Sample records for avian vacuolar myelinopathy

  1. Environmental Factors Influencing Blooms of a Neurotoxic Stigonematalan Cyanobacterium Responsible for Avian Vacuolar Myelinopathy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    aquatic plants and subsequent ecological consequences. The authors of this technical note have linked avian vacuolar myelinopathy (AVM), a disease...additional cyanobacteria sequences to determine designations for probe development, to advance understanding of the species’ phylogeny , and to lay...groundwork for its formal description. Phylogeny data confirm that the species is in section V, order Stigonematales. Phylogeny also infers that the

  2. Epizootiologic studies of avian vacuolar myelinopathy in waterbirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Thomas, N.J.; Augspurger, T.; Miller, Kimberli J.

    2002-01-01

    Epizootic avian vacuolar myelinopathy (AVM) was first recognized as a neurologic disease in bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and American coots (Fulica americana) in Arkansas, USA in 1994 and 1996, respectively, but attempts to identify the etiology of the disease have been unsuccessful to date. Between 1998 and 2001, wing clipped sentinel birds (wild American coots and game farm mallards [Anas platyrhynchos]) were released at Lake Surf, North Carolina, a lake with recurrent outbreaks of AVM, in order to gain a better understanding of the epizootiology of the disease. As early as 5-7 days post-release, sentinel coots and mallards showed neurologic signs of disease and were confirmed with AVM upon histologic examination of their brains. Serial releases of sentinel mallards during the summer, fall, and winter of 2000-01 demonstrated that exposure to the causative agent at a threshold sufficient to manifest disease was seasonal and occurred over about a 2 mo period, during November and December. Our findings that disease onset can be very rapid (5-7 days) and that exposure to the causative agent of AVM is site-specific, seasonal (late fall to early winter), and occurs over a relatively short duration (several months) supports the hypothesis that the disease is caused by a chemical substance, most likely of natural origin.

  3. Failure to transmit avian vacuolar myelinopathy to mallard ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, R.S.; Nutter, F.B.; Augspurger, T.; Rocke, T.E.; Thomas, N.J.; Stoskopf, M.K.

    2003-01-01

    Avian vacuolar myelinopathy (AVM) is a neurologic disease that has been diagnosed in free-ranging birds in the southeastern United States. Bald eagles (Haliaeetus leuocephalus), American coots (Fulica americana), and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) have been affected. Previous investigations have not determined the etiology of this disease. In November and December 2002, we attempted to induce AVM in game-farmed mallards through four, 7-day exposure trials. Mallards were housed in six groups of eight, with two of these groups serving as controls. One group was housed with AVM-affected coots; one group was tube fed daily with water from the lake where affected coots were captured; one group was tube fed daily with aquatic vegetation (Hydrilla verticillata) from the same lake; and another group was tube fed daily with sediment from the lake. No ducks exhibited clinical neurologic abnormalities consistent with AVM and no evidence of AVM was present at histopathologic examination of brain tissue. Although limitations in sample size, quantity of individual doses, frequency of dose administration, duration of exposure, and timing of these trials restrict the interpretation of the findings, AVM was not readily transmitted by direct contact, water, hydrilla, or sediment in this investigation.

  4. Clinical features of avian vacuolar myelinopathy in American coots

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, R.S.; Nutter, F.B.; Augspurger, T.; Rocke, T.E.; Tomlinson, L.; Thomas, N.J.; Stoskopf, M.K.

    2002-01-01

    Objectivea??To characterize clinical features of avian vacuolar myelinopathy (AVM) in American coots. Designa??Case-control study. Animalsa??26 AVM-affected American coots and 12 unaffected coots. Proceduresa??Complete physical, neurologic, hematologic, and plasma biochemical evaluations were performed. Affected coots received supportive care. All coots died or were euthanatized, and AVM status was confirmed via histopathologic findings. Resultsa??3 severely affected coots were euthanatized immediately after examination. Seventeen affected coots were found dead within 7 days of admission, but 5 affected coots survived > 21 days and had signs of clinical recovery. Abnormal physical examination findings appeared to be related to general debilitation. Ataxia (88%), decreased withdrawal reflexes (88%), proprioceptive deficits (81%), decreased vent responses (69%), beak or tongue weakness (42%), and head tremors (31%), as well as absent pupillary light responses (46%), anisocoria (15%), apparent blindness (4%), nystagmus (4%), and strabismus (4%) were detected. Few gross abnormalities were detected at necropsy, but histologically, all AVM-affected coots had severe vacuolation of white matter of the brain. None of the control coots had vacuolation. Conclusions and Clinical Relevancea??Although there was considerable variability in form and severity of clinical neurologic abnormalities, clinical signs common in AVM-affected birds were identified. Clinical recovery of some AVM-affected coots can occur when supportive care is administered. Until the etiology is identified, caution should be exercised when rehabilitating and releasing coots thought to be affected by AVM.

  5. Vacuolar myelinopathy in waterfowl from a North Carolina impoundment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Augspurger, T.; Fischer, John R.; Thomas, Nancy; Sileo, L.; Brannian, Roger E.; Miller, Kimberli J.; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2003-01-01

    Vacuolar myelinopathy was confirmed by light and electron microscopic examination of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), ring-necked ducks (Aythya collaris), and buffleheads (Bucephala albeola) collected during an epizootic at Lake Surf in central North Carolina (USA) between November 1998 and February 1999. Clinical signs of affected birds were consistent with central nervous system impairment of motor function (incoordination, abnormal movement and posture, weakness, paralysis). This is the first report of this disease in wild waterfowl (Anseriformes).Aug

  6. Attempts to identify the source of avian vacuolar myelinopathy for waterbirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, T.E.; Thomas, N.J.; Meteyer, C.U.; Quist, C.F.; Fischer, John R.; Augspurger, T.; Ward, S.E.

    2005-01-01

    Attempts were made to reproduce avian vacuolar myelinopathy (AVM) in a number of test animals in order to determine the source of the causative agent for birds and to find a suitable animal model for future studies. Submerged vegetation, plankton, invertebrates, forage fish, and sediments were collected from three lakes with ongoing outbreaks of AVM and fed to American coots (Fulica americana), mallard ducks and ducklings (Anas platyrhynchos), quail (Coturnix japonica), and laboratory mice either via gavage or ad libitum. Tissues from AVM-affected coots with brain lesions were fed to ducklings, kestrels (Falco sparverius), and American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos). Two mallards that ingested one sample of Hydrilla verticillata along with any biotic or abiotic material associated with its external surface developed brain lesions consistent with AVM, although neither of the ducks had clinical signs of disease. Ingestion of numerous other samples of Hydrilla from the AVM affected lakes and a lake with no prior history of AVM, other materials (sediments, algae, fish, invertebrates, and water from affected lakes), or tissues from AVM-affected birds did not produce either clinical signs or brain lesions in any of the other test animals in our studies. These results suggest that waterbirds are most likely exposed to the causative agent of AVM while feeding on aquatic vegetation, but we do not believe the vegetation itself is the agent. We hypothesize that the causative agent of AVM might either be accumulated by aquatic vegetation, such as Hydrilla, or associated with biotic or abiotic material on its external surfaces. In support of that hypothesis, two coots that ingested Hydrilla sampled from a lake with an ongoing AVM outbreak in wild birds developed neurologic signs within 9 days (ataxia, limb weakness, and incoordination), and one of two coots that ingested Hydrilla collected from the same site 13 days later became sick and died within 38 days. None of these three

  7. Experimental Feeding of Hydrilla verticillata Colonized by Stigonematales Cyanobacteria Induces Vacuolar Myelinopathy in Painted Turtles (Chrysemys picta)

    PubMed Central

    Mercurio, Albert D.; Hernandez, Sonia M.; Maerz, John C.; Yabsley, Michael J.; Ellis, Angela E.; Coleman, Amanda L.; Shelnutt, Leslie M.; Fischer, John R.; Wilde, Susan B.

    2014-01-01

    Vacuolar myelinopathy (VM) is a neurologic disease primarily found in birds that occurs when wildlife ingest submerged aquatic vegetation colonized by an uncharacterized toxin-producing cyanobacterium (hereafter “UCB” for “uncharacterized cyanobacterium”). Turtles are among the closest extant relatives of birds and many species directly and/or indirectly consume aquatic vegetation. However, it is unknown whether turtles can develop VM. We conducted a feeding trial to determine whether painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) would develop VM after feeding on Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata), colonized by the UCB (Hydrilla is the most common “host” of UCB). We hypothesized turtles fed Hydrilla colonized by the UCB would exhibit neurologic impairment and vacuolation of nervous tissues, whereas turtles fed Hydrilla free of the UCB would not. The ability of Hydrilla colonized by the UCB to cause VM (hereafter, “toxicity”) was verified by feeding it to domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) or necropsy of field collected American coots (Fulica americana) captured at the site of Hydrilla collections. We randomly assigned ten wild-caught turtles into toxic or non-toxic Hydrilla feeding groups and delivered the diets for up to 97 days. Between days 82 and 89, all turtles fed toxic Hydrilla displayed physical and/or neurologic impairment. Histologic examination of the brain and spinal cord revealed vacuolations in all treatment turtles. None of the control turtles exhibited neurologic impairment or had detectable brain or spinal cord vacuolations. This is the first evidence that freshwater turtles can become neurologically impaired and develop vacuolations after consuming toxic Hydrilla colonized with the UCB. The southeastern United States, where outbreaks of VM occur regularly and where vegetation colonized by the UCB is common, is also a global hotspot of freshwater turtle diversity. Our results suggest that further investigations into the effect of the

  8. Epizootic vacuolar myelinopathy of the central nervous system of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and American coots (Fulica americana)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, N.J.; Meteyer, C.U.; Sileo, L.

    1998-01-01

    toxicity from hexachlorophene, triethyltin, bromethalin, isonicotinic acid hydrazide, and certain exotic plant toxins; however, despite exhaustive testing, no etiology was determined for the DeGray Lake mortality events. This is the first report of vacuolar myelinopathy associated with spontaneous mortality in wild birds.

  9. Avian vacuolar myelinopathy: a newly recognized fatal neurologic disease of eagles, waterfowl, and other birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, John R.; Lewis, L.A.; Augspurger, T.; Rocke, T.E.

    2002-01-01

    Wildlife biologists and health specialists have been frustrated by a long list of negative findings in their AVM investigations, however studies continue to provide pieces of information to aid the determination of the cause and its source. Available data indicated that AVM may have been present since at least 1990, occurs in at least five states, has been documented during October through April at sites of wintering populations of birds where the exposure apparently occurs, and has killed at least 90 bald eagles. Birds with AVM have difficulty or inability to fly, swim, walk, or perch, but there has been resolution of clinical signs in some affected coots. The list of affected species continues to grow, but remains confined to wild avians, including bald eagle, American coot, great horned owl, killdeer, Canada goose, mallard, ring-necked duck and bufflehead. The effects of the AVM agent on mammals, including human beings, are unknown. A neurotoxicant of manmade or natural origin is the suspected cause of AVM because no infectious disease agents, such as viruses, bacteria, parasites and prions, have been found, and the lesion and epizootiology of AVM resemble those of toxicoses. Additionally it is documented, experimentally, that exposure to raptors can occur through ingestion of infected coots. Collaborative studies will continue in the effort to identify the cause of AVM, its geographic distribution, and the range of species susceptibility. Hopefully, this information can be used to identify measures that might be taken to reduce the impact of AVM on the wildlife resource. Multiple agencies, institutions, and individuals must rely on each other's expertise in the multidisciplinary approach to this problem, persevere in their efforts and take advantage of serendipity that presents itself during investigations of this newly recognized cause of wild bird mortality.

  10. Vba4p, a vacuolar membrane protein, is involved in the drug resistance and vacuolar morphology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Pongcharoen, Pongsanat; Kawahara, Rieko; Yasuda, Mayu; Yamasaki, Takashi; Akiyama, Koichi; Sekito, Takayuki; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2016-01-01

    In the vacuolar basic amino acid (VBA) transporter family of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, VBA4 encodes a vacuolar membrane protein with 14 putative transmembrane helices. Transport experiments with isolated vacuolar membrane vesicles and estimation of the amino acid contents in vacuoles showed that Vba4p is not likely involved in the transport of amino acids. We found that the vba4Δ cells, as well as vba1Δ and vba2Δ cells, showed increased susceptibility to several drugs, particularly to azoles. Although disruption of the VBA4 gene did not affect the salt tolerance of the cells, vacuolar fragmentation observed under high salt conditions was less prominent in vba4Δ cells than in wild type, vba1Δ, and vba2Δ cells. Vba4p differs from Vba1p and Vba2p as a vacuolar transporter but is important for the drug resistance and vacuolar morphology of S. cerevisiae.

  11. Thermoinactivation analysis of vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Su J; Jiang, Shih S; Hsiao, Yi Y; Van, Ru C; Pan, Yih J; Pan, Rong L

    2004-06-07

    Vacuolar H(+)-translocating pyrophosphatase (H(+)-PPase; EC 3.6.1.1) catalyzes both the hydrolysis of PP(i) and the electrogenic translocation of proton from the cytosol to the lumen of the vacuole. Vacuolar H(+)-PPase, purified from etiolated hypocotyls of mung bean (Vigna radiata L.), is a homodimer with a molecular mass of 145 kDa. To investigate the relationship between structure and function of this H(+)-translocating enzyme, thermoinactivation analysis was employed. Thermoinactivation studies suggested that vacuolar H(+)-PPase consists of two distinct states upon heat treatment and exhibited different transition temperatures in the presence and absence of ligands (substrate and inhibitors). Substrate protection of H(+)-PPase stabilizes enzyme structure by increasing activation energy from 54.9 to 70.2 kJ/mol. We believe that the conformation of this enzyme was altered in the presence of substrate to protect against the thermoinactivation. In contrast, the modification of H(+)-PPase by inhibitor (fluorescein 5'-isothiocyanate; FITC) augmented the inactivation by heat treatment. The native, substrate-bound, and FITC-labeled vacuolar H(+)-PPases possess probably distinct conformation and show different modes of susceptibility to thermoinactivation. Our results also indicate that the structure of one subunit of this homodimer exerts long distance effect on the other, suggesting a specific subunit-subunit interaction in vacuolar H(+)-PPase. A working model was proposed to interpret the relationship of the structure and function of vacuolar H(+)-PPase.

  12. Genes Required for Vacuolar Acidity in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Preston, R. A.; Reinagel, P. S.; Jones, E. W.

    1992-01-01

    Mutations that cause loss of acidity in the vacuole (lysosome) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were identified by screening colonies labeled with the fluorescent, pH-sensitive, vacuolar labeling agent, 6-carboxyfluorescein. Thirty nine vacuolar pH (Vph(-)) mutants were identified. Four of these contained mutant alleles of the previously described PEP3, PEP5, PEP6 and PEP7 genes. The remaining mutants defined eight complementation groups of vph mutations. No alleles of the VAT2 or TFP1 genes (known to encode subunits of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase) were identified in the Vph(-) screen. Strains bearing mutations in any of six of the VPH genes failed to grow on medium buffered at neutral pH; otherwise, none of the vph mutations caused notable growth inhibition on standard yeast media. Expression of the vacuolar protease, carboxypeptidase Y, was defective in strains bearing vph4 mutations but was apparently normal in strains bearing any of the other vph mutations. Defects in vacuolar morphology at the light microscope level were evident in all Vph(-) mutants. Strains that contained representative mutant alleles of the 17 previously described PEP genes were assayed for vacuolar pH; mutations in seven of the PEP genes (including PEP3, PEP5, PEP6 and PEP7) caused loss of vacuolar acidity. PMID:1628805

  13. The plant vacuolar Na+/H+ antiport.

    PubMed

    Barkla, B J; Apse, M P; Manolson, M F; Blumwald, E

    1994-01-01

    Salt stress imposes severe limitations on plant growth, however, the extent of growth reduction depends upon the soil salinity level and the plant species. One of the mechanisms employed by salt tolerant plants is the effective vacuolar compartmentalization of sodium. The sequestration of sodium into the vacuole occurs by the operation of a Na+/H+ antiport located at the tonoplast. Evidence for a plant vacuolar Na+/H+ antiport has been demonstrated in tissues, intact vacuoles and isolated tonoplast vesicles. In sugar beet cell suspensions, the activity of the vacuolar Na+/H+ antiport increased with increasing NaCl concentrations in the growth medium. This increased activity was correlated with the increased synthesis of a 170 kDa tonoplast polypeptide. In vivo labelling of tonoplast proteins showed the enhanced synthesis of the 170 kDa polypeptide not only upon exposure of the cells to salt, but also when the cells were grown in the presence of amiloride. Exposure of the cells to amiloride also resulted in increased vacuolar Na+/H+ antiport activity. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the 170 kDa polypeptide almost completely inhibited the antiport activity, suggesting the association of this protein with the plant vacuolar Na+/H+ antiport. Antibodies against the Na+/H+ antiport-associated polypeptide were used to screen a Beta lambda ZAP expression library. A partial clone of 1.65 kb was sequenced and found to encode a polypeptide with a putative transmembrane domain and a large hydrophilic C terminus. This clone showed no homology to any previously cloned gene at either the nucleic acid or the amino acid level.

  14. Vacuolar respiration of nitrate coupled to energy conservation in filamentous Beggiatoaceae.

    PubMed

    Beutler, Martin; Milucka, Jana; Hinck, Susanne; Schreiber, Frank; Brock, Jörg; Mussmann, Marc; Schulz-Vogt, Heide N; de Beer, Dirk

    2012-11-01

    We show that the nitrate storing vacuole of the sulfide-oxidizing bacterium Candidatus Allobeggiatoa halophila has an electron transport chain (ETC), which generates a proton motive force (PMF) used for cellular energy conservation. Immunostaining by antibodies showed that cytochrome c oxidase, an ETC protein and a vacuolar ATPase are present in the vacuolar membrane and cytochrome c in the vacuolar lumen. The effect of different inhibitors on the vacuolar pH was studied by pH imaging. Inhibition of vacuolar ATPases and pyrophosphatases resulted in a pH decrease in the vacuole, showing that the proton gradient over the vacuolar membrane is used for ATP and pyrophosphate generation. Blockage of the ETC decreased the vacuolar PMF, indicating that the proton gradient is build up by an ETC. Furthermore, addition of nitrate resulted in an increase of the vacuolar PMF. Inhibition of nitrate reduction, led to a decreased PMF. Nitric oxide was detected in vacuoles of cells exposed to nitrate showing that nitrite, the product of nitrate reduction, is reduced inside the vacuole. These findings show consistently that nitrate respiration contributes to the high proton concentration within the vacuole and the PMF over the vacuolar membrane is actively used for energy conservation. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Vacuolar Transporters – Companions on a Longtime Journey[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Biochemical and electrophysiological studies on plant vacuolar transporters became feasible in the late 1970s and early 1980s, when methods to isolate large quantities of intact vacuoles and purified vacuolar membrane vesicles were established. However, with the exception of the H+-ATPase and H+-PPase, which could be followed due to their hydrolytic activities, attempts to purify tonoplast transporters were for a long time not successful. Heterologous complementation, T-DNA insertion mutants, and later proteomic studies allowed the next steps, starting from the 1990s. Nowadays, our knowledge about vacuolar transporters has increased greatly. Nevertheless, there are several transporters of central importance that have still to be identified at the molecular level or have even not been characterized biochemically. Furthermore, our knowledge about regulation of the vacuolar transporters is very limited, and much work is needed to get a holistic view about the interplay of the vacuolar transportome. The huge amount of information generated during the last 35 years cannot be summarized in such a review. Therefore, I decided to concentrate on some aspects where we were involved during my research on vacuolar transporters, for some our laboratories contributed more, while others contributed less. PMID:29295940

  16. Genes encoding the vacuolar Na+/H+ exchanger and flower coloration.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, T; Fukada-Tanaka, S; Inagaki, Y; Saito, N; Yonekura-Sakakibara, K; Tanaka, Y; Kusumi, T; Iida, S

    2001-05-01

    Vacuolar pH plays an important role in flower coloration: an increase in the vacuolar pH causes blueing of flower color. In the Japanese morning glory (Ipomoea nil or Pharbitis nil), a shift from reddish-purple buds to blue open flowers correlates with an increase in the vacuolar pH. We describe details of the characterization of a mutant that carries a recessive mutation in the Purple (Pr) gene encoding a vacuolar Na+/H+ exchanger termed InNHX1. The genome of I. nil carries one copy of the Pr (or InNHX1) gene and its pseudogene, and it showed functional complementation to the yeast nhx1 mutation. The mutant of I. nil, called purple (pr), showed a partial increase in the vacuolar pH during flower-opening and its reddish-purple buds change into purple open flowers. The vacuolar pH in the purple open flowers of the mutant was significantly lower than that in the blue open flowers. The InNHX1 gene is most abundantly expressed in the petals at around 12 h before flower-opening, accompanying the increase in the vacuolar pH for the blue flower coloration. No such massive expression was observed in the petunia flowers. Since the NHX1 genes that promote the transport of Na+ into the vacuoles have been regarded to be involved in salt tolerance by accumulating Na+ in the vacuoles, we can add a new biological role for blue flower coloration in the Japanese morning glory by the vacuolar alkalization.

  17. Characterization of vacuolar amino acid transporter from Fusarium oxysporum in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lunprom, Siriporn; Pongcharoen, Pongsanat; Sekito, Takayuki; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Kakinuma, Yoshimi; Akiyama, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum causes wilt disease in many plant families, and many genes are involved in its development or growth in host plants. A recent study revealed that vacuolar amino acid transporters play an important role in spore formation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To investigate the role of vacuolar amino acid transporters of this phytopathogenic fungus, the FOXG_11334 (FoAVT3) gene from F. oxysporum was isolated and its function was characterized. Transcription of FoAVT3 was upregulated after rapamycin treatment. A green fluorescent protein fusion of FoAvt3p was localized to vacuolar membranes in both S. cerevisiae and F. oxysporum. Analysis of the amino acid content of the vacuolar fraction and amino acid transport activities using vacuolar membrane vesicles from S. cerevisiae cells heterologously expressing FoAVT3 revealed that FoAvt3p functions as a vacuolar amino acid transporter, exporting neutral amino acids. We conclude that the FoAVT3 gene encodes a vacuolar neutral amino acid transporter.

  18. Roles of histidine residues in plant vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yi Y; Van, Ru C; Hung, Shu H; Lin, Hsin H; Pan, Rong L

    2004-02-15

    Vacuolar proton pumping pyrophosphatase (H(+)-PPase; EC 3.6.1.1) plays a pivotal role in electrogenic translocation of protons from cytosol to the vacuolar lumen at the expense of PP(i) hydrolysis. Alignment analysis on amino acid sequence demonstrates that vacuolar H(+)-PPase of mung bean contains six highly conserved histidine residues. Previous evidence indicated possible involvement of histidine residue(s) in enzymatic activity and H(+)-translocation of vacuolar H(+)-PPase as determined by using histidine specific modifier, diethylpyrocarbonate [J. Protein Chem. 21 (2002) 51]. In this study, we further attempted to identify the roles of histidine residues in mung bean vacuolar H(+)-PPase by site-directed mutagenesis. A line of mutants with histidine residues singly replaced by alanine was constructed, over-expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and then used to determine their enzymatic activities and proton translocations. Among the mutants scrutinized, only the mutation of H716 significantly decreased the enzymatic activity, the proton transport, and the coupling ratio of vacuolar H(+)-PPase. The enzymatic activity of H716A is relatively resistant to inhibition by diethylpyrocarbonate as compared to wild-type and other mutants, indicating that H716 is probably the target residue for the attack by this modifier. The mutation at H716 of V-PPase shifted the optimum pH value but not the T(1/2) (pretreatment temperature at which half enzymatic activity is observed) for PP(i) hydrolytic activity. Mutation of histidine residues obviously induced conformational changes of vacuolar H(+)-PPase as determined by immunoblotting analysis after limited trypsin digestion. Furthermore, mutation of these histidine residues modified the inhibitory effects of F(-) and Na(+), but not that of Ca(2+). Single substitution of H704, H716 and H758 by alanine partially released the effect of K(+) stimulation, indicating possible location of K(+) binding in the vicinity of domains

  19. Diethylpyrocarbonate inhibition of vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase possibly involves a histidine residue.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yi Yuong; Van, Ru Chuan; Hung, Hsiao Hui; Pan, Rong Long

    2002-01-01

    Vacuolar proton pumping pyrophosphatase (H+-PPase; EC 3.6.1.1) plays a pivotal role in electrogenic translocation of protons from cytosol to the vacuolar lumen at the expense of PPi hydrolysis. A histidine-specific modifier, diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC), could substantially inhibit enzymic activity and H+-translocation of vacuolar H+-PPase in a concentration-dependent manner. Absorbance of vacuolar H+-PPase at 240 nm was increased upon incubation with DEPC, demonstrating that an N-carbethoxyhistidine moiety was probably formed. On the other hand, hydroxylamine, a reagent that can deacylate N-carbethoxyhistidine, could reverse the absorption change at 240 nm and partially restore PPi hydrolysis activity as well. The pKa of modified residues of the enzyme was determined to be 6.4, a value close to that of histidine. Thus, we speculate that inhibition of vacuolar H+-PPase by DEPC possibly could be attributed to the modification of histidyl residues on the enzyme. Furthermore, inhibition of vacuolar H+-PPase by DEPC follows pseudo-first-order rate kinetics. A reaction order of 0.85 was calculated from a double logarithmic plot of the apparent reaction constant against DEPC concentration, suggesting that the modification of one single histidine residue on the enzyme suffices to inhibit vacuolar H+-PPase. Inhibition of vacuolar H+-PPase by DEPC changes Vmax but not Km values. Moreover, DEPC inhibition of vacuolar H+-PPase could be substantially protected against by its physiological substrate, Mg2+-PPi. These results indicated that DEPC specifically competes with the substrate at the active site and the DEPC-labeled histidine residue might locate in or near the catalytic domain of the enzyme. Besides, pretreatment of the enzyme with N-ethylmaleimide decreased the degree of subsequent labeling of H+-PPase by DEPC. Taken together, we suggest that vacuolar H+-PPase likely contains a substrate-protectable histidine residue contributing to the inhibition of its activity by

  20. Anthocyanin Vacuolar Inclusions Form by a Microautophagy Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Chanoca, Alexandra; Ueda, Takashi; Grotewold, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Anthocyanins are flavonoid pigments synthesized in the cytoplasm and stored inside vacuoles. Many plant species accumulate densely packed, 3- to 10-μm diameter anthocyanin deposits called anthocyanin vacuolar inclusions (AVIs). Despite their conspicuousness and importance in organ coloration, the origin and nature of AVIs have remained controversial for decades. We analyzed AVI formation in cotyledons of different Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes grown under anthocyanin inductive conditions and in purple petals of lisianthus (Eustoma grandiorum). We found that cytoplasmic anthocyanin aggregates in close contact with the vacuolar surface are directly engulfed by the vacuolar membrane in a process reminiscent of microautophagy. The engulfed anthocyanin aggregates are surrounded by a single membrane derived from the tonoplast and eventually become free in the vacuolar lumen like an autophagic body. Neither endosomal/prevacuolar trafficking nor the autophagy ATG5 protein is involved in the formation of AVIs. In Arabidopsis, formation of AVIs is promoted by both an increase in cyanidin 3-O-glucoside derivatives and by depletion of the glutathione S-transferase TT19. We hypothesize that this novel microautophagy mechanism also mediates the transport of other flavonoid aggregates into the vacuole. PMID:26342015

  1. ATP-dependent export of neutral amino acids by vacuolar membrane vesicles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Masaya; Sugimoto, Naoko; Sekito, Takayuki; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2012-01-01

    Amino acid analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells indicated that neutral amino acids such as glycine and alanine were probably excluded from the vacuoles, and that vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) was involved in the vacuolar compartmentalization of these amino acids. We found that vacuolar membrane vesicles export neutral amino acids in an ATP-dependent manner. This is important in identifying vacuolar transporters for neutral amino acids.

  2. Pth1/Vam3p is the syntaxin homolog at the vacuolar membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae required for the delivery of vacuolar hydrolases.

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, A; Jones, E W

    1998-01-01

    The PEP12 homolog Pth1p (Pep twelve homolog 1) is predicted to be similar in size to Pep12p, the endosomal syntaxin homolog that mediates docking of Golgi-derived transport vesicles and, like other members of the syntaxin family, is predicted to be a cytoplasmically oriented, integral membrane protein with a C-terminal transmembrane domain. Kinetic analyses indicate that deltapth1/vam3 mutants fail to process the soluble vacuolar hydrolase precursors and that PrA, PrB and most of CpY accumulate within the cell in their Golgi-modified P2 precursor forms. This is in contrast to a pep12 mutant in which P2CpY is secreted from the cell. Furthermore, pep12 is epistatic to pth1/vam3 with respect to the CpY secretion phenotype. Alkaline phosphatase, a vacuolar membrane hydrolase, accumulates in its precursor form in the deltapth1/vam3 mutant. Maturation of pro-aminopeptidase I, a hydrolase precursor delivered directly to the vacuole from the cytoplasm, is also blocked in the deltapth1/vam3 mutant. Subcellular fractionation localizes Pth1/Vam3p to vacuolar membranes. Based on these data, we propose that Pth1/Vam3p is the vacuolar syntaxin/t-SNARE homolog that participates in docking of transport vesicles at the vacuolar membrane and that the function of Pth1/Vam3p impinges on at least three routes of protein delivery to the yeast vacuole. PMID:9475723

  3. Novel families of vacuolar amino acid transporters.

    PubMed

    Sekito, Takayuki; Fujiki, Yuki; Ohsumi, Yoshinori; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2008-08-01

    Amino acids are compartmentalized in the vacuoles of microorganisms and plants. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, basic amino acids accumulate preferentially into vacuoles but acidic amino acids are almost excluded from them. This indicates that selective machineries operate at the vacuolar membrane. The members of the amino acid/auxin permease family and the major facilitator superfamily involved in the vacuolar compartmentalization of amino acids have been recently identified in studies using S. cerevisiae. Homologous genes for these transporters are also found in plant and mammalian genomes. The physiological significance in response to nitrogen starvation can now be discussed. (c) 2008 IUBMB

  4. Vacuolar protein sorting mechanisms in plants.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Li; Etxeberria, Ed; Van den Ende, Wim

    2013-02-01

    Plant vacuoles are unique, multifunctional organelles among eukaryotes. Considerable new insights in plant vacuolar protein sorting have been obtained recently. The basic machinery of protein export from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi and the classical route to the lytic vacuole and the protein storage vacuole shows many similarities to vacuolar/lysosomal sorting in other eukaryotes. However, as a result of its unique functions in plant defence and as a storage compartment, some plant-specific entities and sorting determinants appear to exist. The alternative post-Golgi route, as found in animals and yeast, probably exists in plants as well. Likely, adaptor protein complex 3 fulfils a central role in this route. A Golgi-independent route involving plant-specific endoplasmic reticulum bodies appears to provide sedentary organisms such as plants with extra flexibility to cope with changing environmental conditions. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.

  5. Evidence for Avt6 as a vacuolar exporter of acidic amino acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Chahomchuen, Thippayarat; Hondo, Kana; Ohsaki, Mariko; Sekito, Takayuki; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2009-12-01

    Here we examined the significance of Avt6, a vacuolar exporter of glutamate and aspartate suggested by the in vitro membrane vesicle experiment, in vacuolar compartmentalization of amino acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Fluorescent microscopic observation of GFP-fused Avt6 revealed it to be exclusively localized to the vacuolar membrane, with the amount of Myc-tagged Avt6 significantly increased under nitrogen starvation. Glutamate uptake by cells was enhanced by deletion of the AVT6 gene, indicating indirect involvement of Avt6 in cellular glutamate accumulation. Differences in acidic amino acid content of both total and vacuolar fractions were insignificant between the parent and avt6Delta cells when cultured in nutrient-rich conditions. However, in nitrogen-starved conditions, the amount of glutamate and aspartate in the vacuolar fraction was notably increased in the avt6Delta cells. Avt6 is thus involved in vacuolar amino acid compartmentalization in S. cerevisiae cells, especially under conditions of nitrogen starvation.

  6. The Arabidopsis vacuolar malate channel is a member of the ALMT family.

    PubMed

    Kovermann, Peter; Meyer, Stefan; Hörtensteiner, Stefan; Picco, Cristiana; Scholz-Starke, Joachim; Ravera, Silvia; Lee, Youngsook; Martinoia, Enrico

    2007-12-01

    In plants, malate is a central metabolite and fulfills a large number of functions. Vacuolar malate may reach very high concentrations and fluctuate rapidly, whereas cytosolic malate is kept at a constant level allowing optimal metabolism. Recently, a vacuolar malate transporter (Arabidopsis thaliana tonoplast dicarboxylate transporter, AttDT) was identified that did not correspond to the well-characterized vacuolar malate channel. We therefore hypothesized that a member of the aluminum-activated malate transporter (ALMT) gene family could code for a vacuolar malate channel. Using GFP fusion constructs, we could show that AtALMT9 (A. thaliana ALMT9) is targeted to the vacuole. Promoter-GUS fusion constructs demonstrated that this gene is expressed in all organs, but is cell-type specific as GUS activity in leaves was detected nearly exclusively in mesophyll cells. Patch-clamp analysis of an Atalmt9 T-DNA insertion mutant exhibited strongly reduced vacuolar malate channel activity. In order to functionally characterize AtALMT9 as a malate channel, we heterologously expressed this gene in tobacco and in oocytes. Overexpression of AtALMT9-GFP in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves strongly enhanced the malate current densities across the mesophyll tonoplasts. Functional expression of AtALMT9 in Xenopus oocytes induced anion currents, which were clearly distinguishable from endogenous oocyte currents. Our results demonstrate that AtALMT9 is a vacuolar malate channel. Deletion mutants for AtALMT9 exhibit only slightly reduced malate content in mesophyll protoplasts and no visible phenotype, indicating that AttDT and the residual malate channel activity are sufficient to sustain the transport activity necessary to regulate the cytosolic malate homeostasis.

  7. Ypq3p-dependent histidine uptake by the vacuolar membrane vesicles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Kunio; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Ikeda, Koichi; Sekito, Takayuki; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2016-06-01

    The vacuolar membrane proteins Ypq1p, Ypq2p, and Ypq3p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are known as the members of the PQ-loop protein family. We found that the ATP-dependent uptake activities of arginine and histidine by the vacuolar membrane vesicles were decreased by ypq2Δ and ypq3Δ mutations, respectively. YPQ1 and AVT1, which are involved in the vacuolar uptake of lysine/arginine and histidine, respectively, were deleted in addition to ypq2Δ and ypq3Δ. The vacuolar membrane vesicles isolated from the resulting quadruple deletion mutant ypq1Δypq2Δypq3Δavt1Δ completely lost the uptake activity of basic amino acids, and that of histidine, but not lysine and arginine, was evidently enhanced by overexpressing YPQ3 in the mutant. These results suggest that Ypq3p is specifically involved in the vacuolar uptake of histidine in S. cerevisiae. The cellular level of Ypq3p-HA(3) was enhanced by depletion of histidine from culture medium, suggesting that it is regulated by the substrate.

  8. The vacuolar transport of aleurain-GFP and 2S albumin-GFP fusions is mediated by the same pre-vacuolar compartments in tobacco BY-2 and Arabidopsis suspension cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yansong; Li, Kwun Yee; Li, Hong-Ye; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Jiang, Liwen

    2008-12-01

    Soluble proteins reach vacuoles because they contain vacuolar sorting determinants (VSDs) that are recognized by vacuolar sorting receptor (VSR) proteins. Pre-vacuolar compartments (PVCs), defined by VSRs and GFP-VSR reporters in tobacco BY-2 cells, are membrane-bound intermediate organelles that mediate protein traffic from the Golgi apparatus to the vacuole in plant cells. Multiple pathways have been demonstrated to be responsible for vacuolar transport of lytic enzymes and storage proteins to the lytic vacuole (LV) and the protein storage vacuole (PSV), respectively. However, the nature of PVCs for LV and PSV pathways remains unclear. Here, we used two fluorescent reporters, aleurain-GFP and 2S albumin-GFP, that represent traffic of lytic enzymes and storage proteins to LV and PSV, respectively, to study the PVC-mediated transport pathways via transient expression in suspension cultured cells. We demonstrated that the vacuolar transport of aleurain-GFP and 2S albumin-GFP was mediated by the same PVC populations in both tobacco BY-2 and Arabidopsis suspension cultured cells. These PVCs were defined by the seven GFP-AtVSR reporters. In wortmannin-treated cells, the vacuolated PVCs contained the mRFP-AtVSR reporter in their limiting membranes, whereas the soluble aleurain-GFP or 2S albumin-GFP remained in the lumen of the PVCs, indicating a possible in vivo relationship between receptor and cargo within PVCs.

  9. The amino-terminal hydrophilic region of the vacuolar transporter Avt3p is dispensable for the vacuolar amino acid compartmentalization of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Chardwiriyapreecha, Soracom; Manabe, Kunio; Sekito, Takayuki; Akiyama, Koichi; Takegawa, Kaoru; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2016-12-01

    Avt3p, a vacuolar amino acid exporter (656 amino acid residues) that is important for vacuolar amino acid compartmentalization as well as spore formation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, has an extremely long hydrophilic region (approximately 290 amino acid residues) at its N-terminus. Because known functional domains have not been found in this region, its functional role was examined with a deletion mutant avt3 (∆1-270) expressed in S. pombe avt3∆ cells. The deletion of this region did not affect its intracellular localization or vacuolar contents of basic amino acids as well as neutral ones. The defect of avt3Δ cells in spore formation was rescued by the expression of avt3 + but was not completely rescued by the expression of avt3 (∆1-270) . The N-terminal region is thus dispensable for the function of Avt3p as an amino acid exporter, but it is likely to be involved in the role of Avt3p under nutritional starvation conditions.

  10. Characterization of Avt1p as a vacuolar proton/amino acid antiporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tone, Junichi; Yoshimura, Ayumi; Manabe, Kunio; Murao, Nami; Sekito, Takayuki; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2015-01-01

    Several genes for vacuolar amino acid transport were reported in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but have not well been investigated. We characterized AVT1, a member of the AVT vacuolar transporter family, which is reported to be involved in lifespan of yeast. ATP-dependent uptake of isoleucine and histidine by the vacuolar vesicles of an AVT exporter mutant was lost by introducing avt1∆ mutation. Uptake activity was inhibited by the V-ATPase inhibitor: concanamycin A and a protonophore. Isoleucine uptake was inhibited by various neutral amino acids and histidine, but not by γ-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, and aspartate. V-ATPase-dependent acidification of the vesicles was declined by the addition of isoleucine or histidine, depending upon Avt1p. Taken together with the data of the amino acid contents of vacuolar fractions in cells, the results suggested that Avt1p is a proton/amino acid antiporter important for vacuolar compartmentalization of various amino acids.

  11. Vacuolar morphology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during the process of wine making and Japanese sake brewing.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Shingo; Ikeda, Kayo; Miki, Takeo; Wakai, Yoshinori; Inoue, Yoshiharu

    2010-09-01

    Although ethanol and osmotic stress affect the vacuolar morphology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, little information is available about changes in vacuolar morphology during the processes of wine making and Japanese sake (rice wine) brewing. Here, we elucidated changes in the morphology of yeast vacuoles using Zrc1p-GFP, a vacuolar membrane protein, so as to better understand yeast physiology during the brewing process. Wine yeast cells (OC-2 and EC1118) contained highly fragmented vacuoles in the sake mash (moromi) as well as in the grape must. Although sake yeast cells (Kyokai no. 9 and no. 10) also contained highly fragmented vacuoles during the wine-making process, they showed quite a distinct vacuolar morphology during sake brewing. Since the environment surrounding sake yeast cells in the sake mash did not differ much from that surrounding wine yeast cells, the difference in vacuolar morphology during sake brewing between wine yeast and sake yeast was likely caused by innate characters.

  12. Vacuolar processing enzyme in plant programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Hatsugai, Noriyuki; Yamada, Kenji; Goto-Yamada, Shino; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2015-01-01

    Vacuolar processing enzyme (VPE) is a cysteine proteinase originally identified as the proteinase responsible for the maturation and activation of vacuolar proteins in plants, and it is known to be an ortholog of animal asparaginyl endopeptidase (AEP/VPE/legumain). VPE has been shown to exhibit enzymatic properties similar to that of caspase 1, which is a cysteine protease that mediates the programmed cell death (PCD) pathway in animals. Although there is limited sequence identity between VPE and caspase 1, their predicted three-dimensional structures revealed that the essential amino-acid residues for these enzymes form similar pockets for the substrate peptide YVAD. In contrast to the cytosolic localization of caspases, VPE is localized in vacuoles. VPE provokes vacuolar rupture, initiating the proteolytic cascade leading to PCD in the plant immune response. It has become apparent that the VPE-dependent PCD pathway is involved not only in the immune response, but also in the responses to a variety of stress inducers and in the development of various tissues. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the contribution of VPE to plant PCD and its role in vacuole-mediated cell death, and it also compares VPE with the animal cell death executor caspase 1. PMID:25914711

  13. Biolayer interferometry of lipid nanodisc-reconstituted yeast vacuolar H+ -ATPase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Stuti; Wilkens, Stephan

    2017-05-01

    Vacuolar H + -ATPase (V-ATPase) is a large, multisubunit membrane protein complex responsible for the acidification of subcellular compartments and the extracellular space. V-ATPase activity is regulated by reversible disassembly, resulting in cytosolic V 1 -ATPase and membrane-integral V 0 proton channel sectors. Reversible disassembly is accompanied by transient interaction with cellular factors and assembly chaperones. Quantifying protein-protein interactions involving membrane proteins, however, is challenging. Here we present a novel method to determine kinetic constants of membrane protein-protein interactions using biolayer interferometry (BLI). Yeast vacuoles are solubilized, vacuolar proteins are reconstituted into lipid nanodiscs with native vacuolar lipids and biotinylated membrane scaffold protein (MSP) followed by affinity purification of nanodisc-reconstituted V-ATPase (V 1 V 0 ND). We show that V 1 V 0 ND can be immobilized on streptavidin-coated BLI sensors to quantitate binding of a pathogen derived inhibitor and to measure the kinetics of nucleotide dependent enzyme dissociation. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  14. The V-ATPase subunit A is essential for salt tolerance through participating in vacuolar Na+ compartmentalization in Salicornia europaea.

    PubMed

    Lv, Sulian; Jiang, Ping; Tai, Fang; Wang, Duoliya; Feng, Juanjuan; Fan, Pengxiang; Bao, Hexigeduleng; Li, Yinxin

    2017-12-01

    The V-ATPase subunit A participates in vacuolar Na + compartmentalization in Salicornia europaea regulating V-ATPase and V-PPase activities. Na + sequestration into the vacuole is an efficient strategy in response to salinity in many halophytes. However, it is not yet fully understood how this process is achieved. Particularly, the role of vacuolar H + -ATPase (V-ATPase) in this process is controversial. Our previous proteomic investigation in the euhalophyte Salicornia europaea L. found a significant increase of the abundance of V-ATPase subunit A under salinity. Here, the gene encoding this subunit named SeVHA-A was characterized, and its role in salt tolerance was demonstrated by RNAi directed downregulation in suspension-cultured cells of S. europaea. The transcripts of genes encoding vacuolar H + -PPase (V-PPase) and vacuolar Na + /H + antiporter (SeNHX1) also decreased significantly in the RNAi cells. Knockdown of SeVHA-A resulted in a reduction in both V-ATPase and vacuolar H + -PPase (V-PPase) activities. Accordingly, the SeVHA-A-RNAi cells showed increased vacuolar pH and decreased cell viability under different NaCl concentrations. Further Na + staining showed the reduced vacuolar Na + sequestration in RNAi cells. Taken together, our results evidenced that SeVHA-A participates in vacuolar Na + sequestration regulating V-ATPase and V-PPase activities and thereby vacuolar pH in S. europaea. The possible mechanisms underlying the reduction of vacuolar V-PPase activity in SeVHA-A-RNAi cells were also discussed.

  15. Avt5p is required for vacuolar uptake of amino acids in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Chardwiriyapreecha, Soracom; Mukaiyama, Hiroyuki; Sekito, Takayuki; Iwaki, Tomoko; Takegawa, Kaoru; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2010-06-03

    We identified SPBC1685.07c of Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a novel vacuolar protein, Avt5p, with similarity to vacuolar amino acid transporters Avt5p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Avt5p localizes to the vacuolar membrane and upon disruption of avt5, uptake of histidine, glutamate, tyrosine, arginine, lysine or serine was impaired. During nitrogen starvation, the transient increase of vacuolar lysine transport observed for wild-type cells still occurred in the mutant cells, however, uptake of glutamate did not significantly increase in response to nitrogen starvation. Our results show that under diverse growth conditions Avt5p is involved in vacuolar transport of a selective set of amino acids. Copyright 2010 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification of the fnx1+ and fnx2+ genes for vacuolar amino acid transporters in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Chardwiriyapreecha, Soracom; Shimazu, Masamitsu; Morita, Tomotake; Sekito, Takayuki; Akiyama, Koichi; Takegawa, Kaoru; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2008-06-25

    We have identified the Schizosaccharomyces pombe SPBC3E7.06c gene (fnx2(+)) from a homology search with the fnx1(+) gene involving in G(0) arrest upon nitrogen starvation. Green fluorescent protein-fused Fnx1p and Fnx2p localized exclusively to the vacuolar membrane. Uptake of histidine or isoleucine by S. pombe cells was inhibited by concanamycin A, a specific inhibitor of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase. Amino acid uptake was also defective in the vacuolar ATPase mutant, suggesting that vacuolar compartmentalization is critical for amino acid uptake by whole cells. In both Deltafnx1 and Deltafnx2 mutant cells, uptake of lysine, isoleucine or asparagine was impaired. These results suggest that fnx1(+) and fnx2(+) are involved in vacuolar amino acid uptake in S. pombe.

  17. Rapid Nuclear Exclusion of Hcm1 in Aging Saccharomyces cerevisiae Leads to Vacuolar Alkalization and Replicative Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Ghavidel, Ata; Baxi, Kunal; Prusinkiewicz, Martin; Swan, Cynthia; Belak, Zach R.; Eskiw, Christopher H.; Carvalho, Carlos E.; Harkness, Troy A.

    2018-01-01

    The yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, like other higher eukaryotes, undergo a finite number of cell divisions before exiting the cell cycle due to the effects of aging. Here, we show that yeast aging begins with the nuclear exclusion of Hcm1 in young cells, resulting in loss of acidic vacuoles. Autophagy is required for healthy aging in yeast, with proteins targeted for turnover by autophagy directed to the vacuole. Consistent with this, vacuolar acidity is necessary for vacuolar function and yeast longevity. Using yeast genetics and immunofluorescence microscopy, we confirm that vacuolar acidity plays a critical role in cell health and lifespan, and is potentially maintained by a series of Forkhead Box (Fox) transcription factors. An interconnected transcriptional network involving the Fox proteins (Fkh1, Fkh2 and Hcm1) are required for transcription of v-ATPase subunits and vacuolar acidity. As cells age, Hcm1 is rapidly excluded from the nucleus in young cells, blocking the expression of Hcm1 targets (Fkh1 and Fkh2), leading to loss of v-ATPase gene expression, reduced vacuolar acidification, increased α-syn-GFP vacuolar accumulation, and finally, diminished replicative lifespan (RLS). Loss of vacuolar acidity occurs about the same time as Hcm1 nuclear exclusion and is conserved; we have recently demonstrated that lysosomal alkalization similarly contributes to aging in C. elegans following a transition from progeny producing to post-reproductive life. Our data points to a molecular mechanism regulating vacuolar acidity that signals the end of RLS when acidification is lost. PMID:29519938

  18. Vacuolar transporter Avt4 is involved in excretion of basic amino acids from the vacuoles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sekito, Takayuki; Chardwiriyapreecha, Soracom; Sugimoto, Naoko; Ishimoto, Masaya; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    Basic amino acids (lysine, histidine and arginine) accumulated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuoles should be mobilized to cytosolic nitrogen metabolism under starvation. We found that the decrease of vacuolar basic amino acids in response to nitrogen starvation was impaired by the deletion of AVT4 gene encoding a vacuolar transporter. In addition, overexpression of AVT4 reduced the accumulation of basic amino acids in vacuoles under nutrient-rich condition. In contrast to AVT4, the deletion and overexpression of AVT3, which encodes the closest homologue of Avt4p, did not affect the contents of vacuolar basic amino acids. Consistent with these, arginine uptake into vacuolar membrane vesicles was decreased by Avt4p-, but not by Avt3p-overproduction, whereas various neutral amino acids were excreted from vacuolar membrane vesicles in a manner dependent on either Avt4p or Avt3p. These results suggest that Avt4p is a vacuolar amino acid exporter involving in the recycling of basic amino acids.

  19. Biolayer interferometry of lipid nanodisc‐reconstituted yeast vacuolar H+‐ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Stuti

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Vacuolar H+‐ATPase (V‐ATPase) is a large, multisubunit membrane protein complex responsible for the acidification of subcellular compartments and the extracellular space. V‐ATPase activity is regulated by reversible disassembly, resulting in cytosolic V 1‐ATPase and membrane‐integral V 0 proton channel sectors. Reversible disassembly is accompanied by transient interaction with cellular factors and assembly chaperones. Quantifying protein‐protein interactions involving membrane proteins, however, is challenging. Here we present a novel method to determine kinetic constants of membrane protein–protein interactions using biolayer interferometry (BLI). Yeast vacuoles are solubilized, vacuolar proteins are reconstituted into lipid nanodiscs with native vacuolar lipids and biotinylated membrane scaffold protein (MSP) followed by affinity purification of nanodisc‐reconstituted V‐ATPase (V 1 V 0ND). We show that V 1 V 0ND can be immobilized on streptavidin‐coated BLI sensors to quantitate binding of a pathogen derived inhibitor and to measure the kinetics of nucleotide dependent enzyme dissociation. PMID:28241399

  20. Involvement of MoVMA11, a Putative Vacuolar ATPase c’ Subunit, in Vacuolar Acidification and Infection-Related Morphogenesis of Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guoqing; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Lilin; Cao, Huijuan; Lu, Jianping; Lin, Fucheng

    2013-01-01

    Many functions of vacuole depend on the activity of vacuolar ATPase which is essential to maintain an acidic lumen and create the driving forces for massive fluxes of ions and metabolites through vacuolar membrane. In filamentous fungus Magnaporthe oryzae , subcellular colocalization and quinacrine staining suggested that the V1V0 domains of V-ATPase were fully assembled and the vacuoles were kept acidic during infection-related developments. Targeted gene disruption of MoVMA11 gene, encoding the putative c’ subunit of V-ATPase, impaired vacuolar acidification and mimicked the phenotypes of yeast V-ATPase mutants in the poor colony morphology, abolished asexual and sexual reproductions, selective carbon source utilization, and increased calcium and heavy metals sensitivities, however, not in the typical pH conditional lethality. Strikingly, aerial hyphae of the MoVMA11 null mutant intertwined with each other to form extremely thick filamentous structures. The results also implicated that MoVMA11 was involved in cell wall integrity and appressorium formation. Abundant non-melanized swollen structures and rare, small appressoria without penetration ability were produced at the hyphal tips of the ΔMovma11 mutant on onion epidermal cells. Finally, the MoVMA11 null mutant lost pathogenicity on both intact and wounded host leaves. Overall, our data indicated that MoVMA11, like other fungal VMA genes, is associated with numerous cellular functions and highlighted that V-ATPase is essential for infection-related morphogenesis and pathogenesis in M . oryzae . PMID:23826342

  1. Vacuolar Chloride Fluxes Impact Ion Content and Distribution during Early Salinity Stress1

    PubMed Central

    Baetz, Ulrike; Tohge, Takayuki; Martinoia, Enrico; De Angeli, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    The ability to control the cytoplasmic environment is a prerequisite for plants to cope with changing environmental conditions. During salt stress, for instance, Na+ and Cl− are sequestered into the vacuole to help maintain cytosolic ion homeostasis and avoid cellular damage. It has been observed that vacuolar ion uptake is tied to fluxes across the plasma membrane. The coordination of both transport processes and relative contribution to plant adaptation, however, is still poorly understood. To investigate the link between vacuolar anion uptake and whole-plant ion distribution during salinity, we used mutants of the only vacuolar Cl− channel described to date: the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ALMT9. After 24-h NaCl treatment, almt9 knock-out mutants had reduced shoot accumulation of both Cl− and Na+. In contrast, almt9 plants complemented with a mutant variant of ALMT9 that exhibits enhanced channel activity showed higher Cl− and Na+ accumulation. The altered shoot ion contents were not based on differences in transpiration, pointing to a vacuolar function in regulating xylem loading during salinity. In line with this finding, GUS staining demonstrated that ALMT9 is highly expressed in the vasculature of shoots and roots. RNA-seq analysis of almt9 mutants under salinity revealed specific expression profiles of transporters involved in long-distance ion translocation. Taken together, our study uncovers that the capacity of vacuolar Cl− loading in vascular cells plays a crucial role in controlling whole-plant ion movement rapidly after onset of salinity. PMID:27503602

  2. Vacuolar deposition of recombinant proteins in plant vegetative organs as a strategy to increase yields.

    PubMed

    Marin Viegas, Vanesa Soledad; Ocampo, Carolina Gabriela; Petruccelli, Silvana

    2017-05-04

    Delivery of recombinant proteins to vegetative tissue vacuoles was considered inconvenient since this compartment was expected to be hydrolytic; nevertheless there is growing evidence that certain foreign proteins accumulate at high yields in vacuoles. For example avidin, cellulolytic enzymes, endolysin, and transglutaminases were produced at high yields when were sorted to leaf central vacuole avoiding the detrimental effect of these proteins on plant growth. Also, several secretory mammalian proteins such as collagen, α1-proteinase inhibitor, complement-5a, interleukin-6 and immunoglobulins accumulated at higher yields in leaf vacuoles than in the apoplast or cytosol. To reach this final destination, fusions to sequence specific vacuolar sorting signals (ssVSS) typical of proteases or proteinase inhibitors and/or Ct-VSS representative of storage proteins or plant lectins were used and both types of motifs were capable to increase accumulation. Importantly, the type of VSSs or position, either the N or C-terminus, did not alter protein stability, levels or pos-translational modifications. Vacuolar sorted glycoproteins had different type of oligosaccharides indicating that foreign proteins reached the vacuole by 2 different pathways: direct transport from the ER, bypassing the Golgi (high mannose oligosaccharides decorated proteins) or trafficking through the Golgi (Complex oligosaccharide containing proteins). In addition, some glycoproteins lacked of paucimannosidic oligosaccharides suggesting that vacuolar trimming of glycans did not occur. Enhanced accumulation of foreign proteins fused to VSS occurred in several plant species such as tobacco, Nicotiana benthamiana, sugarcane, tomato and in carrot and the obtained results were influenced by plant physiological state. Ten different foreign proteins fused to vacuolar sorting accumulated at higher levels than their apoplastic or cytosolic counterparts. For proteins with cytotoxic effects vacuolar sorted forms

  3. Functional Expression and Characterization of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Avt3p as a Vacuolar Amino Acid Exporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chardwiriyapreecha, Soracom; Manabe, Kunio; Iwaki, Tomoko; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Sekito, Takayuki; Lunprom, Siriporn; Akiyama, Koichi; Takegawa, Kaoru; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2015-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Avt3p and Avt4p mediate the extrusion of several amino acids from the vacuolar lumen into the cytosol. SpAvt3p of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, a homologue of these vacuolar amino acid transporters, has been indicated to be involved in spore formation. In this study, we confirmed that GFP-SpAvt3p localized to the vacuolar membrane in S. pombe. The amounts of various amino acids increased significantly in the vacuolar pool of avt3Δ cells, but decreased in that of avt3+-overexpressing avt3Δ cells. These results suggest that SpAvt3p participates in the vacuolar compartmentalization of amino acids in S. pombe. To examine the export activity of SpAvt3p, we expressed the avt3+ gene in S. cerevisiae cells. We found that the heterologously overproduced GFP-SpAvt3p localized to the vacuolar membrane in S. cerevisiae. Using the vacuolar membrane vesicles isolated from avt3+-overexpressing S. cerevisiae cells, we detected the export activities of alanine and tyrosine in an ATP-dependent manner. These activities were inhibited by the addition of a V-ATPase inhibitor, concanamycin A, thereby suggesting that the activity of SpAvt3p is dependent on a proton electrochemical gradient generated by the action of V-ATPase. In addition, the amounts of various amino acids in the vacuolar pools of S. cerevisiae cells were decreased by the overproduction of SpAvt3p, which indicated that SpAvt3p was functional in S. cerevisiae cells. Thus, SpAvt3p is a vacuolar transporter that is involved in the export of amino acids from S. pombe vacuoles.

  4. Regulation of Vacuolar pH in Citrus limon

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Lincoln Taiz

    The primary objective of this grant was to characterize the vacuolar V-ATPase of lemon fruits. Lemon fruit vacuoles have an internal pH of about 2.5. Since a typical plant vacuole has a luminal pH of around 5.5, the lemon fruit V-APTase must have special properties which allow it to acidify the lumen to such a low pH: (1) it might have a different structure; (2) it might have a different H{sup +}/ATP stoichiometry; and (3) it might be regulated differently. During the course of the investigations (which began in 1996) they characterized these aspects of the V-ATPases of both lemonmore » fruits and lime fruits. They examined lime fruits because of the availability of both acidic limes with a low vacuolar pH and sweet limes, which have a much higher vacuolar pH. The existence of two types of lime fruits allowed a comparison of the V-ATPases of the two varieties. In this report they are including two publications from 1996 and 1997 as background for the later publications. A review article with Heven Sze on V-ATPase nomenclature was also generated during the funding period. In addition to the studies on citrus fruit vacuoles, they also initiated studies in two new areas: polar auxin transport and the regulation of stomatal opening by UV-B irradiation. These studies were intended to serve as a basis of future separate grants, but the proposals they submitted on these topics were not funded.« less

  5. Identifying Novel Regulators of Vacuolar Trafficking by Combining Fluorescence Imaging-Based Forward Genetic Screening and In Vitro Pollen Germination.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qiang-Nan; Zhang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Subcellular targeting of vacuolar proteins depends on cellular machinery regulating vesicular trafficking. Plant-specific vacuolar trafficking routes have been reported. However, regulators mediating these processes are obscure. By combining a fluorescence imaging-based forward genetic approach and in vitro pollen germination system, we show an efficient protocol of identifying regulators of plant-specific vacuolar trafficking routes.

  6. The R2R3-MYB transcription factor MdMYB73 is involved in malate accumulation and vacuolar acidification in apple.

    PubMed

    Hu, Da-Gang; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Quan-Yan; Li, Ming; Sun, Cui-Hui; Yu, Jian-Qiang; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2017-08-01

    Malate, the predominant organic acid in many fruits, is a crucial component of the organoleptic quality of fruit, including taste and flavor. The genetic and environmental mechanisms affecting malate metabolism in fruit cells have been studied extensively. However, the transcriptional regulation of malate-metabolizing enzymes and vacuolar transporters remains poorly understood. Our previous studies demonstrated that MdMYB1 modulates anthocyanin accumulation and vacuolar acidification by directly activating vacuolar transporters, including MdVHA-B1, MdVHA-E, MdVHP1 and MdtDT. Interestingly, we isolated and identified a MYB transcription factor, MdMYB73, a distant relative of MdMYB1 in this study. It was subsequently found that MdMYB73 protein bound directly to the promoters of MdALMT9 (aluminum-activated malate transporter 9), MdVHA-A (vacuolar ATPase subunit A) and MdVHP1 (vacuolar pyrophosphatase 1), transcriptionally activating their expression and thereby enhancing their activities. Analyses of transgenic apple calli demonstrated that MdMYB73 influenced malate accumulation and vacuolar pH. Furthermore, MdCIbHLH1 interacted with MdMYB73 and enhanced its activity upon downstream target genes. These findings help to elucidate how MdMYB73 directly modulates the vacuolar transport system to affect malate accumulation and vacuolar pH in apple. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Avian cardiology.

    PubMed

    Strunk, Anneliese; Wilson, G Heather

    2003-01-01

    The field of avian cardiology is continually expanding. Although a great deal of the current knowledge base has been derived from poultry data, research and clinical reports involving companion avian species have been published. This article will present avian cardiovascular anatomy and physiology, history and physical examination considerations in the avian cardiac disease patient, specific diagnostic tools, cardiovascular disease processes, and current therapeutic modalities.

  8. A vacuolar membrane protein Avt7p is involved in transport of amino acid and spore formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tone, Junichi; Yamanaka, Atsushi; Manabe, Kunio; Murao, Nami; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Sekito, Takayuki; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2015-01-01

    Active transport systems for various amino acids operate in the vacuolar membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The gene families for vacuolar amino acid transporters were identified by reverse genetics experiments. In the AVT transporter family, Avt1p works for active uptake of amino acid into vacuole, and Avt3p, Avt4p, and Avt6p for active extrusion of amino acid from vacuole to cytosol. Here, we found green fluorescent protein-tagged Avt7p, an unidentified member of the AVT family, localized to the vacuolar membrane of S. cerevisiae. Disruption of the AVT7 gene enhanced both vacuolar contents of several amino acids and uptake activities of glutamine and proline by vacuolar membrane vesicles. Efficiency of spore formation was impaired by the disruption of the AVT7 gene, suggesting the physiological importance of Avt7p-dependent efflux of amino acid from vacuoles under nutrient-poor condition.

  9. Calmodulin-stimulated Ca(2+)-ATPases in the vacuolar and plasma membranes in cauliflower.

    PubMed

    Askerlund, P

    1997-07-01

    The subcellular locations of Ca(2+)-ATPases in the membranes of cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L.) inflorescences were investigated. After continuous sucrose gradient centrifugation a 111-kD calmodulin (CaM)-stimulated and caM-binding Ca(2+)-ATPase (BCA1; P. Askerlund [1996] Plant Physiol 110: 913-922; S. Malmström, P. Askerlund, M.G. Plamgren [1997] FEBS Lett 400: 324-328) comigrated with vacuolar membrane markers, whereas a 116-kD caM-binding Ca(2+)-ATPase co-migrated with a marker for the plasma membrane. The 116 kD Ca(2+)-ATPase was enriched in plasma membranes obtained by aqueous two-phase partitioning, which is in agreement with a plasma membrane location of this Ca(2+)-ATPase. Countercurrent distribution of a low-density intracellular membrane fraction in an aqueous two-phase system resulted in the separation of the endoplasmic reticulum and vacuolar membranes. The 111-kD Ca(2+)-ATPase co-migrated with a vacuolar membrane marker after countercurrent distribution but not with markers for the endoplasmic reticulum. A vacuolar membrane location of the 111-kD Ca(2+)-AtPase was further supported by experiments with isolated vacuoles from cauliflower: (a) Immunoblotting with an antibody against the 111-kD Ca(2+)-ATPase showed that it was associated with the vacuoles, and (b) ATP-dependent Ca2+ uptake by the intact vacuoles was found to be CaM stimulated and partly protonophore insensitive.

  10. Avian Astrovirus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian astroviruses comprise a diverse group of viruses affecting many avian species and causing enteritis, hepatitis and nephritis. To date, six different astroviruses have been identified in avian species based on the species of origin and viral genome characteristics: two turkey-origin astroviru...

  11. LC3 and p62 as diagnostic markers of drug-induced autophagic vacuolar cardiomyopathy: a study of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Brianne H; McComb, Rodney D; Mobley, Bret C; Gultekin, Sakir Humayun; Lee, Han S; Margeta, Marta

    2013-07-01

    Autophagic vacuolar cardiomyopathy is an underrecognized, but potentially fatal, complication of treatment with chloroquine (CQ) and its derivative hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), which are used as therapy for malaria and common connective tissue disorders. Currently, the diagnosis of autophagic vacuolar cardiomyopathy is established through an endomyocardial biopsy and requires electron microscopy, which is not widely available and has a significant potential for sampling error. Recently, we have reported that immunohistochemistry for autophagic markers LC3 and p62 can replace electron microscopy in the diagnosis of HCQ-induced and colchicine-induced autophagic vacuolar skeletal myopathies. In the current study, we use 3 cases of CQ-induced or HCQ-induced cardiomyopathy and 1 HCQ-treated control case to show that the same two markers can be used to diagnose autophagic vacuolar cardiomyopathies by light microscopy. CQ-induced or HCQ-induced autophagic vacuolar cardiomyopathy is not universally fatal, but successful treatment requires early detection. By lowering the barriers to diagnosis, the application of these immunohistochemical markers will decrease the number of misdiagnosed patients, thus increasing the likelihood of favorable clinical outcomes.

  12. Fe deficiency differentially affects the vacuolar proton pumps in cucumber and soybean roots

    PubMed Central

    Dell’Orto, Marta; Nisi, Patrizia De; Vigani, Gianpiero; Zocchi, Graziano

    2013-01-01

    Iron uptake in dicots depends on their ability to induce a set of responses in root cells including rhizosphere acidification through H+ extrusion and apoplastic Fe(III) reduction by Fe(III)-chelate reductase. These responses must be sustained by metabolic rearrangements aimed at providing the required NAD(P)H, ATP and H+. Previous results in Fe-deficient cucumber roots showed that high H+ extrusion is accompanied by increased phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity, involved in the cytosol pH-stat; moreover 31P-NMR analysis revealed increased vacuolar pH and decreased vacuolar [inorganic phosphate (Pi)]. The opposite was found in soybean: low rhizosphere acidification, decreased PEPC activity, vacuole acidification, and increased vacuolar [Pi]. These findings, highlighting a different impact of the Fe deficiency responses on cytosolic pH in the two species, lead to hypothesize different roles for H+ and Pi movements across the tonoplast in pH homeostasis. The role of vacuole in cytosolic pH-stat involves the vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) and vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase (V-PPase) activities, which generating the ΔpH and ΔΨ, mediate the transport of solutes, among which Pi, across the tonoplast. Fluxes of Pi itself in its two ionic forms, H2PO4- predominating in the vacuole and HPO42- in the cytosol, may be involved in pH homeostasis owing to its pH-dependent protonation/deprotonation reactions. Tonoplast enriched fractions were obtained from cucumber and soybean roots grown with or without Fe. Both V-ATPase and V-PPase activities were analyzed and the enrichment and localization of the corresponding proteins in root tissues were determined by Western blot and immunolocalization. V-ATPase did not change its activity and expression level in response to Fe starvation in both species. V-PPase showed a different behavior: in cucumber roots its activity and abundance were decreased, while in Fe-deficient soybean roots they were increased. The distinct role of

  13. Avian influenza

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza virus is naturally found in wild birds, primarily waterfowl, but the virus may also be found in poultry. The virus in poultry is typically differentiated into two types, low pathogenic avian influenza and highly pathogenic avian influenza. In chickens the low pathogenic form typica...

  14. Combined exposure to cyanobacterial biomass, lead and the Newcastle virus enhances avian toxicity.

    PubMed

    Pikula, Jiri; Bandouchova, Hana; Hilscherova, Klara; Paskova, Veronika; Sedlackova, Jana; Adamovsky, Ondrej; Knotkova, Zora; Lany, Petr; Machat, Jiri; Marsalek, Blahoslav; Novotny, Ladislav; Pohanka, Miroslav; Vitula, Frantisek

    2010-10-01

    Under environmental conditions, wild birds can be exposed to multiple stressors including natural toxins, anthropogenic pollutants and infectious agents at the same time. This experimental study was successful in testing the hypothesis that adverse effects of cyanotoxins, heavy metals and a non-pathogenic immunological challenge combine to enhance avian toxicity. Mortality occurred in combined exposures to naturally occurring cyanobacterial biomass and lead shots, lead shots and Newcastle vaccination as well as in single lead shot exposure. Mostly acute effects around day 10 were observed. On day 30 of exposure, there were no differences in the liver accumulation of lead in single and combined exposure groups. Interestingly, liver microcystin levels were elevated in birds co-exposed to cyanobacterial biomass together with lead or lead and the Newcastle virus. Significant differences in body weights between all Pb-exposed and Pb-non-exposed birds were found on days 10 and 20. Single exposure to cyanobacterial biomass resulted in hepatic vacuolar dystrophy, whereas co-exposure with lead led to more severe granular dystrophy. Haematological changes were associated with lead exposure, in particular. Biochemical analysis revealed a decrease in glucose and an increase in lactate dehydrogenase in single and combined cyanobacterial and lead exposures, which also showed a decreased antibody response to vaccination. The combined exposure of experimental birds to sub-lethal doses of individual stressors is ecologically realistic. It brings together new pieces of knowledge on avian health. In light of this study, investigators of wild bird die-offs should be circumspect when evaluating findings of low concentrations of contaminants that would not result in mortality on a separate basis. As such it has implications for wildlife biologists, veterinarians and conservationists of avian biodiversity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Evolution of tonoplast P-ATPase transporters involved in vacuolar acidification.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanbang; Provenzano, Sofia; Bliek, Mattijs; Spelt, Cornelis; Appelhagen, Ingo; Machado de Faria, Laura; Verweij, Walter; Schubert, Andrea; Sagasser, Martin; Seidel, Thorsten; Weisshaar, Bernd; Koes, Ronald; Quattrocchio, Francesca

    2016-08-01

    Petunia mutants (Petunia hybrida) with blue flowers defined a novel vacuolar proton pump consisting of two interacting P-ATPases, PH1 and PH5, that hyper-acidify the vacuoles of petal cells. PH5 is similar to plasma membrane H(+) P3A -ATPase, whereas PH1 is the only known eukaryoticP3B -ATPase. As there were no indications that this tonoplast pump is widespread in plants, we investigated the distribution and evolution of PH1 and PH5. We combined database mining and phylogenetic and synteny analyses of PH1- and PH5-like proteins from all kingdoms with functional analyses (mutant complementation and intracellular localization) of homologs from diverse angiosperms. We identified functional PH1 and PH5 homologs in divergent angiosperms. PH5 homologs evolved from plasma membrane P3A -ATPases, acquiring an N-terminal tonoplast-sorting sequence and new cellular function before angiosperms appeared. PH1 is widespread among seed plants and related proteins are found in some groups of bacteria and fungi and in one moss, but is absent in most algae, suggesting that its evolution involved several cases of gene loss and possibly horizontal transfer events. The distribution of PH1 and PH5 in the plant kingdom suggests that vacuolar acidification by P-ATPases appeared in gymnosperms before flowers. This implies that, next to flower color determination, vacuolar hyper-acidification is required for yet unknown processes. © 2016 European Union. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  16. Proton Gradient-Driven Nickel Uptake by Vacuolar Membrane Vesicles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Ken; Igarashi, Kazuei; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    1998-01-01

    A vacuolar H+-ATPase-negative mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was highly sensitive to nickel ion. Accumulation of nickel ion in the cells of this mutant of less than 60% of the value for the parent strain arrested growth, suggesting a role for this ATPase in sequestering nickel ion into vacuoles. An artificially imposed pH gradient (interior acid) induced transient nickel ion uptake by vacuolar membrane vesicles, which was inhibited by collapse of the pH difference but not of the membrane potential. Nickel ion transport into vacuoles in a pH gradient-dependent manner is thus important for its detoxification in yeast. PMID:9537401

  17. Avian influenza virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is type A influenza, which is adapted to an avian host. Although avian influenza has been isolated from numerous avian species, the primary natural hosts for the virus are dabbling ducks, shorebirds, and gulls. The virus can be found world-wide in these species and in o...

  18. Avian Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) generate new individuals through differentiation, maturation and fertilization. This means that the manipulation of PGCs is directly linked to the manipulation of individuals, making PGCs attractive target cells in the animal biotechnology field. A unique biological property of avian PGCs is that they circulate temporarily in the vasculature during early development, and this allows us to access and manipulate avian germ lines. Following the development of a technique for transplantation, PGCs have become central to avian biotechnology, in contrast to the use of embryo manipulation and subsequent transfer to foster mothers, as in mammalian biotechnology. Today, avian PGC transplantation combined with recent advanced manipulation techniques, including cell purification, cryopreservation, depletion, and long-term culture in vitro, have enabled the establishment of genetically modified poultry lines and ex-situ conservation of poultry genetic resources. This chapter introduces the principles, history, and procedures of producing avian germline chimeras by transplantation of PGCs, and the current status of avian germline modification as well as germplasm cryopreservation. Other fundamental avian reproductive technologies are described, including artificial insemination and embryo culture, and perspectives of industrial applications in agriculture and pharmacy are considered, including poultry productivity improvement, egg modification, disease resistance impairment and poultry gene "pharming" as well as gene banking.

  19. Appropriate vacuolar acidification in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is associated with efficient high sugar fermentation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trung D; Walker, Michelle E; Gardner, Jennifer M; Jiranek, Vladimir

    2018-04-01

    Vacuolar acidification serves as a homeostatic mechanism to regulate intracellular pH, ion and chemical balance, as well as trafficking and recycling of proteins and nutrients, critical for normal cellular function. This study reports on the importance of vacuole acidification during wine-like fermentation. Ninety-three mutants (homozygous deletions in lab yeast strain, BY4743), which result in protracted fermentation when grown in a chemically defined grape juice with 200 g L -1 sugar (pH 3.5), were examined to determine whether fermentation protraction was in part due to a dysfunction in vacuolar acidification (VA) during the early stages of fermentation, and whether VA was responsive to the initial sugar concentration in the medium. Cells after 24 h growth were dual-labelled with propidium iodide and vacuolar specific probe 6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (6-CFDA) and examined with a FACS analyser for viability and impaired VA, respectively. Twenty mutants showed a greater than two-fold increase in fluorescence intensity; the experimental indicator for vacuolar dysfunction; 10 of which have not been previously annotated to this process. With the exception of Δhog1, Δpbs2 and Δvph1 mutants, where dysfunction was directly related to osmolality; the remainder exhibited increased CF-fluorescence, independent of sugar concentration at 20 g L -1 or 200 g L -1 . These findings offer insight to the importance of VA to cell growth in high sugar media. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cytosolic Nucleotides Block and Regulate the Arabidopsis Vacuolar Anion Channel AtALMT9*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingbo; Martinoia, Enrico; De Angeli, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    The aluminum-activated malate transporters (ALMTs) form a membrane protein family exhibiting different physiological roles in plants, varying from conferring tolerance to environmental Al3+ to the regulation of stomatal movement. The regulation of the anion channels of the ALMT family is largely unknown. Identifying intracellular modulators of the activity of anion channels is fundamental to understanding their physiological functions. In this study we investigated the role of cytosolic nucleotides in regulating the activity of the vacuolar anion channel AtALMT9. We found that cytosolic nucleotides modulate the transport activity of AtALMT9. This modulation was based on a direct block of the pore of the channel at negative membrane potentials (open channel block) by the nucleotide and not by a phosphorylation mechanism. The block by nucleotides of AtALMT9-mediated currents was voltage dependent. The blocking efficiency of intracellular nucleotides increased with the number of phosphate groups and ATP was the most effective cellular blocker. Interestingly, the ATP block induced a marked modification of the current-voltage characteristic of AtALMT9. In addition, increased concentrations of vacuolar anions were able to shift the ATP block threshold to a more negative membrane potential. The block of AtALMT9-mediated anion currents by ATP at negative membrane potentials acts as a gate of the channel and vacuolar anion tune this gating mechanism. Our results suggest that anion transport across the vacuolar membrane in plant cells is controlled by cytosolic nucleotides and the energetic status of the cell. PMID:25028514

  1. Cytosolic nucleotides block and regulate the Arabidopsis vacuolar anion channel AtALMT9.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingbo; Martinoia, Enrico; De Angeli, Alexis

    2014-09-12

    The aluminum-activated malate transporters (ALMTs) form a membrane protein family exhibiting different physiological roles in plants, varying from conferring tolerance to environmental Al(3+) to the regulation of stomatal movement. The regulation of the anion channels of the ALMT family is largely unknown. Identifying intracellular modulators of the activity of anion channels is fundamental to understanding their physiological functions. In this study we investigated the role of cytosolic nucleotides in regulating the activity of the vacuolar anion channel AtALMT9. We found that cytosolic nucleotides modulate the transport activity of AtALMT9. This modulation was based on a direct block of the pore of the channel at negative membrane potentials (open channel block) by the nucleotide and not by a phosphorylation mechanism. The block by nucleotides of AtALMT9-mediated currents was voltage dependent. The blocking efficiency of intracellular nucleotides increased with the number of phosphate groups and ATP was the most effective cellular blocker. Interestingly, the ATP block induced a marked modification of the current-voltage characteristic of AtALMT9. In addition, increased concentrations of vacuolar anions were able to shift the ATP block threshold to a more negative membrane potential. The block of AtALMT9-mediated anion currents by ATP at negative membrane potentials acts as a gate of the channel and vacuolar anion tune this gating mechanism. Our results suggest that anion transport across the vacuolar membrane in plant cells is controlled by cytosolic nucleotides and the energetic status of the cell. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Functional expression of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Vba2p in the vacuolar membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Pongcharoen, Pongsanat; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Iwaki, Tomoko; Sugimoto, Naoko; Sekito, Takayuki; Akiyama, Koichi; Takegawa, Kaoru; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2013-01-01

    A vacuolar membrane protein, Vba2p of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, is involved in basic amino acid uptake by intact cells. Here we found evidence that Vba2p mediated ATP-dependent lysine uptake by vacuolar membrane vesicles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Vba2p was also responsible for quinidine sensitivity, and the addition of lysine improved cell growth on quinidine-containing media. These findings should be useful for further characterization of Vba2p.

  3. Subcellular localization and vacuolar targeting of sorbitol dehydrogenase in apple seed.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu-Ling; Hu, Zi-Ying; You, Chun-Xiang; Kong, Xiu-Zhen; Shi, Xiao-Pu

    2013-09-01

    Sorbitol is the primary photosynthate and translocated carbohydrate in fruit trees of the Rosaceae family. NAD(+)-dependent sorbitol dehydrogenase (NAD-SDH, EC 1.1.1.14), which mainly catalyzes the oxidation of sorbitol to fructose, plays a key role in regulating sink strength in apple. In this study, we found that apple NAD-SDH was ubiquitously distributed in epidermis, parenchyma, and vascular bundle in developing cotyledon. NAD-SDH was localized in the cytosol, the membranes of endoplasmic reticulum and vesicles, and the vacuolar lumen in the cotyledon at the middle stage of seed development. In contrast, NAD-SDH was mainly distributed in the protein storage vacuoles in cotyledon at the late stage of seed development. Sequence analysis revealed there is a putative signal peptide (SP), also being predicated to be a transmembrane domain, in the middle of proteins of apple NAD-SDH isoforms. To investigate whether the putative internal SP functions in the vacuolar targeting of NAD-SDH, we analyzed the localization of the SP-deletion mutants of MdSDH5 and MdSDH6 (two NAD-SDH isoforms in apple) by the transient expression system in Arabidopsis protoplasts. MdSDH5 and MdSDH6 were not localized in the vacuoles after their SPs were deleted, suggesting the internal SP functions in the vacuolar targeting of apple NAD-SDH. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Failure to Detect the Neurotoxin Beta-n-methylamino-l-alanine in Samples Collected during an Avian Vacuolar Myelinopathy (AVM) Epornitic in J. Strom Thurmond Lake

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    Cycas micronesica, which are used to make flour and are a favorite food of the flying fox, Pteropus sp., both dietary staples of these indigenous...and Downing 2011). Uptake of this toxin by SAV presents a possible dietary route of bioaccumulation, and possibly biomagnification, and exposure for...BMAA), in South Florida aquatic food webs. Harmful Algae 9:620–635. Cox, P. A., S. A. Banack, S. J. Murch, U. Rasmussen, G. Tien, R. R. Bidigare, J

  5. Nondomestic avian pediatric pathology.

    PubMed

    St Leger, Judy

    2012-05-01

    This is a snapshot of avian neonatal pathology—not an exhaustive review. Through knowledge and recognition of the significant pathogenic challenges of avian neonates and the associated lesions, avian practitioners can improve their diagnostic and therapeutic success. An area of need for avian research is determining the specific pathogenesis of many conditions affecting avian neonates. By narrowing the specific etiologies, we can improve management and reduce neonatal concerns.

  6. Job Sharing in the Endomembrane System: Vacuolar Acidification Requires the Combined Activity of V-ATPase and V-PPase.

    PubMed

    Kriegel, Anne; Andrés, Zaida; Medzihradszky, Anna; Krüger, Falco; Scholl, Stefan; Delang, Simon; Patir-Nebioglu, M Görkem; Gute, Gezahegn; Yang, Haibing; Murphy, Angus S; Peer, Wendy Ann; Pfeiffer, Anne; Krebs, Melanie; Lohmann, Jan U; Schumacher, Karin

    2015-12-01

    The presence of a large central vacuole is one of the hallmarks of a prototypical plant cell, and the multiple functions of this compartment require massive fluxes of molecules across its limiting membrane, the tonoplast. Transport is assumed to be energized by the membrane potential and the proton gradient established by the combined activity of two proton pumps, the vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase (V-PPase) and the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase). Exactly how labor is divided between these two enzymes has remained elusive. Here, we provide evidence using gain- and loss-of-function approaches that lack of the V-ATPase cannot be compensated for by increased V-PPase activity. Moreover, we show that increased V-ATPase activity during cold acclimation requires the presence of the V-PPase. Most importantly, we demonstrate that a mutant lacking both of these proton pumps is conditionally viable and retains significant vacuolar acidification, pointing to a so far undetected contribution of the trans-Golgi network/early endosome-localized V-ATPase to vacuolar pH. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  7. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Promotes V-ATPase Activation and Vacuolar Acidification and Delays Methyl Jasmonate-Induced Leaf Senescence1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Ji, Yingbin; Zhou, Jun; Xing, Da

    2016-01-01

    PI3K and its product PI3P are both involved in plant development and stress responses. In this study, the down-regulation of PI3K activity accelerated leaf senescence induced by methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and suppressed the activation of vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase). Yeast two-hybrid analyses indicated that PI3K bound to the V-ATPase B subunit (VHA-B). Analysis of bimolecular fluorescence complementation in tobacco guard cells showed that PI3K interacted with VHA-B2 in the tonoplasts. Through the use of pharmacological and genetic tools, we found that PI3K and V-ATPase promoted vacuolar acidification and stomatal closure during leaf senescence. Vacuolar acidification was suppressed by the PIKfyve inhibitor in 35S:AtVPS34-YFP Arabidopsis during MeJA-induced leaf senescence, but the decrease was lower than that in YFP-labeled Arabidopsis. These results suggest that PI3K promotes V-ATPase activation and consequently induces vacuolar acidification and stomatal closure, thereby delaying MeJA-induced leaf senescence. PMID:26739232

  8. Avian influenza virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is type A influenza that is adapted to avian host species. Although the virus can be isolated from numerous avian species, the natural host reservoir species are dabbling ducks, shorebirds and gulls. Domestic poultry species (poultry being defined as birds that are rais...

  9. Avian Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Kuykendoll, K.; Rhew, R.; Jones, S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the avian wing geometry (Seagull, Merganser, Teal and Owl) extracted from non-contact surface measurements using a three-dimensional laser scanner. The geometric quantities, including the camber line and thickness distribution of airfoil, wing planform, chord distribution, and twist distribution, are given in convenient analytical expressions. Thus, the avian wing surfaces can be generated and the wing kinematics can be simulated. The aerodynamic characteristics of avian airfoils in steady inviscid flows are briefly discussed. The avian wing kinematics is recovered from videos of three level-flying birds (Crane, Seagull and Goose) based on a two-jointed arm model. A flapping seagull wing in the 3D physical space is re-constructed from the extracted wing geometry and kinematics.

  10. Avian viral surveillance in Victoria, Australia, and detection of two novel avian herpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Carol A.; Vaz, Paola K.; Marenda, Marc S.; Owens, Jane; Eden, Paul A.; Devlin, Joanne M.

    2018-01-01

    Viruses in avian hosts can pose threats to avian health and some have zoonotic potential. Hospitals that provide veterinary care for avian patients may serve as a site of exposure of other birds and human staff in the facility to these viruses. They can also provide a useful location to collect samples from avian patients in order to examine the viruses present in wild birds. This study aimed to investigate viruses of biosecurity and/or zoonotic significance in Australian birds by screening samples collected from 409 birds presented to the Australian Wildlife Health Centre at Zoos Victoria’s Healesville Sanctuary for veterinary care between December 2014 and December 2015. Samples were tested for avian influenza viruses, herpesviruses, paramyxoviruses and coronaviruses, using genus- or family-wide polymerase chain reaction methods coupled with sequencing and phylogenetic analyses for detection and identification of both known and novel viruses. A very low prevalence of viruses was detected. Columbid alphaherpesvirus 1 was detected from a powerful owl (Ninox strenua) with inclusion body hepatitis, and an avian paramyxovirus most similar to Avian avulavirus 5 was detected from a musk lorikeet (Glossopsitta concinna). Two distinct novel avian alphaherpesviruses were detected in samples from a sulphur-crested cockatoo (Cacatua galerita) and a tawny frogmouth (Podargus strigoides). Avian influenza viruses and avian coronaviruses were not detected. The clinical significance of the newly detected viruses remains undetermined. Further studies are needed to assess the host specificity, epidemiology, pathogenicity and host-pathogen relationships of these novel viruses. Further genome characterization is also indicated, and would be required before these viruses can be formally classified taxonomically. The detection of these viruses contributes to our knowledge on avian virodiversity. The low level of avian virus detection, and the absence of any viruses with zoonotic

  11. AtALMT9 is a malate-activated vacuolar chloride channel required for stomatal opening in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    De Angeli, Alexis; Zhang, Jingbo; Meyer, Stefan; Martinoia, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Water deficit strongly affects crop productivity. Plants control water loss and CO2 uptake by regulating the aperture of the stomatal pores within the leaf epidermis. Stomata aperture is regulated by the two guard cells forming the pore and changing their size in response to ion uptake and release. While our knowledge about potassium and chloride fluxes across the plasma membrane of guard cells is advanced, little is known about fluxes across the vacuolar membrane. Here we present the molecular identification of the long-sought-after vacuolar chloride channel. AtALMT9 is a chloride channel activated by physiological concentrations of cytosolic malate. Single-channel measurements demonstrate that this activation is due to a malate-dependent increase in the channel open probability. Arabidopsis thaliana atalmt9 knockout mutants exhibited impaired stomatal opening and wilt more slowly than the wild type. Our findings show that AtALMT9 is a vacuolar chloride channel having a major role in controlling stomata aperture. PMID:23653216

  12. Cloning, 3D modeling and expression analysis of three vacuolar invertase genes from cassava (Manihot Esculenta Crantz).

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuan; Wu, Xiao-Hui; Geng, Meng-Ting; Li, Rui-Mei; Liu, Jiao; Hu, Xin-Wen; Guo, Jian-Chun

    2014-05-15

    Vacuolar invertase is one of the key enzymes in sucrose metabolism that irreversibly catalyzes the hydrolysis of sucrose to glucose and fructose in plants. In this research, three vacuolar invertase genes, named MeVINV1-3, and with 653, 660 and 639 amino acids, respectively, were cloned from cassava. The motifs of NDPNG (β-fructosidase motif), RDP and WECVD, which are conserved and essential for catalytic activity in the vacuolar invertase family, were found in MeVINV1 and MeVINV2. Meanwhile, in MeVINV3, instead of NDPNG we found the motif NGPDG, in which the three amino acids GPD are different from those in other vacuolar invertases (DPN) that might result in MeVINV3 being an inactivated protein. The N-terminal leader sequence of MeVINVs contains a signal anchor, which is associated with the sorting of vacuolar invertase to vacuole. The overall predicted 3D structure of the MeVINVs consists of a five bladed β-propeller module at N-terminus domain, and forms a β-sandwich module at the C-terminus domain. The active site of the protein is situated in the β-propeller module. MeVINVs are classified in two subfamilies, α and β groups, in which α group members of MeVINV1 and 2 are highly expressed in reproductive organs and tuber roots (considered as sink organs), while β group members of MeVINV3 are highly expressed in leaves (source organs). All MeVINVs are highly expressed in leaves, while only MeVINV1 and 2 are highly expressed in tubers at cassava tuber maturity stage. Thus, MeVINV1 and 2 play an important role in sucrose unloading and starch accumulation, as well in buffering the pools of sucrose, hexoses and sugar phosphates in leaves, specifically at later stages of plant development.

  13. Loss of ATP-dependent lysine uptake in the vacuolar membrane vesicles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ypq1∆ mutant.

    PubMed

    Sekito, Takayuki; Nakamura, Kyosuke; Manabe, Kunio; Tone, Junichi; Sato, Yumika; Murao, Nami; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ypq1p is a vacuolar membrane protein of the PQ-loop protein family. We found that ATP-dependent uptake activities of amino acids by vacuolar membrane vesicles were impaired by ypq1∆ mutation. Loss of lysine uptake was most remarkable, and the uptake was recovered by overproduction of Ypq1p. Ypq1p is thus involved in transport of amino acids into vacuoles.

  14. The VPH1 gene encodes a 95-kDa integral membrane polypeptide required for in vivo assembly and activity of the yeast vacuolar H(+)-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Manolson, M F; Proteau, D; Preston, R A; Stenbit, A; Roberts, B T; Hoyt, M A; Preuss, D; Mulholland, J; Botstein, D; Jones, E W

    1992-07-15

    Yeast vacuolar acidification-defective (vph) mutants were identified using the pH-sensitive fluorescence of 6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (Preston, R. A., Murphy, R. F., and Jones, E. W. (1989) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 86, 7027-7031). Vacuoles purified from yeast bearing the vph1-1 mutation had no detectable bafilomycin-sensitive ATPase activity or ATP-dependent proton pumping. The peripherally bound nucleotide-binding subunits of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (60 and 69 kDa) were no longer associated with vacuolar membranes yet were present in wild type levels in yeast whole cell extracts. The VPH1 gene was cloned by complementation of the vph1-1 mutation and independently cloned by screening a lambda gt11 expression library with antibodies directed against a 95-kDa vacuolar integral membrane protein. Deletion disruption of the VPH1 gene revealed that the VPH1 gene is not essential for viability but is required for vacuolar H(+)-ATPase assembly and vacuolar acidification. VPH1 encodes a predicted polypeptide of 840 amino acid residues (molecular mass 95.6 kDa) and contains six putative membrane-spanning regions. Cell fractionation and immunodetection demonstrate that Vph1p is a vacuolar integral membrane protein that co-purifies with vacuolar H(+)-ATPase activity. Multiple sequence alignments show extensive homology over the entire lengths of the following four polypeptides: Vph1p, the 116-kDa polypeptide of the rat clathrin-coated vesicles/synaptic vesicle proton pump, the predicted polypeptide encoded by the yeast gene STV1 (Similar To VPH1, identified as an open reading frame next to the BUB2 gene), and the TJ6 mouse immune suppressor factor.

  15. The plant homolog to the human sodium/dicarboxylic cotransporter is the vacuolar malate carrier

    PubMed Central

    Emmerlich, Vera; Linka, Nicole; Reinhold, Thomas; Hurth, Marco A.; Traub, Michaela; Martinoia, Enrico; Neuhaus, H. Ekkehard

    2003-01-01

    Malate plays a central role in plant metabolism. It is an intermediate in the Krebs and glyoxylate cycles, it is the store for CO2 in C4 and crassulacean acid metabolism plants, it protects plants from aluminum toxicity, it is essential for maintaining the osmotic pressure and charge balance, and it is therefore involved in regulation of stomatal aperture. To fulfil many of these roles, malate has to be accumulated within the large central vacuole. Many unsuccessful efforts have been made in the past to identify the vacuolar malate transporter; here, we describe the identification of the vacuolar malate transporter [A. thaliana tonoplast dicarboxylate transporter (AttDT)]. This transporter exhibits highest sequence similarity to the human sodium/dicarboxylate cotransporter. Independent T-DNA [portion of the Ti (tumor-inducing) plasmid that is transferred to plant cells] Arabidopsis mutants exhibit substantially reduced levels of leaf malate, but respire exogenously applied [14C]malate faster than the WT. An AttDT-GFP fusion protein was localized to vacuole. Vacuoles isolated from Arabidopsis WT leaves exhibited carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone and citrate inhibitable malate transport, which was not stimulated by sodium. Vacuoles isolated from mutant plants import [14C]-malate at strongly reduced rates, confirming that this protein is the vacuolar malate transporter. PMID:12947042

  16. The plant homolog to the human sodium/dicarboxylic cotransporter is the vacuolar malate carrier.

    PubMed

    Emmerlich, Vera; Linka, Nicole; Reinhold, Thomas; Hurth, Marco A; Traub, Michaela; Martinoia, Enrico; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard

    2003-09-16

    Malate plays a central role in plant metabolism. It is an intermediate in the Krebs and glyoxylate cycles, it is the store for CO2 in C4 and crassulacean acid metabolism plants, it protects plants from aluminum toxicity, it is essential for maintaining the osmotic pressure and charge balance, and it is therefore involved in regulation of stomatal aperture. To fulfil many of these roles, malate has to be accumulated within the large central vacuole. Many unsuccessful efforts have been made in the past to identify the vacuolar malate transporter; here, we describe the identification of the vacuolar malate transporter [A. thaliana tonoplast dicarboxylate transporter (AttDT)]. This transporter exhibits highest sequence similarity to the human sodium/dicarboxylate cotransporter. Independent T-DNA [portion of the Ti (tumor-inducing) plasmid that is transferred to plant cells] Arabidopsis mutants exhibit substantially reduced levels of leaf malate, but respire exogenously applied [14C]malate faster than the WT. An AttDT-GFP fusion protein was localized to vacuole. Vacuoles isolated from Arabidopsis WT leaves exhibited carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone and citrate inhibitable malate transport, which was not stimulated by sodium. Vacuoles isolated from mutant plants import [14C]-malate at strongly reduced rates, confirming that this protein is the vacuolar malate transporter.

  17. Modeling the vacuolar storage of malate shed lights on pre- and post-harvest fruit acidity.

    PubMed

    Etienne, Audrey; Génard, Michel; Lobit, Philippe; Bugaud, Christophe

    2014-11-18

    Malate is one of the most important organic acids in many fruits and its concentration plays a critical role in organoleptic properties. Several studies suggest that malate accumulation in fruit cells is controlled at the level of vacuolar storage. However, the regulation of vacuolar malate storage throughout fruit development, and the origins of the phenotypic variability of the malate concentration within fruit species remain to be clarified. In the present study, we adapted the mechanistic model of vacuolar storage proposed by Lobit et al. in order to study the accumulation of malate in pre and postharvest fruits. The main adaptation concerned the variation of the free energy of ATP hydrolysis during fruit development. Banana fruit was taken as a reference because it has the particularity of having separate growth and post-harvest ripening stages, during which malate concentration undergoes substantial changes. Moreover, the concentration of malate in banana pulp varies greatly among cultivars which make possible to use the model as a tool to analyze the genotypic variability. The model was calibrated and validated using data sets from three cultivars with contrasting malate accumulation, grown under different fruit loads and potassium supplies, and harvested at different stages. The model predicted the pre and post-harvest dynamics of malate concentration with fairly good accuracy for the three cultivars (mean RRMSE = 0.25-0.42). The sensitivity of the model to parameters and input variables was analyzed. According to the model, vacuolar composition, in particular potassium and organic acid concentrations, had an important effect on malate accumulation. The model suggested that rising temperatures depressed malate accumulation. The model also helped distinguish differences in malate concentration among the three cultivars and between the pre and post-harvest stages by highlighting the probable importance of proton pump activity and particularly of the free

  18. Wheat Vacuolar Iron Transporter TaVIT2 Transports Fe and Mn and Is Effective for Biofortification.

    PubMed

    Connorton, James M; Jones, Eleanor R; Rodríguez-Ramiro, Ildefonso; Fairweather-Tait, Susan; Uauy, Cristobal; Balk, Janneke

    2017-08-01

    Increasing the intrinsic nutritional quality of crops, known as biofortification, is viewed as a sustainable approach to alleviate micronutrient deficiencies. In particular, iron deficiency anemia is a major global health issue, but the iron content of staple crops such as wheat ( Triticum aestivum ) is difficult to change because of genetic complexity and homeostasis mechanisms. To identify target genes for the biofortification of wheat, we functionally characterized homologs of the VACUOLAR IRON TRANSPORTER ( VIT ). The wheat genome contains two VIT paralogs, TaVIT1 and TaVIT2 , which have different expression patterns but are both low in the endosperm. TaVIT2, but not TaVIT1, was able to rescue the growth of a yeast ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae ) mutant defective in vacuolar iron transport. TaVIT2 also complemented a manganese transporter mutant but not a vacuolar zinc transporter mutant. By overexpressing TaVIT2 under the control of an endosperm-specific promoter, we achieved a greater than 2-fold increase in iron in white flour fractions, exceeding minimum legal fortification levels in countries such as the United Kingdom. The antinutrient phytate was not increased and the iron in the white flour fraction was bioavailable in vitro, suggesting that food products made from the biofortified flour could contribute to improved iron nutrition. The single-gene approach impacted minimally on plant growth and also was effective in barley ( Hordeum vulgare ). Our results show that by enhancing vacuolar iron transport in the endosperm, this essential micronutrient accumulated in this tissue, bypassing existing homeostatic mechanisms. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  19. The vacuolar channel VvALMT9 mediates malate and tartrate accumulation in berries of Vitis vinifera.

    PubMed

    De Angeli, Alexis; Baetz, Ulrike; Francisco, Rita; Zhang, Jingbo; Chaves, Maria Manuela; Regalado, Ana

    2013-08-01

    Vitis vinifera L. represents an economically important fruit species. Grape and wine flavour is made from a complex set of compounds. The acidity of berries is a major parameter in determining grape berry quality for wine making and fruit consumption. Despite the importance of malic and tartaric acid (TA) storage and transport for grape berry acidity, no vacuolar transporter for malate or tartrate has been identified so far. Some members of the aluminium-activated malate transporter (ALMT) anion channel family from Arabidopsis thaliana have been shown to be involved in mediating malate fluxes across the tonoplast. Therefore, we hypothesised that a homologue of these channels could have a similar role in V. vinifera grape berries. We identified homologues of the Arabidopsis vacuolar anion channel AtALMT9 through a TBLASTX search on the V. vinifera genome database. We cloned the closest homologue of AtALMT9 from grape berry cDNA and designated it VvALMT9. The expression profile revealed that VvALMT9 is constitutively expressed in berry mesocarp tissue and that its transcription level increases during fruit maturation. Moreover, we found that VvALMT9 is targeted to the vacuolar membrane. Using patch-clamp analysis, we could show that, besides malate, VvALMT9 mediates tartrate currents which are higher than in its Arabidopsis homologue. In summary, in the present study we provide evidence that VvALMT9 is a vacuolar malate channel expressed in grape berries. Interestingly, in V. vinifera, a tartrate-producing plant, the permeability of the channel is apparently adjusted to TA.

  20. Creating Drought- and Salt-Tolerant Crops by Overexpressing a Vacuolar Pyrophosphatase Gene

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Increased expression of an Arabidopsis vacuolar pyrophosphatase gene, AVP1, leads to increased drought and salt tolerance in transgenic plants, which has been demonstrated in laboratory and field conditions. The molecular mechanism of AVP1-mediated drought resistance is likely due to increased proto...

  1. Transient anterior subcapsular vacuolar change of the crystalline lens in patients after posterior chamber phakic intraocular lens implantation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jin Kwon; Shin, Jin Hee; Lee, Sung Jin

    2013-10-25

    We present two cases of transient vacuolar changes in the anterior subcapsular space of the crystalline lens in patients after posterior chamber phakic intraocular lens implantation. Implantable collamer lenses (ICL) were implanted in healthy myopic patients. Vacuolar changes developed just after the irrigating procedure through the narrow space between the ICL and the crystalline lens. Slit-lamp examinations and spectral domain optical coherence tomography showed bleb-like lesions in the anterior subcapsular space of one eye in each case, though the lesions gradually improved without visual deterioration. Consequently, the lesions turned into a few anterior subcapsular small faint opacities. Direct irrigation of the narrow space confined by the ICL and the crystalline lens is at risk for the development of vacuolar changes in the crystalline lens. The observed spontaneous reversal indicates that surgeons should not rush to surgical intervention but rather opt for close follow over several weeks.

  2. Atg22p, a vacuolar membrane protein involved in the amino acid compartmentalization of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Naoko; Iwaki, Tomoko; Chardwiriyapreecha, Soracom; Shimazu, Masamitsu; Kawano, Miyuki; Sekito, Takayuki; Takegawa, Kaoru; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2011-01-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has a homolog of the budding yeast Atg22p, which is involved in spore formation (Mukaiyama H. et al., Microbiology, 155, 3816-3826 (2009)). GFP-tagged Atg22p in the fission yeast was localized to the vacuolar membrane. Upon disruption of atg22, the amino acid levels of the cellular fraction as well as the vacuolar fraction decreased. The uptake of several amino acids, such as lysine, histidine, and arginine, was impaired in atg22Δ cells. S. pombe Atg22p plays an important role in the compartmentalization of amino acids.

  3. Vba2p, a vacuolar membrane protein involved in basic amino acid transport in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Naoko; Iwaki, Tomoko; Chardwiriyapreecha, Soracom; Shimazu, Masamitsu; Sekito, Takayuki; Takegawa, Kaoru; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2010-01-01

    A recent study filling the gap in the genome sequence in the left arm of chromosome 2 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe revealed a homolog of budding yeast Vba2p, a vacuolar transporter of basic amino acids. GFP-tagged Vba2p in fission yeast was localized to the vacuolar membrane. Upon disruption of vba2, the uptake of several amino acids, including lysine, histidine, and arginine, was impaired. A transient increase in lysine uptake under nitrogen starvation was lowered by this mutation. These findings suggest that Vba2p is involved in basic amino acid transport in S. pombe under diverse conditions.

  4. To Be Cytosolic or Vacuolar: The Double Life of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Bierne, Hélène; Milohanic, Eliane; Kortebi, Mounia

    2018-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens are generally classified into two types: those that exploit host membrane trafficking to construct specific niches in vacuoles (i.e., "vacuolar pathogens"), and those that escape from vacuoles into the cytosol, where they proliferate and often spread to neighboring cells (i.e., "cytosolic pathogens"). However, the boundary between these distinct intracellular phenotypes is tenuous and may depend on the timing of infection and on the host cell type. Here, we discuss recent progress highlighting this phenotypic duality in Listeria monocytogenes , which has long been a model for cytosolic pathogens, but now emerges as a bacterium also capable of residing in vacuoles, in a slow/non-growing state. The ability of L. monocytogenes to enter a persistence stage in vacuoles might play a role during the asymptomatic incubation period of listeriosis and/or the carriage of this pathogen in asymptomatic hosts. Moreover, persistent vacuolar Listeria could be less susceptible to antibiotics and more difficult to detect by routine techniques of clinical biology. These hypotheses deserve to be explored in order to better manage the risks related to this food-borne pathogen.

  5. Multi site polyadenylation and transcriptional response to stress of a vacuolar type H+-ATPase subunit A gene in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Magnotta, Scot M; Gogarten, Johann Peter

    2002-01-01

    Background Vacuolar type H+-ATPases play a critical role in the maintenance of vacuolar homeostasis in plant cells. V-ATPases are also involved in plants' defense against environmental stress. This research examined the expression and regulation of the catalytic subunit of the vacuolar type H+-ATPase in Arabidopsis thaliana and the effect of environmental stress on multiple transcripts generated by this gene. Results Evidence suggests that subunit A of the vacuolar type H+-ATPase is encoded by a single gene in Arabidopsis thaliana. Genome blot analysis showed no indication of a second subunit A gene being present. The single gene identified was shown by whole RNA blot analysis to be transcribed in all organs of the plant. Subunit A was shown by sequencing the 3' end of multiple cDNA clones to exhibit multi site polyadenylation. Four different poly (A) tail attachment sites were revealed. Experiments were performed to determine the response of transcript levels for subunit A to environmental stress. A PCR based strategy was devised to amplify the four different transcripts from the subunit A gene. Conclusions Amplification of cDNA generated from seedlings exposed to cold, salt stress, and etiolation showed that transcript levels for subunit A of the vacuolar type H+-ATPase in Arabidopsis were responsive to stress conditions. Cold and salt stress resulted in a 2–4 fold increase in all four subunit A transcripts evaluated. Etiolation resulted in a slight increase in transcript levels. All four transcripts appeared to behave identically with respect to stress conditions tested with no significant differential regulation. PMID:11985780

  6. Glycolytic control of vacuolar-type ATPase activity: A mechanism to regulate influenza viral infection

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kohio, Hinissan P.; Adamson, Amy L., E-mail: aladamso@uncg.edu

    As new influenza virus strains emerge, finding new mechanisms to control infection is imperative. In this study, we found that we could control influenza infection of mammalian cells by altering the level of glucose given to cells. Higher glucose concentrations induced a dose-specific increase in influenza infection. Linking influenza virus infection with glycolysis, we found that viral replication was significantly reduced after cells were treated with glycolytic inhibitors. Addition of extracellular ATP after glycolytic inhibition restored influenza infection. We also determined that higher levels of glucose promoted the assembly of the vacuolar-type ATPase within cells, and increased vacuolar-type ATPase proton-transportmore » activity. The increase of viral infection via high glucose levels could be reversed by inhibition of the proton pump, linking glucose metabolism, vacuolar-type ATPase activity, and influenza viral infection. Taken together, we propose that altering glucose metabolism may be a potential new approach to inhibit influenza viral infection. - Highlights: • Increased glucose levels increase Influenza A viral infection of MDCK cells. • Inhibition of the glycolytic enzyme hexokinase inhibited Influenza A viral infection. • Inhibition of hexokinase induced disassembly the V-ATPase. • Disassembly of the V-ATPase and Influenza A infection was bypassed with ATP. • The state of V-ATPase assembly correlated with Influenza A infection of cells.« less

  7. Using avian radar to examine relationships among avian activity, bird strikes, and meteorological factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coates, Peter S.; Casazza, Michael L.; Halstead, Brian J.; Fleskes, Joseph P.; Laughlin, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Radar systems designed to detect avian activity at airfields are useful in understanding factors that influence the risk of bird and aircraft collisions (bird strikes). We used an avian radar system to measure avian activity at Beale Air Force Base, California, USA, during 2008 and 2009. We conducted a 2-part analysis to examine relationships among avian activity, bird strikes, and meteorological and time-dependent factors. We found that avian activity around the airfield was greater at times when bird strikes occurred than on average using a permutation resampling technique. Second, we developed generalized linear mixed models of an avian activity index (AAI). Variation in AAI was first explained by seasons that were based on average migration dates of birds at the study area. We then modeled AAI by those seasons to further explain variation by meteorological factors and daily light levels within a 24-hour period. In general, avian activity increased with decreased temperature, wind, visibility, precipitation, and increased humidity and cloud cover. These effects differed by season. For example, during the spring bird migration period, most avian activity occurred before sunrise at twilight hours on clear days with low winds, whereas during fall migration, substantial activity occurred after sunrise, and birds generally were more active at lower temperatures. We report parameter estimates (i.e., constants and coefficients) averaged across models and a relatively simple calculation for safety officers and wildlife managers to predict AAI and the relative risk of bird strike based on time, date, and meteorological values. We validated model predictability and assessed model fit. These analyses will be useful for general inference of avian activity and risk assessment efforts. Further investigation and ongoing data collection will refine these inference models and improve our understanding of factors that influence avian activity, which is necessary to inform

  8. Other avian paramyxoviruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian paramyxovirus infections have been reported for chickens and turkeys in association with respiratory disease or drops in egg production. This book chapter provides general information on etiology, clinical signs, lesions, diagnosis, prevention and control of avian paramyxoviruses except Newcas...

  9. ATP-binding cassette-like transporters are involved in the transport of lignin precursors across plasma and vacuolar membranes

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Miao, Y.C.; Liu, C.

    2010-12-28

    Lignin is a complex biopolymer derived primarily from the condensation of three monomeric precursors, the monolignols. The synthesis of monolignols occurs in the cytoplasm. To reach the cell wall where they are oxidized and polymerized, they must be transported across the cell membrane. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the transport process are unclear. There are conflicting views about whether the transport of these precursors occurs by passive diffusion or is an energized active process; further, we know little about what chemical forms are required. Using isolated plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles prepared from Arabidopsis, together with applying different transporter inhibitorsmore » in the assays, we examined the uptake of monolignols and their derivatives by these native membrane vesicles. We demonstrate that the transport of lignin precursors across plasmalemma and their sequestration into vacuoles are ATP-dependent primary-transport processes, involving ATP-binding cassette-like transporters. Moreover, we show that both plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles selectively transport different forms of lignin precursors. In the presence of ATP, the inverted plasma membrane vesicles preferentially take up monolignol aglycones, whereas the vacuolar vesicles are more specific for glucoconjugates, suggesting that the different ATP-binding cassette-like transporters recognize different chemical forms in conveying them to distinct sites, and that glucosylation of monolignols is necessary for their vacuolar storage but not required for direct transport into the cell wall in Arabidopsis.« less

  10. A vacuolar iron transporter in tulip, TgVit1, is responsible for blue coloration in petal cells through iron accumulation.

    PubMed

    Momonoi, Kazumi; Yoshida, Kumi; Mano, Shoji; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Nakamori, Chihiro; Shoji, Kazuaki; Nitta, Akira; Nishimura, Mikio

    2009-08-01

    Blue color in flowers is due mainly to anthocyanins, and a considerable part of blue coloration can be attributed to metal-complexed anthocyanins. However, the mechanism of metal ion transport into vacuoles and subsequent flower color development has yet to be fully explored. Previously, we studied the mechanism of blue color development specifically at the bottom of the inner perianth in purple tulip petals of Tulipa gesneriana cv. Murasakizuisho. We found that differences in iron content were associated with the development of blue- and purple-colored cells. Here, we identify a vacuolar iron transporter in T. gesneriana (TgVit1), and characterize the localization and function of this transporter protein in tulip petals. The amino acid sequence of TgVit1 is 85% similar that of the Arabidopsis thaliana vacuolar iron transporter AtVIT1, and also showed similarity to the AtVIT1 homolog in yeast, Ca(2+)-sensitive cross-complementer 1 (CCC1). The gene TgVit1 was expressed exclusively in blue-colored epidermal cells, and protein levels increased with increasing mRNA expression and blue coloration. Transient expression experiments revealed that TgVit1 localizes to the vacuolar membrane, and is responsible for the development of the blue color in purple cells. Expression of TgVit1 in yeast rescued the growth defect of ccc1 mutant cells in the presence of high concentrations of FeSO(4). Our results indicate that TgVit1 plays an essential role in blue coloration as a vacuolar iron transporter in tulip petals. These results suggest a new role for involvement of a vacuolar iron transporter in blue flower color development.

  11. Post-translational regulation of acid invertase activity by vacuolar invertase inhibitor affects resistance to cold-induced sweetening of potato tubers.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Marian J; Chen, Ronan K Y; Harris, John C; Ashworth, Matthew J; Brummell, David A

    2013-01-01

    Cold-induced sweetening (CIS) is a serious post-harvest problem for potato tubers, which need to be stored cold to prevent sprouting and pathogenesis in order to maintain supply throughout the year. During storage at cold temperatures (below 10 °C), many cultivars accumulate free reducing sugars derived from a breakdown of starch to sucrose that is ultimately cleaved by acid invertase to produce glucose and fructose. When affected tubers are processed by frying or roasting, these reducing sugars react with free asparagine by the Maillard reaction, resulting in unacceptably dark-coloured and bitter-tasting product and generating the probable carcinogen acrylamide as a by-product. We have previously identified a vacuolar invertase inhibitor (INH2) whose expression correlates both with low acid invertase activity and with resistance to CIS. Here we show that, during cold storage, overexpression of the INH2 vacuolar invertase inhibitor gene in CIS-susceptible potato tubers reduced acid invertase activity, the accumulation of reducing sugars and the generation of acrylamide in subsequent fry tests. Conversely, suppression of vacuolar invertase inhibitor expression in a CIS-resistant line increased susceptibility to CIS. The results show that post-translational regulation of acid invertase by the vacuolar invertase inhibitor is an important component of resistance to CIS. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Identification and functional expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana vacuolar glucose transporter 1 and its role in seed germination and flowering.

    PubMed

    Aluri, Sirisha; Büttner, Michael

    2007-02-13

    Sugar compartmentation into vacuoles of higher plants is a very important physiological process, providing extra space for transient and long-term sugar storage and contributing to the osmoregulation of cell turgor and shape. Despite the long-standing knowledge of this subcellular sugar partitioning, the proteins responsible for these transport steps have remained unknown. We have identified a gene family in Arabidopsis consisting of three members homologous to known sugar transporters. One member of this family, Arabidopsis thaliana vacuolar glucose transporter 1 (AtVGT1), was localized to the vacuolar membrane. Moreover, we provide evidence for transport activity of a tonoplast sugar transporter based on its functional expression in bakers' yeast and uptake studies in isolated yeast vacuoles. Analyses of Atvgt1 mutant lines indicate an important function of this vacuolar glucose transporter during developmental processes like seed germination and flowering.

  13. A Novel Arabidopsis Vacuolar Glucose Exporter Is Involved in Cellular Sugar Homeostasis and Affects the Composition of Seed Storage Compounds1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Poschet, Gernot; Hannich, Barbara; Raab, Sabine; Jungkunz, Isabel; Klemens, Patrick A.W.; Krueger, Stephan; Wic, Stefan; Neuhaus, H. Ekkehard; Büttner, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Subcellular sugar partitioning in plants is strongly regulated in response to developmental cues and changes in external conditions. Besides transitory starch, the vacuolar sugars represent a highly dynamic pool of instantly accessible metabolites that serve as energy source and osmoprotectant. Here, we present the molecular identification and functional characterization of the vacuolar glucose (Glc) exporter Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Early Responsive to Dehydration-Like6 (AtERDL6). We demonstrate tonoplast localization of AtERDL6 in plants. In Arabidopsis, AtERDL6 expression is induced in response to factors that activate vacuolar Glc pools, like darkness, heat stress, and wounding. On the other hand, AtERDL6 transcript levels drop during conditions that trigger Glc accumulation in the vacuole, like cold stress and external sugar supply. Accordingly, sugar analyses revealed that Aterdl6 mutants have elevated vacuolar Glc levels and that Glc flux across the tonoplast is impaired under stress conditions. Interestingly, overexpressor lines indicated a very similar function for the ERDL6 ortholog Integral Membrane Protein from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris). Aterdl6 mutant plants display increased sensitivity against external Glc, and mutant seeds exhibit a 10% increase in seed weight due to enhanced levels of seed sugars, proteins, and lipids. Our findings underline the importance of vacuolar Glc export during the regulation of cellular Glc homeostasis and the composition of seed reserves. PMID:21984725

  14. Tributyltin sensitivity of vacuolar-type Na(+)-transporting ATPase from Enterococcus hirae.

    PubMed

    Chardwiriyapreecha, Soracom; Inoue, Tomohiro; Sugimoto, Naoko; Sekito, Takayuki; Yamato, Ichiro; Murata, Takeshi; Homma, Michio; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2009-10-01

    Tributyltin chloride (TBT), an environmental pollutant, is toxic to a variety of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. Some members of F-ATP synthase (F-ATPase)/vacuolar type ATPase (V-ATPase) superfamily have been identified as the molecular target of this compound. TBT inhibited the activities of H(+)-transporting or Na(+)-transporting F-ATPase as well as H(+)-transporting V-ATPase originated from various organisms. However, the sensitivity to TBT of Na(+)-transporting V-ATPase has not been investigated. We examined the effect of TBT on Na(+)-transporting V-ATPase from an eubacterium Enterococus hirae. The ATP hydrolytic activity of E. hirae V-ATPase in purified form as well as in membrane-bound form was little inhibited by less than 10 microM TBT; IC50 for TBT inhibition of purified enzyme was estimated to be about 35 microM. Active sodium transport by E. hirae cells, indicating the in vivo activity of this V-ATPase, was not inhibited by 20 microM TBT. By contrast, IC50 of H(+)-transporting V-ATPase of the vacuolar membrane vesicles from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was about 0.2 microM. E. hirae V-ATPase is thus extremely less sensitive to TBT.

  15. The antiwrinkle effect of topical concentrated 2-dimethylaminoethanol involves a vacuolar cytopathology.

    PubMed

    Morissette, G; Germain, L; Marceau, F

    2007-03-01

    The 'cosmeceutical' agent 2-dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE) is a tertiary amine found in high concentration in numerous topical antiwrinkle preparations. We hypothesized that a 337 mmol L(-1) (3%) DMAE reservoir applied to the skin could reproduce the cytopathology induced by other amines by maintaining a millimolar drug concentration within a certain depth of the skin layers, and that vacuolar cell expansion could account for the very rapid effect on the apparent skin fullness. Morphological and functional assays were applied to cultured rabbit dermal fibroblasts treated with tertiary amines in vitro. A morphological verification of the vacuolization caused by topical DMAE was also attempted in vivo using the inner skin of the rabbit ear and in vitro using primary cultures of human cutaneous epithelial cells. Fibroblasts responded to DMAE (2.5-10 mmol L(-1)) by massive vacuolization (0.5-4 h; phase contrast observations). Triethanolamine, another chemical frequently used topically, was also active in this respect (10 mmol L(-1)). The vacuolar adenosine triphosphatase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 prevented DMAE- or triethanolamine-induced vacuolization; adding bafilomycin A1 or cell washout slowly reversed the established vacuolization induced by DMAE. Further effects of DMAE in cultured fibroblasts included a moderate cytotoxicity (10 mmol L(-1)) that was abated by bafilomycin A1 cotreatment, a concentration-dependent mitotic arrest (2.5 mmol L(-1)) and transient and mild effects on cell ploidy. The epidermis of the rabbit external ear was significantly thickened and exhibited clear perinuclear swelling indicative of vacuolization in response to 3% DMAE (1 h; paraffin tissue sections). Cultured human cutaneous epithelial cells responded to DMAE by vacuolization (inhibited by bafilomycin A1 cotreatment). The vacuolar cytopathology induced by concentrated organic amines may be the cellular basis of the antiwrinkle effect of DMAE.

  16. Vacuolar invertase gene silencing in potato decreasing the frequency of sugar-end defects

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sugar-end defect is a tuber quality disorder and persistent problem for the French fry processing industry that causes unacceptable darkening of one end of French fries. This defect appears when environmental stress during tuber growth increases post-harvest vacuolar acid invertase activity at one e...

  17. A Grapevine TTG2-Like WRKY Transcription Factor Is Involved in Regulating Vacuolar Transport and Flavonoid Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Amato, Alessandra; Cavallini, Erika; Zenoni, Sara; Finezzo, Laura; Begheldo, Maura; Ruperti, Benedetto; Tornielli, Giovanni Battista

    2016-01-01

    A small set of TTG2-like homolog proteins from different species belonging to the WRKY family of transcription factors were shown to share a similar mechanism of action and to control partially conserved biochemical/developmental processes in their native species. In particular, by activating P-ATPases residing on the tonoplast, PH3 from Petunia hybrida promotes vacuolar acidification in petal epidermal cells whereas TTG2 from Arabidopsis thaliana enables the accumulation of proanthocyanidins in the seed coat. In this work we functionally characterized VvWRKY26 identified as the closest grapevine homolog of PhPH3 and AtTTG2 . When constitutively expressed in petunia ph3 mutant, VvWRKY26 can fulfill the PH3 function in the regulation of vacuolar pH and restores the wild type pigmentation phenotype. By a global correlation analysis of gene expression and by transient over-expression in Vitis vinifera , we showed transcriptomic relationships of VvWRKY26 with many genes related to vacuolar acidification and transport in grapevine. Moreover, our results indicate an involvement in flavonoid pathway possibly restricted to the control of proanthocyanidin biosynthesis that is consistent with its expression pattern in grape berry tissues. Overall, the results show that, in addition to regulative mechanisms and biological roles shared with TTG2-like orthologs, VvWRKY26 can play roles in fleshy fruit development that have not been previously reported in studies from dry fruit species. This study paves the way toward the comprehension of the regulatory network controlling vacuolar acidification and flavonoid accumulation mechanisms that contribute to the final berry quality traits in grapevine.

  18. A Grapevine TTG2-Like WRKY Transcription Factor Is Involved in Regulating Vacuolar Transport and Flavonoid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Alessandra; Cavallini, Erika; Zenoni, Sara; Finezzo, Laura; Begheldo, Maura; Ruperti, Benedetto; Tornielli, Giovanni Battista

    2017-01-01

    A small set of TTG2-like homolog proteins from different species belonging to the WRKY family of transcription factors were shown to share a similar mechanism of action and to control partially conserved biochemical/developmental processes in their native species. In particular, by activating P-ATPases residing on the tonoplast, PH3 from Petunia hybrida promotes vacuolar acidification in petal epidermal cells whereas TTG2 from Arabidopsis thaliana enables the accumulation of proanthocyanidins in the seed coat. In this work we functionally characterized VvWRKY26 identified as the closest grapevine homolog of PhPH3 and AtTTG2. When constitutively expressed in petunia ph3 mutant, VvWRKY26 can fulfill the PH3 function in the regulation of vacuolar pH and restores the wild type pigmentation phenotype. By a global correlation analysis of gene expression and by transient over-expression in Vitis vinifera, we showed transcriptomic relationships of VvWRKY26 with many genes related to vacuolar acidification and transport in grapevine. Moreover, our results indicate an involvement in flavonoid pathway possibly restricted to the control of proanthocyanidin biosynthesis that is consistent with its expression pattern in grape berry tissues. Overall, the results show that, in addition to regulative mechanisms and biological roles shared with TTG2-like orthologs, VvWRKY26 can play roles in fleshy fruit development that have not been previously reported in studies from dry fruit species. This study paves the way toward the comprehension of the regulatory network controlling vacuolar acidification and flavonoid accumulation mechanisms that contribute to the final berry quality traits in grapevine. PMID:28105033

  19. Avian disease at the Salton Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friend, M.

    2002-01-01

    A review of existing records and the scientific literature was conducted for occurrences of avian diseases affecting free-ranging avifauna within the Salton Sea ecosystem. The period for evaluation was 1907 through 1999. Records of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Biological Survey and the scientific literature were the data sources for the period of 1907a??1939. The narrative reports of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Sonny Bono National Wildlife Refuge Complex and the epizootic database of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Wildlife Health Center were the primary data sources for the remainder of the evaluation. The pattern of avian disease at the Salton Sea has changed greatly over time. Relative to past decades, there was a greater frequency of major outbreaks of avian disease at the Salton Sea during the 1990s than in previous decades, a greater variety of disease agents causing epizootics, and apparent chronic increases in the attrition of birds from disease. Avian mortality was high for about a decade beginning during the mid-1920s, diminished substantially by the 1940s and was at low to moderate levels until the 1990s when it reached the highest levels reported. Avian botulism (Clostridium botulinum type C) was the only major cause of avian disease until 1979 when the first major epizootic of avian cholera (Pasteurella multocidia) was documented. Waterfowl and shorebirds were the primary species affected by avian botulism. A broader spectrum of species have been killed by avian cholera but waterfowl have suffered the greatest losses. Avian cholera reappeared in 1983 and has joined avian botulism as a recurring cause of avian mortality. In 1989, avian salmonellosis (Salmonella typhimurium) was first diagnosed as a major cause of avian disease within the Salton Sea ecosystem and has since reappeared several times, primarily among cattle egrets (Bubulcus ibis). The largest loss from a single epizootic occurred in 1992, when an estimated

  20. Avian Flu

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Eckburg, Paul

    2006-11-06

    Since 2003, a severe form of H5N1 avian influenza has rapidly spread throughout Asia and Europe, infecting over 200 humans in 10 countries. The spread of H5N1 virus from person-to-person has been rare, thus preventing the emergence of a widespread pandemic. However, this ongoing epidemic continues to pose an important public health threat. Avian flu and its pandemic potential in humans will be discussed.

  1. Avian Flu

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Eckburg, Paul

    Since 2003, a severe form of H5N1 avian influenza has rapidly spread throughout Asia and Europe, infecting over 200 humans in 10 countries. The spread of H5N1 virus from person-to-person has been rare, thus preventing the emergence of a widespread pandemic. However, this ongoing epidemic continues to pose an important public health threat. Avian flu and its pandemic potential in humans will be discussed.

  2. Wheat Vacuolar Iron Transporter TaVIT2 Transports Fe and Mn and Is Effective for Biofortification1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Eleanor R.; Rodríguez-Ramiro, Ildefonso

    2017-01-01

    Increasing the intrinsic nutritional quality of crops, known as biofortification, is viewed as a sustainable approach to alleviate micronutrient deficiencies. In particular, iron deficiency anemia is a major global health issue, but the iron content of staple crops such as wheat (Triticum aestivum) is difficult to change because of genetic complexity and homeostasis mechanisms. To identify target genes for the biofortification of wheat, we functionally characterized homologs of the VACUOLAR IRON TRANSPORTER (VIT). The wheat genome contains two VIT paralogs, TaVIT1 and TaVIT2, which have different expression patterns but are both low in the endosperm. TaVIT2, but not TaVIT1, was able to rescue the growth of a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) mutant defective in vacuolar iron transport. TaVIT2 also complemented a manganese transporter mutant but not a vacuolar zinc transporter mutant. By overexpressing TaVIT2 under the control of an endosperm-specific promoter, we achieved a greater than 2-fold increase in iron in white flour fractions, exceeding minimum legal fortification levels in countries such as the United Kingdom. The antinutrient phytate was not increased and the iron in the white flour fraction was bioavailable in vitro, suggesting that food products made from the biofortified flour could contribute to improved iron nutrition. The single-gene approach impacted minimally on plant growth and also was effective in barley (Hordeum vulgare). Our results show that by enhancing vacuolar iron transport in the endosperm, this essential micronutrient accumulated in this tissue, bypassing existing homeostatic mechanisms. PMID:28684433

  3. Overview of avian influenza.

    PubMed

    Khare, Shashi; Agarwal, Ramesh; Singh, Ranjana; Lal, Shiv

    2006-07-01

    The current outbreak of H5N 1 avian influenza affecting an unprecedented number of countries is a cause of concern worldwide. As on 26th June, 2006 outbreaks in poultry or wild birds have been reported from 54 countries. In India the first outbreak of avian influenza virus Awas reported in Navapur district in Maharashtra in February 2006 followed by detection of H5N1 in a neighbouring district of Gujarat. No case of human infection has yet been reported in India. Avian influenza virus belongs to influenza type A which is a part of family orthomyxoviridae. Transmission occurs by direct or indirect contact. Clinical symptoms on human is of typical influenza like. Laboratory investigations involves a number of tests confirming diagnosis of avian influenza. The treatment includes general supportive and antiviral therapy with oseltamivir. Prevention and control strategies can held to minimise the public health risk to highly pathogenic avian influenza. There are some dos and don'ts for the community which should be strictly followed.

  4. Avian botulism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friend, Milton; Locke, Louis N.; Kennelly, James J.

    1985-01-01

    What is avian botulism? Avian botulism, or Western duck sickness, is one of the three most important disease problems of wild migratory birds. Each year, many birds are paralyzed or die after exposure to a toxin produced by the botulinum bacterium. Two of the seven toxin types that have been identifies cause mortality in wild birds; one of these types, type C, is most often associated with dieoffs of ducks, while type E primarily affects gulls and loons.

  5. Avian respiratory system disorders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, Glenn H.

    1989-01-01

    Diagnosing and treating respiratory diseases in avian species requires a basic knowledge about the anatomy and physiology of this system in birds. Differences between mammalian and avian respiratory system function, diagnosis, and treatment are highlighted.

  6. Singlet Oxygen-Induced Membrane Disruption and Serpin-Protease Balance in Vacuolar-Driven Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Koh, Eugene; Carmieli, Raanan; Mor, Avishai; Fluhr, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Singlet oxygen plays a role in cellular stress either by providing direct toxicity or through signaling to initiate death programs. It was therefore of interest to examine cell death, as occurs in Arabidopsis, due to differentially localized singlet oxygen photosensitizers. The photosensitizers rose bengal (RB) and acridine orange (AO) were localized to the plasmalemma and vacuole, respectively. Their photoactivation led to cell death as measured by ion leakage. Cell death could be inhibited by the singlet oxygen scavenger histidine in treatments with AO but not with RB In the case of AO treatment, the vacuolar membrane was observed to disintegrate. Concomitantly, a complex was formed between a vacuolar cell-death protease, RESPONSIVE TO DESSICATION-21 and its cognate cytoplasmic protease inhibitor ATSERPIN1. In the case of RB treatment, the tonoplast remained intact and no complex was formed. Over-expression of AtSerpin1 repressed cell death, only under AO photodynamic treatment. Interestingly, acute water stress showed accumulation of singlet oxygen as determined by fluorescence of Singlet Oxygen Sensor Green, by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and the induction of singlet oxygen marker genes. Cell death by acute water stress was inhibited by the singlet oxygen scavenger histidine and was accompanied by vacuolar collapse and the appearance of serpin-protease complex. Over-expression of AtSerpin1 also attenuated cell death under this mode of cell stress. Thus, acute water stress damage shows parallels to vacuole-mediated cell death where the generation of singlet oxygen may play a role. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Expression of an arabidopsis vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase gene (AVP1) in cotton improves drought- and salt tolerance and increases fibre yield in the field conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Arabidopsis gene AVP1 encodes a vacuolar pyrophosphatase that functions as a proton pump on the vacuolar membrane. Overexpression of AVP1 in Arabidopsis, tomato and rice enhances plant performance under salt and drought stress conditions, because up-regulation of the type I H+-PPase from Arabid...

  8. Expression of an Arabidopsis Vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase Gene (AVP1) in Cotton Improves Drought- and Salt Tolerance and Increases Fibre Yield in the Field Conditions.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Arabidopsis gene AVP1 encodes a vacuolar pyrophosphatase that functions as a proton pump on the vacuolar membrane. Overexpression of AVP1 in Arabidopsis, tomato and rice enhances plant performance under salt and drought stress conditions, because up-regulation of the type I H+PPase from Arabido...

  9. 76 FR 24793 - Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    .... APHIS-2006-0074] RIN 0579-AC36 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health... any subtype of highly pathogenic avian influenza is considered to exist. The interim rule also imposed... avian influenza, or that have moved through regions where any subtype of highly pathogenic avian...

  10. Avian botulism and avian chlamydiosis in wild water birds, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Montana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Docherty, Douglas E.; Franson, J. Christian; Brannian, Roger E.; Long, Renee R.; Radi, Craig A.; Krueger, David; Johnson, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    In 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Wildlife Health Center, Madison, Wisconsin, conducted a diagnostic investigation into a water bird mortality event involving intoxication with avian botulism type C and infection with avian chlamydiosis at the Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge in Montana, USA. Of 24 carcasses necropsied, 11 had lesions consistent with avian chlamydiosis, including two that tested positive for infectious Chlamydophila psittaci, and 12 were positive for avian botulism type C. One bird tested positive for both avian botulism type C and C. psittaci. Of 61 apparently healthy water birds sampled and released, 13 had serologic evidence of C. psittaci infection and 7 were, at the time of capture, shedding infectious C. psittaci via the cloacal or oropharyngeal route. Since more routinely diagnosed disease conditions may mask avian chlamydiosis, these findings support the need for a comprehensive diagnostic investigation when determining the cause of a wildlife mortality event.

  11. Listeria monocytogenes switches from dissemination to persistence by adopting a vacuolar lifestyle in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kortebi, Mounia; Milohanic, Eliane; Mitchell, Gabriel; Péchoux, Christine; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Cossart, Pascale; Bierne, Hélène

    2017-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes causes listeriosis, a foodborne disease that poses serious risks to fetuses, newborns and immunocompromised adults. This intracellular bacterial pathogen proliferates in the host cytosol and exploits the host actin polymerization machinery to spread from cell-to-cell and disseminate in the host. Here, we report that during several days of infection in human hepatocytes or trophoblast cells, L. monocytogenes switches from this active motile lifestyle to a stage of persistence in vacuoles. Upon intercellular spread, bacteria gradually stopped producing the actin-nucleating protein ActA and became trapped in lysosome-like vacuoles termed Listeria-Containing Vacuoles (LisCVs). Subpopulations of bacteria resisted degradation in LisCVs and entered a slow/non-replicative state. During the subculture of host cells harboring LisCVs, bacteria showed a capacity to cycle between the vacuolar and the actin-based motility stages. When ActA was absent, such as in ΔactA mutants, vacuolar bacteria parasitized host cells in the so-called "viable but non-culturable" state (VBNC), preventing their detection by conventional colony counting methods. The exposure of infected cells to high doses of gentamicin did not trigger the formation of LisCVs, but selected for vacuolar and VBNC bacteria. Together, these results reveal the ability of L. monocytogenes to enter a persistent state in a subset of epithelial cells, which may favor the asymptomatic carriage of this pathogen, lengthen the incubation period of listeriosis, and promote bacterial survival during antibiotic therapy.

  12. Listeria monocytogenes switches from dissemination to persistence by adopting a vacuolar lifestyle in epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes causes listeriosis, a foodborne disease that poses serious risks to fetuses, newborns and immunocompromised adults. This intracellular bacterial pathogen proliferates in the host cytosol and exploits the host actin polymerization machinery to spread from cell-to-cell and disseminate in the host. Here, we report that during several days of infection in human hepatocytes or trophoblast cells, L. monocytogenes switches from this active motile lifestyle to a stage of persistence in vacuoles. Upon intercellular spread, bacteria gradually stopped producing the actin-nucleating protein ActA and became trapped in lysosome-like vacuoles termed Listeria-Containing Vacuoles (LisCVs). Subpopulations of bacteria resisted degradation in LisCVs and entered a slow/non-replicative state. During the subculture of host cells harboring LisCVs, bacteria showed a capacity to cycle between the vacuolar and the actin-based motility stages. When ActA was absent, such as in ΔactA mutants, vacuolar bacteria parasitized host cells in the so-called “viable but non-culturable” state (VBNC), preventing their detection by conventional colony counting methods. The exposure of infected cells to high doses of gentamicin did not trigger the formation of LisCVs, but selected for vacuolar and VBNC bacteria. Together, these results reveal the ability of L. monocytogenes to enter a persistent state in a subset of epithelial cells, which may favor the asymptomatic carriage of this pathogen, lengthen the incubation period of listeriosis, and promote bacterial survival during antibiotic therapy. PMID:29190284

  13. [Function of transport H+-ATPases in plant cell plasma and vacuolar membranes of maize under salt stress conditions and effect of adaptogenic preparations].

    PubMed

    Rybchenko, Zh I; Palladina, T O

    2011-01-01

    Participations of electrogenic H+-pumps of plasma and vacuolar membranes represented by E1-E2 and V-type H+-ATPases in plant cell adaptation to salt stress conditions has been studied by determination of their transport activities. Experiments were carried out on corn seedlings exposed during 1 or 10 days at 0.1 M NaCl. Preparations Methyure and Ivine were used by seed soaking at 10(-7) M. Plasma and vacuolar membrane fractions were isolated from corn seedling roots. In variants without NaCl a hydrolytical activity of plasma membrane H+-ATPase was increased with seedling age and its transport one was changed insignificantly, wherease the response of the weaker vacuolar H+-ATPase was opposite. NaCl exposition decreased hydrolytical activities of both H+-ATPases and increased their transport ones. These results demonstrated amplification of H+-pumps function especially represented by vacuolar H+-ATPase. Both preparations, Methyure mainly, caused a further increase of transport activity which was more expressed in NaCl variants. Obtained results showed the important role of these H+-pumps in plant adaptation under salt stress conditions realized by energetical maintenance of the secondary active Na+/H+ -antiporters which remove Na+ from cytoplasm.

  14. The Arabidopsis Vacuolar Sorting Receptor1 Is Required for Osmotic Stress-Induced Abscisic Acid Biosynthesis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen-Yu; Gehring, Chris; Zhu, Jianhua; Li, Feng-Min; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Xiong, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Osmotic stress activates the biosynthesis of the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) through a pathway that is rate limited by the carotenoid cleavage enzyme 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED). To understand the signal transduction mechanism underlying the activation of ABA biosynthesis, we performed a forward genetic screen to isolate mutants defective in osmotic stress regulation of the NCED3 gene. Here, we identified the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Vacuolar Sorting Receptor1 (VSR1) as a unique regulator of ABA biosynthesis. The vsr1 mutant not only shows increased sensitivity to osmotic stress, but also is defective in the feedback regulation of ABA biosynthesis by ABA. Further analysis revealed that vacuolar trafficking mediated by VSR1 is required for osmotic stress-responsive ABA biosynthesis and osmotic stress tolerance. Moreover, under osmotic stress conditions, the membrane potential, calcium flux, and vacuolar pH changes in the vsr1 mutant differ from those in the wild type. Given that manipulation of the intracellular pH is sufficient to modulate the expression of ABA biosynthesis genes, including NCED3, and ABA accumulation, we propose that intracellular pH changes caused by osmotic stress may play a signaling role in regulating ABA biosynthesis and that this regulation is dependent on functional VSR1. PMID:25416474

  15. The formation of Anthocyanic Vacuolar Inclusions in Arabidopsis thaliana and implications for the sequestration of anthocyanin pigments.

    PubMed

    Pourcel, Lucille; Irani, Niloufer G; Lu, Yuhua; Riedl, Ken; Schwartz, Steve; Grotewold, Erich

    2010-01-01

    Anthocyanins are flavonoid pigments that accumulate in the large central vacuole of most plants. Inside the vacuole, anthocyanins can be found uniformly distributed or as part of sub-vacuolar pigment bodies, the Anthocyanic Vacuolar Inclusions (AVIs). Using Arabidopsis seedlings grown under anthocyanin-inductive conditions as a model to understand how AVIs are formed, we show here that the accumulation of AVIs strongly correlates with the formation of cyanidin 3-glucoside (C3G) and derivatives. Arabidopsis mutants that fail to glycosylate anthocyanidins at the 5-O position (5gt mutant) accumulate AVIs in almost every epidermal cell of the cotyledons, as compared to wild-type seedlings, where only a small fraction of the cells show AVIs. A similar phenomenon is observed when seedlings are treated with vanadate. Highlighting a role for autophagy in the formation of the AVIs, we show that various mutants that interfere with the autophagic process (atg mutants) display lower numbers of AVIs, in addition to a reduced accumulation of anthocyanins. Interestingly, vanadate increases the numbers of AVIs in the atg mutants, suggesting that several pathways might participate in AVI formation. Taken together, our results suggest novel mechanisms for the formation of sub-vacuolar compartments capable of accumulating anthocyanin pigments.

  16. The prevention and control of avian influenza: the avian influenza coordinated agriculture project.

    PubMed

    Cardona, C; Slemons, R; Perez, D

    2009-04-01

    The Avian Influenza Coordinated Agriculture Project (AICAP) entitled "Prevention and Control of Avian Influenza in the US" strives to be a significant point of reference for the poultry industry and the general public in matters related to the biology, risks associated with, and the methods used to prevent and control avian influenza. To this end, AICAP has been remarkably successful in generating research data, publications through an extensive network of university- and agency-based researchers, and extending findings to stakeholders. An overview of the highlights of AICAP research is presented.

  17. Global avian influenza outbreaks 2010-2016: a systematic review of their distribution, avian species and virus subtype.

    PubMed

    Chatziprodromidou, Ioanna P; Arvanitidou, Malamatenia; Guitian, Javier; Apostolou, Thomas; Vantarakis, George; Vantarakis, Apostolos

    2018-01-25

    We conducted a systematic review to investigate avian influenza outbreaks and to explore their distribution, upon avian influenza subtype, country, avian species and other relating details as no comprehensive epidemiological analysis of global avian influenza outbreaks from 2010 to 2016 exists. Data was collated from four databases (Scopus, Web of Science Core Correlation, PubMed and SpringerLink electronic journal) and a global electronic reporting system (ProMED mail), using PRISMA and ORION systematic approaches. One hundred seventy three avian influenza virus outbreaks were identified and included in this review, alongside 198 ProMED mail reports. Our research identified that the majority of the reported outbreaks occurred in 2016 (22.2%). These outbreaks were located in China (13.6%) and referred to commercial poultry farms (56.1%). The most common subtype reported in these outbreaks was H5N1 (38.2%), while almost 82.5% of the subtypes were highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. There were differences noticed between ProMED mail and the scientific literature screened. Avian influenza virus has been proved to be able to contaminate all types of avian species, including commercial poultry farms, wild birds, backyard domestic animals, live poultry, game birds and mixed poultry. The study focused on wet markets, slaughterhouses, wild habitats, zoos and natural parks, in both developed and developing countries. The impact of avian influenza virus seems disproportionate and could potentially burden the already existing disparities in the public health domain. Therefore, a collaboration between all the involved health sectors is considered to be more than necessary.

  18. Avian dark cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hara, J.; Plymale, D. R.; Shepard, D. L.; Hara, H.; Garry, Robert F.; Yoshihara, T.; Zenner, Hans-Peter; Bolton, M.; Kalkeri, R.; Fermin, Cesar D.

    2002-01-01

    Dark cells (DCs) of mammalian and non-mammalian species help to maintain the homeostasis of the inner ear fluids in vivo. Although the avian cochlea is straight and the mammalian cochlea is coiled, no significant difference in the morphology and/or function of mammalian and avian DCs has been reported. The mammalian equivalent of avian DCs are marginal cells and are located in the stria vascularis along a bony sheet. Avian DCs hang free from the tegmentum vasculosum (TV) of the avian lagena between the perilymph and endolymph. Frame averaging was used to image the fluorescence emitted by several fluorochromes applied to freshly isolated dark cells (iDCs) from chickens (Gallus domesticus) inner ears. The viability of iDCs was monitored via trypan blue exclusion at each isolation step. Sodium Green, BCECF-AM, Rhodamine 123 and 9-anthroyl ouabain molecules were used to test iDC function. These fluorochromes label iDCs ionic transmembrane trafficking function, membrane electrogenic potentials and Na+/K+ ATPase pump's activity. Na+/K+ ATPase pump sites, were also evaluated by the p-nitrophenyl phosphatase reaction. These results suggest that iDCs remain viable for several hours after isolation without special culturing requirements and that the number and functional activity of Na+/K+ ATPase pumps in the iDCs were indistinguishable from in vivo DCs. Primary cultures of freshly iDCs were successfully maintained for 28 days in plastic dishes with RPMI 1640 culture medium. The preparation of iDCs overcomes the difficulty of DCs accessability in vivo and the unavoidable contamination that rupturing the inner ear microenvironments induces.

  19. Nonlinear dynamics of avian influenza epidemic models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sanhong; Ruan, Shigui; Zhang, Xinan

    2017-01-01

    Avian influenza is a zoonotic disease caused by the transmission of the avian influenza A virus, such as H5N1 and H7N9, from birds to humans. The avian influenza A H5N1 virus has caused more than 500 human infections worldwide with nearly a 60% death rate since it was first reported in Hong Kong in 1997. The four outbreaks of the avian influenza A H7N9 in China from March 2013 to June 2016 have resulted in 580 human cases including 202 deaths with a death rate of nearly 35%. In this paper, we construct two avian influenza bird-to-human transmission models with different growth laws of the avian population, one with logistic growth and the other with Allee effect, and analyze their dynamical behavior. We obtain a threshold value for the prevalence of avian influenza and investigate the local or global asymptotical stability of each equilibrium of these systems by using linear analysis technique or combining Liapunov function method and LaSalle's invariance principle, respectively. Moreover, we give necessary and sufficient conditions for the occurrence of periodic solutions in the avian influenza system with Allee effect of the avian population. Numerical simulations are also presented to illustrate the theoretical results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Schisandrin B protects PC12 cells by decreasing the expression of amyloid precursor protein and vacuolar protein sorting 35★

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Mingmin; Mao, Shanping; Dong, Huimin; Liu, Baohui; Zhang, Qian; Pan, Gaofeng; Fu, Zhiping

    2012-01-01

    PC12 cell injury was induced using 20 μM amyloid β-protein 25–35 to establish a model of Alzheimer's disease. The cells were then treated with 5, 10, and 25 μM Schisandrin B. Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assays and Hoechst 33342 staining results showed that with increasing Schisandrin B concentration, the survival rate of PC12 cells injured by amyloid β-protein 25–35 gradually increased and the rate of apoptosis gradually decreased. Reverse transcription-PCR, immunocytochemical staining and western blot results showed that with increasing Schisandrin B concentration, the mRNA and protein expression of vacuolar protein sorting 35 and amyloid precursor protein were gradually decreased. Vacuolar protein sorting 35 and amyloid precursor protein showed a consistent trend for change. These findings suggest that 5, 10, and 25 μM Schisandrin B antagonizes the cellular injury induced by amyloid β-protein 25–35 in a dose-dependent manner. This may be caused by decreasing the expression of vacuolar protein sorting 35 and amyloid precursor protein. PMID:25745458

  1. Hygromycin B hypersensitive (hhy) mutants implicate an intact trans-Golgi and late endosome interface in efficient Tor1 vacuolar localization and TORC1 function.

    PubMed

    Ejzykowicz, Daniele E; Locken, Kristopher M; Ruiz, Fiona J; Manandhar, Surya P; Olson, Daniel K; Gharakhanian, Editte

    2017-06-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuoles are functionally analogous to mammalian lysosomes. Both also serve as physical platforms for Tor Complex 1 (TORC1) signal transduction, the master regulator of cellular growth and proliferation. Hygromycin B is a eukaryotic translation inhibitor. We recently reported on hygromycin B hypersensitive (hhy) mutants that fail to grow at subtranslation inhibitory concentrations of the drug and exhibit vacuolar defects (Banuelos et al. in Curr Genet 56:121-137, 2010). Here, we show that hhy phenotype is not due to increased sensitivity to translation inhibition and establish a super HHY (s-HHY) subgroup of genes comprised of ARF1, CHC1, DRS2, SAC1, VPS1, VPS34, VPS45, VPS52, and VPS54 that function exclusively or inclusively at trans-Golgi and late endosome interface. Live cell imaging of s-hhy mutants revealed that hygromycin B treatment disrupts vacuolar morphology and the localization of late endosome marker Pep12, but not that of late endosome-independent vacuolar SNARE Vam3. This, along with normal post-late endosome trafficking of the vital dye FM4-64, establishes that severe hypersensitivity to hygromycin B correlates specifically with compromised trans-Golgi and late endosome interface. We also show that Tor1p vacuolar localization and TORC1 anabolic functions, including growth promotion and phosphorylation of its direct substrate Sch9, are compromised in s-hhy mutants. Thus, an intact trans-Golgi and late endosome interface is a requisite for efficient Tor1 vacuolar localization and TORC1 function.

  2. Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans

    MedlinePlus

    ... label> Archived Flu Emails Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Avian Influenza A Virus Infections ... label> Archived Flu Emails Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Language: English (US) Español File ...

  3. Evidence-Based Advances in Avian Medicine.

    PubMed

    Summa, Noémie M; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon

    2017-09-01

    This article presents relevant advances in avian medicine and surgery over the past 5 years. New information has been published to improve clinical diagnosis in avian diseases. This article also describes new pharmacokinetic studies. Advances in the understanding and treatment of common avian disorders are presented in this article, as well. Although important progress has been made over the past years, there is still much research that needs to be done regarding the etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of avian diseases and evidence-based information is still sparse in the literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Markov Chain Estimation of Avian Seasonal Fecundity

    EPA Science Inventory

    To explore the consequences of modeling decisions on inference about avian seasonal fecundity we generalize previous Markov chain (MC) models of avian nest success to formulate two different MC models of avian seasonal fecundity that represent two different ways to model renestin...

  5. Current situation on highly pathogenic avian influenza

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza is one of the most important diseases affecting the poultry industry worldwide. Avian influenza viruses can cause a range of clinical disease in poultry. Viruses that cause severe disease and mortality are referred to as highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses. The Asian ...

  6. Seroprevalence of avian hepatitis E virus and avian leucosis virus subgroup J in chicken flocks with hepatitis syndrome, China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yani; Du, Taofeng; Liu, Baoyuan; Syed, Shahid Faraz; Chen, Yiyang; Li, Huixia; Wang, Xinjie; Zhang, Gaiping; Zhou, En-Min; Zhao, Qin

    2016-11-22

    From 2014 to 2015 in China, many broiler breeder and layer hen flocks exhibited a decrease in egg production and some chickens developed hepatitis syndrome including hepatomegaly, hepatic necrosis and hemorrhage. Avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) and avian leucosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) both cause decreasing in egg production, hepatomegaly and hepatic hemorrhage in broiler breeder and layer hens. In the study, the seroprevalence of avian HEV and ALV-J in these flocks emerging the disease from Shandong and Shaanxi provinces were investigated. A total of 1995 serum samples were collected from 14 flocks with hepatitis syndrome in Shandong and Shaanxi provinces, China. Antibodies against avian HEV and ALV-J in these serum samples were detected using iELISAs. The seroprevalence of anti-avian HEV antibodies (35.09%) was significantly higher than that of anti-ALV-J antibodies (2.16%) (p = 0.00). Moreover, the 43 serum samples positive for anti-ALV-J antibodies were all also positive for anti-avian HEV antibodies. In a comparison of both provinces, Shandong chickens exhibited a significantly higher seroprevalence of anti-avian HEV antibodies (42.16%) than Shaanxi chickens (26%) (p = 0.00). In addition, the detection of avian HEV RNA and ALV-J cDNA in the liver samples from the flocks of two provinces also showed the same results of the seroprevalence. In the present study, the results showed that avian HEV infection is widely prevalent and ALV-J infection is endemic in the flocks with hepatitis syndrome from Shandong and Shaanxi provinces of China. These results suggested that avian HEV infection may be the major cause of increased egg drop and hepatitis syndrome observed during the last 2 years in China. These results should be useful to guide development of prevention and control measures to control the diseases within chicken flocks in China.

  7. Avian botulism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, T.E.; Friend, M.

    1999-01-01

    Avian botulism is a paralytic, often fatal, disease of birds that results when they ingest toxin produced by the bacterium, Clostridium botulinum. Seven distinct types of toxin designated by the letters A to G have been identified (Table 38.1). Waterfowl die-offs due to botulism are usually caused by type C toxin; sporadic die-offs among fish-eating birds, such as common loons and gulls, have been caused by type E toxin. Type A botulinum toxin has also caused disease in birds, most frequently in domestic chickens. Types B, D, F, and G are not known to cause avian botulism in North America.

  8. 9 CFR 113.325 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine. 113... REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.325 Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine. Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine... vaccine production. All serials shall be prepared from the first through the fifth passage from the Master...

  9. 9 CFR 113.325 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine. 113... REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.325 Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine. Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine... vaccine production. All serials shall be prepared from the first through the fifth passage from the Master...

  10. 9 CFR 113.325 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine. 113... REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.325 Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine. Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine... vaccine production. All serials shall be prepared from the first through the fifth passage from the Master...

  11. 9 CFR 113.325 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine. 113... REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.325 Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine. Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine... vaccine production. All serials shall be prepared from the first through the fifth passage from the Master...

  12. Vacuolar H+-ATPase Protects Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells against Ethanol-Induced Oxidative and Cell Wall Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Charoenbhakdi, Sirikarn; Dokpikul, Thanittra; Burphan, Thanawat; Techo, Todsapol

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During fermentation, increased ethanol concentration is a major stress for yeast cells. Vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase), which plays an important role in the maintenance of intracellular pH homeostasis through vacuolar acidification, has been shown to be required for tolerance to straight-chain alcohols, including ethanol. Since ethanol is known to increase membrane permeability to protons, which then promotes intracellular acidification, it is possible that the V-ATPase is required for recovery from alcohol-induced intracellular acidification. In this study, we show that the effects of straight-chain alcohols on membrane permeabilization and acidification of the cytosol and vacuole are strongly dependent on their lipophilicity. These findings suggest that the membrane-permeabilizing effect of straight-chain alcohols induces cytosolic and vacuolar acidification in a lipophilicity-dependent manner. Surprisingly, after ethanol challenge, the cytosolic pH in Δvma2 and Δvma3 mutants lacking V-ATPase activity was similar to that of the wild-type strain. It is therefore unlikely that the ethanol-sensitive phenotype of vma mutants resulted from severe cytosolic acidification. Interestingly, the vma mutants exposed to ethanol exhibited a delay in cell wall remodeling and a significant increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). These findings suggest a role for V-ATPase in the regulation of the cell wall stress response and the prevention of endogenous oxidative stress in response to ethanol. IMPORTANCE The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been widely used in the alcoholic fermentation industry. Among the environmental stresses that yeast cells encounter during the process of alcoholic fermentation, ethanol is a major stress factor that inhibits yeast growth and viability, eventually leading to fermentation arrest. This study provides evidence for the molecular mechanisms of ethanol tolerance, which is a desirable characteristic for yeast strains

  13. Vacuolar H+-ATPase Protects Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells against Ethanol-Induced Oxidative and Cell Wall Stresses.

    PubMed

    Charoenbhakdi, Sirikarn; Dokpikul, Thanittra; Burphan, Thanawat; Techo, Todsapol; Auesukaree, Choowong

    2016-05-15

    During fermentation, increased ethanol concentration is a major stress for yeast cells. Vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase), which plays an important role in the maintenance of intracellular pH homeostasis through vacuolar acidification, has been shown to be required for tolerance to straight-chain alcohols, including ethanol. Since ethanol is known to increase membrane permeability to protons, which then promotes intracellular acidification, it is possible that the V-ATPase is required for recovery from alcohol-induced intracellular acidification. In this study, we show that the effects of straight-chain alcohols on membrane permeabilization and acidification of the cytosol and vacuole are strongly dependent on their lipophilicity. These findings suggest that the membrane-permeabilizing effect of straight-chain alcohols induces cytosolic and vacuolar acidification in a lipophilicity-dependent manner. Surprisingly, after ethanol challenge, the cytosolic pH in Δvma2 and Δvma3 mutants lacking V-ATPase activity was similar to that of the wild-type strain. It is therefore unlikely that the ethanol-sensitive phenotype of vma mutants resulted from severe cytosolic acidification. Interestingly, the vma mutants exposed to ethanol exhibited a delay in cell wall remodeling and a significant increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). These findings suggest a role for V-ATPase in the regulation of the cell wall stress response and the prevention of endogenous oxidative stress in response to ethanol. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been widely used in the alcoholic fermentation industry. Among the environmental stresses that yeast cells encounter during the process of alcoholic fermentation, ethanol is a major stress factor that inhibits yeast growth and viability, eventually leading to fermentation arrest. This study provides evidence for the molecular mechanisms of ethanol tolerance, which is a desirable characteristic for yeast strains used in alcoholic

  14. Singlet Oxygen-Induced Membrane Disruption and Serpin-Protease Balance in Vacuolar-Driven Cell Death1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Carmieli, Raanan; Mor, Avishai; Fluhr, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Singlet oxygen plays a role in cellular stress either by providing direct toxicity or through signaling to initiate death programs. It was therefore of interest to examine cell death, as occurs in Arabidopsis, due to differentially localized singlet oxygen photosensitizers. The photosensitizers rose bengal (RB) and acridine orange (AO) were localized to the plasmalemma and vacuole, respectively. Their photoactivation led to cell death as measured by ion leakage. Cell death could be inhibited by the singlet oxygen scavenger histidine in treatments with AO but not with RB. In the case of AO treatment, the vacuolar membrane was observed to disintegrate. Concomitantly, a complex was formed between a vacuolar cell-death protease, RESPONSIVE TO DESSICATION-21 and its cognate cytoplasmic protease inhibitor ATSERPIN1. In the case of RB treatment, the tonoplast remained intact and no complex was formed. Over-expression of AtSerpin1 repressed cell death, only under AO photodynamic treatment. Interestingly, acute water stress showed accumulation of singlet oxygen as determined by fluorescence of Singlet Oxygen Sensor Green, by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and the induction of singlet oxygen marker genes. Cell death by acute water stress was inhibited by the singlet oxygen scavenger histidine and was accompanied by vacuolar collapse and the appearance of serpin-protease complex. Over-expression of AtSerpin1 also attenuated cell death under this mode of cell stress. Thus, acute water stress damage shows parallels to vacuole-mediated cell death where the generation of singlet oxygen may play a role. PMID:26884487

  15. 77 FR 34783 - Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ... [Docket No. APHIS-2006-0074] RIN 0579-AC36 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza AGENCY: Animal and Plant... regions where any subtype of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) is considered to exist. The interim... avian influenza (HPAI). On January 24, 2011, we published in the Federal Register (76 FR 4046-4056...

  16. Isolation, characterization, and structure analysis of a vacuolar processing enzyme gene (MhVPEγ) from Malus hupehensis (Pamp) Rehd.

    PubMed

    Ran, Kun; Yang, Hongqiang; Sun, Xiaoli; Li, Qiang; Jiang, Qianqian; Zhang, Weiwei; Shen, Wei

    2014-05-01

    Vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs) have received considerable attention recently, as they exhibit caspase-1-like cleavage activity and regulate the process of PCD. However, knowledge about their detailed characteristics and structures is relatively limited. In this study, a gamma vacuolar processing enzyme gene, MhVPEγ, has been isolated from the leaves of Malus hupehensis (Ramp) Rehd. var pinyiensis Jiang. MhVPEγ coded-translated protein sequence comprised of 494 amino acids with a signal peptide and a transmembrane helix structure at N-terminal, peptidase_C13 domain, and vacuolar sorting signal at C-terminal. Consequently, genomic walking approach was performed for the isolation of its upstream sequence. Computational analysis demonstrated several motifs of the promoter exhibiting hypothetic MeJA, ABA, and light-induced characteristics, as well as some typical domains universally discovered in promoter, such as TATA-box and CAAT-box. MhVPEγ transcript level was enhanced during wounding treatment, and WUN-motif, as one of the cis-acting regulatory elements existing in the upstream sequence perhaps regulates its expression. In silico-constructed 3D models revealed that MhCPYL successively interacts with MhVPEγ like that of "Induced Fit-Lock and Key" model, providing molecular conformation evidence that CPY is a direct substrate of VPEγ. This study is the first stride to understand the molecular mechanism of VPEγ and CPYL interactions.

  17. Avian influenza surveillance and diagnosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rapid detection and accurate identification of low (LPAI) and high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) is critical to controlling infections and disease in poultry. Test selection and algorithms for the detection and diagnosis of avian influenza virus (AIV) in poultry may vary somewhat among differ...

  18. Vacuolar processing enzyme: an executor of plant cell death.

    PubMed

    Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko; Hatsugai, Noriyuki; Nakaune, Satoru; Kuroyanagi, Miwa; Nishimura, Mikio

    2005-08-01

    Apoptotic cell death in animals is regulated by cysteine proteinases called caspases. Recently, vacuolar processing enzyme (VPE) was identified as a plant caspase. VPE deficiency prevents cell death during hypersensitive response and cell death of limited cell layers at the early stage of embryogenesis. Because plants do not have macrophages, dying cells must degrade their materials by themselves. VPE plays an essential role in the regulation of the lytic system of plants during the processes of defense and development. VPE is localized in the vacuoles, unlike animal caspases, which are localized in the cytosol. Thus, plants might have evolved a regulated cellular suicide strategy that, unlike animal apoptosis, is mediated by VPE and the vacuoles.

  19. Avian influenza: a review.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jennifer K; Noppenberger, Jennifer

    2007-01-15

    A review of the avian influenza A/H5N1 virus, including human cases, viral transmission, clinical features, vaccines and antivirals, surveillance plans, infection control, and emergency response plans, is presented. The World Health Organization (WHO) considers the avian influenza A/H5N1 virus a public health risk with pandemic potential. The next human influenza pandemic, if caused by the avian influenza A/H5N1 virus, is estimated to have a potential mortality rate of more than a hundred million. Outbreaks in poultry have been associated with human transmission. WHO has documented 258 confirmed human infections with a mortality rate greater than 50%. Bird-to-human transmission of the avian influenza virus is likely by the oral-fecal route. The most effective defense against an influenza pandemic would be a directed vaccine to elicit a specific immune response toward the strain or strains of the influenza virus. However, until there is an influenza pandemic, there is no evidence that vaccines or antivirals used in the treatment or prevention of such an outbreak would decrease morbidity or mortality. Surveillance of the bird and human populations for the highly pathogenic H5N1 is being conducted. Infection-control measures and an emergency response plan are discussed. Avian influenza virus A/H5N1 is a public health threat that has the potential to cause serious illness and death in humans. Understanding its pathology, transmission, clinical features, and pharmacologic treatments and preparing for the prevention and management of its outbreak will help avoid its potentially devastating consequences.

  20. Highly pathogenic avian influenza.

    PubMed

    Swayne, D E; Suarez, D L

    2000-08-01

    Highly pathogenic (HP) avian influenza (AI) (HPAI) is an extremely contagious, multi-organ systemic disease of poultry leading to high mortality, and caused by some H5 and H7 subtypes of type A influenza virus, family Orthomyxoviridae. However, most AI virus strains are mildly pathogenic (MP) and produce either subclinical infections or respiratory and/or reproductive diseases in a variety of domestic and wild bird species. Highly pathogenic avian influenza is a List A disease of the Office International des Epizooties, while MPAI is neither a List A nor List B disease. Eighteen outbreaks of HPAI have been documented since the identification of AI virus as the cause of fowl plague in 1955. Mildly pathogenic avian influenza viruses are maintained in wild aquatic bird reservoirs, occasionally crossing over to domestic poultry and causing outbreaks of mild disease. Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses do not have a recognised wild bird reservoir, but can occasionally be isolated from wild birds during outbreaks in domestic poultry. Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses have been documented to arise from MPAI viruses through mutations in the haemagglutinin surface protein. Prevention of exposure to the virus and eradication are the accepted methods for dealing with HPAI. Control programmes, which imply allowing a low incidence of infection, are not an acceptable method for managing HPAI, but have been used during some outbreaks of MPAI. The components of a strategy to deal with MPAI or HPAI include surveillance and diagnosis, biosecurity, education, quarantine and depopulation. Vaccination has been used in some control and eradication programmes for AI.

  1. Vacuolar status and water relations in embryonic axes of recalcitrant Aesculus hippocastanum seeds during stratification and early germination.

    PubMed

    Obroucheva, Natalie V; Lityagina, Snezhana V; Novikova, Galina V; Sin'kevich, Irina A

    2012-01-01

    In tropical recalcitrant seeds, their rapid transition from shedding to germination at high hydration level is of physiological interest but difficult to study because of the time constraint. In recalcitrant horse chestnut seeds produced in central Russia, this transition is much longer and extends through dormancy and dormancy release. This extended time period permits studies of the water relations in embryonic axes during the long recalcitrant period in terms of vacuolar status and water transport. Horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum) seeds sampled in Moscow were stratified in cold wet sand for 4 months. Vacuole presence and development in embryonic axes were examined by vital staining, light and electron microscopy. Aquaporins and vacuolar H(+)-ATPase were identified immunochemically. Water channel operation was tested by water inflow rate. Vacuolar acid invertase was estimated in terms of activity and electrophoretic properties. Throughout the long recalcitrant period after seed shedding, cells of embryonic axes maintained active vacuoles and a high water content. Preservation of enzyme machinery in vacuoles was evident from retention of invertase activity, substrate specificity, molecular mass and subunit composition. Plasmalemma and tonoplast aquaporins and the E subunit of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase were also present. In non-dormant seeds prior to growth initiation, vacuoles enlarged at first in hypocotyls, and then in radicles, with their biogenesis being similar. Vacuolation was accompanied by increasing invertase activity, leading to sugar accumulation and active osmotic functioning. After growth initiation, vacuole enlargement was favoured by enhanced water inflow through water channels formed by aquaporins. Maintenance of high water content and desiccation sensitivity, as well as preservation of active vacuoles in embryonic axes after shedding, can be considered a specific feature of recalcitrant seeds, overlooked when studying tropical recalcitrants due

  2. Vacuolar status and water relations in embryonic axes of recalcitrant Aesculus hippocastanum seeds during stratification and early germination

    PubMed Central

    Obroucheva, Natalie V.; Lityagina, Snezhana V.; Novikova, Galina V.; Sin'kevich, Irina A.

    2012-01-01

    Backgrounds and aims In tropical recalcitrant seeds, their rapid transition from shedding to germination at high hydration level is of physiological interest but difficult to study because of the time constraint. In recalcitrant horse chestnut seeds produced in central Russia, this transition is much longer and extends through dormancy and dormancy release. This extended time period permits studies of the water relations in embryonic axes during the long recalcitrant period in terms of vacuolar status and water transport. Methodology Horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum) seeds sampled in Moscow were stratified in cold wet sand for 4 months. Vacuole presence and development in embryonic axes were examined by vital staining, light and electron microscopy. Aquaporins and vacuolar H+-ATPase were identified immunochemically. Water channel operation was tested by water inflow rate. Vacuolar acid invertase was estimated in terms of activity and electrophoretic properties. Principal results Throughout the long recalcitrant period after seed shedding, cells of embryonic axes maintained active vacuoles and a high water content. Preservation of enzyme machinery in vacuoles was evident from retention of invertase activity, substrate specificity, molecular mass and subunit composition. Plasmalemma and tonoplast aquaporins and the E subunit of vacuolar H+-ATPase were also present. In non-dormant seeds prior to growth initiation, vacuoles enlarged at first in hypocotyls, and then in radicles, with their biogenesis being similar. Vacuolation was accompanied by increasing invertase activity, leading to sugar accumulation and active osmotic functioning. After growth initiation, vacuole enlargement was favoured by enhanced water inflow through water channels formed by aquaporins. Conclusions Maintenance of high water content and desiccation sensitivity, as well as preservation of active vacuoles in embryonic axes after shedding, can be considered a specific feature of recalcitrant

  3. On avian influenza epidemic models with time delay.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sanhong; Ruan, Shigui; Zhang, Xinan

    2015-12-01

    After the outbreak of the first avian influenza A virus (H5N1) in Hong Kong in 1997, another avian influenza A virus (H7N9) crossed the species barrier in mainland China in 2013 and 2014 and caused more than 400 human cases with a death rate of nearly 40%. In this paper, we take account of the incubation periods of avian influenza A virus and construct a bird-to-human transmission model with different time delays in the avian and human populations combining the survival probability of the infective avian and human populations at the latent time. By analyzing the dynamical behavior of the model, we obtain a threshold value for the prevalence of avian influenza and investigate local and global asymptotical stability of equilibria of the system.

  4. Possible roles of vacuolar H+-ATPase and mitochondrial function in tolerance to air-drying stress revealed by genome-wide screening of Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion strains.

    PubMed

    Shima, Jun; Ando, Akira; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2008-03-01

    Yeasts used in bread making are exposed to air-drying stress during dried yeast production processes. To clarify the genes required for air-drying tolerance, we performed genome-wide screening using the complete deletion strain collection of diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The screening identified 278 gene deletions responsible for air-drying sensitivity. These genes were classified based on their cellular function and on the localization of their gene products. The results showed that the genes required for air-drying tolerance were frequently involved in mitochondrial functions and in connection with vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, which plays a role in vacuolar acidification. To determine the role of vacuolar acidification in air-drying stress tolerance, we monitored intracellular pH. The results showed that intracellular acidification was induced during air-drying and that this acidification was amplified in a deletion mutant of the VMA2 gene encoding a component of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, suggesting that vacuolar H(+)-ATPase helps maintain intracellular pH homeostasis, which is affected by air-drying stress. To determine the effects of air-drying stress on mitochondria, we analysed the mitochondrial membrane potential under air-drying stress conditions using MitoTracker. The results showed that mitochondria were extremely sensitive to air-drying stress, suggesting that a mitochondrial function is required for tolerance to air-drying stress. We also analysed the correlation between oxidative-stress sensitivity and air-drying-stress sensitivity. The results suggested that oxidative stress is a critical determinant of sensitivity to air-drying stress, although ROS-scavenging systems are not necessary for air-drying stress tolerance. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Ecology and conservation biology of avian malaria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaPointe, Dennis A.; Atkinson, Carter T.; Samuel, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Avian malaria is a worldwide mosquito-borne disease caused by Plasmodium parasites. These parasites occur in many avian species but primarily affect passerine birds that have not evolved with the parasite. Host pathogenicity, fitness, and population impacts are poorly understood. In contrast to continental species, introduced avian malaria poses a substantial threat to naive birds on Hawaii, the Galapagos, and other archipelagoes. In Hawaii, transmission is maintained by susceptible native birds, competence and abundance of mosquitoes, and a disease reservoir of chronically infected native birds. Although vector habitat and avian communities determine the geographic distribution of disease, climate drives transmission patterns ranging from continuous high infection in warm lowland forests, seasonal infection in midelevation forests, and disease-free refugia in cool high-elevation forests. Global warming is expected to increase the occurrence, distribution, and intensity of avian malaria across this elevational gradient and threaten high-elevation refugia, which is the key to survival of many susceptible Hawaiian birds. Increased temperatures may have already increased global avian malaria prevalence and contributed to an emergence of disease in New Zealand.

  6. Avian cholera in Nebraska's Rainwater Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Windingstad, R.M.; Hurt, J.J.; Trout, A.K.; Cary, J.

    1984-01-01

    The first report of avian cholera in North America occurred in northwestern Texas in winter 1944 (Quortrup et al. 1946). In 1975, mortality from avian cholera occurred for the first time in waterfowl in the Rainwater Basin of Nebraska when an estimated 25,000 birds died (Zinkl et al. 1977). Avian cholera has continued to cause mortality in wild birds in specific areas of the Basin each spring since. Losses of waterfowl from avian cholera continue to be much greater in some of the wetlands in the western part of the Basin than in the east. Several wetlands in the west have consistently higher mortality and are most often the wetlands where initial mortality is noticed each spring (Figure 1). The establishment of this disease in Nebraska is of considerable concern because of the importance of the Rainwater Basin as a spring staging area for waterfowl migrating to their breeding grounds. The wetlands in this area are on a major migration route used by an estimated 5 to 9 million ducks and several hundred thousand geese. A large portion of the western mid-continental greater white-fronted goose (Anser albifrons) population stage in the Basin each spring. Occasionally, whooping cranes (Grus americana) use these wetlands during migration, and lesser sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) staging on the nearby Platte River sometimes use wetlands where avian cholera occurs (Anonymous 1981). Our objectives were to determine whether certain water quality variables in the Rainwater Basin differed between areas of high and low avian cholera incidence. These results would then be used for laboratory studies involving the survivability of Pasteurella multocida, the causative bacterium of avian cholera. Those studies will be reported elsewhere.

  7. Choline but not its derivative betaine blocks slow vacuolar channels in the halophyte Chenopodium quinoa: implications for salinity stress responses.

    PubMed

    Pottosin, Igor; Bonales-Alatorre, Edgar; Shabala, Sergey

    2014-11-03

    Activity of tonoplast slow vacuolar (SV, or TPC1) channels has to be under a tight control, to avoid undesirable leak of cations stored in the vacuole. This is particularly important for salt-grown plants, to ensure efficient vacuolar Na(+) sequestration. In this study we show that choline, a cationic precursor of glycine betaine, efficiently blocks SV channels in leaf and root vacuoles of the two chenopods, Chenopodium quinoa (halophyte) and Beta vulgaris (glycophyte). At the same time, betaine and proline, two major cytosolic organic osmolytes, have no significant effect on SV channel activity. Physiological implications of these findings are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Human NKCC2 cation–Cl– co-transporter complements lack of Vhc1 transporter in yeast vacuolar membranes.

    PubMed

    Petrezselyova, Silvia; Dominguez, Angel; Herynkova, Pavla; Macias, Juan F; Sychrova, Hana

    2013-10-01

    Cation–chloride co-transporters serve to transport Cl– and alkali metal cations. Whereas a large family of these exists in higher eukaryotes, yeasts only possess one cation–chloride co-transporter, Vhc1, localized to the vacuolar membrane. In this study, the human cation–chloride co-transporter NKCC2 complemented the phenotype of VHC1 deletion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its activity controlled the growth of salt-sensitive yeast cells in the presence of high KCl, NaCl and LiCl. A S. cerevisiae mutant lacking plasma-membrane alkali–metal cation exporters Nha1 and Ena1-5 and the vacuolar cation–chloride co-transporter Vhc1 is highly sensitive to increased concentrations of alkali–metal cations, and it proved to be a suitable model for characterizing the substrate specificity and transport activity of human wild-type and mutated cation–chloride co-transporters. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Avian cholera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friend, Milton

    1999-01-01

    Avian cholera is a contagious disease resulting from infection by the bacterium Pasteurella multocida. Several subspecies of bacteria have been proposed for P. multocida, and at least 16 different P. multocida serotypes or characteristics of antigens in bacterial cells that differentiate bacterial variants from each other have been recognized. The serotypes are further differentiated by other methods, including DNA fingerprinting. These evaluations are useful for studying the ecology of avian cholera (Fig. 7.1), because different serotypes are generally found in poultry and free-ranging migratory birds. These evaluations also show that different P. multocida serotypes are found in wild birds in the eastern United States than those that are found in the birds in the rest of the Nation (Fig. 7.2).

  10. Root bacterial endophytes confer drought resistance and enhance expression and activity of a vacuolar H+ -pumping pyrophosphatase in pepper plants.

    PubMed

    Vigani, Gianpiero; Rolli, Eleonora; Marasco, Ramona; Dell'Orto, Marta; Michoud, Grégoire; Soussi, Asma; Raddadi, Noura; Borin, Sara; Sorlini, Claudia; Zocchi, Graziano; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2018-05-22

    It has been previously shown that the transgenic overexpression of the plant root vacuolar proton pumps H + -ATPase (V-ATPase) and H + -PPase (V-PPase) confer tolerance to drought. Since plant-root endophytic bacteria can also promote drought tolerance, we hypothesize that such promotion can be associated to the enhancement of the host vacuolar proton pumps expression and activity. To test this hypothesis, we selected two endophytic bacteria endowed with an array of in vitro plant growth promoting traits. Their genome sequences confirmed the presence of traits previously shown to confer drought resistance to plants, such as the synthesis of nitric oxide and of organic volatile organic compounds. We used the two strains on pepper (Capsicuum annuum L.) because of its high sensitivity to drought. Under drought conditions, both strains stimulated a larger root system and enhanced the leaves' photosynthetic activity. By testing the expression and activity of the vacuolar proton pumps, H + -ATPase (V-ATPase) and H + -PPase (V-PPase), we found that bacterial colonization enhanced V-PPase only. We conclude that the enhanced expression and activity of V-PPase can be favoured by the colonization of drought-tolerance-inducing bacterial endophytes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Carcass Management During Avian Influenza Outbreaks

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page on Avian Influenza (AI) describes carcass management during Avian Flu outbreaks, including who oversees carcass management, how they're managed, environmental concerns from carcass management, and disinfection. The page also describes what AI is.

  12. Avian-like breathing mechanics in maniraptoran dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Codd, Jonathan R; Manning, Phillip L; Norell, Mark A; Perry, Steven F

    2007-01-01

    In 1868 Thomas Huxley first proposed that dinosaurs were the direct ancestors of birds and subsequent analyses have identified a suite of ‘avian’ characteristics in theropod dinosaurs. Ossified uncinate processes are found in most species of extant birds and also occur in extinct non-avian maniraptoran dinosaurs. Their presence in these dinosaurs represents another morphological character linking them to Aves, and further supports the presence of an avian-like air-sac respiratory system in theropod dinosaurs, prior to the evolution of flight. Here we report a phylogenetic analysis of the presence of uncinate processes in Aves and non-avian maniraptoran dinosaurs indicating that these were homologous structures. Furthermore, recent work on Canada geese has demonstrated that uncinate processes are integral to the mechanics of avian ventilation, facilitating both inspiration and expiration. In extant birds, uncinate processes function to increase the mechanical advantage for movements of the ribs and sternum during respiration. Our study presents a mechanism whereby uncinate processes, in conjunction with lateral and ventral movements of the sternum and gastral basket, affected avian-like breathing mechanics in extinct non-avian maniraptoran dinosaurs. PMID:17986432

  13. Ecology and conservation biology of avian malaria.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, Dennis A; Atkinson, Carter T; Samuel, Michael D

    2012-02-01

    Avian malaria is a worldwide mosquito-borne disease caused by Plasmodium parasites. These parasites occur in many avian species but primarily affect passerine birds that have not evolved with the parasite. Host pathogenicity, fitness, and population impacts are poorly understood. In contrast to continental species, introduced avian malaria poses a substantial threat to naive birds on Hawaii, the Galapagos, and other archipelagoes. In Hawaii, transmission is maintained by susceptible native birds, competence and abundance of mosquitoes, and a disease reservoir of chronically infected native birds. Although vector habitat and avian communities determine the geographic distribution of disease, climate drives transmission patterns ranging from continuous high infection in warm lowland forests, seasonal infection in midelevation forests, and disease-free refugia in cool high-elevation forests. Global warming is expected to increase the occurrence, distribution, and intensity of avian malaria across this elevational gradient and threaten high-elevation refugia, which is the key to survival of many susceptible Hawaiian birds. Increased temperatures may have already increased global avian malaria prevalence and contributed to an emergence of disease in New Zealand. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  14. Avian influenza

    MedlinePlus

    ... government keeps a stockpile of vaccine. At this time, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) does not recommend against travel to countries affected by avian influenza. The Centers ...

  15. Avian influenza virus and free-ranging wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dierauf, Leslie A.; Karesh, W.B.; Ip, Hon S.; Gilardi, K.V.; Fischer, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Recent media and news reports and other information implicate wild birds in the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza in Asia and Eastern Europe. Although there is little information concerning highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in wild birds, scientists have amassed a large amount of data on low-pathogenicity avian influenza viruses during decades of research with wild birds. This knowledge can provide sound guidance to veterinarians, public health professionals, the general public, government agencies, and other entities with concerns about avian influenza.

  16. Avian Paramyxovirus: A Brief Review.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, P; Ganar, K; Kumar, S

    2017-02-01

    Avian paramyxoviruses (APMVs) have been reported from a wide variety of avian species around the world. Avian paramyxoviruses are economically significant because of the huge mortality and morbidity associated with it. Twelve different serotypes of APMV have been reported till date. Avian paramyxoviruses belong to the family Paramyxoviridae under genus Avulavirus. Newcastle disease virus (APMV-1) is the most characterized members among the APMV serotypes. Complete genome sequence of all twelve APMV serotypes has been published recently. In recent years, APMV-1 has attracted the virologists for its oncolytic activity and its use as a vaccine vector for both animals and humans. The recombinant APMV-based vaccine offers a pertinent choice for the construction of live attenuated vaccine due to its minimum recombination frequency, modular nature of transcription and lack of DNA phase during its replication. Although insufficient data are available regarding other APMV serotypes, our understanding about the APMV biology is expanding rapidly because of the availability of modern molecular biology tools and high-throughput complete genome sequencing. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. [Oligonucleotide microarray for subtyping avian influenza virus].

    PubMed

    Xueqing, Han; Xiangmei, Lin; Yihong, Hou; Shaoqiang, Wu; Jian, Liu; Lin, Mei; Guangle, Jia; Zexiao, Yang

    2008-09-01

    Avian influenza viruses are important human and animal respiratory pathogens and rapid diagnosis of novel emerging avian influenza viruses is vital for effective global influenza surveillance. We developed an oligonucleotide microarray-based method for subtyping all avian influenza virus (16 HA and 9 NA subtypes). In total 25 pairs of primers specific for different subtypes and 1 pair of universal primers were carefully designed based on the genomic sequences of influenza A viruses retrieved from GenBank database. Several multiplex RT-PCR methods were then developed, and the target cDNAs of 25 subtype viruses were amplified by RT-PCR or overlapping PCR for evaluating the microarray. Further 52 oligonucleotide probes specific for all 25 subtype viruses were designed according to published gene sequences of avian influenza viruses in amplified target cDNAs domains, and a microarray for subtyping influenza A virus was developed. Then its specificity and sensitivity were validated by using different subtype strains and 2653 samples from 49 different areas. The results showed that all the subtypes of influenza virus could be identified simultaneously on this microarray with high sensitivity, which could reach to 2.47 pfu/mL virus or 2.5 ng target DNA. Furthermore, there was no cross reaction with other avian respiratory virus. An oligonucleotide microarray-based strategy for detection of avian influenza viruses has been developed. Such a diagnostic microarray will be useful in discovering and identifying all subtypes of avian influenza virus.

  18. Avian influenza viruses in humans.

    PubMed

    Malik Peiris, J S

    2009-04-01

    Past pandemics arose from low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses. In more recent times, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1, LPAI H9N2 and both HPAI and LPAI H7 viruses have repeatedly caused zoonotic disease in humans. Such infections did not lead to sustained human-to-human transmission. Experimental infection of human volunteers and seroepidemiological studies suggest that avian influenza viruses of other subtypes may also infect humans. Viruses of the H7 subtype appear to have a predilection to cause conjunctivitis and influenza-like illness (ILI), although HPAI H7N7 virus has also caused fatal respiratory disease. Low pathogenic H9N2 viruses have caused mild ILI and its occurrence may be under-recognised for this reason. In contrast, contemporary HPAI H5N1 viruses are exceptional in their virulence for humans and differ from human seasonal influenza viruses in their pathogenesis. Patients have a primary viral pneumonia progressing to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Over 380 human cases have been confirmed to date, with an overall case fatality of 63%. The zoonotic transmission of avian influenza is a rare occurrence, butthe greater public health concern is the adaptation of such viruses to efficient human transmission, which could lead to a pandemic. A better understanding of the ecology of avian influenza viruses and the biological determinants of transmissibility and pathogenicity in humans is important for pandemic preparedness.

  19. Avian Metapneumovirus Subgroup C Infection in Chickens, China

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Li; Zhu, Shanshan; Yan, Xv; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Chunyan; She, Ruiping; Hu, Fengjiao; Quan, Rong

    2013-01-01

    Avian metapneumovirus causes acute respiratory tract infection and reductions in egg production in various avian species. We isolated and characterized an increasingly prevalent avian metapneumovirus subgroup C strain from meat-type commercial chickens with severe respiratory signs in China. Culling of infected flocks could lead to economic consequences. PMID:23763901

  20. The public health impact of avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Katz, J M; Veguilla, V; Belser, J A; Maines, T R; Van Hoeven, N; Pappas, C; Hancock, K; Tumpey, T M

    2009-04-01

    Influenza viruses with novel hemagglutinin and 1 or more accompanying genes derived from avian influenza viruses sporadically emerge in humans and have the potential to result in a pandemic if the virus causes disease and spreads efficiently in a population that lacks immunity to the novel hemagglutinin. Since 1997, multiple avian influenza virus subtypes have been transmitted directly from domestic poultry to humans and have caused a spectrum of human disease, from asymptomatic to severe and fatal. To assess the pandemic risk that avian influenza viruses pose, we have used multiple strategies to better understand the capacity of avian viruses to infect, cause disease, and transmit among mammals, including humans. Seroepidemiologic studies that evaluate the frequency and risk of human infection with avian influenza viruses in populations with exposure to domestic or wild birds can provide a better understanding of the pandemic potential of avian influenza subtypes. Investigations conducted in Hong Kong following the first H5N1 outbreak in humans in 1997 determined that exposure to poultry in live bird markets was a key risk factor for human disease. Among poultry workers, butchering and exposure to sick poultry were risk factors for antibody to H5 virus, which provided evidence for infection. A second risk assessment tool, the ferret, can be used to evaluate the level of virulence and potential for host-to-host transmission of avian influenza viruses in this naturally susceptible host. Avian viruses isolated from humans exhibit a level of virulence and transmissibility in ferrets that generally reflects that seen in humans. The ferret model thus provides a means to monitor emerging avian influenza viruses for pandemic risk, as well as to evaluate laboratory-generated reassortants and mutants to better understand the molecular basis of influenza virus transmissibility. Taken together, such studies provide valuable information with which we can assess the public

  1. Avian models in teratology and developmental toxicology.

    PubMed

    Smith, Susan M; Flentke, George R; Garic, Ana

    2012-01-01

    The avian embryo is a long-standing model for developmental biology research. It also has proven utility for toxicology research both in ovo and in explant culture. Like mammals, avian embryos have an allantois and their developmental pathways are highly conserved with those of mammals, thus avian models have biomedical relevance. Fertile eggs are inexpensive and the embryo develops rapidly, allowing for high-throughput. The chick genome is sequenced and significant molecular resources are available for study, including the ability for genetic manipulation. The absence of a placenta permits the direct study of an agent's embryotoxic effects. Here, we present protocols for using avian embryos in toxicology research, including egg husbandry and hatch, toxicant delivery, and assessment of proliferation, apoptosis, and cardiac structure and function.

  2. A Dual Microscopy-Based Assay To Assess Listeria monocytogenes Cellular Entry and Vacuolar Escape.

    PubMed

    Quereda, Juan J; Pizarro-Cerdá, Javier; Balestrino, Damien; Bobard, Alexandre; Danckaert, Anne; Aulner, Nathalie; Shorte, Spencer; Enninga, Jost; Cossart, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive bacterium and a facultative intracellular pathogen that invades mammalian cells, disrupts its internalization vacuole, and proliferates in the host cell cytoplasm. Here, we describe a novel image-based microscopy assay that allows discrimination between cellular entry and vacuolar escape, enabling high-content screening to identify factors specifically involved in these two steps. We first generated L. monocytogenes and Listeria innocua strains expressing a β-lactamase covalently attached to the bacterial cell wall. These strains were then incubated with HeLa cells containing the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) probe CCF4 in their cytoplasm. The CCF4 probe was cleaved by the bacterial surface β-lactamase only in cells inoculated with L. monocytogenes but not those inoculated with L. innocua, thereby demonstrating bacterial access to the host cytoplasm. Subsequently, we performed differential immunofluorescence staining to distinguish extracellular versus total bacterial populations in samples that were also analyzed by the FRET-based assay. With this two-step analysis, bacterial entry can be distinguished from vacuolar rupture in a single experiment. Our novel approach represents a powerful tool for identifying factors that determine the intracellular niche of L. monocytogenes. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Avian Influenza.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, Gary Adam; Maslow, Melanie Jane

    2005-05-01

    The current epidemic of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza in Southeast Asia raises serious concerns that genetic reassortment will result in the next influenza pandemic. There have been 164 confirmed cases of human infection with avian influenza since 1996. In 2004, there were 45 cases of human H5N1 in Vietnam and Thailand, with a mortality rate more than 70%. In addition to the potential public health hazard, the current zoonotic epidemic has caused severe economic losses. Efforts must be concentrated on early detection of bird outbreaks with aggressive culling, quarantining, and disinfection. To prepare for and prevent an increase in human cases, it is essential to improve detection methods and stockpile effective antivirals. Novel therapeutic modalities, including short-interfering RNAs and new vaccine strategies that use plasmid-based genetic systems, offer promise should a pandemic occur.

  4. Newcastle disease and other avian paramyxoviruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is a form of avian paramyxovirus type 1 (APMV-1) that is highly virulent for chickens and turkeys. There are currently 13 recognized serotypes of avian paramyxovirus, but APMV-1, including NDV, is the most important for poultry Newcastle disease (ND) is considered to be...

  5. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.208 Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine (Killed Virus) shall be prepared from virus-bearing tissues or fluids obtained from...

  6. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.208 Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine (Killed Virus) shall be prepared from virus-bearing tissues or fluids obtained from...

  7. MANAGING AVIAN FLU, CARCASS MANAGEMENT & BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The avian influenza virus is discussed with emphasis on the impact to poultry and possible movement of the highly pathogenic H5N 1 virus to humans. A review is made of the worldwide effects to date of the avian influenza viruses; methods for the viruses to enter recreational wate...

  8. Relationship of the Membrane ATPase from Halobacterium saccharovorum to Vacuolar ATPases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga; Bowman, Emma J.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1991-01-01

    Polyclonal antiserum against subunit A (67 kDa) of the vacuolar ATPase from Neurospora crassa reacted with subunit I (87 kDa) from a membrane ATPase of the extremely halophilic archaebacterium Halobacterium saccharovorum. The halobacterial ATPase was inhibited by nitrate and N-ethylmaleimide; the extent of the latter inhibition was diminished in the presence of adenosine di- or triphosphates. 4-Chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan in- hibited the hatobacterial ATPase also in a nucleotide- protectable manner; the bulk of inhibitor was associated with subunit II (60 kDa). The data suggested that this halobacterial ATPase may have conserved structural features from both the vacuotar and the F-type ATPases.

  9. 9 CFR 113.70 - Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.70 Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate. Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate, shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture of an avirulent or modified...

  10. 9 CFR 113.70 - Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.70 Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate. Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate, shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture of an avirulent or modified...

  11. 9 CFR 113.70 - Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.70 Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate. Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate, shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture of an avirulent or modified...

  12. 9 CFR 113.70 - Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.70 Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate. Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate, shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture of an avirulent or modified...

  13. 9 CFR 113.70 - Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.70 Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate. Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate, shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture of an avirulent or modified...

  14. The Bimodal Lifestyle of Intracellular Salmonella in Epithelial Cells: Replication in the Cytosol Obscures Defects in Vacuolar Replication

    PubMed Central

    Steele-Mortimer, Olivia

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium invades and proliferates within epithelial cells. Intracellular bacteria replicate within a membrane bound vacuole known as the Salmonella containing vacuole. However, this bacterium can also replicate efficiently in the cytosol of epithelial cells and net intracellular growth is a product of both vacuolar and cytosolic replication. Here we have used semi-quantitative single-cell analyses to investigate the contribution of each of these replicative niches to intracellular proliferation in cultured epithelial cells. We show that cytosolic replication can account for the majority of net replication even though it occurs in less than 20% of infected cells. Consequently, assays for net growth in a population of infected cells, for example by recovery of colony forming units, are not good indicators of vacuolar proliferation. We also show that the Salmonella Type III Secretion System 2, which is required for SCV biogenesis, is not required for cytosolic replication. Altogether this study illustrates the value of single cell analyses when studying intracellular pathogens. PMID:22719929

  15. Activities of Vacuolar Cysteine Proteases in Plant Senescence.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Dana E; Costa, Lorenza; Guiamét, Juan José

    2018-01-01

    Plant senescence is accompanied by a marked increase in proteolytic activities, and cysteine proteases (Cys-protease) represent the prevailing class among the responsible proteases. Cys-proteases predominantly locate to lytic compartments, i.e., to the central vacuole (CV) and to senescence-associated vacuoles (SAVs), the latter being specific to the photosynthetic cells of senescing leaves. Cellular fractionation of vacuolar compartments may facilitate Cys-proteases purification and their concentration for further analysis. Active Cys-proteases may be analyzed by different, albeit complementary approaches: (1) in vivo examination of proteolytic activity by fluorescence microscopy using specific substrates which become fluorescent upon cleavage by Cys-proteases, (2) protease labeling with specific probes that react irreversibly with the active enzymes, and (3) zymography, whereby protease activities are detected in polyacrylamide gels copolymerized with a substrate for proteases. Here we describe the three methods mentioned above for detection of active Cys-proteases and a cellular fractionation technique to isolate SAVs.

  16. AVIAN IMMUNOTOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods for studying the avian immune system have matured during the past two decades, with laboratory studies predominating in earlier years and field studies being conducted only in the past decade. One application has been to determine the potential for environmental contamina...

  17. Pandemic Threat Posed by Avian Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Horimoto, Taisuke; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2001-01-01

    Influenza pandemics, defined as global outbreaks of the disease due to viruses with new antigenic subtypes, have exacted high death tolls from human populations. The last two pandemics were caused by hybrid viruses, or reassortants, that harbored a combination of avian and human viral genes. Avian influenza viruses are therefore key contributors to the emergence of human influenza pandemics. In 1997, an H5N1 influenza virus was directly transmitted from birds in live poultry markets in Hong Kong to humans. Eighteen people were infected in this outbreak, six of whom died. This avian virus exhibited high virulence in both avian and mammalian species, causing systemic infection in both chickens and mice. Subsequently, another avian virus with the H9N2 subtype was directly transmitted from birds to humans in Hong Kong. Interestingly, the genes encoding the internal proteins of the H9N2 virus are genetically highly related to those of the H5N1 virus, suggesting a unique property of these gene products. The identification of avian viruses in humans underscores the potential of these and similar strains to produce devastating influenza outbreaks in major population centers. Although highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses had been identified before the 1997 outbreak in Hong Kong, their devastating effects had been confined to poultry. With the Hong Kong outbreak, it became clear that the virulence potential of these viruses extended to humans. PMID:11148006

  18. Reanalysis of Wupus agilis (Early Cretaceous) of Chongqing, China as a Large Avian Trace: Differentiating between Large Bird and Small Non-Avian Theropod Tracks

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Lida; Buckley, Lisa G.; McCrea, Richard T.; Lockley, Martin G.; Zhang, Jianping; Piñuela, Laura; Klein, Hendrik; Wang, Fengping

    2015-01-01

    Trace fossils provide the only records of Early Cretaceous birds from many parts of the world. The identification of traces from large avian track-makers is made difficult given their overall similarity in size and tridactyly in comparison with traces of small non-avian theropods. Reanalysis of Wupus agilis from the Early Cretaceous (Aptian-Albian) Jiaguan Formation, one of a small but growing number of known avian-pterosaur track assemblages, of southeast China determines that these are the traces of a large avian track-maker, analogous to extant herons. Wupus, originally identified as the trace of a small non-avian theropod track-maker, is therefore similar in both footprint and trackway characteristics to the Early Cretaceous (Albian) large avian trace Limiavipes curriei from western Canada, and Wupus is reassigned to the ichnofamily Limiavipedidae. The reanalysis of Wupus reveals that it and Limiavipes are distinct from similar traces of small to medium-sized non-avian theropods (Irenichnites, Columbosauripus, Magnoavipes) based on their relatively large footprint length to pace length ratio and higher mean footprint splay, and that Wupus shares enough characters with Limiavipes to be reassigned to the ichnofamily Limiavipedidae. The ability to discern traces of large avians from those of small non-avian theropods provides more data on the diversity of Early Cretaceous birds. This analysis reveals that, despite the current lack of body fossils, large wading birds were globally distributed in both Laurasia and Gondwana during the Early Cretaceous. PMID:25993285

  19. Are wetlands the reservoir for avian cholera?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuel, M.D.; Shadduck, D.J.; Goldberg, Diana R.

    2004-01-01

    Wetlands have long been suspected to be an important reservoir for Pasteurella multocida and therefore the likely source of avian cholera outbreaks. During the fall of 1995a??98 we collected sediment and water samples from 44 wetlands where avian cholera epizootics occurred the previous winter or spring. We attempted to isolate P. multocida in sediment and surface water samples from 10 locations distributed throughout each wetland. We were not able to isolate P. multocida from any of the 440 water and 440 sediment samples collected from these wetlands. In contrast, during other investigations of avian cholera we isolated P. multocida from 20 of 44 wetlands, including 7% of the water and 4.5% of the sediment samples collected during or shortly following epizootic events. Our results indicate that wetlands are an unlikely reservoir for the bacteria that causes avian cholera.

  20. Proceedings of National Avian-Wind Power Planning Meeting IV

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    NWCC Avian Subcommittee

    2001-05-01

    OAK-B135 The purpose of the fourth meeting was to (1) share research and update research conducted on avian wind interactions (2) identify questions and issues related to the research results, (3) develop conclusions about some avian/wind power issues, and (4) identify questions and issues for future avian research.

  1. Hereditary vacuolar internal anal sphincter myopathy causing proctalgia fugax and constipation: a new case contribution.

    PubMed

    de la Portilla, Fernando; Borrero, Juan José; Rafel, Enrique

    2005-03-01

    Hereditary anal sphincter myopathy is rare. We present a family with one affected member with proctalgia fugax, constipation and internal anal sphincter hypertrophy. Ultrastructural findings show vacuolization of smooth muscle cells without the characteristic polyglucosan inclusion. Further relief of symptoms was obtained using an oral calcium antagonist. Based on clinical presentation, endosonography and morphological findings, we consider our case is a histological variant of the vacuolar myopathy originally described.

  2. In-depth glycoproteomic characterisation of grape berry vacuolar invertase using a combination of mass spectrometry-based approaches.

    PubMed

    Hovasse, Agnès; Alayi, Tchilabalo Dilezitoko; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Marchal, Richard; Jégou, Sandrine; Schaeffer-Reiss, Christine

    2016-06-01

    Vacuolar invertase is a key enzyme of sugar metabolism in grape berries. A full characterisation of this highly N-glycosylated protein is required to help understand its biological and biochemical significance in grapes. We have developed a mass spectrometry (MS)-based glycoproteomic approach wherein deglycosylated peptides are analysed by LC-MS/MS, while intact glycopeptides are characterised using a dedicated MS method to determine the attachment sites and micro-heterogeneity. For grape invertase, in parallel with deglycosylated peptides analysis, different enzymatic digestions were performed and glycopeptide detection was improved by enrichment method, nanoLC-MS and oxonium glycan ions. This MS-based glycoproteomic approach demonstrates that vacuolar invertase is glycosylated at all twelve potential N-glycosylation sites. Glycosylation is heterogeneous, with twelve glycoforms identified at six of the sites. The identification of several types of N-glycans is a major result to correlate with the surface and foaming properties of wine, the solubility, allergenicity, and protease resistance of wine proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Human health implications of avian influenza viruses and paramyxoviruses.

    PubMed

    Capua, I; Alexander, D J

    2004-01-01

    Among avian influenza viruses and avian paramyxoviruses are the aetiological agents of two of the most devastating diseases of the animal kingdom: (i). the highly pathogenic form of avian influenza, caused by some viruses of the H5 and H7 subtypes, and (ii). Newcastle disease, caused by virulent strains of APMV type 1. Mortality rates due to these agents can exceed 50% in naïve bird populations, and, for some strains of AI, nearly 100%. These viruses may also be responsible for clinical conditions in humans. The virus responsible for Newcastle disease has been known to cause conjunctivitis in humans since the 1940s. The conjunctivitis is self-limiting and does not have any permanent consequences. Until 1997, reports of human infection with avian influenza viruses were sporadic and frequently associated with conjunctivitis. Recently, however, avian influenza virus infections have been associated with fatalities in human beings. These casualties have highlighted the potential risk that this type of infection poses to public health. In particular, the pathogenetic mechanisms of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in birds and the possibility of reassortment between avian and human viruses in the human host represent serious threats to human health. For this reason, any suspected case should be investigated thoroughly.

  4. Functional characterization of a vacuolar invertase from Solanum lycopersicum: post-translational regulation by N-glycosylation and a proteinaceous inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Tauzin, Alexandra S; Sulzenbacher, Gerlind; Lafond, Mickael; Desseaux, Véronique; Reca, Ida Barbara; Perrier, Josette; Bellincampi, Daniela; Fourquet, Patrick; Lévêque, Christian; Giardina, Thierry

    2014-06-01

    Plant vacuolar invertases, which belong to family 32 of glycoside hydrolases (GH32), are key enzymes in sugar metabolism. They hydrolyse sucrose into glucose and fructose. The cDNA encoding a vacuolar invertase from Solanum lycopersicum (TIV-1) was cloned and heterologously expressed in Pichia pastoris. The functional role of four N-glycosylation sites in TIV-1 has been investigated by site-directed mutagenesis. Single mutations to Asp of residues Asn52, Asn119 and Asn184, as well as the triple mutant (Asn52, Asn119 and Asn184), lead to enzymes with reduced specific invertase activity and thermostability. Expression of the N516D mutant, as well as of the quadruple mutant (N52D, N119D, N184D and N516D) could not be detected, indicating that these mutations dramatically affected the folding of the protein. Our data indicate that N-glycosylation is important for TIV-1 activity and that glycosylation of N516 is crucial for recombinant enzyme stability. Using a functional genomics approach a new vacuolar invertase inhibitor of S. lycopersicum (SolyVIF) has been identified. SolyVIF cDNA was cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. Specific interactions between SolyVIF and TIV-1 were investigated by an enzymatic approach and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Finally, qRT-PCR analysis of TIV-1 and SolyVIF transcript levels showed a specific tissue and developmental expression. TIV-1 was mainly expressed in flowers and both genes were expressed in senescent leaves. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Regulation of Vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) Reassembly by Glycolysis Flow in 6-Phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK-1)-deficient Yeast Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chun-Yuan; Dominguez, Dennis; Parra, Karlett J.

    2016-01-01

    Yeast 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK-1) has two subunits, Pfk1p and Pfk2p. Deletion of Pfk2p alters glucose-dependent V-ATPase reassembly and vacuolar acidification (Chan, C. Y., and Parra, K. J. (2014) Yeast phosphofructokinase-1 subunit Pfk2p is necessary for pH homeostasis and glucose-dependent vacuolar ATPase reassembly. J. Biol. Chem. 289, 19448–19457). This study capitalized on the mechanisms suppressing vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) in pfk2Δ to gain new knowledge of the mechanisms underlying glucose-dependent V-ATPase regulation. Because V-ATPase is fully assembled in pfk2Δ, and glycolysis partially suppressed at steady state, we manipulated glycolysis and assessed its direct involvement on V-ATPase function. At steady state, the ratio of proton transport to ATP hydrolysis increased 24% after increasing the glucose concentration from 2% to 4% to enhance the glycolysis flow in pfk2Δ. Tighter coupling restored vacuolar pH when glucose was abundant and glycolysis operated below capacity. After readdition of glucose to glucose-deprived cells, glucose-dependent V1Vo reassembly was proportional to the glycolysis flow. Readdition of 2% glucose to pfk2Δ cells, which restored 62% of ethanol concentration, led to equivalent 60% V1Vo reassembly levels. Steady-state level of assembly (100% reassembly) was reached at 4% glucose when glycolysis reached a threshold in pfk2Δ (≥40% the wild-type flow). At 4% glucose, the level of Pfk1p co-immunoprecipitated with V-ATPase decreased 58% in pfk2Δ, suggesting that Pfk1p binding to V-ATPase may be inhibitory in the mutant. We concluded that V-ATPase activity at steady state and V-ATPase reassembly after readdition of glucose to glucose-deprived cells are controlled by the glycolysis flow. We propose a new mechanism by which glucose regulates V-ATPase catalytic activity that occurs at steady state without changing V1Vo assembly. PMID:27226568

  6. Clinical Utility of LC3 and p62 Immunohistochemistry in Diagnosis of Drug-Induced Autophagic Vacuolar Myopathies: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han S.; Daniels, Brianne H.; Salas, Eduardo; Bollen, Andrew W.; Debnath, Jayanta; Margeta, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Background Some patients treated with chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine, or colchicine develop autophagic vacuolar myopathy, the diagnosis of which currently requires electron microscopy. The goal of the current study was to develop an immunohistochemical diagnostic marker for this pathologic entity. Methodology Microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) has emerged as a robust marker of autophagosomes. LC3 binds p62/SQSTM1, an adapter protein that is selectively degraded via autophagy. In this study, we evaluated the utility of immunohistochemical stains for LC3 and p62 as diagnostic markers of drug-induced autophagic vacuolar myopathy. The staining was performed on archival muscle biopsy material, with subject assignment to normal control, drug-treated control, and autophagic myopathy groups based on history of drug use and morphologic criteria. Principal Findings In all drug-treated subjects, but not in normal controls, LC3 and p62 showed punctate staining characteristic of autophagosome buildup. In the autophagic myopathy subjects, puncta were coarser and tended to coalesce into linear structures aligned with the longitudinal axis of the fiber, often in the vicinity of vacuoles. The percentage of LC3- and p62-positive fibers was significantly higher in the autophagic myopathy group compared to either the normal control (p<0.001) or the drug-treated control group (p<0.05). With the diagnostic threshold set between 8% and 15% positive fibers (depending on the desired level of sensitivity and specificity), immunohistochemical staining for either LC3 or p62 could be used to identify subjects with autophagic vacuolar myopathy within the drug-treated subject group (p≤0.001). Significance Immunohistochemistry for LC3 and p62 can facilitate tissue-based diagnosis of drug-induced autophagic vacuolar myopathies. By limiting the need for electron microscopy (a time consuming and costly technique with high specificity, but low sensitivity), clinical use of these

  7. Clinical utility of LC3 and p62 immunohistochemistry in diagnosis of drug-induced autophagic vacuolar myopathies: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han S; Daniels, Brianne H; Salas, Eduardo; Bollen, Andrew W; Debnath, Jayanta; Margeta, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Some patients treated with chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine, or colchicine develop autophagic vacuolar myopathy, the diagnosis of which currently requires electron microscopy. The goal of the current study was to develop an immunohistochemical diagnostic marker for this pathologic entity. Microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) has emerged as a robust marker of autophagosomes. LC3 binds p62/SQSTM1, an adapter protein that is selectively degraded via autophagy. In this study, we evaluated the utility of immunohistochemical stains for LC3 and p62 as diagnostic markers of drug-induced autophagic vacuolar myopathy. The staining was performed on archival muscle biopsy material, with subject assignment to normal control, drug-treated control, and autophagic myopathy groups based on history of drug use and morphologic criteria. In all drug-treated subjects, but not in normal controls, LC3 and p62 showed punctate staining characteristic of autophagosome buildup. In the autophagic myopathy subjects, puncta were coarser and tended to coalesce into linear structures aligned with the longitudinal axis of the fiber, often in the vicinity of vacuoles. The percentage of LC3- and p62-positive fibers was significantly higher in the autophagic myopathy group compared to either the normal control (p<0.001) or the drug-treated control group (p<0.05). With the diagnostic threshold set between 8% and 15% positive fibers (depending on the desired level of sensitivity and specificity), immunohistochemical staining for either LC3 or p62 could be used to identify subjects with autophagic vacuolar myopathy within the drug-treated subject group (p ≤ 0.001). Immunohistochemistry for LC3 and p62 can facilitate tissue-based diagnosis of drug-induced autophagic vacuolar myopathies. By limiting the need for electron microscopy (a time consuming and costly technique with high specificity, but low sensitivity), clinical use of these markers will improve the speed and accuracy of

  8. RhVI1 is a membrane-anchored vacuolar invertase highly expressed in Rosa hybrida L. petals

    PubMed Central

    Farci, Domenica; Collu, Gabriella; Kirkpatrick, Joanna; Esposito, Francesca; Piano, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Invertases are a widespread group of enzymes that catalyse the conversion of sucrose into fructose and glucose. Plants invertases and their substrates are essential factors that play an active role in primary metabolism and in cellular differentiation and by these activities they sustain development and growth. Being naturally present in multiple isoforms, invertases are known to be highly differentiated and tissue specific in such a way that every isoform is characteristic of a specific part of the plant. In this work, we report the identification of the invertase RhVI1 that was found to be highly expressed in rose petals. A characterization of this protein revealed that RhVI1 is a glycosylated membrane-anchored protein associated with the cytosolic side of the vacuolar membrane which occurs in vivo in a monomeric form. Purification yields have shown that the levels of expression decreased during the passage of petals from buds to mature and pre-senescent flowers. Moreover, the activity assay indicates RhVI1 to be an acidic vacuolar invertase. The physiological implications of these findings are discussed, suggesting a possible role of this protein during anthesis. PMID:27083698

  9. Abscisic acid induction of vacuolar H+-ATPase activity in mesembryanthemum crystallinum is developmentally regulated

    PubMed

    Barkla; Vera-Estrella; Maldonado-Gama; Pantoja

    1999-07-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) has been implicated as a key component in water-deficit-induced responses, including those triggered by drought, NaCl, and low- temperature stress. In this study a role for ABA in mediating the NaCl-stress-induced increases in tonoplast H+-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase) and Na+/H+ antiport activity in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, leading to vacuolar Na+ sequestration, were investigated. NaCl or ABA treatment of adult M. crystallinum plants induced V-ATPase H+ transport activity, and when applied in combination, an additive effect on V-ATPase stimulation was observed. In contrast, treatment of juvenile plants with ABA did not induce V-ATPase activity, whereas NaCl treatment resulted in a similar response to that observed in adult plants. Na+/H+ antiport activity was induced in both juvenile and adult plants by NaCl, but ABA had no effect at either developmental stage. Results indicate that ABA-induced changes in V-ATPase activity are dependent on the plant reaching its adult phase, whereas NaCl-induced increases in V-ATPase and Na+/H+ antiport activity are independent of plant age. This suggests that ABA-induced V-ATPase activity may be linked to the stress-induced, developmentally programmed switch from C3 metabolism to Crassulacean acid metabolism in adult plants, whereas, vacuolar Na+ sequestration, mediated by the V-ATPase and Na+/H+ antiport, is regulated through ABA-independent pathways.

  10. Germline Modification and Engineering in Avian Species

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Jo; Lee, Hyung Chul; Han, Jae Yong

    2015-01-01

    Production of genome-edited animals using germline-competent cells and genetic modification tools has provided opportunities for investigation of biological mechanisms in various organisms. The recently reported programmed genome editing technology that can induce gene modification at a target locus in an efficient and precise manner facilitates establishment of animal models. In this regard, the demand for genome-edited avian species, which are some of the most suitable model animals due to their unique embryonic development, has also increased. Furthermore, germline chimera production through long-term culture of chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) has facilitated research on production of genome-edited chickens. Thus, use of avian germline modification is promising for development of novel avian models for research of disease control and various biological mechanisms. Here, we discuss recent progress in genome modification technology in avian species and its applications and future strategies. PMID:26333275

  11. Defects of Vps15 in skeletal muscles lead to autophagic vacuolar myopathy and lysosomal disease

    PubMed Central

    Nemazanyy, Ivan; Blaauw, Bert; Paolini, Cecilia; Caillaud, Catherine; Protasi, Feliciano; Mueller, Amelie; Proikas-Cezanne, Tassula; Russell, Ryan C; Guan, Kun-Liang; Nishino, Ichizo; Sandri, Marco; Pende, Mario; Panasyuk, Ganna

    2013-01-01

    The complex of Vacuolar Protein Sorting 34 and 15 (Vps34 and Vps15) has Class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity and putative roles in nutrient sensing, mammalian Target Of Rapamycin (mTOR) activation by amino acids, cell growth, vesicular trafficking and autophagy. Contrary to expectations, here we show that Vps15-deficient mouse tissues are competent for LC3-positive autophagosome formation and maintain mTOR activation. However, an impaired lysosomal function in mutant cells is traced by accumulation of adaptor protein p62, LC3 and Lamp2 positive vesicles, which can be reverted to normal levels after ectopic overexpression of Vps15. Mice lacking Vps15 in skeletal muscles, develop a severe myopathy. Distinct from the autophagy deficient Atg7−/− mutants, pathognomonic morphological hallmarks of autophagic vacuolar myopathy (AVM) are observed in Vps15−/− mutants, including elevated creatine kinase plasma levels, accumulation of autophagosomes, glycogen and sarcolemmal features within the fibres. Importantly, Vps34/Vps15 overexpression in myoblasts of Danon AVM disease patients alleviates the glycogen accumulation. Thus, the activity of the Vps34/Vps15 complex is critical in disease conditions such as AVMs, and possibly a variety of other lysosomal storage diseases. PMID:23630012

  12. Identifying avian sources of faecal contamination using sterol analysis.

    PubMed

    Devane, Megan L; Wood, David; Chappell, Andrew; Robson, Beth; Webster-Brown, Jenny; Gilpin, Brent J

    2015-10-01

    Discrimination of the source of faecal pollution in water bodies is an important step in the assessment and mitigation of public health risk. One tool for faecal source tracking is the analysis of faecal sterols which are present in faeces of animals in a range of distinctive ratios. Published ratios are able to discriminate between human and herbivore mammal faecal inputs but are of less value for identifying pollution from wildfowl, which can be a common cause of elevated bacterial indicators in rivers and streams. In this study, the sterol profiles of 50 avian-derived faecal specimens (seagulls, ducks and chickens) were examined alongside those of 57 ruminant faeces and previously published sterol profiles of human wastewater, chicken effluent and animal meatwork effluent. Two novel sterol ratios were identified as specific to avian faecal scats, which, when incorporated into a decision tree with human and herbivore mammal indicative ratios, were able to identify sterols from avian-polluted waterways. For samples where the sterol profile was not consistent with herbivore mammal or human pollution, avian pollution is indicated when the ratio of 24-ethylcholestanol/(24-ethylcholestanol + 24-ethylcoprostanol + 24-ethylepicoprostanol) is ≥0.4 (avian ratio 1) and the ratio of cholestanol/(cholestanol + coprostanol + epicoprostanol) is ≥0.5 (avian ratio 2). When avian pollution is indicated, further confirmation by targeted PCR specific markers can be employed if greater confidence in the pollution source is required. A 66% concordance between sterol ratios and current avian PCR markers was achieved when 56 water samples from polluted waterways were analysed.

  13. Emerging and reemerging diseases of avian wildlife

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pello, Susan J.; Olsen, Glenn H.

    2013-01-01

    Of the many important avian wildlife diseases, aspergillosis, West Nile virus, avipoxvirus, Wellfleet Bay virus, avian influenza, and inclusion body disease of cranes are covered in this article. Wellfleet Bay virus, first identified in 2010, is considered an emerging disease. Avian influenza and West Nile virus have recently been in the public eye because of their zoonotic potential and links to wildlife. Several diseases labeled as reemerging are included because of recent outbreaks or, more importantly, recent research in areas such as genomics, which shed light on the mechanisms whereby these adaptable, persistent pathogens continue to spread and thrive.

  14. Vacuolar CAX1 and CAX3 influence auxin transport in guard cells via regulation of apoplastic pH

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cation exchangers CAX1 and CAX3 are vacuolar ion transporters involved in ion homeostasis in plants. Widely expressed in the plant, they mediate calcium transport from the cytosol to the vacuole lumen using the proton gradient across the tonoplast. Here, we report an unexpected role of CAX1 and CAX3...

  15. Avian pox in Magellanic Penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus).

    PubMed

    Kane, Olivia J; Uhart, Marcela M; Rago, Virginia; Pereda, Ariel J; Smith, Jeffrey R; Van Buren, Amy; Clark, J Alan; Boersma, P Dee

    2012-07-01

    Avian pox is an enveloped double-stranded DNA virus that is mechanically transmitted via arthropod vectors or mucosal membrane contact with infectious particles or birds. Magellanic Penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) from two colonies (Punta Tombo and Cabo Dos Bahías) in Argentina showed sporadic, nonepidemic signs of avian pox during five and two of 29 breeding seasons (1982-2010), respectively. In Magellanic Penguins, avian pox expresses externally as wart-like lesions around the beak, flippers, cloaca, feet, and eyes. Fleas (Parapsyllus longicornis) are the most likely arthropod vectors at these colonies. Three chicks with cutaneous pox-like lesions were positive for Avipoxvirus and revealed phylogenetic proximity with an Avipoxvirus found in Black-browed Albatross (Thalassarche melanophrys) from the Falkland Islands in 1987. This proximity suggests a long-term circulation of seabird Avipoxviruses in the southwest Atlantic. Avian pox outbreaks in these colonies primarily affected chicks, often resulted in death, and were not associated with handling, rainfall, or temperature.

  16. Avian influenza in shorebirds: experimental infection of ruddy turnstones (Arenaria interpres) with avian influenza virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Jeffrey S.; Krauss, Scott; Franson, J. Christian; TeSlaa, Joshua L.; Nashold, Sean W.; Stallknecht, David E.; Webby, Richard J.; Webster, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIV) have been reported in shorebirds, especially at Delaware Bay, USA, during spring migration. However, data on patterns of virus excretion, minimal infectious doses, and clinical outcome are lacking. The ruddy turnstone (Arenaria interpres) is the shorebird species with the highest prevalence of influenza virus at Delaware Bay. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to experimentally assess the patterns of influenza virus excretion, minimal infectious doses, and clinical outcome in ruddy turnstones. Methods: We experimentally challenged ruddy turnstones using a common LPAIV shorebird isolate, an LPAIV waterfowl isolate, or a highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus. Cloacal and oral swabs and sera were analyzed from each bird. Results: Most ruddy turnstones had pre-existing antibodies to avian influenza virus, and many were infected at the time of capture. The infectious doses for each challenge virus were similar (103·6–104·16 EID50), regardless of exposure history. All infected birds excreted similar amounts of virus and showed no clinical signs of disease or mortality. Influenza A-specific antibodies remained detectable for at least 2 months after inoculation. Conclusions: These results provide a reference for interpretation of surveillance data, modeling, and predicting the risks of avian influenza transmission and movement in these important hosts.

  17. Avian Plasmodium in Eastern Austrian mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Schoener, Ellen; Uebleis, Sarah Susanne; Butter, Julia; Nawratil, Michaela; Cuk, Claudia; Flechl, Eva; Kothmayer, Michael; Obwaller, Adelheid G; Zechmeister, Thomas; Rubel, Franz; Lebl, Karin; Zittra, Carina; Fuehrer, Hans-Peter

    2017-09-29

    Insect vectors, namely mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae), are compulsory for malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp.) to complete their life cycle. Despite this, little is known about vector competence of different mosquito species for the transmission of avian malaria parasites. In this study, nested PCR was used to determine Plasmodium spp. occurrence in pools of whole individuals, as well as the diversity of mitochondrial cytochrome b gene sequences in wild-caught mosquitoes sampled across Eastern Austria in 2013-2015. A total of 45,749 mosquitoes in 2628 pools were collected, of which 169 pools (6.43%) comprising 9 mosquito species were positive for avian Plasmodium, with the majority of positives in mosquitoes of Culex pipiens s.l./Culex torrentium. Six different avian Plasmodium lineages were found, the most common were Plasmodium vaughani SYAT05, Plasmodium sp. Linn1 and Plasmodium relictum SGS1. In 2014, mosquitoes of the Culex pipiens complex were genetically identified and Culex pipiens f. pipiens presented with the highest number of avian Plasmodium positives (n = 37; 16.74%). Despite this, the minimum infection rate (MIR) was highest in Culex torrentium (5.36%) and Culex pipiens f. pipiens/f. molestus hybrids (5.26%). During 2014 and 2015, seasonal and annual changes in Plasmodium lineage distribution were also observed. In both years P. vaughani SYAT05 dominated at the beginning of the sampling period to be replaced later in the year by P. relictum SGS1 (2014) and Plasmodium sp. Linn1 (2015). This is the first large-scale study of avian Plasmodium parasites in Austrian mosquitoes. These results are of special interest, because molecular identification of the taxa of the Cx. pipiens complex and Cx. torrentium enabled the determination of Plasmodium prevalence in the different mosquito taxa and hybrids of this complex. Since pools of whole insects were used, it is not possible to assert any vector competence in any of the examined mosquitoes, but the results

  18. Effect of vacuolar ATPase subunit H (VmaH) on cellular pH, asexual cycle, stress tolerance and virulence in Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing; Zhu, Xiao-Guan; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2017-01-01

    Vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase) is a conserved multi-subunit protein complex that mediates intracellular acidification in fungi. Here we show functional diversity of V-ATPase subunit H (BbVmaH) in Beauveria bassiana, a filamentous fungal insect pathogen. Deletion of BbvmaH resulted in elevated vacuolar pH, increased Ca 2+ level in cytosol but not in vacuoles, accelerated culture acidification and reduced accumulation of extracellular ammonia. Aerial conidiation and submerged blastospore production were largely delayed and reduced in the deletion mutant, respectively, accompanied with a significant delay in conidial germination, alterations of conidia and blastospores in morphology, size and/or density, and severe growth defects in minimal media with different carbon and nitrogen sources. Despite null responses to osmotic, oxidative and cell wall perturbing stresses, the deletion mutant showed increased sensitivity to Ca 2+ , Zn 2+ and Cu 2+ during growth while its conidia were less tolerant to a wet-heat stress at 45°C and UV-B irradiation. Intracellular glycerol and mannitol contents also decreased significantly. Its virulence to Galleria mellonella larvae was significantly attenuated when conidia were topically applied for normal cuticle infection or injected into haemocoel for cuticle-bypassing infection. All phenotypic changes were restored by targeted gene complementation. Our results indicate that BbVmaH plays an important role in sustaining not only vacuolar acidification but also cytosolic calcium accumulation, ambient pH homeostasis, in vitro asexual cycle and virulence in B. bassiana. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Emerging and reemerging diseases of avian wildlife.

    PubMed

    Pello, Susan J; Olsen, Glenn H

    2013-05-01

    Of the many important avian wildlife diseases, aspergillosis, West Nile virus, avipoxvirus, Wellfleet Bay virus, avian influenza, and inclusion body disease of cranes are covered in this article. Wellfleet Bay virus, first identified in 2010, is considered an emerging disease. Avian influenza and West Nile virus have recently been in the public eye because of their zoonotic potential and links to wildlife. Several diseases labeled as reemerging are included because of recent outbreaks or, more importantly, recent research in areas such as genomics, which shed light on the mechanisms whereby these adaptable, persistent pathogens continue to spread and thrive. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Salinity Tolerance of Two Potato Cultivars (Solanum tuberosum) Correlates With Differences in Vacuolar Transport Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jaarsma, Rinse; de Boer, Albertus H.

    2018-01-01

    Potato is an important cultivated crop species and since it is moderately salt sensitive there is a need to develop more salt tolerant cultivars. A high activity of Na+ transport across the tonoplast in exchange for H+ is essential to reduce Na+ toxicity. The proton motive force (PMF) generated by the V-H+-ATPase and the V-H+-PPase energizes the Na+(K+)/H+ antiport. We compared the activity, gene expression, and protein levels of the vacuolar proton pumps and the Na+/H+ antiporters in two potato cultivars (Solanum tuberosum) contrasting in their salt tolerance (cv. Desiree; tolerant and Mozart; sensitive) grown at 0 and 60 mM NaCl. Tonoplast-enriched vesicles were used to study the pump activity and protein levels of the V-H+-ATPase and the V-H+-PPase and the activity of the Na+/H+ antiporter. Although salt stress reduced the V-H+-ATPase and the V-H+-PPase activity in both cultivars, the decline in H+ pump activity was more severe in the salt-sensitive cultivar Mozart. After salt treatment, protein amounts of the vacuolar H+ pumps decreased in Mozart but remained unchanged in the cultivar Desiree. Decreased protein amounts of the V-H+-PPase found in Mozart may explain the reduced V-H+-PPase activity found for Mozart after salt stress. Under non-stress conditions, protein amounts of V-H+-PPase were equal in both cultivars while the V-H+-PPase activity was already twice as high and remained higher after salt treatment in the cultivar Desiree as compared to Mozart. This cultivar-dependent V-H+-PPase activity may explain the higher salt tolerance of Desiree. Moreover, combined with reduced vacuolar H+ pump activity, Mozart showed a lower Na+/H+ exchange activity and the Km for Na+ is at least twofold lower in tonoplast vesicles from Desiree, what suggests that NHXs from Desiree have a higher affinity for Na+ as compared to Mozart. From these results, we conclude that the higher capacity in combination with the higher affinity for Na+ uptake can be an important factor

  1. Salinity Tolerance of Two Potato Cultivars (Solanum tuberosum) Correlates With Differences in Vacuolar Transport Activity.

    PubMed

    Jaarsma, Rinse; de Boer, Albertus H

    2018-01-01

    Potato is an important cultivated crop species and since it is moderately salt sensitive there is a need to develop more salt tolerant cultivars. A high activity of Na + transport across the tonoplast in exchange for H + is essential to reduce Na + toxicity. The proton motive force (PMF) generated by the V-H + -ATPase and the V-H + -PPase energizes the Na + (K + )/H + antiport. We compared the activity, gene expression, and protein levels of the vacuolar proton pumps and the Na + /H + antiporters in two potato cultivars ( Solanum tuberosum ) contrasting in their salt tolerance (cv. Desiree; tolerant and Mozart; sensitive) grown at 0 and 60 mM NaCl. Tonoplast-enriched vesicles were used to study the pump activity and protein levels of the V-H + -ATPase and the V-H + -PPase and the activity of the Na + /H + antiporter. Although salt stress reduced the V-H + -ATPase and the V-H + -PPase activity in both cultivars, the decline in H + pump activity was more severe in the salt-sensitive cultivar Mozart. After salt treatment, protein amounts of the vacuolar H + pumps decreased in Mozart but remained unchanged in the cultivar Desiree. Decreased protein amounts of the V-H + -PPase found in Mozart may explain the reduced V-H + -PPase activity found for Mozart after salt stress. Under non-stress conditions, protein amounts of V-H + -PPase were equal in both cultivars while the V-H + -PPase activity was already twice as high and remained higher after salt treatment in the cultivar Desiree as compared to Mozart. This cultivar-dependent V-H + -PPase activity may explain the higher salt tolerance of Desiree. Moreover, combined with reduced vacuolar H + pump activity, Mozart showed a lower Na + /H + exchange activity and the K m for Na + is at least twofold lower in tonoplast vesicles from Desiree, what suggests that NHXs from Desiree have a higher affinity for Na + as compared to Mozart. From these results, we conclude that the higher capacity in combination with the higher

  2. Avian Influenza: A growing threat to Africa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The H9N2 low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) is probably the most widespread avian influenza subtype in poultry around the world being endemic in a large part of Asia, the Middle East, Northern Africa, and in Germany. Currently, there is no standardized clade system to describe the antigenic vari...

  3. Avian influenza

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, W.

    1999-01-01

    Wild birds, especially waterfowl and shorebirds, have long been a focus for concern by the poultry industry as a source for influenza infections in poultry. Human health concerns have also been raised. For these reasons, this chapter has been included to provide natural resource managers with basic information about avian influenza viruses.

  4. (Highly pathogenic) avian influenza as a zoonotic agent.

    PubMed

    Kalthoff, Donata; Globig, Anja; Beer, Martin

    2010-01-27

    Zoonotic agents challenging the world every year afresh are influenza A viruses. In the past, human pandemics caused by influenza A viruses had been occurring periodically. Wild aquatic birds are carriers of the full variety of influenza virus A subtypes, and thus, most probably constitute the natural reservoir of all influenza A viruses. Whereas avian influenza viruses in their natural avian reservoir are generally of low pathogenicity (LPAIV), some have gained virulence by mutation after transmission and adaptation to susceptible gallinaceous poultry. Those so-called highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV) then cause mass die-offs in susceptible birds and lead to tremendous economical losses when poultry is affected. Besides a number of avian influenza virus subtypes that have sporadically infected mammals, the HPAIV H5N1 Asia shows strong zoonotic characteristics and it was transmitted from birds to different mammalian species including humans. Theoretically, pandemic viruses might derive directly from avian influenza viruses or arise after genetic reassortment between viruses of avian and mammalian origin. So far, HPAIV H5N1 already meets two conditions for a pandemic virus: as a new subtype it has been hitherto unseen in the human population and it has infected at least 438 people, and caused severe illness and high lethality in 262 humans to date (August 2009). The acquisition of efficient human-to-human transmission would complete the emergence of a new pandemic virus. Therefore, fighting H5N1 at its source is the prerequisite to reduce pandemic risks posed by this virus. Other influenza viruses regarded as pandemic candidates derive from subtypes H2, H7, and H9 all of which have infected humans in the past. Here, we will give a comprehensive overview on avian influenza viruses in concern to their zoonotic potential. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Exo-erythrocytic development of avian malaria and related haemosporidian parasites.

    PubMed

    Valkiūnas, Gediminas; Iezhova, Tatjana A

    2017-03-03

    Avian malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp.) and related haemosporidians (Haemosporida) are responsible for diseases which can be severe and even lethal in avian hosts. These parasites cause not only blood pathology, but also damage various organs due to extensive exo-erythrocytic development all over the body, which is not the case during Plasmodium infections in mammals. However, exo-erythrocytic development (tissue merogony or schizogony) remains the most poorly investigated part of life cycle in all groups of wildlife haemosporidian parasites. In spite of remarkable progress in studies of genetic diversity, ecology and evolutionary biology of avian haemosporidians during the past 20 years, there is not much progress in understanding patterns of exo-erythrocytic development in these parasites. The purpose of this review is to overview the main information on exo-erythrocytic development of avian Plasmodium species and related haemosporidian parasites as a baseline for assisting academic and veterinary medicine researchers in morphological identification of these parasites using tissue stages, and to define future research priorities in this field of avian malariology. The data were considered from peer-reviewed articles and histological material that was accessed in zoological collections in museums of Australia, Europe and the USA. Articles describing tissue stages of avian haemosporidians were included from 1908 to the present. Histological preparations of various organs infected with the exo-erythrocytic stages of different haemosporidian parasites were examined. In all, 229 published articles were included in this review. Exo-erythrocytic stages of avian Plasmodium, Fallisia, Haemoproteus, Leucocytozoon, and Akiba species were analysed, compared and illustrated. Morphological characters of tissue stages that can be used for diagnostic purposes were specified. Recent molecular studies combined with histological research show that avian haemosporidians are more

  6. Low-Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses in Wild House Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shriner, Susan A.; VanDalen, Kaci K.; Mooers, Nicole L.; Ellis, Jeremy W.; Sullivan, Heather J.; Root, J. Jeffrey; Pelzel, Angela M.; Franklin, Alan B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Avian influenza viruses are known to productively infect a number of mammal species, several of which are commonly found on or near poultry and gamebird farms. While control of rodent species is often used to limit avian influenza virus transmission within and among outbreak sites, few studies have investigated the potential role of these species in outbreak dynamics. Methodology/Principal Findings We trapped and sampled synanthropic mammals on a gamebird farm in Idaho, USA that had recently experienced a low pathogenic avian influenza outbreak. Six of six house mice (Mus musculus) caught on the outbreak farm were presumptively positive for antibodies to type A influenza. Consequently, we experimentally infected groups of naïve wild-caught house mice with five different low pathogenic avian influenza viruses that included three viruses derived from wild birds and two viruses derived from chickens. Virus replication was efficient in house mice inoculated with viruses derived from wild birds and more moderate for chicken-derived viruses. Mean titers (EID50 equivalents/mL) across all lung samples from seven days of sampling (three mice/day) ranged from 103.89 (H3N6) to 105.06 (H4N6) for the wild bird viruses and 102.08 (H6N2) to 102.85 (H4N8) for the chicken-derived viruses. Interestingly, multiple regression models indicated differential replication between sexes, with significantly (p<0.05) higher concentrations of avian influenza RNA found in females compared with males. Conclusions/Significance Avian influenza viruses replicated efficiently in wild-caught house mice without adaptation, indicating mice may be a risk pathway for movement of avian influenza viruses on poultry and gamebird farms. Differential virus replication between males and females warrants further investigation to determine the generality of this result in avian influenza disease dynamics. PMID:22720076

  7. The threshold of a stochastic avian-human influenza epidemic model with psychological effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fengrong; Zhang, Xinhong

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a stochastic avian-human influenza epidemic model with psychological effect in human population and saturation effect within avian population is investigated. This model describes the transmission of avian influenza among avian population and human population in random environments. For stochastic avian-only system, persistence in the mean and extinction of the infected avian population are studied. For the avian-human influenza epidemic system, sufficient conditions for the existence of an ergodic stationary distribution are obtained. Furthermore, a threshold of this stochastic model which determines the outcome of the disease is obtained. Finally, numerical simulations are given to support the theoretical results.

  8. Avian influenza.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Awad A; Hussein, Mansour F

    2006-05-01

    A rapidly spreading, highly pathogenic avian influenza virus A H5N1 in the domestic poultry population has crossed the species barrier to humans and other mammalian species, thus, posing an increasing pandemic threat. The World Health Organization, other agencies, and countries worldwide are closely monitoring the prevalent influenza viruses and their related illnesses to detect any increased virulence or transmissibility that might signal the beginnings of any future pandemic. So far, the H5N1 virus has infected birds in more than 30 countries in Asia, Europe and Africa, while further geographical spread remains likely. Human infections are still rare and the virus does not spread easily from birds to humans or readily from person to person. Although antiviral drugs and vaccination are among the most important measures to be used in case of an influenza pandemic, a timely supply of sufficient quantities will not be possible. This review describes various aspects of avian influenza in birds and in humans; epidemiology, transmission, diagnosis and clinical manifestations. Also presented are the global preparedness, the anti-influenza drugs and vaccines.

  9. Avian pox

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, W.

    1999-01-01

    Avian pox is the common name for a mild-to-severe, slowdeveloping disease of birds that is caused by a large virus belonging to the avipoxvirus group, a subgroup of poxviruses. This group contains several similar virus strains; some strains have the ability to infect several groups or species of birds but others appear to be species-specific. Mosquitoes are common mechanical vectors or transmitters of this disease. Avian pox is transmitted when a mosquito feeds on an infected bird that has viremia or pox virus circulating in its blood, or when a mosquito feeds on virus-laden secretions seeping from a pox lesion and then feeds on another bird that is susceptible to that strain of virus. Contact with surfaces or exposure to air-borne particles contaminated with poxvirus can also result in infections when virus enters the body through abraded skin or the conjunctiva or the mucous membrane lining that covers the front part of the eyeball and inner surfaces of the eyelids of the eye.

  10. 9 CFR 113.326 - Avian Pox Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Avian Pox Vaccine. 113.326 Section 113... Vaccines § 113.326 Avian Pox Vaccine. Fowl Pox Vaccine and Pigeon Pox Vaccine shall be prepared from virus... this section shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine production. All serials...

  11. 9 CFR 113.326 - Avian Pox Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Avian Pox Vaccine. 113.326 Section 113... Vaccines § 113.326 Avian Pox Vaccine. Fowl Pox Vaccine and Pigeon Pox Vaccine shall be prepared from virus... this section shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine production. All serials...

  12. 9 CFR 113.326 - Avian Pox Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Avian Pox Vaccine. 113.326 Section 113... Vaccines § 113.326 Avian Pox Vaccine. Fowl Pox Vaccine and Pigeon Pox Vaccine shall be prepared from virus... this section shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine production. All serials...

  13. 9 CFR 113.326 - Avian Pox Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Avian Pox Vaccine. 113.326 Section 113... Vaccines § 113.326 Avian Pox Vaccine. Fowl Pox Vaccine and Pigeon Pox Vaccine shall be prepared from virus... this section shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine production. All serials...

  14. 9 CFR 113.326 - Avian Pox Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Avian Pox Vaccine. 113.326 Section 113... Vaccines § 113.326 Avian Pox Vaccine. Fowl Pox Vaccine and Pigeon Pox Vaccine shall be prepared from virus... this section shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine production. All serials...

  15. The Marine Natural Product Manzamine A Targets Vacuolar ATPases and Inhibits Autophagy in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kallifatidis, Georgios; Hoepfner, Dominic; Jaeg, Tiphaine; Guzmán, Esther A.; Wright, Amy E.

    2013-01-01

    Manzamine A, a member of the manzamine alkaloids, was originally isolated from marine sponges of the genus Haliclona. It was recently shown to have activity against pancreatic cancer cells, but the precise mechanism of action remained unclear. To further our understanding of the mechanism of action of manzamine A, chemogenomic profiling in the yeast S. cerevisiae was performed, suggesting that manzamine A is an uncoupler of vacuolar ATPases. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed this effect on yeast vacuoles, where manzamine A produced a phenotype very similar to that of the established v-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1. In pancreatic cancer cells, 10 µM manzamine A affected vacuolar ATPase activity and significantly increased the level of autophagosome marker LC3-II and p62/SQSTM1 as observed by western blot analysis. Treatment with manzamine A in combination with bafilomycin A1 (inhibitor of autophagosome-lysosome fusion) did not change the levels of LC3-II when compared to cells treated with bafilomycin A1 alone, suggesting that manzamine A is a potential inhibitor of autophagy by preventing autophagosome turnover. As autophagy is essential for pancreatic tumor growth, blocking this pathway with manzamine A suggests a promising strategy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:24048269

  16. Amyloplasts and Vacuolar Membrane Dynamics in the Living Graviperceptive Cell of the Arabidopsis Inflorescence StemW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Chieko; Morita, Miyo T.; Kato, Takehide; Tasaka, Masao

    2005-01-01

    We developed an adequate method for the in vivo analysis of organelle dynamics in the gravity-perceptive cell (endodermis) of the Arabidopsis thaliana inflorescence stem, revealing behavior of amyloplasts and vacuolar membranes in those cells. Amyloplasts in the endodermis showed saltatory movements even before gravistimulation by reorientation, and these movements were confirmed as microfilament dependent. From our quantitative analysis in the wild type, the gravity-oriented movement of amyloplasts mainly occurred during 0 to 3 min after gravistimulation by reorientation, supporting findings from our previous physiological study. Even after microfilament disruption, the gravity-oriented movement of amyloplasts remained. By contrast, in zig/sgr4 mutants, where a SNARE molecule functioning in vacuole biogenesis has been disrupted, the movement of amyloplasts in the endodermis is severely restricted both before and after gravistimulation by reorientation. Here, we describe vacuolar membrane behavior in these cells in the wild-type, actin filament–disrupted, and zig/sgr4 mutants and discuss its putatively important features for the perception of gravity. We also discuss the data on the two kinds of movements of amyloplasts that may play an important role in gravitropism: (1) the leading edge amyloplasts and (2) the en mass movement of amyloplasts. PMID:15689424

  17. RhVI1 is a membrane-anchored vacuolar invertase highly expressed in Rosa hybrida L. petals.

    PubMed

    Farci, Domenica; Collu, Gabriella; Kirkpatrick, Joanna; Esposito, Francesca; Piano, Dario

    2016-05-01

    Invertases are a widespread group of enzymes that catalyse the conversion of sucrose into fructose and glucose. Plants invertases and their substrates are essential factors that play an active role in primary metabolism and in cellular differentiation and by these activities they sustain development and growth. Being naturally present in multiple isoforms, invertases are known to be highly differentiated and tissue specific in such a way that every isoform is characteristic of a specific part of the plant. In this work, we report the identification of the invertase RhVI1 that was found to be highly expressed in rose petals. A characterization of this protein revealed that RhVI1 is a glycosylated membrane-anchored protein associated with the cytosolic side of the vacuolar membrane which occurs in vivo in a monomeric form. Purification yields have shown that the levels of expression decreased during the passage of petals from buds to mature and pre-senescent flowers. Moreover, the activity assay indicates RhVI1 to be an acidic vacuolar invertase. The physiological implications of these findings are discussed, suggesting a possible role of this protein during anthesis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  18. An in depth view of avian sleep.

    PubMed

    Beckers, Gabriël J L; Rattenborg, Niels C

    2015-03-01

    Brain rhythms occurring during sleep are implicated in processing information acquired during wakefulness, but this phenomenon has almost exclusively been studied in mammals. In this review we discuss the potential value of utilizing birds to elucidate the functions and underlying mechanisms of such brain rhythms. Birds are of particular interest from a comparative perspective because even though neurons in the avian brain homologous to mammalian neocortical neurons are arranged in a nuclear, rather than a laminar manner, the avian brain generates mammalian-like sleep-states and associated brain rhythms. Nonetheless, until recently, this nuclear organization also posed technical challenges, as the standard surface EEG recording methods used to study the neocortex provide only a superficial view of the sleeping avian brain. The recent development of high-density multielectrode recording methods now provides access to sleep-related brain activity occurring deep in the avian brain. Finally, we discuss how intracerebral electrical imaging based on this technique can be used to elucidate the systems-level processing of hippocampal-dependent and imprinting memories in birds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Vacuolar invertase gene silencing in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) improves processing quality by decreasing the frequency of sugar-end defects

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sugar-end defect is a tuber quality disorder that causes unacceptable darkening of one end of French fries. This defect appears when environmental stress during tuber growth increases post-harvest vacuolar acid invertase activity at one end of the tuber. Reducing sugars produced by invertase form da...

  20. Co-overexpressing a plasma membrane and a vacuolar membrane sodium/proton antiporter significantly improves salt tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Arabidopsis gene AtNHX1 encodes a vacuolar membrane bound sodium/proton (Sodium/Hydrogen) antiporter that transports sodium into the vacuole and exports hydrogen into the cytoplasm. The Arabidopsis gene SOS1 encodes a plasma membrane bound sodium/hydrogen antiporter that exports sodium to the ex...

  1. Targeting vacuolar H+-ATPases as a new strategy against cancer.

    PubMed

    Fais, Stefano; De Milito, Angelo; You, Haiyan; Qin, Wenxin

    2007-11-15

    Growing evidence suggests a key role of tumor acidic microenvironment in cancer development, progression, and metastasis. As a consequence, the need for compounds that specifically target the mechanism(s) responsible for the low pH of tumors is increasing. Among the key regulators of the tumor acidic microenvironment, vacuolar H(+)-ATPases (V-ATPases) play an important role. These proteins cover a number of functions in a variety of normal as well as tumor cells, in which they pump ions across the membranes. We discuss here some recent results showing that a molecular inhibition of V-ATPases by small interfering RNA in vivo as well as a pharmacologic inhibition through proton pump inhibitors led to tumor cytotoxicity and marked inhibition of human tumor growth in xenograft models. These results propose V-ATPases as a key target for new strategies in cancer treatment.

  2. Global spread and control of avian influenza

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    H5 and H7 high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) viruses emerge from the mutation of H5 and H7 low pathogenicity avian influenza viruses (LPAI) after circulation in terrestrial poultry for a few weeks to years. There have been 42 distinct HPAI epizootics since 1959. The largest being the H5N1 A/G...

  3. Nanoscale domain formation of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate in the plasma and vacuolar membranes of living yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Tomioku, Kan-Na; Shigekuni, Mikiko; Hayashi, Hiroki; Yoshida, Akane; Futagami, Taiki; Tamaki, Hisanori; Tanabe, Kenji; Fujita, Akikazu

    2018-05-01

    In budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, PtdIns(4)P serves as an essential signalling molecule in the Golgi complex, endosomal system, and plasma membrane, where it is involved in the control of multiple cellular functions via direct interactions with PtdIns(4)P-binding proteins. To analyse the distribution of PtdIns(4)P in yeast cells at a nanoscale level, we employed an electron microscopy technique that specifically labels PtdIns(4)P on the freeze-fracture replica of the yeast membrane. This method minimizes the possibility of artificial perturbation, because molecules in the membrane are physically immobilised in situ. We observed that PtdIns(4)P is localised on the cytoplasmic leaflet, but not the exoplasmic leaflet, of the plasma membrane, Golgi body, vacuole, and vesicular structure membranes. PtdIns(4)P labelling was not observed in the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum, and in the outer and inner membranes of the nuclear envelope or mitochondria. PtdIns(4)P forms clusters of <100 nm in diameter in the plasma membrane and vacuolar membrane according to point pattern analysis of immunogold labelling. There are three kinds of compartments in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. In the present study, we showed that PtdIns(4)P is specifically localised in the flat undifferentiated plasma membrane compartment. In the vacuolar membrane, PtdIns(4)P was concentrated in intramembrane particle (IMP)-deficient raft-like domains, which are tightly bound to lipid droplets, but not surrounding IMP-rich non-raft domains in geometrical IMP-distributed patterns in the stationary phase. This is the first report showing microdomain formations of PtdIns(4)P in the plasma membrane and vacuolar membrane of budding yeast cells at a nanoscale level, which will illuminate the functionality of PtdIns(4)P in each membrane. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. 76 FR 67017 - Notice to Manufacturers of Airport Avian Radar Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... Avian Radar Systems AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. DOT. ACTION: Notice to Manufacturers of Airport Avian Radar Systems. SUMMARY: Projects funded under the Airport Improvement Program... Administration (FAA) is considering issuing waivers to foreign manufacturers of airport avian radar systems that...

  5. 9 CFR 113.117 - Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.117 Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 1. Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 1, shall be prepared from cultures of...

  6. Pathobiology of avian influenza virus infection in minor gallinaceous species: a review.

    PubMed

    Bertran, Kateri; Dolz, Roser; Majó, Natàlia

    2014-01-01

    Susceptibility to avian influenza viruses (AIVs) can vary greatly among bird species. Chickens and turkeys are major avian species that, like ducks, have been extensively studied for avian influenza. To a lesser extent, minor avian species such as quail, partridges, and pheasants have also been investigated for avian influenza. Usually, such game fowl species are highly susceptible to highly pathogenic AIVs and may consistently spread both highly pathogenic AIVs and low-pathogenic AIVs. These findings, together with the fact that game birds are considered bridge species in the poultry-wildlife interface, highlight their interest from the transmission and biosecurity points of view. Here, the general pathobiological features of low-pathogenic AIV and highly pathogenic AIV infections in this group of avian species have been covered.

  7. Genome Modification Technologies and Their Applications in Avian Species.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Jo; Kim, Young Min; Ono, Tamao; Han, Jae Yong

    2017-10-26

    The rapid development of genome modification technology has provided many great benefits in diverse areas of research and industry. Genome modification technologies have also been actively used in a variety of research areas and fields of industry in avian species. Transgenic technologies such as lentiviral systems and piggyBac transposition have been used to produce transgenic birds for diverse purposes. In recent years, newly developed programmable genome editing tools such as transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) have also been successfully adopted in avian systems with primordial germ cell (PGC)-mediated genome modification. These genome modification technologies are expected to be applied to practical uses beyond system development itself. The technologies could be used to enhance economic traits in poultry such as acquiring a disease resistance or producing functional proteins in eggs. Furthermore, novel avian models of human diseases or embryonic development could also be established for research purposes. In this review, we discuss diverse genome modification technologies used in avian species, and future applications of avian biotechnology.

  8. Disruption of the vacuolar calcium-ATPases in Arabidopsis results in the activation of a salicylic acid-dependent programmed cell death pathway.

    PubMed

    Boursiac, Yann; Lee, Sang Min; Romanowsky, Shawn; Blank, Robert; Sladek, Chris; Chung, Woo Sik; Harper, Jeffrey F

    2010-11-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) signals regulate many aspects of plant development, including a programmed cell death pathway that protects plants from pathogens (hypersensitive response). Cytosolic Ca(2+) signals result from a combined action of Ca(2+) influx through channels and Ca(2+) efflux through pumps and cotransporters. Plants utilize calmodulin-activated Ca(2+) pumps (autoinhibited Ca(2+)-ATPase [ACA]) at the plasma membrane, endoplasmic reticulum, and vacuole. Here, we show that a double knockout mutation of the vacuolar Ca(2+) pumps ACA4 and ACA11 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) results in a high frequency of hypersensitive response-like lesions. The appearance of macrolesions could be suppressed by growing plants with increased levels (greater than 15 mm) of various anions, providing a method for conditional suppression. By removing plants from a conditional suppression, lesion initials were found to originate primarily in leaf mesophyll cells, as detected by aniline blue staining. Initiation and spread of lesions could also be suppressed by disrupting the production or accumulation of salicylic acid (SA), as shown by combining aca4/11 mutations with a sid 2 (for salicylic acid induction-deficient2) mutation or expression of the SA degradation enzyme NahG. This indicates that the loss of the vacuolar Ca(2+) pumps by itself does not cause a catastrophic defect in ion homeostasis but rather potentiates the activation of a SA-dependent programmed cell death pathway. Together, these results provide evidence linking the activity of the vacuolar Ca(2+) pumps to the control of a SA-dependent programmed cell death pathway in plants.

  9. Avian malaria, ecological host traits and mosquito abundance in southeastern Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Fecchio, Alan; Ellis, Vincenzo A; Bell, Jeffrey A; Andretti, Christian B; D'Horta, Fernando M; Silva, Allan M; Tkach, Vasyl V; Weckstein, Jason D

    2017-07-01

    Avian malaria is a vector transmitted disease caused by Plasmodium and recent studies suggest that variation in its prevalence across avian hosts is correlated with a variety of ecological traits. Here we examine the relationship between prevalence and diversity of Plasmodium lineages in southeastern Amazonia and: (1) host ecological traits (nest location, nest type, flocking behaviour and diet); (2) density and diversity of avian hosts; (3) abundance and diversity of mosquitoes; and (4) season. We used molecular methods to detect Plasmodium in blood samples from 675 individual birds of 120 species. Based on cytochrome b sequences, we recovered 89 lineages of Plasmodium from 136 infected individuals sampled across seven localities. Plasmodium prevalence was homogeneous over time (dry season and flooding season) and space, but heterogeneous among 51 avian host species. Variation in prevalence among bird species was not explained by avian ecological traits, density of avian hosts, or mosquito abundance. However, Plasmodium lineage diversity was positively correlated with mosquito abundance. Interestingly, our results suggest that avian host traits are less important determinants of Plasmodium prevalence and diversity in southeastern Amazonia than in other regions in which they have been investigated.

  10. Construction of an infectious cDNA clone of avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV) recovered from a clinically healthy chicken in the United States and characterization of its pathogenicity in specific-pathogen-free chickens.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyuk Moo; LeRoith, Tanya; Pudupakam, R S; Pierson, F William; Huang, Yao-Wei; Dryman, Barbara A; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2011-01-27

    A genetically distinct strain of avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV-VA strain) was isolated from a healthy chicken in Virginia, and thus it is important to characterize and compare its pathogenicity with the prototype strain (avian HEV-prototype) isolated from a diseased chicken. Here we first constructed an infectious clone of the avian HEV-VA strain. Capped RNA transcripts from the avian HEV-VA clone were replication-competent after transfection of LMH chicken liver cells. Chickens inoculated intrahepatically with RNA transcripts of avian HEV-VA clone developed active infection as evidenced by fecal virus shedding, viremia, and seroconversion. To characterize the pathogenicity, RNA transcripts of both avian HEV-VA and avian HEV-prototype clones were intrahepatically inoculated into the livers of chickens. Avian HEV RNA was detected in feces, serum and bile samples from 10/10 avian HEV-VA-inoculated and 9/9 avian HEV-prototype-inoculated chickens although seroconversion occurred only in some chickens during the experimental period. The histopathological lesion scores were lower for avian HEV-VA group than avian HEV-prototype group in the liver at 3 and 5 weeks post-inoculation (wpi) and in the spleen at 3 wpi, although the differences were not statistically significant. The liver/body weight ratio, indicative of liver enlargement, of both avian HEV-VA and avian HEV-prototype groups were significantly higher than that of the control group at 5 wpi. Overall, the avian HEV-VA strain still induces histological liver lesions even though it was isolated from a healthy chicken. The results also showed that intrahepatic inoculation of chickens with RNA transcripts of avian HEV infectious clone may serve as an alternative for live virus in animal pathogenicity studies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Vacuolar H(+)-Pyrophosphatase AVP1 is Involved in Amine Fungicide Tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana and Provides Tridemorph Resistance in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Agustín; Herrera-Palau, Rosana; Madroñal, Juan M; Albi, Tomás; López-Lluch, Guillermo; Perez-Castiñeira, José R; Navas, Plácido; Valverde, Federico; Serrano, Aurelio

    2016-01-01

    Amine fungicides are widely used as crop protectants. Their success is believed to be related to their ability to inhibit postlanosterol sterol biosynthesis in fungi, in particular sterol-Δ(8),Δ(7)-isomerases and sterol-Δ(14)-reductases, with a concomitant accumulation of toxic abnormal sterols. However, their actual cellular effects and mechanisms of death induction are still poorly understood. Paradoxically, plants exhibit a natural resistance to amine fungicides although they have similar enzymes in postcicloartenol sterol biosynthesis that are also susceptible to fungicide inhibition. A major difference in vacuolar ion homeostasis between plants and fungi is the presence of a dual set of primary proton pumps in the former (V-ATPase and H(+)-pyrophosphatase), but only the V-ATPase in the latter. Abnormal sterols affect the proton-pumping capacity of V-ATPases in fungi and this has been proposed as a major determinant in fungicide action. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model fungus, we provide evidence that amine fungicide treatment induced cell death by apoptosis. Cell death was concomitant with impaired H(+)-pumping capacity in vacuole vesicles and dependent on vacuolar proteases. Also, the heterologous expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana main H(+)-pyrophosphatase (AVP1) at the fungal vacuolar membrane reduced apoptosis levels in yeast and increased resistance to amine fungicides. Consistently, A. thaliana avp1 mutant seedlings showed increased susceptibility to this amine fungicide, particularly at the level of root development. This is in agreement with AVP1 being nearly the sole H(+)-pyrophosphatase gene expressed at the root elongation zones. All in all, the present data suggest that H(+)-pyrophosphatases are major determinants of plant tolerance to amine fungicides.

  12. Avian Models for Human Cognitive Neuroscience: A Proposal.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Nicola S; Emery, Nathan J

    2015-06-17

    Research on avian cognitive neuroscience over the past two decades has revealed the avian brain to be a better model for understanding human cognition than previously thought, despite differences in the neuroarchitecture of avian and mammalian brains. The brain, behavior, and cognition of songbirds have provided an excellent model of human cognition in one domain, namely learning human language and the production of speech. There are other important behavioral candidates of avian cognition, however, notably the capacity of corvids to remember the past and plan for the future, as well as their ability to think about another's perspective, and physical reasoning. We review this work and assess the evidence that the corvid brain can support such a cognitive architecture. We propose potential applications of these behavioral paradigms for cognitive neuroscience, including recent work on single-cell recordings and neuroimaging in corvids. Finally, we discuss their impact on understanding human developmental cognition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Global dynamics of avian influenza epidemic models with psychological effect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sanhong; Pang, Liuyong; Ruan, Shigui; Zhang, Xinan

    2015-01-01

    Cross-sectional surveys conducted in Thailand and China after the outbreaks of the avian influenza A H5N1 and H7N9 viruses show a high degree of awareness of human avian influenza in both urban and rural populations, a higher level of proper hygienic practice among urban residents, and in particular a dramatically reduced number of visits to live markets in urban population after the influenza A H7N9 outbreak in China in 2013. In this paper, taking into account the psychological effect toward avian influenza in the human population, a bird-to-human transmission model in which the avian population exhibits saturation effect is constructed. The dynamical behavior of the model is studied by using the basic reproduction number. The results demonstrate that the saturation effect within avian population and the psychological effect in human population cannot change the stability of equilibria but can affect the number of infected humans if the disease is prevalent. Numerical simulations are given to support the theoretical results and sensitivity analyses of the basic reproduction number in terms of model parameters that are performed to seek for effective control measures for avian influenza.

  14. Vacuolar sequestration capacity and long-distance metal transport in plants

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jia-Shi; Gong, Ji-Ming

    2014-01-01

    The vacuole is a pivotal organelle functioning in storage of metabolites, mineral nutrients, and toxicants in higher plants. Accumulating evidence indicates that in addition to its storage role, the vacuole contributes essentially to long-distance transport of metals, through the modulation of Vacuolar sequestration capacity (VSC) which is shown to be primarily controlled by cytosolic metal chelators and tonoplast-localized transporters, or the interaction between them. Plants adapt to their environments by dynamic regulation of VSC for specific metals and hence targeting metals to specific tissues. Study of VSC provides not only a new angle to understand the long-distance root-to-shoot transport of minerals in plants, but also an efficient way to biofortify essential mineral nutrients or to phytoremediate non-essential metal pollution. The current review will focus on the most recent proceedings on the interaction mechanisms between VSC regulation and long-distance metal transport. PMID:24550927

  15. Vacuolar sequestration capacity and long-distance metal transport in plants.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jia-Shi; Gong, Ji-Ming

    2014-01-01

    The vacuole is a pivotal organelle functioning in storage of metabolites, mineral nutrients, and toxicants in higher plants. Accumulating evidence indicates that in addition to its storage role, the vacuole contributes essentially to long-distance transport of metals, through the modulation of Vacuolar sequestration capacity (VSC) which is shown to be primarily controlled by cytosolic metal chelators and tonoplast-localized transporters, or the interaction between them. Plants adapt to their environments by dynamic regulation of VSC for specific metals and hence targeting metals to specific tissues. Study of VSC provides not only a new angle to understand the long-distance root-to-shoot transport of minerals in plants, but also an efficient way to biofortify essential mineral nutrients or to phytoremediate non-essential metal pollution. The current review will focus on the most recent proceedings on the interaction mechanisms between VSC regulation and long-distance metal transport.

  16. Avians as a Model System of Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Michael; Mikawa, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Summary For more then 2000 years philosophers and scientists have turned to the avian embryo with questions of how life begins (Aristotle; Needham, 1959). Then, as now, the unique accessibility of the embryo both in terms of acquisition of eggs from domesticated fowl, and ease at which the embryo can be visualized by simply opening the shell, have made avians an appealing and powerful model system for the study of development. Thus, as the field of embryology has evolved through observational, comparative, and experimental embryology, into its current iteration as the cellular and molecular biology of development, avians have remained a useful and practical system of study. PMID:25468608

  17. Multi-species patterns of avian cholera mortality in Nebraska's rainwater basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchong, Julie A.; Samuel, M.D.; Mack, G.

    2006-01-01

    Nebraska's Rainwater Basin (RWB) is a key spring migration area for millions of waterfowl and other avian species. Avian cholera has been endemic in the RWB since the 1970s and in some years tens of thousands of waterfowl have died from the disease. We evaluated patterns of avian cholera mortality in waterfowl species using the RWB during the last quarter of the 20th century. Mortality patterns changed between the years before (1976 - 1988) and coincident with (1989 - 1999) the dramatic increases in lesser snow goose abundance and mortality. Lesser snow geese (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) have commonly been associated with mortality events in the RWB and are known to carry virulent strains of Pasteurella multocida, the agent causing avian cholera. Lesser snow geese appeared to be the species most affected by avian cholera during 1989 - 1999; however, mortality in several other waterfowl species was positively correlated with lesser snow goose mortality. Coincident with increased lesser snow goose mortality, spring avian cholera outbreaks were detected earlier and ended earlier compared to 1976 - 1988. Dense concentrations of lesser snow geese may facilitate intraspecific disease transmission through bird-to-bird contact and wetland contamination. Rates of interspecific avian cholera transmission within the waterfowl community, however, are difficult to determine.

  18. Abscisic Acid Induction of Vacuolar H+-ATPase Activity in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum Is Developmentally Regulated1

    PubMed Central

    Barkla, Bronwyn J.; Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Maldonado-Gama, Minerva; Pantoja, Omar

    1999-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) has been implicated as a key component in water-deficit-induced responses, including those triggered by drought, NaCl, and low- temperature stress. In this study a role for ABA in mediating the NaCl-stress-induced increases in tonoplast H+-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase) and Na+/H+ antiport activity in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, leading to vacuolar Na+ sequestration, were investigated. NaCl or ABA treatment of adult M. crystallinum plants induced V-ATPase H+ transport activity, and when applied in combination, an additive effect on V-ATPase stimulation was observed. In contrast, treatment of juvenile plants with ABA did not induce V-ATPase activity, whereas NaCl treatment resulted in a similar response to that observed in adult plants. Na+/H+ antiport activity was induced in both juvenile and adult plants by NaCl, but ABA had no effect at either developmental stage. Results indicate that ABA-induced changes in V-ATPase activity are dependent on the plant reaching its adult phase, whereas NaCl-induced increases in V-ATPase and Na+/H+ antiport activity are independent of plant age. This suggests that ABA-induced V-ATPase activity may be linked to the stress-induced, developmentally programmed switch from C3 metabolism to Crassulacean acid metabolism in adult plants, whereas, vacuolar Na+ sequestration, mediated by the V-ATPase and Na+/H+ antiport, is regulated through ABA-independent pathways. PMID:10398716

  19. Genome Modification Technologies and Their Applications in Avian Species

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Jo; Kim, Young Min; Ono, Tamao

    2017-01-01

    The rapid development of genome modification technology has provided many great benefits in diverse areas of research and industry. Genome modification technologies have also been actively used in a variety of research areas and fields of industry in avian species. Transgenic technologies such as lentiviral systems and piggyBac transposition have been used to produce transgenic birds for diverse purposes. In recent years, newly developed programmable genome editing tools such as transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) have also been successfully adopted in avian systems with primordial germ cell (PGC)-mediated genome modification. These genome modification technologies are expected to be applied to practical uses beyond system development itself. The technologies could be used to enhance economic traits in poultry such as acquiring a disease resistance or producing functional proteins in eggs. Furthermore, novel avian models of human diseases or embryonic development could also be established for research purposes. In this review, we discuss diverse genome modification technologies used in avian species, and future applications of avian biotechnology. PMID:29072628

  20. Different intracellular distribution of avian reovirus core protein sigmaA in cells of avian and mammalian origin

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Vazquez-Iglesias, Lorena; Lostale-Seijo, Irene; Martinez-Costas, Jose

    2012-10-25

    A comparative analysis of the intracellular distribution of avian reovirus (ARV) core protein sigmaA in cells of avian and mammalian origin revealed that, whereas the viral protein accumulates in the cytoplasm and nucleolus of avian cells, most sigmaA concentrates in the nucleoplasm of mammalian cells in tight association with the insoluble nuclear matrix fraction. Our results further showed that sigmaA becomes arrested in the nucleoplasm of mammalian cells via association with mammalian cell-specific factors and that this association prevents nucleolar targeting. Inhibition of RNA polymerase II activity, but not of RNA polymerase I activity, in infected mammalian cells induces nucleus-to-cytoplasmmore » sigmaA translocation through a CRM1- and RanGTP-dependent mechanism, yet a heterokaryon assay suggests that sigmaA does not shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm. The scarcity of sigmaA in cytoplasmic viral factories of infected mammalian cells could be one of the factors contributing to limited ARV replication in mammalian cells.« less

  1. Bird Flu (Avian Influenza)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with bird and human flu viruses. Poultry and egg products Because heat destroys avian viruses, cooked poultry ... 165 F (74 C). Steer clear of raw eggs. Because eggshells are often contaminated with bird droppings, ...

  2. Avian Influenza in Birds

    MedlinePlus

    ... is available through the United States Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service . Surveillance for Avian Influenza CDC, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) , the World Health Organization (WHO) , the World ...

  3. Vacuolar amino acid transporter Avt5p is responsible for lithium uptake in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Iwaki, Tomoko; Sekito, Takayuki; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2010-01-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe was sensitive to salinity; cell growth was stopped by 0.5 M NaCl and by 10 mM LiCl. The avt5+ gene encodes a vacuolar transporter with a broad specificity for amino acids. We found that the avt5Delta mutant became highly tolerant of Li+ and Na+ in growth. Concanamycin A-sensitive Li+ uptake as well as cellular Li+ content was lower in the avt5 mutant, suggesting a role of Avt5p in cellular uptake of toxic Li+.

  4. MTV1 and MTV4 encode plant-specific ENTH and ARF GAP proteins that mediate clathrin-dependent trafficking of vacuolar cargo from the trans-Golgi network.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Michael; Delgadillo, M Otilia; Zouhar, Jan; Reynolds, Gregory D; Pennington, Janice G; Jiang, Liwen; Liljegren, Sarah J; Stierhof, York-Dieter; De Jaeger, Geert; Otegui, Marisa S; Bednarek, Sebastian Y; Rojo, Enrique

    2013-06-01

    Many soluble proteins transit through the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and the prevacuolar compartment (PVC) en route to the vacuole, but our mechanistic understanding of this vectorial trafficking step in plants is limited. In particular, it is unknown whether clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) participate in this transport step. Through a screen for modified transport to the vacuole (mtv) mutants that secrete the vacuolar protein VAC2, we identified MTV1, which encodes an epsin N-terminal homology protein, and MTV4, which encodes the ADP ribosylation factor GTPase-activating protein nevershed/AGD5. MTV1 and NEV/AGD5 have overlapping expression patterns and interact genetically to transport vacuolar cargo and promote plant growth, but they have no apparent roles in protein secretion or endocytosis. MTV1 and NEV/AGD5 colocalize with clathrin at the TGN and are incorporated into CCVs. Importantly, mtv1 nev/agd5 double mutants show altered subcellular distribution of CCV cargo exported from the TGN. Moreover, MTV1 binds clathrin in vitro, and NEV/AGD5 associates in vivo with clathrin, directly linking these proteins to CCV formation. These results indicate that MTV1 and NEV/AGD5 are key effectors for CCV-mediated trafficking of vacuolar proteins from the TGN to the PVC in plants.

  5. A mathematical model of avian influenza with half-saturated incidence.

    PubMed

    Chong, Nyuk Sian; Tchuenche, Jean Michel; Smith, Robert J

    2014-03-01

    The widespread impact of avian influenza viruses not only poses risks to birds, but also to humans. The viruses spread from birds to humans and from human to human In addition, mutation in the primary strain will increase the infectiousness of avian influenza. We developed a mathematical model of avian influenza for both bird and human populations. The effect of half-saturated incidence on transmission dynamics of the disease is investigated. The half-saturation constants determine the levels at which birds and humans contract avian influenza. To prevent the spread of avian influenza, the associated half-saturation constants must be increased, especially the half-saturation constant H m for humans with mutant strain. The quantity H m plays an essential role in determining the basic reproduction number of this model. Furthermore, by decreasing the rate β m at which human-to-human mutant influenza is contracted, an outbreak can be controlled more effectively. To combat the outbreak, we propose both pharmaceutical (vaccination) and non-pharmaceutical (personal protection and isolation) control methods to reduce the transmission of avian influenza. Vaccination and personal protection will decrease β m, while isolation will increase H m. Numerical simulations demonstrate that all proposed control strategies will lead to disease eradication; however, if we only employ vaccination, it will require slightly longer to eradicate the disease than only applying non-pharmaceutical or a combination of pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical control methods. In conclusion, it is important to adopt a combination of control methods to fight an avian influenza outbreak.

  6. Planning for avian flu disruptions on global operations: a DMAIC case study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sameer

    2012-01-01

    The author aims to assess the spread of avian flu, its impact on businesses operating in the USA and overseas, and the measures required for corporate preparedness. Six Sigma DMAIC process is used to analyze avian flu's impact and how an epidemic could affect large US business operations worldwide. Wal-Mart and Dell Computers were chosen as one specializes in retail and the other manufacturing. The study identifies avian flu pandemic risks including failure modes on Wal-Mart and Dell Computers global operations. It reveals the factors that reinforce avian-flu pandemic's negative impact on company global supply chains. It also uncovers factors that balance avian-flu pandemic's impact on their global supply chains. Avian flu and its irregularity affect the research outcomes because its spread could fluctuate based on so many factors that could come into play. Further, the potential cost to manufacturers and other supply chain partners is relatively unknown. As a relatively new phenomenon, quantitative data were not available to determine immediate costs. In this decade, the avian influenza H5N1 virus has killed millions of poultry in Asia, Europe and Africa. This flu strain can infect and kill humans who come into contact with this virus. An avian influenza H5N1 outbreak could lead to a devastating effect on global food supply, business services and business operations. The study provides guidance on what global business operation managers can do to prepare for such events, as well as how avian flu progression to a pandemic can disrupt such operations. This study raises awareness about avian flu's impact on businesses and humans and also highlights the need to create contingency plans for corporate preparedness to avoid incurring losses.

  7. Basic history taking and the avian physical examination.

    PubMed

    Rich, G A

    1991-11-01

    As one may readily see, the basic avian physical examination should be an extensive, thorough procedure. A wide array of diseases and conditions can be detected during the examination. A flow sheet or checklist should be instituted to maintain consistency and cover all aspects of the history and physical examination. I highly recommend as an adjunct to the basic physical examination Gram stains of the choanae, crop, and cloacae or feces. Owing to the fact that a great number of compromised avian patients either are ill because of gram-negative bacteria or have become more compromised by opportunistic organisms such as yeast or gram-negative bacteria, identification of these conditions greatly facilitates treatment and recovery of the avian patient. Other ancillary tests, such as fecal flotation, complete blood count, culture and sensitivity, Chlamydia test, chemistry profile, radiology, and laparotomy/laparoscopy, are available to the practitioner to aid in the diagnosis of various diseases involving the avian patient. [Editor's note: The editors suggest that the complete blood count be done before an extensive physical examination is undertaken to avoid a stress hemogram.

  8. Avian Influenza (Bird Flu)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread Bird Flu to People Interim Guidance on Testing Pandemic Flu Key Information Prevention & Treatment Influenza A Type Viruses & Subtypes Transmission of Avian Influenza A Viruses Between Animals and People Related Links Research Glossary of Influenza ( ...

  9. Avian Schistosomes and Outbreaks of Cercarial Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mikeš, Libor; Lichtenbergová, Lucie; Skála, Vladimír; Soldánová, Miroslava; Brant, Sara Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Cercarial dermatitis (swimmer's itch) is a condition caused by infective larvae (cercariae) of a species-rich group of mammalian and avian schistosomes. Over the last decade, it has been reported in areas that previously had few or no cases of dermatitis and is thus considered an emerging disease. It is obvious that avian schistosomes are responsible for the majority of reported dermatitis outbreaks around the world, and thus they are the primary focus of this review. Although they infect humans, they do not mature and usually die in the skin. Experimental infections of avian schistosomes in mice show that in previously exposed hosts, there is a strong skin immune reaction that kills the schistosome. However, penetration of larvae into naive mice can result in temporary migration from the skin. This is of particular interest because the worms are able to migrate to different organs, for example, the lungs in the case of visceral schistosomes and the central nervous system in the case of nasal schistosomes. The risk of such migration and accompanying disorders needs to be clarified for humans and animals of interest (e.g., dogs). Herein we compiled the most comprehensive review of the diversity, immunology, and epidemiology of avian schistosomes causing cercarial dermatitis. PMID:25567226

  10. Avian schistosomes and outbreaks of cercarial dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Horák, Petr; Mikeš, Libor; Lichtenbergová, Lucie; Skála, Vladimír; Soldánová, Miroslava; Brant, Sara Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Cercarial dermatitis (swimmer's itch) is a condition caused by infective larvae (cercariae) of a species-rich group of mammalian and avian schistosomes. Over the last decade, it has been reported in areas that previously had few or no cases of dermatitis and is thus considered an emerging disease. It is obvious that avian schistosomes are responsible for the majority of reported dermatitis outbreaks around the world, and thus they are the primary focus of this review. Although they infect humans, they do not mature and usually die in the skin. Experimental infections of avian schistosomes in mice show that in previously exposed hosts, there is a strong skin immune reaction that kills the schistosome. However, penetration of larvae into naive mice can result in temporary migration from the skin. This is of particular interest because the worms are able to migrate to different organs, for example, the lungs in the case of visceral schistosomes and the central nervous system in the case of nasal schistosomes. The risk of such migration and accompanying disorders needs to be clarified for humans and animals of interest (e.g., dogs). Herein we compiled the most comprehensive review of the diversity, immunology, and epidemiology of avian schistosomes causing cercarial dermatitis. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Avian influenza surveillance of wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slota, Paul

    2007-01-01

    The President's National Strategy for Pandemic Influenza directs federal agencies to expand the surveillance of United States domestic livestock and wildlife to ensure early warning of hightly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in the U.S. The immediate concern is a potential introduction of HPAI H5N1 virus into the U.S. The presidential directive resulted in the U.S. Interagency Strategic Plan for Early Detection of H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in Wild Migratory Birds (referred to as the Wild Bird Surveillance Plan or the Plan).

  12. Paul D. Sturkie: Avian cardiac physiologist.

    PubMed

    Bello, Nicholas T; Cohick, Wendie S; McKeever, Kenneth H; Malinowski, Karyn

    2018-06-01

    Sturkie's Avian Physiology is a highly regarded textbook for the study of comparative poultry physiology. Less well known, however, is the contribution of Paul D. Sturkie (1909-2002) as a pioneer in the experimental physiology of avian species. His seminal research on the cardiovascular and hemodynamic controls of chickens and egg-laying hens had a notable impact on the poultry industry and breeding practices of farmers. The purpose of this article is to highlight the contributions and practical insights of Paul D. Sturkie to the field of poultry science.

  13. Chemical ions affect survival of avian cholera organisms in pondwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, J.I.; Yandell, B.S.; Porter, W.P.

    1992-01-01

    Avian cholera (Pasteurella multocida) is a major disease of wild waterfowl, but its epizootiology remains little understood. Consequently, we examined whether chemical ions affected survival of avian cholera organisms in water collected from the Nebraska Rainwater Basin where avian cholera is enzootic. We tested the response of P. multocida to ammonium (NH4), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), nitrate (NO3), and ortho-phosphate (PO4) ions individually and in combination using a fractional factorial design divided into 4 blocks. High concentrations of Ca and Mg, singly or in combination, increased survival of P. multocida organisms (P < 0.001). We developed a survival index to predict whether or not specific ponds could be "problem" or "nonproblem" avian cholera sites based on concentrations of these ions in the water.

  14. Comparative genomics reveals insights into avian genome evolution and adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guojie; Li, Cai; Li, Qiye; Li, Bo; Larkin, Denis M.; Lee, Chul; Storz, Jay F.; Antunes, Agostinho; Greenwold, Matthew J.; Meredith, Robert W.; Ödeen, Anders; Cui, Jie; Zhou, Qi; Xu, Luohao; Pan, Hailin; Wang, Zongji; Jin, Lijun; Zhang, Pei; Hu, Haofu; Yang, Wei; Hu, Jiang; Xiao, Jin; Yang, Zhikai; Liu, Yang; Xie, Qiaolin; Yu, Hao; Lian, Jinmin; Wen, Ping; Zhang, Fang; Li, Hui; Zeng, Yongli; Xiong, Zijun; Liu, Shiping; Zhou, Long; Huang, Zhiyong; An, Na; Wang, Jie; Zheng, Qiumei; Xiong, Yingqi; Wang, Guangbiao; Wang, Bo; Wang, Jingjing; Fan, Yu; da Fonseca, Rute R.; Alfaro-Núñez, Alonzo; Schubert, Mikkel; Orlando, Ludovic; Mourier, Tobias; Howard, Jason T.; Ganapathy, Ganeshkumar; Pfenning, Andreas; Whitney, Osceola; Rivas, Miriam V.; Hara, Erina; Smith, Julia; Farré, Marta; Narayan, Jitendra; Slavov, Gancho; Romanov, Michael N; Borges, Rui; Machado, João Paulo; Khan, Imran; Springer, Mark S.; Gatesy, John; Hoffmann, Federico G.; Opazo, Juan C.; Håstad, Olle; Sawyer, Roger H.; Kim, Heebal; Kim, Kyu-Won; Kim, Hyeon Jeong; Cho, Seoae; Li, Ning; Huang, Yinhua; Bruford, Michael W.; Zhan, Xiangjiang; Dixon, Andrew; Bertelsen, Mads F.; Derryberry, Elizabeth; Warren, Wesley; Wilson, Richard K; Li, Shengbin; Ray, David A.; Green, Richard E.; O’Brien, Stephen J.; Griffin, Darren; Johnson, Warren E.; Haussler, David; Ryder, Oliver A.; Willerslev, Eske; Graves, Gary R.; Alström, Per; Fjeldså, Jon; Mindell, David P.; Edwards, Scott V.; Braun, Edward L.; Rahbek, Carsten; Burt, David W.; Houde, Peter; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Jarvis, Erich D.; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Birds are the most species-rich class of tetrapod vertebrates and have wide relevance across many research fields. We explored bird macroevolution using full genomes from 48 avian species representing all major extant clades. The avian genome is principally characterized by its constrained size, which predominantly arose because of lineage-specific erosion of repetitive elements, large segmental deletions, and gene loss. Avian genomes furthermore show a remarkably high degree of evolutionary stasis at the levels of nucleotide sequence, gene synteny, and chromosomal structure. Despite this pattern of conservation, we detected many non-neutral evolutionary changes in protein-coding genes and noncoding regions. These analyses reveal that pan-avian genomic diversity covaries with adaptations to different lifestyles and convergent evolution of traits. PMID:25504712

  15. Peripheral neuropathy in type A Niemann-Pick disease. A morphological study.

    PubMed

    Landrieu, P; Saïd, G

    1984-01-01

    A black boy had a severe neuropathic form of Niemann-Pick disease (NPD) with a pronounced sphingomyelinase deficiency in the fibroblasts. Nerve conduction velocities were diminished, and a nerve biopsy was performed. Isolated fibers showed segmental demyelination and numerous dense bodies in the Schwann cells (SC). Electron microscopy revealed two categories of inclusions: the first was made up of lysosomal inclusions usually described in NPD. The second comprised myelin inclusions--sometimes still connected to the original myelin sheath--indicating severe myelinopathy. Both myelin debris and NPD inclusions were found in axoplasms and probably came from SC cytoplasm through axolemma lesions. NPD is a unique example of myelinopathy due to sphingomyelinase deficiency.

  16. A simple vitrification method for cryobanking avian testicular tissue

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cryopreservation of testicular tissue is a promising method of preserving male reproductive potential for avian species. This study was conducted to assess whether a vitrification method can be used to preserve avian testicular tissue, using the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) as a model. A sim...

  17. Vacuolar ATPase in Phagosome-Lysosome Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kissing, Sandra; Hermsen, Christina; Repnik, Urska; Nesset, Cecilie Kåsi; von Bargen, Kristine; Griffiths, Gareth; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Lee, Beth S.; Schwake, Michael; De Brabander, Jef; Haas, Albert; Saftig, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The vacuolar H+-ATPase (v-ATPase) complex is instrumental in establishing and maintaining acidification of some cellular compartments, thereby ensuring their functionality. Recently it has been proposed that the transmembrane V0 sector of v-ATPase and its a-subunits promote membrane fusion in the endocytic and exocytic pathways independent of their acidification functions. Here, we tested if such a proton-pumping independent role of v-ATPase also applies to phagosome-lysosome fusion. Surprisingly, endo(lyso)somes in mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking the V0 a3 subunit of the v-ATPase acidified normally, and endosome and lysosome marker proteins were recruited to phagosomes with similar kinetics in the presence or absence of the a3 subunit. Further experiments used macrophages with a knockdown of v-ATPase accessory protein 2 (ATP6AP2) expression, resulting in a strongly reduced level of the V0 sector of the v-ATPase. However, acidification appeared undisturbed, and fusion between latex bead-containing phagosomes and lysosomes, as analyzed by electron microscopy, was even slightly enhanced, as was killing of non-pathogenic bacteria by V0 mutant macrophages. Pharmacologically neutralized lysosome pH did not affect maturation of phagosomes in mouse embryonic cells or macrophages. Finally, locking the two large parts of the v-ATPase complex together by the drug saliphenylhalamide A did not inhibit in vitro and in cellulo fusion of phagosomes with lysosomes. Hence, our data do not suggest a fusion-promoting role of the v-ATPase in the formation of phagolysosomes. PMID:25903133

  18. Vacuolar ATPase in phagosome-lysosome fusion.

    PubMed

    Kissing, Sandra; Hermsen, Christina; Repnik, Urska; Nesset, Cecilie Kåsi; von Bargen, Kristine; Griffiths, Gareth; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Lee, Beth S; Schwake, Michael; De Brabander, Jef; Haas, Albert; Saftig, Paul

    2015-05-29

    The vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (v-ATPase) complex is instrumental in establishing and maintaining acidification of some cellular compartments, thereby ensuring their functionality. Recently it has been proposed that the transmembrane V0 sector of v-ATPase and its a-subunits promote membrane fusion in the endocytic and exocytic pathways independent of their acidification functions. Here, we tested if such a proton-pumping independent role of v-ATPase also applies to phagosome-lysosome fusion. Surprisingly, endo(lyso)somes in mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking the V0 a3 subunit of the v-ATPase acidified normally, and endosome and lysosome marker proteins were recruited to phagosomes with similar kinetics in the presence or absence of the a3 subunit. Further experiments used macrophages with a knockdown of v-ATPase accessory protein 2 (ATP6AP2) expression, resulting in a strongly reduced level of the V0 sector of the v-ATPase. However, acidification appeared undisturbed, and fusion between latex bead-containing phagosomes and lysosomes, as analyzed by electron microscopy, was even slightly enhanced, as was killing of non-pathogenic bacteria by V0 mutant macrophages. Pharmacologically neutralized lysosome pH did not affect maturation of phagosomes in mouse embryonic cells or macrophages. Finally, locking the two large parts of the v-ATPase complex together by the drug saliphenylhalamide A did not inhibit in vitro and in cellulo fusion of phagosomes with lysosomes. Hence, our data do not suggest a fusion-promoting role of the v-ATPase in the formation of phagolysosomes. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. The emerging structure of vacuolar ATPases.

    PubMed

    Drory, Omri; Nelson, Nathan

    2006-10-01

    Bioenergetics and physiology of primary pumps have been revitalized by new insights into the mechanism of energizing biomembranes. Structural information is becoming available, and the three-dimensional structure of F-ATPase is being resolved. The growing understanding of the fundamental mechanism of energy coupling may revolutionize our view of biological processes. The F- and V-ATPases (vacuolar-type ATPase) exhibit a common mechanical design in which nucleotide-binding on the catalytic sector, through a cycle of conformation changes, drives the transmembrane passage of protons by turning a membrane-embedded rotor. This motor can run in forward or reverse directions, hydrolyzing ATP as it pumps protons uphill or creating ATP as protons flow downhill. In contrast to F-ATPases, whose primary function in eukaryotic cells is to form ATP at the expense of the proton-motive force (pmf), V-ATPases function exclusively as an ATP-dependent proton pump. The pmf generated by V-ATPases in organelles and membranes of eukaryotic cells is utilized as a driving force for numerous secondary transport processes. V- and F-ATPases have similar structure and mechanism of action, and several of their subunits evolved from common ancestors. Electron microscopy studies of V-ATPase revealed its general structure at low resolution. Recently, several structures of V-ATPase subunits, solved by X-ray crystallography with atomic resolution, were published. This, together with electron microscopy low-resolution maps of the whole complex, and biochemistry cross-linking experiments, allows construction of a structural model for a part of the complex that may be used as a working hypothesis for future research.

  20. Studying the pathogenicity of avian influenza viruses in different avian species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza (AI) viruses are significant pathogens of domestic poultry worldwide. Wild aquatic birds are the primordial reservoirs of AI viruses, which are classified as low pathogenic (LP) and can be any of the 16 hemagglutinin subtypes (H1-16). Circulation of H5 or H7 subtype LPAI viruses in...

  1. Evolution of olfaction in non-avian theropod dinosaurs and birds

    PubMed Central

    Zelenitsky, Darla K.; Therrien, François; Ridgely, Ryan C.; McGee, Amanda R.; Witmer, Lawrence M.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the olfactory capabilities of extinct basal (non-neornithine) birds or the evolutionary changes in olfaction that occurred from non-avian theropods through modern birds. Although modern birds are known to have diverse olfactory capabilities, olfaction is generally considered to have declined during avian evolution as visual and vestibular sensory enhancements occurred in association with flight. To test the hypothesis that olfaction diminished through avian evolution, we assessed relative olfactory bulb size, here used as a neuroanatomical proxy for olfactory capabilities, in 157 species of non-avian theropods, fossil birds and living birds. We show that relative olfactory bulb size increased during non-avian maniraptoriform evolution, remained stable across the non-avian theropod/bird transition, and increased during basal bird and early neornithine evolution. From early neornithines through a major part of neornithine evolution, the relative size of the olfactory bulbs remained stable before decreasing in derived neoavian clades. Our results show that, rather than decreasing, the importance of olfaction actually increased during early bird evolution, representing a previously unrecognized sensory enhancement. The relatively larger olfactory bulbs of earliest neornithines, compared with those of basal birds, may have endowed neornithines with improved olfaction for more effective foraging or navigation skills, which in turn may have been a factor allowing them to survive the end-Cretaceous mass extinction. PMID:21490022

  2. Avian Antimicrobial Host Defense Peptides: From Biology to Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guolong; Sunkara, Lakshmi T.

    2014-01-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are an important first line of defense with antimicrobial and immunomoduatory properties. Because they act on the microbial membranes or host immune cells, HDPs pose a low risk of triggering microbial resistance and therefore, are being actively investigated as a novel class of antimicrobials and vaccine adjuvants. Cathelicidins and β-defensins are two major families of HDPs in avian species. More than a dozen HDPs exist in birds, with the genes in each HDP family clustered in a single chromosomal segment, apparently as a result of gene duplication and diversification. In contrast to their mammalian counterparts that adopt various spatial conformations, mature avian cathelicidins are mostly α-helical. Avian β-defensins, on the other hand, adopt triple-stranded β-sheet structures similar to their mammalian relatives. Besides classical β-defensins, a group of avian-specific β-defensin-related peptides, namely ovodefensins, exist with a different six-cysteine motif. Like their mammalian counterparts, avian cathelicidins and defensins are derived from either myeloid or epithelial origin expressed in a majority of tissues with broad-spectrum antibacterial and immune regulatory activities. Structure-function relationship studies with several avian HDPs have led to identification of the peptide analogs with potential for use as antimicrobials and vaccine adjuvants. Dietary modulation of endogenous HDP synthesis has also emerged as a promising alternative approach to disease control and prevention in chickens. PMID:24583933

  3. Genome-wide profiling of microRNAs reveals novel insights into the interactions between H9N2 avian influenza virus and avian dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian; Xia, Jing; Zhang, Tian; Zhang, Keyun; Yang, Qian

    2018-05-10

    The antigen-presenting ability of dendritic cells (DCs) plays an important and irreplaceable role in recognising and clearing viruses. Antiviral responses must rapidly defend against infection while minimising inflammatory damage, but the mechanisms that regulate the magnitude of response within an infected cell are not well understood. MicroRNAs (microRNAs), small non-coding RNAs, can regulate mouse or avian DCs to inhibit the infection and replication of avian influenza virus (AIV). Here, we performed a global analysis to understand how avian DCs respond to H9N2 AIV and provide a potential mechanism to explain how avian microRNAs can defend against H9N2 AIV replication. First, we found that both active and inactive H9N2 AIV enhanced the ability of DCs to present antigens and activate T lymphocytes. Next, total microarray analyses suggested that H9N2 AIV stimulation involved protein localisation, nucleotide binding, leucocyte transendothelial migration and MAPK signalling. Moreover, we constructed 551 transcription factor (TF)-miRNA-mRNA loops based on the above analyses. Furthermore, we found that the haemagglutinin (HA) fragment, neither H5N1-HA or H9N2-HA, could not activate DCs, while truncated HA greatly increased the immune function of DCs by activating ERK and STAT3 signalling pathways. Lastly, our results not only suggested that gga-miR1644 targets muscleblind-like protein 2 (MBNL2) to enhance the ability of avian DCs to inhibit virus replication, but also suggested that gga-miR6675 targets the nuclear localisation sequence of polymerase basic protein 1 (PB1) to trigger the silencing of PB1 genes, resulting in the inhibition of H9N2 AIV replication. Altogether, our innovative study will shed new light on the role of avian microRNAs in evoking avian DCs and inhibiting virus replication.

  4. Avian research in the U.S. Forest Service

    Treesearch

    Beatrice Van Horne

    2005-01-01

    Avian research in the Federal Government is in a crisis. Yes, there is a strong interest in avian research, as evidenced by the size and level of interest in this conference. But political parties increasingly see wildlife research as expendable. At the same time, the reaction to environment-friendly legislation of the 1970s and 1980s has been strong from both sides....

  5. Production and Characterization of an Avian Ricin Antitoxin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-15

    naturally -occurring plant and/or bacterial toxins as biological threat agents, effective antitoxins are needed for either piophylactic or causal...system, an avian antitoxin against the potent phytotoxin , ricin. will be developed and evaluated. The production of therapeutic antibodies in avian...Dynatech). PolyacrylmIde gel electrophoresis (PAGE): Acrylamide gels were prepared according to methods described by Laemmli ( Nature . 227. 1970) and

  6. Human‐Aided Movement of Viral Disease and the Archaeology of Avian Osteopetrosis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The term avian osteopetrosis is used to describe alterations to the skeletal elements of several species of domestic bird, most typically the chicken, Gallus gallus domesticus (L. 1758). Such lesions are routinely identified in animal bones from archaeological sites due to their distinctive appearance, which is characterised by proliferative diaphyseal thickening. These lesions are relatively uncomplicated for specialists to differentially diagnose and are caused by a range of avian leucosis viruses in a series of subgroups. Only some avian leucosis viruses cause the development of such characteristic lesions in osteological tissue. Viraemia is necessary for the formation of skeletal pathology, and avian osteopetrosis lesions affect skeletal elements at different rates. Lesion expression differs by the age and sex of the infected individual, and environmental conditions have an impact on the prevalence of avian leucosis viruses in poultry flocks. These factors have implications for the ways in which diagnosed instances of avian osteopetrosis in archaeological assemblages are interpreted. By integrating veterinary research with archaeological evidence for the presence of avian leucosis viruses across Western Europe, this paper discusses the nature of these pathogens, outlines criteria for differential diagnosis, and offers a fresh perspective on the human‐aided movement of animal disease in the past through investigation of the incidence and geographic distribution of avian osteopetrosis lesions from the first century BC to the post‐medieval period. © 2017 The Authors International Journal of Osteoarchaeology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:29104410

  7. Comparative genomics reveals insights into avian genome evolution and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guojie; Li, Cai; Li, Qiye; Li, Bo; Larkin, Denis M; Lee, Chul; Storz, Jay F; Antunes, Agostinho; Greenwold, Matthew J; Meredith, Robert W; Ödeen, Anders; Cui, Jie; Zhou, Qi; Xu, Luohao; Pan, Hailin; Wang, Zongji; Jin, Lijun; Zhang, Pei; Hu, Haofu; Yang, Wei; Hu, Jiang; Xiao, Jin; Yang, Zhikai; Liu, Yang; Xie, Qiaolin; Yu, Hao; Lian, Jinmin; Wen, Ping; Zhang, Fang; Li, Hui; Zeng, Yongli; Xiong, Zijun; Liu, Shiping; Zhou, Long; Huang, Zhiyong; An, Na; Wang, Jie; Zheng, Qiumei; Xiong, Yingqi; Wang, Guangbiao; Wang, Bo; Wang, Jingjing; Fan, Yu; da Fonseca, Rute R; Alfaro-Núñez, Alonzo; Schubert, Mikkel; Orlando, Ludovic; Mourier, Tobias; Howard, Jason T; Ganapathy, Ganeshkumar; Pfenning, Andreas; Whitney, Osceola; Rivas, Miriam V; Hara, Erina; Smith, Julia; Farré, Marta; Narayan, Jitendra; Slavov, Gancho; Romanov, Michael N; Borges, Rui; Machado, João Paulo; Khan, Imran; Springer, Mark S; Gatesy, John; Hoffmann, Federico G; Opazo, Juan C; Håstad, Olle; Sawyer, Roger H; Kim, Heebal; Kim, Kyu-Won; Kim, Hyeon Jeong; Cho, Seoae; Li, Ning; Huang, Yinhua; Bruford, Michael W; Zhan, Xiangjiang; Dixon, Andrew; Bertelsen, Mads F; Derryberry, Elizabeth; Warren, Wesley; Wilson, Richard K; Li, Shengbin; Ray, David A; Green, Richard E; O'Brien, Stephen J; Griffin, Darren; Johnson, Warren E; Haussler, David; Ryder, Oliver A; Willerslev, Eske; Graves, Gary R; Alström, Per; Fjeldså, Jon; Mindell, David P; Edwards, Scott V; Braun, Edward L; Rahbek, Carsten; Burt, David W; Houde, Peter; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Jarvis, Erich D; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Wang, Jun

    2014-12-12

    Birds are the most species-rich class of tetrapod vertebrates and have wide relevance across many research fields. We explored bird macroevolution using full genomes from 48 avian species representing all major extant clades. The avian genome is principally characterized by its constrained size, which predominantly arose because of lineage-specific erosion of repetitive elements, large segmental deletions, and gene loss. Avian genomes furthermore show a remarkably high degree of evolutionary stasis at the levels of nucleotide sequence, gene synteny, and chromosomal structure. Despite this pattern of conservation, we detected many non-neutral evolutionary changes in protein-coding genes and noncoding regions. These analyses reveal that pan-avian genomic diversity covaries with adaptations to different lifestyles and convergent evolution of traits. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Avian influenza control strategies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Control strategies for avian influenza in poultry vary depending on whether the goal is prevention, management, or eradication. Components used in control programs include: 1) education which includes communication, public awareness, and behavioral change, 2) changes to production and marketing sys...

  9. Different intracellular distribution of avian reovirus core protein sigmaA in cells of avian and mammalian origin.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Iglesias, Lorena; Lostalé-Seijo, Irene; Martínez-Costas, José; Benavente, Javier

    2012-10-25

    A comparative analysis of the intracellular distribution of avian reovirus (ARV) core protein sigmaA in cells of avian and mammalian origin revealed that, whereas the viral protein accumulates in the cytoplasm and nucleolus of avian cells, most sigmaA concentrates in the nucleoplasm of mammalian cells in tight association with the insoluble nuclear matrix fraction. Our results further showed that sigmaA becomes arrested in the nucleoplasm of mammalian cells via association with mammalian cell-specific factors and that this association prevents nucleolar targeting. Inhibition of RNA polymerase II activity, but not of RNA polymerase I activity, in infected mammalian cells induces nucleus-to-cytoplasm sigmaA translocation through a CRM1- and RanGTP-dependent mechanism, yet a heterokaryon assay suggests that sigmaA does not shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm. The scarcity of sigmaA in cytoplasmic viral factories of infected mammalian cells could be one of the factors contributing to limited ARV replication in mammalian cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. vph6 mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae require calcineurin for growth and are defective in vacuolar H(+)-ATPase assembly.

    PubMed

    Hemenway, C S; Dolinski, K; Cardenas, M E; Hiller, M A; Jones, E W; Heitman, J

    1995-11-01

    We have characterized a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strain that is hypersensitive to cyclosporin A (CsA) and FK506, immunosuppressants that inhibit calcineurin, a serine-threonine-specific phosphatase (PP2B). A single nuclear mutation, designated cev1 for calcineurin essential for viability, is responsible for the CsA-FK506-sensitive phenotype. The peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases cyclophilin A and FKBP12, respectively, mediate CsA and FK506 toxicity in the cev1 mutant strain. We demonstrate that cev1 is an allele of the VPH6 gene and that vph6 mutant strains fail to assemble the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase). The VPH6 gene was mapped on chromosome VIII and is predicted to encode a 181-amino acid (21 kD) protein with no identity to other known proteins. We find that calcineurin is essential for viability in many mutant strains with defects in V-ATPase function or vacuolar acidification. In addition, we find that calcineurin modulates extracellular acidification in response to glucose, which we propose occurs via calcineurin regulation of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase PMA1. Taken together, our findings suggest calcineurin plays a general role in the regulation of cation transport and homeostasis.

  11. Avian nestling predation by endangered Mount Graham red squirrel

    Treesearch

    Claire A. Zugmeyer; John L. Koprowski

    2007-01-01

    Studies using artificial nests or remote cameras have documented avian predation by red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus). Although several direct observations of avian predation events are known in the northern range of the red squirrel distribution, no accounts have been reported in the southern portion. We observed predation upon a hermit thrush...

  12. Parametric Study of Wall Shear Stress in Idealized Avian Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnsworth, Michael S.; Riede, Tobias; Thomson, Scott L.

    2017-11-01

    Because wall shear stress (WSS) affects cell response, WSS patterns in avian respiratory airways may be related to the origin of the syrinx and corresponding voice-producing tissue structures (e.g., membranes or vocal folds) in birds. To explore possible linkages between WSS patterns and the locations of avian voice-producing structures, a computational model of flow through an idealized portion of the avian respiratory airway, including trachea and primary bronchi sections, has been developed. The flow is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations, with velocity boundary conditions derived from pressure-flow data in an adult zebra finch during quiet respiration. Geometric parameters such as tracheal/bronchial diameter and length, as well as bronchial branching angle, are parametrically varied based on data for different avian species. Simulation results predict elevated WSS in the vicinity of the tracheobronchial juncture, the location at which voice-producing tissues are found in avian species. In this presentation, the model will be described and spatial distributions of WSS during inspiration and expiration will be presented and compared for different geometric configurations and respiration rates and waveforms. Funding for this project from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation (Grant 4498) is gratefully acknowledged.

  13. Activity of the C-terminal-dependent vacuolar sorting signal of horseradish peroxidase C1a is enhanced by its secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takeshi; Tabayashi, Ayako; Iwano, Megumi; Shinmyo, Atsuhiko; Kato, Ko; Nakayama, Hideki

    2011-02-01

    Plant class III peroxidase (PRX) catalyzes the oxidation and oxidative polymerization of a variety of phenolic compounds while reducing hydrogen peroxide. PRX proteins are classified into apoplast type and vacuole type based on the absence or the presence of C-terminal propeptides, which probably function as vacuolar sorting signals (VSSs). In this study, in order to improve our understanding of vacuole-type PRX, we analyzed regulatory mechanisms of vacuolar sorting of a model vacuole-type PRX, the C1a isozyme of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) (HRP C1a). Using cultured transgenic tobacco cells and protoplasts derived from horseradish leaves, we characterized HRP C1a's VSS, which is a 15 amino acid C-terminal propeptide (C15). We found that the C-terminal hexapeptide of C15 (C6), which is well conserved among vacuole-type PRX proteins, forms the core of the C-terminal-dependent VSS. We also found that the function of C6 is enhanced by the remaining N-terminal part of C15 which probably folds into an amphiphilic α-helix.

  14. Comparative genomic data of the Avian Phylogenomics Project.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guojie; Li, Bo; Li, Cai; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Jarvis, Erich D; Wang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary relationships of modern birds are among the most challenging to understand in systematic biology and have been debated for centuries. To address this challenge, we assembled or collected the genomes of 48 avian species spanning most orders of birds, including all Neognathae and two of the five Palaeognathae orders, and used the genomes to construct a genome-scale avian phylogenetic tree and perform comparative genomics analyses (Jarvis et al. in press; Zhang et al. in press). Here we release assemblies and datasets associated with the comparative genome analyses, which include 38 newly sequenced avian genomes plus previously released or simultaneously released genomes of Chicken, Zebra finch, Turkey, Pigeon, Peregrine falcon, Duck, Budgerigar, Adelie penguin, Emperor penguin and the Medium Ground Finch. We hope that this resource will serve future efforts in phylogenomics and comparative genomics. The 38 bird genomes were sequenced using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform and assembled using a whole genome shotgun strategy. The 48 genomes were categorized into two groups according to the N50 scaffold size of the assemblies: a high depth group comprising 23 species sequenced at high coverage (>50X) with multiple insert size libraries resulting in N50 scaffold sizes greater than 1 Mb (except the White-throated Tinamou and Bald Eagle); and a low depth group comprising 25 species sequenced at a low coverage (~30X) with two insert size libraries resulting in an average N50 scaffold size of about 50 kb. Repetitive elements comprised 4%-22% of the bird genomes. The assembled scaffolds allowed the homology-based annotation of 13,000 ~ 17000 protein coding genes in each avian genome relative to chicken, zebra finch and human, as well as comparative and sequence conservation analyses. Here we release full genome assemblies of 38 newly sequenced avian species, link genome assembly downloads for the 7 of the remaining 10 species, and provide a guideline of

  15. Vacuolar SPX-MFS transporters are essential for phosphate adaptation in plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinlong; Fu, Shaomin; Yang, Lei; Luan, Mingda; Zhao, Fugeng; Luan, Sheng; Lan, Wenzhi

    2016-08-02

    To survive in most soils in which inorganic phosphate (Pi) levels are limited and constantly changing, plants universally use the vacuoles as cellular Pi "sink" and "source" to maintain Pi homeostasis. However, the transporters that mediate Pi sequestration into the vacuoles remain unknown. Recently, we and other 2 groups independently identified the members of SPS-MSF family as the candidates for tonoplast Pi transporters in Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa. We and Liu et al. demonstrated that one of SPS-MSF member, VPT1 (Vacuolar Phosphate Transporter 1), also named as PHT5;1 (Phosphate Transporter 5;1), plays a predominant role in Pi sequestration of vacuoles in Arabidopsis. Here we show that vpt1 mutants and VPT1-GFP overexpressing lines displayed sensitive to Pi stress under the hydroponic system containing the medium with low iron, supporting that VPT1 is essential for Arabidopsis to adapt phosphate stress.

  16. Avians as a model system of vascular development.

    PubMed

    Bressan, Michael; Mikawa, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    For more than 2,000 years, philosophers and scientists have turned to the avian embryo with questions of how life begins (Aristotle and Peck Generations of Animals. Loeb Classics, vol. XIII. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 1943; Needham, A history of embryology. Abelard-Schuman, New York, 1959). Then, as now, the unique accessibility of the embryo both in terms of acquisition of eggs from domesticated fowl and ease at which the embryo can be visualized by simply opening the shell has made avians an appealing and powerful model system for the study of development. Thus, as the field of embryology has evolved through observational, comparative, and experimental embryology into its current iteration as the cellular and molecular biology of development, avians have remained a useful and practical system of study.

  17. Avian influenza virus infections in humans.

    PubMed

    Wong, Samson S Y; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2006-01-01

    Seroepidemiologic and virologic studies since 1889 suggested that human influenza pandemics were caused by H1, H2, and H3 subtypes of influenza A viruses. If not for the 1997 avian A/H5N1 outbreak in Hong Kong of China, subtype H2 is the likely candidate for the next pandemic. However, unlike previous poultry outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza due to H5 that were controlled by depopulation with or without vaccination, the presently circulating A/H5N1 genotype Z virus has since been spreading from Southern China to other parts of the world. Migratory birds and, less likely, bird trafficking are believed to be globalizing the avian influenza A/H5N1 epidemic in poultry. More than 200 human cases of avian influenza virus infection due to A/H5, A/H7, and A/H9 subtypes mainly as a result of poultry-to-human transmission have been reported with a > 50% case fatality rate for A/H5N1 infections. A mutant or reassortant virus capable of efficient human-to-human transmission could trigger another influenza pandemic. The recent isolation of this virus in extrapulmonary sites of human diseases suggests that the high fatality of this infection may be more than just the result of a cytokine storm triggered by the pulmonary disease. The emergence of resistance to adamantanes (amantadine and rimantadine) and recently oseltamivir while H5N1 vaccines are still at the developmental stage of phase I clinical trial are causes for grave concern. Moreover, the to-be pandemic strain may have little cross immunogenicity to the presently tested vaccine strain. The relative importance and usefulness of airborne, droplet, or contact precautions in infection control are still uncertain. Laboratory-acquired avian influenza H7N7 has been reported, and the laboratory strains of human influenza H2N2 could also be the cause of another pandemic. The control of this impending disaster requires more research in addition to national and international preparedness at various levels. The

  18. Multiple control strategies for prevention of avian influenza pandemic.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Roman; Zaman, Gul; Islam, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    We present the prevention of avian influenza pandemic by adjusting multiple control functions in the human-to-human transmittable avian influenza model. First we show the existence of the optimal control problem; then by using both analytical and numerical techniques, we investigate the cost-effective control effects for the prevention of transmission of disease. To do this, we use three control functions, the effort to reduce the number of contacts with human infected with mutant avian influenza, the antiviral treatment of infected individuals, and the effort to reduce the number of infected birds. We completely characterized the optimal control and compute numerical solution of the optimality system by using an iterative method.

  19. Replication and Adaptive Mutations of Low Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses in Tracheal Organ Cultures of Different Avian Species

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Henning; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Pleschka, Stephan; Rautenschlein, Silke

    2012-01-01

    Transmission of avian influenza viruses (AIV) between different avian species may require genome mutations that allow efficient virus replication in a new species and could increase virulence. To study the role of domestic poultry in the evolution of AIV we compared replication of low pathogenic (LP) AIV of subtypes H9N2, H7N7 and H6N8 in tracheal organ cultures (TOC) and primary embryo fibroblast cultures of chicken, turkey, Pekin duck and homing pigeon. Virus strain-dependent and avian species-related differences between LPAIV were observed in growth kinetics and induction of ciliostasis in TOC. In particular, our data demonstrate high susceptibility to LPAIV of turkey TOC contrasted with low susceptibility of homing pigeon TOC. Serial virus passages in the cells of heterologous host species resulted in adaptive mutations in the AIV genome, especially in the receptor-binding site and protease cleavage site of the hemagglutinin. Our data highlight differences in susceptibility of different birds to AIV viruses and emphasizes potential role of poultry in the emergence of new virus variants. PMID:22912693

  20. [Summary of Guangdong provincial seminar on avian influenza and influenza].

    PubMed

    Yu, Shou-yi; Chen, Qing; Hu, Gui-fang

    2005-12-01

    On 8th November 2005, an academic seminar on avian influenza and influenza in Guangdong Province was held by Guangdong Society of Tropical Medicine and the Epidemiology Committee of the Guangdong Preventive Medicine Society in Southern Medical University, addressing the current problems in epidemics of avian influenza. The specialists attending the conference arrived at the common consideration that at present, the avian influenza virus H5N1 has not the capacity to trigger an pandemic in human population, but scattered cases had been reported to increase the suspicions of H5N1 virus transmission between humans. Due attention should be paid to the tendency of expansion of the host range and epidemic area, and the possibility of disastrous influenza pandemic among human populations persists, for which rational consideration is called for, and the role of specialists should be fully recognized who are endeavoring to examine the possible scale of influenza occurrence and devise strategy to deal with the epidemic in Guangdong province according to the practical situation in China. Increased funds and investment in scientific research on avian influenza is urged for influenza prediction and surveillance, rapid and early diagnostic assays, understanding of virus variation, mechanism of H5N1 virus adaptation to human hosts, effective medicines and vaccines for prevention and therapy of avian influenza. Laboratory bio-safety control should be enforced to prevent infections originated from laboratories. The specialists appeal that the media report the news objectively and issue the public warnings against avian influenza after consulting specialists, so as to avoid unnecessary social panic.

  1. Antibody responses to avian influenza viruses in wild birds broaden with age

    PubMed Central

    Manvell, Ruth J.; Schulenburg, Bodo; Shell, Wendy; Wikramaratna, Paul S.; Perrins, Christopher; Sheldon, Ben C.; Brown, Ian H.; Pybus, Oliver G.

    2016-01-01

    For viruses such as avian influenza, immunity within a host population can drive the emergence of new strains by selecting for viruses with novel antigens that avoid immune recognition. The accumulation of acquired immunity with age is hypothesized to affect how influenza viruses emerge and spread in species of different lifespans. Despite its importance for understanding the behaviour of avian influenza viruses, little is known about age-related accumulation of immunity in the virus's primary reservoir, wild birds. To address this, we studied the age structure of immune responses to avian influenza virus in a wild swan population (Cygnus olor), before and after the population experienced an outbreak of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza in 2008. We performed haemagglutination inhibition assays on sampled sera for five avian influenza strains and show that breadth of response accumulates with age. The observed age-related distribution of antibody responses to avian influenza strains may explain the age-dependent mortality observed during the highly pathogenic H5N1 outbreak. Age structures and species lifespan are probably important determinants of viral epidemiology and virulence in birds. PMID:28003449

  2. Adaptation of avian influenza A (H6N1) virus from avian to human receptor-binding preference

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Qi, Jianxun; Bi, Yuhai; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Min; Zhang, Baorong; Wang, Ming; Liu, Jinhua; Yan, Jinghua; Shi, Yi; Gao, George F

    2015-01-01

    The receptor-binding specificity of influenza A viruses is a major determinant for the host tropism of the virus, which enables interspecies transmission. In 2013, the first human case of infection with avian influenza A (H6N1) virus was reported in Taiwan. To gather evidence concerning the epidemic potential of H6 subtype viruses, we performed comprehensive analysis of receptor-binding properties of Taiwan-isolated H6 HAs from 1972 to 2013. We propose that the receptor-binding properties of Taiwan-isolated H6 HAs have undergone three major stages: initially avian receptor-binding preference, secondarily obtaining human receptor-binding capacity, and recently human receptor-binding preference, which has been confirmed by receptor-binding assessment of three representative virus isolates. Mutagenesis work revealed that E190V and G228S substitutions are important to acquire the human receptor-binding capacity, and the P186L substitution could reduce the binding to avian receptor. Further structural analysis revealed how the P186L substitution in the receptor-binding site of HA determines the receptor-binding preference change. We conclude that the human-infecting H6N1 evolved into a human receptor preference. PMID:25940072

  3. Characterizing the avian gut microbiota: membership, driving influences, and potential function.

    PubMed

    Waite, David W; Taylor, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    Birds represent a diverse and evolutionarily successful lineage, occupying a wide range of niches throughout the world. Like all vertebrates, avians harbor diverse communities of microorganisms within their guts, which collectively fulfill important roles in providing the host with nutrition and protection from pathogens. Although many studies have investigated the role of particular microbes in the guts of avian species, there has been no attempt to unify the results of previous, sequence-based studies to examine the factors that shape the avian gut microbiota as a whole. In this study, we present the first meta-analysis of the avian gut microbiota, using 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained from a range of publicly available clone-library and amplicon pyrosequencing data. We investigate community membership and structure, as well as probe the roles of some of the key biological factors that influence the gut microbiota of other vertebrates, such as host phylogeny, location within the gut, diet, and association with humans. Our results indicate that, across avian studies, the microbiota demonstrates a similar phylum-level composition to that of mammals. Host bird species is the most important factor in determining community composition, although sampling site, diet, and captivity status also contribute. These analyses provide a first integrated look at the composition of the avian microbiota, and serve as a foundation for future studies in this area.

  4. Characterizing the avian gut microbiota: membership, driving influences, and potential function

    PubMed Central

    Waite, David W.; Taylor, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Birds represent a diverse and evolutionarily successful lineage, occupying a wide range of niches throughout the world. Like all vertebrates, avians harbor diverse communities of microorganisms within their guts, which collectively fulfill important roles in providing the host with nutrition and protection from pathogens. Although many studies have investigated the role of particular microbes in the guts of avian species, there has been no attempt to unify the results of previous, sequence-based studies to examine the factors that shape the avian gut microbiota as a whole. In this study, we present the first meta-analysis of the avian gut microbiota, using 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained from a range of publicly available clone-library and amplicon pyrosequencing data. We investigate community membership and structure, as well as probe the roles of some of the key biological factors that influence the gut microbiota of other vertebrates, such as host phylogeny, location within the gut, diet, and association with humans. Our results indicate that, across avian studies, the microbiota demonstrates a similar phylum-level composition to that of mammals. Host bird species is the most important factor in determining community composition, although sampling site, diet, and captivity status also contribute. These analyses provide a first integrated look at the composition of the avian microbiota, and serve as a foundation for future studies in this area. PMID:24904538

  5. Involvement of Vacuolar Sequestration and Active Transport in Tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Hop Iso-α-Acids▿ † ¶

    PubMed Central

    Hazelwood, Lucie A.; Walsh, Michael C.; Pronk, Jack T.; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    The hop plant, Humulus lupulus L., has an exceptionally high content of secondary metabolites, the hop α-acids, which possess a range of beneficial properties, including antiseptic action. Studies performed on the mode of action of hop iso-α-acids have hitherto been restricted to lactic acid bacteria. The present study investigated molecular mechanisms of hop iso-α-acid resistance in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Growth inhibition occurred at concentrations of hop iso-α-acids that were an order of magnitude higher than those found with hop-tolerant prokaryotes. Chemostat-based transcriptome analysis and phenotype screening of the S. cerevisiae haploid gene deletion collection were used as complementary methods to screen for genes involved in hop iso-α-acid detoxification and tolerance. This screening and further analysis of deletion mutants confirmed that yeast tolerance to hop iso-α-acids involves three major processes, active proton pumping into the vacuole by the vacuolar-type ATPase to enable vacuolar sequestration of iso-α-acids and alteration of cell wall structure and, to a lesser extent, active export of iso-α-acids across the plasma membrane. Furthermore, iso-α-acids were shown to affect cellular metal homeostasis by acting as strong zinc and iron chelators. PMID:19915041

  6. Avian plasma chemistry analysis using diluted samples.

    PubMed

    Waldoch, Jennifer; Wack, Raymund; Christopher, Mary

    2009-12-01

    Clinical chemistry tests are essential for the diagnosis and monitoring of disease in birds. The small volume of blood that can be obtained from many avian species limits the use of routine in-house chemistry analyzers. The aim of this study was to examine the accuracy and precision of avian plasma chemistry values obtained by use of a benchtop analyzer in samples diluted with sterile water, as compared with undiluted samples. Whole blood samples were collected from 13 clinically healthy thick-billed parrots (Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha). The samples were placed in lithium heparin tubes and centrifuged and the plasma decanted. One aliquot was analyzed immediately using a VetScan benchtop analyzer with an avian-reptile-specific rotor that included 12 analytes. The remainder of the plasma was divided into two aliquots and stored at -80 degrees C until analysis. One of these aliquots was diluted 1:1, 1:1.5, 1:2, and 1:2.5 with sterile water to give final dilutions of 1:2, 1:2.5, 1:3, and 1:3.5, respectively. The other aliquot was pooled with the 12 other samples to create a plasma pool. The undiluted plasma pool and two final dilutions (1:2 and 1:3) of the pooled plasma were analyzed in replicate (n = 20) to determine intra- and interassay imprecision. Each dilution was analyzed using the avian-reptile rotor and the results multiplied by the appropriate dilution factor to obtain the final result. Significant differences were observed in clinical chemistry results obtained from diluted plasma samples for all analytes except aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, and glucose. Uric acid concentration was not significantly different at dilutions of up to 1:3. Bile acids, globulins, and sodium concentrations were below the limit of detection in all diluted samples and were not statistically analyzed. Based on these results, dilution with sterile water is not recommended for biochemical analysis of avian plasma using the VetScan benchtop analyzer.

  7. Pollination in Nicotiana alata stimulates synthesis and transfer to the stigmatic surface of NaStEP, a vacuolar Kunitz proteinase inhibitor homologue

    PubMed Central

    Busot, Grethel Yanet; McClure, Bruce; Ibarra-Sánchez, Claudia Patricia; Jiménez-Durán, Karina; Vázquez-Santana, Sonia; Cruz-García, Felipe

    2008-01-01

    After landing on a wet stigma, pollen grains hydrate and germination generally occurs. However, there is no certainty of the pollen tube growth through the style to reach the ovary. The pistil is a gatekeeper that evolved in many species to recognize and reject the self-pollen, avoiding endogamy and encouraging cross-pollination. However, recognition is a complex process, and specific factors are needed. Here the isolation and characterization of a stigma-specific protein from N. alata, NaStEP (N. alata Stigma Expressed Protein), that is homologous to Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitors, are reported. Activity gel assays showed that NaStEP is not a functional serine proteinase inhibitor. Immunohistochemical and protein blot analyses revealed that NaStEP is detectable in stigmas of self-incompatible (SI) species N. alata, N. forgetiana, and N. bonariensis, but not in self-compatible (SC) species N. tabacum, N. plumbaginifolia, N. benthamiana, N. longiflora, and N. glauca. NaStEP contains the vacuolar targeting sequence NPIVL, and immunocytochemistry experiments showed vacuolar localization in unpollinated stigmas. After self-pollination or pollination with pollen from the SC species N. tabacum or N. plumbaginifolia, NaStEP was also found in the stigmatic exudate. The synthesis and presence in the stigmatic exudate of this protein was strongly induced in N. alata following incompatible pollination with N. tabacum pollen. The transfer of NaStEP to the stigmatic exudate was accompanied by perforation of the stigmatic cell wall, which appeared to release the vacuolar contents to the apoplastic space. The increase in NaStEP synthesis after pollination and its presence in the stigmatic exudates suggest that this protein may play a role in the early pollen–stigma interactions that regulate pollen tube growth in Nicotiana. PMID:18689443

  8. Pollination in Nicotiana alata stimulates synthesis and transfer to the stigmatic surface of NaStEP, a vacuolar Kunitz proteinase inhibitor homologue.

    PubMed

    Busot, Grethel Yanet; McClure, Bruce; Ibarra-Sánchez, Claudia Patricia; Jiménez-Durán, Karina; Vázquez-Santana, Sonia; Cruz-García, Felipe

    2008-01-01

    After landing on a wet stigma, pollen grains hydrate and germination generally occurs. However, there is no certainty of the pollen tube growth through the style to reach the ovary. The pistil is a gatekeeper that evolved in many species to recognize and reject the self-pollen, avoiding endogamy and encouraging cross-pollination. However, recognition is a complex process, and specific factors are needed. Here the isolation and characterization of a stigma-specific protein from N. alata, NaStEP (N. alata Stigma Expressed Protein), that is homologous to Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitors, are reported. Activity gel assays showed that NaStEP is not a functional serine proteinase inhibitor. Immunohistochemical and protein blot analyses revealed that NaStEP is detectable in stigmas of self-incompatible (SI) species N. alata, N. forgetiana, and N. bonariensis, but not in self-compatible (SC) species N. tabacum, N. plumbaginifolia, N. benthamiana, N. longiflora, and N. glauca. NaStEP contains the vacuolar targeting sequence NPIVL, and immunocytochemistry experiments showed vacuolar localization in unpollinated stigmas. After self-pollination or pollination with pollen from the SC species N. tabacum or N. plumbaginifolia, NaStEP was also found in the stigmatic exudate. The synthesis and presence in the stigmatic exudate of this protein was strongly induced in N. alata following incompatible pollination with N. tabacum pollen. The transfer of NaStEP to the stigmatic exudate was accompanied by perforation of the stigmatic cell wall, which appeared to release the vacuolar contents to the apoplastic space. The increase in NaStEP synthesis after pollination and its presence in the stigmatic exudates suggest that this protein may play a role in the early pollen-stigma interactions that regulate pollen tube growth in Nicotiana.

  9. Increased Activity of the Vacuolar Monosaccharide Transporter TMT1 Alters Cellular Sugar Partitioning, Sugar Signaling, and Seed Yield in Arabidopsis1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Wingenter, Karina; Schulz, Alexander; Wormit, Alexandra; Wic, Stefan; Trentmann, Oliver; Hoermiller, Imke I.; Heyer, Arnd G.; Marten, Irene; Hedrich, Rainer; Neuhaus, H. Ekkehard

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which vacuolar sugar transport activity affects molecular, cellular, and developmental processes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is unknown. Electrophysiological analysis revealed that overexpression of the tonoplast monosaccharide transporter TMT1 in a tmt1-2::tDNA mutant led to increased proton-coupled monosaccharide import into isolated mesophyll vacuoles in comparison with wild-type vacuoles. TMT1 overexpressor mutants grew faster than wild-type plants on soil and in high-glucose (Glc)-containing liquid medium. These effects were correlated with increased vacuolar monosaccharide compartmentation, as revealed by nonaqueous fractionation and by chlorophyllab-binding protein1 and nitrate reductase1 gene expression studies. Soil-grown TMT1 overexpressor plants respired less Glc than wild-type plants and only about half the amount of Glc respired by tmt1-2::tDNA mutants. In sum, these data show that TMT activity in wild-type plants limits vacuolar monosaccharide loading. Remarkably, TMT1 overexpressor mutants produced larger seeds and greater total seed yield, which was associated with increased lipid and protein content. These changes in seed properties were correlated with slightly decreased nocturnal CO2 release and increased sugar export rates from detached source leaves. The SUC2 gene, which codes for a sucrose transporter that may be critical for phloem loading in leaves, has been identified as Glc repressed. Thus, the observation that SUC2 mRNA increased slightly in TMT1 overexpressor leaves, characterized by lowered cytosolic Glc levels than wild-type leaves, provided further evidence of a stimulated source capacity. In summary, increased TMT activity in Arabidopsis induced modified subcellular sugar compartmentation, altered cellular sugar sensing, affected assimilate allocation, increased the biomass of Arabidopsis seeds, and accelerated early plant development. PMID:20709831

  10. Non-selective cation channels in plasma and vacuolar membranes and their contribution to K+ transport.

    PubMed

    Pottosin, Igor; Dobrovinskaya, Oxana

    2014-05-15

    Both in vacuolar and plasma membranes, in addition to truly K(+)-selective channels there is a variety of non-selective channels, which conduct K(+) and other ions with little preference. Many non-selective channels in the plasma membrane are active at depolarized potentials, thus, contributing to K(+) efflux rather than to K(+) uptake. They may play important roles in xylem loading or contribute to a K(+) leak, induced by salt or oxidative stress. Here, three currents, expressed in root cells, are considered: voltage-insensitive cation current, non-selective outwardly rectifying current, and low-selective conductance, activated by reactive oxygen species. The latter two do not only poorly discriminate between different cations (like K(+)vs Na(+)), but also conduct anions. Such solute channels may mediate massive electroneutral transport of salts and might be involved in osmotic adjustment or volume decrease, associated with cell death. In the tonoplast two major currents are mediated by SV (slow) and FV (fast) vacuolar channels, respectively, which are virtually impermeable for anions. SV channels conduct mono- and divalent cations indiscriminately and are activated by high cytosolic Ca(2+) and depolarized voltages. FV channels are inhibited by micromolar cytosolic Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and polyamines, and conduct a variety of monovalent cations, including K(+). Strikingly, both SV and FV channels sense the K(+) content of vacuoles, which modulates their voltage dependence, and in case of SV, also alleviates channel's inhibition by luminal Ca(2+). Therefore, SV and FV channels may operate as K(+)-sensing valves, controlling K(+) distribution between the vacuole and the cytosol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Expression analysis of Arabidopsis vacuolar sorting receptor 3 reveals a putative function in guard cells.

    PubMed

    Avila, Emily L; Brown, Michelle; Pan, Songqin; Desikan, Radhika; Neill, Steven J; Girke, Thomas; Surpin, Marci; Raikhel, Natasha V

    2008-01-01

    Vacuolar sorting receptors (VSRs) are responsible for the proper targeting of soluble cargo proteins to their destination compartments. The Arabidopsis genome encodes seven VSRs. In this work, the spatio-temporal expression of one of the members of this gene family, AtVSR3, was determined by RT-PCR and promoter::reporter gene fusions. AtVSR3 was expressed specifically in guard cells. Consequently, a reverse genetics approach was taken to determine the function of AtVSR3 by using RNA interference (RNAi) technology. Plants expressing little or no AtVSR3 transcript had a compressed life cycle, bolting approximately 1 week earlier and senescing up to 2 weeks earlier than the wild-type parent line. While the development and distribution of stomata in AtVSR3 RNAi plants appeared normal, stomatal function was altered. The guard cells of mutant plants did not close in response to abscisic acid treatment, and the mean leaf temperatures of the RNAi plants were on average 0.8 degrees C lower than both wild type and another vacuolar sorting receptor mutant, atvsr1-1. Furthermore, the loss of AtVSR3 protein caused the accumulation of nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide, signalling molecules implicated in the regulation of stomatal opening and closing. Finally, proteomics and western blot analyses of cellular proteins isolated from wild-type and AtVSR3 RNAi leaves showed that phospholipase Dgamma, which may play a role in abscisic acid signalling, accumulated to higher levels in AtVSR3 RNAi guard cells. Thus, AtVSR3 may play an important role in responses to plant stress.

  12. Avian Influenza A(H5N1) Virus in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Kayali, Ghazi; Kandeil, Ahmed; El-Shesheny, Rabeh; Kayed, Ahmed S; Maatouq, Asmaa M; Cai, Zhipeng; McKenzie, Pamela P; Webby, Richard J; El Refaey, Samir; Kandeel, Amr; Ali, Mohamed A

    2016-03-01

    In Egypt, avian influenza A subtype H5N1 and H9N2 viruses are enzootic in poultry. The control plan devised by veterinary authorities in Egypt to prevent infections in poultry focused mainly on vaccination and ultimately failed. Recently, widespread H5N1 infections in poultry and a substantial increase in the number of human cases of H5N1 infection were observed. We summarize surveillance data from 2009 through 2014 and show that avian influenza viruses are established in poultry in Egypt and are continuously evolving genetically and antigenically. We also discuss the epidemiology of human infection with avian influenza in Egypt and describe how the true burden of disease is underestimated. We discuss the failures of relying on vaccinating poultry as the sole intervention tool. We conclude by highlighting the key components that need to be included in a new strategy to control avian influenza infections in poultry and humans in Egypt.

  13. Avian Influenza A(H5N1) Virus in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Kandeil, Ahmed; El-Shesheny, Rabeh; Kayed, Ahmed S.; Maatouq, Asmaa M.; Cai, Zhipeng; McKenzie, Pamela P.; Webby, Richard J.; El Refaey, Samir; Kandeel, Amr; Ali, Mohamed A.

    2016-01-01

    In Egypt, avian influenza A subtype H5N1 and H9N2 viruses are enzootic in poultry. The control plan devised by veterinary authorities in Egypt to prevent infections in poultry focused mainly on vaccination and ultimately failed. Recently, widespread H5N1 infections in poultry and a substantial increase in the number of human cases of H5N1 infection were observed. We summarize surveillance data from 2009 through 2014 and show that avian influenza viruses are established in poultry in Egypt and are continuously evolving genetically and antigenically. We also discuss the epidemiology of human infection with avian influenza in Egypt and describe how the true burden of disease is underestimated. We discuss the failures of relying on vaccinating poultry as the sole intervention tool. We conclude by highlighting the key components that need to be included in a new strategy to control avian influenza infections in poultry and humans in Egypt. PMID:26886164

  14. Toxoplasma gondii sequesters lysosomes from mammalian hosts in the vacuolar space.

    PubMed

    Coppens, Isabelle; Dunn, Joe Dan; Romano, Julia D; Pypaert, Marc; Zhang, Hui; Boothroyd, John C; Joiner, Keith A

    2006-04-21

    The intracellular compartment harboring Toxoplasma gondii satisfies the parasite's nutritional needs for rapid growth in mammalian cells. We demonstrate that the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) of T. gondii accumulates material coming from the host mammalian cell via the exploitation of the host endo-lysosomal system. The parasite actively recruits host microtubules, resulting in selective attraction of endo-lysosomes to the PV. Microtubule-based invaginations of the PV membrane serve as conduits for the delivery of host endo-lysosomes within the PV. These tubular conduits are decorated by a parasite coat, including the tubulogenic protein GRA7, which acts like a garrote that sequesters host endocytic organelles in the vacuolar space. These data define an unanticipated process allowing the parasite intimate and concentrated access to a diverse range of low molecular weight components produced by the endo-lysosomal system. More generally, they identify a unique mechanism for unidirectional transport and sequestration of host organelles.

  15. Clathrin coat controls synaptic vesicle acidification by blocking vacuolar ATPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Farsi, Zohreh; Rammner, Burkhard; Woehler, Andrew; Lafer, Eileen M; Mim, Carsten; Jahn, Reinhard

    2018-01-01

    Newly-formed synaptic vesicles (SVs) are rapidly acidified by vacuolar adenosine triphosphatases (vATPases), generating a proton electrochemical gradient that drives neurotransmitter loading. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is needed for the formation of new SVs, yet it is unclear when endocytosed vesicles acidify and refill at the synapse. Here, we isolated clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) from mouse brain to measure their acidification directly at the single vesicle level. We observed that the ATP-induced acidification of CCVs was strikingly reduced in comparison to SVs. Remarkably, when the coat was removed from CCVs, uncoated vesicles regained ATP-dependent acidification, demonstrating that CCVs contain the functional vATPase, yet its function is inhibited by the clathrin coat. Considering the known structures of the vATPase and clathrin coat, we propose a model in which the formation of the coat surrounds the vATPase and blocks its activity. Such inhibition is likely fundamental for the proper timing of SV refilling. PMID:29652249

  16. A vacuolar iron-transporter homologue acts as a detoxifier in Plasmodium

    PubMed Central

    Slavic, Ksenija; Krishna, Sanjeev; Lahree, Aparajita; Bouyer, Guillaume; Hanson, Kirsten K.; Vera, Iset; Pittman, Jon K.; Staines, Henry M.; Mota, Maria M.

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient but is also highly toxic. In yeast and plant cells, a key detoxifying mechanism involves iron sequestration into intracellular storage compartments, mediated by members of the vacuolar iron-transporter (VIT) family of proteins. Here we study the VIT homologue from the malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum (PfVIT) and Plasmodium berghei (PbVIT). PfVIT-mediated iron transport in a yeast heterologous expression system is saturable (Km∼14.7 μM), and selective for Fe2+ over other divalent cations. PbVIT-deficient P. berghei lines (Pbvit−) show a reduction in parasite load in both liver and blood stages of infection in mice. Moreover, Pbvit− parasites have higher levels of labile iron in blood stages and are more sensitive to increased iron levels in liver stages, when compared with wild-type parasites. Our data are consistent with Plasmodium VITs playing a major role in iron detoxification and, thus, normal development of malaria parasites in their mammalian host. PMID:26786069

  17. A vacuolar iron-transporter homologue acts as a detoxifier in Plasmodium.

    PubMed

    Slavic, Ksenija; Krishna, Sanjeev; Lahree, Aparajita; Bouyer, Guillaume; Hanson, Kirsten K; Vera, Iset; Pittman, Jon K; Staines, Henry M; Mota, Maria M

    2016-01-20

    Iron is an essential micronutrient but is also highly toxic. In yeast and plant cells, a key detoxifying mechanism involves iron sequestration into intracellular storage compartments, mediated by members of the vacuolar iron-transporter (VIT) family of proteins. Here we study the VIT homologue from the malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum (PfVIT) and Plasmodium berghei (PbVIT). PfVIT-mediated iron transport in a yeast heterologous expression system is saturable (Km ∼ 14.7 μM), and selective for Fe(2+) over other divalent cations. PbVIT-deficient P. berghei lines (Pbvit(-)) show a reduction in parasite load in both liver and blood stages of infection in mice. Moreover, Pbvit(-) parasites have higher levels of labile iron in blood stages and are more sensitive to increased iron levels in liver stages, when compared with wild-type parasites. Our data are consistent with Plasmodium VITs playing a major role in iron detoxification and, thus, normal development of malaria parasites in their mammalian host.

  18. Avian cholera and organochlorine residues in an American oystercatcher

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Locke, L.N.; Cromartie, E.

    1978-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida, the causative bacterium of avian cholera, was isolated from cultures of the liver and heart blood of a female, adult American oystercatcher (Haematopus palliatus) found dead on the Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, South Carolina, in May 1973. This is apparently the first record of avian cholera in the oystercatcher. Low levels of DDE were identified in tissues of the oystercatcher.

  19. Evaluation of Cytology for Diagnosing Avian Pox in Wild Turkeys ( Meleagris gallopavo).

    PubMed

    Hydock, Kira; Brown, Holly; Nemeth, Nicole; Poulson, Rebecca; Casalena, Mary Jo; Johnson, Joshua B; Brown, Justin

    2018-03-01

    Avian pox virus is a common cause of proliferative skin disease in wild turkeys ( Meleagris gallopavo); however, other etiologies may produce grossly indistinguishable lesions. Common methods for diagnosing avian pox include histopathology, virus isolation, and PCR. While these methods are sufficient in most cases, each has their limitations. Cytology is a cost-effective and rapid approach that may be useful when traditional diagnostics are not feasible. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of cytology relative to histopathology and PCR for avian pox diagnosis in wild turkeys. Fifty wild turkeys were submitted for necropsy due to nodular skin lesions on unfeathered skin of the head. Of these, five had similar skin lesions on the unfeathered legs and 26 had plaques on the mucosa of the oropharynx or esophagus. Representative skin, oropharyngeal, and esophageal lesions from all birds were examined with cytology and histopathology. Skin lesions on the head of each bird were also tested for avian pox virus via PCR. Histopathology and PCR were equally sensitive in diagnosing avian pox from skin lesions on the head. There were no significant differences between cytologic and histopathologic diagnosis of avian pox from skin lesions on the head (sensitivity = 97.4%, specificity = 100.0%), legs (sensitivity = 75.0%, specificity = 100.0%), or from lesions in the oropharynx and esophagus (sensitivity of 62.5%). Similarly, there were no significant differences between PCR and cytology for diagnosis of pox viral skin lesions of the head. Relative to PCR detection of avian pox virus, cytology had a sensitivity of 90.0% and a specificity of 90.0%. These results suggest that cytology is a useful tool for diagnosis of avian pox in wild turkeys.

  20. Troop education and avian influenza surveillance in military barracks in Ghana, 2011.

    PubMed

    Odoom, John Kofi; Bel-Nono, Samuel; Rodgers, David; Agbenohevi, Prince G; Dafeamekpor, Courage K; Sowa, Roland M L; Danso, Fenteng; Tettey, Reuben; Suu-Ire, Richard; Bonney, Joseph H K; Asante, Ivy A; Aboagye, James; Abana, Christopher Zaab-Yen; Frimpong, Joseph Asamoah; Kronmann, Karl C; Oyofo, Buhari A; Ampofo, William K

    2012-11-08

    Influenza A viruses that cause highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) also infect humans. In many developing countries such as Ghana, poultry and humans live in close proximity in both the general and military populations, increasing risk for the spread of HPAI from birds to humans. Respiratory infections such as influenza are especially prone to rapid spread among military populations living in close quarters such as barracks making this a key population for targeted avian influenza surveillance and public health education. Twelve military barracks situated in the coastal, tropical rain forest and northern savannah belts of the country were visited and the troops and their families educated on pandemic avian influenza. Attendants at each site was obtained from the attendance sheet provided for registration. The seminars focused on zoonotic diseases, influenza surveillance, pathogenesis of avian influenza, prevention of emerging infections and biosecurity. To help direct public health policies, a questionnaire was used to collect information on animal populations and handling practices from 102 households in the military barracks. Cloacal and tracheal samples were taken from 680 domestic and domesticated wild birds and analysed for influenza A using molecular methods for virus detection. Of the 1028 participants that took part in the seminars, 668 (65%) showed good knowledge of pandemic avian influenza and the risks associated with its infection. Even though no evidence of the presence of avian influenza (AI) infection was found in the 680 domestic and wild birds sampled, biosecurity in the households surveyed was very poor. Active surveillance revealed that there was no AI circulation in the military barracks in April 2011. Though participants demonstrated good knowledge of pandemic avian influenza, biosecurity practices were minimal. Sustained educational programs are needed to further strengthen avian influenza surveillance and prevention in military barracks.

  1. Avian influenza in birds and mammals.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Carol J; Xing, Zheng; Sandrock, Christian E; Davis, Cristina E

    2009-07-01

    The disease syndromes caused by avian influenza viruses are highly variable depending on the host species infected, its susceptibility and response to infection and the virulence of the infecting viral strain. Although avian influenza viruses have a broad host range in general, it is rare for an individual strain or subtype to infect more than one species. The H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) lineages of viruses that descended from A/goose/Guandong/96 (H5N1 HPAIV) are unusual in the diversity of species they have infected worldwide. Although the species affected by H5N1 HPAI in the field and those that have been experimentally studied are diverse, their associated disease syndromes are remarkably similar across species. In some species, multi-organ failure and death are rapid and no signs of the disease are observed. Most prominently in this category are chickens and other avian species of the order Galliformes. In other species, neurologic signs develop resulting in the death of the host. This is what has been reported in domestic cats (Carnivora), geese (Anseriformes), ratites (Struthioniformes), pigeons inoculated with high doses (Columbiformes) and ducks infected with H5N1 HPAIV isolated since 2002 (Anseriformes). In some other species, the disease is more prolonged and although multi-organ failure and death are the eventual outcomes, the signs of disease are more extensive. Predominantly, these species include humans (Primates) and the laboratory models of human disease, the ferret (Carnivora), mouse (Rodentia) and cynamologous macaques (Primates). Finally, some species are more resistant to infection with H5N1 HPAIV and show few or no signs of disease. These species include pigeons in some studies (Columbiformes), ducks inoculated with pre-2002 isolates (Anseriformes), and pigs (Artiodactyla).

  2. Practical aspects of vaccination of poultry against avian influenza virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although little has changed in vaccine technology for avian influenza virus (AIV) in the past 20 years, the approach to vaccination of poultry (chickens, turkeys and ducks) for avian influenza has evolved as highly pathogenic (HP) AIV has become endemic in several regions of the world. Vaccination f...

  3. Surveillance of wild birds for avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Hoye, Bethany J; Munster, Vincent J; Nishiura, Hiroshi; Klaassen, Marcel; Fouchier, Ron A M

    2010-12-01

    Recent demand for increased understanding of avian influenza virus in its natural hosts, together with the development of high-throughput diagnostics, has heralded a new era in wildlife disease surveillance. However, survey design, sampling, and interpretation in the context of host populations still present major challenges. We critically reviewed current surveillance to distill a series of considerations pertinent to avian influenza virus surveillance in wild birds, including consideration of what, when, where, and how many to sample in the context of survey objectives. Recognizing that wildlife disease surveillance is logistically and financially constrained, we discuss pragmatic alternatives for achieving probability-based sampling schemes that capture this host-pathogen system. We recommend hypothesis-driven surveillance through standardized, local surveys that are, in turn, strategically compiled over broad geographic areas. Rethinking the use of existing surveillance infrastructure can thereby greatly enhance our global understanding of avian influenza and other zoonotic diseases.

  4. Developmental imaging: the avian embryo hatches to the challenge.

    PubMed

    Kulesa, Paul M; McKinney, Mary C; McLennan, Rebecca

    2013-06-01

    The avian embryo provides a multifaceted model to study developmental mechanisms because of its accessibility to microsurgery, fluorescence cell labeling, in vivo imaging, and molecular manipulation. Early two-dimensional planar growth of the avian embryo mimics human development and provides unique access to complex cell migration patterns using light microscopy. Later developmental events continue to permit access to both light and other imaging modalities, making the avian embryo an excellent model for developmental imaging. For example, significant insights into cell and tissue behaviors within the primitive streak, craniofacial region, and cardiovascular and peripheral nervous systems have come from avian embryo studies. In this review, we provide an update to recent advances in embryo and tissue slice culture and imaging, fluorescence cell labeling, and gene profiling. We focus on how technical advances in the chick and quail provide a clearer understanding of how embryonic cell dynamics are beautifully choreographed in space and time to sculpt cells into functioning structures. We summarize how these technical advances help us to better understand basic developmental mechanisms that may lead to clinical research into human birth defects and tissue repair. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Avian Influenza in wild birds from Chile, 2007-2009.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Christian; Moreno, Valentina; Pedersen, Janice; Jeria, Julissa; Agredo, Michel; Gutiérrez, Cristian; García, Alfonso; Vásquez, Marcela; Avalos, Patricia; Retamal, Patricio

    2015-03-02

    Aquatic and migratory birds, the main reservoir hosts of avian influenza viruses including those with high pathogenic potential, are the wildlife species with the highest risk for viral dissemination across countries and continents. In 2002, the Chilean poultry industry was affected with a highly pathogenic avian influenza strain, which created economic loss and triggered the establishment of a surveillance program in wild birds. This effort consisted of periodic samplings of sick or suspicious animals found along the coast and analyses with standardized techniques for detection of influenza A virus. The aim of this work is to report the detection of three avian influenza strains (H13N2, H5N9, H13N9) in gulls from Chile between 2007-2009, which nucleotide sequences showed highest similitudes to viruses detected in wild birds from North America. These results suggest a dissemination route for influenza viruses along the coasts of Americas. Migratory and synanthropic behaviors of birds included in this study support continued monitoring of avian influenza viruses isolated from wild birds in The Americas and the establishment of biosecurity practices in farms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Avian Egg and Egg Coat.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Hiroki

    2017-01-01

    An ovulated egg of vertebrates is surrounded by unique extracellular matrix, the egg coat or zona pellucida, playing important roles in fertilization and early development. The vertebrate egg coat is composed of two to six zona pellucida (ZP) glycoproteins that are characterized by the evolutionarily conserved ZP-domain module and classified into six subfamilies based on phylogenetic analyses. Interestingly, investigations of biochemical and functional features of the ZP glycoproteins show that the roles of each ZP-glycoprotein family member in the egg-coat formation and the egg-sperm interactions seemingly vary across vertebrates. This might be one reason why comprehensive understandings of the molecular basis of either architecture or physiological functions of egg coat still remain elusive despite more than 3 decades of intensive investigations. In this chapter, an overview of avian egg focusing on the oogenesis are provided in the first section, and unique features of avian egg coat, i.e., perivitelline layer, including the morphology, biogenesis pathway, and physiological functions are discussed mainly on chicken and quail in terms of the characteristics of ZP glycoproteins in the following sections. In addition, these features of avian egg coat are compared to mammalian zona pellucida, from the viewpoint that the structural and functional varieties of ZP glycoproteins might be associated with the evolutionary adaptation to their reproductive strategies. By comparing the egg coat of birds and mammals whose reproductive strategies are largely different, new insights into the molecular mechanisms of vertebrate egg-sperm interactions might be provided.

  7. [Micro vs. macro: structural-functional organization of avian micro- and macrochromosomes].

    PubMed

    Rodionov, A V

    1996-05-01

    Karyotypes of lower vertebrates mainly consist of microchromosomes. In higher vertebrates, microchromosomes are present in each class of the most primitive orders. Birds have more microchromosomes in their karyotype than other vertebrates. Accumulation of microchromosomes in the avian karyotype probably occurred after separation of birds from reptilians in Triassic, but prior to radiation of ancestors of the modern orders (late Cretaceous-early Jurassic). In this review, the structural, molecular, and functional organization of avian macro- and microchromosomes and their participation in genetic processes are discussed. The average size of an avian microchromosome is about 12.4 Mb, which is ten times less than the size of an average macrochromosome. In contrast to macrochromosomes, medium and small avian chromosomes lack the highest level of chromosomal organization: their chromonemes do not have spiral coiling. Microchromosomal euchromatin largely consists of GC-rich R regions. More than half of the mapped avian genes are located on microchromosomes. Crossing-over frequency in microchromosomes is approximately threefold higher than in macrochromosomes. This may be caused by high GC content and recombination hot spots, which are present on each microchromosome. High recombination frequency in microchromosomes increases the probability of their correct meiotic segregation.

  8. Ecology and diagnosis of introduced avian malaria in Hawaiian forest birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atkinson, Carter T.

    2005-01-01

    Avian malaria is a disease caused by species of protozoan parasites (Plasmodium) that infect birds. Related species commonly infect reptiles, birds and mammals in tropical and temperate regions of the world. Transmitted by mosquitoes, the parasites spend part of their lives in the red blood cells of birds (Figure 1). Avian malaria is common in continental areas, but is absent from the most isolated island archipelagos where mosquitoes do not naturally occur. More than 40 different species of avian Plasmodium have been described, but only one, P. relictum, has been introduced to the Hawaiian Islands. Because they evolved without natural exposure to avian malaria, native Hawaiian honeycreepers are extremely susceptible to this disease. Malaria currently limits the geographic distribution of native species, has population level impacts on survivorship, and is limiting the recovery of threatened and endangered species of forest birds.

  9. Climate change and avian influenza

    PubMed Central

    Slingenbergh, J.; Xiao, X.

    2009-01-01

    Summary This paper discusses impacts of climate change on the ecology of avian influenza viruses (AI viruses), which presumably co-evolved with migratory water birds, with virus also persisting outside the host in subarctic water bodies. Climate change would almost certainly alter bird migration, influence the AI virus transmission cycle and directly affect virus survival outside the host. The joint, net effects of these changes are rather unpredictable, but it is likely that AI virus circulation in water bird populations will continue with endless adaptation and evolution. In domestic poultry, too little is known about the direct effect of environmental factors on highly pathogenic avian influenza transmission and persistence to allow inference about the possible effect of climate change. However, possible indirect links through changes in the distribution of duck-crop farming are discussed. PMID:18819672

  10. Low diversity, activity, and density of transposable elements in five avian genomes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bo; Wang, Saisai; Wang, Yali; Shen, Dan; Xue, Songlei; Chen, Cai; Cui, Hengmi; Song, Chengyi

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we conducted the activity, diversity, and density analysis of transposable elements (TEs) across five avian genomes (budgerigar, chicken, turkey, medium ground finch, and zebra finch) to explore the potential reason of small genome sizes of birds. We found that these avian genomes exhibited low density of TEs by about 10% of genome coverages and low diversity of TEs with the TE landscapes dominated by CR1 and ERV elements, and contrasting proliferation dynamics both between TE types and between species were observed across the five avian genomes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that CR1 clade was more diverse in the family structure compared with R2 clade in birds; avian ERVs were classified into four clades (alpha, beta, gamma, and ERV-L) and belonged to three classes of ERV with an uneven distributed in these lineages. The activities of DNA and SINE TEs were very low in the evolution history of avian genomes; most LINEs and LTRs were ancient copies with a substantial decrease of activity in recent, with only LTRs and LINEs in chicken and zebra finch exhibiting weak activity in very recent, and very few TEs were intact; however, the recent activity may be underestimated due to the sequencing/assembly technologies in some species. Overall, this study demonstrates low diversity, activity, and density of TEs in the five avian species; highlights the differences of TEs in these lineages; and suggests that the current and recent activity of TEs in avian genomes is very limited, which may be one of the reasons of small genome sizes in birds.

  11. Avian influenza survey in migrating waterfowl in Sonora, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Montalvo-Corral, M; López-Robles, G; Hernández, J

    2011-02-01

    A two-year survey was carried out on the occurrence of avian influenza in migrating birds in two estuaries of the Mexican state of Sonora, which is located within the Pacific flyway. Cloacal and oropharyngeal swabs were collected from 1262 birds, including 20 aquatic bird species from the Moroncarit and Tobari estuaries in Sonora, Mexico. Samples were tested for type A influenza (M), H5 Eurasian and North American subtypes (H5EA and H5NA respectively) and the H7 North American subtype (H7NA). Gene detection was determined by one-step real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR). The results revealed that neither the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5 of Eurasian lineage nor H7NA were detected. The overall prevalence of avian influenza type A (M-positive) in the sampled birds was 3.6% with the vast majority in dabbling ducks (Anas species). Samples from two birds, one from a Redhead (Aythya americana) and another from a Northern Shoveler (Anas clypeata), were positive for the low-pathogenic H5 avian influenza virus of North American lineage. These findings represented documented evidence of the occurrence of avian influenza in wintering birds in the Mexican wetlands. This type of study contributes to the understanding of how viruses spread to new regions of North America and highlights the importance of surveillance for the early detection and control of potentially pathogenic strains, which could affect animal and human health. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Persistence of Pasteurella multocida in wetlands following avian cholera outbreaks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchong, Julie A.; Samuel, M.D.; Goldberg, Diana R.; Shadduck, D.J.; Lehr, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Avian cholera, caused by Pasteurella multocida, affects waterbirds across North America and occurs worldwide among various avian species. Once an epizootic begins, contamination of the wetland environment likely facilitates the transmission of P. multocida to susceptible birds. To evaluate the ability of P. multocida serotype-1, the most common serotype associated with avian cholera in waterfowl in western and central North America, to persist in wetlands and to identify environmental factors associated with its persistence, we collected water and sediment samples from 23 wetlands during winters and springs of 1996a??99. These samples were collected during avian cholera outbreaks and for up to 13 wk following initial sampling. We recovered P. multocida from six wetlands that were sampled following the initial outbreaks, but no P. multocida was isolated later than 7 wk after the initial outbreak sampling. We found no significant relationship between the probability of recovery of P. multocida during resampling and the abundance of the bacterium recovered during initial sampling, the substrate from which isolates were collected, isolate virulence, or water quality conditions previously suggested to be related to the abundance or survival of P. multocida. Our results indicate that wetlands are unlikely to serve as a long-term reservoir for P. multocida because the bacterium does not persist in wetlands for long time periods following avian cholera outbreaks.

  13. Avian Influenza in Wild Birds, Central Coast of Peru

    PubMed Central

    Blazes, David L.; Icochea, Eliana; Gonzalez, Rosa I.; Kochel, Tadeusz; Tinoco, Yeny; Sovero, Merly M.; Lindstrom, Stephen; Shu, Bo; Klimov, Alexander; Gonzalez, Armando E.; Montgomery, Joel M.

    2009-01-01

    To determine genotypes of avian influenza virus circulating among wild birds in South America, we collected and tested environmental fecal samples from birds along the coast of Peru, June 2006–December 2007. The 9 isolates recovered represented 4 low-pathogenicity avian influenza strains: subtypes H3N8, H4N5, H10N9, and H13N2. PMID:19523296

  14. Reduced Avian Virulence and Viremia of West Nile Virus Isolates from Mexico and Texas

    PubMed Central

    Brault, Aaron C.; Langevin, Stanley A.; Ramey, Wanichaya N.; Fang, Ying; Beasley, David W. C.; Barker, Christopher M.; Sanders, Todd A.; Reisen, William K.; Barrett, Alan D. T.; Bowen, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    A West Nile virus (WNV) isolate from Mexico (TM171-03) and BIRD1153, a unique genotype from Texas, have exhibited reduced murine neuroinvasive phenotypes. To determine if murine neuroinvasive capacity equates to avian virulence potential, American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and house sparrows (Passer domesticus) were experimentally inoculated with representative murine neuroinvasive/non-neuroinvasive strains. In both avian species, a plaque variant from Mexico that was E-glycosylation competent produced higher viremias than an E-glycosylation–incompetent variant, indicating the potential importance of E-glycosylation for avian replication. The murine non-neuroinvasive BIRD1153 strain was significantly attenuated in American crows but not house sparrows when compared with the murine neuroinvasive Texas strain. Despite the loss of murine neuroinvasive properties of nonglycosylated variants from Mexico, our data indicate avian replication potential of these strains and that unique WNV virulence characteristics exist between murine and avian models. The implications of reduced avian replication of variants from Mexico for restricted WNV transmission in Latin America is discussed. PMID:21976584

  15. Reduced avian virulence and viremia of West Nile virus isolates from Mexico and Texas.

    PubMed

    Brault, Aaron C; Langevin, Stanley A; Ramey, Wanichaya N; Fang, Ying; Beasley, David W C; Barker, Christopher M; Sanders, Todd A; Reisen, William K; Barrett, Alan D T; Bowen, Richard A

    2011-10-01

    A West Nile virus (WNV) isolate from Mexico (TM171-03) and BIRD1153, a unique genotype from Texas, have exhibited reduced murine neuroinvasive phenotypes. To determine if murine neuroinvasive capacity equates to avian virulence potential, American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and house sparrows (Passer domesticus) were experimentally inoculated with representative murine neuroinvasive/non-neuroinvasive strains. In both avian species, a plaque variant from Mexico that was E-glycosylation competent produced higher viremias than an E-glycosylation-incompetent variant, indicating the potential importance of E-glycosylation for avian replication. The murine non-neuroinvasive BIRD1153 strain was significantly attenuated in American crows but not house sparrows when compared with the murine neuroinvasive Texas strain. Despite the loss of murine neuroinvasive properties of nonglycosylated variants from Mexico, our data indicate avian replication potential of these strains and that unique WNV virulence characteristics exist between murine and avian models. The implications of reduced avian replication of variants from Mexico for restricted WNV transmission in Latin America is discussed.

  16. The Radical Pair Mechanism and the Avian Chemical Compass: Quantum Coherence and Entanglement

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Zhang, Yiteng; Kais, Sabre; Berman, Gennady Petrovich

    2015-02-02

    We review the spin radical pair mechanism which is a promising explanation of avian navigation. This mechanism is based on the dependence of product yields on 1) the hyperfine interaction involving electron spins and neighboring nuclear spins and 2) the intensity and orientation of the geomagnetic field. One surprising result is that even at ambient conditions quantum entanglement of electron spins can play an important role in avian magnetoreception. This review describes the general scheme of chemical reactions involving radical pairs generated from singlet and triplet precursors; the spin dynamics of the radical pairs; and the magnetic field dependence ofmore » product yields caused by the radical pair mechanism. The main part of the review includes a description of the chemical compass in birds. We review: the general properties of the avian compass; the basic scheme of the radical pair mechanism; the reaction kinetics in cryptochrome; quantum coherence and entanglement in the avian compass; and the effects of noise. We believe that the quantum avian compass can play an important role in avian navigation and can also provide the foundation for a new generation of sensitive and selective magnetic-sensing nano-devices.« less

  17. The influence of vertical and horizontal habitat structure on nationwide patterns of avian biodiversity

    Treesearch

    Patrick D. Culbert; Volker C. Radeloff; Curtis H. Flather; Josef M. Kellndorfer; Chadwick D. Rittenhouse; Anna M. Pidgeon

    2013-01-01

    With limited resources for habitat conservation, the accurate identification of high-value avian habitat is crucial. Habitat structure affects avian biodiversity but is difficult to quantify over broad extents. Our goal was to identify which measures of vertical and horizontal habitat structure are most strongly related to patterns of avian biodiversity across the...

  18. Putative Novel Genotype of Avian Hepatitis E Virus, Hungary, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Bányai, Krisztián; Tóth, Ádám György; Ivanics, Éva; Glávits, Róbert; Szentpáli-Gavallér, Katalin

    2012-01-01

    To explore the genetic diversity of avian hepatitis E virus strains, we characterized the near-complete genome of a strain detected in 2010 in Hungary, uncovering moderate genome sequence similarity with reference strains. Public health implications related to consumption of eggs or meat contaminated by avian hepatitis E virus, or to poultry handling, require thorough investigation. PMID:22840214

  19. Avian cholera in ospreys: first occurrence and possible mode of transmission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hindman, L.J.; Harvey, W.F.; Costanzo, G.R.; Converse, K.A.; Stein, George

    1997-01-01

    In 1994, six Ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) were recovered during the later stages of an epizootic of avian cholera (Pasteurella multocida) in diving ducks and seabirds on Chesapeake Bay in Maryland and Virginia. Pasteurella multocida was isolated from four Ospreys submitted for bacterial examination. This is believed to be the first report of avian cholera in Ospreys. The same isolate, serotype 3,4, was isolated from the Ospreys, diving ducks,and seabirds collected during the epizootic. Possible modes of transmission of avian cholera in Ospreys were either the ingestion of sick waterfowl or use of infected carcasses or bones as nest material.

  20. Common avian infection plagued the tyrant dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Ewan D S; Salisbury, Steven W; Horner, John R; Varricchio, David J

    2009-09-30

    Tyrannosaurus rex and other tyrannosaurid fossils often display multiple, smooth-edged full-thickness erosive lesions on the mandible, either unilaterally or bilaterally. The cause of these lesions in the Tyrannosaurus rex specimen FMNH PR2081 (known informally by the name 'Sue') has previously been attributed to actinomycosis, a bacterial bone infection, or bite wounds from other tyrannosaurids. We conducted an extensive survey of tyrannosaurid specimens and identified ten individuals with full-thickness erosive lesions. These lesions were described, measured and photographed for comparison with one another. We also conducted an extensive survey of related archosaurs for similar lesions. We show here that these lesions are consistent with those caused by an avian parasitic infection called trichomonosis, which causes similar abnormalities on the mandible of modern birds, in particular raptors. This finding represents the first evidence for the ancient evolutionary origin of an avian transmissible disease in non-avian theropod dinosaurs. It also provides a valuable insight into the palaeobiology of these now extinct animals. Based on the frequency with which these lesions occur, we hypothesize that tyrannosaurids were commonly infected by a Trichomonas gallinae-like protozoan. For tyrannosaurid populations, the only non-avian dinosaur group that show trichomonosis-type lesions, it is likely that the disease became endemic and spread as a result of antagonistic intraspecific behavior, consumption of prey infected by a Trichomonas gallinae-like protozoan and possibly even cannibalism. The severity of trichomonosis-related lesions in specimens such as Tyrannosaurus rex FMNH PR2081 and Tyrannosaurus rex MOR 980, strongly suggests that these animals died as a direct result of this disease, mostly likely through starvation.

  1. Common Avian Infection Plagued the Tyrant Dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Ewan D. S.; Salisbury, Steven W.; Horner, John R.; Varricchio, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Tyrannosaurus rex and other tyrannosaurid fossils often display multiple, smooth-edged full-thickness erosive lesions on the mandible, either unilaterally or bilaterally. The cause of these lesions in the Tyrannosaurus rex specimen FMNH PR2081 (known informally by the name ‘Sue’) has previously been attributed to actinomycosis, a bacterial bone infection, or bite wounds from other tyrannosaurids. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted an extensive survey of tyrannosaurid specimens and identified ten individuals with full-thickness erosive lesions. These lesions were described, measured and photographed for comparison with one another. We also conducted an extensive survey of related archosaurs for similar lesions. We show here that these lesions are consistent with those caused by an avian parasitic infection called trichomonosis, which causes similar abnormalities on the mandible of modern birds, in particular raptors. Conclusions/Significance This finding represents the first evidence for the ancient evolutionary origin of an avian transmissible disease in non-avian theropod dinosaurs. It also provides a valuable insight into the palaeobiology of these now extinct animals. Based on the frequency with which these lesions occur, we hypothesize that tyrannosaurids were commonly infected by a Trichomonas gallinae-like protozoan. For tyrannosaurid populations, the only non-avian dinosaur group that show trichomonosis-type lesions, it is likely that the disease became endemic and spread as a result of antagonistic intraspecific behavior, consumption of prey infected by a Trichomonas gallinae-like protozoan and possibly even cannibalism. The severity of trichomonosis-related lesions in specimens such as Tyrannosaurus rex FMNH PR2081 and Tyrannosaurus rex MOR 980, strongly suggests that these animals died as a direct result of this disease, mostly likely through starvation. PMID:19789646

  2. Epizootiology and effect of avian pox on Hawaiian forest birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Riper, Charles; van Riper, Sandra G.; Hansen, Wallace R.

    2002-01-01

    We determined prevalence and altitudinal distribution of forest birds infected with avian pox at 16 locations on Hawaii, from sea level to tree line in mesic and xeric habitats, during 1977–1980. Isolates from lesions were cultured in the laboratory for positive identification of Poxvirus avium. Infected birds from the wild were brought into the laboratory to assess differences in the course of infection in native versus introduced species. We also documented distributions and activity cycles of potential avian pox vectors.Native forest birds were (1) more susceptible to avian pox infection than were introduced species, (2) most likely to be infected during the wet season, and (3) found to have a higher prevalence in mesic when compared to xeric forests. Avian pox occurred in forest birds at all elevations, but highest levels were in the mid-elevational ranges (∼1,200 m) where vectors and native birds had the greatest overlap. Temporal and elevational differences in prevalence were apparent throughout the annual cycle. Avian pox probably did not reach epizootic proportions on Hawaii until after introduction of the mosquito and domestic birds in the early 1800s, and since then has had a negative effect on the population dynamics of native forest birds. Today, this introduced disease is an important factor that should be considered in future conservation efforts that are directed at the recovery of native forest birds in Hawaii.

  3. Global phylogeographic limits of Hawaii's avian malaria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beadell, J.S.; Ishtiaq, F.; Covas, R.; Melo, M.; Warren, B.H.; Atkinson, C.T.; Bensch, S.; Graves, G.R.; Jhala, Y.V.; Peirce, M.A.; Rahmani, A.R.; Fonseca, D.M.; Fleischer, R.C.

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum) to Hawaii has provided a model system for studying the influence of exotic disease on naive host populations. Little is known, however, about the origin or the genetic variation of Hawaii's malaria and traditional classification methods have confounded attempts to place the parasite within a global ecological and evolutionary context. Using fragments of the parasite mitochondrial gene cytochrome b and the nuclear gene dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase obtained from a global survey of greater than 13 000 avian samples, we show that Hawaii's avian malaria, which can cause high mortality and is a major limiting factor for many species of native passerines, represents just one of the numerous lineages composing the morphological parasite species. The single parasite lineage detected in Hawaii exhibits a broad host distribution worldwide and is dominant on several other remote oceanic islands, including Bermuda and Moorea, French Polynesia. The rarity of this lineage in the continental New World and the restriction of closely related lineages to the Old World suggest limitations to the transmission of reproductively isolated parasite groups within the morphological species. ?? 2006 The Royal Society.

  4. Circulating avian influenza viruses closely related to the 1918 virus have pandemic potential

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Tokiko; Zhong, Gongxun; Russell, Colin A.; Nakajima, Noriko; Hatta, Masato; Hanson, Anthony; McBride, Ryan; Burke, David F.; Takahashi, Kenta; Fukuyama, Satoshi; Tomita, Yuriko; Maher, Eileen A.; Watanabe, Shinji; Imai, Masaki; Neumann, Gabriele; Hasegawa, Hideki; Paulson, James C.; Smith, Derek J.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Summary Wild birds harbor a large gene pool of influenza A viruses that have the potential to cause influenza pandemics. Foreseeing and understanding this potential is important for effective surveillance. Our phylogenetic and geographic analyses revealed the global prevalence of avian influenza virus genes whose proteins differ only a few amino acids from the 1918 pandemic influenza virus, suggesting that 1918-like pandemic viruses may emerge in the future. To assess this risk, we generated and characterized a virus composed of avian influenza viral segments with high homology to the 1918 virus. This virus exhibited higher pathogenicity in mice and ferrets than an authentic avian influenza virus. Further, acquisition of seven amino acid substitutions in the viral polymerases and the hemagglutinin surface glycoprotein conferred respiratory droplet transmission to the 1918-like avian virus in ferrets, demonstrating that contemporary avian influenza viruses with 1918 virus-like proteins may have pandemic potential. PMID:24922572

  5. Cloning, localization and expression analysis of vacuolar sugar transporters in the CAM plant Ananas comosus (pineapple).

    PubMed

    Antony, Edna; Taybi, Tahar; Courbot, Mikaël; Mugford, Sam T; Smith, J Andrew C; Borland, Anne M

    2008-01-01

    In photosynthetic tissues of the CAM plant pineapple (Ananas comosus), storage of soluble sugars in the central vacuole during the daytime and their remobilization at night is required to provide carbon skeletons for nocturnal CO(2) fixation. However, soluble sugars produced photosynthetically must also be exported to support growth processes in heterotrophic tissues. To begin to address how vacuolar sugar storage and assimilate partitioning are regulated in A. comosus, degenerate PCR and cDNA library screening were used to clone three candidate sugar transporters from the leaves of this species. Subcellular localization of the three transporters was investigated via expression of YFP-fusion proteins in tobacco epidermal cells and their co-localization with subcellular markers by confocal microscopy. Using this strategy, a putative hexose transporter (AcMST1) and a putative inositol transporter (AcINT1) were identified that both localized to the tonoplast, whereas a putative sucrose transporter (AcSUT1) was found to localize to prevacuolar compartments. A cDNA (AcMST2) with high similarity to a recently characterized tonoplast hexose transporter in Arabidopsis was also identified from an A. comosus fruit EST database. Analyses of transcript abundance indicated that AcMST1 was more highly expressed in fruits compared to leaves of A. comosus, whilst transcripts of AcINT1, AcSUT1, and AcMST2 were more abundant in leaves. Transcript abundance of AcINT1, the putative inositol transporter, showed day-night changes comparable to those of other CAM-related transcripts described in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum. The results are discussed in terms of the role of vacuolar sugar transporters in regulating carbon flow during the diel cycle in CAM plants.

  6. Avian influenza virus RNA extraction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The efficient extraction and purification of viral RNA is critical for down-stream molecular applications whether it is the sensitive and specific detection of virus in clinical samples, virus gene cloning and expression, or quantification of avian influenza (AI) virus by molecular methods from expe...

  7. Evolution of Avian Tumor Viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Virus-induced neoplastic diseases of poultry, namely Marek’s disease (MD), induced by a herpesvirus, and the avian leukosis and reticuloendotheliosis induced by retroviruses, can cause significant economic losses from tumor mortality as well as poor performance. Successful control of MD is and has ...

  8. Emergence of a Novel Avian Pox Disease in British Tit Species

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Becki; Lachish, Shelly; Colvile, Katie M.; Durrant, Chris; Peck, Kirsi M.; Toms, Mike P.; Sheldon, Ben C.; Cunningham, Andrew A.

    2012-01-01

    Avian pox is a viral disease with a wide host range. In Great Britain, avian pox in birds of the Paridae family was first diagnosed in a great tit (Parus major) from south-east England in 2006. An increasing number of avian pox incidents in Paridae have been reported each year since, indicative of an emergent infection. Here, we utilise a database of opportunistic reports of garden bird mortality and morbidity to analyse spatial and temporal patterns of suspected avian pox throughout Great Britain, 2006–2010. Reports of affected Paridae (211 incidents) outnumbered reports in non-Paridae (91 incidents). The majority (90%) of Paridae incidents involved great tits. Paridae pox incidents were more likely to involve multiple individuals (77.3%) than were incidents in non-Paridae hosts (31.9%). Unlike the small wart-like lesions usually seen in non-Paridae with avian pox in Great Britain, lesions in Paridae were frequently large, often with an ulcerated surface and caseous core. Spatial analyses revealed strong clustering of suspected avian pox incidents involving Paridae hosts, but only weak, inconsistent clustering of incidents involving non-Paridae hosts. There was no spatial association between Paridae and non-Paridae incidents. We documented significant spatial spread of Paridae pox from an origin in south-east England; no spatial spread was evident for non-Paridae pox. For both host clades, there was an annual peak of reports in August/September. Sequencing of the avian poxvirus 4b core protein produced an identical viral sequence from each of 20 great tits tested from Great Britain. This sequence was identical to that from great tits from central Europe and Scandinavia. In contrast, sequence variation was evident amongst virus tested from 17 non-Paridae hosts of 5 species. Our findings show Paridae pox to be an emerging infectious disease in wild birds in Great Britain, apparently originating from viral incursion from central Europe or Scandinavia. PMID:23185231

  9. Emergence of a novel avian pox disease in British tit species.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Becki; Lachish, Shelly; Colvile, Katie M; Durrant, Chris; Peck, Kirsi M; Toms, Mike P; Sheldon, Ben C; Cunningham, Andrew A

    2012-01-01

    Avian pox is a viral disease with a wide host range. In Great Britain, avian pox in birds of the Paridae family was first diagnosed in a great tit (Parus major) from south-east England in 2006. An increasing number of avian pox incidents in Paridae have been reported each year since, indicative of an emergent infection. Here, we utilise a database of opportunistic reports of garden bird mortality and morbidity to analyse spatial and temporal patterns of suspected avian pox throughout Great Britain, 2006-2010. Reports of affected Paridae (211 incidents) outnumbered reports in non-Paridae (91 incidents). The majority (90%) of Paridae incidents involved great tits. Paridae pox incidents were more likely to involve multiple individuals (77.3%) than were incidents in non-Paridae hosts (31.9%). Unlike the small wart-like lesions usually seen in non-Paridae with avian pox in Great Britain, lesions in Paridae were frequently large, often with an ulcerated surface and caseous core. Spatial analyses revealed strong clustering of suspected avian pox incidents involving Paridae hosts, but only weak, inconsistent clustering of incidents involving non-Paridae hosts. There was no spatial association between Paridae and non-Paridae incidents. We documented significant spatial spread of Paridae pox from an origin in south-east England; no spatial spread was evident for non-Paridae pox. For both host clades, there was an annual peak of reports in August/September. Sequencing of the avian poxvirus 4b core protein produced an identical viral sequence from each of 20 great tits tested from Great Britain. This sequence was identical to that from great tits from central Europe and Scandinavia. In contrast, sequence variation was evident amongst virus tested from 17 non-Paridae hosts of 5 species. Our findings show Paridae pox to be an emerging infectious disease in wild birds in Great Britain, apparently originating from viral incursion from central Europe or Scandinavia.

  10. Mercury risk to avian piscivores across western United States and Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, Allyson K.; Evers, David C.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Willacker, James J.; Elliott, John E.; Lepak, Jesse M.; Vander Pol, Stacy S.; Bryan, Colleen E.

    2016-01-01

    The widespread distribution of mercury (Hg) threatens wildlife health, particularly piscivorous birds. Western North America is a diverse region that provides critical habitat to many piscivorous bird species, and also has a well-documented history of mercury contamination from legacy mining and atmospheric deposition. The diversity of landscapes in the west limits the distribution of avian piscivore species, complicating broad comparisons across the region. Mercury risk to avian piscivores was evaluated across the western United States and Canada using a suite of avian piscivore species representing a variety of foraging strategies that together occur broadly across the region. Prey fish Hg concentrations were size-adjusted to the preferred size class of the diet for each avian piscivore (Bald Eagle = 36 cm, Osprey = 30 cm, Common and Yellow-billed Loon = 15 cm, Western and Clark's Grebe = 6 cm, and Belted Kingfisher = 5 cm) across each species breeding range. Using a combination of field and lab-based studies on Hg effect in a variety of species, wet weight blood estimates were grouped into five relative risk categories including: background (< 0.5 μg/g), low (0.5–1 μg/g), moderate (1–2 μg/g), high (2–3 μg/g), and extra high (> 3 μg/g). These risk categories were used to estimate potential mercury risk to avian piscivores across the west at a 1 degree-by-1 degree grid cell resolution. Avian piscivores foraging on larger-sized fish generally were at a higher relative risk to Hg. Habitats with a relatively high risk included wetland complexes (e.g., prairie pothole in Saskatchewan), river deltas (e.g., San Francisco Bay, Puget Sound, Columbia River), and arid lands (Great Basin and central Arizona). These results indicate that more intensive avian piscivore sampling is needed across Western North America to generate a more robust assessment of exposure risk.

  11. Avian cholera in waterfowl: the role of lesser snow and Ross's geese as carriers of avian cholera in the Playa Lakes region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuel, M.D.; Shadduck, D.J.; Goldberg, Diana R.; Johnson, W.P.

    2005-01-01

    We collected samples from apparently healthy geese in the Playa Lakes Region (USA) during the winters of 2000a??01 and 2001a??02 to determine whether carriers of Pasteurella multocida, the bacterium that causes avian cholera, were present in wild populations. With the use of methods developed in laboratory challenge trials (Samuel et al., 2003a) and a serotype-specific polymerase chain reaction method for identification of P. multocida serotype 1, we found that a small proportion of 322 wild birds (<5%) were carriers of pathogenic P. multocida. On the basis of serology, an additional group of these birds (<10%) were survivors of recent avian cholera infection. Our results confirm the hypothesis that wild waterfowl are carriers of avian cholera and add support for the hypothesis that wild birds are a reservoir for this disease. In concert with other research, this work indicates that enzootic infection with avian cholera occurs in lesser snow goose (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) populations throughout their annual cycle. Although fewer Rossa??s geese (Chen rossii) were sampled, we also found these birds were carriers of P. multocida. Even in the absence of disease outbreaks, serologic evidence indicates that chronic disease transmission and recent infection are apparently occurring year-round in these highly gregarious birds and that a small portion of these populations are potential carriers with active infection.

  12. Inorganic polyphosphate in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a mutation disturbing the function of vacuolar ATPase.

    PubMed

    Tomaschevsky, A A; Ryasanova, L P; Kulakovskaya, T V; Kulaev, I S

    2010-08-01

    A mutation in the vma2 gene disturbing V-ATPase function in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in a five- and threefold decrease in inorganic polyphosphate content in the stationary and active phases of growth on glucose, respectively. The average polyphosphate chain length in the mutant cells is decreased. The mutation does not prevent polyphosphate utilization during cultivation in a phosphate-deficient medium and recovery of its level on reinoculation in complete medium after phosphate deficiency. The content of short chain acid-soluble polyphosphates is recovered first. It is supposed that these polyphosphates are less dependent on the electrochemical gradient on the vacuolar membrane.

  13. Coquillettidia (Culicidae, Diptera) mosquitoes are natural vectors of avian malaria in Africa

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The mosquito vectors of Plasmodium spp. have largely been overlooked in studies of ecology and evolution of avian malaria and other vertebrates in wildlife. Methods Plasmodium DNA from wild-caught Coquillettidia spp. collected from lowland forests in Cameroon was isolated and sequenced using nested PCR. Female Coquillettidia aurites were also dissected and salivary glands were isolated and microscopically examined for the presence of sporozoites. Results In total, 33% (85/256) of mosquito pools tested positive for avian Plasmodium spp., harbouring at least eight distinct parasite lineages. Sporozoites of Plasmodium spp. were recorded in salivary glands of C. aurites supporting the PCR data that the parasites complete development in these mosquitoes. Results suggest C. aurites, Coquillettidia pseudoconopas and Coquillettidia metallica as new and important vectors of avian malaria in Africa. All parasite lineages recovered clustered with parasites formerly identified from several bird species and suggest the vectors capability of infecting birds from different families. Conclusion Identifying the major vectors of avian Plasmodium spp. will assist in understanding the epizootiology of avian malaria, including differences in this disease distribution between pristine and disturbed landscapes. PMID:19664282

  14. New host and lineage diversity of avian haemosporidia in the northern Andes

    PubMed Central

    Harrigan, Ryan J; Sedano, Raul; Chasar, Anthony C; Chaves, Jaime A; Nguyen, Jennifer T; Whitaker, Alexis; Smith, Thomas B

    2014-01-01

    The northern Andes, with their steep elevational and climate gradients, are home to an exceptional diversity of flora and fauna, particularly rich in avian species that have adapted to divergent ecological conditions. With this diversity comes the opportunity for parasites to exploit a wide breadth of avian hosts. However, little research has focused on examining the patterns of prevalence and lineage diversity of avian parasites in the Andes. Here, we screened a total of 428 birds from 19 species (representing nine families) and identified 133 infections of avian haemosporidia (31%), including lineages of Plasmodium, Haemoproteus, and Leucocytozoon. We document a higher prevalence of haemosporidia at higher elevations and lower temperatures, as well as an overall high diversity of lineages in the northern Andes, including the first sequences of haemosporidians reported in hummingbirds (31 sequences found in 11 species within the family Trochilidae). Double infections were distinguished using PHASE, which enables the separation of distinct parasite lineages. Results suggest that the ecological heterogeneity of the northern Andes that has given rise to a rich diversity of avian hosts may also be particularly conducive to parasite diversification and specialization. PMID:25469161

  15. West Nile and St. Louis encephalitis viral genetic determinants of avian host competence

    PubMed Central

    Maharaj, Payal D.; Bosco-Lauth, Angela M.; Langevin, Stanley A.; Anishchenko, Michael; Bowen, Richard A.; Reisen, William K.

    2018-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) and St. Louis encephalitis (SLEV) virus are enzootically maintained in North America in cycles involving the same mosquito vectors and similar avian hosts. However, these viruses exhibit dissimilar viremia and virulence phenotypes in birds: WNV is associated with high magnitude viremias that can result in mortality in certain species such as American crows (AMCRs, Corvus brachyrhynchos) whereas SLEV infection yields lower viremias that have not been associated with avian mortality. Cross-neutralization of these viruses in avian sera has been proposed to explain the reduced circulation of SLEV since the introduction of WNV in North America; however, in 2015, both viruses were the etiologic agents of concurrent human encephalitis outbreaks in Arizona, indicating the need to re-evaluate host factors and cross-neutralization responses as factors potentially affecting viral co-circulation. Reciprocal chimeric WNV and SLEV viruses were constructed by interchanging the pre-membrane (prM)-envelope (E) genes, and viruses subsequently generated were utilized herein for the inoculation of three different avian species: house sparrows (HOSPs; Passer domesticus), house finches (Haemorhous mexicanus) and AMCRs. Cross-protective immunity between parental and chimeric viruses were also assessed in HOSPs. Results indicated that the prM-E genes did not modulate avian replication or virulence differences between WNV and SLEV in any of the three avian species. However, WNV-prME proteins did dictate cross-protective immunity between these antigenically heterologous viruses. Our data provides further evidence of the important role that the WNV / SLEV viral non-structural genetic elements play in viral replication, avian host competence and virulence. PMID:29447156

  16. Revised Nomenclature for Avian Telencephalon and Some Related Brainstem Nuclei

    PubMed Central

    REINER, ANTON; PERKEL, DAVID J.; BRUCE, LAURA L.; BUTLER, ANN B.; CSILLAG, ANDRÁS; KUENZEL, WAYNE; MEDINA, LORETA; PAXINOS, GEORGE; SHIMIZU, TORU; STRIEDTER, GEORG; WILD, MARTIN; BALL, GREGORY F.; DURAND, SARAH; GÜTÜRKÜN, ONUR; LEE, DIANE W.; MELLO, CLAUDIO V.; POWERS, ALICE; WHITE, STEPHANIE A.; HOUGH, GERALD; KUBIKOVA, LUBICA; SMULDERS, TOM V.; WADA, KAZUHIRO; DUGAS-FORD, JENNIFER; HUSBAND, SCOTT; YAMAMOTO, KEIKO; YU, JING; SIANG, CONNIE; JARVIS, ERICH D.

    2008-01-01

    The standard nomenclature that has been used for many telencephalic and related brainstem structures in birds is based on flawed assumptions of homology to mammals. In particular, the outdated terminology implies that most of the avian telencephalon is a hypertrophied basal ganglia, when it is now clear that most of the avian telencephalon is neurochemically, hodologically, and functionally comparable to the mammalian neocortex, claustrum, and pallial amygdala (all of which derive from the pallial sector of the developing telencephalon). Recognizing that this promotes misunderstanding of the functional organization of avian brains and their evolutionary relationship to mammalian brains, avian brain specialists began discussions to rectify this problem, culminating in the Avian Brain Nomenclature Forum held at Duke University in July 2002, which approved a new terminology for avian telencephalon and some allied brainstem cell groups. Details of this new terminology are presented here, as is a rationale for each name change and evidence for any homologies implied by the new names. Revisions for the brainstem focused on vocal control, catecholaminergic, cholinergic, and basal ganglia-related nuclei. For example, the Forum recognized that the hypoglossal nucleus had been incorrectly identified as the nucleus intermedius in the Karten and Hodos (1967) pigeon brain atlas, and what was identified as the hypoglossal nucleus in that atlas should instead be called the supraspinal nucleus. The locus ceruleus of this and other avian atlases was noted to consist of a caudal noradrenergic part homologous to the mammalian locus coeruleus and a rostral region corresponding to the mammalian A8 dopaminergic cell group. The midbrain dopaminergic cell group in birds known as the nucleus tegmenti pedunculopontinus pars compacta was recognized as homologous to the mammalian substantia nigra pars compacta and was renamed accordingly; a group of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons at

  17. Control strategies against avian influenza

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Since 1959, 40 epizootics of high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) have occurred (Figure 1). Thirty-five of these epizootic HPAI viruses were geographically-limited (mostly to single countries), involved farm-to-farm spread and were eradicated from poultry by stamping-out programs; i.e. the HPAI...

  18. Structure of the vacuolar H+-ATPase rotary motor reveals new mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Shaun; Phillips, Clair; Huss, Markus; Tiburcy, Felix; Wieczorek, Helmut; Trinick, John; Harrison, Michael A; Muench, Stephen P

    2015-03-03

    Vacuolar H(+)-ATPases are multisubunit complexes that operate with rotary mechanics and are essential for membrane proton transport throughout eukaryotes. Here we report a ∼ 1 nm resolution reconstruction of a V-ATPase in a different conformational state from that previously reported for a lower-resolution yeast model. The stator network of the V-ATPase (and by implication that of other rotary ATPases) does not change conformation in different catalytic states, and hence must be relatively rigid. We also demonstrate that a conserved bearing in the catalytic domain is electrostatic, contributing to the extraordinarily high efficiency of rotary ATPases. Analysis of the rotor axle/membrane pump interface suggests how rotary ATPases accommodate different c ring stoichiometries while maintaining high efficiency. The model provides evidence for a half channel in the proton pump, supporting theoretical models of ion translocation. Our refined model therefore provides new insights into the structure and mechanics of the V-ATPases. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic applications in avian conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haig, Susan M.; Bronaugh, Whitcomb M.; Crowhurst, Rachel S.; D'Elia, Jesse; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Epps, Clinton W.; Knaus, Brian; Miller, Mark P.; Moses, Michael L.; Oyler-McCance, Sara; Robinson, W. Douglas; Sidlauskas, Brian

    2011-01-01

    A fundamental need in conserving species and their habitats is defining distinct entities that range from individuals to species to ecosystems and beyond (Table 1; Ryder 1986, Moritz 1994, Mayden and Wood 1995, Haig and Avise 1996, Hazevoet 1996, Palumbi and Cipriano 1998, Hebert et al. 2004, Mace 2004, Wheeler et al. 2004, Armstrong and Ball 2005, Baker 2008, Ellis et al. 2010, Winker and Haig 2010). Rapid progression in this interdisciplinary field continues at an exponential rate; thus, periodic updates on theory, techniques, and applications are important for informing practitioners and consumers of genetic information. Here, we outline conservation topics for which genetic information can be helpful, provide examples of where genetic techniques have been used best in avian conservation, and point to current technical bottlenecks that prevent better use of genomics to resolve conservation issues related to birds. We hope this review will provide geneticists and avian ecologists with a mutually beneficial dialogue on how this integrated field can solve current and future problems.

  20. A preliminary assessment of avian mortality at utility-scale solar energy facilities in the United States

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Walston, Leroy J.; Rollins, Katherine E.; LaGory, Kirk E.

    Despite the benefits of reduced toxic and carbon emissions and a perpetual energy resource, there is potential for negative environmental impacts resulting from utility-scale solar energy (USSE) development. Although USSE development may represent an avian mortality source, there is little knowledge regarding the magnitude of these impacts in the context of other avian mortality sources. In this study we present a first assessment of avian mortality at USSE facilities through a synthesis of available avian monitoring and mortality information at existing USSE facilities. Using this information, we contextualize USSE avian mortality relative to other forms of avian mortality at 2more » spatial scales: a regional scale (confined to southern California) and a national scale. Systematic avian mortality information was available for three USSE facilities in the southern California region. We estimated annual USSE-related avian mortality to be between 16,200 and 59,400 birds in the southern California region, which was extrapolated to between 37,800 and 138,600 birds for all USSE facilities across the United States that are either installed or under construction. We also discuss issues related to avian–solar interactions that should be addressed in future research and monitoring programs.« less

  1. New insight on the anatomy and architecture of the avian neurocranium.

    PubMed

    Marugán-Lobón, Jesús; Buscalioni, Angela D

    2009-03-01

    This study aims to disentangle the main features of the avian neurocranium at high taxonomic scales using geometric morphometric tools. When surveying the variation across 60% of avian orders (sampled among 72 individuals), our results verify that the central nervous system has an important influence upon the architecture of the avian neurocranium, as in other very encephalized vertebrates such as mammals. When the avian brain expands relative to the cranial base it causes more "reptilian-like" neurocranial configurations to shape into rounder ones. This rounder appearance is achieved because the cranial base becomes relatively shorter and turns its flexure from concave to convex, at the same time forcing the foramen magnum to reorient ventrally instead of caudally. However, our analyses have also revealed that an important morphological difference between birds resides between the occiput and the cranial roof. This variation was unexpected since it had not been reported thus far, and entertains two plausible interpretations. Although it could be due to a trade-off between the relative sizes of the supraoccipital and the parietal bones, the presence of an additional bone (the intra- or post-parietal) between the latter two bones could also explain the variation congruently. This descriptive insight stresses the need for further developmental studies focused in understanding the evolutionary disparity of the avian neurocranium. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. The vacuolar ATPase from Entamoeba histolytica: molecular cloning of the gene encoding for the B subunit and subcellular localization of the protein.

    PubMed

    Meléndez-Hernández, Mayra Gisela; Barrios, María Luisa Labra; Orozco, Esther; Luna-Arias, Juan Pedro

    2008-12-23

    Entamoeba histolytica is a professional phagocytic cell where the vacuolar ATPase plays a key role. This enzyme is a multisubunit complex that regulates pH in many subcellular compartments, even in those that are not measurably acidic. It participates in a wide variety of cellular processes such as endocytosis, intracellular transport and membrane fusion. The presence of a vacuolar type H+-ATPase in E. histolytica trophozoites has been inferred previously from inhibition assays of its activity, the isolation of the Ehvma1 and Ehvma3 genes, and by proteomic analysis of purified phagosomes. We report the isolation and characterization of the Ehvma2 gene, which encodes for the subunit B of the vacuolar ATPase. This polypeptide is a 55.3 kDa highly conserved protein with 34 to 80% identity to orthologous proteins from other species. Particularly, in silico studies showed that EhV-ATPase subunit B displays 78% identity and 90% similarity to its Dictyostelium ortholog. A 462 bp DNA fragment of the Ehvma2 gene was expressed in bacteria and recombinant polypeptide was used to raise mouse polyclonal antibodies. EhV-ATPase subunit B antibodies detected a 55 kDa band in whole cell extracts and in an enriched fraction of DNA-containing organelles named EhkOs. The V-ATPase subunit B was located by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy in many vesicles, in phagosomes, plasma membrane and in EhkOs. We also identified the genes encoding for the majority of the V-ATPase subunits in the E. histolytica genome, and proposed a putative model for this proton pump. We have isolated the Ehvma2 gene which encodes for the V-ATPase subunit B from the E. histolytica clone A. This gene has a 154 bp intron and encodes for a highly conserved polypeptide. Specific antibodies localized EhV-ATPase subunit B in many vesicles, phagosomes, plasma membrane and in EhkOs. Most of the orthologous genes encoding for the EhV-ATPase subunits were found in the E. histolytica genome, indicating the

  3. Avian and human influenza virus compatible sialic acid receptors in little brown bats.

    PubMed

    Chothe, Shubhada K; Bhushan, Gitanjali; Nissly, Ruth H; Yeh, Yin-Ting; Brown, Justin; Turner, Gregory; Fisher, Jenny; Sewall, Brent J; Reeder, DeeAnn M; Terrones, Mauricio; Jayarao, Bhushan M; Kuchipudi, Suresh V

    2017-04-06

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) continue to threaten animal and human health globally. Bats are asymptomatic reservoirs for many zoonotic viruses. Recent reports of two novel IAVs in fruit bats and serological evidence of avian influenza virus (AIV) H9 infection in frugivorous bats raise questions about the role of bats in IAV epidemiology. IAVs bind to sialic acid (SA) receptors on host cells, and it is widely believed that hosts expressing both SA α2,3-Gal and SA α2,6-Gal receptors could facilitate genetic reassortment of avian and human IAVs. We found abundant co-expression of both avian (SA α2,3-Gal) and human (SA α2,6-Gal) type SA receptors in little brown bats (LBBs) that were compatible with avian and human IAV binding. This first ever study of IAV receptors in a bat species suggest that LBBs, a widely-distributed bat species in North America, could potentially be co-infected with avian and human IAVs, facilitating the emergence of zoonotic strains.

  4. A fossil brain from the Cretaceous of European Russia and avian sensory evolution.

    PubMed

    Kurochkin, Evgeny N; Dyke, Gareth J; Saveliev, Sergei V; Pervushov, Evgeny M; Popov, Evgeny V

    2007-06-22

    Fossils preserving traces of soft anatomy are rare in the fossil record; even rarer is evidence bearing on the size and shape of sense organs that provide us with insights into mode of life. Here, we describe unique fossil preservation of an avian brain from the Volgograd region of European Russia. The brain of this Melovatka bird is similar in shape and morphology to those of known fossil ornithurines (the lineage that includes living birds), such as the marine diving birds Hesperornis and Enaliornis, but documents a new stage in avian sensory evolution: acute nocturnal vision coupled with well-developed hearing and smell, developed by the Late Cretaceous (ca 90Myr ago). This fossil also provides insights into previous 'bird-like' brain reconstructions for the most basal avian Archaeopteryx--reduction of olfactory lobes (sense of smell) and enlargement of the hindbrain (cerebellum) occurred subsequent to Archaeopteryx in avian evolution, closer to the ornithurine lineage that comprises living birds. The Melovatka bird also suggests that brain enlargement in early avians was not correlated with the evolution of powered flight.

  5. Avian cholera in the central and Mississippi flyways 1979-80

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brand, C.J.

    1984-01-01

    Waterfowl mortality from avian cholera during July 1979-May 1980 was widespread in the Central and Mississippi flyways, occurring in a wide variety of species and locations from nesting grounds of snow geese (Chen caerulescens) on Hudson Bay south to waterfowl wintering areas on the Texas coast and playa lakes region. Mortality estimates at the various sites ranged from several birds to over 72,000. The chronological and geographic occurrence of outbreaks corresponded closely to waterfowl migrations from infected sites, suggesting that waterfowl served to distribute avian cholera along migration routes. Recurrent outbreaks at several locations suggest that these sites have become enzootic for this disease. The magnitude of avian cholera mortality and its geographic spread during 1979-80 underscores the need to address management of this disease on an intra- and inter-flyway basis.

  6. Avian community response to small-scale habitat disturbance in Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Derleth, E.L.; McAuley, D.G.; Dwyer, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of small clearcuts (1 - 8 ha) on avian communities in the forest of eastern Maine were studied using point counts during spring 1978 - 1981. Surveys were conducted in uncut (control) and clear-cut (treatment) plots in three stand types: conifer, hardwood, and mixed growth. We used a mark-recapture model and its associated jackknife species richness estimator (N), as an indicator of avian community structure. Increases in estimated richness (N) and Shannon - Weaver diversity (H') were noted in the treated hardwood and mixed growth, but not in the conifer stands. Seventeen avian species increased in relative abundance, whereas two species declined. Stand treatment was associated with important changes in bird species composition. Increased habitat patchiness and the creation of forest edge are hypothesized as causes for the greater estimates of richness and diversity.

  7. Molecular evolution and emergence of avian gammacoronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Jackwood, Mark W; Hall, David; Handel, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Coronaviruses, which are single stranded, positive sense RNA viruses, are responsible for a wide variety of existing and emerging diseases in humans and other animals. The gammacoronaviruses primarily infect avian hosts. Within this genus of coronaviruses, the avian coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) causes a highly infectious upper-respiratory tract disease in commercial poultry. IBV shows rapid evolution in chickens, frequently producing new antigenic types, which adds to the multiple serotypes of the virus that do not cross protect. Rapid evolution in IBV is facilitated by strong selection, large population sizes and high genetic diversity within hosts, and transmission bottlenecks between hosts. Genetic diversity within a host arises primarily by mutation, which includes substitutions, insertions and deletions. Mutations are caused both by the high error rate, and limited proof reading capability, of the viral RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase, and by recombination. Recombination also generates new haplotype diversity by recombining existing variants. Rapid evolution of avian coronavirus IBV makes this virus extremely difficult to diagnose and control, but also makes it an excellent model system to study viral genetic diversity and the mechanisms behind the emergence of coronaviruses in their natural host. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Functionally heterogenous ryanodine receptors in avian cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Sierralta, J; Fill, M; Suárez-Isla, B A

    1996-07-19

    The functional heterogeneity of the ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels in avian cerebellum was defined. Heavy endoplasmic reticulum microsomes had significant levels of ryanodine and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate binding. Scatchard analysis and kinetic studies indicated the existence of at least two distinct ryanodine binding sites. Ryanodine binding was calcium-dependent but was not significantly enhanced by caffeine. Incorporation of microsomes into planar lipid bilayers revealed ion channels with pharmacological features (calcium, magnesium, ATP, and caffeine sensitivity) similar to the RyR channels found in mammalian striated muscle. Despite a wide range of unitary conductances (220-500 picosiemens, symmetrical cesium methanesulfonate), ryanodine locked both channels into a characteristic slow gating subconductance state, positively identifying them as RyR channels. Two populations of avian RyR channels were functionally distinguished by single channel calcium sensitivity. One population was defined by a bell-shaped calcium sensitivity analogous to the skeletal muscle RyR isoform (type I). The calcium sensitivity of the second RyR population was sigmoidal and analogous to the cardiac muscle RyR isoform (type II). These data show that there are at least two functionally distinct RyR channel populations in avian cerebellum. This leads to the possibility that these functionally distinct RyR channels are involved in different intracellular calcium signaling pathways.

  9. Cognitive ornithology: the evolution of avian intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Nathan J

    2005-01-01

    Comparative psychologists interested in the evolution of intelligence have focused their attention on social primates, whereas birds tend to be used as models of associative learning. However, corvids and parrots, which have forebrains relatively the same size as apes, live in complex social groups and have a long developmental period before becoming independent, have demonstrated ape-like intelligence. Although, ornithologists have documented thousands of hours observing birds in their natural habitat, they have focused their attention on avian behaviour and ecology, rather than intelligence. This review discusses recent studies of avian cognition contrasting two different approaches; the anthropocentric approach and the adaptive specialization approach. It is argued that the most productive method is to combine the two approaches. This is discussed with respects to recent investigations of two supposedly unique aspects of human cognition; episodic memory and theory of mind. In reviewing the evidence for avian intelligence, corvids and parrots appear to be cognitively superior to other birds and in many cases even apes. This suggests that complex cognition has evolved in species with very different brains through a process of convergent evolution rather than shared ancestry, although the notion that birds and mammals may share common neural connectivity patterns is discussed. PMID:16553307

  10. Risk perceptions for avian influenza virus infection among poultry workers, China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qi; Liu, Linqing; Pu, Juan; Zhao, Jingyi; Sun, Yipeng; Shen, Guangnian; Wei, Haitao; Zhu, Junjie; Zheng, Ruifeng; Xiong, Dongyan; Liu, Xiaodong; Liu, Jinhua

    2013-02-01

    To determine risk for avian influenza virus infection, we conducted serologic surveillance for H5 and H9 subtypes among poultry workers in Beijing, China, 2009-2010, and assessed workers' understanding of avian influenza. We found that poultry workers had considerable risk for infection with H9 subtypes. Increasing their knowledge could prevent future infections.

  11. Publication Rate of Avian Medicine Conference Abstracts and Influencing Factors: 2011-2015.

    PubMed

    Doukaki, Christina; MedVet, Dr; Beaufrère, Hugues; Vet, Dr Med; Huynh, Minh

    2018-06-01

    International conferences on avian medicine and surgery aim to disseminate scientific and evidence-based information in the form of oral presentations and posters. Most manuscripts presented are printed in the conference proceedings as abstracts. Subsequent publication in a scientific peer-reviewed journal is the natural outcome of the research cycle, although studies have shown that the vast majority of conference abstracts are not published. The purpose of this study was to explore 1) the fate of abstracts presented in avian conferences (Association of Avian Veterinarians, European Association of Avian Veterinarians, International Conference on Avian Herpetological and Exotic Mammal Medicine) in the years 2011-2015, 2) assess the publication rate in peer-reviewed journals, 3) describe the time course of subsequent publication, and 4) identify factors associated with increased likelihood of publication. The results showed that 24% of conference abstracts were published within the next 2 years. Depending on the statistical model used, several factors were identified as associated with increased publication rate. North American papers seem to publish with more frequency (univariate model), while European papers had the opposite trend (multivariable model). Likewise, experimental studies were more prone to being published overall (univariate model), whereas retrospective observational studies had a lower rate of publication (multivariable model). Increasing the number of authors was also associated with increased publication rate. Most publications were published in the Journal of Avian Medicine and Surgery, which tends to suggest that this journal is the main journal of the specialty. Some parameters highlighted in this study may assist conference attendees to assess the likelihood of later publication.

  12. Bulls, Bears, and Birds: Preparing the Financial Industry for an Avian Influenza Pandemic.

    PubMed

    Maldin, Beth; Inglesby, Thomas V; Nuzzo, Jennifer B; Lien, Onora; Gronvall, Gigi Kwik; Toner, Eric; O'Toole, Tara

    2005-01-01

    Bulls, Bears, and Birds: Preparing the Financial Industry for an Avian Influenza Pandemic was a half day symposium on avian influenza for senior leaders and decision makers from the financial sector with responsibility for business continuity, health, and security. The event brought together experts and leaders from the medical, public health, business continuity, and financial communities to appraise financial industry leaders on the threat of avian influenza and to offer suggestions regarding what the financial industry could do to prepare and respond.

  13. Clipping the wings of avian influenza.

    PubMed

    Parry, Jane

    2012-09-01

    Up to now, the threat of avian influenza has been lessened by effective animal husbandry methods. However, the public health community is trying to ensure enough measures are in place to prevent a possible pandemic. Jane Parry reports.

  14. Tonoplast Na+/H+ Antiport Activity and Its Energization by the Vacuolar H+-ATPase in the Halophytic Plant Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L.

    PubMed Central

    Barkla, B. J.; Zingarelli, L.; Blumwald, E.; Smith, JAC.

    1995-01-01

    Tonoplast vesicles were isolated from leaf mesophyll tissue of the inducible Crassulacean acid metabolism plant Mesembryanthemum crystallinum to investigate the mechanism of vacuolar Na+ accumulation in this halophilic species. In 8-week-old plants exposed to 200 mM NaCl for 2 weeks, tonoplast H+-ATPase activity was approximately doubled compared with control plants of the same age, as determined by rates of both ATP hydrolysis and ATP-dependent H+ transport. Evidence was also obtained for the presence of an electroneutral Na+/H+ antiporter at the tonoplast that is constitutively expressed, since extravesicular Na+ was able to dissipate a pre-existing transmembrane pH gradient. Initial rates of H+ efflux showed saturation kinetics with respect to extravesicular Na+ concentration and were 2.1-fold higher from vesicles of salt-treated plants compared with the controls. Na+-dependent H+ efflux also showed a high selectivity for Na+ over K+, was insensitive to the transmembrane electrical potential difference, and was more than 50% inhibited by 200 [mu]M N-amidino-3,5-diamino-6-chloropyrazinecarboxamide hydrochloride. The close correlation between increased Na+/H+ antiport and H+-ATPase activities in response to salt treatment suggests that accumulation of the very high concentrations of vacuolar Na+ found in M. crystallinum is energized by the H+ electrochemical gradient across the tonoplast. PMID:12228611

  15. Tonoplast Na+/H+ Antiport Activity and Its Energization by the Vacuolar H+-ATPase in the Halophytic Plant Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L.

    PubMed

    Barkla, B. J.; Zingarelli, L.; Blumwald, E.; Smith, JAC.

    1995-10-01

    Tonoplast vesicles were isolated from leaf mesophyll tissue of the inducible Crassulacean acid metabolism plant Mesembryanthemum crystallinum to investigate the mechanism of vacuolar Na+ accumulation in this halophilic species. In 8-week-old plants exposed to 200 mM NaCl for 2 weeks, tonoplast H+-ATPase activity was approximately doubled compared with control plants of the same age, as determined by rates of both ATP hydrolysis and ATP-dependent H+ transport. Evidence was also obtained for the presence of an electroneutral Na+/H+ antiporter at the tonoplast that is constitutively expressed, since extravesicular Na+ was able to dissipate a pre-existing transmembrane pH gradient. Initial rates of H+ efflux showed saturation kinetics with respect to extravesicular Na+ concentration and were 2.1-fold higher from vesicles of salt-treated plants compared with the controls. Na+-dependent H+ efflux also showed a high selectivity for Na+ over K+, was insensitive to the transmembrane electrical potential difference, and was more than 50% inhibited by 200 [mu]M N-amidino-3,5-diamino-6-chloropyrazinecarboxamide hydrochloride. The close correlation between increased Na+/H+ antiport and H+-ATPase activities in response to salt treatment suggests that accumulation of the very high concentrations of vacuolar Na+ found in M. crystallinum is energized by the H+ electrochemical gradient across the tonoplast.

  16. Wetland environmental conditions associated with the risk of avian cholera outbreaks and the abundance of Pasteurella multocida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchong, Julie A.; Samuel, Michael D.; Goldberg, Diana R.; Shadduck, Daniel J.; Creekmore, L.H.

    2006-01-01

    Avian cholera is a significant infectious disease affecting waterfowl across North America and occurs worldwide among various avian species. Despite the importance of this disease, little is known about the factors that cause avian cholera outbreaks and what management strategies might be used to reduce disease mortality. Previous studies indicated that wetland water conditions may affect survival and transmission of Pasteurella multocida, the agent that causes avian cholera. These studies hypothesized that water conditions affect the likelihood that avian cholera outbreaks will occur in specific wetlands. To test these predictions, we collected data from avian cholera outbreak and non-outbreak (control) wetlands throughout North America (wintera??spring 1995a??1996 to 1998a??1999) to evaluate whether water conditions were associated with outbreaks. Conditional logistic regression analysis on paired outbreak and non-outbreak wetlands indicated no significant association between water conditions and the risk of avian cholera outbreaks. For wetlands where avian cholera outbreaks occurred, linear regression showed that increased eutrophic nutrient concentrations (Potassium [K], nitrate [NO3], phosphorus [P], and phosphate [PO3]) were positively related to the abundance of P. multocida recovered from water and sediment samples. Wetland protein concentration and an El Ni??o event were also associated with P. multocida abundance. Our results indicate that wetland water conditions are not strongly associated with the risk of avian cholera outbreaks; however, some variables may play a role in the abundance of P. multocida bacteria and might be important in reducing the severity of avian cholera outbreaks.

  17. Avian genomics lends insights into endocrine function in birds.

    PubMed

    Mello, C V; Lovell, P V

    2018-01-15

    The genomics era has brought along the completed sequencing of a large number of bird genomes that cover a broad range of the avian phylogenetic tree (>30 orders), leading to major novel insights into avian biology and evolution. Among recent findings, the discovery that birds lack a large number of protein coding genes that are organized in highly conserved syntenic clusters in other vertebrates is very intriguing, given the physiological importance of many of these genes. A considerable number of them play prominent endocrine roles, suggesting that birds evolved compensatory genetic or physiological mechanisms that allowed them to survive and thrive in spite of these losses. While further studies are needed to establish the exact extent of avian gene losses, these findings point to birds as potentially highly relevant model organisms for exploring the genetic basis and possible therapeutic approaches for a wide range of endocrine functions and disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Infrasound and the avian navigational map.

    PubMed

    Hagstrum, J T

    2000-04-01

    Birds can navigate accurately over hundreds to thousands of kilometres, and this ability of homing pigeons is the basis for a worldwide sport. Compass senses orient avian flight, but how birds determine their location in order to select the correct homeward bearing (map sense) remains a mystery. Also mysterious are rare disruptions of pigeon races in which most birds are substantially delayed and large numbers are lost. Here, it is shown that in four recent pigeon races in Europe and the northeastern USA the birds encountered infrasonic (low-frequency acoustic) shock waves from the Concorde supersonic transport. An acoustic avian map is proposed that consists of infrasonic cues radiated from steep-sided topographic features; the source of these signals is microseisms continuously generated by interfering oceanic waves. Atmospheric processes affecting these infrasonic map cues can explain perplexing experimental results from pigeon releases.

  19. Bibliography of Literature for Avian Issues in Solar and Wind Energy and Other Activities

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Walston, Leroy J.; White, Ellen M.; Meyers, Stephanie A.

    2015-04-01

    Utility-scale solar energy has been a rapidly expanding energy sector in the United States in recent years and is expected to continue to grow. In 2014, concerns were raised over the risk of avian fatalities associated with utility-scale solar plants. With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Program, Argonne National Laboratory and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory studied the issue and released A Review of Avian Monitoring and Mitigation Information at Existing Utility-Scale Solar Facilities (ANL/EVS-15/2, March 2015). A comprehensive literature review included peer-reviewed journal articles on avian fatalities from solar energy facilities and other sources (e.g., windmore » energy, building collisions, etc.), project-specific technical reports on avian monitoring and fatality at solar facilities, information on mitigation measures and best management practices, and literature pertaining to avian behavioral patterns and habitat use. The source citations are listed in this bibliography; they are current through December 2014.« less

  20. Transmission and reassortment of avian influenza viruses at the Asian-North American interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramey, Andrew M.; Pearce, John M.; Ely, Craig R.; Guy, Lisa M. Sheffield; Irons, David B.; Derksen, Dirk V.; Ip, Hon S.

    2010-01-01

    Twenty avian influenza viruses were isolated from seven wild migratory bird species sampled at St. Lawrence Island, Alaska. We tested predictions based on previous phylogenetic analyses of avian influenza viruses that support spatially dependent trans-hemispheric gene flow and frequent interspecies transmission at a location situated at the Asian–North American interface. Through the application of phylogenetic and genotypic approaches, our data support functional dilution by distance of trans-hemispheric reassortants and interspecific virus transmission. Our study confirms infection of divergent avian taxa with nearly identical avian influenza strains in the wild. Findings also suggest that H16N3 viruses may contain gene segments with unique phylogenetic positions and that further investigation of how host specificity may impact transmission of H13 and H16 viruses is warranted.

  1. The scientific rationale for the World Organisation for Animal Health standards and recommendations on avian influenza.

    PubMed

    Pasick, J; Kahn, S

    2014-12-01

    The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) prescribes standards for the diagnosis and control of avian influenza, as well as health measures for safe trade in birds and avian products, which are based on up-to-date scientific information and risk management principles, consistent with the role of the OIE as a reference standard-setting body for the World Trade Organization (WTO). These standards and recommendations continue to evolve, reflecting advances in technology and scientific understanding of this important zoonotic disease. The avian influenza viruses form part of the natural ecosystem by virtue of their ubiquitous presence in wild aquatic birds, a fact that human intervention cannot change. For the purposes of the Terrestrial Animal Health Code (Terrestrial Code), avian influenza is defined as an infection of poultry. However, the scope of the OIE standards and recommendations is not restricted to poultry, covering the diagnosis, early detection and management of avian influenza, including sanitary measures for trade in birds and avian products. The best way to manage avian influenza-associated risks to human and animal health is for countries to conduct surveillance using recommended methods, to report results in a consistent and transparent manner, and to applythe sanitary measures described in the Terrestrial Code. Surveillance for and timely reporting of avian influenza in accordance with OIE standards enable the distribution of relevant, up-to-date information to the global community.

  2. Immunizing Canada geese against avian cholera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, J.I.

    1985-01-01

    A small flock of captive giant Canada geese were vaccinated with the experimental bac- terin in Nebraska to test its efficacy under field conditions. Only 2 of 157 vaccinates died from avian cholera during an annual spring die-off.

  3. The anatomy and physiology of the avian endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Midge; Pilny, Anthony A

    2008-01-01

    The endocrine system of birds is comparable to that of mammals, although there are many unique aspects to consider when studying the anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry. Avian endocrinology is a field of veterinary medicine that is unfamiliar to many practitioners; however, it is important to have a comprehensive understanding when evaluating companion birds in clinical practice. This article covers the anatomy and physiology of the normal avian, and readers are referred to other articles for a more detailed explanation of altered physiology and pathology.

  4. Detection of Evolutionarily Distinct Avian Influenza A Viruses in Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Vijaykrishna, Dhanasekaran; Butler, Jeffrey; Baas, Chantal; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Silva-de-la-Fuente, M. Carolina; Medina-Vogel, Gonzalo; Olsen, Bjorn; Kelso, Anne; Barr, Ian G.; González-Acuña, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Distinct lineages of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) are harbored by spatially segregated birds, yet significant surveillance gaps exist around the globe. Virtually nothing is known from the Antarctic. Using virus culture, molecular analysis, full genome sequencing, and serology of samples from Adélie penguins in Antarctica, we confirmed infection by H11N2 subtype AIVs. Their genetic segments were distinct from all known contemporary influenza viruses, including South American AIVs, suggesting spatial separation from other lineages. Only in the matrix and polymerase acidic gene phylogenies did the Antarctic sequences form a sister relationship to South American AIVs, whereas distant phylogenetic relationships were evident in all other gene segments. Interestingly, their neuraminidase genes formed a distant relationship to all avian and human influenza lineages, and the polymerase basic 1 and polymerase acidic formed a sister relationship to the equine H3N8 influenza virus lineage that emerged during 1963 and whose avian origins were previously unknown. We also estimated that each gene segment had diverged for 49 to 80 years from its most closely related sequences, highlighting a significant gap in our AIV knowledge in the region. We also show that the receptor binding properties of the H11N2 viruses are predominantly avian and that they were unable to replicate efficiently in experimentally inoculated ferrets, suggesting their continuous evolution in avian hosts. These findings add substantially to our understanding of both the ecology and the intra- and intercontinental movement of Antarctic AIVs and highlight the potential risk of an incursion of highly pathogenic AIVs into this fragile environment. PMID:24803521

  5. A national survey of emergency nurses and avian influenza threat.

    PubMed

    Bell, Mary Ann; Dake, Joseph A; Price, James H; Jordan, Timothy R; Rega, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived likelihood of emergency nurses reporting to work during an avian influenza outbreak, to consider options if nurses decided not to report work, and to explore Protection Motivation Theory constructs as predictors of reporting to work. A descriptive, nonexperimental, cross-sectional survey of emergency nurses within the United States. A total of 332 nurses (46%) responded. Most emergency nurses (84%) reported they would report to work (1 in 6 would not). The likelihood of reporting to work differed by education level, nurses' avian influenza information sources, and nurses who had family living with them. Of the nurses who decided not to report to work, the majority were willing to provide health information (90%), administer vaccinations (82%), and triage (74%) neighbors/friends from home. One third of nurses had not attended a disaster-preparedness drill within the past year. Only 20% identified formal training while on the job as a source of avian influenza information. A third of emergency nurses would be worried about getting an avian influenza vaccination because of potential adverse effects. Protection Motivation Theory accounted for almost 40% of the variance of likelihood to report to work, with response costs being the largest predictor. Disaster drills, avian influenza job training, and vaccination education are necessary to prepare emergency nurses for an outbreak. The findings support emergency nurses' willingness to work from home if they are unable to report to work. This finding is new and may have implications for disaster planning, staffing, and ED operations. Copyright © 2014 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Isolation strategy of a two-strain avian influenza model using optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardlijah, Ariani, Tika Desi; Asfihani, Tahiyatul

    2017-08-01

    Avian influenza has killed many victims of both birds and humans. Most cases of avian influenza infection in humans have resulted transmission from poultry to humans. To prevent or minimize the patients of avian influenza can be done by pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical measures such as the use of masks, isolation, etc. We will be analyzed two strains of avian influenza models that focus on treatment of symptoms with insulation, then investigate the stability of the equilibrium point by using Routh-Hurwitz criteria. We also used optimal control to reduce the number of humans infected by making the isolation level as the control then proceeds optimal control will be simulated. The completion of optimal control used in this study is the Pontryagin Minimum Principle and for simulation we are using Runge Kutta method. The results obtained showed that the application of two control is more optimal compared to apply one control only.

  7. Electron tomographic characterization of a vacuolar reticulum and of six vesicle types that occupy different cytoplasmic domains in the apex of tip-growing Chara rhizoids.

    PubMed

    Limbach, Christoph; Staehelin, L Andrew; Sievers, Andreas; Braun, Markus

    2008-04-01

    We provide a 3D ultrastructural analysis of the membrane systems involved in tip growth of rhizoids of the green alga Chara. Electron tomography of cells preserved by high-pressure freeze fixation has enabled us to distinguish six different types of vesicles in the apical cytoplasm where the tip growth machinery is accommodated. The vesicle types are: dark and light secretory vesicles, plasma membrane-associated clathrin-coated vesicles (PM-CCVs), Spitzenkoerper-associated clathrin-coated vesicles (Sp-CCVs) and coated vesicles (Sp-CVs), and microvesicles. Each of these vesicle types exhibits a distinct distribution pattern, which provides insights into their possible function for tip growth. The PM-CCVs are confined to the cytoplasm adjacent to the apical plasma membrane. Within this space they are arranged in clusters often surrounding tubular plasma membrane invaginations from which CCVs bud. This suggests that endocytosis and membrane recycling are locally confined to specialized apical endocytosis sites. In contrast, exocytosis of secretory vesicles occurs over the entire membrane area of the apical dome. The Sp-CCVs and the Sp-CVs are associated with the aggregate of endoplasmic reticulum membranes in the center of the growth-organizing Spitzenkoerper complex. Here, Sp-CCVs are seen to bud from undefined tubular membranes. The subapical region of rhizoids contains a vacuolar reticulum that extends along the longitudinal cell axis and consists of large, vesicle-like segments interconnected by thin tubular domains. The tubular domains are encompassed by thin filamentous structures resembling dynamin spirals which could drive peristaltic movements of the vacuolar reticulum similar to those observed in fungal hyphae. The vacuolar reticulum appears to serve as a lytic compartment into which multivesicular bodies deliver their internal vesicles for molecular recycling and degradation.

  8. Current situation of avian influenza with emphasis on pathobiology, epidemiology and control

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza is one of the most important diseases affecting the poultry industry around the world. Avian Influenza virus (AIV) has a broad host range in birds and mammals, although the natural reservoir is considered to be in wild birds where it typically causes an asymptomatic to mild infectio...

  9. Transmission and reassortment of avian influenza viruses at the Asian-North American interface.

    PubMed

    Ramey, Andrew M; Pearce, John M; Ely, Craig R; Guy, Lisa M Sheffield; Irons, David B; Derksen, Dirk V; Ip, Hon S

    2010-10-25

    Twenty avian influenza viruses were isolated from seven wild migratory bird species sampled at St. Lawrence Island, Alaska. We tested predictions based on previous phylogenetic analyses of avian influenza viruses that support spatially dependent trans-hemispheric gene flow and frequent interspecies transmission at a location situated at the Asian-North American interface. Through the application of phylogenetic and genotypic approaches, our data support functional dilution by distance of trans-hemispheric reassortants and interspecific virus transmission. Our study confirms infection of divergent avian taxa with nearly identical avian influenza strains in the wild. Findings also suggest that H16N3 viruses may contain gene segments with unique phylogenetic positions and that further investigation of how host specificity may impact transmission of H13 and H16 viruses is warranted. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. The cuticle modulates ultraviolet reflectance of avian eggshells

    PubMed Central

    Fecheyr-Lippens, Daphne C.; Igic, Branislav; D'Alba, Liliana; Hanley, Daniel; Verdes, Aida; Holford, Mande; Waterhouse, Geoffrey I. N.; Grim, Tomas; Hauber, Mark E.; Shawkey, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Avian eggshells are variedly coloured, yet only two pigments, biliverdin and protoporphyrin IX, are known to contribute to the dramatic diversity of their colours. By contrast, the contributions of structural or other chemical components of the eggshell are poorly understood. For example, unpigmented eggshells, which appear white to the human eye, vary in their ultraviolet (UV) reflectance, which may be detectable by birds. We investigated the proximate mechanisms for the variation in UV-reflectance of unpigmented bird eggshells using spectrophotometry, electron microscopy, chemical analyses, and experimental manipulations. We specifically tested how UV-reflectance is affected by the eggshell cuticle, the outermost layer of most avian eggshells. The chemical dissolution of the outer eggshell layers, including the cuticle, increased UV-reflectance for only eggshells that contained a cuticle. Our findings demonstrate that the outer eggshell layers, including the cuticle, absorb UV-light, probably because they contain higher levels of organic components and other chemicals, such as calcium phosphates, compared to the predominantly calcite-based eggshell matrix. These data highlight the need to examine factors other than the known pigments in studies of avian eggshell colour. PMID:25964661

  11. The global nature of avian influenza

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza (AI) virus (AIV) is a global virus which knows no geographic boundaries, has no political agenda, and can infect poultry irrespective of their occupying ecosystem, agricultural production system, or other anthropocentric niches. AIVs or evidence of their infection have been detected...

  12. Avian use of scoria rock outcrops

    Treesearch

    Mark A. Rumble

    1987-01-01

    Avian use of scoria outcrop habitats was compared to use of sagebrush (Artemisia spp.)/grassland habitats. Outcrop habitats exhibited higher species richness, total population density, density of lark sparrows (Chondestres grammucus), and density of rock wrens (Salpinctes obsoetus). Western meadowlarks (Sturnella neglecta...

  13. Control of avian influenza: philosophy and perspectives on behalf of migratory birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friend, Milton

    1992-01-01

    Aquatic birds are considered the primary reservoir for influenza A viruses (Nettles et al., 1987).  However, there is little concern about avian influenza among conservation agencies responsible for the welfare of those species.  IN contrast, the poultry industry has great concern about avian influenza and view aquatic birds as a source for infection of poultry flocks.  In some instances, differences in these perspectives created conflict between conservation agencies and the poultry industry.  I speak on behalf of migratory birds, but philosophy and perspectives offered are intended to be helpful to the poultry industry in their efforts to combat avian influenza.

  14. H9N2 low pathogenic avian influenza: Should we be afraid?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The H9N2 low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) is probably the most widespread avian influenza subtype in poultry around the world being endemic in a large part of Asia, the Middle East, Northern Africa, and in Germany. Currently, there is no standardized clade system to describe the antigenic vari...

  15. Evaluation of different embryonating bird eggs and cell cultures for isolation efficiency of avian influenza A virus and avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 from real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction--positive

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two hundred samples collected from Anseriformes, Charadriiformes, Gruiformes, and Galliformes were assayed using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) for presence of avian influenza virus and avian paramyxovirus-1. Virus isolation using embryonating chicken eggs, embr...

  16. Structure versus time in the evolutionary diversification of avian carotenoid metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Erin S; Badyaev, Alexander V

    2018-05-01

    Historical associations of genes and proteins are thought to delineate pathways available to subsequent evolution; however, the effects of past functional involvements on contemporary evolution are rarely quantified. Here, we examined the extent to which the structure of a carotenoid enzymatic network persists in avian evolution. Specifically, we tested whether the evolution of carotenoid networks was most concordant with phylogenetically structured expansion from core reactions of common ancestors or with subsampling of biochemical pathway modules from an ancestral network. We compared structural and historical associations in 467 carotenoid networks of extant and ancestral species and uncovered the overwhelming effect of pre-existing metabolic network structure on carotenoid diversification over the last 50 million years of avian evolution. Over evolutionary time, birds repeatedly subsampled and recombined conserved biochemical modules, which likely maintained the overall structure of the carotenoid metabolic network during avian evolution. These findings explain the recurrent convergence of evolutionary distant species in carotenoid metabolism and weak phylogenetic signal in avian carotenoid evolution. Remarkable retention of an ancient metabolic structure throughout extensive and prolonged ecological diversification in avian carotenoid metabolism illustrates a fundamental requirement of organismal evolution - historical continuity of a deterministic network that links past and present functional associations of its components. © 2018 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2018 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  17. Food plant diversity as broad-scale determinant of avian frugivore richness

    PubMed Central

    Kissling, W. Daniel; Rahbek, Carsten; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin

    2007-01-01

    The causes of variation in animal species richness at large spatial scales are intensively debated. Here, we examine whether the diversity of food plants, contemporary climate and energy, or habitat heterogeneity determine species richness patterns of avian frugivores across sub-Saharan Africa. Path models indicate that species richness of Ficus (their fruits being one of the major food resources for frugivores in the tropics) has the strongest direct effect on richness of avian frugivores, whereas the influences of variables related to water–energy and habitat heterogeneity are mainly indirect. The importance of Ficus richness for richness of avian frugivores diminishes with decreasing specialization of birds on fruit eating, but is retained when accounting for spatial autocorrelation. We suggest that a positive relationship between food plant and frugivore species richness could result from niche assembly mechanisms (e.g. coevolutionary adaptations to fruit size, fruit colour or vertical stratification of fruit presentation) or, alternatively, from stochastic speciation–extinction processes. In any case, the close relationship between species richness of Ficus and avian frugivores suggests that figs are keystone resources for animal consumers, even at continental scales. PMID:17251107

  18. ERG2 and ERG24 Are Required for Normal Vacuolar Physiology as Well as Candida albicans Pathogenicity in a Murine Model of Disseminated but Not Vaginal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Luna-Tapia, Arturo; Peters, Brian M.; Eberle, Karen E.; Kerns, Morgan E.; Foster, Timothy P.; Marrero, Luis; Noverr, Mairi C.; Fidel, Paul L.

    2015-01-01

    Several important classes of antifungal agents, including the azoles, act by blocking ergosterol biosynthesis. It was recently reported that the azoles cause massive disruption of the fungal vacuole in the prevalent human pathogen Candida albicans. This is significant because normal vacuolar function is required to support C. albicans pathogenicity. This study examined the impact of the morpholine antifungals, which inhibit later steps of ergosterol biosynthesis, on C. albicans vacuolar integrity. It was found that overexpression of either the ERG2 or ERG24 gene, encoding C-8 sterol isomerase or C-14 sterol reductase, respectively, suppressed C. albicans sensitivity to the morpholines. In addition, both erg2Δ/Δ and erg24Δ/Δ mutants were hypersensitive to the morpholines. These data are consistent with the antifungal activity of the morpholines depending upon the simultaneous inhibition of both Erg2p and Erg24p. The vacuoles within both erg2Δ/Δ and erg24Δ/Δ C. albicans strains exhibited an aberrant morphology and accumulated large quantities of the weak base quinacrine, indicating enhanced vacuolar acidification compared with that of control strains. Both erg mutants exhibited significant defects in polarized hyphal growth and were avirulent in a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis. Surprisingly, in a mouse model of vaginal candidiasis, both mutants colonized mice at high levels and induced a pathogenic response similar to that with the controls. Thus, while targeting Erg2p or Erg24p alone could provide a potentially efficacious therapy for disseminated candidiasis, it may not be an effective strategy to treat vaginal infections. The potential value of drugs targeting these enzymes as adjunctive therapies is discussed. PMID:26231054

  19. Modelling the impact of co-circulating low pathogenic avian influenza viruses on epidemics of highly pathogenic avian influenza in poultry.

    PubMed

    Nickbakhsh, Sema; Hall, Matthew D; Dorigatti, Ilaria; Lycett, Samantha J; Mulatti, Paolo; Monne, Isabella; Fusaro, Alice; Woolhouse, Mark E J; Rambaut, Andrew; Kao, Rowland R

    2016-12-01

    It is well known that highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses emerge through mutation of precursor low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses in domestic poultry populations. The potential for immunological cross-protection between these pathogenic variants is recognised but the epidemiological impact during co-circulation is not well understood. Here we use mathematical models to investigate whether altered flock infection parameters consequent to primary LPAI infections can impact on the spread of HPAI at the population level. First we used mechanistic models reflecting the co-circulatory dynamics of LPAI and HPAI within a single commercial poultry flock. We found that primary infections with LPAI led to HPAI prevalence being maximised under a scenario of high but partial cross-protection. We then tested the population impact in spatially-explicit simulations motivated by a major avian influenza A(H7N1) epidemic that afflicted the Italian poultry industry in 1999-2001. We found that partial cross-protection can lead to a prolongation of HPAI epidemic duration. Our findings have implications for the control of HPAI in poultry particularly for settings in which LPAI and HPAI frequently co-circulate. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Antigenic characterization of H3 subtypes of avian influenza A viruses from North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, Elizabeth; Long, Li-Pong; Zhao, Nan; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Baroch, John A; Nolting, Jaqueline; Senter, Lucy; Cunningham, Frederick L; Pharr, G Todd; Hanson, Larry; Slemons, Richard; DeLiberto, Thomas J.; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Besides humans, H3 subtypes of influenza A viruses (IAVs) can infect various animal hosts, including avian, swine, equine, canine, and sea mammal species. These H3 viruses are both antigenically and genetically diverse. Here, we characterized the antigenic diversity of contemporary H3 avian IAVs recovered from migratory birds in North America. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays were performed on 37 H3 isolates of avian IAVs recovered from 2007 to 2011 using generated reference chicken sera. These isolates were recovered from samples taken in the Atlantic, Mississippi, Central, and Pacific waterfowl migration flyways. Antisera to all the tested H3 isolates cross-reacted with each other and, to a lesser extent, with those to H3 canine and H3 equine IAVs. Antigenic cartography showed that the largest antigenic distance among the 37 avian IAVs is about four units, and each unit corresponds to a 2 log 2 difference in the HI titer. However, none of the tested H3 IAVs cross-reacted with ferret sera derived from contemporary swine and human IAVs. Our results showed that the H3 avian IAVs we tested lacked significant antigenic diversity, and these viruses were antigenically different from those circulating in swine and human populations. This suggests that H3 avian IAVs in North American waterfowl are antigenically relatively stable.

  1. Antigenic Characterization of H3 Subtypes of Avian Influenza A Viruses from North America.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Elizabeth; Long, Li-Ping; Zhao, Nan; Hall, Jeffrey S; Baroch, John A; Nolting, Jacqueline; Senter, Lucy; Cunningham, Frederick L; Pharr, G Todd; Hanson, Larry; Slemons, Richard; DeLiberto, Thomas J; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2016-05-01

    Besides humans, H3 subtypes of influenza A viruses (IAVs) can infect various animal hosts, including avian, swine, equine, canine, and sea mammal species. These H3 viruses are both antigenically and genetically diverse. Here, we characterized the antigenic diversity of contemporary H3 avian IAVs recovered from migratory birds in North America. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays were performed on 37 H3 isolates of avian IAVs recovered from 2007 to 2011 using generated reference chicken sera. These isolates were recovered from samples taken in the Atlantic, Mississippi, Central, and Pacific waterfowl migration flyways. Antisera to all the tested H3 isolates cross-reacted with each other and, to a lesser extent, with those to H3 canine and H3 equine IAVs. Antigenic cartography showed that the largest antigenic distance among the 37 avian IAVs is about four units, and each unit corresponds to a 2 log 2 difference in the HI titer. However, none of the tested H3 IAVs cross-reacted with ferret sera derived from contemporary swine and human IAVs. Our results showed that the H3 avian IAVs we tested lacked significant antigenic diversity, and these viruses were antigenically different from those circulating in swine and human populations. This suggests that H3 avian IAVs in North American waterfowl are antigenically relatively stable.

  2. Evidence for subclinical avian influenza virus infections among rural Thai villagers.

    PubMed

    Khuntirat, Benjawan P; Yoon, In-Kyu; Blair, Patrick J; Krueger, Whitney S; Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Putnam, Shannon D; Supawat, Krongkaew; Gibbons, Robert V; Pattamadilok, Sirima; Sawanpanyalert, Pathom; Heil, Gary L; Friary, John A; Capuano, Ana W; Gray, Gregory C

    2011-10-01

    Regions of Thailand reported sporadic outbreaks of A/H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) among poultry between 2004 and 2008. Kamphaeng Phet Province, in north-central Thailand had over 50 HPAI poultry outbreaks in 2004 alone, and 1 confirmed and 2 likely other human HPAI infections between 2004 and 2006. In 2008, we enrolled a cohort of 800 rural Thai adults living in 8 sites within Kamphaeng Phet Province in a prospective study of zoonotic influenza transmission. We studied participants' sera with serologic assays against 16 avian, 2 swine, and 8 human influenza viruses. Among participants (mean age 49.6 years and 58% female) 65% reported lifetime poultry exposure of at least 30 consecutive minutes. Enrollees had elevated antibodies by microneutralization assay against 3 avian viruses: A/Hong Kong/1073/1999(H9N2), A/Thailand/676/2005(H5N1), and A/Thailand/384/2006(H5N1). Bivariate risk factor modeling demonstrated that male gender, lack of an indoor water source, and tobacco use were associated with elevated titers against avian H9N2 virus. Multivariate modeling suggested that increasing age, lack of an indoor water source, and chronic breathing problems were associated with infection with 1 or both HPAI H5N1 strains. Poultry exposure was not associated with positive serologic findings. These data suggest that people in rural central Thailand may have experienced subclinical avian influenza infections as a result of yet unidentified environmental exposures. Lack of an indoor water source may play a role in transmission.

  3. Relationships among vegetation structure, canopy composition, and avian richness patterns across an aspen-conifer forest gradient

    Treesearch

    Charles E. Swift; Kerri T. Vierling; Andrew T. Hudak; Lee A. Vierling

    2017-01-01

    Ecologists have a long-term interest in understanding the relative influence of vegetation composition and vegetation structure on avian diversity. LiDAR remote sensing is useful in studying local patterns of avian diversity because it characterizes fine-scale vegetation structure across broad extents. We used LiDAR, aerial and satellite imagery, and avian field data...

  4. Vacuolar Localization of Endoproteinases EP(1) and EP(2) in Barley Mesophyll Cells.

    PubMed

    Thayer, S S; Huffaker, R C

    1984-05-01

    The localization of two previously characterized endoproteinases (EP(1) and EP(2)) that comprise more than 95% of the protease activity in primary Hordeum vulgare L. var Numar leaves was determined. Intact vacuoles released from washed mesophyll protoplasts by gentle osmotic shock and increase in pH, were purified by flotation through a four-step Ficoll gradient. These vacuoles contained endoproteinases that rapidly degraded purified barley ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPCase) substrate. Breakdown products and extent of digestion of RuBPCase were determined using 12% polyacrylamide-sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. Coomassie brilliant blue- or silver-stained gels were scanned, and the peaks were integrated to provide quantitative information. The characteristics of the vacuolar endoproteinases (e.g. sensitivity to various inhibitors and activators, and the molecular weights of the breakdown products, i.e. peptide maps) closely resembled those of purified EP(1) and partially purified EP(2). It is therefore concluded that EP(1) and EP(2) are localized in the vacuoles of mesophyll cells.

  5. Molecular Basis of ADP Inhibition of Vacuolar (V)-type ATPase/Synthase*

    PubMed Central

    Kishikawa, Jun-ichi; Nakanishi, Atsuko; Furuike, Shou; Tamakoshi, Masatada; Yokoyama, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Reduction of ATP hydrolysis activity of vacuolar-type ATPase/synthase (V0V1) as a result of ADP inhibition occurs as part of the normal mechanism of V0V1 of Thermus thermophilus but not V0V1 of Enterococcus hirae or eukaryotes. To investigate the molecular basis for this difference, domain-swapped chimeric V1 consisting of both T. thermophilus and E. hirae enzymes were generated, and their function was analyzed. The data showed that the interaction between the nucleotide binding and C-terminal domains of the catalytic A subunit from E. hirae V1 is central to increasing binding affinity of the chimeric V1 for phosphate, resulting in reduction of the ADP inhibition. These findings together with a comparison of the crystal structures of T. thermophilus V1 with E. hirae V1 strongly suggest that the A subunit adopts a conformation in T. thermophilus V1 different from that in E. hirae V1. This key difference results in ADP inhibition of T. thermophilus V1 by abolishing the binding affinity for phosphate during ATP hydrolysis. PMID:24247239

  6. USGS highly pathogenic avian influenza research strategy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, M. Camille; Miles, A. Keith; Pearce, John M.; Prosser, Diann J.; Sleeman, Jonathan M.; Whalen, Mary E.

    2015-09-09

    Avian influenza viruses are naturally occurring in wild birds such as ducks, geese, swans, and gulls. These viruses generally do not cause illness in wild birds, however, when spread to poultry they can be highly pathogenic and cause illness and death in backyard and commercial farms. Outbreaks may cause devastating agricultural economic losses and some viral strains have the potential to infect people directly. Furthermore, the combination of avian influenza viruses with mammalian viruses can result in strains with the ability to transmit from person to person, possibly leading to viruses with pandemic potential. All known pandemic influenza viruses have had some genetic material of avian origin. Since 1996, a strain of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus, H5N1, has caused infection in wild birds, losses to poultry farms in Eurasia and North Africa, and led to the deaths of several hundred people. Spread of the H5N1 virus and other influenza strains from China was likely facilitated by migratory birds. In December 2014, HPAI was detected in poultry in Canada and migratory birds in the United States. Since then, HPAI viruses have spread to large parts of the United States and will likely continue to spread through migratory bird flyways and other mechanisms throughout North America. In the United States, HPAI viruses have severely affected the poultry industry with millions of domestic birds dead or culled. These strains of HPAI are not known to cause disease in humans; however, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advise caution when in close contact with infected birds. Experts agree that HPAI strains currently circulating in wild birds of North America will likely persist for the next few years. This unprecedented situation presents risks to the poultry industry, natural resource management, and potentially human health. Scientific knowledge and decision support tools are urgently needed to understand factors affecting the persistence

  7. A PELAGIC OUTBREAK OF AVIAN CHOLERA IN NORTH AMERICAN GULLS: SCAVENGING AS A PRIMARY MECHANISM FOR TRANSMISSION?

    PubMed

    Wille, Michelle; McBurney, Scott; Robertson, Gregory J; Wilhelm, Sabina I; Blehert, David S; Soos, Catherine; Dunphy, Ron; Whitney, Hugh

    2016-10-01

    Avian cholera, caused by the bacterium Pasteurella multocida , is an endemic disease globally, often causing annual epizootics in North American wild bird populations with thousands of mortalities. From December 2006 to March 2007, an avian cholera outbreak caused mortality in marine birds off the coast of Atlantic Canada, largely centered 300-400 km off the coast of the island of Newfoundland. Scavenging gulls ( Larus spp.) were the primary species detected; however, mortality was also identified in Black-legged Kittiwakes ( Rissa tridactyla ) and one Common Raven ( Corvus corax ), a nonmarine species. The most common gross necropsy findings in the birds with confirmed avian cholera were acute fibrinous and necrotizing lesions affecting the spleen, air sacs, and pericardium, and nonspecific hepatomegaly and splenomegaly. The etiologic agent, P. multocida serotype 1, was recovered from 77 of 136 carcasses examined, and confirmed or probable avian cholera was diagnosed in 85 cases. Mortality observed in scavenging gull species was disproportionately high relative to their abundance, particularly when compared to nonscavenging species. The presence of feather shafts in the ventricular lumen of the majority of larid carcasses diagnosed with avian cholera suggests scavenging of birds that died from avian cholera as a major mode of transmission. This documentation of an outbreak of avian cholera in a North American pelagic environment affecting primarily scavenging gulls indicates that offshore marine environments may be a component of avian cholera dynamics.

  8. Evolution of highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza viruses

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Macken, Catherine A; Green, Margaret A

    2009-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian H5N1 viruses have circulated in Southeast Asia for more than a decade, are now endemic in parts of this region, and have also spread to more than 60 countries on three continents. The evolution of these viruses is characterized by frequent reassortment events that have created a significant number of different genotypes, both transient and longer lasting. However, fundamental questions remain about the generation and perpetuation of this substantial genetic diversity. These gaps in understanding may, in part, be due to the difficulties of genotyping closely related viruses, and limitations in the size of the data setsmore » used in analysis. Using our recently published novel genotyping procedure ('two-time test'), which is amenable to high throughput analysis and provides an increased level of resolution relative to previous analyses, we propose a detailed model for the evolution and diversification of avian H5N1 viruses. Our analysis suggests that (i) all current H5N1 genotypes are derived from a single, clearly defined sequence of initial reassortment events; (ii) reassortment of the polymerase and NP genes may have played an important role in avian H5N1 virus evolution; (iii) the current genotype Z viruses have diverged into three distinguishable sub-genotypes in the absence of reassortment; (iv) some potentially significant molecular changes appear to be correlated with particular genotypes (for example, reassortment of the internal genes is often paralleled by a change in the HA clade); and (v) as noted in earlier studies of avian influenza A virus evolution, novel segments are typically derived from different donors (i.e., there is no obvious pattern of gene linkage in reassortment). The model of avian H5N1 viral evolution by reassortment and mutation that emerges from our study provides a context within which significant amino acid changes may be revealed; it also may help in predicting the 'success' of newly emerging avian H5N1

  9. A relationship between avian carcasses and living invertebrates in the epizootiology of avian botulism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duncan, Ruth M.; Jensen, Wayne I.

    1976-01-01

    A survey of the sources of Clostridium botulinum type C toxin possibly utilized as food by aquatic birds in an epizootic area of avian botulism in northern Utah showed that living aquatic and terrestrial invertebrates normally found in close association with dead, decomposing birds commonly carried the toxin. Of 461 samples associated with 21 species of avian carcasses, 198 were toxin-positive. Invertebrate species not normally scavengers of vertebrate tissues were less commonly and less highly toxic, particularly when captured 30 cm or more from a carcass; six of 237 samples of such aquatic invertebrates contained low-level toxin. Of the species tested, blow fly larvae (Calliphoridae) were the most consistently and highly toxic, although others, particularly adult and larval stages of several species of beetles (Coleoptera), contained toxin at levels probably significant in the epizootiology of the disease. An estimated 0.05 to 0.25 g of the most toxic fly larvae or 15 g of the most toxic beetles tested carried a mediam lethal dose for an adult mallard duck. Examination of stomach contents of aquatic birds dead of botulism showed that some had consumed invertebrates.

  10. DNA in Uninfected and Virus-Infected Cells Complementary to Avian Tumor Virus RNA

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Peter N.; Robinson, Harriet L.; Robinson, William S.; Hanafusa, Teruko; Hanafusa, Hidesaburo

    1971-01-01

    The 70S RNA component of several avian tumor viruses was hybridized with DNA extracted from avian tumor virus-infected and uninfected chicken and Japanese quail cells. Tritium-labeled 70S RNAs from Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), Rous associated virus-1 (RAV-1), RAV-60, and Schmidt-Ruppin-RSV (SR-RSV) hybridize from 3 to 10 times more with DNA from uninfected chicken cells than with DNA from Escherichia coli, calfthymus, or baby hamster kidney cells. After infection of chicken cells with RSV(RAV-1), SR-RSV, or RAV-2, the amount of 70S avian tumor virus [3H]RNA hybridized increases by 1.6 times. The specificity of the hybridization reaction was shown by the specific competition of 70S SR-RSV [3H]RNA with 70S RNA from RSV(RAV-1), and not with RNA from Sendai virus or chicken cells. There was no difference in the hybridization of 70S RNA from RSV (RAV-1), RAV-1, or RAV-60 with DNA either from chicken cells that contain RAV-60 in a nonreplicating form or from chicken cells that do not appear to contain RAV-60. These results indicate that both types of uninfected chicken cells contain DNA that is complementary to RNA from several avian tumor viruses and that the amount of complementary DNA increases in such cells after infection with an avian tumor virus. The RNAs of genetically different avian tumor viruses appear to have indistinguishable base sequences by this technique. PMID:4332808

  11. Proton pump inhibitors as anti vacuolar-ATPases drugs: a novel anticancer strategy.

    PubMed

    Spugnini, Enrico P; Citro, Gennaro; Fais, Stefano

    2010-05-08

    The vacuolar ATPases are ATP-dependent proton pumps whose functions include the acidification of intracellular compartments and the extrusion of protons through the cell cytoplasmic membrane. These pumps play a pivotal role in the regulation of cell pH in normal cells and, to a much greater extent, in tumor cells. In fact, the glucose metabolism in hypoxic conditions by the neoplasms leads to an intercellular pH drift towards acidity. The acid microenvironment is modulated through the over-expression of H+ transporters that are also involved in tumor progression, invasiveness, distant spread and chemoresistance. Several strategies to block/downmodulate the efficiency of these transporters are currently being investigated. Among them, proton pump inhibitors have shown to successfully block the H+ transporters in vitro and in vivo, leading to apoptotic death. Furthermore, their action seems to synergize with conventional chemotherapy protocols, leading to chemosensitization and reversal of chemoresistance. Aim of this article is to critically revise the current knowledge of this cellular machinery and to summarize the therapeutic strategies developed to counter this mechanism.

  12. Differential expression of vacuolar and defective cell wall invertase genes in roots and seeds of metalliferous and non-metalliferous populations of Rumex dentatus under copper stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhong-Rui; Cai, Shen-Wen; Huang, Wu-Xing; Liu, Rong-Xiang; Xiong, Zhi-Ting

    2018-01-01

    Acid invertase activities in roots and young seeds of a metalliferous population (MP) of Rumex dentatus were previously observed to be significantly higher than those of a non-metalliferous population (NMP) under Cu stress. To date, no acid invertase gene has been cloned from R. dentatus. Here, we isolated four full-length cDNAs from the two populations of R. dentatus, presumably encoding cell wall (RdnCIN1 and RdmCIN1 from the NMP and MP, respectively) and vacuolar invertases (RdnVIN1 and RdmVIN1 from the NMP and MP, respectively). Unexpectedly, RdnCIN1 and RdmCIN1 most likely encode special defective invertases with highly attenuated sucrose-hydrolyzing capacity. The transcript levels of RdmCIN1 were significantly higher than those of RdnCIN1 in roots and young seeds under Cu stress, whereas under control conditions, the former was initially lower than the latter. Unexpected high correlations were observed between the transcript levels of RdnCIN1 and RdmCIN1 and the activity of cell wall invertase, even though RdnCIN1 and RdmCIN1 do not encode catalytically active invertases. Similarly, the transcript levels of RdmVIN1 in roots and young seeds were increased under Cu stress, whereas those of RdnVIN1 were decreased. The high correlations between the transcript levels of RdnVIN1 and RdmVIN1 and the activity of vacuolar invertase indicate that RdnVIN1 and RdmVIN1 might control distinct vacuolar invertase activities in the two populations. Moreover, a possible indirect role for acid invertases in Cu tolerance, mediated by generating a range of sugars used as nutrients and signaling molecules, is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Studies on the serological relationships between avian pox, sheep pox, goat pox and vaccinia viruses

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, P. K.; Nilakantan, P. R.

    1970-01-01

    By using neutralization, complement fixation and immunogel-diffusion tests, it has been demonstrated that cross-reactions occur between various avian pox viruses and between sheep pox and goat pox viruses. No such reactions were demonstrated between avian pox viruses and vaccinia virus or between avian pox and sheep pox and goat pox viruses. Furthermore, no serological relationship was demonstrable between vaccinia virus and sheep pox and goat pox viruses. PMID:4989854

  14. Cruise ships as a source of avian mortality during fall migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bocetti, Carol I.

    2011-01-01

    Avian mortality during fall migration has been studied at many anthropogenic structures, most of which share the common feature of bright lighting. An additional, unstudied source of avian mortality during fall migration is recreational cruise ships that are brightly lit throughout the night. I documented a single mortality event of eight Common Yellowthroats (Geothlypis trichas) on one ship during part of one night in fall 2003, but suggest this is a more wide-spread phenomenon. The advertised number of ship-nights for 50 cruise ships in the Caribbean Sea during fall migration in 2003 was 2,981. This may pose a significant, additional, anthropogenic source of mortality that warrants further investigation, particularly because impacts could be minimized if this source of avian mortality is recognized. ?? 2011 by the Wilson Ornithological Society.

  15. Avian Semen Collection by Cloacal Massage and Isolation of DNA from Sperm.

    PubMed

    Kucera, Aurelia C; Heidinger, Britt J

    2018-02-05

    Collection of semen may be useful for a wide range of applications including studies involving sperm quality, sperm telomere dynamics, and epigenetics. Birds are widely used subjects in biological research and are ideal for studies involving repeated sperm samples. However, few resources are currently available for those wishing to learn how to collect and extract DNA from avian sperm. Here we describe cloacal massage, a gentle, non-invasive manual technique for collecting avian sperm. Although this technique is established in the literature, it can be difficult to learn from the available descriptions. We also provide information for extracting DNA from avian semen using a commercial extraction kit with modifications. Cloacal massage can be easily used on any small- to medium-sized male bird in reproductive condition. Following collection, the semen can be used immediately for motility assays, or frozen for DNA extraction following the protocol described herein. This extraction protocol was refined for avian sperm and has been successfully used on samples collected from several passerine species (Passer domesticus, Spizella passerina, Haemorhous mexicanus, and Turdus migratorius) and one columbid (Columba livia).

  16. Molecular cloning, functional expression and subcellular localization of two putative vacuolar voltage-gated chloride channels in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Atsuko; Fukuda, Atsunori; Sakai, Shingo; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki

    2006-01-01

    We isolated two cDNA clones (OsCLC-1 and OsCLC-2) homologous to tobacco CLC-Nt1, which encodes a voltage-gated chloride channel, from rice (Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica, cv. Nipponbare). The deduced amino acid sequences were highly conserved (87.9% identity with each other). Southern blot analysis of the rice genomic DNA revealed that OsCLC-1 and OsCLC-2 were single-copy genes on chromosomes 4 and 2, respectively. OsCLC-1 was expressed in most tissues, whereas OsCLC-2 was expressed only in the roots, nodes, internodes and leaf sheaths. The level of expression of OsCLC-1, but not of OsCLC-2, was increased by treatment with NaCl. Both genes could partly substitute for GEF1, which encodes the sole chloride channel in yeast, by restoring growth under ionic stress. These results indicate that both genes are chloride channel genes. The proteins from both genes were immunochemically detected in the tonoplast fraction. Tagged synthetic green fluorescent protein which was fused to OsCLC-1 or OsCLC-2 localized in the vacuolar membranes. These results indicate that the proteins may play a role in the transport of chloride ions across the vacuolar membrane. We isolated loss-of-function mutants of both genes from a panel of rice mutants produced by the insertion of a retrotransposon, Tos17, in the exon region, and found inhibition of growth at all life stages.

  17. Vacuolar zinc transporter Zrc1 is required for detoxification of excess intracellular zinc in the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Cho, Minsu; Hu, Guanggan; Caza, Mélissa; Horianopoulos, Linda C; Kronstad, James W; Jung, Won Hee

    2018-01-01

    Zinc is an important transition metal in all living organisms and is required for numerous biological processes. However, excess zinc can also be toxic to cells and cause cellular stress. In the model fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a vacuolar zinc transporter, Zrc1, plays important roles in the storage and detoxification of excess intracellular zinc to protect the cell. In this study, we identified an ortholog of the S. cerevisiae ZRC1 gene in the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. Zrc1 was localized in the vacuolar membrane in C. neoformans, and a mutant lacking ZRC1 showed significant growth defects under high-zinc conditions. These results suggested a role for Zrc1 in zinc detoxification. However, contrary to our expectation, the expression of Zrc1 was induced in cells grown in zinc-limited conditions and decreased upon the addition of zinc. These expression patterns were similar to those of Zip1, the high-affinity zinc transporter in the plasma membrane of C. neoformans. Furthermore, we used the zrc1 mutant in a murine model of cryptococcosis to examine whether a mammalian host could inhibit the survival of C. neoformans using zinc toxicity. We found that the mutant showed no difference in virulence compared with the wildtype strain. This result suggests that Zrc1-mediated zinc detoxification is not required for the virulence of C. neoformans, and imply that zinc toxicity may not be an important aspect of the host immune response to the fungus.

  18. Investigation of avian influenza virus in poultry and wild birds due to novel avian-origin influenza A(H10N8) in Nanchang City, China.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xiansheng; He, Fenglan; Hu, Maohong; Zhou, Xianfeng; Wang, Bin; Feng, Changhua; Wu, Yumei; Li, Youxing; Tu, Junling; Li, Hui; Liu, Mingbin; Chen, Haiying; Chen, Shengen

    2015-01-01

    Multiple reassortment events within poultry and wild birds had resulted in the establishment of another novel avian influenza A(H10N8) virus, and finally resulted in human death in Nanchang, China. However, there was a paucity of information on the prevalence of avian influenza virus in poultry and wild birds in Nanchang area. We investigated avian influenza virus in poultry and wild birds from live poultry markets, poultry countyards, delivery vehicles, and wild-bird habitats in Nanchang. We analyzed 1036 samples from wild birds and domestic poultry collected from December 2013 to February 2014. Original biological samples were tested for the presence of avian influenza virus using specific primer and probe sets of H5, H7, H9, H10 and N8 subtypes by real-time RT-PCR. In our analysis, the majority (97.98%) of positive samples were from live poultry markets. Among the poultry samples from chickens and ducks, AIV prevalence was 26.05 and 30.81%, respectively. Mixed infection of different HA subtypes was very common. Additionally, H10 subtypes coexistence with N8 was the most prevalent agent during the emergence of H10N8. This event illustrated a long-term surveillance was so helpful for pandemic preparedness and response. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Pathophysiology of avian intestinal ion transport.

    PubMed

    Nighot, Meghali; Nighot, Prashant

    2018-06-01

    The gut has great importance for the commercial success of poultry production. Numerous ion transporters, exchangers, and channels are present on both the apical and the basolateral membrane of intestinal epithelial cells, and their differential expression along the crypt-villus axis within the various intestinal segments ensures efficient intestinal absorption and effective barrier function. Recent studies have shown that intensive production systems, microbial exposure, and nutritional management significantly affect intestinal physiology and intestinal ion transport. Dysregulation of normal intestinal ion transport is manifested as diarrhoea, malabsorption, and intestinal inflammation resulting into poor production efficiency. This review discusses the basic mechanisms involved in avian intestinal ion transport and the impact of development during growth, nutritional and environmental alterations, and intestinal microbial infections on it. The effect of intestinal microbial infections on avian intestinal ion transport depends on factors such as host immunity, pathogen virulence, and the mucosal organisation of the particular intestinal segment.

  20. Personal protective equipment and risk for avian influenza (H7N3).

    PubMed

    Morgan, Oliver; Kuhne, Mirjam; Nair, Pat; Verlander, Neville Q; Preece, Richard; McDougal, Marianne; Zambon, Maria; Reacher, Mark

    2009-01-01

    An outbreak of avian influenza (H7N3) among poultry resulted in laboratory-confirmed disease in 1 of 103 exposed persons. Incomplete use of personal protective equipment (PPE) was associated with conjunctivitis and influenza-like symptoms. Rigorous use of PPE by persons managing avian influenza outbreaks may reduce exposure to potentially hazardous infected poultry materials.

  1. Personal Protective Equipment and Risk for Avian Influenza (H7N3)

    PubMed Central

    Kuhne, Mirjam; Nair, Pat; Verlander, Neville Q.; Preece, Richard; McDougal, Marianne; Zambon, Maria; Reacher, Mark

    2009-01-01

    An outbreak of avian influenza (H7N3) among poultry resulted in laboratory-confirmed disease in 1 of 103 exposed persons. Incomplete use of personal protective equipment (PPE) was associated with conjunctivitis and influenza-like symptoms. Rigorous use of PPE by persons managing avian influenza outbreaks may reduce exposure to potentially hazardous infected poultry materials. PMID:19116052

  2. Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli bind fibronectin and laminin.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Rosa María; Almanza, Yolanda; González, Rafael; García, Santos; Heredia, Norma

    2009-04-01

    Avian colisepticemia frequently occurs after respiratory tract damage, the primary site for infection allows bacteria to encounter an exposed basement membrane, where laminin and fibronectin are important components. We investigated the ability of an isolate of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli to bind fibronectin and laminin. Using Far-western dot blot analysis, we demonstrated the ability of this microorganism to bind basement membrane proteins fibronectin and laminin. Results from an ELISA-based approach indicate that the binding to these membrane proteins was bacterial-dose dependent. Furthermore, two specific E. coli polypeptides, of 32 kDa and 130 kDa, reacted with laminin and fibronectin, respectively. Further evaluation of these potential bacterial adhesins may provide insights into the pathogenesis of colibacillosis.

  3. Culturing of avian embryos for time-lapse imaging.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Paul A; Rongish, Brenda J; Czirok, Andras; Little, Charles D

    2003-02-01

    Monitoring morphogenetic processes, at high resolution over time, has been a long-standing goal of many developmental cell biologists. It is critical to image cells in their natural environment whenever possible; however, imaging many warm-blooded vertebrates, especially mammals, is problematic. At early stages of development, birds are ideal for imaging, since the avian body plan is very similar to that of mammals. We have devised a culturing technique that allows for the acquisition of high-resolution differential interference contrast and epifluorescence images of developing avian embryos in a 4-D (3-D + time) system. The resulting information, from intact embryos, is derived from an area encompassing several millimeters, at micrometer resolution for up to 30 h.

  4. Transmission and immunopathology of the avian influenza virus A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) human isolate in three commonly commercialized avian species.

    PubMed

    Vidaña, B; Dolz, R; Busquets, N; Ramis, A; Sánchez, R; Rivas, R; Valle, R; Cordón, I; Solanes, D; Martínez, J; Majó, N

    2018-05-01

    H7N9 virus infection is a global concern, given that it can cause severe infection and mortality in humans. However, the understanding of H7N9 epidemiology, animal reservoir species and zoonotic risk remains limited. This work evaluates the pathogenicity, transmissibility and local innate immune response of three avian species harbouring different respiratory distribution of α2,6 and α2,3 SA receptors. Muscovy ducks, European quails and SPF chickens were intranasally inoculated with 10 5 embryo infectious dose (EID) 50 of the human H7N9 (A/Anhui/1/2013) influenza isolate. None of the avian species showed clinical signs or macroscopic lesions, and only mild microscopic lesions were observed in the upper respiratory tract of quail and chickens. Quail presented more severe histopathologic lesions and avian influenza virus (AIV) positivity by immunohistochemistry (IHC), which correlated with higher IL-6 responses. In contrast, Muscovy ducks were resistant to disease and presented higher IFNα and TLR7 response. In all species, viral shedding was higher in the respiratory than in the digestive tract. Higher viral shedding was observed in quail, followed by chicken and ducks, which presented similar viral titres. Efficient transmission was observed in all contact quail and half of the Muscovy ducks, while no transmission was observed between chicken. All avian species showed viral shedding in drinking water throughout infection. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Reconsidering the Avian Nature of the Oviraptorosaur Brain (Dinosauria: Theropoda)

    PubMed Central

    Balanoff, Amy M.; Bever, G. S.; Norell, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    The high degree of encephalization characterizing modern birds is the product of a long evolutionary history, our understanding of which is still largely in its infancy. Here we provide a redescription of the endocranial space of the oviraptorosaurian dinosaur Conchoraptor gracilis with the goal of assessing the hypothesis that it shares uniquely derived endocranial characters with crown-group avians. The existence of such features has implications for the transformational history of avian neuroanatomy and suggests that the oviraptorosaur radiation is a product of the immediate stem lineage of birds—after the divergence of Archaeopteryx lithographica. Results derived from an expanded comparative sample indicate that the strong endocranial similarity between Conchoraptor and modern birds largely reflects shared conservation of plesiomorphic features. The few characters that are maintained as being uniquely expressed in these two taxa are more likely products of convergence than homology but still indicate that the oviraptorosaur endocranial cavity has much to teach us about the complex history of avian brain evolution. PMID:25494183

  6. Active Surveillance for Avian Influenza Virus, Egypt, 2010–2012

    PubMed Central

    Kandeil, Ahmed; El-Shesheny, Rabeh; Kayed, Ahmed S.; Gomaa, Mokhtar M.; Maatouq, Asmaa M.; Shehata, Mahmoud M.; Moatasim, Yassmin; Bagato, Ola; Cai, Zhipeng; Rubrum, Adam; Kutkat, Mohamed A.; McKenzie, Pamela P.; Webster, Robert G.; Webby, Richard J.; Ali, Mohamed A.

    2014-01-01

    Continuous circulation of influenza A(H5N1) virus among poultry in Egypt has created an epicenter in which the viruses evolve into newer subclades and continue to cause disease in humans. To detect influenza viruses in Egypt, since 2009 we have actively surveyed various regions and poultry production sectors. From August 2010 through January 2013, >11,000 swab samples were collected; 10% were positive by matrix gene reverse transcription PCR. During this period, subtype H9N2 viruses emerged, cocirculated with subtype H5N1 viruses, and frequently co-infected the same avian host. Genetic and antigenic analyses of viruses revealed that influenza A(H5N1) clade 2.2.1 viruses are dominant and that all subtype H9N2 viruses are G1-like. Cocirculation of different subtypes poses concern for potential reassortment. Avian influenza continues to threaten public and animal health in Egypt, and continuous surveillance for avian influenza virus is needed. PMID:24655395

  7. Emergence of fatal avian influenza in New England harbor seals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anthony, S.J.; St. Leger, J. A.; Pugliares, K.; Ip, Hon S.; Chan, J.M.; Carpenter, Z.W.; Navarrete-Macias, I.; Sanchez-Leon, M.; Saliki, J.T.; Pedersen, J.; Karesh, W.; Daszak, P.; Rabadan, R.; Rowles, T.; Lipkin, W.I.

    2012-01-01

    From September to December 2011, 162 New England harbor seals died in an outbreak of pneumonia. Sequence analysis of postmortem samples revealed the presence of an avian H3N8 influenza A virus, similar to a virus circulating in North American waterfowl since at least 2002 but with mutations that indicate recent adaption to mammalian hosts. These include a D701N mutation in the viral PB2 protein, previously reported in highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses infecting people. Lectin staining and agglutination assays indicated the presence of the avian-preferred SAα-2,3 and mammalian SAα-2,6 receptors in seal respiratory tract, and the ability of the virus to agglutinate erythrocytes bearing either the SAα-2,3 or the SAα-2,6 receptor. The emergence of this A/harbor seal/Massachusetts/1/2011 virus may herald the appearance of an H3N8 influenza clade with potential for persistence and cross-species transmission.

  8. Global Avian Influenza Surveillance in Wild Birds: A Strategy to Capture Viral Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Machalaba, Catherine C.; Elwood, Sarah E.; Forcella, Simona; Smith, Kristine M.; Hamilton, Keith; Jebara, Karim B.; Swayne, David E.; Webby, Richard J.; Mumford, Elizabeth; Mazet, Jonna A.K.; Gaidet, Nicolas; Daszak, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Wild birds play a major role in the evolution, maintenance, and spread of avian influenza viruses. However, surveillance for these viruses in wild birds is sporadic, geographically biased, and often limited to the last outbreak virus. To identify opportunities to optimize wild bird surveillance for understanding viral diversity, we reviewed responses to a World Organisation for Animal Health–administered survey, government reports to this organization, articles on Web of Knowledge, and the Influenza Research Database. At least 119 countries conducted avian influenza virus surveillance in wild birds during 2008–2013, but coordination and standardization was lacking among surveillance efforts, and most focused on limited subsets of influenza viruses. Given high financial and public health burdens of recent avian influenza outbreaks, we call for sustained, cost-effective investments in locations with high avian influenza diversity in wild birds and efforts to promote standardized sampling, testing, and reporting methods, including full-genome sequencing and sharing of isolates with the scientific community. PMID:25811221

  9. Instruction in Avian Medicine: Correlation of Trends in Education and Work Experience with Attitudes of AAAP Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, W. T.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    AAAP's Continuing Education Committee surveyed AAAP members in 1975 to determine the history and quality of their formal instruction in avian medicine, their opinion of the importance of avian medicine in veterinary medical education, and what effective methods could be used to stimulate interest in avian medicine. Results are reviewed. (LBH)

  10. A pelagic outbreak of avian cholera in North American gulls: Scavenging as a primary mechanism for transmission?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wille, Michelle; McBurney, Scott; Robertson, Gregory J.; Wilhelm, Sabine; Blehert, David; Soos, Catherine; Dunphy, Ron; Whitney, Hugh

    2016-01-01

    Avian cholera, caused by the bacterium Pasteurella multocida, is an endemic disease globally, often causing annual epizootics in North American wild bird populations with thousands of mortalities. From December 2006 to March 2007, an avian cholera outbreak caused mortality in marine birds off the coast of Atlantic Canada, largely centered 300–400 km off the coast of the island of Newfoundland. Scavenging gulls (Larus spp.) were the primary species detected; however, mortality was also identified in Black-legged Kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) and one Common Raven (Corvus corax), a nonmarine species. The most common gross necropsy findings in the birds with confirmed avian cholera were acute fibrinous and necrotizing lesions affecting the spleen, air sacs, and pericardium, and nonspecific hepatomegaly and splenomegaly. The etiologic agent, P. multocida serotype 1, was recovered from 77 of 136 carcasses examined, and confirmed or probable avian cholera was diagnosed in 85 cases. Mortality observed in scavenging gull species was disproportionately high relative to their abundance, particularly when compared to nonscavenging species. The presence of feather shafts in the ventricular lumen of the majority of larid carcasses diagnosed with avian cholera suggests scavenging of birds that died from avian cholera as a major mode of transmission. This documentation of an outbreak of avian cholera in a North American pelagic environment affecting primarily scavenging gulls indicates that offshore marine environments may be a component of avian cholera dynamics.

  11. Enhanced salt stress tolerance of rice plants expressing a vacuolar H+-ATPase subunit c1 (SaVHAc1) gene from the halophyte grass Spartina alterniflora Löisel

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The physiological role of a vacuolar ATPase subunit c1 (SaVHAc1) from a halophyte grass Spartina alterniflora was studied through its expression in rice. The SaVHAc1– expressing plants showed enhanced tolerance to salt stress than the wild-type plants, mainly through adjustments in early stage and p...

  12. Avian flu school: a training approach to prepare for H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza.

    PubMed

    Beltran-Alcrudo, Daniel; Bunn, David A; Sandrock, Christian E; Cardona, Carol J

    2008-01-01

    Since the reemergence of highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1 HPAI) in 2003, a panzootic that is historically unprecedented in the number of infected flocks, geographic spread, and economic consequences for agriculture has developed. The epidemic has affected a wide range of birds and mammals, including humans. The ineffective management of outbreaks, mainly due to a lack of knowledge among those involved in detection, prevention, and response, points to the need for training on H5N1 HPAI. The main challenges are the multidisciplinary approach required, the lack of experts, the need to train at all levels, and the diversity of outbreak scenarios. Avian Flu School addresses these challenges through a three-level train-the-trainer program intended to minimize the health and economic impacts of H5N1 HPAI by improving a community's ability to prevent and respond, while protecting themselves and others. The course teaches need-to-know facts using highly flexible, interactive, and relevant materials.

  13. Avian cholera in Southern Great Petrel (Macronectes giganteus) from Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leotta, G.A.; Rivas, M.; Chinen, I.; Vigo, G.B.; Moredo, F.A.; Coria, N.; Wolcott, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    A southern giant petrel (Macronectes giganteus) was found dead at Potter Peninsula, King George Island, South Shetland, Antarctica. The adult male was discovered approximately 48 hr after death. Macroscopic and microscopic lesions were compatible with avian cholera and the bacterium Pasteurella multocida subsp. gallicida, serotype A1 was isolated from lung, heart, liver, pericardial sac, and air sacs. In addition, Escherichia coli was isolated from pericardial sac and air sacs. This is the first known report of avian cholera in a southern giant petrel in Antarctica.

  14. Surveillance of avian influenza virus type A in semi-scavenging ducks in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ducks are the natural reservoir of influenza A virus and the central host for highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1), while domestic ducks rearing in semi-scavenging system could serve as re-assortment vessels for re-emerging new subtypes of influenza viruses between birds to human. Avian influenza virus (AIV) surveillance in Bangladesh has been passive, relying on poultry farmers to report suspected outbreaks of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza. Here, the results of an active surveillance effort focusing on the semi-scavenging ducks are presented. Result A total of 2100 cloacal swabs and 2100 sera were collected from semi-scavenging ducks from three wintering-sites of Bangladesh during three successive winter seasons, December through February in the years between 2009 and 2012. Virus isolation and identification were carried out from the cloacal swabs by virus propagation in embryonated hen eggs followed by amplification of viral RNA using Avian influenza virus (AIV) specific RT-PCR. The overall prevalence of avian influenza type A was 22.05% for swab samples and 39.76% ducks were sero-positive for avian influenza type A antibody. Extremely low sero-prevalence (0.09%) of AIV H5N1 was detected. Conclusions Based on our surveillance results, we conclude that semi-scavenging ducks in Bangladesh might play important role in transmitting Avian Influenza virus (AIV) type A. However, the current risk of infection for humans from domestic ducks in Bangladesh is negligible. We believe that this relatively large dataset over three winters in Bangladesh might create a strong foundation for future studies of AIV prevalence, evolution, and ecology in wintering sites around the globe. PMID:24099526

  15. Fossil evidence of avian crops from the Early Cretaceous of China

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaoting; Martin, Larry D.; Zhou, Zhonghe; Burnham, David A.; Zhang, Fucheng; Miao, Desui

    2011-01-01

    The crop is characteristic of seed-eating birds today, yet little is known about its early history despite remarkable discoveries of many Mesozoic seed-eating birds in the past decade. Here we report the discovery of some early fossil evidence for the presence of a crop in birds. Two Early Cretaceous birds, the basal ornithurine Hongshanornis and a basal avian Sapeornis, demonstrate that an essentially modern avian digestive system formed early in avian evolution. The discovery of a crop in two phylogenetically remote lineages of Early Cretaceous birds and its absence in most intervening forms indicates that it was independently acquired as a specialized seed-eating adaptation. Finally, the reduction or loss of teeth in the forms showing seed-filled crops suggests that granivory was possibly one of the factors that resulted in the reduction of teeth in early birds. PMID:21896733

  16. Reconciling the Structural Attributes of Avian Antibodies*

    PubMed Central

    Conroy, Paul J.; Law, Ruby H. P.; Gilgunn, Sarah; Hearty, Stephen; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; Lloyd, Gordon; O'Kennedy, Richard J.; Whisstock, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are high value therapeutic, diagnostic, biotechnological, and research tools. Combinatorial approaches to antibody discovery have facilitated access to unique antibodies by surpassing the diversity limitations of the natural repertoire, exploitation of immune repertoires from multiple species, and tailoring selections to isolate antibodies with desirable biophysical attributes. The V-gene repertoire of the chicken does not utilize highly diverse sequence and structures, which is in stark contrast to the mechanism employed by humans, mice, and primates. Recent exploitation of the avian immune system has generated high quality, high affinity antibodies to a wide range of antigens for a number of therapeutic, diagnostic and biotechnological applications. Furthermore, extensive examination of the amino acid characteristics of the chicken repertoire has provided significant insight into mechanisms employed by the avian immune system. A paucity of avian antibody crystal structures has limited our understanding of the structural consequences of these uniquely chicken features. This paper presents the crystal structure of two chicken single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies generated from large libraries by phage display against important human antigen targets, which capture two unique CDRL1 canonical classes in the presence and absence of a non-canonical disulfide constrained CDRH3. These structures cast light on the unique structural features of chicken antibodies and contribute further to our collective understanding of the unique mechanisms of diversity and biochemical attributes that render the chicken repertoire of particular value for antibody generation. PMID:24737329

  17. Avian Influenza Pandemic May Expand the Military Role in Disaster Relief

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-15

    USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT AVIAN INFLUENZA PANDEMIC MAY EXPAND THE MILITARY ROLE IN DISASTER RELIEF by Colonel Frank William Sherod II United... Influenza Pandemic May Expand the Military Role in Disaster Relief 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 ABSTRACT AUTHOR: Colonel Frank William Sherod II TITLE: Avian Influenza Pandemic May Expand The Military Role

  18. Glycan-functionalized graphene-FETs toward selective detection of human-infectious avian influenza virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Takao; Oe, Takeshi; Kanai, Yasushi; Ikuta, Takashi; Ohno, Yasuhide; Maehashi, Kenzo; Inoue, Koichi; Watanabe, Yohei; Nakakita, Shin-ichi; Suzuki, Yasuo; Kawahara, Toshio; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2017-03-01

    There are global concerns about threat of pandemic caused by the human-infectious avian influenza virus. To prevent the oncoming pandemic, it is crucial to analyze the viral affinity to human-type or avian-type sialoglycans with high sensitivity at high speed. Graphene-FET (G-FET) realizes such high-sensitive electrical detection of the targets, owing to graphene’s high carrier mobility. In the present study, G-FET was functionalized using sialoglycans and employed for the selective detection of lectins from Sambucus sieboldiana and Maackia amurensis as alternatives of the human and avian influenza viruses. Glycan-functionalized G-FET selectively monitored the sialoglycan-specific binding reactions at subnanomolar sensitivity.

  19. ERG2 and ERG24 Are Required for Normal Vacuolar Physiology as Well as Candida albicans Pathogenicity in a Murine Model of Disseminated but Not Vaginal Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Luna-Tapia, Arturo; Peters, Brian M; Eberle, Karen E; Kerns, Morgan E; Foster, Timothy P; Marrero, Luis; Noverr, Mairi C; Fidel, Paul L; Palmer, Glen E

    2015-10-01

    Several important classes of antifungal agents, including the azoles, act by blocking ergosterol biosynthesis. It was recently reported that the azoles cause massive disruption of the fungal vacuole in the prevalent human pathogen Candida albicans. This is significant because normal vacuolar function is required to support C. albicans pathogenicity. This study examined the impact of the morpholine antifungals, which inhibit later steps of ergosterol biosynthesis, on C. albicans vacuolar integrity. It was found that overexpression of either the ERG2 or ERG24 gene, encoding C-8 sterol isomerase or C-14 sterol reductase, respectively, suppressed C. albicans sensitivity to the morpholines. In addition, both erg2Δ/Δ and erg24Δ/Δ mutants were hypersensitive to the morpholines. These data are consistent with the antifungal activity of the morpholines depending upon the simultaneous inhibition of both Erg2p and Erg24p. The vacuoles within both erg2Δ/Δ and erg24Δ/Δ C. albicans strains exhibited an aberrant morphology and accumulated large quantities of the weak base quinacrine, indicating enhanced vacuolar acidification compared with that of control strains. Both erg mutants exhibited significant defects in polarized hyphal growth and were avirulent in a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis. Surprisingly, in a mouse model of vaginal candidiasis, both mutants colonized mice at high levels and induced a pathogenic response similar to that with the controls. Thus, while targeting Erg2p or Erg24p alone could provide a potentially efficacious therapy for disseminated candidiasis, it may not be an effective strategy to treat vaginal infections. The potential value of drugs targeting these enzymes as adjunctive therapies is discussed. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Avian influenza: the political economy of disease control in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Ear, Sophal

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In the wake of avian flu outbreaks in 2004, Cambodia received $45 million in commitments from international donors to help combat the spread of animal and human influenza, particularly avian influenza (H5N1). How countries leverage foreign aid to address the specific needs of donors and the endemic needs of the nation is a complex and nuanced issue throughout the developing world. Cambodia is a particularly compelling study in pandemic preparedness and the management of avian influenza because of its multilayered network of competing local, national, and global needs, and because the level of aid in Cambodia represents approximately $2.65 million per human case-a disproportionately high number when compared with neighbors Vietnam and Indonesia. This paper examines how the Cambodian government has made use of animal and human influenza funds to protect (or fail to protect) its citizens and the global community. It asks how effective donor and government responses were to combating avian influenza in Cambodia, and what improvements could be made at the local and international level to help prepare for and respond to future outbreaks. Based on original interviews, a field survey of policy stakeholders, and detailed examination of Cambodia's health infrastructure and policies, the findings illustrate that while pandemic preparedness has shown improvements since 2004, new outbreaks and human fatalities accelerated in 2011, and more work needs to be done to align the specific goals of funders with the endemic needs of developing nations.

  1. Relationships between avian richness and landscape structure at multiple scales using multiple landscapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, M.S.; Rutzmoser, S.H.; Wigley, T.B.; Loehle, C.; Gerwin, J.A.; Keyser, P.D.; Lancia, R.A.; Perry, R.W.; Reynolds, C.J.; Thill, R.E.; Weih, R.; White, D.; Wood, P.B.

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about factors that structure biodiversity on landscape scales, yet current land management protocols, such as forest certification programs, place an increasing emphasis on managing for sustainable biodiversity at landscape scales. We used a replicated landscape study to evaluate relationships between forest structure and avian diversity at both stand and landscape-levels. We used data on bird communities collected under comparable sampling protocols on four managed forests located across the Southeastern US to develop logistic regression models describing relationships between habitat factors and the distribution of overall richness and richness of selected guilds. Landscape models generated for eight of nine guilds showed a strong relationship between richness and both availability and configuration of landscape features. Diversity of topographic features and heterogeneity of forest structure were primary determinants of avian species richness. Forest heterogeneity, in both age and forest type, were strongly and positively associated with overall avian richness and richness for most guilds. Road density was associated positively but weakly with avian richness. Landscape variables dominated all models generated, but no consistent patterns in metrics or scale were evident. Model fit was strong for neotropical migrants and relatively weak for short-distance migrants and resident species. Our models provide a tool that will allow managers to evaluate and demonstrate quantitatively how management practices affect avian diversity on landscapes.

  2. Occurrence of avian Plasmodium and West Nile virus in culex species in Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, T.; Irwin, P.; Hofmeister, E.; Paskewitz, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of multiple pathogens in mosquitoes and birds could affect the dynamics of disease transmission. We collected adult Culex pipiens and Cx. restuans (Cx. pipiens/restuans hereafter) from sites in Wisconsin and tested them for West Nile virus (WNV) and for avian malaria (Plasmodium). Gravid Cx. pipiens/restuans were tested for WNV using a commercial immunoassay, the RAMP?? WNV test, and positive results were verified by reverse transcriptasepolymerase chain reaction. There were 2 WNV-positive pools of Cx. pipiens/restuans in 2006 and 1 in 2007. Using a bias-corrected maximum likelihood estimation, the WNV infection rate for Cx. pipiens/restuans was 5.48/1,000 mosquitoes in 2006 and 1.08/1,000 mosquitoes in 2007. Gravid Cx. pipiens or Cx. restuans were tested individually for avian Plasmodium by a restriction enzymebased assay. Twelve mosquitoes were positive for avian Plasmodium (10.0), 2 were positive for Haemoproteus, and 3 were positive for Leucocytozoon. There were 4 mixed infections, with mosquitoes positive for >1 of the hemosporidian parasites. This work documents a high rate of hemosporidian infection in Culex spp. and illustrates the potential for co-infections with other arboviruses in bird-feeding mosquitoes and their avian hosts. In addition, hemosporidian infection rates may be a useful tool for investigating the ecological dynamics of Culex/avian interactions. ?? 2010 by The American Mosquito Control Association, Inc.

  3. Avian and human influenza A virus receptors in trachea and lung of animals.

    PubMed

    Thongratsakul, Sukanya; Suzuki, Yasuo; Hiramatsu, Hiroaki; Sakpuaram, Thavajchai; Sirinarumitr, Theerapol; Poolkhet, Chaithep; Moonjit, Pattra; Yodsheewan, Rungrueang; Songserm, Thaweesak

    2010-12-01

    Influenza A viruses are capable of crossing the specific barrier between human beings and animals resulting in interspecies transmission. The important factor of potential infectivity of influenza A viruses is the suitability of the receptor binding site of the host and viruses. The affinities of avian and human influenza virus to bind with the receptors and the distributions of receptors in animals are different. This study aims to investigate the anatomical distribution of avian and human influenza virus receptors using the double staining lectin histochemistry method. Double staining of lectin histochemistry was performed to identify both SA alpha2,3 Gal and SA alpha2,6 Gal receptors in trachea and lung tissue of dogs, cats, tigers, ferret, pigs, ducks and chickens. We have demonstrated that avian and human influenza virus receptors were abundantly present in trachea, bronchus and bronchiole, but in alveoli of dogs, cats and tigers showed SA alpha2,6 Gal only. Furthermore, endothelial cells in lung tissues showed presence of SA alpha2,3 Gal. The positive sites of both receptors in respiratory tract, especially in the trachea, suggest that all mammalian species studied can be infected with avian influenza virus. These findings suggested that dogs and cats in close contact with humans should be of greater concern as an intermediate host for avian influenza A in which there is the potential for viral adaptation and reassortment.

  4. Vacuolar transport of the glutathione conjugate of trans-cinnamic acid.

    PubMed

    Walczak, H A; Dean, J V

    2000-02-01

    Red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) tonoplast membrane vesicles and [14C]trans-cinnamic acid-glutatione were used to study the vacuolar transport of phynylpropanoid-glutathione conjugates which are formed in peroxidase-mediated reactions. It was determined that the uptake of [14C]trans-cinnamic acid-glutathione into the tonoplast membrane vesicles was MgATP dependent and was 10-fold faster than the uptake of non-conjugated [14C]trans-cinnamic acid. Uptake of the conjugate in the presence of MgATP was not dependent on a trans-tonoblast H+-electrochemical gradient, because uptake was not affected by the addition of NH4Cl (1 mM; 0% inhibition) and was only slightly affected by gramicidin-D (5 microM; 14% inhibition). Uptake of the conjugate was inhibited 92% by the addition of vanadate (1 mM) and 71% by the addition of the model substrate S-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) glutathione (500 microM). Uptake did not occur when a nonhydrolyzable analog of ATP was used in place of MgATP. The calculated Km and Vmax values for uptake were 142 microM amd 5.95 nmol mg(-1) min(-1), respectively. Based on these results, phenylpropanoid-glutation conjugates formed in peroxidase-mediated reactions appear to be transported into the vacuole by the glutathione S-conjugate pump(s) located in the tonoplast membrane.

  5. Structures of Trypanosome Vacuolar Soluble Pyrophosphatases: Anti-Parasitic Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunyun; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Chen, Chun-Chi; Huang, Guozhong; Zheng, Yingying; Liu, Weidong; Wang, Iren; Ho, Meng-Ru; Danny Hsu, Shang-Te; O’Dowd, Bing; Huff, Hannah C.; Huang, Chun-Hsiang; Docampo, Roberto; Oldfield, Eric; Guo, Rey-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomatid parasites are the causative agents of many neglected tropical diseases including the leishmaniases, Chagas disease, and human African trypanosomiasis. They exploit unusual vacuolar soluble pyrophosphatases (VSPs), absent in humans, for cell growth and virulence and as such, are drug targets. Here, we report the crystal structures of VSP1s from Trypanosoma cruzi and T. brucei, together with that of the T. cruzi protein bound to a bisphosphonate inhibitor. Both VSP1s form a hybrid structure containing an (N-terminal) EF-hand domain fused to a (C-terminal) pyrophosphatase domain. The two domains are connected via an extended loop of about 17 residues. Crystallographic analysis and size exclusion chromatography indicate that the VSP1s form tetramers containing head-to-tail dimers. Phosphate and diphosphate ligands bind in the PPase substrate-binding pocket and interact with several conserved residues, and a bisphosphonate inhibitor (BPH-1260) binds to the same site. Based on Cytoscape and other bioinformatics analyses it is apparent that similar folds will be found in most if not all trypanosomatid VSP1s, including those found in insects (Angomonas deanei, Strigomonas culicis), plant pathogens (Phytomonas spp.) and Leishmania spp. Overall, the results are of general interest since they open the way to structure-based drug design for many of the neglected tropical diseases. PMID:26907161

  6. Regulation of vacuolar H{sup +}-ATPase in microglia by RANKL

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Serrano, Eric M.; Ricofort, Ryan D.; Zuo, Jian

    2009-11-06

    Vacuolar H{sup +}-ATPases (V-ATPases) are large electrogenic proton pumps composed of numerous subunits that play vital housekeeping roles in the acidification of compartments of the endocytic pathway. Additionally, V-ATPases play specialized roles in certain cell types, a capacity that is linked to cell type selective expression of isoforms of some of the subunits. We detected low levels of the a3 isoform of the a-subunit in mouse brain extracts. Examination of various brain-derived cell types by immunoblotting showed a3 was expressed in the N9 microglia cell line and in primary microglia, but not in other cell types. The expression of a3more » in osteoclasts requires stimulation by Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor {kappa}B-ligand (RANKL). We found that Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor {kappa}B (RANK) was expressed by microglia. Stimulation of microglia with RANKL triggered increased expression of a3. V-ATPases in microglia were shown to bind microfilaments, and stimulation with RANKL increased the proportion of V-ATPase associated with the detergent-insoluble cytoskeletal fraction and with actin. In summary, microglia express the a3-subunit of V-ATPase. The expression of a3 and the interaction between V-ATPases and microfilaments was modulated by RANKL. These data suggest a novel molecular pathway for regulating microglia.« less

  7. [Human and avian influenza due to the H5N1 virus].

    PubMed

    Durand, Maurice-Paul

    2007-01-01

    Recent alerts about "avian influenza", more often referred to by veterinarians as "fowl plague" and by the public as "bird flu", and about its transmission to humans, have received extensive media coverage. Physicians need further information about this development. We begin by looking at several fundamental aspects of influenza virus structure and its various types and subtypes and then review the various avian and human influenza epidemics throughout history. A description follows of the current avian influenza, its history, its presence in migratory and domestic birds, and its clinical aspects. Transmission to humans is covered next: the facts, conditions, human cases, and consumption of poultry meat. Then we consider treatment: none in animal diseases, and very limited for human disease. Vaccination has previously been dealt with and will be barely touched upon here. Finally we will present the guidelines and measures taken both nationally and internationally. Our conclusion is intended to be relatively optimistic, stressing the species barrier and the multiplicity of pathogenic avian viruses recently encountered in humans. We insist on the need to contain the epizootic, if necessary by animal vaccination, to diminish the likelihood of human contamination.

  8. Can avian reproductive outcomes estimated with MCnest be made more robust using stochastic parameterizations?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Markov chain nest productivity model, or MCnest, is a set of algorithms for integrating the results of avian toxicity tests with reproductive life-history data to project the relative magnitude of chemical effects on avian reproduction. The mathematical foundation of MCnest i...

  9. A simplified method for extracting androgens from avian egg yolks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kozlowski, C.P.; Bauman, J.E.; Hahn, D.C.

    2009-01-01

    Female birds deposit significant amounts of steroid hormones into the yolks of their eggs. Studies have demonstrated that these hormones, particularly androgens, affect nestling growth and development. In order to measure androgen concentrations in avian egg yolks, most authors follow the extraction methods outlined by Schwabl (1993. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 90:11446-11450). We describe a simplified method for extracting androgens from avian egg yolks. Our method, which has been validated through recovery and linearity experiments, consists of a single ethanol precipitation that produces substantially higher recoveries than those reported by Schwabl.

  10. A new real-time PCR protocol for detection of avian haemosporidians.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jeffrey A; Weckstein, Jason D; Fecchio, Alan; Tkach, Vasyl V

    2015-07-19

    Birds possess the most diverse assemblage of haemosporidian parasites; including three genera, Plasmodium, Haemoproteus, and Leucocytozoon. Currently there are over 200 morphologically identified avian haemosporidian species, although true species richness is unknown due to great genetic diversity and insufficient sampling in highly diverse regions. Studies aimed at surveying haemosporidian diversity involve collecting and screening samples from hundreds to thousands of individuals. Currently, screening relies on microscopy and/or single or nested standard PCR. Although effective, these methods are time and resource consuming, and in the case of microscopy require substantial expertise. Here we report a newly developed real-time PCR protocol designed to quickly and reliably detect all three genera of avian haemosporidians in a single biochemical reaction. Using available DNA sequences from avian haemosporidians we designed primers R330F and R480RL, which flank a 182 base pair fragment of mitochondrial conserved rDNA. These primers were initially tested using real-time PCR on samples from Malawi, Africa, previously screened for avian haemosporidians using traditional nested PCR. Our real time protocol was further tested on 94 samples from the Cerrado biome of Brazil, previously screened using a single PCR assay for haemosporidian parasites. These samples were also amplified using modified nested PCR protocols, allowing for comparisons between the three different screening methods (single PCR, nested PCR, real-time PCR). The real-time PCR protocol successfully identified all three genera of avian haemosporidians from both single and mixed infections previously detected from Malawi. There was no significant difference between the three different screening protocols used for the 94 samples from the Brazilian Cerrado (χ(2) = 0.3429, df = 2, P = 0.842). After proving effective, the real-time protocol was used to screen 2113 Brazilian samples, identifying 693

  11. A glossary for avian conservation biology

    Treesearch

    Rolf R. Koford; John B. Dunning; Christine A. Ribic; Deborah M. Finch

    1994-01-01

    This glossary provides standard definitions for many of the terms used in avian conservation biology. We compiled these definitions to assist communication among researchers, managers, and others involved in the Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Program, also known as Partners in Flight. We used existing glossaries and recent literature to prepare this glossary....

  12. Avian cholera causes marine bird mortality in the Bering Sea of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodenstein, Barbara L.; Kimberlee Beckmen,; Gay Sheffield,; Kathy Kuletz,; Van Hemert, Caroline R.; Berlowski-Zier, Brenda M.; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie I.

    2015-01-01

    The first known avian cholera outbreak among wild birds in Alaska occurred during November 2013. Liver, intestinal, and splenic necrosis consistent with avian cholera was noted, and Pasteurella multocida serotype 1 was isolated from liver and lung or spleen in Crested Auklets (Aethia cristatella), Thick-billed Murres (Uria lomvia), Common Eider (Somateria mollissima), Northern Fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis), and Glaucous-winged Gulls (Larus glaucescens).

  13. Central and South West Corporation`s avian activity study - preconstruction phase

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Hamilton, J.; Randell, S.; Bouchard, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    A pre-construction avian activity study at the CSW wind farm site is underway. Resident and migratory avian species are being monitored with special emphasis on the incidence of birds passing over or through the wind turbine line and within the circumference of the turbine blades. Diurnal activity is monitored by unaided visual and field glass observation, while nocturnal activity is monitored with marine radar and image intensifying optics. This report reviews the study`s design, methodology, and preliminary data. A total of 872 birds were seen in 194 hours from December 1993 to November 1994. The turkey vulture, vesper sparrow, Americanmore » kestrel, golden eagle, and white-throated swift were the species most frequently observed flying through wind turbine blade space. Monitoring will continue after construction. This is one of few studies we know of that looks at pre- and post-construction avian activity.« less

  14. Selecting surrogate endpoints for estimating pesticide effects on avian reproductive success.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Richard S; Etterson, Matthew A

    2013-10-01

    A Markov chain nest productivity model (MCnest) has been developed for projecting the effects of a specific pesticide-use scenario on the annual reproductive success of avian species of concern. A critical element in MCnest is the use of surrogate endpoints, defined as measured endpoints from avian toxicity tests that represent specific types of effects possible in field populations at specific phases of a nesting attempt. In this article, we discuss the attributes of surrogate endpoints and provide guidance for selecting surrogates from existing avian laboratory tests as well as other possible sources. We also discuss some of the assumptions and uncertainties related to using surrogate endpoints to represent field effects. The process of explicitly considering how toxicity test results can be used to assess effects in the field helps identify uncertainties and data gaps that could be targeted in higher-tier risk assessments. © 2013 SETAC.

  15. Gain-of-function mutations identify amino acids within transmembrane domains of the yeast vacuolar transporter Zrc1 that determine metal specificity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huilan; Burton, Damali; Li, Liangtao; Warner, David E.; Phillips, John D.; Ward, Diane McVEY; Kaplan, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Cation diffusion facilitator transporters are found in all three Kingdoms of life and are involved in transporting transition metals out of the cytosol. The metals they transport include Zn2+, Co2+, Fe2+, Cd2+, Ni2+ and Mn2+; however, no single transporter transports all metals. Previously we showed that a single amino acid mutation in the yeast vacuolar zinc transporter Zrc1 changed its substrate specificity from Zn2+ to Fe2+ and Mn2+ [Lin, Kumanovics, Nelson, Warner, Ward and Kaplan (2008) J. Biol. Chem. 283, 33865–33873]. Mutant Zrc1 that gained iron transport activity could protect cells with a deletion in the vacuolar iron transporter (CCC1) from high iron toxicity. Utilizing suppression of high iron toxicity and PCR mutagenesis of ZRC1, we identified other amino acid substitutions within ZRC1 that changed its metal specificity. All Zrc1 mutants that transported Fe2+ could also transport Mn2+. Some Zrc1 mutants lost the ability to transport Zn2+, but others retained the ability to transport Zn2+. All of the amino acid substitutions that resulted in a gain in Fe2+ transport activity were found in transmembrane domains. In addition to alteration of residues adjacent to the putative metal-binding site in two transmembrane domains, alteration of residues distant from the binding site affected substrate specificity. These results suggest that substrate selection involves co-operativity between transmembrane domains. PMID:19538181

  16. Highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H7N9) virus, Tennessee, USA, March 2017

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In March 2017, highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H7N9) was detected at 2 poultry farms in Tennessee, USA. Surveillance data and genetic analyses indicated multiple introductions of low pathogenicity avian influenza virus before mutation to high pathogenicity and interfarm transmission. Poultry sur...

  17. The hemagglutinin structure of an avian H1N1 influenza A virus

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Lin, Tianwei; Wang, Gengyan; Li, Anzhang

    2009-09-15

    The interaction between hemagglutinin (HA) and receptors is a kernel in the study of evolution and host adaptation of H1N1 influenza A viruses. The notion that the avian HA is associated with preferential specificity for receptors with Sia{alpha}2,3Gal glycosidic linkage over those with Sia{alpha}2,6Gal linkage is not all consistent with the available data on H1N1 viruses. By x-ray crystallography, the HA structure of an avian H1N1 influenza A virus, as well as its complexes with the receptor analogs, was determined. The structures revealed no preferential binding of avian receptor analogs over that of the human analog, suggesting that the HA/receptormore » binding might not be as stringent as is commonly believed in determining the host receptor preference for some subtypes of influenza viruses, such as the H1N1 viruses. The structure also showed difference in glycosylation despite the preservation of related sequences, which may partly contribute to the difference between structures of human and avian origin.« less

  18. Avian Disease & Oncology Lab (ADOL) Research Update

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Employing Genomics, Epigenetics, and Immunogenetics to Control Diseases Induced by Avian Tumor Viruses - Gene expression is a major factor accounting for phenotypic variation. Taking advantage of allele-specific expression (ASE) screens, we found the use of genetic markers was superior to traditiona...

  19. Expression, crystallization and phasing of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase subunit C (Vma5p) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Drory, Omri; Mor, Adi; Frolow, Felix; Nelson, Nathan

    2004-10-01

    The expression, crystallization and phasing of subunit C (Vma5p) of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) vacuolar proton-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase) is described. The expressed protein consists of 412 residues: 392 from the reading frame of Vma5p and 20 N-terminal residues originating from the plasmid. Diffraction-quality crystals were obtained using the hanging-drop and sitting-drop vapour-diffusion methods assisted by streak-seeding, with PEG 3350 as precipitant. The crystals formed in hanging drops diffracted to 1.80 A and belong to space group P4(3)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 62.54, c = 327.37 A, alpha = beta = gamma = 90 degrees. The structure was solved using SIRAS with a Lu(O2C2H3)2 heavy-atom derivative.

  20. A method to assess flux hazards at CSP plants to reduce avian mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Clifford K.; Wendelin, Timothy; Horstman, Luke; Yellowhair, Julius

    2017-06-01

    A method to evaluate avian flux hazards at concentrating solar power plants (CSP) has been developed. A heat-transfer model has been coupled to simulations of the irradiance in the airspace above a CSP plant to determine the feather temperature along prescribed bird flight paths. Probabilistic modeling results show that the irradiance and assumed feather properties (thickness, absorptance, heat capacity) have the most significant impact on the simulated feather temperature, which can increase rapidly (hundreds of degrees Celsius in seconds) depending on the parameter values. The avian flux hazard model is being combined with a plant performance model to identify alternative heliostat standby aiming strategies that minimize both avian flux hazards and negative impacts on plant performance.

  1. A bibliography of references to avian botulism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Jack E.; Wilson, Sonoma S.

    1977-01-01

    This bibliography, first compiled in 1970 in response to many requests for information on avian botulism, has been updated to include the literature published through 1975.In general, only articles dealing primarily with the avian disease are included, as opposed to those concerned with various aspects of the biology of Clostridium botulinum, either type C or type E. A few exceptions, such as Bengton’s report of the first isolation and description of the type C organism, are included for their historical interest. Progress reports and other administrative documents not available for distribution or request are excluded, as are textbook accounts, which are generally summaries of work published elsewhere.Although Mr. Allen and Mrs. Wilson have attempted to list every important reference, they make no claim to complete coverage of the published literature. The authors will be grateful to users of the bibliography who call attention to errors or omissions.

  2. Modelling low pathogenic avian influenza introduction into the commercial poultry industry.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Belinda; Glass, Kathryn

    2018-06-01

    Outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in commercial poultry flocks are rare but highly disruptive to the industry. There is evidence that low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) can transfer from wild birds to domestic flocks, where it may mutate to HPAI, and the industry is concerned that an increasing demand for free-range produce may affect the risk of LPAI and HPAI outbreaks. In this paper we focus on LPAI introduction and establishment, and formulate a branching process model to compare risk between sectors and their contribution to overall industry-level risk. Our aim is to determine how heterogeneity in avian influenza viruses and the distinct population structures of each sector - caged, barn and free-range, meat and layer - interact with a continuous risk of virus introduction to affect outbreak probabilities. We show that free-range access is the most influential driver of LPAI outbreaks, with production cycle length having relatively little effect. We demonstrate that variation in virus transmission rates is particularly important when modelling avian influenza introduction to domestic poultry. Virus-free status is of interest for biosecurity and we distinguish how it differs from the usual probability of extinction, and discuss how production cycle length affects this difference. We also use the nonlinear relationship between shed size and risk to identify conditions for which shed size is most influential. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Thermal inactivation of avian viral and bacterial pathogens in an effluent treatment system within a biosafety level 2 and 3 enhanced facility

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza (AI) virus, avian paramyxovirus Type 1 (APMV-1 or Newcastle disease virus [NDV]), reovirus, rotavirus, turkey astrovirus (TAstV), avian metapneumovirus (aMPV), Marek’s disease virus (MDV-1), avian parvovirus (ChPV) and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis are significant biosafety...

  4. Susceptibility of swine to H5 and H7 low pathogenic avian influenza viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ability of pigs to become infected with low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses from an avian reservoir, and then generate mammalian adaptable influenza A viruses (IAVs) is difficult to determine. Yet, it is an important link to understanding any relationship between LPAI virus ecology and...

  5. Avian influenza virus transmission to mammals.

    PubMed

    Herfst, S; Imai, M; Kawaoka, Y; Fouchier, R A M

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause yearly epidemics and occasional pandemics. In addition, zoonotic influenza A viruses sporadically infect humans and may cause severe respiratory disease and fatalities. Fortunately, most of these viruses do not have the ability to be efficiently spread among humans via aerosols or respiratory droplets (airborne transmission) and to subsequently cause a pandemic. However, adaptation of these zoonotic viruses to humans by mutation or reassortment with human influenza A viruses may result in airborne transmissible viruses with pandemic potential. Although our knowledge of factors that affect mammalian adaptation and transmissibility of influenza viruses is still limited, we are beginning to understand some of the biological traits that drive airborne transmission of influenza viruses among mammals. Increased understanding of the determinants and mechanisms of airborne transmission may aid in assessing the risks posed by avian influenza viruses to human health, and preparedness for such risks. This chapter summarizes recent discoveries on the genetic and phenotypic traits required for avian influenza viruses to become airborne transmissible between mammals.

  6. A vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase differential activation and energy coupling integrate the responses of weeds and crops to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Venancio, Josimara Barcelos; Catunda, Michelle Guedes; Ogliari, Juarez; Rima, Janaína Aparecida Hottz; Okorokova-Facanha, Anna Lvovna; Okorokov, Lev Alexandrovitich; Facanha, Arnoldo Rocha

    2014-06-01

    Cyperus rotundus L. is a C4 weed of large vegetative and reproductive vigor endowed with competitive advantages over most crop species mainly under adverse environmental conditions. Vacuole functions are critical for the mechanisms of drought resistance, and here the modulation of the primary system of vacuolar ion transport is investigated during a transient water stress imposed to this weed and to C4 crop species (Zea mays L.). The vacuolar H(+) pumps, the H(+)-ATPase and H(+)-PPiase, expression, activities and the energy coupling were spectrophotometrically investigated as key elements in the differential drought-resistance mechanisms developed by weeds and crops. In C. rotundus tonoplasts, ATP hydrolysis was more sensitive to drought than its coupled H(+) transport, which was in turn at least 3-folds faster than that mediated by the H(+)-PPiase. Its PPi hydrolysis was only slightly affected by severe water deficit, contrasting with the disruption induced in the PPi-dependent H(+)-gradient. This effect was antagonized by plant rehydration as the H(+)-PPiase activity was highly stimulated, reassuming a coupled PPi-driven H(+) pumping. Maize tonoplasts exhibited 2-4 times lower hydrolytic activities than that of C. rotundus, but were able to overactivate specifically PPi-dependent H(+) pumping in response to stress relief, resulting in an enhanced H(+)-pumps coupling efficiency. These results together with immunoanalysis revealed profiles consistent with pre- and post-translational changes occurring on the tonoplast H(+)-pumps, which differ between weeds and crops upon water deficit. The evidences highlight an unusual modulation of the H(+)-PPiase energy coupling as a key biochemical change related to environmental stresses adaptive capacity of plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cross-reactivity of anti-chicken IgY antibody with immunoglobulins of exotic avian species.

    PubMed

    Cray, Carolyn; Villar, David

    2008-09-01

    A major challenge in the serologic diagnosis of infectious diseases in exotic birds is the limited availability of species-specific antibodies. The purpose of the current study was to determine if there is cross reactivity between commercially available anti-chicken IgY antibodies and immunoglobulins of several avian species, with particular emphasis on psittacines. To quantitate the reactivity with anti-chicken IgY, Western blot analysis was performed using plasma samples from many different avian species. Results were compared with gamma globulin fraction quantitation obtained by protein electrophoresis. By Western blot, 2 protein bands corresponding to the heavy and light chains of chicken IgY were identified in species from 21 avian orders using 1 of 2 rabbit anti-chicken IgY antibodies. Densitometric analysis showed that the amount of immunoglobulin estimated from Western blots correlated strongly with data from protein electrophoresis assays. The results demonstrate that some commercially available anti-chicken IgY antibodies exhibit good cross-reactivity with most avian species.

  8. Evidence for avian H9N2 influenza virus infections among rural villagers in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Blair, Patrick J; Putnam, Shannon D; Krueger, Whitney S; Chum, Channimol; Wierzba, Thomas F; Heil, Gary L; Yasuda, Chadwick Y; Williams, Maya; Kasper, Matthew R; Friary, John A; Capuano, Ana W; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Peiris, Malik; Shao, Hongxia; Perez, Daniel R; Gray, Gregory C

    2013-04-01

    Southeast Asia remains a critical region for the emergence of novel and/or zoonotic influenza, underscoring the importance of extensive sampling in rural areas where early transmission is most likely to occur. In 2008, 800 adult participants from eight sites were enrolled in a prospective population-based study of avian influenza (AI) virus transmission where highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus had been reported in humans and poultry from 2006 to 2008. From their enrollment sera and questionnaires, we report risk factor findings for serologic evidence of previous infection with 18 AI virus strains. Serologic assays revealed no evidence of previous infection with 13 different low-pathogenic AI viruses or with HPAI avian-like A/Cambodia/R0404050/2007(H5N1). However, 21 participants had elevated antibodies against avian-like A/Hong Kong/1073/1999(H9N2), validated with a monoclonal antibody blocking ELISA assay specific for avian H9. Although cross-reaction from antibodies against human influenza viruses cannot be completely excluded, the study data suggest that a number of participants were previously infected with the avian-like A/Hong Kong/1073/1999(H9N2) virus, likely due to as yet unidentified environmental exposures. Prospective data from this cohort will help us better understand the serology of zoonotic influenza infection in a rural cohort in SE Asia. Copyright © 2013 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. All rights reserved.

  9. Promoter regions of potato vacuolar invertase gene in response to sugars and hormones.

    PubMed

    Ou, Yongbin; Song, Botao; Liu, Xun; Xie, Conghua; Li, Meng; Lin, Yuan; Zhang, Huiling; Liu, Jun

    2013-08-01

    Potato vacuolar acid invertase (StvacINV1) (β-fructofuranosidase; EC 3.2.1.26) has been confirmed to play an important role in cold-induced sweetening of potato tubers. However, the transcriptional regulation mechanisms of StvacINV1 are largely unknown. In this study, the 5'-flanking sequence of StvacINV1 was cloned and the cis-acting elements were predicted. Histochemical assay showed that the StvacINV1 promoter governed β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression in potato leaves, stems, roots and tubers. Quantitative analysis of GUS expression suggested that the activity of StvacINV1 promoter was suppressed by sucrose, glucose, fructose, and cold, while enhanced by indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and gibberellic acid (GA3). Further deletion analysis clarified that the promoter regions from -118 to -551, -551 to -1021, and -1021 to -1521 were required for responding to sucrose/glucose, GA3, and IAA, respectively. These findings provide essential information regarding transcriptional regulation mechanisms of StvacINV1. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Convergent Evolution of Human-Isolated H7N9 Avian Influenza A Viruses.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Dan; Shen, Xuejuan; Pu, Zhiqing; Irwin, David M; Liao, Ming; Shen, Yongyi

    2018-05-05

    Avian influenza A virus H7N9 has caused 5 epidemic waves of human infections in China since 2013. Avian influenza A viruses may face strong selection to adapt to novel conditions when establishing themselves in humans. In this study, we sought to determine whether adaptive evolution had occurred in human-isolated H7N9 viruses. We evaluated all available genomes of H7N9 avian influenza A virus. Maximum likelihood trees were separately reconstructed for all 8 genes. Signals of positive selection and convergent evolution were then detected on branches that lead to changes in host tropism (from avian to human). We found that 3 genes had significant signals of positive selection (all of them P < .05). In addition, we detected 34 sites having significant signals for parallel evolution in 8 genes (all of them P < .05), including 7 well-known sites (Q591K, E627K, and D701N in PB2 gene; R156K, V202A, and L244Q in HA; and R289K in NA) that play roles in crossing species barriers for avian influenza A viruses. Our study suggests that, during infection in humans, H7N9 viruses have undergone adaptive evolution to adapt to their new host environment and that the sites where parallel evolution occurred might play roles in crossing species barriers and respond to the new selection pressures arising from their new host environments.

  11. Clinical avian nutrition.

    PubMed

    Orosz, Susan E

    2014-09-01

    Psittacine birds eat plant-based foods. Birds in the wild seem to be able to balance their energy needs, amino acids, and calcium. Companion birds in captivity do not do as well when self-selecting, and balanced diets are needed to improve their general health. A nutritional history is important to determine whether the avian patient is in balance nutritionally. Understanding the various sources of the fat-soluble vitamins, calcium, and protein will help guide clients to provide nutritious foods for their birds. Owners need to learn to use foraging as a major source of their bird's diet and techniques. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Amino Acid Availability Modulates Vacuolar H+-ATPase Assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Stransky, Laura A.; Forgac, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) is an ATP-dependent proton pump composed of a peripheral ATPase domain (V1) and a membrane-integral proton-translocating domain (V0) and is involved in many normal and disease processes. An important mechanism of regulating V-ATPase activity is reversible assembly of the V1 and V0 domains. Increased assembly in mammalian cells occurs under various conditions and has been shown to involve PI3K. The V-ATPase is necessary for amino acid-induced activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which is important in controlling cell growth in response to nutrient availability and growth signals. The V-ATPase undergoes amino acid-dependent interactions with the Ragulator complex, which is involved in recruitment of mTORC1 to the lysosomal membrane during amino acid sensing. We hypothesized that changes in the V-ATPase/Ragulator interaction might involve amino acid-dependent changes in V-ATPase assembly. To test this, we measured V-ATPase assembly by cell fractionation in HEK293T cells treated with and without amino acids. V-ATPase assembly increases upon amino acid starvation, and this effect is reversed upon readdition of amino acids. Lysosomes from amino acid-starved cells possess greater V-ATPase-dependent proton transport, indicating that assembled pumps are catalytically active. Amino acid-dependent changes in both V-ATPase assembly and activity are independent of PI3K and mTORC1 activity, indicating the involvement of signaling pathways distinct from those implicated previously in controlling assembly. By contrast, lysosomal neutralization blocks the amino acid-dependent change in assembly and reactivation of mTORC1 after amino acid starvation. These results identify an important new stimulus for controlling V-ATPase assembly. PMID:26378229

  13. Captive-bred neotropical birds diagnosed with Cryptosporidium Avian genotype III.

    PubMed

    Silva Novaes, Ricardo; Pires, Marcus Sandes; Sudré, Adriana Pittella; Bergamo do Bomfim, Teresa Cristina

    2018-02-01

    Currently, there are only three valid species of Cryptosporidium infecting avian hosts, namely, Cryptosporidium meleagridis, Cryptosporidium baileyi, Cryptosporidium galli and Cryptosporidium avium in addition to 12 genotypes of unknown species status. The objectives of this study were to microscopically diagnose the presence of Cryptosporidium in birds from a commercial aviary located in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; genotypically characterize species and/or genotypes of genus Cryptosporidum; and conduct sequencing and phylogenetic analyses to compare the obtained DNA sequences with those deposited in GenBank. A total of 85 fecal samples were collected from wild captive-bred birds: 48 of family Psittacidae and 37 of family Ramphastidae. Initially, a search for the presence of Cryptosporidium sp. oocysts was conducted using the centrifugal-flotation in saturated sugar solution technique, after that, the collected samples were analyzed microscopically. Cryptosporidium infections were only detected in 24.32% of samples belonging to the family Ramphastidae. DNA was extracted from positive samples and molecular diagnostics was applied targeting the 18S rRNA gene, followed by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. The Cryptosporidium Avian genotype III was diagnosed in this study more closely related to the gastric species. This is the first record of Cryptosporidium Avian genotype III in order Piciformes and family Ramphastidae, where three host species (Ramphastus toco, Ramphastus tucanus, and Pteroglossus bailloni) were positive for the etiologic agent. Based on the molecular data obtained, these wild birds raised in captivity do not represent a source of human cryptosporidiosis, considering that Cryptosporidium Avian genotype III does not constitute a zoonosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Immunogenetics and resistance to avian malaria in Hawaiian honeycreepers (Drepanidinae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarvi, Susan I.; Atkinson, Carter T.; Fleischer, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Although a number of factors have contributed to the decline and extinction of Hawai‘i’s endemic terrestrial avifauna, introduced avian malaria (Plasmodium relicturn) is probably the single most important factor preventing recovery of these birds in low-elevation habitats. Continued decline in numbers, fragmentation of populations, and extinction of species that are still relatively common will likely continue without new, aggressive approaches to managing avian disease. Methods of intervention in the disease cycle such as chemotherapy and vaccine development are not feasible because of efficient immune-evasion strategies evolved by the parasite, technical difficulties associated with treating wild avian populations, and increased risk of selection for more virulent strains of the parasite. We are investigating the natural evolution of disease resistance in some low-elevation native bird populations, particularly Hawai‘i ‘Amakihi (Hemignathus virens), to perfect genetic methods for identifying individuals with a greater immunological capacity to survive malarial infection. We are focusing on genetic analyses of the major histocompatibility complex, due to its critical role in both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. In the parasite, we are evaluating conserved ribosomal genes as well as variable genes encoding cell-surface molecules as a first step in developing a better understanding of the complex interactions between malarial parasites and the avian immune system. A goal is to provide population managers with new criteria for maintaining long-term population stability for threatened species through the development of methods for evaluating and maintaining genetic diversity in small populations at loci important in immunological responsiveness to pathogens.

  15. Avian visual behavior and the organization of the telencephalon.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Toru; Patton, Tadd B; Husband, Scott A

    2010-01-01

    Birds have excellent visual abilities that are comparable or superior to those of primates, but how the bird brain solves complex visual problems is poorly understood. More specifically, we lack knowledge about how such superb abilities are used in nature and how the brain, especially the telencephalon, is organized to process visual information. Here we review the results of several studies that examine the organization of the avian telencephalon and the relevance of visual abilities to avian social and reproductive behavior. Video playback and photographic stimuli show that birds can detect and evaluate subtle differences in local facial features of potential mates in a fashion similar to that of primates. These techniques have also revealed that birds do not attend well to global configural changes in the face, suggesting a fundamental difference between birds and primates in face perception. The telencephalon plays a major role in the visual and visuo-cognitive abilities of birds and primates, and anatomical data suggest that these animals may share similar organizational characteristics in the visual telencephalon. As is true in the primate cerebral cortex, different visual features are processed separately in the avian telencephalon where separate channels are organized in the anterior-posterior axis roughly parallel to the major laminae. Furthermore, the efferent projections from the primary visual telencephalon form an extensive column-like continuum involving the dorsolateral pallium and the lateral basal ganglia. Such a column-like organization may exist not only for vision, but for other sensory modalities and even for a continuum that links sensory and limbic areas of the avian brain. Behavioral and neural studies must be integrated in order to understand how birds have developed their amazing visual systems through 150 million years of evolution. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Avian Visual Behavior and the Organization of the Telencephalon

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Toru; Patton, Tadd B.; Husband, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Birds have excellent visual abilities that are comparable or superior to those of primates, but how the bird brain solves complex visual problems is poorly understood. More specifically, we lack knowledge about how such superb abilities are used in nature and how the brain, especially the telencephalon, is organized to process visual information. Here we review the results of several studies that examine the organization of the avian telencephalon and the relevance of visual abilities to avian social and reproductive behavior. Video playback and photographic stimuli show that birds can detect and evaluate subtle differences in local facial features of potential mates in a fashion similar to that of primates. These techniques have also revealed that birds do not attend well to global configural changes in the face, suggesting a fundamental difference between birds and primates in face perception. The telencephalon plays a major role in the visual and visuo-cognitive abilities of birds and primates, and anatomical data suggest that these animals may share similar organizational characteristics in the visual telencephalon. As is true in the primate cerebral cortex, different visual features are processed separately in the avian telencephalon where separate channels are organized in the anterior-posterior axis roughly parallel to the major laminae. Furthermore, the efferent projections from the primary visual telencephalon form an extensive column-like continuum involving the dorsolateral pallium and the lateral basal ganglia. Such a column-like organization may exist not only for vision, but for other sensory modalities and even for a continuum that links sensory and limbic areas of the avian brain. Behavioral and neural studies must be integrated in order to understand how birds have developed their amazing visual systems through 150 million years of evolution. PMID:20733296

  17. Antimicrobial Products Registered for Disinfection Use against Avian Influenza on Poultry Farms and Other Facilities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA registers disinfectants against Avian Influenza A. Although there are no antimicrobial products registered for the H5N2 subtype of Avian Influenza A virus, based on available scientific information these products will work against other HPAI strains.

  18. Markov Chain Estimation of Avian Seasonal Fecundity, Presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Avian seasonal fecundity is of interest from evolutionary, ecological, and conservation perspectives. However, direct estimation of seasonal fecundity is difficult, especially with multibrooded birds, and models representing the renesting and quitting processes are usually requi...

  19. Serological Evidence of Human Infection with Avian Influenza A H7virus in Egyptian Poultry Growers.

    PubMed

    Gomaa, Mokhtar R; Kandeil, Ahmed; Kayed, Ahmed S; Elabd, Mona A; Zaki, Shaimaa A; Abu Zeid, Dina; El Rifay, Amira S; Mousa, Adel A; Farag, Mohamed M; McKenzie, Pamela P; Webby, Richard J; Ali, Mohamed A; Kayali, Ghazi

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses circulate widely in birds, with occasional human infections. Poultry-exposed individuals are considered to be at high risk of infection with avian influenza viruses due to frequent exposure to poultry. Some avian H7 viruses have occasionally been found to infect humans. Seroprevalence of neutralizing antibodies against influenza A/H7N7 virus among poultry-exposed and unexposed individuals in Egypt were assessed during a three-years prospective cohort study. The seroprevalence of antibodies (titer, ≥80) among exposed individuals was 0%, 1.9%, and 2.1% annually while the seroprevalence among the control group remained 0% as measured by virus microneutralization assay. We then confirmed our results using western blot and immunofluorescence assays. Although human infection with H7 in Egypt has not been reported yet, our results suggested that Egyptian poultry growers are exposed to avian H7 viruses. These findings highlight the need for surveillance in the people exposed to poultry to monitor the risk of zoonotic transmission of avian influenza viruses.

  20. Identification of avian wax synthases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bird species show a high degree of variation in the composition of their preen gland waxes. For instance, galliform birds like chicken contain fatty acid esters of 2,3-alkanediols, while Anseriformes like goose or Strigiformes like barn owl contain wax monoesters in their preen gland secretions. The final biosynthetic step is catalyzed by wax synthases (WS) which have been identified in pro- and eukaryotic organisms. Results Sequence similarities enabled us to identify six cDNAs encoding putative wax synthesizing proteins in chicken and two from barn owl and goose. Expression studies in yeast under in vivo and in vitro conditions showed that three proteins from chicken performed WS activity while a sequence from chicken, goose and barn owl encoded a bifunctional enzyme catalyzing both wax ester and triacylglycerol synthesis. Mono- and bifunctional WS were found to differ in their substrate specificities especially with regard to branched-chain alcohols and acyl-CoA thioesters. According to the expression patterns of their transcripts and the properties of the enzymes, avian WS proteins might not be confined to preen glands. Conclusions We provide direct evidence that avian preen glands possess both monofunctional and bifunctional WS proteins which have different expression patterns and WS activities with different substrate specificities. PMID:22305293

  1. Outbreak of Avian Tuberculosis in Commercial Domestic Pekin Ducks ( Anas platyrhynchos domestica).

    PubMed

    Zhu, De-Kang; Song, Xiao-Heng; Wang, Jiang-Bo; Zhou, Wang-Shu; Ou, Xu-Ming; Chen, Hong-Xi; Liu, Ma-Feng; Wang, Ming-Shu; Jia, Ren-Yong; Chen, Shun; Sun, Kun-Feng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Chen, Xiao-Yue; Cheng, An-Chun

    2016-09-01

    Avian tuberculosis is a contagious disease affecting various domestic and wild bird species, and is caused by Mycobacterium avium . It is reported extremely rarely in commercial poultry flocks and has not been reported in commercial domestic ducks to date, with domestic ducks reported to be moderately resistant to M. avium infection. Here, we report the outbreak of avian tuberculosis in commercial Pekin duck ( Anas platyrhynchos domestica) flocks. Postmortem and histopathologic findings included nodules presenting in the visceral organs of ducks, and granulomas with central caseous necrosis surrounded by infiltrating lymphocytes. The M. avium pathogen was isolated and further identified by Ziehl-Neelsen staining and PCR based on insert sequence IS901 and the 16S rRNA gene. We highlight that avian tuberculosis not only has economic significance for the duck industry, but also presents a potential zoonotic hazard to humans.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of the Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli Strain APEC O78

    PubMed Central

    Mangiamele, Paul; Nicholson, Bryon; Wannemuehler, Yvonne; Seemann, Torsten; Logue, Catherine M.; Li, Ganwu; Tivendale, Kelly A.

    2013-01-01

    Colibacillosis, caused by avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC), is a significant disease, causing extensive animal and financial losses globally. Because of the significance of this disease, more knowledge is needed regarding APEC's mechanisms of virulence. Here, we present the fully closed genome sequence of a typical avian pathogenic E. coli strain belonging to the serogroup O78. PMID:23516182

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of an Avian Paramyxovirus Representative of Putative New Serotype 13

    PubMed Central

    Goraichuk, Iryna; Sharma, Poonam; Stegniy, Borys; Muzyka, Denys; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J.; Gerilovych, Anton; Solodiankin, Olexii; Bolotin, Vitaliy; Miller, Patti J.; Dimitrov, Kiril M.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a virus of a putative new serotype of avian paramyxovirus (APMV). The virus was isolated from a white-fronted goose in Ukraine in 2011 and designated white-fronted goose/Ukraine/Askania-Nova/48-15-02/2011. The genomic characterization of the isolate suggests that it represents the novel avian paramyxovirus group APMV 13. PMID:27469958

  4. A Method to Assess Flux Hazards at CSP Plants to Reduce Avian Mortality

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Ho, Clifford K.; Wendelin, Timothy; Horstman, Luke

    A method to evaluate avian flux hazards at concentrating solar power plants (CSP) has been developed. A heat-transfer model has been coupled to simulations of the irradiance in the airspace above a CSP plant to determine the feather temperature along prescribed bird flight paths. Probabilistic modeling results show that the irradiance and assumed feather properties (thickness, absorptance, heat capacity) have the most significant impact on the simulated feather temperature, which can increase rapidly (hundreds of degrees Celsius in seconds) depending on the parameter values. The avian flux hazard model is being combined with a plant performance model to identify alternativemore » heliostat standby aiming strategies that minimize both avian flux hazards and negative impacts on plant performance.« less

  5. Evidence of infection with H4 and H11 avian influenza viruses among Lebanese chicken growers.

    PubMed

    Kayali, Ghazi; Barbour, Elie; Dbaibo, Ghassan; Tabet, Carelle; Saade, Maya; Shaib, Houssam A; Debeauchamp, Jennifer; Webby, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    Human infections with H5, H7, and H9 avian influenza viruses are well documented. Exposure to poultry is the most important risk factor for humans becoming infected with these viruses. Data on human infection with other low pathogenicity avian influenza viruses is sparse but suggests that such infections may occur. Lebanon is a Mediterranean country lying under two major migratory birds flyways and is home to many wild and domestic bird species. Previous reports from this country demonstrated that low pathogenicity avian influenza viruses are in circulation but highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses were not reported. In order to study the extent of human infection with avian influenza viruses in Lebanon, we carried out a seroprevalence cross-sectional study into which 200 poultry-exposed individuals and 50 non-exposed controls were enrolled. We obtained their sera and tested it for the presence of antibodies against avian influenza viruses types H4 through H16 and used a questionnaire to collect exposure data. Our microneutralization assay results suggested that backyard poultry growers may have been previously infected with H4 and H11 avian influenza viruses. We confirmed these results by using a horse red blood cells hemagglutination inhibition assay. Our data also showed that farmers with antibodies against each virus type clustered in a small geographic area suggesting that unrecognized outbreaks among birds may have led to these human infections. In conclusion, this study suggests that occupational exposure to chicken is a risk factor for infection with avian influenza especially among backyard growers and that H4 and H11 influenza viruses may possess the ability to cross the species barrier to infect humans.

  6. Seroepidemiologic Survey of Potential Pathogens in Obligate and Facultative Scavenging Avian Species in California

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Mary H.; Kelly, Terra R.; Rideout, Bruce A.; Eng, Curtis; Wynne, Janna; Braun, Josephine; Johnson, Christine K.

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the world, populations of scavenger birds are declining rapidly with some populations already on the brink of extinction. Much of the current research into the factors contributing to these declines has focused on exposure to drug residues, lead, and other toxins. Despite increased monitoring of these declining populations, little is known about infectious diseases affecting scavenger bird species. To assess potential infectious disease risks to both obligate and facultative scavenger bird species, we performed a serosurvey for eleven potential pathogens in three species of scavenging birds in California: the California condor (Gymnogyps californianus), turkey vulture (Cathartes aura) and golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos). California condors were seropositive for avian adenovirus, infectious bronchitis virus, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, avian paramyxovirus-2, West Nile virus (WNV) and Toxoplasma gondii. Golden eagles were seropositive for avian adenovirus, Chlamydophila psittaci and Toxoplasma gondii, and turkey vultures were seropositive for avian adenovirus, Chlamydophila psittaci, avian paramyxovirus-1, Toxoplasma gondii and WNV. Risk factor analyses indicated that rearing site and original release location were significantly associated with a positive serologic titer to WNV among free-flying condors. This study provides preliminary baseline data on infectious disease exposure in these populations for aiding in early disease detection and provides potentially critical information for conservation of the endangered California condor as it continues to expand its range and encounter new infectious disease threats. PMID:26606755

  7. Virological and pathological characterization of an avian H1N1 influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Koo, Bon-Sang; Kim, Hye Kwon; Song, Daesub; Na, Woonsung; Song, Min-Suk; Kwon, Jin Jung; Wong, Sook-San; Noh, Ji Yeong; Ahn, Min-Ju; Kim, Doo-Jin; Webby, Richard J; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Jeong, Dae Gwin

    2018-05-01

    Gene segments from avian H1N1 influenza A viruses have reassorted with other influenza viruses to generate pandemic strains over the past century. Nevertheless, little effort has been invested in understanding the characteristics of avian H1N1 influenza viruses. Here, we present the genome sequence and a molecular and virological characterization of an avian influenza A virus, A/wild bird/Korea/SK14/2014 (A/SK14, H1N1), isolated from migratory birds in South Korea during the winter season of 2014-2015. Full-genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the virus belongs to the Eurasian avian lineage. Although it retained avian-receptor binding preference, A/SK14 virus also exhibited detectable human-like receptor binding and was able to replicate in differentiated primary normal human bronchial epithelial cells. In animal models, A/SK14 virus was moderately pathogenic in mice, and virus was detected in nasal washes from inoculated guinea pigs, but not in direct-contact guinea pigs. Although A/SK14 showed moderate pathogenicity and no evidence of transmission in a mammalian model, our results suggest that the dual receptor specificity of A/SK14-like virus might allow for a more rapid adaptation to mammals, emphasizing the importance of further continuous surveillance and risk-assessment activities.

  8. Associations between water quality, Pasteurella multocida, and avian cholera at Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lehr, M.A.; Botzler, R.G.; Samuel, M.D.; Shadduck, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    We studied patterns in avian cholera mortality, the presence of Pasteurella multocida in the water or sediment, and water chemistry characteristics in 10 wetlands at the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex (California, USA), an area of recurrent avian cholera epizootics, during the winters of 1997 and 1998. Avian cholera outbreaks (a?Y50 dead birds) occurred on two wetlands during the winter of 1997, but no P. multocida were recovered from 390 water and 390 sediment samples from any of the 10 wetlands. No mortality events were observed on study wetlands during the winter of 1998; however, P. multocida was recovered from water and sediment samples in six of the 10 study wetlands. The pH levels were higher for wetlands experiencing outbreaks during the winter of 1997 than for nonoutbreak wetlands, and aluminum concentrations were higher in wetlands from which P. multocida were recovered during the winter of 1998. Water chemistry parameters (calcium, magnesium, sodium, and dissolved protein) previously linked with P. multocida and avian cholera mortality were not associated with the occurrence of avian cholera outbreaks or the presence of P. multocida in our study wetlands. Overall, we found no evidence to support the hypothesis that wetland characteristics facilitate the presence of P. multocida and, thereby, allow some wetlands to serve as long-term sources (reservoirs) for P. multocida.

  9. 76 FR 66032 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Avian Influenza-Marek's Disease...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ... Avian Influenza-Marek's Disease Vaccine, H5 Subtype, Serotype 3, Live Marek's Disease Vector AGENCY...-Marek's Disease Vaccine, H5 Subtype, Serotype 3, Live Marek's Disease Vector. The environmental... product: Requester: Biomune Company. Product: Avian Influenza-Marek's Disease Vaccine, H5 Subtype...

  10. Preferential recognition of avian-like receptors in human influenza A H7N9 viruses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rui; de Vries, Robert P; Zhu, Xueyong; Nycholat, Corwin M; McBride, Ryan; Yu, Wenli; Paulson, James C; Wilson, Ian A

    2013-12-06

    The 2013 outbreak of avian-origin H7N9 influenza in eastern China has raised concerns about its ability to transmit in the human population. The hemagglutinin glycoprotein of most human H7N9 viruses carries Leu(226), a residue linked to adaptation of H2N2 and H3N2 pandemic viruses to human receptors. However, glycan array analysis of the H7 hemagglutinin reveals negligible binding to humanlike α2-6-linked receptors and strong preference for a subset of avian-like α2-3-linked glycans recognized by all avian H7 viruses. Crystal structures of H7N9 hemagglutinin and six hemagglutinin-glycan complexes have elucidated the structural basis for preferential recognition of avian-like receptors. These findings suggest that the current human H7N9 viruses are poorly adapted for efficient human-to-human transmission.

  11. Role for migratory wild birds in the global spread of avian influenza H5N8

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; Ip, Hon S.

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses affect both poultry production and public health. A subtype H5N8 (clade 2.3.4.4) virus, following an outbreak in poultry in South Korea in January 2014, rapidly spread worldwide in 2014–2015. Our analysis of H5N8 viral sequences, epidemiological investigations, waterfowl migration, and poultry trade showed that long-distance migratory birds can play a major role in the global spread of avian influenza viruses. Further, we found that the hemagglutinin of clade 2.3.4.4 virus was remarkably promiscuous, creating reassortants with multiple neuraminidase subtypes. Improving our understanding of the circumpolar circulation of avian influenza viruses in migratory waterfowl will help to provide early warning of threats from avian influenza to poultry, and potentially human, health.

  12. Avian Plasmodium infection in field-collected mosquitoes during 2012-2013 in Tarlac, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tien-Huang; Aure, Wilfredo E; Cruz, Estrella Irlandez; Malbas, Fedelino F; Teng, Hwa-Jen; Lu, Liang-Chen; Kim, Kyeong Soon; Tsuda, Yoshio; Shu, Pei-Yun

    2015-12-01

    Global warming threatens to increase the spread and prevalence of mosquito-transmitted diseases. Certain pathogens may be carried by migratory birds and transmitted to local mosquito populations. Mosquitoes were collected in the northern Philippines during bird migration seasons to detect avian malaria parasites as well as for the identification of potential vector species and the estimation of infections among local mosquito populations. We used the nested PCR to detect the avian malaria species. Culex vishnui (47.6%) was the most abundant species collected and Cx. tritaeniorhynchus (13.8%) was the second most abundant. Avian Plasmodium parasites were found in eight mosquito species, for which the infection rates were between 0.5% and 6.2%. The six Plasmodium genetic lineages found in this study included P. juxtanucleare -GALLUS02, Tacy7 (Donana04), CXBIT01, Plasmodium species LIN2 New Zealand, and two unclassified lineages. The potential mosquito vectors for avian Plasmodium parasites in the Philippines were Cq. crassipes, Cx. fuscocephala, Cx. quinquefasciatus, Cx. sitiens, Cx. vishnui, and Ma. Uniformis; two major genetic lineages, P. juxtanucleare and Tacy7, were identified. © 2015 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  13. Combined extraction-cleanup column chromatographic procedure for determination of dicofol in avian eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krynitsky, A.J.; Stafford, C.J.; Wiemeyer, Stanley N.

    1988-01-01

    Dicofol in avian eggs was completely oxidized to dichlorobenzophenone (DCBP) when a hexane Soxhlet extraction procedure was used. This degradation did not occur with other avian tissues (muscle and liver). For this reason, a combined extraction-cleanup column chromatographic procedure, without added heat, was developed for the determination of dicofol in avian eggs. Homogenized subsamples of eggs were mixed with sodium sulfate, and the mixture was added as the top layer on a column prepacked with Florisil. The dicofol and other compounds of interest were then eluted with ethyl ether-hexane. The extracts, relatively free from lipids, were quantitated on a gas chromatograph equipped with a 63Ni electron-capture detector and a methyl silicone capillary column. Recoveries from chicken eggs, fortified with dicofol and other DDT-related compounds, averaged 96%. Analysis of eggs of eastern screech-owls, fed a meat diet containing 10 ppm technical Kelthane, showed that both dicofol and DCBP were present. Results were confirmed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. This method is rapid and reliable, involves a minimum of sample handling, and is well suited for high volume determination of dicofol in eggs and other avian tissues.

  14. Avian influenza outbreak in Turkey through health personnel's views: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Sarikaya, Ozlem; Erbaydar, Tugrul

    2007-01-01

    Background Avian influenza threatens public health worldwide because it is usually associated with severe illness and, consequently, a higher risk of death. During the first months of 2006, Turkey experienced its first human avian influenza epidemic. A total of 21 human cases were identified, 12 of which were confirmed by the National Institute for Medical Research. Nine of the cases, including the four fatal ones, were from the Dogubeyazit-Van region. This study aims to evaluate the efforts at the avian influenza outbreak control in the Van-Dogubeyazit region in 2006 through the experiences of health personnel. Methods We conducted in-depth interviews with seventeen key informants who took active roles during the avian influenza outbreak in East Turkey during the first months of 2006. We gathered information about the initial responses, the progress and management of the outbreak control, and the reactions of the health professionals and the public. The findings of the study are reported according to the topics that appeared through thematic analysis of the interview transcripts. Results Following the first suspected avian influenza cases, a Van Crisis Coordination Committee was formed as the coordinating and decision-making body and played an important role in the appropriate timing of decisions. The health and agriculture services could not be well coordinated owing to the lack of integrated planning in preparation for outbreak and of integrated surveillance programs. Traditional poultry practice together with the low socio-economic status of the people and the lack of health care access in the region seemed to be a major risk for animal to animal and animal to human transmission. The strengths and weaknesses of the present health system – primary health care services, national surveillance and notification systems, human resource and management – affected the inter organizational coordination during the outbreak. Open communication between the government

  15. Pathobiology of avian influenza in domestic ducks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Domestic ducks are an important source of food and income in many parts of the world. The susceptibility of domestic ducks to avian influenza (AI) viruses varies depending on many factors, including the species and the age of the ducks, the virus strain, and management practices. Although wild wat...

  16. Rational design of avian metapneumovirus live attenuated vaccines by inhibiting viral messenger RNA cap methyltransferase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV), also known as avian pneumovirus or turkey rhinotracheitis, is a non-segmented negative-sense RNA virus belonging to the family of Paramyxoviridae, the subfamily Pneumovirinae, and the genus Metapneumovirus. aMPV is the causative agent of respiratory tract infection and ...

  17. Avian trichomoniasis: a study of lesions and relative prevalence in a variety of captive and free-living bird species as seen in an Australian avian practice.

    PubMed

    Park, F J

    2011-03-01

    Studies of avian trichomoniasis in the literature are limited to some extent, often being confined to a single bird species or group of species within a bird Order. Some incidence studies have been reported for free-living birds, and occasionally for captive birds. Very few reports describe the prevalence and types of lesions seen for a wide range of bird species, especially from a clinical perspective. Retrospective study of avian practice records from a 10-year period. Emphasis on the types of presentations and relative prevalence of trichomoniasis in a variety of captive and free-living bird species encountered in Australian avian practice. The occurrence of trichomoniasis in several novel species (lorikeets, corvids and a cuckoo species), plus its distinctive presentation in southern boobook owls (Ninox boobook), is documented. Trichomoniasis should be a differential diagnosis for birds presenting with regurgitation or upper gastrointestinal abscesses, even if motile trichomonads are not found in wet preparations from crop washes or lesions. © 2011 The Author. Australian Veterinary Journal © 2011 Australian Veterinary Association.

  18. Avian cholera mortality in lesser snow geese nesting on Banks Island, Northwest Territories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuel, M.D.; Takekawa, John Y.; Samelius, G.; Goldberg, Diana R.

    1999-01-01

    Avian cholera is one of the most important diseases affecting waterfowl in North America, but little is known about its ecology and its impact on waterfowl populations. We documented avian cholera mortality in breeding lesser snow geese (Chen c. caerulescens) at the Egg River colony on Banks Island, Northwest Territories, Canada, in 1995 and 1996. Area of the breeding colony, core nesting area, and number of nesting geese were greater in 1996 (colony=7,537 ha, core area=1,581 ha, 401,000 nesting geese) than in 1995 (colony=6,637 ha, core area=996 ha, 318,000 nesting geese). Density of nesting geese also was greater in the core area during 1995 (120 geese/ha) than in 1996 (90 geese/ha). Pasteurella multocida (serotype 1) was cultured from the leg bones of adult snow goose carcasses collected after outbreaks. Mortality from avian cholera began during nesting and continued until birds dispersed at hatch. Mortality appeared to be in foci scattered throughout the nesting colony, but generally was greater where there were greater densities of nesting geese. We estimated that 30,000 and 20,000 geese died in 1995 and 1996, respectively, about 5-9% of the nesting colony. Between 1991 and 1997, at least 4 avian cholera outbreaks occurred at Banks Island. It appears that avian cholera has become endemic in this population of snow geese, and these birds have the potential to transmit the disease to other waterfowl, especially on wintering areas where waterfowl are very concentrated.

  19. Evaluation of NDVI to assess avian abundance and richness along the upper San Pedro River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McFarland, T.M.; van Riper, Charles; Johnson, G.E.

    2012-01-01

    Remote-sensing models have become increasingly popular for identifying, characterizing, monitoring, and predicting avian habitat but have largely focused on single bird species. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) has been shown to positively correlate with avian abundance and richness and has been successfully applied to southwestern riparian systems which are uniquely composed of narrow bands of vegetation in an otherwise dry landscape. Desert riparian ecosystems are important breeding and stopover sites for many bird species but have been degraded due to altered hydrology and land management practices. Here we investigated the use of NDVI, coupled with vegetation, to model the avian community structure along the San Pedro River, Arizona. We also investigated how vegetation and physical features measured locally compared to those data that can be gathered through remote-sensing. We found that NDVI has statistically significant relationships with both avian abundance and species richness, although is better applied at the individual species level. However, the amount of variation explained by even our best models was quite low, suggesting that NDVI habitat models may not presently be an accurate tool for extensive modeling of avian communities. We suggest additional studies in other watersheds to increase our understanding of these bird/NDVI relationships.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of an Avian Paramyxovirus Representative of Putative New Serotype 13.

    PubMed

    Goraichuk, Iryna; Sharma, Poonam; Stegniy, Borys; Muzyka, Denys; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J; Gerilovych, Anton; Solodiankin, Olexii; Bolotin, Vitaliy; Miller, Patti J; Dimitrov, Kiril M; Afonso, Claudio L

    2016-07-28

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a virus of a putative new serotype of avian paramyxovirus (APMV). The virus was isolated from a white-fronted goose in Ukraine in 2011 and designated white-fronted goose/Ukraine/Askania-Nova/48-15-02/2011. The genomic characterization of the isolate suggests that it represents the novel avian paramyxovirus group APMV 13. Copyright © 2016 Goraichuk et al.

  1. The Completeness of the Fossil Record of Mesozoic Birds: Implications for Early Avian Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Brocklehurst, Neil; Upchurch, Paul; Mannion, Philip D.; O'Connor, Jingmai

    2012-01-01

    Many palaeobiological analyses have concluded that modern birds (Neornithes) radiated no earlier than the Maastrichtian, whereas molecular clock studies have argued for a much earlier origination. Here, we assess the quality of the fossil record of Mesozoic avian species, using a recently proposed character completeness metric which calculates the percentage of phylogenetic characters that can be scored for each taxon. Estimates of fossil record quality are plotted against geological time and compared to estimates of species level diversity, sea level, and depositional environment. Geographical controls on the avian fossil record are investigated by comparing the completeness scores of species in different continental regions and latitudinal bins. Avian fossil record quality varies greatly with peaks during the Tithonian-early Berriasian, Aptian, and Coniacian–Santonian, and troughs during the Albian-Turonian and the Maastrichtian. The completeness metric correlates more strongly with a ‘sampling corrected’ residual diversity curve of avian species than with the raw taxic diversity curve, suggesting that the abundance and diversity of birds might influence the probability of high quality specimens being preserved. There is no correlation between avian completeness and sea level, the number of fluviolacustrine localities or a recently constructed character completeness metric of sauropodomorph dinosaurs. Comparisons between the completeness of Mesozoic birds and sauropodomorphs suggest that small delicate vertebrate skeletons are more easily destroyed by taphonomic processes, but more easily preserved whole. Lagerstätten deposits might therefore have a stronger impact on reconstructions of diversity of smaller organisms relative to more robust forms. The relatively poor quality of the avian fossil record in the Late Cretaceous combined with very patchy regional sampling means that it is possible neornithine lineages were present throughout this interval but

  2. A Qualitative Stakeholder Analysis of Avian Influenza Policy in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Kaushik; Fournié, Guillaume; Abul Kalam, Md; Biswas, Paritosh K; Hoque, Ahasanul; Debnath, Nitish C; Rahman, Mahmudur; Pfeiffer, Dirk U; Harper, David; Heymann, David L

    2017-11-13

    Avian influenza is a major animal and public health concern in Bangladesh. A decade after development and implementation of the first national avian influenza and human pandemic influenza preparedness and response plan in Bangladesh, a two-stage qualitative stakeholder analysis was performed in relation to the policy development process and the actual policy. This study specifically aimed to identify the future policy options to prevent and control avian influenza and other poultry-related zoonotic diseases in Bangladesh. It was recommended that the policy should be based on the One Health concept, be evidence-based, sustainable, reviewed and updated as necessary. The future policy environment that is suitable for developing and implementing these policies should take into account the following points: the need to formally engage multiple sectors, the need for clear and acceptable leadership, roles and responsibilities and the need for a common pool of resources and provision for transferring resources. Most of these recommendations are directed towards the Government of Bangladesh. However, other sectors, including research and poultry production stakeholders, also have a major role to play to inform policy making and actively participate in the multi-sectoral approach.

  3. Air pollution impacts on avian species via inhalation exposure and associated outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderfoot, Olivia V.; Holloway, Tracey

    2017-08-01

    Despite the well-established links between air pollution and human health, vegetation, and aquatic ecosystems, less attention has been paid to the potential impact of reactive atmospheric gases and aerosols on avian species. In this literature review, we summarize findings published since 1950 regarding avian responses to air pollution and discuss knowledge gaps that could be addressed in future studies. We find consistent evidence for adverse health impacts on birds attributable to exposure to gas-phase and particulate air pollutants, including carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O3), sulfur dioxide (SO2), smoke, and heavy metals, as well as mixtures of urban and industrial emissions. Avian responses to air pollution include respiratory distress and illness, increased detoxification effort, elevated stress levels, immunosuppression, behavioral changes, and impaired reproductive success. Exposure to air pollution may furthermore reduce population density, species diversity, and species richness in bird communities.

  4. Avian Species and Functional Diversity in Agricultural Landscapes: Does Landscape Heterogeneity Matter?

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung-Bok; Martin, James A

    2017-01-01

    While the positive relationship between avian diversity and habitat heterogeneity is widely accepted, it is primarily based on observed species richness without accounting for imperfect detection. Other facets of diversity such as functional diversity are also rarely explored. We investigated the avian diversity-landscape heterogeneity relationship in agricultural landscapes by considering two aspects of diversity: taxonomic diversity (species richness) estimated from a multi-species dynamic occupancy model, and functional diversity (functional evenness [FEve] and divergence [FDiv]) based on traits of occurring species. We also assessed how agricultural lands enrolled in a conservation program managed on behalf of declining early successional bird species (hereafter CP38 fields, an agri-environment scheme) influenced avian diversity. We analyzed breeding bird data collected at CP38 fields in Mississippi, USA, during 2010-2012, and two principal components of environmental variables: a gradient of heterogeneity (Shannon's landscape diversity index) and of the amount of CP38 fields (percent cover of CP38 fields; CP38). FEve did not show significant responses to environmental variables, whereas FDiv responded positively to heterogeneity and negatively to CP38. However, most FDiv values did not significantly differ from random expectations along an environmental gradient. When there was a significant difference, FDiv was lower than that expected. Unlike functional diversity, species richness showed a clear pattern. Species richness increased with increasing landscape heterogeneity but decreased with increasing amounts of CP38 fields. Only one species responded negatively to heterogeneity and positively to CP38. Our results suggest that the relationships between avian diversity and landscape heterogeneity may vary depending on the aspect of diversity considered: strong positive effects of heterogeneity on taxonomic diversity, but weakly positive or non

  5. Surveillance for Asian H5N1 avian influenza in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ip, Hon S.; Slota, Paul G.

    2006-01-01

    Increasing concern over the potential for migratory birds to introduce the Asian H5N1 strain of avian influenza to North America prompted the White House Policy Coordinating Committee for Pandemic Influenza Preparedness to request that the U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Interior (DOI) develop a plan for the early detection of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in the United States. To promote coordination among wildlife, agriculture, and human health agencies on HPAI surveillance efforts, the two Departments worked with representatives from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the International Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, and the Alaska Department of Fish and Game to develop the U.S. Interagency Strategic Plan for Early Detection of Asian H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in Wild Migratory Birds.

  6. Epidemiology of low pathogenic avian influenza viruses in wild birds.

    PubMed

    Fouchier, R A M; Munster, V J

    2009-04-01

    Although extensive data are available on low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) virus surveillance in wild birds in North America and Europe, data are scarce for other parts of the world, and our understanding of LPAI virus ecology in the natural reservoir is still far from complete. The outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) of the H5N1 subtype in the eastern hemisphere has put an increased focus on the role of wild birds in influenza virus transmission. Here, the authors review the current knowledge of the (molecular) epidemiology, genetics and evolution of LPAI viruses in wild birds, and identify some important gaps in current knowledge.

  7. Modeling broad-scale patterns of avian species richness across the Midwestern United States with measures of satellite image texture

    Treesearch

    Patrick D. Culbert; Volker C. Radeloff; Veronique St-Louis; Curtis H. Flather; Chadwick D. Rittenhouse; Thomas P. Albright; Anna M. Pidgeon

    2012-01-01

    Avian biodiversity is threatened, and in order to prioritize limited conservation resources and conduct effective conservation planning a better understanding of avian species richness patterns is needed. The use of image texture measures, as a proxy for the spatial structure of land cover and vegetation, has proven useful in explaining patterns of avian abundance and...

  8. 78 FR 38044 - Authorization of Emergency Use of an In Vitro Diagnostic for Detection of the Novel Avian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ...] Authorization of Emergency Use of an In Vitro Diagnostic for Detection of the Novel Avian Influenza A(H7N9... Authorization) for an in vitro diagnostic device for detection of the novel avian influenza A(H7N9) virus. FDA... security of U.S. citizens living abroad that involves the novel avian influenza A(H7N9) virus. On the basis...

  9. Gender determination of avian embryo

    DOEpatents

    Daum, Keith A.; Atkinson, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for gender determination of avian embryos. During the embryo incubation process, the outer hard shells of eggs are drilled and samples of allantoic fluid are removed. The allantoic fluids are directly introduced into an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for analysis. The resulting spectra contain the relevant marker peaks in the positive or negative mode which correlate with unique mobilities which are sex-specific. This way, the gender of the embryo can be determined.

  10. Phagocytosis of antibody‐opsonized tumor cells leads to the formation of a discrete vacuolar compartment in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Velmurugan, Ramraj; Ramakrishnan, Sreevidhya; Kim, Mingin

    2018-01-01

    Despite the rapidly expanding use of antibody‐based therapeutics to treat cancer, knowledge of the cellular processes following phagocytosis of antibody‐opsonized tumor cells is limited. Here we report the formation of a phagosome‐associated vacuole that is observed in macrophages as these degradative compartments mature following phagocytosis of HER2‐positive cancer cells in the presence of the HER2‐specific antibody, trastuzumab. We demonstrate that this vacuole is a distinct organelle that is closely apposed to the phagosome. Furthermore, the size of the phagosome‐associated vacuole is increased by inhibition of the mTOR pathway. Collectively, the identification of this vacuolar compartment has implications for understanding the subcellular trafficking processes leading to the destruction of phagocytosed, antibody‐opsonized cancer cells by macrophages. PMID:29437282

  11. Identification of New World Quails Susceptible to Infection with Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J

    PubMed Central

    Plachý, Jiří; Reinišová, Markéta; Kučerová, Dana; Šenigl, Filip; Stepanets, Volodymyr; Hron, Tomáš; Trejbalová, Kateřina; Elleder, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The J subgroup of avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) infects domestic chickens, jungle fowl, and turkeys. This virus enters the host cell through a receptor encoded by the tvj locus and identified as Na+/H+ exchanger 1. The resistance to avian leukosis virus subgroup J in a great majority of galliform species has been explained by deletions or substitutions of the critical tryptophan 38 in the first extracellular loop of Na+/H+ exchanger 1. Because there are concerns of transspecies virus transmission, we studied natural polymorphisms and susceptibility/resistance in wild galliforms and found the presence of tryptophan 38 in four species of New World quails. The embryo fibroblasts of New World quails are susceptible to infection with avian leukosis virus subgroup J, and the cloned Na+/H+ exchanger 1 confers susceptibility on the otherwise resistant host. New World quails are also susceptible to new avian leukosis virus subgroup J variants but resistant to subgroups A and B and weakly susceptible to subgroups C and D of avian sarcoma/leukosis virus due to obvious defects of the respective receptors. Our results suggest that the avian leukosis virus subgroup J could be transmitted to New World quails and establish a natural reservoir of circulating virus with a potential for further evolution. IMPORTANCE Since its spread in broiler chickens in China and Southeast Asia in 2000, ALV-J remains a major enzootic challenge for the poultry industry. Although the virus diversifies rapidly in the poultry, its spillover and circulation in wild bird species has been prevented by the resistance of most species to ALV-J. It is, nevertheless, important to understand the evolution of the virus and its potential host range in wild birds. Because resistance to avian retroviruses is due particularly to receptor incompatibility, we studied Na+/H+ exchanger 1, the receptor for ALV-J. In New World quails, we found a receptor compatible with virus entry, and we confirmed the

  12. Identification of New World Quails Susceptible to Infection with Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J.

    PubMed

    Plachý, Jiří; Reinišová, Markéta; Kučerová, Dana; Šenigl, Filip; Stepanets, Volodymyr; Hron, Tomáš; Trejbalová, Kateřina; Elleder, Daniel; Hejnar, Jiří

    2017-02-01

    The J subgroup of avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) infects domestic chickens, jungle fowl, and turkeys. This virus enters the host cell through a receptor encoded by the tvj locus and identified as Na + /H + exchanger 1. The resistance to avian leukosis virus subgroup J in a great majority of galliform species has been explained by deletions or substitutions of the critical tryptophan 38 in the first extracellular loop of Na + /H + exchanger 1. Because there are concerns of transspecies virus transmission, we studied natural polymorphisms and susceptibility/resistance in wild galliforms and found the presence of tryptophan 38 in four species of New World quails. The embryo fibroblasts of New World quails are susceptible to infection with avian leukosis virus subgroup J, and the cloned Na + /H + exchanger 1 confers susceptibility on the otherwise resistant host. New World quails are also susceptible to new avian leukosis virus subgroup J variants but resistant to subgroups A and B and weakly susceptible to subgroups C and D of avian sarcoma/leukosis virus due to obvious defects of the respective receptors. Our results suggest that the avian leukosis virus subgroup J could be transmitted to New World quails and establish a natural reservoir of circulating virus with a potential for further evolution. Since its spread in broiler chickens in China and Southeast Asia in 2000, ALV-J remains a major enzootic challenge for the poultry industry. Although the virus diversifies rapidly in the poultry, its spillover and circulation in wild bird species has been prevented by the resistance of most species to ALV-J. It is, nevertheless, important to understand the evolution of the virus and its potential host range in wild birds. Because resistance to avian retroviruses is due particularly to receptor incompatibility, we studied Na + /H + exchanger 1, the receptor for ALV-J. In New World quails, we found a receptor compatible with virus entry, and we confirmed the susceptibilities

  13. Role for migratory wild birds in the global spread of avian influenza H5N8.

    PubMed

    2016-10-14

    Avian influenza viruses affect both poultry production and public health. A subtype H5N8 (clade 2.3.4.4) virus, following an outbreak in poultry in South Korea in January 2014, rapidly spread worldwide in 2014-2015. Our analysis of H5N8 viral sequences, epidemiological investigations, waterfowl migration, and poultry trade showed that long-distance migratory birds can play a major role in the global spread of avian influenza viruses. Further, we found that the hemagglutinin of clade 2.3.4.4 virus was remarkably promiscuous, creating reassortants with multiple neuraminidase subtypes. Improving our understanding of the circumpolar circulation of avian influenza viruses in migratory waterfowl will help to provide early warning of threats from avian influenza to poultry, and potentially human, health. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Influenza A viruses of avian origin circulating in pigs and other mammals.

    PubMed

    Urbaniak, Kinga; Kowalczyk, Andrzej; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) are zoonotic agents, capable of crossing the species barriers. Nowadays, they still constitute a great challenge worldwide. The natural reservoir of all influenza A viruses are wild aquatic birds, despite the fact they have been isolated from a number of avian and mammalian species, including humans. Even when influenza A viruses are able to get into another than waterfowl population, they are often unable to efficiently adapt and transmit between individuals. Only in rare cases, these viruses are capable of establishing a new lineage. To succeed a complete adaptation and further transmission between species, influenza A virus must overcome a species barrier, including adaptation to the receptors of a new host, which would allow the virus-cell binding, virus replication and, then, animal-to-animal transmission. For many years, pigs were thought to be intermediate host for adaptation of avian influenza viruses to humans, because of their susceptibility to infection with both, avian and human influenza viruses, which supported hypothesis of pigs as a 'mixing vessel'. In this review, the molecular factors necessary for interspecies transmission are described, with special emphasis on adaptation of avian influenza viruses to the pig population. In addition, this review gives the information about swine influenza viruses circulating around the world with special emphasis on Polish strains.

  15. The influence of avian biovectors on mercury speciation in a bog ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Kickbush, Jocelyn C; Mallory, Mark L; Murimboh, John D; Rand, Jennie; Klapstein, Sara J; Loder, Amanda L; Hill, Nicholas M; O'Driscoll, Nelson J

    2018-05-08

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a neurotoxin and endocrine disruptor that bioaccumulates and biomagnifies through trophic levels, resulting in potentially hazardous concentrations. Although wetlands are known hotspots for mercury (Hg) methylation, the effects of avian biovectors on these processes are poorly understood. We examined Hg speciation and distribution in shallow groundwater and surface water from a raised-bog with over 30years of avian biovector (herring gulls Larus argentatus and great black-backed gulls Larus marinus) colonization and guano input. Compared to the reference site, the avian-impacted bog had elevated concentrations of total dissolved organic carbon (TOC), total Hg, MeHg, phosphate (PO 4 3- ), and other trace metals, notably Pb, As, Cd and Ni. Spatial interpolation showed that the densest area of gull nesting was co-located with areas that had the highest concentrations of PO 4 3- , MeHg, As and Cd, but not total mercury (THg), and models suggested that Mn, PO 4 3- , and dissolved TOC were strong predictors of MeHg. Our findings suggest that while these gulls may not be a significant source of Hg, the excess of PO 4 3- (a well recognised component of guano) and the subsequent changes in water chemistry due to avian biovector subsidies may increase net Hg methylation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessing Arboreal Adaptations of Bird Antecedents: Testing the Ecological Setting of the Origin of the Avian Flight Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Dececchi, T. Alexander; Larsson, Hans C. E.

    2011-01-01

    The origin of avian flight is a classic macroevolutionary transition with research spanning over a century. Two competing models explaining this locomotory transition have been discussed for decades: ground up versus trees down. Although it is impossible to directly test either of these theories, it is possible to test one of the requirements for the trees-down model, that of an arboreal paravian. We test for arboreality in non-avian theropods and early birds with comparisons to extant avian, mammalian, and reptilian scansors and climbers using a comprehensive set of morphological characters. Non-avian theropods, including the small, feathered deinonychosaurs, and Archaeopteryx, consistently and significantly cluster with fully terrestrial extant mammals and ground-based birds, such as ratites. Basal birds, more advanced than Archaeopteryx, cluster with extant perching ground-foraging birds. Evolutionary trends immediately prior to the origin of birds indicate skeletal adaptations opposite that expected for arboreal climbers. Results reject an arboreal capacity for the avian stem lineage, thus lending no support for the trees-down model. Support for a fully terrestrial ecology and origin of the avian flight stroke has broad implications for the origin of powered flight for this clade. A terrestrial origin for the avian flight stroke challenges the need for an intermediate gliding phase, presents the best resolved series of the evolution of vertebrate powered flight, and may differ fundamentally from the origin of bat and pterosaur flight, whose antecedents have been postulated to have been arboreal and gliding. PMID:21857918

  17. Spatial assessment of the potential risk of avian influenza A virus infection in three raptor species in Japan

    PubMed Central

    MORIGUCHI, Sachiko; ONUMA, Manabu; GOKA, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza A, a highly pathogenic avian influenza, is a lethal infection in certain species of wild birds, including some endangered species. Raptors are susceptible to avian influenza, and spatial risk assessment of such species may be valuable for conservation planning. We used the maximum entropy approach to generate potential distribution models of three raptor species from presence-only data for the mountain hawk-eagle Nisaetus nipalensis, northern goshawk Accipiter gentilis and peregrine falcon Falco peregrinus, surveyed during the winter from 1996 to 2001. These potential distribution maps for raptors were superimposed on avian influenza A risk maps of Japan, created from data on incidence of the virus in wild birds throughout Japan from October 2010 to March 2011. The avian influenza A risk map for the mountain hawk-eagle showed that most regions of Japan had a low risk for avian influenza A. In contrast, the maps for the northern goshawk and peregrine falcon showed that their high-risk areas were distributed on the plains along the Sea of Japan and Pacific coast. We recommend enhanced surveillance for each raptor species in high-risk areas and immediate establishment of inspection systems. At the same time, ecological risk assessments that determine factors, such as the composition of prey species, and differential sensitivity of avian influenza A virus between bird species should provide multifaceted insights into the total risk assessment of endangered species. PMID:26972333

  18. Assessing arboreal adaptations of bird antecedents: testing the ecological setting of the origin of the avian flight stroke.

    PubMed

    Dececchi, T Alexander; Larsson, Hans C E

    2011-01-01

    The origin of avian flight is a classic macroevolutionary transition with research spanning over a century. Two competing models explaining this locomotory transition have been discussed for decades: ground up versus trees down. Although it is impossible to directly test either of these theories, it is possible to test one of the requirements for the trees-down model, that of an arboreal paravian. We test for arboreality in non-avian theropods and early birds with comparisons to extant avian, mammalian, and reptilian scansors and climbers using a comprehensive set of morphological characters. Non-avian theropods, including the small, feathered deinonychosaurs, and Archaeopteryx, consistently and significantly cluster with fully terrestrial extant mammals and ground-based birds, such as ratites. Basal birds, more advanced than Archaeopteryx, cluster with extant perching ground-foraging birds. Evolutionary trends immediately prior to the origin of birds indicate skeletal adaptations opposite that expected for arboreal climbers. Results reject an arboreal capacity for the avian stem lineage, thus lending no support for the trees-down model. Support for a fully terrestrial ecology and origin of the avian flight stroke has broad implications for the origin of powered flight for this clade. A terrestrial origin for the avian flight stroke challenges the need for an intermediate gliding phase, presents the best resolved series of the evolution of vertebrate powered flight, and may differ fundamentally from the origin of bat and pterosaur flight, whose antecedents have been postulated to have been arboreal and gliding.

  19. Inhibition of bone resorption in vitro by antisense RNA and DNA molecules targeted against carbonic anhydrase II or two subunits of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Laitala, T; Väänänen, H K

    1994-01-01

    The bone resorbing cells, osteoclasts, express high levels of carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) and vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) during bone resorption. We have used antisense RNA and DNA molecules targeted against CA II, and against 16- and 60-kD subunits of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase), to block the expression of these proteins in vitro. Osteoclastic bone resorption was studied in two in vitro culture systems: release of 45Calcium from prelabeled newborn mouse calvaria cultures, and resorption pit assays performed with rat osteoclasts cultured on bovine bone slices. Both antisense RNA and DNA against CA II and the V-ATPase were used to compare their specificities as regards inhibiting bone resorption in vitro. The antisense molecules inhibited the synthesis of these proteins by decreasing the amounts of mRNA in the cells in a highly specific manner. In osteoclast cultures treated with the 16-kD V-ATPase antisense RNA, acidification of an unknown population of intracellular vesicles was highly stimulated. The acidification of these vesicles was not sensitive to amiloride or bafilomycin A1. This suggests the existence of a back-up system for acidification of intracellular vesicles, when the expression of the V-ATPase is blocked. Our results further indicate that blocking the expression of CA II and V-ATPase with antisense RNA or DNA leads to decreased bone resorption. Images PMID:8200964

  20. The avian cell line AGE1.CR.pIX characterized by metabolic flux analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In human vaccine manufacturing some pathogens such as Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara, measles, mumps virus as well as influenza viruses are still produced on primary material derived from embryonated chicken eggs. Processes depending on primary cell culture, however, are difficult to adapt to modern vaccine production. Therefore, we derived previously a continuous suspension cell line, AGE1.CR.pIX, from muscovy duck and established chemically-defined media for virus propagation. Results To better understand vaccine production processes, we developed a stoichiometric model of the central metabolism of AGE1.CR.pIX cells and applied flux variability and metabolic flux analysis. Results were compared to literature dealing with mammalian and insect cell culture metabolism focusing on the question whether cultured avian cells differ in metabolism. Qualitatively, the observed flux distribution of this avian cell line was similar to distributions found for mammalian cell lines (e.g. CHO, MDCK cells). In particular, glucose was catabolized inefficiently and glycolysis and TCA cycle seem to be only weakly connected. Conclusions A distinguishing feature of the avian cell line is that glutaminolysis plays only a minor role in energy generation and production of precursors, resulting in low extracellular ammonia concentrations. This metabolic flux study is the first for a continuous avian cell line. It provides a basis for further metabolic analyses to exploit the biotechnological potential of avian and vertebrate cell lines and to develop specific optimized cell culture processes, e.g. vaccine production processes. PMID:25077436