 0.046±0.002 (exp) -0.003+0.004(theory).

  13. Avalanche control: Conservation Guide Series No. 5

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This book examines different methods for determining the characteristics of snow cover and for localizing avalanche risk. It describes various techniques for temporary defense; for snow stabilization in the starting zone; and for wind deflection.

  14. Spike avalanches in vivo suggest a driven, slightly subcritical brain state

    PubMed Central

    Priesemann, Viola; Wibral, Michael; Valderrama, Mario; Pröpper, Robert; Le Van Quyen, Michel; Geisel, Theo; Triesch, Jochen; Nikolić, Danko; Munk, Matthias H. J.

    2014-01-01

    In self-organized critical (SOC) systems avalanche size distributions follow power-laws. Power-laws have also been observed for neural activity, and so it has been proposed that SOC underlies brain organization as well. Surprisingly, for spiking activity in vivo, evidence for SOC is still lacking. Therefore, we analyzed highly parallel spike recordings from awake rats and monkeys, anesthetized cats, and also local field potentials from humans. We compared these to spiking activity from two established critical models: the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld model, and a stochastic branching model. We found fundamental differences between the neural and the model activity. These differences could be overcome for both models through a combination of three modifications: (1) subsampling, (2) increasing the input to the model (this way eliminating the separation of time scales, which is fundamental to SOC and its avalanche definition), and (3) making the model slightly sub-critical. The match between the neural activity and the modified models held not only for the classical avalanche size distributions and estimated branching parameters, but also for two novel measures (mean avalanche size, and frequency of single spikes), and for the dependence of all these measures on the temporal bin size. Our results suggest that neural activity in vivo shows a mélange of avalanches, and not temporally separated ones, and that their global activity propagation can be approximated by the principle that one spike on average triggers a little less than one spike in the next step. This implies that neural activity does not reflect a SOC state but a slightly sub-critical regime without a separation of time scales. Potential advantages of this regime may be faster information processing, and a safety margin from super-criticality, which has been linked to epilepsy. PMID:25009473

  15. Spike avalanches in vivo suggest a driven, slightly subcritical brain state.

    PubMed

    Priesemann, Viola; Wibral, Michael; Valderrama, Mario; Pröpper, Robert; Le Van Quyen, Michel; Geisel, Theo; Triesch, Jochen; Nikolić, Danko; Munk, Matthias H J

    2014-01-01

    In self-organized critical (SOC) systems avalanche size distributions follow power-laws. Power-laws have also been observed for neural activity, and so it has been proposed that SOC underlies brain organization as well. Surprisingly, for spiking activity in vivo, evidence for SOC is still lacking. Therefore, we analyzed highly parallel spike recordings from awake rats and monkeys, anesthetized cats, and also local field potentials from humans. We compared these to spiking activity from two established critical models: the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld model, and a stochastic branching model. We found fundamental differences between the neural and the model activity. These differences could be overcome for both models through a combination of three modifications: (1) subsampling, (2) increasing the input to the model (this way eliminating the separation of time scales, which is fundamental to SOC and its avalanche definition), and (3) making the model slightly sub-critical. The match between the neural activity and the modified models held not only for the classical avalanche size distributions and estimated branching parameters, but also for two novel measures (mean avalanche size, and frequency of single spikes), and for the dependence of all these measures on the temporal bin size. Our results suggest that neural activity in vivo shows a mélange of avalanches, and not temporally separated ones, and that their global activity propagation can be approximated by the principle that one spike on average triggers a little less than one spike in the next step. This implies that neural activity does not reflect a SOC state but a slightly sub-critical regime without a separation of time scales. Potential advantages of this regime may be faster information processing, and a safety margin from super-criticality, which has been linked to epilepsy.

  16. Spike avalanches in vivo suggest a driven, slightly subcritical brain state.

    PubMed

    Priesemann, Viola; Wibral, Michael; Valderrama, Mario; Pröpper, Robert; Le Van Quyen, Michel; Geisel, Theo; Triesch, Jochen; Nikolić, Danko; Munk, Matthias H J

    2014-01-01

    In self-organized critical (SOC) systems avalanche size distributions follow power-laws. Power-laws have also been observed for neural activity, and so it has been proposed that SOC underlies brain organization as well. Surprisingly, for spiking activity in vivo, evidence for SOC is still lacking. Therefore, we analyzed highly parallel spike recordings from awake rats and monkeys, anesthetized cats, and also local field potentials from humans. We compared these to spiking activity from two established critical models: the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld model, and a stochastic branching model. We found fundamental differences between the neural and the model activity. These differences could be overcome for both models through a combination of three modifications: (1) subsampling, (2) increasing the input to the model (this way eliminating the separation of time scales, which is fundamental to SOC and its avalanche definition), and (3) making the model slightly sub-critical. The match between the neural activity and the modified models held not only for the classical avalanche size distributions and estimated branching parameters, but also for two novel measures (mean avalanche size, and frequency of single spikes), and for the dependence of all these measures on the temporal bin size. Our results suggest that neural activity in vivo shows a mélange of avalanches, and not temporally separated ones, and that their global activity propagation can be approximated by the principle that one spike on average triggers a little less than one spike in the next step. This implies that neural activity does not reflect a SOC state but a slightly sub-critical regime without a separation of time scales. Potential advantages of this regime may be faster information processing, and a safety margin from super-criticality, which has been linked to epilepsy. PMID:25009473

  17. Laboratory study of avalanches in magnetized plasmas.

    PubMed

    Van Compernolle, B; Morales, G J; Maggs, J E; Sydora, R D

    2015-03-01

    It is demonstrated that a novel heating configuration applied to a large and cold magnetized plasma allows the study of avalanche phenomena under controlled conditions. Intermittent collapses of the plasma pressure profile, associated with unstable drift-Alfvén waves, exhibit a two-slope power-law spectrum with exponents near -1 at lower frequencies and in the range of -2 to -4 at higher frequencies. A detailed mapping of the spatiotemporal evolution of a single avalanche event is presented.

  18. Directed avalanche processes with underlying interface dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chung; den Nijs, Marcel

    2002-07-01

    We describe a directed avalanche model; a slowly unloading sandbox driven by lowering a retaining wall. The directness of the dynamics allows us to interpret the stable sand surfaces as world sheets of fluctuating interfaces in one lower dimension. In our specific case, the interface growth dynamics belongs to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) universality class. We formulate relations between the critical exponents of the various avalanche distributions and those of the roughness of the growing interface. The nonlinear nature of the underlying KPZ dynamics provides a nontrivial test of such generic exponent relations. The numerical values of the avalanche exponents are close to the conventional KPZ values, but differ sufficiently to warrant a detailed study of whether avalanche-correlated Monte Carlo sampling changes the scaling exponents of KPZ interfaces. We demonstrate that the exponents remain unchanged, but that the traces left on the surface by previous avalanches give rise to unusually strong finite-size corrections to scaling. This type of slow convergence seems intrinsic to avalanche dynamics.

  19. Enhanced Red and Near Infrared Detection in Flow Cytometry Using Avalanche Photodiodes

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, William G.; Varadi, Gyula; Entine, Gerald; Podniesinski, Edward; Wallace, Paul K.

    2008-01-01

    Background Polychromatic flow cytometry enables detailed identification of cell phenotype using multiple fluorescent parameters. The photomultiplier tubes used to detect fluorescence in current instruments limit the sensitivity in the long wavelength spectral range. We demonstrate the flow cytometric applications of silicon avalanche photodiodes, which have improved red sensitivity and a working fluorescence detection range beyond 1000 nm. Methods A comparison of the wavelength dependent performance of the avalanche photodiode and photomultiplier tube was carried out using pulsed light emitting diode sources, calibrated test beads and biological samples. A breadboard flow cytometer test bench was constructed to compare the performance of photomultiplier tubes and avalanche photodiode detectors. The avalanche photodiode used an additional amplifier stage to match the internal gain of the photomultiplier tube. Results The resolution of the avalanche photodiode and photomultiplier tube was compared for flow cytometry applications using a pulsed light emitting diode source over the 500 nm to 1060 nm spectral range. These measurements showed the relative changes in the signal to noise performance of the APD and PMT over a broad spectral range. Both the avalanche photodiode and photomultiplier tubes were used to measure the signal to noise response for a set of 6 peak calibration beads over the 530 to 800 nm wavelength range. CD4 positive cells labeled with antibody conjugated phycoerythrin or 800 nm quantum dots were identified by simultaneous detection using the avalanche photodiode and the photomultiplier tube. The ratios of the intensities of the CD4− and CD4+ populations were found to be similar for both detectors in the visible wavelengths, but only the avalanche photodiode was able to separate these populations at wavelengths above 800 nm. Conclusions These measurements illustrate the differences in APD and PMT performance at different wavelengths and signal

  20. Prehistoric rock avalanches in the Olympic Mountains, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuster, R.L.; Logan, R.L.; Pringle, P.T.

    1992-01-01

    Rock avalanches blocked streams in the Olympic Mountains southwest of Puget Sound during the past few thousand years. Limiting radiocarbon ages indicated that three or four of six avalanches occurred from 1000 to 1300 years ago or shortly thereafter. Most of the dates were from the outer preserved rings of trees drowned behind avalanche dams. These three or four avalanches may be coeval not only with one another but also with abrupt tectonic deformation in western Washington. No rock avalanches in the Olympic Mountains are known to have resulted from storms or earthquakes during the past century. The avalanches strengthen the case that a large prehistoric earthquake occurred in the Puget Sound region.

  1. Dynamics of glide avalanches and snow gliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancey, Christophe; Bain, Vincent

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, due to warmer snow cover, there has been a significant increase in the number of cases of damage caused by gliding snowpacks and glide avalanches. On most occasions, these have been full-depth, wet-snow avalanches, and this led some people to express their surprise: how could low-speed masses of wet snow exert sufficiently high levels of pressure to severely damage engineered structures designed to carry heavy loads? This paper reviews the current state of knowledge about the formation of glide avalanches and the forces exerted on simple structures by a gliding mass of snow. One particular difficulty in reviewing the existing literature on gliding snow and on force calculations is that much of the theoretical and phenomenological analyses were presented in technical reports that date back to the earliest developments of avalanche science in the 1930s. Returning to these primary sources and attempting to put them into a contemporary perspective are vital. A detailed, modern analysis of them shows that the order of magnitude of the forces exerted by gliding snow can indeed be estimated correctly. The precise physical mechanisms remain elusive, however. We comment on the existing approaches in light of the most recent findings about related topics, including the physics of granular and plastic flows, and from field surveys of snow and avalanches (as well as glaciers and debris flows). Methods of calculating the forces exerted by glide avalanches are compared quantitatively on the basis of two case studies. This paper shows that if snow depth and density are known, then certain approaches can indeed predict the forces exerted on simple obstacles in the event of glide avalanches or gliding snow cover.

  2. Plasmonic field confinement for separate absorption-multiplication in InGaAs nanopillar avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Alan C.; Senanayake, Pradeep; Hung, Chung-Hong; El-Howayek, Georges; Rajagopal, Abhejit; Currie, Marc; Hayat, Majeed M.; Huffaker, Diana L.

    2015-12-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are essential components in quantum key distribution systems and active imaging systems requiring both ultrafast response time to measure photon time of flight and high gain to detect low photon flux. The internal gain of an APD can improve system signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Excess noise is typically kept low through the selection of material with intrinsically low excess noise, using separate-absorption-multiplication (SAM) heterostructures, or taking advantage of the dead-space effect using thin multiplication regions. In this work we demonstrate the first measurement of excess noise and gain-bandwidth product in III-V nanopillars exhibiting substantially lower excess noise factors compared to bulk and gain-bandwidth products greater than 200 GHz. The nanopillar optical antenna avalanche detector (NOAAD) architecture is utilized for spatially separating the absorption region from the avalanche region via the NOA resulting in single carrier injection without the use of a traditional SAM heterostructure.

  3. Electron avalanches in liquid argon mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.G.; Dardin, S.M.; Kadel, R.W.; Kadyk, J.A.; Wenzel, W.B.; Peskov, V.

    2004-03-19

    We have observed stable avalanche gain in liquid argon when mixed with small amounts of xenon in the high electric field (>7 MV/cm) near the point of a chemically etched needle in a point-plane geometry. We identify two gain mechanisms, one pressure dependent, and the other independent of the applied pressure. We conclude that the pressure dependent signals are from avalanche gain in gas bubbles at the tip of the needle, while the pressure independent pulses are from avalanche gain in liquid. We measure the decay time spectra of photons from both types of avalanches. The decay times from the pressure dependent pulses decrease (increase) with the applied pressure (high voltage), while the decay times from the pressure independent pulses are approximately independent of pressure or high voltage. For our operating conditions, the collected charge distribution from avalanches is similar for 60 keV or 122 keV photon sources. With krypton additives, instead of Xe, we measure behavior consistent with only the pressure dependent pulses. Neon and TMS were also investigated as additives, and designs for practical detectors were tested.

  4. Synaptic plasticity and neuronal refractory time cause scaling behaviour of neuronal avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michiels van Kessenich, L.; de Arcangelis, L.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2016-08-01

    Neuronal avalanches measured in vitro and in vivo in different cortical networks consistently exhibit power law behaviour for the size and duration distributions with exponents typical for a mean field self-organized branching process. These exponents are also recovered in neuronal network simulations implementing various neuronal dynamics on different network topologies. They can therefore be considered a very robust feature of spontaneous neuronal activity. Interestingly, this scaling behaviour is also observed on regular lattices in finite dimensions, which raises the question about the origin of the mean field behavior observed experimentally. In this study we provide an answer to this open question by investigating the effect of activity dependent plasticity in combination with the neuronal refractory time in a neuronal network. Results show that the refractory time hinders backward avalanches forcing a directed propagation. Hebbian plastic adaptation plays the role of sculpting these directed avalanche patterns into the topology of the network slowly changing it into a branched structure where loops are marginal.

  5. Synaptic plasticity and neuronal refractory time cause scaling behaviour of neuronal avalanches

    PubMed Central

    Michiels van Kessenich, L.; de Arcangelis, L.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal avalanches measured in vitro and in vivo in different cortical networks consistently exhibit power law behaviour for the size and duration distributions with exponents typical for a mean field self-organized branching process. These exponents are also recovered in neuronal network simulations implementing various neuronal dynamics on different network topologies. They can therefore be considered a very robust feature of spontaneous neuronal activity. Interestingly, this scaling behaviour is also observed on regular lattices in finite dimensions, which raises the question about the origin of the mean field behavior observed experimentally. In this study we provide an answer to this open question by investigating the effect of activity dependent plasticity in combination with the neuronal refractory time in a neuronal network. Results show that the refractory time hinders backward avalanches forcing a directed propagation. Hebbian plastic adaptation plays the role of sculpting these directed avalanche patterns into the topology of the network slowly changing it into a branched structure where loops are marginal. PMID:27534901

  6. Synaptic plasticity and neuronal refractory time cause scaling behaviour of neuronal avalanches.

    PubMed

    Michiels van Kessenich, L; de Arcangelis, L; Herrmann, H J

    2016-08-18

    Neuronal avalanches measured in vitro and in vivo in different cortical networks consistently exhibit power law behaviour for the size and duration distributions with exponents typical for a mean field self-organized branching process. These exponents are also recovered in neuronal network simulations implementing various neuronal dynamics on different network topologies. They can therefore be considered a very robust feature of spontaneous neuronal activity. Interestingly, this scaling behaviour is also observed on regular lattices in finite dimensions, which raises the question about the origin of the mean field behavior observed experimentally. In this study we provide an answer to this open question by investigating the effect of activity dependent plasticity in combination with the neuronal refractory time in a neuronal network. Results show that the refractory time hinders backward avalanches forcing a directed propagation. Hebbian plastic adaptation plays the role of sculpting these directed avalanche patterns into the topology of the network slowly changing it into a branched structure where loops are marginal.

  7. Aberrant neuronal avalanches in cortical tissue removed from juvenile epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Jon P; Smith, Jodi L; Beggs, John M

    2010-12-01

    Some forms of epilepsy may arise as a result of pathologic interactions among neurons. Many forms of collective activity have been identified, including waves, spirals, oscillations, synchrony, and neuronal avalanches. All these emergent activity patterns have been hypothesized to show pathologic signatures associated with epilepsy. Here, the authors used 60-channel multielectrode arrays to record neuronal avalanches in cortical tissue removed from juvenile epilepsy patients. For comparison, they also recorded activity in rat cortical slices. The authors found that some human tissue removed from epilepsy patients exhibited prolonged periods of hyperactivity not seen in rat slices. In addition, they found a positive correlation between the branching parameter, a measure of network gain, and firing rate in human slices during periods of hyperactivity. This relationship was not present in rat slices. The authors suggest that this positive correlation between the branching parameter and the firing rate is part of a positive feedback loop and may contribute to some forms of epilepsy. These results also indicate that neuronal avalanches are abnormally regulated in slices removed from pediatric epilepsy patients.

  8. Synaptic plasticity and neuronal refractory time cause scaling behaviour of neuronal avalanches.

    PubMed

    Michiels van Kessenich, L; de Arcangelis, L; Herrmann, H J

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal avalanches measured in vitro and in vivo in different cortical networks consistently exhibit power law behaviour for the size and duration distributions with exponents typical for a mean field self-organized branching process. These exponents are also recovered in neuronal network simulations implementing various neuronal dynamics on different network topologies. They can therefore be considered a very robust feature of spontaneous neuronal activity. Interestingly, this scaling behaviour is also observed on regular lattices in finite dimensions, which raises the question about the origin of the mean field behavior observed experimentally. In this study we provide an answer to this open question by investigating the effect of activity dependent plasticity in combination with the neuronal refractory time in a neuronal network. Results show that the refractory time hinders backward avalanches forcing a directed propagation. Hebbian plastic adaptation plays the role of sculpting these directed avalanche patterns into the topology of the network slowly changing it into a branched structure where loops are marginal. PMID:27534901

  9. The application of Landsat data to mapping avalanche hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waterman, S.

    1979-01-01

    Two test areas, representing a variety of avalanche hazards, were selected in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado. Midwinter Landsat digital data were analyzed using a clustering technique, and the results compared to 1:24,000 scale maps of avalanche hazards derived from air photo interpretation and field surveys. Confined avalanches were readily identified because of the high contrast between the snow covered avalanche track and the adjacent forested slopes. Unconfined avalanches could not be identified without supplementary topographic data. Spatial characteristics were of primary importance in delineating avalanche tracks. Spatial resolution was the limiting factor in avalanche detection. Landsat data should prove useful for rapid reconnaissance mapping of avalanche hazards, particularly in the absence of other data sources.

  10. Predicting extreme avalanches in self-organized critical sandpiles.

    PubMed

    Garber, Anja; Hallerberg, Sarah; Kantz, Holger

    2009-08-01

    In a finite-size Abelian sandpile model, extreme avalanches are repelling each other. Taking a time series of the avalanche size and using a decision variable derived from that, we predict the occurrence of a particularly large avalanche in the next time step. The larger the magnitude of these target avalanches, the better is their predictability. The predictability which is based on a finite-size effect, is discussed as a function of the system size.

  11. Relating rock avalanche morphology to emplacement processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufresne, Anja; Prager, Christoph; Bösmeier, Annette

    2015-04-01

    The morphology, structure and sedimentological characteristics of rock avalanche deposits reflect both internal emplacement processes and external influences, such as runout path characteristics. The latter is mainly predisposed by topography, substrate types, and hydrogeological conditions. Additionally, the geological setting at the source slope controls, e.g. the spatial distribution of accumulated lithologies and hence material property-related changes in morphology, or the maximum clast size and amount of fines of different lithological units. The Holocene Tschirgant rock avalanche (Tyrol, Austria) resulted from failure of an intensely deformed carbonate rock mass on the southeast face of a 2,370-m-high mountain ridge. The initially sliding rock mass rapidly fragmented as it moved towards the floor of the Inn River valley. Part of the 200-250 x 106 m3 (Patzelt 2012) rock avalanche debris collided with and moved around an opposing bedrock ridge and flowed into the Ötz valley, reaching up to 6.3 km from source. Where the Tschirgant rock avalanche spread freely it formed longitudinal ridges aligned along motion direction as well as smaller hummocks. Encountering high topography, it left runup ridges, fallback patterns (i.e. secondary collapse), and compressional morphology (successively elevated, transverse ridges). Further evidence for the mechanical landslide behaviour is given by large volumes of mobilized valley-fill sediments (polymict gravels and sands). These sediments indicate both shearing and compressional faulting within the rock avalanche mass (forming their own morphological units through, e.g. in situ bulldozing or as distinctly different hummocky terrain), but also indicate extension of the spreading landslide mass (i.e. intercalated/injected gravels encountered mainly in morphological depressions between hummocks). Further influences on its morphology are given by the different lithological units. E.g. the transition from massive dolomite

  12. Phase avalanches in near-adiabatic evolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Vertesi, T.; Englman, R.

    2006-02-15

    In the course of slow, nearly adiabatic motion of a system, relative changes in the slowness can cause abrupt and high magnitude phase changes, ''phase avalanches,'' superimposed on the ordinary geometric phases. The generality of this effect is examined for arbitrary Hamiltonians and multicomponent (>2) wave packets and is found to be connected (through the Blaschke term in the theory of analytic signals) to amplitude zeros in the lower half of the complex time plane. Motion on a nonmaximal circle on the Poincare-sphere suppresses the effect. A spectroscopic transition experiment can independently verify the phase-avalanche magnitudes.

  13. Bulk metallic glasses deform via slip avalanches.

    PubMed

    Antonaglia, James; Wright, Wendelin J; Gu, Xiaojun; Byer, Rachel R; Hufnagel, Todd C; LeBlanc, Michael; Uhl, Jonathan T; Dahmen, Karin A

    2014-04-18

    For the first time in metallic glasses, we extract both the exponents and scaling functions that describe the nature, statistics, and dynamics of slip events during slow deformation, according to a simple mean field model. We model the slips as avalanches of rearrangements of atoms in coupled shear transformation zones (STZs). Using high temporal resolution measurements, we find the predicted, different statistics and dynamics for small and large slips thereby excluding self-organized criticality. The agreement between model and data across numerous independent measures provides evidence for slip avalanches of STZs as the elementary mechanism of inhomogeneous deformation in metallic glasses.

  14. Laboratory study of avalanches in magnetized plasmas.

    PubMed

    Van Compernolle, B; Morales, G J; Maggs, J E; Sydora, R D

    2015-03-01

    It is demonstrated that a novel heating configuration applied to a large and cold magnetized plasma allows the study of avalanche phenomena under controlled conditions. Intermittent collapses of the plasma pressure profile, associated with unstable drift-Alfvén waves, exhibit a two-slope power-law spectrum with exponents near -1 at lower frequencies and in the range of -2 to -4 at higher frequencies. A detailed mapping of the spatiotemporal evolution of a single avalanche event is presented. PMID:25871044

  15. Definition and Characterization of Potential Avalanche Release Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggioni, M.; Gruber, U.

    The avalanche hazard map zones in Switzerland are defined by the frequency and the impact pressure of a potential avalanche event. Therefore, it is crucial to be able to accurately estimate the release frequency and, related to the frequency, the release ex- tent for a specific avalanche track. In this work a detailed analysis of avalanche release area topographies is performed to find general rules to relate topographic parameters to the avalanche frequency. In the region of Davos, an almost complete database of avalanche events over the last 50 years exists, that covers not only frequent avalanche tracks but the whole area. Using Geographic Information System (GIS) technologies in combination with Digital Elevation Models (DEM), all avalanche release areas have been analysed with respect to topographic characteristics. In a first step, topographic parameters like slope, curvature and aspect are derived from the DEM and used for the automatic definition of the potential release areas. In a second step, every potential re- lease area is characterised by smaller scale geomorphologic parameters. Finally, these geomorphologic parameters are analysed with respect to the avalanche frequencies ob- served in the different potential release areas. The general rules are a valuable aid for the avalanche experts in cases where information about historic avalanche is lacking for a particular track. Furthermore, the probability distributions can be directly used as input for uncertainty modelling of avalanche run-out distances and impact pressure by Monte Carlo methods.

  16. Avalanche mode of motion - Implications from lunar examples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, K. A.

    1973-01-01

    A large avalanche (21 square kilometers) at the Apollo 17 landing site moved out several kilometers over flat ground beyond its source slope. If not triggered by impacts, then it was as 'efficient' as terrestrial avalanches attributed to air-cushion sliding. Evidently lunar avalanches are able to flow despite the lack of lubricating or cushioning fluid.

  17. Avalanche mode of motion: Implications from lunar examples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, K.A.

    1973-01-01

    A large avalanche (21 square kilometers) at the Apollo 17 landing site moved out several kilometers over flat ground beyond its source slope. If not triggered by impacts, then it was as "efficient" as terrestrial avalanches attributed to air-cushion sliding. Evidently lunar avalanches are able to flow despite the lack of lubricating or cushioning fluid.

  18. Assessing the importance of terrain parameters on glide avalanche release

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peitzsch, Erich H.; Hendrikx, Jordy; Fagre, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    Glide snow avalanches are dangerous and difficult to predict. Despite recent research there is still a lack of understanding regarding the controls of glide avalanche release. Glide avalanches often occur in similar terrain or the same locations annually and observations suggest that topography may be critical. Thus, to gain an understanding of the terrain component of these types of avalanches we examined terrain parameters associated with glide avalanche release as well as areas of consistent glide crack formation but no subsequent avalanches. Glide avalanche occurrences visible from the Going-to-the-Sun Road corridor in Glacier National Park, Montana from 2003-2013 were investigated using an avalanche database derived of daily observations each year from April 1 to June 15. This yielded 192 glide avalanches in 53 distinct avalanche paths. Each avalanche occurrence was digitized in a GIS using satellite, oblique, and aerial imagery as reference. Topographical parameters such as area, slope, aspect, elevation and elevation were then derived for the entire dataset utilizing GIS tools and a 10m DEM. Land surface substrate and surface geology were derived from National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring maps and U.S. Geological Survey surface geology maps, respectively. Surface roughness and glide factor were calculated using a four level classification index. . Then, each avalanche occurrence was aggregated to general avalanche release zones and the frequencies were compared. For this study, glide avalanches released in elevations ranging from 1300 to 2700 m with a mean aspect of 98 degrees (east) and a mean slope angle of 38 degrees. The mean profile curvature for all glide avalanches was 0.15 and a plan curvature of -0.01, suggesting a fairly linear surface (i.e. neither convex nor concave). The glide avalanches occurred in mostly bedrock made up of dolomite and limestone slabs and talus deposits with very few occurring in alpine meadows. However, not all glide

  19. Measurement of the Branching Ratios Gamma(D*+s -> D+s pi0)/Gamma(D*+s ->D+s gamma) and Gamma(D*0 ->D0 pi0)/Gamma(D*0 -> D0gamma)

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-08-23

    Data samples corresponding to the isospin-violating decay D*{sub s}{sup +} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} and the decays D*{sub s}{sup +} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}, D*{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} and D*{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{gamma} are reconstructed using 90.4 fb{sup -1} of data recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The following branching ratios are extracted: {Lambda}(D*{sub s}{sup +} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0})/{Lambda}(D*{sub s}{sup +} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}{gamma}) = 0.062 {+-} 0.005(stat.) {+-} 0.006(syst.) and {Lambda}(D*{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0})/{Lambda}(D*{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{gamma}) = 1.74 {+-} 0.02(stat.) {+-} 0.13(syst.). Both measurements represent significant improvements over present world averages.

  20. Measurement of the Ratio of Branching Fractions B (B¯ 0→D* +τ-ν¯ τ)/B (B¯ 0→D* +μ-ν¯ μ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusardi, N.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthieu, K.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Ninci, D.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zucchelli, S.; LHCb Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    The branching fraction ratio R (D *) ≡B (B¯ 0→D* +τ-ν¯ τ)/B (B¯ 0→D* +μ-ν¯ μ) is measured using a sample of proton-proton collision data corresponding to 3.0 fb-1 of integrated luminosity recorded by the LHCb experiment during 2011 and 2012. The tau lepton is identified in the decay mode τ-→μ-ν¯μντ. The semitauonic decay is sensitive to contributions from non-standard-model particles that preferentially couple to the third generation of fermions, in particular, Higgs-like charged scalars. A multidimensional fit to kinematic distributions of the candidate B¯0 decays gives R (D *) =0.336 ±0.027 (stat )±0.030 (syst ) . This result, which is the first measurement of this quantity at a hadron collider, is 2.1 standard deviations larger than the value expected from lepton universality in the standard model.

  1. Measurement of the ratio of branching fractions B(B[over ¯]^{0}→D^{*+}τ^{-}ν[over ¯]_{τ})/B(B[over ¯]^{0}→D^{*+}μ^{-}ν[over ¯]_{μ}).

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Bel, L J; Bellee, V; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Birnkraut, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Demmer, M; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Ruscio, F; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fohl, K; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Geraci, A; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Kozeiha, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, X; Loh, D; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusardi, N; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matthieu, K; Mauri, A; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Mitzel, D S; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monroy, I A; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Ninci, D; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Osorio Rodrigues, B; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Pappenheimer, C; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Poikela, T; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Ronayne, J W; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; 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Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zucchelli, S

    2015-09-11

    The branching fraction ratio R(D^{*})≡B(B[over ¯]^{0}→D^{*+}τ^{-}ν[over ¯]_{τ})/B(B[over ¯]^{0}→D^{*+}μ^{-}ν[over ¯]_{μ}) is measured using a sample of proton-proton collision data corresponding to 3.0  fb^{-1} of integrated luminosity recorded by the LHCb experiment during 2011 and 2012. The tau lepton is identified in the decay mode τ^{-}→μ^{-}ν[over ¯]_{μ}ν_{τ}. The semitauonic decay is sensitive to contributions from non-standard-model particles that preferentially couple to the third generation of fermions, in particular, Higgs-like charged scalars. A multidimensional fit to kinematic distributions of the candidate B[over ¯]^{0} decays gives R(D^{*})=0.336±0.027(stat)±0.030(syst). This result, which is the first measurement of this quantity at a hadron collider, is 2.1 standard deviations larger than the value expected from lepton universality in the standard model. PMID:26406820

  2. Measurement of the ratio of branching fractions B(B[over ¯]^{0}→D^{*+}τ^{-}ν[over ¯]_{τ})/B(B[over ¯]^{0}→D^{*+}μ^{-}ν[over ¯]_{μ}).

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Bel, L J; Bellee, V; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Birnkraut, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Demmer, M; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Ruscio, F; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fohl, K; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Geraci, A; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Kozeiha, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, X; Loh, D; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusardi, N; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matthieu, K; Mauri, A; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Mitzel, D S; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monroy, I A; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Ninci, D; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Osorio Rodrigues, B; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Pappenheimer, C; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Poikela, T; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Ronayne, J W; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santimaria, M; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Siddi, B G; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skillicorn, I; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, I T; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Sterpka, F; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Tayduganov, A; Tekampe, T; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Todd, J; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Trabelsi, K; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zucchelli, S

    2015-09-11

    The branching fraction ratio R(D^{*})≡B(B[over ¯]^{0}→D^{*+}τ^{-}ν[over ¯]_{τ})/B(B[over ¯]^{0}→D^{*+}μ^{-}ν[over ¯]_{μ}) is measured using a sample of proton-proton collision data corresponding to 3.0  fb^{-1} of integrated luminosity recorded by the LHCb experiment during 2011 and 2012. The tau lepton is identified in the decay mode τ^{-}→μ^{-}ν[over ¯]_{μ}ν_{τ}. The semitauonic decay is sensitive to contributions from non-standard-model particles that preferentially couple to the third generation of fermions, in particular, Higgs-like charged scalars. A multidimensional fit to kinematic distributions of the candidate B[over ¯]^{0} decays gives R(D^{*})=0.336±0.027(stat)±0.030(syst). This result, which is the first measurement of this quantity at a hadron collider, is 2.1 standard deviations larger than the value expected from lepton universality in the standard model.

  3. REACTIONS FORMING C{sub n=2,10}{sup (0,+)}, C{sub n=2,4}H{sup (0,+)}, AND C{sub 3}H{sub 2}{sup (0,+)} IN THE GAS PHASE: SEMIEMPIRICAL BRANCHING RATIOS

    SciTech Connect

    Chabot, M.; Jallat, A.; Beroff, K.; Gratier, P.; Wakelam, V.

    2013-07-10

    The aim of this paper is to provide a new set of branching ratios (BRs) for interstellar and planetary chemical networks based on a semiempirical model. We applied, instead of zero-order theory (i.e., only the most exoergic decaying channel is considered), a statistical microcanonical model based on the construction of breakdown curves and using experimental high velocity collision BRs for their parameterization. We applied the model to ion-molecule, neutral-neutral, and ion-pair reactions implemented in the few popular databases for astrochemistry, such as KIDA, OSU, and UMIST. We studied the reactions of carbon and hydrocarbon species with electrons, He{sup +}, H{sup +}, CH{sup +}, CH, C, and C{sup +} leading to intermediate complexes of the type C{sub n=2,10}, C{sub n=2,4}H, C{sub 3}H{sub 2}, C{sub n=2,10}{sup +}, C{sub n=2,4}H{sup +}, or C{sub 3}H{sub 2}{sup +}. Comparison of predictions with measurements supports the validity of the model. Huge deviations with respect to database values are often obtained. Effects of the new BRs in time-dependent chemistry for dark clouds and for photodissociation region chemistry with conditions similar to those found in the Horsehead Nebula are discussed.

  4. Measurements of branching fraction ratios and CP-asymmetries in suppressed B-→ D(→ K+π-)K- and B-→ D(→ K+π-)π- decays

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-01

    We report the first reconstruction in hadron collisions of the suppressed decays B-→ D(→ K+π-)K- and B-→ D(→ K+π-)π- decays, sensitive to the CKM phase {gamma}, using data from 7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. We reconstruct a signal for the B-→ D(→ K+π-)K- suppressed mode with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations, and measure the ratios of the suppressed to favored branching fractions R(K) = [22.0 ± 8.6(stat) ± 2.6(syst)] x 10-3, R+(K) = [42.6 ± 13.7(stat) ± 2.8(syst)] x 10-3, R-(K) = [3.8 ± 10.3(stat) ± 2.7(syst)] x 10-3more » as well as the direct CP-violating asymmetry A(K) = -0.82±0.44(stat)±0.09(syst) of this mode. Corresponding quantities for B- → D(→ K+π-)π- decay are also reported.« less

  5. Self-organization and neuronal avalanches in networks of dissociated cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Pasquale, V; Massobrio, P; Bologna, L L; Chiappalone, M; Martinoia, S

    2008-06-01

    Dissociated cortical neurons from rat embryos cultured onto micro-electrode arrays exhibit characteristic patterns of electrophysiological activity, ranging from isolated spikes in the first days of development to highly synchronized bursts after 3-4 weeks in vitro. In this work we analyzed these features by considering the approach proposed by the self-organized criticality theory: we found that networks of dissociated cortical neurons also generate spontaneous events of spreading activity, previously observed in cortical slices, in the form of neuronal avalanches. Choosing an appropriate time scale of observation to detect such neuronal avalanches, we studied the dynamics by considering the spontaneous activity during acute recordings in mature cultures and following the development of the network. We observed different behaviors, i.e. sub-critical, critical or super-critical distributions of avalanche sizes and durations, depending on both the age and the development of cultures. In order to clarify this variability, neuronal avalanches were correlated with other statistical parameters describing the global activity of the network. Criticality was found in correspondence to medium synchronization among bursts and high ratio between bursting and spiking activity. Then, the action of specific drugs affecting global bursting dynamics (i.e. acetylcholine and bicuculline) was investigated to confirm the correlation between criticality and regulated balance between synchronization and variability in the bursting activity. Finally, a computational model of neuronal network was developed in order to interpret the experimental results and understand which parameters (e.g. connectivity, excitability) influence the distribution of avalanches. In summary, cortical neurons preserve their capability to self-organize in an effective network even when dissociated and cultured in vitro. The distribution of avalanche features seems to be critical in those cultures displaying

  6. The role of thermal coupling on avalanches in manganites.

    PubMed

    Macià, F; Abril, G; Hernandez, J M; Tejada, J

    2009-10-01

    We report here a study on the environmental dependence of the occurrence, at low temperature, of ultra-sharp field induced avalanches in phase separated manganites. Despite the high reproducibility of avalanches, it has already been observed that the critical fields shift with the magnetic field sweep rate and that different sample sizes lead to different ignition fields for the avalanches. Critical growing rates have been suggested to describe the avalanche ignition though the role of thermal coupling has hardly been considered. We qualitatively analyze here a set of experimental data on avalanches in manganites and discuss the role of thermal coupling as a key parameter of the instability in a dynamical system.

  7. Nano-multiplication region avalanche photodiodes and arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Xinyu (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An avalanche photodiode with a nano-scale reach-through structure comprising n-doped and p-doped regions, formed on a silicon island on an insulator, so that the avalanche photodiode may be electrically isolated from other circuitry on other silicon islands on the same silicon chip as the avalanche photodiode. For some embodiments, multiplied holes generated by an avalanche reduces the electric field in the depletion region of the n-doped and p-doped regions to bring about self-quenching of the avalanche photodiode. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  8. Rock avalanches caused by earthquakes: Source characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keefer, D.K.

    1984-01-01

    Study of a worldwide sample of historical earthquakes showed that slopes most susceptible to catastrophic rock avalanches were higher than 150 meters and steeper than 25 degrees. The slopes were undercut by fluvial or glacial erosion, were composed ofintensely fractured rock, and exhibited at least one other indicator of low strength or potential instability.

  9. Extended kinetic theory applied to snow avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauter, Matthias; Fischer, Jan-Thomas; Fellin, Wolfgang; Kofler, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In this work we apply the extended kinetic theory, a three-dimensional rheological model for rapid granular flows, to the two-dimensional, depth-averaged shallow water framework, used in snow avalanche simulations. Usually, empirical relations are used to determine the basal friction, which represents the material behavior in the avalanche. Here we present an energy equivalent basal friction relation which accounts for energy dissipating processes in the avalanche body as predicted by the extended kinetic theory. The obtained relation is compared to traditional basal friction relations, e.g. the Voellmy model by conducting numerical simulations with both approaches. As reference, field measurements of runout, affected area and velocity are compared to the simulation results. Two avalanche events, that occurred at the Vallée de la Sionne and Ryggfonn test sites, are evaluated with this method. It is shown that the kinetic theory delivers a physically based explanation for the structure of phenomenological friction relations. However, the new form of the frictional terms explicitly takes the flow depth into account. As consequence, improvements in finding unified parameter sets for various observation variables and events of different sizes could be achieved.

  10. Vortex avalanches in a type II superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Behnia, K.; Capan, C.; Mailly, D.; Etienne, B.

    1999-12-01

    The authors report on a study of the spatiotemporal variation of magnetic induction in a superconducting niobium sample during a slow sweep of external magnetic field. A sizable fraction of the increase in the local vortex population occurs in abrupt jumps. They compare the size distribution of these avalanches with the predictions of self-organized-criticality models for vortex dynamics.

  11. Rock avalanches caused by earthquakes: source characteristics.

    PubMed

    Keefer, D K

    1984-03-23

    Study of a worldwide sample of historical earthquakes showed that slopes most susceptible to catastrophic rock avalanches were higher than 150 meters and steeper than 25 degrees. The slopes were undercut by fluvial or glacial erosion, were composed of intensely fractured rock, and exhibited at least one other indicator of low strength or potential instability.

  12. Measuring acoustic emissions in an avalanche slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiweger, Ingrid; Schweizer, Jürg

    2014-05-01

    Measurements of acoustic emissions are a common technique for monitoring damage and predicting imminent failure of a material. Within natural hazards it has already been used to successfully predict the break-off of a hanging glacier. To explore the applicability of the acoustic emission (AE) technique for avalanche prediction, we installed two acoustic sensors (with 30 kHz and 60 kHz resonance frequency) in an avalanche prone slope at the Mittelgrat in the Parsenn ski area above Davos, Switzerland. The slope is north-east facing, frequently wind loaded, and approximately 35° steep. The AE signals - in particular the event energy and waiting time distributions - were compared with slope stability. The latter was determined by observing avalanche activity. The results of two winter's measurements yielded that the exponent β of the inverse cumulative distribution of event energy showed a significant drop (from a value of 3.5 to roughly 2.5) at very unstable conditions, i.e. on the three days during our measurement periods when spontaneous avalanches released on our study slope.

  13. Are Comet Outbursts the Result of Avalanches?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckloff, Jordan; Melosh, H. Jay

    2016-10-01

    Recently, Rosetta became the first spacecraft to make high-resolution observations of a comet outburst (a rapid, ephemeral increase in dust production) emerging from the surface of a comet nucleus. These outbursts occurred near perihelion, lasted only a few minutes, and produced a highly collimated outburst plume without any corresponding increase in H2O or CO2 gas production (See abstract by Rinaldi et al.). These observations cannot be explained by proposed driving outburst mechanisms (such as crystallization of amorphous ice, cryovolcanic gas exsolution, or explosive outgasing of subsurface chambers), all of which are driven by gas, and would therefore lead to an increase in the gas production.We propose instead that the observed outbursts on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (hereafter 67P) are the result of cometary avalanches. The surface of 67P contains many cliffs and scarps, with dusty surface layers blanketing the shallower slopes above and below these steep surfaces. The Rosetta spacecraft returned clear evidence of mass wasting, which form icy talus fields that are the source of much of 67P's cometary activity. Additionally, Rosetta observed morphological changes over time in the shallower, dusty surface layers above these steep slopes, which suggest that avalanches periodically release dusty materials onto these active talus fields.Here we present the results of a numerical simulation of dusty material avalanching into an active area (active talus field). These simulations show that such avalanches will generate a transient, highly collimated outburst plume that closely matches the observed morphology of the outbursts emanating from the surface of 67P. This mechanism predicts that cometary outbursting should not be directly associated with any increase in gas production, consistent with observations. Additionally, we show that regions of the nucleus that have sourced outburst plumes contain steep surfaces (above the angle of repose), which is required

  14. Developing an Experimental Simulation Method for Rock Avalanches: Fragmentation Behavior of Brittle Analogue Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thordén Haug, Øystein; Rosenau, Matthias; Leever, Karen; Oncken, Onno

    2013-04-01

    Gravitational mass movement on earth and other planets show a scale dependent behavior, of which the physics is not fully understood. In particular, the runout distance for small to medium sized landslides (volume < 106m3) can be predicted by a simple Coulomb friction law consistent with a constant kinetic coefficient of friction at the landslide base. This implies that the runout can be considered independent of volume. Large volume landslides (rock avalanches), however, show a dependence of runout on volume. This break in scaling behavior suggests that different dynamics control small and large landslides/rock avalanches. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this scale dependent behavior, but no consensus has been reached. Experimental simulations of rock avalanches usually involve transport of loose granular material down a chute. Though such granular avalanche models provide important insights into avalanche dynamics, they imply that the material fully disintegrate instantaneously. Observations from nature, however, suggests that a transition from solid to "liquid" occurs over some finite distance downhill, critically controlling the mobility and energy budget of the avalanche. Few experimental studies simulated more realistically the material failing during sliding and those were realized in a labscale centrifuge, where the range of volumes/scales is limited. To develop a new modeling technique to study the scale dependent runout behavior of rock avalanches, we designed, tested and verified several brittle materials allowing fragmentation to occur under normal gravity conditions. According to the model similarity theory, the analogue material must behave dynamically similar to the rocks in natural rock avalanches. Ideally, the material should therefore deform in a brittle manner with limited elastic and ductile strains up to a certain critical stress, beyond which the material breaks and deforms irreversibly. According to scaling relations derived

  15. Transition state theory thermal rate constants and RRKM-based branching ratios for the N((2)D) + CH(4) reaction based on multi-state and multi-reference ab initio calculations of interest for the Titan's chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ouk, Chanda-Malis; Zvereva-Loëte, Natalia; Scribano, Yohann; Bussery-Honvault, Béatrice

    2012-10-30

    Multireference single and double configuration interaction (MRCI) calculations including Davidson (+Q) or Pople (+P) corrections have been conducted in this work for the reactants, products, and extrema of the doublet ground state potential energy surface involved in the N((2)D) + CH(4) reaction. Such highly correlated ab initio calculations are then compared with previous PMP4, CCSD(T), W1, and DFT/B3LYP studies. Large relative differences are observed in particular for the transition state in the entrance channel resolving the disagreement between previous ab initio calculations. We confirm the existence of a small but positive potential barrier (3.86 ± 0.84 kJ mol(-1) (MR-AQCC) and 3.89 kJ mol(-1) (MRCI+P)) in the entrance channel of the title reaction. The correlation is seen to change significantly the energetic position of the two minima and five saddle points of this system together with the dissociation channels but not their relative order. The influence of the electronic correlation into the energetic of the system is clearly demonstrated by the thermal rate constant evaluation and it temperature dependance by means of the transition state theory. Indeed, only MRCI values are able to reproduce the experimental rate constant of the title reaction and its behavior with temperature. Similarly, product branching ratios, evaluated by means of unimolecular RRKM theory, confirm the NH production of Umemoto et al., whereas previous works based on less accurate ab initio calculations failed. We confirm the previous findings that the N((2)D) + CH(4) reaction proceeds via an insertion-dissociation mechanism and that the dominant product channels are CH(2)NH + H and CH(3) + NH.

  16. Measurement of the Ratios of Branching Fractions B(Bs -> Ds pi pi pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi pi pi) and B(Bs -> Ds pi) / B(Bd -> Dd pi)

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati /Taiwan, Inst. Phys.

    2006-10-01

    Using 355 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, they study the fully reconstructed hadronic decays B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub (s)}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub (s)}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. They present the first measurement of the ratio of branching fractions {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = 1.05 {+-} 0.10(stat.) {+-} 0.22(syst.). They also update their measurement of {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +})/{Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -} {pi}{sup +}) to 1.13 {+-} 0.08(stat.) {+-} 0.23(syst.) improving the statistical uncertainty by more than a factor of two. They find {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}) = [3.8 {+-} 0.3(stat.) {+-} 1.3(syst.)] x 10{sup -3} and {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = [8.4 {+-} 0.8(stat.) {+-} 3.2(syst.)] x 10{sup -3}.

  17. Fragmentation of multiply charged hydrocarbon molecules C{sub n}H{sup q+} (n{<=} 4, q{<=} 9) produced in high-velocity collisions: Branching ratios and kinetic energy release of the H{sup +} fragment

    SciTech Connect

    Beroff, K.; Pino, T.; Carpentier, Y.; Van-Oanh, N. T.; Chabot, M.; Tuna, T.; Martinet, G.; Le Padellec, A.; Lavergne, L.

    2011-09-15

    Fragmentation branching ratios for channels involving H{sup +} emission and associated kinetic energy release of the H{sup +} fragment [KER(H{sup +})] have been measured for multicharged C{sub n}H{sup q+} molecules produced in high velocity (3.6 a.u.) collisions between C{sub n}H{sup +} projectiles and helium atoms. For CH{sup q+} (q{<=} 4) molecules, measured KER(H{sup +}) were found well below predictions of the simple point charge Coulomb model (PCCM) for all q values. Multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) calculations for ground as well as electronic excited states were performed which allowed a perfect interpretation of the CH{sup q+} experimental results for low charges (q = 2-3) as well as for the highest charge (q = 4). In this last case we could show, on the basis of ionization cross sections calculations and experimental measurements performed on the same systems at slightly higher velocity (4.5 a.u.), the prominent role played by inner-shell ionization followed by Auger relaxation and could extract the lifetime of this Auger relaxation giving rise to the best agreement between the experiment and the calculations. For dissociation of C{sub 2}H{sup q+} and C{sub 3}H{sup q+} with the highest charges (q{>=} 5), inner-shell ionization contributed in a prominent way to the ion production. In these two cases it was shown that measured KER(H{sup +}) were in good agreement with PCCM predictions when those were corrected for Auger relaxation with the same Auger lifetime value as in CH{sup 3+}.

  18. X-ray imaging using avalanche multiplication in amorphous selenium: Investigation of depth dependent avalanche noise

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, D. C.; Tanioka, Kenkichi; Rowlands, J. A.

    2007-03-15

    The past decade has seen the swift development of the flat-panel detector (FPD), also known as the active matrix flat-panel imager, for digital radiography. This new technology is applicable to other modalities, such as fluoroscopy, which require the acquisition of multiple images, but could benefit from some improvements. In such applications where more than one image is acquired less radiation is available to form each image and amplifier noise becomes a serious problem. Avalanche multiplication in amorphous selenium (a-Se) can provide the necessary amplification prior to read out so as to reduce the effect of electronic noise of the FPD. However, in direct conversion detectors avalanche multiplication can lead to a new source of gain fluctuation noise called depth dependent avalanche noise. A theoretical model was developed to understand depth dependent avalanche noise. Experiments were performed on a direct imaging system implementing avalanche multiplication in a layer of a-Se to validate the theory. For parameters appropriate for a diagnostic imaging FPD for fluoroscopy the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) was found to drop by as much as 50% with increasing electric field, as predicted by the theoretical model. This drop in DQE can be eliminated by separating the collection and avalanche regions. For example by having a region of low electric field where x rays are absorbed and converted into charge that then drifts into a region of high electric field where the x-ray generated charge undergoes avalanche multiplication. This means quantum noise limited direct conversion FPD for low exposure imaging techniques are a possibility.

  19. Unimolecular photodissociation dynamics of ketene (CH{sub 2}CO): The singlet/triplet branching ratio and experimental observation of the vibrational level thresholds of the transition-state

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.K.

    1993-05-01

    The rotational distributions of CO products from the dissociation of ketene at photolysis energies 10 cm{sup {minus}1} below, 56, 110, 200, 325, 425, 1,107, 1,435, 1,720, and 2,500 cm{sup {minus}1} above the singlet threshold, are measured in a supersonic free jet of ketene. The CO(v{double_prime} = 0) rotational distributions at 56, 110, 200, 325, and 425 cm{sup {minus}1} are bimodal. The peaks at low J`s, which are due to CO from the singlet channel, show that the product rotational distribution of CO product from ketene dissociation on the singlet surface is well described by phase space theory (PST). For CO(v{double_prime} = 0) rotational distributions at higher excess energies, the singlet and triplet contributions are not clearly resolved, and the singlet/triplet branching ratios are estimated by assuming that PST accurately predicts the CO rotational distribution from the singlet channel and that the distribution from the triplet channel changes little from that at 10 cm{sup {minus}1} below the singlet threshold. At 2,500 cm{sup {minus}1} excess energy, the CO(v{double_prime} = 1) rotational distribution is obtained, and the ratio of CO(v{double_prime} = 1) to CO(v{double_prime} = 0) products for the singlet channel is close to the variational RRKM calculation, 0.038, and the separate statistical ensembles (SSE) prediction, 0.041, but much greater than the PST prediction, 0.016. Rate constants for the dissociation of ketene (CH{sub 2}CO) and deuterated ketene (CD{sub 2}CO) have been measured at the threshold for the production of the CH(D){sub 2} and CO. Sharp peaks observed in photofragment excitation (PHOFEX) spectra probing CO (v = 0, J = 2) product are identified with the C-C-O bending mode of the transition state. RRKM calculations are carried out for two limiting cases for the dynamics of K-mixing in highly vibrationally excited reactant states.

  20. The Marocche rock avalanches (Trentino, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Martin, Silvana; Campedel, Paolo; Viganò, Alfio; Alberti, Silvio; Rigo, Manuel; Vockenhuber, Christof

    2015-04-01

    The floors of the Adige and Sarca River valleys are punctuated by numerous rock avalanche deposits of undetermined age. With a view to understanding predisposition and triggering factors, thus ultimately paleoseismicity in the region, we are studying the geomorphology and timing of the largest rock avalanches of the River Sarca-Lake Garda area (e.g., Marocche, Monte Spinale, Lago di Tovel, Lago di Molveno, San Giovanni and Torbole). Among the most extensive of these deposits, with an area of 13 km2 and a volume of about 109 m3, are the Marocche. Marocche deposits cover the lower Sarca valley north of Lake Garda for a length of more than 8 km with 200 m of debris. Both collapse and bedding parallel sliding are a consequence of dip slopes and the extreme relief on the right side of the valley of nearly 2000 m from the bedrock below the valley floor to the peaks combined with the zones of structural weakness. The rock avalanches developed within carbonate rocks of Mesozoic age, mainly limestones of the Jurassic Calcari Grigi Group. The main scarps are located on the western side of the lower Sarca Valley, along the steep faces of Mt. Brento and Mt. Casale. The presence of these scarps is strictly related to the Southern Giudicarie and the Ballino fault systems. The former is here constituted by regular NNE-directed ESE-vergent thrust faults. The latter has been reactivated as normal faults. These complicated structural relationships favored complex failure mechanisms, including rock slide and massive collapse. At the Marocche itself, based on field relationships and analysis of lidar imagery, we differentiated two large rock avalanches: the Marocca di Kas in the south which overlies and in part buries the Marocche (s.s.) in the northern sector. Previous mapping had suggested up to five rock avalanches in the area where we differentiate two. In spite of hypotheses suggesting failure of the rock avalanches onto stagnating late Pleistocene glaciers, preliminary 36Cl

  1. The net benefit of public expenditures on avalanche defence structures in the municipality of Davos, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, S.; McAlpin, M. C.

    2005-04-01

    Avalanches pose a threat to settlements as well as industrial and recreational areas in the Alps. As a counter measure, technical mitigation measures have been implemented since the 19th century, resulting in a raise in value of formerly endangered areas. This increase in value can be considered as a benefit due to prevented damage. This paper compares the total costs and benefits of technical mitigation measures in the municipality of Davos, Switzerland as a basis for evaluating their net social benefit. The benefit of avalanche defence structures is determined using two different approaches. First, the replacement value of buildings protected by mitigation measures is quantified. Second, the number of protected persons is monetarily assessed by means of a human capital approach. The quantified benefit is compared with the present value of cumulative capital expenditures on avalanche mitigation measures. In addition, distributional effects of the public expenditures on technical mitigation measures are discussed based on the average future tax revenues within protected areas. Depending on whether benefits are calculated in terms of protected buildings or protected persons, the results show a large range of cost-benefit ratios. Critical issues of cost-benefit analyses in the context of alpine natural hazards are highlighted, including problems related to the human capital approach and the sensitivity of results to how benefits are calculated. The applicability of cost-benefit analyses for evaluating avalanche mitigation measures is discussed.

  2. Correcting for accidental correlations in saturated avalanche photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Grieve, J A; Chandrasekara, R; Tang, Z; Cheng, C; Ling, A

    2016-02-22

    In this paper we present a general method for estimating rates of accidental coincidence between a pair of single photon detectors operated within their saturation regimes. By folding the effects of recovery time of both detectors and the detection circuit into an "effective duty cycle" we are able to accomodate complex recovery behaviour at high event rates. As an example, we provide a detailed high-level model for the behaviour of passively quenched avalanche photodiodes, and demonstrate effective background subtraction at rates commonly associated with detector saturation. We show that by post-processing using the updated model, we observe an improvement in polarization correlation visibility from 88.7% to 96.9% in our experimental dataset. This technique will be useful in improving the signal-to-noise ratio in applications which depend on coincidence measurements, especially in situations where rapid changes in flux may cause detector saturation. PMID:26907016

  3. Teaching Natural Hazards: The Use of Snow Avalanches in Demonstrating and Addressing Geographic Topics and Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, David R.

    1988-01-01

    Illustrates the importance of studying the snow avalanche as a natural hazard. Describes the various kinds of snow avalanches, the types of triggering mechanisms that produce them, the typical avalanche terrain, and the geomorphic and the vegetative evidence for snow avalanching. Depicts methods of human adjustment to the avalanche hazard.…

  4. Physical models of giant subaqueous rock avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Blasio, F. V.

    2011-12-01

    Large subaqueous rock avalanches are characterized by horizontal run-outs approximately ten times longer than the fall height. It is shown that this mobility is somehow puzzling, as it corresponds to a decrease of the effective friction coefficient by a factor 10-50 compared to bare rock. Two dynamical models are so introduced to explain the observed mobility. In the first model, the fast-moving fragmented rock avalanche is subjected to a lift force that makes it hydroplane, avoiding contact with the sea floor. In a second model the fragmented material ingests water, transforming into a non-Newtonian fluid that progressively reduces its shear strength. Both models give peak velocity of 65-70 m/s, which implies a high potential for tsunami generation.

  5. Olokele rock avalanche, island of Kauai, Hawaii.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, B.L.; Chinn, S.S.W.; Brice, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    In October 1981 a mass of rock and soil having an estimated volume of 500 000 m3 fell as a rock fall-avalanche from a steep slope 800 m high near the head of Olokele Canyon. Boulders were launched into the air from a bench on the slope for a downstream distance of about 850 m. The velocity of the avalanche was rapidly diminished by impact against the valley sides, and it became a muddy debris flow that traveled 4.6 km downstream, severely eroding the valley sides. The volume of debris deposited on the canyon bottom is estimated to be 2 500 000 m3, or about four times the volume derived from the slope. -from Authors

  6. Hierarchical networks, power laws, and neuronal avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Eric J.; Landsberg, Adam S.

    2013-03-01

    We show that in networks with a hierarchical architecture, critical dynamical behaviors can emerge even when the underlying dynamical processes are not critical. This finding provides explicit insight into current studies of the brain's neuronal network showing power-law avalanches in neural recordings, and provides a theoretical justification of recent numerical findings. Our analysis shows how the hierarchical organization of a network can itself lead to power-law distributions of avalanche sizes and durations, scaling laws between anomalous exponents, and universal functions—even in the absence of self-organized criticality or critical points. This hierarchy-induced phenomenon is independent of, though can potentially operate in conjunction with, standard dynamical mechanisms for generating power laws.

  7. Stochastic simulation of electron avalanches on supercomputers

    SciTech Connect

    Rogasinsky, S. V.; Marchenko, M. A.

    2014-12-09

    In the paper, we present a three-dimensional parallel Monte Carlo algorithm named ELSHOW which is developed for simulation of electron avalanches in gases. Parallel implementation of the ELSHOW was made on supercomputers with different architectures (massive parallel and hybrid ones). Using the ELSHOW, calculations of such integral characteristics as the number of particles in an avalanche, the coefficient of impact ionization, the drift velocity, and the others were made. Also, special precise computations were made to select an appropriate size of the time step using the technique of dependent statistical tests. Particularly, the algorithm consists of special methods of distribution modeling, a lexicographic implementation scheme for “branching” of trajectories, justified estimation of functionals. A comparison of the obtained results for nitrogen with previously published theoretical and experimental data was made.

  8. Hierarchical networks, power laws, and neuronal avalanches.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Eric J; Landsberg, Adam S

    2013-03-01

    We show that in networks with a hierarchical architecture, critical dynamical behaviors can emerge even when the underlying dynamical processes are not critical. This finding provides explicit insight into current studies of the brain's neuronal network showing power-law avalanches in neural recordings, and provides a theoretical justification of recent numerical findings. Our analysis shows how the hierarchical organization of a network can itself lead to power-law distributions of avalanche sizes and durations, scaling laws between anomalous exponents, and universal functions-even in the absence of self-organized criticality or critical points. This hierarchy-induced phenomenon is independent of, though can potentially operate in conjunction with, standard dynamical mechanisms for generating power laws.

  9. Time arrival of slab avalanche masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClung, D. M.

    2003-10-01

    One of three criteria to demonstrate self-organized criticality (SOC) for a critical phenomenon is that time arrival of events displays a frequency dependence which is inversely proportional to frequency (f) to some power. That is, for SOC, the power spectrum in the frequency (f) domain is supposed to fall off as 1/fβ, where β is typically a number between 1 and 2. Avalanche phenomena have been used as prototypes for illustrating SOC, and therefore it is of interest as to whether snow avalanches follow the criterion. In this paper, time series analyses of mass arrivals from 20 years of records constituting ˜10,000 avalanches are presented for Bear Pass and Kootenay Pass, British Columbia. The results suggest that the autocorrelation functions and partial autocorrelation functions of the series fall off in an exponential manner so that the implied power spectra in the frequency domain, given by the Fourier transforms of the autocorrelation functions, decay with frequency in a manner which is not strictly consistent with SOC. In common with SOC, the power spectra are suggested to have most content in the low-frequency events and the spectra do not constitute white noise. However, given the limitations on the data sampling and recording, it cannot be definitively stated that the power spectra fall off with 1/f® as required for SOC.

  10. Unjamming and jamming transitions of granular avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Wang, Ziwei

    2014-03-01

    Study of the jamming transitions of granular materials has become an active field of research in recent years. A closely related inverse process is the unjamming transition, where granular systems may suddenly lose rigidity and start to flow freely. Understanding such a process is of crucial implication towards the understanding of natural disasters such as snow avalanches, landslides and earthquakes. Recent work by Banigan and colleagues (Nature Physics 2013) has provided a new perspective in the study of unjamming and jamming transitions by applying nonlinear dynamical methods. To test their proposition experimentally, we have designed a rotating drum filled with bidisperse photo-elastic disks to create particle avalanches. In unjamming transition, Lyapunov vector and velocity fields are indeed strongly correlated in spatial domain, whereas in jamming transition no such a strong correlation is observed. The Lyapunov exponents are positive in unjamming transition and negative in jamming transition. In addition, the total stress variation, kinetic energy, and non-affine motion of particles all show strong correlations in the time domain during avalanches. Their spatial correlations have also been analyzed.

  11. Reversible Avalanches and Criticality in Amorphous Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, Charles

    2015-03-01

    Despite its importance for basic science and industry, the physical process that causes a solid to change its shape permanently under external deformation is still not well understood. In this paper we use molecular dynamics simulations of amorphous solids under oscillatory shear to study this phenomenon, and show that at a critical strain amplitude, the size of the cooperative atomic motion that allows for a permanent deformation diverges. We compare this non-equilibrium critical behavior to that of a ``front depinning'' transition. This viewpoint, based on fluctuations and statistics, is complementary to the dynamical ``transition to chaos'' which was previously identified at the same strain amplitude. Below this irreversibile-depinning transition, we observe large avalanches which are completely repetitive with each shear strain cycle. This suggests that while avalanches on their own do not cause irreversible deformation, it is likely that the irreversibility transition and the ``depinning-like'' transition are two aspects of the same phenomena. One implication is that the transition could be detected before the onset of irreversible flow by an analysis of the power spectra of avalanches. Work done in collaboration with Ido Regev, Karin Dahmen, John Weber, and Turab Lookman.

  12. Monte Carlo simulations within avalanche rescue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiweger, Ingrid; Genswein, Manuel; Schweizer, Jürg

    2016-04-01

    Refining concepts for avalanche rescue involves calculating suitable settings for rescue strategies such as an adequate probing depth for probe line searches or an optimal time for performing resuscitation for a recovered avalanche victim in case of additional burials. In the latter case, treatment decisions have to be made in the context of triage. However, given the low number of incidents it is rarely possible to derive quantitative criteria based on historical statistics in the context of evidence-based medicine. For these rare, but complex rescue scenarios, most of the associated concepts, theories, and processes involve a number of unknown "random" parameters which have to be estimated in order to calculate anything quantitatively. An obvious approach for incorporating a number of random variables and their distributions into a calculation is to perform a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. We here present Monte Carlo simulations for calculating the most suitable probing depth for probe line searches depending on search area and an optimal resuscitation time in case of multiple avalanche burials. The MC approach reveals, e.g., new optimized values for the duration of resuscitation that differ from previous, mainly case-based assumptions.

  13. Thermal avalanches near a Mott transition.

    PubMed

    Lashley, J C; Gofryk, K; Mihaila, B; Smith, J L; Salje, E K H

    2014-01-22

    We probe the volume collapse transition (ΔV/Vo ∼ 15%) between the isostructural γ and α phases (T ∼ 100 K) of Ce0.9Th0.1 using the Hall effect, three-terminal capacitive dilatometry, and electrical resistivity measurements. Hall effect measurements confirm the itinerant ground state as the carrier concentration increases by a factor of 7 in the α phase, γ phase (nH = 5.28 × 10(26) m(-3)), and the α phase (nH = 3.76 × 10(27) m(-3)). We were able to detect a noise spectrum consisting of avalanches while slowly varying the temperature through the hysteretic region. We surmise that the avalanches originate from intergranular stresses at the interfaces between partially transformed high-volume and low-volume phases. The statistical distribution of avalanches obey power laws with energy exponent ϵ ≃ 1.5. Hall effect measurements, combined with universal critical exponents, point to short electron mean-free percolation pathways and carrier localization at phase interfaces. Carrier localization was predicted many years ago for elemental cerium by Johansson (1974 Phil. Mag. 30 469).

  14. Neuronal avalanches in spontaneous activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Gerald; Petermann, Thomas; Havenith, Martha N; Yu, Shan; Singer, Wolf; Plenz, Dietmar; Nikolic, Danko

    2010-12-01

    Many complex systems give rise to events that are clustered in space and time, thereby establishing a correlation structure that is governed by power law statistics. In the cortex, such clusters of activity, called "neuronal avalanches," were recently found in local field potentials (LFPs) of spontaneous activity in acute cortex slices, slice cultures, the developing cortex of the anesthetized rat, and premotor and motor cortex of awake monkeys. At present, it is unclear whether neuronal avalanches also exist in the spontaneous LFPs and spike activity in vivo in sensory areas of the mature brain. To address this question, we recorded spontaneous LFPs and extracellular spiking activity with multiple 4 × 4 microelectrode arrays (Michigan Probes) in area 17 of adult cats under anesthesia. A cluster of events was defined as a consecutive sequence of time bins Δt (1-32 ms), each containing at least one LFP event or spike anywhere on the array. LFP cluster sizes consistently distributed according to a power law with a slope largely above -1.5. In two thirds of the corresponding experiments, spike clusters also displayed a power law that displayed a slightly steeper slope of -1.8 and was destroyed by subsampling operations. The power law in spike clusters was accompanied with stronger temporal correlations between spiking activities of neurons that spanned longer time periods compared with spike clusters lacking power law statistics. The results suggest that spontaneous activity of the visual cortex under anesthesia has the properties of neuronal avalanches.

  15. Neutron In-beam Moessbauer Spectroscopy with a Parallel Plate Avalanche Counter

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, M.K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Yamada, Y.; Nemoto, Y.; Saito, T.; Sakai, Y.; Shoji, H.; Yonezawa, C.; Matsue, H.; Nakada, M.

    2005-04-26

    An in-beam 57Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy system using a parallel plate avalanche counter has been developed for characterizing chemical species produced after neutron capture reactions. The high signal-to-background ratio of the detector enabled us to obtain the first spectrum of semiconductor iron disulfide. A new chemical species of iron, different from the parent compound, arising from the nuclear reaction was clearly observed.

  16. Edge effect on the power law distribution of granular avalanches.

    PubMed

    Lorincz, Kinga A; Wijngaarden, Rinke J

    2007-10-01

    Many punctuated phenomena in nature are claimed [e.g., by the theory of self-organized criticality (SOC)] to be power-law distributed. In our experiments on a three-dimensional pile of long-grained rice, we find that by only changing the boundary condition of the system, we switch from such power-law-distributed avalanche sizes to quasiperiodic system-spanning avalanches. Conversely, by removing ledges the incidence of system-spanning avalanches is significantly reduced. This may offer a perspective on new avalanche prevention schemes. In addition, our findings may help to explain why the archetype of SOC, the sandpile, was found to have power-law-distributed avalanches in some experiments, while in other experiments quasiperiodic system-spanning avalanches were found.

  17. Avalanche in adhesion. [interfacial separation between two Ni crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, John R.; Bozzolo, Guillermo; Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John

    1989-01-01

    Consider surfaces being brought into contact. It is proposed that atomic layers can collapse or avalanche together when the interfacial spacing falls below a critical distance. This causes a discontinuous drop in the adhesive binding energy. Avalanche can occur regardless of the stiffness of external supports. A simple understanding of the origin of this phenomenon is provided. A numerical calculation has been carried out for adhesion in Ni. A new wear mechanism due to avalanche is suggested.

  18. Two scenarios for avalanche dynamics in inclined granular layers.

    PubMed

    Börzsönyi, Tamás; Halsey, Thomas C; Ecke, Robert E

    2005-05-27

    We report experimental measurements of avalanche behavior of thin granular layers on an inclined plane for low volume flow rate. The dynamical properties of avalanches were quantitatively and qualitatively different for smooth glass beads compared to irregular granular materials such as sand. Two scenarios for granular avalanches on an incline are identified, and a theoretical explanation for these different scenarios is developed based on a depth-averaged approach that takes into account the differing rheologies of the granular materials.

  19. Unambiguous reconstruction of network structure using avalanche dynamics.

    PubMed

    Leleu, Timothée; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2015-02-01

    A robust method for inferring the structure of networks is presented based on the one-to-one correspondence between the expected composition of cascades of bursts of activity, called crackling noise or avalanches, and the weight matrix. Using a model of neuronal avalanches as a paradigmatic example, we derive this correspondence exactly by calculating the closed-form expression of the joint probability distribution of avalanche sizes obtained by counting separately the number of elements active in each subnetwork during avalanches. PMID:25768549

  20. A Monte Carlo simulator for noise analysis of avalanche photodiode pixels in low-light image sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resetar, Tomislav; Süss, Andreas; Vermandere, Elke; Karpiak, Bogdan; Puers, Robert; Van Hoof, Chris

    2016-03-01

    Noise performance of avalanche photodiodes in light detection is typically described by the excessive noise factor, taking into account only the increase of the variance of the output electron count distribution with respect to the input. This approach is attractive since the excessive noise factor, together with the avalanche gain, can easily be included into the signal-to-noise ratio expression of the complete detection chain. For low-light applications down to single-photon counting, that description is typically not sufficient since one is also interested in the higher moments of the output distribution. Analytical derivation of the output electron count distributions of avalanche photodiodes is typically possible only for very simple electric field profile approximations, which is often not a sufficient description of reality. This work presents a Monte Carlo simulator for numerical prediction of the output distribution that can be applied to any arbitrary electric field profile as well as any light absorption profile and therefore serve as a useful tool for device design and optimization. Comparison with the standard McIntyre theory is provided for a constant field profile showing good agreement. Furthermore, the presented method is used to predict the avalanche noise performance of the recently presented pinned avalanche photodiode pixel (PAPD) with the electric field profile extracted from a finite-element simulation. The pixel is aiming for improvements in high-speed and low-light level image detection in minimally-modified CMOS image sensor technology.

  1. Characterization of Advanced Avalanche Photodiodes for Water Vapor Lidar Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Halama, Gary E.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2000-01-01

    Development of advanced differential absorption lidar (DIAL) receivers is very important to increase the accuracy of atmospheric water vapor measurements. A major component of such receivers is the optical detector. In the near-infrared wavelength range avalanche photodiodes (APD's) are the best choice for higher signal-to-noise ratio, where there are many water vapor absorption lines. In this study, characterization experiments were performed to evaluate a group of silicon-based APD's. The APD's have different structures representative of different manufacturers. The experiments include setups to calibrate these devices, as well as characterization of the effects of voltage bias and temperature on the responsivity, surface scans, noise measurements, and frequency response measurements. For each experiment, the setup, procedure, data analysis, and results are given and discussed. This research was done to choose a suitable APD detector for the development of an advanced atmospheric water vapor differential absorption lidar detection system operating either at 720, 820, or 940 nm. The results point out the benefits of using the super low ionization ratio (SLIK) structure APD for its lower noise-equivalent power, which was found to be on the order of 2 to 4 fW/Hz(sup (1/2)), with an appropriate optical system and electronics. The water vapor detection systems signal-to-noise ratio will increase by a factor of 10.

  2. towards a continuum theory of avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champeaux, Stephanie

    2001-10-01

    Recently there has been increased interest in avalanches and other structures and their role in turbulent transport in confined plasmas. Experimental and computational investigations [1] have provided evidence of avalanche phenomena at work in transport dynamics. Numerical simulations of familiar turbulence models exhibit anisotropic radially extended structures clearly related to mesoscale transport events or bursts [2]. Such structures, also called streamers, may be viewed as radially extended cells of nonlinear nature (as indicated by mounting evidence). Modulational instabilities are explored as a mechanism for avalanche type formation in drift-ITG turbulence. Radially extended streamer cell formation and self-regulation are investigated within both random phase approximation and coherent envelope approaches [3]. The dual roles of the modulated Reynolds stress and nonlinear pressure advection are elucidated. While convection cells are a time-honored topic, a major new theme of this work is the study of the cell saturation mechanisms, which regulate the transport. Both poloidal shearing on the underlying ITG turbulence, Kelvin-Helmholtz type instability and curvature-drift resonant damping are explored as a saturation mechanism. Saturation levels for streamer and underlying turbulence are estimated. Implications for scalings of enhancement factors are discussed. Aspect of streamer structure and dynamics are used to estimate the variance of the drift-wave induced heat flux, which is shown to be proportional to the streamer intensity level. Streamer growth then results in a significant enhancement of the heat flux variance to order unity. [1] B.A. Carreras et al Phys Rev Lett 83 (1999) 3653; P.A. Politzer Phys Rev Lett 84 (2000) 1192 [2] P. Beyer et al Phys Rev Lett 85 (2000) 4892 [3] P.H. Diamond, S. Champeaux et al Nuclear Fusion in press; S. Champeaux & P.H. Diamond Phys Lett A in press

  3. Type-II Superlattice Avalanche Photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jun

    Type-II superlattice avalanche photodiodes have shown advantages compared to conventional mercury cadmium telluride photodiodes for infrared wavelength detection. However, surface or interface leakage current has been a major issue for superlattice avalanche photodiodes, especially in infrared wavelength region. First, passivation of the superlattice device with ammonium sulfide and thioacetamide was carried out, and its surface quality was studied by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. The study showed that both ammonium sulfide and thiacetamide passivation can actively remove the native oxide at the surface. Thiacetamide passivation combine more sulfur bonds with III-V elements than that of ammonium sulfide. Another X-ray photoelectron spectra of thiacetamide-treated atomic layer deposited zinc sulfide capped InAs/GaSb superlattice was performed to investigate the interface sulfur bond conditions. Sb--S and As--S bonds disappear while In-S bond gets enhanced, indicating that Indium Sulfide should be the major components at the interface after ZnS deposition. Second, the simulation of electrical characteristics for zinc sulfide, silicon nitride and silicon dioxide passivated superlattice devices was performed by SILVACO software to fit the experimental results and to discover the surface current mechanism. Different surface current mechanism strengths were found. Third, several novel dual-carrier avalanche photodiode structures were designed and simulated. The structures had alternate carrier multiplication regions, placed next to a wider electron multiplication region, creating dual-carrier multiplication feedback systems. Gain and excess noise factor of these structures were simulated and compared based on the dead space multiplication theory under uniform electric field. From the simulation, the applied bias can be greatly lowered or the thickness can be shrunk to achieve the same gain from the conventional device. The width of the thin region was the most

  4. Neuronal Avalanches in Spontaneous Activity In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Gerald; Petermann, Thomas; Havenith, Martha N.; Yu, Shan; Singer, Wolf; Plenz, Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    Many complex systems give rise to events that are clustered in space and time, thereby establishing a correlation structure that is governed by power law statistics. In the cortex, such clusters of activity, called “neuronal avalanches,” were recently found in local field potentials (LFPs) of spontaneous activity in acute cortex slices, slice cultures, the developing cortex of the anesthetized rat, and premotor and motor cortex of awake monkeys. At present, it is unclear whether neuronal avalanches also exist in the spontaneous LFPs and spike activity in vivo in sensory areas of the mature brain. To address this question, we recorded spontaneous LFPs and extracellular spiking activity with multiple 4 × 4 microelectrode arrays (Michigan Probes) in area 17 of adult cats under anesthesia. A cluster of events was defined as a consecutive sequence of time bins Δt (1–32 ms), each containing at least one LFP event or spike anywhere on the array. LFP cluster sizes consistently distributed according to a power law with a slope largely above –1.5. In two thirds of the corresponding experiments, spike clusters also displayed a power law that displayed a slightly steeper slope of −1.8 and was destroyed by subsampling operations. The power law in spike clusters was accompanied with stronger temporal correlations between spiking activities of neurons that spanned longer time periods compared with spike clusters lacking power law statistics. The results suggest that spontaneous activity of the visual cortex under anesthesia has the properties of neuronal avalanches. PMID:20631221

  5. Bilayer avalanche spin-diode logic

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Joseph S. Querlioz, Damien; Fadel, Eric R.; Wessels, Bruce W.; Sahakian, Alan V.

    2015-11-15

    A novel spintronic computing paradigm is proposed and analyzed in which InSb p-n bilayer avalanche spin-diodes are cascaded to efficiently perform complex logic operations. This spin-diode logic family uses control wires to generate magnetic fields that modulate the resistance of the spin-diodes, and currents through these devices control the resistance of cascaded devices. Electromagnetic simulations are performed to demonstrate the cascading mechanism, and guidelines are provided for the development of this innovative computing technology. This cascading scheme permits compact logic circuits with switching speeds determined by electromagnetic wave propagation rather than electron motion, enabling high-performance spintronic computing.

  6. Lifetime of bubble rafts: cooperativity and avalanches.

    PubMed

    Ritacco, Hernán; Kiefer, Flavien; Langevin, Dominique

    2007-06-15

    We have studied the collapse of pseudo-bi-dimensional foams. These foams are made of uniformly sized soap bubbles packed in an hexagonal lattice sitting at the top of a liquid surface. The collapse process follows the sequence: (1) rupture of a first bubble, driven by thermal fluctuations and (2) a cascade of bursting bubbles. We present a simple numerical model which captures the main characteristics of the dynamics of foam collapse. We show that in a certain range of viscosities of the foaming solutions, the size distribution of the avalanches follows power laws as in self-organized criticality processes. PMID:17677967

  7. TCAD simulation of Low Gain Avalanche Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalal, Ranjeet; Jain, Geetika; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Ranjan, Kirti

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, detailed simulation using Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) tool, Silvaco for non-irradiated and irradiated LGAD (Low Gain Avalanche Detector) devices has been carried out. The effects of different design parameters and proton irradiation on LGAD operation are discussed in detail. An already published effective two trap bulk damage model is used to simulate the radiation damage without implementing any acceptor removal term. The TCAD simulation for irradiated LGAD devices produce decreasing gain with increasing fluence, similar to the measurement results. The space charge density and electric field distribution are used to illustrate the possible reasons for the degradation of gain of the irradiated LGAD devices.

  8. Photon detection with cooled avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. L.; Metscher, B. D.

    1987-01-01

    Commercial avalanche photodiodes have been operated as single-photon detectors at an optimum operating temperature and bias voltage. These detectors were found to be 1.5-3 times more sensitive than presently available photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Both single-photon detection probability and detector noise increase with bias voltage; detection probabilities greater than twice that of a PMT were obtained with detector noise levels below 100 counts per second. Higher probabilities were measured at higher noise levels. The sources of noise and their dependence on temperature and bias voltage are discussed.

  9. Avalanche Photodiode Arrays for Optical Communications Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, M.; Vilnrotter, V.

    2001-01-01

    An avalanche photodiode (APD) array for ground-based optical communications receivers is investigated for the reception of optical signals through the turbulent atmosphere. Kolmogorov phase screen simulations are used to generate realistic spatial distributions of the received optical field. It is shown that use of an APD array for pulse-position modulation detection can improve performance by up to 4 dB over single APD detection in the presence of turbulence, but that photon-counting detector arrays yield even greater gains.

  10. Cooled avalanche photodiode used for photon detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Deborah L.; Metscher, Brian D.

    1987-01-01

    Commercial avalanche photodiodes have been operated as single-photon detectors at an optimum operating temperature and bias voltage. These detectors were found to be 1.5 to 3 times more sensitive than presently-available photomultiplier tubes (PPMTs). Both single-photon detection probability and detector noise increase with bias voltage; detection probabilities greater than 25 percent were obtained with detector noise levels comparable to the noise of a PMT; higher probabilities were measured at higher noise levels. The sources of noise and their dependence on temperature and bias voltage are discussed.

  11. Bilayer avalanche spin-diode logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Joseph S.; Fadel, Eric R.; Wessels, Bruce W.; Querlioz, Damien; Sahakian, Alan V.

    2015-11-01

    A novel spintronic computing paradigm is proposed and analyzed in which InSb p-n bilayer avalanche spin-diodes are cascaded to efficiently perform complex logic operations. This spin-diode logic family uses control wires to generate magnetic fields that modulate the resistance of the spin-diodes, and currents through these devices control the resistance of cascaded devices. Electromagnetic simulations are performed to demonstrate the cascading mechanism, and guidelines are provided for the development of this innovative computing technology. This cascading scheme permits compact logic circuits with switching speeds determined by electromagnetic wave propagation rather than electron motion, enabling high-performance spintronic computing.

  12. Reaction Dynamics of O((3)P) + Propyne: II. Primary Products, Branching Ratios, and Role of Intersystem Crossing from Ab Initio Coupled Triplet/Singlet Potential Energy Surfaces and Statistical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Gimondi, Ilaria; Cavallotti, Carlo; Vanuzzo, Gianmarco; Balucani, Nadia; Casavecchia, Piergiorgio

    2016-07-14

    The mechanism of the O((3)P) + CH3CCH reaction was investigated using a combined experimental/theoretical approach. Experimentally the reaction dynamics was studied using crossed molecular beams (CMB) with mass-spectrometric detection and time-of-flight analysis at 9.2 kcal/mol collision energy. Theoretically master equation (ME) simulations were performed on a potential energy surface (PES) determined using high-level ab initio electronic structure calculations. In this paper (II) the theoretical results are described and compared with experiments, while in paper (I) are reported and discussed the results of the experimental study. The PES was investigated by determining structures and vibrational frequencies of wells and transition states at the CASPT2/aug-cc-pVTZ level using a minimal active space. Energies were then determined at the CASPT2 level increasing systematically the active space and at the CCSD(T) level extrapolating to the complete basis set limit. Two separate portions of the triplet PES were investigated, as O((3)P) can add either on the terminal or the central carbon of the unsaturated propyne bond. Minimum energy crossing points (MECPs) between the triplet and singlet PESs were searched at the CASPT2 level. The calculated spin-orbit coupling constants between the T1 and S0 electronic surfaces were ∼25 cm(-1) for both PESs. The portions of the singlet PES that can be accessed from the MECPs were investigated at the same level of theory. The system reactivity was predicted integrating stochastically the one-dimensional ME using Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory to determine rate constants on the full T1/S0 PESs, accounting explicitly for intersystem crossing (ISC) using the Landau-Zener model. The computational results are compared both with the branching ratios (BRs) determined experimentally in the companion paper (I) and with those estimated in a recent kinetic study at 298 K. The ME results allow to interpret the main system reactivity: CH

  13. Reaction Dynamics of O((3)P) + Propyne: II. Primary Products, Branching Ratios, and Role of Intersystem Crossing from Ab Initio Coupled Triplet/Singlet Potential Energy Surfaces and Statistical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Gimondi, Ilaria; Cavallotti, Carlo; Vanuzzo, Gianmarco; Balucani, Nadia; Casavecchia, Piergiorgio

    2016-07-14

    The mechanism of the O((3)P) + CH3CCH reaction was investigated using a combined experimental/theoretical approach. Experimentally the reaction dynamics was studied using crossed molecular beams (CMB) with mass-spectrometric detection and time-of-flight analysis at 9.2 kcal/mol collision energy. Theoretically master equation (ME) simulations were performed on a potential energy surface (PES) determined using high-level ab initio electronic structure calculations. In this paper (II) the theoretical results are described and compared with experiments, while in paper (I) are reported and discussed the results of the experimental study. The PES was investigated by determining structures and vibrational frequencies of wells and transition states at the CASPT2/aug-cc-pVTZ level using a minimal active space. Energies were then determined at the CASPT2 level increasing systematically the active space and at the CCSD(T) level extrapolating to the complete basis set limit. Two separate portions of the triplet PES were investigated, as O((3)P) can add either on the terminal or the central carbon of the unsaturated propyne bond. Minimum energy crossing points (MECPs) between the triplet and singlet PESs were searched at the CASPT2 level. The calculated spin-orbit coupling constants between the T1 and S0 electronic surfaces were ∼25 cm(-1) for both PESs. The portions of the singlet PES that can be accessed from the MECPs were investigated at the same level of theory. The system reactivity was predicted integrating stochastically the one-dimensional ME using Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory to determine rate constants on the full T1/S0 PESs, accounting explicitly for intersystem crossing (ISC) using the Landau-Zener model. The computational results are compared both with the branching ratios (BRs) determined experimentally in the companion paper (I) and with those estimated in a recent kinetic study at 298 K. The ME results allow to interpret the main system reactivity: CH

  14. Design and characterization of single photon avalanche diodes arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, L.; Tudisco, S.; Lanzanò, L.; Musumeci, F.; Privitera, S.; Scordino, A.; Condorelli, G.; Fallica, G.; Mazzillo, M.; Sanfilippo, D.; Valvo, G.

    2010-05-01

    During the last years, in collaboration with ST-Microelectronics, we developed a new avalanche photo sensor, single photon avalanche diode (SPAD) see Ref.[S. Privitera, et al., Sensors 8 (2008) 4636 [1];S. Tudisco et al., IEEE Sensors Journal 8 (2008) 1324 [2

  15. Validation of DEM prediction for granular avalanches on irregular terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Stuart R.; Cleary, Paul W.

    2015-09-01

    Accurate numerical simulation can provide crucial information useful for a greater understanding of destructive granular mass movements such as rock avalanches, landslides, and pyroclastic flows. It enables more informed and relatively low cost investigation of significant risk factors, mitigation strategy effectiveness, and sensitivity to initial conditions, material, or soil properties. In this paper, a granular avalanche experiment from the literature is reanalyzed and used as a basis to assess the accuracy of discrete element method (DEM) predictions of avalanche flow. Discrete granular approaches such as DEM simulate the motion and collisions of individual particles and are useful for identifying and investigating the controlling processes within an avalanche. Using a superquadric shape representation, DEM simulations were found to accurately reproduce transient and static features of the avalanche. The effect of material properties on the shape of the avalanche deposit was investigated. The simulated avalanche deposits were found to be sensitive to particle shape and friction, with the particle shape causing the sensitivity to friction to vary. The importance of particle shape, coupled with effect on the sensitivity to friction, highlights the importance of quantifying and including particle shape effects in numerical modeling of granular avalanches.

  16. Avalanches mediate crystallization in a hard-sphere glass.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Eduardo; Valeriani, Chantal; Zaccarelli, Emanuela; Poon, Wilson C K; Cates, Michael E; Pusey, Peter N

    2014-01-01

    By molecular-dynamics simulations, we have studied the devitrification (or crystallization) of aged hard-sphere glasses. First, we find that the dynamics of the particles are intermittent: Quiescent periods, when the particles simply "rattle" in their nearest-neighbor cages, are interrupted by abrupt "avalanches," where a subset of particles undergo large rearrangements. Second, we find that crystallization is associated with these avalanches but that the connection is not straightforward. The amount of crystal in the system increases during an avalanche, but most of the particles that become crystalline are different from those involved in the avalanche. Third, the occurrence of the avalanches is a largely stochastic process. Randomizing the velocities of the particles at any time during the simulation leads to a different subsequent series of avalanches. The spatial distribution of avalanching particles appears random, although correlations are found among avalanche initiation events. By contrast, we find that crystallization tends to take place in regions that already show incipient local order.

  17. A cooled avalanche photodiode with high photon detection probability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. L.; Metscher, B. D.

    1986-01-01

    An avalanche photodiode has been operated as a photon-counting detector with 2 to 3 times the sensitivity of currently-available photomultiplier tubes. APD (avalanche photodiodes) detection probabilities that exceed 27% and approach 50% have been measured at an optimum operating temperature which minimizes noise. The sources of noise and their dependence on operating temperature and bias voltage are discussed.

  18. Age of Palos Verdes submarine debris avalanche, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Normark, W.R.; McGann, M.; Sliter, R.

    2004-01-01

    The Palos Verdes debris avalanche is the largest, by volume, late Quaternary mass-wasted deposit recognized from the inner California Borderland basins. Early workers speculated that the sediment failure giving rise to the deposit is young, taking place well after sea level reached its present position. A newly acquired, closely-spaced grid of high-resolution, deep-tow boomer profiles of the debris avalanche shows that the Palos Verdes debris avalanche fills a turbidite leveed channel that extends seaward from San Pedro Sea Valley, with the bulk of the avalanche deposit appearing to result from a single failure on the adjacent slope. Radiocarbon dates from piston-cored sediment samples acquired near the distal edge of the avalanche deposit indicate that the main failure took place about 7500 yr BP. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Angle sensitive single photon avalanche diode

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Changhyuk Johnson, Ben Molnar, Alyosha

    2015-06-08

    An ideal light sensor would provide exact information on intensity, timing, location, and angle of incoming photons. Single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) provide such desired high (single photon) sensitivity with precise time information and can be implemented at a pixel-scale to form an array to extract spatial information. Furthermore, recent work has demonstrated photodiode-based structures (combined with micro-lenses or diffraction gratings) that are capable of encoding both spatial and angular information of incident light. In this letter, we describe the implementation of such a grating structure on SPADs to realize a pixel-scale angle-sensitive single photon avalanche diode (A-SPAD) built in a standard CMOS process. While the underlying SPAD structure provides high sensitivity, the time information of the two layers of diffraction gratings above offers angle-sensitivity. Such a unique combination of SPAD and diffraction gratings expands the sensing dimensions to pave a path towards lens-less 3-D imaging and light-field time-of-flight imaging.

  20. Reducing financial avalanches by random investments.

    PubMed

    Biondo, Alessio Emanuele; Pluchino, Alessandro; Rapisarda, Andrea; Helbing, Dirk

    2013-12-01

    Building on similarities between earthquakes and extreme financial events, we use a self-organized criticality-generating model to study herding and avalanche dynamics in financial markets. We consider a community of interacting investors, distributed in a small-world network, who bet on the bullish (increasing) or bearish (decreasing) behavior of the market which has been specified according to the S&P 500 historical time series. Remarkably, we find that the size of herding-related avalanches in the community can be strongly reduced by the presence of a relatively small percentage of traders, randomly distributed inside the network, who adopt a random investment strategy. Our findings suggest a promising strategy to limit the size of financial bubbles and crashes. We also obtain that the resulting wealth distribution of all traders corresponds to the well-known Pareto power law, while that of random traders is exponential. In other words, for technical traders, the risk of losses is much greater than the probability of gains compared to those of random traders. PMID:24483518

  1. Similar Hamiltonian Between Avalanche-effect & Sociophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksoed, Ssi, Wh-

    2016-05-01

    Of similar Hamiltonian concerned in ``sociophysics'', there were RandomFieldIsingModel/RFIM in external field retrieved in S. Sabhapandit:``Hysteresis & Avalanche in RandomFieldIsingModel'',2002:'' ..in earthquake, it is an energy release and in case of ferromagnet, it is the size of the domain flips''. Following the extremes & compromises curve in Serge Galam: ``Sociophysics: a Review of Galam Model'', 2008 fig. 12, h 9 whereas it seems similar with ``heating curve''-Prof. Ir. Abdul Kadir: ``Mesin Arus Searah'', h 192 when the heat sources are continuous denote continuous opinion dynamics. Further, hysteresis as duties in ``Kajian Analisis Model Mikromagnetik dari Struktur Magnet Nanokomposit'', 2007 [ UI file no. S29286 ] also sought:'' calculate the probability that `one more site became unstable' causes an avalanche of the spin flips...'' usually found in Per Bak sand-pile fractal characters experiment exhibits. Great acknowledgment to HE. Mr. LieutGen-TNI[rtd]. H. TUK SETYOHADI, +62-21-7220385, Jl. Sriwijaya Raya 3, Kebayoran Baru, South-Jakarta.

  2. Avalanches and scaling in plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Koslowski, M.

    2004-01-01

    Plastic deformation of crystalline materials is a complex non-homogeneous process characterized by avalanches in the motion of dislocations. We study the evolution of dislocations loops using an analytically solvable phase-field model of dislocations for ductile single crystals during monotonic loading. We present simulations of dislocations under slow external loading that generate scale-free avalanches and power-law behavior that are characteristics of self organized criticality. The distribution of dislocation loop sizes is given by P(A) {approx} A{sup -{sigma}}, with {sigma} = 1.8 {+-} 0.1. The power law exponent is in agreement with those found in acoustic emission measurements on stressed ice single crystals. In addition to the jerky character of dislocation motion, this model also predicts a range of macroscopic behaviors in agreement with observation, including hardening and dislocation multiplication with monotonic loading and a maximum in the acoustic emission signal at the onset of yielding. At sufficient large stress, the hardening rate drops and the stress-strain curve saturates. At the same time the acoustic emission as well as the dislocation production decreases in agreement with experimental observation.

  3. Reducing financial avalanches by random investments.

    PubMed

    Biondo, Alessio Emanuele; Pluchino, Alessandro; Rapisarda, Andrea; Helbing, Dirk

    2013-12-01

    Building on similarities between earthquakes and extreme financial events, we use a self-organized criticality-generating model to study herding and avalanche dynamics in financial markets. We consider a community of interacting investors, distributed in a small-world network, who bet on the bullish (increasing) or bearish (decreasing) behavior of the market which has been specified according to the S&P 500 historical time series. Remarkably, we find that the size of herding-related avalanches in the community can be strongly reduced by the presence of a relatively small percentage of traders, randomly distributed inside the network, who adopt a random investment strategy. Our findings suggest a promising strategy to limit the size of financial bubbles and crashes. We also obtain that the resulting wealth distribution of all traders corresponds to the well-known Pareto power law, while that of random traders is exponential. In other words, for technical traders, the risk of losses is much greater than the probability of gains compared to those of random traders.

  4. Avalanches and the distribution of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Edward T.; Hamilton, Russell J.

    1991-01-01

    The solar coronal magnetic field is proposed to be in a self-organized critical state, thus explaining the observed power-law dependence of solar-flare-occurrence rate on flare size which extends over more than five orders of magnitude in peak flux. The physical picture that arises is that solar flares are avalanches of many small reconnection events, analogous to avalanches of sand in the models published by Bak and colleagues in 1987 and 1988. Flares of all sizes are manifestations of the same physical processes, where the size of a given flare is determined by the number of elementary reconnection events. The relation between small-scale processes and the statistics of global-flare properties which follows from the self-organized magnetic-field configuration provides a way to learn about the physics of the unobservable small-scale reconnection processes. A simple lattice-reconnection model is presented which is consistent with the observed flare statistics. The implications for coronal heating are discussed and some observational tests of this picture are given.

  5. Angle sensitive single photon avalanche diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changhyuk; Johnson, Ben; Molnar, Alyosha

    2015-06-01

    An ideal light sensor would provide exact information on intensity, timing, location, and angle of incoming photons. Single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) provide such desired high (single photon) sensitivity with precise time information and can be implemented at a pixel-scale to form an array to extract spatial information. Furthermore, recent work has demonstrated photodiode-based structures (combined with micro-lenses or diffraction gratings) that are capable of encoding both spatial and angular information of incident light. In this letter, we describe the implementation of such a grating structure on SPADs to realize a pixel-scale angle-sensitive single photon avalanche diode (A-SPAD) built in a standard CMOS process. While the underlying SPAD structure provides high sensitivity, the time information of the two layers of diffraction gratings above offers angle-sensitivity. Such a unique combination of SPAD and diffraction gratings expands the sensing dimensions to pave a path towards lens-less 3-D imaging and light-field time-of-flight imaging.

  6. Reducing financial avalanches by random investments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondo, Alessio Emanuele; Pluchino, Alessandro; Rapisarda, Andrea; Helbing, Dirk

    2013-12-01

    Building on similarities between earthquakes and extreme financial events, we use a self-organized criticality-generating model to study herding and avalanche dynamics in financial markets. We consider a community of interacting investors, distributed in a small-world network, who bet on the bullish (increasing) or bearish (decreasing) behavior of the market which has been specified according to the S&P 500 historical time series. Remarkably, we find that the size of herding-related avalanches in the community can be strongly reduced by the presence of a relatively small percentage of traders, randomly distributed inside the network, who adopt a random investment strategy. Our findings suggest a promising strategy to limit the size of financial bubbles and crashes. We also obtain that the resulting wealth distribution of all traders corresponds to the well-known Pareto power law, while that of random traders is exponential. In other words, for technical traders, the risk of losses is much greater than the probability of gains compared to those of random traders.

  7. [Avalanche emergency. New aspects of the pathophysiology and therapy of buried avalanche victims].

    PubMed

    Brugger, H; Falk, M; Adler-Kastner, L

    1997-03-14

    A series of investigations on the pathophysiology and management of persons buried in an avalanche has been undertaken over the past few years in response to increased awareness of the importance of emergency medical treatment of avalanche victims and the fact that the high mortality rate has not decreased in spite of the improvement in rescue techniques. This paper is the very first review of the problems encountered in avalanche disasters. The developments over the past 20 years, in particular, are summarized and discussed. Furthermore, current opinions and recommendations on optimal rescue procedure, as well as the prevention of such emergencies are presented. Precise assessment of the survival probability after burial under an avalanche and recognition of the prognostic importance of an air pocket, but only limited role of hypothermia, provide the basis for new concepts governing therapy and triage by the emergency doctor. Resulting guidelines have been endorsed by the Emergency Medicine Subdivision of the International Commission of the Alpine Rescue Services (ICAR) and these recommendations are intended for implementation by organised rescue teams in order to reduce secondary deaths following successful extrication of victims from the avalanche masses. However, the chance of being rescued alive depends primarily on the rapidity of extrication, i.e. how quickly the rescue teams are alerted and transported to the disaster area in the first instance, then how quickly the victims are located and extricated. In order to reduce the mortality additional preventive measures must be introduced to avoid complete burial if possible, or appreciably hasten the rescue procedure. The very steep drop ("fatal kink") in survival probability as from 15 minutes after burial underlines the absolute necessity of the mastery of efficient rescue procedure by uninjured companions. Improvement of the technical developments for the avoidance of total burial (avalanche air bag) and

  8. Branch Library Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, John W.; And Others

    Designed for the training of a newly appointed branch librarian as well as for general background on the function of a branch library for the entire staff, this publication was written as a comprehensive guide to the administration of a branch library. Specific chapters focus on: (1) administrative goals and activities, (2) organizational…

  9. Characterizing Branched Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drury, Byron; Klales, Anna; Heller, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Branched flow appears in a variety of physical systems spanning length scales from microns to thousands of kilometers. For instance, it plays an important role in both electron transport in two dimensional electron gases and the propagation of tsunamis in the ocean. Branches have typically been identified with caustics in the theoretical literature, but concentrations of flux recognizable as branches can arise from other mechanisms. We propose a generalized definition of branching based on a local measure of the stability of trajectories. We analytically and numerically study the characteristics of Hamiltonian flow in phase space and characterize the relationship between branch formation and trajectory stability.

  10. Avalanche situation in Turkey and back calculation of selected events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, A.; Bühler, Y.; Christen, M.; Gürer, I.

    2014-05-01

    In Turkey, an average of 24 people die in snow avalanches every year, mainly in the eastern part of Anatolia and in the eastern Black Sea region, where high-mountain ranges are close to the sea. The proportion of people killed in buildings is very high (87%), especially in comparison to other European countries and North America. In this paper we discuss avalanche occurrence, the climatic situation and historical avalanche events in Turkey; in addition, we identify bottlenecks and suggest solutions to tackle avalanche problems. Furthermore, we have applied the numerical avalanche simulation software RAMMS (rapid mass movements simulation) combined with a (digital elevation model) DEM-based potential release zone identification algorithm to analyze the catastrophic avalanche events in the villages of Üzengili (Bayburt province) in 1993 and Yaylaönü (Trabzon province) in 1981. The results demonstrate the value of such an approach for regions with poor avalanche databases, enabling the calculation of different scenarios and the estimation of run-out distances, impact pressure and flow height.

  11. Record-breaking avalanches in driven threshold systems.

    PubMed

    Shcherbakov, Robert; Davidsen, Jörn; Tiampo, Kristy F

    2013-05-01

    Record-breaking avalanches generated by the dynamics of several driven nonlinear threshold models are studied. Such systems are characterized by intermittent behavior, where a slow buildup of energy is punctuated by an abrupt release of energy through avalanche events, which usually follow scale-invariant statistics. From the simulations of these systems it is possible to extract sequences of record-breaking avalanches, where each subsequent record-breaking event is larger in magnitude than all previous events. In the present work, several cellular automata are analyzed, among them the sandpile model, the Manna model, the Olami-Feder-Christensen (OFC) model, and the forest-fire model to investigate the record-breaking statistics of model avalanches that exhibit temporal and spatial correlations. Several statistical measures of record-breaking events are derived analytically and confirmed through numerical simulations. The statistics of record-breaking avalanches for the four models are compared to those of record-breaking events extracted from the sequences of independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) random variables. It is found that the statistics of record-breaking avalanches for the above cellular automata exhibit behavior different from that observed for i.i.d. random variables, which in turn can be used to characterize complex spatiotemporal dynamics. The most pronounced deviations are observed in the case of the OFC model with a strong dependence on the conservation parameter of the model. This indicates that avalanches in the OFC model are not independent and exhibit spatiotemporal correlations.

  12. Plasmonic field confinement for separate absorption-multiplication in InGaAs nanopillar avalanche photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Alan C; Senanayake, Pradeep; Hung, Chung-Hong; El-Howayek, Georges; Rajagopal, Abhejit; Currie, Marc; Hayat, Majeed M; Huffaker, Diana L

    2015-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are essential components in quantum key distribution systems and active imaging systems requiring both ultrafast response time to measure photon time of flight and high gain to detect low photon flux. The internal gain of an APD can improve system signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Excess noise is typically kept low through the selection of material with intrinsically low excess noise, using separate-absorption-multiplication (SAM) heterostructures, or taking advantage of the dead-space effect using thin multiplication regions. In this work we demonstrate the first measurement of excess noise and gain-bandwidth product in III-V nanopillars exhibiting substantially lower excess noise factors compared to bulk and gain-bandwidth products greater than 200 GHz. The nanopillar optical antenna avalanche detector (NOAAD) architecture is utilized for spatially separating the absorption region from the avalanche region via the NOA resulting in single carrier injection without the use of a traditional SAM heterostructure. PMID:26627932

  13. Neuronal avalanches imply maximum dynamic range in cortical networks at criticality.

    PubMed

    Shew, Woodrow L; Yang, Hongdian; Petermann, Thomas; Roy, Rajarshi; Plenz, Dietmar

    2009-12-01

    Spontaneous neuronal activity is a ubiquitous feature of cortex. Its spatiotemporal organization reflects past input and modulates future network output. Here we study whether a particular type of spontaneous activity is generated by a network that is optimized for input processing. Neuronal avalanches are a type of spontaneous activity observed in superficial cortical layers in vitro and in vivo with statistical properties expected from a network operating at "criticality." Theory predicts that criticality and, therefore, neuronal avalanches are optimal for input processing, but until now, this has not been tested in experiments. Here, we use cortex slice cultures grown on planar microelectrode arrays to demonstrate that cortical networks that generate neuronal avalanches benefit from a maximized dynamic range, i.e., the ability to respond to the greatest range of stimuli. By changing the ratio of excitation and inhibition in the cultures, we derive a network tuning curve for stimulus processing as a function of distance from criticality in agreement with predictions from our simulations. Our findings suggest that in the cortex, (1) balanced excitation and inhibition establishes criticality, which maximizes the range of inputs that can be processed, and (2) spontaneous activity and input processing are unified in the context of critical phenomena.

  14. Plasmonic field confinement for separate absorption-multiplication in InGaAs nanopillar avalanche photodiodes

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Alan C.; Senanayake, Pradeep; Hung, Chung-Hong; El-Howayek, Georges; Rajagopal, Abhejit; Currie, Marc; Hayat, Majeed M.; Huffaker, Diana L.

    2015-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are essential components in quantum key distribution systems and active imaging systems requiring both ultrafast response time to measure photon time of flight and high gain to detect low photon flux. The internal gain of an APD can improve system signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Excess noise is typically kept low through the selection of material with intrinsically low excess noise, using separate-absorption-multiplication (SAM) heterostructures, or taking advantage of the dead-space effect using thin multiplication regions. In this work we demonstrate the first measurement of excess noise and gain-bandwidth product in III–V nanopillars exhibiting substantially lower excess noise factors compared to bulk and gain-bandwidth products greater than 200 GHz. The nanopillar optical antenna avalanche detector (NOAAD) architecture is utilized for spatially separating the absorption region from the avalanche region via the NOA resulting in single carrier injection without the use of a traditional SAM heterostructure. PMID:26627932

  15. Indirect flat-panel detector with avalanche gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Hunt, Dylan C.; Tanioka, Kenkichi; Rowlands, John A.

    2004-05-01

    A new concept - an indirect flat-panel detector with avalanche gain - for low dose x-ray imaging has been proposed. The detector consists of an amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor optically coupled to a structured cesium iodide (CsI) scintillator. Under an electric field ESe, the a-Se is sensitive to light and converts the optical photons emitted from CsI into electronic signal. These signals can be stored and read out in the same fashion as in existing flat-panel detectors. When ESe is increased to > 90 V/μm, avalanche multiplication occurs. The avalanche gain ranges between 1-800 depending on ESe and the thickness of the a-Se layer dSe. The avalanche a-Se photoconductor is referred to as HARP (High-gain Avalanche Rushing amorphous Photoconductor). A cascaded linear system model for the proposed detector was developed in order to determine the optimal CsI properties and avalanche gain for different x-ray imaging applications. Our results showed that x-ray quantum noise limited performance can be achieved at the lowest exposure level necessary for fluoroscopy (0.1 μR) and mammography (0.1 mR) with a moderate avalanche gain of 20 (d = 1-2 μm). A laboratory test system using an existing HARP tube optically coupled (through a lens) to a CsI layer was built and the advantage of avalanche gain in overcoming electronic noise was demonstrated experimentally. One of the advantages of the avalanche gain is that it will permit the use of high resolution (HR) CsI (which due to its low light output has not previously been used in flat-panel detectors) to improve DQE at high spatial frequencies.

  16. Tree Branching: Leonardo da Vinci's Rule versus Biomechanical Models

    PubMed Central

    Minamino, Ryoko; Tateno, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    This study examined Leonardo da Vinci's rule (i.e., the sum of the cross-sectional area of all tree branches above a branching point at any height is equal to the cross-sectional area of the trunk or the branch immediately below the branching point) using simulations based on two biomechanical models: the uniform stress and elastic similarity models. Model calculations of the daughter/mother ratio (i.e., the ratio of the total cross-sectional area of the daughter branches to the cross-sectional area of the mother branch at the branching point) showed that both biomechanical models agreed with da Vinci's rule when the branching angles of daughter branches and the weights of lateral daughter branches were small; however, the models deviated from da Vinci's rule as the weights and/or the branching angles of lateral daughter branches increased. The calculated values of the two models were largely similar but differed in some ways. Field measurements of Fagus crenata and Abies homolepis also fit this trend, wherein models deviated from da Vinci's rule with increasing relative weights of lateral daughter branches. However, this deviation was small for a branching pattern in nature, where empirical measurements were taken under realistic measurement conditions; thus, da Vinci's rule did not critically contradict the biomechanical models in the case of real branching patterns, though the model calculations described the contradiction between da Vinci's rule and the biomechanical models. The field data for Fagus crenata fit the uniform stress model best, indicating that stress uniformity is the key constraint of branch morphology in Fagus crenata rather than elastic similarity or da Vinci's rule. On the other hand, mechanical constraints are not necessarily significant in the morphology of Abies homolepis branches, depending on the number of daughter branches. Rather, these branches were often in agreement with da Vinci's rule. PMID:24714065

  17. Seeded excitation avalanches in off-resonantly driven Rydberg gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonelli, C.; Valado, M. M.; Masella, G.; Asteria, L.; Arimondo, E.; Ciampini, D.; Morsch, O.

    2016-08-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the facilitated excitation dynamics in off-resonantly driven Rydberg gases by separating the initial off-resonant excitation phase from the facilitation phase, in which successive facilitation events lead to excitation avalanches. We achieve this by creating a controlled number of initial seed excitations. Greater insight into the avalanche mechanism is obtained from an analysis of the full counting distributions. We also present simple mathematical models and numerical simulations of the excitation avalanches that agree well with our experimental results.

  18. ELECTRON AVALANCHE MODEL OF DIELECTRIC-VACUUM SURFACE BREAKDOWN

    SciTech Connect

    Lauer, E J

    2007-02-21

    The model assumes that an 'initiating event' results in positive ions on the surface near the anode and reverses the direction of the normal component of electric field so that electrons in vacuum are attracted to the dielectric locally. A sequence of surface electron avalanches progresses in steps from the anode to the cathode. For 200 kV across 1 cm, the spacing of avalanches is predicted to be about 13 microns. The time for avalanches to step from the anode to the cathode is predicted to be about a ns.

  19. Characterization of avalanche photodiodes for lidar atmospheric return signal detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antill, C. W., Jr.; Holloway, R. M.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented from tests to characterize noise, dark current, overload, and gain versus bias, relationships of ten avalanche photodiodes. The advantages of avalanche photodiodes over photomultiplier tubes for given laser wavelengths and return signal amplitudes are outlined. The relationship between responsivity and temperature and dark current and temperature are examined. Also, measurements of the noise equivalent power, the excess noise factor, and linearity are given. The advantages of using avalanche photodiodes in the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment and the Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment are discussed.

  20. III-V alloy heterostructure high speed avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, H. D.; Nakano, K.; Tomasetta, L. R.

    1979-01-01

    Heterostructure avalanche photodiodes have been successfully fabricated in several III-V alloy systems: GaAlAs/GaAs, GaAlSb/GaAlSb, and InGaAsP/InP. These diodes cover optical wavelengths from 0.4 to 1.8 micron. Early stages of development show very encouraging results. High speed response of less than 35 ps and high quantum efficiency more than 95 percent have been obtained. The dark currents and the excess avalanche noise are also dicussed. A direct comparison of GaAlSb, GaAlAsSb, and In GaAsP avalanche photodiodes is given.

  1. Scaling crossover for the average avalanche shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanikolaou, Stefanos; Bohn, Felipe; Sommer, Rubem L.; Durin, Gianfranco; Zapperi, Stefano; Sethna, James P.

    2010-03-01

    Universality and the renormalization group claim to predict all behavior on long length and time scales asymptotically close to critical points. In practice, large simulations and heroic experiments have been needed to unambiguously test and measure the critical exponents and scaling functions. We announce here the measurement and prediction of universal corrections to scaling, applied to the temporal average shape of Barkhausen noise avalanches. We bypass the confounding factors of time-retarded interactions (eddy currents) by measuring thin permalloy films, and bypass thresholding effects and amplifier distortions by applying Wiener deconvolution. We show experimental shapes that are approximately symmetric, and measure the leading corrections to scaling. We solve a mean-field theory for the magnetization dynamics and calculate the relevant demagnetizing-field correction to scaling, showing qualitative agreement with the experiment. In this way, we move toward a quantitative theory useful at smaller time and length scales and farther from the critical point.

  2. High sensitivity 10Gb/s Si photonic receiver based on a low-voltage waveguide-coupled Ge avalanche photodetector.

    PubMed

    Chen, H T; Verbist, J; Verheyen, P; De Heyn, P; Lepage, G; De Coster, J; Absil, P; Yin, X; Bauwelinck, J; Van Campenhout, J; Roelkens, G

    2015-01-26

    We demonstrate low-voltage germanium waveguide avalanche photodetectors (APDs) with a gain × bandwidth product above 100GHz. A photonic receiver based on such a Ge APD, including a 0.13μm SiGe BiCMOS low-noise trans-impedance amplifier and a limiting amplifier, is realized. A 5.8dB sensitivity improvement is demonstrated at -5.9V bias at an avalanche gain of 6 through bit error ratio measurements. The absolute sensitivity in avalanche mode is -23.4dBm and -24.4dBm at a bit error ratio of 1 × 10(-12) and 1 × 10(-9) respectively. PMID:25835841

  3. DUE AvalRS: Remote Sensing Derive Avalanche Inventory Data for Decision Support and Hind-Cast After Avalanche Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frauenfelder, Regula; Kronholm, Kalle; Solberg, Rune; Larsen, Siri Oyen; Salberg, Arnt-Borre; Larsen, Jan Otto; Bjordal, Heidi

    2010-12-01

    Each year, snow avalanches hit populated areas and parts of the transport network in the Norwegian mountain regions, leading to loss of lives and the damaging of buildings and infrastructure. We present the results of a feasibility study on the operation of a service providing the National Public Roads Administration (NPRA) with hind-cast avalanche inventory data on a local-to-regional scale during the course of the winter season, and as soon as possible after major avalanche events. We have explored the use of imagery from high-resolution and very-high-resolution space-borne satellites applying manual mapping and automated image segmentation.

  4. First observation of B(s)(0) --> D(s)(+/-)K(-/+) and measurement of the ratio of branching fractions B(B(s)(0) --> D(s)(+/-)K(-/+)/B(B(s)(0) --> D(s)(+)pi(-)).

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-11-01

    A combined mass and particle identification fit is used to make the first observation of the decay B(s)(0) --> D(s)(+/-)K(-/+) and measure the branching fraction of B(s)(0) --> D(s)(+/-)K(-/+) relative to B(s)(0) --> D(s)(+)pi(-). This analysis uses 1.2 fb(-1) integrated luminosity of pp collisions at square root(s) = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We observe a B(s)(0) --> D(s)(+/-)K(-/+) signal with a statistical significance of 8.1 sigma and measure B(B(s)(0) --> D(s)(+/-)K(-/+) /B(B(s)(0) --> D(s)(+)pi(-) 0.097+/-0.018(stat) +/- 0.009(syst). PMID:20365917

  5. Observation of B(0)(s)-->Psi(2S)Phi and measurement of the ratio of branching fractions Beta(B(0)(s)-->Psi(2S)Phi)/Beta(B(0)(s)-->J/PsiPhi).

    PubMed

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Haim, E Ben; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cresciolo, F; Cruz, A; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; Daronco, S; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'orso, M; Paoli, F Delli; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dituro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Sciveres, M Garcia; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Naganoma, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; Denis, R St; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-06-16

    We report the first observation of B(0)(s)-->Psi(2S)Phi decay in p(p_) collisions at square root of 8=1.96 TeV using 360 pb(-1) of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We observe 20.2 +/- 5.0 and 12.3 +/- 4.1 B(0)(s)-->Psi(2S)Phi candidates, in Psi(2S)-->mu(+)mu(-) and Phi(2S)-->J/Phipi(+)pi(-) decay modes, respectively. We present a measurement of the relative branching fraction Beta(B(0)(s)-->Psi(2S)Phi)/Beta(B(0)(s)-->J/PsiPhi)=0.52 +/- 0.13(stat) +/- 0.04(syst) +/- 0.06(BR) using the Psi(2S)-->mu(+)mu(-) decay mode.

  6. First observation of B(s)(0) --> D(s)(+/-)K(-/+) and measurement of the ratio of branching fractions B(B(s)(0) --> D(s)(+/-)K(-/+)/B(B(s)(0) --> D(s)(+)pi(-)).

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-11-01

    A combined mass and particle identification fit is used to make the first observation of the decay B(s)(0) --> D(s)(+/-)K(-/+) and measure the branching fraction of B(s)(0) --> D(s)(+/-)K(-/+) relative to B(s)(0) --> D(s)(+)pi(-). This analysis uses 1.2 fb(-1) integrated luminosity of pp collisions at square root(s) = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We observe a B(s)(0) --> D(s)(+/-)K(-/+) signal with a statistical significance of 8.1 sigma and measure B(B(s)(0) --> D(s)(+/-)K(-/+) /B(B(s)(0) --> D(s)(+)pi(-) 0.097+/-0.018(stat) +/- 0.009(syst).

  7. Observation of B(0)(s)-->Psi(2S)Phi and measurement of the ratio of branching fractions Beta(B(0)(s)-->Psi(2S)Phi)/Beta(B(0)(s)-->J/PsiPhi).

    PubMed

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Haim, E Ben; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cresciolo, F; Cruz, A; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; Daronco, S; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'orso, M; Paoli, F Delli; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dituro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Sciveres, M Garcia; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Naganoma, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; Denis, R St; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-06-16

    We report the first observation of B(0)(s)-->Psi(2S)Phi decay in p(p_) collisions at square root of 8=1.96 TeV using 360 pb(-1) of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We observe 20.2 +/- 5.0 and 12.3 +/- 4.1 B(0)(s)-->Psi(2S)Phi candidates, in Psi(2S)-->mu(+)mu(-) and Phi(2S)-->J/Phipi(+)pi(-) decay modes, respectively. We present a measurement of the relative branching fraction Beta(B(0)(s)-->Psi(2S)Phi)/Beta(B(0)(s)-->J/PsiPhi)=0.52 +/- 0.13(stat) +/- 0.04(syst) +/- 0.06(BR) using the Psi(2S)-->mu(+)mu(-) decay mode. PMID:16803368

  8. Relative degradation of near infrared avalanche photodiodes from proton irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Heidi; Johnston, Allan H.

    2004-01-01

    InGaAs and Ge avalanche photodiodes are compared for the effects of 63-MeV protons on dark current. Differences in displacement damage factors are discussed as they relate to structural differences between devices.

  9. Effects of scale-free avalanche walks on anomalous diffusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Joo

    2016-07-01

    Effects of scale-free avalanche walks on anomalous diffusions have been studied by introducing simple non-Markovian walk models. The scale-free avalanche walk is realized as a walker goes to one direction consistently in a time interval, the distribution of which follows a power-law. And it is applied to the memory models, in which the entire history of a walk process is memorized or the memory for the latest step is enhanced with time. The power-law avalanche walk with memory effects strengthens the persistence between steps and thus makes the Hurst exponent be larger than the cases without avalanche walks, while does not affect the anti-persistent nature.

  10. Random walk theory applied to electron avalanche formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    Use of microscopic detail in random walk theory describing the initial formations of a large number of avalanches shows that concomitant electron transport coefficients quickly relax to equilibrium values. This enables the use of random walks having step sizes and probabilities based only on local electric field strengths and densities. A self-consistent avalanche solution which accounts for collective long range Coulomb interactions as well as short range elastic and inelastic collisions between electrons and background atoms is demonstrated for helium. Avalanche growth retardation followed by an abrupt growth augmentation as time proceeds is shown to be associated with the formation of regions of charge density extrema near the avalanche axis and within the axial distance covered by the electron swarm.

  11. Physical vulnerability of reinforced concrete buildings impacted by snow avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, D.; Naaim, M.; Brun, M.

    2010-07-01

    This paper deals with the assessment of physical vulnerability of civil engineering structures to snow avalanche loadings. In this case, the vulnerability of the element at risk is defined by its damage level expressed on a scale from 0 (no damage) to 1 (total destruction). The vulnerability of a building depends on its structure and flow features (geometry, mechanical properties, type of avalanche, topography, etc.). This makes it difficult to obtain vulnerability relations. Most existing vulnerability relations have been built from field observations. This approach suffers from the scarcity of well documented events. Moreover, the back analysis is based on both rough descriptions of the avalanche and the structure. To overcome this problem, numerical simulations of reinforced concrete structures loaded by snow avalanches are carried out. Numerical simulations allow to study, in controlled conditions, the structure behavior under snow avalanche loading. The structure is modeled in 3-D by the finite element method (FEM). The elasto-plasticity framework is used to represent the mechanical behavior of both materials (concrete and steel bars) and the transient feature of the avalanche loading is taken into account in the simulation. Considering a reference structure, several simulation campaigns are conducted in order to assess its snow avalanches vulnerability. Thus, a damage index is defined and is based on global and local parameters of the structure. The influence of the geometrical features of the structure, the compressive strength of the concrete, the density of steel inside the composite material and the maximum impact pressure on the damage index are studied and analyzed. These simulations allow establishing the vulnerability as a function of the impact pressure and the structure features. The derived vulnerability functions could be used for risk analysis in a snow avalanche context.

  12. Modeling negative feedback in single-photon avalanche diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Majeed M.; Ramirez, David A.; Rees, Graham J.; Itzler, Mark A.

    2010-04-01

    Recently, considerable attention has been placed upon exploiting the negative-feedback effect in accelerating the quenching time of the avalanche current in passively quenched single-photon avalanche-diode (SPAD) circuits. Reducing the quenching time results in a reduction in the total charge generated in the SPAD, thereby reducing the number of trapped carries; this, in turn, can lead to improved after-pulsing characteristics. A passively quenched SPAD circuit consists of a DC source connected to the SPAD, to provide the reverse bias, and a series load resistor. Upon a photon-generated electron-hole pair triggering an avalanche breakdown, current through the diode and the load resistor rises quickly reaching a steady state value, after which it can collapse (quench) at a stochastic time. In this paper we review recent analytical and Monte-Carlo based models for the quenching time. In addition, results on the statistics of the quenching time and the avalanche pulse duration of SPADs with arbitrary time-variant field across the multiplication region are presented. The calculations of the statistics of the avalanche pulse duration use the dead-space multiplication theory (DSMT) to determine the probability of the avalanche pulse to quench by time t after the instant s at which the electron-hole pair that triggers the avalanche was created. In the analytical and Monte-Carlo based models for the quenching time, the dynamic negative feedback, which is due to the dynamic voltage drop across the load resistor, is taken into account. In addition, in the Monte-Carlo simulations the stochastic nature of the avalanche current is also considered.

  13. Optimum Receiver Structure for PPM Signals with Avalanche Photodiode Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V.; Srinivasan, M.

    1998-01-01

    The maximum likelihood decision statistic for detection of pulse-position modulated signals with an avalanche photodiode is derived, using the more accurate Webb density rather than Poisson or Gaussian approximations for the distribution of avalanche photodiode output electrons. It is shown that for Webb-distributed output electtrons, the maximum likelihood rule is to choose the PPM word corresponding to the slot with the maximum electron count.

  14. Avalanche risk assessment for the link Osh - Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarkulova, Kydyr

    2015-04-01

    The Bishkek-Osh road is main North-South ground transportation connection between the two major cities of Kyrgyzstan. One of the causes for frequent interruptions and closures between November and May is the avalanche risk due to local terrain characteristics and orographically induced precipitation maxima during winter. As a first step towards more effective prediction and implementation of mitigating measures the development of a digital avalanche inventory ('avalanche cadastre') has been initiated. This is aiming at modeling regional risk, and prioritizes the implementation of protective infrastructures in the most avalanche-prone zones. In addition, this helps with continuous monitoring of avalanche behaviour and the assessment of potential influence of climate change. For the parameterisation of models and support of decisions, details about avalanche incidences need to be collected. Historical data collected during Soviet time serve as an important baseline, complemented by more recent data. Overall, developing such a geo database shall be useful and effective for future planning at the Ministry of Emergency Services. This paper demonstrates important parameters to be collected and critical role of historical data as a baseline. Geodatabases are being developed on ArcGIS and used locally for planning preventive measures.

  15. Avalanches and hysteresis in frustrated superconductors and XY spin glasses.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Auditya; Andreanov, Alexei; Müller, Markus

    2014-10-01

    We study avalanches along the hysteresis loop of long-range interacting spin glasses with continuous XY symmetry, which serves as a toy model of granular superconductors with long-range and frustrated Josephson couplings. We identify sudden jumps in the T=0 configurations of the XY phases as an external field is increased. They are initiated by the softest mode of the inverse susceptibility matrix becoming unstable, which induces an avalanche of phase updates (or spin alignments). We analyze the statistics of these events and study the correlation between the nonlinear avalanches and the soft mode that initiates them. We find that the avalanches follow the directions of a small fraction of the softest modes of the inverse susceptibility matrix, similarly as was found in avalanches in jammed systems. In contrast to the similar Ising spin glass (Sherrington-Kirkpatrick) studied previously, we find that avalanches are not distributed with a scale-free power law but rather have a typical size which scales with the system size. We also observe that the Hessians of the spin-glass minima are not part of standard random matrix ensembles as the lowest eigenvector has a fractal support. PMID:25375434

  16. Avalanches and hysteresis in frustrated superconductors and XY spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Auditya; Andreanov, Alexei; Müller, Markus

    2014-10-01

    We study avalanches along the hysteresis loop of long-range interacting spin glasses with continuous XY symmetry, which serves as a toy model of granular superconductors with long-range and frustrated Josephson couplings. We identify sudden jumps in the T =0 configurations of the XY phases as an external field is increased. They are initiated by the softest mode of the inverse susceptibility matrix becoming unstable, which induces an avalanche of phase updates (or spin alignments). We analyze the statistics of these events and study the correlation between the nonlinear avalanches and the soft mode that initiates them. We find that the avalanches follow the directions of a small fraction of the softest modes of the inverse susceptibility matrix, similarly as was found in avalanches in jammed systems. In contrast to the similar Ising spin glass (Sherrington-Kirkpatrick) studied previously, we find that avalanches are not distributed with a scale-free power law but rather have a typical size which scales with the system size. We also observe that the Hessians of the spin-glass minima are not part of standard random matrix ensembles as the lowest eigenvector has a fractal support.

  17. Avalanches, plasticity, and ordering in colloidal crystals under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, D.; Reichhardt, C. J. Olson; Reichhardt, C.

    2016-06-01

    Using numerical simulations we examine colloids with a long-range Coulomb interaction confined in a two-dimensional trough potential undergoing dynamical compression. As the depth of the confining well is increased, the colloids move via elastic distortions interspersed with intermittent bursts or avalanches of plastic motion. In these avalanches, the colloids rearrange to minimize their colloid-colloid repulsive interaction energy by adopting an average lattice constant that is isotropic despite the anisotropic nature of the compression. The avalanches take the form of shear banding events that decrease or increase the structural order of the system. At larger compression, the avalanches are associated with a reduction of the number of rows of colloids that fit within the confining potential, and between avalanches the colloids can exhibit partially crystalline or anisotropic ordering. The colloid velocity distributions during the avalanches have a non-Gaussian form with power-law tails and exponents that are consistent with those found for the velocity distributions of gliding dislocations. We observe similar behavior when we subsequently decompress the system, and find a partially hysteretic response reflecting the irreversibility of the plastic events.

  18. A revision of the Haiming rock avalanche (Eastern Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufresne, Anja; Ostermann, Marc; Kelfoun, Karim; Ring, Max; Asam, Dario; Prager, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The carbonate Haiming rock avalanche is directly neighbouring the larger Tschirgant rock avalanche deposit, both located in the upper Inn valley (Tyrol, Austria). Based on detailed morpho-lithologic mapping of the deposit, which has not been done at Haiming before, the sedimentology of the Holocene landslide debris is characterised. Structural-tectonic elements of the bedrock units at the scarp area are supplemented with borehole data from drillings at the source area giving valuable insights into the complex geological bedrock composition and structure. New source and runout reconstructions allow updated volumetric calculations, which are subsequently integrated into numerical runout modelling. Haiming is one of few topographically unobstructed rock avalanches, yet its morphology was greatly influenced by fluvial terraces, which are still discernible through the deposit on LiDAR hillshade images. We also address the influence of the rock avalanche on the valley floor and local river system as a short-lived dam and its interaction with fluvial incision. Finally, we discuss the Haiming rock avalanche in view of the other massive rock slope failures in the area ("Fernpass cluster"), their spatio-temporal distribution, and point out further highlights of this simple(?) rock avalanche deposit.

  19. Repertoires of Spike Avalanches Are Modulated by Behavior and Novelty.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Tiago L; Ribeiro, Sidarta; Copelli, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal avalanches measured as consecutive bouts of thresholded field potentials represent a statistical signature that the brain operates near a critical point. In theory, criticality optimizes stimulus sensitivity, information transmission, computational capability and mnemonic repertoires size. Field potential avalanches recorded via multielectrode arrays from cortical slice cultures are repeatable spatiotemporal activity patterns. It remains unclear whether avalanches of action potentials observed in forebrain regions of freely-behaving rats also form recursive repertoires, and whether these have any behavioral relevance. Here, we show that spike avalanches, recorded from hippocampus (HP) and sensory neocortex of freely-behaving rats, constitute distinct families of recursive spatiotemporal patterns. A significant number of those patterns were specific to a behavioral state. Although avalanches produced during sleep were mostly similar to others that occurred during waking, the repertoire of patterns recruited during sleep differed significantly from that of waking. More importantly, exposure to novel objects increased the rate at which new patterns arose, also leading to changes in post-exposure repertoires, which were significantly different from those before the exposure. A significant number of families occurred exclusively during periods of whisker contact with objects, but few were associated with specific objects. Altogether, the results provide original evidence linking behavior and criticality at the spike level: spike avalanches form repertoires that emerge in waking, recur during sleep, are diversified by novelty and contribute to object representation.

  20. Avalanches, plasticity, and ordering in colloidal crystals under compression.

    PubMed

    McDermott, D; Reichhardt, C J Olson; Reichhardt, C

    2016-06-01

    Using numerical simulations we examine colloids with a long-range Coulomb interaction confined in a two-dimensional trough potential undergoing dynamical compression. As the depth of the confining well is increased, the colloids move via elastic distortions interspersed with intermittent bursts or avalanches of plastic motion. In these avalanches, the colloids rearrange to minimize their colloid-colloid repulsive interaction energy by adopting an average lattice constant that is isotropic despite the anisotropic nature of the compression. The avalanches take the form of shear banding events that decrease or increase the structural order of the system. At larger compression, the avalanches are associated with a reduction of the number of rows of colloids that fit within the confining potential, and between avalanches the colloids can exhibit partially crystalline or anisotropic ordering. The colloid velocity distributions during the avalanches have a non-Gaussian form with power-law tails and exponents that are consistent with those found for the velocity distributions of gliding dislocations. We observe similar behavior when we subsequently decompress the system, and find a partially hysteretic response reflecting the irreversibility of the plastic events.

  1. Avalanches and hysteresis in frustrated superconductors and XY spin glasses.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Auditya; Andreanov, Alexei; Müller, Markus

    2014-10-01

    We study avalanches along the hysteresis loop of long-range interacting spin glasses with continuous XY symmetry, which serves as a toy model of granular superconductors with long-range and frustrated Josephson couplings. We identify sudden jumps in the T=0 configurations of the XY phases as an external field is increased. They are initiated by the softest mode of the inverse susceptibility matrix becoming unstable, which induces an avalanche of phase updates (or spin alignments). We analyze the statistics of these events and study the correlation between the nonlinear avalanches and the soft mode that initiates them. We find that the avalanches follow the directions of a small fraction of the softest modes of the inverse susceptibility matrix, similarly as was found in avalanches in jammed systems. In contrast to the similar Ising spin glass (Sherrington-Kirkpatrick) studied previously, we find that avalanches are not distributed with a scale-free power law but rather have a typical size which scales with the system size. We also observe that the Hessians of the spin-glass minima are not part of standard random matrix ensembles as the lowest eigenvector has a fractal support.

  2. Repertoires of Spike Avalanches Are Modulated by Behavior and Novelty

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Tiago L.; Ribeiro, Sidarta; Copelli, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal avalanches measured as consecutive bouts of thresholded field potentials represent a statistical signature that the brain operates near a critical point. In theory, criticality optimizes stimulus sensitivity, information transmission, computational capability and mnemonic repertoires size. Field potential avalanches recorded via multielectrode arrays from cortical slice cultures are repeatable spatiotemporal activity patterns. It remains unclear whether avalanches of action potentials observed in forebrain regions of freely-behaving rats also form recursive repertoires, and whether these have any behavioral relevance. Here, we show that spike avalanches, recorded from hippocampus (HP) and sensory neocortex of freely-behaving rats, constitute distinct families of recursive spatiotemporal patterns. A significant number of those patterns were specific to a behavioral state. Although avalanches produced during sleep were mostly similar to others that occurred during waking, the repertoire of patterns recruited during sleep differed significantly from that of waking. More importantly, exposure to novel objects increased the rate at which new patterns arose, also leading to changes in post-exposure repertoires, which were significantly different from those before the exposure. A significant number of families occurred exclusively during periods of whisker contact with objects, but few were associated with specific objects. Altogether, the results provide original evidence linking behavior and criticality at the spike level: spike avalanches form repertoires that emerge in waking, recur during sleep, are diversified by novelty and contribute to object representation. PMID:27047341

  3. Repertoires of Spike Avalanches Are Modulated by Behavior and Novelty.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Tiago L; Ribeiro, Sidarta; Copelli, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal avalanches measured as consecutive bouts of thresholded field potentials represent a statistical signature that the brain operates near a critical point. In theory, criticality optimizes stimulus sensitivity, information transmission, computational capability and mnemonic repertoires size. Field potential avalanches recorded via multielectrode arrays from cortical slice cultures are repeatable spatiotemporal activity patterns. It remains unclear whether avalanches of action potentials observed in forebrain regions of freely-behaving rats also form recursive repertoires, and whether these have any behavioral relevance. Here, we show that spike avalanches, recorded from hippocampus (HP) and sensory neocortex of freely-behaving rats, constitute distinct families of recursive spatiotemporal patterns. A significant number of those patterns were specific to a behavioral state. Although avalanches produced during sleep were mostly similar to others that occurred during waking, the repertoire of patterns recruited during sleep differed significantly from that of waking. More importantly, exposure to novel objects increased the rate at which new patterns arose, also leading to changes in post-exposure repertoires, which were significantly different from those before the exposure. A significant number of families occurred exclusively during periods of whisker contact with objects, but few were associated with specific objects. Altogether, the results provide original evidence linking behavior and criticality at the spike level: spike avalanches form repertoires that emerge in waking, recur during sleep, are diversified by novelty and contribute to object representation. PMID:27047341

  4. Avalanches, plasticity, and ordering in colloidal crystals under compression.

    PubMed

    McDermott, D; Reichhardt, C J Olson; Reichhardt, C

    2016-06-01

    Using numerical simulations we examine colloids with a long-range Coulomb interaction confined in a two-dimensional trough potential undergoing dynamical compression. As the depth of the confining well is increased, the colloids move via elastic distortions interspersed with intermittent bursts or avalanches of plastic motion. In these avalanches, the colloids rearrange to minimize their colloid-colloid repulsive interaction energy by adopting an average lattice constant that is isotropic despite the anisotropic nature of the compression. The avalanches take the form of shear banding events that decrease or increase the structural order of the system. At larger compression, the avalanches are associated with a reduction of the number of rows of colloids that fit within the confining potential, and between avalanches the colloids can exhibit partially crystalline or anisotropic ordering. The colloid velocity distributions during the avalanches have a non-Gaussian form with power-law tails and exponents that are consistent with those found for the velocity distributions of gliding dislocations. We observe similar behavior when we subsequently decompress the system, and find a partially hysteretic response reflecting the irreversibility of the plastic events. PMID:27415320

  5. Measurement of the Ratio of Branching Fractions Br(B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$ π+)/Br(B0 → D- π+) at CDF-II

    SciTech Connect

    Furic, Ivan Kresimir

    2004-03-01

    The measurement of B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing is one of the flagship analyses for the Run II B physics program. The sensitivity of the measurement to the frequency of B$0\\atop{s}$ oscillations strongly depends on the number of reconstructed B$0\\atop{s}$ mesons. They present the measurement of the ratio of branching fractions Br(B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$π+)/Br(B0 → D-π+), which directly influences the number of B$0\\atop{s}$ events available for the measurement of B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing at CDF-II. They analyze 115 pb-1 of data collected with the CDF-II detector in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using a novel displaced track trigger. They reconstruct 78 ± 11 B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$π+ decays at 1153 ± 45 B0 → D-π+ decays with good signal to background ratio. This is the world's largest sample of fully reconstructed B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$π+ decays. They find the ratio of production fractions multiplied by the ratio of branching fractions to be: fs/fd • Br(B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$π+)/Br(B0 → D-π+) = 0.325 ± 0.046(stat) ± 0.034(syst) ± 0.084 (BR). Using the world average value of fs/fd = 0.26 ± 0.03, we infer that the ratio of branching fractions is: Br(B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$π+)/Br(B0 → D-π+) = 1.25 ± 0.18(stat) ± 0.13(syst) ± 0.32(BR) ± 0.14(PR) where the last uncertainty is due to the uncertainty on the world average measurement of the ratio of B$0\\atop{s}$ to B0 production rates, fs/fd.

  6. Optimal branching designs in respiratory systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Keunhwan; Kim, Wonjung; Kim, Ho-Young

    2015-11-01

    In nature, the size of the flow channels systematically decreases with multiple generations of branching, and a mother branch is ultimately divided into numerous terminal daughters. One important feature of branching designs is an increase in the total cross-sectional area along with generation, which provide more time and area for mass transfer at the terminal branches. However, the expansion of the total cross-sectional area can be costly due to the maintenance of redundant branches or the additional viscous resistance. Accordingly, we expect to find optimal designs in natural branching systems. Here we present two examples of branching designs in respiratory systems: fish gills and human lung airways. Fish gills consist of filaments with well-ordered lamellar structures. By developing a mathematical model of oxygen transfer rate as a function of the dimensions of fish gills, we demonstrate that the interlamellar distance has been optimized to maximize the oxygen transfer rate. Using the same framework, we examine the diameter reduction ratio in human lung airways, which branch by dichotomy with a systematic reduction of their diameters. Our mathematical model for oxygen transport in the airways enables us to unveil the design principle of human lung airways.

  7. Observation of B0(s) -->psi(2S)phi and Measurement of Ratio ofBranching Fractions B(B0(s) -->psi(2S)phi)/B(B0(s) -->J/psiphi

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A. et al.

    2006-02-02

    We report the first observation of B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}{psi}(2S){phi} decay in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV using 360 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We observe 20.2{+-}5.0 and 12.3{+-}4.1 B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}{psi}(2S){phi} candidates, in {psi}(2S){yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and {psi}(2S){yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay modes, respectively. We present a measurement of the relative branching fraction (script B)(B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}{psi}(2S){phi})/(script B)(B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{phi})=0.52{+-}0.13(stat){+-}0.04(syst){+-}0.06(BR) using the {psi}(2S){yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decay mode.

  8. Observation of B0(s) ---> psi(2S)phi and measurement of ratio of branching fractions B(B0(s) ---> psi(2S)phi) / B(B0(s) ---> J/psi phi)

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-02-01

    The authors report the first observation of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {psi}(2S){phi} decay in p{bar p} collisions {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using 360 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. They observe 20.2 {+-} 5.0 and 12.3 {+-} 4.1 B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {psi}(2S){phi} candidates, in {psi}(2S) {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and {psi}(2S) {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay modes, respectively. They present a measurement of the relative branching fraction {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {psi}(2S){phi})/{Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}) = 0.52 {+-} 0.13(stat.) {+-} 0.04(syst.) {+-} 0.06(BR) using the {psi}(2S) {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decay mode.

  9. Melons are Branched Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurau, Razvan; Ryan, James P.

    2014-11-01

    Melonic graphs constitute the family of graphs arising at leading order in the 1/N expansion of tensor models. They were shown to lead to a continuum phase, reminiscent of branched polymers. We show here that they are in fact precisely branched polymers, that is, they possess Hausdorff dimension 2 and spectral dimension 4/3.

  10. Skier triggering of backcountry avalanches with skilled route selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinickas, Alexandra; Haegeli, Pascal; Jamieson, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    Jamieson (2009) provided numerical estimates for the baseline probabilities of triggering an avalanche by a backcountry skier making fresh tracks without skilled route selection as a function of the North American avalanche danger scale (i.e., hazard levels Low, Moderate, Considerable, High and Extreme). Using the results of an expert survey, he showed that triggering probabilities while skiing directly up, down or across a trigger zone without skilled route selection increase roughly by a factor of 10 with each step of the North American avalanche danger scale (i.e. hazard level). The objective of the present study is to examine the effect of skilled route selection on the relationship between triggering probability and hazard level. To assess the effect of skilled route selection on triggering probability by hazard level, we analysed avalanche hazard assessments as well as reports of skiing activity and triggering of avalanches from 11 Canadian helicopter and snowcat operations during two winters (2012-13 and 2013-14). These reports were submitted to the daily information exchange among Canadian avalanche safety operations, and reflect professional decision-making and route selection practices of guides leading groups of skiers. We selected all skier-controlled or accidentally triggered avalanches with a destructive size greater than size 1 according to the Canadian avalanche size classification, triggered by any member of a guided group (guide or guest). These operations forecast the avalanche hazard daily for each of three elevation bands: alpine, treeline and below treeline. In contrast to the 2009 study, an exposure was defined as a group skiing within any one of the three elevation bands, and consequently within a hazard rating, for the day (~4,300 ratings over two winters). For example, a group that skied below treeline (rated Moderate) and treeline (rated Considerable) in one day, would receive one count for exposure to Moderate hazard, and one count for

  11. Dead Time of Single Photon Avalanche Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, L.; Tudisco, S.; Musumeci, F.; Scordino, A.; Fallica, G.; Mazzillo, M.; Zimbone, M.

    2011-06-01

    Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) is the new generation of Geiger-Muller counter device developed in semiconductor technology [S. Privitera et al. Sensors Journal, vol 8 Iss. 8 (2008) 4636; S. Tudisco et al. IEEE Sensors Journal vol 8 ISS 7-8 (2008) 1324; S. Cova et al. Applied Optics 35 (1996) 1956]. Physical dead time model and noise production process has been analyzed and their corrections have been performed [S.H. Lee, R.P. Gardner, M. Jae, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. in Phys. Res. B 263 (2007) 46]. We have been able to extract the real amount of incident photon rate up to 10 7cps using a device with 0.97μs total deadtime. We also developed the equation of the noise count rate vs incoming photon rate, supported by Montecarlo simulation and experimental data. We marked the difference between dark rate and noise count rate, and introduced the noise rate inside the hybrid deadtime equation used for SPAD device.

  12. Avalanche outbreaks emerging in cooperative contagions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Weiran; Chen, Li; Ghanbarnejad, Fakhteh; Grassberger, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The spreading of contagions can exhibit a percolation transition, which separates transitory prevalence from outbreaks that reach a finite fraction of the population. Such transitions are commonly believed to be continuous, but empirical studies have shown more violent spreading modes when the participating agents are not limited to one type. Striking examples include the co-epidemic of the Spanish flu and pneumonia that occurred in 1918 (refs , ), and, more recently, the concurrent prevalence of HIV/AIDS and a host of diseases. It remains unclear to what extent an outbreak in the presence of interacting pathogens differs from that due to an ordinary single-agent process. Here we study a mechanistic model for understanding contagion processes involving inter-agent cooperation. Our stochastic simulations reveal the possible emergence of a massive avalanche-like outbreak right at the threshold, which is manifested as a discontinuous phase transition. Such an abrupt change arises only if the underlying network topology supports a bottleneck for cascaded mutual infections. Surprisingly, all these discontinuous transitions are accompanied by non-trivial critical behaviours, presenting a rare case of hybrid transition. The findings may imply the origin of catastrophic occurrences in many realistic systems, from co-epidemics to financial contagions.

  13. The structure of powder snow avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sovilla, Betty; McElwaine, Jim N.; Louge, Michel Y.

    2015-01-01

    Powder snow avalanches (PSAs) can be hundreds of metres high and descend at astonishing speeds. This review paints a composite picture of PSAs from data acquired at the Vallée de la Sionne test site in Switzerland, including time-histories of snow cover thickness from buried RADAR and, at several elevations on a pylon, impact pressures from load cells, air pressure, particle velocity from optical sensors, and cloud density and particle cluster size from capacitance probes. PSAs feature distinct flow regions with stratification in mean density. At the head, highly fluctuating impact pressures weaken with elevation, while vertical velocity profiles evolve rapidly along the flow, suggesting that surface snow layers of light, cold, cohesionless snow erupt into a turbulent, inhomogeneous, recirculating frontal cloud region. For hundreds of metres behind the head, cloud stratification sharpens with the deposition of suspended cloud particles, while a denser basal flow of increasing thickness forms as deeper, warmer and heavier parts of the weakened snow cover are entrained. Toward the tail, vertical velocity profiles are more uniform, impact pressures become lower and steadier as the flow becomes thinner, and snow pack entrainment is negligible.

  14. OPTIMIZING THROUGH CO-EVOLUTIONARY AVALANCHES

    SciTech Connect

    S. BOETTCHER; A. PERCUS

    2000-08-01

    We explore a new general-purpose heuristic for finding high-quality solutions to hard optimization problems. The method, called extremal optimization, is inspired by ''self-organized critically,'' a concept introduced to describe emergent complexity in many physical systems. In contrast to Genetic Algorithms which operate on an entire ''gene-pool'' of possible solutions, extremal optimization successively replaces extremely undesirable elements of a sub-optimal solution with new, random ones. Large fluctuations, called ''avalanches,'' ensue that efficiently explore many local optima. Drawing upon models used to simulate far-from-equilibrium dynamics, extremal optimization complements approximation methods inspired by equilibrium statistical physics, such as simulated annealing. With only one adjustable parameter, its performance has proved competitive with more elaborate methods, especially near phase transitions. Those phase transitions are found in the parameter space of most optimization problems, and have recently been conjectured to be the origin of some of the hardest instances in computational complexity. We will demonstrate how extremal optimization can be implemented for a variety of combinatorial optimization problems. We believe that extremal optimization will be a useful tool in the investigation of phase transitions in combinatorial optimization problems, hence valuable in elucidating the origin of computational complexity.

  15. Granular avalanches down inclined and vibrated planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudel, Naïma; Kiesgen de Richter, Sébastien; Louvet, Nicolas; Jenny, Mathieu; Skali-Lami, Salaheddine

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we study granular avalanches when external mechanical vibrations are applied. We identify conditions of flow arrest and compare with the ones classically observed for nonvibrating granular flows down inclines [Phys. Fluids 11, 542 (1999), 10.1063/1.869928]. We propose an empirical law to describe the thickness of the deposits with the inclination angle and the vibration intensity. The link between the surface velocity and the depth of the flow highlights a competition between gravity and vibrations induced flows. We identify two distinct regimes: (a) gravity-driven flows at large angles where vibrations do not modify dynamical properties but the deposits (scaling laws in this regime are in agreement with the literature for nonvibrating granular flows) and (b) vibrations-driven flows at small angles where no flow is possible without applied vibrations (in this last regime, the flow behavior can be properly described by a vibration induced activated process). We show, in this study, that granular flows down inclined planes can be finely tuned by external mechanical vibrations.

  16. Measurement of the branching ratio for the doubly cabibbo suppressed decay D++ K-K+K+; Medida da razao de ramificacao do Decaimento D++ K-K+K+ duplamente suprimido por cabibbo

    SciTech Connect

    Silva Carvalho, Hendly da

    1997-07-01

    In this thesis, we performed a study for the decay modes D++ K-K+K+ and D+s+ K-K+K+, using the data collected by the E791, a hadroproduction of charm experiment at Fermilab. The D++ K-K+K+ decay is doubly Cabibbo suppressed while the D+s+ K-K+K+ decay is singly Cabibbo suppressed. We found 11.6 +- 3.9 events in the D+ mass region and 8.9 +- 3.3 in the D+s mass region. The D++ K-K+K+ branching ratio is measured to be (3.7 +- 1.3 +- 0.6) x 10-4 while the D++ K-K+K+ branching ratio relative to D+s+ K-K+K+ is measured to be (4.2 +- 1.5 +- 0.6) x 10-2.

  17. Geomorphic assessment of the debris avalanche deposit from the Jocotitlán volcano, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Sergio; López-Blanco, Jorge

    2010-11-01

    Edifice collapse of the Jocotitlán volcano produced a debris avalanche deposit whose morphology is characterized by conical hummocks and elongated ridges. We consulted aerial photographs, orthophotographs, and conducted field work to define field relationships between mound morphology and stratigraphy. Based on field evidence and geomorphic and geologic interpretation we sub-divide the deposit into three sectors (north, northeastern, and eastern). We determine the emplacement mechanisms of the different sectors based on their distinct morphologic and lithologic features. In this context, we generate a geomorphometric database comprising 17 variables for each mound and apply multivariate statistical methods (principal component analysis and cluster analysis) to define the relationships between them. The principal components incorporated 73% of the total data variance and seven geomorphometric variables (perimeter, major axis, area, height, distance to the source, axis ratio and circularity index) defined two groups: hummocks and ridges. The circularity index and the axis ratio best characterize the elongated form of hummocks composing the deposits. Contrasts in lithological characteristics, such as material strength and mobility, provide evidence for a transition from a sliding mass (debris avalanche deposit) to a debris-flow-like emplacement. Differences in deposit morphology suggest two collapse mechanisms: magmatic intrusion (Bezymianny-type sector collapse) and a tectonic mass-slide, an earthquake could provide the trigger for both collapses. The eastern lower flank of the volcano then collapsed gravitationally due to a movement along a fault (tectonic activity possibly related to the Acambay-Tixmadeje Fault System). This produced the northeastern sector of the debris avalanche deposit dominated by large elongated ridges. The spatial arrangement of both sectors (the N and NE) suggests that the two failure events occurred simultaneously. Finally, the eastern

  18. Record-breaking avalanches in driven threshold systems.

    PubMed

    Shcherbakov, Robert; Davidsen, Jörn; Tiampo, Kristy F

    2013-05-01

    Record-breaking avalanches generated by the dynamics of several driven nonlinear threshold models are studied. Such systems are characterized by intermittent behavior, where a slow buildup of energy is punctuated by an abrupt release of energy through avalanche events, which usually follow scale-invariant statistics. From the simulations of these systems it is possible to extract sequences of record-breaking avalanches, where each subsequent record-breaking event is larger in magnitude than all previous events. In the present work, several cellular automata are analyzed, among them the sandpile model, the Manna model, the Olami-Feder-Christensen (OFC) model, and the forest-fire model to investigate the record-breaking statistics of model avalanches that exhibit temporal and spatial correlations. Several statistical measures of record-breaking events are derived analytically and confirmed through numerical simulations. The statistics of record-breaking avalanches for the four models are compared to those of record-breaking events extracted from the sequences of independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) random variables. It is found that the statistics of record-breaking avalanches for the above cellular automata exhibit behavior different from that observed for i.i.d. random variables, which in turn can be used to characterize complex spatiotemporal dynamics. The most pronounced deviations are observed in the case of the OFC model with a strong dependence on the conservation parameter of the model. This indicates that avalanches in the OFC model are not independent and exhibit spatiotemporal correlations. PMID:23767588

  19. Infrasonic monitoring of snow avalanches in the Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, E.; Ulivieri, G.; Ripepe, M.; Chiambretti, I.; Segor, V.

    2012-04-01

    Risk assessment of snow avalanches is mostly related to weather conditions and snow cover. However a robust risk validation requires to identify all avalanches occurring, in order to compare predictions to real effects. For this purpose on December 2010 we installed a permanent 4-element, small aperture (100 m), infrasound array in the Alps, after a pilot experiment carried out in Gressonay during the 2009-2010 winter season. The array has been deployed in the Ayas Valley, at an elevation of 2000 m a.s.l., where natural avalanches are expected and controlled events are regularly performed. The array consists into 4 Optimic 2180 infrasonic microphones, with a sensitivity of 10-3 Pa in the 0.5-50 Hz frequency band and a 4 channel Guralp CMG-DM24 A/D converter, sampling at 100 Hz. Timing is achieved with a GPS receiver. Data are transmitted to the Department of Earth Sciences of the University of Firenze, where data is recorded and processed in real-time. A multi-channel semblance is carried out on the continuous data set as a function of slowness, back-azimuth and frequency of recorded infrasound in order to detect all avalanches occurring from the back-ground signal, strongly affected by microbarom and mountain induced gravity waves. This permanent installation in Italy will allow to verify the efficiency of the system in short-to-medium range (2-8 km) avalanche detection, and might represent an important validation to model avalanches activity during this winter season. Moreover, the real-time processing of infrasonic array data, might strongly contribute to avalanche risk assessments providing an up-to-description of ongoing events.

  20. Avalanches in a stochastic model of spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Benayoun, Marc; Cowan, Jack D; van Drongelen, Wim; Wallace, Edward

    2010-07-08

    Neuronal avalanches are a form of spontaneous activity widely observed in cortical slices and other types of nervous tissue, both in vivo and in vitro. They are characterized by irregular, isolated population bursts when many neurons fire together, where the number of spikes per burst obeys a power law distribution. We simulate, using the Gillespie algorithm, a model of neuronal avalanches based on stochastic single neurons. The network consists of excitatory and inhibitory neurons, first with all-to-all connectivity and later with random sparse connectivity. Analyzing our model using the system size expansion, we show that the model obeys the standard Wilson-Cowan equations for large network sizes ( neurons). When excitation and inhibition are closely balanced, networks of thousands of neurons exhibit irregular synchronous activity, including the characteristic power law distribution of avalanche size. We show that these avalanches are due to the balanced network having weakly stable functionally feedforward dynamics, which amplifies some small fluctuations into the large population bursts. Balanced networks are thought to underlie a variety of observed network behaviours and have useful computational properties, such as responding quickly to changes in input. Thus, the appearance of avalanches in such functionally feedforward networks indicates that avalanches may be a simple consequence of a widely present network structure, when neuron dynamics are noisy. An important implication is that a network need not be "critical" for the production of avalanches, so experimentally observed power laws in burst size may be a signature of noisy functionally feedforward structure rather than of, for example, self-organized criticality.

  1. -delayed proton emission branches in 43Cr

    SciTech Connect

    Pomorski, M.; Miernik, K.; Dominik, W.; Janas, Z.; Pfutzner, M.; Bingham, C. R.; Czyrkowski, H.; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Darby, Iain; Dabrowski, Ryszard; Ginter, T. N.; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz; Karny, M.; Korgul, A.; Kusmierz, W.; Liddick, Sean; Rajabali, M. M.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Stolz, A.

    2011-01-01

    The + decay of very neutron-deficient 43Cr was studied by means of an imaging time projection chamber that allowed recording tracks of charged particles. Events of -delayed emission of one, two, and three protons were clearly identified. The absolute branching ratios for these channels were determined to be (81 4)%, (7.1 0.4)%, and (0.08 0.03)%, respectively. 43Cr is thus established as the second case in which the -3p decay occurs. Although the feeding to the proton-bound states in 43V is expected to be negligible, the large branching ratio of (12 4)% for decays without proton emission is found.

  2. Materials Test Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Gail

    2012-01-01

    The Materials Test Branch resides at Marshall Space Flight Center's Materials and Processing laboratory and has a long history of supporting NASA programs from Mercury to the recently retired Space Shuttle. The Materials Test Branch supports its customers by supplying materials testing expertise in a wide range of applications. The Materials Test Branch is divided into three Teams, The Chemistry Team, The Tribology Team and the Mechanical Test Team. Our mission and goal is to provide world-class engineering excellence in materials testing with a special emphasis on customer service.

  3. Sediment Transport by Spring Avalanches in the Southern Swiss Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egloff, J. M.; Hunziker, M.; Moore, J. R.; Christen, M.

    2010-12-01

    Dense wet-snow avalanches breaking through to the base of the snow pack or overriding snow-free surfaces can entrain basal material and act as important agents of sediment transport in steep Alpine catchments. As part of an ongoing study, we investigated two debris fans in the Matter Valley of southern Switzerland during spring 2009 and 2010, with emphasis on quantifying avalanche sediment transport. Deposited debris ranged from soil parcels and plant material to cobbles and boulders greater than 1 m3. Large boulders were generally angular and fresh with clear signs of recent impacts. The seasonal sediment load transported by avalanches was estimated at one fan by sampling the debris content within a number of representative areas, and then extrapolating the cumulative volume. Results reveal a total transported sediment volume of ~150 m3 in 2009 and ~15 m3 in 2010, which likely reflects varying snowfall and avalanche frequency between years. When distributed over the deposition area on the fan, these results imply an average accumulated sediment thickness of 12 mm in 2009 and 3 mm in 2010. Calculated catchment-wide erosion rates are ~0.1 mm/yr for 2009 and ~0.01 mm/yr for 2010. Cross-sections through avalanche debris revealed that transported sediment generally resides on top of the snow surface. As the avalanches melt, entrained sediment is set down gently, often resulting in precariously balanced boulders and rows of blocks perched on the walls of the fan’s channels. In flat lying areas, snowmelt resulted in sparse sediment deposits with no clear structure or sorting. Observations show that the fan surface is usually protected from erosion by snow and older avalanche deposits, which provide a smooth gliding plane for new events. Within the bedrock gulley adjacent to the fan, and in the avalanche source region above, signs of abrasive wear were evident on exposed bedrock surfaces. These include rounded and scoured bedrock, fresh signs of boulder impacts, and

  4. The effectiveness of mean-field theory for avalanche distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Edward; Raju, Archishman; Sethna, James

    We explore the mean-field theory of the pseudogap found in avalanche systems with long-range anisotropic interactions using analytical and numerical tools. The pseudogap in the density of low-stability states emerges from the competition between stabilizing interactions between spins in an avalanche and the destabilizing random movement towards the threshold caused by anisotropic couplings. Pazmandi et al. have shown that for the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, the pseudogap scales linearly and produces a distribution of avalanche sizes with exponent t=1 in contrast with that predicted from RFIM t=3/2. Lin et al. have argued that the scaling exponent ? of the pseudogap depends on the tail of the distribution of couplings and on non-universal values like the strain rate and the magnitude of the coupling strength. Yet others have argued that the relationship between the pseudogap scaling and the distribution of avalanche sizes is dependent on dynamical details. Despite the theoretical arguments, the class of RFIM mean-field models is surprisingly good at predicting the distribution of avalanche sizes in a variety of different magnetic systems. We investigate these differences with a combination of theory and simulation.

  5. Gain-Bandwidth Product Optimization of Heterostructure Avalanche Photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Oh-Hyun; Hayat, Majeed M.; Campbell, Joe C.; Saleh, Bahaa E. A.; Teich, Malvin C.

    2005-05-01

    A generalized history-dependent recurrence theory for the time-response analysis is derived for avalanche photodiodes with multilayer, heterojunction multiplication regions. The heterojunction multiplication region considered consists of two layers: a high-bandgap Al_0.6 Ga_0.4 As energy-buildup layer, which serves to heat up the primary electrons, and a GaAs layer, which serves as the primary avalanching layer. The model is used to optimize the gain-bandwidth product (GBP) by appropriate selection of the width of the energy-buildup layer for a given width of the avalanching layer. The enhanced GBP is a direct consequence of the heating of primary electrons in the energy-buildup layer, which results in a reduced first dead space for the carriers that are injected into the avalanche-active GaAs layer. This effect is akin to the initial-energy effect previously shown to enhance the excess-noise factor characteristics in thin avalanche photodiodes (APDs). Calculations show that the GBP optimization is insensitive to the operational gain and the optimized APD also minimizes the excess-noise factor.

  6. Friction and dynamics of rock avalanches travelling on glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Blasio, Fabio Vittorio

    2014-05-01

    Rock avalanches travelling on glaciers often exhibit effective friction coefficient lower than those on a rocky terrain. After briefly considering some data of rock avalanches on glaciers, the physics of sliding of solid objects on icy surfaces is reviewed, and a model is put forward for the mechanics of rock avalanche sliding on ice accounting for the formation of a natural lubricating layer. It is suggested that at the beginning of the flow of a rock avalanche, friction results from rocky blocks ploughing on ice. As the erosion continues, a gouge of ice particles results, which clogs the interstices between blocks and may partially melt as a consequence of the production of frictional heat. This conceptual model is numerically investigated for a slab travelling on ice. The results show an increase in mobility as a function of slab thickness, travelled length, and the gravity field, in agreement with case studies. The results are useful to interpret the peculiar features of rock avalanches travelling on icy surfaces such as digitations, out-runner blocks, and longitudinal furrows. The lubrication theory for landslides on ice proposed here may provide a framework for understanding landslides on Earth and for future modelling; in addition, it may help elucidate the presence of similar landslide deposits on the surface of Mars.

  7. Solid-state flat panel imager with avalanche amorphous selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuermann, James R.; Howansky, Adrian; Goldan, Amir H.; Tousignant, Olivier; Levéille, Sébastien; Tanioka, K.; Zhao, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Active matrix flat panel imagers (AMFPI) have become the dominant detector technology for digital radiography and fluoroscopy. For low dose imaging, electronic noise from the amorphous silicon thin film transistor (TFT) array degrades imaging performance. We have fabricated the first prototype solid-state AMFPI using a uniform layer of avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor to amplify the signal to eliminate the effect of electronic noise. We have previously developed a large area solid-state avalanche a-Se sensor structure referred to as High Gain Avalanche Rushing Photoconductor (HARP) capable of achieving gains of 75. In this work we successfully deposited this HARP structure onto a 24 x 30 cm2 TFT array with a pixel pitch of 85 μm. An electric field (ESe) up to 105 Vμm-1 was applied across the a-Se layer without breakdown. Using the HARP layer as a direct detector, an X-ray avalanche gain of 15 +/- 3 was achieved at ESe = 105 Vμm-1. In indirect mode with a 150 μm thick structured CsI scintillator, an optical gain of 76 +/- 5 was measured at ESe = 105 Vμm-1. Image quality at low dose increases with the avalanche gain until the electronic noise is overcome at a constant exposure level of 0.76 mR. We demonstrate the success of a solid-state HARP X-ray imager as well as the largest active area HARP sensor to date.

  8. Avalanche multiplication and impact ionization in amorphous selenium photoconductive target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Wug-Dong; Tanioka, Kenkichi

    2014-03-01

    The avalanche multiplication factor and the hole ionization coefficient in the amorphous selenium (a-Se) high-gain avalanche rushing amorphous photoconductor (HARP) target depend on the electric field. The phenomenon of avalanche multiplication and impact ionization in the 0.4-µm-thick a-Se HARP target is investigated. The hot carrier energy in the 0.4-µm-thick a-Se HARP target increases linearly as the target voltage increases. The energy relaxation length of hot carriers in the a-Se photoconductor of the 0.4-µm-thick HARP target saturates as the electric field increases. The average energy Eav of a hot carrier and the energy relaxation length λE in the a-Se photoconductor of the 0.4-µm-thick HARP target at 1 × 108 V/m were 0.25 eV and 2.5 nm, respectively. In addition, the hole ionization coefficient β and the avalanche multiplication factor M are derived as a function of the electric field, the average energy of a hot carrier, and the impact ionization energy. The experimental hole ionization coefficient β and the avalanche multiplication factor M in the 0.4-µm-thick a-Se HARP target agree with the theoretical results.

  9. Debris avalanche deposits: emplacement dynamics, morphology and hazards (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, T. R.; Dufresne, A.

    2013-12-01

    Debris avalanches from volcanoes form some of the largest subaerial and submarine landslide deposits on Earth, covering vast areas (10s to 100s km2) and displaying typically hummocky surface topography. Numerical models have been developed that can identify the area threatened by an event of known volume from a known volcano, if the runout mechanics can be understood. Better understanding the hazards from these enormous events requires realistic parameterization of models, which must be able to explain debris avalanche deposit geometries under water, in air, on Mars and in vacuo on the Moon. We have shown that the complex deposit geometry of the 25 km3 Socompa deposit in Chile can be explained by the effects of basal debris fragmenting during runout. The hummocky surface morphology of many debris avalanche deposits again indicates that the emplacement process involved a very mobile basal layer, above which the travelling mass passively extends, leading to lateral and longitudinal disaggregation of the mass into discrete blocks whose dimension reflects the mass depth. Submarine debris avalanches can also be modelled on this basis, because the presence of ambient water does not fundamentally alter the fragmentation process; to assess the additional hazards of debris avalanches entering into water, models are available to simulate the tsunami generated by such events.

  10. Functional impact of dendritic branch point morphology

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, Michele; Migliore, Michele; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2013-01-01

    Cortical pyramidal cells store multiple features of complex synaptic input in individual dendritic branches and independently regulate the coupling between dendritic and somatic spikes. Branch points in apical trees exhibit wide ranges of sizes and shapes, and the large diameter ratio between trunk and oblique dendrites exacerbates impedance mismatch. The morphological diversity of dendritic bifurcations could thus locally tune neuronal excitability and signal integration. However, these aspects have never been investigated. Here, we first quantified the morphological variability of branch points from two-photon images of rat CA1 pyramidal neurons. We then investigated the geometrical features affecting spike initiation, propagation, and timing with a computational model validated by glutamate uncaging experiments. The results suggest that even subtle membrane readjustments at branch point could drastically alter the ability of synaptic input to generate, propagate, and time action potentials. PMID:23365251

  11. Cd Hg Te (1.3 µm - 1.55 µm) Avalanche Photodiode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meslage, J.; Pichard, G.; Fragnon, M.; Royer, M.; Nguyen Duy, M.; Biosrobert, C.; Morvan, D.

    1983-11-01

    The particular Cd0.7 Hg0.3Te band structure:almost equality of band gap and spin orbit splitting, provides good ionization properties to this alloy : a high ionization coefficients ratio is expected. The devices elaboration is made by planar technology. A N+/N/P+ structure is achieved by ions implantation followed by a diffusion process. A diffused guard ring allows to avoid surface and junction edge effects. The I (V) characteristic shows a breakdown voltage (VB) of about 100 V. The dark current at 0.95 VB, amounts 100nA.Photodiodes sensitivity is typiclly of 0.7. A/W when M=1.Multiplication coefficients as high as 40 have been measured, the photoresponse spatial homogeneity in gain mode has been also controlled with a lOμm size spot : no microplasma effect have been observed. Photodetectors sensitivity, measured at 500 MHz, remains identical in avalanche operating mode. Good linearity is obtained when plotting P-N schottky noise versus light intensity No excess noise was observed. The study of the avalanche photodiode noise, synchronous with 1.3. μm DEL emission, at 30 MHz with a 1 MHz bandwith has been carried out in relation to the multiplication factor, and has led to an estimation of the ionization coefficient ratio.

  12. A study of the runaway relativistic electron avalanche and the feedback theory using GEANT4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broberg Skeltved, Alexander; Østgaard, Nikolai; Carlson, Brant; Gjesteland, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    This study investigate the Runaway Relativistic Electron Avalanche (RREA) and the feedback process as well as the production of Bremsstrahlung photons from Runaway Electrons (REs). These processes are important to understand the production of the intense bursts of gamma-rays known as Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs). Results are obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using the GEometry ANd Tracking 4 (GEANT4) programming toolkit. The simulations takes into account the effects of electron ionisation, electron by electron scattering (Møller scattering) as well as positron and photon interactions, in the 250 eV-100 GeV energy range. Several physics libraries or 'physics lists' are provided with GEANT4 to implement these physics processes in the simulations. We give a detailed analysis of the electron and the feedback multiplication, in particular the avalanche lengths, Λ, the energy distribution and the feedback factor, γ. We also find that our results vary significantly depending on which physics list we implement. In order to verify our results and the GEANT4 programming toolkit, we compare them to previous results from existing models. In addition we present the ratio of the production of bremsstrahlung photons to runaway electrons. From this ratio we obtain the parameter, α, which describe the electron to photon relation.

  13. Activity-Dependent Model for Neuronal Avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Arcangelis, L.

    Networks of living neurons represent one of the most fascinating systems of modern biology. If the physical and chemical mechanisms at the basis of the functioning of a single neuron are quite well understood, the collective behavior of a system of many neurons is an extremely intriguing subject. Crucial ingredient of this complex behavior is the plasticity property of the network, namely the capacity to adapt and evolve depending on the level of activity. This plastic ability is believed, nowadays, to be at the basis of learning and memory in real brains. This fundamental problem in neurobiology has recently shown a number of features in common to other complex systems. These features mainly concern the morphology of the network, namely the spatial organization of the established connections, and a novel kind of neuronal activity. Experimental data have, in fact, shown that electrical information propagates in a cortex slice via an avalanche mode. Both features have been found in other problems in the context of the physics of complex systems and successful models have been developed to describe their behavior. In this contribution, we apply a statistical mechanical model to describe the complex activity in a neuronal network. The network is chosen to have a number of connections in long range, as found for neurons in vitro. The model implements the main physiological properties of living neurons and is able to reproduce recent experimental results. The numerical power spectra for electrical activity reproduces also the power law behavior measured in an EEG of man resting with the eyes closed.

  14. The Olive Branch Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harnack, William

    1984-01-01

    The first annual Olive Branch Awards, sponsored by the Writers' and Publishers Alliance and the Editors' Organizing Committee, were given to ten magazines, out of 60 that submitted entries. Winning entries are described briefly. (IM)

  15. Restoration technology branch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2007-01-01

    The mission of Leetown Science Center (LSC), Restoration Technology Branch (RTB) is to conduct research needed to restore or protect the chemical, physical and biological integrity of desirable aquatic systems.

  16. Branch retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Sadaf; Mirza, Sajid Ali; Shokh, Ishrat

    2008-01-01

    Retinal vein occlusions (RVO) are the second commonest sight threatening vascular disorder. Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) and central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) are the two basic types of vein occlusion. Branch retinal vein occlusion is three times more common than central retinal vein occlusion and- second only to diabetic retinopathy as the most common retinal vascular cause of visual loss. The origin of branch retinal vein occlusion undoubtedly includes both systemic factors such as hypertension and local anatomic factors such as arteriovenous crossings. Branch retinal vein occlusion causes a painless decrease in vision, resulting in misty or distorted vision. Current treatment options don't address the underlying aetiology of branch retinal vein occlusion. Instead they focus on treating sequelae of the occluded venous branch, such as macular oedema, vitreous haemorrhage and traction retinal detachment from neovascularization. Evidences suggest that the pathogenesis of various types of retinal vein occlusion, like many other ocular vascular occlusive disorders, is a multifactorial process and there is no single magic bullet that causes retinal vein occlusion. A comprehensive management of patients with retinal vascular occlusions is necessary to correct associated diseases or predisposing abnormalities that could lead to local recurrences or systemic event. Along with a review of the literature, a practical approach for the management of retinal vascular occlusions is required, which requires collaboration between the ophthalmologist and other physicians: general practitioner, cardiologist, internist etc. as appropriate according to each case. PMID:19385476

  17. Avalanche process of the fiber-bundle model with stick-slip dynamics and a variable Young modulus.

    PubMed

    Hao, Da-Peng; Tang, Gang; Xia, Hui; Xun, Zhi-Peng; Han, Kui

    2013-04-01

    In order to more accurately describe the fracture process of extensive biological fibers, a fiber-bundle model with stick-slip dynamics and a variable Young modulus is constructed. In this model, the Young modulus of a fiber is assumed to increase or decrease by multiplying with a changing ratio after local sliding events. So, the maximum number of stick-slip events of a single fiber and the changing ratio of the Young modulus are the two key parameters of the model. By means of analytical theory and numerical simulation, the constitutive law, the critical stress, the average size of the largest avalanche, and the avalanche size distribution are shown against the two parameters of the model. From a macroscopic viewpoint, the constitutive curves show different morphologies varying from a local plastic state to a unimodal parabola, while from a microscopic viewpoint, the avalanche size distributions can be well fitted into a power law relationship, which is in accord with the classical fiber-bundle model.

  18. [Death by avalanche in the minor mountain range].

    PubMed

    Geisenberger, Dorothee; Kramer, Lena; Pircher, Rebecca; Pollak, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    On 30 Jan 2015, two avalanche accidents happened in the Black Forest (at the foot of the 1493 m high Feldberg and the Herzogenhorn situated next to it), in which experienced ski tourers--a 58-year-old woman and a 20-year-old man--were completely buried by snow masses. Both victims were recovered dead after nearly 2 hours under the snow. The avalanches were promoted by strong snowfalls, snowdrift by the wind and steep downwind slopes. One of the victims, the 20-year-old man, underwent a forensic autopsy. The findings suggested death by protracted asphyxiation with agonal hypothermia. A mechanical traumatization with internal injuries suspected by the emergency doctor at the scene could not be confirmed at autopsy. The possible causes of death in the avalanche are discussed using the reported case as an example and in reference to the relevant literature.

  19. Universality in the mean spatial shape of avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiery, Thimothée; Le Doussal, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    Quantifying the universality of avalanche observables beyond critical exponents is of current great interest in theory and experiments. Here, we compute the spatial shape of avalanches in the universality class of the depinning of elastic interfaces in random media. We provide for the first time an analytically tractable definition of the spatial shape, accessible in experiments, and study the mean spatial shape of avalanches at fixed size centered around their starting point (seed). We calculate the associated universal scaling functions, both in a mean-field model and beyond. Notably, they are predicted to exhibit a cusp singularity near the seed. The results are in good agreement with a numerical simulation of an elastic line.

  20. Mobility of large rock avalanches: evidence from Valles Marineris, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEwen, A.S.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of H/L (height of drop/length of runout) vs. volume for landslides in Valles Marineris on Mars show a trend of decreasing H/L with increasing volume. This trend, which is linear on a log-log plot, is parallel to but lies above the trend for terrestrial dry rock avalanches. This result and estimates of 104 to 105 Pa yield strength suggest that the landslides were not water saturated, as suggested by previous workers. The offset between the H/L vs. volume trends shows that a typical Martian avalanche must be nearly two orders of magnitude more voluminous than a typical terrestrial avalance in order to achieve the same mobility. This offset might be explained by the effects of gravity on flows with high yield strengths. These results should prove useful to future efforts to resolve the controversy over the mechanics of long-runout avalanches. -Author

  1. TOPICAL REVIEW: Nonlocal impact ionization and avalanche multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, G. J.; David, J. P. R.

    2010-06-01

    Impact ionization and avalanche multiplication are conventionally described in terms of ionization coefficients which depend only upon the local electric field. Such a description takes no account of the effect of ionization dead space, within which the population distribution, and hence the ionization coefficient of carriers injected cool approach equilibrium with the high electric field, inhibiting ionization and reducing multiplication. This effect, which increases in importance as device dimensions are reduced, clearly benefits such high field devices as transistors by suppressing parasitic avalanche multiplication. It also improves the performance of avalanche photodiodes (APDs) by reducing the spatial randomness of impact ionization, so that the resulting excess multiplication noise is also reduced. It reduces temperature sensitivity and may also further enhance APD speed. This paper reviews these effects and some theoretical models used to describe them. In memory of Peter Robson, who inspired and encouraged scientists and engineers, young and old.

  2. Avalanche Dynamics of Crackle Sound in the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Alencar, Adriano M.; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Majumdar, Arnab; Stanley, H. Eugene; Suki, Bela

    2001-08-20

    We analyze a sequence of short transient sound waves, called 'crackles,' which are associated with explosive openings of airways during lung inflation. The distribution of time intervals between consecutive crackles {Delta}t shows two regimes of power law behavior. We develop an avalanche model which fits the data over five decades of {Delta}t. We find that the regime for large {Delta}t is related to the dynamics of distinct avalanches in a Cayley tree, and the regime for small {Delta}t is determined by the dynamics of crackle propagation within a single avalanche. We also obtain a mean-field solution of the model which provides information about lung inflation.

  3. Erosive granular avalanches : a cross confrontation between theory and experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, E.; Malloggi, F.; Andreotti, B.; Aranson, I. S.; Materials Science Division; ESPCI-Univ. Paris; Univ. of Twente

    2007-01-01

    Results on two laboratory scale avalanches experiments taking place both in the air and under-water, are presented. In both cases a family of solitary erosion/deposition waves are observed. At higher inclination angles, we show the existence of a long wavelength transverse instability followed by a coarsening and the onset of a fingering pattern. While the experiments strongly differ by the spatial and time scales, the agreement between the stability diagram, the wavelengths selection and the avalanche morphology suggest a common erosion/deposition scenario. These experiments are studied theoretically in the framework of the 'partial fluidization' model of dense granular flows. This model identifies a family of propagating solitary waves displaying a behavior similar to the experimental observation. A primary cause for the transverse instability is related to the dependence of avalanche velocity on the granular mass trapped by the flow.

  4. Controlling avalanche criticality in 2D nano arrays.

    PubMed

    Zohar, Y C; Yochelis, S; Dahmen, K A; Jung, G; Paltiel, Y

    2013-01-01

    Many physical systems respond to slowly changing external force through avalanches spanning broad range of sizes. Some systems crackle even without apparent external force, such as bursts of neuronal activity or charge transfer avalanches in 2D molecular layers. Advanced development of theoretical models describing disorder-induced critical phenomena calls for experiments probing the dynamics upon tuneable disorder. Here we show that isomeric structural transitions in 2D organic self-assembled monolayer (SAM) exhibit critical dynamics with experimentally tuneable disorder. The system consists of field effect transistor coupled through SAM to illuminated semiconducting nanocrystals (NCs). Charges photoinduced in NCs are transferred through SAM to the transistor surface and modulate its conductivity. Avalanches of isomeric structural transitions are revealed by measuring the current noise I(t) of the transistor. Accumulated surface traps charges reduce dipole moments of the molecules, decrease their coupling, and thus decrease the critical disorder of the SAM enabling its tuning during experiments.

  5. Distribution of maximum velocities in avalanches near the depinning transition.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Michael; Angheluta, Luiza; Dahmen, Karin; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2012-09-01

    We report exact predictions for universal scaling exponents and scaling functions associated with the distribution of the maximum collective avalanche propagation velocities v(m) in the mean field theory of the interface depinning transition. We derive the extreme value distribution P(v(m)|T) for the maximum velocities in avalanches of fixed duration T and verify the results by numerical simulation near the critical point. We find that the tail of the distribution of maximum velocity for an arbitrary avalanche duration, v(m), scales as P(v(m))~v(m)(-2) for large v(m). These results account for the observed power-law distribution of the maximum amplitudes in acoustic emission experiments of crystal plasticity and are also broadly applicable to other systems in the mean-field interface depinning universality class, ranging from magnets to earthquakes.

  6. Internal Avalanches in a Growing Pile of Superconducting Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Choong-Seop; Bassler, Kevin E.; Paczuski, Maya

    2002-03-01

    Avalanches of magnetic vortices produced by systematically increasing an external magnetic field applied to a type-II superconductor are studied using a simple ``sandpile'' type cellular model (K. E. Bassler and M. Paczuski, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81), 3761 (1998).. The cellular model describes the over-damped stick-slip dynamics of the vortices, which results in avalanches of vortex motion as the magnetic field increased. Driving the system by very slowly increasing the magnetic field, the system reaches a self-organized critical state in which the average density of vortices is increasing. In that state, the scaling properties and critical exponents describing the avalanche statistics are measured, and compared with recent experiments.

  7. [Death by avalanche in the minor mountain range].

    PubMed

    Geisenberger, Dorothee; Kramer, Lena; Pircher, Rebecca; Pollak, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    On 30 Jan 2015, two avalanche accidents happened in the Black Forest (at the foot of the 1493 m high Feldberg and the Herzogenhorn situated next to it), in which experienced ski tourers--a 58-year-old woman and a 20-year-old man--were completely buried by snow masses. Both victims were recovered dead after nearly 2 hours under the snow. The avalanches were promoted by strong snowfalls, snowdrift by the wind and steep downwind slopes. One of the victims, the 20-year-old man, underwent a forensic autopsy. The findings suggested death by protracted asphyxiation with agonal hypothermia. A mechanical traumatization with internal injuries suspected by the emergency doctor at the scene could not be confirmed at autopsy. The possible causes of death in the avalanche are discussed using the reported case as an example and in reference to the relevant literature. PMID:26548036

  8. Catastrophic debris avalanche from ancestral Mount Shasta volcano, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crandell, D. R.; Miller, C. D.; Glicken, H. X.; Christiansen, R. L.; Newhall, C. G.

    1984-03-01

    A debris-avalanche deposit extends 43 km northwestward from the base of Mount Shasta across the floor of Shasta Valley, California, where it covers an area of at least 450 km2. The surface of the deposit is dotted with hundreds of mounds, hills, and ridges, all formed of blocks of pyroxene andesite and unconsolidated volcaniclastic deposits derived from an ancestral Mount Shasta. Individual hills are separated by flat-topped laharlike deposits that also form the matrix of the debris avalanche and slope northwestward about 5 m/km. Radiometric ages of rocks in the deposit and of a postavalanche basalt flow indicate that the avalanche occurred between about 300,000 and 360,000 yr ago. An inferred average thickness of the deposit, plus a computed volume of about 4 km3 for the hills and ridges, indicate an estimated volume of about 26 km3, making it the largest known Quaternary landslide on Earth.

  9. Rare Nonleptonic Decays of the Omega Hyperon: Measurements of the Branching Ratios for Ω --> Ξ$*0\\atop{(1530)}$ (anti-Ξ$*0\\atop{(1530)}$) π and Ω→ Ξ π± π

    SciTech Connect

    Kamaev, Oleg

    2007-12-01

    A clean signal of 78 (24) events has been observed in the rare nonleptonic particle (antiparticle) decay modes Ω → Ξπ±π using data collected with the HyperCP spectrometer during Fermilab's 1999 fixed-target run. We obtain B(Ω- → Ξ-π+π-) = [4.32 ± 0.56(stat) ± 0.28(syst)] x 10-4 and B(Ω+ → Ξ+π-π+) = 3.13 ± 0.71(stat) ± 0.20(syst) x 10-4. This is the first observation of the antiparticle mode. Our measurement for the particle mode agrees with the previous experimental result and has an order-of-magnitude better precision. We extract the contribution from the resonance decay mode Ω → Ξ$*0\\atop{(1530)}$ (Ξ$*0\\atop{(1530)}$)π to the final state Ξπ±π. This the first actual measurement of the resonance-mode branching ratios, gives B(Ω- → Ξ$*0\\atop{(1530)}$ π-) = [4.55 ± 2.33(stat) ± 0.38(syst)] x 10-5, B(Ω+ → Ξ$*0\\atop{(1530)}$π+) = [1.40 ± 2.83(stat) ± 0.12(syst)] x 10-5 and disagrees with the current Particle Data Group review value, being ~ 14 times smaller. Since the central value of the resonance-mode branching ratio is less than two standard deviations away from zero, we also calculate branching ratio upper limits at 90% confidence level: B(Ω- → Ξ$*0\\atop{(1530)}$ π-) < 7.61 x 10-5 and B(Ω+ → Ξ$*0\\atop{(1530)}$ π+) < 5.61 x 10-5. This analysis provides new data on nonleptonic hyperon decays which allows studies of how weak interaction processes occur in the presence of strong interactions.

  10. Modeling and monitoring avalanches caused by rain-on-snow events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havens, S.; Marshall, H. P.; Trisca, G. O.; Johnson, J. B.; Nicholson, B.

    2014-12-01

    Direct-action avalanches occur during large storm cycles in mountainous regions, when stresses on the snowpack increase rapidly due to the load of new snow and outpace snow strengthening due to compaction. If temperatures rise above freezing during the storm and snowfall turns to rain, the near-surface snow undergoes rapid densification caused by the introduction of liquid water. This shock to the snowpack, if stability is near critical, can cause widespread immediate avalanching due to the large induced strain rates in the slab, followed by secondary delayed avalanches due to both the increased load as well as water percolation to the depth of a weak layer. We use the semi-empirical SNOow Slope Stability model (SNOSS) to estimate the evolution of stability prior to large avalanches during rain-on-snow events on Highway 21 north of Boise, Idaho. We have continuously monitored avalanche activity using arrays of infrasound sensors in the avalanche-prone section of HW21 near Stanley, in collaboration with the Idaho Transportation Department's avalanche forecasting program. The autonomous infrasound avalanche monitoring system provides accurate timing of avalanche events, in addition to capturing avalanche dynamics during some major releases adjacent to the array. Due to the remote location and low winter traffic volume, the highway is typically closed for multiple days during major avalanche cycles. Many major avalanches typically release naturally and reach the road, but due the complex terrain and poor visibility, manual observations are often not possible until several days later. Since most avalanche programs typically use explosives on a regular basis to control slope stability, the infrasound record of avalanche activity we have recorded on HW21 provides a unique opportunity to study large naturally triggered avalanches. We use a first-order physically based stability model to estimate the importance of precipitation phase, amount, and rate during major rain

  11. Enhancing the branching ratios in the dissociation channels for O{sup 16}O{sup 16}O{sup 18} molecule by designing optimum laser pulses: A study using stochastic optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Talukder, Srijeeta; Chaudhury, Pinaki; Sen, Shrabani; Sharma, Rahul; Adhikari, Satrajit

    2015-10-14

    We propose a strategy of using a stochastic optimization technique, namely, simulated annealing to design optimum laser pulses (both IR and UV) to achieve greater fluxes along the two dissociating channels (O{sup 18} + O{sup 16}O{sup 16} and O{sup 16} + O{sup 16}O{sup 18}) in O{sup 16}O{sup 16}O{sup 18} molecule. We show that the integrated fluxes obtained along the targeted dissociating channel is larger with the optimized pulse than with the unoptimized one. The flux ratios are also more impressive with the optimized pulse than with the unoptimized one. We also look at the evolution contours of the wavefunctions along the two channels with time after the actions of both the IR and UV pulses and compare the profiles for unoptimized (initial) and optimized fields for better understanding the results that we achieve. We also report the pulse parameters obtained as well as the final shapes they take.

  12. Theoretical branching ratios for the 5I7 to 5I7 levels of Ho(3+) in the garnets A3B2C3O12 (A = Y,La,Lu,Gd; B = Al,Lu,Sc,Ga; C = Al,Ga)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filer, Elizabeth D.; Morrison, Clyde A.; Turner, Gregory A.; Barnes, Norman P.

    1991-01-01

    Results are reported from an experimental study investigating triply ionized holmium in 10 garnets using the point-change model to predict theoretical energy levels and temperature-dependent branching ratios for the 5I7 to 5I8 manifolds for temperatures between 50 and 400 K. Plots were made for the largest lines at 300 K. YScAG was plotted twice, once for each set of X-ray data available. Energy levels are predicted based on theoretical crystal-field parameters, and good agreement to experiment is found. It is suggested that the present set of theoretical crystal-field parameters provides good estimates of the energy levels for the other hosts on which there are no experimental optical data. X-ray and index-of-refraction data are used to evaluate the performance of 10 lasers via a quantum mechanical model to predict the position of the energy levels and the temperature-dependent branching rations of the 5I7 to 5I8 levels of holmium. The fractional population inversion required for threshold is also evaluated.

  13. Effect of volume fraction on granular avalanche dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gravish, Nick; Goldman, Daniel I

    2014-09-01

    We study the evolution and failure of a granular slope as a function of prepared volume fraction, ϕ(0). We rotated an initially horizontal layer of granular material (0.3-mm-diam glass spheres) to a 45° angle while we monitor the motion of grains from the side and top with high-speed video cameras. The dynamics of grain motion during the tilt process depended sensitively on ϕ(0)∈[0.58-0.63] and differed above or below the granular critical state, ϕ(c), defined as the onset of dilation as a function of increasing volume fraction. For ϕ(0)-ϕ(c)<0, slopes experienced short, rapid, precursor compaction events prior to the onset of a sustained avalanche. Precursor compaction events began at an initial angle θ(0)=7.7±1.4° and occurred intermittently prior to the onset of an avalanche. Avalanches occurred at the maximal slope angle θ(m)=28.5±1.0°. Granular material at ϕ(0)-ϕ(c)>0 did not experience precursor compaction prior to avalanche flow, and instead experienced a single dilational motion at θ(0)=32.1±1.5° prior to the onset of an avalanche at θ(m)=35.9±0.7°. Both θ(0) and θ(m) increased with ϕ(0) and approached the same value in the limit of random close packing. The angle at which avalanching grains came to rest, θ(R)=22±2°, was independent of ϕ(0). From side-view high-speed video, we measured the velocity field of intermittent and avalanching flow. We found that flow direction, depth, and duration were affected by ϕ(0), with ϕ(0)-ϕ(c)<0 precursor flow extending deeper into the granular bed and occurring more rapidly than precursor flow at ϕ(0)-ϕ(c)>0. Our study elucidates how initial conditions-including volume fraction-are important determinants of granular slope stability and the onset of avalanches. PMID:25314432

  14. Microwave diagnostics of laser-induced avalanche ionization in air

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zhili; Shneider, Mikhail N.; Miles, Richard B.

    2006-10-01

    This work presents a simplified model of microwave scattering during the avalanche ionization stage of laser breakdown and corresponding experimental results of microwave scattering from laser breakdown in room air. The model assumes and measurements confirm that the breakdown regime can be viewed as a point dipole scatterer of the microwave radiation and thus directly related to the time evolving number of electrons. The delay between the laser pulse and the rise of the microwave scattering signal is a direct measure of the avalanche ionization process.

  15. Effect of volume fraction on granular avalanche dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravish, Nick; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2014-09-01

    We study the evolution and failure of a granular slope as a function of prepared volume fraction, ϕ0. We rotated an initially horizontal layer of granular material (0.3-mm-diam glass spheres) to a 45∘ angle while we monitor the motion of grains from the side and top with high-speed video cameras. The dynamics of grain motion during the tilt process depended sensitively on ϕ0∈[0.58-0.63] and differed above or below the granular critical state, ϕc, defined as the onset of dilation as a function of increasing volume fraction. For ϕ0-ϕc<0, slopes experienced short, rapid, precursor compaction events prior to the onset of a sustained avalanche. Precursor compaction events began at an initial angle θ0=7.7±1.4∘ and occurred intermittently prior to the onset of an avalanche. Avalanches occurred at the maximal slope angle θm=28.5±1.0∘. Granular material at ϕ0-ϕc>0 did not experience precursor compaction prior to avalanche flow, and instead experienced a single dilational motion at θ0=32.1±1.5∘ prior to the onset of an avalanche at θm=35.9±0.7∘. Both θ0 and θm increased with ϕ0 and approached the same value in the limit of random close packing. The angle at which avalanching grains came to rest, θR=22±2∘, was independent of ϕ0. From side-view high-speed video, we measured the velocity field of intermittent and avalanching flow. We found that flow direction, depth, and duration were affected by ϕ0, with ϕ0-ϕc<0 precursor flow extending deeper into the granular bed and occurring more rapidly than precursor flow at ϕ0-ϕc>0. Our study elucidates how initial conditions—including volume fraction—are important determinants of granular slope stability and the onset of avalanches.

  16. Negative Avalanche Feedback Detectors for Photon-Counting Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Negative Avalanche Feedback photon counting detectors with near-infrared spectral sensitivity offer an alternative to conventional Geiger mode avalanche photodiode or phototube detectors for free space communications links at 1 and 1.55 microns. These devices demonstrate linear mode photon counting without requiring any external reset circuitry and may even be operated at room temperature. We have now characterized the detection efficiency, dark count rate, after-pulsing, and single photon jitter for three variants of this new detector class, as well as operated these uniquely simple to use devices in actual photon starved free space optical communications links.

  17. Avalanches in strained amorphous solids: does inertia destroy critical behavior?

    PubMed

    Salerno, K Michael; Maloney, Craig E; Robbins, Mark O

    2012-09-01

    Simulations are used to determine the effect of inertia on athermal shear of amorphous two-dimensional solids. In the quasistatic limit, shear occurs through a series of rapid avalanches. The distribution of avalanches is analyzed using finite-size scaling with thousands to millions of disks. Inertia takes the system to a new underdamped universality class rather than driving the system away from criticality as previously thought. Scaling exponents are determined for the underdamped and overdamped limits and a critical damping that separates the two regimes. Systems are in the overdamped universality class even when most vibrational modes are underdamped.

  18. Assessing risk based on uncertain avalanche activity patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeidler, Antonia; Fromm, Reinhard

    2015-04-01

    Avalanches may affect critical infrastructure and may cause great economic losses. The planning horizon of infrastructures, e.g. hydropower generation facilities, reaches well into the future. Based on the results of previous studies on the effect of changing meteorological parameters (precipitation, temperature) and the effect on avalanche activity we assume that there will be a change of the risk pattern in future. The decision makers need to understand what the future might bring to best formulate their mitigation strategies. Therefore, we explore a commercial risk software to calculate risk for the coming years that might help in decision processes. The software @risk, is known to many larger companies, and therefore we explore its capabilities to include avalanche risk simulations in order to guarantee a comparability of different risks. In a first step, we develop a model for a hydropower generation facility that reflects the problem of changing avalanche activity patterns in future by selecting relevant input parameters and assigning likely probability distributions. The uncertain input variables include the probability of avalanches affecting an object, the vulnerability of an object, the expected costs for repairing the object and the expected cost due to interruption. The crux is to find the distribution that best represents the input variables under changing meteorological conditions. Our focus is on including the uncertain probability of avalanches based on the analysis of past avalanche data and expert knowledge. In order to explore different likely outcomes we base the analysis on three different climate scenarios (likely, worst case, baseline). For some variables, it is possible to fit a distribution to historical data, whereas in cases where the past dataset is insufficient or not available the software allows to select from over 30 different distribution types. The Monte Carlo simulation uses the probability distribution of uncertain variables

  19. High gain multigap avalanche detectors for Cerenkov ring imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, R.S.; Lavender, W.M.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Williams, S.H.

    1980-10-01

    We report on a continuing study of multigap parallel plate avalanche chambers, primarily as photoelectron detectors for use with Cerenkov ring imaging counters. By suitable control of the fields in successive gaps and by introducing screens to reduce photon feedback to the cathode the gain many be increased considerably. We have obtained gains in excess of 6 x 10/sup 7/ for photoelectrons with a good pulse height spectrum and expect to increase this further. We discuss the use of resistive anodes to give avalanche positions in two dimensions by charge division.

  20. Simultaneous resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization and electron avalanche ionization in gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Zhang Zhili; Miles, Richard B.

    2008-07-15

    Resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and electron avalanche ionization (EAI) are measured simultaneously in Ar:Xe mixtures at different partial pressures of mixture components. A simple theory for combined REMPI+EAI in gas mixture is developed. It is shown that the REMPI electrons seed the avalanche process, and thus the avalanche process amplifies the REMPI signal. Possible applications are discussed.

  1. Practical methods for using vegetation patterns to estimate avalanche frequency and magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonson, S.; Fassnacht, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    Practitioners working in avalanche terrain may never witness an extreme event, but understanding extreme events is important for categorizing avalanches that occur within a given season. Historical records of avalanche incidents and direct observations are the most reliable evidence of avalanche activity, but patterns in vegetation can be used to further quantify and map the frequency and magnitude of past events. We surveyed published literature to synthesize approaches for using vegetation sampling to characterize avalanche terrain, and developed examples to identify the benefits and caveats of using different practical field methods to estimate avalanche frequency and magnitude. Powerful avalanches can deposit massive piles of snow, rocks, and woody debris in runout zones. Large avalanches (relative to the path) can cut fresh trimlines, widening their tracks by uprooting, stripping, and breaking trees. Discs and cores can be collected from downed trees to detect signals of past avalanche disturbance recorded in woody plant tissue. Signals of disturbance events recorded in tree rings can include direct impact scars from the moving snow and wind blast, development of reaction wood in response to tilting, and abrupt variation in the relative width of annual growth rings. The relative ages of trees in avalanche paths and the surrounding landscape can be an indicator of the area impacted by past avalanches. Repeat photography can also be useful to track changes in vegetation over time. For Colorado, and perhaps elsewhere, several vegetation ecology methods can be used in combination to accurately characterize local avalanche frequency and magnitude.

  2. Safety on the Hills in Winter: Avalanche Risk--Snow Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Frank

    2003-01-01

    This compact training session on avalanche risk reviews snow crystal formations and common generalities about avalanches. Two types of avalanches--loose and slab--are described, and the characteristics of each are given along with danger signs that accompany each one. Three books are highly recommended for further information. (TD)

  3. Meteorological variables associated with deep slab avalanches on persistent weak layers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marienthal, Alex; Hendrikx, Jordy; Birkeland, Karl; Irvine, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    Deep slab avalanches are a particularly challenging avalanche forecasting problem. These avalanches are typically difficult to trigger, yet when they are triggered they tend to propagate far and result in large and destructive avalanches. For this work we define deep slab avalanches as those that fail on persistent weak layers deeper than 0.9m (3 feet), and that occur after February 1st. We utilized a 44-year record of avalanche control and meteorological data from Bridger Bowl Ski Area to test the usefulness of meteorological variables for predicting deep slab avalanches. As in previous studies, we used data from the days preceding deep slab cycles, but we also considered meteorological metrics over the early months of the season. We utilized classification trees for our analyses. Our results showed warmer temperatures in the prior twenty-four hours and more loading over the seven days before days with deep slab avalanches on persistent weak layers. In line with previous research, extended periods of above freezing temperatures led to days with deep wet slab avalanches on persistent weak layers. Seasons with either dry or wet avalanches on deep persistent weak layers typically had drier early months, and often had some significant snow depth prior to those dry months. This paper provides insights for ski patrollers, guides, and avalanche forecasters who struggle to forecast deep slab avalanches on persistent weak layers late in the season.

  4. Measurement of the ratio of branching fractions β(B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$ D$+\\atop{s}$) /b (B0 → D- D$+\\atop{s}$) with the CDF detector

    SciTech Connect

    Iyutin, Boris

    2007-03-01

    In this thesis they report the measurement of ratios of branching fractions: β(B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$ π+π+π-)/β(B0 → D-π+π+π-), and β(B0 → D-D$+\\atop{s}$)/β(B0 → D-π+π+π-), using 355 pb-1 of data collected by CDF detector at the Tevatron p$\\bar{p}$ collider at √s = 1.96 TeV.

  5. III-V strain layer superlattice based band engineered avalanche photodiodes (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sid

    2015-08-01

    Laser detection and ranging (LADAR)-based systems operating in the Near Infrared (NIR) and Short Wave Infrared (SWIR) have become popular optical sensors for remote sensing, medical, and environmental applications. Sophisticated laser-based radar and weapon systems used for long-range military and astronomical applications need to detect, recognize, and track a variety of targets under a wide spectrum of atmospheric conditions. Infrared APDs play an important role in LADAR systems by integrating the detection and gain stages in a single device. Robust silicon-APDs are limited to visible and very near infrared region (< 1 um), while InGaAs works well up to wavelengths of about 1.5um. Si APDs have low multiplication or excess noise but are limited to below 1um due very poor quantum efficiency above 0.8um. InGaAs and Ge APDs operate up to wavelengths of 1.5um but have poor multiplication or excess noise due to a low impact ionization coefficient ratio between electrons and holes. For the past several decades HgCdTe has been traditionally used in longer wavelength (> 3um) infrared photon detection applications. Recently, various research groups (including Ghosh et. al.) have reported SWIR and MWIR HgCdTe APDs on CdZnTe and Si substrates. However, HgCdTe APDs suffer from low breakdown fields due to material defects, and excess noise increases significantly at high electric fields. During the past decade, InAs/GaSb Strain Layer Superlattice (SLS) material system has emerged as a potential material for the entire infrared spectrum because of relatively easier growth, comparable absorption coefficients, lower tunneling currents and longer Auger lifetimes resulting in enhanced detectivities (D*). Band engineering in type II SLS allows us to engineer avalanche properties of electrons and holes. This is a great advantage over bulk InGaAs and HgCdTe APDs where engineering avalanche properties is not possible. The talk will discuss the evolution of superlattice based avalanche

  6. Fuzzy branching temporal logic.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seong-ick; Lee, Kwang H; Lee, Doheon

    2004-04-01

    Intelligent systems require a systematic way to represent and handle temporal information containing uncertainty. In particular, a logical framework is needed that can represent uncertain temporal information and its relationships with logical formulae. Fuzzy linear temporal logic (FLTL), a generalization of propositional linear temporal logic (PLTL) with fuzzy temporal events and fuzzy temporal states defined on a linear time model, was previously proposed for this purpose. However, many systems are best represented by branching time models in which each state can have more than one possible future path. In this paper, fuzzy branching temporal logic (FBTL) is proposed to address this problem. FBTL adopts and generalizes concurrent tree logic (CTL*), which is a classical branching temporal logic. The temporal model of FBTL is capable of representing fuzzy temporal events and fuzzy temporal states, and the order relation among them is represented as a directed graph. The utility of FBTL is demonstrated using a fuzzy job shop scheduling problem as an example. PMID:15376850

  7. Pen Branch delta expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.A.; Christensen, E.J.; Mackey, H.E.; Sharitz, R.R.; Jensen, J.R.; Hodgson, M.E.

    1984-02-01

    Since 1954, cooling water discharges from K Reactor ({anti X} = 370 cfs {at} 59 C) to Pen Branch have altered vegetation and deposited sediment in the Savannah River Swamp forming the Pen Branch delta. Currently, the delta covers over 300 acres and continues to expand at a rate of about 16 acres/yr. Examination of delta expansion can provide important information on environmental impacts to wetlands exposed to elevated temperature and flow conditions. To assess the current status and predict future expansion of the Pen Branch delta, historic aerial photographs were analyzed using both basic photo interpretation and computer techniques to provide the following information: (1) past and current expansion rates; (2) location and changes of impacted areas; (3) total acreage presently affected. Delta acreage changes were then compared to historic reactor discharge temperature and flow data to see if expansion rate variations could be related to reactor operations.

  8. Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.

    2013-01-01

    The Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch evaluates the ability of a structure to perform reliably throughout its service life in the presence of a defect, crack, or other form of damage. Such assessment is fundamental to the use of structural materials and requires an integral blend of materials engineering, fracture testing and analysis, and nondestructive evaluation. The vision of the Branch is to increase the safety of manned space flight by improving the fracture control and the associated nondestructive evaluation processes through development and application of standards, guidelines, advanced test and analytical methods. The Branch also strives to assist and solve non-aerospace related NDE and damage tolerance problems, providing consultation, prototyping and inspection services.

  9. Self-organized critical branching in systems that violate conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanico, D. E.; Monterola, C.; Saloma, C.

    2007-04-01

    A non-conservative critical branching model is proposed to demonstrate that self-organized criticality (SOC) can occur in mean-field sandpiles that violate a conservation law. The critical state is characterized by avalanche sizes and lifetimes that obey an inverse power-law distribution with exponents τS = 3/2 and τT = 2, respectively. Criticality is achieved when the branching process is coupled to a background activity characterized by the spontaneous switching between refractoriness and quiescence among system components. The stationary state of the system is analysed mathematically and numerically, and is shown to exhibit a transition from a subcritical phase to a critical phase. SOC in sandpile models has been widely believed to occur only when grains are conserved during avalanches. However, such a conservation law is likely to be violated by open, non-equilibrium systems such as biological networks and socially interacting systems like animal groups. The model explores the role of dynamic synapses and synaptic plasticity in maintaining criticality of cortical networks. These brain networks have been found to display neuronal avalanches that obey a power-law distribution. The non-conservative model also emulates the main features of the size distributions of free-swimming tuna schools and red deer herds. Demonstrating criticality in self-organizing systems that violate conservation laws enhances the predictive ability of the theory of SOC in the arena of biocomplexity.

  10. Information capacity and transmission are maximized in balanced cortical networks with neuronal avalanches.

    PubMed

    Shew, Woodrow L; Yang, Hongdian; Yu, Shan; Roy, Rajarshi; Plenz, Dietmar

    2011-01-01

    The repertoire of neural activity patterns that a cortical network can produce constrains the ability of the network to transfer and process information. Here, we measured activity patterns obtained from multisite local field potential recordings in cortex cultures, urethane-anesthetized rats, and awake macaque monkeys. First, we quantified the information capacity of the pattern repertoire of ongoing and stimulus-evoked activity using Shannon entropy. Next, we quantified the efficacy of information transmission between stimulus and response using mutual information. By systematically changing the ratio of excitation/inhibition (E/I) in vitro and in a network model, we discovered that both information capacity and information transmission are maximized at a particular intermediate E/I, at which ongoing activity emerges as neuronal avalanches. Next, we used our in vitro and model results to correctly predict in vivo information capacity and interactions between neuronal groups during ongoing activity. Close agreement between our experiments and model suggest that neuronal avalanches and peak information capacity arise because of criticality and are general properties of cortical networks with balanced E/I.

  11. Hybrid phase transition into an absorbing state: Percolation and avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Deokjae; Choi, S.; Stippinger, M.; Kertész, J.; Kahng, B.

    2016-04-01

    Interdependent networks are more fragile under random attacks than simplex networks, because interlayer dependencies lead to cascading failures and finally to a sudden collapse. This is a hybrid phase transition (HPT), meaning that at the transition point the order parameter has a jump but there are also critical phenomena related to it. Here we study these phenomena on the Erdős-Rényi and the two-dimensional interdependent networks and show that the hybrid percolation transition exhibits two kinds of critical behaviors: divergence of the fluctuations of the order parameter and power-law size distribution of finite avalanches at a transition point. At the transition point global or "infinite" avalanches occur, while the finite ones have a power law size distribution; thus the avalanche statistics also has the nature of a HPT. The exponent βm of the order parameter is 1 /2 under general conditions, while the value of the exponent γm characterizing the fluctuations of the order parameter depends on the system. The critical behavior of the finite avalanches can be described by another set of exponents, βa and γa. These two critical behaviors are coupled by a scaling law: 1 -βm=γa .

  12. Catastrophic debris avalanche deposit of Socompa volcano, northern Chile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, P. W.; Gardeweg, M.; Ramirez, C. F.; Rothery, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Between 10,000 and 500 yr ago the Socompa volcano in northern Chile experienced a catastrophic collapse of a 70 deg sector of the original cone, causing a debris avalanche that descended nearly 3000 m vertically and traveled more than 35 km from the volcano. The deposits cover some 490 sq km and have a minimum volume of 15 cu km. Parts of the original cone slumped in a nearly coherent form and are now preserved as large blocks more than 400 m high. The primary avalanche traveled northwestward over sloping ground before coming to rest transiently, forming a prominent marginal ridge, and then slid away northeastward to form a secondary flow, overriding much of the primary avalanche deposit. Abundant, prismatic, jointed dacite blocks within the debris avalanche deposit and a thin, fine-grained pumiceous deposit beneath it suggest that the collapse was triggered by magmatic activity and may have been accompanied by a violent lateral blast. Collapse was followed by eruption of pumiceous pyroclastic flows and extrusion of voluminous dacite domes.

  13. Avalanches in dry and saturated disordered media at fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanese, Enrico; Yılmaz, Okan; Molinari, Jean-François; Schrefler, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    This paper analyzes fracturing in inhomogeneous media under dry and fully saturated conditions. We adopt a central force model with continuous damage to study avalanche behavior in a two-dimensional truss lattice undergoing dilation. Multiple fractures can develop at once and a power-law distribution of the avalanche size is observed. The values for the power-law exponent are compared with the ones found in the literature and scale-free behavior is suggested. The fracture evolves intermittently in time because only some avalanches correspond to fracture advancement. A fully saturated model with continuous damage based on the extended Biot's theory is developed and avalanche behavior is studied in the presence of fluid, varying the fluid boundary conditions. We show that power-law behavior is destroyed when the fluid flux governs the problem. Fluid pressure behavior during intermittent crack tip advancement is studied for the continuous-damage fully saturated model. It is found that when mechanical loading prevails, the pressure rises when the crack advances, while when fluid loading prevails, the pressure drops when the crack advances.

  14. Gridded snow maps supporting avalanche forecasting in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, K.; Humstad, T.; Engeset, R. V.; Andersen, J.

    2012-04-01

    We present gridded maps indicating key parameters for avalanche forecasting with a 1 km x 1 km resolution. Based on the HBV hydrology model, snow parameters are modeled based on observed and interpolated precipitation and temperature data. Modeled parameters include for example new snow accumulated the last 24 and 72 hours, snow-water equivalent, and snow-water content. In addition we use meteorological parameters from the UK weather prediction model "Unified Model" such as wind and radiation to model snow-pack properties. Additional loading in lee-slopes by wind-transport is modeled based on prevailing wind conditions, snow-water content and snow age. A depth hoar index accounts for days with considerable negative temperature gradients in the snow pack. A surface hoar index based on radiation and humidity is currently under development. The maps are tested against field reports from avalanche observers throughout Norway. All data is available via a web-platform that combines maps for geo-hazards such as floods, landslides and avalanches. The maps are used by the Norwegian avalanche forecasting service, which is currently in a test phase. The service will be operational by winter 2012/2013.

  15. Hybrid phase transition into an absorbing state: Percolation and avalanches.

    PubMed

    Lee, Deokjae; Choi, S; Stippinger, M; Kertész, J; Kahng, B

    2016-04-01

    Interdependent networks are more fragile under random attacks than simplex networks, because interlayer dependencies lead to cascading failures and finally to a sudden collapse. This is a hybrid phase transition (HPT), meaning that at the transition point the order parameter has a jump but there are also critical phenomena related to it. Here we study these phenomena on the Erdős-Rényi and the two-dimensional interdependent networks and show that the hybrid percolation transition exhibits two kinds of critical behaviors: divergence of the fluctuations of the order parameter and power-law size distribution of finite avalanches at a transition point. At the transition point global or "infinite" avalanches occur, while the finite ones have a power law size distribution; thus the avalanche statistics also has the nature of a HPT. The exponent β_{m} of the order parameter is 1/2 under general conditions, while the value of the exponent γ_{m} characterizing the fluctuations of the order parameter depends on the system. The critical behavior of the finite avalanches can be described by another set of exponents, β_{a} and γ_{a}. These two critical behaviors are coupled by a scaling law: 1-β_{m}=γ_{a}.

  16. Group Dynamics and Decision Making: Backcountry Recreationists in Avalanche Terrain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright, Leslie Shay

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and determine the prevalence of decision-making characteristics of recreational backcountry groups when making a decision of where to travel and ride in avalanche terrain from the perspective of individuals. Decision-making characteristics encompassed communication, decision-making processes, leadership,…

  17. Avalanches in dry and saturated disordered media at fracture.

    PubMed

    Milanese, Enrico; Yılmaz, Okan; Molinari, Jean-François; Schrefler, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    This paper analyzes fracturing in inhomogeneous media under dry and fully saturated conditions. We adopt a central force model with continuous damage to study avalanche behavior in a two-dimensional truss lattice undergoing dilation. Multiple fractures can develop at once and a power-law distribution of the avalanche size is observed. The values for the power-law exponent are compared with the ones found in the literature and scale-free behavior is suggested. The fracture evolves intermittently in time because only some avalanches correspond to fracture advancement. A fully saturated model with continuous damage based on the extended Biot's theory is developed and avalanche behavior is studied in the presence of fluid, varying the fluid boundary conditions. We show that power-law behavior is destroyed when the fluid flux governs the problem. Fluid pressure behavior during intermittent crack tip advancement is studied for the continuous-damage fully saturated model. It is found that when mechanical loading prevails, the pressure rises when the crack advances, while when fluid loading prevails, the pressure drops when the crack advances.

  18. Spontaneous cortical activity in awake monkeys composed of neuronal avalanches.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Thomas; Thiagarajan, Tara C; Lebedev, Mikhail A; Nicolelis, Miguel A L; Chialvo, Dante R; Plenz, Dietmar

    2009-09-15

    Spontaneous neuronal activity is an important property of the cerebral cortex but its spatiotemporal organization and dynamical framework remain poorly understood. Studies in reduced systems--tissue cultures, acute slices, and anesthetized rats--show that spontaneous activity forms characteristic clusters in space and time, called neuronal avalanches. Modeling studies suggest that networks with this property are poised at a critical state that optimizes input processing, information storage, and transfer, but the relevance of avalanches for fully functional cerebral systems has been controversial. Here we show that ongoing cortical synchronization in awake rhesus monkeys carries the signature of neuronal avalanches. Negative LFP deflections (nLFPs) correlate with neuronal spiking and increase in amplitude with increases in local population spike rate and synchrony. These nLFPs form neuronal avalanches that are scale-invariant in space and time and with respect to the threshold of nLFP detection. This dimension, threshold invariance, describes a fractal organization: smaller nLFPs are embedded in clusters of larger ones without destroying the spatial and temporal scale-invariance of the dynamics. These findings suggest an organization of ongoing cortical synchronization that is scale-invariant in its three fundamental dimensions--time, space, and local neuronal group size. Such scale-invariance has ontogenetic and phylogenetic implications because it allows large increases in network capacity without a fundamental reorganization of the system.

  19. Reducing the Odds: Backcountry Powder Skiing in Avalanche Terrain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daffern, Tony

    This paper provides information and strategies to reduce the risk of encountering an avalanche when skiing or climbing on steep slopes. Skiers must recognize that the risk exists, be aware of their own tolerance for risk, and not allow companions to pressure them into taking more risk than they can tolerate. Ideally, one should ski with a small…

  20. Teaching Avalanche Safety Courses: Instructional Techniques and Field Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watters, Ron

    This paper discusses course structure, teaching techniques, and field exercises for enhancing winter travelers' avalanche knowledge and skills. In two class sessions, the course typically consists of a historical perspective; a section on snow physics (clouds, types of snow crystals, effects of riming, identification of precipitated snow crystals,…

  1. Avalanches in dry and saturated disordered media at fracture.

    PubMed

    Milanese, Enrico; Yılmaz, Okan; Molinari, Jean-François; Schrefler, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    This paper analyzes fracturing in inhomogeneous media under dry and fully saturated conditions. We adopt a central force model with continuous damage to study avalanche behavior in a two-dimensional truss lattice undergoing dilation. Multiple fractures can develop at once and a power-law distribution of the avalanche size is observed. The values for the power-law exponent are compared with the ones found in the literature and scale-free behavior is suggested. The fracture evolves intermittently in time because only some avalanches correspond to fracture advancement. A fully saturated model with continuous damage based on the extended Biot's theory is developed and avalanche behavior is studied in the presence of fluid, varying the fluid boundary conditions. We show that power-law behavior is destroyed when the fluid flux governs the problem. Fluid pressure behavior during intermittent crack tip advancement is studied for the continuous-damage fully saturated model. It is found that when mechanical loading prevails, the pressure rises when the crack advances, while when fluid loading prevails, the pressure drops when the crack advances. PMID:27176380

  2. Hybrid phase transition into an absorbing state: Percolation and avalanches.

    PubMed

    Lee, Deokjae; Choi, S; Stippinger, M; Kertész, J; Kahng, B

    2016-04-01

    Interdependent networks are more fragile under random attacks than simplex networks, because interlayer dependencies lead to cascading failures and finally to a sudden collapse. This is a hybrid phase transition (HPT), meaning that at the transition point the order parameter has a jump but there are also critical phenomena related to it. Here we study these phenomena on the Erdős-Rényi and the two-dimensional interdependent networks and show that the hybrid percolation transition exhibits two kinds of critical behaviors: divergence of the fluctuations of the order parameter and power-law size distribution of finite avalanches at a transition point. At the transition point global or "infinite" avalanches occur, while the finite ones have a power law size distribution; thus the avalanche statistics also has the nature of a HPT. The exponent β_{m} of the order parameter is 1/2 under general conditions, while the value of the exponent γ_{m} characterizing the fluctuations of the order parameter depends on the system. The critical behavior of the finite avalanches can be described by another set of exponents, β_{a} and γ_{a}. These two critical behaviors are coupled by a scaling law: 1-β_{m}=γ_{a}. PMID:27176256

  3. Silicon avalanche photodiodes developed at the Institute of Electron Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegrzecka, Iwona; Wegrzecki, Maciej; Bar, Jan; Grynglas, Maria; Uszynski, Andrzej; Grodecki, Remigiusz; Grabiec, Piotr B.; Krzeminski, Sylwester; Budzynski, Tadeusz

    2004-07-01

    Silicon avalanche photodiodes (APDs) -- due to the effect of avalanche multiplication of carriers in their structure -- are most sensitive and fastest detectors of visible and near infrared radiation. Also the value of noise equivalent power NEP of these detectors is the smallest. In the paper, the design, technology and properties of the silicon avalanche photodiodes with a n+ - p - π - p+ epiplanar structure developed at the Institute of Electron Technology (ITE) are presented. The diameters of photosensitive area range from 0.3 mm to 5 mm. The ITE photodiodes are optimized for the detection of the 800 nm - 850 nm radiation, but the detailed research on spectral dependencies of the gain and noise parameters has revealed that the spectral operating range of the ITE photodiodes is considerable wider and achieves 550 - 1000 nm. These photodiodes can be used in detection of very weak and very fast optical signals. Presently in the world, the studies are carried out on applying the avalanche photodiodes in detection of X radiation and in the scintillation detection of nuclear radiation.

  4. Electron avalanche structure determined by random walk theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, G. W.

    1973-01-01

    A self-consistent avalanche solution which accounts for collective long range Coulomb interactions as well as short range elastic and inelastic collisions between electrons and background atoms is made possible by a random walk technique. Results show that the electric field patterns in the early formation stages of avalanches in helium are close to those obtained from theory based on constant transport coefficients. Regions of maximum and minimum induced electrostatic potential phi are located on the axis of symmetry and within the volume covered by the electron swarm. As formation time continues, however, the region of minimum phi moves to slightly higher radii and the electric field between the extrema becomes somewhat erratic. In the intermediate formation periods the avalanche growth is slightly retarded by the high concentration of ions in the tail which oppose the external electric field. Eventually the formation of ions and electrons in the localized regions of high field strength more than offset this effect causing a very abrupt increase in avalanche growth.

  5. Volcanic and non-volcanic debris avalanche deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzella, Irene; Phillips, Jeremy; Bonadonna, Costanza

    2010-05-01

    Dry debris avalanches are characterized by extremely rapid, flow-like motion of large masses and they travel extremely long distances showing much greater mobility than could be predicted using frictional models. Rock avalanches (i.e. flows of fragmented rock derived from a bed-rock failure) and volcanic debris avalanches (i.e. block and ash flows caused by volcanic sector collapses) are both examples of this phenomenon. However, field observations show that volcanic-derived avalanches travel typically greater distance than non-volcanic rock avalanches. At present time the mechanisms involved in these phenomena are still mostly unknown. Several theories have been developed to explain their long runouts but there is no general agreement on a comprehensive rheological law and many questions remain unsolved. The main goal of this research is to constrain experimentally the effect of the characteristics of flow material on runout, deposit morphology and granular flow mechanisms. This will help identify the main differences between volcanic and non-volcanic debris avalanches. Preliminary experiments of unconstrained granular flows have been carried out at the École Polytechinique Féderale de Lausanne. Three kinds of material with different grain size distribution were used: a fine sand with D90 of 0.55mm and two types of gravel with similar density and friction coefficient but with D90 values of respectively 2 and 4 mm. Experiments showed relevant differences between sand and gravel deposit morphologies. The shape of the sand deposit is rather regular and compact whereas the gravel deposit showed well defined angular discontinuities: a central zone with a small slope and several ridges and a front, rear and sides with strong inclination. The presence of ridges and a steep front in gravel deposit evidence a rapid stop of the mass. These morphological features are also often observed in the field. For this reason this kind of gravel results to be more suitable for

  6. Use of a magnetic field to modify and detect avalanche behavior on a conical bead pile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Nathan; Lehman, Susan

    2015-03-01

    A conical bead pile subject to slow driving and an external magnetic field is used to test the effects of drop height and cohesion on avalanche statistics. Magnetically susceptible beads were dropped onto a pile from different heights and into different strengths of magnetic field. Avalanches were recorded by the change in mass as beads fall off the pile. For beads dropped from a low drop height with no cohesion, the avalanche size distribution follows a power law. As cohesion increases, we observe an increase in the probability of very large avalanches and decreases in the mid-size avalanches. The resulting bump in the avalanche distribution moves to larger avalanche size as the cohesion in the system is increased, matching the prediction by an analytic theory from a mean-field model of slip avalanches. The model also makes predictions for avalanche duration, which is not measurable with our current system. Since the steel beads are magnetized while in the applied magnetic field, their motion during an avalanche creates a change in magnetic flux. To detect this motion, we have placed a large-diameter pick-up coil around the pile. Results of the testing and calibration of this coil to measure avalanche duration are presented.

  7. Meteorological variables to aid forecasting deep slab avalanches on persistent weak layers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marienthal, Alex; Hendrikx, Jordy; Birkeland, Karl; Irvine, Kathryn M.

    2015-01-01

    Deep slab avalanches are particularly challenging to forecast. These avalanches are difficult to trigger, yet when they release they tend to propagate far and can result in large and destructive avalanches. We utilized a 44-year record of avalanche control and meteorological data from Bridger Bowl ski area in southwest Montana to test the usefulness of meteorological variables for predicting seasons and days with deep slab avalanches. We defined deep slab avalanches as those that failed on persistent weak layers deeper than 0.9 m, and that occurred after February 1st. Previous studies often used meteorological variables from days prior to avalanches, but we also considered meteorological variables over the early months of the season. We used classification trees and random forests for our analyses. Our results showed seasons with either dry or wet deep slabs on persistent weak layers typically had less precipitation from November through January than seasons without deep slabs on persistent weak layers. Days with deep slab avalanches on persistent weak layers often had warmer minimum 24-hour air temperatures, and more precipitation over the prior seven days, than days without deep slabs on persistent weak layers. Days with deep wet slab avalanches on persistent weak layers were typically preceded by three days of above freezing air temperatures. Seasonal and daily meteorological variables were found useful to aid forecasting dry and wet deep slab avalanches on persistent weak layers, and should be used in combination with continuous observation of the snowpack and avalanche activity.

  8. Dealing with the white death: avalanche risk management for traffic routes.

    PubMed

    Rheinberger, Christoph M; Bründl, Michael; Rhyner, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses mitigation strategies to protect traffic routes from snow avalanches. Up to now, mitigation of snow avalanches on many roads and railways in the Alps has relied on avalanche sheds, which require large initial investments resulting in high opportunity costs. Therefore, avalanche risk managers have increasingly adopted organizational mitigation measures such as warning systems and closure policies instead. The effectiveness of these measures is, however, greatly dependent on human decisions. In this article, we present a method for optimizing avalanche mitigation for traffic routes in terms of both their risk reduction impact and their net benefit to society. First, we introduce a generic framework for assessing avalanche risk and for quantifying the impact of mitigation. This allows for sound cost-benefit comparisons between alternative mitigation strategies. Second, we illustrate the framework with a case study from Switzerland. Our findings suggest that site-specific characteristics of avalanche paths, as well as the economic importance of a traffic route, are decisive for the choice of optimal mitigation strategies. On routes endangered by few avalanche paths with frequent avalanche occurrences, structural measures are most efficient, whereas reliance on organizational mitigation is often the most appropriate strategy on routes endangered by many paths with infrequent or fuzzy avalanche risk. Finally, keeping a traffic route open may be very important for tourism or the transport industry. Hence, local economic value may promote the use of a hybrid strategy that combines organizational and structural measures to optimize the resource allocation of avalanche risk mitigation.

  9. Dealing with the white death: avalanche risk management for traffic routes.

    PubMed

    Rheinberger, Christoph M; Bründl, Michael; Rhyner, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses mitigation strategies to protect traffic routes from snow avalanches. Up to now, mitigation of snow avalanches on many roads and railways in the Alps has relied on avalanche sheds, which require large initial investments resulting in high opportunity costs. Therefore, avalanche risk managers have increasingly adopted organizational mitigation measures such as warning systems and closure policies instead. The effectiveness of these measures is, however, greatly dependent on human decisions. In this article, we present a method for optimizing avalanche mitigation for traffic routes in terms of both their risk reduction impact and their net benefit to society. First, we introduce a generic framework for assessing avalanche risk and for quantifying the impact of mitigation. This allows for sound cost-benefit comparisons between alternative mitigation strategies. Second, we illustrate the framework with a case study from Switzerland. Our findings suggest that site-specific characteristics of avalanche paths, as well as the economic importance of a traffic route, are decisive for the choice of optimal mitigation strategies. On routes endangered by few avalanche paths with frequent avalanche occurrences, structural measures are most efficient, whereas reliance on organizational mitigation is often the most appropriate strategy on routes endangered by many paths with infrequent or fuzzy avalanche risk. Finally, keeping a traffic route open may be very important for tourism or the transport industry. Hence, local economic value may promote the use of a hybrid strategy that combines organizational and structural measures to optimize the resource allocation of avalanche risk mitigation. PMID:18808393

  10. Snow avalanche detection and identification for near real-time application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havens, S.; Johnson, J. B.; Marshall, H.; Nicholson, B.; Trisca, G. O.

    2013-12-01

    A near real-time avalanche detection system will provide highway avalanche forecasters with a tool to remotely monitor major avalanche paths and provide information about regional avalanche activity and timing. For the last three winters, a network of infrasound arrays has been remotely monitoring both avalanche and non-avalanche events along a 10 mile section of Highway 21 in Idaho. To provide the best results to avalanche forecasters, the system must be robust and detect all major avalanche events of interest that affect the highway. Over the last three winters, the infrasound arrays recorded multiple avalanche cycles and we explore different methods of event detection for both large dry avalanches (strong infrasound signal) and small wet avalanches (weak infrasound signal). We compare the F-statistic and cross-correlation techniques (i.e. PMCC) to determine the most robust method and develop computationally efficient algorithms to implement in near-real time using parallel processing and GPU computing. Once an event has been detected, we use the artificial intelligence method of recursive neural networks to classify based on similar characteristics to past known signals.

  11. Radioiodinated branched carbohydrates

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1989-01-01

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  12. Front Range Branch Officers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Front Range Branch of AGU has installed officers for 1990: Ray Noble, National Center for Atmospheric Research, chair; Sherry Oaks, U.S. Geological Survey, chair-elect; Howard Garcia, NOAA, treasurer; Catharine Skokan, Colorado School of Mines, secretary. JoAnn Joselyn of NOAA is past chair. Members at large are Wallace Campbell, NOAA; William Neff, USGS; and Stephen Schneider, NCAR.

  13. Electroded avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) photosensor

    PubMed Central

    Bubon, Oleksandr; DeCrescenzo, Giovanni; Zhao, Wei; Ohkawa, Yuji; Miyakawa, Kazunori; Matsubara, Tomoki; Kikuchi, Kenji; Tanioka, Kenkichi; Kubota, Misao; Rowlands, John A.; Reznik, Alla

    2012-01-01

    Although avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) is a very promising photoconductor for a variety of imaging applications, it is currently restricted to applications with electron beam readout in vacuum pick-up tube called a High-gain Avalanche Rushing Photoconductor (HARP). The electron beam readout is compatible with high definition television (HDTV) applications, but for use in solid-state medical imaging devices it should be replaced by an electronic readout with a two-dimensional array of metal pixel electrodes. However, due to the high electric field required for avalanche multiplication, it is a technological challenge to avoid possible dielectric breakdown at the edges, where electric field experiences local enhancement. It has been shown recently that this problem can be overcome by the use of a Resistive Interface Layer (RIL) deposited between a-Se and the metal electrode, however, at that time, at a sacrifice in transport properties. Here we show that optimization of RIL deposition technique allows for electroded avalanche a-Se with transport properties and time performance previously not achievable with any other a-Se structures. We have demonstrated this by detailed analysis of transport properties performed by Time-of-Flight (TOF) technique. Our results showed that a stable gain of 200 is reached at 104 V/μm for a 15-μm thick a-Se layer, which is the maximum theoretical gain for this thickness. We conclude that RIL is an enabling technology for practical implementation of solid-state avalanche a-Se image sensors. PMID:23115545

  14. Laboratory study of avalanches in a magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Compernolle, Bart

    2015-11-01

    Results of a basic heat transport experiment [] involving an off-axis heat source are presented. Experiments are performed in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA. A ring-shaped electron beam source injects low energy electrons (below ionization energy) along a strong magnetic field into a preexisting, large and cold plasma. The injected electrons are thermalized by Coulomb collisions within a short distance and provide an off-axis heat source that results in a long, hollow, cylindrical region of elevated electron temperature embedded in a colder plasma, and far from the machine walls. It is demonstrated that this heating configuration provides an ideal environment to study avalanche phenomena under controlled conditions. The avalanches are identified as sudden rearrangements of the pressure profile following the growth of fluctuations from ambient noise. The intermittent collapses of the plasma pressure profile are associated with unstable drift-Alfvén waves and exhibit both radial and azimuthal dynamics. After each collapse the plasma enters a quiescent phase in which the pressure profile slowly recovers and steepens until a threshold is exceeded, and the process repeats. The use of reference probes as time markers allows for the visualization of the 2D spatio-temporal evolution of the avalanche events. Avalanches are only observed for a limited combination of heating powers and magnetic fields. At higher heating powers the system transitions from the avalanche regime into a regime dominated by sustained drift-Alfvén wave activity. The pressure profile then transitions to a near steady-state in which anomalous transport balances the external pressure source. Performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility at UCLA, supported jointly by DOE and NSF.

  15. The development of structures in analogue and natural debris avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paguican, Engielle Mae; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin; Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo; Grosse, Pablo

    2010-05-01

    All types of rockslide-debris avalanches present a plethora of internal structures that are also well observed on the surface. Many of these are seen as faults and folds that can be used to determine deformation history and kinematics. We present two sets of simple and well-constrained experiments of reduced basal friction laboratory rockslides, equivalent to a highly deformed simple shear layer, with plug-flow. These follow the original ramp-slide work of Shea and van Wyk de Vries (Geosphere, 2008). The experiments used a curved ramp where materials accelerate until reaching a gently-sloped depositional surface and a constantly inclined ramp with a more regular slope and longer slides. A detailed description of deposit structures, their sequential formation and morphology is then used to investigate the transport type and deformation chronology from slide initiation to runout stopping of avalanches. Results using a curved ramp show accumulation and thickening at where the slope decreases. The thickened mass then further remobilises and advances by secondary collapse of the mass. Such a stop-start process may be important in many mountainous avalanches where there are rapid changes in slope. The constantly inclined ramp shows shearing and extensional structures at the levees and a set of compression and extension structures in the middle. We noted that frontal accumulation during flow occurs as materials at the front move slower relative to those in the medial and proximal zones. This also leads to secondary frontal collapse, and helps to maintain a thicker mass that can flow further. Descriptions and analyses of these structures are then applied to the kinematics and dynamics of natural examples. We study the 2006 Guinsaugon Rockslide event in the Philippines and find that frontal accumulation and secondary avalanching had also occurred and were important in determining the distribution and runout of the mass. Frontal bulking and collapse may also have occurred at

  16. Avalanche Debris Detection Using Satellite- and Drone Based Radar and Optical Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckerstorfer, M.; Malnes, E.; Vickers, H.; Solbø, S. A.; Tøllefsen, A.

    2014-12-01

    The mountainous fjord landscape in the county of Troms, ar