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Sample records for average interplanetary magnetic

  1. Interplanetary magnetic field data book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    An interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) data set is presented that is uniform with respect to inclusion of cislunar IMF data only, and which has as complete time coverage as presently possible over a full solar cycle. Macroscale phenomena in the interplanetary medium (sector structure, heliolatitude variations, solar cycle variations, etc.) and other phenomena (e.g., ground level cosmic-ray events) for which knowledge of the IMF with hourly resolution is necessary, are discussed. Listings and plots of cislunar hourly averaged IMP parameters over the period November 27, 1963, to May 17, 1974, are presented along with discussion of the mutual consistency of the IMF data used herein. The magnetic tape from which the plots and listings were generated, which is available from the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), is also discussed.

  2. The interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Large-scale properties of the interplanetary magnetic field as determined by the solar wind velocity structure are examined. The various ways in which magnetic fields affect phenomena in the solar wind are summarized. The dominant role of high and low velocity solar wind streams that persist, with fluctuations and evolution, for weeks or months is emphasized. It is suggested that for most purposes the sector structure is better identified with the stream structure than with the magnetic polarity and that the polarity does not necessarily change from one velocity sector to the next. Several mechanisms that might produce the stream structure are considered. The interaction of the high and low velocity streams is analyzed in a model that is steady state when viewed in a frame that corotates with the sun.

  3. Magnetic sails and interplanetary travel

    SciTech Connect

    Zubrin, R.M.; Andrews, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    A new concept, the magnetic sail, or 'magsail' is proposed which propels spacecraft by using the magnetic field generated by a loop of superconducting cable to deflect interplanetary or interstellar plasma winds. The performance of such a device is evaluated using both a plasma particle model and a fluid model, and the results of a series of investigations are presented. It is found that a magsail sailing on the solar wind at a radius of one astronautical unit can attain accelerations on the order of 0.01 m/sec squared, much greater than that available from a conventional solar lightsail, and also greater than the acceleration due to the sun's gravitational attraction. A net tangential force, or 'lift' can also be generated. Lift to drag ratios of about 0.3 appear attainable. Equations are derived whereby orbital transfers using magsail propulsion can be calculated analytically.

  4. Interplanetary magnetic field and geomagnetic Dst variations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, V. L.; Desai, U. D.

    1973-01-01

    The interplanetary magnetic field has been shown to influence the ring current field represented by Dst. Explorer 28 hourly magnetic field observations have been used with the hourly Dst values. The moderate geomagnetic storms of 60 gammas and quiet-time fluctuations of 10 to 30 gammas are correlated with the north to south change of the interplanetary field component perpendicular to the ecliptic. This change in the interplanetary field occurs one to three hours earlier than the corresponding change in the Dst field.

  5. Interplanetary stream magnetism - Kinematic effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Barouch, E.

    1976-01-01

    The particle density and the magnetic-field intensity and direction are calculated for volume elements of the solar wind as a function of the initial magnetic-field direction and the initial speed gradient. It is assumed that the velocity is constant and radial. These assumptions are approximately valid between about 0.1 and 1.0 AU for many streams. Time profiles of the particle density, field intensity, and velocity are calculated for corotating streams, neglecting effects of pressure gradients. The compression and rarefaction of the magnetic field depend sensitively on the initial field direction. By averaging over a typical stream, it is found that the average radial field intensity is inversely proportional to the square of the heliocentric distance, whereas the average intensity in the direction of the planets' motion does not vary in a simple way, consistent with deep space observations. Changes of field direction may be very large, depending on the initial angle; but when the initial angle at 0.1 AU is such that the base of the field line corotates with the sun, the spiral angle is the preferred direction at 1 AU. The theory is also applicable to nonstationary flows.

  6. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Guiding Relativistic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, S.; Demoulin, P.; Dasso, S.; Klein, K. L.

    2011-01-01

    The origin and the propagation of relativistic solar particles (0.5 to few Ge V) in the interplanetary medium remains a debated topic. These relativistic particles, detected at the Earth by neutron monitors have been previously accelerated close to the Sun and are guided by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) lines, connecting the acceleration site and the Earth. Usually, the nominal Parker spiral is considered for ensuring the magnetic connection to the Earth. However, in most GLEs the IMF is highly disturbed, and the active regions associated to the GLEs are not always located close to the solar footprint of the nominal Parker spiral. A possible explanation is that relativistic particles are propagating in transient magnetic structures, such as Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). In order to check this interpretation, we studied in detail the interplanetary medium where the particles propagate for 10 GLEs of the last solar cycle. Using the magnetic field and the plasma parameter measurements (ACE/MAG and ACE/SWEPAM), we found widely different IMF configurations. In an independent approach we develop and apply an improved method of the velocity dispersion analysis to energetic protons measured by SoHO/ERNE. We determined the effective path length and the solar release time of protons from these data and also combined them with the neutron monitor data. We found that in most of the GLEs, protons propagate in transient magnetic structures. Moreover, the comparison between the interplanetary magnetic structure and the interplanetary length suggest that the timing of particle arrival at Earth is dominantly determined by the type of IMF in which high energetic particles are propagating. Finally we find that these energetic protons are not significantly scattered during their transport to Earth.

  7. Distributions of the interplanetary magnetic field revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, Joan; Ruzmaikin, Alexander

    1994-01-01

    The adequacy of the power spectrum to characterize the variations of a parameter depends on whether or not the parameter has a Gaussian distribution. We here perform very simple tests of Gaussianity on the distribution. We here perform very simple tests of Gaussianity on the distributions of the magnitudes of the interplanetary magnetic field, and on the distributions of the components; that is, we find the first four cumulants of the distributions (mean, variance, skewness, and kurtosis) and their solar cycle variations. We find, consistent with other recent analyses, that the traditional distributions of the 1-hour averaged magnitude are not distributed normally or lognomally as has often been assumed and the 1-hour averaged z component is found to have a nonzero kurtosis. Thus the power spectrum is insufficient to completely characterize these variations and polyspectra are needed. We have isolated variations in the 1/f frequency region of the spectrum and show that the distributions of the magnitudes have nonzero skewness and kurtosis, the magnitudes are not distributed lognormally, and the distributions of the components have nonzero kurtosis. Thus higher-order spectra are again needed for a full characterization.

  8. Interplanetary planar magnetic structures associated with expanding active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakagawa, Tomoko; Uchida, Yutaka

    1995-01-01

    Planar magnetic structures are interplanetary objects whose magnetic field cannot be explained by Parker's solar wind model. They are characterized by two-dimensional structure of magnetic field that are highly variable and parallel to a plane which is inclined to the ecliptic plane. They appeared independently of interplanetary compression, solar flares, active prominences nor filament disappearances, but the sources often coincided with active regions. On the other hand, it has been discovered by the Yohkoh Soft X-ray telescope that active-region corona expand outwards at speeds of a few to a few tens of km/s near the Sun. The expansions occurred repeatedly, almost continually, even in the absence of any sizable flares. In the Yohkoh Soft X-ray images, the active-region corona seems to expand out into interplanetary space. Solar sources of interplanetary planar magnetic structures observed by Sakigake were examined by Yohkoh soft X-ray telescope. During a quiet period of the Sun from January 6 to November 11, 1993, there found 5 planar magnetic structures according to the criteria (absolute value of Bn)/(absolute value of B) less than 0.1 for planarity and (dB)/(absolute value of B) greater than 0.7 for variability of magnetic field, where Bn, dB, and the absolute value of B are field component normal to a plane, standard deviation, and average of the magnitude of the magnetic field, respectively. Sources of 4 events were on low-latitude (less than 5 degrees) active regions from which loop-like structures were expanding. The coincidence, 80%, is extremely high with respect to accidental coincidence, 7%, of Sakigake windows of solar wind observation with active regions. The last source was on loop-like features which seemed to be related with a mid-latitude (20 degrees) active region.

  9. Regulation of the interplanetary magnetic flux

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, D.J.; Gosling, J.T.; Phillips, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    In this study we use a recently developed technique for measuring the 2-D magnetic flux in the ecliptic plane to examine (1) the long term variation of the magnetic flux in interplanetary space and (2) the apparent rate at which coronal mass ejections (CMEs) may be opening new flux from the Sun. Since there is a substantial variation ({approximately}50%) of the flux in the ecliptic plane over the solar cycle, we conclude that there must be some means whereby new flux can be opened from the Sun and previously open magnetic flux can be closed off. We briefly describe recently discovered coronal disconnections events which could serve to close off previously open magnetic flux. CMEs appear to retain at least partial magnetic connection to the Sun and hence open new flux, while disconnections appear to be likely signatures of the process that returns closed flux to the Sun; the combination of these processes could regulate the amount of open magnetic flux in interplanetary space. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Coronal and interplanetary magnetic field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1999-06-01

    We provide an historical perspective of coronal and interplanetary field models. The structure of the interplanetary medium is controlled by the coronal magnetic field from which the solar wind emanates. This field has been described with ``Source Surface'' (SS) and ``Heliospheric Current Sheet'' (HCS) models. The ``Source Surface'' model was the first to open the solar field into interplanetary space using volumetric coronal currents, which were a ``source'' for the IMF. The Heliospheric Current Sheet (HCS) model provided a more physically realistic solution. The field structure was primarily a dipole, however, without regard to sign, the shape appeared to be a monopole pattern (uniform field stress). Ulysses has observed this behavior. Recently, Sheeley and Wang have utilized the HCS field model to calculate solar wind structures fairly accurately. Fisk, Schwadron, and Zurbuchen have investigated small differences from the SS model. These differences allow field line motions reminiscent of a ``timeline'' or moving ``streakline'' in a flow field, similar to the smoke pattern generated by a skywriting plane. Differences exist in the magnetic field geometry, from the Parker ``garden hose'' model affecting both the ``winding angle'' as well as the amount of latitudinal ``wandering.''

  11. Fractal structure of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Klein, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    Under some conditions, time series of the interplanetary magnetic field strength and components have the properties of fractal curves. Magnetic field measurements made near 8.5 AU by Voyager 2 from June 5 to August 24, 1981 were self-similar over time scales from approximately 20 sec to approximately 3 x 100,000 sec, and the fractal dimension of the time series of the strength and components of the magnetic field was D = 5/3, corresponding to a power spectrum P(f) approximately f sup -5/3. Since the Kolmogorov spectrum for homogeneous, isotropic, stationary turbulence is also f sup -5/3, the Voyager 2 measurements are consistent with the observation of an inertial range of turbulence extending over approximately four decades in frequency. Interaction regions probably contributed most of the power in this interval. As an example, one interaction region is discussed in which the magnetic field had a fractal dimension D = 5/3.

  12. Solar cycle variations in the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Smith, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    ISEE 3 interplanetary magnetic field measurements have been used to extend the NSSDC hourly averaged IMF composite data set through mid-1982. Most of sunspot cycle 20 (start:1964) and the first half of cycle 21 (start:1976) are now covered. The average magnitude of the field was relatively constant over cycle 20 with approx. 5-10% decreases in 1969 and 1971, when the Sun's polar regions changed polarity, and a 20% decrease in 1975-6 around solar minimum. Since the start of the new cycle, the total field strength has risen with the mean for the first third of 1982 being about 40% greater than the cycle 20 average. As during the previous cycle, an approx. 10% drop in IMF magnitude accompanied the 1980 reversal of the solar magnetic field. While the interplanetary magnetic field is clearly stronger during the present solar cycle, another 5-7 years of observations will be needed to determine if cycle 21 exhibits the same modest variations as the last cycle. Accordingly, it appears at this time that intercycle changes in IMF magnitude may be much larger than the intracycle variations.

  13. Large-scale properties of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, K. H.

    1972-01-01

    Early theoretical work of Parker is presented along with the observational evidence supporting his Archimedes spiral model. Variations present in the interplanetary magnetic field from the spiral angle are related to structures in the solar wind. The causes of these structures are found to be either nonuniform radial solar wind flow or the time evolution of the photospheric field. Coronal magnetic models are related to the connection between the solar magnetic field and the interplanetary magnetic field. Direct extension of the solar field-magnetic nozzle controversy is discussed along with the coronal magnetic models. Effects of active regions on the interplanetary magnetic field is discussed with particular reference to the evolution of interplanetary sectors. Interplanetary magnetic field magnitude variations are shown throughout the solar cycle. The percentage of time the field magnitude is greater than 10 gamma is shown to closely parallel sunspot number. The sun's polar field influence on the interplanetary field and alternative views of the magnetic field structure out of the ecliptic plane are presented. In addition, a variety of significantly different interplanetary field structures are discussed.

  14. Size and energy distributions of interplanetary magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, H. Q.; Wu, D. J.; Chao, J. K.

    2007-02-01

    In observations from 1995 to 2001 from the Wind spacecraft, 144 interplanetary magnetic flux ropes were identified in the solar wind around 1 AU. Their durations vary from tens of minutes to tens of hours. These magnetic flux ropes include many small- and intermediate-sized structures and display a continuous distribution in size. Energies of these flux ropes are estimated and it is found that the distribution of their energies is a good power law spectrum with an index ~-0.87. The possible relationship between them and solar eruptions is discussed. It is suggested that like interplanetary magnetic clouds are interplanetary coronal mass ejections, the small- and intermediate-sized interplanetary magnetic flux ropes are the interplanetary manifestations of small coronal mass ejections produced in small solar eruptions. However, these small coronal mass ejections are too weak to appear clearly in the coronagraph observations as an ordinary coronal mass ejection.

  15. Interplanetary magnetic sector polarity inferred from polar geomagnetic field observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friis-Christensen, E.; Lassen, K.; Wilcox, J. M.; Gonzalez, W.; Colburn, D. S.

    1971-01-01

    In order to infer the interplanetary sector polarity from polar geomagnetic field diurnal variations, measurements were carried out at Godhavn and Thule (Denmark) Geomagnetic Observatories. The inferred interplanetary sector polarity was compared with the polarity observed at the same time by Explorer 33 and 35 magnetometers. It is shown that the polarity (toward or away from the sun) of the interplanetary magnetic field can be reliably inferred from observations of the polar cap geomagnetic fields.

  16. Interplanetary magnetic sector polarity inferred from polar geomagnetic field observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriss-Christensen, E.; Lassen, K.; Wilcox, J. M.; Gonzalez, W.; Colburn, D. S.

    1971-01-01

    With the use of a prediction technique it is shown that the polarity (toward or away from the sun) of the interplanetary magnetic field can be reliably inferred from observations of the polar geomagnetic field.

  17. The interplanetary and solar magnetic field sector structures, 1962 - 1968

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    The interplanetary magnetic field sector structure was observed from late 1962 through 1968. During this time it has been possible to study the manner in which the sector pattern and its relation to the photospheric magnetic field configuration changes from solar minimum to solar maximum. Observations were also made relating sector boundaries to specific regions on the solar disk. These and other observations related to the solar origin of the interplanetary field are briefly reviewed.

  18. Heliocentric distance dependence of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behannon, K. W.

    1977-01-01

    Recent and ongoing planetary missions have provided extensive observations of the variations of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) both in time and with heliocentric distance from the sun. Large time variations in both the IMF and its fluctuations were observed. These are produced predominantly by dynamical processes in the interplanetary medium associated with stream interactions. Magnetic field variations near the sun are propagated to greater heliocentric distances, also contributing to the observed variablity of the IMF. Temporal variations on a time-scale comparable to or less than the corotation period complicate attempts to deduce radial gradients of the field and its fluctuations from the various observations. However, recent measurements inward to 0.46 AU and outward to 5 AU suggest that the radial component of the field on average decreases approximately as r to the minus second power, while the azimuthal component decreases more rapidly than the r to the minum first power dependence predicted by simple theory. This, and other observations, are discussed.

  19. Magnetic field line lengths inside interplanetary magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qiang; Qiu, Jiong; Krucker, Sam

    2015-07-01

    We report on the detailed and systematic study of field line twist and length distributions within magnetic flux ropes embedded in interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). The Grad-Shafranov reconstruction method is utilized together with a constant-twist nonlinear force-free (Gold-Hoyle) flux rope model to reveal the close relation between the field line twist and length in cylindrical flux ropes, based on in situ Wind spacecraft measurements. We show that the field line twist distributions within interplanetary flux ropes are inconsistent with the Lundquist model. In particular, we utilize the unique measurements of magnetic field line lengths within selected ICME events as provided by Kahler et al. () based on energetic electron burst observations at 1 AU and the associated type III radio emissions detected by the Wind spacecraft. These direct measurements are compared with our model calculations to help assess the flux rope interpretation of the embedded magnetic structures. By using the different flux rope models, we show that the in situ direct measurements of field line lengths are consistent with a flux rope structure with spiral field lines of constant and low twist, largely different from that of the Lundquist model, especially for relatively large-scale flux ropes.

  20. The spiral interplanetary magnetic field - A polarity and sunspot cycle variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svalgaard, L.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Spacecraft observations near the earth of the average direction of the interplanetary magnetic field during the sunspot maximum year 1968 showed a deviation from the spiral field of Parker's classical description. The included angle between the average field direction when the field polarity was away from the sun and the average direction when the field polarity was toward the sun was 168 deg, rather than 180 deg as predicted by Parker. This effect appears to have a sunspot cycle variation.

  1. The spiral interplanetary magnetic field: A polarity and sunspot cycle variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svalgaard, L.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Spacecraft observations near the earth of the yearly average direction of the interplanetary magnetic field during the sunspot maximum year 1968 showed a deviation from the spiral field. The angle between the average field direction when the field polarity was away from the sun and the average direction for toward polarity was 168 deg, rather than 180 deg. This effect appears to have a sunspot cycle variation.

  2. Interplanetary magnetic field effects on high latitude ionospheric convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heelis, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Relations between the electric field and the electric current in the ionosphere can be established on the basis of a system of mathematical and physical equations provided by the equations of current continuity and Ohm's law. For this reason, much of the synthesis of electric field and plasma velocity data in the F-region is made with the aid of similar data sets derived from field-aligned current and horizontal current measurements. During the past decade, the development of a self-consistent picture of the distribution and behavior of these measurements has proceeded almost in parallel. The present paper is concerned with the picture as it applies to the electric field and plasma drift velocity and its dependence on the interplanetary magnetic field. Attention is given to the southward interplanetary magnetic field and the northward interplanetary magnetic field.

  3. The earth's magnetosphere under continued forcing - Substorm activity during the passage of an interplanetary magnetic cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Freeman, M. P.; Burlaga, L. F.; Lepping, R. P.; Takahashi, K.

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic field and energetic particle observations from six spacecraft in the near-earth magnetotail are described and combined with ground magnetograms to document for the first time the magnetospheric substorm activity during a 30-hour long transit of an interplanetary cloud at 1 AU. During an earlier 11-hr interval when B(z) was continuously positive, the magnetosphere was quiescent, while in a later 18-hr interval when B(z) was uninterruptedly negative a large magnetic storm was set off. In the latter interval the substorm onsets recurred on average every 50 min. Their average recurrence frequency remained relatively undiminished even when the magnetic cloud B(z) and other measures of the interplanetary energy input decreased considerably. These results concur with current models of magnetospheric substorms based on deterministic nonlinear dynamics. The substorm onset occurred when the cloud's magnetic field had a persistent northward component but was predominantly westward pointing.

  4. A Study of Geoeffective Magnetic Clouds in the Interplanetary Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lago, Alisson Dal

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic clouds are interplanetary structures whose origins are related to Coronal Mass Ejections (CUE). Their features are: strong magnetic field intensity (typically > 10nT (nano Tesla)), a large rotation in the magnetic field angle as the cloud crosses the spacecraft, low proton temperature and Beta (thermal pressure/magnetic pressure) values (approximately 0.1). For a set of previously published magnetic cloud events and another set of clouds identified in the whole year of 1979 we present a study of plasma and magnetic field parameters. We have shown the existence of a relationship between the peak magnetic field strength and peak velocity value of the cloud, with a tendency that clouds which move at higher speeds also possess higher core magnetic field strengths. There is also an indication that this relationship is peculiar to magnetic clouds, whereas other types of non-cloud driver gas, or ICME , events do not seam to show a similar relationship. Both parameters, velocity and magnetic field strength, are related to Magnetic Storms. It is also addressed the interaction between magnetic clouds and other features in the interplanetary medium by calculating the Total Static Pressure, Magnetic plus Thermal, and the Dynamic Pressure relative to other structures surrounding the cloud, investigating their possible relation to magnetic cloud field enhancement. This work contributes to: (1) Space Weather Forecasting, through the calculation of the magnetic cloud field strengths by knowing their velocities (the latter can be remotely measured by sequences of coronograph images); (2) the study of the relation between magnetic clouds and magnetic storms; and (3) the study of the interaction between magnetic clouds and other interplanetary structures surrounding it.

  5. Understanding Magnetic Eruptions in the Sun and Their Interplanetary Consequences

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-30

    the Sun and their interplanetary consequences. This project is motivated by the fact that the Sun drives the most violent space weather events. The mechanisms that trigger and drive these eruptions are the least understood aspects of space weather. A better physical understanding of how magnetic eruptions occur and how these disturbances propagate will surely lead to more accurate and longer range

  6. SIGNATURES OF MAGNETIC RECONNECTION AT BOUNDARIES OF INTERPLANETARY SMALL-SCALE MAGNETIC FLUX ROPES

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Hui; Yao Shuo; Zong Qiugang; Qi Yu; He Jiansen

    2010-09-01

    The interaction between interplanetary small-scale magnetic flux ropes and the magnetic field in the ambient solar wind is an important topic in the understanding of the evolution of magnetic structures in the heliosphere. Through a survey of 125 previously reported small flux ropes from 1995 to 2005, we find that 44 of them reveal clear signatures of Alfvenic fluctuations and thus classify them as Alfven wave trains rather than flux ropes. Signatures of magnetic reconnection, generally including a plasma jet of {approx}30 km s{sup -1} within a magnetic field rotational region, are clearly present at boundaries of about 42% of the flux ropes and 14% of the wave trains. The reconnection exhausts are often observed to show a local increase in the proton temperature, density, and plasma beta. About 66% of the reconnection events at flux rope boundaries are associated with a magnetic field shear angle larger than 90{sup 0} and 73% of them reveal a decrease of 20% or more in the magnetic field magnitude, suggesting a dominance of anti-parallel reconnection at flux rope boundaries. The occurrence rate of magnetic reconnection at flux rope boundaries through the years 1995-2005 is also investigated and we find that it is relatively low around the solar maximum and much higher when approaching solar minima. The average magnetic field depression and shear angle for reconnection events at flux rope boundaries also reveal a similar trend from 1995 to 2005. Our results demonstrate for the first time that boundaries of a substantial fraction of small-scale flux ropes have properties similar to those of magnetic clouds, in the sense that both of them exhibit signatures of magnetic reconnection. The observed reconnection signatures could be related either to the formation of small flux ropes or to the interaction between flux ropes and the interplanetary magnetic fields.

  7. Average Spatial Distribution of Cosmic Rays behind the Interplanetary Shock—Global Muon Detector Network Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozai, M.; Munakata, K.; Kato, C.; Kuwabara, T.; Rockenbach, M.; Dal Lago, A.; Schuch, N. J.; Braga, C. R.; Mendonça, R. R. S.; Jassar, H. K. Al; Sharma, M. M.; Duldig, M. L.; Humble, J. E.; Evenson, P.; Sabbah, I.; Tokumaru, M.

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) density and its spatial gradient in Forbush Decreases (FDs) observed with the Global Muon Detector Network (GMDN) and neutron monitors (NMs). By superposing the GCR density and density gradient observed in FDs following 45 interplanetary shocks (IP-shocks), each associated with an identified eruption on the Sun, we infer the average spatial distribution of GCRs behind IP-shocks. We find two distinct modulations of GCR density in FDs, one in the magnetic sheath and the other in the coronal mass ejection (CME) behind the sheath. The density modulation in the sheath is dominant in the western flank of the shock, while the modulation in the CME ejecta stands out in the eastern flank. This east-west asymmetry is more prominent in GMDN data responding to ˜60 GV GCRs than in NM data responding to ˜10 GV GCRs, because of the softer rigidity spectrum of the modulation in the CME ejecta than in the sheath. The geocentric solar ecliptic-y component of the density gradient, G y , shows a negative (positive) enhancement in FDs caused by the eastern (western) eruptions, while G z shows a negative (positive) enhancement in FDs caused by the northern (southern) eruptions. This implies that the GCR density minimum is located behind the central flank of IP-shocks and propagating radially outward from the location of the solar eruption. We also confirmed that the average G z changes its sign above and below the heliospheric current sheet, in accord with the prediction of the drift model for the large-scale GCR transport in the heliosphere.

  8. INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FLUX DEPLETION DURING PROTRACTED SOLAR MINIMA

    SciTech Connect

    Connick, David E.; Smith, Charles W.; Schwadron, Nathan A. E-mail: Charles.Smith@unh.edu

    2011-01-20

    We examine near-Earth solar wind observations as assembled within the Omni data set over the past 15 years that constitute the latest solar cycle. We show that the interplanetary magnetic field continues to be depleted at low latitudes throughout the protracted solar minimum reaching levels below previously predicted minima. We obtain a rate of flux removal resulting in magnetic field reduction by 0.5 nT yr{sup -1} at 1 AU when averaged over the years 2005-2009 that reduces to 0.3 nT yr{sup -1} for 2007-2009. We show that the flux removal operates on field lines that follow the nominal Parker spiral orientation predicted for open field lines and are largely unassociated with recent ejecta. We argue that the field line reduction can only be accomplished by ongoing reconnection of nominally open field lines or very old closed field lines and we contend that these two interpretations are observationally equivalent and indistinguishable.

  9. On the limitations of geomagnetic measures of interplanetary magnetic polarity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Rosenberg, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The maximum attainable accuracy in inferring the interplanetary magnetic polarity from polar cap magnetograms is about 88%. This is achieved in practice, when high-latitude polar cap stations are used during local summer months, and the signature in the ground records is strong. An attempt by Svalgaard (1972) to use this effect to infer an index of interplanetary magnetic polarity back to 1926 has not been so successful. Furthermore, some of the properties of the index have changed with time. Prior to 1963, the inferred polarities are strongly dependent on geomagnetic activity, while after this time they are not. Thus, this index should not be used to separate solar-magnetic from solar-activity effects prior to 1963.

  10. Interplanetary boundary layers at 1 AU. [magnetic field measurements from Explorer 34

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Lemaire, J. F.; Turner, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The structure and nature of discontinuities in the interplanetary magnetic field at 1 AU in the period March 18, 1971 to April 9, 1971, is determined by using high-resolution magnetic field measurements from Explorer 34. The discontinuities that were selected for this analysis occurred under a variety of interplanetary conditions at an average rate of 0.5/hr. This set does not include all discontinuities that were present, but the sample is large and it is probably representative. Both tangential and rotational discontinuities were identified, the ratio of TD's to RD's being approximately 3 to 1. Tangential discontinuities were observed every day, even among Alfvenic fluctuations. The structure of most of the boundary layers was simple and ordered, i.e., the magnetic field usually changed smoothly and monotonically from one side of the boundary layer to the other.

  11. Magnetic Reconnection in the Interior of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermo, R. L.; Opher, M.; Drake, J. F.

    2014-07-01

    Recent in situ observations of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) found signatures of reconnection exhausts in their interior or trailing edge. Whereas reconnection on the leading edge of an ICME would indicate an interaction with the coronal or interplanetary environment, this result suggests that the internal magnetic field reconnects with itself. In light of this data, we consider the stability properties of flux ropes first developed in the context of astrophysics, then further elaborated upon in the context of reversed field pinches (RFPs). It was shown that the lowest energy state of a flux rope corresponds to ∇×B=λB with λ a constant, the so-called Taylor state. Variations from this state will result in the magnetic field trying to reorient itself into the Taylor state solution, subject to the constraints that the toroidal flux and magnetic helicity are invariant. In reversed field pinches, this relaxation is mediated by the reconnection of the magnetic field, resulting in a sawtooth crash. If we likewise treat the ICME as a flux rope, any deviation from the Taylor state will result in reconnection within the interior of the flux tube, in agreement with the observations by Gosling et al. Such a departure from the Taylor state takes place as the flux tube cross section expands in the latitudinal direction, as seen in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of flux tubes propagating through the interplanetary medium. We show analytically that this elongation results in a state which is no longer in the minimum energy Taylor state. We then present magnetohydrodynamic simulations of an elongated flux tube which has evolved away from the Taylor state and show that reconnection at many surfaces produces a complex stochastic magnetic field as the system evolves back to a minimum energy state configuration.

  12. Magnetic Field-Line Lengths in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections Inferred From Energetic Electron Events (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-03

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TP-2012-0026 TP-2012-0026 MAGNETIC FIELD -LINE LENGTHS IN INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS INFERRED FROM... Magnetic Field -Line Lengths in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections Inferred 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House From Energetic Electron Events... MAGNETIC FIELD -LINE LENGTHS IN INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS INFERRED FROM ENERGETIC ELECTRON EVENTS S. W. Kahler1, D. K. Haggerty2, and I. G

  13. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Power Spectrum Variations: A VHO Enabled Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, A.; Koval, A.; Merka, J.; Narock, T.

    2011-01-01

    The newly reprocessed high time resolution (11/22 vectors/sec) Wind mission interplanetary magnetic field data and the solar wind key parameter search capability of the Virtual Heliospheric Observatory (VHO) affords an opportunity to study magnetic field power spectral density variations as a function of solar wind conditions. In the reprocessed Wind Magnetic Field Investigation (MFI) data, the spin tone and its harmonics are greatly reduced that allows the meaningful fitting of power spectra to the 2 Hz limit above which digitization noise becomes apparent. The power spectral density is computed and the spectral index is fitted for the MHD and ion inertial regime separately along with the break point between the two for various solar wind conditions. The time periods of fixed solar wind conditions are obtained from VHO searches that greatly simplify the process. The functional dependence of the ion inertial spectral index and break point on solar wind plasma and magnetic field conditions will be discussed

  14. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Power Spectrum Variations: A VHO Enabled Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, A.; Koval, A.; Merka, J.; Narock, T.

    2010-01-01

    The newly reprocessed high time resolution (11/22 vectors/sec) Wind mission interplanetary magnetic field data and the solar wind key parameter search capability of the Virtual Heliospheric Observatory (VHO) affords an opportunity to study magnetic field power spectral density variations as a function of solar wind conditions. In the reprocessed Wind Magnetic Field Investigation (MFI) data, the spin tone and its harmonics are greatly reduced that allows the meaningful fitting of power spectra to the approx.2 Hz limit above which digitization noise becomes apparent. The power spectral density is computed and the spectral index is fitted for the MHD and ion inertial regime separately along with the break point between the two for various solar wind conditions . The time periods of fixed solar wind conditions are obtained from VHO searches that greatly simplify the process. The functional dependence of the ion inertial spectral index and break point on solar wind plasma and magnetic field conditions will be discussed

  15. The topology of intrasector reversals of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Crooker, N. U.; Gosling, J. T.

    1996-11-01

    A technique has been developed recently to determine the polarities of interplanetary magnetic fields relative to their origins at the Sun by comparing energetic electron flow directions with local magnetic field directions. Here we use heat flux electrons from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) plasma detector on the ISEE 3 spacecraft to determine the field polarities. We examine periods within well-defined magnetic sectors when the field directions appear to be reversed from the normal spiral direction of the sector. About half of these intrasector field reversals (IFRs) are cases in which the polarities match those of the surrounding sectors, indicating that those fields have been folded back toward the Sun. The more interesting cases are those with polarity reversals. We find no clear cases of isolated reverse polarity fields, which suggests that islands of reverse polarity in the solar source dipole field probably do not exist. The IFRs with polarity reversals are strongly associated with periods of bidirectional electron flows, suggesting that those fields occur only in conjunction with closed fields. We propose that both those IFRs and the bidirectional flows are signatures of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In that case, many interplanetary CMEs are larger and more complex than previously thought, consisting of both open and closed field components.

  16. Strong geomagnetic activity forecast by neural networks under dominant southern orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valach, Fridrich; Bochníček, Josef; Hejda, Pavel; Revallo, Miloš

    2014-02-01

    The paper deals with the relation of the southern orientation of the north-south component Bz of the interplanetary magnetic field to geomagnetic activity (GA) and subsequently a method is suggested of using the found facts to forecast potentially dangerous high GA. We have found that on a day with very high GA hourly averages of Bz with a negative sign occur at least 16 times in typical cases. Since it is very difficult to estimate the orientation of Bz in the immediate vicinity of the Earth one day or even a few days in advance, we have suggested using a neural-network model, which assumes the worse of the possibilities to forecast the danger of high GA - the dominant southern orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field. The input quantities of the proposed model were information about X-ray flares, type II and IV radio bursts as well as information about coronal mass ejections (CME). In comparing the GA forecasts with observations, we obtain values of the Hanssen-Kuiper skill score ranging from 0.463 to 0.727, which are usual values for similar forecasts of space weather. The proposed model provides forecasts of potentially dangerous high geomagnetic activity should the interplanetary CME (ICME), the originator of geomagnetic storms, hit the Earth under the most unfavorable configuration of cosmic magnetic fields. We cannot know in advance whether the unfavorable configuration is going to occur or not; we just know that it will occur with the probability of 31%.

  17. Interplanetary magnetic field orientation for transient events in the outer magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Newell, P. T.

    1995-01-01

    It is generally believed that flux transfer events (FTEs) in the outer dayside magneosphere, usually identified by transient (approximately 1 min) bipolar magneitc field perturbations in the direction normal to the nominal magnetopause, occur when the magnetosheath magetic field has a southward component. We compare the results of three methods for determining the magnetosheath magnetic field orientationat the times of previously identified UKS/IRM events: (1) the average magnetosheath magnetic field orientation in the 30-min period adjacent to the nearest magnetopause crossing, (2) the magnetosheath magnetic field orientation observed just outside the magnetopause, and (3) the lagged interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation at the time of the transient events. Whereas the results of method 2 indicate that the events tend to occur for a southward magnetosheath magnetic field, the results of methods 1 and 3 show no such tnedency. The fact that the three methods yield significantly diffeent results emphasizes the need for caution in future studies.

  18. Counterstreaming electrons in small interplanetary magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, H. Q.; Zhao, G. Q.; Wang, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Small interplanetary magnetic flux ropes (SIMFRs) are commonly observed by spacecraft at 1 AU, and their origin still remains disputed. We investigated the counterstreaming suprathermal electron (CSE) signatures of 106 SIMFRs measured by Wind during 1995-2005. We found that 79 (75%) of the 106 flux ropes contain CSEs, and the percentages of counterstreaming vary from 8% to 98%, with a mean value of 51%. CSEs are often observed in magnetic clouds (MCs), and this indicates these MCs are still attached to the Sun at both ends. CSEs are also related to heliospheric current sheets (HCSs) and the Earth's bow shock. We divided the SIMFRs into two categories: The first category is far from HCSs, and the second category is in the vicinity of HCSs. The first category has 57 SIMFRs, and only 7 of 57 ropes have no CSEs. This ratio is similar to that of MCs. The second category has 49 SIMFRs; however, 20 of the 49 events have no CSEs. This ratio is larger than that of MCs. These two categories have different origins. One category originates from the solar corona, and most ropes are still connected to the Sun at both ends. The other category is formed near HCSs in the interplanetary space.

  19. Transport of solar electrons in the turbulent interplanetary magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Ablaßmayer, J.; Tautz, R. C.; Dresing, N.

    2016-01-15

    The turbulent transport of solar energetic electrons in the interplanetary magnetic field is investigated by means of a test-particle Monte-Carlo simulation. The magnetic fields are modeled as a combination of the Parker field and a turbulent component. In combination with the direct calculation of diffusion coefficients via the mean-square displacements, this approach allows one to analyze the effect of the initial ballistic transport phase. In that sense, the model complements the main other approach in which a transport equation is solved. The major advancement is that, by recording the flux of particles arriving at virtual detectors, intensity and anisotropy-time profiles can be obtained. Observational indications for a longitudinal asymmetry can thus be explained by tracing the diffusive spread of the particle distribution. The approach may be of future help for the systematic interpretation of observations for instance by the solar terrestrial relations observatory (STEREO) and advanced composition explorer (ACE) spacecrafts.

  20. Three-dimensional interplanetary stream magnetism and energetic particle motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barouch, E.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1976-01-01

    Cosmic rays interact with mesoscale configurations of the interplanetary magnetic field. A technique is presented for calculating such configurations in the inner solar system, which are due to streams and source conditions near the sun, and maps of magnetic field are constructed for some plausible stream and source conditions. One effect of these mesoscale configurations on galactic cosmic rays is shown to be an out-of-the-ecliptic gradient drift sufficient to explain Forbush decreases. The effects on solar energetic particles include small polar drifts due to the field gradients and a possibly large modification of the time-intensity profiles and anisotropy characteristics due to the formation of mirror configurations in space. If a diffusion model is applicable to solar particles, the true diffusion coefficient will be masked by the effects of streams. A conceptual model which incorporates these ideas and those of several other models is presented.

  1. Interplanetary magnetic field variations and the electromagnetic state of the equatorial ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, V. L.

    1978-01-01

    The Esq phenomena were selected in order to examine the effect of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on the ionospheric plasma and to obtain insight into the interplanetary ionospheric coupling processes. January-March 1973 interplanetary magnetic field data of Explorer 43, Huancayo ionograms, and surface equatorial magnetograms were used. The IMF observations from Explorer 43 in the form of 15-sec averages were examined around the time of disappearance of the Esq. The IMF z-component was observed to change from a negative to a positive value before the disappearance of the Esq in four events where simultaneous data were available. The general explanation is that the induced electric field becomes westward from a previous eastward direction, coinciding with the IMF z-component reversal. Thus, just before the Esq disappears, the magnetosphere is subjected to the westward electric field. If this field is impressed to the low-latitude ionosphere, the resultant electric field in the equatorial ionosphere changes from eastward (westward) to westward (eastward) in the daytime (nighttime).

  2. Charged Dust Grain Dynamics Subject to Solar Wind, Poynting-Robertson Drag, and the Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhotka, Christoph; Bourdin, Philippe; Narita, Yasuhito

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the combined effect of solar wind, Poynting-Robertson drag, and the frozen-in interplanetary magnetic field on the motion of charged dust grains in our solar system. For this reason, we derive a secular theory of motion by the means of an averaging method and validate it with numerical simulations of the unaveraged equations of motions. The theory predicts that the secular motion of charged particles is mainly affected by the z-component of the solar magnetic axis, or the normal component of the interplanetary magnetic field. The normal component of the interplanetary magnetic field leads to an increase or decrease of semimajor axis depending on its functional form and sign of charge of the dust grain. It is generally accepted that the combined effects of solar wind and photon absorption and re-emmision (Poynting-Robertson drag) lead to a decrease in semimajor axis on secular timescales. On the contrary, we demonstrate that the interplanetary magnetic field may counteract these drag forces under certain circumstances. We derive a simple relation between the parameters of the magnetic field, the physical properties of the dust grain, as well as the shape and orientation of the orbital ellipse of the particle, which is a necessary conditions for the stabilization in semimajor axis.

  3. An Alternative Method for Identifying Interplanetary Magnetic Cloud Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojeda-Gonzalez, A.; Mendes, O.; Calzadilla, A.; Domingues, M. O.; Prestes, A.; Klausner, V.

    2017-03-01

    Spatio-temporal entropy (STE) analysis is used as an alternative mathematical tool to identify possible magnetic cloud (MC) candidates. We analyze Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) data using a time interval of only 10 days. We select a convenient data interval of 2500 records moving forward by 200 record steps until the end of the time series. For every data segment, the STE is calculated at each step. During an MC event, the STE reaches values close to zero. This extremely low value of STE is due to MC structure features. However, not all of the magnetic components in MCs have STE values close to zero at the same time. For this reason, we create a standardization index (the so-called Interplanetary Entropy, IE, index). This index is a worthwhile effort to develop new tools to help diagnose ICME structures. The IE was calculated using a time window of one year (1999), and it has a success rate of 70% over other identifiers of MCs. The unsuccessful cases (30%) are caused by small and weak MCs. The results show that the IE methodology identified 9 of 13 MCs, and emitted nine false alarm cases. In 1999, a total of 788 windows of 2500 values existed, meaning that the percentage of false alarms was 1.14%, which can be considered a good result. In addition, four time windows, each of 10 days, are studied, where the IE method was effective in finding MC candidates. As a novel result, two new MCs are identified in these time windows.

  4. Evidence linking coronal mass ejections with interplanetary magnetic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. M.; Hildner, E.

    1983-01-01

    Using proxy data for the occurrence of those mass ejections from the solar corona which are directed earthward, we investigate the association between the post-1970 interplanetary magnetic clouds of Klein and Burlaga and coronal mass ejections. The evidence linking magnetic clouds following shocks with coronal mass ejections is striking; six of nine clouds observed at Earth were preceded an appropriate time earlier by meter-wave type II radio bursts indicative of coronal shock waves and coronal mass ejections occurring near central meridian. During the selected periods when no clouds were detected near Earth, the only type II bursts reported were associated with solar activity near the limbs. Where the proxy solar data to be sought are not so clearly suggested, that is, for clouds preceding interaction regions and clouds within cold magnetic enhancements, the evidence linking the clouds and coronal mass ejections is not as clear; proxy data usually suggest many candidate mass-ejection events for each cloud. Overall, the data are consistent with and support the hypothesis suggested by Klein and Burlaga that magnetic clouds observed with spacecraft at 1 AU are manifestations of solar coronal mass ejection transients.

  5. Magnetic shielding of interplanetary spacecraft against solar flare radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocks, Franklin H.; Watkins, Seth

    1993-01-01

    The ultimate objective of this work is to design, build, and fly a dual-purpose, piggyback payload whose function is to produce a large volume, low intensity magnetic field and to test the concept of using such a magnetic field (1) to protect spacecraft against solar flare protons, (2) to produce a thrust of sufficient magnitude to stabilize low satellite orbits against orbital decay from atmospheric drag, and (3) to test the magsail concept. These all appear to be capable of being tested using the same deployed high temperature superconducting coil. In certain orbits, high temperature superconducting wire, which has now been developed to the point where silver-sheathed high T sub c wires one mm in diameter are commercially available, can be used to produce the magnetic moments required for shielding without requiring any mechanical cooling system. The potential benefits of this concept apply directly to both earth-orbital and interplanetary missions. The usefulness of a protective shield for manned missions needs scarcely to be emphasized. Similarly, the usefulness of increasing orbit perigee without expenditure of propellant is obvious. This payload would be a first step in assessing the true potential of large volume magnetic fields in the US space program. The objective of this design research is to develop an innovative, prototype deployed high temperature superconducting coil (DHTSC) system.

  6. Genesis of Interplanetary Intermittent Turbulence: A Case Study of Rope&enrope Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chian, Abraham C.-L.; Feng, Heng Q.; Hu, Qiang; Loew, Murray H.; Miranda, Rodrigo A.; Muñoz, Pablo R.; Sibeck, David G.; Wu, De J.

    2016-12-01

    In a recent paper, the relation between current sheet, magnetic reconnection, and turbulence at the leading edge of an interplanetary coronal mass ejection was studied. We report here the observation of magnetic reconnection at the interface region of two interplanetary magnetic flux ropes. The front and rear boundary layers of three interplanetary magnetic flux ropes are identified, and the structures of magnetic flux ropes are reconstructed by the Grad-Shafranov method. A quantitative analysis of the reconnection condition and the degree of intermittency reveals that rope-rope magnetic reconnection is the most likely site for genesis of interplanetary intermittency turbulence in this event. The dynamic pressure pulse resulting from this reconnection triggers the onset of a geomagnetic storm.

  7. RELATIONSHIPs among Geomagnetic storms, interplanetary shocks, magnetic clouds, and SUNSPOT NUMBER during 1995-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdichevsky, D. B.; Lepping, R. P.; Wu, C. C.

    2015-12-01

    During 1995-2012 Wind recorded 168 magnetic clouds (MCs), 197 magnetic cloud-like structures (MCLs), and 358 interplanetary (IP) shocks. Ninety four MCs and 56 MCLs had upstream shock waves. The following features are found: (i) Averages of solar wind speed, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), duration (<Δt>), strength of Bzmin, and intensity of the associated geomagnetic storm/activity (Dstmin) for MCs with upstream shock waves (MCSHOCK) are higher (or stronger) than those averages for the MCs without upstream shock waves (MCNO-SHOCK). (ii) The <Δt> of MCSHOCK events (≈19.6 hr) is 9% longer than that for MCNO-SHOCK events (≈17.9 hr). (iii) For the MCSHOCK events, the average duration of the sheath (<ΔtSHEATH>) is 12.1 hrs. These findings could be very useful for space weather predictions, i.e. IP shocks driven by MCs are expected to arrive at Wind (or at 1 AU) about ~12 hours ahead of the front of the MCs on average. (iv) The occurrence frequency of IP shocks is well associated with sunspot number (SSN). The average intensity of geomagnetic storms measured by for MCSHOCK and MCNOSHOCK events is -102 and -31 nT, respectively. The is -78, -70, and -35 nT for the 358 IP shocks, 168 MCs, and 197 MCLs, respectively. These results imply that IP shocks, when they occur with MCs/MCLs, must play an important role in the strength of geomagnetic storms. We speculate as to why this is so. Yearly occurrence frequencies of MCSHOCK and IP shocks are well correlated with solar activity (e.g., SSN). Choosing the right Dstmin estimating formula for predicting the intensity of MC-associated geomagnetic storms is crucial for space weather predictions.

  8. Interaction of the geomagnetic field with northward interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, Shree Krishna

    The interaction of the solar wind with Earth's magnetic field causes the transfer of momentum and energy from the solar wind to geospace. The study of this interaction is gaining significance as our society is becoming more and more space based, due to which, predicting space weather has become more important. The solar wind interacts with the geomagnetic field primarily via two processes: viscous interaction and the magnetic reconnection. Both of these interactions result in the generation of an electric field in Earth's ionosphere. The overall topology and dynamics of the magnetosphere, as well as the electric field imposed on the ionosphere, vary with speed, density, and magnetic field orientation of the solar wind as well as the conductivity of the ionosphere. In this dissertation, I will examine the role of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and discuss the global topology of the magnetosphere and the interaction with the ionosphere using results obtained from the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) simulation. The electric potentials imposed on the ionosphere due to viscous interaction and magnetic reconnection are called the viscous and the reconnection potentials, respectively. A proxy to measure the overall effect of these potentials is to measure the cross polar potential (CPP). The CPP is defined as the difference between the maximum and the minimum of the potential in a given polar ionosphere. I will show results from the LFM simulation showing saturation of the CPP during periods with purely northward IMF of sufficiently large magnitude. I will further show that the viscous potential, which was assumed to be independent of IMF orientation until this work, is reduced during periods of northward IMF. Furthermore, I will also discuss the implications of these results for a simulation of an entire solar rotation.

  9. Tongues, bottles, and disconnected loops: The opening and closing of the interplanetary magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, D.J.

    1994-06-01

    For years the field of Space Physics has had a problem, a really big problem for it occurs on the largest spatial scales in Space physics -- across the entire region under the Sun`s influence, the heliosphere. The problem is that the Sun appears to keep opening new magnetic flux into interplanetary space with no obvious way for this flux to close back off again. This state of affairs, without some previously unknown method for closing the open interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), leads to an ever growing amount of magnetic flux in interplanetary space: the magnetic flux catastrophe. Recently, considerable progress has been made in understanding why this catastrophic state is not the observed state of the heliosphere. This brief article paints the newly emerging picture of the opening and closing of the IMF and how these processes may account for the observed variation in the amount of magnetic flux in interplanetary space over the solar cycle.

  10. The local dayside reconnection rate for oblique interplanetary magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komar, C. M.; Cassak, P. A.

    2016-06-01

    We present an analysis of local properties of magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause for various interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientations in global magnetospheric simulations. This has heretofore not been practical because it is difficult to locate where reconnection occurs for oblique IMF, but new techniques make this possible. The approach is to identify magnetic separators, the curves separating four regions of differing magnetic topology, which map the reconnection X line. The electric field parallel to the X line is the local reconnection rate. We compare results to a simple model of local two-dimensional asymmetric reconnection. To do so, we find the plasma parameters that locally drive reconnection in the magnetosheath and magnetosphere in planes perpendicular to the X line at a large number of points along the X line. The global magnetohydrodynamic simulations are from the three-dimensional Block-Adaptive, Tree Solarwind Roe-type Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code with a uniform resistivity, although the techniques described here are extensible to any global magnetospheric simulation model. We find that the predicted local reconnection rates scale well with the measured values for all simulations, being nearly exact for due southward IMF. However, the absolute predictions differ by an undetermined constant of proportionality, whose magnitude increases as the IMF clock angle changes from southward to northward. We also show similar scaling agreement in a simulation with oblique southward IMF and a dipole tilt. The present results will be an important component of a full understanding of the local and global properties of dayside reconnection.

  11. Interplanetary stream magnetism: Kinematic effects. [solar magnetic fields and wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Barouch, E.

    1974-01-01

    The particle density, and the magnetic field intensity and direction are calculated in corotating streams of the solar wind, assuming that the solar wind velocity is constant and radial and that its azimuthal variations are not two rapid. The effects of the radial velocity profile in corotating streams on the magnetic fields were examined using kinematic approximation and a variety of field configurations on the inner boundary. Kinematic and dynamic effects are discussed.

  12. The Bastille Day Magnetic Clouds and Upstream Shocks: Near Earth Interplanetary Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Berdichevsky, D. B.; Burlaga, L. F.; Lazarus, A. J.; Kasper, J.; Desch, M. D.; Wu, C.-C.; Reames, D. V.; Singer, H. J.; Singer, H. J.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The energetic charged particle, interplanetary magnetic field, and plasma characteristics of the 'Bastille Day' shock and ejecta/magnetic cloud events at 1 AU occurring over the days 14-16 July 2000 are described. Profiles of MeV (WIND/LEMT) energetic ions help to organize the overall sequence of events from the solar source to 1 AU. Stressed are analyses of an outstanding magnetic cloud (MC2) starting late on 15 July and its upstream shock about 4 hours earlier in WIND magnetic field and plasma data. Also analyzed is a less certain, but likely, magnetic cloud (MC1) occurring early on 15 July; this was separated from MC2 by its upstream shock and many heliospheric current sheet (HCS) crossings. Other HCS crossings occurred throughout the 3-day period. Overall this dramatic series of interplanetary events caused a large multi-phase magnetic storm with min Dst lower than -300 nT. The very fast solar wind speed (greater than or equal to 1100 km/s) in and around the front of MC2 (for near average densities) was responsible for a very high solar wind ram pressure driving in the front of the magnetosphere to geocentric distances estimated to be as low as approx. 5 R(sub E), much lower than the geosynchronous orbit radius. This was consistent with magnetic field observations from two GOES satellites which indicated they were in the magnetosheath for extended times. A static force free field model is used to fit the two magnetic cloud profiles providing estimates of the clouds' physical and geometrical properties. MC2 was much larger than MCI, but their axes were nearly antiparallel, and their magnetic fields had the same left-handed helicity. MC2's axis and its upstream shock normal were very close to being perpendicular to each other, as might be expected if the cloud were driving the shock at the time of observation. The estimated axial magnetic flux carried by MC2 was 52 x 10(exp 20) Mx, which is about 5 times the typical magnetic flux estimated for other magnetic

  13. Correlation of the 27-day variation of cosmic rays to the interplanetary magnetic field strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbah, I.

    2001-08-01

    We analyze cosmic ray data as well as interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) data, to examine the relation and correlation between their 27-day variations during the time interval 1965-1995. The amplitude of the 27day variation of galactic cosmic rays is linearly correlated with: the IMF strength (B), the z-component (Bz) of the IMF vector and the product of the solar wind speed (V) times B (VB). It is well correlated with the heliospheric current sheet tiltangle.Thecross-correlationfunctionofthe27-daycosmic ray variation versus the solar wind speed shows a negative correlation. The solar wind speed leads the cosmic ray variation by 2 years. The 27-day variation of cosmic rays is correlated with the variation in both the xand y-components of the IMF, it lags with 3-5 years. 1. Introduction Galactic cosmic rays are modulated (modified) through their propagation in the heliosphere by the effect of the large scale structure of the interplanetary medium. A wavy structured neutralcurrentsheet(NCS) separatesthe heliosphereintotwo regions of opposite magnetic polarity. During positive magnetic phase, the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is directed away from the Sun above the NCS and toward the Sun south of it. During negative magnetic phase the IMF direction is reversed. The angle between the Sun's equatorial plane and the NCS is referred as the tilt angle R, of the neutral sheet. It exhibits a solar activity dependence, R is small near sunspot minimum and large near solar maximum. The 27-day variations of galactic cosmic rays have been related to the changing position of the interplanetary NCS (Swinson and Yasue, 1992; Valdes-Galicia and Dorman, 1997). Here we examine the effect of the interplanetary parameters upon the 27-day variation of galactic cosmic rays during the last three solar cycles. 2. Solar Cycle Dependance We used hourly averaged cosmic ray counts observed with neutron monitors at Deep River (DR) and Huancayo (HU) and muon surface telescope at Nagoya (NA

  14. The large-scale magnetic field in the solar wind. [astronomical models of interplanetary magnetics and the solar magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    1976-01-01

    A literature review is presented of theoretical models of the interaction of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic fields. Observations of interplanetary magnetic fields by the IMP and OSO spacecraft are discussed. The causes for cosmic ray variations (Forbush decreases) by the solar wind are examined. The model of Parker is emphasized. This model shows the three dimensional magnetic field lines of the solar wind to have the form of spirals wrapped on cones. It is concluded that an out-of-the-ecliptic solar probe mission would allow the testing and verification of the various theoretical models examined. Diagrams of the various models are shown.

  15. Dayside Magnetopause Location During Radial Interplanetary Magnetic Field Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Huang, T.; Shue, J. H.; Ridley, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    The present work has investigated the dayside magnetopause locations under radial interplanetary field (IMF) conditions. During 49 earthward radial IMF events from years of 2001 to 2009, Cluster satellites have crossed the dayside magnetopause for 11 times. Among them, there are 8 events occurring at mid latitudes. The observed locations of the magnetopause are compared with the widely used magnetopause model (Shue et al., 1998). The model performance exhibits local time asymmetry at mid latitudes. The observed magnetopause contracts in the prenoon while expands in the postnoon. This local time asymmetry is confirmed by GOES magnetic field observations at geosynchronous orbits. The result might confirm the bullet shape magnetopause during radial IMF period. The model-observation differences during radial IMF periods correlate well with the solar wind dynamic pressure at mid-latitudes. The present work has indicated the important role of the IMF cone angle and dipole tilt angle in the modulation of the magnetopause shape at midlatitudes. Larger IMF cone angle or smaller dipole tilt angle can make the southern magnetopause expand further outward.

  16. Observation of Two Slow Shocks Associated with Magnetic Reconnection Exhausts in the Interplanetary Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, HengQiang; Li, QiuHuan; Wang, JieMin; Zhao, GuoQing

    2017-04-01

    In the Petschek magnetic reconnection model, two groups of slow shocks play an important role in the energy release. In the past half century, a large number of slow shocks were observed in the geomagnetic tail, and many slow shocks were associated with magnetic reconnection events in the geomagnetic tail. Slow shocks in the interplanetary space are rarer than in the geomagnetic tail. We investigated whether slow shocks associated with interplanetary reconnection exhausts are rare. We examined the boundaries of 50 reconnection exhausts reported by Phan, Gosling, and Davis (Geophys. Res. Lett. 36:L09108, 2009) in interplanetary space to identify slow shocks by fitting the Rankine-Hugoniot relations. Two slow shocks associated with magnetic reconnection exhausts were found and evaluated using observations from Wind and the Advanced Composition Explorer. The observed slow shocks associated with interplanetary reconnection exhausts are rarer than the observed slow shocks associated with geomagnetic tail reconnection exhausts.

  17. Interplanetary magnetic field as a detector of turbulence in the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, O.

    2013-12-01

    Analysis of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) behavior at different scales may give a key for understanding of turbulence spatial evolution in the heliosphere. It has been known that the solar wind plasma becomes more and more turbulent with heliocentric distance. Recent multi-spacecraft investigations of the large-scale IMF [1] show unexpectedly fast lost of the regular sector structure of the solar wind in the inner heliosphere. In the ecliptic plane, it seems to be broken at 3-4 AU, much closer to the Sun than the Parker spiral gets perpendicular to the sunward direction. At the same time, the high-latitude solar wind remains more structured at the same heliocentric distances [2]. This fact may bear evidence of radial increase of turbulence and intermittency in the solar wind due to magnetic reconnection. The magnetic reconnection recurrently occurs at the large-scale heliospheric current sheet (HCS) as well as at smaller-scale current sheets during the solar wind expansion [3]. As a result, a significant part of the heliosphere is filled with secondary current sheets as well as with waves and accelerated particles in some vicinity of the HCS. Under averaging, it looks as a radial increase of turbulence, especially in low latitudes. It also can be considered as one of the main causes of the break of the expected IMF radial dependence law [1, 2]. Results of the consequent multi-spacecraft analysis of plasma and magnetic filed turbulence characteristics at different heliocentric distances and heliolatitudes will be discussed. 1. O. Khabarova, V. Obridko, Puzzles of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field in the Inner Heliosphere, 2012, Astrophysical Journal, 761, 2, 82, doi:10.1088/0004-637X/761/2/82, http://arxiv.org/pdf/1204.6672v2.pdf 2. O.V. Khabarova, The interplanetary magnetic field: radial and latitudinal dependences, Astronomy Reports, 2013, 57, 11, http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1305/1305.1204.pdf 3. V. Zharkova, O. Khabarova, Particle Acceleration in

  18. Criteria of interplanetary parameters causing intense magnetic storms (Dst less than -100nT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Walter D.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1987-01-01

    Ten intense storms occurred during the 500 days of August 16, 1978 to December 28, 1979. From the analysis of ISEE-3 field and plasma data, it is found that the interplanetary cause of these storms are long-duration, large and negative IMF B sub Z events, associated with interplanetary duskward-electric fields greater than 5 mV/m. Because a one-to-one relationship was found between these interplanetary events and intense storms, it is suggested that these criteria can, in the future, be used as predictors of intense storms by an interplanetary monitor such as ISEE-3. These B sub Z events are found to occur in association with large amplitudes of the IMF magnitude within two days after the onset of either high-speed solar wind streams or of solar wind density enhancement events, giving important clues to their interplanetary origin. Some obvious possibilities will be discussed. The close proximity of B sub Z events and magnetic storms to the onset of high speed streams or density enhancement events is in sharp contrast to interplanetary Alfven waves and HILDCAA events previously reported, and thus the two interplanetary features corresponding geomagnetic responses can be thought of as being complementary in nature. An examination of opposite polarity B sub Z events with the same criteria show that their occurrence is similar both in number as well as in their relationship to interplanetary disturbances, and that they lead to low levels of geomagnetic activity.

  19. Solar sources of interplanetary southward Bz events responsible for major magnetic storms (1978-1979)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Frances; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Smith, Edward J.; Gonzalez, Walter D.; Akasofu, Syun I.

    1989-01-01

    The solar sources of interplanetary southward Bz events responsible for major magnetic storms observed in the August 1978-December 1979 period were studied using a full complement of solar wind plasma and field data from ISEE 3. It was found that, of the ten major storms observed, seven were initiated by active region flares, and three were associated with prominence eruptions in solar quiet regions. Nine of the storms were associated with interplanetary shocks. However, a comparison of the solar events' characteristics and those of the resulting interplanetary shocks indicated that standard solar parameters did not correlate with the strengths of the resulting shocks at 1 AU.

  20. Relationships Among Geomagnetic Storms, Interplanetary Shocks, Magnetic Clouds, and Sunspot Number During 1995 - 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chin-Chun; Lepping, Ronald P.

    2016-01-01

    During 1995 - 2012, the Wind spacecraft has recorded 168 magnetic clouds (MCs), 197 magnetic cloud-like structures (MCLs), and 358 interplanetary (IP) shocks. Ninety-four MCs and 56 MCLs had upstream shock waves. The following features are found: i) The averages of the solar wind speed, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), duration (< Δ t >), the minimum of B_{min}, and intensity of the associated geomagnetic storm/activity (Dst_{min}) for MCs with upstream shock waves (MC_{shock}) are higher (or stronger) than those averages for the MCs without upstream shock waves (MC_{no-shock}). ii) The average < Δ t > of MC_{shock} events ({≈} 19.8 h) is 9 % longer than that for MC_{no-shock} events ({≈} 17.6 h). iii) For the MC_{shock} events, the average duration of the sheath (<Δ t_{sheath}>) is 12.1 h. These findings could be very useful for space weather predictions, i.e. IP shocks driven by MCs are expected to arrive at Wind (or at 1 AU) about 12 h ahead of the front of the MCs on average. iv) The occurrence frequency of IP shocks is well associated with sunspot number (SSN). The average intensity of geomagnetic storms measured by < Dst_{min}> for MC_{shock} and MC_{no-shock} events is -102 and -31 nT, respectively. The average values < {Dst}_{min} > are -78, -70, and -35 nT for the 358 IP shocks, 168 MCs, and 197 MCLs, respectively. These results imply that IP shocks, when they occur with MCs/MCLs, must play an important role in the strength of geomagnetic storms. We speculate about the reason for this. Yearly occurrence frequencies of MC_{shock} and IP shocks are well correlated with solar activity ( e.g., SSN). Choosing the correct Dst_{min} estimating formula for predicting the intensity of MC-associated geomagnetic storms is crucial for space weather predictions.

  1. The interplanetary magnetic field: Radial and latitudinal dependences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, O. V.

    2013-11-01

    Results of the analysis of spacecraft measurements at 1-5.4 AU are presented within the scope of the large-scale interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) structure investigation. The work is focused on revealing of the radial IMF component ( B r ) variations with heliocentric distance and latitude as seen by Ulysses. It was found out that | B r | decreases as ˜ r -5/3 in the ecliptic plane vicinity (±10° of latitude), which is consistent with the previous results obtained on the basis of the analysis of in-ecliptic measurements from five spacecraft. The difference between the experimentally found ( r -5/3) and commonly used ( r -2) radial dependence of B r may lead to mistakes in the IMF recalculations from point to point in the heliosphere. This can be one of the main sources of the "magnetic flux excess" effect, which is exceeding of the distantly measured magnetic flux over the values obtained through the measurements at the Earth orbit. It is shown that the radial IMF component can be considered as independent of heliolatitude in a rough approximation only. More detailed analysis demonstrates an expressed | B r | (as well as the IMF strength) increase in the latitudinal vicinity of ±30° relative to the ecliptic plane. Also, a slight increase of the both parameters is observed in the polar solar wind. The comparison of the B r distributions confirms that, at the same radial distance, B r values are higher at low than at high latitudes. The analysis of the latitudinal and radial dependences of the B r distribution's bimodality is performed. The B r bimodality is more expressed at high than in the low-latitude solar wind, and it is observed at greater radial distances at high latitudes. The investigation has not revealed any dependence between B r and the solar wind speed V. The two-peak distribution of the solar wind speed as measured by Ulysses is a consequence of a strong latitudinal and solar cycle dependence of V. It is shown that the solar wind speed in high

  2. Sources of magnetic fields in recurrent interplanetary streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Behannon, K. W.; Hansen, S. F.; Pneuman, G. W.; Feldman, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    The sources of magnetic fields in recurrent streams were examined. Most fields and plasmas at 1 AU were related to coronal holes, and the magnetic field lines were open in those holes. Some of the magnetic fields and plasmas were related to open field line regions on the sun which were not associated with known coronal holes, indicating that open field lines are more basic than coronal holes as sources of the solar wind. Magnetic field intensities in five equatorial coronal holes ranged from 2G to 18G. Average measured photospheric magnetic fields along the footprints of the corresponding unipolar fields on circular equatorial arcs at 2.5 solar radii had a similar range and average, but in two cases the intensities were approximately three times higher than the projected intensities. The coronal footprints of the sector boundaries on the source surface at 2.5 solar radii, meandered between -45 deg and +45 deg latitude, and their inclination ranged from near zero to near ninety degrees.

  3. OBSERVATIONS OF A SMALL INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE ASSOCIATED WITH A MAGNETIC RECONNECTION EXHAUST

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, H. Q.; Wu, D. J.

    2009-11-10

    A small interplanetary magnetic flux rope prior to an X-line magnetic reconnection exhaust was observed on 1998 March 25 at 1 AU. The X-line magnetic reconnection exhaust has been identified and reported by Gosling et al. The duration of this small magnetic flux rope is about 2 hr. We fitted the constant alpha force-free model to the observed magnetic fields. The model fitting results show that the spacecraft crosses the magnetic flux rope well away from the axis, with d {sub 0}/R {sub 0} being 0.76. The fitting results also show that its magnetic configuration is a right-handed helical flux rope, that the estimated field intensity at the axis is 16.3 nT, and that its diameter is 0.0190 AU. In addition, the axial direction of this rope is (theta = 6 deg., phi = 214 deg.), namely, this magnetic flux rope is lying nearly in the ecliptic plane. According to the geometric relation of the small flux rope and the reconnection exhaust, it is very possible that the small magnetic flux rope has a larger scale initially and comes from the corona; its magnetic fields are peeled off when moving from the Sun to the Earth and at last it reaches a small scale. Though magnetic reconnection can produce a flux-rope topology, in this case the X-line magnetic reconnection is destroying rather than generating the small magnetic flux rope.

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the bifurcation of tail lobes during intervals with a northward interplanetary magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, T.; Walker, R.J.

    1984-10-01

    The interaction of the solar wind with the Earth's magnetosphere during a northward interplanetary magnetic field was studied by using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model. For a northward interplanetary magnetic field of 5 nT, the plasma sheer thickens near the noon-midnight meridian plane. When projected onto the polar cap this appears as a narrow channel extending from midnight towards noon. This plasma pattern is associated with three pairs of convection cells. The high latitude sunward convection and northern B/sub z/ Birkeland current are caused by magnetic merging in the polar region.

  5. Interplanetary magnetic field orientations associated with bidirectional electron heat fluxes detected at ISEE 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stansberry, J. A.; Gosling, J. T.; Thomsen, M. F.; Bame, S. J.; Smith, E. J.

    1988-01-01

    A statistical survey of interplanetary magnetic field orientations associated with bidirectional electron heat fluxes observed at ISEE 3 in orbit about the Sunward Lagrange point indicates that magnetic connection of the spacecraft to the earth's shock was frequently the source of the bidirectionality. When the interplanetary magnetic field was oriented within 5 deg of the earth-spacecraft line, backstreaming electrons from the bow shock were clearly observed approximately 18 percent of the time, and connections apparently occurred for angles as large as about 30-35 deg.

  6. Interplanetary medium data book, appendix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Computer generated listings of hourly average interplanetary plasma and magnetic field parameters are given. Parameters include proton temperature, proton density, bulk speed, an identifier of the source of the plasma data for the hour, average magnetic field magnitude and cartesian components of the magnetic field. Also included are longitude and latitude angles of the vector made up of the average field components, a vector standard deviation, and an identifier of the source of magnetic field data.

  7. Reexamination of the connections between interplanetary magnetic field and Pc3 geomagnetic pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verö, József; Zieger, Bertalan

    1999-06-01

    Data used in an earlier paper [Verö and Holló, 1978] are here reexamined to clarify problems which emerged concerning the previously found relationship between the interplanetary magnetic field and Pc3 geomagnetic pulsations. We show that Pc3 pulsation spectra are strongly affected by wave amplification in the vicinity of the local field line resonance period. Possibilities are presented for the suppression of this effect. The influence of the variability of the interplanetary magnetic field is analyzed, and it is shown that this is a major factor determining momentary pulsation activity. The possibility of exciting field line resonances by impulses imbedded into noise of the interplanetary magnetic field is considered.

  8. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Line Mixing Deduced from Impulsive Solar Flare Particles.

    PubMed

    Mazur; Mason; Dwyer; Giacalone; Jokipii; Stone

    2000-03-20

    We have studied fine-scale temporal variations in the arrival profiles of approximately 20 keV nucleon-1 to approximately 2 MeV nucleon-1 ions from impulsive solar flares using instrumentation on board the Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft at 1 AU between 1997 November and 1999 July. The particle events often had short-timescale ( approximately 3 hr) variations in their intensity that occurred simultaneously across all energies and were generally not in coincidence with any local magnetic field or plasma signature. These features appear to be caused by the convection of magnetic flux tubes past the observer that are alternately filled and devoid of flare ions even though they had a common flare source at the Sun. Thus, we have used the particles to study the mixing of the interplanetary magnetic field that is due to random walk. We deduce an average timescale of 3.2 hr for these features, which corresponds to a length of approximately 0.03 AU.

  9. An interplanetary magnetic field enhancement observed by five spacecraft: Deducing the magnetic structure, size and mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, H.; Russell, C. T.; Delzanno, G.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2012-12-01

    Interplanetary Field Enhancements (IFEs) were discovered almost 30 years ago in the PVO magnetic-field records and attributed to the interaction between solar wind and dust particles from comets or asteroids, but the physics of this interaction remained obscure. Our current understanding is that IFEs result from collisions of small interplanetary bodies that produce electrically charged nanometer-scale dust particles possibly enhanced by tribo-electric charging in the collision. These charged dust particles in turn interact with the magnetized solar wind. Momentum is transferred from the solar wind to the dust cloud via the collective effect of the formation of a magnetic barrier. This momentum transfer accelerates the particles to near the solar wind speed and moves the dust outward through the solar gravitational potential well. Multi-spacecraft observations can help us to determine the speed of the IFE and the orientation of the current sheet. They enable us to reconstruct the pressure profile of an IFE in three dimensions and estimate the mass contained in the IFE. We have done these reconstructions with an IFE observed on March 3, 2011 with Wind, ACE, ARTEMIS P1 and P2 and Geotail. We find that the magnetic field near the center of the IFE is highly twisted indicating a complicated magnetic topology as expected in a plasma-charged dust interaction. The magnetic field and plasma properties during this event distinguish it from a typical flux rope. Based on the statistical results obtained at 1 AU and the assumption that all the IFEs are self-similar, we find that this IFE has a radial scale length several times longer than the cross flow radius and contains a mass of about 108 kg. The rates of collisions expected for objects of this size are consistent with the observed rates of these disturbances.

  10. Interplanetary magnetic field-geomagnetic field coupling and vertical variance index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, A.; Renuka, G.; Cherian, L.

    2010-01-01

    The solar wind impacting at the geomagnetopause contains transient variations in the embedded interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). These disturbances are mirrored in the horizontal geomagnetic field measured at the Huancayo and Ascension Island stations. This investigation attempts to relate the microtemporal fluctuations in the IMF with the horizontal component of the geomagnetic field by means of a newly developed daily vertical variance index, which permits the quantification of such pulsations. A linear relationship is established between the disturbances observed in the interplanetary and terrestrial fields on a daily basis.

  11. Cross-correlation analysis of the AE index and the interplanetary magnetic field Bz component.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, C.-I.; Tsurutani, B.; Kawasaki, K.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1973-01-01

    A cross-correlation study between magnetospheric activity (the AE index) and the southward-directed component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is made for a total of 792 hours (33 days) with a time resolution of about 5.5 min. The peak correlation tends to occur when the interplanetary data are shifted approximately 40 min later with respect to the AE index data. Cross-correlation analysis is conducted on some idealized wave forms to illustrate that this delay between southward turning of the IMF and the AE index should not be interpreted as being the duration of the growth phase.

  12. The Earth's magnetosphere under continued forcing: Substorm activity during the passage of an interplanetary magnetic cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Farrugia, C.J.; Burlaga, L.F.; Lepping, R.P. ); Freeman, M.P. ); Takahashi, K. )

    1993-05-01

    This is the third of three papers dealing with the interaction of an interplanetary magnetic field with the earth's magnetosphere in Jan 1988. Here the authors report on substorm observations made during this time period. They sampled information from six spacecraft and a larger number of ground based systems to serve as signals for the initiation of substorm behavior. They relate the interplanetary magnetic field and plasma conditions to the time of observation of substorm initiation. Current models tie substorm occurrence to magnetic reconnection in the magnetosphere. The IMF B[sub y] and B[sub z] components varied slowly over a range of 20 nT on both sides of zero during this observation period. During the period of northward IMF the magnetosphere was quiescent, but during the period of southward IMF a large magnetic storm was initiated. During this interval substorms were observed roughly every 50 minutes.

  13. Comments on the measurement of power spectra of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1972-01-01

    Examination of possible noise sources in the measurement of the power spectrum of fluctuations in the interplanetary magnetic field shows that most measurements by fluxgate magnetometers are limited by digitization noise whereas the search coil magnetometer is limited by instrument noise. The folding of power about the Nyquist frequency or aliasing can be a serious problem at times for many magnetometers, but it is not serious during typical solar wind conditions except near the Nyquist frequency. Waves in the solar wind associated with the presence of the earth's bow shock can contaminate the interplanetary spectrum in the vicinity of the earth. However, at times the spectrum in this region is the same as far from the earth. Doppler shifting caused by the convection of waves by the solar wind makes the interpretation of interplanetary spectra difficult.

  14. Interplanetary magnetic field variations and slow mode transitions in the Earth's magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Daniel

    2001-04-01

    The event observed on September 17, 1978 on ISEE 1-2, which led to the concept of a stationary slow mode transition region (SMT) in the magnetosheath in front of the magnetopause, is revisited. We establish that the two edges of this SMT have an exogenous origin induced by two discontinuities of the interplanetary magnetic field. The key of our analysis is that the outer edge of the SMT is built up by a tangential interplanetary discontinuity which is observed on ISEE-3 at a large distance from the Sun-Earth line and which has an unusual direction. In this SMT the subsolar magnetosheath is entirely downstream of a quasi-parallel bow shock, while upstream this SMT the subsolar magnetosheath is downstream of a quasi-perpendicular shock. We identify three effects at the origin of the density enhancement in this SMT. We extend this approach to the original statistical study and we find that any SMT is connected to interplanetary magnetic field variations. This corroborates our hypothesis that SMTs have an exogeneous origin driven by interplanetary magnetic field variations.

  15. Interplanetary medium data book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Unresolved questions on the physics of solar wind and its effects on magnetospheric processes and cosmic ray propagation were addressed with hourly averaged interplanetary plasma and magnetic field data. This composite data set is described with its content and extent, sources, limits of validity, and the mutual consistency studies and normalizations to which the input data were subjected. Hourly averaged parameters were presented in the form of digital listings and 27-day plots. The listings are contained in a separately bound appendix.

  16. Effects of interstellar particles upon the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, P. J., Jr.; Winter, E. M.

    1972-01-01

    The flow of interstellar neutral particles into the interplanetary medium and their subsequent ionization in the presence of the electromagnetic field of the solar wind can cause a loss of field angular momentum by the solar wind. One effect of this loss of field angular momentum is a significant unwinding of the spiral field. This effect is evaluated using simple models for neutral density and ion production. For a free-stream interstellar medium with a neutral hydrogen density of 1 per cubic centimeter and a velocity relative to the sun of 10 to 20 km per second, the spiral angle at the orbit of Jupiter will be less than its nominal value of 45 deg at the orbit of the earth.

  17. Effect of interplanetary magnetic field on ionosphere over the magnetic equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastogi, R. G.; Patel, V. L.

    1975-01-01

    Large and quick changes of the latitude of the interplanetary magnetic field from its southward to northward direction are shown to be associated with the disappearance of the Es-q layer (Knecht, 1959) at the equatorial ionosphere during the daytime or with the reversal of E region horizontal and F region vertical electron drifts during both night and day. This phenomenon is suggested as the imposition of an electric field in the ionosphere in a direction opposite to that of the Sq electric field. The resultant electrostatic field on the equatorial ionosphere would be decreased or even reversed from its normal direction, resulting in the reduction of electron drift velocity. When the normal Sq field is over-compensated by the magnetospheric electric field, the electron drifts are reversed and the irregularities in the E region due to the cross-field instabilities are inhibited, resulting in the sudden disappearance of the Es-q layers.

  18. Low energy proton bidirectional anisotropies and their relation to transient interplanetary magnetic structures: ISEE-3 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsden, R. G.; Sanderson, T. R.; Wenzel, K. P.; Smith, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    It is known that the interplanetary medium in the period approaching solar maximum is characterized by an enhancement in the occurrence of transient solar wind streams and shocks and that such systems are often associated with looplike magnetic structures or clouds. There is observational evidence that bidirectional, field aligned flows of low energy particles could be a signature of such looplike structures, although detailed models for the magnetic field configuration and injection mechanisms do not exist at the current time. Preliminary results of a survey of low energy proton bidirectional anisotropies measured on ISEE-3 in the interplanetary medium between August 1978 and May 1982, together with magnetic field data from the same spacecraft are presented.

  19. Energy spectrum of interplanetary magnetic flux ropes and its connection with solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D. J.; Feng, H. Q.; Chao, J. K.

    2008-03-01

    Context: Recent observations of the solar wind show that interplanetary magnetic flux ropes (IMFRs) have a continuous scale-distribution from small-scale flux ropes to large-scale magnetic clouds. Aims: In this work, we investigate the energy spectrum of IMFRs and its possible connection with solar activity. Methods: In consideration of the detectable probability of an IMFR to be proportional to its diameter, the actual energy spectrum of IMFRs can be obtained from the observed spectrum based on spacecraft observations in the solar wind. Results: It is found that IMFRs have a negative power-law spectrum with an index α = 1.36±0.03, which is similar to that of solar flares, and is probably representative of interplanetary energy spectrum of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), that is, the energy spectrum of interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs). This indicates that the energy distribution of CMEs has a similar negative power-law spectrum. In particular, there are numerous small-scale CMEs in the solar corona, and their interplanetary consequences may be directly detected in situ by spacecraft in the solar wind as small-scale IMFRs, although they are too weak to appear clearly in current coronagraph observations. Conclusions: The presence of small-scale CMEs, especially the energy spectrum of CMEs is potentially important for understanding both the solar magneto-atmosphere and CMEs.

  20. The relation between the polarity of the interplanetary magnetic field and the polar geomagnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svalgaard, L.

    1973-01-01

    The relation between the azimuthal component of the interplanetary magnetic field and the polar cap geomagnetic field is discussed. The geomagnetic effects can be described as produced by an ionospheric current system encircling the magnetic pole. The sense of the current is clockwise during toward-sectors and reversed during away-sectors. The importance of this very direct solar-terrestrial relation is stressed. A recent magnetic sunspot cycle model is discussed as inferred from this relationship, the basic feature being that the sun reproduces the same sector pattern during every sunspot cycle.

  1. Comparison of inferred and observed interplanetary magnetic field polarities, 1970-1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, J. M.; Svalgaard, L.; Hedgecock, P. C.

    1975-01-01

    The inferred polarity (toward or away from the sun) of the interplanetary magnetic field at earth using polar observations of the geomagnetic field has been compared with spacecraft observations. A list published by Svalgaard (1974) of the inferred field polarities in the period from 1970 to 1972 is found to be correct on 82% of the days. A near real-time (same day) method of inferring the polarity of the interplanetary magnetic field using geomagnetic observations at Vostok and Thule is in use at the NOAA Space Environment Laboratory, Boulder, Colorado. During 1972, this method is found to be correct on 87% of the days. A list of 'well-defined' sector boundaries at earth from 1970 to 1972 is given.

  2. Interplanetary magnetic field power spectra - Mean field radial or perpendicular to radial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sari, J. W.; Valley, G. C.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed frequency analysis of Pioneer-6 interplanetary magnetic field data is carried out for 5 to 15 hour periods during which the mean interplanetary field is approximately radial or perpendicular to radial. The reason why these data sets were chosen is that by making the usual assumption that the phase speed of any wave present is much less than the mean solar wind speed, the measured frequency spectra can be interpreted in terms of the wave number parallel or perpendicular to the mean field, without such additional assumptions as isotropy or the dominance of a particular mode and without measurements of velocity and density. The details of the calculation of the magnetic field power spectra, coherencies, and correlation functions are discussed, along with results obtained directly from the data (such as spectra, slopes, anisotropies, and coherencies). The results are interpreted in terms of MHD theory, and are related to work in other areas.

  3. Transport equations for low-energy solar particles in evolving interplanetary magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    Two new forms of a simplified Fokker-Planck equation are derived for the transport of low-energy solar energetic particles in an evolving interplanetary magnetic field, carried by a variable radial solar wind. An idealized solution suggests that the 'invariant' anisotropy direction reported by Allum et al. (1974) may be explained within the conventional theoretical framework. The equations may be used to relate studies of solar particle propagation to solar wind transients, and vice versa.

  4. On the existence of finite amplitude, transverse Alfven waves in the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sari, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Interplanetary magnetic field data from the Mariner 10 spacecraft were examined for evidence of small and finite amplitude transverse Alfven waves, general finite amplitude Alfven waves, and magnetosonic waves. No evidence for transverse Alfven waves was found. Instead, the field fluctuations were found to be dominated by the general finite amplitude Alfven wave. Such wave modes correspond to non-plane-wave solutions of the nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic equations.

  5. Venus internal magnetic field and its interaction with the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudsen, W. C.

    1992-01-01

    In a previous study, Knudsen et al. suggested that Venus has a weak internal magnetic dipole field of the order of 7 x 10 + 20 G cm(exp -3) that is manifested in the form of magnetic flux tubes threading the ionospheric holes in the Venus nightside ionosphere. They pointed out that any internal field of Venus, dipole or multipole, would be weakened in the subsolar region and concentrated in the antisolar region of the planet by the supersonic transterminator convection of the dayside ionosphere into the nightside hemisphere. The inferred magnitude of the dipole field does not violate the upper limit for an internal magnetic field established by the Pioneer Venus magnetometer experiment. The most compelling objection to the model suggested by Knudsen et al. has been the fact that it does not explain the observed interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) control of the polarity of the ionospheric hole flux tubes. In this presentation I suggest that a magnetic reconnection process analogous to that occurring at earth is occurring at Venus between the IMF and a weak internal dipole field. At Venus in the subsolar region, the reconnection occurs within the ionosphere. At Earth it occurs at the magnetopause. Reconnection will occur only when the IMF has an appropriate orientation relative to that of the weak internal field. Thus, reconnection provides a process for the IMF to control the flux tube polarity. The reconnection in the subsolar region takes place in the ionosphere as the barrier magnetic field is transported downward into the lower ionosphere by downward convection of ionospheric plasma and approaches the oppositely directed internal magnetic field that is diffusing upward. The reconnected flux tubes are then transported anti-Sunward by the anti-Sunward convecting ionospheric plasma as well as by the anti-Sunward-flowing solar wind. Reconnection will also occur in the Venus magnetic tail region, somewhat analogously to the reconnection that occurs in the

  6. The large-scale magnetic field in the solar wind. [interplanetary magnetic fields/solar activity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    1975-01-01

    A large-scale, three dimensional magnetic field in the interplanetary medium with an expected classical spiral pattern to zeroth order is discussed. Systematic and random deviations which are expected are treated. The sector structure which should be evident at high latitudes is examined. Interplanetary streams are discussed as determining the patterns of magnetic field intensity. It was proposed that the large-scale spiral field can induce a meridional flow which might alter the field geometry somewhat. The nonuniformities caused by streams will probably significantly influence the motion of solar and galactic particles. It was concluded that knowledge of the 3-dimensional field and its dynamical effects can be obtained by in situ measurements by a probe which goes over the sun's poles. Diagrams of the magnetic fields are given.

  7. The interplanetary magnetic field associated with the propagation of solar relativistic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Sophie; Dasso, Sergio; Demoulin, Pascal

    The origin and the propagation of relativistic solar particles (450 MeV-few GeV) in the inter-planetary medium remains a complex topic. These particles, detected at the Earth by neutron monitors (called Ground level enhancement, GLE), have been previously accelerated close to the Sun. Before being detected at the Earth, these relativistic particles have to travel along an interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) connecting the acceleration site and the Earth. Generally, the nominal Parker spiral (SP), is considered for ensuring the magnetic connection to the Earth. However, in most GLEs the IMF is highly disturbed, and the active regions (ARs) associated to the GLEs are not always located close to the footprint of the nominal Parker spiral. If it is not the nominal Parker spiral, which IMF connects the acceleration site and the Earth during the GLEs? A possible explanation of relativistic particles propagation under these circumstances are transient magnetic structures, travelling in the IMF as Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). In order to check this interpretation, we studied in detail the interplanetary medium in which 10 GLEs of the last solar cycle propagate. Using the magnetic field and the plasma parameter measurements (ACE/MAG and ACE/SWEPAM), we found widely different IMF configurations. Those included obvious cases of propagation in an ICME, as well as some cases consistent with a Parker Spiral. But, we also found cases correponding to the propagation of relativistic particles in a highly disturbed Parker like IMF. In an independant approach we applied the velocity dispersion method (VDA) to energetic protons measured by SoHO/ERNE and relativistic particles measured by the neutron monitor network. We determined the path length travelled by energetic particles. These lengths are fully consistent with the IMF shape determined previously. Thus, the length associated to particles propagating along the nominal Parker spiral is of the order of 1-1.2 AU

  8. Evolution of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field sector structure during the last 15 solar cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vokhmyanin, Mikhail

    We have inferred for the first time Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) polarities from ground-based geomagnetic observations back to 1844. Reconstructions are reliable enough to study sector structure of the IMF in the past. The inferred daily polarities demonstrate solar-cycle changes during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We have analyzed statistics of the sector boundaries and found recurrences that reflect evolution of the solar wind sources. Additionally, seasonal variations of the ratio of positive and negative sectors provide evidence of solar magnetic field reversals during the last 15 solar cycles.

  9. Criteria of interplanetary parameters causing intense magnetic storms (Dst of less than -100 nT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Walter D.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of ISEE-3 field and plasma data shows that 10 intense magnetic storms that occurred in 1979 were caused by long-duration, large-amplitude (13-30 nT) and negative (less than -10 nT) IMF Bz events associated with interplanetary duskward-electric fields of greater than 5 mV/m. The results suggest that these criteria may be used as predictors of intense storms. A study of opposite polarity (northward) Bz events with the same criteria shows that their occurrence is similar both in number and in their relationship to interplanetary disturbances. The amplitudes of the storms were not found to vary with shock strengths.

  10. EFFECT OF FINITE LARMOR RADIUS ON COSMIC-RAY PENETRATION INTO AN INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Yuki; Shimazu, Hironori

    2010-09-01

    We discuss a mechanism for cosmic-ray penetration into an interplanetary magnetic flux rope, particularly the effect of the finite Larmor radius and magnetic field irregularities. First, we derive analytical solutions for cosmic-ray behavior inside a magnetic flux rope, on the basis of the Newton-Lorentz equation of a particle, to investigate how cosmic rays penetrate magnetic flux ropes under an assumption of there being no scattering by small-scale magnetic field irregularities. The results show that the behavior of a particle is determined by only one parameter f{sub 0}, that is, the ratio of the Larmor radius at the flux rope axis to the flux rope radius. The analytical solutions show that cosmic rays cannot penetrate into the inner region of a flux rope by only gyration and gradient-curvature drift in the case of small f{sub 0}. Next, we perform a numerical simulation of a cosmic-ray penetration into an interplanetary magnetic flux rope by adding small-scale magnetic field irregularities. The results show that cosmic rays can penetrate into a magnetic flux rope even in the case of small f{sub 0} because of the effect of small-scale magnetic field irregularities. This simulation also shows that a cosmic-ray density distribution is greatly different from that deduced from a guiding center approximation because of the effect of the finite Larmor radius and magnetic field irregularities for the case of a moderate to large Larmor radius compared to the flux rope radius.

  11. Dependence of the location of the Martian magnetic lobes on the interplanetary magnetic field direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanelli, Norberto; Mazelle, Christian; Bertucci, Cesar; Gomez, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The magnetic field topology surrounding the Martian atmosphere is mainly the result of gradients in the velocity of the solar wind (SW). Such variations in the SW velocity are in turn the result of a massloading process and forces associated with electric currents flowing around the ionosphere of Mars [Nagy et al 2004, Mazelle et al 2004, Brain et al 2015]. In particular, in the regions where the collisionless regime holds, the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) frozen into the SW piles up in front of the stagnation region of the flow. At the same time, the magnetic field lines are stretched in the direction of the unperturbed SW as this stream moves away from Mars, giving rise to a magnetotail [Alfvén, 1957]. As a result and in contrast with an obstacle with and intrinsic global magnetic field, the structure and organization of the magnetic field around Mars depends on the direction of the IMF and its variabilities [Yeroshenko et al., 1990; Crider et al., 2004; Bertucci et al., 2003; Romanelli et al 2015]. In this study we use magnetometer data from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft during portions of the premapping orbits of the mission to study the variability of the Martian-induced magnetotail as a function of the orientation of the IMF. The time spent by MGS in the magnetotail lobes during periods with positive solar wind flow-aligned IMF component B∥IMF suggests that their location as well as the position of the central polarity reversal layer (PRL) are displaced in the direction antiparallel to the IMF cross-flow component B⊥IMF . Analogously, in the cases where B∥IMF is negative, the lobes are displaced in the direction of B⊥IMF. We find this behavior to be compatible with a previously published B⊥IMF analytical model of the IMF draping, where for the first time, the displacement of a complementary reversal layer (denoted as IPRL for inverse polarity reversal layer) is deduced from first principles [Romanelli et al 2014]. We also

  12. On the twists of interplanetary magnetic flux ropes observed at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuming; Zhuang, Bin; Hu, Qiang; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong; Chi, Yutian

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) are one kind of fundamental structures in the solar/space physics and involved in various eruption phenomena. Twist, characterizing how the magnetic field lines wind around a main axis, is an intrinsic property of MFRs, closely related to the magnetic free energy and stableness. Although the effect of the twist on the behavior of MFRs had been widely studied in observations, theory, modeling, and numerical simulations, it is still unclear how much amount of twist is carried by MFRs in the solar atmosphere and in heliosphere and what role the twist played in the eruptions of MFRs. Contrasting to the solar MFRs, there are lots of in situ measurements of magnetic clouds (MCs), the large-scale MFRs in interplanetary space, providing some important information of the twist of MFRs. Thus, starting from MCs, we investigate the twist of interplanetary MFRs with the aid of a velocity-modified uniform-twist force-free flux rope model. It is found that most of MCs can be roughly fitted by the model and nearly half of them can be fitted fairly well though the derived twist is probably overestimated by a factor of 2.5. By applying the model to 115 MCs observed at 1 AU, we find that (1) the twist angles of interplanetary MFRs generally follow a trend of about 0.6l/R radians, where l/R is the aspect ratio of a MFR, with a cutoff at about 12π radians AU-1, (2) most of them are significantly larger than 2.5π radians but well bounded by 2l/R radians, (3) strongly twisted magnetic field lines probably limit the expansion and size of MFRs, and (4) the magnetic field lines in the legs wind more tightly than those in the leading part of MFRs. These results not only advance our understanding of the properties and behavior of interplanetary MFRs but also shed light on the formation and eruption of MFRs in the solar atmosphere. A discussion about the twist and stableness of solar MFRs are therefore given.

  13. Effects of interplanetary magnetic clouds, interaction regions, and high-speed streams on the transient modulation of galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Y. P.; Badruddin

    2007-02-01

    Interplanetary manifestations of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) with specific plasma and field properties, called ``interplanetary magnetic clouds,'' have been observed in the heliosphere since the mid-1960s. Depending on their associated features, a set of observed magnetic clouds identified at 1 AU were grouped in four different classes using data over 4 decades: (1) interplanetary magnetic clouds moving with the ambient solar wind (MC structure), (2) magnetic clouds moving faster than the ambient solar wind and forming a shock/sheath structure of compressed plasma and field ahead of it (SMC structure), (3) magnetic clouds ``pushed'' by the high-speed streams from behind, forming an interaction region between the two (MIH structure), and (4) shock-associated magnetic clouds followed by high-speed streams (SMH structure). This classification into different groups led us to study the role, effect, and the relative importance of (1) closed field magnetic cloud structure with low field variance, (2) interplanetary shock and magnetically turbulent sheath region, (3) interaction region with large field variance, and (4) the high-speed solar wind stream coming from the open field regions, in modulating the galactic cosmic rays (GCRs). MC structures are responsible for transient decrease with fast recovery. SMC structures are responsible for fast decrease and slow recovery, MIH structures produce depression with slow decrease and slow recovery, and SMH structures are responsible for fast decrease with very slow recovery. Simultaneous variations of GCR intensity, solar plasma velocity, interplanetary magnetic field strength, and its variance led us to study the relative effectiveness of different structures as well as interplanetary plasma/field parameters. Possible role of the magnetic field, its topology, field turbulence, and the high-speed streams in influencing the amplitude and time profile of resulting decreases in GCR intensity have also been discussed.

  14. DRIFT ORBITS OF ENERGETIC PARTICLES IN AN INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE

    SciTech Connect

    Krittinatham, W.; Ruffolo, D. E-mail: scdjr@mahidol.ac.t

    2009-10-10

    Interplanetary magnetic flux ropes have significant effects on the distribution of energetic particles in space. Flux ropes can confine solar energetic particles (SEPs) for hours, and have relatively low densities of Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), as seen during second-stage Forbush decreases. As particle diffusion is apparently inhibited across the flux rope boundary, we suggest that guiding center drifts could play a significant role in particle motion into and out of the flux ropes. We develop an analytic model of the magnetic field in an interplanetary magnetic flux rope attached to the Sun at both ends, in quasi-toroidal coordinates, with the realistic features of a flux rope cross section that is small near the Sun, expanding with distance from the Sun, and field lines that are wound less tightly close to the Sun due to stretching by the solar wind. We calculate the particle drift velocity field due to the magnetic field curvature and gradient as a function of position and pitch-angle cosine, and trace particle guiding center orbits numerically, assuming conservation of the first adiabatic invariant. We find that SEPs in the interior of a flux rope can have drift orbits that are trapped for long times, as in a tokamak configuration, with resonant escape features as a function of the winding number. For Forbush decreases of GCRs, the drifts should contribute to a unidirectional anisotropy and net flow from one leg of the loop to the other, in a direction determined by the poloidal field direction.

  15. A magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the bifurcation of tail lobes during intervals with a northward interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogino, T.; Walker, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    The interaction of the solar wind with the earth's magnetosphere during a northward interplanetary magnetic field was studied by using a three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic model. For a northward interplanetary magnetic field on 5 nT, the plasma sheet thickens near the noon-midnight meridian plane. When projected onto the polar cap this appears as a narrow channel extending from midnight towards noon. This plasma pattern is associated with three pairs of convection cells. The high latitude sunward convection and northern B(z) Birkeland current are caused by magnetic merging in the polar region.

  16. Structures of interplanetary magnetic flux ropes and comparison with their solar sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qiang; Dasgupta, B.; Khare, A.; Webb, G. M. E-mail: qiu@physics.montana.edu

    2014-09-20

    Whether a magnetic flux rope is pre-existing or formed in situ in the Sun's atmosphere, there is little doubt that magnetic reconnection is essential to release the flux rope during its ejection. During this process, the question remains: how does magnetic reconnection change the flux-rope structure? In this work, we continue with the original study of Qiu et al. by using a larger sample of flare-coronal mass ejection (CME)-interplanetary CME (ICME) events to compare properties of ICME/magnetic cloud (MC) flux ropes measured at 1 AU and properties of associated solar progenitors including flares, filaments, and CMEs. In particular, the magnetic field-line twist distribution within interplanetary magnetic flux ropes is systematically derived and examined. Our analysis shows that, similar to what was found before, for most of these events, the amount of twisted flux per AU in MCs is comparable with the total reconnection flux on the Sun, and the sign of the MC helicity is consistent with the sign of the helicity of the solar source region judged from the geometry of post-flare loops. Remarkably, we find that about half of the 18 magnetic flux ropes, most of them associated with erupting filaments, have a nearly uniform and relatively low twist distribution from the axis to the edge, and the majority of the other flux ropes exhibit very high twist near the axis, up to ≳ 5 turns per AU, which decreases toward the edge. The flux ropes are therefore not linearly force-free. We also conduct detailed case studies showing the contrast of two events with distinct twist distribution in MCs as well as different flare and dimming characteristics in solar source regions, and discuss how reconnection geometry reflected in flare morphology may be related to the structure of the flux rope formed on the Sun.

  17. Role of solar wind speed and interplanetary magnetic field during two-step Forbush decreases caused by Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskar, Ankush; Vichare, Geeta; Arunbabu, K. P.; Raghav, Anil

    2016-07-01

    The relationship of Forbush decreases (FDs) observed in Moscow neutron monitor with the interplanetary magnetic field (B) and solar wind speed (Vsw) is investigated in detail for the FDs associated with Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) during 2001-2004. The classical two-step FD events are selected, and characteristics of the first step (mainly associated with shock), as well as of complete decrease (main phase) and recovery phase, are studied here. It is observed that the onset of FD occurs generally after zero to a few hours of shock arrival, indicating in the post-shock region that mainly sheath and ICME act as important drivers of FD. A good correlation is observed between the amplitude of B and associated FD magnitude observed in the neutron count rate of the main phase. The duration of the main phase observed in the neutron count rate also shows good correlation with B. This might indicate that stronger interplanetary disturbances have a large dimension of magnetic field structure which causes longer fall time of FD main phase when they transit across the Earth. It is observed that Vsw and neutron count rate time profiles show considerable similarity with each other during complete FD, especially during the recovery phase of FD. Linear relationship is observed between time duration/e-folding time of FD recovery phase and Vsw. These observations indicate that the FDs are influenced by the inhibited diffusion of cosmic rays due to the enhanced convection associated with the interplanetary disturbances. We infer that the inhibited cross-field diffusion of the cosmic rays due to enhanced B is mainly responsible for the main phase of FD whereas the expansion of ICME contributes in the early recovery phase and the gradual variation of Vsw beyond ICME boundaries contributes to the long duration of FD recovery through reduced convection-diffusion.

  18. The effects of 8 Helios observed solar proton events of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ValdezGalicia, J. F.; Alexander, P.; Otaola, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    There have been recent suggestions that large fluxes during solar energetic particle events may produce their own turbulence. To verify this argument it becomes essential to find out whether these flows cause an enhancement of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations. In the present work, power and helicity spectra of the IMF before, during and after 8 Helios-observed solar proton events in the range 0.3 - 1 AU are analyzed. In order to detect proton self generated waves, the time evolution of spectra are followed.

  19. Contributions to the Fourth Solar Wind Conference. [interplanetary magnetic fields and medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.; Behannon, K. W.; Burlaga, L. F.; Lepping, R.; Ness, N.; Ogilvie, K.; Pizzo, J.

    1979-01-01

    Recent results in interplanetary physics are examined. These include observations of shock waves and post-shock magnetic fields made by Voyager 1, 2; observations of the electron temperature as a function of distance between 1.36 AU and 2.25 AU; and observations of the structure of sector boundaries observed by Helios 1. A theory of electron energy transport in the collisionless solar wind is presented, and compared with observations. Alfven waves and Alvenic fluctuations in the solar wind are also discussed.

  20. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Control of the Entry of Solar Energetic Particles into the Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, R. L.; El-Alaoui, M.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Walker, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the entry of energetic ions of solar origin into the magnetosphere as a function of the interplanetary magnetic field orientation. We have modeled this entry by following high energy particles (protons and 3 He ions) ranging from 0.1 to 50 MeV in electric and magnetic fields from a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of the magnetosphere and its interaction with the solar wind. For the most part these particles entered the magnetosphere on or near open field lines except for some above 10 MeV that could enter directly by crossing field lines due to their large gyroradii. The MHD simulation was driven by a series of idealized solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. It was found that the flux of particles in the magnetosphere and transport into the inner magnetosphere varied widely according to the IMF orientation for a constant upstream particle source, with the most efficient entry occurring under southward IMF conditions. The flux inside the magnetosphere could approach that in the solar wind implying that SEPs can contribute significantly to the magnetospheric energetic particle population during typical SEP events depending on the state of the magnetosphere.

  1. Momentum transfer from solar wind to interplanetary field enhancements inferred from magnetic field draping signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, H. R.; Russell, C. T.; Jia, Y. D.; Wei, H. Y.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2015-03-01

    Characterized by a cusp-shaped enhancement in the magnetic field strength, the magnetic structure in the solar wind, called an interplanetary field enhancement (IFE), has been investigated since its discovery. To understand its three-dimensional magnetic field geometry, we study an IFE detected by five spacecraft simultaneously. Field lines are seen draping around in the upstream region and rotating in the ambient convection electric field direction in the downstream region. Earlier studies suggest that IFEs are created when the solar wind accelerates newly formed dust clouds. Both signatures found in our study support this hypothesis: the field line draping is caused by dust-solar wind momentum exchange, while the field line rotation is a typical signature of dusty plasma pickup. The force that exchanges the momentum is approximately 106 N. This study illustrates the nature of the interaction between two flowing plasmas of very different mass-to-charge ratio.

  2. The Chain Response of the Magnetospheric - and - ground Magnetic Field to Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, T.; Wang, C.; Zhang, J.; Pilipenko, V.

    2014-12-01

    In response to interplanetary (IP) shocks, magnetic field may decrease/increase (negative/positive response) in nightside magnetosphere, while at high latitudes on the ground it has two phase bipolar variations: preliminary impulse(PI) and main impulse (MI). Using global MHD simulations, we investigate the linkage between the MI phase variation on the ground and the magnetospheric negative response to an IP shock. It is revealed that although the two phenomena occur at largely-separated locations, they are physically related and form a response chain. The velocity disturbances near the flanks of the magnetopause cause the magnetic field to decrease, resulting in a dynamo which thus powers the transient field-aligned currents (FACs). These FACs further generates a pair of ionospheric current vortex, leading to MI variations on the ground. For the first time, we report here the intrinsic physically-related chain response of the magnetospheric - and - ground magnetic field to IP shocks.

  3. Small-scale electrodynamics of the cusp with northward interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basinska, Ewa M.; Burke, William J.; Maynard, Nelson C.; Hughes, W. J.; Winningham, J. D.; Hanson, W. B.

    1992-01-01

    Possible low-altitude field signatures of merging occurring at high latitudes during a period of strong northward directed interplanetary magnetic field are reported. Large electric and magnetic field spikes detected at the poleward edge of the magnetosheathlike particle precipitation are interpreted as field signatures of the low-altitude footprint of such merging line locations. A train of phase-shifted, almost linearly polarized electric and magnetic field fluctuations was detected just equatorward of the large electromagnetic spike. It is argued that these may be due to either ion cyclotron waves excited by penetrating magnetosheath ions or transient oscillations in the frame of convecting plasma, brought about by the sudden change in the flow at the magnetospheric end of the field line.

  4. Characteristic magnetic field and speed properties of interplanetary coronal mass ejections and their sheath regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, M. J.; Cargill, P. J.; Pagel, C.; Siscoe, G. L.; Crooker, N. U.

    2005-01-01

    Prediction of the solar wind conditions in near-Earth space, arising from both quasi-steady and transient structures, is essential for space weather forecasting. To achieve forecast lead times of a day or more, such predictions must be made on the basis of remote solar observations. A number of empirical prediction schemes have been proposed to forecast the transit time and speed of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at 1 AU. However, the current lack of magnetic field measurements in the corona severely limits our ability to forecast the 1 AU magnetic field strengths resulting from interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs). In this study we investigate the relation between the characteristic magnetic field strengths and speeds of both magnetic cloud and noncloud ICMEs at 1 AU. Correlation between field and speed is found to be significant only in the sheath region ahead of magnetic clouds, not within the clouds themselves. The lack of such a relation in the sheaths ahead of noncloud ICMEs is consistent with such ICMEs being skimming encounters of magnetic clouds, though other explanations are also put forward. Linear fits to the radial speed profiles of ejecta reveal that faster-traveling ICMEs are also expanding more at 1 AU. We combine these empirical relations to form a prediction scheme for the magnetic field strength in the sheaths ahead of magnetic clouds and also suggest a method for predicting the radial speed profile through an ICME on the basis of upstream measurements.

  5. Interplanetary magnetic field polarity and the size of low-pressure troughs near 180 deg W longitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, J. M.; Duffy, P. B.; Schatten, K. H.; Svalgaard, L.; Scherrer, P. H.; Roberts, W. O.; Olson, R. H.

    1979-01-01

    The relationship between interplanetary magnetic field polarity and the area of low pressure (300 mbar) troughs near 180 deg W longitude is examined. For most of the winters from 1951 to 1973, the trough size, as indicated by the vorticity area index, is found to be significantly greater when the interplanetary magnetic field is directed away from the sun than when the field is directed towards the sun. This relationship is shown to hold for various combinations of winters and for most months within a winter, and be most pronounced at the time when polarity was determined. It is suggested that the phenomenon is caused by merging of interplanetary magnetic field lines, when polarity is directed away from the sun, with geomagnetic field lines in the Northern Hemisphere (where these measurements were made), allowing energetic particle fluxes to have access to the north polar region

  6. The influences of solar wind pressure and interplanetary magnetic field on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt electrons

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, J.; Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.; ...

    2016-07-28

    Using the Van Allen Probe in situ measured magnetic field and electron data, we examine the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) effects on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt relativistic electrons (≥1.8 MeV). The dynamic pressure enhancements (>2 nPa) cause the dayside magnetic field increase and the nightside magnetic field reduction, whereas the large southward IMFs (Bz-IMF < –2nT) mainly lead to the decrease of the nightside magnetic field. In the dayside increased magnetic field region (magnetic local time (MLT) ~ 06:00–18:00, and L > 4), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons are mainly pancakemore » distributions with a flux peak around 90° (corresponding anisotropic index A > 0.1), and the higher-energy electrons have stronger pancake distributions (the larger A), suggesting that the compression-induced betatron accelerations enhance the dayside pancake distributions. However, in the nighttime decreased magnetic field region (MLT ~ 18:00–06:00, and L ≥ 5), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons become butterfly distributions with two flux peaks around 45° and 135° (A < 0). The spatial range of the nighttime butterfly distributions is almost independent of the relativistic electron energy, but it depends on the magnetic field day-night asymmetry and the interplanetary conditions. The dynamic pressure enhancements can make the nighttime butterfly distribution extend inward. The large southward IMFs can also lead to the azimuthal expansion of the nighttime butterfly distributions. As a result, these variations are consistent with the drift shell splitting and/or magnetopause shadowing effect.« less

  7. The influences of solar wind pressure and interplanetary magnetic field on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J.; Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H.

    2016-07-28

    Using the Van Allen Probe in situ measured magnetic field and electron data, we examine the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) effects on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt relativistic electrons (≥1.8 MeV). The dynamic pressure enhancements (>2 nPa) cause the dayside magnetic field increase and the nightside magnetic field reduction, whereas the large southward IMFs (Bz-IMF < –2nT) mainly lead to the decrease of the nightside magnetic field. In the dayside increased magnetic field region (magnetic local time (MLT) ~ 06:00–18:00, and L > 4), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons are mainly pancake distributions with a flux peak around 90° (corresponding anisotropic index A > 0.1), and the higher-energy electrons have stronger pancake distributions (the larger A), suggesting that the compression-induced betatron accelerations enhance the dayside pancake distributions. However, in the nighttime decreased magnetic field region (MLT ~ 18:00–06:00, and L ≥ 5), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons become butterfly distributions with two flux peaks around 45° and 135° (A < 0). The spatial range of the nighttime butterfly distributions is almost independent of the relativistic electron energy, but it depends on the magnetic field day-night asymmetry and the interplanetary conditions. The dynamic pressure enhancements can make the nighttime butterfly distribution extend inward. The large southward IMFs can also lead to the azimuthal expansion of the nighttime butterfly distributions. As a result, these variations are consistent with the drift shell splitting and/or magnetopause shadowing effect.

  8. The influences of solar wind pressure and interplanetary magnetic field on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.; Reeves, G. D.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H.

    2016-07-01

    Using the Van Allen Probe in situ measured magnetic field and electron data, we examine the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) effects on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt relativistic electrons (≥1.8 MeV). The dynamic pressure enhancements (>2 nPa) cause the dayside magnetic field increase and the nightside magnetic field reduction, whereas the large southward IMFs (Bz-IMF < -2nT) mainly lead to the decrease of the nightside magnetic field. In the dayside increased magnetic field region (magnetic local time (MLT) ~ 06:00-18:00, and L > 4), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons are mainly pancake distributions with a flux peak around 90° (corresponding anisotropic index A > 0.1), and the higher-energy electrons have stronger pancake distributions (the larger A), suggesting that the compression-induced betatron accelerations enhance the dayside pancake distributions. However, in the nighttime decreased magnetic field region (MLT ~ 18:00-06:00, and L ≥ 5), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons become butterfly distributions with two flux peaks around 45° and 135° (A < 0). The spatial range of the nighttime butterfly distributions is almost independent of the relativistic electron energy, but it depends on the magnetic field day-night asymmetry and the interplanetary conditions. The dynamic pressure enhancements can make the nighttime butterfly distribution extend inward. The large southward IMFs can also lead to the azimuthal expansion of the nighttime butterfly distributions. These variations are consistent with the drift shell splitting and/or magnetopause shadowing effect.

  9. AN ANALYSIS OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC INVARIANTS OF MAGNETIC FLUCTUATIONS WITHIN INTERPLANETARY FLUX ROPES

    SciTech Connect

    Telloni, D.; Perri, S.; Carbone, V.; Bruno, R.; D Amicis, R.

    2013-10-10

    A statistical analysis of magnetic flux ropes, identified by large-amplitude, smooth rotations of the magnetic field vector and a low level of both proton density and temperature, has been performed by computing the invariants of the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, namely the magnetic helicity, the cross-helicity, and the total energy, via magnetic field and plasma fluctuations in the interplanetary medium. A technique based on the wavelet spectrograms of the MHD invariants allows the localization and characterization of those structures in both scales and time: it has been observed that flux ropes show, as expected, high magnetic helicity states (|σ{sub m}| in [0.6: 1]), but extremely variable cross-helicity states (|σ{sub c}| in [0: 0.8]), which, however, are not independent of the magnetic helicity content of the flux rope itself. The two normalized MHD invariants observed within the flux ropes tend indeed to distribute, neither trivially nor automatically, along the √(σ{sub m}{sup 2}+σ{sub c}{sup 2})=1 curve, thus suggesting that some constraint should exist between the magnetic and cross-helicity content of the structures. The analysis carried out has further showed that the flux rope properties are totally independent of their time duration and that they are detected either as a sort of interface between different portions of solar wind or as isolated structures embedded in the same stream.

  10. A global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the magnetosheath and magnetosphere when the interplanetary magnetic field is northward

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogino, Tatsuki; Walker, Raymond I.; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha

    1992-01-01

    We have used a new high-resolution global magnetohydrodynamic simulation model to investigate the configuration of the magnetosphere when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is northward. For northward IMF the magnetospheric configuration is dominated by magnetic reconnection at the tail lobe magnetopause tailward of the polar cusp. This results in a local thickening of the plasma sheet equatorward of the region of reconnection and the establishment of a convection system with two cells in each lobe. In the magnetosheath the plasma density and pressure decrease near the subsolar magnetopause, forming a depletion region. Along the flanks of the magnetosphere the magnetosheath flow is accelerated to values larger than the solar wind velocity. The magnetopause shape from the simulations is consistent with the empirically determined shape.

  11. Quantitative Imaging of the Solar Wind: CME Mass Evolution and the Interplanetary Magnetic Flux Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeForest, Craig

    2012-05-01

    We recently developed post-processing techniques for heliospheric images from the STEREO spacecraft; the new data sets enable, for the first time, quantitative photometric studies of evolving wind features at distances up to 1 A.U. from the Sun. We have used the new data to trace several CMEs and magnetic disconnection events to their origins in the solar corona, and to infer the force balance and entrained magnetic flux in those features. We present recent results showing the relationship between ICME and CME anatomy, in particular the origin of an observed interplanetary flux rope and the relationship between original launched solar material and piled-up sheath material and flux in the storm at 1. A.U. We discuss implications for understanding space weather physics and predicting individual events, and point out the importance of future imaging technologies such as polarized heliospheric imaging.

  12. Cusp region particle precipitation and ion convection for northward interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.; Reiff, P. H.; Spiro, R. W.; Heelis, R. A.; Fields, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    Data from Atmosphere Explorer D for periods of strong northward interplanetary magnetic field are discussed. In the dayside magnetospheric cusp region energy time spectrograms of suprathermal positive ion fluxes exhibit a characteristic 'V' pattern as the spacecraft moves toward higher latitudes; that is, with the peak in the energy spectrum falling in energy and then rising again. Convection velocities follow this pattern closely with strong eastwest flows (with antisunward components) occurring in the equatorward half of the 'V' and significant sunward flows occurring in the poleward half of the 'V'. These patterns can be understood qualitatively in terms of a model of ionospheric electric potential produced by the known dependence of Birkeland current densities on magnetic activity.

  13. Anomalous magnetosheath properties during Earth passage of an interplanetary magnetic cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Farrugia, C.J.; Erkaev, N.V.; Burlaga, L.F.

    1995-10-01

    In this work the authors present a model for the behavior of the magnetosheath during the passage of the earth thru an interplanetary magnetic cloud. They study the variation of plasma flow and field values as a result of this encounter. The unique feature of such encounters is that they present substantial changes in the solar wind conditions along the bow shock and magnetopause for periods of 1 to 2 days. The mach number upstream of the bow shock can be as low as 3, compared to normal value of 8 to 10. The mach number and magnetic shear across the magnetopause have a major impact on the magnetosheath properties. The authors use the encounter of January 14-15, 1988, as a basis for their model, and apply ideal MHD equations, by means of a boundary layer technique, to study changes in field and plasma flow patterns.

  14. An interplanetary cause of large geomagnetic storms: Fast forward shock overtaking preceding magnetic cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. M.; Ye, P. Z.; Wang, S.; Xue, X. H.

    2003-07-01

    In the event that occurred during October 3-6, 2000, at least one magnetosonic wave and one fast forward shock advanced into the preceding magnetic cloud (MC). By using the field and plasma data from the ACE and WIND spacecraft, we analyze the evolution of this event, including the characteristics and changes of the magnetic fields and plasma. At the rear part of the cloud, a large southward magnetic field is caused by a shock compression. The shock intensified a preexisting southward magnetic field. This increased the geoeffectiveness of this event and produced an intense geomagnetic storm with Dst = -175 nT. We also describe another event with a shock overtaking a MC on Nov. 6, 2001. A great geomagnetic storm of intensity Dst = 292 nT resulted. These observations are used to argue that shock compression of magnetic cloud fields is an important interplanetary cause of large geomagnetic storms. Our analyses suggest that the geoeffectiveness is related to the direction of preexisting magnetic fields, the intensity of overtaking shock, and the amount of shock penetration into the preceding MC.

  15. The effect of interplanetary magnetic field orientation on the solar wind flux impacting Mercury's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, J.; Pantellini, F.; Moncuquet, M.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the plasma flows on the Mercury surface for different interplanetary magnetic field orientations on the day side of the planet. We use a single fluid MHD model in spherical coordinates to simulate the interaction of the solar wind with the Hermean magnetosphere for six solar wind realistic configurations with different magnetic field orientations: Mercury-Sun, Sun-Mercury, aligned with the magnetic axis of Mercury (Northward and Southward) and with the orbital plane perpendicular to the previous cases. In the Mercury-Sun (Sun-Mercury) simulation the Hermean magnetic field is weakened in the South-East (North-East) of the magnetosphere leading to an enhancement of the flows on the South (North) hemisphere. For a Northward (Southward) orientation there is an enhancement (weakening) of the Hermean magnetic field in the nose of the bow shock so the fluxes are reduced and drifted to the poles (enhanced and drifted to the equator). If the solar wind magnetic field is in the orbital plane the magnetosphere is tilted to the West (East) and weakened at the nose of the shock, so the flows are enhanced and drifted to the East (West) in the Northern hemisphere and to the West (East) in the Southern hemisphere.

  16. Long-term Trends in Interplanetary Magnetic Field Strength and Solar Wind Structure during the 20th Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cliver, E. W.; Cane, H. V.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Lockwood et al have recently reported an approximately 40% increase in the radial component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) at Earth between 1964 and 1996. We argue that this increase does not constitute a secular trend but is largely the consequence of lower than average fields during solar cycle 20 (1964-1976) in comparison with surrounding cycles. For times after 1976 the average IMF strength has actually decreased slightly. Examination of the cosmic ray intensity, an indirect measure of the IMF strength, over the last five solar cycles (19-23) also indicates that cycle averages of the IMF strength have been relatively constant since approximately 1954. We also consider the origin of the well-documented increase in the geomagnetic alphaalpha index that occurred primarily during the first half of the twentieth century. We surmise that the coronal mass ejection (CME) rate for recent solar cycles was approximately twice as high as that for solar cycles 100 years ago. However, this change in the CME rate and the accompanying increase in 27-day recurrent storm activity reported by others are unable to account completely for the increase in alphaalpha. Rather, the CMEs and recurrent high-speed streams at the beginning of the twentieth century must have been embedded in a background of slow solar wind that was less geoeffective (having, for example, lower IMF strength and/or flow speed) than its modern counterpart.

  17. The B-dot Earth Average Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capo-Lugo, Pedro A.; Rakoczy, John; Sanders, Devon

    2013-01-01

    The average Earth's magnetic field is solved with complex mathematical models based on mean square integral. Depending on the selection of the Earth magnetic model, the average Earth's magnetic field can have different solutions. This paper presents a simple technique that takes advantage of the damping effects of the b-dot controller and is not dependent of the Earth magnetic model; but it is dependent on the magnetic torquers of the satellite which is not taken into consideration in the known mathematical models. Also the solution of this new technique can be implemented so easily that the flight software can be updated during flight, and the control system can have current gains for the magnetic torquers. Finally, this technique is verified and validated using flight data from a satellite that it has been in orbit for three years.

  18. Magnetic and plasma response of the Earth's magnetosphere to interplanetary shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, A.; Cao, X.; Wang, R.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the global response of magnetosphere to interplanetary shock, and focus on the magnetic and plasma variations related to aurora. The analysis utilizes data from simultaneous observations of interplanetary shocks from available spacecraft in the solar wind and the Earth's magnetosphere such as ACE, Wind and SOHO in solar wind, LANL and GOES in outer magnetosphere, TC1 in the midinight neutral plasma sheet, Geotail and Polar in dusk side of plasma sheet, and Cluster in downside LLBL. The shock front speed is ~1051 km/s in the solar wind, and ~981km/s in the Earth's magnetosphere. The shock is propagating anti-sunward (toward the Earth) in the plasma frame with a speed of ~320 km/s. After the shock bumps at the magnetopause, the dayside aurora brightens, then nightside aurora brightens and expanses to poleward. During the aurora activity period, the fast earthward and tailward flows in plasma sheet are observed by TC1 (X~7.1 Re, Y~1.2 Re). The variation of magnetic field and plasma in duskside of magnetosphere is weaker than that in dawnside. At low latitude boundary layer (LLBL), the Cluster spacecraft detected rolled-up large scale vortices generated by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI). Toroidal oscillations of the magnetic field in the LLBL might be driven by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The strong IP shock highly compresses the magnetopause and the outer magnetosphere. This process may also lead to particle precipitation and auroral brightening (Zhou and Tsurutani, 1999; Tsurutani et al., 2001 and 2003).

  19. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Power Spectrum Variations in the Inner Heliosphere: A Wind and MESSENGER Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, Adam; Koval, A.

    2011-01-01

    The newly reprocessed high time resolution (11/22 vectors/sec) Wind mission interplanetary magnetic field data and the similar observations made by the MESSENGER spacecraft in the inner heliosphere affords an opportunity to compare magnetic field power spectral density variations as a function of radial distance from the Sun under different solar wind conditions. In the reprocessed Wind Magnetic Field Investigation (MFI) data, the spin tone and its harmonics are greatly reduced that allows the meaningful fitting of power spectra to the approx.2 Hz limit above which digitization noise becomes apparent. The powe'r spectral density is computed and the spectral index is fitted for the MHD and ion inertial regime separately along with the break point between the two for various solar wind conditions. Wind and MESSENGER magnetic fluctuations are compared for times when the two spacecraft are close to radial and Parker field alignment. The functional dependence of the ion inertial spectral index and break point on solar wind plasma and magnetic field conditions will be discussed.

  20. Variations of solar, interplanetary, and geomagnetic parameters with solar magnetic multipole fields during Solar Cycles 21-24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bogyeong; Lee, Jeongwoo; Yi, Yu; Oh, Suyeon

    2015-01-01

    In this study we compare the temporal variations of the solar, interplanetary, and geomagnetic (SIG) parameters with that of open solar magnetic flux from 1976 to 2012 (from Solar Cycle 21 to the early phase of Cycle 24) for a purpose of identifying their possible relationships. By the open flux, we mean the average magnetic field over the source surface (2.5 solar radii) times the source area as defined by the potential field source surface (PFSS) model of the Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO). In our result, most SIG parameters except the solar wind dynamic pressure show rather poor correlations with the open solar magnetic field. Good correlations are recovered when the contributions from individual multipole components are counted separately. As expected, solar activity indices such as sunspot number, total solar irradiance, 10.7 cm radio flux, and solar flare occurrence are highly correlated with the flux of magnetic quadrupole component. The dynamic pressure of solar wind is strongly correlated with the dipole flux, which is in anti-phase with Solar Cycle (SC). The geomagnetic activity represented by the Ap index is correlated with higher order multipole components, which show relatively a slow time variation with SC. We also found that the unusually low geomagnetic activity during SC 23 is accompanied by the weak open solar fields compared with those in other SCs. It is argued that such dependences of the SIG parameters on the individual multipole components of the open solar magnetic flux may clarify why some SIG parameters vary in phase with SC and others show seemingly delayed responses to SC variation.

  1. Interplanetary coronal mass ejection and ambient interplanetary magnetic field correlations during the Sun-Earth connection events of October-November 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Matsui, H.; Kucharek, H.; Torbert, R. B.; Smith, C. W.; Jordanova, V. K.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Lepping, R. P.; Berdichevsky, D. B.; Terasawa, T.; Kasper, J.; Mukai, T.; Saito, Y.; Skoug, R.

    2005-09-01

    Magnetic field observations made during 28 October to 1 November 2003, which included two fast interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), allow a study of correlation lengths of magnetic field parameters for two types of interplanetary (IP) structures: ICMEs and ambient solar wind. Further, they permit the extension of such investigations to the magnetosheath and to a distance along the Sun-Earth line (X) of about 400 RE. Data acquired by three spacecraft are examined: ACE, in orbit around the L1 point; Geotail, traveling eastward in the near-Earth solar wind (at R ˜ 30 RE); and Wind, nominally in the distant geomagnetic tail (R ˜ -160 RE) but making repeated excursions into the magnetosheath/solar wind due to the flapping of the tail. Analyses are presented in both time and frequency domains. We find significant differences in the cross-correlation/coherence properties of the ambient interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and ICME parameters. For the ambient IMF, we find high coherence to be confined to low frequencies, consistent with other studies. In contrast, ICME magnetic field parameters remain generally coherent up to much higher frequencies. Scale lengths of ICME magnetic field parameters are in excess of 400 RE. High speeds of ˜1700 km s-1 are inferred from the plot of phase difference versus frequency, consistent with that obtained from plasma instruments. To strengthen these results and to extend them to include dependence on the distance perpendicular to the Sun-Earth line (Y), we examine a 28-day interval in year 2001 characterized by a sequence of 10 ICMEs and containing roughly equal ambient solar wind and ICME time intervals. ACE-Wind X and Y separations were ˜220 and ˜250 RE, respectively. We find good coherence/correlation alternating with poor values. In particular, we find that in general ICME coherence/correlation lengths along Y are larger by a factor of 3-5 than those quoted in the literature for ambient solar wind parameters. Our

  2. Saturn's dayside ultraviolet auroras: Evidence for morphological dependence on the direction of the upstream interplanetary magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Meredith, C J; Alexeev, I I; Badman, S V; Belenkaya, E S; Cowley, S W H; Dougherty, M K; Kalegaev, V V; Lewis, G R; Nichols, J D

    2014-03-01

    We examine a unique data set from seven Hubble Space Telescope (HST) "visits" that imaged Saturn's northern dayside ultraviolet emissions exhibiting usual circumpolar "auroral oval" morphologies, during which Cassini measured the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) upstream of Saturn's bow shock over intervals of several hours. The auroras generally consist of a dawn arc extending toward noon centered near ∼15° colatitude, together with intermittent patchy forms at ∼10° colatitude and poleward thereof, located between noon and dusk. The dawn arc is a persistent feature, but exhibits variations in position, width, and intensity, which have no clear relationship with the concurrent IMF. However, the patchy postnoon auroras are found to relate to the (suitably lagged and averaged) IMF Bz , being present during all four visits with positive Bz and absent during all three visits with negative Bz . The most continuous such forms occur in the case of strongest positive Bz . These results suggest that the postnoon forms are associated with reconnection and open flux production at Saturn's magnetopause, related to the similarly interpreted bifurcated auroral arc structures previously observed in this local time sector in Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph data, whose details remain unresolved in these HST images. One of the intervals with negative IMF Bz however exhibits a prenoon patch of very high latitude emission extending poleward of the dawn arc to the magnetic/spin pole, suggestive of the occurrence of lobe reconnection. Overall, these data provide evidence of significant IMF dependence in the morphology of Saturn's dayside auroras.

  3. Reconstruction of Interplanetary Magnetic Field and Solar Wind Speed for the Last 135 Years Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osherovich, V. A.; Fainberg, J.

    2007-12-01

    We reconstruct the magnitude of the interplanetary magnetic field B and solar wind speed v at 1 AU using 1) yearly values of sunspot numbers and geomagnetic index aa; 2) available spacecraft measurements of v and B since 1964. We compare our results with the reconstruction done by Stamper et al. (1999) and also with the reconstruction by Svalgaard et al. (2003). References Stamper, R., M. Lockwood and M.N. Wild, Solar causes of the long-term increase in geomagnetic activity, J. Geophys. Res., Vol.104 (A12), 24325, 1999. Svalgaard, Leif, E. W. Cliver and P. Lesager, In; Solar variability as an input to the Earth's environment. International Solar Cycle Studies (ISCS) Symposium, 23 - 28 June 2003, Tatranska Lomnica, Slovak Republic. Ed.:A. Wilson. ESA SP-535, Noorwijk: ESA Publications Division, IBSN 92-9092-845-X, 2003, p. 15 - 23

  4. The latitude dependencies of the solar wind. [of interplanetary magnetic field polarity and configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, R. L.; Winge, C. R., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The motion of spacecraft following the earth's orbit occurs within the solar latitude range of 7 deg 15 min N on approximately September 7 to 7 deg 15 min S on approximately March 6. The latitude dependencies so far detected within this range have shown that the photospheric dipole-like field of the sun makes very important contributions to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) observed near the ecliptic. Changes in geomagnetic activity from even to odd numbered 11-year solar cycles are related to changes in the sun's dipolar field. The north-south IMF component and meridional, nonradial flow are important to a complete understanding of steady-state solar wind dynamics. Coronal conditions must be latitude-dependent in a way that accounts for the observed latitude dependence of the velocity and density of the solar wind.

  5. Radio observations of interplanetary magnetic field structures out of the ecliptic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzenreiter, R. J.; Fainberg, J.; Weber, R. R.; Alvarez, H.; Haddock, F. T.; Potter, W. H.

    1976-01-01

    New observations of the out-of-the ecliptic trajectories of type 3 solar radio bursts have been obtained from simultaneous direction finding measurements on two independent satellite experiments, IMP-6 with spin plane in the ecliptic, and RAE-2 with spin plane normal to the ecliptic. Burst exciter trajectories were observed which originated at the active region and then crossed the ecliptic plane at about 0.8 AU. A considerable large scale north-south component of the interplanetary magnetic field is followed by the exciters. The apparent north-south and east-west angular source sizes observed by the two spacecraft are approximately equal, and range from 25 deg at 600 KHz to 110 deg at 80 KHz.

  6. STRONG SOLAR WIND DYNAMIC PRESSURE PULSES: INTERPLANETARY SOURCES AND THEIR IMPACTS ON GEOSYNCHRONOUS MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Pingbing; Feng, Xueshang; Wang, Yi; Xie, Yanqiong; Xu, Xiaojun E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn

    2015-10-20

    In this investigation, we first present a statistical result of the interplanetary sources of very strong solar wind dynamic pressure pulses (DPPs) detected by WIND during solar cycle 23. It is found that the vast majority of strong DPPs reside within solar wind disturbances. Although the variabilities of geosynchronous magnetic fields (GMFs) due to the impact of positive DPPs have been well established, there appears to be no systematic investigations on the response of GMFs to negative DPPs. Here, we study both the decompression effects of very strong negative DPPs and the compression from strong positive DPPs on GMFs at different magnetic local time sectors. In response to the decompression of strong negative DPPs, GMFs on the dayside near dawn and near dusk on the nightside, are generally depressed. But near the midnight region, the responses of GMF are very diverse, being either positive or negative. For part of the events when GOES is located at the midnight sector, the GMF is found to abnormally increase as the result of magnetospheric decompression caused by negative DPPs. It is known that under certain conditions magnetic depression of nightside GMFs can be caused by the impact of positive DPPs. Here, we find that a stronger pressure enhancement may have a higher probability of producing the exceptional depression of GMF at the midnight region. Statistically, both the decompression effect of strong negative DPPs and the compression effect of strong positive DPPs depend on the magnetic local time, which are stronger at the noon sector.

  7. ULF cusp pulsations: Diurnal variations and interplanetary magnetic field correlations with ground-based observations

    SciTech Connect

    McHarg, M.G.; Olson, J.V.; Newell, P.T.

    1995-10-01

    In this paper the authors establish the Pc 5 magnetic pulsation signatures of the cusp and boundary regions for the high-latitude dayside cusp region. These signatures were determined by comparing spectrograms of the magnetic pulsations with optical observations of particle precipitation regions observed at the cusp. The ULF pulsations have a diurnal variation, and a cusp discriminant is proposed using a particular narrow-band feature in the pulsation spectrograms. The statistical distribution of this pattern over a 253-day period resembles the statistical cusp description using particle precipitation data from the Defense Meterological Satellite Program (DMSP). The distribution of the ground-based cusp discriminant is found to peak 1 hour earlier than the DMSP cusp distribution. This offset is due to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) being predominantly negative B{sub y} for the period when the data were collected. The authors find the diurnal variations so repeatable that only three main categories have statistically different IMF distributions. The identification of the signatures in the magnetic spectrograms of the boundary regions and central cusp allows the spectrogram to be used as a {open_quotes}time line{close_quotes} that shows when the station passed under different regions of the dayside oval. 36 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Galactic Cosmic Ray Intensity Response to Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections/Magnetic Clouds in 1995 - 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    2011-06-01

    We summarize the response of the galactic cosmic ray (CGR) intensity to the passage of the more than 300 interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and their associated shocks that passed the Earth during 1995 - 2009, a period that encompasses the whole of Solar Cycle 23. In ˜ 80% of cases, the GCR intensity decreased during the passage of these structures, i.e., a "Forbush decrease" occurred, while in ˜ 10% there was no significant change. In the remaining cases, the GCR intensity increased. Where there was an intensity decrease, minimum intensity was observed inside the ICME in ˜ 90% of these events. The observations confirm the role of both post-shock regions and ICMEs in the generation of these decreases, consistent with many previous studies, but contrary to the conclusion of Reames, Kahler, and Tylka ( Astrophys. J. Lett. 700, L199, 2009) who, from examining a subset of ICMEs with flux-rope-like magnetic fields (magnetic clouds) argued that these are "open structures" that allow free access of particles including GCRs to their interior. In fact, we find that magnetic clouds are more likely to participate in the deepest GCR decreases than ICMEs that are not magnetic clouds.

  9. Propagation of Solar Energetic Particles Associated with Impulsive Solar Flares in Turbulent Interplanetary Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, F.; Giacalone, J.

    2008-12-01

    We discuss the physics of the propagation of an impulsive release of charged particles in a turbulent magnetic field. Test-particle numerical simulations are used to study the propagation of solar energetic particles (SEPs) in interplanetary magnetic turbulence created by the random transverse motions of magnetic footpoints embedded in the solar atmosphere (Giacalone et al. 2006). The turbulence model includes a Kolmogorov-like magnetic field power spectrum containing a broad range of scales from those that lead to large-scale field-line random walk to small scales leading to resonant pitch-angle scattering of energetic particles. We relate our numerical simulations to spacecraft observations and show that a number of features of SEP events observed by ACE and Wind can be reproduced in these simulations. For instance, we find that,the path lengths traveled by particles are different from that expected for a simple Parker spiral; and thus. The resulting velocity dispersion is energy dependent. We also find flux dropouts associated with steep localized gradients. Moreover, since particles sample different field lines which have different path length, their arriving times are non-uniform.

  10. Physical characteristics of interplanetary space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernov, S. N.; Logachev, Y. I.; Pisarenko, N. F.

    1975-01-01

    The most important properties of the interplanetary medium are its interplanetary plasma (solar wind), magnetic field, galactic and solar cosmic rays, and micrometeorite material. Also considered is electromagnetic radiation from the sun, stars, and the galaxy.

  11. ISEE 3 observations of low-energy proton bidirectional events and their relation to isolated interplanetary magnetic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsden, R. G.; Sanderson, T. R.; Tranquille, C.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Smith, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    The paper represents the results of a comprehensive survey of low-energy proton bidirectional anisotropies and associated transient magnetic structures as observed in the 35-1600 keV energy range on ISEE-3 during the last solar maximum. The majority of observed bidirectional flow (BDF) events (more than 70 percent) are associated with isolated magnetic structures which are postulated to be an interplanetary manifestation of coronal mass ejection (CME) events. The observed BDF events can be qualitatively grouped into five classes depending on the field signature of the related magnetic structure and the association (or lack of association) with an interplanetary shock. Concerning the topology of the CME-related magnetic structures, the observations are interpreted as being consistent with a detached bubble, comprising closed loops or tightly wound helices.

  12. The chain response of the magnetospheric and ground magnetic field to interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, T. R.; Wang, C.; Zhang, J. J.; Pilipenko, V. A.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J. Y.

    2015-01-01

    In response to interplanetary (IP) shocks, magnetic field may decrease/increase (negative/positive response) in nightside magnetosphere, while at high latitudes on the ground it has two-phase bipolar variations: preliminary impulse and main impulse (MI). Using global MHD simulations, we investigate the linkage between the MI phase variation on the ground and the magnetospheric negative response to an IP shock. It is revealed that although the two phenomena occur at largely separated locations, they are physically related and form a response chain. The velocity disturbances near the flanks of the magnetopause cause the magnetic field to decrease, resulting in a dynamo which thus powers the transient field-aligned currents (FACs). These FACs further generate a pair of ionospheric current vortex, leading to MI variations on the ground. Therefore, we report here the intrinsic physically related chain response of the magnetospheric and ground magnetic field to IP shocks, and thus link the magnetospheric sudden impulse (SI) and ground SI together.

  13. Self-similar evolution of interplanetary magnetic clouds and Ulysses measurements of the polytropic index inside the cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osherovich, Vladimir A.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Berdichevsky, D.

    1997-01-01

    A self similar model for the expanding flux rope is developed for a magnetohydrodynamic model of interplanetary magnetic clouds. It is suggested that the dependence of the maximum magnetic field on the distance from the sun and the polytropic index gamma has the form B = r exp (-1/gamma), and that the ratio of the electron temperature to the proton temperature increases with distance from the sun. It is deduced that ion acoustic waves should be observed in the cloud. Both predictions were confirmed by Ulysses observations of a 1993 magnetic cloud. Measurements of gamma inside the cloud demonstrate sensitivity to the internal topology of the magnetic field in the cloud.

  14. Yearly Comparison of Magnetic Cloud Parameters, Sunspot Number, and Interplanetary Quantities for the First 18 Years of the Wind Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Wu, C.-C.; Berdichevsky, D. B.

    2015-02-01

    In the scalar part of this study, we determine various statistical relationships between estimated magnetic cloud (MC) model fit-parameters and sunspot number (SSN) for the interval defined by the Wind mission, i.e., early 1995 until the end of 2012, all in terms of yearly averages. The MC-fitting model used is that of Lepping, Jones, and Burlaga ( J. Geophys. Res. 95, 11957 - 11965, 1990). We also statistically compare the MC fit-parameters and other derived MC quantities [ e.g., axial magnetic flux (ΦO) and total axial current density ( J O)] with some associated ambient interplanetary quantities (including the interplanetary magnetic field ( B IMF), proton number density ( N P), and others). Some of the main findings are that the minimum SSN is nearly simultaneous with the minimum in the number of MCs per year ( N MC), which occurs in 2008. There are various fluctuations in N MC and the MC model-fit quality ( Q') throughout the mission, but the last four years (2009 - 2012) are markedly different from the others; Q' is low and N MC is large over these four years. N MC is especially large for 2012. The linear correlation coefficient (c.c.≈0.75) between the SSN and each of the three quantities J O, MC diameter (2 R O), and B IMF, is moderately high, but none of the MC parameters track the SSN well in the sense defined in this article. However, there is good statistical tracking among the following: MC axial field, B IMF, 2 R O, average MC speed ( V MC), and yearly average solar wind speed ( V SW) with relatively high c.c.s among most of these. From the start of the mission until late 2005, J O gradually increases, with a slight violation in 2003, but then a dramatic decrease (by more than a factor of five) occurs to an almost steady and low value of ≈ 3 μA km-2 until the end of the interval of interest, i.e., lasting for at least seven years. This tends to split the overall 18-year interval into two phases with a separator at

  15. Stable motions of charged dust grains subject to solar wind, Poynting-Robertson drag, and the mean interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhotka, Christoph; Bourdin, Philippe; Narita, Yasuhito

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the combined effect of solar wind, Poynting-Robertson drag, and the frozen-in interplanetary magnetic field on the motion of charged dust grains in our solar system. It is generally accepted that the combined effects of solar wind and photon absorption and re-emmision (Poynting-Robertson drag) lead to a decrease in semi-major axis on secular time scales. On the contrary, we demonstrate that the interplanetary magnetic field may counteract these drag forces under certain circumstances. We derive a simple relation between the parameters of the magnetic field, the physical properties of the dust grain as well as the shape and orientation of the orbital ellipse of the particle, which is a necessary conditions for the stabilization in semi-major axis.

  16. Improving the predictions of solar wind speed and interplanetary magnetic field at the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Tham

    2009-09-01

    The Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model, an advanced version of the potential field source surface (PFSS) model, is widely used to predict the solar wind speed (SWS) and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) polarities at the Earth. The results, however, do not always match the observations. To improve the predictive capability of this model we made the following changes: (1) We used the high resolution magnetograms produced by the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observer (SOHO) spacecraft. We properly calibrated the magnetic field strength of the MDI observations using the Mt. Wilson (MWO) FeI magnetograms so that each MDI level 1.8 magnetogram can be converted to the same basis as the saturation-corrected long-duration MWO Fel magnetogram. (2) The WSA model requires a map of full solar surface magnetic field, and traditionally a synoptic chart is used. However, the synoptic chart does not represent the full solar surface at a particular time. Therefore, we suggest to use a new format called heliospheric (or snapshot) map in the model. (3) We implement a better estimate of the polar field that is not observable during some part of the year due to the solar tilted angle B0. The magnetic field near the solar poles is very important because it may be the dominant part of the solar magnetic field far away from the Sun, especially during the period of solar minimum. (4) The WSA model assumes that the solar photospheric magnetic field is nearly radial, so that its radial component can be obtained directly from the line-of-sight (LOS) of the observed field. This approach produces very strong radial magnetic field near the solar poles. We solve this problem by first obtaining the spherical harmonic coefficients directly from the LOS magnetic data and then reconstructing the radial magnetic chart. (5) Finally, changing the radius of the source surface, rss, in the PFSS analysis strongly affects the predicted SWS and IMF at the Earth. Our

  17. Large-scale variations of the interplanetary magnetic field: Voyager 1 and 2 observations between 1-5 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Lepping, R. P.; Behannon, K. W.; Klein, L. W.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1981-01-01

    Observations by the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft of the interplanetary magnetic field between 1 and 5 AU were used to investigate the large scale structure of the IMF in a period of increasing solar activity. The Voyager spacecraft found notable deviations from the Parker axial model. These deviations are attributed both to temporal variations associated with increasing solar activity, and to the effects of fluctuations of the field in the radial direction. The amplitude of the latter fluctuations were found to be large relative to the magnitude of the radial field component itself beyond approximately 3 AU. Both Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 observed decreases with increasing heliocentric distance in the amplitude of transverse fluctuations in the averaged field strength (B) which are consistent with the presence of predominantly undamped Alfven waves in the solar wind, although and necessarily implying the presence of them. Fluctuations in the strength of B (relative to mean field strength) were found to be small in amplitude, with a RMS which is approximately one third of that for the transverse fluctuations and they are essentially independent of distance from the Sun.

  18. Search for Persistent Quasi-Periodicities in the Solar and Interplanetary Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, J. K.; Cadavid, A. C.; Ruzmaikin, A.

    2007-12-01

    Previous analysis of the radial component of the interplanetary magnetic field from 1962 - 1998 has revealed a dominant frequency of 27.03 days to 0.02 day accuracy (Neugebauer, et al., 2000). We have repeated and extended this analysis with OMNI data from 1963 - 2007 obtained from the Coordinated Heliospheric Observations (COHO) database. Over this longer data string we find that the 27.03 day Lomb-Scargle periodogram peak is reduced while two side peaks near 26.8 days and 27.6 days become almost as strong. In the interval 1999-2007 there are two dominant periods near 26.5 days and 27.2 days. As a solar counterpart to the above analysis we have searched for persistent rotation periods near 27 days of global patterns of photospheric magnetic fields derived from Wilcox Solar Observatory synoptic Carrington rotation maps. Techniques applied include, principal components analysis, independent component analysis, singular spectrum analysis, wavelet spectral analysis, and complex demodulation. We find a variety of quasi- periodicities between 26 and 29 days that remain coherent for 1 - 2 years. In the southern solar hemisphere the strongest periodicity is at 28.2 days, while in the northern hemisphere it is around 26.5 days. Neugebauer, M., Smith, Smith, E.J., Ruzmaikin, A., Feynman, J., Vaughan, A.H. 2000, J. Geophys. Res., 106, A5, 8363.

  19. Enhanced Thermospheric Density: The Roles of East-West and Northward Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipp, D. J.; Drake, K. A.; Lei, J.; Crowley, G.

    2009-12-01

    During 2005 solar EUV energy input to the thermosphere waned as Solar Cycle 23 declined. The reduction allowed a clearer delineation of episodic density disturbances caused by geomagnetic storms. We show new views of these disturbances based on Poynting flux calculations from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F-series satellites, as well as from 1) accelerometer data from polar orbiting satellites, 2) the assimilative mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics (AMIE) procedure and 3) the Thermospheric Ionospheric Electrodynamic General Circulation Model (TIEGCM). The new Poynting flux estimates and TIEGCM results allow us to trace the origins of disturbances that are poorly specified by ground indices. In particular we find that intervals of enhanced northward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) combined with strong east-west components of the IMF allow significant electromagnetic energy input into localized dayside regions of the high-latitude thermosphere. In some cases this energy deposition is consistent with IMF-geomagnetic field merging tailward of the Earth’s magnetic cusps. In other cases the energy is deposited in the vicinity of an extremely narrow convection throat. This mode of interaction provides little energy to the magnetotail; and instead concentrates the energy in the dayside thermosphere. We discuss the solar cycle variability of this type of interaction. as well as compare the relative value of Poynting flux and particle energy deposition for such events.

  20. Excitation of dayside chorus waves due to magnetic field line compression in response to interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen; Li, Wen; Thorne, Richard M.; Bortnik, Jacob; Ma, Qianli; An, Xin; Zhang, Xiao-jia; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Ni, Binbin; Gu, Xudong; Fu, Song; Zhao, Zhengyu

    2015-10-01

    The excitation of magnetospheric whistler-mode chorus in response to interplanetary (IP) shocks is investigated using wave data from the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) spacecraft. As an example, we show a typical chorus wave excitation following an IP shock event that was observed by THEMIS in the postnoon sector near the magnetopause on 3 August 2010. We then analyze characteristic changes during this event and perform a survey of similar events during the period 2008-2014 using the THEMIS and OMNI data set. Our statistical analysis demonstrates that the chorus wave excitation/intensification in response to IP shocks occurs only at high L shells (L > 8) on the dayside. We analyzed the variations of magnetic curvature following the arrival of the IP shock and found that IP shocks lead to more homogeneous background magnetic field configurations in the near-equatorial dayside magnetosphere; and therefore, the threshold of nonlinear chorus wave growth is likely to be reduced, favoring chorus wave generation. Our results provide the observational evidence to support the concept that the geomagnetic field line configuration plays a key role in the excitation of dayside chorus.

  1. Penetration of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field B(sub y) into Earth's Plasma Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hau, L.-N.; Erickson, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    There has been considerable recent interest in the relationship between the cross-tail magnetic field component B(sub y) and tail dynamics. The purpose of this paper is to give an overall description of the penetration of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B(sub y) into the near-Earth plasma sheet. We show that plasma sheet B(sub y) may be generated by the differential shear motion of field lines and enhanced by flux tube compression. The latter mechanism leads to a B(sub y) analogue of the pressure-balance inconsistency as flux tubes move from the far tail toward the Earth. The growth of B(sub y), however, may be limited by the dawn-dusk asymmetry in the shear velocity as a result of plasma sheet tilting. B(sub y) penetration into the plasma sheet implies field-aligned currents flowing between hemispheres. These currents together with the IMF B(sub y) related mantle field-aligned currents effectively shield the lobe from the IMF B(sub y).

  2. Sharp Trapping Boundaries in the Random Walk of Interplanetary Magnetic Field Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffolo, D.; Chuychai, P.; Meechai, J.; Pongkitiwanichkul, P.; Kimpraphan, N.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Rowlands, G.

    2004-05-01

    Although magnetic field lines in space are believed to undergo a diffusive random walk in the long-distance limit, observed dropouts of solar energetic particles, as well as computer simulations, indicate sharply defined filaments in which interplanetary magnetic field lines have been temporarily trapped. We identify mechanisms that can explain such sharp boundaries in the framework of 2D+slab turbulence, a model that provides a good explanation of solar wind turbulence spectra and the parallel transport of solar energetic particles. Local trapping boundaries (LTBs) are empirically defined as trajectories of 2D turbulence where the mean 2D field is a local maximum. In computer simulations, the filaments (or ``islands'' in the two dimensions perpendicular to the mean field) that are most resistant to slab diffusion correspond closely to the mathematically defined LTBs, that is, there is a mathematical prescription for defining the trapping regions. Furthermore, we provide computational evidence and a theoretical explanation that strong 2D turbulence can inhibit diffusion due to the slab component. Therefore, while these filaments are basically defined by the small-scale topology of 2D turbulence, there can be sharp trapping boundaries where the 2D field is strongest. This work was supported by the Thailand Research Fund, the Rachadapisek Sompoj Fund of Chulalongkorn University, and NASA Grant NAG5-11603. G.R. thanks Mahidol University for its hospitality and the Thailand Commission for Higher Education for travel support.

  3. Dependence of efficiency of magnetic storm generation on the types of interplanetary drivers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolaev, Yuri; Nikolaeva, Nadezhda; Lodkina, Irina

    2015-04-01

    To compare the coupling coefficients between the solar-wind electric field Ey and Dst (and corrected Dst*) index during the magnetic storms generated by different types of interplanetary drivers, we use the Kyoto Dst-index data, the OMNI data of solar wind plasma and magnetic field measurements, and our "Catalog of large scale phenomena during 1976-2000" (published in [1] and presented on websites: ftp://ftp.iki.rssi.ru/pub/omni/). Both indexes at the main phase of magnetic storms are approximated by the linear dependence on the following solar wind parameters: integrated electric field of solar wind (sumEy), solar wind dynamic pressure (Pd), and the level of magnetic field fluctuations (sB), and the fitting coefficients are determined by the technique of least squares. We present the results of the main phase modelling for magnetic storms with Dst<-50 nT induced by 4 types of the solar wind streams: MC (10 events), CIR (41), Sheath (26), Ejecta (45). Our analysis [2, 3] shows that the coefficients of coupling between Dst and Dst* indexes and integral electric field are significantly higher for Sheath (for Dst*and Dst they are -3.4 and -3.3 nT/V m-1 h, respectively) and CIR (-3.0 and -2.8) than for MC (-2.0 and -2.5) and Ejecta (-2.1 and -2.3). Thus we obtained additional confirmation of experimental fact that Sheath and CIR have higher efficiency in generation of magnetic storms than MC and Ejecta. This work was supported by the RFBR, project 13-02-00158a, and by the Program 9 of Presidium of Russian Academy of Sciences. References 1. Yu. I. Yermolaev, N. S. Nikolaeva, I. G. Lodkina, and M. Yu. Yermolaev, Catalog of Large-Scale Solar Wind Phenomena during 1976-2000, Cosmic Research, 2009, Vol. 47, No. 2, pp. 81-94. 2. N.S. Nikolaeva, Yu.I. Yermolaev, I.G. Lodkina, Modeling of Dst-index temporal profile on the main phase of the magnetic storms generated by different types of solar wind, Cosmic Research, 2013, Vol. 51, No. 6, pp. 401-412 3. Nikolaeva N.S., Yermolaev

  4. Observations of Particle Acceleration Associated with Small-Scale Magnetic Islands Downstream of Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, Olga V.; Zank, Gary P.; Li, Gang; Malandraki, Olga E.; le Roux, Jakobus A.; Webb, Gary M.

    2016-04-01

    We have recently shown both theoretically (Zank et al. 2014, 2015; le Roux et al. 2015) and observationally (Khabarova et al. 2015) that dynamical small-scale magnetic islands play a significant role in local particle acceleration in the supersonic solar wind. We discuss here observational evidence for particle acceleration at shock waves that is enhanced by the recently proposed mechanism of particle energization by both island contraction and the reconnection electric field generated in merging or contracting magnetic islands downstream of the shocks (Zank et al. 2014, 2015; le Roux et al. 2015). Both observations and simulations suppose formation of magnetic islands in the turbulent wake of heliospheric or interplanetary shocks (ISs) (Turner et al. 2013; Karimabadi et al. 2014; Chasapis et al. 2015). A combination of the DSA mechanism with acceleration by magnetic island dynamics explain why the spectra of energetic particles that are supposed to be accelerated at heliospheric shocks are sometimes harder than predicted by DSA theory (Zank et al. 2015). Moreover, such an approach allows us to explain and describe other unusual behaviour of accelerated particles, such as when energetic particle flux intensity peaks are observed downstream of heliospheric shocks instead of peaking directly at the shock according to DSA theory. Zank et al. (2015) predicted the peak location to be behind the heliospheric termination shock (HTS) and showed that the distance from the shock to the peak depends on particle energy, which is in agreement with Voyager 2 observations. Similar particle behaviour is observed near strong ISs in the outer heliosphere as observed by Voyager 2. Observations show that heliospheric shocks are accompanied by current sheets, and that IS crossings always coincide with sharp changes in the IMF azimuthal angle and the IMF strength, which is typical for strong current sheets. The presence of current sheets in the vicinity of ISs acts to magnetically

  5. Wavelet detection of coherent structures in interplanetary magnetic flux ropes and its role in the intermittent turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, P. R.; Chian, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    We implement a method to detect coherent magnetic structures using the Haar discrete wavelet transform (Salem et al., ApJ 702, 537, 2009), and apply it to an event detected by Cluster at the turbulent boundary layer of an interplanetary magnetic flux rope. The wavelet method is able to detect magnetic coherent structures and extract main features of solar wind intermittent turbulence, such as the power spectral density and the scaling exponent of structure functions. Chian and Muñoz (ApJL 733, L34, 2011) investigated the relation between current sheets, turbulence, and magnetic reconnections at the leading edge of an interplanetary coronal mass ejection measured by Cluster upstream of the Earth's bow shock on 2005 January 21. We found observational evidence of two magnetically reconnected current sheets in the vicinity of a front magnetic cloud boundary layer, where the scaling exponent of structure functions of magnetic fluctuations exhibits multifractal behavior. Using the wavelet technique, we show that the current sheets associated to magnetic reconnection are part of the set of magnetic coherent structures responsible for multifractality. By removing them using a filtering criteria, it is possible to recover a self-similar scaling exponent predicted for homogeneous turbulence. Finally, we discuss an extension of the wavelet technique to study coherent structures in two-dimensional solar magnetograms.

  6. Dependence of the location of the Martian magnetic lobes on the interplanetary magnetic field direction: Observations from Mars Global Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanelli, N.; Bertucci, C.; Gómez, D.; Mazelle, C.

    2015-09-01

    We use magnetometer data from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft during portions of the premapping orbits of the mission to study the variability of the Martian-induced magnetotail as a function of the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The time spent by MGS in the magnetotail lobes during periods with positive solar wind flow-aligned IMF component B∥IMF suggests that their location as well as the position of the central polarity reversal layer (PRL) are displaced in the direction antiparallel to the IMF cross-flow component B⊥IMF. Analogously, in the cases where B∥IMF is negative, the lobes are displaced in the direction of B⊥IMF. This behavior is compatible with a previously published analytical model of the IMF draping, where for the first time, the displacement of a complementary reversal layer (denoted as IPRL for inverse polarity reversal layer) is deduced from first principles.

  7. Correlated particle and magnetic field observations of a large-scale magnetic loop structure behind an interplanetary shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanderson, T. R.; Marsden, R. G.; Reinhard, R.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Smith, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    From a survey of observations on ISEE-3, an example of correlated particle and magnetic field observations of a large-scale magnetic loop structure is presented. Bidirectional proton fluxes were observed for a period of 40 hours in the energy range 35-1600 keV approximately 12 hours after the passage of the interplanetary shock of December 11, 1980, and directly after the passage of a discontinuity. For each of the eight logarithmically spaced energy channels, a three-dimensional anisotropy analysis reveals streaming along both directions of the magnetic field. The magnetic field rotated slowly but steadily through approximately 180 deg during this same 40-hour period; this is consistent with the existence of a large-scale loop with extent greater than 0.5 AU. The observations suggest that the particles are being injected into the loop sunward of the spacecraft; they appear as bidirectional fluxes in the outermost regions of the loop arising from a combination of focusing and near scatter-free transport.

  8. Twenty years of interplanetary magnetic field variations with periods in the range of 10 days to 3 years

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, A.; Lepping, R.P.; King, J.H.

    1995-06-01

    Twenty years of interplanetary magnetic field data collected primarily by the IMP-8 spacecraft near Earth has been analyzed by a dynamic periodogram method in search of significant periodicities in the range of 10 days to 3 years. The method has the advantage of detecting variations with time in the periodicities besides determining the power and phase of the dominant variations. It has been found that the well known periodicities near 1 year and 27 days are strongly modulated by the solar cycle. Both of these periodicities are only detected during solar minimum. During solar maximum. a number of unusual variations are observed. Special emphasis will be placed on the recently reported 1.3 year variation in solar wind parameters besides periods in the interplanetary magnetic field near 51, 73 and 154 days. Correlations with solar wind plasma and solar index variations will also be presented.

  9. Twenty years of interplanetary magnetic field variations with periods in the range of 10 days to 3 years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, A.; Lepping, R. P.; King, J. H.

    1995-01-01

    Twenty years of interplanetary magnetic field data collected primarily by the IMP-8 spacecraft near Earth has been analyzed by a dynamic periodogram method in search of significant periodicities in the range of 10 days to 3 years. The method has the advantage of detecting variations with time in the periodicities besides determining the power and phase of the dominant variations. It has been found that the well known periodicities near 1 year and 27 days are strongly modulated by the solar cycle. Both of these periodicities are only detected during solar minimum. During solar maximum. a number of unusual variations are observed. Special emphasis will be placed on the recently reported 1.3 year variation in solar wind parameters besides periods in the interplanetary magnetic field near 51, 73 and 154 days. Correlations with solar wind plasma and solar index variations will also be presented.

  10. Collisions in Space: Observations of Disturbances in the Interplanetary Magnetic Field Caused by Destructive Collisions of Small Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, H. R.; Russell, C. T.; Delzanno, G. L.; Jia, Y. D.

    2011-10-01

    Collisions between small interplanetary bodies can produce clouds of dust particles, which rapidly become charged in the solar wind plasma. A wide range of particle sizes will be produced and the smallest nanoscale particles can be accelerated to solar wind speed in minutes. Our multi-fluid MHD simulation with charged dust as one fluid shows a three-dimensional disturbance in the magnetic field with compression and draping in the flow direction and bending in the direction perpendicular to both the flow and unperturbed magnetic field, producing a current sheet orthogonal to the flow. The Lorentz force of this current balances the transverse momentum of the gyrating dust particles and the solar gravity force balances the magnetic pressure gradient force. Thus the magnetic gradient force is proportional to the mass of the picked up dust and allows us to weigh the dust cloud. The magnetic field behavior in the simulation results qualitatively resembles the phenomenon called an interplanetary field enhancement (IFE), which is featured by a cuspshaped magnetic field enhancement lasting from several minutes to hours, with a sharp discontinuity in at least one component of the magnetic field. The association between IFE appearance and dust production was first inferred from PVO data in the 1980s, but the IFE formation process has been unclear until now. In this paper, we will gather the statistics of IFEs and use the magnetic compression to weigh the mass of the dust cloud. We will also estimate the volume over which individual events may be sensed. Using this volume together with the IFE occurrence rate we can calculate the inferred collision rate. We find for the IFE with mass about 107 kg, this rate approximately agrees with the estimated rate of collision of interplanetary bodies which can produce dust within the same mass range.

  11. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of the Earth's Magnetotail Response to the Interplanetary Magnetic Field Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauer, Paulo Ricardo; Echer, Ezequiel; Alves, Maria Virginia

    In the present work, a study of the dynamical response of the macroscopic parameters, den-sity, pressure, and velocity, of the Earth's magnetotail, was carried out. The goal of this work was to study the variation of such parameters as a response to the different topologies of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) present in some of the geoeffective solar wind magnetic structures. We used Magnetohydrodynamic simulation in order to approach this problem. The bi-dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic code was originally developed by Ogino et al. (1986), being restricted to the formation of the terrestrial magnetosphere with a stationary IMF. After we performed the necessary modifications in the original code, the magnetospheric dynamics was observed. Based on that, we investigated the response of the different regions of the magne-tosphere (specially the magnetotail) to different IMF conditions. Four different configurations of the IMF were analyzed when interacting with the Earth's magnetosphere. Among these different topologies, one could find a representative for a positive shock, i.e, a shock with a pos-itive Bz , another for a negative shock, i.e, a shock with a negative Bz , an idealized HILDCAA event with a Bz squared fluctuation similar to an Alfvénic one, and, finally, a structure similar to a Magnetic Cloud. The considered changes in the IMF configuration favored the observation of different physical processes. Among these processes, it was possible to observe the forma-tion of the Near-Earth Neutral Line for the IMF configuration representative of a negative Bz (negative shock). Furthermore, a plasmoid release was observed, which is associated with one of the most dynamics phenomena in the terrestrial magnetosphere: the substorm.

  12. The distant magnetotail's response to a strong interplanetary magnetic field By - Twisting, flattening, and field line bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Siscoe, G. L.; Slavin, J. A.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Lepping, R. P.

    1985-01-01

    During an interval of strong interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By, while ISEE 3 was in the distant magnetotail, the north lobe was observed south of the ecliptic plane. Lobe field lines were strongly bent in the direction of the IMF, and a dense boundary layer plasma was observed. During the interval, magnetopause normals pointed in the z direction, although ISEE 3 was near the dawnside ecliptic plane. The observations are interpreted in terms of field line bending within a twisted and flattened magnetotail.

  13. The IDV Index: Its Derivation and Use in Inferring Long-Term Variations of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field Strength

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-13

    day solar A preliminary report of our results has been published minimum interval examined, Mayaud was "astonished" elsewhere [Svalgaard et al, 2003... 2020 Figure 7. Inferred (reconstructed) near-Earth interplanetary magnetic field strength, B since 1872 (blue curve). Before 1890 (light blue), B is...IDV) P(sqr (ql ()) B(obs) B(guess) 0 1870 1880 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 Figure 9. Variation of yearly

  14. Saturn's dayside ultraviolet auroras: Evidence for morphological dependence on the direction of the upstream interplanetary magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, C J; Alexeev, I I; Badman, S V; Belenkaya, E S; Cowley, S W H; Dougherty, M K; Kalegaev, V V; Lewis, G R; Nichols, J D

    2014-01-01

    We examine a unique data set from seven Hubble Space Telescope (HST) “visits” that imaged Saturn's northern dayside ultraviolet emissions exhibiting usual circumpolar “auroral oval” morphologies, during which Cassini measured the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) upstream of Saturn's bow shock over intervals of several hours. The auroras generally consist of a dawn arc extending toward noon centered near ∼15° colatitude, together with intermittent patchy forms at ∼10° colatitude and poleward thereof, located between noon and dusk. The dawn arc is a persistent feature, but exhibits variations in position, width, and intensity, which have no clear relationship with the concurrent IMF. However, the patchy postnoon auroras are found to relate to the (suitably lagged and averaged) IMF Bz, being present during all four visits with positive Bz and absent during all three visits with negative Bz. The most continuous such forms occur in the case of strongest positive Bz. These results suggest that the postnoon forms are associated with reconnection and open flux production at Saturn's magnetopause, related to the similarly interpreted bifurcated auroral arc structures previously observed in this local time sector in Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph data, whose details remain unresolved in these HST images. One of the intervals with negative IMF Bz however exhibits a prenoon patch of very high latitude emission extending poleward of the dawn arc to the magnetic/spin pole, suggestive of the occurrence of lobe reconnection. Overall, these data provide evidence of significant IMF dependence in the morphology of Saturn's dayside auroras. Key Points We examine seven cases of joint HST Saturn auroral images and Cassini IMF data The persistent but variable dawn arc shows no obvious IMF dependence Patchy postnoon auroras are present for northward IMF but not for southward IMF PMID:26167441

  15. The relation of variations in total magnetic field at high latitude with the parameters of the interplanetary magnetic field and with DP2 fluctuations. [using OGO -3-C, and -4 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    The maximum disturbances from the positive and negative regions of delta B (Bp and Bn, respectively) are investigated with respect to their correlation with (1) the average N-S component, Bz, (2) the average angle with respect to the solar magnetospheric equatorial plane, theta (3) the variance, sigma sub i, and (4) the magnitude, Bi, of the interplanetary magnetic field. These quantities were averaged over a period, T, ranging from 20 min. to 8 hours prior to the measurement of Bp or Bn. Variations (i.e., disturbances) in total magnetic field magnitude were studied utilizing data from the Polar Orbiting Geophysical Observatory satellites (OGO 2, 4, and 6), unofficially referred to as POGO.

  16. Propagation and Evolution of Interplanetary Magnetic Clouds: Global Simulations and Comparisons with Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, P.; Ben-Nun, M.; Linker, J.; Torok, T.; Lionello, R.; Downs, C.

    2014-12-01

    In this talk, we explore the evolution of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), and fast magnetic clouds (MCs) in particular. We address three specific issues. First, What are the large-scale forces acting on ejecta as they travel from the Sun to 1 AU through a realistic ambient solar wind, and how does they affect the large-scale structure of the event? Second, what are the dominant waves/shocks associated with fast ICMEs? And third, how are the properties of ICMEs different during cycle 24 than during the previous cycle? To accomplish these objectives, we employ a variety of numerical approaches, including global resistive MHD models that incorporate realistic energy transport processes. We also compare and contrast model results with both remote solar and in-situ measurements of ICMEs at 1 AU and elsewhere, including the so-called ``Bastille Day'' event of July 14, 2000, and the more recent ``extreme ICME'' observed by STEREO-A on July 23, 2012.

  17. Discrete time--frequency coupling between the interplanetary magnetic field and the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, D. J.; Lessard, M. R.

    2003-12-01

    Recent work has shown the existence at geosynchronous orbit of wave power at frequencies substantially below that of fundamental field-line resonances. The existence of spectral power below that of fundamental frequencies indicates that the driver must be external to the magnetosphere, i.e, that the source is contained in the solar wind. Other work has shown that frequencies matching field-line resonances can sometimes also be observed in the solar wind. The combined spectrum that includes power at fundamental frequencies and lower overlaps with p-mode helioseismic oscillations and the question has been raised whether these helioseismic modes may stimulate the magnetospheric fluctuations. In this study, we compute coherences between the magnetometers on {ACE} and {GOES-10}, that is in interplanetary space and inside the magnetosphere. These show several frequencies where all nine coherences are significant. Moreover, many of these frequencies are the same as those reported from Ulysses data in Thomson, Maclennan, and Lanzerotti (1995). Using hourly average data from all 1999, a frequency tolerance of 30 nHz, and retaining only peaks in the coherence above the 95% significance level, about 21 agreements would be expected by chance but 34 are observed. The coherences exhibit seasonal dependence, so the coupling has a complicated time--frequency structure exhibiting both frequency and event dependence.

  18. Interplanetary magnetic field control of mantle precipitation and associated field-aligned currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Dingan; Kivelson, Margaret G.; Walker, Ray J.; Newell, Patrick T.; Meng, C.-I.

    1995-01-01

    Dayside reconnection, which is particularly effective for a southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), allows magnetosheath particles to enter the magnetosphere where they form the plasma mantle. The motions of the reconnected flux tube produce convective flows in the ionosphere. It is known that the convection patterns in the polar cap are skewed to the dawnside for a positive IMF B(sub y) (or duskside for a negative IMF B(sub y)) in the northern polar cap. Correspondingly, one would expect to find asymmetric distributions of mantle particle precipitation, but previous results have been unclear. In this paper the correlation between B(sub y) and the distribution of mantle particle precipitation is studied for steady IMF conditions with southward IMF. Ion and electron data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F6 and F7 satellites are used to identify the mantle region and IMP 8 is used as a solar wind monitor to characterize the IMF. We study the local time extension of mantle precipitation in the prenoon and postnoon regions. We find that, in accordance with theoretical expectations for a positive (negative) IMF B(sub y), mantle particle precipitation mainly appears in the prenoon region of the northern (southern) hemisphere. The mantle particle precipitation can extend to as early as 0600 magnetic local time (MLT) in the prenoon region but extends over a smaller local time region in the postnoon sector (we did not find mantle plasma beyond 1600 MLT in our data set although coverage is scant in this area). Magnetometer data from F7 are used to determine whether part of the region 1 current flows on open field lines. We find that at times part of the region 1 sense current extends into the region of mantle particle precipitation, and is therefore on open field lines. In other cases, region 1 currents are absent on open field lines. Most of the observed features can be readily interpreted in terms of the open magnetosphere model.

  19. The relation between the azimuthal component of the interplanetary magnetic field and the geomagnetic field in the polar caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svalgaard, L.

    1973-01-01

    The recently discovered relation between the azimuthal component of the interplanetary magnetic field and magnetic variations in the earth's polar caps is reviewed. When the IMF azimuthal component is positive (typical of an interplanetary sector with magnetic field directed away from the sun) geomagnetic perturbations directed away from the earth are observed within 8 deg from the corrected geomagnetic pole. When the IMF azimuthal component is negative (typically within toward sectors) the geomagnetic perturbations are directed towards the earth at both poles. These perturbations can also be described by an equivalent current flowing at a constant magnetic latitude of 80 - 82 deg clockwise around the magnetic poles during toward sectors and counterclockwise during away sectors. This current fluctuates in magnitude and direction with the azimuthal component of the IMF, with a delay time of the order of 20 minutes. The importance of this effect for understanding of both solar magnetism and magnetospheric physics is stressed in view of the possibility for investigating the solar sector structure during the last five sunspot cycles.

  20. Superconducting magnets and mission strategies for protection from ionizing radiation in interplanetary manned missions and interplanetary habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spillantini, Piero

    2011-05-01

    First order evaluations for active shielding based on superconducting magnetic lenses were made in the past in ESA supported studies. The present increasing interest of permanent space complexes, to be considered in the far future as 'bases' rather than 'stations', located in 'deep' space (as it has been proposed for the L1 libration's point between Earth and Moon, or for Stations in orbit around Mars), requires that this preliminary activity continues, envisaging the problem of the protection from cosmic ray (CR) action at a scale allowing long permanence in 'deep' space, not only for a relatively small number of dedicated astronauts but also to citizens conducting there 'normal' activities. Part of the personnel of such a 'deep space base' should stay and work there for a long period of time. It is proposed that the activities and life of these personnel will be concentrated in a sector protected from Galactic CR (GCR) during the whole duration of their mission. In the exceptional case of an intense flux of Solar Energetic Protons (SEP), this sector could be of use as a shelter for all the other personnel normally located in other sectors of the Space Base. The realization of the magnetic protection of the long permanence sector by well-established current materials and techniques is in principle possible, but not workable in practice for the huge required mass of the superconductor, the too low operating temperature (10-15 K) and the corresponding required cooling power and thermal shielding. However the fast progress in the production of reliable High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) or MgB 2 cables and of cryocoolers suitable for space operation opens the perspective of practicable solutions. In fact these cables, when used at relatively low temperature, but in any case higher than for NbTi and Nb 3Sn, show a thermodynamically much better behavior. Quantitative evaluations for the protection of the sector of the 'Space Base' to be protected from GCRs (and

  1. MAGNETIC FIELD-LINE LENGTHS IN INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS INFERRED FROM ENERGETIC ELECTRON EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kahler, S. W.; Haggerty, D. K.; Richardson, I. G.

    2011-08-01

    About one quarter of the observed interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are characterized by enhanced magnetic fields that smoothly rotate in direction over timescales of about 10-50 hr. These ICMEs have the appearance of magnetic flux ropes and are known as 'magnetic clouds' (MCs). The total lengths of MC field lines can be determined using solar energetic particles of known speeds when the solar release times and the 1 AU onset times of the particles are known. A recent examination of about 30 near-relativistic (NR) electron events in and near 8 MCs showed no obvious indication that the field-line lengths were longest near the MC boundaries and shortest at the MC axes or outside the MCs, contrary to the expectations for a flux rope. Here we use the impulsive beamed NR electron events observed with the Electron Proton and Alpha Monitor instrument on the Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft and type III radio bursts observed on the Wind spacecraft to determine the field-line lengths inside ICMEs included in the catalog of Richardson and Cane. In particular, we extend this technique to ICMEs that are not MCs and compare the field-line lengths inside MCs and non-MC ICMEs with those in the ambient solar wind outside the ICMEs. No significant differences of field-line lengths are found among MCs, ICMEs, and the ambient solar wind. The estimated number of ICME field-line turns is generally smaller than those deduced for flux-rope model fits to MCs. We also find cases in which the electron injections occur in solar active regions (ARs) distant from the source ARs of the ICMEs, supporting CME models that require extensive coronal magnetic reconnection with surrounding fields. The field-line lengths are found to be statistically longer for the NR electron events classified as ramps and interpreted as shock injections somewhat delayed from the type III bursts. The path lengths of the remaining spike and pulse electron events are compared with model calculations

  2. Magnetic Field-Line Lengths in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections Inferred from Energetic Electron Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Haggerty, D. K.; Richardson, I. G.

    2011-01-01

    About one quarter of the observed interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are characterized by enhanced magnetic fields that smoothly rotate in direction over timescales of about 10-50 hr. These ICMEs have the appearance of magnetic flux ropes and are known as "magnetic clouds" (MCs). The total lengths of MC field lines can be determined using solar energetic particles of known speeds when the solar release times and the I AU onset times of the particles are known. A recent examination of about 30 near-relativistic (NR) electron events in and near 8 MCs showed no obvious indication that the field-line lengths were longest near the MC boundaries and shortest at the MC axes or outside the MCs, contrary to the expectations for a flux rope. Here we use the impulsive beamed NR electron events observed with the Electron Proton and Alpha Monitor instrument on the Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft and type III radio bursts observed on the Wind spacecraft to determine the field-line lengths inside ICMEs included in the catalog of Richardson & Cane. In particular, we extend this technique to ICMEs that are not MCs and compare the field-line lengths inside MCs and non-MC ICMEs with those in the ambient solar wind outside the ICMEs. No significant differences of field-line lengths are found among MCs, ICMEs, and the ambient solar wind. The estimated number of ICME field-line turns is generally smaller than those deduced for flux-rope model fits to MCs. We also find cases in which the electron injections occur in solar active regions CARs) distant from the source ARs of the ICMEs, supporting CME models that require extensive coronal magnetic reconnection with surrounding fields. The field-line lengths are found to be statistically longer for the NR electron events classified as ramps and interpreted as shock injections somewhat delayed from the type III bursts. The path lengths of the remaining spike and pulse electron events are compared with model calculations of

  3. Parametric study of the solar wind interaction with the Hermean magnetosphere for a weak interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, J.; Pantellini, F.; Moncuquet, M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to simulate the interaction of the solar wind with the Hermean magnetosphere when the interplanetary magnetic field is weak, performing a parametric study for all the range of hydrodynamic values of the solar wind predicted on Mercury for the ENLIL + GONG WSA + Cone SWRC model: density from 12 to 180 cm-3, velocity from 200 to 500 km/s and temperatures from 2 ·104 to 18 ·104 K, and compare the results with a real MESSENGER orbit as reference case. We use the code PLUTO in spherical coordinates and an asymmetric multipolar expansion for the Hermean magnetic field. The study shows for all simulations a stand off distance larger than the Mercury radius and the presence of close magnetic field lines on the day side of the planet, so the dynamic pressure of the solar wind is not high enough to push the magnetopause on the planet surface if the interplanetary magnetic field is weak. The simulations with large dynamic pressure lead to a large compression of the Hermean magnetic field modifying its topology in the inner magnetosphere as well as the plasma flows from the magnetosheath towards the planet surface.

  4. Ground magnetic response to sudden changes in the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitar, Robert John

    1999-12-01

    Most, if not all, of the early research on impulsive magnetic events at high latitudes focused on first identifying the events in ground magnetic recordings and then examining the solar wind properties in search of a common link between different events. The results of these types of studies were often inconclusive and open to debate. The work presented here attacks the problem from the opposite point of view, namely by identifying changes within the solar wind and then examining the resulting ground magnetic signatures. This is accomplished using a combination of ground-based magnetic measurements from arrays of magnetometers located in Greenland and IMP 8 satellite measurements of the solar wind velocity, density, and magnetic field orientation. The study of solar wind dynamic pressure changes uses data collected by the IMP 8 satellite during 1991 and 1992 and focuses on step changes in dynamic pressure of |Dp|>2 nPa occurring on a timescale of Dt<15 min. It has been observed that the ground response does not consistently conform to existing theoretical models of field-aligned currents generated by changes in dynamic pressure. No explicit dependence on interplanetary magnetic field orientation (IMF) has been found. The relationship between IMF orientation changes and magnetic impulse events is highlighted by a case study of an IMF orientation change occurring on July 24, 1996. The effects of the IMF orientation change are observed in ground magnetometer data, incoherent scatter radar measurements, and auroral ultraviolet emissions. It is believed the ground observations result from the interaction of a hot flow anomaly with the magnetopause. These observations are the first of their kind and provide a mechanism to tie an IMF orientation change into the existing theory that traveling convection vortices result from a deformation of the magnetopause. The study of IMF orientation changes uses data from the IMP 8 satellite collected between 1992 and 1995. We have

  5. Solar Sources and Geospace Consequences of Interplanetary Magnetic Clouds Observed During Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Michalek, G.; Lepping, R. P.

    2007-01-01

    We present results of a statistical investigation of 99 magnetic clouds (MCs) observed during 1995-2005. The MC-associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are faster and wider on the average and originate within +/-30deg from the solar disk center. The solar sources of MCs also followed the butterfly diagram. The correlation between the magnetic field strength and speed of MCs was found to be valid over a much wider range of speeds. The number of south-north (SN) MCs was dominant and decreased with solar cycle, while the number of north-south (NS) MCs increased confirming the odd-cycle behavior. Two-thirds of MCs were geoeffective; the Dst index was highly correlated with speed and magnetic field in MCs as well as their product. Many (55%) fully northward (FN) MCs were geoeffective solely due to their sheaths. The non-geoeffective MCs were slower (average speed approx. 382 km/s), had a weaker southward magnetic field (average approx. -5.2nT), and occurred mostly during the rise phase of the solar activity cycle.

  6. An Alternative Interpretation of the Relationship between the Inferred Open Solar Flux and the Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Pete

    2007-01-01

    Photospheric observations at the Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) represent an uninterrupted data set of 32 years and are therefore unique for modeling variations in the magnetic structure of the corona and inner heliosphere over three solar cycles. For many years, modelers have applied a latitudinal correction factor to these data, believing that it provided a better estimate of the line-of-sight magnetic field. Its application was defended by arguing that the computed open flux matched observations of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) significantly better than the original WSO correction factor. However, no physically based argument could be made for its use. In this Letter we explore the implications of using the constant correction factor on the value and variation of the computed open solar flux and its relationship to the measured IMF. We find that it does not match the measured IMF at 1 AU except at and surrounding solar minimum. However, we argue that interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) may provide sufficient additional magnetic flux to the extent that a remarkably good match is found between the sum of the computed open flux and inferred ICME flux and the measured flux at 1 AU. If further substantiated, the implications of this interpretation may be significant, including a better understanding of the structure and strength of the coronal field and I N providing constraints for theories of field line transport in the corona, the modulation of galactic cosmic rays, and even possibly terrestrial climate effects.

  7. Observations of the interplanetary magnetic field between 0.46 and 1 A.U. by the Mariner 10 spacecraft. Ph.D. Thesis - Catholic Univ. of Am.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behannon, K. W.

    1976-01-01

    Almost continuous measurement of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) at a sampling rate of 25 vectors/sec was performed by the magnetic field experiment onboard the Mariner 10 spacecraft during the period November 3, 1973 to April 14, 1974, comprising approximately 5-2/3 solar rotations and extending in radial distance from the sun from 1 to 0.46 AU. A clearly discernible two-sector pattern of field polarity was observed during the last 3-1/2 months of the period, with the dominant polarity toward the sun below the solar equatorial plane. Two compound high-speed solar wind streams were also present during this period, one in each magnetic field sector. Relative fluctuations of the field in magnitude and direction were found to have large time variations, but on average the relative magnitude fluctuations were approximately constant over the range of heliocentric distance covered while the relative directional fluctuations showed a slight decrease on average with increasing distance. The occurrence rate of directional discontinuities was also found to decrease with increasing radial distance from the sun.

  8. A Robust Method to Predict the Near-Sun and Interplanetary Magnetic Field Strength of Coronal Mass Ejections: Parametric and Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsourakos, Spiros; Georgoulis, Manolis K.

    2016-07-01

    Predicting the near-Sun, and particularly the Interplanetary (IP), magnetic field structure of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and interplanetary counterparts (ICMEs) is a topic of intense research activity. This is because Earth-directed CMEs with strong southward magnetic fields are responsible for the most powerful geomagnetic storms. We have recently developed a simple two-tier method to predict the magnetic field strength of CMEs in the outer corona and in the IP medium, using as input the magnetic-helicity budget of the source solar active region and stereoscopic coronagraphic observations. Near-Sun CME magnetic fields are obtained by utilizing the principle of magnetic helicity conservation of flux-rope CMEs for coronagraphic observations. Interplanetary propagation of the inferred values is achieved by employing power-law prescriptions of the radial evolution of the CME-ICME magnetic fields. We hereby present a parametric study of our method, based on the observed statistics of input parameters, to infer the anticipated range of values for the near-Sun and interplanetary CME-ICME magnetic fields. This analysis is complemented by application of our method to several well-observed major CME-ICME events.

  9. Interplanetary medium data book, supplement, 1975 - 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    Since the issurance of the Interplanetary Medium Data Book (NSSDC/WDC-A-R&S 77-04, 1977) which contains plots and listings of hourly average interplanetary field and plasma parameters covering the period November 27, 1963 through December 30, 1975, additional data are available which fill some 1975 data gaps and which extend the data coverage well into 1978. This supplement contains all the presently available data for the years 1975-1978, Interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) data are from the IMP 8 triaxial fluxgate magnetometer experiment. Derived plasma parameters are form the IMP 7 and IMP 8 instruments. Some of the early 1975 IMF data are from a HEOS 1 experiment.

  10. Interplanetary Charged Dust Magnetic Clouds Striking the Magnetosphere: Coordinated Space-based and Ground-based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Chi, Peter; Lai, Hairong

    In general, asteroids, meteoroids and dust do not interact with the plasma structures in the solar system, but after a collision between fast moving bodies the debris cloud contains nanoscale dust particles that are charged and behave like heavy ions. Dusty magnetic clouds are then accelerated to the solar wind speed. While they pose no threat to spacecraft because of the particle size, the coherency imposed by the magnetization of the cloud allows the cloud to interact with the Earth’s magnetosphere as well as the plasma in the immediate vicinity of the cloud. We call these clouds Interplanetary Field Enhancements (IFEs). These IFEs are a unique class of interplanetary field structures that feature cusp-shaped increases and decreases in the interplanetary magnetic field and a thin current sheet. The occurrence of IFEs is attributed to the interaction between the solar wind and dust particles produced in inter-bolide collisions. Previous spacecraft observations have confirmed that IFEs move with the solar wind. When IFEs strike the magnetosphere, they may distort the magnetosphere in several possible ways, such as producing a small indentation, a large scale compression, or a glancing blow. In any event if the IFE is slowed by the magnetosphere, the compression of the Earth’s field should be seen in the ground-based magnetic records that are continuously recorded. Thus it is important to understand the magnetospheric response to IFE arrival. In this study, we investigate the IFE structure observed by spacecraft upstream of the magnetosphere and the induced magnetic field perturbations observed by networks of ground magnetometers, including the THEMIS, CARISMA, McMAC arrays in North America and the IMAGE array in Europe. We find that, in a well-observed IFE event on December 24, 2006, all ground magnetometer stations observed an impulse at approximately 1217 UT when the IFE was expected to arrive at the Earth’s magnetopause. These ground stations spread across

  11. Predicting the near-Sun and Interplanetary Magnetic Field of CMEs using photospheric magnetograms and coronagraph images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsourakos, Spiros; Georgoulis, Manolis

    2016-04-01

    Earth-directed Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) containing a strong southward magnetic-field component upon arrival at 1 AU statistically account for the most powerful geomagnetic storms. Unfortunately, though, we currently lack routine diagnostics of the magnetic field of CMEs and its evolution in the inner heliosphere and the interplanetary (IP) medium. We hereby present a simple, yet powerful and easy-to-implement, method to deduce the near-Sun and IP magnetic field entrained in CMEs, by using photospheric magnetograms of the solar source regions and multi-viewpoint coronagraph images of the corresponding CMEs. The method relies on the principle of magnetic-helicity conservation in low plasma-beta, flux-rope CMEs and a power-law prescription of the radial evolution of the CME magnetic field in the IP medium. We outline a parametric study based on the observed statistics of input parameters to calculate a matrix of magnetic-field solutions for 10000 synthetic CMEs. The robustness and possible limitations / ramifications of the method are deduced by a comparison with the distributions of the predicted CME-ICME magnetic fields at 0.3 and 1 AU using actual Messenger and ACE published observations.

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation of interplanetary propagation of multiple coronal mass ejections with internal magnetic flux rope (SUSANOO-CME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiota, D.; Kataoka, R.

    2016-02-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most important drivers of various types of space weather disturbance. Here we report a newly developed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of the solar wind, including a series of multiple CMEs with internal spheromak-type magnetic fields. First, the polarity of the spheromak magnetic field is set as determined automatically according to the Hale-Nicholson law and the chirality law of Bothmer and Schwenn. The MHD simulation is therefore capable of predicting the time profile of the southward interplanetary magnetic field at the Earth, in relation to the passage of a magnetic cloud within a CME. This profile is the most important parameter for space weather forecasts of magnetic storms. In order to evaluate the current ability of our simulation, we demonstrate a test case: the propagation and interaction process of multiple CMEs associated with the highly complex active region NOAA 10486 in October to November 2003, and present the result of a simulation of the solar wind parameters at the Earth during the 2003 Halloween storms. We succeeded in reproducing the arrival at the Earth's position of a large amount of southward magnetic flux, which is capable of causing an intense magnetic storm. We find that the observed complex time profile of the solar wind parameters at the Earth could be reasonably well understood by the interaction of a few specific CMEs.

  13. The Fraction of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections That Are Magnetic Clouds: Evidence for a Solar Cycle Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    2004-01-01

    "Magnetic clouds" (MCs) are a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) characterized by enhanced magnetic fields with an organized rotation in direction, and low plasma beta. Though intensely studied, MCs only constitute a fraction of all the ICMEs that are detected in the solar wind. A comprehensive survey of ICMEs in the near- Earth solar wind during the ascending, maximum and early declining phases of solar cycle 23 in 1996 - 2003 shows that the MC fraction varies with the phase of the solar cycle, from approximately 100% (though with low statistics) at solar minimum to approximately 15% at solar maximum. A similar trend is evident in near-Earth observations during solar cycles 20 - 21, while Helios 1/2 spacecraft observations at 0.3 - 1.0 AU show a weaker trend and larger MC fraction.

  14. Magnetopause shape as a bivariate function of interplanetary magnetic field B{sub z} and solar wind dynamic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Roelof, E.C.; Sibeck, D.G.

    1993-12-01

    The authors present a new method for determining the shape of the magnetopause as a bivariate function of the hourly averaged solar wind dynamic pressure (p) and the north-south component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B{sub z}. They represent the magnetopause (for X{sub GSE}>{minus}40R{sub E}) as an ellipsoid of revolution in solar-wind-aberrated coordinates and express the (p, B{sub z}) dependence of each of the three ellipsoid parameters as a second-order (6-term) bivariate expansion in lnp and B{sub z}. The authors define 12 overlapping bins in a normalized dimensionless (p,B{sub z}) {open_quotes}control space{close_quotes} and fit an ellipsoid to those magnetopause crossings having (p,B{sub z}) values within each bin. They also calculate the bivariate (lnp, B{sub z}) moments to second order over each bin in control space. They can then calculate the six control-space expansion coefficients for each of the three ellipsoid parameters in configuration space. From these coefficients they can derive useful diagnostics of the magnetopause shape as joint functions of p and B{sub z}: the aspect ratio of the ellipsoid`s minor-to-major axes the flank distance radius of curvature, and flaring angle (at X{sub GSE}=0); and the subsolar distance and radius of curvature. The authors confirm and quantify previous results that during periods of southward B{sub z} the subsolar magnetopause moves inward, while at X{sub GSE}=0 the flank magnetopause moves outward and the flaring angle increases. These changes are most pronounced during periods of low pressure, wherein all have a dependence on B{sub z} that is stronger and functionally different for B{sub z} southward as compared to B{sub z} northward. In contrast, all these changes are much less sensitive to IMF B{sub z} at the highest pressures. 44 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. An Examination of Directional Discontinuities and Magnetic Polarity Changes around Interplanetary Sector Boundaries Using E > 2 keV Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Lin, R. P.

    1995-10-01

    Past studies of interplanetary magnetic sector boundaries have been based on the assumption that one can determine the field polarities by comparing the field directions with those of the nominal Parker spiral angles. Previous investigators have found evidence for decreases of ∣B∣, the magnitude of the magnetic fieldB, and increases of Θ, the angle betweenB and the ecliptic plane, at sector boundaries. Others have argued that the characteristic thickness of sector boundaries exceeds that of tangential discontinuities, making sector boundaries a separate class of structures. We use a simple technique for inferring the polarities of interplanetary magnetic fields based on the assumption thatE > 2 keV electrons are always flowing along the magnetic field away from the Sun. Electron data from the UC Berkeley experiment on the ISEE-3 spacecraft are used to examine periods around several apparent sector boundaries in 1978 and 1979. We compare properties of (a) boundaries with field polarity changes and (b) large-angle (ω > 60°) directional discontinuities with no field polarity changes. We find no significant differences between the sector boundaries and the directional discontinuities in terms of associated decreases in ∣B∣ or of values of Θ. These results suggest no significant difference between sector boundaries and directional discontinuities other than the change in field polarities. Within limited statistics we find that about half the polarity changes would not have been identified using a requirement thatω > 90° and that half of theω > 120° discontinuities would have been misidentified as polarity changes.

  16. The determination of interplanetary magnetic field polarities around sector boundaries using E greater than 2 keV electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S.; Lin, R. P.

    1994-01-01

    The determination of the polarities of interplanetary magnetic fields (whether the field direction is outward from or inward toward the sun) has been based on a comparison of observed field directions with the nominal Parker spiral angle. These polarities can be mapped back to the solar source field polarities. This technique fails when field directions deviate substantially from the Parker angle or when fields are substantially kinked. We introduce a simple new technique to determine the polarities of interplanetary fields using E greater than 2 keV interplanetary electrons which stream along field lines away from the sun. Those electrons usually show distinct unidirectional pitch-angle anisotropies either parallel or anti-parallel to the field. Since the electron flow direction is known to be outward from the sun, the anisotropies parallel to the field indicate outward-pointing, positive-polarity fields, and those anti-parallel indicate inward-pointing, negative-polarity fields. We use data from the UC Berkeley electron experiment on the International Sun Earth Explorer 3 (ISSE-3) spacecraft to compare the field polarities deduced from the electron data, Pe (outward or inward), with the polarities inferred from field directions, Pd, around two sector boundaries in 1979. We show examples of large (greater than 100 deg) changes in azimuthal field direction Phi over short (less than 1 hr) time scales, some with and some without reversals in Pe. The latter cases indicate that such large directional changes can occur in unipolar structures. On the other hand, we found an example of a change in Pe during which the rotation in Phi was less than 30 deg, indicating polarity changes in nearly unidirectional structures. The field directions are poor guides to the polarities in these cases.

  17. Magnetospheric convection on the presence of interplanetary magnetic gield B{sub y}: A conceptual model and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Khurana, K.K.; Walker, R.J.; Ogino, Tatsuki

    1996-03-01

    Existing observations from ISEE 3 and new observations from Galileo show that when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) has a B{sub y} component, a B{sub y} component also develops in the Earth`s magnetotail, but only in those quadrants in which the addition of the newly opened magnetic flux tubes occurs. The presence of B{sub y} on the closed field lines (which is in the same direction as the IMF B{sub y}) is also seen. The authors suggest that for a positive IMF B{sub y}, the magnetopause is open only in the north dawn and south dusk quadrants of the magnetotail. The continuity of magnetic field across the open boundary then requires that a B{sub y} component be present in the magnetosphere in these quadrants but not in the other two quadrants. They present a model of the magnetospheric convection that postulates cross-tail flows in the mantle/lobe system and the plasma sheet. They suggest that shear flows between the northern and southern halves of the plasma sheet generate a B{sub y} component on the closed magnetic field lines. The model is consistent with the two cell ionospheric convection models constructed from electric field observations by Heppner and Maynard. Results from global MHD simulations confirm the main features of the proposed model. 34 refs., 13 fig.

  18. A data-driven coupled modeling approach to predicting the magnetic structure of interplanetary coronal mass ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomoell, Jens; Kilpua, Emilia; Isavnin, Alexey; Palmerio, Erika; Lumme, Erkka

    2016-04-01

    Unraveling the formation and evolution of coronal mass ejections from the Sun to the Earth remains one of the outstanding goals in current solar-terrestrial physics and space weather research. In this work, we present our data-driven modeling principle designed to tackle specifically the question of predicting the magnetic structure of interplanetary coronal mass ejections. Our modeling paradigm consists of three components: a) a data-driven non-potential model of the coronal magnetic field up to 2.5 RSun fed by a time-sequence of vector magnetograms b) a versatile flux rope magnetic field model c) a three-dimensional MHD model that computes self-consistently the dynamics in the inner heliosphere from 0.1 AU up to the orbit of Mars (Euhforia). The key feature of our approach is to employ a flux rope model in Euhforia whose parameters are determined solely through data-driven modeling. While the time-dependent kinematics and morphology of the flux rope are fitted using EUV and coronagraph observations, the magnetic parameters are directly obtained from the data-driven coronal model. In addition to presenting the modeling scheme, we showcase results of the modeling using well-observed case studies and comparisons with in-situ observations. Finally, we discuss future horizons for our model.

  19. Galactic Cosmic Ray Intensity Response to Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections/Magnetic Clouds in 1995-2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    2011-01-01

    We summarize the response of the galactic cosmic ray (CGR) intensity to the passage of the more than 300 interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and their associated shocks that passed the Earth during 1995-2009, a period that encompasses the whole of Solar Cycle 23. In approx.80% of cases, the GCR intensity decreased during the passage of these structures, i.e., a "Forbush decrease" occurred, while in approx.10% there was no significant change. In the remaining cases, the GCR intensity increased. Where there was an intensity decrease, minimum intensity was observed inside the ICME in approx.90% of these events. The observations confirm the role of both post-shock regions and ICMEs in the generation of these decreases, consistent with many previous studies, but contrary to the conclusion of Reames, Kahler, and Tylka (Astrophys. 1. Lett. 700, L199, 2009) who, from examining a subset of ICMEs with flux-rope-like magnetic fields (magnetic clouds) argued that these are "open structures" that allow free access of particles including GCRs to their interior. In fact, we find that magnetic clouds are more likely to participate in the deepest GCR decreases than ICMEs that are not magnetic clouds.

  20. About the Las Acacias, Trelew and Vassouras Magnetic Observatories Monitoring the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly Region Response to an Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianibelli, J. C.; Quaglino, N. M.

    2007-05-01

    The South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly (SAMA) Region presents evolutive characteristics very important as were observed by a variety of satelital sensors. Important Magnetic Observatories with digital record monitor the effects of the Sun-Earth interaction, such as San Juan de Puerto Rico (SJG), Kourou (KOU), Vassouras (VSS), Las Acacias (LAS), Trelew (TRW), Vernadsky (AIA), Hermanus (HER) and Huancayo (HUA). In the present work we present the features registered during the geomagnetic storm in January 21, 2005, produced by a geoeffective Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) whose Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME) was detected by the instrumental onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) Sonde. We analize how the Magnetic Total Intensity records at VSS, TRW and LAS Observatories shows the effect of the entering particles to ionospherical dephts producing a field enhancement following the first Interplanetary Shock (IP) arrival of the ICME. This process manifest in the digital record as an increment over the magnetospheric Ring Current field effect and superinpossed effects over the Antarctic Auroral Electrojet. The analysis and comparison of the records demonstrate that the Ring Current effects are important in SJG and KOU but not in VSS, LAS and TRW observatories, concluding that SAMA region shows a enhancement of the ionospherical currents oposed to those generated at magnetospheric heighs. Moreover in TRW, 5 hours after the ICME shock arrival, shows the effect of the Antarctic Auroral Electrojet counteracting to fields generated by the Ring Current.

  1. Weighted averages of magnetization from magnetic field measurements: A fast interpretation tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedi, Maurizio

    2003-08-01

    Magnetic anomalies may be interpreted in terms of weighted averages of magnetization (WAM) by a simple transformation. The WAM transformation consists of dividing at each measurement point the experimental magnetic field by a normalizing field, computed from a source volume with a homogeneous unit-magnetization. The transformation yields a straightforward link among source and field position vectors. A main WAM outcome is that sources at different depths appear well discriminated. Due to the symmetry of the problem, the higher the considered field altitude, the deeper the sources outlined by the transformation. This is shown for single and multi-source synthetic cases as well as for real data. We analyze the real case of Mt. Vulture volcano (Southern Italy), where the related anomaly strongly interferes with that from deep intrusive sources. The volcanic edifice is well identified. The deep source is estimated at about 9 km depth, in agreement with other results.

  2. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  3. High average power magnetic modulator for metal vapor lasers

    DOEpatents

    Ball, Don G.; Birx, Daniel L.; Cook, Edward G.; Miller, John L.

    1994-01-01

    A three-stage magnetic modulator utilizing magnetic pulse compression designed to provide a 60 kV pulse to a copper vapor laser at a 4.5 kHz repetition rate is disclosed. This modulator operates at 34 kW input power. The circuit includes a step up auto transformer and utilizes a rod and plate stack construction technique to achieve a high packing factor.

  4. Interplanetary magnetic field connection to the sun during electron heat flux dropouts in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Kahler, S. W.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses observations of 2- to 8.5-keV electrons, made by measurements aboard the ISEE 3 spacecraft during the periods of heat flux decreases (HFDs) reported by McComas et al. (1989). In at least eight of the total of 25 HFDs observed, strong streaming of electrons that were equal to or greater than 2 keV outward from the sun was recorded. In one HFD, an impulsive solar electron event was observed with an associated type III radio burst, which could be tracked from the sun to about 1 AU. It is concluded that, in many HFDs, the interplanetary field is still connected to the sun and that some energy-dependent process may produce HFDs without significantly perturbing electrons of higher energies.

  5. Solar wind polytropic index estimates based on single spacecraft plasma and interplanetary magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartalev, M.; Dryer, M.; Grigorov, K.; Stoimenova, E.

    2006-10-01

    We propose an approach for estimating the polytropic index in the solar wind. This is an artificially introduced parameter simplifying essentially the gasdynamic or magnetogasdynamic modeling of the interplanetary plasma. The problem in the straightforward utilization of the polytropic equation is to find sufficient homogeneous fragments of the solar wind flow, observed by single spacecraft only, where the application of this polytropic equation is correct. We propose an algorithm for following the plasma data time series to ensure the separation of data segments that belong, with high probability, to the same plasma flow flux tube. A linear regression model between logarithms of plasma density and temperature within such a segment provides an estimate for the polytropic index. Some preliminary applications of the algorithm to real data from spacecraft crossings of different solar wind structures are performed for the Bastille event of 14-16 July 2000.

  6. A global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the magnetosphere when the interplanetary magnetic field is southward: The onset of magnetotail reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.J.; Raeder, J.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Ogino, Tatsuki

    1993-10-01

    The authors have used a new high-resolution global magnetohydrodynamic simulation model to investigate the onset of reconnection in the magnetotail during intervals with southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). After the southward IMF reaches the dayside magnetopause, reconnection begins and magnetic flux is convected into the tail lobes. After about 35 min, reconnection begins within the plasma sheet near midnight at x = 14R{sub E}. Later the x line moves toward dawn and dusk. The reconnection occurs just tailward of the region where the tail attaches onto the dipole-dominated inner magnetosphere. The simulation shows that prior to the onset of reconnection, the Poynting flux is concentrated in this region. The time required for the start of reconnection depends on the component of the magnetic field normal to the equator (B{sub z}). Reconnection occurs only after the B{sub z} component has been reduced sufficiently for the tearing mode to grow. Later, when all the plasma sheet field lines have reconnected, a plasmoid moves down the tail. 63 refs., 15 figs.

  7. Solar and interplanetary signatures of declining of solar magnetic fields: Implications to the next solar cycle 25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisoi, Susanta Kumar; Janardhan, P.; Ananthakrishnan, S.; Tokumaru, M.; Fujiki, K.

    2015-08-01

    Our detailed study of solar surface magnetic fields at high-latitudes, using magnetic synoptic magnetograms of NSO/Kitt Peak observatory from 1975-2014, has shown a steady decline of the field strength since mid-1990's until mid-2014, i.e. the solar maximum of cycle 24. We also found that magnetic field strength at high-latitudes declines after each solar cycle maximum, and since cycle 24 is already past its peak implies that solar surface magnetic fields will be continuing to decline until solar minimum of cycle 24. In addition, interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements of solar wind micro-turbulence levels, from Solar and Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STEL), Japan, have also shown a steady decline in sync with the declining surface fields. Even the heliospheric magnetic fields (HMF) at 1 AU have been declined much below the previously proposed floor level of HMF of ~4.6 nT. From study of a correlation between the high-latitude surface fields and the HMF at the last four solar minima we found a floor value of HMF of ~3.2 nT. Using the above correlation and the fact that the high-latitude surface fields is expected to decline until the minimum of cycle 24, we estimate the value of the HMF at the minimum of cycle 24 will be 3.8 ± 0.2 nT and the peak sunspot number for solar cycle 25 will be 56±12 suggesting a weak sunspot activity to be continued in cycle 25 too.

  8. Strategies to Forecasting Space Weather Events from Uncovering and Predicting Patterns of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field Inside Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, Jorg-Micha; Elliott, H. A.

    The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) inside coronal mass ejections (CME) is a major factor in controlling terrestrial space weather events. Our ability to model, and thus predict, CME propagation is constantly improving. However, our ability to predict the detailed and relevant magnetic structure inside CMEs is not necessarily following behind at the same rate. Nev-ertheless, it is highly desirable to predict the IMF structure at the L1 point on intermediate timescales up to half a day ahead of time. In this presentation, we discuss how pattern recog-nition of at solar wind IMF data at the L1 point could be part of a forecast system for the IMF and terrestrial space weather events on these intermediate time scales. Our approach is to clas-sify the temporal patterns of the IMF inside CMEs at relevant time scales by classifying solar wind time series segments of various lengths using Kohonen Self-Organizing Maps. We present how these networks view the time history of CMEs passing over the L1 point. We discuss how this classification of temporal patterns can be used in predicting the future temporal develop-ment of the solar wind IMF in CMEs. Ultimately, our approach is geared towards enabling the development of a probability-driven space weather forecasting approach that combines at a minimum L1 in situ and solar remote observations, but is also open to (and very likely will require) model-based techniques.

  9. Radiation shielding of astronauts in interplanetary flights: the CREAM surveyor to Mars and the magnetic lens system for a spaceship.

    PubMed

    Spillantini, P; Taccetti, F; Papini, P; Rossi, L; Casolino, M

    2001-01-01

    The radiation absorbed by astronauts during interplanetary flights is mainly due to cosmic rays of solar origin (SCR). In the most powerful solar flares the dose absorbed in few hours can exceed that cumulated in one year of exposition to the galactic component of cosmic rays (GCR). At energies above the minimum one needed to cross the walls of the spaceship there are extrapolations and guesses, but no data, on the angular distribution of SCR's, an information that is necessary for establishing whatever defence strategy. It was therefore proposed of sending to Mars a measurement device, that should continuously collect data during the travel, and possibly also in the orbit around Mars and on the Mars surface. The device should identify the particle and privilege the completeness in the measurement of its parameters. In fact the high energy electrons travel at speed of the light and could be used in the and future dangerous proton component. Also the much less abundant but individually more dangerous ions should be identified. The device should indeed include a magnetic spectrometer and a high granularity range telescope, and a good time of flight measurement. ASI is supporting an assessment study of a possible mission of such a device on board of the 2005 probe to Mars. A parallel technical study is also in progress to define the workable techniques and the possible configurations of a system of magnetic lenses for protecting the crew of a spaceship.

  10. A deployable high temperature superconducting coil (DHTSC) - A novel concept for producing magnetic shields against both solar flare and Galactic radiation during manned interplanetary missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocks, F. Hadley

    1991-01-01

    The discovery of materials which are superconducting above 100 K makes possible the use of superconducting coils deployed beyong the hull of an interplanetary spacecraft to produce a magnetic shield capable of giving protection not only against solar flare radiation, but also even against Galactic radiation. Such deployed coils can be of very large size and can thus achieve the great magnetic moments required using only relatively low currents. Deployable high-temperature-superconducting coil magnetic shields appear to offer very substantial reductions in mass and energy compared to other concepts and could readily provide the radiation protection needed for a Mars mission or space colonies.

  11. Space Environment of Mercury at the Time of the First MESSENGER Flyby: Solar Wind and Interplanetary Magnetic Field Modeling of Upstream Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    passed over the planet (and MESSENGER) several days prior to the flyby of Mercury with the highest-speed (600 km/s) stream features having been expected...when MESSENGER is in orbit around Mercury , the spacecraft will be within the magnetosphere and magnetotail of the planet for extended portions of...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Space environment of Mercury at the time of the first 3HESSENGER flyby: Solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field •Modeling

  12. Influences of the interplanetary magnetic field clock angle and cone angle on the field-aligned currents in the magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Z. W.; Shi, J. K.; Dunlop, M.; Liu, Z. X.

    2013-10-01

    The influences of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) cone angle θ and clock angle ϕ on the field-aligned currents (FACs) at the plasma sheet boundary layers (PSBLs) have been investigated using Cluster Data. The FAC occurrence increases monotonically with IMF cone angle and has two peaks at -90° and +110° clock angle, respectively. The peak at +110° is distinctly larger than that at -90°. Overall, there are more FACs between 0° < ϕ < 180°, indicating that FACs occurrence is closely associated with duskward IMF. More FACs occur when 90° < |ϕ| < 180°, implying that FAC is closely associated with southward IMF. The large FAC densities occur when 60° < |ϕ| < 120°. The density also has two peaks and the peak at +90° clock angle (duskward IMF) is larger than that at -90° (dawnward IMF). These results indicate that the IMF influence on the FACs is from all IMF components and not only from a single component.

  13. Filamentary field-aligned currents at the polar cap region during northward interplanetary magnetic field derived with the Swarm constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lühr, Hermann; Huang, Tao; Wing, Simon; Kervalishvili, Guram; Rauberg, Jan; Korth, Haje

    2016-10-01

    ESA's Swarm constellation mission makes it possible for the first time to determine field-aligned currents (FACs) in the ionosphere uniquely. In particular at high latitudes, the dual-satellite approach can reliably detect some FAC structures which are missed by the traditional single-satellite technique. These FAC events occur preferentially poleward of the auroral oval and during times of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation. Most events appear on the nightside. They are not related to the typical FAC structures poleward of the cusp, commonly termed NBZ. Simultaneously observed precipitating particle spectrograms and auroral images from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites are consistent with the detected FACs and indicate that they occur on closed field lines mostly adjacent to the auroral oval. We suggest that the FACs are associated with Sun-aligned filamentary auroral arcs. Here we introduce in an initial study features of the high-latitude FAC structures which have been observed during the early phase of the Swarm mission. A more systematic survey over longer times is required to fully characterize the so far undetected field aligned currents.

  14. Solar wind interaction effects on the magnetic fields around Mars: Consequences for interplanetary and crustal field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Ma, Y.-J.; Brain, D. A.; Ulusen, D.; Lillis, R. J.; Halekas, J. S.; Espley, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    The first unambiguous detections of the crustal remanent magnetic fields of Mars were obtained by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) during its initial orbits around Mars, which probed altitudes to within ∼110 km of the surface. However, the majority of its measurements were carried out around 400 km altitude, fixed 2 a.m. to 2 p.m. local time, mapping orbit. While the general character and planetary origins of the localized crustal fields were clearly revealed by the mapping survey data, their effects on the solar wind interaction could not be investigated in much detail because of the limited mapping orbit sampling. Previous analyses (Brain et al., 2006) of the field measurements on the dayside nevertheless provided an idea of the extent to which the interaction of the solar wind and planetary fields leads to non-ideal field draping at the mapping altitude. In this study we use numerical simulations of the global solar wind interaction with Mars as an aid to interpreting that observed non-ideal behavior. In addition, motivated by models for different interplanetary field orientations, we investigate the effects of induced and reconnected (planetary and external) fields on the Martian field's properties derived at the MGS mapping orbit altitude. The results suggest that inference of the planetary low order moments is compromised by their influence. In particular, the intrinsic dipole contribution may differ from that in the current models because the induced component is so dominant.

  15. Interplanetary magnetic field control of the Venus magnetosheath field and bow shock location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, J. L.; Luhmann, J. G.; Russell, C. T.; Alexander, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    Six Venus years of Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) data are analyzed in a coordinate system which isolates magnetic effects. The field draping pattern features two lobes easily identifiable even in the near planet region. The magnetosheath magnetic magnitude has a hemispherical asymmetry controlled by the IMF orientation in a manner suggesting preferrential ion pickup in one hemisphere. This result complements recent findings that the bow shock position is responsive to IMF direction. Examination of the ionopause position to evaluate ionospheric effects on the overall asymmetry of thfe Venus-solar wind interaction produces negative but not conclusive results.

  16. Turbulence in a Global Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of the Earth's Magnetosphere during Northward and Southward Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Alaoui, M.; Richard, R. L.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Walker, R. J.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of MHD simulations of Earth's magnetosphere for idealized steady solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. The simulations feature purely northward and southward magnetic fields and were designed to study turbulence in the magnetotail plasma sheet. We found that the power spectral densities (PSDs) for both northward and southward IMF had the characteristics of turbulent flow. In both cases, the PSDs showed the three scale ranges expected from theory: the energy-containing scale, the inertial range, and the dissipative range. The results were generally consistent with in-situ observations and theoretical predictions. While the two cases studied, northward and southward IMF, had some similar characteristics, there were significant differences as well. For southward IMF, localized reconnection was the main energy source for the turbulence. For northward IMF, remnant reconnection contributed to driving the turbulence. Boundary waves may also have contributed. In both cases, the PSD slopes had spatial distributions in the dissipative range that reflected the pattern of resistive dissipation. For southward IMF there was a trend toward steeper slopes in the dissipative range with distance down the tail. For northward IMF there was a marked dusk-dawn asymmetry with steeper slopes on the dusk side of the tail. The inertial scale PSDs had a dusk-dawn symmetry during the northward IMF interval with steeper slopes on the dawn side. This asymmetry was not found in the distribution of inertial range slopes for southward IMF. The inertial range PSD slopes were clustered around values close to the theoretical expectation for both northward and southward IMF. In the dissipative range, however, the slopes were broadly distributed and the median values were significantly different, consistent with a different distribution of resistivity.

  17. Field-Aligned Current Reconfiguration and Magnetospheric Response to an Impulse in the Interplanetary Magnetic Field BY Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder, F. D.; Eriksson, S.; Korth, H.; Hairston, M. R.; Baker, J. B.; Heinselman, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    When the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is dawnward or duskward, magnetic merging between the IMF and the geomagnetic field occurs near the cusp on the dayside flanks of the magnetosphere. During these intervals, flow channels in the ionosphere with velocities in excess of 2 km/s have been observed, which can deposit large amounts of energy into the high-latitude thermosphere. In this study, we analyze an interval on 5 April 2010 where there was a strong dawnward impulse in the IMF, followed by a gradual decay in IMF magnitude at constant clock angle. Data from the Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar and the DMSP spacecraft were used to investigate ionospheric convection during this interval, and data from the Active Magnetospheric and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) were used to investigate the associated Field-Aligned Current (FAC) system. Additionally, data from AMPERE were used to investigate the time response of the dawn-side FAC pair. We find there is a delay of approximately 1.25 hours between the arrival of the dawnward IMF impulse at the magnetopause and strength of the dawnward FAC pair, which is comparable to substorm growth and expansion time scales under southward IMF. Additionally, we find at the time of the peak FAC, there is evidence of a reconfiguring four-sheet FAC system in the morning local time sector of the ionosphere. Additionally, we find an inverse correlation between the dawn FAC strength and both the solar wind Alfvénic Mach number and the SYM-H index. No statistically significant correlation between the FAC strength and the solar wind dynamic pressure was found.

  18. Ring Current Decay During Northward Turnings of The Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monreal MacMahon, R.; Llop, C.; Miranda, R.

    The ring current formation and energization is thought to be the main consequence of geomagnetic storms and its strength is characterized by the Dst index which evolu- tion satisfies a simple and well-known differential equation introduced by Burton et al. (1975). Since then, several attempts and approaches have been done to study the evolution of the ring current whether introducing discrete values or continuous func- tions for the decay time involved. In this work, we study the character of the recovery phase of magnetic storms in response to well defined northward turnings of the inter- planetary magnetic field using our functional form of the decay time of ring current particles introduced previously.

  19. About possibility of primary cosmic rays proton acceleration up to super-high relativistic energies in the Neutral Layer of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaradze, Nodar; Vanishvili, George; Bakradze, Themur; Kordzadze, Lia; Elizbarashvili, Misha; Bazerashvili, Eka

    2013-02-01

    Theoretical considerations concerning of the charged particles acceleration in general, and in particular, the peculiarities of protons acceleration in the Neutral Layer of Cosmic Space, in the frame of Maxwell Electro-Magnetic Field Theory have been reviewed on the article. A brief historical review of events is given, indicating that protons can be speeding up to ultra-relativistic energies in the Neutral Layer of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field, which is affirmed by anomalously high number of cosmic μ-mesons, generated by protons, through the decay of π- and -mesons, have been discovered in lower layers of the Earth's Atmosphere, as well as in a great depths of underground

  20. Anomalous short-term increases in the galactic cosmic ray intensity: Are they related to the interplanetary magnetic cloud-like structures?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iucci, N.; Parisi, M.; Signorini, C.; Storini, M.; Villoresi, G.

    1985-01-01

    Thirty-one short-term increases (time duration 24 hours and amplitude up to 5%) in the galactic cosmic ray intensity, occurring inside Forbush decreases events, have been identified over the period 1966 - 1977. These increases are highly anisotropic and occur after the compression region following the shock; the interplanetary medium is characterized by intense ( 10 nT) and higly fluctuating magnetic field B, high velocity, low density and temperature (flare ejecta piston?). These B-fluctuations seem to be ordered variations which could be representative of magnetic clouds. Also the large cosmic ray increase occurring on 17-18 September 1979, belongs to this category of events.

  1. Variations of the ionospheric plasma concentration in the region of the main ionospheric trough during the magnetic storm of December 18-19, 1978, in connection with measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Gdalevich, G.L.; Afonin, V.V.; Eliseev, A.Y.; Kolomiitsev, O.P.; Ozerov, V.D.; Soboleva, T.N.

    1986-07-01

    Data from the Kosmos-900 satellite are used to examine variations of the ion concentration in the region of the main ionospheric trough at altitudes of about 500 km during the storm of December 18-19, 1978. These variations of ion densities are compared with the variations of the parameters of the interplanetary medium, in particular, with the E /sub y/ = -VB /sub z/ component of the interplanetary electric field. The results of the comparison are discussed. A scheme is proposed for the formation and motion of the trough during magnetic disturbances.

  2. Venus ionospheric tail rays - Spatial distributions and interplanetary magnetic field control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, M.; Luhmann, J. G.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Brace, L. H.

    1991-01-01

    The overall properties of Venus ionospheric tail rays (such as density, spatial extent, and distribution) and their relationship to the draped magnetic field configuration behind the planet were investigated using measurements obtained by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter Langmuir probe, a magnetometer, and a plasma-wave detector. The results suggest that tail rays are a normal feature of the steady solar wind interaction with Venus and are not generally associated with a central tail plasma sheet. The statistics of the tail rays occurrence point toward the existence of a distributed terminator ionosphere source, consistent with findings of Brace et al. (1990).

  3. The interplanetary magnetic field during solar cycle 21 ISEE-3/ICE observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Jungman, G.; Smith, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    Temporal variations in the IMF during solar cycle 21 are investigated using magnetic field observations collected by the vector helium magnetometer on the ISEE-3/ICE spacecraft. Analysis of the observations reveal that the IMF magnitude, which had declined to 4.7 nT in 1976, peaked in late 1982 (two years after solar maximum) at 9.0 nT and rapidly decreased during 1983-1984 to an intensity of 6.2 nT in early 1985. The IMF intensities are compared with the auroral AE index; the observed peak in strength during 1981-1983 is related to a 50 percent increase in substorm activity levels. A decrease in Parker spiral angle, revealing the existence of high-speed streams is detected in the declining phase of the solar cycle. Variations in the intensity of the IMF correlate with Mt. Wilson magnetograph measurements of full disk magnetic flux. Source regions for the evolution of solar wind and the IMF are proposed.

  4. Using Statistical Multivariable Models to Understand the Relationship Between Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejecta and Magnetic Flux Ropes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, P.; Richardson, I. G.

    2012-01-01

    In-situ measurements of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) display a wide range of properties. A distinct subset, "magnetic clouds" (MCs), are readily identifiable by a smooth rotation in an enhanced magnetic field, together with an unusually low solar wind proton temperature. In this study, we analyze Ulysses spacecraft measurements to systematically investigate five possible explanations for why some ICMEs are observed to be MCs and others are not: i) An observational selection effect; that is, all ICMEs do in fact contain MCs, but the trajectory of the spacecraft through the ICME determines whether the MC is actually encountered; ii) interactions of an erupting flux rope (PR) with itself or between neighboring FRs, which produce complex structures in which the coherent magnetic structure has been destroyed; iii) an evolutionary process, such as relaxation to a low plasma-beta state that leads to the formation of an MC; iv) the existence of two (or more) intrinsic initiation mechanisms, some of which produce MCs and some that do not; or v) MCs are just an easily identifiable limit in an otherwise corntinuous spectrum of structures. We apply quantitative statistical models to assess these ideas. In particular, we use the Akaike information criterion (AIC) to rank the candidate models and a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to uncover any intrinsic clustering of the data. Using a logistic regression, we find that plasma-beta, CME width, and the ratio O(sup 7) / O(sup 6) are the most significant predictor variables for the presence of an MC. Moreover, the propensity for an event to be identified as an MC decreases with heliocentric distance. These results tend to refute ideas ii) and iii). GMM clustering analysis further identifies three distinct groups of ICMEs; two of which match (at the 86% level) with events independently identified as MCs, and a third that matches with non-MCs (68 % overlap), Thus, idea v) is not supported. Choosing between ideas i) and

  5. Factors controlling degree of correlation between ISEE 1 and ISEE 3 interplanetary magnetic field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooker, N. U.; Siscoe, G. L.; Russell, C. T.; Smith, E. J.

    1982-01-01

    Correlation variability between ISEE 1 and 3 IMF measurements is investigated, and factors governing the variability are discussed. About 200 two-hour periods when correlation was good, and 200 when correlation was poor, are examined, and both IMF variance and spacecraft separation distance in the plane perpendicular to the earth-sun line exert substantial control. The scale size of magnetic features is larger when variance is high, and abrupt changes in the correlation coefficient from poor to good or good to poor in adjacent two-hour intervals appear to be governed by the sense of change of IMF variance and vice versa. During periods of low variance, good correlations are most likely to occur when the distance between ISEE 1 and 3 perpendicular to the IMF is less than 20 earth radii.

  6. Comparison of magnetic field observations of an average magnetic cloud with a simple force free model: the importance of field compression and expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Narock, T. W.; Chen, H.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate the ability of the cylindrically symmetric force-free magnetic cloud (MC) fitting model of Lepping et al. (1990) to faithfully reproduce actual magnetic field observations by examining two quantities: (1) a difference angle, called β, i.e., the angle between the direction of the observed magnetic field (Bobs) and the derived force free model field (Bmod) and (2) the difference in magnitudes between the observed and modeled fields, i.e., ΔB(=|Bobs|-|Bmod|), and a normalized ΔB (i.e., ΔB/) is also examined, all for a judiciously chosen set of 50 WIND interplanetary MCs, based on quality considerations. These three quantities are developed as a percent of MC duration and averaged over this set of MCs to obtain average profiles. It is found that, although <ΔB> and its normalize version are significantly enhanced (from a broad central average value) early in an average MC (and to a lesser extent also late in the MC), the angle <β> is small (less than 8°) and approximately constant all throughout the MC. The field intensity enhancements are due mainly to interaction of the MC with the surrounding solar wind plasma causing field compression at front and rear. For example, for a typical MC, ΔB/ is: 0.21±0.27 very early in the MC, -0.11±0.10 at the center (and -0.085±0.12 averaged over the full "central region," i.e., for 30% to 80% of duration), and 0.05±0.29 very late in the MC, showing a double sign change as we travel from front to center to back, in the MC. When individual MCs are examined we find that over 80% of them possess field enhancements within several to many hours of the front boundary, but only about 30% show such enhancements at their rear portions. The enhancement of the MC's front field is also due to MC expansion, but this is usually a lesser effect compared to compression. It is expected that this compression is manifested as significant distortion to the MC's cross-section from the ideal circle, first suggested by Crooker et

  7. Source Regions of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field and Variability in Heavy-Ion Elemental Composition in Gradual Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Tylka, Allan J.; Ng, Chee K.; Wang, Yi-Ming; Dietrich, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events are those in which ions are accelerated to their observed energies by interactions with a shock driven by a fast coronal mass-ejection (CME). Previous studies have shown that much of the observed event-to-event variability can be understood in terms of shock speed and evolution in the shock-normal angle. But an equally important factor, particularly for the elemental composition, is the origin of the suprathermal seed particles upon which the shock acts. To tackle this issue, we (1) use observed solar-wind speed, magnetograms, and the PFSS model to map the Sun-L1 interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) line back to its source region on the Sun at the time of the SEP observations; and (2) then look for correlation between SEP composition (as measured by Wind and ACE at approx. 2-30 MeV/nucleon) and characteristics of the identified IMF-source regions. The study is based on 24 SEP events, identified as a statistically-significant increase in approx. 20 MeV protons and occurring in 1998 and 2003-2006, when the rate of newly-emergent solar magnetic flux and CMEs was lower than in solar-maximum years and the field-line tracing is therefore more likely to be successful. We find that the gradual SEP Fe/O is correlated with the field strength at the IMF-source, with the largest enhancements occurring when the footpoint field is strong, due to the nearby presence of an active region. In these cases, other elemental ratios show a strong charge-to-mass (q/M) ordering, at least on average, similar to that found in impulsive events. These results lead us to suggest that magnetic reconnection in footpoint regions near active regions bias the heavy-ion composition of suprathermal seed ions by processes qualitatively similar to those that produce larger heavy-ion enhancements in impulsive SEP events. To address potential technical concerns about our analysis, we also discuss efforts to exclude impulsive SEP events from our event sample.

  8. INTERVALS OF RADIAL INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELDS AT 1 AU, THEIR ASSOCIATION WITH RAREFACTION REGIONS, AND THEIR APPARENT MAGNETIC FOOT POINTS AT THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Orlove, Steven T.; Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Schwadron, Nathan A.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Zhao Liang E-mail: Charles.Smith@unh.edu E-mail: N.Schwadron@unh.edu E-mail: thomasz@umich.edu

    2013-09-01

    We have examined 226 intervals of nearly radial interplanetary magnetic field orientations at 1 AU lasting in excess of 6 hr. They are found within rarefaction regions as are the previously reported high-latitude observations. We show that these rarefactions typically do not involve high-speed wind such as that seen by Ulysses at high latitudes during solar minimum. We have examined both the wind speeds and the thermal ion composition before, during and after the rarefaction in an effort to establish the source of the flow that leads to the formation of the rarefaction. We find that the bulk of the measurements, both fast- and slow-wind intervals, possess both wind speeds and thermal ion compositions that suggest they come from typical low-latitude sources that are nominally considered slow-wind sources. In other words, we find relatively little evidence of polar coronal hole sources even when we examine the faster wind ahead of the rarefaction regions. While this is in contrast to high-latitude observations, we argue that this is to be expected of low-latitude observations where polar coronal hole sources are less prevalent. As with the previous high-latitude observations, we contend that the best explanation for these periods of radial magnetic field is interchange reconnection between two sources of different wind speed.

  9. Hourly average values of solar wing parameters (flow rate and ion temperatures) according to data of measurements of the Venera-9 and Venera-10 automatic interplanetary stations on an Earth-Venus during the period June 1975 - April 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaysberg, O. L.; Dyachkov, A. V.; Smirnov, V. N.; Tsyrkin, K. B.; Isaeva, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    Four electrostatic analyzers with channel electron multipliers as detectors were used to measure solar wind ionic flow. The axes of the fields of vision of two of these analyzers were directed along the axis of the automatic interplanetary station, oriented towards the Sun, while the other two were turned in one plane at angles of +15 deg and -15 deg. The full hemisphere of the angular diagram of each analyzer was approximately 5 deg. The energetic resolution was approximately 6%, and the geometric energy was 0.002 sq cm ave. keV. Each analyzer covered an energetic range of approximately 10 in eight energetic intervals. Spectral distributions were processed in order to obtain the velocity and temperature of the protons. Tabular data show the hour interval (universal time) and the average solar wind velocity in kilometers per second.

  10. Heliocentric distance and temporal dependence of the interplanetary density-magnetic field magnitude correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    The Helios, IMP 8, ISEE 3, ad Voyager 2 spacecraft are used to examine the solar cycle and heliocentric distance dependence of the correlation between density n and magnetic field magnitude B in the solar wind. Previous work had suggested that this correlation becomes progressively more negative with heliocentric distance out to 9.5 AU. Here it is shown that this evolution is not a solar cycle effect, and that the correlations become even more strongly negative at heliocentric distance larger than 9.5 AU. There is considerable variability in the distributions of the correlations at a given heliocentric distance, but this is not simply related to the solar cycle. Examination of the evolution of correlations between density and speed suggest that most of the structures responsible for evolution in the anticorrelation between n and B are not slow-mode waves, but rather pressure balance structures. The latter consist of both coherent structures such as tangential discontinuities and the more generally pervasive 'pseudosound' which may include the coherent structures as a subset.

  11. By-controlled convection and field-aligned currents near midnight auroral oval for northward interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taguchi, S.; Sugiura, M.; Iyemori, T.; Winningham, J. D.; Slavin, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Using the Dynamics Explorer (DE) 2 magnetic and electric field and plasma data, B(sub y)- controlled convection and field-aligned currents in the midnight sector for northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) are examined. The results of an analysis of the electric field data show that when IMF is stable and when its magnitude is large, a coherent B(sub y)-controlled convection exists near the midnight auroral oval in the ionosphere having adequate conductivities. When B(sub y) is negative, the convection consists of a westward (eastward) plasma flow at the lower latitudes and an eastward (westward) plasma flow at the higher latitudes in the midnight sector in the northern (southern) ionosphere. When B(sub y) is positive, the flow directions are reversed. The distribution of the field-aligned currents associated with the B(sub y)-controlled convection, in most cases, shows a three-sheet structure. In accordance with the convection the directions of the three sheets are dependent on the sign of B(sub y). The location of disappearance of the precipitating intense electrons having energies of a few keV is close to the convection reversal surface. However, the more detailed relationship between the electron precipitation boundary and the convection reversal surface depends on the case. In some cases the precipitating electrons extend beyond the convection reversal surface, and in others the poleward boundary terminates at a latitude lower than the reversal surface. Previous studies suggest that the poleward boundary of the electrons having energies of a few keV is not necessarily coincident with an open/closed bounary. Thus the open/closed boundary may be at a latitude higher than the poleward boundary of the electron precipitation, or it may be at a latitude lower than the poleward boundary of the electron precipitation. We discuss relationships between the open/closed boundary and the convection reversal surface. When as a possible choice we adopt a view that the

  12. Magnetic field hourly averages from the Rome-GSFC experiment aboard Helios 1 and Helio 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mariani, F.; Ness, N. F.; Bavassano, B.; Bruno, R.; Buccellato, R.; Burlaga, L. F.; Cantarano, S.; Scearce, C. S.; Terenzi, R.; Villante, U.

    1987-01-01

    Plots of all the hourly averages computed from the solar magnetic field measurements obtained during the mission are given separately for Helios 1 and Helios 2. The magnitude and the direction of the averaged field are plotted versus the number of solar rotations as seen from Helios, counted from launch.

  13. Interplanetary medium data book: Supplement 3A, 1977-1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Couzens, David A.; King, Joseph H.

    1986-01-01

    Supplement 3 of the Interplanetary Medium Data Book contains a detailed discussion of a data set compilation of hourly averaged interplanetary plasma and magnetic field parameters. The discussion addresses data sources, systematic and random differences, time shifting of ISEE 3 data, and plasma normalizations. Supplement 3 also contains solar rotation plots of field and plasma parameters. Supplement 3A contains computer-generated listings of selected parameters from the composite data set. These parameters are bulk speed (km/sec), density (per cu cm), temperature (in units of 1000 K) and the IMF parameters: average magnitude, latitude and longitude angles of the vector made up of the average GSE components, GSM Cartesian components, and the vector standard deviation. The units of field magnitude, components, and standard deviation are gammas, while the units of field direction angles and degrees.

  14. Prediction of magnetic orientation in driver gas associated -Bz events. [in interplanetary medium observed at earth when solar source is identified

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoeksema, J. T.; Zhao, Xuepu

    1992-01-01

    The source regions of five strong -Bz events detected at 1 AU for which solar sources were identified by Tang et al. (1989) and Tsurutani et al. (1992) are investigated in order to determine whether the magnetic orientation of driver gas in the interplanetary medium observed at the earth can be predicted when its solar source is identified. Three -Bz events were traced to flare-associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs), one to an eruptive prominence associated CME, and one to three possible solar sources. The computed magnetic orientations at the candidate 'release height' (the height where the front of a CME ceases to accelerate) above the flare sites associated with CMEs show the existence of the expected southward field component. It is concluded that the magnetic orientation in flare-associated CME generated driver gas may be predictable.

  15. The effect of stress and incentive magnetic field on the average volume of magnetic Barkhausen jump in iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Di; Guo, Lei; Yin, Liang; Chen, Zhaoyang; Chen, Juan; Qi, Xin

    2015-11-01

    The average volume of magnetic Barkhausen jump (AVMBJ) v bar generated by magnetic domain wall irreversible displacement under the effect of the incentive magnetic field H for ferromagnetic materials and the relationship between irreversible magnetic susceptibility χirr and stress σ are adopted in this paper to study the theoretical relationship among AVMBJ v bar(magneto-elasticity noise) and the incentive magnetic field H. Then the numerical relationship among AVMBJ v bar, stress σ and the incentive magnetic field H is deduced. Utilizing this numerical relationship, the displacement process of magnetic domain wall for single crystal is analyzed and the effect of the incentive magnetic field H and the stress σ on the AVMBJ v bar (magneto-elasticity noise) is explained from experimental and theoretical perspectives. The saturation velocity of Barkhausen jump characteristic value curve is different when tensile or compressive stress is applied on ferromagnetic materials, because the resistance of magnetic domain wall displacement is different. The idea of critical magnetic field in the process of magnetic domain wall displacement is introduced in this paper, which solves the supersaturated calibration problem of AVMBJ - σ calibration curve.

  16. Average daily variations in the magnetic field as observed by ATS-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skillman, T. L.

    1974-01-01

    Hourly averages of the magnetic field components are determined and analyzed using the measurements of the magnetic field monitor aboard the ATS-5. The data covering the time period of September 1969 through September 1971 are sorted and analyzed for various Kp values, geomagnetic latitude of the subsolar point, and local time. Local time variations are harmonically analyzed, and amplitudes and phases are given up to the fourth harmonic.

  17. Average daily variations in the magnetic field as observed by ATS-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skillman, T. L.

    1972-01-01

    Hourly averages of the magnetic field components are determined and analyzed using the measurements, by the magnetic field monitor (MFM) aboard the ATS-5 satellite. The data covering the time period of September 1969 through September 1971 are sorted and analyzed for various Kp values, geomagnetic latitude of the subsolar point, and local time. Local time variations are harmonically analyzed, and amplitudes and phases are given up to the fourth harmonic.

  18. Upper Thermosphere Winds and Temperatures in the Geomagnetic Polar Cap: Solar Cycle, Geomagnetic Activity, and Interplanetary Magnetic Field Dependencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killeen, T. L.; Won, Y.-I.; Niciejewski, R. J.; Burns, A. G.

    1995-01-01

    Ground-based Fabry-Perot interferometers located at Thule, Greenland (76.5 deg. N, 69.0 deg. W, lambda = 86 deg.) and at Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland (67.0 deg. N, 50.9 deg. W, lambda = 74 deg.) have monitored the upper thermospheric (approx. 240-km altitude) neutral wind and temperature over the northern hemisphere geomagnetic polar cap since 1983 and 1985, respectively. The thermospheric observations are obtained by determining the Doppler characteristics of the (OI) 15,867-K (630.0-nm) emission of atomic oxygen. The instruments operate on a routine, automatic, (mostly) untended basis during the winter observing seasons, with data coverage limited only by cloud cover and (occasional) instrument failures. This unique database of geomagnetic polar cap measurements now extends over the complete range of solar activity. We present an analysis of the measurements made between 1985 (near solar minimum) and 1991 (near solar maximum), as part of a long-term study of geomagnetic polar cap thermospheric climatology. The measurements from a total of 902 nights of observations are compared with the predictions of two semiempirical models: the Vector Spherical Harmonic (VSH) model of Killeen et al. (1987) and the Horizontal Wind Model (HWM) of Hedin et al. (1991). The results are also analyzed using calculations of thermospheric momentum forcing terms from the Thermosphere-ionosphere General Circulation Model TGCM) of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The experimental results show that upper thermospheric winds in the geomagnetic polar cap have a fundamental diurnal character, with typical wind speeds of about 200 m/s at solar minimum, rising to up to about 800 m/s at solar maximum, depending on geomagnetic activity level. These winds generally blow in the antisunward direction, but are interrupted by episodes of modified wind velocity and altered direction often associated with changes in the orientation of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF). The

  19. A study on the main periodicities in interplanetary magnetic field Bz component and geomagnetic AE index during HILDCAA events using wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, A. M.; Echer, E.; Bolzan, M. J. A.; Hajra, R.

    2016-11-01

    The interplanetary and geomagnetic characteristics of High-Intensity Long-Duration Continuous AE Activity (HILDCAA) events are studied using wavelet analysis technique. The Morlet wavelet transform was applied to the 1 min interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz component and the geomagnetic AE index during HILDCAA events. We have analyzed the AE data for the events occurring between 1975 and 2011, and the IMF Bz data (both in GSE and GSM) for the events between 1995 and 2011. We analyzed the scalograms and the global wavelet spectrum of the parameters. For 50% of all HILDCAA events, the main periodicities of the AE index are generally between 4 and 12 h. For the Bz component, the main periodicities were found to be less than 8 h for 56% of times in GSM system and for 54% of times in GSE system. It is conjectured that the periodicities might be associated with the Alfvén waves which have typical periods between 1 and 10 h. The results are discussed in the light of self organized criticality theory where the physical events have the capacity of releasing a considerable amount of energy in a short interval of time.

  20. Anomalous aspects of magnetosheath flow and of the shape and oscillations of the magnetopause during an interval of strongly northward interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Sheng-Hsien; Kivelson, Margaret G.; Gosling, Jack T.; Walker, Raymond T.; Lazarus, Allan J.

    1992-01-01

    On 15 Feb. 1978, the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) remained steadily northward for more than 12 hours. The ISEE 1 and 2 spacecraft were located near apogee on the dawn side flank of the magnetotail. IMP 8 was almost symmetrically located in the magnetosheath on the dusk flank and IMP 7 was upstream in the solar wind. Using plasma and magnetic field data, we show the following: (1) the magnetosheath flow speed on the flanks of the magnetotail steadily exceeded the solar wind speed by 20 percent; (2) surface waves with approximately a 5-min period and very non-sinusoidal waveform were persistently present on the dawn magnetopause and waves of similar period were present in the dusk magnetosheath; and (3) the magnetotail ceased to flare at an antisunward distance of 15 R(sub E). We propose that the acceleration of the magnetosheath flow is achieved by magnetic tension in the draped field configuration for northward IMF and that the reduction of tail flaring is consistent with a decreased amount of open magnetic flux and a larger standoff distance of the subsolar magnetopause. Results of a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation support this phenomenological model.

  1. A new solar signal: Average maximum sunspot magnetic fields independent of activity cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, William; Watson, Fraser

    2015-11-01

    Over the past 5 years, 2010 to April 2015, we observed 4176 sunspot umbrae in the infrared (IR) to measure maximum magnetic field strengths from the Zeeman splitting of Fe 15,648.5 Å. Herein we distinguish "field strengths" from "field flux." Field strengths range from 1500 G in pores to 3500+ in large spots. We made one observation per spot per observing day, ignoring spot size. We show that in the IR no activity cycle dependence on average maximum field strength (2070 ± 20 G) has been found. A similar analysis of 17,450 spots observed in space by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager reveals a similar cycle independence (2050 ± 0.18 G). We conclude that the average maximum umbral fields are constant with time and independent of the activity cycle within our time coverage.

  2. The use of induction linacs with nonlinear magnetic drive as high average power accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birx, D. L.; Cook, E. G.; Hawkins, S. A.; Newton, M. A.; Poor, S. E.; Reginato, L. L.; Schmidt, J. A.; Smith, M. W.

    1985-05-01

    The marriage of induction linac technology with Nonlinear Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 MeV/m, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator is under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to allow us to demonstrate some of these concepts. Progress on this project is reported here.

  3. Erratum to "Solar Sources and Geospace Consequences of Interplanetary Magnetic Clouds Observed During Solar Cycle 23-Paper 1" [J. Atmos. Sol.-Terr. Phys. 70(2-4) (2008) 245-253

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Michalek, G.; Lepping, R. P.

    2009-01-01

    One of the figures (Fig. 4) in "Solar sources and geospace consequences of interplanetary magnetic Clouds observed during solar cycle 23 -- Paper 1" by Gopalswamy et al. (2008, JASTP, Vol. 70, Issues 2-4, February 2008, pp. 245-253) is incorrect because of a software error in t he routine that was used to make the plot. The source positions of various magnetic cloud (MC) types are therefore not plotted correctly.

  4. Statistical averaging of marine magnetic anomalies and the aging of oceanic crust.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakely, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Visual comparison of Mesozoic and Cenozoic magnetic anomalies in the North Pacific suggests that older anomalies contain less short-wavelength information than younger anomalies in this area. To test this observation, magnetic profiles from the North Pacific are examined from crust of three ages: 0-2.1, 29.3-33.1, and 64.9-70.3Ma. For each time period, at least nine profiles were analyzed by 1) calculating the power density spectrum of each profile, 2) averaging the spectra together, and 3) computing a 'recording filter' for each time period by assuming a hypothetical seafloor model. The model assumes that the top of the source is acoustic basement, the source thickness is 0.5km, and the time scale of geomagnetic reversals is according to Ness et al. (1980). The calculated power density spectra of the three recording filters are complex in shape but show an increase of attenuation of short-wavelength information as the crust ages. These results are interpreted using a multilayer model for marine magnetic anomalies in which the upper layer, corresponding to pillow basalt of seismic layer 2A, acts as a source of noise to the magnetic anomalies. As the ocean crust ages, this noisy contribution by the pillow basalts becomes less significant to the anomalies. Consequently, magnetic sources below layer 2A must be faithful recorders of geomagnetic reversals.-AuthorPacific power density spectrum

  5. Properties of a large-scale interplanetary loop structure as deduced from low-energy proton anisotropy and magnetic field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tranquille, C.; Sanderson, T. R.; Marsden, R. G.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Smith, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    Correlated particle and magnetic field measurements by the ISEE 3 spacecraft are presented for the loop structure behind the interplanetary traveling shock event of Nov. 12, 1978. Following the passage of the turbulent shock region, strong bidirectional streaming of low-energy protons is observed for approximately 6 hours, corresponding to a loop thickness of about 0.07 AU. This region is also characterized by a low relative variance of the magnetic field, a depressed proton intensity, and a reduction in the magnetic power spectral density. Using quasi-linear theory applied to a slab model, a value of 3 AU is derived for the mean free path during the passage of the closed loop. It is inferred from this observation that the proton regime associated with the loop structure is experiencing scatter-free transport and that either the length of the loop is approximately 3 AU between the sun and the earth or else the protons are being reflected at both ends of a smaller loop.

  6. The Earth's magnetosphere is 165 R(sub E) long: Self-consistent currents, convection, magnetospheric structure, and processes for northward interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedder, J. A.; Lyon, J. G.

    1995-01-01

    The subject of this paper is a self-consistent, magnetohydrodynamic numerical realization for the Earth's magnetosphere which is in a quasi-steady dynamic equilibrium for a due northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Although a few hours of steady northward IMF are required for this asymptotic state to be set up, it should still be of considerable theoretical interest because it constitutes a 'ground state' for the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction. Moreover, particular features of this ground state magnetosphere should be observable even under less extreme solar wind conditions. Certain characteristics of this magnetosphere, namely, NBZ Birkeland currents, four-cell ionospheric convection, a relatively weak cross-polar potential, and a prominent flow boundary layer, are widely expected. Other characteristics, such as no open tail lobes, no Earth-connected magnetic flux beyond 155 R(sub E) downstream, magnetic merging in a closed topology at the cusps, and a 'tadpole' shaped magnetospheric boundary, might not be expected. In this paper, we will present the evidence for this unusual but interesting magnetospheric equilibrium. We will also discuss our present understanding of this singular state.

  7. Catalogue of averaged stellar effective magnetic fields. I. Chemically peculiar A and B type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, V. D.; Bychkova, L. V.; Madej, J.

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents the catalogue and the method of determination of averaged quadratic effective magnetic fields < B_e > for 596 main sequence and giant stars. The catalogue is based on measurements of the stellar effective (or mean longitudinal) magnetic field strengths B_e, which were compiled from the existing literature. We analysed the properties of 352 chemically peculiar A and B stars in the catalogue, including Am, ApSi, He-weak, He-rich, HgMn, ApSrCrEu, and all ApSr type stars. We have found that the number distribution of all chemically peculiar (CP) stars vs. averaged magnetic field strength is described by a decreasing exponential function. Relations of this type hold also for stars of all the analysed subclasses of chemical peculiarity. The exponential form of the above distribution function can break down below about 100 G, the latter value representing approximately the resolution of our analysis for A type stars. Table A.1 and its references are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/407/631 and Tables 3 to 9 are only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org

  8. Multiple responses of magnetotail to the enhancement and fluctuation of solar wind dynamic pressure and the southward turning of interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.; Zhou, G. C.; Zhang, T. L.; Zhang, D.; Dandouras, I.; Rème, H.; Carr, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    During the interval from 06:15 to 07:30 UT on 24 August 2005, the Chinese Tan-Ce 1 (TC1) satellite observed the multiple responses of the near-Earth magnetotail to the combined changes in solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The magnetotail was highly compressed by a strong interplanetary shock because of the dynamic pressure enhancement (˜15 nPa), and the large shrinkage of magnetotail made a northern lobe and plasma mantle move inward to the position of the inbound TC1 that was initially in the plasma sheet. Meanwhile, the dynamic pressure fluctuations (˜0.5-3 nPa) behind the shock drove the quasi-periodic oscillations of the magnetopause, lobe-mantle boundary, and geomagnetic field at the same frequencies: one dominant frequency was around 3 mHz and the other was around 5 mHz. The quasi-periodic oscillations of the lobe-mantle boundary caused the alternate entries of TC1 into the northern lobe and the plasma mantle. In contrast to a single squeezed or deformed magnetotail by a solar wind discontinuity moving tailward, the compressed and oscillating magnetotail can better indicate the dynamic evolution of magnetotail when solar wind dynamic pressure increases and fluctuates remarkably, and the near-Earth magnetotail is quite sensitive even to some small changes in the solar wind dynamic pressure when it is highly compressed. Furthermore, it is found that a considerable amount of oxygen ions (O+) appeared in the lobe after the southward turning of IMF.

  9. Investigation of influence of hypomagnetic conditions closely similar to interplanetary magnetic filed on behavioral and vegetative reactions of higher mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivova, Natalie; Trukhanov, Kiril; Zamotshina, Tatyana; Zaeva, Olga; Khodanovich, Marina; Misina, Tatyana; Tukhvatulin, Ravil; Suhko, Valery

    To study the influence of long being under reduced magnetic field on behavioral and vegetative reactions of higher mammals the white rat males were put into the 700-1000 times reduced geomagnetic field (50-70 nT) for 25 days. Such field was obtained by using automatic compensation of the horizontal and vertical components of the GMF at a frequencies up to 10 Hz by means of solenoids of the experimental magnetic system. Control animals were located in the same room under usual laboratory GMF conditions (52 uT). Two days before the experiment the behavioral reactions were studied in the "open field" by means of a set of tests, characterizing the level of emotionality, moving and orientational-investigative activities of the animals under conditions of unimpeded behavior. 60 white underbred rat males with the initial body mass of 200 g were divided into three clusters. Animals with average indices were selected for the experiment. We have judged behavioral reaction disturbances of the rats under hypomagnetic conditions using videotape recordings carried out in the entire course of the chronic experiment. According to the obtained results during the period of maximum activity (from 230 to 330 a.m.) the number of interrelations between the individuals increased appreciably for experimental rats including interrelations with aggressive character. This was real during all 25 days of observation. We observed a certain dynamics of this index differed from that of the control group. We have also analyzed the final period of observation from the 21th to the 25th days. In this period we studied the 24 hours' dynamics of interrelations which were noted during 5 minutes in every hour around the clock. In the control group the number of interrelation was at a constantly low level. For experimental animals the number of interrelations was higher in the night hours than in the day ones. Moreover it exceeded the similar indexes observed from the 1st to the 20th day. For example from

  10. A TIEGCM numerical study of the source and evolution of ionospheric F-region tongues of ionization: Universal time and interplanetary magnetic field dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Wenbin; Burns, Alan; Liu, Libo; McInerney, Joe

    2017-04-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere-Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIEGCM) has been employed to systematically study the source and evolution of the ionospheric F-region Tongue of Ionization (TOI), which is electron density enhancement in the polar region. The model is run for different Universal Times (UT), season and Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) conditions. It is found that: (1) The TOI formation is critically dependent on UT, preferentially near 2000 UT in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and near 1600 UT in the Southern Hemisphere (SH). These are the intervals when the high-latitude ion convection throat is closer to the middle-latitude high plasma density source region, so that more plasma can be directly transported into the polar cap region; (2) this different UT dependence between the two Hemispheres occurs, not only because of the different separation of the magnetic poles from the geographic poles in the two hemispheres, but also because of the UT dependence of the mid-latitude source locations (local time, latitude) and the magnitude of plasma density enhancements; (3) the TOI is generally stronger in the SH than it is in the NH, and in winter than in summer; (4) IMF By operates in the opposite sense in the two hemispheres in terms of the TOI pattern such that positive/negative IMF By tends to deflect the TOI toward the morning/afternoon sector in the NH. The opposite condition occurs in the SH.

  11. Penetration of the interplanetary magnetic field B(sub y) magnetosheath plasma into the magnetosphere: Implications for the predominant magnetopause merging site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, Patrick T.; Sibeck, David G.; Meng, Ching-I

    1995-01-01

    Magnetosheath plasma peertated into the magnetospere creating the particle cusp, and similarly the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B(sub y) component penetrates the magnetopause. We reexamine the phenomenology of such penetration to investigate implications for the magnetopause merging site. Three models are popular: (1) the 'antiparallel' model, in which merging occurs where the local magnetic shear is largest (usually high magnetic latitude); (2) a tilted merging line passing through the subsolar point but extending to very high latitudes; or (3) a tilted merging line passing through the subsolar point in which most merging occurs within a few Earth radii of the equatorial plane and local noon (subsolar merging). It is difficult to distinguish between the first two models, but the third implies some very different predictions. We show that properties of the particle cusp imply that plasma injection into the magnetosphere occurs most often at high magnetic latitudes. In particular, we note the following: (1) The altitude of the merging site inferred from midaltitude cusp ion pitch angle dispersion is typically 8-12 R(sub E). (2) The highest ion energy observable when moving poleward through the cusp drops long before the bulk of the cusp plasma is reached, implying that ions are swimming upstream against the sheath flow shortly after merging. (3) Low-energy ions are less able to enter the winter cusp than the summer cusp. (4) The local time behavior of the cusp as a function of B(sub y) and B(sub z) corroborates predictions of the high-latitude merging models. We also reconsider the penetration of the IMF B(sub y) component onto closed dayside field lines. Our approach, in which closed field lines ove to fill in flux voids created by asymmetric magnetopause flux erosion, shows that strich subsolar merging cannot account for the observations.

  12. The First in situ Observation of Kelvin-Helmholtz Waves at High-Latitude Magnetopause during Strongly Dawnward Interplanetary Magnetic Field Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, K.-J.; Goldstein, M. L.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Wang, Y.; Vinas, A. F.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2012-01-01

    We report the first in situ observation of high-latitude magnetopause (near the northern duskward cusp) Kelvin-Helmholtz waves (KHW) by Cluster on January 12, 2003, under strongly dawnward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. The fluctuations unstable to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) are found to propagate mostly tailward, i.e., along the direction almost 90 deg. to both the magnetosheath and geomagnetic fields, which lowers the threshold of the KHI. The magnetic configuration across the boundary layer near the northern duskward cusp region during dawnward IMF is similar to that in the low-latitude boundary layer under northward IMF, in that (1) both magnetosheath and magnetospheric fields across the local boundary layer constitute the lowest magnetic shear and (2) the tailward propagation of the KHW is perpendicular to both fields. Approximately 3-hour-long periods of the KHW during dawnward IMF are followed by the rapid expansion of the dayside magnetosphere associated with the passage of an IMF discontinuity that characterizes an abrupt change in IMF cone angle, Phi = acos (B(sub x) / absolute value of Beta), from approx. 90 to approx. 10. Cluster, which was on its outbound trajectory, continued observing the boundary waves at the northern evening-side magnetopause during sunward IMF conditions following the passage of the IMF discontinuity. By comparing the signatures of boundary fluctuations before and after the IMF discontinuity, we report that the frequencies of the most unstable KH modes increased after the discontinuity passed. This result demonstrates that differences in IMF orientations (especially in f) are associated with the properties of KHW at the high-latitude magnetopause due to variations in thickness of the boundary layer, and/or width of the KH-unstable band on the surface of the dayside magnetopause.

  13. Solar wind plasma profiles during interplanetary field enhancements (IFEs): Consistent with charged-dust pickup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, H. R.; Wei, H. Y.; Russell, C. T.

    2013-06-01

    The solar wind contains many magnetic structures, and most of them have identifiable correlated changes in the flowing plasma. However, the very characteristic rise and fall of the magnetic field in an interplanetary field enhancement has no clear solar wind counterpart. It appears to be a pure magnetic ``barrier'' that transfers solar wind momentum to charged dust produced in collisions of interplanetary bodies in the size range of tens to hundreds of meters. This transfer lifts the fine scale dust out of the Sun's gravitational well. We demonstrate the lack of field-plasma correlation with several examples from spacecraft records as well as show an ensemble average velocity profile during IFEs which is consistent with our IFE formation hypothesis.

  14. Magnetic field measurements at Jupiter by Voyagers 1 and 2: Daily plots of 48 second averages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Silverstein, M. J.; Ness, N. F.

    1981-01-01

    A series of 24 hour summary plots of the magnetic field, in 48-s average form, measured in the vicinity of Jupiter by the magnetometers onboard Voyagers 1 and 2 are presented. The Voyager 1 data cover the period from 27 February 1979 (day = 58) to 23 March (day = 82) inclusive, and the Voyager 2 data cover the period from 2 July 1979 (day = 183) to 14 August (day = 226) inclusive. Closest approach to the planet occurred on days 64 (AT 1205 UT) and 190 (AT 2230 UT) for Voyagers 1 and 2, respectively. Also included are: a description of the characteristics of the magnetometers, a brief description of the near-planet trajectories of the two spacecraft, a listing of the bow shock and magnetopause crossing times, and a bibliography containing Voyager-Jupiter related papers and reports.

  15. Orbit-averaged behavior of magnetic control laws for momentum unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camillo, P. J.; Markley, F. L.

    1980-01-01

    Analytical formulas are derived for orbit-averaged behavior of magnetic control laws for unloading the excess angular momentum of a spacecraft reaction wheel control system in the presence of secular environmental torques. The specific example of an axially symmetric spacecraft with an inertially fixed attitude for which the dominant environmental torque is the gravity-gradient torque is treated in detail, but extensions of the general approach to other inertially fixed and earth-pointing spacecraft are discussed. The analytical formulas are compared to detailed simulations performed for the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft, and agreement to within 10% is found. The analytical formulas can be used in place of detailed simulations for preliminary studies, and can be used to find selected cases giving the most stringent tests of momentum unloading capability for which detailed simulations may be performed.

  16. A theoretical and empirical study of the response of the high latitude thermosphere to the sense of the 'Y' component of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, D.; Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Gordon, R.; Smith, M. F.; Maynard, N. C.; Heppner, J. P.; Spencer, N. W.; Wharton, L.

    1986-01-01

    Patterns of magnetospheric energetic plasma precipitation as a function of the Y component of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) are studied. The development of a three-dimensional, time-dependent global thermospheric model using a polar conversion electric field with a dependence on the Y component of the IMF to evaluate thermospheric wind circulation is examined. Thermospheric wind data from the ISEE-3 satellite, Dynamics Explorer-2 satellite, and a ground-based Fabry-Perot interferometer in Kiruna, Sweden, collected on December 1, 2, 6, 25, 1981 and February 12, 13, 1982 are described. The observed data and simulations of polar thermospheric winds are compared. In the Northern Hemisphere a strong antisunward ion flow on the dawn side of the geomagnetic polar cap is observed when the BY is positive, and the flow is detected on the dusk side when the BY is negative. It is concluded that the strength and direction of the IMF directly control the transfer of solar wind momentum and energy to the high latitude thermosphere.

  17. Average magnetic moments of pre-yrast high spin states in {sup 166,165}Hf

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, L.; Hass, M.; Broude, C.

    1996-01-01

    The average magnetic moments of high spin states in Hf isotopes were determined in a transient field measurement at the 14 MV Koffler accelerator of the Weizmann Institute. The reaction {sup 130}Te({sup 40}Ca,{ital xn}){sup 166,165}Hf at beam energies from 167 to 182.5 MeV was used to populate different high spin regions and provide the recoiling Hf nuclei with sufficient velocity to traverse the 2.9 mg/cm{sup 2} Gd ferromagnetic layer. Standard double ratios and angular distributions for various low level transitions were measured to determine precession angles. These carry information regarding the average {ital g} factor of unobservable transitions at medium excitation. To obtain a more quantitative analysis regarding the time-decay history of the {gamma} cascade, Monte Carlo simulations of the cascade were carried out. The significance of the results for understanding the single particle nature of these pre-yrast levels is discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. Numerical simulation of interplanetary dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chin-Chun

    This dissertation discusses investigations into the physics of the propagation of solar generated disturbances in the interplanetary medium. The motivation to initiate this study was two-fold: (1) understanding the fundamental physics of the nonlinear interactions of solar generated MHD shocks and non-homogeneous interplanetary medium, and (2) understanding the physics of solar generated disturbance effects on the Earth's environment, (i.e. the solar connection to the geomagnetic storm). In order to achieve these goals, the authors employed two numerical models to encompass these studies. In the first part, a one-dimensional MHD code with adaptive grids is used to study the evolution of interplanetary slow shocks (ISS), the interaction of a forward slow shock with a reverse slow shock, and the interaction of a fast shock with a slow shock. Results show that the slow shocks can be generated by a decreasing density, velocity or temperature perturbation or by a pressure pulse by following a forward fast shock and that slow shocks can propagate over 1 AU; results also show that the ISS never evolves into fast shocks. Interestingly, it is also found that an ISS could be 'eaten up' by an interplanetary fast shock (IFS) catching up from behind. This could be a reason that the slow shock has been difficult to observe near 1 AU. In addition, a forward slow shock could be dissipated by following a strong forward fast shock (Mach number greater than 1.7). In the second part, a fully three-dimensional (3D), time-dependent, MHD interplanetary global model (3D IGM) is used to study the relationship between different forms of solar activity and transient variations of the north-south component, Bx, of the interplanetary magnetic field, IMF, at 1 AU. One form of solar activity, the flare, is simulated by using a pressure pulse at different locations near the solar surface and observing the simulated IMF evolution of Btheta (= -Bx) at 1 AU. Results show that, for a given pressure

  19. Interstellar neutrals in interplanetary space

    SciTech Connect

    Hovestadt, D.; Moebius, E. )

    1989-03-01

    The solar system is moving through the interstellar medium with a velocity of about 20 km/s. The neutral interstellar gas, which thereby penetrates the heliosphere, is subject to ionization by solar UV radiation, charge exchange with the solar wind, and electron collisions. The newly created ions are then picked by the solar wind through interaction of interstellar neutrals with the interplanetary magnetic field. The pick-up ions with their peculiar elemental composition probably also constitute the source particles of the Anomalous Cosmic Ray Component (ACR). In this report descriptions of the interaction with the solar wind are reviewed. While most of the constituents are already ionized far beyond the orbit of the Earth, neutral helium (because of its high ionization potential) approaches the Sun to {lt}1 AU. The pick-up of interstellar He{sup +} ions has recently been directly observed for the first time. The observed velocity distribution of He{sup +} extending up to twice the solar wind velocity can be explained in terms of pitch angle scattering of the ions probably by interplanetary Alven waves and subsequent adiabatic cooling in the expanding solar wind. Thermal coupling of the He{sup +} to the solar wind is negligible in the inner heliosphere. Detailed studies of the pick-up distribution provide a method to investigate the interplanetary propagation parameters and the state of the local interstellar medium.

  20. Wave properties near the subsolar magnetopause - Pc 3-4 energy coupling for northward interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, P.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Wygant, J. R.; Cattell, C. A.; Fitzenreiter, R. J.; Anderson, R. R.

    1993-01-01

    Strong slow mode waves in the Pc 3-4 frequency range are found in the magnetosheath close to the magnetopause. We have studied these waves at one of the ISEE subsolar magnetopause crossings using the magnetic field, electric field, and plasma measurements. We use the pressure balance at the magnetopause to calibrate the Fast Plasma Experiment data versus the magnetometer data. When we perform such a calibration and renormalization, we find that the slow mode structures are not in pressure balance and small scale fluctuations in the total pressure still remain in the Pc 3-4 range. Energy in the total pressure fluctuations can be transmitted through the magnetopause by boundary motions. The Poynting flux calculated from the electric and magnetic field measurements suggests that a net Poynting flux is transmitted into the magnetopause. The two independent measurements show a similar energy transmission coefficient. The transmitted energy flux is about 18 percent of the magnetic energy flux of the waves in the magnetosheath. Part of this transmitted energy is lost in the sheath transition layer before it enters the closed field line region. The waves reaching the boundary layer decay rapidly. Little wave power is transmitted into the magnetosphere.

  1. An MHD simulation of the effects of the interplanetary magnetic field By component on the interaction of the solar wind with the earth's magnetosphere during southward interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogino, T.; Walker, R. J.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Dawson, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    The interaction between the solar wind and the earth's magnetosphere has been studied by using a time-dependent three-dimensional MHD model in which the IMF pointed in several directions between dawnward and southward. When the IMF is dawnward, the dayside cusp and the tail lobes shift toward the morningside in the northern magnetosphere. The plasma sheet rotates toward the north on the dawnside of the tail and toward the south on the duskside. For an increasing southward IMF component, the plasma sheet becomes thinner and subsequently wavy because of patchy or localized tail reconnection. At the same time, the tail field-aligned currents have a filamentary layered structure. When projected onto the northern polar cap, the filamentary field-aligned currents are located in the same area as the region 1 currents, with a pattern similar to that associated with auroral surges. Magnetic reconnection also occurs on the dayside magnetopause for southward IMF.

  2. The relationship of the large-scale solar field to the interplanetary magnetic field - What will Ulysses find?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoeksema, J. T.

    1986-01-01

    Using photospheric magnetic field observations obtained at the Stanford Wilcox Solar Observatory, results from a potential field model for the present solar cycle are given, and qualitative predictions of the IMF that Ulysses may encounter are presented. Results indicate that the IMF consists of large regions of opposite polarity separated by a neutral sheet (NS) (extended to at least 50 deg) and a four-sector structure near solar minimum (produced by small quadripolar NS warps). The latitudinal extent of the NS increases following minimum and the structure near maximum includes multiple NSs, while a simplified IMF is found during the declining phase.

  3. Occupational exposure assessment of magnetic fields generated by induction heating equipment—the role of spatial averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kos, Bor; Valič, Blaž; Kotnik, Tadej; Gajšek, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Induction heating equipment is a source of strong and nonhomogeneous magnetic fields, which can exceed occupational reference levels. We investigated a case of an induction tempering tunnel furnace. Measurements of the emitted magnetic flux density (B) were performed during its operation and used to validate a numerical model of the furnace. This model was used to compute the values of B and the induced in situ electric field (E) for 15 different body positions relative to the source. For each body position, the computed B values were used to determine their maximum and average values, using six spatial averaging schemes (9-285 averaging points) and two averaging algorithms (arithmetic mean and quadratic mean). Maximum and average B values were compared to the ICNIRP reference level, and E values to the ICNIRP basic restriction. Our results show that in nonhomogeneous fields, the maximum B is an overly conservative predictor of overexposure, as it yields many false positives. The average B yielded fewer false positives, but as the number of averaging points increased, false negatives emerged. The most reliable averaging schemes were obtained for averaging over the torso with quadratic averaging, with no false negatives even for the maximum number of averaging points investigated.

  4. Occupational exposure assessment of magnetic fields generated by induction heating equipment-the role of spatial averaging.

    PubMed

    Kos, Bor; Valič, Blaž; Kotnik, Tadej; Gajšek, Peter

    2012-10-07

    Induction heating equipment is a source of strong and nonhomogeneous magnetic fields, which can exceed occupational reference levels. We investigated a case of an induction tempering tunnel furnace. Measurements of the emitted magnetic flux density (B) were performed during its operation and used to validate a numerical model of the furnace. This model was used to compute the values of B and the induced in situ electric field (E) for 15 different body positions relative to the source. For each body position, the computed B values were used to determine their maximum and average values, using six spatial averaging schemes (9-285 averaging points) and two averaging algorithms (arithmetic mean and quadratic mean). Maximum and average B values were compared to the ICNIRP reference level, and E values to the ICNIRP basic restriction. Our results show that in nonhomogeneous fields, the maximum B is an overly conservative predictor of overexposure, as it yields many false positives. The average B yielded fewer false positives, but as the number of averaging points increased, false negatives emerged. The most reliable averaging schemes were obtained for averaging over the torso with quadratic averaging, with no false negatives even for the maximum number of averaging points investigated.

  5. The interplanetary Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, A. J.

    2000-01-01

    Architectural design of the interplanetary internet is now underway and prototype flight testing of some of the candidate protocols is anticipated within a year. This talk will describe the current status of the project.

  6. Mercury's Time-Averaged and Induced Magnetic Fields from MESSENGER Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. L.; Winslow, R. M.; Anderson, B. J.; Purucker, M. E.; Korth, H.; Al Asad, M. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Baker, D. N.; Hauck, S. A.; Phillips, R. J.; Zuber, M. T.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Observations from MESSENGER's Magnetometer (MAG) have allowed the construction of a baseline, time-averaged model for Mercury's magnetosphere. The model, constructed with the approximation that the magnetospheric shape can be represented as a paraboloid, includes two external (magnetopause and magnetotail) current systems and an internal (dipole) field. We take advantage of the geometry of the orbital MAG data to constrain all but one of the model parameters, and their ranges, directly from the observations. These parameters are then used as a priori constraints in the magnetospheric model, and the remaining parameter, the dipole moment, is estimated from a grid search. The model provides an excellent fit to the MAG observations, with a root-mean-square misfit of less than 20 nT globally. The mean distance from the planetary dipole origin to the magnetopause subsolar point, RSS, is 1.45 RM (where RM = 2440 km) and the mean planetary dipole moment is 190 nT- RM3. Temporal variations in the global-scale magnetic fields result from changes in solar wind ram pressure, Pram, at Mercury that arise from the planet's 88-day eccentric orbit around the Sun and from transient, rapid changes in solar wind conditions. For a constant planetary dipole moment, RSS varies as Pram-1/6. However, magnetopause crossings obtained from several Mercury years of MESSENGER observations indicate that RSS is proportional to Pram-1/a where a is greater than 6, suggesting induction in Mercury's highly conducting metallic interior. We obtain an effective dipole moment that varies by up to ˜15% about its mean value. We further investigate the periodic 88-day induction signature and use the paraboloid model to describe the spatial structure in the inducing magnetopause field, together with estimates for the outer radius of Mercury's liquid core and possible overlying solid iron sulfide layer, to calculate induced core fields. The baseline magnetospheric model is adapted to include the 88-day

  7. Curie point depth in the SW Caribbean using the radially averaged spectra of magnetic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, Juan M.; Vargas, Carlos A.; Leon, Hermann

    2017-01-01

    We have estimated the Curie Point Depth (CPD) using the average radial power spectrum in a tectonically complex area located in the SW Caribbean basin. Data analyzed came from the World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map, and three methods have been used to compare results and evaluate uncertainties: Centroid, Spectral Peak, and Forward Modeling. Results show a match along the three methods, suggesting that the CPD values in the area ranging between 6 km and 50 km. The results share the following characteristics: A) High values (> 30 km) are in continental regions; B) There is a trend of maximum CPD values along the SW-NE direction, starting from the Central Cordillera in Colombia to the Maracaibo Lake in Venezuela; C) There is a maximum CPD at the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta (Colombia) as well as between Costa Rica - Nicaragua and Nicaragua - Honduras borders. The lowest CPD values (< 20 km) are associated with the coastal regions and offshore. We also tested results by estimating the geothermal gradient and comparing measured observations of the study area. Our results suggest at least five thermal terrains in the SW Caribbean Basin: A) The area that is comprising the Venezuela Basin, the Beata Ridge and the Colombia Basin up to longitude parallel to the Providencia Throat. B) The area that includes zones to the north of the Cocos Ridge and Panam Basin up to the trench. C) The orogenic region of the northern Andes and including areas of the Santa Marta Massif. D) The continental sector that encompasses Nicaragua, northern Costa Rica and eastern of Honduras. E) Corresponds to areas of the northern Venezuela and Colombia, NW of Colombia, the Panamanian territory and the transition zones between the Upper and Lower Nicaragua Rise.

  8. A statistical study of the interplanetary magnetic field control of sporadic E-layer occurrence in the southern polar cap ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, W.; Parkinson, M. L.; Dyson, P. L.; Breed, A. M.; Morris, R. J.

    1999-12-01

    The influence of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on the occurrence of sporadic E (Es)-layers in the southern polar cap ionosphere has been investigated. We statistically analysed ionogram and Doppler velocity observations made using a HF digital ionosonde located at Casey, Antarctica (66.3°S, 110.5°E 81°S magnetic latitude) during the two summer campaign intervals 1 January to 18 February, and 1 November to 31 December 1997. The ionogram and Doppler velocity measurements were used to determine the Es-occurrence and electric field vectors (assuming E×B/B2 drift), respectively. Concurrent IMF data were obtained from measurements made on board the Wind spacecraft. First, the gross properties of the IMF dependence of Es-formation were obtained: the occurrence rate was higher for negative By and/or positive Bz, and lower for positive By and/or negative Bz. To reconcile these gross properties with the electric field theory of Es-layer formation, the detailed diurnal variation of both Es-occurrence and the ionospheric electric field were obtained for different orientations of the IMF. The main statistical results are that: (1) the By component mainly controls the occurrence of the midnight Es-layers through its influence on the corresponding South West electric field; and (2) the Bz component mainly controls the occurrence of the evening Es-layers. However, the change in the occurrence rate for evening Es-layers was not related to the strength of the associated North West and North East electric fields. The total occurrence of Es-layers depended more on By than on Bz, owing to the dominance of By-controlled midnight Es-layers in the occurrence distribution. Nevertheless, the dependence of Es-occurrence on Bz was important. We suggest that the increase in Es-occurrence for positive Bz might be explained by the intermittent production of lower F-region ionisation by polar showers and squalls, which also increase in frequency and intensity for positive Bz. The

  9. Orbit-averaged quantities, the classical Hellmann-Feynman theorem, and the magnetic flux enclosed by gyro-motion

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R. J. Bellan, P. M.

    2015-02-15

    Action integrals are often used to average a system over fast oscillations and obtain reduced dynamics. It is not surprising, then, that action integrals play a central role in the Hellmann-Feynman theorem of classical mechanics, which furnishes the values of certain quantities averaged over one period of rapid oscillation. This paper revisits the classical Hellmann-Feynman theorem, rederiving it in connection to an analogous theorem involving the time-averaged evolution of canonical coordinates. We then apply a modified version of the Hellmann-Feynman theorem to obtain a new result: the magnetic flux enclosed by one period of gyro-motion of a charged particle in a non-uniform magnetic field. These results further demonstrate the utility of the action integral in regards to obtaining orbit-averaged quantities and the usefulness of this formalism in characterizing charged particle motion.

  10. High Amplitude Events in relation to Interplanetary disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Rajesh Kumar; Agarwal Mishra, Rekha

    2012-07-01

    The Sun emits the variable solar wind which interacts with the very local interstellar medium to form the heliosphere. Hence variations in solar activity strongly influence interplanetary space, from the Sun's surface out to the edge of the heliosphere. Superimposed on the solar wind are mass ejections from the Sun and/or its corona which, disturb the interplanetary medium - hence the name "interplanetary disturbances". Interplanetary disturbances are the sources of large-scale particle acceleration, of disturbances in the Earth's magnetosphere, of modulations of galactic cosmic rays in short, they are the prime focus for space weather studies. The investigation deals with the study of cosmic ray intensity, solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic field parameters variation due to interplanetary disturbances (magnetic clouds) during an unusual class of days i.e. high amplitude anisotropic wave train events. The high amplitude anisotropic wave train events in cosmic ray intensity has been identified using the data of ground based Goose Bay neutron monitor and studied during the period 1981-94. Even though, the occurrence of high amplitude anisotropic wave trains does not depend on the onset of interplanetary magnetic clouds. But the possibility of occurrence of these events cannot be overlooked during the periods of interplanetary magnetic cloud events. It is observed that solar wind velocity remains higher (> 300) than normal and interplanetary magnetic field B remains lower than normal on the onset of interplanetary magnetic cloud during the passage of these events. It is also noted from the superposed epoch analysis of cosmic ray intensity and geomagnetic activity for high amplitude anisotropic wave train events during the onset of interplanetary magnetic clouds that the increase in cosmic ray intensity and decrease in geomagnetic activity start not at the onset of magnetic clouds but after few days. The north south component of IMF (Bz), IMF (B), proton

  11. Interplanetary space weather effects on Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter avalanche photodiode performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, E. B.; Carlton, A. K.; Joyce, C. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Spence, H. E.; Sun, X.; Cahoy, K.

    2016-05-01

    Space weather is a major concern for radiation-sensitive space systems, particularly for interplanetary missions, which operate outside of the protection of Earth's magnetic field. We examine and quantify the effects of space weather on silicon avalanche photodiodes (SiAPDs), which are used for interplanetary laser altimeters and communications systems and can be sensitive to even low levels of radiation (less than 50 cGy). While ground-based radiation testing has been performed on avalanche photodiode (APDs) for space missions, in-space measurements of SiAPD response to interplanetary space weather have not been previously reported. We compare noise data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) SiAPDs with radiation measurements from the onboard Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) instrument. We did not find any evidence to support radiation as the cause of changes in detector threshold voltage during radiation storms, both for transient detector noise and long-term average detector noise, suggesting that the approximately 1.3 cm thick shielding (a combination of titanium and beryllium) of the LOLA detectors is sufficient for SiAPDs on interplanetary missions with radiation environments similar to what the LRO experienced (559 cGy of radiation over 4 years).

  12. Interplanetary Space Weather Effects on Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Avalanche Photodiode Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, E. B.; Carlton, A. K.; Joyce, C. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Spence, H. E.; Sun, X.; Cahoy, K.

    2016-01-01

    Space weather is a major concern for radiation-sensitive space systems, particularly for interplanetary missions, which operate outside of the protection of Earth's magnetic field. We examine and quantify the effects of space weather on silicon avalanche photodiodes (SiAPDs), which are used for interplanetary laser altimeters and communications systems and can be sensitive to even low levels of radiation (less than 50 cGy). While ground-based radiation testing has been performed on avalanche photodiode (APDs) for space missions, in-space measurements of SiAPD response to interplanetary space weather have not been previously reported. We compare noise data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) SiAPDs with radiation measurements from the onboard Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) instrument. We did not find any evidence to support radiation as the cause of changes in detector threshold voltage during radiation storms, both for transient detector noise and long-term average detector noise, suggesting that the approximately 1.3 cm thick shielding (a combination of titanium and beryllium) of the LOLA detectors is sufficient for SiAPDs on interplanetary missions with radiation environments similar to what the LRO experienced (559 cGy of radiation over 4 years).

  13. Modular model for Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field confined within the average observed magnetopause

    PubMed Central

    Tsyganenko, Nikolai A.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Philpott, Lydia C.; Anderson, Brian J.; Al Asad, Manar M.; Solomon, Sean C.; McNutt, Ralph L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Accurate knowledge of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field is required to understand the sources of the planet's internal field. We present the first model of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field confined within a magnetopause shape derived from Magnetometer observations by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging spacecraft. The field of internal origin is approximated by a dipole of magnitude 190 nT RM 3, where RM is Mercury's radius, offset northward by 479 km along the spin axis. External field sources include currents flowing on the magnetopause boundary and in the cross‐tail current sheet. The cross‐tail current is described by a disk‐shaped current near the planet and a sheet current at larger (≳ 5 RM) antisunward distances. The tail currents are constrained by minimizing the root‐mean‐square (RMS) residual between the model and the magnetic field observed within the magnetosphere. The magnetopause current contributions are derived by shielding the field of each module external to the magnetopause by minimizing the RMS normal component of the magnetic field at the magnetopause. The new model yields improvements over the previously developed paraboloid model in regions that are close to the magnetopause and the nightside magnetic equatorial plane. Magnetic field residuals remain that are distributed systematically over large areas and vary monotonically with magnetic activity. Further advances in empirical descriptions of Mercury's magnetospheric external field will need to account for the dependence of the tail and magnetopause currents on magnetic activity and additional sources within the magnetosphere associated with Birkeland currents and plasma distributions near the dayside magnetopause. PMID:27656335

  14. Modular model for Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field confined within the average observed magnetopause.

    PubMed

    Korth, Haje; Tsyganenko, Nikolai A; Johnson, Catherine L; Philpott, Lydia C; Anderson, Brian J; Al Asad, Manar M; Solomon, Sean C; McNutt, Ralph L

    2015-06-01

    Accurate knowledge of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field is required to understand the sources of the planet's internal field. We present the first model of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field confined within a magnetopause shape derived from Magnetometer observations by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging spacecraft. The field of internal origin is approximated by a dipole of magnitude 190 nT RM(3), where RM is Mercury's radius, offset northward by 479 km along the spin axis. External field sources include currents flowing on the magnetopause boundary and in the cross-tail current sheet. The cross-tail current is described by a disk-shaped current near the planet and a sheet current at larger (≳ 5 RM ) antisunward distances. The tail currents are constrained by minimizing the root-mean-square (RMS) residual between the model and the magnetic field observed within the magnetosphere. The magnetopause current contributions are derived by shielding the field of each module external to the magnetopause by minimizing the RMS normal component of the magnetic field at the magnetopause. The new model yields improvements over the previously developed paraboloid model in regions that are close to the magnetopause and the nightside magnetic equatorial plane. Magnetic field residuals remain that are distributed systematically over large areas and vary monotonically with magnetic activity. Further advances in empirical descriptions of Mercury's magnetospheric external field will need to account for the dependence of the tail and magnetopause currents on magnetic activity and additional sources within the magnetosphere associated with Birkeland currents and plasma distributions near the dayside magnetopause.

  15. Interplanetary causes of middle latitude ionospheric disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Echer, Ezequiel; Guarnieri, Fernando L.; Verkhoglyadova, Olga P.

    The solar and interplanetary causes of major middle latitude ionospheric disturbances are reviewed. Solar flare photons can cause abrupt (within ˜5 min), 30% increases in ionospheric total electron content, a feature that can last for tens of minutes to hours, depending on the altitude of concern. Fast interplanetary coronal mass ejection sheath fields and magnetic clouds can cause intense magnetic storms if the field in either region is intensely southward for several hours or more. If the field conditions in both regions are southward, "double storms" will occur. Multiple interplanetary fast forward shocks "pump up" the sheath magnetic field, leading to conditions that can lead to superstorms. Magnetic storm auroral precipitation and Joule heating cause pressure waves that propagate from subauroral latitudes to middle and equatorial latitudes. Shocks can create middle latitude dayside auroras as well as trigger nightside subauroral supersubstorms. Solar wind ram pressure increases after fast shocks can lead to the formation of new radiation belts under proper conditions. Prompt penetration electric fields can cause a dayside ionospheric superfountain, leading to plasma transport from the equatorial region to middle latitudes. The large amplitude Alfvén waves present in solar wind high-speed streams cause sporadic magnetic reconnection, plasma injections, and electromagnetic chorus wave generation. Energetic electrons interacting with chorus (and PC5) waves are accelerated to hundreds of keV up to MeV energies.

  16. Multipoint study of interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Cano, Xochitl; Kajdic, Primoz; Russell, Christopher T.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, Ernesto; Jian, Lan K.; Luhmann, Janet G.

    2016-04-01

    Interplanetary (IP) shocks are driven in the heliosphere by Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) and Stream Interaction Regions (SIRs). These shocks perturb the solar wind plasma, and play an active role in the acceleration of ions to suprathermal energies. Shock fronts evolve as they move from the Sun. Their surfaces can be far from uniform and be modulated by changes in the ambient solar wind (magnetic field orientation, flow velocity), shocks rippling, and perturbations upstream and downstream from the shocks, i.e., electromagnetic waves. In this work we use multipoint observations from STEREO, WIND, and MESSENGER missions to study shock characteristics at different helio-longitudes and determine the properties of the waves near them. We also determine shock longitudinal extensions and foreshock sizes. The variations of geometry along the shock surface can result in different extensions of the wave and ion foreshocks ahead of the shocks, and in different wave modes upstream and downtream of the shocks. We find that the ion foreshock can extend up to 0.2 AU ahead of the shock, and that the upstream region with modified solar wind/waves can be very asymmetric.

  17. Viscosity and inertia in cosmic-ray transport - Effects of an average magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, L. L.; Jokipii, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    A generalized transport equation is introduced which describes the transport and propagation of cosmic rays in a magnetized, collisionless medium. The equation is valid if the cosmic-ray distribution function is nearly isotropic in momentum, if the ratio of fluid speed to fluid-flow particle speed is small, and if the ratio of collision time to time for change in the macroscopic flow is small. Five independent cosmic-ray viscosity coefficients are found, and the ralationship of this viscosity to particle orbits in a magnetic field is presented.

  18. Interplanetary flux enhancements - Comparison with cometary models and observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Phillips, J. L.; Luhmann, J. G.; Fedder, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Interplanetary field enhancements (IFE's) are unusual nearly symmetric increases in the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field lasting tens of minutes to hours. Examples of interplanetary field enhancements are compared with MHD models and with the data obtained by the ICE spacecraft at Giacobini-Zinner. These comparisons suggest that the varying properties of IFE's are due to the fact that some events are due to passages in front of the nucleus, others in the near tail and yet others in the distant tail.

  19. Heat equation inversion framework for average SAR calculation from magnetic resonance thermal imaging.

    PubMed

    Alon, Leeor; Sodickson, Daniel K; Deniz, Cem M

    2016-10-01

    Deposition of radiofrequency (RF) energy can be quantified via electric field or temperature change measurements. Magnetic resonance imaging has been used as a tool to measure three dimensional small temperature changes associated with RF radiation exposure. When duration of RF exposure is long, conversion from temperature change to specific absorption rate (SAR) is nontrivial due to prominent heat-diffusion and conduction effects. In this work, we demonstrated a method for calculation of SAR via an inversion of the heat equation including heat-diffusion and conduction effects. This method utilizes high-resolution three dimensional magnetic resonance temperature images and measured thermal properties of the phantom to achieve accurate calculation of SAR. Accuracy of the proposed method was analyzed with respect to operating frequency of a dipole antenna and parameters used in heat equation inversion. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:493-503, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Interplanetary charged particle environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divine, T. N.

    1973-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art knowledge of the solar wind, solar particle events, and galactic cosmic rays is reviewed for the development of space vehicle design criteria based on these interplanetary environments. These criteria are described quantitatively in terms of intensity, flux and fluence, and their dependences on time, position and energy, and the associated probabilities and related parameters, for electrons, protons and other ions.

  1. The role of size polydispersity in magnetic fluid hyperthermia: average vs. local infra/over-heating effects.

    PubMed

    Munoz-Menendez, Cristina; Conde-Leboran, Ivan; Baldomir, Daniel; Chubykalo-Fesenko, Oksana; Serantes, David

    2015-11-07

    An efficient and safe hyperthermia cancer treatment requires the accurate control of the heating performance of magnetic nanoparticles, which is directly related to their size. However, in any particle system the existence of some size polydispersity is experimentally unavoidable, which results in a different local heating output and consequently a different hyperthermia performance depending on the size of each particle. With the aim to shed some light on this significant issue, we have used a Monte Carlo technique to study the role of size polydispersity in heat dissipation at both the local (single particle) and global (macroscopic average) levels. We have systematically varied size polydispersity, temperature and interparticle dipolar interaction conditions, and evaluated local heating as a function of these parameters. Our results provide a simple guide on how to choose, for a given polydispersity degree, the more adequate average particle size so that the local variation in the released heat is kept within some limits that correspond to safety boundaries for the average-system hyperthermia performance. All together we believe that our results may help in the design of more effective magnetic hyperthermia applications.

  2. Interplanetary Field Enhancements: The Interaction between Solar Wind and Interplanetary Dusty Plasma Released by Interplanetary Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Hairong

    Interplanetary field enhancements (IFEs) are unique large-scale structures in the solar wind. During IFEs, the magnetic-field strength is significantly enhanced with little perturbation in the solar-wind plasma. Early studies showed that IFEs move at nearly the solar-wind speed and some IFEs detected at 0.72AU by Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) are associated with material co-orbiting with asteroid Oljato. To explain the observed IFE features, we develop and test an IFE formation hypothesis: IFEs result from interactions between the solar wind and clouds of nanoscale charged dust particles released in interplanetary collisions. This hypothesis predicts that the magnetic field drapes and the solar wind slows down in the upstream. Meanwhile the observed IFE occurrence rate should be comparable with the detectable interplanetary collision rate. Based on this hypothesis, we can use the IFE occurrence to determine the spatial distribution and temporal variation of interplanetary objects which produce IFEs. To test the hypothesis, we perform a systematic survey of IFEs in the magnetic-field data from many spacecraft. Our datasets cover from 1970s to present and from inner than 0.3AU to outer than 5 AU. In total, more than 470 IFEs are identified and their occurrences show clustering features in both space and time. We use multi-spacecraft simultaneous observations to reconstruct the magnetic-field geometry and find that the magnetic field drapes in the upstream region. The results of a superposed epoch study show that the solar wind slows down in the upstream and there is a plasma depletion region near the IFE centers. In addition, the solar-wind slowdown and plasma depletion feature are more significant in larger IFEs. The mass contained in IFEs can be estimated by balancing the solar-wind pressure force exerted on the IFEs against the solar gravity. The solar-wind slowdown resultant from the estimated mass is consistent with the result in superposed epoch study. The

  3. Stability of force-free Taylor states in a new version of magnetic flux-averaged magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pfirsch, D.; Sudan, R.N.

    1996-01-01

    It is observed that the recently developed magnetic flux-averaged magnetohydrodynamics (AMHD) [Phys. Plasmas {bold 1}, 2488 (1994)] is incompatible with Taylor{close_quote}s theorem, which states that the lowest-energy state of force-free equilibria based on the conservation of the helicity integral is absolutely stable for vanishingly small resistivity. By a modification of the Lagrangian from which AMHD is derived, a modified version of AMHD that is compatible with Taylor{close_quote}s theorem is obtained. It also provides an energy principle for examining the linear instability of resistive equilibria, which has a great advantage over resistive MHD. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Electron heating at interplanetary shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, W. C.; Asbridge, J. R.; Bame, S. J.; Gosling, J. T.; Zwickl, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    Data for 41 forward interplanetary shocks show that the ratio of downstream to upstream electron temperatures, T/sub e/(d/u) is variable in the range between 1.0 (isothermal) and 3.0. On average, (T/sub e/(d/u) = 1.5 with a standard deviation, sigma e = 0.5. This ratio is less than the average ratio of proton temperatures across the same shocks, (T/sub p/(d/u)) = 3.3 with sigma p = 2.5 as well as the average ratio of electron temperatures across the Earth's bow shock. Individual samples of T/sub e/(d/u) and T/sub p/(d/u) appear to be weakly correlated with the number density ratio. However the amounts of electron and proton heating are well correlated with each other as well as with the bulk velocity difference across each shock. The stronger shocks appear to heat the protons relatively more efficiently than they heat the electrons.

  5. Storm Sudden Commencements Without Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Wooyeon; Lee, Jeongwoo; Yi, Yu; Ssessanga, Nicholas; Oh, Suyeon

    2015-09-01

    Storm sudden commencements (SSCs) occur due to a rapid compression of the Earth's magnetic field. This is generally believed to be caused by interplanetary (IP) shocks, but with exceptions. In this paper we explore possible causes of SSCs other than IP shocks through a statistical study of geomagnetic storms using SYM-H data provided by the World Data Center for Geomagnetism ? Kyoto and by applying a superposed epoch analysis to simultaneous solar wind parameters obtained with the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite. We select a total of 274 geomagnetic storms with minimum SYM-H of less than ?30nT during 1998-2008 and regard them as SSCs if SYM-H increases by more than 10 nT over 10 minutes. Under this criterion, we found 103 geomagnetic storms with both SSC and IP shocks and 28 storms with SSC not associated with IP shocks. Storms in the former group share the property that the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), proton density and proton velocity increase together with SYM-H, implying the action of IP shocks. During the storms in the latter group, only the proton density rises with SYM-H. We find that the density increase is associated with either high speed streams (HSSs) or interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), and suggest that HSSs and ICMEs may be alternative contributors to SSCs.

  6. A new approach to identify interplanetary Alfvén waves and to obtain their frequency properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Wang, C.; Chao, J. K.; Hsieh, W. C.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional diagnosis of interplanetary Alfvén waves requires an accurately determined de Hoffmann-Teller (HT) frame or background magnetic field. For simplicity, the averaged HT frame and the mean value of the magnetic field are often used in the literature. However, HT frame can change quite fast in high-speed solar wind streams, and it is not always appropriate to take the average value of the magnetic field to be the background state. In order to reduce the uncertainty introduced by determining HT frame and background magnetic field, we propose a new approach for identifying large-amplitude interplanetary Alfvén waves. This new approach is independent of HT frame and of background magnetic field. Instead of the original data sets, the band-pass filtered signals of plasma velocity and magnetic field observations are used to check the Walén relation. The robustness of this technique is verified by applying to simulated pure Alfvén waves with two separate frequencies and contaminated by pink colored noises in a varying solar wind stream. Furthermore, in our approach, more properties of Alfvén waves in frequency domain can be obtained, which have been rarely discussed before. Our analysis technique is applied to two intervals of solar wind high-speed streams, and it is shown that large-amplitude Alfvén waves near 1 AU are frequently found during these two intervals.

  7. The Floor in the Solar Wind Magnetic Field Revisited

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-07

    Paper 3 . DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 Oct 2007 – 10 Nov 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Floor in the Solar Wind Magnetic Field Revisited...magnitude [B] had a floor of ≈ 4.6 nT in yearly averages, a value which the interplanetary magnetic - field [IMF] strength returned to, or approached, at...is implicit in the work of Owens and Crooker (2006, 2007) who simulated the interplanetary magnetic - field strength in terms of a constant open-flux

  8. Average Magnetic Field Magnitude Profiles of Wind Magnetic Clouds as a Function of Closest Approach to the Clouds' Axes and Comparison to Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Berdichevsky, D. B.; Wu, C.-C.

    2017-02-01

    We examine the average magnetic field magnitude (| B | ≡ B) within magnetic clouds (MCs) observed by the Wind spacecraft from 1995 to July 2015 to understand the difference between this B and the ideal B-profiles expected from using the static, constant-α, force-free, cylindrically symmetric model for MCs of Lepping, Jones, and Burlaga ( J. Geophys. Res. 95, 11957, 1990, denoted here as the LJB model). We classify all MCs according to an assigned quality, Q0 (= 1, 2, 3, for excellent, good, and poor). There are a total of 209 MCs and 124 when only Q0 = 1, 2 cases are considered. The average normalized field with respect to the closest approach (CA) is stressed, where we separate cases into four CA sets centered at 12.5 %, 37.5 %, 62.5 %, and 87.5 % of the average radius; the averaging is done on a percentage-duration basis to treat all cases the same. Normalized B means that before averaging, the B for each MC at each point is divided by the LJB model-estimated B for the MC axis, B0. The actual averages for the 209 and 124 MC sets are compared to the LJB model, after an adjustment for MC expansion ( e.g. Lepping et al. in Ann. Geophys. 26, 1919, 2008). This provides four separate difference-relationships, each fitted with a quadratic ( Quad) curve of very small σ. Interpreting these Quad formulae should provide a comprehensive view of the variation in normalized B throughout the average MC, where we expect external front and rear compression to be part of its explanation. These formulae are also being considered for modifying the LJB model. This modification will be used in a scheme for forecasting the timing and magnitude of magnetic storms caused by MCs. Extensive testing of the Quad formulae shows that the formulae are quite useful in correcting individual MC B-profiles, especially for the first {≈ }1/3 of these MCs. However, the use of this type of B correction constitutes a (slight) violation of the force-free assumption used in the original LJB MC model.

  9. Whistler Waves Associated with Weak Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velez, J. C. Ramirez; Blanco-Cano, X.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Russell, C. T.; Kajdic, P.; Jian,, L. K.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the properties of 98 weak interplanetary shocks measured by the dual STEREO spacecraft over approximately 3 years during the past solar minimum. We study the occurrence of whistler waves associated with these shocks, which on average are high beta shocks (0.2 < Beta < 10). We have compared the waves properties upstream and downstream of the shocks. In the upstream region the waves are mainly circularly polarized, and in most of the cases (approx. 75%) they propagate almost parallel to the ambient magnetic field (<30 deg.). In contrast, the propagation angle with respect to the shock normal varies in a broad range of values (20 deg. to 90 deg.), suggesting that they are not phase standing. We find that the whistler waves can extend up to 100,000 km in the upstream region but in most cases (88%) are contained in a distance within 30,000 km from the shock. This corresponds to a larger region with upstream whistlers associated with IP shocks than previously reported in the literature. The maximum amplitudes of the waves are observed next to the shock interface, and they decrease as the distance to the shock increases. In most cases the wave propagation direction becomes more aligned with the magnetic field as the distance to the shock increases. These two facts suggest that most of the waves in the upstream region are Landau damping as they move away from the shock. From the analysis we also conclude that it is likely that the generation mechanism of the upstream whistler waves is taking place at the shock interface. In the downstream region, the waves are irregularly polarized, and the fluctuations are very compressive; that is, the compressive component of the wave clearly dominates over the transverse one. The majority of waves in the downstream region (95%) propagate at oblique angles with respect to the ambient magnetic field (>60 deg.). The wave propagation with respect to the shock-normal direction has no preferred direction and varies similarly to

  10. Interplanetary shocks and solar wind extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vats, Hari

    The interplanetary shocks have a very high correlation with the annual sunspot numbers during the solar cycle; however the correlation falls very low on shorter time scale. Thus poses questions and difficulty in the predictability. Space weather is largely controlled by these interplanetary shocks, solar energetic events and the extremes of solar wind. In fact most of the solar wind extremes are related to the solar energetic phenomena. It is quite well understood that the energetic events like flares, filament eruptions etc. occurring on the Sun produce high speed extremes both in terms of density and speed. There is also high speed solar wind steams associated with the coronal holes mainly because the magnetic field lines are open there and the solar plasma finds it easy to escape from there. These are relatively tenuous high speed streams and hence create low intensity geomagnetic storms of higher duration. The solar flares and/or filament eruptions usually release excess coronal mass into the interplanetary medium and thus these energetic events send out high density and high speed solar wind which statistically found to produce more intense storms. The other extremes of solar wind are those in which density and speed are much lower than the normal values. Several such events have been observed and are found to produce space weather consequences of different kind. It is found that such extremes are more common around the maximum of solar cycle 20 and 23. Most of these have significantly low Alfven Mach number. This article is intended to outline the interplanetary and geomagnetic consequences of observed by ground based and satellite systems for the solar wind extremes.

  11. Unusually long lasting multiple penetration of interplanetary electric field to equatorial ionosphere under oscillating IMF Bz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yong; Hong, Minghua; Wan, Weixing; Du, Aimin; Lei, Jiuhou; Zhao, Biqiang; Wang, Wenbin; Ren, Zhipeng; Yue, Xinan

    2008-01-01

    During November 11-16, 2003, the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B z oscillated between northward and southward directions, which suggests discontinuous magnetic reconnection associated with the multiple pulses-like reconnection electric field. The Jicamarca incoherent scatter radar (ISR) measurements of ionospheric zonal electric field showed similar fluctuations during this period. The high correlation coefficient of 0.71 between the reconnection electric field and equatorial zonal electric field during 125 hours suggests that the interplanetary electric field (IEF) pulsively penetrated into the equatorial ionosphere due to the discontinuous magnetic reconnection. It is implied that the short lifetime (<3 hours) dawn-dusk IEF pulses can penetrate into ionosphere without shielding, in other words, they may exhibit the ``shielding immunity''. The averaged penetration efficiency is about 0.136 and highly local time-dependent. Furthermore, the intense AU and AL indices imply that the multiple electric field penetration is associated with a ``High-Intensity Long-Duration Continuous AE Activity (HILDCAA).''

  12. Laser-fusion rocket for interplanetary propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R.A.

    1983-09-27

    A rocket powered by fusion microexplosions is well suited for quick interplanetary travel. Fusion pellets are sequentially injected into a magnetic thrust chamber. There, focused energy from a fusion Driver is used to implode and ignite them. Upon exploding, the plasma debris expands into the surrounding magnetic field and is redirected by it, producing thrust. This paper discusses the desired features and operation of the fusion pellet, its Driver, and magnetic thrust chamber. A rocket design is presented which uses slightly tritium-enriched deuterium as the fusion fuel, a high temperature KrF laser as the Driver, and a thrust chamber consisting of a single superconducting current loop protected from the pellet by a radiation shield. This rocket can be operated with a power-to-mass ratio of 110 W gm/sup -1/, which permits missions ranging from occasional 9 day VIP service to Mars, to routine 1 year, 1500 ton, Plutonian cargo runs.

  13. Laboratory studies of interplanetary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are a form of primitive extraterrestrial material. In spite of the formidable experimental problems in working with particles that are too small to be seen with the naked eye, it has proven possible to obtain considerable information concerning their properties and possible origins. Dust particles collected in the stratosphere were reviewed. These particles are the best available samples of interplanetary dust and were studied using a variety of analytical techniques.

  14. Search Coil vs. Fluxgate Magnetometer Measurements at Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L.B., III

    2012-01-01

    We present magnetic field observations at interplanetary shocks comparing two different sample rates showing significantly different results. Fluxgate magnetometer measurements show relatively laminar supercritical shock transitions at roughly 11 samples/s. Search coil magnetometer measurements at 1875 samples/s, however, show large amplitude (dB/B as large as 2) fluctuations that are not resolved by the fluxgate magnetometer. We show that these fluctuations, identified as whistler mode waves, would produce a significant perturbation to the shock transition region changing the interpretation from laminar to turbulent. Thus, previous observations of supercritical interplanetary shocks classified as laminar may have been under sampled.

  15. Plasma properties of driver gas following interplanetary shocks observed by ISEE-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwickl, R. D.; Ashbridge, J. R.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Gosling, J. T.; Smith, E. J.

    1982-01-01

    Plasma fluid parameters calculated from solar wind and magnetic field data obtained on ISEE 3 were studied. The characteristic properties of driver gas following interplanetary shocks was determined. Of 54 shocks observed from August 1978 to February 1980, nine contained a well defined driver gas that was clearly identifiable by a discontinuous decrease in the average proton temperature across a tangential discontinuity. While helium enhancements were present in all of nine of these events, only about half of them contained simultaneous changes in the two quantities. Often the He/H ratio changed over a period of minutes. Simultaneous with the drop in proton temperature the helium and electron temperature decreased abruptly. In some cases the proton temperature depression was accompanied by a moderate increase in magnetic field magnitude with an unusually low variance and by an increase in the ratio of parallel to perpendicular temperature. The drive gas usually displayed a bidirectional flow of suprathermal solar wind electrons at higher energies.

  16. Proceedings of the Symposium on the Study of the Sun and Interplanetary Medium in Three Dimensions. [space mission planning and interplanetary trajectories by NASA and ESA to better observe the sun and solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisk, L. A. (Editor); Axford, W. I. (Editor)

    1976-01-01

    A series of papers are presented from a symposium attended by over 200 European and American scientists to examine the importance of exploring the interplanetary medium and the sun by out-of-the-ecliptic space missions. The likely scientific returns of these missions in the areas of solar, interplanetary, and cosmic ray physics is examined. Theoretical models of the solar wind and its interaction with interplanetary magnetic fields are given.

  17. Bounce- and MLT-averaged diffusion coefficients in a physics-based magnetic field geometry obtained from RAM-SCB for the March 17 2013 storm

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Lei; Yu, Yiqun; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Jordanova, Vania K.

    2015-04-01

    Local acceleration via whistler wave and particle interaction plays a significant role in particle dynamics in the radiation belt. In this work we explore gyro-resonant wave-particle interaction and quasi-linear diffusion in different magnetic field configurations related to the March 17 2013 storm. We consider the Earth's magnetic dipole field as a reference and compare the results against non-dipole field configurations corresponding to quiet and stormy conditions. The latter are obtained with the ring current-atmosphere interactions model with a self-consistent magnetic field RAM-SCB, a code that models the Earth's ring current and provides a realistic modeling of the Earth's magnetic field. By applying quasi-linear theory, the bounce- and MLT-averaged electron pitch angle, mixed term, and energy diffusion coefficients are calculated for each magnetic field configuration. For radiation belt (~1 MeV) and ring current (~100 keV) electrons, it is shown that at some MLTs the bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients become rather insensitive to the details of the magnetic field configuration, while at other MLTs storm conditions can expand the range of equatorial pitch angles where gyro-resonant diffusion occurs and significantly enhance the diffusion rates. When MLT average is performed at drift shell L = 4.25 (a good approximation to drift average), the diffusion coefficients become quite independent of the magnetic field configuration for relativistic electrons, while the opposite is true for lower energy electrons. These results suggest that, at least for the March 17 2013 storm and for L ≲ 4.25, the commonly adopted dipole approximation of the Earth's magnetic field can be safely used for radiation belt electrons, while a realistic modeling of the magnetic field configuration is necessary to describe adequately the diffusion rates of ring current electrons.

  18. Bounce- and MLT-averaged diffusion coefficients in a physics-based magnetic field geometry obtained from RAM-SCB for the March 17 2013 storm

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Lei; Yu, Yiqun; Delzanno, Gian Luca; ...

    2015-04-01

    Local acceleration via whistler wave and particle interaction plays a significant role in particle dynamics in the radiation belt. In this work we explore gyro-resonant wave-particle interaction and quasi-linear diffusion in different magnetic field configurations related to the March 17 2013 storm. We consider the Earth's magnetic dipole field as a reference and compare the results against non-dipole field configurations corresponding to quiet and stormy conditions. The latter are obtained with the ring current-atmosphere interactions model with a self-consistent magnetic field RAM-SCB, a code that models the Earth's ring current and provides a realistic modeling of the Earth's magnetic field.more » By applying quasi-linear theory, the bounce- and MLT-averaged electron pitch angle, mixed term, and energy diffusion coefficients are calculated for each magnetic field configuration. For radiation belt (~1 MeV) and ring current (~100 keV) electrons, it is shown that at some MLTs the bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients become rather insensitive to the details of the magnetic field configuration, while at other MLTs storm conditions can expand the range of equatorial pitch angles where gyro-resonant diffusion occurs and significantly enhance the diffusion rates. When MLT average is performed at drift shell L = 4.25 (a good approximation to drift average), the diffusion coefficients become quite independent of the magnetic field configuration for relativistic electrons, while the opposite is true for lower energy electrons. These results suggest that, at least for the March 17 2013 storm and for L ≲ 4.25, the commonly adopted dipole approximation of the Earth's magnetic field can be safely used for radiation belt electrons, while a realistic modeling of the magnetic field configuration is necessary to describe adequately the diffusion rates of ring current electrons.« less

  19. Heliospheric Consecuences of Solar Activity In Several Interplanetary Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Mendoza, B.; Lara, A.; Maravilla, D.

    We have done an analysis of several phenomena related to solar activity such as the total magnetic flux, coronal hole area and sunspots, investigated its long trend evolu- tion over several solar cycles and its possible relationships with interplanetary shocks, sudden storm commencements at earth and cosmic ray variations. Our results stress the physical connection between the solar magnetic flux emergence and the interplan- etary medium dynamics, in particular the importance of coronal hole evolution in the structuring of the heliosphere.

  20. Interplanetary Microlaser Transponders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, John J.

    1999-01-01

    The feasibility of an asynchronous (i.e. independently firing) interplanetary laser transponder, capable of ranging between Earth and Mars and using the automated SLR2000 Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) system as an Earth base station, has been suggested. Since that time, we have received a small amount of discretionary funding to further explore the transponder concept and to develop and test an engineering breadboard. Candidate operational scenarios for acquiring and tracking the opposite laser terminal over interplanetary distances have been developed, and breadboard engineering parameters were chosen to reflect the requirements of an Earth-Mars link Laboratory tests have been devised to simulate the Earth- Mars link between two independent SLR2000 transceivers and to demonstrate the transfer of range and time in single photon mode. The present paper reviews the concept of the asynchronous microlaser transponder, the transponder breadboard design, an operational scenario recently developed for an asteroid rendezvous, and the laboratory test setup. The optical head of the transponder breadboard fits within a cylinder roughly 15 cm in diameter and 32 cm in length and is mounted in a commercial two axis gimbal driven by two computer-controlled stepper motors which allows the receiver optical axis to be centered on a simulated Earth image. The optical head is built around a small optical bench which supports a 14.7 cm diameter refractive telescope, a prototype 2 kHz SLR2000 microlaser transmitter, a quadrant microchannel plate photomultiplier (MCP/PMT), a CCD array camera, spatial and spectral filters, assorted lenses and mirrors, and protective covers and sun shields. The microlaser is end-pumped by a fiber-coupled diode laser array. An annular mirror is employed as a passive transmit/receive (T/R) switch in an aperture-sharing arrangement wherein the transmitted beam passes through the central hole and illuminates only the central 2.5 cm of the common telescope

  1. Electromagnetic Whistler Precursors at Supercritical Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. B., III

    2012-01-01

    We present observations of electromagnetic precursor waves, identified as whistler mode waves, at supercritical interplanetary shocks using the Wind search coil magnetometer. The precursors propagate obliquely with respect to the local magnetic field, shock normal vector, solar wind velocity, and they are not phase standing structures. All are right-hand polarized with respect to the magnetic field (spacecraft frame), and all but one are right-hand polarized with respect to the shock normal vector in the normal incidence frame. Particle distributions show signatures of specularly reflected gyrating ions, which may be a source of free energy for the observed modes. In one event, we simultaneously observe perpendicular ion heating and parallel electron acceleration, consistent with wave heating/acceleration due to these waves.

  2. THREE-DIMENSIONAL FEATURES OF THE OUTER HELIOSPHERE DUE TO COUPLING BETWEEN THE INTERSTELLAR AND INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELDS. III. THE EFFECTS OF SOLAR ROTATION AND ACTIVITY CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Borovikov, Sergey N.; Zank, Gary P.; Ogino, Tatsuki E-mail: snb0003@uah.edu E-mail: ogino@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2009-05-10

    We investigate the effects of the 11 year solar cycle and 25 day rotation period of the Sun on the interaction of the solar wind (SW) with the local interstellar medium (LISM). Our models take into account the partially ionized character of the LISM and include momentum and energy transfer between the ionized and neutral components. We assume that the interstellar magnetic field vector belongs to the hydrogen deflection plane as discovered in the SOHO SWAN experiment. This plane is inclined at an angle of about 60 deg. toward the ecliptic plane of the Sun, as suggested in recent publications relating the local interstellar cloud properties to the radio emission observed by Voyager 1. It is assumed that the latitudinal extent of the boundary between the slow and fast SW regions, as well as the angle between the Sun's rotation and magnetic-dipole axes, are periodic functions of time, while the polarity of the interstellar magnetic field changes sign every 11 years at the solar maximum. The global variation of the SW-LISM interaction pattern, the excursions of the termination shock and the heliopause, and parameter distributions in certain directions are investigated. The analysis of the behavior of the wavy heliospheric current sheet in the supersonic SW region shows the importance of neutral atoms on its dynamics.

  3. Adaptive interplanetary orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crain, Timothy Price

    This work documents the development of a real-time interplanetary orbit determination monitoring algorithm for detecting and identifying changes in the spacecraft dynamic and measurement environments. The algorithm may either be utilized in a stand-alone fashion as a spacecraft monitor and hypothesis tester by navigators or may serve as a component in an autonomous adaptive orbit determination architecture. In either application, the monitoring algorithm serves to identify the orbit determination filter parameters to be modified by an offline process to restore the operational model accuracy when the spacecraft environment changes unexpectedly. The monitoring algorithm utilizes a hierarchical mixture-of-experts to regulate a multilevel bank organization of extended Kalman filters. Banks of filters operate on the hierarchy top-level and are composed of filters with configurations representative of a specific environment change called a macromode. Fine differences, or micromodes, within the macromodes are represented by individual filter configurations. Regulation is provided by two levels of single-layer neural networks called gating networks. A single top-level gating network regulates the weighting among macromodes and each bank uses a gating network to regulate member filters internally. Experiments are conducted on the Mars Pathfinder cruise trajectory environment using range and Doppler data from the Deep Space Network. The experiments investigate the ability of the hierarchical mixture-of-experts to identify three environment macromodes: (1) unmodeled impulsive maneuvers, (2) changes in the solar radiation pressure dynamics, and (3) changes in the measurement noise strength. Two methods of initializing the gating networks are examined in each experiment. One method gives the neurons associated with all filters equivalent synaptic weight. The other method places greater weight on the operational filter initially believed to model the spacecraft environment. The

  4. The earth's bow shock in an oblique interplanetary field.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, W.-W.

    1972-01-01

    The pressure, magnetic field, temperature, particle density, and stream velocity throughout the magnetosheath have been calculated in the plane containing the interplanetary field and solar wind velocity vector for various orientations of the interplanetary magnetic field and various assumed ratios of specific heats of the compressed solar wind. Jump conditions at the bow shock gave initial conditions in the shocked plasma from which the appropriate hydromagnetic equations (for blunt bodies in the subsonic region near the subsolar point and for the method of characteristics in the supersonic region back in the tail) were integrated numerically back to the surface of the magnetosphere. Explicit consideration of the magnetic field shows that a net asymmetrical force on the magnetopause produces a side force, or 'lift' in addition to the well-known drag on the magnetosphere.

  5. Latitudinal Dependence of the Radial IMF Component - Interplanetary Imprint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Smith, E. J.; Phillips, J.; Goldstein, B. E.; Nerney, S.

    1996-01-01

    Ulysses measurements have confirmed that there is no significant gradient with respect to heliomagnetic latitude in the radial component, B(sub r,), of the interplanetary magnetic field. There are two processes responsible for this observation. In the corona, the plasma beta is much less than 1, except directly above streamers, so both longitudinal and latitudinal (meridional) gradients in field strength will relax, due to the transverse magnetic pressure gradient force, as the solar wind carries magnetic flux away from the Sun. This happens so quickly that the field is essentially uniform by 5 solar radius. Beyond 10 solar radius, beta is greater than 1 and it is possible for a meridional thermal pressure gradient to redistribute magnetic flux - an effect apparently absent in Ulysses and earlier ICE and Interplanetary Magnetic Physics (IMP) data. We discuss this second effect here, showing that its absence is mainly due to the perpendicular part of the anisotropic thermal pressure gradient in the interplanetary medium being too small to drive significant meridional transport between the Sun and approx. 4 AU. This is done using a linear analytic estimate of meridional transport. The first effect was discussed in an earlier paper.

  6. Transport in the interplanetary medium of coronal mass ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgazzi, A.; Lara, A.; Romero-Salazar, L.; Ventura, A.

    2008-07-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large scale structures of plasma and magnetic field expelled from the Sun to the interplanetary medium and generally observed in white light coronagraphs. During their travel, in the interplanetary medium these structures named interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), suffer acceleration or deceleration due to the interaction with the ambient solar wind. This process can be understood as a transference of momentum between the interplanetary CME (ICME) and the solar wind. This process seems to be fundamentally different for `slow' and `fast' ICMEs (compared with the ambient solar wind velocity). In this work, we approach the problem from the fluid dynamics point of view and consider the ICMEs - solar wind system as two interacting fluids under the action of viscous forces. We note that this interaction is a special case of interaction between low density plasmas. Using these viscous forces in the Newtons Second Law, we obtained an analytical solution for the ICME velocity as a function of time. By comparing our analytic results with empirical models found in recent literature, we suggested values for the viscosity and drag parameters in this system. In this first approximation we have neglected the magnetic field.

  7. Fine-scale characteristics of interplanetary sector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behannon, K. W.; Neubauer, F. M.; Barnstoff, H.

    1980-01-01

    The structure of the interplanetary sector boundaries observed by Helios 1 within sector transition regions was studied. Such regions consist of intermediate (nonspiral) average field orientations in some cases, as well as a number of large angle directional discontinuities (DD's) on the fine scale (time scales 1 hour). Such DD's are found to be more similar to tangential than rotational discontinuities, to be oriented on average more nearly perpendicular than parallel to the ecliptic plane to be accompanied usually by a large dip ( 80%) in B and, with a most probable thickness of 3 x 10 to the 4th power km, significantly thicker previously studied. It is hypothesized that the observed structures represent multiple traversals of the global heliospheric current sheet due to local fluctuations in the position of the sheet. There is evidence that such fluctuations are sometimes produced by wavelike motions or surface corrugations of scale length 0.05 - 0.1 AU superimposed on the large scale structure.

  8. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections from MESSENGER Orbital Observations at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winslow, R. M.; Lugaz, N.; Philpott, L. C.; Schwadron, N.; Farrugia, C. J.; Anderson, B. J.; Smith, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    We use observations from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, in orbit around Mercury, to investigate interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) near 0.3 AU. MESSENGER, the first spacecraft since the 1980s to make in-situ measurements at distances < 0.5 AU, presents a unique opportunity for observing the innermost heliosphere. It also allows studies of ICME evolution as they expand and propagate outward, interacting with the solar wind. In order to catalog ICME events observed by MESSENGER, we design a strict set of selection criteria to identify them based on magnetic field observations only, since reliable solar wind plasma observations are not available from MESSENGER. We identify 61 ICME events observed by the MESSENGER Magnetometer between 2011 and 2014, and present statistical analyses of ICME properties at Mercury. In addition, using existing datasets of ICMEs at 1 AU we investigate key ICME property changes from Mercury to 1 AU. We find good agreement with previous studies for the magnetic field strength dependence on heliospheric distance, r. We have also established three different lines of evidence that ICME deceleration continues beyond the orbit of Mercury: 1) we find a shallow decrease with distance of ˜r-0.45 for the ICME shock speed from Mercury to 1 AU, 2) the average transit speed from the Sun to Mercury for ICMEs in our catalog is ˜20% faster than the average speed from the Sun to 1 AU, 3) the ICME transit time to 1 AU has a weaker dependence on the CME initial coronagraphic speed, as compared to what we predict based on our MESSENGER ICME catalog. Based on our results, future ICME propagation studies should account for ICME speed changes beyond Mercury's heliocentric distances to improve ICME arrival time forecasting. Our ICME database will also prove particularly useful for multipoint spacecraft studies of recent ICMEs, as well as for model validation of ICME properties.

  9. 3-D MHD Model of the Solar Wind-Interplanetary Space Combining System 1:Variation of Solar Wind Speed Associated with the Photospheric Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamizo, A.; Tanaka, T.

    2006-12-01

    Existing global models of the solar-wind/IMF expanding to the Earth's orbit are basically grounded in the idea of "source surface." It is widely accepted that the sector structure and the solar wind speed are primarily controlled by the magnetic field at the source surface and the so-called "expansion factor." On the other hand, 3-D MHD model is still off from practical use because both of scientific and technical problems. One of the former problems is the reproduction of supersonic solar-wind. From the viewpoint of the physics of the solar wind, coronal heating and outward acceleration mechanisms are invoked to explain the supersonic evolution of the solar wind. Since the mechanism responsible for the heating/acceleration is still one of the primary subjects of the physics of the solar wind, many MHD models have taken into account their effects by incorporating additional source terms corresponding to promising candidates such as thermal conductions, radiation losses and wave pressures. However there are few MHD models considering the effect of the expansion factor, which determines the solar-wind speed in the series of source surface models. In this study we newly incorporate the flux tube expansion rate into the MHD equation system including heat source function in the energy equation. Appling the unstructured grid system, we achieved the dense grid spacing at the inner boundary, which enable us to adopt realistic solar magnetic fields, and a size of simulation space of 1AU. Photospheric magnetic field data is used as the inner boundary condition.The simulation results are summarized as: (1) The variation of solar wind speed is well controlled by the structure of magnetic fields at and little above the solar surface and (2) Far above the solar surface, the interface between high and low speed flows evolves to a structure suggestive of CIRs. Comparing the data from simulation with the actual solar wind data obtained by spacecrafts, we will discuss the future

  10. Interplanetary dust particles and impact erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klacka, J.; Saniga, M.

    1992-11-01

    Consideration is given to the motion of interplanetary dust particles under the effect of collisions with much smaller interplanetary dust particles. The equation of motion is derived. Perturbation equations of celestial mechanics are also discussed. The results are compared with the Poynting-Robertson effect and the effect of solar wind on the motion of the interplanetary dust particles.

  11. USING COORDINATED OBSERVATIONS IN POLARIZED WHITE LIGHT AND FARADAY ROTATION TO PROBE THE SPATIAL POSITION AND MAGNETIC FIELD OF AN INTERPLANETARY SHEATH

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Ming; Feng, Xueshang; Liu, Ying D.; Davies, Jackie A.; Harrison, Richard A.; Owens, Mathew J.; Davis, Chris J.

    2013-11-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) can be continuously tracked through a large portion of the inner heliosphere by direct imaging in visible and radio wavebands. White light (WL) signatures of solar wind transients, such as CMEs, result from Thomson scattering of sunlight by free electrons and therefore depend on both viewing geometry and electron density. The Faraday rotation (FR) of radio waves from extragalactic pulsars and quasars, which arises due to the presence of such solar wind features, depends on the line-of-sight magnetic field component B{sub ∥} and the electron density. To understand coordinated WL and FR observations of CMEs, we perform forward magnetohydrodynamic modeling of an Earth-directed shock and synthesize the signatures that would be remotely sensed at a number of widely distributed vantage points in the inner heliosphere. Removal of the background solar wind contribution reveals the shock-associated enhancements in WL and FR. While the efficiency of Thomson scattering depends on scattering angle, WL radiance I decreases with heliocentric distance r roughly according to the expression I∝r {sup –3}. The sheath region downstream of the Earth-directed shock is well viewed from the L4 and L5 Lagrangian points, demonstrating the benefits of these points in terms of space weather forecasting. The spatial position of the main scattering site r{sub sheath} and the mass of plasma at that position M{sub sheath} can be inferred from the polarization of the shock-associated enhancement in WL radiance. From the FR measurements, the local B{sub ∥sheath} at r{sub sheath} can then be estimated. Simultaneous observations in polarized WL and FR can not only be used to detect CMEs, but also to diagnose their plasma and magnetic field properties.

  12. Development with MESSENGER Data of a Model of Mercury's Magnetospheric Magnetic Field Confined within the Average Observed Magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korth, H.; Tsyganenko, N. A.; Johnson, C. L.; Philpott, L. C.; Anderson, B. J.; Al Asad, M.; Solomon, S. C.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate knowledge of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field is required to understand the sources of the planet's internal field. We present the first model of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field that is confined within a magnetopause shape derived from Magnetometer observations by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. The model consists of individual modules for magnetic fields of internal origin, approximated by a dipole of magnitude 190 nT RM3, where RM is Mercury's radius, offset northward by 479 km along the spin axis, and of external origin resulting from currents flowing on the magnetopause boundary and in the cross-tail current sheet. The cross-tail current is prescribed having a disk shape near the planet and extending into a Harris sheet at larger distances. The magnitude of the tail current is fit to minimize the root mean square residual between the magnetic field within the magnetosphere observed by MESSENGER and the model field. The magnetic field contribution from each module is shielded individually by a scalar potential function consisting of Cartesian harmonic expansions with linear and non-linear coefficients, which are fit to minimize the root-mean-square normal magnetic field component at the magnetopause. The resulting model resembles the observed magnetic field better than the previously developed paraboloid model in regions that are close to the magnetopause, i.e., at northern high latitudes and on the dayside. It will allow more accurate characterization of crustal magnetization, which may be observed during low-altitude orbits in the final months of the MESSENGER mission.

  13. Differential measurement of cosmic-ray gradient with respect to interplanetary current sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christon, S. P.; Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Behannon, K. W.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1985-01-01

    Simultaneous magnetic field and charged particle measurements from the Voyager spacecraft at heliographic latitude separations from 10 deg. to 21 deg. are used to determine the latitude gradient of the galactic cosmic ray flux with respect to the interplanetary current sheet. By comparing the ratio of cosmic ray flux at Voyager 1 to that a Voyager 2 during periods when both spacecraft are first nort and then south of the interplanetary current sheet, we find an estimate of the latitudinal gradient with respect to the current sheet of approximately -0.15 + or 0.05% deg under restricted interplanetary conditions.

  14. Interplanetary Circumstances of Quasi-Perpendicular Interplanetary Shocks in 1996-2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    2010-01-01

    The angle (theta(sub Bn)) between the normal to an interplanetary shock front and the upstream magnetic field direction, though often thought of as a property "of the shock," is also determined by the configuration of the magnetic field immediately upstream of the shock. We investigate the interplanetary circumstances of 105 near-Earth quasi-perpendicular shocks during 1996-2005 identified by theta(sub Bn) greater than or equal to 80 degrees and/or by evidence of shock drift particle acceleration. Around 87% of these shocks were driven by interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs); the remainder were probably the forward shocks of corotating interaction regions. For around half of the shocks, the upstream field was approximately perpendicular to the radial direction, either east-west or west-east or highly inclined to the ecliptic. Such field directions will give quasi-perpendicular configurations for radially propagating shocks. Around 30% of the shocks were propagating through, or closely followed, ICMEs at the time of observation. Another quarter were propagating through the heliospheric plasma sheet (HPS), and a further quarter occurred in slow solar wind that did not have characteristics of the HPS. Around 11% were observed in high-speed streams, and 7% in the sheaths following other shocks. The fraction of shocks found in high-speed streams is around a third of that expected based on the fraction of the time when such streams were observed at Earth. Quasi-perpendicular shocks are found traveling through ICMEs around 2-3 times more frequently than expected. In addition, shocks propagating through ICMEs are more likely to have larger values of theta(sub Bn) than shocks outside ICMEs.

  15. Cosmic rays, conditions in interplanetary space and geomagnetic variations during solar cycles 19-24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biktash, Lilia

    2016-07-01

    We have studied conditions in interplanetary space, which can have an influence on galactic and solar cosmic rays (CRs). In this connection the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field parameters and CRs variations have been compared with geomagnetic activity represented by the equatorial Dst and Kp indices beginning from 1955 to the end 2015. The indices are in common practice in the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction studies and they are the final product of this interaction. The important drivers in interplanetary medium which have effect on cosmic rays as CMEs (coronal mass ejections) and CIRs (corotating interaction regions) undergo very strong changes during their propagation to the Earth. Correlation of sunspot numbers and long-term variations of cosmic rays do not adequately reflect peculiarities concerned with the solar wind arrival to 1 AU also. Moreover records of in situ space measurements of the IMF and most other indicators of solar activity cover only a few decades and have a lot of gaps for calculations of long-term variations. Because of this, in such investigations, the geomagnetic indices have some inestimable advantage as continuous series other the solar wind measurements. We have compared the yearly average variations of the indices and of the solar wind parameters with cosmic ray data from Moscow, Climax, Halekala and Oulu neutron monitors during the 20-24 solar cycles. During the descending phases of the solar cycles the long-lasting solar wind high speed streams occurred frequently and were the primary contributors to the recurrent Dst variations and had effects on cosmic rays variations. We show that long-term Dst and Kp variations in these solar cycles were correlated with cosmic ray count rates and can be used for prediction of CR variations. Climate change in connection with evolution of CRs variations is discussed.

  16. Solar Implications of ULYSSES Interplanetary Field Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.-M.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    1995-07-01

    Recent observations by the Ulysses magnetometer team have shown that the strength of the radial interplanetary field component, |Br| , is essentially independent of latitude, a result which implies that the heliospheric currents are confined entirely to thin sheets. Using such a current sheet model, we extrapolate the observed photospheric field to 1 AU and compare the predicted magnitude and sign of Br with spacecraft measurements during 1970--1993. Approximate agreement can be obtained if the solar magnetograph measurements in the Fe I lambda 5250 line are scaled upward by a latitude-dependent factor, similar to that derived by Ulrich from a study of magnetic saturation effects. The correction factor implies sharply peaked polar fields near sunspot minimum, with each polar coronal hole having a mean field strength of 10 G.

  17. The emergence of different polarity photospheric flux as the cause of CMEs and interplanetary shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bravo, S.

    1995-01-01

    Here we discuss the effect that the emergence of flux with a polarity opposed to that previously established in a certain photospheric region. can have on the magnetic structure of the solar atmosphere. We show that such a flux emergence may lead to the ejection of coronal material into the interplanetary medium (a CME) and also to a rapid change in the velocity of the solar wind from the region, which may eventually lead to the formation of an interplanetary shock.

  18. Correlations of SEP event decline characteristics with parameters of interplanetary medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daibog, E. I.; Kahler, S.; Kecskemety, K.; Logachev, Yu. I.

    The shape of the particle flux decline in solar energetic particle (SEP) events is of particular importance in understanding the propagation of energetic particles in the interplanetary medium. Power-law time profiles indicate the dominance of diffusive propagation, whereas exponential-law decline emphasizes convection transport and adiabatic deceleration. Values obtained theoretically for the decay time τ = 3r / 2V (2 + α γ ) in the latter case are reasonably close to the fitted slopes in nearly half of all events when the solar wind speed V stays nearly constant. Dependencies as the variation of the decay time with energy and angular distance of the observer from the flare heliolongitude are considered, as well as those of characteristic decay time and spectral index on environmental plasma parameters. The influence of parameters of interplanetary medium upon decay time manifestates in a tendency of τ decreasing with increasing of both solar wind speed and magnetic field strength. Parts of exponential-law declines when solar wind speeds: i) is constant, ii) increases and iii) decreases with time through the interval were analyzed separately. Both average values and dispersions of size distributions of τ for these three groups markedly differ in accordance with theoretical expectations. Some "restricting" dependence of τ on V (τ decreases with V) was obtained as well.

  19. Interplanetary density models as inferred from solar Type III bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppeneiger, Lucas; Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Lammer, Helmut; Lichtenegger, Herbert

    2016-04-01

    We report on the density models derived from spectral features of solar Type III bursts. They are generated by beams of electrons travelling outward from the Sun along open magnetic field lines. Electrons generate Langmuir waves at the plasma frequency along their ray paths through the corona and the interplanetary medium. A large frequency band is covered by the Type III bursts from several MHz down to few kHz. In this analysis, we consider the previous empirical density models proposed to describe the electron density in the interplanetary medium. We show that those models are mainly based on the analysis of Type III bursts generated in the interplanetary medium and observed by satellites (e.g. RAE, HELIOS, VOYAGER, ULYSSES,WIND). Those models are confronted to stereoscopic observations of Type III bursts recorded by WIND, ULYSSES and CASSINI spacecraft. We discuss the spatial evolution of the electron beam along the interplanetary medium where the trajectory is an Archimedean spiral. We show that the electron beams and the source locations are depending on the choose of the empirical density models.

  20. Particle acceleration due to shocks in the interplanetary field: High time resolution data and simulation results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, R. L.; Armstrong, T. P.; Nuber, R.; Bandle, J.

    1985-01-01

    Data were examined from two experiments aboard the Explorer 50 (IMP 8) spacecraft. The Johns Hopkins University/Applied Lab Charged Particle Measurement Experiment (CPME) provides 10.12 second resolution ion and electron count rates as well as 5.5 minute or longer averages of the same, with data sampled in the ecliptic plane. The high time resolution of the data allows for an explicit, point by point, merging of the magnetic field and particle data and thus a close examination of the pre- and post-shock conditions and particle fluxes associated with large angle oblique shocks in the interplanetary field. A computer simulation has been developed wherein sample particle trajectories, taken from observed fluxes, are allowed to interact with a planar shock either forward or backward in time. One event, the 1974 Day 312 shock, is examined in detail.

  1. Coronal and interplanetary propagation, interplanetary acceleration, cosmic-ray observations by deep space network and anomalous component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose is to provide an overview of the contributions presented in sessions SH3, SH1.5, SH4.6 and SH4.7 of the 19th International Cosmic Ray Conference. These contributed papers indicate that steady progress continues to be made in both the observational and the theoretical aspects of the transport and acceleration of energetic charged particles in the heliosphere. Studies of solar and interplanetary particles have placed emphasis on particle directional distributions in relation to pitch-angle scattering and magnetic focusing, on the rigidity and spatial dependence of the mean free path, and on new propagation regimes in the inner and outer heliosphere. Coronal propagation appears in need of correlative multi-spacecraft studies in association with detailed observation of the flare process and coronal magnetic structures. Interplanetary acceleration has now gone into a consolidation phase, with theories being worked out in detail and checked against observation.

  2. The interplanetary exchange of photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Cockell, Charles S

    2008-02-01

    Panspermia, the transfer of organisms from one planet to another, either through interplanetary or interstellar space, remains speculation. However, its potential can be experimentally tested. Conceptually, it is island biogeography on an interplanetary or interstellar scale. Of special interest is the possibility of the transfer of oxygenic photosynthesis between one planet and another, as it can initiate large scale biospheric productivity. Photosynthetic organisms, which must live near the surface of rocks, can be shown experimentally to be subject to destruction during atmospheric transit. Many of them grow as vegetative cells, which are shown experimentally to be susceptible to destruction by shock during impact ejection, although the effectiveness of this dispersal filter can be shown to be mitigated by the characteristics of the cells and their local environment. Collectively these, and other, experiments reveal the particular barriers to the cross-inoculation of photosynthesis. If oxygen biosignatures are eventually found in the atmospheres of extrasolar planets, understanding the potential for the interplanetary exchange of photosynthesis will aid in their interpretation.

  3. Quaternion Averaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Cheng, Yang; Crassidis, John L.; Oshman, Yaakov

    2007-01-01

    Many applications require an algorithm that averages quaternions in an optimal manner. For example, when combining the quaternion outputs of multiple star trackers having this output capability, it is desirable to properly average the quaternions without recomputing the attitude from the the raw star tracker data. Other applications requiring some sort of optimal quaternion averaging include particle filtering and multiple-model adaptive estimation, where weighted quaternions are used to determine the quaternion estimate. For spacecraft attitude estimation applications, derives an optimal averaging scheme to compute the average of a set of weighted attitude matrices using the singular value decomposition method. Focusing on a 4-dimensional quaternion Gaussian distribution on the unit hypersphere, provides an approach to computing the average quaternion by minimizing a quaternion cost function that is equivalent to the attitude matrix cost function Motivated by and extending its results, this Note derives an algorithm that deterniines an optimal average quaternion from a set of scalar- or matrix-weighted quaternions. Rirthermore, a sufficient condition for the uniqueness of the average quaternion, and the equivalence of the mininiization problem, stated herein, to maximum likelihood estimation, are shown.

  4. Dynamics of the Solar Plasma Events and Their Interplanetary Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Subhash Chandra

    2016-07-01

    In the present study we have analyzed the interplanetary plasma / field parameter, which have initiated the complex nature intense and highly geo-effective events in the magnetosphere. It is believed that Solar wind velocity V. interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B and Bz are the crucial drivers of these activities. However, sometimes strong geomagnetic disturbance is associated with the interaction between slow and fast solar wind originating from coronal holes leads to create co-rotating plasma interaction region (CIR). Thus the dynamics of the magnetospheric plasma configuration is the reflection of measured solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. While the magnetospheric plasma anomalies are generally represented by geomagnetic storms and sudden ionosphere disturbance (SIDs). The study considers geomagnetic storms associated with disturbance storm time (Dst) decreases of more than -50 nT to -300 nT, observed during solar cycle 23 and the ascending phase of solar cycle 24. These have been analyzed and studied statistically. The spacecraft data those provided by SOHO, ACE and geomagnetic stations like WDC-Kyoto are utilized in the study. It is observed that the yearly occurrences of geomagnetic storm are strongly correlated with 11-year sunspot cycle, but no significant correlation between the maximum and minimum phase of solar cycle have been found. It is also found that solar cycle-23 is remarkable for occurrence of intense geomagnetic storms during its declining phase. The detailed results are discussed in this paper.

  5. Propagation of Interplanetary Disturbances in the Outer Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chi

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. We have developed a one-dimensional, spherically symmetric, multi-fluid MHD model that includes solar wind protons and electrons, pickup ions, and interstellar neutral hydrogen. This model advances the existing solar wind models for the outer heliosphere in two important ways: one is that it distinguishes solar wind protons from pickup ions, and the other is that it allows for energy transfer from pickup ions to the solar wind protons. Model results compare favorably with the Voyager 2 observations. 2. 2. Solar wind slowdown and interstellar neutral density. The solar wind in the outer heliosphere is fundamentally different from that in the inner heliosphere since the effects of interstellar neutrals become significant. 3. ICME propagation from the inner to outer heliosphere. Large coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have major effects on the structure of the solar wind and the heliosphere. The plasma and magnetic field can be compressed ahead of interplanetary CMEs. 4. During the current solar cycle (Cycle 23), several major CMEs associated with solar flares produced large transient shocks which were observed by widely-separated spacecraft such as Wind at Earth and Voyager 2 beyond 60 AU. Using data from these spacecraft, we use the multi-fluid model to investigate shock propagation and interaction in the heliosphere. Specifically, we studied the Bastille Day 2000, April 2001 and Halloween 2003 events. 5. Statistical properties of the solar wind in the outer heliosphere. In a collaboration with L.F. Burlaga of GSFC, it is shown that the basic statistical properties of the solar wind in the outer heliosphere can be well produced by our model. We studied the large-scale heliospheric magnetic field strength fluctuations as a function of distance from the Sun during the declining phase of a solar cycle, using our numerical model with observations made at 1 AU during 1995 as input. 6. Radial heliospheric magnetic field events. The

  6. Can upstream ion events at the Lagrangian point L1 mimic ions accelerated at an interplanetary shock wave?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostopoulos, George C.; Maragakis, Mιchael; Vassiliadis, Efthymios

    2013-04-01

    Changes in plasma, magnetic field and energetic ion observations at Libration Point L1 (~220 Re) are important for space whether research. However, short-lived (from some minutes to a few hours) ion intensity enhancements at L1 have been attributed to various sources and acceleration sites: interplanetary shock acceleration, acceleration at Earth's bow shock, leakage from Earth's magnetosphere etc. The scope of this study is to examine to which extent ion events originating from the Earth's magnetosphere environment could mimic ion events propagating up to L1 point after acceleration at (distant) interplanetary shock waves. For this reason we performed a statistical study and compared ion events observed almost simultaneously by the Geotail spacecraft near the Earth's bow shock and by ACE moving around the Libration point L1. Due to drastic changes of several parameters between the two sites, we found that at around the point L1, the ACE ion events show a strong spectrum with an average spectral index as low as ?A = 2.1 (for a power law spectrum) at the level of 200 keV, while the average spectral index for the corresponding ion events observed by Goetail was found to be ?G = 5.4. We infer that a short duration ion event with a hard "solar" / "interplanetary" type energy spectrum can originate from the Earth's magnetosphere, and, that, therefore, these results should be seriously taken into account in space weather prediction research. More detailed information on the varying features of travelling ions and electrons from the bow shock to far distances are important as regards the problem of their origin and are also presented and discussed in the paper.

  7. Modeling solar wind with boundary conditions from interplanetary scintillations

    DOE PAGES

    Manoharan, P.; Kim, T.; Pogorelov, N. V.; ...

    2015-09-30

    Interplanetary scintillations make it possible to create three-dimensional, time- dependent distributions of the solar wind velocity. Combined with the magnetic field observations in the solar photosphere, they help perform solar wind simulations in a genuinely time-dependent way. Interplanetary scintillation measurements from the Ooty Radio Astronomical Observatory in India provide directions to multiple stars and may assure better resolution of transient processes in the solar wind. In this paper, we present velocity distributions derived from Ooty observations and compare them with those obtained with the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model. We also present our simulations of the solar wind flow from 0.1 AUmore » to 1 AU with the boundary conditions based on both Ooty and WSA data.« less

  8. Modeling solar wind with boundary conditions from interplanetary scintillations

    SciTech Connect

    Manoharan, P.; Kim, T.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Arge, C. N.

    2015-09-30

    Interplanetary scintillations make it possible to create three-dimensional, time- dependent distributions of the solar wind velocity. Combined with the magnetic field observations in the solar photosphere, they help perform solar wind simulations in a genuinely time-dependent way. Interplanetary scintillation measurements from the Ooty Radio Astronomical Observatory in India provide directions to multiple stars and may assure better resolution of transient processes in the solar wind. In this paper, we present velocity distributions derived from Ooty observations and compare them with those obtained with the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model. We also present our simulations of the solar wind flow from 0.1 AU to 1 AU with the boundary conditions based on both Ooty and WSA data.

  9. Interplanetary shock waves and the structure of solar wind disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hundhausen, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    Observations and theoretical models of interplanetary shock waves are reviewed, with emphasis on the large-scale characteristics of the associated solar wind disturbances and on the relationship of these disturbances to solar activity. The sum of observational knowledge indicates that shock waves propagate through the solar wind along a broad, roughly spherical front, ahead of plasma and magnetic field ejected from solar flares. Typically, the shock front reaches 1 AU about two days after its flare origin, and is of intermediate strength. Not all large flares produce observable interplanetary shock waves; the best indicator of shock production appears to be the generation of both type 2 and type 4 radio bursts by a flare. Theoretical models of shock propagation in the solar wind can account for the typically observed shock strength, transit time, and shape.

  10. Atypical Particle Heating at a Supercritical Interplanetary Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Lynn B., III

    2010-01-01

    We present the first observations at an interplanetary shock of large amplitude (> 100 mV/m pk-pk) solitary waves and large amplitude (approx.30 mV/m pk-pk) waves exhibiting characteristics consistent with electron Bernstein waves. The Bernstein-like waves show enhanced power at integer and half-integer harmonics of the cyclotron frequency with a broadened power spectrum at higher frequencies, consistent with the electron cyclotron drift instability. The Bernstein-like waves are obliquely polarized with respect to the magnetic field but parallel to the shock normal direction. Strong particle heating is observed in both the electrons and ions. The observed heating and waveforms are likely due to instabilities driven by the free energy provided by reflected ions at this supercritical interplanetary shock. These results offer new insights into collisionless shock dissipation and wave-particle interactions in the solar wind.

  11. On interplanetary coronal mass ejection identification at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, T.; Russell, C. T.; Gosling, J. T.

    1999-06-01

    Coronal mass ejections are believed to be produced in the corona from closed magnetic regions not previously participating in the solar wind expansion. At 1 AU their interplanetary counterparts (ICMEs) generally have a number of distinct plasma and field signatures that distinguish them from the ambient solar wind. These include heat flux dropouts, bi-directional streaming, enhanced alpha particle events, times of depressed proton temperatures, intervals of distorted or enhanced magnetic field, and times of large magnetic field rotations characteristic of magnetic clouds. The first three of these signatures are phenomena that occur at some point within the ICME, but do not necessarily persist throughout the entire ICME. The large scale magnetic field rotations, distortions and enhancements, and the proton temperature depressions tend to mark more accurately the beginning and end of the ICME proper. We examine herein the reliability with which each of these markers identifies ICMEs utilizing ISEE-3 data from 1978-1980.

  12. Magnetic clouds, helicity conservation, and intrinsic scale flux ropes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.; Rust, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    An intrinsic-scale flux-rope model for interplanetary magnetic clouds, incorporating conservation of magnetic helicity, flux and mass is found to adequately explain clouds' average thermodynamic and magnetic properties. In spite their continuous expansion as they balloon into interplanetary space, magnetic clouds maintain high temperatures. This is shown to be due to magnetic energy dissipation. The temperature of an expanding cloud is shown to pass through a maximum above its starting temperature if the initial plasma beta in the cloud is less than 2/3. Excess magnetic pressure inside the cloud is not an important driver of the expansion as it is almost balanced by the tension in the helical field lines. It is conservation of magnetic helicity and flux that requires that clouds expand radially as they move away from the Sun. Comparison with published data shows good agreement between measured cloud properties and theory. Parameters determined from theoretical fits to the data, when extended back to the Sun, are consistent with the origin of interplanetary magnetic clouds in solar filament eruptions. A possible extension of the heating mechanism discussed here to heating of the solar corona is discussed.

  13. Interplanetary Lyman-beta emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paresce, F.

    1973-01-01

    Derivation of the intensity of the diffuse hydrogen Lyman-beta glow at 1025 A which is due to resonance scattering of the solar H I 1025 A line by interstellar and interplanetary hydrogen. Two sources of neutral hydrogen are considered: the local interstellar medium interacting with the solar system, and the dust deionization of the H(+) component of the solar wind. It is shown that if the dust geometrical factor is less than or equal to five quintillionths per cm, observations of backscattered Lyman-beta radiation will provide a unique determination of the density and temperature of the local interstellar medium.

  14. Active shielding for long duration interplanetary manned missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spillantini, Piero

    2010-04-01

    For long duration interplanetary manned missions the protection of astronauts from cosmic radiation is an unavoidable problem that has been considered by many space agencies. In Europe, during 2002-2004, the European Space Agency supported two research programs on this thematic: one was the constitution of a dedicated study group (on the thematic 'Shielding from cosmic radiation for interplanetary missions: active and passive methods') in the framework of the 'life and physical sciences' report, and the other an industrial study concerning the 'radiation exposure and mission strategies for interplanetary manned missions to Moon and Mars'. Both programs concluded that, outside the protection of the magnetosphere and in the presence of the most intense and energetic solar events, the protection cannot rely solely on the mechanical structures of the spacecraft, but a temporary shelter must be provided. Because of the limited mass budget, the shelter should be based on the use of superconducting magnetic systems. For long duration missions the astronauts must be protected from the much more energetic galactic cosmic rays during the whole mission period. This requires the protection of a large habitat where they could live and work, and not the temporary protection of a small volume shelter. With passive absorbers unable to play any significant role, the use of active shielding is mandatory. The possibilities offered by superconducting magnets are discussed, and recommendations are made about the needed R&D. The technical developments that have occurred in the meanwhile and the evolving panorama of possible near future interplanetary missions, require revising the pioneering studies of the last decades and the adoption of a strategy that considers long lasting human permanence in 'deep' space, moreover not only for a relatively small number of dedicated astronauts but also for citizens conducting there 'normal' activities.

  15. The effect of reducing spatial resolution by in-plane partial volume averaging on peak velocity measurements in phase contrast magnetic resonance angiography

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Jonathan; Minhas, Kishore; Pieles, Guido; McAlindon, Elisa; Occleshaw, Christopher; Manghat, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to quantify the degree of the effect of in-plane partial volume averaging on recorded peak velocity in phase contrast magnetic resonance angiography (PCMRA). Methods Using cardiac optimized 1.5 Tesla MRI scanners (Siemens Symphony and Avanto), 145 flow measurements (14 anatomical locations; ventricular outlets, aortic valve (AorV), aorta (5 sites), pulmonary arteries (3 sites), pulmonary veins, superior and inferior vena cava)- in 37 subjects (consisting of healthy volunteers, congenital and acquired heart disease patients) were analyzed by Siemens Argus default voxel averaging technique (where peak velocity = mean of highest velocity voxel and four neighbouring voxels) and by single voxel technique (1.3×1.3×5 or 1.7×1.7×5.5 mm3) (where peak velocity = highest velocity voxel only). The effect of scan protocol (breath hold versus free breathing) and scanner type (Siemens Symphony versus Siemens Avanto) were also assessed. Statistical significance was defined as P<0.05. Results There was a significant mean increase in peak velocity of 7.1% when single voxel technique was used compared to voxel averaging (P<0.0001). Significant increases in peak velocity were observed by single voxel technique compared to voxel averaging regardless of subject type, anatomical flow location, scanner type and breathing command. Disabling voxel averaging did not affect the volume of flow recorded. Conclusions Reducing spatial resolution by the use of voxel averaging produces a significant underestimation of peak velocity. While this is of itself not surprising this is the first report to quantify the size of the effect. When PCMRA is used to assess peak velocity recording pixel averaging should be disabled. PMID:27942477

  16. STEREO database of interplanetary Langmuir electric waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briand, C.; Henri, P.; Génot, V.; Lormant, N.; Dufourg, N.; Cecconi, B.; Nguyen, Q. N.; Goetz, K.

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes a database of electric waveforms that is available at the Centre de Données de la Physique des Plasmas (CDPP, http://cdpp.eu/). This database is specifically dedicated to waveforms of Langmuir/Z-mode waves. These waves occur in numerous kinetic processes involving electrons in space plasmas. Statistical analysis from a large data set of such waves is then of interest, e.g., to study the relaxation of high-velocity electron beams generated at interplanetary shock fronts, in current sheets and magnetic reconnection region, the transfer of energy between high and low frequencies, the generation of electromagnetic waves. The Langmuir waveforms were recorded by the Time Domain Sampler (TDS) of the WAVES radio instrument on board the STEREO mission. In this paper, we detail the criteria used to identify the Langmuir/Z-mode waves among the whole set of waveforms of the STEREO spacecraft. A database covering the November 2006 to August 2014 period is provided. It includes electric waveforms expressed in the normalized frame (B,B × Vsw,B × (B × Vsw)) with B and Vsw the local magnetic field and solar wind velocity vectors, and the local magnetic field in the variance frame, in an interval of ±1.5 min around the time of the Langmuir event. Quicklooks are also provided that display the three components of the electric waveforms together with the spectrum of E∥, together with the magnitude and components of the magnetic field in the 3 min interval, in the variance frame. Finally, the distribution of the Langmuir/Z-mode waves peak amplitude is also analyzed.

  17. Performance of a Bounce-Averaged Global Model of Super-Thermal Electron Transport in the Earth's Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, Tim

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we report the results of our recent research on the application of a multiprocessor Cray T916 supercomputer in modeling super-thermal electron transport in the earth's magnetic field. In general, this mathematical model requires numerical solution of a system of partial differential equations. The code we use for this model is moderately vectorized. By using Amdahl's Law for vector processors, it can be verified that the code is about 60% vectorized on a Cray computer. Speedup factors on the order of 2.5 were obtained compared to the unvectorized code. In the following sections, we discuss the methodology of improving the code. In addition to our goal of optimizing the code for solution on the Cray computer, we had the goal of scalability in mind. Scalability combines the concepts of portabilty with near-linear speedup. Specifically, a scalable program is one whose performance is portable across many different architectures with differing numbers of processors for many different problem sizes. Though we have access to a Cray at this time, the goal was to also have code which would run well on a variety of architectures.

  18. The interaction of a magnetic cloud with the Earth - Ionospheric convection in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres for a wide range of quasi-steady interplanetary magnetic field conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, M. P.; Farrugia, C. J.; Burlaga, L. F.; Hairston, M. R.; Greenspan, M. E.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Lepping, R. P.

    1993-01-01

    Observations are presented of the ionospheric convection in cross sections of the polar cap and auroral zone as part of the study of the interaction of the Earth's magnetosphere with the magnetic cloud of January 13-15, 1988. For strongly northward IMF, the convection in the Southern Hemisphere is characterized by a two-cell convection pattern comfined to high latitudes with sunward flow over the pole. The strength of the flows is comparable to that later seen under southward IMF. Superimposed on this convection pattern there are clear dawn-dusk asymmetries associated with a one-cell convection component whose sense depends on the polarity of the magnetic cloud's large east-west magnetic field component. When the cloud's magnetic field turns southward, the convection is characterized by a two-cell pattern extending to lower latitude with antisunward flow over the pole. There is no evident interhemispheric difference in the structure and strength of the convection. Superimposed dawn-dusk asymmetries in the flow patterns are observed which are only in part attributable to the east-west component of the magnetic field.

  19. Fine structure of the interplanetary shock front according to measurements of the ion flux of the solar wind with high time resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eselevich, V. G.; Borodkova, N. L.; Eselevich, M. V.; Zastenker, G. N.; Šafránkova, Y.; Němeček, Z.; Přech, L.

    2017-01-01

    According to the data of the BMSW/ SPEKTR-R instrument, which measured the density and velocity of solar wind plasma with a record time resolution, up to 3 ×10-2 s, the structure of the front of interplanetary shocks has been investigated. The results of these first investigations were compared with the results of studying the structure of the bow shocks obtained in previous years. A comparison has shown that the quasi-stationary (averaged over the rapid oscillations) distribution of plasma behind the interplanetary shock front was significantly more inhomogeneous than that behind the bow-shock front, i.e., in the magnetosheath. It has also been shown that, to determine the size of internal structures of the fronts of quasi-perpendicular (θBN > 45°) shocks, one could use the magnetic field magnitude, the proton density, and the proton flux of the solar wind on almost equal terms. A comparison of low Mach ( M A < 2), low beta (β1 < 1) fronts of interplanetary and bow shocks has shown that the dispersion of oblique magnetosonic waves plays an essential role in their formation.

  20. Preconditioning of Interplanetary Space Due to Transient CME Disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temmer, M.; Reiss, M. A.; Nikolic, L.; Hofmeister, S. J.; Veronig, A. M.

    2017-02-01

    Interplanetary space is characteristically structured mainly by high-speed solar wind streams emanating from coronal holes and transient disturbances such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs). While high-speed solar wind streams pose a continuous outflow, CMEs abruptly disrupt the rather steady structure, causing large deviations from the quiet solar wind conditions. For the first time, we give a quantification of the duration of disturbed conditions (preconditioning) for interplanetary space caused by CMEs. To this aim, we investigate the plasma speed component of the solar wind and the impact of in situ detected interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs), compared to different background solar wind models (ESWF, WSA, persistence model) for the time range 2011–2015. We quantify in terms of standard error measures the deviations between modeled background solar wind speed and observed solar wind speed. Using the mean absolute error, we obtain an average deviation for quiet solar activity within a range of 75.1–83.1 km s‑1. Compared to this baseline level, periods within the ICME interval showed an increase of 18%–32% above the expected background, and the period of two days after the ICME displayed an increase of 9%–24%. We obtain a total duration of enhanced deviations over about three and up to six days after the ICME start, which is much longer than the average duration of an ICME disturbance itself (∼1.3 days), concluding that interplanetary space needs ∼2–5 days to recover from the impact of ICMEs. The obtained results have strong implications for studying CME propagation behavior and also for space weather forecasting.

  1. Geometrical Relationship Between Interplanetary Flux Ropes and Their Solar Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marubashi, K.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Gopalswamy, N.; Cho, K.-S.; Park, Y.-D.

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the physical connection between interplanetary flux ropes (IFRs) near Earth and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) by comparing the magnetic field structures of IFRs and CME source regions. The analysis is based on the list of 54 pairs of ICMEs (interplanetary coronal mass ejections) and CMEs that are taken to be the most probable solar source events. We first attempted to identify the flux rope structure in each of the 54 ICMEs by fitting models with a cylinder and torus magnetic field geometry, both with a force-free field structure. This analysis determined the possible geometries of the identified flux ropes. Then we compared the flux rope geometries with the magnetic field structure of the solar source regions. We obtained the following results: (1) Flux rope structures are seen in 51 ICMEs out of the 54. The result implies that all ICMEs have an intrinsic flux rope structure, if the three exceptional cases are attributed to unfavorable observation conditions. (2) It is possible to find flux rope geometries with the main axis orientation close to the orientation of the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL) in the solar source regions, the differences being less than 25°. (3) The helicity sign of an IFR is strongly controlled by the location of the solar source: flux ropes with positive (negative) helicity are associated with sources in the southern (northern) hemisphere (six exceptions were found). (4) Over two-thirds of the sources in the northern hemisphere are concentrated along PILs with orientations of 45° ± 30° (measured clockwise from the east), and over two-thirds in the southern hemisphere along PILs with orientations of 135° ± 30°, both corresponding to the Hale boundaries. These results strongly support the idea that a flux rope with the main axis parallel to the PIL erupts in a CME and that the erupted flux rope propagates through the interplanetary space with its orientation maintained and is observed as an IFR.

  2. Propagation Characteristics of Two Coronal Mass Ejections from the Sun Far into Interplanetary Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaowei; Liu, Ying D.; Hu, Huidong; Wang, Rui

    2017-03-01

    Propagation of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from the Sun far into interplanetary space is not well understood, due to limited observations. In this study we examine the propagation characteristics of two geo-effective CMEs, which occurred on 2005 May 6 and 13, respectively. Significant heliospheric consequences associated with the two CMEs are observed, including interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) at the Earth and Ulysses, interplanetary shocks, a long-duration type II radio burst, and intense geomagnetic storms. We use coronagraph observations from SOHO/LASCO, frequency drift of the long-duration type II burst, in situ measurements at the Earth and Ulysses, and magnetohydrodynamic propagation of the observed solar wind disturbances at 1 au to track the CMEs from the Sun far into interplanetary space. We find that both of the CMEs underwent a major deceleration within 1 au and thereafter a gradual deceleration when they propagated from the Earth to deep interplanetary space, due to interactions with the ambient solar wind. The results also reveal that the two CMEs interacted with each other in the distant interplanetary space even though their launch times on the Sun were well separated. The intense geomagnetic storm for each case was caused by the southward magnetic fields ahead of the CME, stressing the critical role of the sheath region in geomagnetic storm generation, although for the first case there is a corotating interaction region involved.

  3. First Taste of Hot Channel in Interplanetary Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, H. Q.; Zhang, J.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, X.; Li, G.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-04-01

    A hot channel (HC) is a high temperature (˜10 MK) structure in the inner corona first revealed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Eruptions of HCs are often associated with flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Results of previous studies have suggested that an HC is a good proxy for a magnetic flux rope (MFR) in the inner corona as well as another well known MFR candidate, the prominence-cavity structure, which has a normal coronal temperature (˜1-2 MK). In this paper, we report a high temperature structure (HTS, ˜1.5 MK) contained in an interplanetary CME induced by an HC eruption. According to the observations of bidirectional electrons, high temperature and density, strong magnetic field, and its association with the shock, sheath, and plasma pile-up region, we suggest that the HTS is the interplanetary counterpart of the HC. The scale of the measured HTS is around 14 R ⊙ , and it maintained a much higher temperature than the background solar wind even at 1 AU. It is significantly different from the typical magnetic clouds, which usually have a much lower temperature. Our study suggests that the existence of a corotating interaction region ahead of the HC formed a magnetic container to inhibit expansion of the HC and cool it down to a low temperature.

  4. Solar events and their influence on the interplanetary medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joselyn, Joann

    1987-09-01

    Aspects of a workshop on Solar events and their influence on the interplanetary medium, held in September 1986, are reviewed, the goal of which was to foster interactions among colleagues, leading to an improved understanding of the unified relationship between solar events and interplanetary disturbances. The workshop consisted of three working groups: (1) flares, eruptives, and other near-Sun activity; (2) coronal mass ejections; and (3) interplanetary events. Each group discussed topics distributed in advance. The flares-eruptives group members agreed that pre-event energy is stored in stressed/sheared magnetic fields, but could not agree that flares and other eruptive events (e.g., eruptive solar prominences) are aspects of the same physical phenomenon. In the coronal mass ejection group, general agreement was reached on the presence of prominences in CMEs, and that they have a significant three-dimensional structure. Some topics identified for further research were the aftermath of CMEs (streamer deflections, transient coronal holes, possible disconnections), identification of the leading edge of CMEs, and studies of the range and prevalence of CME mass sizes and energies.

  5. Solar events and their influence on the interplanetary medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joselyn, Joann

    1987-01-01

    Aspects of a workshop on Solar events and their influence on the interplanetary medium, held in September 1986, are reviewed, the goal of which was to foster interactions among colleagues, leading to an improved understanding of the unified relationship between solar events and interplanetary disturbances. The workshop consisted of three working groups: (1) flares, eruptives, and other near-Sun activity; (2) coronal mass ejections; and (3) interplanetary events. Each group discussed topics distributed in advance. The flares-eruptives group members agreed that pre-event energy is stored in stressed/sheared magnetic fields, but could not agree that flares and other eruptive events (e.g., eruptive solar prominences) are aspects of the same physical phenomenon. In the coronal mass ejection group, general agreement was reached on the presence of prominences in CMEs, and that they have a significant three-dimensional structure. Some topics identified for further research were the aftermath of CMEs (streamer deflections, transient coronal holes, possible disconnections), identification of the leading edge of CMEs, and studies of the range and prevalence of CME mass sizes and energies.

  6. Outer Radiation Belt Dropout Dynamics Following the Arrival of Two Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alves, L. R.; Da Silva, L. A.; Souza, V. M.; Sibeck, D. G.; Jauer, P. R.; Vieira, L. E. A.; Walsh, B. M.; Silveira, M. V. D.; Marchezi, J. P.; Rockenbach, M.; Del Lago, A.; Mendes, O.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Koga, D.; Kanekal, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetopause shadowing and wave-particle interactions are recognized as the two primary mechanisms for losses of electrons from the outer radiation belt. We investigate these mechanisms, sing satellite observations both in interplanetary space and within the magnetosphere and particle drift modeling. Two interplanetary shocks sheaths impinged upon the magnetopause causing a relativistic electron flux dropout. The magnetic cloud (C) and interplanetary structure sunward of the MC had primarily northward magnetic field, perhaps leading to a concomitant lack of substorm activity and a 10 day long quiescent period. The arrival of two shocks caused an unusual electron flux dropout. Test-particle simulations have shown 2 to 5 MeV energy, equatorially mirroring electrons with initial values of L 5.5can be lost to the magnetosheath via magnetopause shadowing alone. For electron losses at lower L-shells, coherent chorus wave-driven pitch angle scattering and ULF wave-driven radial transport have been shownto be viable mechanisms.

  7. CFDP for Interplanetary Overlay Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    The CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) File Delivery Protocol for Interplanetary Overlay Network (CFDP-ION) is an implementation of CFDP that uses IO' s DTN (delay tolerant networking) implementation as its UT (unit-data transfer) layer. Because the DTN protocols effect automatic, reliable transmission via multiple relays, CFDP-ION need only satisfy the requirements for Class 1 ("unacknowledged") CFDP. This keeps the implementation small, but without loss of capability. This innovation minimizes processing resources by using zero-copy objects for file data transmission. It runs without modification in VxWorks, Linux, Solaris, and OS/X. As such, this innovation can be used without modification in both flight and ground systems. Integration with DTN enables the CFDP implementation itself to be very simple; therefore, very small. Use of ION infrastructure minimizes consumption of storage and processing resources while maximizing safety.

  8. Ion bombardment of interplanetary dust

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.E.; Lanzerotti, L.J.

    1986-06-01

    It is thought that a fraction of the interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) collected in the stratosphere by high-flying aircraft represent materials ejected from comets. An investigation is conducted regarding the effects of ion bombardment on these particles, taking into account information on ion tracks and carbon in IDP's and laboratory data on charged particle bombardment of surfaces. It is found that the observational discovery of particle tracks in certain IDP's clearly indicates the exposure of these particles to approximately 10,000 years of 1-AU equivalent solar-particle fluences. If some erasure of the tracks occurs, which is likely when an IDP enters the upper atmosphere, then somewhat longer times are implied. The effects of the erosion and enhanced adhesion produced by ions are considered. 46 references.

  9. Modeling Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Pete

    2004-01-01

    Heliospheric models of Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) propagation and evolution provide an important insight into the dynamics of CMEa and are a valuable tool for interpreting interplanetary in situ observations. Moreover, they represent a virtual laboratory for exploring conditions and regions of space that are not conveniently or currently accessible by spacecraft. In this review I summarize recent advances in modeling the properties and evolution of CMEs in the solar wind. In particular, I will focus on: (1) the types of ICME models; (2) the boundary conditions that are imposed, (3) the role of the ambient solar wind; (4) predicting new phenomena; and (5) distinguishing between competing CME initiation mechanisms. I will conclude by discussing what topics will likely be important for models to address in the future.

  10. Impact angle control of interplanetary shock geoeffectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, D. M.; Raeder, J.

    2014-10-01

    We use Open Geospace General Circulation Model global MHD simulations to study the nightside magnetospheric, magnetotail, and ionospheric responses to interplanetary (IP) fast forward shocks. Three cases are presented in this study: two inclined oblique shocks, hereafter IOS-1 and IOS-2, where the latter has a Mach number twice stronger than the former. Both shocks have impact angles of 30° in relation to the Sun-Earth line. Lastly, we choose a frontal perpendicular shock, FPS, whose shock normal is along the Sun-Earth line, with the same Mach number as IOS-1. We find that, in the IOS-1 case, due to the north-south asymmetry, the magnetotail is deflected southward, leading to a mild compression. The geomagnetic activity observed in the nightside ionosphere is then weak. On the other hand, in the head-on case, the FPS compresses the magnetotail from both sides symmetrically. This compression triggers a substorm allowing a larger amount of stored energy in the magnetotail to be released to the nightside ionosphere, resulting in stronger geomagnetic activity. By comparing IOS-2 and FPS, we find that, despite the IOS-2 having a larger Mach number, the FPS leads to a larger geomagnetic response in the nightside ionosphere. As a result, we conclude that IP shocks with similar upstream conditions, such as magnetic field, speed, density, and Mach number, can have different geoeffectiveness, depending on their shock normal orientation.

  11. Impact Angle Control of Interplanetary Shock Geoeffectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, D.; Raeder, J.

    2014-12-01

    We use OpenGGCM global MHD simulations to study the nightside magnetospheric/ magnetotail/ ionospheric responses to interplanetary (IP) fast foward shocks. Three cases are presented in this study: two inclined oblique shocks, hereafter IOS-1 and IOS-2, where the latter has a Mach number twice stronger than the former. Both shocks have impact angles of 30o in relation to the Sun-Earth line. Lastly, we choose a frontal perpendicular shock, FPS, whose shock normal is along th Sun-Earth line, with the same Mach number as IOS-1. We find that, in the IOS-1 case, due to the north-south asymmetry, the magnetotail is deflected southward, leading to a mild compression. The geomagnetic activity observed in the nightside ionosphere is then weak. On the other hand, in the head-on case, the FPS compresses the magnetotail on both sides symmetrically. This compression triggers a substorm allowing a larger amount of stored energy in the magnetotail to be released to the nightside ionosphere, resulting in a larger geomagnetic activity there. By comparing IOS-2 and FPS, we find that, despite the IOS-2 having a larger Mach number, the FPS leads to larger geomagnetic responses in the ionosphere nightside. As a result, we conclude that IP shocks with similar upstream conditions, such as magnetic field, speed, density, and even Mach number, can be differently geoeffective, depending on their shock normal orientation.

  12. Anatomy of Depleted Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocher, M.; Lepri, S. T.; Landi, E.; Zhao, L.; Manchester, W. B., IV

    2017-01-01

    We report a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) containing distinct periods of anomalous heavy-ion charge state composition and peculiar ion thermal properties measured by ACE/SWICS from 1998 to 2011. We label them “depleted ICMEs,” identified by the presence of intervals where C6+/C5+ and O7+/O6+ depart from the direct correlation expected after their freeze-in heights. These anomalous intervals within the depleted ICMEs are referred to as “Depletion Regions.” We find that a depleted ICME would be indistinguishable from all other ICMEs in the absence of the Depletion Region, which has the defining property of significantly low abundances of fully charged species of helium, carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen. Similar anomalies in the slow solar wind were discussed by Zhao et al. We explore two possibilities for the source of the Depletion Region associated with magnetic reconnection in the tail of a CME, using CME simulations of the evolution of two Earth-bound CMEs described by Manchester et al.

  13. The auroral ionosphere TEC response to an interplanetary shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yaqi; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Moen, Jøran I.; Hairston, Marc

    2016-03-01

    This letter investigates the global total electron content (TEC) response in the auroral ionosphere to an interplanetary shock on 8 March 2012, using GPS TEC data from three pierce point chains. One is a longitudinal chain along ~65° magnetic latitude (MLAT) from ~19 magnetic local time (MLT) through dayside to 03 MLT clockwise; one meridional chain is around 14 MLT from 88° to 59° MLAT; and the third one is a chain along ~75° MLAT from ~14 to 00 MLT clockwise. The first chain clearly presents a TEC signal propagation away from ~14 MLT, indicating the shock impact location. Such a propagation is well consistent with the diffuse shock aurora propagation, and the impact location is well predicted by the shock normal direction calculated using the Geotail solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field data. The meridional chain reveals a very fast TEC signal equatorward expansion at ~45 km/s, which is the manifestation of the shock impact and further compression near the subsolar magnetopause. While TEC along the high-latitude chain varies randomly, lacking any pattern, it is consistent with the discrete aurora dynamics along the poleward boundary of the auroral oval. These findings strongly support the shock aurora mechanisms of adiabatic compression and field-aligned current establishment or enhancement, suggest that due to the same mechanisms a shock-generated TEC variation is a "duplication" of the shock aurora from the global picture to the auroral forms and their dynamics, and open the door for the TEC to be an important tool to understand the solar wind and geospace coupling. These results, for the first time, reveal the prompt, intense, and global ionospheric TEC response to the interplanetary fast-forward shock.

  14. Shielding Structures for Interplanetary Human Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracino, Emanuele; Lobascio, Cesare

    2012-07-01

    Since the end of Apollo missions, human spaceflight has been limited to the Low Earth Orbit (LEO), inside the protective magnetic field of the Earth, because astronauts are, to the largest degree, protected from the harsh radiation environment of the interplanetary space. However, this situation will change when space exploration missions beyond LEO will become the real challenge of the human exploration program. The feasibility of these missions in the solar system is thus strongly connected to the capability to mitigate the radiation-induced biological effects on the crew during the journey and the permanence on the intended planet surface. Inside the International Space Station (ISS), the volumes in which the crew spends most of the time, namely the crew quarters are the only parts that implement dedicated additional radiation shielding made of polyethylene tiles designed for mitigating SPE effects. Furthermore, specific radiation shielding materials are often added to the described configuration to shield crew quarters or the entire habitat example of these materials are polyethylene, liquid hydrogen, etc. but, increasing the size of the exploration vehicles to bring humans beyond LEO, and without the magnetosphere protection, such approach is unsustainable because the mass involved is a huge limiting factor with the actual launcher engine technology. Moreover, shielding against GCR with materials that have a low probability of nuclear interactions and in parallel a high ionizing energy loss is not always the best solution. In particular there is the risk to increase the LET of ions arriving at the spacecraft shell, increasing their Radio-Biological Effectiveness. Besides, the production of secondary nuclei by projectile and target fragmentation is an important issue when performing an engineering assessment of materials to be used for radiation shielding. The goal of this work is to analyze different shielding solutions to increase as much as possible the

  15. Energetic solar electrons in the interplanetary medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1985-01-01

    Results are given of ISEE-3 measurements of energetic solar electrons extending down to 2 keV energy. Such measurements have provided a new perspective on energetic solar electrons in the interplanetary medium. Impulsive solar electron events are observed, on the average, several times a day near solar maximum, with about 40 percent detected only below about 15 keV. The electron energy spectra have a nearly power-law shape extending smoothly down to 2 keV, indicating that the origin of these events is high in the corona. In large solar flares which accelerate electrons and ions to relativistic energies, the electron spectrum appears to be modified by a second acceleration which results in a double power-law shape above about 10 keV with a break near 100 keV and flattening from about 10-100 keV. Solar type-III radio bursts are produced by the escaping 2-100 keV electrons through a beam-plasma instability.

  16. Interplanetary medium data book, supplement 4, 1985-1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Joseph H.

    1989-01-01

    An extension is presented of the series of Interplanetary Medium Data Books and supplements which have been issued by the National Space Science Data Center since 1977. This volume contains solar wind magnetic field (IMF) and plasma data from the IMP 8 spacecraft for 1985 to 1988, and 1985 IMF data from the Czechoslovakian Soviet Prognoz 10 spacecraft. The normalization of the MIT plasma density and temperature, which has been discussed at length in previous volumes, is implemented as before, using the same normalization constants for 1985 to 1988 data as for the earlier data.

  17. Evolution of Fourier spectra through interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitna, Alexander; Safrankova, Jana; Nemecek, Zdenek; Nemec, Frantisek; Goncharov, Oleksandr

    2014-05-01

    Well established nearly isothermic solar wind expansion requires an additional heating. A dissipation of large scale variations of the solar wind kinetic energy into the thermal energy via turbulence cascades is thought to be an important source of this heating, although the exact mechanism is yet to be found. For this reason, the turbulence in the solar wind is a subject of extensive theoretical and experimental studies on different time scales ranging from years to minutes. The frequency spectrum of magnetic field fluctuations can be divided into several domains differing by spectral indices - the lowest frequencies are controlled by the solar activity, MHD activity shapes the spectrum at higher (up to 0.1 Hz) frequencies, whereas the ion and electron kinetic effects dominate at the high frequency end of the spectra. Interplanetary shocks of various origins are a part of solar wind turbulence naturally occurring in the solar wind and the BMSW instrument onboard the Spektr-R spacecraft has detected tens of them in course of the 2011-2013 years. Based on its high-time resolution of the ion flux, density and velocity measurements reaching 31 ms, we study an evolution of the frequency spectra on MHD and kinetic scales across fast forward low Mach number shocks. We have found that the power of downstream fluctuations rises by an order of magnitude in a broad range of frequencies independently of its upstream value but the slope of the spectrum on the kinetic scale (≡3-8 Hz) has been found to be statistically steeper downstream than upstream of the shock. The time needed to a full relaxation to the pre-shock spectral shape is as long as several hours. A combination of the ion flux power spectra obtained by BMSW with fast magnetic field observations of other spacecraft enhances our understanding of dissipation mechanisms.

  18. Spectral analysis of magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations near interplanetary schocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinas, A. F.; Goldstein, M. L.; Acuna, M. H.

    1983-01-01

    Evidence for two types of relatively large amplitude MHD waves upstream and downstream of quasi-parallel forward and reverse interplanetary shocks is presented. The first mode is an Alfven wave with frequencies (in the spacecraft frame) in the range of 0.025 to 0.07 Hz. This is a left-hand polarized mode and propagates within a few degrees of the ambient magnetic field. The second is a fast MHD mode with frequencies in the range of 0.025 to 0.17 Hz, right-hand polarization and propagating along the magnetic field. These waves are detected principally in association with quasi-parallel shock. The Alfven waves are found to have plasma rest frame frequencies in the range of 1.1 to 6.3 mHz with wavelengths in the order of 4.8 x 10 to the 8th power to 2.7 x 10 to the 9th power cm. Similarly, the fast MHD modes have rest frame frequencies in the range 1.6 to 26 mHz with typical wavelengths about 2.19 x 10 to the 8th power cm. The magnetic field power spectrum in the vicinity of these interplanetary shocks is much steeper than f to the -s/3 at high frequencies. The observed spectra have a high frequency dependence of f to the -2/5 to f to the -4.

  19. The Ring Current Response to Solar and Interplanetary Storm Drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouikis, C.; Kistler, L. M.; Bingham, S.; Kronberg, E. A.; Gkioulidou, M.; Huang, C. L.; Farrugia, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    The ring current responds differently to the different solar and interplanetary storm drivers such as coronal mass injections, (CME's), corotating interaction regions (CIR's), high-speed streamers and other structures. The resulting changes in the ring current particle pressure, in turn, change the global magnetic field, controlling the transport of the radiation belts. To quantitatively determine the field changes during a storm throughout the magnetosphere, it is necessary to understand the transport, sources and losses of the particles that contribute to the ring current. Because the measured ring current energy spectra depend not only on local processes, but also on the history of the ions along their entire drift path, measurements of ring current energy spectra at two or more locations can be used to strongly constrain the time dependent magnetic and electric fields. In this study we use data predominantly from the Cluster and the Van Allen Probes, covering more than a full solar cycle (from 2001 to 2014). For the period 2001-2012, the Cluster CODIF and RAPID measurements of the inner magnetosphere are the primary data set used to monitor the storm time ring current variability. After 2012, the Cluster data set complements the data from the Van Allen Probes HOPE and RBSPICE instruments, providing additional measurements from different MLT and L shells. Selected storms from this periods, allow us to study the ring current dynamics and pressure changes, as a function of L shell, magnetic local time, and the type of interplanetary disturbances.

  20. Interplanetary Physics Laboratory (IPL): A concept for an interplanetary mission in the mid-eighties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Feldman, W.

    1977-01-01

    A concept for a near-earth interplanetary mission in the mid-eighties is described. The proposed objectives would be to determine the composition of the interplanetary constituents and its dependence on source-conditions and to investigate energy and momentum transfer processes in the interplanetary medium. Such a mission would accomplish three secondary objectives: (1) provide a baseline for deep space missions, (2) investigate variations of the solar wind with solar activity, and (3) provide input functions for magnetospheric studies.

  1. Coronal type III radio bursts and their X-ray flare and interplanetary type III counterparts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Hamish A. S.; Vilmer, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    V X-rays. A stronger interplanetary association was present when 25-50 keV RHESSI count rates were above 250 counts/s or radio fluxes of around 170 MHz were large (>103 SFU), relating to electron beams with more energetic electrons above 25 keV and events where magnetic flux tubes extend into the high corona. We also find that whilst on average type III bursts increase in flux with decreasing frequency, the rate of this increase varies from event to event.

  2. Cause of the exceptionally high AE average for 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestes, A.

    2012-04-01

    In this work we focus on the year of 2003 when the AE index was extremely high (AE=341nT, with peak intensity more than 2200nT), this value is almost 100 nT higher when compared with others years of the cycle 23. Interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and plasma data are compared with geomagnetic AE and Dst indices to determine the causes of exceptionally high AE average value. Analyzing the solar wind parameters we found that the annual average speed value was extremely high, approximately 542 km/s (peak value ~1074 km/s). These values were due to recurrent high-speed solar streams from large coronal holes, which stretch to the solar equator, and low-latitude coronal holes, which exist for many solar rotations. AE was found to increase with increasing solar wind speed and decrease when solar wind speed decrease. The cause of the high AE activity during 2003 is the presence of the high-speed corotating streams that contain large-amplitude Alfvén waves throughout the streams, which resulted in a large number of HILDCAAs events. When plasma and field of solar wind impinge on Earth's magnetosphere, the southward field turnings associated with the wave fluctuations cause magnetic reconnection and consequential high levels of AE activity and very long recovery phases on Dst, sometimes lasting until the next stream arrives.

  3. Hypersonic Interplanetary Flight: Aero Gravity Assist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Al; Banks, Dan; Randolph, Jim

    2006-01-01

    The use of aero-gravity assist during hypersonic interplanetary flights is highlighted. Specifically, the use of large versus small planet for gravity asssist maneuvers, aero-gravity assist trajectories, launch opportunities and planetary waverider performance are addressed.

  4. Operating CFDP in the Interplanetary Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines the design elements of CCSDS File Delivery Protocol and Interplanetary Internet technologies that will simplify their integration and discusses the resulting new capabilities, such as efficient transmission of large files via multiple relay satellites operating in parallel.

  5. Volatiles in interplanetary dust particles - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents a review of the volatiles found within interplanetary dust particles. These particles have been shown to represent primitive material from early in the solar system's formation and also may contain records of stellar processes. The organogenic elements (i.e., H, C, N, O, and S) are among the most abundant elements in our solar system, and their abundances, distributions, and isotopic compositions in early solar system materials permit workers to better understand the processes operating early in the evolutionary history of solar system materials. Interplanetary dust particles have a range of elemental compositions, but generally they have been shown to be similar to carbonaceous chondrites, the solar photosphere, Comet Halley's chondritic cores, and matrix materials of chondritic chondrites. Recovery and analysis of interplanetary dust particles have opened new opportunities for analysis of primitive materials, although interplanetary dust particles represent major challenges to the analyst because of their small size.

  6. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Interplanetary Cruise Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    You, Tung-Han; Graat, Eric; Halsell, Allen; Highsmith, Dolan; Long, Stacia; Bhat, Ram; Demcak, Stuart; Higa, Earl; Mottinger, Neil; Jah, Moriba

    2007-01-01

    Carrying six science instruments and three engineering payloads, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) is the first mission in a low Mars orbit to characterize the surface, subsurface, and atmospheric properties with unprecedented detail. After a seven-month interplanetary cruise, MRO arrived at Mars executing a 1.0 km/s Mars Orbit Insertion (MOI) maneuver. MRO achieved a 430 km periapsis altitude with the final orbit solution indicating that only 10 km was attributable to navigation prediction error. With the last interplanetary maneuver performed four months before MOI, this was a significant accomplishment. This paper describes the navigation analyses and results during the 210-day interplanetary cruise. As of August 2007 MRO has returned more than 18 Terabits of scientific data in support of the objectives set by the Mars Exploration Program (MEP). The robust and exceptional interplanetary navigation performance paved the way for a successful MRO mission.

  7. TPS Ablator Technologies for Interplanetary Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Donald M.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the status of Thermal Protection System (TPS) Ablator technologies and the preparation for use in interplanetary spacecraft. NASA does not have adequate TPS ablatives and sufficient selection for planned missions. It includes a comparison of shuttle and interplanetary TPS requirements, the status of mainline TPS charring ablator materials, a summary of JSC SBIR accomplishments in developing advanced charring ablators and the benefits of SBIR Ablator/fabrication technology.

  8. Robust solution procedure for the discrete energy-averaged model on the calculation of 3D hysteretic magnetization and magnetostriction of iron-gallium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tari, H.; Scheidler, J. J.; Dapino, M. J.

    2015-06-01

    A reformulation of the Discrete Energy-Averaged model for the calculation of 3D hysteretic magnetization and magnetostriction of iron-gallium (Galfenol) alloys is presented in this paper. An analytical solution procedure based on an eigenvalue decomposition is developed. This procedure avoids the singularities present in the existing approximate solution by offering multiple local minimum energy directions for each easy crystallographic direction. This improved robustness is crucial for use in finite element codes. Analytical simplifications of the 3D model to 2D and 1D applications are also presented. In particular, the 1D model requires calculation for only one easy direction, while all six easy directions must be considered for general applications. Compared to the approximate solution procedure, it is shown that the resulting robustness comes at no expense for 1D applications, but requires almost twice the computational effort for 3D applications. To find model parameters, we employ the average of the hysteretic data, rather than anhysteretic curves, which would require additional measurements. An efficient optimization routine is developed that retains the dimensionality of the prior art. The routine decouples the parameters into exclusive sets, some of which are found directly through a fast preprocessing step to improve accuracy and computational efficiency. The effectiveness of the model is verified by comparison with existing measurement data.

  9. Plasma properties of driver gas following interplanetary shocks observed by ISEE-3

    SciTech Connect

    Zwickl, R.D.; Asbridge, J.R.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.; Gosling, J.T.; Smith, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    Plasma fluid parameters calculated from solar wind and magnetic field data obtained on ISEE 3 were studied to determine the characteristic properties of driver gas following interplanetary shocks. Of 54 shocks observed from August 1978 to February 1980, 9 contained a well defined driver gas that was clearly identifiable by a discontinuous decrease in the average proton temperature across a tangential discontinuity. While helium enhancements were present in all of 9 of these events, only about half of them contained simultaneous changes in the two quantities. Often the He/H ratio changed over a period of minutes. Simultaneous with the drop in proton temperature the helium and electron temperature decreased abruptly. In some cases the proton temperature depression was accompanied by a moderate increase in magnetic field magnitude with an unusually low variance and by an increase in the ratio of parallel to perpendicular temperature. The drive gas usually displayed a bi-directional flow of suprathermal solar wind electrons at higher energies (>137 eV).

  10. Relative importance of first and second derivatives of nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts and spin-spin coupling constants for vibrational averaging.

    PubMed

    Dracínský, Martin; Kaminský, Jakub; Bour, Petr

    2009-03-07

    Relative importance of anharmonic corrections to molecular vibrational energies, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts, and J-coupling constants was assessed for a model set of methane derivatives, differently charged alanine forms, and sugar models. Molecular quartic force fields and NMR parameter derivatives were obtained quantum mechanically by a numerical differentiation. In most cases the harmonic vibrational function combined with the property second derivatives provided the largest correction of the equilibrium values, while anharmonic corrections (third and fourth energy derivatives) were found less important. The most computationally expensive off-diagonal quartic energy derivatives involving four different coordinates provided a negligible contribution. The vibrational corrections of NMR shifts were small and yielded a convincing improvement only for very accurate wave function calculations. For the indirect spin-spin coupling constants the averaging significantly improved already the equilibrium values obtained at the density functional theory level. Both first and complete second shielding derivatives were found important for the shift corrections, while for the J-coupling constants the vibrational parts were dominated by the diagonal second derivatives. The vibrational corrections were also applied to some isotopic effects, where the corrected values reasonably well reproduced the experiment, but only if a full second-order expansion of the NMR parameters was included. Contributions of individual vibrational modes for the averaging are discussed. Similar behavior was found for the methane derivatives, and for the larger and polar molecules. The vibrational averaging thus facilitates interpretation of previous experimental results and suggests that it can make future molecular structural studies more reliable. Because of the lengthy numerical differentiation required to compute the NMR parameter derivatives their analytical implementation in

  11. Analysis of human brain exposure to low-frequency magnetic fields: a numerical assessment of spatially averaged electric fields and exposure limits.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi-Lin; Benkler, Stefan; Chavannes, Nicholas; De Santis, Valerio; Bakker, Jurriaan; van Rhoon, Gerard; Mosig, Juan; Kuster, Niels

    2013-07-01

    Compliance with the established exposure limits for the electric field (E-field) induced in the human brain due to low-frequency magnetic field (B-field) induction is demonstrated by numerical dosimetry. The objective of this study is to investigate the dependency of dosimetric compliance assessments on the applied methodology and segmentations. The dependency of the discretization uncertainty (i.e., staircasing and field singularity) on the spatially averaged peak E-field values is first determined using canonical and anatomical models. Because spatial averaging with a grid size of 0.5 mm or smaller sufficiently reduces the impact of artifacts regardless of tissue size, it is a superior approach to other proposed methods such as the 99th percentile or smearing of conductivity contrast. Through a canonical model, it is demonstrated that under the same uniform B-field exposure condition, the peak spatially averaged E-fields in a heterogeneous model can be significantly underestimated by a homogeneous model. The frequency scaling technique is found to introduce substantial error if the relative change in tissue conductivity is significant in the investigated frequency range. Lastly, the peak induced E-fields in the brain tissues of five high-resolution anatomically realistic models exposed to a uniform B-field at ICNIRP and IEEE reference levels in the frequency range of 10 Hz to 100 kHz show that the reference levels are not always compliant with the basic restrictions. Based on the results of this study, a revision is recommended for the guidelines/standards to achieve technically sound exposure limits that can be applied without ambiguity.

  12. New interplanetary proton fluence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, Joan; Armstrong, T. P.; Dao-Gibner, L.; Silverman, S.

    1990-01-01

    A new predictive engineering model for the interplanetary fluence of protons with above 10 MeV and above 30 MeV is described. The data set used is a combination of observations made from the earth's surface and from above the atmosphere between 1956 and 1963 and observations made from spacecraft in the vicinity of earth between 1963 and 1985. The data cover a time period three times as long as the period used in earlier models. With the use of this data set the distinction between 'ordinary proton events' and 'anomalously large events' made in earlier work disappears. This permitted the use of statistical analysis methods developed for 'ordinary events' on the entire data set. The greater than 10 MeV fluences at 1 AU calculated with the new model are about twice those expected on the basis of models now in use. At energies above 30 MeV, the old and new models agree. In contrast to earlier models, the results do not depend critically on the fluence from any one event and are independent of sunspot number. Mission probability curves derived from the fluence distribution are presented.

  13. A quantitative study of the geoeffectiveness of interplanetary structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, L. A.

    2001-05-01

    The time-integrated values of the injection function F(E) necessary to observe variations in the Dst index during the main phase of intense magnetic storms at levels of -50, -75, -100, -125 and -150 nT, were estimated for a set of 12 interplanetary coronal mass ejections events. The dataset was classified into four groups concerning the occurrence of sheath fields just behind the shock and the polarity of the magnetic clouds: (i) magnetic clouds with polarity NS, (ii) magnetic clouds with SN polarity, (iii) magnetic clouds with southward field (Y polarity) and (iv) sheath fields. The injection function was estimated using two models of the evolution of the Dst. The time-integrated values estimated for the subset of Y clouds were found to be greater than for the other subsets. This occurs as a consequence of the slow increase of the Bs for Y clouds that leads to a smaller difference between the energy injection and the loss in the ring current that for the other groups. It is important to remember that while the energy injection is driven by the dawn-dusk component of the interplanetary electric field, the energy loss is proportional to the ring current population, with a decay time τ that varies from 3 to 20 h. The time-integrated values estimated for the subset of NS were found to be high. This is also associated to the profile of the Bs. Otherwise, sheath field and the SN magnetic cloud events seems to have shorter time-integrated values as a consequence of the sharp variation of the Bs component. In this case the energy injection is much greater than the loss energy during the main phase. These results have shown that, for the dataset studied, different structures of the interplanetary events are associated to different main phase development of the ring current. We would like to acknowledge the Fundacao de Amparo a Pesquisa do Estado de Sao Paulo for the financial support. Project numbers 98/04734-4 and 98/15959-0.

  14. The Heliocentric Variation of the Properties of Interplanetary Field Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, H.; Russell, C. T.; Wei, H.; Zhang, T.

    2013-05-01

    Interplanetary Field Enhancements (IFEs) are increases of the interplanetary magnetic field usually to a sharp maximum and containing a current sheet near the center of the event. They have been observed at Helios and MESSENGER as close as 0.3 AU to the Sun, at VEX and PVO at 0.72 AU; at STEREO, ACE, Wind, Geotail, ARTEMIS at 1 AU and Ulysses from 1 to 5 AU. Our model for the physical mechanism for creating these disturbances is that collisions of bodies in the size range 10 - 1000m are catastrophically disrupted by a collision with a fast moving smaller object. The rate of detection of IFEs is dependent on heliocentric range increasing closer to the Sun. There are several possible reasons for this increase which we explore. The mass of the dust cloud that is picked up is significant about 108kg. The magnetic gradient force of the IFE is large enough to lift this mass through the Sun's gravitational potential wall. The momentum transfer that enables this outward transport is a small fraction of the solar wind momentum flux but this transfer can be detected using superposed epoch studies of the solar wind, and is consistent with the hypothesis. We note that the rate of IFE observations in the Helios and MESSENGER data at 0.3 AU is less than expected from extrapolating the observations at and beyond 0.7 AU. This result can soon be extended closer to the Sun with Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus.

  15. In situ observations of coronal mass ejections in interplanetary space

    SciTech Connect

    Gosling, J.T.

    1991-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections, CMEs, in the solar wind at 1 AU generally have distinct plasma and field signatures by which they can be distinguished from the ordinary solar wind. These include one or more of the following: helium abundance enhancements, ion and electron temperature depressions, unusual ionization states, strong magnetic fields, low plasma beta, low magnetic field variance, coherent field rotations, counterstreaming (along the field) energetic protons, and counterstreaming suprathermal electrons. The most reliable of these appears to be counterstreaming electrons, which indicates that CMEs at 1 AU typically are closed field structures either rooted at both ends in the Sun or entirely disconnected from it as plasmoids. About 1/3 of all CMEs have sufficiently high speeds to produce transient interplanetary shock disturbances at 1 AU; the remainder simply ride along with the solar wind. The frequency of occurrence of CMEs in the ecliptic plane, as distinguished by the counterstreaming electron signature, varies roughly in phase and amplitude with the 11-yr solar activity cycle. Near solar maximum they account for {approximately} 15% of all solar wind measurements, while near solar minimum they account for less than 1% of all the measurements. All but one of the 37 largest geomagnetic storms near the last solar maximum were associated with Earth-passage of interplanetary disturbances driven by fast CMEs; that is, CMEs are the prime link between solar and geomagnetic activity. However, more than half of all earthward directed CMEs are relatively ineffective in a geomagnetic sense. 19 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Earth's Magnetosphere Response to the 12 May, 2001 Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, X.; Dejong, A. D.; Clauer, C. R.; Liemohn, M. W.

    2006-12-01

    A sawtooth event is clearly identified from the low energetic proton flux measurements at geosynchronous orbit on 12 May, 2001. The Earth's magnetosphere is in steady magnetospheric convection (SMC) mode right before the sawtooth event based on spacecraft aurora observations. By examination of the solar wind driver, we find these two events are related to an interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME). The Earth's magnetosphere enters the SMC mode when southward interplanetary magnetic field is roughly steady at ~ 6 nT before the arrival of the ICME. The sawtooth oscillation occurs during the sheath region of the ICME when solar wind pressure is enhanced and the IMF is highly variable. We investigate the magnetosphere change between the two modes in response to the changing interplanetary conditions. The relationship between the onsets of individual teeth and solar wind changes are examined in detail.

  17. LDEF Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, John P.; Singer, S. F.; Weinberg, J. L.; Simon, C. G.; Cooke, W. J.; Kassel, P. C.; Kinard, W. H.; Mulholland, J. D.; Wortman, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    The Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) provided high time resolution detection of microparticle impacts on the Long Duration Exposure Facility satellite. Particles, in the diameter range from 0.2 microns to several hundred microns, were detected impacting on six orthogonal surfaces of the gravity-gradient stabilized LDEF spacecraft. The total sensitive surface area was about one square meter, distributed between LDEF rows 3 (Wake or West), 6 (South), 9 (Ram or East), 12 (North), as well as the Space and Earth ends of LDEF. The time of each impact is known to an accuracy that corresponds to better than one degree in orbital longitude. Because LDEF was gravity-gradient stabilized and magnetically damped, the direction of the normal to each detector panel is precisely known for each impact. The 11 1/2 month tape-recorded data set represents the most extensive record gathered of the number, orbital location, and incidence direction for microparticle impacts in low Earth orbit. Perhaps the most striking result from IDE was the discovery that microparticle impacts, especially on the Ram, South, and North surfaces, were highly episodic. Most such impacts occurred in localized regions of the orbit for dozens or even hundreds of orbits in what we have termed Multiple Orbit Event Sequences (MOES). In addition, more than a dozen intense and short-lived 'spikes' were seen in which impact fluxes exceeded the background by several orders of magnitude. These events were distributed in a highly non-uniform fashion in time and terrestrial longitude and latitude.

  18. Propagation and Evolution of CMEs in the Interplanetary Medium: Analysis of Remote Sensing and In situ Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Vinas, Adolfo; Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa; Vourlidas, Angelos; Gomez-Herrero, Raul; Malandraki, Olga; Szabo, Adam; Dresing, Nina; Davila, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    EUV disk imagers and white light coronagraphs have provided for many years information on the early formation and evolution of corona) mass ejections (CMEs). More recently, the novel heliospheric imaging instruments aboard the STEREO mission are providing crucial remote sensing information on the interplanetary evolution of these events while in situ instruments complete the overall characterization of the interplanetary CMEs. In this work, we present an analysis of CMEs from the Sun to the interplanetary medium using combined data from THE SOHO, STEREO, WIND, and ACE spacecraft. The events were selected to cover the widest possible spectrum of different ambient solar wind, magnetic field configurations, plasma parameters, etc. to allow uncovering those aspects that are important in understanding the propagation and evolution mechanisms of CMEs in the interplanetary medium.

  19. The elemental abundances in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Peter; Bohsung, Jörg; Maetz, Mischa; Jessberger, Elmar K.

    1996-11-01

    We compiled a table of all major, minor, and trace-element abundances in 89 interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) that includes data obtained with proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE), synchroton x-ray fluorescence (SXRF), and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). For the first time, the reliability of the trace-element abundances in IDPs is tested by various crosschecks. We also report on the results of cluster analyses that we performed on IDP compositions. Because of the incompleteness of the data set, we included only the elements Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, and Zn, normalized to Fe and CI chondrite abundances, that are determined in 73 IDPs. The data arrange themselves in four rather poorly defined groups that we discuss in relation to CI chondrites following the assumption that on the average CI abundances are most probable. The largest group (chondritic), with 44 members, has close to CI abundances for many refractory and moderately refractory elements (Na, Al, Si, P, K, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Co, Ge, Sr). It is slightly depleted in Fe and more in Ca and S, while the volatile elements (Cl, Cu, Zn, Ga, Se, Rb) are enriched by =1.7 × CI and Br by 21 × CI. The low-Zn group, with 12 members, is very similar to the chondritic group except for its Zn-depletion, stronger Ca-depletion and Fe-enrichment. The low-Ni group, with 11 members, has Ni/Fe = 0.03 × CI and almost CI-like Ca, but its extraterrestrial origin is not established. The last group (6 members) contains non-systematic particles of unknown origin. We found that Fe is inhomogeneously distributed on a micron scale. Furthermore, the abundances of elements that are measured near their limits of detection are easily overestimated. These biases involved, the incomplete data set and possible contaminating processes prevent us from obtaining information on the specific origin(s) of IDPs from elemental abundances.

  20. INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS LACKING TYPE II RADIO BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalswamy, N.; Kaiser, M. L.; Xie, H.; Maekelae, P.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Howard, R. A.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    2010-02-20

    We report on the radio-emission characteristics of 222 interplanetary (IP) shocks detected by spacecraft at Sun-Earth L1 during solar cycle 23 (1996 to 2006, inclusive). A surprisingly large fraction of the IP shocks ({approx}34%) was radio quiet (RQ; i.e., the shocks lacked type II radio bursts). We examined the properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and soft X-ray flares associated with such RQ shocks and compared them with those of the radio-loud (RL) shocks. The CMEs associated with the RQ shocks were generally slow (average speed {approx}535 km s{sup -1}) and only {approx}40% of the CMEs were halos. The corresponding numbers for CMEs associated with RL shocks were 1237 km s{sup -1} and 72%, respectively. Thus, the CME kinetic energy seems to be the deciding factor in the radio-emission properties of shocks. The lower kinetic energy of CMEs associated with RQ shocks is also suggested by the lower peak soft X-ray flux of the associated flares (C3.4 versus M4.7 for RL shocks). CMEs associated with RQ CMEs were generally accelerating within the coronagraph field of view (average acceleration {approx}+6.8 m s{sup -2}), while those associated with RL shocks were decelerating (average acceleration {approx}-3.5 m s{sup -2}). This suggests that many of the RQ shocks formed at large distances from the Sun, typically beyond 10 Rs, consistent with the absence of metric and decameter-hectometric (DH) type II radio bursts. A small fraction of RL shocks had type II radio emission solely in the kilometric (km) wavelength domain. Interestingly, the kinematics of the CMEs associated with the km type II bursts is similar to those of RQ shocks, except that the former are slightly more energetic. Comparison of the shock Mach numbers at 1 AU shows that the RQ shocks are mostly subcritical, suggesting that they were not efficient in accelerating electrons. The Mach number values also indicate that most of these are quasi-perpendicular shocks. The radio-quietness is predominant

  1. Interplanetary Shocks Lacking Type 2 Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Xie, H.; Maekela, P.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Kaiser, M. L.; Howard, R. A.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the radio-emission characteristics of 222 interplanetary (IP) shocks detected by spacecraft at Sun-Earth L1 during solar cycle 23 (1996 to 2006, inclusive). A surprisingly large fraction of the IP shocks (approximately 34%) was radio quiet (RQ; i.e., the shocks lacked type II radio bursts). We examined the properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and soft X-ray flares associated with such RQ shocks and compared them with those of the radio-loud (RL) shocks. The CMEs associated with the RQ shocks were generally slow (average speed approximately 535 km/s) and only approximately 40% of the CMEs were halos. The corresponding numbers for CMEs associated with RL shocks were 1237 km/s and 72%, respectively. Thus, the CME kinetic energy seems to be the deciding factor in the radio-emission properties of shocks. The lower kinetic energy of CMEs associated with RQ shocks is also suggested by the lower peak soft X-ray flux of the associated flares (C3.4 versus M4.7 for RL shocks). CMEs associated with RQ CMEs were generally accelerating within the coronagraph field of view (average acceleration approximately +6.8 m/s (exp 2)), while those associated with RL shocks were decelerating (average acceleration approximately 3.5 m/s (exp 2)). This suggests that many of the RQ shocks formed at large distances from the Sun, typically beyond 10 Rs, consistent with the absence of metric and decameter-hectometric (DH) type II radio bursts. A small fraction of RL shocks had type II radio emission solely in the kilometric (km) wavelength domain. Interestingly, the kinematics of the CMEs associated with the km type II bursts is similar to those of RQ shocks, except that the former are slightly more energetic. Comparison of the shock Mach numbers at 1 AU shows that the RQ shocks are mostly subcritical, suggesting that they were not efficient in accelerating electrons. The Mach number values also indicate that most of these are quasi-perpendicular shocks. The radio-quietness is

  2. Separating Nightside Interplanetary and Ionospheric Scintillation with LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallows, R. A.; Bisi, M. M.; Forte, B.; Ulich, Th.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Mann, G.; Vocks, C.

    2016-09-01

    Observation of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) beyond Earth-orbit can be challenging due to the necessity to use low radio frequencies at which scintillation due to the ionosphere could confuse the interplanetary contribution. A recent paper by Kaplan et al. presenting observations using the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) reports evidence of nightside IPS on two radio sources within their field of view. However, the low time cadence of 2 s used might be expected to average out the IPS signal, resulting in the reasonable assumption that the scintillation is more likely to be ionospheric in origin. To check this assumption, this Letter uses observations of IPS taken at a high time cadence using the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR). Averaging these to the same as the MWA observations, we demonstrate that the MWA result is consistent with IPS, although some contribution from the ionosphere cannot be ruled out. These LOFAR observations represent the first of nightside IPS using LOFAR, with solar wind speeds consistent with a slow solar wind stream in one observation and a coronal mass ejection expected to be observed in another.

  3. Measurements of line-averaged electron density of pulsed plasmas using a He-Ne laser interferometer in a magnetized coaxial plasma gun device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, D.; Sakuma, I.; Kitagawa, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2012-10-01

    In next step of fusion devices such as ITER, lifetime of plasma-facing materials (PFMs) is strongly affected by transient heat and particle loads during type I edge localized modes (ELMs) and disruption. To clarify damage characteristics of the PFMs, transient heat and particle loads have been simulated by using a plasma gun device. We have performed simulation experiments by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) device at University of Hyogo. The line-averaged electron density measured by a He-Ne interferometer is 2x10^21 m-3 in a drift tube. The plasma velocity measured by a time of flight technique and ion Doppler spectrometer was 70 km/s, corresponding to the ion energy of 100 eV for helium. Thus, the ion flux density is 1.4x10^26 m-2s-1. On the other hand, the MCPG is connected to a target chamber for material irradiation experiments. It is important to measure plasma parameters in front of target materials in the target chamber. In particular, a vapor cloud layer in front of the target material produced by the pulsed plasma irradiation has to be characterized in order to understand surface damage of PFMs under ELM-like plasma bombardment. In the conference, preliminary results of application of the He-Ne laser interferometer for the above experiment will be shown.

  4. Energetic electron response to interplanetary shocks at geosynchronous orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Zong, Q.-G.

    2015-06-01

    Interplanetary (IP) shocks have great impacts on Earth's magnetosphere, especially in causing global dynamic changes of energetic particles. In order to study the response of energetic electrons (50keV-1.5MeV) at geosynchronous orbit to IP shocks, we have systematically analyzed 215 IP shock events based on ACE, GOES, and LANL observations during 1998-2007. Our study shows that after the shock arrival low-energy electron fluxes increase at geosynchronous orbit. However, in higher energy channels fluxes show smaller increases and eventually become unchanged or even decrease. The oscillations of electron fluxes following the shock arrival have also been studied in this paper. Statistical analysis revealed a frequency preference for 2.2 mHz and 3.3 mHz oscillations of energetic electron fluxes. The amplitude of these oscillations is larger under southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) than under northward IMF. Furthermore, oscillations from high-energy and low-energy electron fluxes show different phase characteristics and power distributions. The phase angles of the oscillations are the same in the dawn, dusk, and noon sectors for low-energy channels (50-500keV), while they have a π/2 difference between two adjacent local time sectors for high-energy channels (0.5-1.5MeV). The wave power distribution of electron fluxes shows different dawn-dusk asymmetries for low-energy channels and high-energy channels. The results presented in this paper provide an energetic particle point of view of the magnetospheric response to the interplanetary shock impact.

  5. International Launch Vehicle Selection for Interplanetary Travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrone, Kristine; Nguyen, Lori T.

    2010-01-01

    In developing a mission strategy for interplanetary travel, the first step is to consider launch capabilities which provide the basis for fundamental parameters of the mission. This investigation focuses on the numerous launch vehicles of various characteristics available and in development internationally with respect to upmass, launch site, payload shroud size, fuel type, cost, and launch frequency. This presentation will describe launch vehicles available and in development worldwide, then carefully detail a selection process for choosing appropriate vehicles for interplanetary missions focusing on international collaboration, risk management, and minimization of cost. The vehicles that fit the established criteria will be discussed in detail with emphasis on the specifications and limitations related to interplanetary travel. The final menu of options will include recommendations for overall mission design and strategy.

  6. Numerical simulations of the breakout model for the initiation of solar coronal mass ejections and in-situ observations of their interplanetary structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Benjamin James

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the one of the most exciting manifestations of dynamic solar activity and one of the most important solar inputs into the Sun-Earth system. Utilizing both large-scale numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations of solar eruptions and in-situ magnetic field and plasma measurements by satellites, substantial progress is made on a number of outstanding scientific questions about the origin, structure, and long-term heliospheric effects of CMEs. We present results of the first successful demonstration of the breakout model for CME initiation in 3-dimensions. The 3D topology allows for the gradual accumulation of free magnetic energy and magnetic reconnection external to the highly-sheared filament channel, which triggers catastrophic, runaway expansion and leads to the eruption of the low-lying sheared flux. Previous 2.5D breakout simulations are examined in an observational context. There is excellent agreement between the simulation results and CME morphology and dynamics through the corona, the properties of eruptive flare loop systems, and in the ejecta magnetic structure and in-situ measurements of the most coherent interplanetary CMEs. The magnetic and plasma structure of the most ordered interplanetary CMES (ICMEs, also called magnetic clouds) is examined using field and plasma data from the WIND and ACE spacecraft. We find anomalously high charge states of heavy ion species present, on average, throughout the entire magnetic cloud which suggests enhanced heating close to the sun, most-likely associated with eruptive flare magnetic reconnection. A long-term study of magnetic clouds events from 1995--2003 is also presented and the magnetic flux and helicity content is analyzed for solar-cycle trends. Magnetic clouds show a solar-cycle evolution of the preference for right-handed fields during the cycle 23 solar minimum that changes to a left-handed preference during solar maximum. A time varying dynamo-type source is present

  7. Helium at Interplanetary Discontinuities: ACE STEREO Observations and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Allegrini, F.; Desai, M.; Klecker, B.; Popecki, M.; Farrugia, C.; Galvin, A.; Bochsler, P.; Karrer, R.; Opitz, A.; Simunac, K.

    2007-12-01

    ACE/SEPICA observations showed that, on average, energetic He+ is after H+ and He2+ the third most abundant energetic particle species in the heliosphere. Depending on the type of the energetic population the He+/He2+ ratio can reach unusually high values in the energy range 250 - 800keV/n ratios up to unity. As a major source of energetic He+ interplanetary pickup ions have been identified that are preferentially accelerated at co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs), transient interaction regions (TIRs), and interplanetary traveling shocks. Most recent data from STEREO/PLASTIC in the energy range of 0.2-80keV/Q show clear evidence of abundant He+ at interplanetary discontinuities. Thus PLASTIC extends the energy range into injection region of the source. Furthermore, ACE/ULEIS and ACE/SEPICA measurements showed that very often 3He2+ and He+ are also accelerated simultaneously at CME-driven IP shocks. This is surprising because, these to species originate from different sources. However, this may indicate that the injection, or the acceleration efficiency of the accelerator for different source population may be similar. From observations, however, this cannot be differentiated easily. In numerical simulations this can be done because there is control over species and distribution functions. In a numerical study we applied test particle simulations and multi-dimensional hybrid simulations to address the contribution of source, injection and acceleration efficiency at shocks to the variability of the helium ratio. These, simulations with and without superimposed turbulence in the shock region will be compared with observations.

  8. Interplanetary Space Weather and Its Planetary Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, Norma; Bothmer, Volker; Facius, Rainer; Grießmeier, Jean-Mathias; Moussas, Xenophon; Panasyuk, Mikhail; Romanova, Natalia; Withers, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Interplanetary travel is not just a science fiction scenario anymore, but a goal as realistic as when our ancestors started to cross the oceans. With curiosity driving humans to visit other planets in our solar system, the understanding of interplanetary space weather is a vital subject today, particularly because the physical conditions faced during a space vehicle's transit to its targeted solar system object are crucial to a mission's success and vital to the health and safety of spacecraft crew, especially when scheduling planned extravehicular activities.

  9. Mars Science Laboratory Interplanetary Navigation Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin-Mur, Tomas J.; Kruizinga, Gerhard; Wong, Mau

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft, carrying the Curiosity rover to Mars, hit the top of the Martian atmosphere just 200 meters from where it had been predicted more than six days earlier, and 2.6 million kilometers away. This un-expected level of accuracy was achieved by a combination of factors including: spacecraft performance, tracking data processing, dynamical modeling choices, and navigation filter setup. This paper will describe our best understanding of what were the factors that contributed to this excellent interplanetary trajectory prediction performance. The accurate interplanetary navigation contributed to the very precise landing performance, and to the overall success of the mission.

  10. The cause of high-intensity long-duration continuous AE activity (HILDCAAS) - Interplanetary Alfven wave trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Gonzalez, Walter D.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that high intensity (AE of greater than 1,000 nT), long duration (T of greater than 2d) continuous auroral activity events are caused by outward (from the sun) propagating interplanetary Alfven wave trains. The Alfven waves are often (but not always) detected several days after major interplanetary events, such as shocks and solar wind density enhancements. Presumably, magnetic reconnection between the southward components of the Alfven wave magnetic fields and magnetospheric fields is the mechanism for transfer of solar wind energy to the magnetosphere.

  11. Relativistic electrons at geosynchronous orbit, interplanetary electron flux, and the 13-month Jovian synodic year

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christon, S. P.; Chenette, D. L.; Baker, D. N.; Moses, D.

    1989-01-01

    Results are reported from a search to determine the correlation, if any, between the temporal behaviors of 0.2-7 MeV or higher electrons at GEO (6.6 earth radii) and 6-10 MeV electrons in the interplanetary region near earth at the period of the Jovian synodic year (about 13 months). The 13-month intensity variation results from the synodic interplanetary magnetic field conection of earth to Jupiter. Direct compariosn of intensity-time flux profiles for the years 1976-1984, about 7 synodic Jovian electron seasons, shows that the intensity envelope of peak electron flux at GEO does not appear to be correlated to the observed 13 month intensity envelope of relativistic electron flux in the interplanetary region near earth. A persistent 13-month variation of GEO flux is not obvious, thus indicating that the intensity of electron flux at GEO is not directly and soley related to the intensity of Jovian electron flux near earth. It is concluded that dynamic erergization and redistribution processes in earth's magnetosphere must be invoked to produce the intensity variations of relativistic electron flux at GEO and not interplanetary magnetic field connection to Jupiter.

  12. Multispacecraft study of interplanetary shocks at 1 AU.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Cano, X.; Kajdic, P.; Russell, C. T.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Jian, L.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Interplanetary (IP) shocks propagate through the heliosphere perturbing the solar wind plasma. They can be driven by Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) and Stream Interaction Regions (SIRs). They play an active role in the acceleration of ions to suprathermal energies. Shock fronts evolve as they move from the Sun. Their surfaces can be far from uniform and be modulated by changes in the solar wind (magnetic field orientation, flow velocity), and perturbations upstream and downstream from the shocks, i.e., electromagnetic waves. In this work we use multispacecraft data (STEREO, WIND, ACE) to study shock characteristics at different helio-longitudes and determine the properties of the waves near them. We also determine shock longitudinal extensions and foreshock sizes. The variations of geometry along the shock surface can result in different extensions of the wave and ion foreshocks ahead of the shocks, and in different wave modes upstream and downtream of the shocks. Thus, the region with modified solar wind ahead of the shocks can be very asymmetric.

  13. CME dynamics using coronagraph and interplanetary ejecta data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Lago, Alisson; Gonzalez, Walter D.; De Lucas, Aline; Braga, Carlos Roberto; Vieira, Lucas Ramos; Stekel, Tardelli Ronan Coelho; Rockenbach, Marlos

    2013-05-01

    In this work, we present a study of the coronal mass ejection (CME) dynamics using LASCO coronagraph observations combined with in-situ ACE plasma and magnetic field data, covering a continuous period of time from January 1997 to April 2001, complemented by few extreme events observed in 2001 and 2003. We show, for the first time, that the CME expansion speed correlates very well with the travel time to 1 AU of the interplanetary ejecta (or ICMEs) associated with the CMEs, as well as with their preceding shocks. The events analyzed in this work are a subset of the events studied in Schwenn et al. (2005), from which only the CMEs associated with interplanetary ejecta (ICMEs) were selected. Three models to predict CME travel time to Earth, two proposed by Gopalswamy et al. (2001) and one by Schwenn et al. (2005), were used to characterize the dynamical behavior of this set of events. Extreme events occurred in 2001 and 2003 were used to test the prediction capability of the models regarding CMEs with very high LASCO C3 speeds.

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic Shocks in the Interplanetary Space: a Theoretical Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, D. M.

    2017-02-01

    I discuss in this brief review some properties of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) discontinuities in the interplanetary space. My emphasis is on a special case of MHD discontinuity, namely interplanetary (IP) shocks, and those that are found at 1 AU. I derive the Rankine-Hugoniot (RH) equations to evaluate plasma parameters in the downstream region (shocked plasma) in relation to the upstream region (unshocked plasma). These properties are used to classify IP shocks in terms of their geometry and their direction of propagation in relation to the Sun. The shock geometry is determined in terms of two angles: θ _{Bn}, the angle between the upstream magnetic field and the shock normal, and θ _{xn}, the angle between the shock normal and the Sun-Earth line. Sources of IP shocks frequently found in the solar wind at Earth's orbit are presented. Then the RH equations are solved for two categories of IP shocks in a special case: perpendicular shocks, when θ _{Bn} is 90 ∘, and oblique shocks, when that angle is 45 ∘. Finally, I highlight the importance of knowing the shock geometry, mainly the impact angle θ _{xn}, specially whether the shock is frontal or inclined, for space weather-related investigations. IP shocks are known to be more geoeffective if they strike the Earth's magnetosphere frontally, or with impact angle nearly null. These results have been reported both by modeling and experimental studies in the literature.

  15. ENERGETIC PARTICLE PRESSURE AT INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS: STEREO-A OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lario, D.; Decker, R. B.; Roelof, E. C.; Viñas, A.-F.

    2015-11-10

    We study periods of elevated energetic particle intensities observed by STEREO-A when the partial pressure exerted by energetic (≥83 keV) protons (P{sub EP}) is larger than the pressure exerted by the interplanetary magnetic field (P{sub B}). In the majority of cases, these periods are associated with the passage of interplanetary shocks. Periods when P{sub EP} exceeds P{sub B} by more than one order of magnitude are observed in the upstream region of fast interplanetary shocks where depressed magnetic field regions coincide with increases of energetic particle intensities. When solar wind parameters are available, P{sub EP} also exceeds the pressure exerted by the solar wind thermal population (P{sub TH}). Prolonged periods (>12 hr) with both P{sub EP} > P{sub B} and P{sub EP} > P{sub TH} may also occur when energetic particles accelerated by an approaching shock encounter a region well upstream of the shock characterized by low magnetic field magnitude and tenuous solar wind density. Quasi-exponential increases of the sum P{sub SUM} = P{sub B} + P{sub TH} + P{sub EP} are observed in the immediate upstream region of the shocks regardless of individual changes in P{sub EP}, P{sub B}, and P{sub TH}, indicating a coupling between P{sub EP} and the pressure of the background medium characterized by P{sub B} and P{sub TH}. The quasi-exponential increase of P{sub SUM} implies a radial gradient ∂P{sub SUM}/∂r > 0 that is quasi-stationary in the shock frame and results in an outward force applied to the plasma upstream of the shock. This force can be maintained by the mobile energetic particles streaming upstream of the shocks that, in the most intense events, drive electric currents able to generate diamagnetic cavities and depressed solar wind density regions.

  16. An electrodynamic model of electric currents and magnetic fields in the dayside ionosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cloutier, P. A.; Tascione, T. F.; Danieli, R. E., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The electric current configuration induced in the ionosphere of Venus by the interaction of the solar wind has been calculated in previous papers (Cloutier and Daniell, 1973; Daniell and Cloutier, 1977; Cloutier and Daniell, 1979) for average steady-state solar wind conditions and interplanetary magnetic field. This model is generalized to include the effects of (1) plasma depletion and magnetic field enhancement near the ionopause, (2) velocity-shear-induced MHD instabilities of the Kelvin-Helmholtz type within the ionosphere, and (3) variations in solar wind parameters and interplanetary magnetic field. It is shown that the magnetic field configuration resulting from the model varies in response to changes in solar wind and interplanetary field conditions, and that these variations produce magnetic field profiles in excellent agreement with those seen by the Pioneer-Venus Orbiter. The formation of flux-ropes by the Kelving-Helmholtz instability is shown to be a natural consequence of the model, with the spatial distribution and size of the flux-ropes determined by the magnetic Reynolds number.

  17. Properties and drivers of fast interplanetary shocks near the orbit of the Earth (1995-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpua, E. K. J.; Lumme, E.; Andreeova, K.; Isavnin, A.; Koskinen, H. E. J.

    2015-06-01

    We present a comprehensive statistical analysis spanning over a solar cycle of the properties and drivers of traveling fast forward and fast reverse interplanetary shocks. We combine statistics of 679 shocks between 1995 and 2013 identified from the near-Earth (Wind and ACE) and STEREO-A observations. We find that fast forward shocks dominate over fast reverse shocks in all solar cycle phases except during solar minimum. Nearly all fast reverse shocks are driven by slow-fast stream interaction regions (SIRs), while coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the principal drivers of fast forward shocks in all phases except at solar minimum. The occurrence rate and median speeds of CME-driven fast forward shocks follow the sunspot cycle, while SIR-associated shocks do not show such correspondence. The strength of the shock (characterized by the magnetosonic Mach number and by the upstream to downstream magnetic field and density ratio) shows relatively little variations over solar cycle. However, the shocks were slightly stronger during the ascending phase of a relatively weak solar cycle 24 than during the previous ascending phase. The CME- and SIR-driven fast forward shocks and fast reverse shocks have distinct upstream solar wind conditions, which reflect to their relative strengths. We found that CME-driven shocks are on average stronger and faster, and they show broader distributions of shock parameters than the shocks driven by SIRs.

  18. LDEF Interplanetary Dust Experiment - Techniques for identification and study of long-lived orbital debris clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, S. F.; Oliver, J. P.; Weinberg, J. L.; Cooke, W. J.; Montague, N. L.; Mulholland, J. D.; Wortman, J. J.; Kassel, P. C.; Kinard, W. H.

    1991-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is a 12-sided, 4.3-m-diameter, 9.1-m-long cylinder designed and built by NASA Langley to carry experiments for extended periods in space. The LDEF was first placed in orbit by the Shuttle Challenger on 7 April 1984 and recovered by the Shuttle Columbia in January 1990, only days before it was expected to burn up in the earth's atmosphere. The Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) was designed to detect impacts of extra-terrestrial particles and orbital debris. The IDE detectors (which covered about 1 sq m of the surface of LDEF) were sensitive to particles ranging in size from about 0.2 to 100 microns. Data were recorded for 11.5 months before the supply of magnetic tape was exhausted. Examination of the LDEF IDE dataset shows that impacts often occurred in 'bursts', during which numerous impacts occurred in a short time (typically 3-5 min) at a rate much greater than the average impact rate. In several cases, such events reoccurred each time the LDEF returned to the same point in its orbit. Such multi-orbit event sequences were found to extend for as many as 25 or more orbits.

  19. The interplanetary pioneers. Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corliss, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    The Pioneer Space Probe Project is explained to document the events which occurred during the project. The subjects discussed are: (1) origin and history of interplanetary Pioneer program, (2) Pioneer system development and design, (3) Pioneer flight operations, and (4) Pioneer scientific results. Line drawings, circuit diagrams, illustrations, and photographs are included to augment the written material.

  20. Interplanetary monitoring platform engineering history and achievements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    In the fall of 1979, last of ten Interplanetary Monitoring Platform Satellite (IMP) missions ended a ten year series of flights dedicated to obtaining new knowledge of the radiation effects in outer space and of solar phenomena during a period of maximum solar flare activity. The technological achievements and scientific accomplishments from the IMP program are described.

  1. Interplanetary shocks preceded by solar filament eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Kahler, S. W.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The solar and interplanetary characteristics of six interplanetary shock and energetic particle events associated with the eruptions of solar filaments lying outside active regions are discussed. The events are characterized by the familiar double-ribbon H-alpha brightenings observed with large flares, but only very weak soft X-ray and microwave bursts. Both impulsive phases and metric type II bursts are absent in all six events. The energetic particles observed near the earth appear to be accelerated predominantly in the interplanetary shocks. The interplanetary shock speeds are lower and the longitudinal extents considerably less than those of flare-associated shocks. Three of the events were associated with unusual enhancements of singly-ionized helium in the solar wind following the shocks. These enhancements appear to be direct detections of the cool filament material expelled from the corona. It is suggested that these events are part of a spectrum of solar eruptive events which include both weaker events and the large flares. Despite their unimpressive and unreported solar signatures, the quiescent filament eruptions can result in substantial space and geophysical disturbances.

  2. Hummingbird: Dramatically Reducing Interplanetary Mission Cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertz, J. R.; Van Allen, R. E.; Sarzi-Amade, N.; Shao, A.; Taylor, C.

    2012-06-01

    The Hummingbird interplanetary spacecraft has an available delta V of 2 to 4 km/sec and a recurring cost of 2 to 3 million, depending on the payload and configuration. The baseline telescope has a resolution of 30 cm at a distance of 100 km.

  3. Relationship between the growth of the ring current and the interplanetary quantity. [solar wind energy-magnetospheric coupling parameter correlation with substorm AE index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akasofu, S.-I.

    1979-01-01

    Akasofu (1979) has reported that the interplanetary parameter epsilon correlates reasonably well with the magnetospheric substorm index AE; in the first approximation, epsilon represents the solar wind coupled to the magnetosphere. The correlation between the interplanetary parameter, the auroral electrojet index and the ring current index is examined for three magnetic storms. It is shown that when the interplanetary parameter exceeds the amount that can be dissipated by the ionosphere in terms of the Joule heat production, the excess energy is absorbed by the ring current belt, producing an abnormal growth of the ring current index.

  4. Characterizing Interplanetary Structures of Long-Lasting Ionospheric Storm Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandoi, C.; Dong, Y.; Ngwira, C. M.; Damas, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    Geomagnetic storms can result in periods of heightened TEC (Total Electron Content) in Earth's ionosphere. These periods of change in TEC (dTEC) can have adverse impacts on a technological society, such as scintillation of radio signals used by communication and navigation satellites. However, it is unknown which exact properties of a given storm cause dTEC. We are comparing different solar wind properties that result in a significant long-lasting dTEC to see if there are any patterns that remain constant in these storms. These properties, among others, include the interplanetary magnetic field By and Bz components, the proton density, and the flow speed. As a preliminary investigation, we have studied 15 solar storms. Preliminary results will be presented. In the future, we hope to increase our sample size and analyze over 80 different solar storms, which result in significant dTEC.

  5. Planetary and Interplanetary Environmental Models for Radiation Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeAngelis, G.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2005-01-01

    The essence of environmental modeling is presented as suited for radiation analysis purposes. The variables of fundamental importance for radiation environmental assessment are discussed. The characterization is performed by dividing modeling into three areas, namely the interplanetary medium, the circumplanetary environment, and the planetary or satellite surface. In the first area, the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and their modulation by the heliospheric magnetic field as well as and solar particle events (SPE) are considered, in the second area the magnetospheres are taken into account, and in the third area the effect of the planetary environment is also considered. Planetary surfaces and atmospheres are modeled based on results from the most recent targeted spacecraft. The results are coupled with suited visualization techniques and radiation transport models in support of trade studies of health risks for future exploration missions.

  6. Radiation shielding of spacecraft in manned interplanetary flights.

    PubMed

    Spillantini, P; Taccetti, F; Papini, P; Rossi, L

    2000-04-01

    During the interplanetary flights the crewmembers will be exposed to cosmic ray radiation with great risk for their health. The absorbed dose due to CR depends on the galactic (GCR) or solar (SCR) origin. GCRs are isotropic and relatively high in energy and deliver a dose nearly constant with time that can be reduced only by means of "heavy" passive protection. The outer walls of the spacecraft usually shield the SCRs up to a few tens of MeV, but during some exceptional solar bursts, a great number of particles, mainly protons, are ejected at higher energies. In this case the dose delivered in a few hours by a solar burst can easily exceed 1 year cumulated dose by GCRS. The high-energy component of SCRs is quasi-directional so that a shielding system based on a superconductive magnetic lens can reduce the daily dose of SCRs to the level delivered by GCRS.

  7. Effects of the interaction and evolution of interplanetary shocks on ``background'' solar wind speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chin-Chun; Feng, X. S.; Wu, S. T.; Dryer, M.; Fry, C. D.

    2006-12-01

    Solar wind speed plays an important role in the study of space weather prediction. Some workers have used it for measuring the arrival time of solar disturbances at 1 AU. The purpose of this work is to extend our previous study (Wu et al., 2005c) of some Halloween 2003 events by presenting additional physical effects of multiple shock interactions on the solar wind profile during a complex compound event. In order to achieve this goal, we track a group of specific solar events' plasma and magnetic field output as they propagate into interplanetary space. A one-dimensional, time-dependent adaptive grid MHD code is used to study the evolution and interaction of shocks from Sun through the heliosphere. The MHD simulation results demonstrate that the solar wind speed might increase about ≈25% after two shocks collide with each other. This kind of interaction can affect the accuracy of the identification of the solar source that causes the interplanetary event (e.g., magnetic cloud, coronal mass ejection, interplanetary shock, or some other interplanetary discontinuity.) In this study we further simulate part of the famous Halloween 2003 events that contain at least four major solar events (flares) during 28 October to 1 November 2003. These major events, simulated by pressure pulses, generated shocks that matched well with ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer) observations as reported by Wu et al. (2005c) in our previous study. The present work presents new details concerning the interplay (such as sunward and antisunward traveling compression and rarefaction waves) between fast forward and fast reverse interplanetary shocks.

  8. Fullerenes and interplanetary dust at the Permian-Triassic boundary.

    PubMed

    Poreda, Robert J; Becker, Luann

    2003-01-01

    We recently presented new evidence that an impact occurred approximately 250 million years ago at the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB), triggering the most severe mass extinction in the history of life on Earth. We used a new extraterrestrial tracer, fullerene, a third carbon carrier of noble gases besides diamond and graphite. By exploiting the unique properties of this molecule to trap noble gases inside of its caged structure (helium, neon, argon), the origin of the fullerenes can be determined. Here, we present new evidence for fullerenes with extraterrestrial noble gases in the PTB at Graphite Peak, Antarctica, similar to PTB fullerenes from Meishan, China and Sasayama, Japan. In addition, we isolated a (3)He-rich magnetic carrier phase in three fractions from the Graphite Peak section. The noble gases in this magnetic fraction were similar to zero-age deep-sea interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and some magnetic grains isolated from the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. The helium and neon isotopic compositions for both the bulk Graphite Peak sediments and an isolated magnetic fraction from the bulk material are consistent with solar-type gases measured in zero-age deep-sea sediments and point to a common source, namely, the flux of IDPs to the Earth's surface. In this instance, the IDP noble gas signature for the bulk sediment can be uniquely decoupled from fullerene, demonstrating that two separate tracers are present (direct flux of IDPs for (3)He vs. giant impact for fullerene).

  9. Toroidal Plasma Thruster for Interplanetary and Interstellar Space Flights

    SciTech Connect

    N.N. Gorelenkov; L.E. Zakharov; and M.V. Gorelenkova

    2001-07-11

    This work involves a conceptual assessment for using the toroidal fusion reactor for deep space interplanetary and interstellar missions. Toroidal thermonuclear fusion reactors, such as tokamaks and stellarators, are unique for space propulsion, allowing for a design with the magnetic configuration localized inside toroidal magnetic field coils. Plasma energetic ions, including charged fusion products, can escape such a closed configuration at certain conditions, a result of the vertical drift in toroidal rippled magnetic field. Escaping particles can be used for direct propulsion (since toroidal drift is directed one way vertically) or to create and heat externally confined plasma, so that the latter can be used for propulsion. Deuterium-tritium fusion neutrons with an energy of 14.1 MeV also can be used for direct propulsion. A special design allows neutrons to escape the shield and the blanket of the tokamak. This provides a direct (partial) conversion of the fusion energy into the directed motion of the propellant. In contrast to other fusion concepts proposed for space propulsion, this concept utilizes the natural drift motion of charged particles out of the closed magnetic field configuration.

  10. Power spectral signatures of interplanetary corotating and transient flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Burlaga, L. F.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    1984-01-01

    Studies of the time behavior of the galactic cosmic ray intensity have concluded that long term decreases in the intensity are generally associated with systems of interplanetary flows that contain flare generated shock waves, magnetic clouds and other transient phenomena. The magnetic field power spectral signatures of such flow systems are compared to power spectra obtained during times when the solar wind is dominated by stable corotating streams that do not usually produce long-lived reduction in the cosmic ray intensity. The spectral signatures of these two types of regimes (transient and corotating) are distinct. However, the distinguishing features are not the same throughout the heliosphere. In data collected beyond 1 AU the primary differences are in the power spectra of the magnitude of the magnetic field rather than in the power in the field components. Consequently, decreases in cosmic ray intensity are very likely due to magnetic mirror forces and gradient drifts rather than to small angle scattering due to cyclotron wave-particle interactions.

  11. Fullerenes and Interplanetary Dust at the Permian-Triassic Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poreda, Robert J.; Becker, Luann

    2003-01-01

    We recently presented new evidence that an impact occurred ~250 million years ago at the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB), triggering the most severe mass extinction in the history of life on Earth. We used a new extraterrestrial tracer, fullerene, a third carbon carrier of noble gases besides diamond and graphite. By exploiting the unique properties of this molecule to trap noble gases inside of its caged structure (helium, neon, argon), the origin of the fullerenes can be determined. Here, we present new evidence for fullerenes with extraterrestrial noble gases in the PTB at Graphite Peak, Antarctica, similar to PTB fullerenes from Meishan, China and Sasayama, Japan. In addition, we isolated a 3He-rich magnetic carrier phase in three fractions from the Graphite Peak section. The noble gases in this magnetic fraction were similar to zero-age deep-sea interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and some magnetic grains isolated from the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. The helium and neon isotopic compositions for both the bulk Graphite Peak sediments and an isolated magnetic fraction from the bulk material are consistent with solar-type gases measured in zero-age deep-sea sediments and point to a common source, namely, the flux of IDPs to the Earth's surface. In this instance, the IDP noble gas signature for the bulk sediment can be uniquely decoupled from fullerene, demonstrating that two separate tracers are present (direct flux of IDPs for 3He vs. giant impact for fullerene).

  12. Interstellar helium in interplanetary space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, W. C.; Lange, J. J.; Scherb, F.

    1972-01-01

    The velocity distribution function of He(+) in the solar wind at 1 AU is calculated with the assumption that the source is photoionization of a cold (T = 100 K), neutral interstellar wind. If the spiral magnetic field is noise free, the velocity distribution is diffuse and would not produce a peak at 4(E over Q) sub H in an E over Q particle spectrum. If the velocity of the interstellar wind with respect to the sun lies in the ecliptic, a large variation of the He(+) number density with respect to ecliptic longitude is expected.

  13. Coronal Mass Ejections Near the Sun and in the Interplanetary Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2012-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most energetic phenomenon in the heliosphere. During solar eruptions, the released energy flows out from the Sun in the form of magnetized plasma and electromagnetic radiation. The electromagnetic radiation suddenly increases the ionization content of the ionosphere, thus impacting communication and navigation systems. The plasma clouds can drive shocks that accelerate charged particles to very high energies in the interplanetary space, which pose radiation hazard to astronauts and space systems. The plasma clouds also arrive at Earth in about two days and impact Earth's magnetosphere, producing geomagnetic storms. The magnetic storms result in a number of effects including induced currents that can disrupt power grids, railroads, and underground pipelines. This lecture presents an overview of the origin, propagation, and geospace consequences of CMEs and their interplanetary counterparts.

  14. The VISTA spacecraft: Advantages of ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) for interplanetary fusion propulsion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, C.D.; Klein, G.; Sercel, J.; Hoffman, N.; Murray, K.; Chang-Diaz, F.

    1987-10-02

    Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is an attractive engine power source for interplanetary manned spacecraft, especially for near-term missions requiring minimum flight duration, because ICF has inherent high power-to-mass ratios and high specific impulses. We have developed a new vehicle concept called VISTA that uses ICF and is capable of round-trip manned missions to Mars in 100 days using A.D. 2020 technology. We describe VISTA's engine operation, discuss associated plasma issues, and describe the advantages of DT fuel for near-term applications. Although ICF is potentially superior to non-fusion technologies for near-term interplanetary transport, the performance capabilities of VISTA cannot be meaningfully compared with those of magnetic-fusion systems because of the lack of a comparable study of the magnetic-fusion systems. We urge that such a study be conducted.

  15. The VISTA spacecraft: Advantages of ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) for interplanetary fusions propulsion applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orth, Charles D.; Klein, Gail; Sercel, Joel; Hoffman, Nate; Murray, Kathy; Chang-Diaz, Franklin

    1987-01-01

    Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is an attractive engine power source for interplanetary manned spacecraft, especially for near-term missions requiring minimum flight duration, because ICF has inherent high power-to-mass ratios and high specific impulses. We have developed a new vehicle concept called VISTA that uses ICF and is capable of round-trip manned missions to Mars in 100 days using A.D. 2020 technology. We describe VISTA's engine operation, discuss associated plasma issues, and describe the advantages of DT fuel for near-term applications. Although ICF is potentially superior to non-fusion technologies for near-term interplanetary transport, the performance capabilities of VISTA cannot be meaningfully compared with those of magnetic-fusion systems because of the lack of a comparable study of the magnetic-fusion systems. We urge that such a study be conducted.

  16. Quasi-linear theory and transport theory. [particle acceleration in interplanetary medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles W.

    1992-01-01

    The theory of energetic particle scattering by magnetostatic fluctuations is reviewed in so far as it fails to produce the rigidity-independent mean-free-paths observed. Basic aspects of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations are reviewed with emphasis placed on the existence of dissipation range spectra at high wavenumbers. These spectra are then incorporated into existing theories for resonant magnetostatic scattering and are shown to yield infinite mean-free-paths. Nonresonant scattering in the form of magnetic mirroring is examined and offered as a partial solution to the magnetostatic problem. In the process, mean-free-paths are obtained in good agreement with observations in the interplanetary medium at 1 AU and upstream of planetary bow shocks.

  17. Multi-Spacecraft Observations of Interplanetary Shocks Near Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajdic, P.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Lavraud, B.

    2014-12-01

    Space missions around Earth have been continuously monitoring solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field for many years now. They have detected a large number of interplanetary (IP) shocks. These have been observed with multiple spacecraft at separations ranging from 103 km to several 105. Comparing observations of IP shocks at different locations in space can provide us with important insights on micro-physical processes that take place near or within the shock transitions. We have compiled a database of about 50 IP shocks detected between 2001 and 2014 with several missions. In the first part of our research we calculated local normals of IP shocks by using different one-spacecraft methods and also the 4-spacecraft method, when possible. In some cases we were able to compare the results of the latter method for different inter-spacecraft separations. This is the first time that comparison of IP shock profiles is also performed systematically on small inter-spacecraft separations of several 100 km (Cluster and Themis observations). Shock normals obtained by using different spacecraft configurations may differ. We find that spacecraft observe different shock profiles even when the their separations are only ~1000 km and the detection times differ by less than a second. The four-spacecraft method is less reliable when the detection times are small, since the changing shock profiles and uncertainties related to timing of the shock arrivals may distort the calculations. We also study regions upstream and downstream of IP shocks - we analyze the properties of suprathermal particles and magnetic perturbations there.

  18. Cosmic-ray streaming perpendicular to the mean magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, M. A.; Jokipii, J. R.; Owens, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Starting from a quasi-linear approximation for the ensemble-averaged particle distribution function in a random magnetic field, the complete diffusion tensor is derived. This is done by assuming a simple form for the ensemble-averaged distribution function, explicitly retaining all components of the streaming flux. This derivation obtains the antisymmetric terms in a natural manner. The necessary dropping of higher-order terms gives a criterion for the lower-energy limit of validity of the perpendicular and antisymmetric diffusion coefficients. The limit for the assumed distribution function is about 0.8 GV rigidity in the interplanetary field near 1 AU.

  19. Magnetic Clouds: Global and local expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulisano, Adriana; Demoulin, Pascal; Soledad Nakwacki, Ms Maria; Dasso, Sergio; Emilia Ruiz, Maria

    Magnetic clouds (MCs) are magnetized objects forming flux ropes, which are expelled from the Sun and travel through the heliosphere, transporting important amounts of energy, mass, magnetic flux, and magnetic helicity from the Sun to the interplanetary medium. To know the detailed dynamical evolution of MCs is very useful to improve the knowledge of solar processes, for instance from linking a transient solar source with its interplanetary manifestation. During its travel, and mainly due to the decrease of the total (magnetic plus thermal) pressure in the surrounding solar wind, MCs are objects in expansion. However, the detailed magnetic structure and the dynamical evolution of MCs is still not fully known. Even the identification of their boundaries is an open question in some cases. In a previous work we have shown that from onepoint observations of the bulk velocity profile, it is possible to infer the 'local' expansion rate for a given MC, i.e., the expansion rate while the MC is observed by the spacecraft. By the another hand, and from the comparison of sizes for different MCs observed at different heliodistances, it is possible to quantify an 'average' expansion law (i.e., a global expansion). In this work, in order to study the variability of the 'local' expansion with respect to the 'average' expansion of MCs during their travel, we present results and a comparison between both approaches. We make a detailed study of one-point observations (magnetic and bulk velocity) using a set of MCs and we get the 'local' expansion rate for each studied event. We compare the obtained 'local' expansion rates with the 'average' expansion law, and also with the expansion rates for the stationary solar wind.

  20. Solar rotating magnetic dipole?. [around axis perpendicular to rotation axis of the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonucci, E.

    1974-01-01

    A magnetic dipole rotating around an axis perpendicular to the rotation axis of the sun can account for the characteristics of the surface large-scale solar magnetic fields through the solar cycle. The polarity patterns of the interplanetary magnetic field, predictable from this model, agree with the observed interplanetary magnetic sector structure.

  1. A New Look at Jupiter: Results at the Now Frontier. [Pioneer 10, interplanetary space, and Jupiter atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Pioneer 10's encounter with Jupiter is discussed along with the interplanetary space beyond the orbit of Mars. Other topics discussed include the size of Jupiter, the Galilean satellites, the magnetic field of Jupiter, radiation belts, Jupiter's weather and interior, and future exploration possibilities. Educational projects are also included.

  2. Bi-directional streaming of halo electrons in interplanetary plasma clouds observed between 0.3 and 1 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivory, K.; Schwenn, R.

    1995-01-01

    The solar wind data obtained from the two Helios solar probes in the years 1974 to 1986 were systematically searched for the occurrence of bi-directional electron events. Most often these events are found in conjunction with shock associated magnetic clouds. The implications of these observations for the topology of interplanetary plasma clouds are discussed.

  3. The Study of a Solar Storm and Its Interplanetary and Geomagnetic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, B. H.; Li, C.

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed study of a solar storm occurred on 2014 January 7. By using the remote-sensing solar observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), the eruptions of the solar flare and the coronal mass ejection (CME) are investigated. Based on the particle measurement from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) and the in-situ plasma measurement from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), the solar energetic particle (SEP) event, the interplanetary CME (ICME), and its driven shock are analyzed. The influence of the solar storm on the geomagnetic fields is also analyzed. The results show that: (1) The impulsive eruption of the solar flare and the lift of the CME are temporally in accordance with each other. (2) The solar protons are mainly accelerated by the CME-driven shock when the CME travels to 7.7 solar radius, rather than by the magnetic reconnection in the flare. (3) The widths of the interplanetary shock sheath and the ICME itself are derived to be 0.22 AU and 0.26 AU, respectively. (4) The interplanetary shock and the ICME give rise to substorms and aurora, whereas no obvious geomagnetic storm is detected. The reason is that the ICME does not include a structure of the magnetic cloud (MC) or southward magnetic fields.

  4. Identification of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections at 1 AU Using Multiple Solar Wind Plasma Composition Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the use of multiple simultaneous solar wind plasma compositional anomalies, relative to the composition of the ambient solar wind, for identifying interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) plasma. We first summarize the characteristics of several solar wind plasma composition signatures (O(+7)/O(+6), Mg/O, Ne/O, Fe charge states, He/p) observed by the ACE and WIND spacecraft within the ICMEs during 1996 - 2002 identsed by Cane and Richardson. We then develop a set of simple criteria that may be used to identify such compositional anomalies, and hence potential ICMEs. To distinguish these anomalies from the normal variations seen in ambient solar wind composition, which depend on the wind speed, we compare observed compositional signatures with those 'expected' in ambient solar wind with the same solar wind speed. This method identifies anomalies more effectively than the use of fixed thresholds. The occurrence rates of individual composition anomalies within ICMEs range from approx. 70% for enhanced iron and oxygen charge states to approx. 30% for enhanced He/p (> 0.06) and Ne/O, and are generally higher in magnetic clouds than other ICMEs. Intervals of multiple anomalies are usually associated with ICMEs, and provide a basis for the identification of the majority of ICMEs. We estimate that Cane and Richardson, who did not refer to composition data, probably identitied approx. 90% of the ICMEs present. However, around 10% of their ICMEs have weak compositional anomalies, suggesting that the presence of such signatures does not provide a necessary requirement for an ICME. We note a remarkably similar correlation between the Mg/O and O(7)/O(6) ratios in hourly-averaged data both within ICMEs and the ambient solar wind. This 'universal' relationship suggests that a similar process (such as minor ion heating by waves inside coronal magnetic field loops) produces the first-ionization potential bias and ion freezing-in temperatures in the source regions

  5. Tin in a chondritic interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Submicron platey Sn-rich grains are present in chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle (IDP) W7029 A and it is the second occurrence of a tin mineral in a stratospheric micrometeorite. Selected Area Electron Diffraction data for the Sn-rich grains match with Sn2O3 and Sn3O4. The oxide(s) may have formed in the solar nebula when tin metal catalytically supported reduction of CO or during flash heating on atmospheric entry of the IDP. The presence of tin is consistent with enrichments for other volatile trace elements in chondritic IDPs and may signal an emerging trend toward nonchondritic volatile element abundances in chondritic IDPs. The observation confirms small-scale mineralogical heterogeneity in fine-grained chondritic porous interplanetary dust.

  6. Earth orbital operations supporting manned interplanetary missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Brent; Buddington, Patricia A.; Whittaker, William L.

    1989-01-01

    The orbital operations required to accumulate, assemble, test, verify, maintain, and launch complex manned space systems on interplanetary missions from earth orbit are as vital as the flight hardware itself. Vast numbers of orbital crew are neither necessary nor desirable for accomplishing the required tasks. A suite of robotic techniques under human supervisory control, relying on sensors, software and manipulators either currently emergent or already applied in terrestrial settings, can make the job tractable. The mission vehicle becomes largely self-assembling, using its own rigid aerobrake as a work platform. The Space Station, having been used as a laboratory testbed and to house an assembly crew of four, is not dominated by the process. A feasible development schedule, if begun soon, could emplace orbital support technologies for exploration missions in time for a 2004 first interplanetary launch.

  7. Tin in a chondritic interplanetary dust particle

    SciTech Connect

    Rietmeijer, F.J.M. )

    1989-03-01

    Submicron platey Sn-rich grains are present in chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle (IDP) W7029 A and it is the second occurrence of a tin mineral in a stratospheric micrometeorite. Selected Area Electron Diffraction data for the Sn-rich grains match with Sn{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Sn{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The oxide(s) may have formed in the solar nebula when tin metal catalytically supported reduction of CO or during flash heating on atmospheric entry of the IDP. The presence of tin is consistent with enrichments for other volatile trace elements in chondritic IDPs and may signal an emerging trend toward nonchondritic volatile element abundances in chondritic IDPs. The observation confirms small-scale mineralogical heterogeneity in fine-grained chondritic porous interplanetary dust. 27 refs.

  8. Dusty Plasma Effects in the Interplanetary Medium?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Ingrid; Issautier, Karine; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Le Chat, Gaétan; Czechowski, Andrzej; Zaslavsky, Arnaud; Zouganelis, Yannis; Belheouane, Soraya

    Cosmic dust particles exist in a variety of compositions and sizes in the interplanetary medium. There is little direct information on the composition, but those interplanetary dust particles that are collected in the upper Earth’s atmosphere and can be studied in the laboratory typically have an irregular, sometimes porous structure on scales <100 nm. They contain magnesium-rich silicates and silicon carbide, iron-nickel and iron-sulfur compounds, calcium- and aluminum oxides, and chemical compounds that contain a large mass fraction of carbon (e.g. carbonaceous species). A fraction of the dust originates from comets, but because of their bulk material temperature of about 280 K near 1 AU, most icy compounds have disappeared. The dust particles are embedded in the solar wind, a hot plasma with at 1 AU kinetic temperatures around 100 000 K and flow direction nearly radial outward from the Sun at supersonic bulk velocities around 400 km/s. Since the dust particles carry an electric surface charge they are subject to electromagnetic forces and the nanodust particles are efficiently accelerated to velocities of order of solar wind speed. The acceleration of the nanodust is similar, but not identical to the formation of pick-up ions. The S/WAVES radio wave instrument on STEREO measured a flux of nanodust at 1 AU [1]. The nanodust probably forms in the region inward of 1 AU and is accelerated by the solar wind as discussed. We also discuss the different paths of dust - plasma interactions in the interplanetary medium and their observations with space experiments. Comparing these interactions we show that the interplanetary medium near 1 AU can in many cases be described as “dust in plasma" rather than "dusty plasma”. [1] S. Belheouane, N. Meyer-Vernet, K. Issautier, G. Le Chat, A. Zaslavsky, Y. Zouganelis, I. Mann, A. Czechowski: Dynamics of nanoparticles detected at 1 AU by S/WAVES onboard STEREO spacecraft, in this session.

  9. Discovery of nuclear tracks in interplanetary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, J. P.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    Prior to capture by the Earth's atmosphere individual interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) have allegedly spent up to 10 to the 5th power years as discrete bodies within the interplanetary medium. Observation of tracks in IDP's in the form of solar flare tracks would provide hitherto unknown data about micrometeorites such as: (1) whether an IDP existed in space as an individual particle or as part of a larger meteroid; (2) the degree to which a particle was heated during the trauma of atmospheric entry; (3) residence time of an IDP within the interplanetary medium; and (4) possible hints as to the pre-accretional exposure of component mineral grains to solar or galactic irradiation. Using transmission electron microscopy tracks in several micrometeorites have been successfully identified. All of the studied particles had been retrieved from the stratosphere by U-2 aircraft. Three pristine IDP's (between 5 and 15 micro m diameter) have so far been searched for solar flare tracks, and they have been found in the two smaller particles U2-20B11 (11 micro m) and U2-20B37 (8 micro m).

  10. Manned interplanetary missions: prospective medical problems.

    PubMed

    Grigoriev, A I; Svetaylo, E N; Egorov, A D

    1998-12-01

    The present review aimed to suggest approaches to prospective medical problems related to the health maintenance of space crews during future manned interplanetary, particularly Martian, missions up to 2-3 years with a possible stay on a planet with gravity different from that on Earth. The approaches are based on knowledge so far obtained from our analysis of the medical support of long-term orbital flights up to one year, as well as on the consideration of specific conditions of interplanetary missions. These specific conditions include not only long-term exposure to microgravity, but also a prolonged stay of unpredictable duration (2-3 years) on board a spacecraft or on a planet without direct contact with Earth, and living in a team with a risk of psychological incompatibility and the impossibility of an urgent return to Earth. These conditions necessitate a highly trained medical person in the crew, diagnostic tools and equipment, psychophysiological support, countermeasures, as well as the means for urgent, including surgical, treatment on board a spacecraft or on a planet. In this review, the discussion was focused on the following predictable medical problems during an interplanetary mission; 1) unfavorable effects of prolonged exposure to microgravity, 2) specific problems related to Martian missions, 3) medical monitoring, 4) countermeasures, 5) psychophysiological support and 6) the medical care system.

  11. Remote radio tracking of interplanetary CMEs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Kaiser, M. L.; Fainberg, J.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Stone, R. G.

    1997-01-01

    Two examples of type 2 radio emissions associated with the propagation of earth-directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs) through the interplanetary medium are illustrated and compared. The two type 2 radio events were observed by WIND/WAVES in January and May of 1997 and exhibit very different radio characteristics. The analyses presented here use the novel approach of presenting the radio data as a function of the inverse of the frequency and time, which facilitates remote radio tracking of the CME through the interplanetary medium. It is demonstrated unequivocally that for the May 1997 event, the radio emissions were generated at the fundamental, and harmonic of the plasma frequency in the ambient plasma upstream of the CME-driven shock. For the January 1997 event, evidence is presented that some of the radio emissions were generated while the CME-driven shock passed through a corotating interaction region (CIR). This is the first time that type 2 radio emissions were shown to originate in a specific interplanetary structure.

  12. Integrated shielding systems for manned interplanetary spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Jeffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    The radiation environment encountered by manned interplanetary missions can have a severe impact on both vehicle design and mission performance. This study investigates the potential impact of radiation protection on interplanetary vehicle design for a manned Mars mission. A systems approach was used to investigate the radiation protection requirements of the sum interplanetary environment. Radiation budgets were developed which result in minimum integrated shielding system masses for both nuclear and non-nuclear powered missions. A variety of system configurations and geometries were assessed over a range of dose constraints. For an annual dose equivalent rate limit of 50 rem/yr, an environmental shielding system composed of a habitat shield and storm shelter was found to result in the lowest total mass. For a limit of 65 rem/yr, a system composed of a sleeping quarters shield was least massive, and resulted in significantly reduced system mass. At a limit of 75 rem/yr, a storm shelter alone was found to be sufficient, and exhibited a further mass reduction. Optimal shielding system results for 10 MWe nuclear powered missions were found to follow along similar lines, with the addition of a reactor shadow shield. A solar minimum galactic cosmic ray spectrum and one anomalously large solar particle event during the course of a two year mission were assumed. Water was assumed for environmental radiation shielding.

  13. Dynamics of interplanetary dust in the F corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusk, Edwin T.

    The dynamical mechanisms in interplanetary space and in the F corona were studied using numerical simulations. An expression for the radiation pressure force due to a rotating spherical source of radiation was derived. Also, expressions relating the variation in inclination and the longitude of the ascending node to the solar magnetic field were derived. The latter are based on the spherical source surface model of the solar magnetic field. Simulation of particles released during perihelion passages of comet Encke show that cometary particles have lifetimes shorter than the lifetime calculated by Wyatt and Whipple in 1950. These simulations also resulted in higher eccentricities and a definite alignment of the particles' aphelia toward a direction 20 deg. east of the vernal equinox. An expression relating the size of a planet's zone of influence to perturbations on particles in solar orbits based on the closest approach between the planet and the particle show that the expression for the size of a planet's zone of influence is not singular, but varies with the particular orbital element which is being studied. Simulations of the interaction of the Lorentz force in the F corona, based on observed solar magnetic field values, result in a spreading of the inclinations of particles in circumsolar orbits. This result, along with a reevaluation of recent observations of the F corona, leads to the conclusion that the shape of the circumsolar dust cloud cannot be a ring, but must be a wide band or a spherical shell.

  14. CAWSES November 7-8, 2004, Superstorm: Complex Solar and Interplanetary Features in the Post-Solar Maximum Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Echer, Ezequiel; Guarnieri, Fernando L.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2008-01-01

    The complex interplanetary structures during 7 to 8 Nov 2004 are analyzed to identify their properties as well as resultant geomagnetic effects and the solar origins. Three fast forward shocks, three directional discontinuities and two reverse waves were detected and analyzed in detail. The three fast forward shocks 'pump' up the interplanetary magnetic field from a value of approx.4 nT to 44 nT. However, the fields after the shocks were northward, and magnetic storms did not result. The three ram pressure increases were associated with major sudden impulses (SI + s) at Earth. A magnetic cloud followed the third forward shock and the southward Bz associated with the latter was responsible for the superstorm. Two reverse waves were detected, one at the edge and one near the center of the magnetic cloud (MC). It is suspected that these 'waves' were once reverse shocks which were becoming evanescent when they propagated into the low plasma beta MC. The second reverse wave caused a decrease in the southward component of the IMF and initiated the storm recovery phase. It is determined that flares located at large longitudinal distances from the subsolar point were the most likely causes of the first two shocks without associated magnetic clouds. It is thus unlikely that the shocks were 'blast waves' or that magnetic reconnection eroded away the two associated MCs. This interplanetary/solar event is an example of the extremely complex magnetic storms which can occur in the post-solar maximum phase.

  15. CAWSES November 7-8, 2004, superstorm: Complex solar and interplanetary features in the post-solar maximum phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Echer, Ezequiel; Guarnieri, Fernando L.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2008-02-01

    The complex interplanetary structures during 7 to 8 Nov 2004 are analyzed to identify their properties as well as resultant geomagnetic effects and the solar origins. Three fast forward shocks, three directional discontinuities and two reverse waves were detected and analyzed in detail. The three fast forward shocks ``pump'' up the interplanetary magnetic field from a value of ~4 nT to ~44 nT. However, the fields after the shocks were northward, and magnetic storms did not result. The three ram pressure increases were associated with major sudden impulses (SI + s) at Earth. A magnetic cloud followed the third forward shock and the southward Bz associated with the latter was responsible for the superstorm. Two reverse waves were detected, one at the edge and one near the center of the magnetic cloud (MC). It is suspected that these ``waves'' were once reverse shocks which were becoming evanescent when they propagated into the low plasma beta MC. The second reverse wave caused a decrease in the southward component of the IMF and initiated the storm recovery phase. It is determined that flares located at large longitudinal distances from the subsolar point were the most likely causes of the first two shocks without associated magnetic clouds. It is thus unlikely that the shocks were ``blast waves'' or that magnetic reconnection eroded away the two associated MCs. This interplanetary/solar event is an example of the extremely complex magnetic storms which can occur in the post-solar maximum phase.

  16. Travelling interplanetary shocks: their local orientations and inference of their global characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdichevsky, D. B.; Reames, D. V.; Lepping, R. P.; Schwenn, R.; Farrugia, C. J.; Wu, C.; MacDowall, R. J.; Kaiser, M. L.; Lazarus, A. J.; Kaspers, J. C.

    2004-05-01

    The orientation of the evaluated normal direction to the interplanetary shock tells us of its local propagation in the interplanetary medium. It has recently been established for case studies like the Oct 19, 1995 and the July 15, 2000 (1) interplanetary magnetic clouds that the orientation of the respective shock normals appear consistent with their overall evolution, e.g., orientation and propagation of the driver. We test this result for a series of shocks observed simultaneously at widely extended locations. Preliminary single case studies (Jan 1978, Sept 1978, and Apr 1979) are used to infer the global geometry of the shock. We examine the relationship between the existence of a strong shock and the level of energization and intensity of the gradual solar energetic particle events. We will test hypotheses on the possible correlation between the extension of the strong shock and the level of energization and flux intensity observed for gradual solar energetic particle events. For selected cases, we also apply type II radio burst remote sensing using ISEE-3 radio data. Also we compare with some unusual shocks of the current solar cycle. For this purpose we will mainly use Wind magnetic field and plasma data from the MFI and SWE instruments, as well as radio emissions from its radio receiver WAVES. The shock normal will be tested against shock passage at other spacecraft (ACE, IMP-8). [(1) see e.g. Lepping et al, Sol Phys, 204, 287, 2001.

  17. August 1972 solar-terrestrial events - Observations of interplanetary shocks at 2.2 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.; Davis, L., Jr.; Coleman, P. J., Jr.; Colburn, D. S.; Dyal, P.; Jones, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    Simultaneous magnetic field and plasma observations on Pioneer 10 were used to identify three shocks and a plasma driver (possible flare ejecta) at 2.2 AU caused by the four large solar flares of August 2-7, 1972. Two shocks, the first and third, were forward shocks, while the second was a reverse shock. The local inertial velocities of all three shocks were estimated under the assumption of quasi-perpendicularity, i.e., the shocks were assumed to be propagating principally across, rather than along, the interplanetary magnetic field.

  18. Large-Amplitude Electrostatic Waves Observed at a Supercritical Interplanetary Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. B., III; Cattell, C. A.; Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Kersten, K.; Kasper, J. C.; Szabo, A.; Wilber, M.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first observations at an interplanetary shock of large-amplitude (> 100 mV/m pk-pk) solitary waves and large-amplitude (approx.30 mV/m pk-pk) waves exhibiting characteristics consistent with electron Bernstein waves. The Bernstein-like waves show enhanced power at integer and half-integer harmonics of the cyclotron frequency with a broadened power spectrum at higher frequencies, consistent with the electron cyclotron drift instability. The Bernstein-like waves are obliquely polarized with respect to the magnetic field but parallel to the shock normal direction. Strong particle heating is observed in both the electrons and ions. The observed heating and waveforms are likely due to instabilities driven by the free energy provided by reflected ions at this supercritical interplanetary shock. These results offer new insights into collisionless shock dissipation and wave-particle interactions in the solar wind.

  19. Dynamics of interplanetary dust in the F corona

    SciTech Connect

    Rusk, E.T.

    1986-01-01

    Dynamical mechanisms in interplanetary space and in the F corona were studied by numerical simulations. An expression for the radiation pressure force due to a rotating spherical source of radiation was derived. Also, expressions relating the variation in inclination and the longitude of the ascending node to the solar magnetic field were derived. These expressions are based on the spherical source surface model of the solar magnetic field. Simulations of particles released during perihelion passages of comet Encke show that cometary particles have lifetimes shorter than the lifetime calculated by Wyatt and Whipple in 1950. These simulations also resulted in higher eccentricities and a definite alignment of the particles' aphelia toward a direction 20/sup 0/ east of the vernal equinox. An expression relating the size of a planet's zone of influence to perturbations on particles in solar orbits based on the closest approach between the planet and the particle show that the expression for the size of planet's zone of influence is not singular, but varies with the particular orbital element which is being studied.

  20. Observations of Electromagnetic Whistler Precursors at Supercritical Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. B., III; Koval, A.; Szabo, Adam; Breneman, A.; Cattell, C. A.; Goetz, K.; Kellogg, P. J.; Kersten, K.; Kasper, J. C.; Maruca, B. A.; Pulupa, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present observations of electromagnetic precursor waves, identified as whistler mode waves, at supercritical interplanetary shocks using the Wind search coil magnetometer. The precursors propagate obliquely with respect to the local magnetic field, shock normal vector, solar wind velocity, and they are not phase standing structures. All are right-hand polarized with respect to the magnetic field (spacecraft frame), and all but one are right-hand polarized with respect to the shock normal vector in the normal incidence frame. They have rest frame frequencies f(sub ci) < f much < f(sub ce) and wave numbers 0.02 approx < k rho (sub ce) approx <. 5.0. Particle distributions show signatures of specularly reflected gyrating ions, which may be a source of free energy for the observed modes. In one event, we simultaneously observe perpendicular ion heating and parallel electron acceleration, consistent with wave heating/acceleration due to these waves. Al though the precursors can have delta B/B(sub o) as large as 2, fluxgate magnetometer measurements show relatively laminar shock transitions in three of the four events.

  1. Quasilinear simulations of interplanetary shocks and Earth's bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasiev, Alexandr; Battarbee, Markus; Ganse, Urs; Vainio, Rami; Palmroth, Minna; Pfau-Kempf, Yann; Hoilijoki, Sanni; von Alfthan, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a new self-consistent Monte Carlo simulation model for particle acceleration in shocks. The model includes a prescribed large-scale magnetic field and plasma density, temperature and velocity profiles and a self-consistently computed incompressible ULF foreshock under the quasilinear approximation. Unlike previous analytical treatments, our model is time dependent and takes full account of the anisotropic particle distributions and scattering in the wave-particle interaction process. We apply the model to the problem of particle acceleration at traveling interplanetary (IP) shocks and Earth's bow shock and compare the results with hybrid-Vlasov simulations and spacecraft observations. A qualitative agreement in terms of spectral shape of the magnetic fluctuations and the polarization of the unstable mode is found between the models and the observations. We will quantify the differences of the models and explore the region of validity of the quasilinear approach in terms of shock parameters. We will also compare the modeled IP shocks and the bow shock, identifying the similarities and differences in the spectrum of accelerated particles and waves in these scenarios. The work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324 (HESPERIA). The Academy of Finland is thanked for financial support. We acknowledge the computational resources provided by CSC - IT Centre for Science Ltd., Espoo.

  2. Polarization of the Interplanetary Dust Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasue, J.; Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Hadamcik, E.

    2015-12-01

    The interplanetary dust cloud is visible through its scattered light (the zodiacal light) at visible wavelengths. Brightness observations lead to equilibrium temperature and albedo of the particles and their variation as a function of the heliocentric distance. The light scattered by this optically thin medium is linearly polarized with negative values of the degree of linear polarization, PQ, in the backscattering region. We will review the zodiacal light photopolarimetric observations from the whole line-of-sight integrated values to the local values retrieved by inversion. Whenever available, the local PQ variation as a function of the phase angle presents a phase curve with a small negative branch and large positive branch similar to comets or asteroids. PQ does not seem to show a wavelength variation. The maximum of polarization decreases with decreasing heliocentric distance. A circular polarization signal may be present in parts of the sky. Both numerical simulations and laboratory experiments of light scattering by irregular particles have been performed to constrain the interplanetary dust properties based on their polarimetric signature. These studies indicate that mixtures of low-absorption (Mg-silicates) and high-absorption (carbonaceous) particles can explain the intensity and polarimetric observations of the zodiacal cloud. The variations with the heliocentric distance may be due to decreasing carbonaceous content of the dust cloud. Such models would favor a significant proportion of aggregates and absorbing particles in the interplanetary dust medium, indicative of a major cometary dust contribution. The exact origin (asteroidal, cometary, interstellar) and physical properties of the dust particles contributing to the zodiacal cloud is still debated and will be more constrained with future observations. New high-resolution systems will monitor the zodiacal light from the ground and new results are expected from upcoming space missions.

  3. Mineralogy of chondritic interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, I. D. R.; Rietmeijer, F. J. M.

    1987-08-01

    This paper presents a synopsis of current investigations on the mineralogy of chondritic micrometeorites obtained from the lower stratosphere using flat-plate collection surfaces attached to high-flying aircraft. A compilation of detailed mineralogical analyses for 30 documented chondritic interplanetary dust particles indicates a wide variety of minerals present in assemblages which, as yet, are poorly defined. Two possible assemblages are: (1) carbonaceous phases and layer silicates and (2) carbonaceous and chain silicates or nesosilicates. Particles with both types of silicate assemblages are also observed.

  4. Analysis and design of aeroassisted interplanetary missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Wyatt R.

    An aeroassisted mission uses atmospheric forces to effect a spacecraft delta-V, which could allow for substantial propellant savings. This research focuses on aero-maneuvers useful for interplanetary flight. The aerogravity assist maneuver uses aerodynamic lift to achieve a greater delta-V than with gravity alone. Aerobraking and aerocapture both use aerodynamic drag to supplement or replace propulsive planetary captures. Optimal aerogravity assist trajectories are found, using a combination of analytic and graphical techniques. Simple control schemes are developed to manage angular momentum during aerobraking and to guide a spacecraft to a desired final orbit during aerocapture.

  5. Discovery of nuclear tracks in interplanetary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, J. P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Fraundorf, P.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear tracks have been identified in interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) collected from the stratosphere. The presence of tracks unambiguously confirms the extraterrestrial nature of IDP's, and the high track densities (10 to the 10th to 10 to the 11th per square centimeter) suggest an exposure age of approximately 10,000 years within the inner solar system. Tracks also provide an upper temperature limit for the heating of IDP's during atmospheric entry, thereby making it possible to distinguish between pristine and thermally modified micrometeorites.

  6. Coronal and interplanetary Type 2 radio emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cane, H. V.

    1987-09-01

    Several observations suggest that the disturbances which generate coronal (meter wavelength) type II radio bursts are not driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). A new analysis using a large sample of metric radio bursts and associated soft X-ray events provides further support for the original hypothesis that type II-producing disturbances are blast waves generated at the time of impulsive energy release in flares. Interplanetary (IP) shocks, however, are closely associated with CMEs. The shocks responsible for IP type II events (observed at kilometer wavelengths) are associated with the most energetic CMEs.

  7. Interplanetary exploration-A challenge for photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, P. M.

    1985-01-01

    Future U.S. interplanetary missions will be less complex and costly than past missions such as Voyager and the soon to be launched, Galileo. This is required to achieve a balanced exploration program that can be sustained within the context of a limited budget. Radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) have served as the power source for missions beyond the orbit of Mars. It is indicated that the cost to the user of these power sources will significantly increase. Solar arrays can provide a low cost alternative for a number of missions. Potential missions are identified along with concerns for implementation, and some array configurations under present investigation are reviewed.

  8. Problems of Interplanetary and Interstellar Trade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, John

    2008-01-01

    If and when interplanetary and interstellar trade develops, it will be novel in two respects. First, the distances and time spans involved will reduce all or nearly all trade to the exchange of intangible goods. That threatens the possibility of conducting business in a genuinely common currency and of enforcing debt agreements, especially those involving sovereign debt. Second, interstellar trade suggests trade between humans and aliens. Cultural distance is a probable obstacle to initiating and sustaining such trade. Such exchange also threatens the release of new and potentially toxic memes.

  9. Nonthermal Radiation Processes in Interplanetary Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chian, A. C. L.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. En la interacci6n de haces de electrones energeticos con plasmas interplanetarios, se excitan ondas intensas de Langmuir debido a inestabilidad del haz de plasma. Las ondas Langmuir a su vez interaccio nan con fluctuaciones de densidad de baja frecuencia para producir radiaciones. Si la longitud de las ondas de Langmujr exceden las condicio nes del umbral, se puede efectuar la conversi5n de modo no lineal a on- das electromagneticas a traves de inestabilidades parametricas. As se puede excitar en un plasma inestabilidades parametricas electromagneticas impulsadas por ondas intensas de Langmuir: (1) inestabilidades de decaimiento/fusi5n electromagnetica impulsadas por una bomba de Lang- muir que viaja; (2) inestabilidades dobles electromagneticas de decai- miento/fusi5n impulsadas por dos bombas de Langrnuir directamente opues- tas; y (3) inestabilidades de dos corrientes oscilatorias electromagne- ticas impulsadas por dos bombas de Langmuir de corrientes contrarias. Se concluye que las inestabilidades parametricas electromagneticas in- ducidas por las ondas de Langmuir son las fuentes posibles de radiacio- nes no termicas en plasmas interplanetarios. ABSTRACT: Nonthermal radio emissions near the local electron plasma frequency have been detected in various regions of interplanetary plasmas: solar wind, upstream of planetary bow shock, and heliopause. Energetic electron beams accelerated by solar flares, planetary bow shocks, and the terminal shock of heliosphere provide the energy source for these radio emissions. Thus, it is expected that similar nonthermal radiation processes may be responsible for the generation of these radio emissions. As energetic electron beams interact with interplanetary plasmas, intense Langmuir waves are excited due to a beam-plasma instability. The Langmuir waves then interact with low-frequency density fluctuations to produce radiations near the local electron plasma frequency. If Langmuir waves are of sufficiently large

  10. Laboratory simulation of interplanetary ultraviolet radiation (broad spectrum) and its effects on Deinococcus radiodurans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulino-Lima, Ivan Gláucio; Pilling, Sérgio; Janot-Pacheco, Eduardo; de Brito, Arnaldo Naves; Barbosa, João Alexandre Ribeiro Gonçalves; Leitão, Alvaro Costa; Lage, Claudia de Alencar Santos

    2010-08-01

    The radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans was exposed to a simulated interplanetary UV radiation at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). Bacterial samples were irradiated on different substrates to investigate the influence of surface relief on cell survival. The effects of cell multi-layers were also investigated. The ratio of viable microorganisms remained virtually the same (average 2%) for integrated doses from 1.2 to 12 kJ m -2, corresponding to 16 h of irradiation at most. The asymptotic profiles of the curves, clearly connected to a shielding effect provided by multi-layering cells on a cavitary substrate (carbon tape), means that the inactivation rate may not change significantly along extended periods of exposure to radiation. Such high survival rates reinforce the possibility of an interplanetary transfer of viable microbes.

  11. A Free-Return Earth-Moon Cycler Orbit for an Interplanetary Cruise Ship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genova, Anthony L.; Aldrin, Buzz

    2015-01-01

    A periodic circumlunar orbit is presented that can be used by an interplanetary cruise ship for regular travel between Earth and the Moon. This Earth-Moon cycler orbit was revealed by introducing solar gravity and modest phasing maneuvers (average of 39 m/s per month) which yields close-Earth encounters every 7 or 10 days. Lunar encounters occur every 26 days and offer the chance for a smaller craft to depart the cycler and enter lunar orbit, or head for a Lagrange point (e.g., EM-L2 halo orbit), distant retrograde orbit (DRO), or interplanetary destination such as a near-Earth object (NEO) or Mars. Additionally, return-to-Earth abort options are available from many points along the cycling trajectory.

  12. Comment on 'Observations of reconnection of interplanetary and lobe magnetic field lines at the high-latitude magnetopause' by J.T. Gosling, M.F. Thomsen, S.J. Bame, R.C. Elphic, and C.T. Russell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belen'kaia, Elena

    1993-01-01

    Comment is presented on the results of measurements, reported by Gosling et al. (1991), that were made on ISEE in the vicinity of the high-latitude dusk magnetopause near the terminator plane, at a time when the local magnetosheath and tail lobe magnetic fields were nearly oppositely directed. The character of the observed plasma flowing both tailward and sunward within the high-latitude magnetopause current layer presented real evidence for the local reconnection process. Gosling et al. argued that this process may be a manifestation of different global magnetospheric topology structures. In the comment, a global magnetospheric convection pattern is constructed for the northward IMF and for the case of a large azimuthal component of the IMF with small Bz, irrespective of its sign. The suggested scheme provides a simple explanation for the observed sunward convection in the polar caps both for the northward and for strong By with small Bz. According to the present model, for the magnetosheath field at 2300 UT on June 11, 1978, the reconnection between the open field lines appears at the northern neutral point.

  13. An empirical RBF model of the magnetosphere parameterized by interplanetary and ground-based drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganenko, N. A.; Andreeva, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    In our recent paper (Andreeva and Tsyganenko, 2016), a novel method was proposed to model the magnetosphere directly from spacecraft data, with no a priori knowledge nor ad hoc assumptions about the geometry of the magnetic field sources. The idea was to split the field into the toroidal and poloidal parts and then expand each part into a weighted sum of radial basis functions (RBF). In the present work we take the next step forward by having developed a full-fledged model of the near magnetosphere, based on a multiyear set of space magnetometer data (1995-2015) and driven by ground-based and interplanetary input parameters. The model consolidates the largest ever amount of data and has been found to provide the best ever merit parameters, in terms of both the overall RMS residual field and record-high correlation coefficients between the observed and model field components. By experimenting with different combinations of input parameters and their time-averaging intervals, we found the best so far results to be given by the ram pressure Pd, SYM-H, and N-index by Newell et al. (2007). In addition, the IMF By has also been included as a model driver, with a goal to more accurately represent the IMF penetration effects. The model faithfully reproduces both externally and internally induced variations in the global distribution of the geomagnetic field and electric currents. Stronger solar wind driving results in a deepening of the equatorial field depression and a dramatic increase of its dawn-dusk asymmetry. The Earth's dipole tilt causes a consistent deformation of the magnetotail current sheet and a significant north-south asymmetry of the polar cusp depressions on the dayside. Next steps to further develop the new approach are also discussed.

  14. Advanced routing in interplanetary backbone network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ge; Sheng, Min; Wu, Chengke

    2007-11-01

    Interplanetary (IPN) Internet is a communication infrastructure providing communication services for scientific data delivery and navigation services for the explorer spacecrafts and orbiters of the future deep space missions. The interplanetary backbone network has the unique characteristics hence routing through the backbone network present many challenges that are not presented in traditional networks. Some routing algorithms have been proposed, in which, LPDB integrates the shortest path algorithm and the directional broadcast method to guarantee fast and reliable message delivery. Through this mutipath routing strategy, unpredictable link failures is addressed, but additional network overhead is introduced. In this paper, we propose an improvement of the LPDB named ALPDB in which the source could adaptively decide the next-hop nodes according to the link condition, hence reduce the network overhead. We model this algorithm on the network simulation platform of OPNET and compare it with other applicable algorithms in data passing ratio, data delay and network overhead. The result indicates that the ALPDB algorithm could not only guarantee reliable message delivery, but also decrease the cost significantly.

  15. Mercury's sodium exosphere and interplanetary dust distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, S.; Watanabe, H.; Ogawa, G.; Yoshikawa, I.

    2009-12-01

    The interplanetary dust (IPD) distribution in the inner solar system is not yet well understood because of lack of direct dust measurements in the inner solar system and so one needs to rely on zodiacal light observations that are difficult to interpret. Mercury has a thin and unstable atmosphere, and the source processes of Na in its atmosphere are unclear. Results of past observations have revealed that the atmospheric Na density has no or low correlation with the solar flux, sunspot number, heliocentric distance, or solar radiation pressure. We show that the variability of Mercury’s atmospheric Na density depends strongly on the IPD distribution. That is, Na density is low (high) when Mercury is far away from (close to) the symmetry plane of IPD, and so one can infer the IPD distribution near Mercury orbit from the temporal variability of Na density in Mercury’s atmosphere. In this presentation, we report the new result of observation performed from 2008 to 2009, and the correlation between sodium density in Mercury's exosphere and interplanetary dust distribution near Mercury. Additionally, we plan to observe the emission from Mercury's exosphere at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory in Japan in the Messenger 3rd flyby. We will also report preliminary results (if we would succeed in the observation.)

  16. Interplanetary proton cumulated fluence model update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, A.; Hilgers, A.; Rosenqvist, L.; Bourdarie, S.

    2008-11-01

    Solar particle events leading to important increase of particle fluxes at energies of order of magnitude ranging from MeV to GeV constitute an important hazard for space missions. They may lead to effects seen in microelectronics or damage to solar cells and constitute a potential hazard for manned missions. Cumulative damage is commonly expressed as a function of fluence which is defined as the integral of the flux over time. A priori deterministic estimates of the expected fluence cannot be made because over the time scale of a space mission, the fluence can be dominated by the contribution of a few rare and unpredictable high intensity events. Therefore, statistical approaches are required in order to estimate fluences likely to be encountered by a space mission in advance. This paper extends work done by Rosenqvist et al. [Rosenqvist, L., Hilgers, A., Evans, H., Daly, E., Hapgood, M., Stamper, R., Zwickl, R., Bourdarie, S., Boscher, D. Toolkit for updating interplanetary proton-cumulated fluence models. J. Spacecraft Rockets, 42(6), 1077 1090, 2005] to describe an updated predictive engineering model for the proton interplanetary fluence with energies >30 MeV. This model is derived from a complete list of solar proton fluences based on data from a number of calibrated sources covering almost three solar cycles.

  17. A tiny event producing an interplanetary type III burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alissandrakis, C. E.; Nindos, A.; Patsourakos, S.; Kontogeorgos, A.; Tsitsipis, P.

    2015-10-01

    Aims: We investigate the conditions under which small-scale energy release events in the low corona gave rise to strong interplanetary (IP) type III bursts. Methods: We analyzed observations of three tiny events, detected by the Nançay Radio Heliograph (NRH), two of which produced IP type III bursts. We took advantage of the NRH positioning information and of the high cadence of AIA/SDO data to identify the associated extreme-UV (EUV) emissions. We measured positions and time profiles of the metric and EUV sources. Results: We found that the EUV events that produced IP type III bursts were located near a coronal hole boundary, while the one that did not was located in a closed magnetic field region. In all three cases tiny flaring loops were involved, without any associated mass eruption. In the best observed case, the radio emission at the highest frequency (435 MHz) was displaced by ~55'' with respect to the small flaring loop. The metric type III emission shows a complex structure in space and in time, indicative of multiple electron beams, despite the low intensity of the events. From the combined analysis of dynamic spectra and NRH images, we derived the electron beam velocity as well as the height, ambient plasma temperature, and density at the level of formation of the 160 MHz emission. From the analysis of the differential emission measure derived from the AIA images, we found that the first evidence of energy release was at the footpoints, and this was followed by the development of flaring loops and subsequent cooling. Conclusions: Even small energy release events can accelerate enough electrons to give rise to powerful IP type III bursts. The proximity of the electron acceleration site to open magnetic field lines facilitates the escape of the electrons into the interplanetary space. The offset between the site of energy release and the metric type III location warrants further investigation. The movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) attitude measurements of the Interplanetary Dust Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassel, Philip C., Jr.; Motley, William R., III; Singer, S. Fred; Mulholland, J. Derral; Oliver, John P.; Weinberg, Jerry L.; Cooke, William J.; Wortman, Jim J.

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of the data from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) sun sensors has allowed a confirmation of the attitude of LDEF during its first year in orbit. Eight observations of the yaw angle at specific times were made and are tabulated in this paper. These values range from 4.3 to 12.4 deg with maximum uncertainty of plus or minus 2.0 deg and an average of 7.9 deg. No specific measurements of pitch or roll were made but the data indicates that LDEF had an average pitch down attitude of less than 0.7 deg.

  19. Probable Cause of Interplanetary Field Enhancements: Destructive Collisions of Small Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, H.; Russell, C. T.; Delzanno, G. L.

    2011-12-01

    Interplanetary Field Enhancements (IFEs) appear as smoothly varying cusp-shaped enhancements in the interplanetary magnetic field with a strong central current sheet. They last minutes to many hours. IFEs were attributed to dust released by asteroids and comets because of their appearance in association with conjunctions with asteroid 2201 Oljato. To maintain their magnetic field structure while at rest in the solar wind frame, IFEs must have significant mass because they do not have a flux rope geometry. We use the pressure gradient force to estimate the IFE mass using Helios (0.3-1.0AU) and ACE (1AU) data. We find the magnetic pressure difference falls as R-2 approximately from 0.3AU to 1AU, keeping the mass almost constant. At 1AU, the most frequent IFE mass is 10^8 kg and the rate decreases with both increasing and decreasing mass. We believe IFEs arise in interactions between solar wind and charged nanoscale dust particles produced in collisions of interplanetary objects. This hypothesis explains the large velocity achieved by IFEs, the macroscale magnetic field disturbances and the large mass contained in IFEs. In this paper we will use observed meteoroid population and collision models to calculate the inferred occurrence rate at 1AU and estimate the mass released by these collisions. By estimating the size of the disturbance produced by the collisions, we can relate the collision rate to the event rate detected by a spacecraft. The estimated meteoroid collision rate is found to be consistent with the IFE occurrence rate within the same mass range.

  20. The Study on a Solar Storm and Its Interplanetary and Geomagnetic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai-han, Qiu; Chuan, LI

    2015-10-01

    We present a detailed study on a solar storm occurred on 2014 January 7. By using the remote-sensing observations of solar activities at multiple wavelengths from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), the eruptions of the solar flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) are investigated. Based on the measurement of energetic protons from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and the in-situ plasma measurement from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) at the solar-terrestrial L1 point, the solar energetic particle (SEP) event and interplanetary CME (ICME) accompanied by the solar storm, and the shock driven by the ICME are analyzed. The influence of the solar storm on the geomagnetic fields is also analyzed with the ground-based magnetic data. The results in this study show that: (1) The initial time of impulsive phase of the solar flare and the ejection time of the CME are temporally in accordance with each other. (2) The solar protons are mainly accelerated by the CME-driven shock, rather than by the magnetic reconnection in the flare, and the protons are released when the CME travels to 7.7 solar radius. (3) The widths of the interplanetary shock sheath and the ICME itself are derived to be 0.22 AU and 0.26 AU, respectively. (4) The interplanetary shock and the ICME give rise to substorms and aurora, whereas no obvious geomagnetic storm is detected. The reason is that the ICME does not contain a regular structure of magnetic cloud (MC) or evident southward component of magnetic field.

  1. LDEF (Prelaunch), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray B12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    (6) orthogonal faces of the LDEF was correlated, the Interplanetary Dust Experiment clock could be precisely calibrated. The center 1/3rd tray cover is a chromic anodized aluminum plate that protects the IDE data conditioning and control electronics mounted underneath. The cover plate also serves as a mounting platform for ten (10) individual specimen holders provided by one of the IDE investigators.The material specimen, consisting of germanium, sapphire and zinc sulfide of different sizes, shapes and colors, are bonded to the specimen holders with an RTV adhesive. The specimen holders are attached to the cover plate with stainless steel non-magnetic fasteners. The 1/3rd tray cover plate in the right hand end of the experiment tray is an aluminum plate painted white with Chemglaze II A-276 paint and used as a thermal cover for the Experiment Power and Data System (EPDS). The EPDS is a system provided by the LDEF Project Office that processes and stores, on magnetic tape, the orbital experiment and housekeeping data from six (6) experiment locations on the LDEF.

  2. The interplanetary electric field, cleft currents and plasma convection in the polar caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, P. M.; Clauer, C. R.; Araki, T.; St. Maurice, J. P.; Foster, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between the pattern of plasma convection in the polar cleft and the dynamics of the interplanetary electric field (IEF) is examined theoretically. It is shown that owing to the geometrical properties of the magnetosphere, the East-West component of the IEF will drive field-aligned currents which connect to the ionosphere at points lying on either side of noon, while currents associated with the North-South component of the IEF will connect the two polar caps as sheet currents, also centered at 12 MLT. In order to describe the consequences of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) effects upon high-latitude electric fields and convection patterns, a series of numerical simulations was carried out. The simulations were based on a solution to the steady-state equation of current continuity in a height-integrated ionospheric current. The simulations demonstrate that a simple hydrodynamical model can account for the narrow 'throats' of strong dayside antisunward convection observed during periods of southward interplanetary IMF drift, as well as the sunward convection observed during periods of strongly northward IMF drift.

  3. PROPAGATION AND EVOLUTION OF THE JUNE 1st 2008 CME IN THE INTERPLANETARY MEDIUM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Lamb, D. A.; Davila, J. M.; Vinas, A. F.; Moestl, C.; Hidalgo, M. A.; Farrugia, C. J.; Malandraki, O.; Dresing, N.; Gómez-Herrero, R.

    2009-12-01

    In this work we present a study of the coronal mass ejection (CME) of June 1st of 2008 in the interplanetary medium. This event has been extensively studied by others because of its favorable geometry and the possible consequences of its peculiar initiation for space weather forecasting. We show an analysis of the evolution of the CME in the interplanetary medium in order to shed some light on the propagation mechanism of the ICME. We have determined the typical shock associated characteristics of the ICME in order to understand the propagation properties. Using two different non force-free models of the magnetic cloud allows us to incorporate expansion of the cloud. We use in-situ measurements from STEREO B/IMPACT to characterize the ICME. In addition, we use images from STEREO A/SECCHI-HI to analyze the propagation and visual evolution of the associated flux rope in the interplanetary medium. We compare and contrast these observations with the results of the analytical models.

  4. Comprehensive Population-Averaged Arterial Input Function for Dynamic Contrast–Enhanced vMagnetic Resonance Imaging of Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Onxley, Jennifer D.; Yoo, David S.; Muradyan, Naira; MacFall, James R.; Brizel, David M.; Craciunescu, Oana I.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To generate a population-averaged arterial input function (PA-AIF) for quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data in head and neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI during concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Imaging consisted of 2 baseline scans 1 week apart (B1/B2) and 1 scan after 1 week of chemoradiation therapy (Wk1). Regions of interest (ROIs) in the right and left carotid arteries were drawn on coronal images. Plasma concentration curves of all ROIs were averaged and fit to a biexponential decay function to obtain the final PA-AIF (AvgAll). Right-sided and left-sided ROI plasma concentration curves were averaged separately to obtain side-specific AIFs (AvgRight/AvgLeft). Regions of interest were divided by time point to obtain time-point-specific AIFs (AvgB1/AvgB2/AvgWk1). The vascular transfer constant (K{sub trans}) and the fractional extravascular, extracellular space volume (V{sub e}) for primaries and nodes were calculated using the AvgAll AIF, the appropriate side-specific AIF, and the appropriate time-point-specific AIF. Median K{sub trans} and V{sub e} values derived from AvgAll were compared with those obtained from the side-specific and time-point-specific AIFs. The effect of using individual AIFs was also investigated. Results: The plasma parameters for AvgAll were a{sub 1,2} = 27.11/17.65 kg/L, m{sub 1,2} = 11.75/0.21 min{sup −1}. The coefficients of repeatability (CRs) for AvgAll versus AvgLeft were 0.04 min{sup −1} for K{sub trans} and 0.02 for V{sub e}. For AvgAll versus AvgRight, the CRs were 0.08 min{sup −1} for K{sub trans} and 0.02 for V{sub e}. When AvgAll was compared with AvgB1/AvgB2/AvgWk1, the CRs were slightly higher: 0.32/0.19/0.78 min{sup −1}, respectively, for K{sub trans}; and 0.07/0.08/0.09 for V{sub e}. Use of a PA-AIF was not significantly different from use of individual AIFs. Conclusion: A PA-AIF for head and neck cancer

  5. Interplanetary meteoroid debris in LDEF metal craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlee, D. E.; Horz, F.; Bradley, J.

    1992-01-01

    The extraterrestrial meteoroid residue found lining craters in the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) aluminum and gold targets is highly variable in both quantity and type. In typical craters only a minor amount of residue is found and for these craters it is evident that most of the impacting projectile was ejected during crater formation. Less than 10 percent of the craters greater than 100 microns contain abundant residue consistent with survival of a major fraction of the projectile. In these cases the residue can be seen optically as a dark liner and it can easily be analyzed by SEM-EDX techniques. Because they are rare, the craters with abundant residue must be a biased sampling of the meteoroids reaching the earth. Factors that favor residue retention are low impact velocity and material properties such as high melting point. In general, the SEM-EDX observations of crater residues are consistent with the properties of chondritic meteorites and interplanetary dust particles collected in the stratosphere. Except for impacts by particles dominated by single minerals such as FeS and olivine, most of the residue compositions are in broad agreement with the major element compositions of chondrites. In most cases the residue is a thin liner on the crater floor and these craters are difficult to quantitatively analyze by EDX techniques because the electron beam excites both residue and underlying metal substrate. In favorable cases, the liner is thick and composed of vesicular glass with imbedded FeNi, sulfide and silicate grains. In the best cases of meteoroid preservation, the crater is lined with large numbers of unmelted mineral grains. The projectiles fragmented into micron sized pieces but the fragments survived without melting. In one case, the grains contain linear defects that appear to be solar flare tracks. Solar flare tracks are common properties of small interplanetary particles and their preservation during impact implies that the fragments were

  6. Investigation of interplanetary dust from out-of-ecliptic space probes. [astronomical models of interplanetary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fechtig, H.; Giese, R. H.; Hanner, M. S.; Zook, H. A.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of interplanetary dust via zodiacal light observations and direct detection are discussed for an out-of-ecliptic space probe. Particle fluxes and zodiacal light brightnesses were predicted for three models of the dust distribution. These models predict that most of the information will be obtained at space probe distances less than 1 A.U. from the ecliptic plane. Joint interpretation of the direct particle measurements and the zodiacal light data can yield the best knowledge of the three-dimensional particle dynamics, spatial distribution, and physical characteristics of the interplanetary dust. Such measurements are important for an understanding of the origin and role of the dust in relation to meteoroids, asteroids, and comets, as well as the interaction of the dust with solar forces.

  7. Suprathermal ions upstream from interplanetary shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Paschmann, G.; Sckopke, N.; Russell, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    Low energy (10 eV-30 keV) observations of suprathermal ions ahead of outward propagating interplanetary shock waves (ISQ) are reported. The data were taken with the fast plasma experiment on ISEE 1 and 2 during 17 events. Structure was more evident in the suprathermal ion distribution in the earth bow shock region than in the upstream region. Isotropic distributions were only observed ahead of ISW, although field alignment, kidney-bean distributions, ion shells in velocity space and bunches of gyrating ions were not. The data suggest that the solar wind ions are accelerated to suprathermal energies in the vicinity of the shocks, which feature low and subcritical Mach numbers at 1 AU.

  8. Interplanetary Particle Environment. Proceedings of a Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, Joan (Editor); Gabriel, Stephen (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    A workshop entitled the Interplanetary Charged Particle Environment was held at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) on March 16 and 17, 1987. The purpose of the Workshop was to define the environment that will be seen by spacecraft operating in the 1990s. It focused on those particles that are involved in single event upset, latch-up, total dose and displacement damage in spacecraft microelectronic parts. Several problems specific to Magellan were also discussed because of the sensitivity of some electronic parts to single-event phenomena. Scientists and engineers representing over a dozen institutions took part in the meeting. The workshop consisted of two major activities, reviews of the current state of knowledge and the formation of working groups and the drafting of their reports.

  9. Interplanetary approach optical navigation with applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jerath, N.

    1978-01-01

    The use of optical data from onboard television cameras for the navigation of interplanetary spacecraft during the planet approach phase is investigated. Three optical data types were studied: the planet limb with auxiliary celestial references, the satellite-star, and the planet-star two-camera methods. Analysis and modelling issues related to the nature and information content of the optical methods were examined. Dynamic and measurement system modelling, data sequence design, measurement extraction, model estimation and orbit determination, as relating optical navigation, are discussed, and the various error sources were analyzed. The methodology developed was applied to the Mariner 9 and the Viking Mars missions. Navigation accuracies were evaluated at the control and knowledge points, with particular emphasis devoted to the combined use of radio and optical data. A parametric probability analysis technique was developed to evaluate navigation performance as a function of system reliabilities.

  10. IPShocks: Database of Interplanetary Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isavnin, Alexey; Lumme, Erkka; Kilpua, Emilia; Lotti, Mikko; Andreeova, Katerina; Koskinen, Hannu; Nikbakhsh, Shabnam

    2016-04-01

    Fast collisionless shocks are one of the key interplanetary structures, which have also paramount role for solar-terrestrial physics. In particular, coronal mass ejection driven shocks accelerate particles to high energies and turbulent post-shock flows may drive intense geomagnetic storms. We present comprehensive Heliospheric Shock Database (ipshocks.fi) developed and hosted at University of Helsinki. The database contains currently over 2000 fast forward and fast reverse shocks observed by Wind, ACE, STEREO, Helios, Ulysses and Cluster spacecraft. In addition, the database has search and sort tools based on the spacecraft, time range, and several key shock parameters (e.g., shock type, shock strength, shock angle), data plots for each shock and data download options. These features allow easy access to shocks and quick statistical analyses. All current shocks are identified visually and analysed using the same procedure.

  11. Interplanetary space transport using inertial fusion propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, C.D.

    1998-04-20

    In this paper, we indicate how the great advantages that ICF offers for interplanetary propulsion can be accomplished with the VISTA spacecraft concept. The performance of VISTA is expected to surpass that from other realistic technologies for Mars missions if the energy gain achievable for ICF targets is above several hundred. Based on the good performance expected from the U. S. National Ignition Facility (NIF), the requirements for VISTA should be well within the realm of possibility if creative target concepts such as the fast ignitor can be developed. We also indicate that a 6000-ton VISTA can visit any planet in the solar system and return to Earth in about 7 years or less without any significant physiological hazards to astronauts. In concept, VISTA provides such short-duration missions, especially to Mars, that the hazards from cosmic radiation and zero gravity can be reduced to insignificant levels. VISTA therefore represents a significant step forward for space-propulsion concepts.

  12. Nearedge Absorption Spectroscopy of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, S.; Luening, K.; Pianetta, P.; Bradley, J.; Graham, G.; Westphal, A.; Snead, C.; Dominguez, G.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-10-25

    Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) are derived from primitive Solar System bodies like asteroids and comets. Studies of IDPs provide a window onto the origins of the solar system and presolar interstellar environments. We are using Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF) techniques developed for the measurement of the cleanliness of silicon wafer surfaces to analyze these particles with high detection sensitivity. In addition to elemental analysis of the particles, we have collected X-ray Absorption Near-Edge spectra in a grazing incidence geometry at the Fe and Ni absorption edges for particles placed on a silicon wafer substrate. We find that the iron is dominated by Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  13. Tailoring dynamic qualification tests for interplanetary spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that the word 'tailoring' has become quite popular in the past few years. Thus, two recently revised environmental test documents make frequent mention of test tailoring. 'Tailoring' is defined by MIL STD 810D (Environmental Test Methods and Engineering Guidelines). The word refers to 'the process of choosing or altering test procedures, conditions, values, tolerances, measures of failure, etc., to simulate or exaggerate the effects of one or more forcing functions to which an item will be subjected during its life cycle...'. This paper is concerned with requirement level test tailoring. Attention is given to examples of dynamic qualification test tailoring for an interplanetary spacecraft program. These examples are to provide ideas for test tailoring which can be applied to other space flight programs.

  14. Early Solar Nebula Grains - Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, J. P.

    This chapter examines the compositions, mineralogy, sources, and geochemical significance of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Despite their micrometer-scale dimensions and nanogram masses, it is now possible, primarily as a result of advances in small particle handling techniques and analytical instrumentation, to examine IDPs at close to atomic-scale resolution. The most widely used instruments for IDP studies are presently the analytical electron microscope, synchrotron facilities, and the ion microprobe. These laboratory analytical techniques are providing fundamental insights about IDP origins, mechanisms of formation, and grain processing phenomena that were important in the early solar system and presolar environments. At the same time, laboratory data from IDPs are being compared with astronomical data from dust in comets, circumstellar disks, and the interstellar medium. The direct comparison of grains in the laboratory with grains in astronomical environments is known as "astromineralogy."

  15. Infrared Spectroscopy of Anhydrous Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Flynn, G. J.

    2003-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is the primary means of mineralogical analysis of materials outside our solar system. The identity and properties of circumstellar grains are inferred from spectral comparisons between astronomical observations and laboratory data from natural and synthetic materials. These comparisons have been facilitated by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), which obtained IR spectra from numerous astrophysical objects over a wide spectral range (out to 50/cm) where crystalline silicates and other phases have distinct features. The anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are particularly important comparison materials because some IDPs contain carbonaceous material with non-solar D/H and N-15/N-14 ratios and amorphous and crystalline silicates with non-solar 0- isotopic ratios, demonstrating that these IDPs contain preserved interstellar material. Here, we report on micro- Fourier transform (FT) IR spectrometry of IDPs, focusing on the inorganic components of primitive IDPs (FTIR spectra from the organic/carbonacecous materials in IDPs are described elsewhere).

  16. Impact angle control of interplanetary shock geoeffectiveness: A statistical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Denny M.; Raeder, Joachim

    2015-06-01

    We present a survey of interplanetary (IP) shocks using Wind and ACE satellite data from January 1995 to December 2013 to study how IP shock geoeffectiveness is controlled by IP shock impact angles. A shock list covering one and a half solar cycle is compiled. The yearly number of IP shocks is found to correlate well with the monthly sunspot number. We use data from SuperMAG, a large chain with more than 300 geomagnetic stations, to study geoeffectiveness triggered by IP shocks. The SuperMAG SML index, an enhanced version of the familiar AL index, is used in our statistical analysis. The jumps of the SML index triggered by IP shock impacts on the Earth's magnetosphere are investigated in terms of IP shock orientation and speed. We find that, in general, strong (high speed) and almost frontal (small impact angle) shocks are more geoeffective than inclined shocks with low speed. The strongest correlation (correlation coefficient R = 0.78) occurs for fixed IP shock speed and for varied IP shock impact angle. We attribute this result, predicted previously with simulations, to the fact that frontal shocks compress the magnetosphere symmetrically from all sides, which is a favorable condition for the release of magnetic energy stored in the magnetotail, which in turn can produce moderate to strong auroral substorms, which are then observed by ground-based magnetometers.

  17. Multi-Spacecraft Observations of Interplanetary Shock Accelerated Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, G. C.; Lario, D.; Decker, R. B.; Desai, M. I.; Hu, Q.; Kasper, J.

    2006-01-01

    We use simultaneous measurements from the Wind and ACE spacecraft to determine the spatial properties of both interplanetary (IP) shocks and the shock-associated energetic particle events. We combine plasma, magnetic field and energetic particle data from ACE and Wind for 124 energetic storm particle (ESP) events from 1998 to 2003 and examine the spatial and temporal variations of these events in the Earth's vicinity. We find that even though the two spacecraft were occasionally separated by more than 400 RE, the plasma, field, and energetic particle time-intensity profiles during the events were very similar. In addition, we find that the ion composition and energy spectra in individual IP shock events are identical at the two spacecraft locations. We also use the fitted shock velocity along the normal from ACE and estimate the shock transit time to Wind location. In general, there is poor agreement between the estimated transit time and the actual measured transit time. Hence, our assumptions that a) the IP shock at 1 AU propagates radially, and/or b) the IP shock is spherically symmetric at 1 AU are not valid. In this paper, we will also study, for the first time, the anisotropy measurements of low-energy IP shock-associated ions at both ACE and Wind. We will then compare these new anisotropy analyses with locally measured shock parameters and identify possible signatures of different shock acceleration processes as predicted by the first-order Fermi and shock-drift models.

  18. The Trapping of Low-Energy Particles by Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Dayeh, M.; Dwyer, J.; Rassoul, H.; Mason, G.; Mazur, J.; Desai, M.

    2007-12-01

    Using ~0.045-10 MeV/nucleon ion data from ACE/ULEIS, we have found that a substantial number of shock- associated solar energetic particle events (20 events) have significant delays in the arrival of the low-energy component beyond what is expected from the travel time of energetic particles from the sun to the earth at 1 AU. Indeed, for some events, after correcting for the velocity dispersion, the low energy component (E < 0.1 MeV/nucleon) is almost completely absent while the high-energy component (E > 1 MeV/nucleon) has very large enhancements. SEP events with the most dramatic initial depletion of low-energy particles are accompanied by large proton fluxes and have large enhancements of the low-energy particles later, in coincidence with the arrival of the interplanetary shock, a day or two after the start of the event. In addition, these events show Fe/O enhancements during the periods in which the low-energy component is depleted and lower Fe/O values once the shock arrives. These new observations appear to be explained by the trapping of particles with low energy-to-charge (E/Q) ratios in the vicinity of the shock by magnetohydrodynamic waves, possibly generated by high energy protons streaming along the magnetic field lines.

  19. The Radiation, Interplanetary Shocks, and Coronal Sources (RISCS) Toolset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zank, G. P.; Spann, J.

    2014-01-01

    We outline a plan to develop a physics based predictive toolset RISCS to describe the interplanetary energetic particle and radiation environment throughout the inner heliosphere, including at the Earth. To forecast and "nowcast" the radiation environment requires the fusing of three components: 1) the ability to provide probabilities for incipient solar activity; 2) the use of these probabilities and daily coronal and solar wind observations to model the 3D spatial and temporal heliosphere, including magnetic field structure and transients, within 10 AU; and 3) the ability to model the acceleration and transport of energetic particles based on current and anticipated coronal and heliospheric conditions. We describe how to address 1) - 3) based on our existing, well developed, and validated codes and models. The goal of RISCS toolset is to provide an operational forecast and "nowcast" capability that will a) predict solar energetic particle (SEP) intensities; b) spectra for protons and heavy ions; c) predict maximum energies and their duration; d) SEP composition; e) cosmic ray intensities, and f) plasma parameters, including shock arrival times, strength and obliquity at any given heliospheric location and time. The toolset would have a 72 hour predicative capability, with associated probabilistic bounds, that would be updated hourly thereafter to improve the predicted event(s) and reduce the associated probability bounds. The RISCS toolset would be highly adaptable and portable, capable of running on a variety of platforms to accommodate various operational needs and requirements.

  20. The Wind Spacecraft As an Interplanetary Physics Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Wind spacecraft was launched in the fall of 1994 to explore the nature of the solar wind and the interaction of the solar wind with the Earth. As the years have passed, and the rich datasets collected by the spacecraft have grown, the Wind mission has taken on an additional role as an interplanetary physics experiment, producing fundamental insights into processes in tenuous magnetized plasmas including kinetic instabilities, dissipation, heat flux, and heating. Results from Wind have helped us understand plasmas throughout the heliosphere, but they have also been applied to more exotic situations such as the accretion of matter onto black holes, and cooling of material within galaxy clusters. This talk will both highlight major recent results from Wind and examine the factors of the mission that have made this research possible. Beyond the sensitive statistical tests permitted by two decades of observations, Wind is equipped with a particularly diverse set of complementary instruments, permitting precise inter-calibration of observations and a detailed understanding of the nature of the solar wind that only improves with time.

  1. Automated interplanetary shock detection and its application to Wind observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruparova, O.; Maksimovic, M.; Å AfráNková, J.; NěMečEk, Z.; Santolik, O.; Krupar, V.

    2013-08-01

    We present an automated two-step detection algorithm for identification of interplanetary (IP) shocks regardless their type in a real-time data stream. This algorithm is aimed for implementation on board the future Solar Orbiter mission for triggering the transmission of the high-resolution data to the Earth. The first step of the algorithm is based on a determination of a quality factor, Q indicating abrupt changes of plasma parameters (proton density and bulk velocity) and magnetic field strength. We test two sets of weighting coefficients for Q determination and propose the second step consisting of three additional constraints that increase the effectiveness of the algorithm. We checked the algorithm using Wind (at 1 AU) and Helios (at distances from 0.29 to 1 AU) data and compared obtained results with already existing lists of IP shocks. The efficiency of the presented algorithm for the Wind shock lists varies from 60% to 84% for two Q thresholds. The final shock candidate list provided by the presented algorithm contains the real IP shocks, as well as different discontinuities. The detection rate of the IP shocks equals to 64% and 29% for two Q thresholds. The algorithm detected all IP shocks associated with the solar wind transient structures triggering intense (Dst<-100 nT) geomagnetic storms.

  2. Interplanetary medium data book, supplement 5, 1988-1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Joseph H.; Papitashvili, Natalia E.

    1994-01-01

    This publication represents an extension of the series of Interplanetary Medium Data Books and supplements that have been issued by the National Space Science Data Center since 1977. This volume contains solar wind magnetic field and plasma data from the IMP 8 spacecraft for 1988 through the end of 1993. The normalization of the MIT plasma density and temperature, which has been discussed at length in previous volumes, is implemented as before, using the same normalization constants for 1988-1993 data as for the earlier data. Owing to a combination of non-continuity of IMP 8 telemetry acquisition and IMP's being out of the solar wind for about 40 percent of its orbit, the annual solar wind coverage for 1988-1993 is 40 plus or minus 5 percent. The plots and listings of this supplement are in essentially the same format as in previous supplements. Days for which neither IMF nor plasma data were available for any hours are omitted from the listings.

  3. The Spanish Fireball Network: Popularizing Interplanetary Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo-Rodríguez, J. M.; Castro-Tirado, A.; Llorca, J.; Fabregat, J.

    In order to increase in Spain the social interest in the study of interplanetary matter (asteroids, comets and meteoroids) we created the Spanish Photographic Meteor Network (SPMN) in 1997. This network has been dedicated to studying interplanetary matter with participation of researchers from three universities (Universitat Jaume I, Universitat de Barcelona and Universitat de València), the Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC) and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía and it is also supported by the Atmospheric Sounding Station at El Arenosillo (INTA-CEDEA) and by the Experimental Station La Mayora (EELM-CSIC). In order to promote the participation of amateurs, our homepage (www.spmn.uji.es) presents public information about our research explains how amateur astronomers can participate in our network. In this paper we give some examples of the social role of a Fireball Network in order to give a coherent explanation to bright fireball events. Moreover, we also discuss the role of this kind of research project as a promoter of amateur participation and contribution to science. In fact, meteor astronomy can become an excellent area to form young researchers because systematic observation of meteors using photographic, video and CCD techniques has become one of the rare fields in astronomy in which amateurs can work together with professionals to make important contributions. We present here some results of the campaigns realized from the formation of the network. Finally, in a new step of development of our network, the all-sky CCD automatic cameras will be continuously detecting meteors and fireballs from four stations located in the Andalusia and Valencian communities by the end of 2005. Additionally, during important meteor showers we plan to develop fireball spectroscopy using medium field lenses.

  4. Magnetic field sector structure and origins of solar wind streams in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shugay, Yulia; Slemzin, Vladimir; Veselovsky, Igor

    2014-08-01

    The origins of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field sector structure in the beginning of the magnetic polarity reversal of 24th solar cycle were investigated using the Wilcox Solar Observatory magnetic field measurements and their products as well as the solar wind data from ACE and the SDO/AIA EUV images. The dominance of the quadrupole harmonics in the solar magnetic field in this period resulted in a four-sector structure of the interplanetary magnetic field. The dominating source of recurrent high-speed solar wind stream was a large trans-equatorial coronal hole of negative polarity evolving in the course of the polarity reversal process. The contribution of ICMEs to the high-speed solar wind did not exceed 17% of the total flux. The solar wind density flux averaged over the year amounted to 1 × 108 cm-2 s-1 which is considerably lower than the typical long-term value (2-4 × 108 cm-2 s-1). The slow-speed component of solar wind density flux constituted in average more than 68% of the total flux, the high-speed component was about 10%, reaching the maximum of 32% in some Carrington rotations.

  5. Aquarius, a reusable water-based interplanetary human spaceflight transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamo, Daniel R.; Logan, James S.

    2016-11-01

    Attributes of a reusable interplanetary human spaceflight transport are proposed and applied to example transits between the Earth/Moon system and Deimos, the outer moon of Mars. Because the transport is 54% water by mass at an interplanetary departure, it is christened Aquarius. In addition to supporting crew hydration/hygiene, water aboard Aquarius serves as propellant and as enhanced crew habitat radiation shielding during interplanetary transit. Key infrastructure and technology supporting Aquarius operations include pre-emplaced consumables and subsurface habitat at Deimos with crew radiation shielding equivalent to sea level on Earth, resupply in a selenocentric distant retrograde orbit, and nuclear thermal propulsion.

  6. Interplanetary and near-Jupiter meteoroid environments - Preliminary results from the meteoroid detection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinard, W. H.; O'Neal, R. L.; Alvarez, J. M.; Humes, D. H.

    1974-01-01

    Data on interplanetary and near-Jupiter micrometer-sized particle encounters from the meteoroid-detection experiment on Pioneer 10 indicate that Jupiter is much 'dustier' than interplanetary space. Whereas the near-earth particulate flux showed very little increase over the interplanetary flux, the near-Jupiter penetration flux was over two orders of magnitude higher than the interplanetary flux.

  7. Evidence for confinement of low-energy cosmic rays ahead of interplanetary shock waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmeira, R. A. R.; Allum, F. R.

    1973-01-01

    Short-lived (about 15 min), low-energy proton increases associated with the passage of interplanetary shock waves have been previously reported. In the present paper, we have examined in a fine time scale (about 1 min) the concurrent particle and magnetic field data, taken by detectors on Explorer 34, for four of these events. Our results further support the view that these impulsive events are due to confinement of the solar cosmic-ray particles in the region just ahead (about 1,000,000 km) of the advancing shock front.

  8. On the use of Godhavn H-component as an indicator of the interplanetary sector polarity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svalgaard, L.

    1974-01-01

    An objective method of inferring the polarity of the interplanetary magnetic field using the H-component at Godhavn is presented. The objectively inferred polarities are compared with a subjective index inferred earlier. It is concluded that no significant difference exists between the two methods. The inferred polarities derived from Godhavn H is biased by the (slp) sub q signature in the sense that during summer prolonged intervals of geomagnetic calm will result in inferred Away polarity regardless of the actual sector polarity. This bias does not significantly alter the large scale structure of the inferred sector structure.

  9. On the use of Godhavn H component as an indicator of the interplanetary sector polarity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svalgaard, L.

    1975-01-01

    An objective method of inferring the polarity of the interplanetary magnetic field using the H component at Godhavn is presented. The objectively inferred polarities are compared with a subjective index inferred earlier (Svalgaard, 1972b). It is concluded that no significant difference exists between the two methods. The inferred polarities derived from Godhavn H are biased by the Sq-p signature in the sense that during summer, prolonged intervals of geomagnetic calm will result in inferred away polarity regardless of the actual sector polarity. This bias does not significantly alter the large-scale structure of the inferred sector structure.

  10. Overview of cosmic rays, solar and interplanetary physics research (1987-1990)

    SciTech Connect

    Jokipii, J.R. )

    1991-01-01

    A brief survey of recent U.S. investigations in the field of heliospheric plasmas and their manifestations is presented, introducing the following collection of detailed reviews (accessions A91-46959 to A91-46964). Topics examined include the large-scale structure of interplanetary plasmas, models of Galactic cosmic-ray production and propagation, solar-wind turbulence, long-period solar-terrestrial variability, the possible relation between solar-neutrino counts and the sunspot cycle, X-ray studies of solar flares and their implications for solar processes, and the near-sun magnetic field.

  11. CME Interaction with Coronal Holes and Their Interplanetary Consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Xie, H.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.

    2008-01-01

    A significant number of interplanetary (IP) shocks (-17%) during cycle 23 were not followed by drivers. The number of such "driverless" shocks steadily increased with the solar cycle with 15%, 33%, and 52% occurring in the rise, maximum, and declining phase of the solar cycle. The solar sources of 15% of the driverless shocks were very close the central meridian of the Sun (within approx.15deg), which is quite unexpected. More interestingly, all the driverless shocks with their solar sources near the solar disk center occurred during the declining phase of solar cycle 23. When we investigated the coronal environment of the source regions of driverless shocks, we found that in each case there was at least one coronal hole nearby suggesting that the coronal holes might have deflected the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) away from the Sun-Earth line. The presence of abundant low-latitude coronal holes during the declining phase further explains why CMEs originating close to the disk center mimic the limb CMEs, which normally lead to driverless shocks due to purely geometrical reasons. We also examined the solar source regions of shocks with drivers. For these, the coronal holes were located such that they either had no influence on the CME trajectories. or they deflected the CMEs towards the Sun-Earth line. We also obtained the open magnetic field distribution on the Sun by performing a potential field source surface extrapolation to the corona. It was found that the CMEs generally move away from the open magnetic field regions. The CME-coronal hole interaction must be widespread in the declining phase, and may have a significant impact on the geoeffectiveness of CMEs.

  12. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections Observed by MESSENGER and Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, S. W.; Forsyth, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) observed by the MESSENGER and Venus Express spacecraft have been catalogued and analysed. The ICMEs were identified by a relatively smooth rotation of the magnetic field direction consistent with a flux rope structure, coinciding with a relatively enhanced magnetic field strength. A total of 35 ICMEs were found in the surveyed MESSENGER data (primarily from March 2007 to April 2012), and 84 ICMEs in the surveyed Venus Express data (from May 2006 to December 2013). The ICME flux rope configurations have been determined. Ropes with northward leading edges were about four times more common than ropes with southward leading edges, in agreement with a previously established solar cycle dependence. Ropes with low inclinations to the solar equatorial plane were about four times more common than ropes with high inclinations, possibly an observational effect. Left- and right-handed ropes were observed in almost equal numbers. In addition, data from MESSENGER, Venus Express, STEREO-A, STEREO-B and ACE were examined for multipoint signatures of the catalogued ICMEs. For spacecraft separations below 15° in heliocentric longitude, the second spacecraft observed the ICME flux rope in 82 % of cases; this percentage dropped to 49 % for separations between 15 and 30°, to 18 % for separations between 30 and 45°, and to 12 % for separations between 45 and 60°. As the spacecraft separation increased, it became increasingly likely that only the sheath and not the flux rope of the ICME was observed, in agreement with the notion that ICME flux ropes are smaller in longitudinal extent than the shocks or discontinuities that they often drive. Furthermore, this study has identified 23 ICMEs observed by pairs of spacecraft close to radial alignment. A detailed analysis of these events could lead to a better understanding of how ICMEs evolve during propagation.

  13. Neutron resonance averaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    The principles of resonance averaging as applied to neutron capture reactions are described. Several illustrations of resonance averaging to problems of nuclear structure and the distribution of radiative strength in nuclei are provided. 30 refs., 12 figs.

  14. Differences in generation of magnetic storms driven by magnetic clouds, ejecta, sheath region before ICME and CIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, Nadezhda; Yermolaev, Yuri; Lodkina, Irina

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the efficiency of main phase storm generation by different solar wind (SW) streams when using 12 functions coupling (FC) various interplanetary parameters with magnetospheric state. By using our Catalog of Solar Wind Phenomena [Yermolaev et al., 2009] created on the basis of the OMNI database for 1976-2000, we selected the magnetic storms with Dst ≤ -50 nT for which interplanetary sources were following: MC (10 storms); Ejecta (31 storms); Sheath (21 storms); CIRs (31magnetic storms). To compare the interplanetary drivers we estimate an efficiency of magnetic storm generation by type of solar wind stream with using 12 coupling functions. We obtained that in average Sheath has more large efficiency of the magnetic storm generation and MC has more low efficiency in agreement with our previous results which show that by using a modification of formula by Burton et al. [1975] for connection of interplanetary conditions with Dst and Dst* indices the efficiency of storm generation by Sheath and CIR was ~50% higher than generation by ICME [Nikolaeva et al., 2013; 2015]. The most part of FCs has sufficiently high correlation coefficients. In particular the highest values of coefficients (~ 0.5 up to 0.63) are observed for Sheath- driven storms. In a small part of FCs with low coefficients it is necessary to increase the number of magnetic storms to increase the statistical significance of results. The reliability of the obtained data and possible reasons of divergences for various FCs and various SW types require further researches. The authors are grateful for the opportunity to use the OMNI database. This work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, project 16-02-00125, and by Program of Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences. References: Nikolaeva, N. S., Y. I. Yermolaev, and I. G. Lodkina (2013), Modeling of Dst-index temporal profile on the main phase of the magnetic storms generated by different types of solar wind, Cosmic

  15. Large-scale solar wind streams: Average temporal evolution of parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolaev, Yuri; Lodkina, Irina; Yermolaev, Michael; Nikolaeva, Nadezhda

    2016-07-01

    In the report we describe the average temporal profiles of plasma and field parameters in the disturbed large-scale types of solar wind (SW): corotating interaction regions (CIR), interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICME) (both magnetic cloud (MC) and Ejecta), and Sheath as well as the interplanetary shock (IS) on the basis of OMNI database and our Catalog of large-scale solar wind phenomena during 1976-2000 (see website ftp://ftp.iki.rssi.ru/pub/omni/ and paper [Yermolaev et al., 2009]). To consider influence of both the surrounding undisturbed solar wind, and the interaction of the disturbed types of the solar wind on the parameters, we separately analyze the following sequences of the phenomena: (1) SW/CIR/SW, (2) SW/IS/CIR/SW, (3) SW/Ejecta/SW, (4) SW/Sheath/Ejecta/SW, (5) SW/IS/Sheath/Ejecta/SW, (6) SW/MC/SW, (7) SW/Sheath/MC/SW, and (8) SW/IS/Sheath/MC/SW. To take into account the different durations of SW types, we use the double superposed epoch analysis (DSEA) method: rescaling the duration of the interval for all types in such a manner that, respectively, beginning and end for all intervals of selected type coincide [Yermolaev et al., 2010; 2015]. Obtained data allow us to suggest that (1) the behavior of parameters in Sheath and in CIR is very similar not only qualitatively but also quantitatively, and (2) the speed angle phi in ICME changes from 2 to -2deg. while in CIR and Sheath it changes from -2 to 2 deg., i.e., the streams in CIR/Sheath and ICME deviate in the opposite side. The work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, project 16-02-00125 and by Program of Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences. References: Yermolaev, Yu. I., N. S. Nikolaeva, I. G. Lodkina, and M. Yu. Yermolaev (2009), Catalog of Large-Scale Solar Wind Phenomena during 1976-2000, Cosmic Research, , Vol. 47, No. 2, pp. 81-94. Yermolaev, Y. I., N. S. Nikolaeva, I. G. Lodkina, and M. Y. Yermolaev (2010), Specific interplanetary conditions for CIR

  16. Areal Average Albedo (AREALAVEALB)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Riihimaki, Laura; Marinovici, Cristina; Kassianov, Evgueni

    2008-01-01

    he Areal Averaged Albedo VAP yields areal averaged surface spectral albedo estimates from MFRSR measurements collected under fully overcast conditions via a simple one-line equation (Barnard et al., 2008), which links cloud optical depth, normalized cloud transmittance, asymmetry parameter, and areal averaged surface albedo under fully overcast conditions.

  17. Plasma and energetic particle structure upstream of a quasi-parallel interplanetary shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, C. F.; Scarf, F. L.; Coroniti, F. V.; Russell, C. T.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Sanderson, T. R.; Van Nes, P.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Scudder, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    ISEE 1, 2 and 3 data from 1978 on interplanetary magnetic fields, shock waves and particle energetics are examined to characterize a quasi-parallel shock. The intense shock studied exhibited a 640 km/sec velocity. The data covered 1-147 keV protons and electrons and ions with energies exceeding 30 keV in regions both upstream and downstream of the shock, and also the magnitudes of ion-acoustic and MHD waves. The energetic particles and MHD waves began being detected 5 hr before the shock. Intense halo electron fluxes appeared ahead of the shock. A closed magnetic field structure was produced with a front end 700 earth radii from the shock. The energetic protons were cut off from the interior of the magnetic bubble, which contained a markedly increased density of 2-6 keV protons as well as the shock itself.

  18. Analysis of the Acceleration Process of SEPs by an Interplanetary Shock for Bastille Day Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, G. M.; Han, Y. B.

    Based on the solar energetic particle (SEP) data from ACE and GOES satellites, the acceleration of SEP by CME-driven shock in interplanetary space was investigated. The results showed that the acceleration process of SEP by the Bastille CME-driven shock ran through the whole space from the sun to the magnetosphere. The highest energy of SEP accelerated by the shock was greater than 100MeV. A magnetic bottle associated with the CME captured a lot of high energy particles with some of them having energy greater than 100MeV. Based on magnetic field data of solar wind observed by ACE data, we found that the the magnetic bottle associated with the Bastille CME was the sheath caused by the CME in fact.

  19. Zodiacal light as an indicator of interplanetary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, J. L.; Sparrow, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    The most striking feature of the night sky in the tropics is the zodiacal light, which appears as a cone in the west after sunset and in the east before sunrise. It is caused by sunlight scattered or absorbed by particles in the interplanetary medium. The zodiacal light is the only source of information about the integrated properties of the whole ensemble of interplanetary dust. The brightness and polarization in different directions and at different colors can provide information on the optical properties and spatial distribution of the scattering particles. The zodiacal light arises from two independent physical processes related to the scattering of solar continuum radiation by interplanetary dust and to thermal emission which arises from solar radiation that is absorbed by interplanetary dust and reemitted mainly at infrared wavelengths. Attention is given to observational parameters of zodiacal light, the methods of observation, errors and absolute calibration, and the observed characteristics of zodiacal light.

  20. MAGNETIC FLUX CONSERVATION IN THE HELIOSHEATH INCLUDING SOLAR CYCLE VARIATIONS OF MAGNETIC FIELD INTENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, A. T.; Opher, M.; Provornikova, E.; Richardson, J. D.; Tóth, G. E-mail: mopher@bu.edu E-mail: jdr@space.mit.edu

    2015-04-10

    In the heliosheath (HS), Voyager 2 has observed a flow with constant radial velocity and magnetic flux conservation. Voyager 1, however, has observed a decrease in the flow’s radial velocity and an order of magnitude decrease in magnetic flux. We investigate the role of the 11 yr solar cycle variation of the magnetic field strength on the magnetic flux within the HS using a global 3D magnetohydrodynamic model of the heliosphere. We use time and latitude-dependent solar wind velocity and density inferred from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/SWAN and interplanetary scintillations data and implemented solar cycle variations of the magnetic field derived from 27 day averages of the field magnitude average of the magnetic field at 1 AU from the OMNI database. With the inclusion of the solar cycle time-dependent magnetic field intensity, the model matches the observed intensity of the magnetic field in the HS along both Voyager 1 and 2. This is a significant improvement from the same model without magnetic field solar cycle variations, which was over a factor of two larger. The model accurately predicts the radial velocity observed by Voyager 2; however, the model predicts a flow speed ∼100 km s{sup −1} larger than that derived from LECP measurements at Voyager 1. In the model, magnetic flux is conserved along both Voyager trajectories, contrary to observations. This implies that the solar cycle variations in solar wind magnetic field observed at 1 AU does not cause the order of magnitude decrease in magnetic flux observed in the Voyager 1 data.

  1. Global Magnetospheric Response to an Interplanetary Shock: THEMIS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Hui; Sibeck, David G.; Zong, Q.-G.; McFadden, James P.; Larson, Davin; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the global response of geospace plasma environment to an interplanetary shock at approx. 0224 UT on May 28, 2008 from multiple THEMIS spacecraft observations in the magnetosheath (THEMIS B and C) and the mid-afternoon (THEMIS A) and dusk magnetosphere (THEMIS D and E). The interaction of the transmitted interplanetary shock with the magnetosphere has global effects. Consequently, it can affect geospace plasma significantly. After interacting with the bow shock, the interplanetary shock transmitted a fast shock and a discontinuity which propagated through the magnetosheath toward the Earth at speeds of 300 km/s and 137 km/s respectively. THEMIS A observations indicate that the plasmaspheric plume changed significantly by the interplanetary shock impact. The plasmaspheric plume density increased rapidly from 10 to 100/ cubic cm in 4 min and the ion distribution changed from isotropic to strongly anisotropic distribution. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves observed by THEMIS A are most likely excited by the anisotropic ion distributions caused by the interplanetary shock impact. To our best knowledge, this is the first direct observation of the plasmaspheric plume response to an interplanetary shock's impact. THEMIS A, but not D or E, observed a plasmaspheric plume in the dayside magnetosphere. Multiple spacecraft observations indicate that the dawn-side edge of the plasmaspheric plume was located between THEMIS A and D (or E).

  2. Solar radio burst and in situ determination of interplanetary electron density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougeret, J. L.; King, J. H.; Schwenn, R.

    1983-01-01

    A few interplanetary electron density scales which were derived from the analysis of interplanetary solar radio burst are discussed and compared to a model derived from 1974 to 1980 Helios 1 and 2 in situ density observations made in the 0.3 to 1.0 AU range. The Helios densities were normalized to 1976 with the aid of IMP and ISEE data at 1 AU, and were then sorted into 0.1 AU bins and logarithmically averaged within each bin. The best fit to these 1976-normalized, bin averages is N(R(AU)) = 6.1 R(-2.10)/cu cm. This model is in rather good agreement with the solar burst determination if the radiation is assumed to be on the second harmonic of the plasma frequency. This analysis also suggests that the radio emissions tend to be produced in regions denser than the average where the density gradient decreases faster with distance than the observed R(-2.10).

  3. Mars interplanetary trajectory design via Lagrangian points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eapen, Roshan Thomas; Sharma, Ram Krishan

    2014-09-01

    With the increase in complexities of interplanetary missions, the main focus has shifted to reducing the total delta-V for the entire mission and hence increasing the payload capacity of the spacecraft. This paper develops a trajectory to Mars using the Lagrangian points of the Sun-Earth system and the Sun-Mars system. The whole trajectory can be broadly divided into three stages: (1) Trajectory from a near-Earth circular parking orbit to a halo orbit around Sun-Earth Lagrangian point L2. (2) Trajectory from Sun-Earth L2 halo orbit to Sun-Mars L1 halo orbit. (3) Sun-Mars L1 halo orbit to a circular orbit around Mars. The stable and unstable manifolds of the halo orbits are used for halo orbit insertion. The intermediate transfer arcs are designed using two-body Lambert's problem. The total delta-V for the whole trajectory is computed and found to be lesser than that for the conventional trajectories. For a 480 km Earth parking orbit, the total delta-V is found to be 4.6203 km/s. Another advantage in the present approach is that delta-V does not depend upon the synodic period of Earth with respect to Mars.

  4. Raman observations on individual interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wopenka, B.

    1988-05-01

    A Raman study of 20 representative interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) belonging to different infrared spectral classes is discussed. Six different groups of Raman spectra were discerned among the IDPs studied. Groups 1-5 exhibit the Raman signature of poorly crystallized carbonaceous material, with the degree of disorder of this material increasing from group 1 (most ordered) to group 5 (least ordered). Group 1 contains IDPs that have infrared spectra characteristic of olivines, and are deuterium depleted, while those in groups 2, 3, and 4 contain less ordered carbonaceous material and are deuterium enriched, suggesting different carbonaceous carrier phases for deuterium depletions and enrichments. Groups 5 and 6 contain little or no carbonaceous material, with an abundance of deuterium. No obvious relationship was found between Raman groups and infrared classes based on the 10 micron absorption band due to silicates. Because silicates are known to be present, but are not seen, it is presumed that silicate grains are coated with and/or imbedded in carbonaceous material. Several IDPs show broad visible laser-induced photoluminescence, probably produced by a carbonaceous component.

  5. Inward electrostatic precipitation of interplanetary particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rulison, Aaron J.; Flagan, Richard C.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1993-01-01

    An inward precipitator collects particles initially dispersed in a gas throughout either a cylindrical or spherical chamber onto a small central planchet. The instrument is effective for particle diameters greater than about 1 micron. One use is the collection of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) which are stopped in a noble gas (xenon) by drag and ablation after perforating the wall of a thin-walled spacecraft-mounted chamber. First, the particles are positively charged for several seconds by the corona production of positive xenon ions from inward facing needles placed on the chamber wall. Then an electric field causes the particles to migrate toward the center of the instrument and onto the planchet. The collection time (on the order of hours for a 1 m radius spherical chamber) is greatly reduced by the use of optimally located screens which reapportion the electric field. Some of the electric field lines terminate on the wires of the screens so a fraction of the total number of particles in the chamber is lost. The operation of the instrument is demonstrated by experiments which show the migration of carbon soot particles with radius of approximately 1 micron in a 5 cm diameter cylindrical chamber with a single field enhancing screen toward a 3.2 mm central collection rod.

  6. Mars Science Laboratory Interplanetary Navigation Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin-Mur, Tomas J.; Kruizinga, Gerard L.; Wong, Mau C.

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is a NASA rover mission that will be launched in late 2011 and will land on Mars in August of 2012. This paper describes the analyses performed to validate the navigation system for launch, interplanetary cruise, and approach. MSL will use guidance during its descent into Mars in order to minimize landing dispersions, and therefore will be able to use smaller landing zones that are closer to terrain of high scientific interest. This will require a more accurate delivery of the spacecraft to the atmospheric entry interface, and a late update of the state of the spacecraft at entry. During cruise and approach the spacecraft may perform up to six trajectory correction maneuvers (TCMs), to target to the desired landing site with the required flight path angle at entry. Approach orbit determination covariance analyses have been performed to evaluate the accuracy that can be achieved in delivering the spacecraft to the entry interface point, and to determine how accurately the state of the spacecraft can be predicted to initialize the guidance algorithm. In addition, a sensitivity analysis has been performed to evaluate which factors most contribute to the improvement or degradation of the navigation performance, for both entry flight path angle delivery and entry state knowledge.

  7. Volatiles in interplanetary dust particles and aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Harmetz, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    Volatiles measured in 25 interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are a mixture of both indigenous materials and contaminants associated with the collection and processing of the ODPs prior to analysis. Most IDPs have been collected in the stratosphere using a silicone oil/freon mixture (20:1 ratio) coated on collector plates. Studies have shown that silicone oil, freon and hexane residues remain with the ODPs, despite attempts to clean the IDPs. Analysis of the IDPs with the LMMS-technique produces spectra with a mixture of indigeneous and contaminants components. The contamination signal can be identified and removed; however, the contamination signal may obscure some of the indigeneous component's signal. Employing spectra stripping techniques, the indigenous volatile constituents associated with the IDPs can be identified. Volatiles are similar to those measured in CI or CM carbonaceous chondrites. Collection of IDPs in low-Earth orbit utilizing a Cosmic Dust Collection Facility attached to Space Station Freedom has been proposed. The low-density material aerogel has been proposed as a collection substrate for IDPs. Our studies have concentrated on identifying volatile contaminants that are associated with aerogel. We have found that solvents used for the preparation of aerogel remain in aerogel and methods must be developed for removing the entrapped solvents before aerogels can be used for an IDP collection substrate.

  8. Water and organics in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, John

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and larger micrometeorites (MMs) impinge on the upper atmosphere where they decelerate at 90 km altitude and settle to the Earths surface. Comets and asteroids are the major sources and the flux, 30,000-40,000 tons/yr, is comparable to the mass of larger meteorites impacting the Earths surface. The sedimentary record suggests that the flux was much higher on the early Earth. The chondritic porous (CP) subset of IDPs together with their larger counterparts, ultracarbonaceous micrometeorites (UCMMs), appear to be unique among known meteoritic materials in that they are composed almost exclusively of anhydrous minerals, some of them contain >> 50% organic carbon by volume as well as the highest abundances of presolar silicate grains including GEMS. D/H and 15N abundances implicate the Oort Cloud or presolar molecular cloud as likely sources of the organic carbon. Prior to atmospheric entry, IDPs and MMs spend 104-105 year lifetimes in solar orbit where their surfaces develop amorphous space weathered rims from exposure to the solar wind (SW). Similar rims are observed on lunar soil grains and on asteroid Itokawa regolith grains. Using valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) we have detected radiolytic water in the rims on IDPs formed by the interaction of solar wind protons with oxygen in silicate minerals. Therefore, IDPs and MMs continuously deliver both water and organics to the earth and other terrestrial planets. The interaction of protons with oxygen-rich minerals to form water is a universal process.

  9. Radioisotopic heater units warm an interplanetary spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Ferreira, E.A.; Rinehart, G.H.

    1998-01-01

    The Cassini orbiter and Huygens probe, which were successfully launched on October 15, 1997, constitute NASA`s last grand-scale interplanetary mission of this century. The mission, which consists of a four-year, close-up study of Saturn and its moons, begins in July 2004 with Cassini`s 60 orbits of Saturn and about 33 fly-bys of the large moon Titan. The Huygens probe will descend and land on Titan. Investigations will include Saturn`s atmosphere, its rings and its magnetosphere. The atmosphere and surface of Titan and other icy moons also will be characterized. Because of the great distance of Saturn from the sun, some of the instruments and equipment on both the orbiter and the probe require external heaters to maintain their temperature within normal operating ranges. These requirements are met by Light Weight Radioisotope Heater Units (LWRHUs) designed, fabricated and safety tested at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico. An improved gas tungsten arc welding procedure lowered costs and decreased processing time for heat units for the Cassini spacecraft.

  10. Optimizing interplanetary trajectories with deep space maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navagh, John

    1993-09-01

    Analysis of interplanetary trajectories is a crucial area for both manned and unmanned missions of the Space Exploration Initiative. A deep space maneuver (DSM) can improve a trajectory in much the same way as a planetary swingby. However, instead of using a gravitational field to alter the trajectory, the on-board propulsion system of the spacecraft is used when the vehicle is not near a planet. The purpose is to develop an algorithm to determine where and when to use deep space maneuvers to reduce the cost of a trajectory. The approach taken to solve this problem uses primer vector theory in combination with a non-linear optimizing program to minimize Delta(V). A set of necessary conditions on the primer vector is shown to indicate whether a deep space maneuver will be beneficial. Deep space maneuvers are applied to a round trip mission to Mars to determine their effect on the launch opportunities. Other studies which were performed include cycler trajectories and Mars mission abort scenarios. It was found that the software developed was able to locate quickly DSM's which lower the total Delta(V) on these trajectories.

  11. Origins and Dynamics of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, Stanley F.

    2005-01-01

    This is a final report for research supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration issued through the Office of Space Science Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program, covering all relevant activities during its 3-year period of funding from 02/01/2002 through to 01/31/2005. The ongoing aim of the research supported through this grant, and now through a successor award, is to investigate the origin of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and their dynamical and collisional evolution, in order to: (1) understand the provenance of zodiacal cloud particles and their transport from their source regions to the inner solar system; (2) produce detailed models of the zodiacal cloud and its constituent components; (3) determine the origin of the dust particles accreted by the Earth; (4) ascertain the level of temporal variations in the dust environment of the inner solar system and the accretion rate of IDPs by the Earth, and evaluate potential effects on global climate; and to (5) exploit this research as a basis for interpreting the structure observed in exozodiacal clouds that may result from the collisional evolution of planetesimals and the presence of unseen planets.

  12. Magnetospheric Response to Interplanetary Field Enhancements: Coordinated Space-based and Ground-based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Peter; Russell, Christopher; Lai, Hairong

    2014-05-01

    In general, asteroids, meteoroids and dust do not interact with the plasma structures in the solar system, but after a collision between fast moving bodies the debris cloud contains nanoscale dust particles that are charged and behave like heavy ions. Dusty magnetic clouds are then accelerated to the solar wind speed. While they pose no threat to spacecraft because of the particle size, the coherency imposed by the magnetization of the cloud allows the cloud to interact with the Earth's magnetosphere as well as the plasma in the immediate vicinity of the cloud. We call these clouds Interplanetary Field Enhancements (IFEs). These IFEs are a unique class of interplanetary field structures that feature cusp-shaped increases and decreases in the interplanetary magnetic field and a thin current sheet. The occurrence of IFEs is attributed to the interaction between the solar wind and dust particles produced in inter-bolide collisions. Previous spacecraft observations have confirmed that IFEs move with the solar wind. When IFEs strike the magnetosphere, they may distort the magnetosphere in several possible ways, such as producing a small indentation, a large scale compression, or a glancing blow. In any event if the IFE is slowed by the magnetosphere, the compression of the Earth's field should be seen in the ground-based magnetic records that are continuously recorded. Thus it is important to understand the magnetospheric response to IFE arrival. In this study, we investigate the IFE structure observed by spacecraft upstream of the magnetosphere and the induced magnetic field perturbations observed by networks of ground magnetometers, including the THEMIS, CARISMA, McMAC arrays in North America and the IMAGE array in Europe. We find that, in a well-observed IFE event on December 24, 2006, all ground magnetometer stations observed an impulse at approximately 1217 UT when the IFE was expected to arrive at the Earth's magnetopause. These ground stations spread across many

  13. Solar source of energetic particles in interplanetary space during the 2006 December 13 event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Dai, Y.; Vial, J.-C.; Owen, C. J.; Matthews, S. A.; Tang, Y. H.; Fang, C.; Fazakerley, A. N.

    2009-09-01

    An X3.4 solar flare and a fast halo coronal mass ejection (CME) occurred on 2006 December 13, accompanied by a high flux of energetic particles recorded both in near-Earth space and at ground level. Our purpose is to provide evidence of flare acceleration in a major solar energetic particle (SEP) event. We first present observations from ACE/EPAM, GOES, and the Apatity neutron monitor. It is found that the initial particle release time coincides with the flare emission and that the spectrum becomes softer and the anisotropy becomes weaker during particle injection, indicating that the acceleration source changes from a confined coronal site to a widespread interplanetary CME-driven shock. We then describe a comprehensive study of the associated flare active region. By use of imaging data from HINODE/SOT and SOHO/MDI magnetogram, we infer the flare magnetic reconnection rate in the form of the magnetic flux change rate. This correlates in time with the microwave emission, indicating a physical link between the flare magnetic reconnection and the acceleration of nonthermal particles. Combining radio spectrograph data from Huairou/NOAC, Culgoora/IPS, Learmonth/RSTN, and WAVES/WIND leads to a continuous and longlasting radio burst extending from a few GHz down to several kHz. Based on the photospheric vector magnetogram from Huairou/NOAC and the nonlinear force free field (NFFF) reconstruction method, we derive the 3D magnetic field configuration shortly after the eruption. Furthermore, we also compute coronal field lines extending to a few solar radii using a potential-field source-surface (PFSS) model. Both the so-called type III-l burst and the magnetic field configuration suggest that open-field lines extend from the flare active region into interplanetary space, allowing the accelerated and charged particles escape.

  14. Orientations of LASCO Halo CMEs and their connection to the flux rope structure of interplanetary CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchyshyn, V.; Hu, Q.; Lepping, R. P.; Lynch, B. J.; Krall, J.

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed near the Sun via LASCO coronographic imaging are the most important solar drivers of geomagnetic storms. ICMEs, their interplanetary, near-Earth counterparts, can be detected in situ, for example, by the Wind and ACE spacecraft. An ICME usually exhibits a complex structure that very often includes a magnetic cloud (MC). They can be commonly modelled as magnetic flux ropes and there is observational evidence to expect that the orientation of a halo CME elongation corresponds to the orientation of the flux rope. In this study, we compare orientations of elongated CME halos and the corresponding MCs, measured by Wind and ACE spacecraft. We characterize the MC structures by using the Grad-Shafranov reconstruction technique and three MC fitting methods to obtain their axis directions. The CME tilt angles and MC fitted axis angles were compared without taking into account handedness of the underlying flux rope field and the polarity of its