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Sample records for avium complex paradigm

  1. The Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Inderlied, C B; Kemper, C A; Bermudez, L E

    1993-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease emerged early in the epidemic of AIDS as one of the common opportunistic infections afflicting human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. However, only over the past few years has a consensus developed about its significance to the morbidity and mortality of AIDS. M. avium was well known to mycobacteriologists decades before AIDS, and the MAC was known to cause disease, albeit uncommon, in humans and animals. The early interest in the MAC provided a basis for an explosion of studies over the past 10 years largely in response to the role of the MAC in AIDS opportunistic infection. Molecular techniques have been applied to the epidemiology of MAC disease as well as to a better understanding of the genetics of antimicrobial resistance. The interaction of the MAC with the immune system is complex, and putative MAC virulence factors appear to have a direct effect on the components of cellular immunity, including the regulation of cytokine expression and function. There now is compelling evidence that disseminated MAC disease in humans contributes to both a decrease in the quality of life and survival. Disseminated disease most commonly develops late in the course of AIDS as the CD4 cells are depleted below a critical threshold, but new therapies for prophylaxis and treatment offer considerable promise. These new therapeutic modalities are likely to be useful in the treatment of other forms of MAC disease in patients without AIDS. The laboratory diagnosis of MAC disease has focused on the detection of mycobacteria in the blood and tissues, and although the existing methods are largely adequate, there is need for improvement. Indeed, the successful treatment of MAC disease clearly will require an early and rapid detection of the MAC in clinical specimens long before the establishment of the characteristic overwhelming infection of bone marrow, liver, spleen, and other tissue. Also, a standard method of susceptibility testing

  2. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of thirty Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) organisms were measured. The EPMs of fifteen clinical isolates ranged from -1.9 to -5.0 µm cm V-1s-1, and the EPMs of fifteen environmental isolates ranged from -1...

  3. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of thirty Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) organisms isolated from clinical and environmental sources were measured in 9.15 mM KH2PO4 buffered water. The EPMs of fifteen clinical isolates ranged from -1.9 to -5.0 µm cm V-1 ...

  4. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of thirty Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) organisms were measured. The EPMs of fifteen clinical isolates ranged from -1.9 to -5.0 µm cm V-1s-1, and the EPMs of fifteen environmental isolates ranged from -1...

  5. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of thirty Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) organisms isolated from clinical and environmental sources were measured in 9.15 mM KH2PO4 buffered water. The EPMs of fifteen clinical isolates ranged from -1.9 to -5.0 µm cm V-1 ...

  6. Genotyping of Mycobacterium avium complex organisms using multispacer sequence typing.

    PubMed

    Cayrou, Caroline; Turenne, Christine; Behr, Marcel A; Drancourt, Michel

    2010-03-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) currently comprises eight species of environmental and animal-associated, slowly-growing mycobacteria: Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, Mycobacterium chimaera, Mycobacterium colombiense, Mycobacterium arosiense , Mycobacterium bouchedurhonense, Mycobacterium marseillense and Mycobacterium timonense. In humans, MAC organisms are responsible for opportunistic infections whose unique epidemiology remains poorly understood, in part due to the lack of a genotyping method applicable to all eight MAC species. In this study we developed multispacer sequence typing (MST), a sequencing-based method, for the genotyping of MAC organisms. An alignment of the genome sequence of M. avium subsp. hominissuis strain 104 and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strain K-10 revealed 621 intergenic spacers <1000 bp. From these, 16 spacers were selected that ranged from 300 to 800 bp and contained a number of variable bases, <50 within each of the 16 spacers. Four spacers were successfully PCR-amplified and sequenced in 11 reference strains. Combining the sequence of these four spacers in 106 MAC organisms, including 83 M. avium, 11 M. intracellulare , six M. chimaera, two M. colombiense and one each of M. arosiense, M. bouchedurhonense, M. marseillense and M. timonense, yielded a total of 45 spacer types, with an index of discrimination of 0.94. Each spacer type was specific for a species and certain spacer types were specific for subspecies of M. avium. MST is a new method for genotyping of organisms belonging to any one of the eight MAC species tested in this study.

  7. Genetic relatedness among Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and M. avium complex.

    PubMed

    Labidi, A; Thoen, C O

    1989-01-01

    Total DNA was extracted from M. paratuberculosis (ATCC 19698) and from M. avium complex (ATCC 25291) cultivated on RVB-10 enriched liquid media. Restriction endonuclease analysis of total DNA was performed with 34 enzymes and DNA digestion profiles were compared. Fifteen enzymes revealed important differences between the two species. Two pairs of enzymes (EcoRII, BstNI) and (MboI, Sau3AI) provide evidence for the presence of dcmI and dam methylation in DNA of M. avium complex and M. paratuberculosis. The differences in DNA fragments of these two species could be of potential value in differentiating these clinically significant mycobacteria.

  8. Sequencing of hsp65 Distinguishes among Subsets of the Mycobacterium avium Complex

    PubMed Central

    Turenne, Christine Y.; Semret, Makeda; Cousins, Debby V.; Collins, Desmond M.; Behr, Marcel A.

    2006-01-01

    The Mycobacterium avium complex consists of epidemiologically distinct subsets. The classification of these subsets is complicated by a number of factors, including the ambiguous results obtained with phenotypic and genetic assays and the recent appreciation that human and avian strains appear to be distinct. In previous work, sequencing based on a 441-bp portion of the hsp65 gene has proven to efficiently classify isolates within the Mycobacterium genus but provides low resolution for distinguishing among members of the M. avium complex. Therefore, in this study, we have targeted the more variable 3′ region of the hsp65 gene to determine whether it can effectively discriminate M. avium complex isolates at the levels of species and subspecies. Primers designed for this target consistently generated amplicons for all organisms classified as M. avium complex. Sequences obtained indicate that M. intracellulare is genetically divergent from M. avium organisms, and distinct sequevars were obtained for M. avium subsets, including M. avium subsp. avium (bird type), M. avium subsp. hominissuis, and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. In addition, sequence differences served to distinguish bovine from ovine strains of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. A unique profile for M. avium subsp. silvaticum was not obtained. These results indicate that sequencing the 3′ region of the hsp65 gene can simply and unambiguously distinguish species and subspecies of the M. avium complex. PMID:16455896

  9. GENETIC FINGERPRINTING OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX (MAC) ORGANISMS ISOLATED FROM HOSPITAL PATIENTS AND THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A particularly pathogenic group of mycobacteria belong to the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), which includes M. avium and M. intracellulare. MAC organisms cause disease in children, the elderly, and immuno-compromised individuals. A critical step in preventing MAC infections...

  10. GENETIC FINGERPRINTING OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX (MAC) ORGANISMS ISOLATED FROM HOSPITAL PATIENTS AND THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A particularly pathogenic group of mycobacteria belong to the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), which includes M. avium and M. intracellulare. MAC organisms cause disease in children, the elderly, and immuno-compromised individuals. A critical step in preventing MAC infections...

  11. Mycobacterium avium Complex Cervical Lymphadenitis in an Immunocompetent Adult▿

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Joshua B.; Koeppe, John

    2010-01-01

    Nontuberculosis mycobacterial cervical lymphadenitis is a relatively common disease in immunocompetent children but a rare disease in immunocompetent adults. We report the diagnosis and treatment of Mycobacterium avium complex cervical lymphadenitis in an adult female. Our evaluation of immune competence, including gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-12 (IL-12) signaling, found no evidence of deficiency. PMID:20668140

  12. Hemolysin as a Virulence Factor for Systemic Infection with Isolates of Mycobacterium avium Complex

    PubMed Central

    Maslow, Joel N.; Dawson, David; Carlin, Elizabeth A.; Holland, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    Isolates of the Mycobacterium avium complex were examined for hemolysin expression. Only invasive isolates of M. avium were observed to be hemolytic (P < 0.001), with activity the greatest for isolates of serovars 4 and 8. Thus, M. avium hemolysin appears to represent a virulence factor necessary for invasive disease. PMID:9889239

  13. In Vitro Susceptibility Testing of Bedaquiline against Mycobacterium avium Complex.

    PubMed

    Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Philley, Julie V; Griffith, David E; Thakkar, Foram; Wallace, Richard J

    2017-02-01

    We performed bedaquiline broth microdilution susceptibility testing using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines on 103 respiratory isolates of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), including multidrug-resistant isolates. Approximately 90% of isolates had bedaquiline MICs of ≤0.008 μg/ml, and 102/103 isolates had MICs of ≤0.015 μg/ml. Bedaquiline has excellent potential for use in patients with MAC infections, although for reasons of its metabolism by the cytochrome P450 system, it should not be given with rifampin.

  14. Characterization of Mouse Models of Mycobacterium avium Complex Infection and Evaluation of Drug Combinations

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Deepak V.; Tyagi, Sandeep; Converse, Paul J.; Ammerman, Nicole C.; Grosset, Jacques H.

    2015-01-01

    The Mycobacterium avium complex is the most common cause of nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease worldwide; yet, an optimal treatment regimen for M. avium complex infection has not been established. Clarithromycin is accepted as the cornerstone drug for treatment of M. avium lung disease; however, good model systems, especially animal models, are needed to evaluate the most effective companion drugs. We performed a series of experiments to evaluate and use different mouse models (comparing BALB/c, C57BL/6, nude, and beige mice) of M. avium infection and to assess the anti-M. avium activity of single and combination drug regimens, in vitro, ex vivo, and in mice. In vitro, clarithromycin and moxifloxacin were most active against M. avium, and no antagonism was observed between these two drugs. Nude mice were more susceptible to M. avium infection than the other mouse strains tested, but the impact of treatment was most clearly seen in M. avium-infected BALB/c mice. The combination of clarithromycin-ethambutol-rifampin was more effective in all infected mice than moxifloxacin-ethambutol-rifampin; the addition of moxifloxacin to the clarithromycin-containing regimen did not increase treatment efficacy. Clarithromycin-containing regimens are the most effective for M. avium infection; substitution of moxifloxacin for clarithromycin had a negative impact on treatment efficacy. PMID:25624335

  15. REAL-TIME QUANTITATIVE PCR DETECTION OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) includes the species M. avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI), and others. MAC are listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Contaminant Candidate List (CCL) due to their association with human disease and occurrence in public drinkin...

  16. Detection of quantification of Mycobacterium avium complex organisms in drinking water

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) includes the species M. avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI), and others. MAC are listed on the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Contaminant Candidate List 2 (CCL2) due to their association with human disease and occurrence in public dr...

  17. Detection of quantification of Mycobacterium avium complex organisms in drinking water

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) includes the species M. avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI), and others. MAC are listed on the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Contaminant Candidate List 2 (CCL2) due to their association with human disease and occurrence in public dr...

  18. REAL-TIME QUANTITATIVE PCR DETECTION OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) includes the species M. avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI), and others. MAC are listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Contaminant Candidate List (CCL) due to their association with human disease and occurrence in public drinkin...

  19. Draft genome sequence of a Mycobacterium avium complex isolate from a broadbill bird

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We report the draft genome sequences of ten Mycobacterium avium complex isolates obtained from diverse hosts. This collection includes isolates obtained from deer, pig, elephant, ruddy duck and Red-tailed hawk species. The type strain of Mycobacterium avium subspecies silvaticum (ATCC 49884) is also...

  20. Evaluation of Vitek MS for rapid classification of clinical isolates belonging to Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Daniel P; Zembower, Teresa R; Qi, Chao

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of the Vitek MS system to classify clinical pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex isolates compared to multilocus sequence analysis. Vitek MS accurately identified 55% of the isolates as M. avium and 18% as M. intracellulare, but misidentified 24 (27%) Mycobacterium chimaera isolates as Mycobacterium intracellulare.

  1. Proteins : paradigms of complexity /

    SciTech Connect

    Frauenfelder, Hans,

    2001-01-01

    Proteins are the working machines of living systems. Directed by the DNA, of the order of a few hundred building blocks, selected from twenty different amino acids, are covalently linked into a linear polypeptide chain. In the proper environment, the chain folds into the working protein, often a globule of linear dimensions of a few nanometers. The biologist considers proteins units from which living systems are built. Many physical scientists look at them as systems in which the laws of complexity can be studied better than anywhere else. Some of the results of such studies will be sketched.

  2. AMPLIFIED FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM ANALYSIS OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ISOLATES RECOVERED FROM SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fine-scale genotyping methods are necessary in order to identify possible sources of human exposure to opportunistic pathogens belonging to the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). In this study, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was evaluated for fingerprintin...

  3. AMPLIFIED FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM ANALYSIS OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ISOLATES RECOVERED FROM SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fine-scale genotyping methods are necessary in order to identify possible sources of human exposure to opportunistic pathogens belonging to the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). In this study, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was evaluated for fingerprintin...

  4. Infection of Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) with Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) bacteria.

    PubMed

    Balseiro, Ana; Merediz, Isabel; Sevilla, Iker A; García-Castro, Carmen; Gortázar, Christian; Prieto, José M; Delahay, Richard J

    2011-05-01

    There are few reports of infection with Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) bacteria in badgers. In this study archive data relating to the isolation of MAC organisms from badgers in the UK is presented, and information derived from recent cases of such infection in Spain is used to illustrate the associated pathology and to characterise strain types. Tissue samples were cultured for mycobacteria and, in the case of Spanish badgers, were examined both histopathologically and using immunohistochemistry, and DNA typing of M. avium isolates was also carried out. A total of 5 (7.35%) and 281 (0.51%) isolates of M. avium spp. were recovered from badgers from the studies in Spain and the UK, respectively. DNA typing of the isolates from Spain identified the sub-species M. avium hominissuis and M. avium avium. These findings provide new information on the prevalence of MAC organisms in badgers in the UK and Spain. The extent to which infected badgers may be involved in the epidemiology of M. avium in other wild or domestic hosts remains unknown.

  5. Distribution of IS901 in strains of Mycobacterium avium complex from swine by using IS901-detecting primers that discriminate between M. avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare.

    PubMed

    Nishimori, K; Eguchi, M; Nakaoka, Y; Onodera, Y; Ito, T; Tanaka, K

    1995-08-01

    The presence of the mycobacterial insertion sequence IS901 was studied by PCR with reference strains of Mycobacterium avium complex; 122 veterinary strains of mycobacteria, mainly M. avium complex, isolated from swine; and 15 clinical strains. Four kinds of DNA extraction methods for PCR were compared. Use of the commercial extraction matrix allowed for the faster and easier preparation of PCR-amplifiable DNA than use of NaOH heating extraction or sodium dodecyl sulfate extraction of pretreated mycobacteria. It also provided more effective protection than boiling extraction against the destruction of DNA. Four reference strains of serovars 1 to 3 possessed IS901. Nine reference strains of serovars 1, 4 to 6, 8 to 11, and 21 possessed only IS901 insertion sites. A novel PCR product was found in the other reference strains of serovars 7, 12 to 17, 19, and 20 and two clinical strains of serovar 15. It is suggested that the primers that amplified the insertion portion of IS901 divided the M. avium complex into M. avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, and other mycobacteria. None of the 110 strains of M. avium complex isolated from swine possessed IS901. It is suggested that the absence of IS901 might be characteristic of swine-derived strains of M. avium complex.

  6. Species identification of Mycobacterium avium complex isolates by a variety of molecular techniques.

    PubMed

    Beggs, M L; Stevanova, R; Eisenach, K D

    2000-02-01

    Organisms in the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC; M. avium, M. intracellulare, and "nonspecific or X" MAC) are emerging pathogens among individual organisms of which significant genetic variability is displayed. The objective of the present study was to evaluate various molecular methods for the rapid and definitive identification of MAC species. Isolates were obtained from both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients and HIV-negative patients with and without known predisposing conditions. The isolates were initially hybridized with nucleic acid probes complementary to the rRNA of the respective mycobacterial species (AccuProbe Culture Confirmation kits for M. avium, M. intracellulare, and MAC species; Gen-Probe). Isolates were also examined by PCR and in some cases by Southern blot hybridization for the insertion element IS1245. Two other techniques included a PCR assay that amplifies the mig gene, a putative virulence factor for MAC, and hsp65 gene amplification and sequencing. This study led to the following observations. Eighty-five percent of the isolates from HIV-positive patients were M. avium and 86% of the isolates from HIV-negative patients were M. intracellulare. Fifteen of the M. avium isolates did not contain IS1245 and 7% of the M. intracellulare isolates were found to carry IS1245. All of the M. avium strains were mig positive, and all of the M. intracellulare strains were mig negative.

  7. Investigation of Spa Pools Associated with Lung Disorders Caused by Mycobacterium avium Complex in Immunocompetent Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lumb, Richard; Stapledon, Richard; Scroop, Andrew; Bond, Peter; Cunliffe, David; Goodwin, Allan; Doyle, Robyn; Bastian, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    Three cases of Mycobacterium avium complex-related lung disorders were associated with two poorly maintained spa pools by genotypic investigations. Inadequate disinfection of the two spas had reduced the load of environmental bacteria to less than 1 CFU/ml but allowed levels of M. avium complex of 4.3 × 104 and 4.5 × 103 CFU/ml. Persistence of the disease-associated genotype was demonstrated in one spa pool for over 5 months until repeated treatments with greater than 10 mg of chlorine per liter for 1-h intervals eliminated M. avium complex from the spa pool. A fourth case of Mycobacterium avium complex-related lung disease was associated epidemiologically but not genotypically with another spa pool that had had no maintenance undertaken. This spa pool contained low numbers of mycobacteria by smear and was culture positive for M. avium complex, and the nonmycobacterial organism count was 5.2 × 106 CFU/ml. Public awareness about the proper maintenance of private (residential) spa pools must be promoted by health departments in partnership with spa pool retailers. PMID:15294830

  8. Proposal to elevate Mycobacterium avium complex ITS sequevar MAC-Q to Mycobacterium vulneris sp. nov.

    PubMed

    van Ingen, J; Boeree, M J; Kösters, K; Wieland, A; Tortoli, E; Dekhuijzen, P N R; van Soolingen, D

    2009-09-01

    The Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) consists of four recognized species, Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium colombiense, Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium chimaera, and a variety of other strains that may be members of undescribed taxa. We report on two isolates of a scotochromogenic, slowly growing, non-tuberculous Mycobacterium species within the M. avium complex from a lymph node and an infected wound after a dogbite of separate patients in The Netherlands. The extrapulmonary infections in immunocompetent patients suggested a high level of virulence. These isolates were characterized by a unique nucleotide sequence in the 16S rRNA gene, 99% similar to Mycobacterium colombiense, and the MAC-Q 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence. Sequence analyses of the hsp65 gene revealed 97% similarity to M. avium. The rpoB gene sequence was 98% similar to M. colombiense. Phenotypically, the scotochromogenicity, positive semi-quantitative catalase and heat-stable catalase tests, negative tellurite reductase and urease tests and susceptibility to hydroxylamine and oleic acid set these isolates apart from related species. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of cell-wall mycolic acid content revealed a unique pattern, related to that of M. avium and M. colombiense. Together, these findings supported a separate species status within the Mycobacterium avium complex. We propose elevation of scotochromogenic M. avium complex strains sharing this 16S gene and MAC-Q ITS sequence to separate species status, for which the name Mycobacterium vulneris sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NLA000700772T (=DSM 45247T=CIP 109859T).

  9. Whole chromosomal DNA probes for rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, M C; McMillan, C; Coyle, M B

    1987-01-01

    Whole chromosomal DNA probes were used to identify clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium complex, and Mycobacterium gordonae. The probe for M. tuberculosis was prepared from Mycobacterium bovis BCG, which has been shown to be closely related to M. tuberculosis. A probe for the M. avium complex was prepared from three strains representing each of the three DNA homology groups in the M. avium complex. The probes were used in dot blot assays to identify clinical isolates of mycobacteria. The dot blot test correctly identified 57 of the 61 (93%) cultures grown on solid media, and 100% of antibiotic-treated broth-grown cells were correctly identified. Identification by dot blot required a maximum of 48 h. When the probes were tested against 63 positive BACTEC (Johnston Laboratories, Inc., Towson, Md.) cultures of clinical specimens, 59% were correctly identified. However, of the 14 BACTEC cultures that had been treated with antibiotics before being lysed, 13 (93%) were correctly identified. PMID:3112180

  10. Thioridazine as Chemotherapy for Mycobacterium avium Complex Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Devyani; Srivastava, Shashikant; Musuka, Sandirai

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC) causes an intractable intracellular infection that presents as chronic pulmonary disease. Currently, therapy consists of ethambutol and macrolides and takes several years to complete. The neuroleptic phenothiazine thioridazine kills mycobacteria by inhibiting the electron transport chain. In several experiments with bacterial populations of up to 1012 CFU/ml, we failed to isolate any bacteria resistant to 3 times the MIC of thioridazine, suggesting the absence of resistant mutants at bacterial burdens severalfold higher than those encountered in patients. In the hollow-fiber model of intracellular MAC (HFS-MAC), thioridazine achieved an extracellular half-life of 16.8 h and an intracellular half-life of 19.7 h. Thioridazine concentrations were >28,000-fold higher inside infected macrophages than in the HFS-MAC central compartment (equivalent to plasma). Thioridazine maximal kill was 5.20 ± 0.75 log10 CFU/ml on day 7 (r2 = 0.96) and 7.19 ± 0.31 log10 CFU/ml on day 14 (r2 = 0.99), the highest seen with any drug in the system. Dose fractionation studies revealed that thioridazine efficacy and acquired drug resistance were driven by the peak concentation-to-MIC ratio, with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 2.78 ± 0.44 for microbial killing. Acquired drug resistance was encountered by day 21 with suboptimal doses, demonstrating that fluctuating drug concentrations drive evolution faster than static concentrations in mutation frequency studies. However, the thioridazine EC50 changed 16.14-fold when the concentration of fetal bovine serum was changed from 0% to 50%, suggesting that intracellular potency could be heavily curtailed by protein binding. Efficacy in patients will depend on the balance between trapping of the drug in the pulmonary system and the massive intracellular concentrations versus very high protein binding of thioridazine. PMID:27216055

  11. Zoonotic aspects of Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC).

    PubMed

    Biet, Franck; Boschiroli, Maria Laura; Thorel, Marie Françoise; Guilloteau, Laurence A

    2005-01-01

    Pathogens that are transmitted between the environment, wildlife, livestock and humans represent major challenges for the protection of human and domestic animal health, the economic sustainability of agriculture, and the conservation of wildlife. Among such pathogens, the genus Mycobacterium is well represented by M. bovis, the etiological agent of bovine tuberculosis, M. avium ssp. paratuberculosis (Map) the etiological agent of Johne disease, M. avium ssp. avium (Maa) and in a few common cases by other emergent environmental mycobacteria. Epidemiologic surveys performed in Europe, North America and New Zealand have demonstrated the existence and importance of environmental and wildlife reservoirs of mycobacterial infections that limit the attempts of disease control programmes. The aim of this review is to examine the zoonotic aspects of mycobacteria transmitted from the environment and wildlife. This work is focused on the species of two main groups of mycobacteria classified as important pathogens for humans and animals: first, M. bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis, which belongs to the M. tuberculosis complex and has a broad host range including wildlife, captive wildlife, domestic livestock, non-human primates and humans; the second group examined, is the M. avium-intracellulare complex (MAC) which includes M. avium ssp. avium causing major health problems in AIDS patients and M. avium ssp. paratuberculosis the etiological agent of Johne disease in cattle and identified in patients with Crohn disease. MAC agents, in addition to a broad host range, are environmental mycobacteria found in numerous biotopes including the soil, water, aerosols, protozoa, deep litter and fresh tropical vegetation. This review examines the possible reservoirs of these pathogens in the environment and in wildlife, their role as sources of infection in humans and animals and their health impact on humans. The possibilities of control and management programmes for

  12. Assessing the effectiveness of low-pressure ultraviolet light for inactivating Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) micro-organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: To assess low-pressure ultraviolet light (LP-UV) inactivation kinetics of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) strains in a water matrix using collimated beam apparatus. Methods and Results: Strains of M. avium (n = 3) and Mycobacterium intracellulare (n = 2) were exposed t...

  13. Assessing the effectiveness of low-pressure ultraviolet light for inactivating Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) micro-organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: To assess low-pressure ultraviolet light (LP-UV) inactivation kinetics of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) strains in a water matrix using collimated beam apparatus. Methods and Results: Strains of M. avium (n = 3) and Mycobacterium intracellulare (n = 2) were exposed t...

  14. Envelope protein complexes of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and their antigenicity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne’s disease, a chronic enteric disease of ruminant animals. In the present study, blue native PAGE electrophoresis and 2D SDS-PAGE were used to separate MAP envelope protein complexes, followed by mass spectrometry (MS) ...

  15. Structure of a New Glycolipid from the Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare Complex

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Motoko; Ohta, Akihiro; Sasaki, Shun-ichi; Minnikin, David E.

    1999-01-01

    From the lipid fraction of a freeze-dried cell mass of a strain of the Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare complex, a new glycolipid was isolated and was characterized as 5-mycoloyl-α-arabinofuranosyl (1→1′)-glycerol, mainly on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies. PMID:10094713

  16. Improved detection of Mycobacterium avium complex with the Bactec radiometric system

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffner, S.E.

    1988-05-01

    A reconsideration of the laboratory methods used for primary isolation of mycobacteria other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis is needed due to the increasingly recognized importance of such mycobacterial infections in immunocompromised patients. One example of this is the severe opportunistic infections caused by Mycobacterium avium complex among AIDS patients. In this study, the Bactec radiometric system was compared to conventional culture on solid medium for the detection of M. avium complex in 3,612 selected clinical specimens, mainly of extrapulmonary origin. Of a total number of 63 M. avium complex isolates, the Bactec system detected 58 (92%), compared to 37 (59%) for conventional culture. A much more rapid detection was attained with radiometric technique than with conventional culture. The mean detection time for the cultures positive with both methods was 7.1 and 28.3 days, respectively. The Bactec radiometric system achieves a rapid and significantly more sensitive detection and seems to be an excellent complement to conventional culture in the laboratory diagnosis of infections with the M. avium complex.

  17. Efficient Differentiation of Mycobacterium avium Complex Species and Subspecies by Use of Five-Target Multiplex PCR▿

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sung Jae; Lee, Byung Soo; Koh, Won-Jung; Manning, Elizabeth J. B.; Anklam, Kelly; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Lambrecht, Randall S.; Collins, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Infections caused by the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are on the rise in both human and veterinary medicine. A means of effectively discriminating among closely related yet pathogenetically diverse members of the MAC would enable better diagnosis and treatment as well as further our understanding of the epidemiology of these pathogens. In this study, a five-target multiplex PCR designed to discriminate MAC organisms isolated from liquid culture media was developed. This MAC multiplex was designed to amplify a 16S rRNA gene target common to all Mycobacterium species, a chromosomal target called DT1 that is unique to M. avium subsp. avium serotypes 2 and 3, to M. avium subsp. silvaticum, and to M. intracellulare, and three insertion sequences, IS900, IS901, and IS1311. The pattern of amplification results allowed determination of whether isolates were mycobacteria, whether they were members of the MAC, and whether they belonged to one of three major MAC subspecies, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, M. avium subsp. avium, and M. avium subsp. hominissuis. Analytical sensitivity was 10 fg of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genomic DNA, 5 to 10 fg of M. avium subsp. avium genomic DNA, and 2 to 5 fg of DNA from other mycobacterial species. Identification accuracy of the MAC multiplex was evaluated by testing 53 bacterial reference strains consisting of 28 different mycobacterial species and 12 nonmycobacterial species. Identification accuracy in a clinical setting was evaluated for 223 clinical MAC isolates independently identified by other methods. Isolate identification agreement between the MAC multiplex and these comparison assays was 100%. The novel MAC multiplex is a rapid, reliable, and simple assay for discrimination of MAC species and subspecies in liquid culture media. PMID:20810779

  18. Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis analysis of the Mycobacterium avium complex and other mycobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Wasem, C F; McCarthy, C M; Murray, L W

    1991-01-01

    Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis analysis was used to evaluate the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), M. paratuberculosis, and nine other mycobacterial species. The average number of alleles per locus was 2.8 for the 35 MAC and 2 M. paratuberculosis strains which represented 24 electrophoretic types (ETs) and two distinct groups. The M. avium group was resolved into 17 ETs and contained the M. paratuberculosis ET. The M. intracellulare group consisted of six ETs. There was complete agreement between Gen-Probe identification and group placement by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. The mean genetic diversity per locus for the 24 MAC ETs was 0.38. This procedure subdivided some serovars and, if implemented, should prove to be a powerful epidemiologic tool for the MAC. Eleven additional ETs were formed after the data for the other mycobacterial species were pooled with those for the MAC. PMID:2007633

  19. Mycobacteriosis in ostriches (Struthio camelus) due to infection with Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Pamela; Jahns, Hanne; Power, Eugene; Bainbridge, John; Kenny, Kevin; Corpa, Juan M; Cassidy, Joseph P; Callanan, John J

    2013-12-01

    Avian tuberculosis rarely affects ratites compared to other bird species and is typically caused by Mycobacterium avium species. This study describes the pathological and microbiological findings in three adult ostriches with mycobacteriosis, in one of which Mycobacterium bovis was isolated from the lesions. Post mortem examinations on ostriches from two different zoological collections in Ireland revealed multifocal caseous granulomas affecting the spleen and liver in all cases, with additional involvement of intestines in two cases. In one case, granulomas were present within the pharynx, at the thoracic inlet and multifocally on the pleural surface. Acid-fast bacilli were observed in all lesions. Mycobacterium sp. of the M. avium complex was isolated from the intestinal lesions in the two cases with intestinal involvement, and M. bovis sp. oligotype SB0140 was cultured from the liver of the third ostrich. This represents the first reported case of M. bovis infection in an ostrich. Avian tuberculosis due to M. bovis is rare and to date has been reported in only parrots and experimentally inoculated birds. Mycobacterium bovis needs to be considered as a possible cause of tuberculosis in ostriches because the lesions are similar to those observed with M. avium complex infection.

  20. [Distribution of PRA patterns of clinical isolates of the Mycobacterium avium complex from Spain and South America].

    PubMed

    Murcia, Martha Isabel; Leao, Sylvia Cardoso; Ritacco, Viviana; Palenque, Elia; de Oliveira, Rosangela Siqueira; Reniero, Ana; Menendez, Maria Carmen; Telles, María Alice da Silva; Hadad, David Jamil; Barrera, Lucía; García, María Jesús

    2004-06-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infections are the most frequent systemic infections associated with advanced AIDS. DNA probes for accurate identification of mycobacteria are available but are very expensive in many Latin American settings. Consequently, most Latin American diagnostic laboratories employ inaccurate and outdated tests for mycobacteria identification. Therefore, PCR restriction analysis (PRA) of the hsp65 gene was evaluated for the identification of 163 MAC human isolates originated from Spain and South America. The predominant PRA type in each country was: M. avium type I in Argentina (23/42, 55%) and Brazil (48/72, 67%), M. avium type II in Spain (18/26, 69%) and M. avium type III in Colombia (10/23, 43%). The Colombia frequency is noteworthy, since the PRA type III was quite infrequent in the other three countries. Furthermore, its presence has not been reported outside the Americas. The advantages and disadvantages of PRA in diagnostic mycobacteriology are discussed.

  1. Experimental Reactivation of Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium Complex Infection in a Modified Cornell-Like Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Sik; Kim, Jong-Seok; Kim, Hong Min; Kwon, Kee Woong; Cho, Sang-Nae; Shin, Sung Jae; Koh, Won-Jung

    2015-01-01

    The latency and reactivation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection has been well studied. However, there have been few studies of the latency and reactivation of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), the most common etiological non-tuberculous Mycobacterium species next to M. tuberculosis in humans worldwide. We hypothesized that latent MAC infections can be reactivated following immunosuppression after combination chemotherapy with clarithromycin and rifampicin under experimental conditions. To this end, we employed a modified Cornell-like murine model of tuberculosis and investigated six strains consisting of two type strains and four clinical isolates of M. avium and M. intracellulare. After aerosol infection of each MAC strain, five to six mice per group were euthanized at 2, 4, 10, 18, 28 and 35 weeks post-infection, and lungs were sampled to analyze bacterial burden and histopathology. One strain of each species maintained a culture-negative state for 10 weeks after completion of 6 weeks of chemotherapy, but was reactivated after 5 weeks of immunosuppression in the lungs with dexamethasone (three out of six mice in M. avium infection) or sulfasalazine (four out of six mice in both M. avium and M. intracellulare infection). The four remaining MAC strains exhibited decreased bacterial loads in response to chemotherapy; however, they remained at detectable levels and underwent regrowth after immunosuppression. In addition, the exacerbated lung pathology demonstrated a correlation with bacterial burden after reactivation. In conclusion, our results suggest the possibility of MAC reactivation in an experimental mouse model, and experimentally demonstrate that a compromised immune status can induce reactivation and/or regrowth of MAC infection. PMID:26406237

  2. Cnn: a Paradigm for Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Leon O.

    The following sections are included: * What is a CNN? * Part I: Standard CNNs * Standard CNNs are uniquely specified by CNN genes * Oscillations and chaos from standard CNNs * Complete stability criteria for standard CNNs * Bistable criterion * Coding the CNN gene * Edge detection CNN * Corner detection CNN * A gallery of basic CNN genes * Does there exist a CNN gene for solving Minsky's global connectivity problem? * Decoding the CNN gene * Examples of input-output CNN operators * Uncoupled CNN genes * Boolean CNN genes and truth tables * What task can an uncoupled Boolean CNN gene Perform? * Bifurcation of CNN genes * The game-of-life CNN gene * The CNN universal machine * Generalized cellular automata * A glimpse at some real-world CNN applications * Part II: Autonomous CNNs * Pattern formation in standard CNNs * Characterization of stable equilibria * The dynamics of pattern formation * CNN pattern formation in biology and physics * Pattern formation in reaction-diffusion CNNs * Nonlinear waves in reaction-diffusion CNNs * Simulating nonlinear PDEs via autonomous CNNs * Part III: Local Activity: The Genesis of Complexity * Transistors and local activity: What do they have to common? * Nonlinear circuit models for reaction-diffusion CNNs * What is local activity? * Cell equilibrium points * Local state equations and local power flows * Local activity in reaction-diffusion CNN cells * Testing for local activity * Testing one-port CNN cells for local activity * Testing two-port CNN cells for local activity * Why is local activity necessary for pattern formation? * How to choose locally-active CNN parameters? * Local activity and stability are different concepts * The local activity dogma

  3. Cell-free system responsible for internal radiolabeling of glycopeptidolipids of the Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Ramasesh, N; Wright, E L; Barrow, W W

    1992-01-01

    Internal radiolabeling of serotype-specific glycopeptidolipids with [14C]mannose was accomplished with a cell-free system derived from serotype 20 of the Mycobacterium avium complex. Similar radiolabeling was not apparent with a cell-free system derived from the rough colony variant, previously shown to be devoid of glycopeptidolipids. Although a comparative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protein analysis of the parent and rough variant strains revealed a close similarity, there were some proteins unique to the parent strain. Images PMID:1729193

  4. Characterization of total deoxyribonucleic acid of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis (ATCC 19698) and of M. avium complex (ATCC 25291) using restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Labidi, A

    1988-01-01

    Total DNA was extracted from M. paratuberculosis (ATCC 19698) and from M. avium complex (ATCC 25291) cultivated on RVB-10 enriched liquid media. Restriction endonuclease analysis was conducted of Total DNA using 34 enzymes and DNA digestion profiles were compared. Fifteen enzymes revealed important differences between the two species. Two pairs of enzymes (EcoRII, BstNI) and (MboI, Sau3AI) provide evidence for the presence of dcmI and dam methylation in DNA of M. avium complex and M. paratuberculosis. The differences in DNA fragments of these two species could be of potential value in differentiating these clinically significant mycobacteria.

  5. THE ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX (MAC) RECOVERED FROM LOS ANGELES POTABLE WATER, A POSSIBLE SOURCE OF INFECTION IN AIDS PATIENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Los Angeles water was investigated as a possible source of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection in patients with AIDS. MAC consists of M.avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI) and Mycobacterium X (MX)(positive for MAC by DNA probe but not MA or MI). The study included 13 reser...

  6. THE ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX (MAC) RECOVERED FROM LOS ANGELES POTABLE WATER, A POSSIBLE SOURCE OF INFECTION IN AIDS PATIENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Los Angeles water was investigated as a possible source of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection in patients with AIDS. MAC consists of M.avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI) and Mycobacterium X (MX)(positive for MAC by DNA probe but not MA or MI). The study included 13 reser...

  7. Modified lymphocyte response to mitogens after intraperitoneal injection of glycopeptidolipid antigens from Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Brownback, P E; Barrow, W W

    1988-01-01

    Intraperitoneal injection of glycopeptidolipid (GPL) antigens from Mycobacterium avium complex serovar 4 resulted in the decreased ability of murine splenic lymphocytes to respond to nonspecific-mitogen-induced blastogenesis when exposed to concanavalin A, phytohemagglutinin, and lipopolysaccharide. Adherent cell depletion and cell mixing experiments with T lymphocytes indicated that macrophages were not a major contributor to the immunosuppression observed in this study. Enumeration of splenic lymphocytes by means of flow-cytometry with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that intraperitoneal injection of GPL antigens resulted in a significant decrease in Thy-1+ and Lyt-1+ cells but no change in the numbers of Lyt-2+ cells. Treatment with GPL antigens in vitro affected the ability of splenic mononuclear cells to respond optimally for concanavalin A-induced blastogenesis at 40 micrograms of GPL per 4 X 10(5) cells per 0.2 ml and lipopolysaccharide-induced blastogenesis at concentrations ranging from 5 to 40 micrograms of GPL per 4 X 10(5) cells per 0.2 ml. However, in vitro treatment with GPL antigens did not affect phytohemagglutinin-induced blastogenesis at concentrations ranging from 5 to 40 micrograms of GPL per 4 X 10(5) cells per 0.2 ml. These findings suggest that GPL antigens or their metabolites affect lymphocyte function and may be important cofactors in the overall pathogenesis of M. avium complex infections. PMID:3258582

  8. Culture and molecular method for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk and dairy products.

    PubMed

    Messelhäusser, U; Kämpf, P; Hörmansdorfer, S; Wagner, B; Schalch, B; Busch, U; Höller, C; Wallner, P; Barth, G; Rampp, A

    2012-01-01

    A combined molecular and cultural method for the detection of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis was developed and tested with artificially contaminated milk and dairy products. Results indicate that the method can be used for a reliable detection as a basis for first risk assessments.

  9. Investigation of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) in Australian commercial milk using qPCR.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Shraddha; Caro Tohme, Tanya; Whiley, Harriet

    2017-02-01

    This technical research communication describes the first study to use quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to investigate the presence of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) in Australian pasteurised milk. MAC is the most common NTM responsible for human illnesses and includes M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). MAC is a causative agent of lymphadenitis in children, with contaminated food and water considered as a likely source. As such the presence of MAC in milk would have public health significance. MAP has been linked to Crohn's disease and is also the causative agent of Johne's disease in cattle. Previous studies have detected MAP in pasteurised milk from Brazil, India, Czech Republic, USA, Argentina, UK, Iran, Ireland and the United Kingdom. This study investigated a total of 180 commercially available Australian pasteurised milk samples which were tested for MAC DNA in triplicate using PCR. All samples were negative for MAC DNA. An additional 14 milk samples were tested, incubated for 3 weeks at 37 °C to potentially increase the concentration of any viable MAC that may be present and then retested. All samples were again negative for MAC DNA. This could be due to concentrations below the limit of detection, limited sample size or could be reflective of the Australian biosecurity control protocols and surveillance of Johne's disease in ruminant animals.

  10. rpoB sequence-based identification of Mycobacterium avium complex species.

    PubMed

    Ben Salah, Iskandar; Adékambi, Toidi; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2008-12-01

    The Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) comprises slowly growing mycobacteria responsible for opportunistic infections and zoonoses. The ability to speciate MAC isolates in the clinical microbiology laboratory is critical for determining the organism implicated in clinical disease and for epidemiological investigation of the source of infection. Investigation of a 711 bp variable fragment of rpoB flanked by the Myco-F/Myco-R primers found a 0.7-5.1 % divergence among MAC reference strains, with Mycobacterium chimaera and Mycobacterium intracellulare being the most closely related. Using a 0.7 % divergence cut-off, 83 % of 100 clinical isolates, which had been previously identified by phenotypic characteristics and 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (ITS) probing, were identified as M. avium, 8 % as M. intracellulare and 2 % as M. chimaera. The uniqueness of seven isolates, exhibiting < 99.3 % rpoB sequence similarity with MAC reference strains, was confirmed by 16S rDNA, ITS and hsp65 sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. Partial rpoB gene sequencing using the Myco-F/Myco-R primers permits one-step identification of MAC isolates at the species level and the detection of potentially novel MAC species.

  11. Mycobacterium avium complex in day care hot water systems, and persistence of live cells and DNA in hot water pipes.

    PubMed

    Bukh, Annette S; Roslev, Peter

    2014-04-01

    The Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is a group of opportunistic human pathogens that may thrive in engineered water systems. MAC has been shown to occur in drinking water supplies based on surface water, but less is known about the occurrence and persistence of live cells and DNA in public hot water systems based on groundwater. In this study, we examined the occurrence of MAC in hot water systems of public day care centers and determined the persistence of live and dead M. avium cells and naked DNA in model systems with the modern plumbing material cross-linked polyethylene (PEX). The occurrence of MAC and co-occurrence of Legionella spp. and Legionella pneumophila were determined using cultivation and qPCR. Co-occurrences of MAC and Legionella were detected in water and/or biofilms in all hot water systems at temperatures between 40 and 54 °C. Moderate correlations were observed between abundance of culturable MAC and that of MAC genome copies, and between MAC and total eubacterial genome copies. No quantitative relationship was observed between occurrence of Legionella and that of MAC. Persistence in hot water of live and dead M. avium cells and naked DNA was studied using PEX laboratory model systems at 44 °C. Naked DNA and DNA in dead M. avium cells persisted for weeks. Live M. avium increased tenfold in water and biofilms on PEX. The results suggest that water and biofilms in groundwater-based hot water systems can constitute reservoirs of MAC, and that amplifiable naked DNA is relatively short-lived, whereas PEX plumbing material supports persistence and proliferation of M. avium.

  12. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium Complexes by Real-Time PCR in Bovine Milk from Brazilian Dairy Farms.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, André Vinícius Andrade; Dos Reis, Emily Marques; Rodrigues, Rogério Oliveira; Cenci, Alexander; Cerva, Cristine; Mayer, Fabiana Quoos

    2015-05-01

    Foodborne diseases are a public health problem worldwide. The consumption of contaminated raw milk has been recognized as a major cause of transmission of bovine tuberculosis to humans. Other mycobacteria that may be present in raw milk and may cause diseases are those belonging to the Mycobacterium avium complex. In this study, molecular biology tools were applied to investigate raw milk contamination with Mycobacterium spp. in family dairy farms from Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil. Furthermore, different variables related to the source of the milk, herd characteristics, and management were evaluated for their effect on milk contamination. Five hundred and two samples were analyzed, of which 354 were from the Northwest region (102 farms with samples from 93 bulk tanks and 261 animals) and 148 from the South region of the state (22 farms with samples from 23 bulk tanks and 125 animals). Among them, 10 (1.99%) and 7 (1.39%) were positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (9 confirmed as Mycobacterium bovis) and M. avium complexes, respectively. There was no difference in the frequencies of positive samples between the regions or the sample sources. Of the positive samples, 4 were collected from a bulk tank (1 positive for M. avium and 3 for M. tuberculosis). Moreover, 1 sample was positive concomitantly for M. tuberculosis and M. avium complexes. On risk analysis, no variable was associated with raw milk contamination by M. tuberculosis complex species. However, washing the udders of all animals and drying them with paper towels were weakly classified as risk factors for M. avium contamination. Positive samples were obtained from both animals and bulk tanks, which emphasizes the importance of tuberculosis control programs and provides evidence that milk monitoring can be used as a control practice. Moreover, the findings of this study reinforce the need for awareness of the problems of raw milk consumption among the general population.

  13. Clinical Evaluation of COBAS TaqMan PCR for the Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ikegame, Satoshi; Sakoda, Yoritake; Fujino, Nao; Taguchi, Kazuhito; Kawasaki, Masayuki; Kajiki, Akira

    2012-01-01

    A retrospective observational study was performed to determine the sensitivity and limitation of PCR test for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium complex. We obtained clinical specimens collected from the respiratory tract, cultured M. tuberculosis or M. avium complex, and performed PCR analysis. A total of 299 samples (M. tuberculosis, 177; M. avium, 35; M. intracellulare, 87) were analyzed by COBAS TaqMan PCR from April 2007 to March 2011. The PCR positivity rates were 50–55%, 70–100%, 88–98%, and 100% in smear-negative, smear 1+, 2+, and 3+ groups, respectively. The PCR positivity of tuberculosis in smear 1+ was 80.6%, which was statistically significantly (P < 0.001) lower than that of smear 2+ (97.3%). From January 2005 to March 2007, we collected an additional 138 samples (M. tuberculosis, 74; M. avium, 21; M. intracellulare, 43), which were analyzed by COBAS Amplicor PCR. The PCR positivity rates obtained using COBAS TaqMan PCR and COBAS Amplicor PCR were not significantly different. The sensitivity of PCR test for mycobacteria is not sufficient in case of smear 1+. Careful consideration must be given to the interpretation of negative PCR test results in smear 1+, because smear-positive tuberculosis is the criterion for isolation. PMID:23029612

  14. Rapid susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium avium complex and Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from AIDS patients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhople, Arvind M.

    1994-01-01

    In ominous projections issued by both U.S. Public Health Service and the World Health Organization, the epidemic of HIV infection will continue to rise more rapidly worldwide than predicted earlier. The AIDS patients are susceptible to diseases called opportunistic infections of which tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection are most common. This has created an urgent need to uncover new drugs for the treatment of these infections. In the seventies, NASA scientists at Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, had adopted a biochemical indicator, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), to detect presence of life in extraterrestrial space. We proposed to develop ATP assay technique to determine sensitivity of antibacterial compounds against MAC and M. tuberculosis.

  15. Infection of Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) with Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium complex in Spain.

    PubMed

    Balseiro, Ana; Rodríguez, Oscar; González-Quirós, Pablo; Merediz, Isabel; Sevilla, Iker A; Davé, Dipesh; Dalley, Deanna J; Lesellier, Sandrine; Chambers, Mark A; Bezos, Javier; Muñoz, Marta; Delahay, Richard J; Gortázar, Christian; Prieto, José M

    2011-11-01

    The prevalence, distribution and pathology related to infection with Mycobacterium bovis and other mycobacteria were determined in trapped (n=36) and road-killed (n=121) badgers in Spain from 2006 to 2010. The prevalence of M. bovis based on bacteriological culture from road-killed badgers was 8/121 (6.6%) and from trapped badgers was 0/36 (0%). Tuberculosis/M. bovis infection was evident in 15/121 (12.4%) road-killed badgers when bacteriology and histopathology were combined. Mycobacterium avium complex was isolated by culture from the tracheal aspirate of 1/36 (2.8%) trapped badgers and from tissue pools from 8/121 (6.6%) road-killed badgers.

  16. DRESS syndrome presenting after initiation of mycobacterium avium complex osteomyelitis treatment.

    PubMed

    Blair, Paul W; Herrin, Douglas; Abaalkhail, Nawaf; Fiser, Wesley

    2015-10-05

    Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is characterised by fever, rash, eosinophilia and organ damage that develops 2-6 weeks after the initiation of a medication. We report a case of DRESS syndrome in a 79-year-old man that developed after the introduction of rifabutin, ethambutol and clarithromycin used to treat Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) vertebral osteomyelitis. This case highlights treatment and management challenges in a patient with known MAC vertebral osteomyelitis requiring prolonged steroids. Steroids are the mainstays of treatment for moderate to severe cases of DRESS syndrome. Initiation of steroids for the treatment of DRESS syndrome among patients with concomitant infections requires multidisciplinary collaboration for optimal management. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  17. Opportunistic Pathogens Mycobacterium Avium Complex (MAC) and Legionella spp. Colonise Model Shower.

    PubMed

    Whiley, Harriet; Giglio, Steven; Bentham, Richard

    2015-07-24

    Legionella spp. and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are opportunistic pathogens of public health concern. Hot water systems, including showers, have been identified as a potential source of infection. This paper describes the colonization of Legionella and MAC on the flexible tubing within a model potable shower system, utilizing thermostatic mixing and a flexible shower head. A MAC qPCR method of enumeration was also developed. MAC and Legionella spp. were detected within the biofilm at maximum concentrations of 7.0 × 104 and 2.0 × 103 copies/cm2 PVC tubing respectively. No significant changes were observed between sample of the flexible shower tubing that dried between uses and those that remained filled with water. This suggested the "unhooking" showerheads and allowing them to dry is not an effective method to reduce the risk of Legionella or MAC colonisation.

  18. Mycobacterium avium Complex Osteomyelitis in Persons With Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Case Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Brian R.; Buitrago, Martha O.; Patel, Sugat; Hachey, David H.; Haneuse, Sebastien; Harrington, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    In persons with advanced immunosuppression, Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) typically causes disseminated disease with systemic symptoms. We report 2 cases in which MAC caused localized osteomyelitis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy with rising CD4 counts. We summarize 17 additional cases of HIV-associated MAC osteomyelitis from the literature and compare CD4 count at presentation for vertebral cases versus nonvertebral cases, which reveals a significantly higher CD4 at presentation for vertebral cases (median 251 cells/µL vs 50 cells/µL; P = .043; Mann–Whitney U test). The literature review demonstrates that the majority of cases of MAC osteomyelitis, especially vertebral, occurs in individuals with CD4 counts that have increased to above 100 cells/µL on antiretroviral therapy. Among HIV-infected individuals with osteomyelitis, MAC should be considered a possible etiology, particularly in the setting of immune reconstitution. PMID:26180837

  19. [Measurement of sitafloxacin MIC for Mycobacterium avium complex and application for treatment of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteriosis].

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masaki; Matsumoto, Takemasa; Hirano, Ryousuke; Harada, Eiji; Ikegame, Satoshi; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Watanabe, Kentaro

    2014-12-01

    Treatment for pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteriosis is difficult. Since current treatment has limitation, new application is needed. Fluoroquinolone is one of candidates. We have investigated the feasibility of sitafloxacin (STFX). At first, the drug of MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) was determined by the methods based on BrothMIC NTM. The MICs of STFX, moxifloxacin (MFLX), gatifloxacin (GFLX) were low. On contrast, the MICs of garenoxacin (GRNX) and tosufloxacin (TFLX) were high. Two cases of pulmonary Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC) disease were treated by STFX-contained regimen. In all cases of pulmonary MAC disease, improve of symptoms and chest CT images were attained. Adverse events were slight. These MIC studies and case reports suggest that STFX might have excellent in vitro and in vivo antimicrobial activities against MAC and is considered to be a candidate for the medication against pulmonary MAC disease.

  20. Heat inactivation of Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare complex organisms in meat products.

    PubMed Central

    Merkal, R S; Crawford, J A; Whipple, D L

    1979-01-01

    Wieners and sausages were prepared which contained the most heat-tolerant representative of the Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare complex we were able to obtain. They also were prepared with infected tissues obtained from tuberculous swine. Processing conditions were as varied as possible. Neither incorporation of sodium nitrite in the emulsion nor presence of smoke during processing altered the heat susceptibility of the organisms. Substantial killing of the organisms occurred as wieners reached the upper processing temperatures, but hot oil or radiant heating of the "precooked" sausages allowed very short times within the killing range; hence, higher peak internal temperatures were necessary. The lethalities for these organisms of reaching and maintaining various processing temperatures are given. PMID:575610

  1. Rapid drug susceptibility of Mycobacterium avium complex using a fluorescence quenching method.

    PubMed

    Marone, P; Bono, L; Carretto, E; Barbarini, D; Telecco, S

    1997-08-01

    Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT) is a recently introduced rapid growth detection method which uses an oxygen quenched fluorescent indicator. The present study evaluated the ability of this new method to determine the drug susceptibility of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). Thirty strains recovered from patients with AIDS were tested for susceptibility to clarithromycin, rifabutin, ciprofloxacin, azithromycin and amikacin using MGIT. Results were compared to susceptibilities determined by the agar dilution method. The results obtained showed a 100% correlation between MGIT and the agar dilution method for rifabutin and clarithromycin. There was a 100% correlation between the two methods for azithromycin against 27 strains. MGIT was well correlated with the agar dilution method for detecting resistance to clarithromycin, rifabutin and azithromycin in 4 days, but the correlation was poor when susceptibilities to ciprofloxacin and amikacin were determined. This rapid method is non-radiometric, noninvasive and does not require any special instruments.

  2. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex disease in a patient with left ventricular assist device (Heart Mate II).

    PubMed

    Cordioli, Maddalena; Del Bravo, Paola; Rigo, Fabio; Azzini, Anna Maria; Merighi, Mara; Forni, Alberto; Concia, Ercole

    2015-09-01

    Although disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex disease occurs mainly in immunocompromised hosts, especially HIV-infected patients in the last stage of the disease (AIDS), this condition is still rare in immunocompetent subjects. We report the case of a Caucasian man who received a left ventricular assist device two years before as a bridge to heart transplantation, that began to present signs and symptoms of mycobacterial infection. The diagnostic work-up we performed showed the presence of Mycobacterium intracellulare in lungs and both peripherical and bone marrow blood. Although evaluated, we found no abnormalities in the patient's immune system that can be related to mycobacterial infection. The beginning of a specific therapy made the patient slowly improve and further nuclear medicine assay (PET-TC) showed a good reduction in radio-labelled drug captation.

  3. Novel Mycobacterium avium Complex Species Isolated From Black Wildebeest (Connochaetes gnou) in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kabongo-Kayoka, P N; Obi, C L; Nakajima, C; Suzuki, Y; Hattori, T; Eloff, J N; Wright, J; Mbelle, N; McGaw, L J

    2017-06-01

    A study was undertaken to isolate and characterize Mycobacterium species from black wildebeest suspected of being infected with tuberculosis in South Africa. This led to the discovery of a new Mycobacterium avium complex species, provisionally referred to as the Gnou isolate from black wildebeest (Connochaetes gnou). Sixteen samples from nine black wildebeest were processed for Mycobacterium isolation. Following decontamination, samples were incubated in an ordinary incubator at 37°C on Löwenstein-Jensen slants and in liquid medium tubes using the BACTEC(™) MGIT(™) 960 system, respectively. Identification of the isolate was carried out by standard biochemical tests and using the line probe assay from the GenoType(®) CM/AS kit (Hain Lifescience GmbH, Nehren, Germany). The DNA extract was also analysed using gene sequencing. Partial gene sequencing and analysis of 16S rRNA gene, and 16S-23S rRNA (ITS), rpoB and hsp65 and phylogenetic analyses by searching GenBank using the BLAST algorithm were conducted. Phylogenetic trees were constructed using four methods, namely Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony and neighbour-joining methods. The isolate was identified as Mycobacterium intracellulare using the GenoType(®) CM/AS kit and as Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) by gene sequencing. The gene sequence targeting all the genes, ITS, 16S rRNA, rpoB and hsp65 and phylogenetic analyses indicated that this isolate presented a nucleotide sequence different from all currently published sequences, and its position was far enough from other MAC species to suggest that it might be a new species. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. [Strategies for Mycobacterium avium complex infection control in Japan: how do they improve the present situation?].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kenji; Sano, Chiaki

    2013-03-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) were the most frequently isolated (about 80%) and most common cause of lung nontuberculosis. Its rate of infection is globally increasing, especially in Japan. In this situation, it is urgently needed to provide scientific evidences and develop therapeutic interventions in MAC infections. Recently, more and more patients are elderly women with no history of smoking, and they have reticulonodular infiltrates and patchy bilateral bronchiectasis. However the prognostic and intractable factors of MAC infections are poorly known. In this symposium, we address five novel strategies for MAC infection, concerning the more accurate incidence and prevalence rates compared with other countries, host defense associated with Th1/Th17 balance, route of MAC infection related soil exposure, MAC IgA antibody as a diagnosis maker, and improved chemotherapy including aminoglycoside or new quinolone. Appropriate clinical intervention may help to reduce the prolongation of MAC infection or enhance the activity of chemotherapy for the improved control of MAC. Below are the abstracts for each of the five speakers. 1. Review of current epidemiological study of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease in Japan and the rest of the world: Kozo MORIMOTO (Respiratory Center, Fukujuji Hospital, Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association) The studies on pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) disease prevalence were started in early 1970s in Japan by the Mycobacteriosis Research Group of National Chest Hospitals. They were followed by a questionnaire survey in 1990s, by the National Tuberculosis and NTM Survey in late 1990s, and recently by the questionnaire surveys conducted by the NTM Disease Research Committee. The latest data in Japan (from 2007) indicated a morbidity rate of 5.7 per 100,000 population. Deaths from NTM disease were reported for the first time in 1970 and showed a marked, steady increase until 2007, with 912 deaths in that year. We

  5. The international epidemiology of disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex infection in AIDS. International MAC Study Group.

    PubMed

    Fordham von Reyn, C; Arbeit, R D; Tosteson, A N; Ristola, M A; Barber, T W; Waddell, R; Sox, C H; Brindle, R J; Gilks, C F; Ranki, A; Bartholomew, C; Edwards, J; Falkinham, J O; O'Connor, G T

    1996-08-01

    To determine rates of disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection among AIDS patients in developed and developing countries, and to determine whether different rates reflect differences in exposure or immunity, or both. Prospective cohort study. University hospitals and outpatient AIDS programs. HIV-infected subjects with CD4 counts < 200 x 10(6)/l were interviewed and had CD4 lymphocyte counts, blood cultures for mycobacteria (baseline and at 6 months), and skin tests with purified protein derivative (PPD) and M. avium sensitin. Among 566 study patients rates of disseminated MAC were 10.5-21.6% in New Hampshire, Boston and Finland compared to 2.4-2.6% in Trinidad and Kenya (P < 0.001). PPD skin test reactions > or = 5 mm were present in 20% of patients from Kenya compared to 1% at other sites (P < 0.001). Among patients from the United States and Finland, multiple logistic regression indicated that occupational exposure to soil and water was associated with a decreased risk of disseminated MAC, whereas the following were associated with an increased risk of disseminated MAC: low CD4 count, swimming in an indoor pool, history of bronchoscopy, regular consumption of raw or partially cooked fish/shellfish and treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Rates of disseminated MAC in AIDS are higher in developed than developing countries and are due to both differences in exposure and differences in immunity. These data provide a rationale for prevention of MAC through both active immunization and reduction in exposure to the organism.

  6. Comparative in vivo activities of rifabutin and rifapentine against Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Klemens, S P; Grossi, M A; Cynamon, M H

    1994-01-01

    The dose-response activity of rifabutin and the comparative activities of rifabutin and rifapentine were evaluated in the beige mouse model of disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection. In the dose-response study, mice were infected intravenously with approximately 10(7) viable M. avium ATCC 49601. Treatment with rifabutin at 10, 20, or 40 mg/kg of body weight was started 7 days postinfection and was administered daily for 10 days. The mice were sacrificed 3 to 5 days after the last dose. Spleens, livers, and lungs were homogenized, and viable cell counts were determined by serial dilution and plating onto Middlebrook 7H10 agar. A dose-related reduction in MAC cell counts in the organs was noted for this MAC isolate. The comparative activities of rifabutin and rifapentine were determined against a total of five MAC isolates in the beige mouse model. Rifabutin or rifapentine (20 mg/kg each) was administered to infected mice for 10 days. Groups of treated mice were compared with untreated control animals. Despite favorable in vitro susceptibility results, rifabutin and rifapentine had activities in the spleens against only two of the five MAC isolates. For these two MAC isolates, rifabutin was more active than rifapentine. These agents had activities in the lungs against three of five isolates. Further study of rifabutin or rifapentine against a broader range of clinical isolates in a murine infection model may be useful as part of the continuing development of newer rifamycins as anti-MAC agents. PMID:8192449

  7. Mycobacterium avium complex suppurative parotitis in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus infection presenting with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Babiker, Zahir Osman Eltahir; Beeston, Christine; Purcell, Janet; Desai, Niranjan; Ustianowski, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    Restoration of the immune system following initiation of antiretroviral therapy can result in an adverse phenomenon known as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). Herein, we report a case of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) suppurative parotitis associated with IRIS in a patient with advanced human immunodeficiency virus disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of MAC parotitis in the setting of IRIS and clinicians should be aware of this condition.

  8. The clinical efficacy of a clarithromycin-based regimen for Mycobacterium avium complex disease: A nationwide post-marketing study.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Jun-Ichi; Kurashima, Atsuyuki; Suzuki, Katsuhiro

    2017-05-01

    The revised 2007 American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America statement recommend clarithromycin-based combination therapy for treatment of Mycobacterium avium complex lung disease and stipulates approximately 1 year of continuous treatment after bacilli negative conversion. However, supporting data are insufficient. Our objective was to obtain data on the clinical outcome of clarithromycin-based daily regimens by conducting a nationwide retrospective post-marketing study of M. avium complex lung disease. In accordance with the Japanese guidelines, patients were enrolled in this survey according to their chest radiographic findings and microbiologic test results. They were treated with a multidrug regimen including clarithromycin, rifampicin, and ethambutol (clarithromycin-based regimen) until bacilli negative conversion, and the treatment was continued for approximately 1 year after the initial conversion. Data were collected before administration, at the time of bacilli negative conversion, at the end of treatment, and at 6 months after the end of treatment. Of the 466 subjects enrolled in the study, 271 patients who received clarithromycin at 800 mg/day underwent evaluation for M. avium complex disease. The final bacilli negative conversion rate in those patients was 94.7%. The bacteriological relapse rate was 5.0% (5/100 patients). Bacteriological relapse was noted in patients treated for less than 15 months after conversion. No life-threatening or serious adverse drug reactions were observed. This study demonstrated that a clarithromycin-based daily regimen can yield a high bacteriological conversion rate in M. avium complex disease. After conversion, treatment for less than 15 months might be insufficient to prevent bacteriological relapse. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The pncA gene from naturally pyrazinamide-resistant Mycobacterium avium encodes pyrazinamidase and confers pyrazinamide susceptibility to resistant M. tuberculosis complex organisms.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z; Scorpio, A; Zhang, Y

    1997-10-01

    The antituberculosis drug pyrazinamide (PZA) needs to be converted into pyrazinoic acid (POA) by the bacterial pyrazinamidase (PZase) in order to show bactericidal activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. M. avium is naturally resistant to PZA. To investigate whether this natural resistance to PZA is due to inability of the M. avium PZase to convert PZA to bactericidal POA, the M. avium PZase gene (pncA) was cloned by using the M. tuberculosis pncA gene as a probe. Sequence analysis showed that the M. avium pncA gene is 561 bp long, encoding a protein with a predicted size of about 19.8 kDa; but Western blotting showed that the M. avium PZase migrated as a 24 kDa band when expressed in M. bovis BCG and Escherichia coli. Sequence comparison revealed that M. avium PZase has 67.7% and 32.8% amino acid identity with the corresponding enzymes from M. tuberculosis and E. coli, respectively. Southern blot analysis with the M. avium pncA gene as a probe showed that M. terrae, M. gastri, M. marinum, M. fortuitum, M. xenopi, M. gordonae, M. szulgai, M. celatum and M. kansasii have close pncA homologues, whereas M. chelonae and M. smegmatis did not give significant hybridization signals. Transformation with the M. avium pncA gene conferred PZA susceptibility to PZA-resistant M. tuberculosis complex organisms, indicating that the nonsusceptibility of M. avium to PZA is not due to an ineffective PZase enzyme, but appears to be related to other factors such as transport of POA.

  10. Detection of Mycobacteria, Mycobacterium avium Subspecies, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex by a Novel Tetraplex Real-Time PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Elena; Elguezabal, Natalia; Pérez, Valentín; Garrido, Joseba M.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, Mycobacterium avium, and many other nontuberculous mycobacteria are worldwide distributed microorganisms of major medical and veterinary importance. Considering the growing epidemiologic significance of wildlife-livestock-human interrelation, developing rapid detection tools of high specificity and sensitivity is vital to assess their presence and accelerate the process of diagnosing mycobacteriosis. Here we describe the development and evaluation of a novel tetraplex real-time PCR for simultaneous detection of Mycobacterium genus, M. avium subspecies, and M. tuberculosis complex in an internally monitored single assay. The method was evaluated using DNA from mycobacterial (n = 38) and nonmycobacterial (n = 28) strains, tissues spiked with different CFU amounts of three mycobacterial species (n = 57), archival clinical samples (n = 233), and strains isolated from various hosts (n = 147). The minimum detectable DNA amount per reaction was 50 fg for M. bovis BCG and M. kansasii and 5 fg for M. avium subsp. hominissuis. When spiked samples were analyzed, the method consistently detected as few as 100 to 1,000 mycobacterial CFU per gram. The sensitivity and specificity values for the panel of clinical samples were 97.5 and 100% using a verified culture-based method as the reference method. The assays performed on clinical isolates confirmed these results. This PCR was able to identify M. avium and M. tuberculosis complex in the same sample in one reaction. In conclusion, the tetraplex real-time PCR we designed represents a highly specific and sensitive tool for the detection and identification of mycobacteria in routine laboratory diagnosis with potential additional uses. PMID:25588660

  11. Detection of mycobacteria, Mycobacterium avium subspecies, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by a novel tetraplex real-time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Sevilla, Iker A; Molina, Elena; Elguezabal, Natalia; Pérez, Valentín; Garrido, Joseba M; Juste, Ramón A

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, Mycobacterium avium, and many other nontuberculous mycobacteria are worldwide distributed microorganisms of major medical and veterinary importance. Considering the growing epidemiologic significance of wildlife-livestock-human interrelation, developing rapid detection tools of high specificity and sensitivity is vital to assess their presence and accelerate the process of diagnosing mycobacteriosis. Here we describe the development and evaluation of a novel tetraplex real-time PCR for simultaneous detection of Mycobacterium genus, M. avium subspecies, and M. tuberculosis complex in an internally monitored single assay. The method was evaluated using DNA from mycobacterial (n = 38) and nonmycobacterial (n = 28) strains, tissues spiked with different CFU amounts of three mycobacterial species (n = 57), archival clinical samples (n = 233), and strains isolated from various hosts (n = 147). The minimum detectable DNA amount per reaction was 50 fg for M. bovis BCG and M. kansasii and 5 fg for M. avium subsp. hominissuis. When spiked samples were analyzed, the method consistently detected as few as 100 to 1,000 mycobacterial CFU per gram. The sensitivity and specificity values for the panel of clinical samples were 97.5 and 100% using a verified culture-based method as the reference method. The assays performed on clinical isolates confirmed these results. This PCR was able to identify M. avium and M. tuberculosis complex in the same sample in one reaction. In conclusion, the tetraplex real-time PCR we designed represents a highly specific and sensitive tool for the detection and identification of mycobacteria in routine laboratory diagnosis with potential additional uses.

  12. Infection Sources of a Common Non-tuberculous Mycobacterial Pathogen, Mycobacterium avium Complex

    PubMed Central

    Nishiuchi, Yukiko; Iwamoto, Tomotada; Maruyama, Fumito

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have revealed a continuous increase in the worldwide incidence and prevalence of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) diseases, especially pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) diseases. Although it is not clear why NTM diseases have been increasing, one possibility is an increase of mycobacterial infection sources in the environment. Thus, in this review, we focused on the infection sources of pathogenic NTM, especially MAC. The environmental niches for MAC include water, soil, and dust. The formation of aerosols containing NTM arising from shower water, soil, and pool water implies that these niches can be infection sources. Furthermore, genotyping has shown that clinical isolates are identical to environmental ones from household tap water, bathrooms, potting soil, and garden soil. Therefore, to prevent and treat MAC diseases, it is essential to identify the infection sources for these organisms, because patients with these diseases often suffer from reinfections and recurrent infections with them. In the environmental sources, MAC and other NTM organisms can form biofilms, survive within amoebae, and exist in a free-living state. Mycobacterial communities are also likely to occur in these infection sources in households. Water distribution systems are a transmission route from natural water reservoirs to household tap water. Other infection sources include areas with frequent human contact, such as soil and bathrooms, indicating that individuals may carry NTM organisms that concomitantly attach to their household belongings. To explore the mechanisms associated with the global spread of infection and MAC transmission routes, an epidemiological population-wide genotyping survey would be very useful. A good example of the power of genotyping comes from M. avium subsp. hominissuis, where close genetic relatedness was found between isolates of it from European patients and pigs in Japan and Europe, implying global transmission of this bacterium

  13. Infection Sources of a Common Non-tuberculous Mycobacterial Pathogen, Mycobacterium avium Complex.

    PubMed

    Nishiuchi, Yukiko; Iwamoto, Tomotada; Maruyama, Fumito

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have revealed a continuous increase in the worldwide incidence and prevalence of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) diseases, especially pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) diseases. Although it is not clear why NTM diseases have been increasing, one possibility is an increase of mycobacterial infection sources in the environment. Thus, in this review, we focused on the infection sources of pathogenic NTM, especially MAC. The environmental niches for MAC include water, soil, and dust. The formation of aerosols containing NTM arising from shower water, soil, and pool water implies that these niches can be infection sources. Furthermore, genotyping has shown that clinical isolates are identical to environmental ones from household tap water, bathrooms, potting soil, and garden soil. Therefore, to prevent and treat MAC diseases, it is essential to identify the infection sources for these organisms, because patients with these diseases often suffer from reinfections and recurrent infections with them. In the environmental sources, MAC and other NTM organisms can form biofilms, survive within amoebae, and exist in a free-living state. Mycobacterial communities are also likely to occur in these infection sources in households. Water distribution systems are a transmission route from natural water reservoirs to household tap water. Other infection sources include areas with frequent human contact, such as soil and bathrooms, indicating that individuals may carry NTM organisms that concomitantly attach to their household belongings. To explore the mechanisms associated with the global spread of infection and MAC transmission routes, an epidemiological population-wide genotyping survey would be very useful. A good example of the power of genotyping comes from M. avium subsp. hominissuis, where close genetic relatedness was found between isolates of it from European patients and pigs in Japan and Europe, implying global transmission of this bacterium

  14. Serodiagnosis of Mycobacterium avium complex disease in humans: translational research from basic mycobacteriology to clinical medicine.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Rapid and accurate diagnosis of infectious diseases, including mycobacterial disease such as tuberculosis (TB) and diseases due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), is a very important element of global health. The gold standard in diagnosis of mycobacterial diseases remains clinical examination, combined with direct microscopic examination of sputum and culture of bacteria. Culture of slowly growing mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and NTM (such as M. avium complex: MAC), can take up to 4 to 6 weeks, and in 10-20% of cases the bacillus is not successfully cultivated. Diagnosis of MAC pulmonary disease (MAC-PD) is complicated and time-consuming (usually at least 1 month). I have characterized the nature of MAC antigens and immune responses from the aspect of basic mycobacteriology, and then translated to clinical science. My multicenter study in Japan has demonstrated the usefulness of a serodiagnostic test to determine serum IgA antibodies against mycobacterial glycopeptidolipid (GPL) core antigen for diagnosing MAC-PD within a few hours. To validate in a larger number of patients, at diverse geographic locations, and among other races, the test was also assessed the usefulness internationally in the United States and Taiwan. In this review, I discuss development of serodiagnosis of MAC-PD by translational research and international collaboration study.

  15. Isolation of Mycobacterium avium complex from bone marrow aspirates of AIDS patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barreto, J A; Palaci, M; Ferrazoli, L; Martins, M C; Suleiman, J; Lorenço, R; Ferreira, O C; Riley, L W; Johnson, W D; Galvão, P A

    1993-09-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection has not been reported as a major opportunistic infection among patients with AIDS in Latin America or Africa. In this study, 125 AIDS patients who had persistent fever, anemia, and leukopenia were examined among 2628 AIDS patients admitted to Instituto de Infectologia Emilio Ribas between May 1990 and April 1992. From the bone marrow aspirates of the 125 patients, MAC was isolated from 23 (18.4%) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis was isolated from 9 (7.2%). Between 1985 and 1990, only 11 MAC isolations among 60,000 cultures obtained from human immunodeficiency virus-seronegative patients were documented in São Paulo. Hence, the minimal estimated rate of MAC infection in AIDS patients in this city was 23/2628, or 0.88%. These findings suggest that MAC infection is an important opportunistic infection, especially among a subset of patients with AIDS in Brazil who have clinical characteristics and risk activities similar to those associated with MAC infections in North America and Europe.

  16. Mycobacterium avium complex--the role of potable water in disease transmission.

    PubMed

    Whiley, H; Keegan, A; Giglio, S; Bentham, R

    2012-08-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is a group of opportunistic pathogens of major public health concern. It is responsible for a wide spectrum of disease dependent on subspecies, route of infection and patients pre-existing conditions. Presently, there is limited research on the incidence of MAC infection that considers both pulmonary and other clinical manifestations. MAC has been isolated from various terrestrial and aquatic environments including natural waters, engineered water systems and soils. Identifying the specific environmental sources responsible for human infection is essential in minimizing disease prevalence. This paper reviews current literature and case studies regarding the wide spectrum of disease caused by MAC and the role of potable water in disease transmission. Potable water was recognized as a putative pathway for MAC infection. Contaminated potable water sources associated with human infection included warm water distribution systems, showers, faucets, household drinking water, swimming pools and hot tub spas. MAC can maintain long-term contamination of potable water sources through its high resistance to disinfectants, association with biofilms and intracellular parasitism of free-living protozoa. Further research is required to investigate the efficiency of water treatment processes against MAC and into construction and maintenance of warm water distribution systems and the role they play in MAC proliferation. No claim to Australian Government works Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Rapid susceptibility testing of mycobacterium avium complex and mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from AIDS patients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhople, Arvind M.

    1993-01-01

    In ominous projections issued by both U.S. Public Health Service and the World Health Organization, the epidemic of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection will continue to rise more rapidly worldwide than predicted earlier. The Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients are susceptible to diseases called opportunistic infections of which tuberculosis and M. avium Complex (MAC) infection are most common. This has created an urgent need to uncover new drugs for the treatment of these infections. In the seventies, NASA scientists at Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, had adopted a biochemical indicator, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), to detect presence of life in extraterrestrial space. Therefore, we proposed to develop ATP assay technique to determine sensitivity of antibacterial compounds against MAC and M. tuberculosis. The work was initiated in June 1992. In the last report, we described our efforts in developing ATP assay method using MAC. Studies were continued further, and during the period of this report, we established the relationship between colony forming units and ATP levels of these organisms during the growth cycle. Also, we evaluated the effects of standard antimycobacterial drugs using ATP assay technique and compared the results with those obtained with conventional tube dilution proportional method.

  18. Lessons from Mycobacterium avium complex-associated pneumonitis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zota, Victor; Angelis, Sheryn M; Fraire, Armando E; McNamee, Ciaran; Kielbasa, Shasta; Libraty, Daniel H

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is an increasingly recognized cause of pulmonary disease in immunocompetent individuals. An acute form of MAC lung disease, MAC-associated pneumonitis, has generally been associated with the use of hot tubs. There is controversy in the literature about whether MAC-associated pneumonitis is a classic hypersensitivity pneumonitis or is a direct manifestation of mycobacterial infection. Case presentation We report the second case in the literature of MAC-associated pneumonitis not related to the use of hot tubs. The source of MAC in a 52-year-old immunocompetent patient was an intrapulmonary cyst containing numerous acid-fast bacilli. The patient developed disseminated miliary nodules throughout both lung fields. Histological examination of resected lung tissue revealed well-formed, acid-fast negative granulomas composed predominantly of CD4+ T-cells and CD68+ histiocytes. The granulomas were strongly positive for tumor necrosis factor-α, a pro-inflammatory cytokine. Conclusion The attempt to classify MAC-associated pneumonitis as either a classic hypersensitivity pneumonitis or a direct manifestation of mycobacterial infection is not particularly useful. Our case demonstrates that MAC-associated pneumonitis is characterized by a vigorous T-helper 1-like, pro-inflammatory, immune response to pulmonary mycobacterial infection. The immunopathology provides a rationale for clinical studies of anti-MAC therapy with the addition of anti-inflammatory agents (for example, corticosteroids) to hasten the resolution of infection and symptoms. PMID:18477401

  19. Lessons from Mycobacterium avium complex-associated pneumonitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zota, Victor; Angelis, Sheryn M; Fraire, Armando E; McNamee, Ciaran; Kielbasa, Shasta; Libraty, Daniel H

    2008-05-13

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is an increasingly recognized cause of pulmonary disease in immunocompetent individuals. An acute form of MAC lung disease, MAC-associated pneumonitis, has generally been associated with the use of hot tubs. There is controversy in the literature about whether MAC-associated pneumonitis is a classic hypersensitivity pneumonitis or is a direct manifestation of mycobacterial infection. We report the second case in the literature of MAC-associated pneumonitis not related to the use of hot tubs. The source of MAC in a 52-year-old immunocompetent patient was an intrapulmonary cyst containing numerous acid-fast bacilli. The patient developed disseminated miliary nodules throughout both lung fields. Histological examination of resected lung tissue revealed well-formed, acid-fast negative granulomas composed predominantly of CD4+ T-cells and CD68+ histiocytes. The granulomas were strongly positive for tumor necrosis factor-alpha, a pro-inflammatory cytokine. The attempt to classify MAC-associated pneumonitis as either a classic hypersensitivity pneumonitis or a direct manifestation of mycobacterial infection is not particularly useful. Our case demonstrates that MAC-associated pneumonitis is characterized by a vigorous T-helper 1-like, pro-inflammatory, immune response to pulmonary mycobacterial infection. The immunopathology provides a rationale for clinical studies of anti-MAC therapy with the addition of anti-inflammatory agents (for example, corticosteroids) to hasten the resolution of infection and symptoms.

  20. Treatment of intracellular Mycobacterium avium complex infection by free and liposome-encapsulated sparfloxacin.

    PubMed Central

    Düzgüneş, N; Flasher, D; Reddy, M V; Luna-Herrera, J; Gangadharam, P R

    1996-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex (MAC) is the most frequent cause of opportunistic bacterial infection in patients with AIDS. Previous studies have indicated that liposome-encapsulated aminoglycosides are highly effective in treating MAC infections in mice. We investigated whether the fluoroquinolone sparfloxacin is effective in treating MAC infection in the murine macrophage-like cell line J774. Sparfloxacin was encapsulated in the membrane phase of multilamellar liposomes composed of phosphatidylglycerol-phosphatidylcholine-cholesterol (1:1:1 molar ratio). MAC-infected macrophages were treated for either 24 h or 4 days with free or liposome-encapsulated sparfloxacin. Treatment with free or liposome-encapsulated sparfloxacin (6 micrograms/ml) for 24 h resulted in the reduction of the growth index to 25 and 30% of that of untreated controls, respectively. When cultures were treated for 4 days, free sparfloxacin reduced the growth index to 6% of that of the untreated control, while liposome-encapsulated sparfloxacin reduced it to 8% of that of the control. PMID:8913475

  1. Mycobacterium avium complex organisms predominantly colonize in the bathtub inlets of patients' bathrooms.

    PubMed

    Nishiuchi, Yukiko; Tamura, Aki; Kitada, Seigo; Taguri, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Sohkichi; Tateishi, Yoshitaka; Yoshimura, Mamiko; Ozeki, Yuriko; Matsumura, Narumi; Ogura, Hisashi; Maekura, Ryoji

    2009-05-01

    Medical treatment of pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease does not always provide curative effects and is frequently hampered by recurrence. This suggests the presence of a reservoir for MAC in the environment surrounding patients. We previously reported the recovery of MAC isolates from the residential bathrooms of outpatients. In the present study, to ascertain the colonizing sites and the possibility of an MAC reservoir in the bathrooms of patients, we tested the recovery and the genetic diversity of MAC isolates from 6 sites of specimens, including 2 additional sampling sites, inside the showerhead and the bathtub inlet, in the residential bathrooms of patients with pulmonary MAC disease. MAC isolates were recovered from 15 out of the 29 bathrooms (52%), including specimens from 14 bathtub inlets and 3 showerheads. Nearly half of these bathrooms (7/15) contained MAC strains that were identical or similar to their respective clinical isolates Additionally, in 5 out of 15 bathrooms, polyclonal colonization was revealed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The results imply that colonization of MAC organisms in the bathrooms of MAC patients occurs predominantly in the bathtub inlets, and there is thus a risk of infection and/or reinfection for patients via use of the bathtub and other sites in the bathroom.

  2. The relationship of temperature to desiccation and starvation tolerance of the Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed

    Archuleta, Rebecca Joy; Mullens, Patricia; Primm, Todd P

    2002-10-01

    Mycobacterium avium grew in media at 14-37 degrees C, and persisted at 4 degrees C and 42 degrees C. The bacteria lost approximately 90% viability after 3 months in reverse-osmosis deionized water at 4-37 degrees C. Cooler temperatures lowered the death rate. Death rates also decreased after a 5- to 10-day starvation adaptation period. Alterations of the steady-state levels of different mycolic acid classes, presumably to facilitate thermoadaptation, were found. Following desiccation, M. avium lost viability at a constant rate (half-life of 2.3 days). This implies that bacilli contaminating dry medical surfaces would persist for short periods of time. The remarkable stress survival exhibited by M. avium further suggests persistence in a range of environmental and clinical settings.

  3. [A case of environmental infection with pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex disease from a residential bathroom of a patient suggested by variable-number tandem-repeat typing of Mycobacterium avium tandem repeat loci].

    PubMed

    Taga, Shu; Niimi, Masaki; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Nakagawa, Taku; Ogawa, Kenji

    2012-05-01

    A 63-year-old woman was referred to our hospital because of bilateral infiltrations and nodular opacities in her chest radiograph taken in the mass radiography screening in September 2010. The chest computed tomography showed patchy infiltrations with bronchiectasis in the lower lung fields on both sides. She was diagnosed with pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease based on the bacteria recovered from the sputum and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. To elucidate an environmental MAC source, we investigated her home, and isolated M. avium and M. gordonae from the bathtub and shower tap, respectively, in her residential bathroom. Analysis of the hsp65-PRA variants digested with BamHI and some insertion sequences showed that the clinical strains recovered from sputum and strains from the bathtub were M. avium subsp. hominissuis. A dendrogram of the Mycobacterium avium tandem repeat loci variable-number tandem-repeat (MATR-VNTR) analysis of the MAC strains showed that the bathtub strains formed a polyclonal colonization, and that 1 of the 5 MATR-VNTR patterns was identical to the corresponding pattern of the sputum strain from the patient. In conclusion, we believe that the residential bathroom of the patient was the environmental source of her pulmonary MAC disease, as has been previously reported.

  4. Intermittent antibiotic therapy for nodular bronchiectatic Mycobacterium avium complex lung disease.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Jeon, Kyeongman; Park, Hye Yun; Kim, Su-Young; Lee, Kyung Soo; Huh, Hee Jae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Nam Yong; Shin, Sung Jae; Daley, Charles L; Koh, Won-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Although intermittent, three-times-weekly therapy is recommended for the initial treatment of noncavitary nodular bronchiectatic Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lung disease, supporting data are limited. To evaluate the clinical efficacy of intermittent therapy compared with daily therapy for nodular bronchiectatic MAC lung disease. A retrospective cohort study of 217 patients with treatment-naive noncavitary nodular bronchiectatic MAC lung disease. All patients received either daily (n = 99) or intermittent therapy (n = 118) that included clarithromycin or azithromycin, rifampin, and ethambutol. Modification of the initial antibiotic therapy occurred more frequently in the daily therapy group than in the intermittent therapy group (46 vs. 21%; P < 0.001); in particular, ethambutol was more frequently discontinued in the daily therapy group than in the intermittent therapy group (24 vs. 1%; P ≤ 0.001). However, the rates of symptomatic improvement, radiographic improvement, and sputum culture conversion were not different between the two groups (daily therapy vs. intermittent therapy: 75 vs. 82%, P = 0.181; 68 vs. 73%, P = 0.402; 76 vs. 67%, P = 0.154, respectively). In addition, the adjusted proportion of sputum culture conversion was similar between the daily therapy (71.3%; 95% confidence interval, 59.1-81.1%) and the intermittent therapy groups (73.6%; 95% confidence interval, 62.9-82.2%; P = 0.785). These results suggest that intermittent three-times-weekly therapy with a macrolide, rifampin, and ethambutol is a reasonable initial treatment regimen for patients with noncavitary nodular bronchiectatic MAC lung disease. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 00970801).

  5. Characteristics of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) pulmonary disease in previously treated lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Meier, Erin; Pennington, Kelly; Gallo de Moraes, Alice; Escalante, Patricio

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is responsible for a large portion of non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infections worldwide. Host factors such as active malignancy, immunosuppression, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and bronchiectasis increase the risk of MAC infection. However, the relationship between previously treated lung cancer with subsequent development of MAC pulmonary disease and treatment outcomes have not been previously studied. We retrospectively identified all patients with lung cancer and MAC pulmonary disease documented in medical records at Mayo Clinic between January 2005 and October 2016. Patients who were diagnosed with MAC pulmonary disease before or at the time of lung cancer diagnosis were excluded. Patients meeting all inclusion criteria underwent chart review for prior oncologic treatments, clinical characteristics, and MAC treatment response. We identified 13 patients with MAC pulmonary disease and prior lung cancer, including 4 men and 9 women. Eight patients had structural lung disease that can predispose to MAC pulmonary disease, including bronchiectasis (23.0%) and COPD (46.2%). Four (30.8%) had no apparent immunosuppression or other risk factor(s) for MAC pulmonary disease. Primary pulmonary malignancies included pulmonary carcinoid, adenocarcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma. Ten (76.9%) patients were started on antimicrobial treatment for MAC, and 8 (61.5%) patients completed MAC treatment with 6 (46.1%) patients achieving symptomatic improvement. MAC pulmonary disease in previously treated lung cancer can occur without apparent risk factors for this NTM infection. Symptomatic improvement with MAC antimicrobial therapy appears to be lower than expected but comorbidities might influence outcomes in this patient population.

  6. Association between polyclonal and mixed mycobacterial Mycobacterium avium complex infection and environmental exposure.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kohei; Ito, Yutaka; Hirai, Toyohiro; Kubo, Takeshi; Maekawa, Koichi; Togashi, Kaori; Ichiyama, Satoshi; Mishima, Michiaki

    2014-01-01

    Polyclonal and mixed mycobacterial Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection is observed in pulmonary MAC disease. Human living environments contain multiple species or genotypes of nontuberculous mycobacterial strains and are considered sources of infection. To investigate the association of environmental exposure with polyclonal and mixed mycobacterial infection in pulmonary MAC disease after adjustments for potential confounding diseases and conditions and radiographic findings. We collected two separate sputum samples from 102 patients and single sputum samples from 18 patients in whom the second MAC strain was not isolated in our prospective cohort of pulmonary MAC disease. MAC isolates from sputum samples and patients' residential soils were used for variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) analyses. Polyclonal and mixed mycobacterial MAC infections were defined as having different VNTR genotypes and other mycobacterial species, respectively. Monoclonal MAC infection was defined as all isolates showing a single VNTR genotype. Associations of the type of infection with clinical and radiographic findings and environmental exposure were measured. Polyclonal and mixed mycobacterial MAC and monoclonal infections were observed in 42 and 78 patients, respectively. By stepwise regression analysis, patients with polyclonal and mixed mycobacterial MAC infections were associated with history of asthma (odds ratio [OR], 11.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41-255.77; P = 0.021), high soil exposure (≥2 h/wk; OR, 4.31; 95% CI, 1.72-11.45; P < 0.01), shower use in a bathroom (OR, 4.57; 95% CI, 1.28-23.23; P = 0.018), and swimming in a pool (OR, 9.69; 95% CI, 1.21-206.92; P < 0.01). Environmental exposure was associated with polyclonal and mixed mycobacterial MAC infection in pulmonary MAC disease.

  7. Relationship Between Lung Cancer and Mycobacterium Avium Complex Isolated Using Bronchoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Atsuhisa; Hebisawa, Akira; Kusaka, Kei; Hirose, Takashi; Suzuki, Junko; Yamane, Akira; Nagai, Hideaki; Fukami, Takeshi; Ohta, Ken; Takahashi, Fumiaki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The incidence of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC)-positive respiratory specimen cultures and MAC lung disease (MACLD) is increasing worldwide. This retrospective study aimed to assess the association between MAC culture-positive bronchoscopy specimens and lung cancer. Materials and Methods: The medical records of 1382 untreated lung cancer patients between 2003 and 2011 were collected using our hospital database. Of them, records for 1258 that had undergone bronchoscopy together with sampling for mycobacterial culture were reviewed. Patient characteristics were compared between those with MAC-positive/other nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM)-negative bronchial washings and those with MAC-negative/other NTM-negative bronchial washings. Patients with MAC-positive lung cancer were cross-sectionally divided into MACLD and non-MACLD groups, and their features were assessed. Follow-up data for patients with lung cancer but without MACLD were reviewed for subsequent development of MACLD. Results: Of the 1258 patients with lung cancer, 25 (2.0%) had MAC-positive/other NTM-negative bronchial washings. The proportion of women (52% vs 30%; P = 0.0274) and patient age (72 years vs 69 years; P = 0.0380) were significantly higher in the MAC-positive/other NTM-negative lung cancer group (n = 25) than in the MAC-negative/other NTM-negative lung cancer group (n = 1223). There were 10 patients with lung cancer and MACLD and 15 without MACLD; significant differences in patient characteristics were not found between the two groups, and none of the 15 patients without MACLD subsequently developed MACLD. Conclusion: MAC culture-positive bronchial washing is positively associated with lung cancer. Female sex and advanced age, but not lung cancer characteristics, were found to be associated with MAC infection in patients with lung cancer. PMID:27335625

  8. THE EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON THE GROWTH OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX (MAC) ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MAC organisms are able to grow, persist, and colonize in water distribution systems and may amplify in hospital hot water systems. This study examined the response of MAC organisms (M. avium, M. intracellulare, and MX) to a range of temperatures commonly associated with drinking...

  9. THE EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON THE GROWTH OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX (MAC) ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MAC organisms are able to grow, persist, and colonize in water distribution systems and may amplify in hospital hot water systems. This study examined the response of MAC organisms (M. avium, M. intracellulare, and MX) to a range of temperatures commonly associated with drinking...

  10. Peak Plasma Concentration of Azithromycin and Treatment Responses in Mycobacterium avium Complex Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Jeon, Kyeongman; Park, Hye Yun; Moon, Seong Mi; Kim, Su-Young; Lee, Soo-Youn; Shin, Sung Jae; Daley, Charles L; Koh, Won-Jung

    2016-10-01

    Macrolides, such as azithromycin (AZM) and clarithromycin, are the cornerstones of treatment for Mycobacterium avium complex lung disease (MAC-LD). Current guidelines recommend daily therapy with AZM for cavitary MAC-LD and intermittent therapy for noncavitary MAC-LD, but the effectiveness of these regimens has not been thoroughly investigated. This study evaluated associations between microbiological response and estimated peak plasma concentrations (Cmax) of AZM. The AZM Cmax was measured in patients receiving daily therapy (250 mg of AZM daily, n = 77) or intermittent therapy (500 mg of AZM three times weekly, n = 89) for MAC-LD and daily therapy for Mycobacterium abscessus complex LD (MABC-LD) (250 mg of AZM daily, n = 55). The AZM Cmax was lower with the daily regimen for MAC-LD (median, 0.24 μg/ml) than with the intermittent regimen for MAC-LD (median, 0.65 μg/ml; P < 0.001) or daily therapy for MABC-LD (median, 0.53 μg/ml; P < 0.001). After adjusting for confounding factors, AZM Cmax was independently associated with favorable microbiological responses in MAC-LD patients receiving a daily regimen (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01 to 2.48; P = 0.044) but not an intermittent regimen (aOR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.58 to 1.23, P = 0.379). With the daily AZM-based multidrug regimen for MAC-LD, a low AZM Cmax was common, whereas a higher AZM Cmax was associated with favorable microbiologic responses. The results also suggested that the addition of rifampin may lower AZM Cmax When a daily AZM-based multidrug regimen is used for treating severe MAC-LD, such as cavitary disease, the currently recommended AZM dose might be suboptimal. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT00970801.). Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Comparative genomics between human and animal associated subspecies of the Mycobacterium avium complex: a basis for pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Timms, Verlaine J; Hassan, Karl A; Mitchell, Hazel M; Neilan, Brett A

    2015-09-15

    A human isolate of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis 43525) was sequenced and compared genomically to other mycobacterial pathogens. M. paratuberculosis 43525 was recently isolated from a patient with ulcerative colitis and belongs to the M. avium complex, a group known to infect both humans and animals. While M. paratuberculosis is a known pathogen of livestock, there are only 20 human isolates from the last 20 years, therefore we took the opportunity to perform a whole genome comparison between human and animal mycobacterial pathogens. We also compared virulence determinants such as the mycobactin cluster, PE/PPE genes and mammalian cell entry (mce) operons between MAC subspecies that infect animals and those that infect humans. M. tuberculosis was also included in these analyses given its predominant role as a human pathogen. This genome comparison showed the PE/PPE profile of M. paratuberculosis 43525 to be largely the same as other M. paratuberculosis isolates, except that it had one PPE and one PE_PGRS protein that are only present in human MAC strains and M. tuberculosis. PE/PPE proteins that were unique to M. paratuberculosis 43525, M. avium subsp. hominissuis and a caprine M. paratuberculosis isolate, were also identified. In addition, the mycobactin cluster differed between human and animal isolates and a unique mce operon flanked by two mycobactin genes, mbtA and mbtJ, was identified in all available M. paratuberculosis genomes. Despite the whole genome comparison placing M. paratuberculosis 43525 as closely related to bovine M. paratuberculosis, key virulence factors were similar to human mycobacterial pathogens. This study highlights key factors of mycobacterial pathogenesis in humans and forms the basis for future functional studies.

  12. Complexity: a potential paradigm for a health promotion discipline.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Marie-Claude; Richard, Lucie

    2014-06-01

    Health promotion underpins a distancing from narrow, simplifying health approaches associated with the biomedical model. However, it has not yet succeeded in formally establishing its theoretical, epistemological and methodological foundations on a single paradigm. The complexity paradigm, which it has yet to broach head-on, might provide it with a disciplinary matrix in line with its implicit stances and basic values. This article seeks to establish complexity's relevance as a paradigm that can contribute to the development of a health promotion discipline. The relevance of complexity is justified primarily by its matching with several implicit epistemological and methodological/theoretical stances found in the cardinal concepts and principles of health promotion. The transcendence of ontological realism and determinism as well as receptiveness in respect of the reflexivity that complexity encompasses are congruent with the values of social justice, participation, empowerment and the concept of positive health that the field promotes. Moreover, from a methodological and theoretical standpoint, complexity assumes a holistic, contextual and transdisciplinary approach, toward which health promotion is tending through its emphasis on ecology and interdisciplinary action. In a quest to illustrate our position, developmental evaluation is presented as an example of practice stemming from a complexity paradigm that can be useful in the evaluation of health promotion initiatives. In short, we argue that it would be advantageous for health promotion to integrate this paradigm, which would provide it with a formal framework appropriate to its purposes and concerns.

  13. Proteins as paradigms of complex systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Fenimore, P. W.; Frauenfelder, Hans,; Young, R. D.

    2003-03-26

    The science of complexity has moved to center stage within the past few decades. Complex systems range from glasses to the immune system and the brain. Glasses are too simple to possess all aspects of complexity; brains are too complex to expose common concepts and laws of complexity. Proteins, however, are systems where many concepts and laws of complexity can be explored experimentally, theoretically, and computationally. Such studies have elucidated crucial aspects. The energy landscape has emerged as one central concept; it describes the free energy of a system as a function of temperature and the coordinates of all relevant atoms. A second concept is that of fluctuations. Without fluctuations, proteins would be dead and life impossible. A third concept is slaving. Proteins are not isolated systems; they are embedded in cells and membranes. Slaving arises when the fluctuations in the surroundings of a protein dominate many of the motions of the protein proper.

  14. Isolation and identification of Mycobacterium avium complex and other nontuberculosis mycobacteria from drinking-water in Basra governorate, Iraq.

    PubMed

    Al-Sulami, A A; Al-Taee, A M R; Wida'a, Q H

    2012-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the occurrence of Mycobacterium avium complex and other nontuberculous mycobacteria in drinking-water in Basra governorate, Iraq and their susceptibility to several antibiotics and the effect of 0.5 mg/L of chlorine on their survival. A total of 404 samples of drinking-water were collected from 33 different districts of the governorate from November 2006 to August 2007. Filtered samples were incubated for 7 days or less in a monophasic-biphasic culture setup of tuberculosis broth and Lowenstein-Jensen agar. The 252 isolates were identified as M. avium complex (21), M. marinum (15), M. kansasii (30), M. simiae (20), M. szulgai (19), M. xenopi (16), M. malmoense (11), M. fortuitum (37), M. chelonae (50) and M. abscessus (33). Isolates were tested for antibiotic susceptibility as well as their ability to tolerate chlorine at a concentration of 0.5 mg/L. The presence of these pathogenic bacteria in drinking-water renders the water unfit for human consumption.

  15. Proton Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Initial Assessment of Isolated Mycobacterium avium Complex Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jonathan H; Huitt, Gwen; Yagihashi, Kunihiro; Hobbs, Stephen B; Faino, Anna V; Bolster, Bradley D; Biederer, Jürgen; Puderbach, Michael; Lynch, David A

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) radiography is the reference standard for imaging Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lung infection. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be comparable to CT for characterizing other pulmonary inflammatory conditions, but has not been rigorously tested for imaging MAC pneumonia. To determine the feasibility of pulmonary MRI for imaging MAC pneumonia and to assess the degree of agreement between MRI and CT for assessing the anatomic features and lobar extent of MAC lung infections. Twenty-five subjects with culture-confirmed MAC pneumonia and no identified coinfecting organisms were evaluated by thoracic MRI and then by chest CT imaging performed up to 1 week later. After deidentification, first the MRI and then the CT scans were scored 2 weeks apart by two chest radiologists working independently of one another. Discrepancies were resolved by a third chest radiologist. The scans were scored for bronchiectasis, consolidation or atelectasis, abscess or sacculation, nodules, and mucus plugging using a three-point lobar scale (absent, <50% of lobe, and >50% of lobe). Agreement analyses and ordinary least products regressions were performed. A fixed bias was found between total CT and MRI scores, with CT scoring higher on average (median difference: 4 on a scale of 48; interquartile range: 3, 6). Fixed biases were found for bronchiectasis and consolidation or atelectasis subscale scores. Both fixed and proportional biases were found between CT and MRI mucus plugging scores. No bias was found between CT and MRI nodule scores. There was nearly perfect lobar percent agreement for more conspicuous findings such as consolidation or atelectasis and abscess or sacculation. In this exploratory study of 25 adult patients with culture-proven MAC lung infection, we found moderate agreement between MRI and CT for assessing the anatomic features and lobar extent of disease. Given the feasibility of chest MRI for this condition, future work is

  16. [Identification of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex by PCR of AIDS and disseminated mycobacteriosis].

    PubMed

    García-Elorriaga, Guadalupe; Degollado-Estrada, Edgar; Villagómez-Ruiz, Alfredo; Cortés-Torres, Nancy; Arreguín-Reséndiz, Lilián; Del Rey-Pineda, Guillermo; González-Bonilla, César

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: el objetivo de este artículo es Identificar y diferenciar el complejo MAC por PCR en pacientes con SIDA y micobacteriosis diseminada. Métodos: se llevó a cabo un estudio transversal para identificar MAC por biología molecular. Se sintetizaron dos conjuntos de iniciadores: MAV y MIN, para M. avium y M. intracellulare, respectivamente. El ADN total de células obtenidas de 29 aislados clínicos y muestras de suero de otros 24 pacientes con SIDA e infección micobacteriana diseminada fue extraído y se amplificó por PCR con los iniciadores MAV y MIN. Cada uno de los iniciadores MAV y MIN amplificó un segmento altamente específico de 1.3 kb del ADN homólogo, respectivamente. Resultados: veintinueve ADN de los aislados clínicos de MAC identificadas por Gen-Probe AccuProbes se amplificaron con los iniciadores MAV (M. avium). De las 24 muestras clínicas, 3 fueron positivas para M. avium y 6 para M. tuberculosis. Conclusiones: nuestros resultados demostraron que la técnica de PCR se puede aplicar para la diferenciación de M. avium y M. intracellulare por iniciadores específicos 16S rRNA. En pacientes con estadio avanzado de SIDA y en quienes se sospecha micobacteriosis diseminada, la presencia de anemia (incluso con cultivos negativos) fosfatasa alcalina elevada y una mediana de CD4 de 15.9/ml, se debe considerar seriamente el diagnóstico de infección por MAC; sugerimos que, de acuerdo con nuestros resultados, se justifica una estratificación más precisa de los pacientes en términos de sus recuentos de células T CD4.

  17. Genetic relatedness of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex isolates from patients with pulmonary MAC disease and their residential soils.

    PubMed

    Fujita, K; Ito, Y; Hirai, T; Maekawa, K; Imai, S; Tatsumi, S; Niimi, A; Iinuma, Y; Ichiyama, S; Mishima, M

    2013-06-01

    Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC) strains were recovered from 48.9% of residential soil samples (agricultural farms (n = 7), residential yards (n = 79), and planting pots (n = 49)) of 100 pulmonary MAC patients and 35 non-infected control patients. The frequency of MAC recovery did not differ among soil types or among patients regardless of the presence of pulmonary MAC disease, infecting MAC species or period of soil exposure. Variable numbers of tandem repeats (VNTR) analysis for MAC clinical and soil isolates revealed 78 different patterns in 47 M. avium clinical isolates and 41 soil isolates, and 53 different patterns in 18 M. intracellulare clinical isolates and 37 soil isolates. Six clinical and corresponding soil isolate pairs with an identical VNTR genotype were from case patients with high soil exposure (≥2 h per week, 37.5% (6/16) with high exposure compared with 0.0% (0/19) with low or no exposure, p <0.01), suggesting that residential soils are a likely source of pulmonary MAC infection. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2012 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  18. Clinical and epidemiological correlates of genotypes within the Mycobacterium avium complex defined by restriction and sequence analysis of hsp65.

    PubMed

    Smole, Sandra C; McAleese, Fionnuala; Ngampasutadol, Jutamas; Von Reyn, C Fordham; Arbeit, Robert D

    2002-09-01

    Species identification of isolates of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) remains a difficult task. Although M. avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare can be identified with expensive, commercially available probes, many MAC isolates remain unresolved, including those representing Mycobacterium lentiflavum as well as other potentially undefined species. PCR restriction analysis (PRA) of the hsp65 gene has been proposed as a rapid and inexpensive approach. We applied PRA to 278 MAC isolates, including 126 from blood of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, 59 from sputum of HIV-negative patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 88 from environmental sources, and 5 pulmonary isolates from a different study. A total of 15 different PRA patterns were observed. For 27 representative isolates, a 441-bp fragment of the hsp65 gene was sequenced; based on 54 polymorphic sites, 18 different alleles were defined, including 12 alleles not previously reported. Species and phylogenetic relationships were more accurately defined by sequencing than by PRA or commercial probe. The distribution of PRA types and, by implication, phylogenetic lineages among blood isolates was significantly different from that for pulmonary and environmental isolates, suggesting that particular lineages have appreciably greater virulence and invasive potential.

  19. Preliminary Evaluation of a Sitafloxacin-Containing Regimen for Relapsed or Refractory Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium Complex Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Kohei; Fujita, Masaki; Ito, Yutaka; Hirai, Toyohiro; Mio, Tadashi; Watanabe, Kentaro; Mishima, Michiaki

    2016-01-01

    Although sitafloxacin (STFX) is known to have a favorable minimum inhibitory concentration for Mycobacterium avium, few studies have evaluated the clinical efficacy of an STFX-containing regimen for pulmonary M avium complex (MAC) disease. To evaluate the clinical efficacy of STFX-containing regimens for relapsed or refractory pulmonary MAC disease, we retrospectively reviewed 18 patients with pulmonary MAC disease who received STFX for at least 4 weeks for pulmonary MAC disease between January 2008 and February 2016. Of 18 patients, 10 (55.6%) showed improved radiological characteristics and 8 (44.4%) showed negative sputum cultures at 6 months. Regarding the clinical symptoms, improvements were observed in decreasing order in sputum production (77.8%), cough (72.2%), and malaise (55.6%). Common adverse events included nausea or vomiting (38.9%), followed by loose stool or diarrhea (27.8%) and sleepiness (11.1%). Although this study contained a small number of subjects, we describe a STFX-containing regimen that was effective in achieving sputum culture negative conversions and had an acceptable adverse events profile. PMID:27704005

  20. Broncho-Pleural Fistula with Hydropneumothorax at CT: Diagnostic Implications in Mycobacterium avium Complex Lung Disease with Pleural Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hyun Jung; Chung, Myung Jin; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Jung Soo; Park, Hye Yun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the patho-mechanism of pleural effusion or hydropneumothorax in Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lung disease through the computed tomographic (CT) findings. Materials and Methods We retrospectively collected data from 5 patients who had pleural fluid samples that were culture-positive for MAC between January 2001 and December 2013. The clinical findings were investigated and the radiological findings on chest CT were reviewed by 2 radiologists. Results The 5 patients were all male with a median age of 77 and all had underlying comorbid conditions. Pleural fluid analysis revealed a wide range of white blood cell counts (410–100690/µL). The causative microorganisms were determined as Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare in 1 and 4 patients, respectively. Radiologically, the peripheral portion of the involved lung demonstrated fibro-bullous changes or cavitary lesions causing lung destruction, reflecting the chronic, insidious nature of MAC lung disease. All patients had broncho-pleural fistulas (BPFs) and pneumothorax was accompanied with pleural effusion. Conclusion In patients with underlying MAC lung disease who present with pleural effusion, the presence of BPFs and pleural air on CT imaging are indicative that spread of MAC infection is the cause of the effusion. PMID:26957917

  1. Complex Engineered Systems: A New Paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mina, Ali A.; Braha, Dan; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    Human history is often seen as an inexorable march towards greater complexity — in ideas, artifacts, social, political and economic systems, technology, and in the structure of life itself. While we do not have detailed knowledge of ancient times, it is reasonable to conclude that the average resident of New York City today faces a world of much greater complexity than the average denizen of Carthage or Tikal. A careful consideration of this change, however, suggests that most of it has occurred recently, and has been driven primarily by the emergence of technology as a force in human life. In the 4000 years separating the Indus Valley Civilization from 18th century Europe, human transportation evolved from the bullock cart to the hansom, and the methods of communication used by George Washington did not differ significantly from those used by Alexander or Rameses. The world has moved radically towards greater complexity in the last two centuries. We have moved from buggies and letter couriers to airplanes and the Internet — an increase in capacity, and through its diversity also in complexity, orders of magnitude greater than that accumulated through the rest of human history. In addition to creating iconic artifacts — the airplane, the car, the computer, the television, etc. — this change has had a profound effect on the scope of experience by creating massive, connected and multiultra- level systems — traffic networks, power grids, markets, multinational corporations — that defy analytical understanding and seem to have a life of their own. This is where complexity truly enters our lives.

  2. Commentary: is the paradigm for humiliation sufficiently complex?

    PubMed

    Altshul, Victor A

    2010-01-01

    The authors Torres and Bergner present a simple, elegant paradigm for understanding the phenomenon of humiliation. They suggest it may have universal applicability and may be of heuristic value for clinicians and policy-makers involved in forensic and social arenas. They offer case examples to illustrate its utility. It is open to question, however, whether the paradigm is sufficiently complex to encompass all the variables in actual situations. In real life, the evolution of humiliation is a highly complicated, often messy process that takes place over time and often results in intense feelings of humiliation in more than one person, often affecting several persons. The authors' examples are reexamined from alternate assumptions about what may have happened in each case. An additional case example illustrates a high degree of interpersonal complexity, suggesting that actual situations may be too unwieldy to allow for simple analysis by the paradigm.

  3. The paradigm of complexity in clinical neurocognitive science.

    PubMed

    Orsucci, Franco F

    2006-10-01

    Neurocognitive science represents the modern approach to integrating the subdisciplines aimed at a scientific study of the brain-mind system. This relatively new discipline recognizes, implicitly or explicitly, that this is a complex system whose states and processes are determined by multiple bio-psycho-social variables and order parameters. In a generic perspective, all neurocognitive science is complex, as it is multidisciplinary, but in some studies, complexity has become a more defined scientific paradigm using its own specific empirical and theoretical tools. Some neuroscientists consider complexity science as a specific and formalized paradigm. Between their contributions, the author will try to highlight some current promising paths and new frontiers for neuroscience. In this perspective, he will mostly focus on those contributions directly related to clinical perspectives. This is the reason why some seminal contributions more focused on physiological functioning might not be mentioned.

  4. Isolation of the Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare-M. scrofulaceum complex from tank water in Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed Central

    Tuffley, R E; Holbeche, J D

    1980-01-01

    Disease-associated serotypes of Mycobacterium intracellulare and M. avium have been isolated from 32 of 141 rainwater tanks situated in the basin of the Fitzroy River and its tributaries in central Queensland, 7 of 32 tanks situated in the hinterland of the coastal city of Rockhampton, and 2 of 32 tanks sampled repetitively in the southeastern Queensland city of Toowoomba. M. gordonae was also isolated from 23 of the river basin tanks, from 9 in the Rockhampton hinterland, and from 5 in the city of Toowoomba. One half of these isolates came from tanks which also yielded M. intracellulare. Mycobacteria of the M. terrae-M. triviale-M. nonchromogenicum complex were found in 7 tanks, usually in conjunction with M. intracellulare. The humans who consume the contaminated tank water are free of symptoms but have not been medically examined. It is suggested that mycobacteria adhering to dust particles disturbed by mechanical cultivation may be the source of contamination. PMID:7356321

  5. The presence of opportunistic pathogens, Legionella spp., L. pneumophila and Mycobacterium avium complex, in South Australian reuse water distribution pipelines.

    PubMed

    Whiley, H; Keegan, A; Fallowfield, H; Bentham, R

    2015-06-01

    Water reuse has become increasingly important for sustainable water management. Currently, its application is primarily constrained by the potential health risks. Presently there is limited knowledge regarding the presence and fate of opportunistic pathogens along reuse water distribution pipelines. In this study opportunistic human pathogens Legionella spp., L. pneumophila and Mycobacterium avium complex were detected using real-time polymerase chain reaction along two South Australian reuse water distribution pipelines at maximum concentrations of 10⁵, 10³ and 10⁵ copies/mL, respectively. During the summer period of sampling the concentration of all three organisms significantly increased (P < 0.05) along the pipeline, suggesting multiplication and hence viability. No seasonality in the decrease in chlorine residual along the pipelines was observed. This suggests that the combination of reduced chlorine residual and increased water temperature promoted the presence of these opportunistic pathogens.

  6. Mycobacterium colombiense sp. nov., a novel member of the Mycobacterium avium complex and description of MAC-X as a new ITS genetic variant.

    PubMed

    Murcia, Martha I; Tortoli, Enrico; Menendez, M Carmen; Palenque, Elia; Garcia, Maria J

    2006-09-01

    Forty-five mycobacterial strains isolated from 23 Colombian HIV-positive patients were identified as members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) and were characterized using different molecular approaches. Seven of the isolates showed characteristic features that allowed them to be differentiated from other members of the complex. The isolates had a novel 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS 1) gene sequence which is described as a new sequevar, MAC-X. All of the seven novel isolates gave a positive result with the MAC-specific AccuProbe (Gen-Probe), but tested negative for Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare species-specific probes (64 and 100 % of the isolates, respectively). The novel isolates could be differentiated phenotypically from other members of the MAC on the basis of the production of urease and by a consistent mycolic acid pattern. The novel isolates shared some characteristics with M. avium, such as the avium variant I (av-I) pattern of the hsp65 gene as determined by PCR restriction analysis and a positive PCR result for the mig (macrophage-induced) gene. However, the novel isolates showed a unique 16S rRNA gene sequence. DNA-DNA relatedness values, from 24 to 44 %, confirmed the distinction of the novel isolates from other members of the MAC at the genetic level and their status as members of a separate species. The novel isolates are proposed as representatives of a novel species, Mycobacterium colombiense sp. nov., that is closely related to M. avium within the MAC. The type strain is 10B(T) (=CIP 108962(T)=CECT 3035(T)).

  7. Bordetella avium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bordetellosis is an acute, highly contagious disease of the upper respiratory tract of young turkeys (4-8 wk of age). The disease is caused by a gram-negative, nonfermentative bacterium, Bordetella avium. Members of the genus Bordetella are well known for their ability to colonize and damage ciliate...

  8. Absence of Mycobacterium intracellulare and presence of Mycobacterium chimaera in household water and biofilm samples of patients in the United States with Mycobacterium avium complex respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Richard J; Iakhiaeva, Elena; Williams, Myra D; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Lande, Leah; Peterson, Donald D; Sawicki, Janet; Kwait, Rebecca; Tichenor, Wellington S; Turenne, Christine; Falkinham, Joseph O

    2013-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that respiratory isolates from pulmonary disease patients and household water/biofilm isolates of Mycobacterium avium could be matched by DNA fingerprinting. To determine if this is true for Mycobacterium intracellulare, household water sources for 36 patients with Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lung disease were evaluated. MAC household water isolates from three published studies that included 37 additional MAC respiratory disease patients were also evaluated. Species identification was done initially using nonsequencing methods with confirmation by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and/or partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. M. intracellulare was identified by nonsequencing methods in 54 respiratory cultures and 41 household water/biofilm samples. By ITS sequencing, 49 (90.7%) respiratory isolates were M. intracellulare and 4 (7.4%) were Mycobacterium chimaera. In contrast, 30 (73%) household water samples were M. chimaera, 8 (20%) were other MAC X species (i.e., isolates positive with a MAC probe but negative with species-specific M. avium and M. intracellulare probes), and 3 (7%) were M. avium; none were M. intracellulare. In comparison, M. avium was recovered from 141 water/biofilm samples. These results indicate that M. intracellulare lung disease in the United States is acquired from environmental sources other than household water. Nonsequencing methods for identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria (including those of the MAC) might fail to distinguish closely related species (such as M. intracellulare and M. chimaera). This is the first report of M. chimaera recovery from household water. The study underscores the importance of taxonomy and distinguishing the many species and subspecies of the MAC.

  9. Evaluation of a high-throughput repetitive-sequence-based PCR system for DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium complex strains.

    PubMed

    Cangelosi, Gerard A; Freeman, Robert J; Lewis, Kaeryn N; Livingston-Rosanoff, Devon; Shah, Ketan S; Milan, Sparrow Joy; Goldberg, Stefan V

    2004-06-01

    Repetitive-sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) is useful for generating DNA fingerprints of diverse bacterial and fungal species. Rep-PCR amplicon fingerprints represent genomic segments lying between repetitive sequences. A commercial system that electrophoretically separates rep-PCR amplicons on microfluidic chips, and provides computer-generated readouts of results has been adapted for use with Mycobacterium species. The ability of this system to type M. tuberculosis and M. avium complex (MAC) isolates was evaluated. M. tuberculosis strains (n = 56) were typed by spoligotyping with rep-PCR as a high-resolution adjunct. Results were compared with those generated by a standard approach of spoligotyping with IS6110-targeted restriction fragment length polymorphism (IS6110-RFLP) as the high-resolution adjunct. The sample included 11 epidemiologically and genotypically linked outbreak isolates and a population-based sample of 45 isolates from recent immigrants to Seattle, Wash., from the African Horn countries of Somalia, Eritrea, and Ethiopia. Twenty isolates exhibited unique spoligotypes and were not analyzed further. Of the 36 outbreak and African Horn isolates with nonunique spoligotypes, 23 fell into four clusters identified by IS6110-RFLP and rep-PCR, with 97% concordance observed between the two methods. Both approaches revealed extensive strain heterogeneity within the African Horn sample, consistent with a predominant pattern of reactivation of latent infections in this immigrant population. Rep-PCR exhibited 89% concordance with IS1245-RFLP typing of 28 M. avium subspecies avium strains. For M. tuberculosis as well as M. avium subspecies avium, the discriminative power of rep-PCR equaled or exceeded that of RFLP. Rep-PCR also generated DNA fingerprints from M. intracellulare (n = 8) and MAC(x) (n = 2) strains. It shows promise as a fast, unified method for high-throughput genotypic fingerprinting of multiple Mycobacterium species.

  10. Absence of Mycobacterium intracellulare and Presence of Mycobacterium chimaera in Household Water and Biofilm Samples of Patients in the United States with Mycobacterium avium Complex Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Iakhiaeva, Elena; Williams, Myra D.; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A.; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Lande, Leah; Peterson, Donald D.; Sawicki, Janet; Kwait, Rebecca; Tichenor, Wellington S.; Turenne, Christine; Falkinham, Joseph O.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that respiratory isolates from pulmonary disease patients and household water/biofilm isolates of Mycobacterium avium could be matched by DNA fingerprinting. To determine if this is true for Mycobacterium intracellulare, household water sources for 36 patients with Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lung disease were evaluated. MAC household water isolates from three published studies that included 37 additional MAC respiratory disease patients were also evaluated. Species identification was done initially using nonsequencing methods with confirmation by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and/or partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. M. intracellulare was identified by nonsequencing methods in 54 respiratory cultures and 41 household water/biofilm samples. By ITS sequencing, 49 (90.7%) respiratory isolates were M. intracellulare and 4 (7.4%) were Mycobacterium chimaera. In contrast, 30 (73%) household water samples were M. chimaera, 8 (20%) were other MAC X species (i.e., isolates positive with a MAC probe but negative with species-specific M. avium and M. intracellulare probes), and 3 (7%) were M. avium; none were M. intracellulare. In comparison, M. avium was recovered from 141 water/biofilm samples. These results indicate that M. intracellulare lung disease in the United States is acquired from environmental sources other than household water. Nonsequencing methods for identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria (including those of the MAC) might fail to distinguish closely related species (such as M. intracellulare and M. chimaera). This is the first report of M. chimaera recovery from household water. The study underscores the importance of taxonomy and distinguishing the many species and subspecies of the MAC. PMID:23536397

  11. [The dimension of the paradigm of complexity in health systems].

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Ortiz, Guillermo; Fernández-Ortega, Miguel Ángel; Ortiz-Montalvo, Armando; Olivares-Santos, Roberto Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This article presents elements to better understand health systems from the complety paradigm, innovative perspective that offers other ways in the conception of the scientific knowledge prevalent away from linear, characterized by the arise of emerging dissociative and behaviors, based on the intra and trans-disciplinarity concepts such knowledges explain and understand in a different way what happens in the health systems with a view to efficiency and effectiveness. The complexity paradigm means another way of conceptualizing the knowledge, is different from the prevalent epistemology, is still under construction does not separate, not isolated, is not reductionist, or fixed, does not solve the problems, but gives other bases to know them and study them, is a different strategy, a perspective that has basis in the systems theory, informatics and cybernetics beyond traditional knowledge, the positive logics, the newtonian physics and symmetric mathematics, in which everything is centered and balanced, joint the "soft sciences and hard sciences", it has present the Social Determinants of Health and organizational culture. Under the complexity paradigm the health systems are identified with the following concepts: entropy, neguentropy, the thermodynamic second law, attractors, chaos theory, fractals, selfmanagement and self-organization, emerging behaviors, percolation, uncertainty, networks and robusteness; such expressions open new possibilities to improve the management and better understanding of the health systems, giving rise to consider health systems as complex adaptive systems. Copyright © 2015. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A.

  12. Clarithromycin Susceptibility Testing of Mycobacterium avium Complex Using 2,3-Diphenyl-5-thienyl-(2)-tetrazolium Chloride Microplate Assay with Middlebrook 7H9 Broth

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young Kil; Koh, Won-Jung; Kim, Shin Ok; Shin, Sonya; Kim, Bum Joon; Cho, Sang-Nae; Lee, Sun Min

    2009-01-01

    A series of 119 Mycobacterium avium complex isolates were subjected to clarithromycin susceptibility testing using microplates containing 2,3-diphenyl-5-thienyl-(2)-tetrazolium chloride (STC). Among 119 isolates, 114 (95.8%) were susceptible to clarithromycin and 5 were resistant according to the new and the standard method. STC counts the low cost and reduces the number of procedures needed for susceptibility testing. PMID:19543518

  13. Characterization and growth in human macrophages of Mycobacterium avium complex strains isolated from the blood of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Meylan, P R; Richman, D D; Kornbluth, R S

    1990-01-01

    Strains of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) yield opaque and transparent colonial variants when cultivated in vitro. The transparent variants are more virulent than the opaque for animals, but little is known about the respective roles of these colonial variants in humans. To assess which variant infects humans, various blood fractions from eight patients with MAC bacteremia were plated directly onto 7H10 agar. In cell fractionation studies, all the M. avium complex CFU were associated with leukocytes and none were found free in plasma. All colonies on the primary culture plate exhibited the transparent phenotype. However, during subculture in 7H9 broth or on Lowenstein-Jensen agar, opaque variants appeared in seven of eight strains. Isogenic pairs of transparent and opaque variants were prepared and used to infect in vitro human monocyte-derived macrophages from healthy seronegative individuals. Transparent variants invariably grew inside macrophages, but only one of seven opaque variants did so. These observations indicate that the bacteremia of M. avium complex in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients consists exclusively of the transparent variants, perhaps because these variants are able to multiply inside macrophages. In contrast, opaque variants appear after in vitro subculture and are controlled by human macrophages, consistent with their reduced virulence in animals. Images PMID:2370109

  14. Early bactericidal activity of rifabutin versus that of placebo in treatment of disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex bacteremia in AIDS patients.

    PubMed Central

    Dautzenberg, B; Castellani, P; Pellegrin, J L; Vittecoq, D; Truffot-Pernot, C; Pirotta, N; Sassella, D

    1996-01-01

    Rifabutin, 600 mg/day, was compared with a placebo in the early treatment of culture-proven Mycobacterium avium bacteremia in patients with AIDS. Following 14 days' treatment, bacteriological success, defined as a negative culture or a reduction in the number of CFU of M. avium organisms per milliliter of blood by a factor of > or = 0.5 log from the baseline, was observed in 7 of 10 (70%) evaluable rifabutin patients and in 1 of 13 (8%) evaluable placebo patients (P = 0.002). Rifabutin is active against M. avium as a single agent and can make a significant contribution to combination regimens for the treatment of disseminated M. avium infection in AIDS patients. PMID:8807071

  15. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification for Direct Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex, M. avium, and M. intracellulare in Sputum Samples

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Tomotada; Sonobe, Toshiaki; Hayashi, Kozaburo

    2003-01-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a novel nucleic acid amplification method in which reagents react under isothermal conditions with high specificity, efficiency, and rapidity. We used LAMP for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, Mycobacterium avium, and Mycobacterium intracellulare directly from sputum specimens as well as for detection of culture isolates grown in a liquid medium (MGIT; Nippon Becton Dickinson Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan) or on a solid medium (Ogawa's medium). Species-specific primers were designed by targeting the gyrB gene, and their specificities were validated on 24 mycobacterial species and 7 nonmycobacterial species. The whole procedure is quite simple, starting with the mixing of all reagents in a single tube, followed by an isothermal reaction during which the reaction mixture is held at 63°C. The resulting amplicons are visualized by adding SYBR Green I to the reaction tube. The only equipment needed for the amplification reaction is a regular laboratory water bath or heat block that furnishes a constant temperature of 63°C. The assay had a detection limit of 5 to 50 copies of purified DNA with a 60-min incubation time. The reaction time could be shortened to 35 min for the species identification of M. tuberculosis complex, M. avium, and M. intracellulare from a solid-medium culture. Residual DNA lysates prepared for the Amplicor assay (Roche Diagnostics GmbH) from 66 sputum specimens were tested in the LAMP assay. Although the sample size used for the latter assay was small, 2.75 μl of the DNA lysates, it showed a performance comparable with that of the Amplicor assay, which required 50 μl of the lysates. This LAMP-based assay is simple, rapid, and sensitive; a result is available in 35 min for a solid-medium culture and in 60 min for a liquid-medium culture or for a sputum specimen that contains a corresponding amount of DNA available for testing. PMID:12791888

  16. [Nursing education in the light of the complexity paradigm].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ana Lúcia; Camillo, Simone de Oliveira

    2007-09-01

    The objectives of this research were to recognize, interpret and discuss themes that arise out of the speeches of instructors of an undergraduate course of Nursing as guiding sources to a humanized teaching-learning experience in the light of Edgard Morin's Theory of Complexity. It is a qualitative, exploratory and analytic research. The study tried to verify principles of the paradigm of complexity through content analysis, theme modality, in the speeches of 11 instructors, obtained in 2004. The themes that were found were: teaching the instructor's responsibility; combining knowledge: connections and interrelations to face reality; teaching human complexity; stimulating creativity and curiosity; facing uncertainty: building life's continuous, dynamic knowledge; experiencing the teaching-learning process through transdisciplinarity; and teaching citizenship. This study shows that it is possible to have a university education based on the human condition, solidarity and knowledge interconnection.

  17. Azithromycin, rifabutin, and rifapentine for treatment and prophylaxis of Mycobacterium avium complex in rats treated with cyclosporine.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, S T; Edwards, F F; Bernard, E M; Tong, W; Armstrong, D

    1993-01-01

    Azithromycin, rifabutin, and rifapentine were used to treat or prevent disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infections produced in rats immunosuppressed with cyclosporine. Animals with bacteremic infections were treated 1 week after intravenous inoculation with 10(7) CFU of MAC with azithromycin, 100 mg/kg of body weight administered subcutaneously for 5 days and then 75 mg/kg on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, or with rifabutin or rifapentine, 20 mg/kg administered intraperitoneally on Monday through Friday. All three drugs showed efficacy after 1 and 2 months. Rifabutin cleared the organisms from tissues more rapidly than azithromycin or rifapentine. To approximate prophylaxis, treatment was started 2 weeks before intravenous inoculation with 10(4) organisms. MAC infections were undetectable in treated animals after 4 months, while control animals had disseminated infections. These findings support the rationale for clinical trials of treatment and prophylaxis with these agents. The cyclosporine-treated rat appears to be a useful model in which to evaluate compounds for the treatment and prophylaxis of disseminated MAC infections. PMID:8384809

  18. [A case of generalized disseminated atypical mycobacteriosis caused by M. avium complex with a giant gravitation abscess].

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, H; Torii, Y; Senda, Y; Totani, Y; Suzuki, M; Ooshika, H; Wakayama, H; Ito, Y; Noguchi, M

    1994-02-01

    A case of generalized disseminated atypical mycobacteriosis caused by M. avium complex (MAC) was reported. The case was a female of 52 years of age. She was admitted to our hospital due to high fever and polyarthralgia. Her chest X-ray and CT scan revealed infiltrative shadows in the right S2b and S4 segments, and multiple accumulation shadows were seen on osteoscintigraphy. Pus aspirated from a lesion of the right fifth rib were acid-fast bacilli positive by smear (Gaffky v). The administration of four drugs, INH, RFP, EB and SM, was introduced, then corticosteroid was added, and the case became afebrile. Later, acid-fast bacilli were also isolated from bronchial washing and aspirated specimen from bone marrow, and all of them were identified as MAC. Based on these findings, the case was diagnosed as generalized disseminated mycobacteriosis. After several months remission, tenderness over the fifth lumbar vertebra deteriorated, and MRI scan on lumbar vertebrae showed high-intensity area both on T1-weighted and T2-weighted images. MAC was isolated from the pus of the fifth lumbar vertebra. Lumbar lesions deteriorated gradually, and a giant gravitation abscess which involved right ilium was revealed by CT scan of the pelvis. In spite of vigorous treatment including chemotherapy, aspiration of pus and drainage, general condition of the case deteriorated, and the case finally died of renal insufficiency.

  19. Evaluation of the MycoAKT latex agglutination test for rapid diagnosis of Mycobacterium avium complex infections.

    PubMed

    Olano, J P; Holmes, H; Woods, G L

    1998-01-01

    Rapid diagnosis of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) bacteremia is important for management of patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome who have disseminated MAC. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the MycoAKT latex agglutination test for direct detection of MAC in positive mycobacterial blood cultures. First, colonies of isolates of previously identified mycobacteria, including 35 MAC, were tested. Of the 55 isolates evaluated, 33 were identified as MAC by the latex test, including 31 of the known MAC and 2 M. chelonae (sensitivity, 88.6%; specificity, 90.0%). Second, broth from 20 ESP II and 20 BACTEC 12B bottles seeded with isolates of MAC were tested. Aliquots from 19 (95%) ESP II cultures and 16 (80%) 12B cultures were positive by the latex test. In phase 3, broth from 115 signal-positive ESP II blood cultures were tested by latex agglutination. Forty-three subcultures from these bottles grew mycobacteria (41 MAC and 2 Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex); the remainder grew no organisms. Broth from 40 of the blood cultures (39 that grew MAC and 1 from which no organisms were recovered) were latex positive; thus, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the latex test for direct identification of MAC in ESP II blood cultures were 95.1, 98.6, 97.5, and 97.3%, respectively. The mean time to detection of MAC was 14.6 days (range, 6-34 days) with the direct latex test, compared with 18.3 days (range, 9-36 days) with subculture and probe (p < 0.05).

  20. Validation of a Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for Detection of Mycobacterium spp., Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex, and Mycobacterium avium Complex Directly from Clinical Samples by Use of the BD Max Open System.

    PubMed

    Rocchetti, Talita T; Silbert, Suzane; Gostnell, Alicia; Kubasek, Carly; Widen, Raymond

    2016-06-01

    A multiplex real-time PCR was validated on the BD Max open system to detect different Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, Mycobacterium avium complex, and Mycobacterium spp. directly from clinical samples. The PCR results were compared to those with traditional cultures. The multiplex PCR assay was found to be a specific and sensitive method for the rapid detection of mycobacteria directly from clinical specimens. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Clinical efficacy of anti-glycopeptidolipid-core IgA test for diagnosing Mycobacterium avium complex infection in lung.

    PubMed

    Numata, Takanori; Araya, Jun; Yoshii, Yutaka; Shimizu, Kenichiro; Hara, Hiromichi; Nakayama, Katsutoshi; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi

    2015-11-01

    It is difficult to verify the bacteriological diagnosis of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection. The anti-glycopeptidolipid (GPL)-core IgA antibody test was recently developed as a diagnostic method for MAC pulmonary disease. Only a few studies evaluate its clinical efficacy. We conducted retrospective evaluations of clinical characteristics of patients suspected of MAC infection to explore the usefulness of the anti-GPL-core IgA antibody test. We retrospectively evaluated 296 patients who were suspected to have MAC infection and underwent anti-GPL-core IgA antibody test between March 2013 and July 2014 in Jikei University hospital. A total of 29 patients were diagnosed with 'definite MAC' based on the American Thoracic Society (ATS) criteria with multiple identifications of MAC. On the other hand, 106 patients were diagnosed with other pulmonary diseases than MAC. The sensitivity and specificity of anti-GPL-core IgA antibody test for MAC diagnosis were 58.6% and 98.1%, respectively. The definite MAC group showed no significant differences in strains, treatment history or number of segments involved. The duration of MAC disease in the positive-antibody group was significantly longer than in the negative-antibody group (P = 0.046). A significant increase in the false-negative rate was observed in patients with malignant disease (P = 0.029). The anti-GPL-core IgA antibody test demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of MAC infection especially in patients without malignant diseases. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  2. Mycobacterium avium complex olecranon bursitis resolves without antimicrobials or surgical intervention: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Working, Selene; Tyser, Andrew; Levy, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Nontuberculous mycobacteria are an uncommon cause of septic olecranon bursitis, though cases have increasingly been described in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent hosts. Guidelines recommend a combination of surgical resection and antimicrobials for treatment. This case is the first reported case of nontuberculous mycobacterial olecranon bursitis that resolved without medical or surgical intervention. Case presentation A 67-year-old female developed a painless, fluctuant swelling of the olecranon bursa following blunt trauma to the elbow. Due to persistent bursal swelling, she underwent three separate therapeutic bursal aspirations, two involving intrabursal steroid injection. After the third aspiration, the bursa became erythematous and severely swollen, and bursal fluid grew Mycobacterium avium complex. Triple-drug antimycobacterial therapy was initiated, but discontinued abruptly due to a rash. Surgery was not performed. The patient was observed off antimicrobials, and gradually clinically improved with a compressive dressing. By 14 months after initial presentation, clinical exam revealed complete resolution of the previously erythematous bursal mass. Discussion This is the first reported case of nontuberculous mycobacterial olecranon bursitis managed successfully without surgery or antimicrobials. Musculoskeletal nontuberculous mycobacterial infections are challenging given the lack of clinical data about optimal duration and choice of antimicrobials or the role of surgery. Additionally, the potential toxicity and drug interactions of antimycobacterials are not insignificant and warrant close monitoring if treatment is pursued. Conclusion This case raises an important clinical question of whether close observation off antimicrobials is appropriate in select cases of immunocompetent patients with localized atypical mycobacterial disease of soft tissue and skeletal structures. PMID:26793457

  3. Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) Immune Reconstitution Syndrome (IRIS) With Reduced Susceptibility to Ethambutol in an HIV-Infected Patient.

    PubMed

    Adams, Immaculata B; Schafer, Jason J; Roberts, Amity L; Short, William R

    2014-09-01

    To describe a case of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lymphadenitis complicated by immune reconstitution syndrome (IRIS) and reduced susceptibility to ethambutol. A 24-year-old man was diagnosed in October 2012 with advanced HIV infection upon hospitalization for multiple opportunistic infections (OIs). Within 5 months of starting antiretroviral therapy, the patient developed significant cervical lymphadenopathy concerning for MAC/IRIS. Acid-fast bacilli were detected in the primary lymph node biopsy smear, and culture results confirmed the presence of MAC. Susceptibility testing revealed an organism susceptible to azithromycin, with an elevated minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) to ethambutol (8 µg/mL). Currently, there is no interpretation for an ethambutol MIC of 8 µg/mL for MAC. A review of the primary literature revealed the possibility of decreased ethambutol susceptibility when the MIC is above 1 µg/mL, and therefore, therapy was replaced by rifabutin in combination with azithromycin. Current guidelines recommend a 2-drug regimen for the treatment of MAC, specifically a macrolide plus ethambutol. Guidelines also emphasize MAC susceptibility testing for macrolides only. Susceptibility results from this patient's biopsy prompted an evaluation of the effectiveness of his antimycobacterial regimen. Reduced ethambutol susceptibility in this patient triggered a search of the primary literature that resulted in the decision to replace ethambutol with rifabutin. Additional clinical trials are needed to define susceptibility breakpoints for ethambutol and other antimycobacterial agents used for MAC infection treatment and to direct clinical decisions when elevated MICs to primary agents are identified. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Clinical Characteristics, Treatment Outcomes, and Resistance Mutations Associated with Macrolide-Resistant Mycobacterium avium Complex Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seong Mi; Park, Hye Yun; Kim, Su-Young; Jhun, Byung Woo; Lee, Hyun; Jeon, Kyeongman; Kim, Dae Hun; Huh, Hee Jae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Nam Yong; Kim, Hong Kwan; Choi, Yong Soo; Kim, Jhingook; Lee, Seung-Heon; Kim, Chang Ki; Shin, Sung Jae; Daley, Charles L; Koh, Won-Jung

    2016-11-01

    Macrolide antibiotics are key components of the multidrug treatment regimen for treating lung disease (LD) due to Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). Despite the emergence of macrolide resistance, limited data are available on macrolide-resistant MAC-LD. This study evaluated the clinical features and treatment outcomes of patients with macrolide-resistant MAC-LD and the molecular characteristics of the macrolide-resistant isolates. A retrospective review of the medical records of 34 patients with macrolide-resistant MAC-LD who were diagnosed between January 2002 and December 2014 was performed, along with genetic analysis of 28 clinical isolates. Nineteen (56%) patients had the fibrocavitary form of MAC-LD, and 15 (44%) had the nodular bronchiectatic form. M. intracellulare was the etiologic organism in 21 (62%) patients. Approximately two-thirds (22/34 [65%]) of the patients had been treated with currently recommended multidrug regimens that included macrolide, ethambutol, and rifamycin prior to the emergence of macrolide resistance, and none had been treated with macrolide monotherapy. The median duration of treatment after the detection of macrolide resistance was 23.0 months (interquartile range, 16.8 to 45.3 months). Treatment outcomes were poor after the development of macrolide resistance, with favorable treatment outcomes achieved in only five (15%) patients, including two patients who underwent surgical resection. One-, 3-, and 5-year mortality rates were 9, 24, and 47%, respectively. Molecular analysis of 28 clinical isolates revealed that 96% (27/28) had point mutations at position 2058 or 2059 of the 23S rRNA gene. Our analyses indicate that more effective therapy is needed to treat macrolide-resistant MAC-LD and prevent its development. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. High-resolution CT findings of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex pulmonary disease: correlation with pulmonary function test results.

    PubMed

    Song, Jong Woon; Koh, Won-Jung; Lee, Kyung Soo; Lee, Ji Young; Chung, Myung Jin; Kim, Tae Sung; Kwon, O Jung

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of our study was to analyze the high-resolution CT findings of the nodular bronchiectatic form of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC) pulmonary disease and to correlate the extent of high-resolution CT findings with pulmonary function test (PFT) results. From January 2005 through December 2005, we identified 47 patients (mean age, 58 +/- 13 years; age range, 24-72 years; male-female ratio, 11:36) with the nodular bronchiectatic form of MAC pulmonary disease who underwent both high-resolution CT and PFTs. High-resolution CT findings were reviewed retrospectively in terms of the presence and extent of bronchiectasis, cellular or inflammatory bronchiolitis (centrilobular small nodules and tree-in-bud signs), cavity, nodule, and other findings. The extent of the abnormalities seen on high-resolution CT was scored by modifying the cystic fibrosis scoring system proposed by Helbich and coworkers. The scores were correlated with PFT results using Spearman's correlation coefficient. On high-resolution CT, the three most frequently observed patterns of parenchymal abnormalities were, in decreasing order of frequency, cellular bronchiolitis (n = 47, 100%), bronchiectasis (n = 46, 98%), and consolidation (n = 27, 57%). The total CT score showed a significant correlation with the residual volume-total lung capacity (RV/TLC) ratio (r = 0.572, p < 0.001), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)) value (r = -0.426, p = 0.003), forced vital capacity (FVC) value (r = -0.360, p = 0.013), peak expiratory flow value (r = -0.352, p = 0.015), and peak expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of the forced vital capacity (FEF(25-75%)) (r = -0.289, p = 0.049). CT scoring of pulmonary abnormalities correlates with measures of functional impairment in patients with MAC pulmonary disease.

  6. Activities of sparfloxacin, azithromycin, temafloxacin, and rifapentine compared with that of clarithromycin against multiplication of Mycobacterium avium complex within human macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Perronne, C; Gikas, A; Truffot-Pernot, C; Grosset, J; Vilde, J L; Pocidalo, J J

    1991-01-01

    The activities of sparfloxacin, azithromycin, temafloxacin, and rifapentine against two virulent strains of the Mycobacterium avium complex isolated from patients with AIDS were evaluated in a model of intracellular infection and were compared with that of clarithromycin. Human monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with the M. avium complex at day 6 of culture. The intracellular CFU was counted 60 min after inoculation. The intracellular and supernatant CFU was counted on days 4 and 7 after inoculation. The concentrations used, which were equal to peak levels in serum, were 10 micrograms of rifapentine per ml (MICs for the two strains, 4 and 16 micrograms/ml), 4 micrograms of clarithromycin per ml (MICs, 8 and 4 micrograms/ml), 1 microgram of azithromycin per ml (MICs, 32 and 16 micrograms/ml), 4 micrograms of temafloxacin per ml (MICs, 2 and 16 micrograms/ml), and 1 microgram of sparfloxacin per ml (MICs, 0.5 and 2 micrograms/ml). Compared with controls on day 7 after inoculation, clarithromycin (P less than 0.001), sparfloxacin (P less than 0.001), and azithromycin (P less than 0.001 for the first strain, P less than 0.02 for the second) slowed intracellular replication. Rifapentine (P less than 0.001) and temafloxacin (P less than 0.001) slowed intracellular replication of the first strain but not of the second strain. Azithromycin plus sparfloxacin was as effective as sparfloxacin alone. In this macrophage model, sparfloxacin or clarithromycin (difference not significant) exhibited a better efficacy than rifapentine, azithromycin, or temafloxacin against intracellular M. avium complex infection. PMID:1656860

  7. Virulence and Immune Response Induced by Mycobacterium avium Complex Strains in a Model of Progressive Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Subcutaneous Infection in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    González-Pérez, Mónica; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo; Parra-López, Carlos Alberto; Murcia, Martha Isabel; Marquina, Brenda; Mata-Espinoza, Dulce; Rodriguez-Míguez, Yadira; Baay-Guzman, Guillermina J.; Huerta-Yepez, Sara

    2013-01-01

    The genus Mycobacterium comprises more than 150 species, including important pathogens for humans which cause major public health problems. The vast majority of efforts to understand the genus have been addressed in studies with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The biological differentiation between M. tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is important because there are distinctions in the sources of infection, treatments, and the course of disease. Likewise, the importance of studying NTM is not only due to its clinical significance but also due to the mechanisms by which some species are pathogenic while others are not. Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is the most important group of NTM opportunistic pathogens, since it is the second largest medical complex in the genus after the M. tuberculosis complex. Here, we evaluated the virulence and immune response of M. avium subsp. avium and Mycobacterium colombiense, using experimental models of progressive pulmonary tuberculosis and subcutaneous infection in BALB/c mice. Mice infected intratracheally with a high dose of MAC strains showed high expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and inducible nitric oxide synthase with rapid bacillus elimination and numerous granulomas, but without lung consolidation during late infection in coexistence with high expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines. In contrast, subcutaneous infection showed high production of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and gamma interferon with relatively low production of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-10 (IL-10) or IL-4, which efficiently eliminate the bacilli but maintain extensive inflammation and fibrosis. Thus, MAC infection evokes different immune and inflammatory responses depending on the MAC species and affected tissue. PMID:23959717

  8. Beyond the oncogene paradigm: understanding complexity in cancerogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bizzarri, M; Cucina, A; Conti, F; D'Anselmi, F

    2008-09-01

    In the past decades, an enormous amount of precious information has been collected about molecular and genetic characteristics of cancer. This knowledge is mainly based on a reductionistic approach, meanwhile cancer is widely recognized to be a 'system biology disease'. The behavior of complex physiological processes cannot be understood simply by knowing how the parts work in isolation. There is not solely a matter how to integrate all available knowledge in such a way that we can still deal with complexity, but we must be aware that a deeply transformation of the currently accepted oncologic paradigm is urgently needed. We have to think in terms of biological networks: understanding of complex functions may in fact be impossible without taking into consideration influences (rules and constraints) outside of the genome. Systems Biology involves connecting experimental unsupervised multivariate data to mathematical and computational approach than can simulate biologic systems for hypothesis testing or that can account for what it is not known from high-throughput data sets. Metabolomics could establish the requested link between genotype and phenotype, providing informations that ensure an integrated understanding of pathogenic mechanisms and metabolic phenotypes and provide a screening tool for new targeted drug.

  9. Comparison of CO2 Generation (BACTEC) and Viable-Count Methods To Determine the Postantibiotic Effect of Antimycobacterial Agents against Mycobacterium avium Complex

    PubMed Central

    Zhanel, George G.; Saunders, Marilyn H.; Wolfe, Joyce N.; Hoban, Daryl J.; Karlowsky, James A.; Kabani, Amin M.

    1998-01-01

    The postantibiotic effects (PAEs) of antimycobacterial agents determined with a BACTEC TB-460 instrument (CO2 production) and by a traditional viable-count method against Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) were not significantly different (P > 0.05). The longest PAEs following a 2-h exposure to 2× the MIC were induced by amikacin (10.3 h), rifampin (9.7 h), and rifabutin (9.5 h), while the shortest PAEs resulted from clofazimine (1.7 h) and ethambutol (1.1 h) exposure. CO2 generation is a valid and efficient means of determining in vitro PAEs against MAC. PMID:9449284

  10. Use of the INNO-LiPA-MYCOBACTERIA assay (version 2) for identification of Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare-Mycobacterium scrofulaceum complex isolates.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, Léa; Weill, François-Xavier; Lafendi, Leila; Houriez, Florence; Casanova, François; Gutierrez, M Cristina; Ingrand, Didier; Lagrange, Philippe; Vincent, Véronique; Herrmann, Jean Louis

    2005-06-01

    Using INNO-LiPA-MYCOBACTERIA (Lipav1; Innogenetics) and the AccuProbe (Gen-Probe Inc./bioMérieux) techniques, 35 Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare-Mycobacterium scrofulaceum (MAC/MAIS) complex strains were identified between January 2000 and December 2002. Thirty-four of 35 isolates were positive only for the MAIS complex probe by Lipav1 and were further analyzed by INNO-LiPA-MYCOBACTERIA version 2 (Lipav2), hsp65 PCR restriction pattern analysis (PRA), and ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS), hsp65, and 16S rRNA sequences. Lipav2 identified 14 of 34 strains at the species level, including 11 isolates positive for the newly specific MAC sequevar Mac-A probe (MIN-2 probe). Ten of these 11 isolates corresponded to sequevar Mac-A, which was recently defined as Mycobacterium chimerae sp. nov. Among the last 20 of the 34 MAIS isolates, 17 (by hsp65 PRA) and 18 (by hsp65 sequence) were characterized as M. avium. Ten of the 20 were identified as Mac-U sequevar. All these 20 isolates were identified as M. intracellulare by 16S rRNA sequence except one isolate identified as Mycobacterium paraffinicum by 16S rRNA and ITS sequencing. One isolate out of 35 isolates that was positive for M. avium by AccuProbe and that was Mycobacterium genus probe positive and MAIS probe negative by Lipav1 and Lipav2 might be considered a new species. In conclusion, the new INNO-LiPA-MYCOBACTERIA allowed the identification of 40% of the previously unidentified MAIS isolates at the species level. The results of the Lipav2 assay on the MAIS isolates confirm the great heterogeneity of this group and suggest the use of hsp65 or ITS sequencing for precise identification of such isolates.

  11. Proposal to elevate the genetic variant MAC-A, included in the Mycobacterium avium complex, to species rank as Mycobacterium chimaera sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Tortoli, Enrico; Rindi, Laura; Garcia, Maria J; Chiaradonna, Patrizia; Dei, Rosanna; Garzelli, Carlo; Kroppenstedt, Reiner M; Lari, Nicoletta; Mattei, Romano; Mariottini, Alessandro; Mazzarelli, Gianna; Murcia, Martha I; Nanetti, Anna; Piccoli, Paola; Scarparo, Claudio

    2004-07-01

    The possibility that the strains included within the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), but not belonging either to M. avium or to Mycobacterium intracellulare, may be members of undescribed taxa, has already been questioned by several taxonomists. A very homogeneous cluster of 12 strains characterized by identical nucleotide sequences both in the 16S rDNA and in the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer was investigated. Similar strains, previously reported in the literature, had been assigned either to the species M. intracellulare on the basis of the 16S rDNA similarity or to the group of MAC intermediates. However, several phenotypical and epidemiological characteristics seem to distinguish these strains from all other MAC organisms. The unique mycolic acid pattern obtained by HPLC is striking as it is characterized by two clusters of peaks, instead of the three presented by all other MAC organisms. All of the strains have been isolated from humans and all but one came from the respiratory tract of elderly people. The clinical significance of these strains, ascertained for seven patients, seems to suggest an unusually high virulence. The characteristics of all the strains reported in the literature, genotypically identical to the ones described here, seem to confirm our data, without reports of isolations from animals or the environment or, among humans, from AIDS patients. Therefore, an elevation of the MAC variant was proposed and characterized here, with the name Mycobacterium chimaera sp. nov.; this increases the number of species included in the M. avium complex. The type strain is FI-01069T (=CIP 107892T=DSM 44623T).

  12. Dose response models and a quantitative microbial risk assessment framework for the Mycobacterium avium complex that account for recent developments in molecular biology, taxonomy, and epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Kerry A; Weir, Mark H; Haas, Charles N

    2017-02-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is a group of environmentally-transmitted pathogens of great public health importance. This group is known to be harbored, amplified, and selected for more human-virulent characteristics by amoeba species in aquatic biofilms. However, a quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) has not been performed due to the lack of dose response models resulting from significant heterogeneity within even a single species or subspecies of MAC, as well as the range of human susceptibilities to mycobacterial disease. The primary human-relevant species and subspecies responsible for the majority of the human disease burden and present in drinking water, biofilms, and soil are M. avium subsp. hominissuis, M. intracellulare, and M. chimaera. A critical review of the published literature identified important health endpoints, exposure routes, and susceptible populations for MAC risk assessment. In addition, data sets for quantitative dose-response functions were extracted from published in vivo animal dosing experiments. As a result, seven new exponential dose response models for human-relevant species of MAC with endpoints of lung lesions, death, disseminated infection, liver infection, and lymph node lesions are proposed. Although current physical and biochemical tests used in clinical settings do not differentiate between M. avium and M. intracellulare, differentiating between environmental species and subspecies of the MAC can aid in the assessment of health risks and control of MAC sources. A framework is proposed for incorporating the proposed dose response models into susceptible population- and exposure route-specific QMRA models.

  13. Mycobacterium marseillense sp. nov., Mycobacterium timonense sp. nov. and Mycobacterium bouchedurhonense sp. nov., members of the Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed

    Ben Salah, Iskandar; Cayrou, Caroline; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2009-11-01

    An rpoB sequence-based evaluation of 100 Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) clinical isolates led to the identification of five respiratory tract isolates that were potential representatives of three novel MAC species. Distinctive phenotypic features of isolates 62863 and 5356591(T) included a pseudomycelium morphology and both esterase and acid phosphatase activities. These two isolates exhibited sequence similarities of 99.8 % for the 16S rRNA gene, 86.3 and 86.1 % for 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) sequence, 96.7 and 97.8 % for rpoB and 97.6 and 97.4 % for hsp65, respectively, with the type strain of Mycobacterium chimaera, the most closely related species. Isolates 3256799 and 5351974(T) lacked alpha-mannosidase and beta-glucosidase activities. They exhibited sequence similarities of 99.6 % for the 16S rRNA gene, 90.1 and 90.4 % for ITS-1, 97.8 % for rpoB and 98.0 and 98.1 % for hsp65, respectively, with the type strain of M. chimaera, the most closely related species. Isolate 4355387(T) lacked urease and alpha-glucosidase activities, but it exhibited valine arylamidase, cystine arylamidase and acid phosphatase activities. It had sequence similarities of 99.3 % for the 16S rRNA gene, 51.8 % for ITS-1, 97.1 % for rpoB and 97.8 % for hsp65 with the type strain of Mycobacterium colombiense, the most closely related species. A phylogenetic tree based on concatenated 16S rRNA gene, ITS-1, rpoB and hsp65 sequences showed the uniqueness of these five isolates as representatives of three novel species, with bootstrap values >/=95 % in all nodes. On the basis of these phenotypic and genetic characteristics, these five isolates are proposed as representatives of three novel MAC species: Mycobacterium marseillense sp. nov., with strain 5356591(T) (=CCUG 56325(T) =CIP 109828(T) =CSUR P30(T)) as the type strain; Mycobacterium timonense sp. nov., with strain 5351974(T) (=CCUG 56329(T) =CIP 109830(T) =CSUR P32(T)) as the type strain; and Mycobacterium

  14. Changes in Serum IgA Antibody Levels against the Glycopeptidolipid Core Antigen during Antibiotic Treatment of Mycobacterium avium Complex Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Jhun, Byung Woo; Kim, Su-Young; Park, Hye Yun; Jeon, Kyeongman; Shin, Sung Jae; Koh, Won-Jung

    2017-03-28

    We evaluated serial changes in the levels of serum immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibody to the glycopeptidolipid (GPL) core antigen during antibiotic treatment in 57 patients with M. avium complex (MAC) lung disease, at baseline (T0) and after 3 months (T3) and 6 months (T6) of treatment. The median patient age was 59 years and 37 (65%) were female. Etiologic organisms included M. avium in 32 (56%) patients and M. intracellulare in 25 (44%). Seven (12%) patients had the fibrocavitary form of the disease on computed tomography. After 12 months of treatment, 42 (74%) patients achieved favorable responses, whereas 15 (26%) patients had unfavorable responses defined as no sputum culture conversion within 12 months of treatment. The initial median serum anti-GPL IgA levels in the 57 patients was 3.50 U/mL, and measurements at T0 (median 3.50 U/mL), T3 (median 2.71 U/mL), and T6 (median 2.61 U/mL) revealed significant decreases following treatment (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that an initially elevated anti-GPL IgA level (> 3.50 U/mL) was associated with an unfavorable response (P = 0.049). Our data suggest that elevated anti-GPL IgA levels may reflect disease activity, which may help to predict treatment response in patients with MAC lung disease.

  15. Military Intelligence Fusion for Complex Operations: A New Paradigm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    systems theory (see Ludwig von Bertalanffy , General System Theory: Foundations, Development, Applications, rev. ed., New York: George Braziller...for analytic recruitment, training, and education, as well as adopting a new paradigm for analysis. 27 Bibliography Bertalanffy , Ludwig von, General

  16. Use of restriction fragment length polymorphisms resolved by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for subspecies identification of mycobacteria in the Mycobacterium avium complex and for isolation of DNA probes.

    PubMed Central

    Coffin, J W; Condon, C; Compston, C A; Potter, K N; Lamontagne, L R; Shafiq, J; Kunimoto, D Y

    1992-01-01

    Mycobacterial strains from the Mycobacterium avium complex were compared with each other and with Mycobacterium phlei isolates by restriction endonuclease digestion of chromosomal DNA with SspI and analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Characteristic profiles were observed for known typed strains, and five groups were identified. Primary bovine isolates identified as Mycobacterium paratuberculosis by classical methods were shown to fall into both the M. paratuberculosis- and M. avium-like groups. M. paratuberculosis 18 was in the latter category. Two Mycobacterium intracellulare strains of different Schaefer serotypes had different digestion profiles. In addition, this system was exploited for the preparation of DNA probes by the isolation, digestion, and subcloning of DNA fragments separated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Probe JC12 hybridized only to M. avium complex strains, but not to M. phlei, showing characteristic hybridization profiles for each of the groups previously identified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The approach taken in the study lends itself to the comparative analysis of members of the M. avium complex and to the isolation and characterization of DNA probes with specificity for these mycobacteria. Images PMID:1352787

  17. Mycobacterium Avium Complex (MAC)

    MedlinePlus

    Home Fact Sheet Categories Internet Bookmarks on AIDS Have Questions? Printing & Downloading Fact Sheets Permission to Use Fact Sheets Sponsors and Advertising Privacy Policy Project Staff Contact Us This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here . Site of ...

  18. Visualizing the Complexities of Instruction: The CMT Paradigm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branch, Robert C.

    The relationship between instruction and instructional design is explored. The aim of instruction is to assist the individual as learner. The Learner, the Content, the Media, the Teacher Function, and the Context within which learning is to occur interact during a period of time to form an instructional episode (the CMT paradigm). Considering all…

  19. Complex slow potential generators in a simplified attention paradigm.

    PubMed

    Basile, Luis F H; Brunetti, Enzo P; Pereira, José F; Ballester, Gerson; Amaro, Edson; Anghinah, Renato; Ribeiro, Pedro; Piedade, Roberto; Gattaz, Wagner F

    2006-08-01

    We have recently obtained evidence for complex multifocal, individually variable generators of slow cortical potentials, elicited during performance of visual tasks involving expecting attention, comparison and memory [Basile, L.F.H., Ballester, G., Castro, C.C., and Gattaz, W.F., 2002. Multifocal slow potential generators revealed by high-resolution EEG and current density reconstruction. Int. J. Psychophysiol., 45 (3), 227-240; Basile, L.F.H, Baldo, M.V., Castro, C.C., and Gattaz, W.F. 2003. The generators of slow potentials obtained during verbal, pictorial and spatial tasks. Int. J. Psychophysiol., 48, 55-65]. The cue-target aspect of traditional paradigms for attention studies is equivalent to 'warning S1'-'imperative S2' in slow potential designs. We simplified Posner's spatial cueing task [Posner, M.I. 1980. Orienting of attention.Q. J. Exp. Psychol. Feb;32 (1), 3-25; Posner, M.I., Snyder, C.R., Davidson, B.J. 1980. Attention and the detection of signals. J Exp Psychol. Jun; 109 (2), 160-174] to temporal cuing only, by using visual cues to indicate the mere presence, on a known central position, of the eventual target (17 ms duration, +/-0.3 degrees grey circle). We recorded slow potentials on 12 healthy subjects, by 124-channel EEG system (Neuroscan Inc.), and modeled their generators using current density reconstruction (CDR) by L(p) 1.2 norm minimization ("Curry V4.6", Neurosoft Inc.) applied to the target onset time. MRIs were obtained for each subject for constraining source models to individual brain anatomy. Average slow potentials were computed from above 60 artifact-free EEG-epochs (ISI=1.6 s, average ITI=2.5 s). We tabulated individual cortical current distributions by cytoarchitectonic area of Brodmann, after scaling into negligible, low, moderate and strong local density, based on percentile bands with respect to absolute maximum current. Despite the task's simplicity, the main result was individual variability and complexity in both scalp

  20. Polyclonal infections due to Mycobacterium avium complex in patients with AIDS detected by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of sequential clinical isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Slutsky, A M; Arbeit, R D; Barber, T W; Rich, J; von Reyn, C F; Pieciak, W; Barlow, M A; Maslow, J N

    1994-01-01

    Invasive infection with organisms of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is common among patients with advanced human immunodeficiency virus infection. In previous studies, we analyzed multiple individual colonies of MAC isolated from specimens obtained at the same time and observed that 14 to 20% of patients are simultaneously infected with more than one strain. In this study, we examined sequential isolates from 12 patients with AIDS who had two or more MAC isolates available from clinical specimens collected more than 1 week apart; the intervals between the first and last specimens ranged from 8 to 192 (median, 46) days. For each isolate, restriction digests of genomic DNA were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis; DNA was prepared by using a protocol, described here in detail, which had been optimized for conditions of bacterial growth and lysis. The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis identified four patients (33%) infected with two different MAC strains. Both M. avium and M. intracellulare were cultured from blood specimens from two patients. In each of the four patients, the second strain was identified from a culture taken within 14 days of the initial study isolate, and in three of these patients, the first strain was detected again in a subsequent culture. These observations suggest that the presence of two different strains among isolates from sequential cultures may reflect ongoing polyclonal infection. We conclude that polyclonal infection with MAC is common among patients with AIDS. The identification of such infections may be critical in the development of effective treatments. Images PMID:7929773

  1. Antigenicity in sheep of synthetic peptides derived from stress-regulated Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis proteins and comparison with recombinant protein and complex native antigens.

    PubMed

    Gurung, Ratna B; Begg, Douglas J; Purdie, Auriol C; Whittington, Richard J

    2014-03-15

    Serum antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is the most commonly used test for diagnosis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in ruminants. However, the assay requires serum preabsorption with Mycobacterium phlei proteins to reduce cross reactions potentially contributed by the exposure of livestock to environmental mycobacteria. To trial the discovery of novel antigens which do not require serum absorption, synthetic MAP-specific peptides were selected based on in silico research to identify putative B cell epitopes. Four peptides from previously identified stress-regulated proteins were synthesized and evaluated using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay to detect Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis specific antibodies in sheep. Two peptides were from hypothetical MAP proteins (MAP3567 and MAP1168c) and two were from proteins with known function (MAP2698c, an acyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase-DesA2 and MAP2487c a carbonic anhydrase). The ability of each peptide to discriminate between unexposed and MAP exposed (infected and vaccinated) animals was similar to that of the parent recombinant MAP antigen, with area under receiver operating curve values of 0.86-0.93. Assays run with a combination of two peptides showed slightly higher reactivity than those of individual peptides. Peptides evaluated in this study had diagnostic potential similar to corresponding recombinant proteins but not superior to a complex native MAP antigen or a commercial assay. Further study is required to investigate other peptides for their diagnostic potential, and this may be simpler and cheaper than subunit protein-based research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex infection in a child with partial dominant interferon gamma receptor 1 deficiency in India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Varun K; Pai, Gautham; Deswarte, Caroline; Lodha, Rakesh; Singh, Sarman; Kang, Liew Woei; Yin, Chong Chia; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Bustamante, Jacinta; Kabra, Sushil K

    2015-07-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD) is a rare condition characterized by clinical disease caused by weakly virulent mycobacteria. All genes mutated in MSMD patients are involved in IFN-γ immunity. Autosomal partial dominant (PD) interferon-γ receptor 1 (IFN-γR1) deficiency is the most frequent abnormality affecting the group of MSMD patients leading to impaired response of IFN-γ. We describe here a patient from India with disseminated infection due to Mycobacterium avium intracellulare (MAC) including multifocal osteomyelitis and BCG disease. A heterozygous mutation in exon 6 of IFNGR1 gene was identified, conferring an autosomal PD IFN-γR1 deficiency. Patient had recurrence of mycobacterial disease during antibiotic therapy for which subcutaneous IFN-γ was added as a modality of treatment for resistant MAC infection.

  3. Moving alcohol prevention research forward-Part I: introducing a complex systems paradigm.

    PubMed

    Apostolopoulos, Yorghos; Lemke, Michael K; Barry, Adam E; Lich, Kristen Hassmiller

    2017-07-22

    The drinking environment is a complex system consisting of a number of heterogeneous, evolving and interacting components, which exhibit circular causality and emergent properties. These characteristics reduce the efficacy of commonly used research approaches, which typically do not account for the underlying dynamic complexity of alcohol consumption and the interdependent nature of diverse factors influencing misuse over time. We use alcohol misuse among college students in the United States as an example for framing our argument for a complex systems paradigm. A complex systems paradigm, grounded in socio-ecological and complex systems theories and computational modeling and simulation, is introduced. Theoretical, conceptual, methodological and analytical underpinnings of this paradigm are described in the context of college drinking prevention research. The proposed complex systems paradigm can transcend limitations of traditional approaches, thereby fostering new directions in alcohol prevention research. By conceptualizing student alcohol misuse as a complex adaptive system, computational modeling and simulation methodologies and analytical techniques can be used. Moreover, use of participatory model-building approaches to generate simulation models can further increase stakeholder buy-in, understanding and policymaking. A complex systems paradigm for research into alcohol misuse can provide a holistic understanding of the underlying drinking environment and its long-term trajectory, which can elucidate high-leverage preventive interventions. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  4. Complexity, Training Paradigm Design, and the Contribution of Memory Subsystems to Grammar Learning.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Mark; Ettlinger, Marc; Wong, Patrick C M

    2016-01-01

    Although there is variability in nonnative grammar learning outcomes, the contributions of training paradigm design and memory subsystems are not well understood. To examine this, we presented learners with an artificial grammar that formed words via simple and complex morphophonological rules. Across three experiments, we manipulated training paradigm design and measured subjects' declarative, procedural, and working memory subsystems. Experiment 1 demonstrated that passive, exposure-based training boosted learning of both simple and complex grammatical rules, relative to no training. Additionally, procedural memory correlated with simple rule learning, whereas declarative memory correlated with complex rule learning. Experiment 2 showed that presenting corrective feedback during the test phase did not improve learning. Experiment 3 revealed that structuring the order of training so that subjects are first exposed to the simple rule and then the complex improved learning. The cumulative findings shed light on the contributions of grammatical complexity, training paradigm design, and domain-general memory subsystems in determining grammar learning success.

  5. Complexity, Training Paradigm Design, and the Contribution of Memory Subsystems to Grammar Learning

    PubMed Central

    Ettlinger, Marc; Wong, Patrick C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Although there is variability in nonnative grammar learning outcomes, the contributions of training paradigm design and memory subsystems are not well understood. To examine this, we presented learners with an artificial grammar that formed words via simple and complex morphophonological rules. Across three experiments, we manipulated training paradigm design and measured subjects' declarative, procedural, and working memory subsystems. Experiment 1 demonstrated that passive, exposure-based training boosted learning of both simple and complex grammatical rules, relative to no training. Additionally, procedural memory correlated with simple rule learning, whereas declarative memory correlated with complex rule learning. Experiment 2 showed that presenting corrective feedback during the test phase did not improve learning. Experiment 3 revealed that structuring the order of training so that subjects are first exposed to the simple rule and then the complex improved learning. The cumulative findings shed light on the contributions of grammatical complexity, training paradigm design, and domain-general memory subsystems in determining grammar learning success. PMID:27391085

  6. Drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium Avium subsp. Avium isolates from naturally infected domestic pigeons to avian tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Parvandar, Kaveh; Mayahi, Mansour; Mosavari, Nader; Pajoohi, Reza Aref

    2016-12-01

    Avian tuberculosis is one of the most important infections affecting most species of birds. Several mycobacterial species have been identified causing avian tuberculosis, and the organisms confirmed most frequently are Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium genavense. Any species of birds can be infected with M. avium. Generally, domesticated fowl or captive wild birds are affected more frequently than those living in the wild. M. avium can not only infect all species of birds, but can also infect some domesticated mammals to cause disease, usually with localized lesion. In immunocompetent individuals, M. avium complex isolates produce localized soft tissue infections, including chronic pulmonary infections in the elderly and cervical lymphadenitis in children, but rarely any disseminated disease. In patients infected with HIV and AIDS or in other immunocompromised individuals, M. avium complex isolates frequently cause severe systemic infections. The importance of avian tuberculosis and the risk of its zoonotic spread motivated our interest to determine the drug susceptibility testing of M. avium subsp. avium isolates from naturally infected domestic pigeons to avian tuberculosis. Based on their clinical signs, 80 pigeons suspected with avian tuberculosis were subjected to the study. Out of the 51 identified isolates, 20 M. avium subsp. avium were subjected to the test. Drug susceptibly testing was performed according to the guidelines by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and using proportional method. In the drug susceptibility testing, all isolates were resistant to streptomycin, kanamycin, ethionamide, and thiophene carboxylic acid hydrazide. Additionally, 3, 2, and 1 isolates were susceptible to isoniazid, rifampin, and ethambutol, respectively. To date, no study has documented the drug susceptibility testing of M. avium isolates from infected birds to avian tuberculosis. Pigeons are extensively kept in urban and rural areas for homing and racing

  7. Dual color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assays for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium complexes and related pathogens in cultures.

    PubMed

    Shah, Jyotsna; Weltman, Helena; Narciso, Patricia; Murphy, Christina; Poruri, Akhila; Baliga, Shrikala; Sharon, Leesha; York, Mary; Cunningham, Gail; Miller, Steve; Caviedes, Luz; Gilman, Robert; Desmond, Edward; Ramasamy, Ranjan

    2017-01-01

    Two rapid dual color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assays were evaluated for detecting M. tuberculosis and related pathogens in cultures. The MN Genus-MTBC FISH assay uses an orange fluorescent probe specific for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and a green fluorescent probe specific for the Mycobacterium and Nocardia genera (MN Genus) to detect and distinguish MTBC from other Mycobacteria and Nocardia. A complementary MTBC-MAC FISH assay uses green and orange fluorescent probes specific for the MTBC and M. avium complex (MAC) respectively to identify and differentiate the two species complexes. The assays are performed on acid-fast staining bacteria from liquid or solid cultures in less than two hours. Forty-three of 44 reference mycobacterial isolates were correctly identified by the MN Genus-specific probe as Mycobacterium species, with six of these correctly identified as MTBC with the MTBC-specific probe and 14 correctly as MAC by the MAC-specific probe. Of the 25 reference isolates of clinically relevant pathogens of other genera tested, only four isolates representing two species of Corynebacterium gave a positive signal with the MN Genus probe. None of these 25 isolates were detected by the MTBC and MAC specific probes. A total of 248 cultures of clinical mycobacterial isolates originating in India, Peru and the USA were also tested by FISH assays. DNA sequence of a part of the 23S ribosomal RNA gene amplified by PCR was obtained from 243 of the 248 clinical isolates. All 243 were confirmed by DNA sequencing as Mycobacterium species, with 157 and 50 of these identified as belonging to the MTBC and the MAC, respectively. The accuracy of the MN Genus-, MTBC-and MAC -specific probes in identifying these 243 cultures in relation to their DNA sequence-based identification was 100%. All ten isolates of Nocardia, (three reference strains and seven clinical isolates) tested were detected by the MN Genus-specific probe but not the MTBC- or

  8. Contributions of the complexity paradigm to the understanding of Cerrado's organization and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mattos, Sérgio H V L DE; Vicente, Luiz E; Perez, Archimedes; Piqueira, José R C

    2016-01-01

    The Brazilian Cerrado is a vegetation mosaic composed of different physiognomies. Discussions remain open regarding the factors and processes responsible for the dynamic and spatial organization of the Cerrado - in its different physiognomies. The contributions of the complexity paradigm in this context are still less exploited, despite its great potential for explanations and predictions presented in previous diverse dynamic systems of complex behavior researches, a category in which the Cerrado can be included. This article has the intention of contributing to the construction of this new perspective, discussing - from theoretical concepts - the paradigm of complexity for the understanding of the organization and the dynamics of the Cerrado.

  9. Cognitive Complexity and the Similarity-Attraction Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Russell L., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Tested the hypothesis that cognitively complex judges will be more attracted to similar others than to dissimilar others, while cognitively simple judges will not be differentially attracted to similar and dissimilar others. (Author/RK)

  10. Toward a Complexity Paradigm for Understanding Gender Role Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enns, Carolyn Zerbe

    2008-01-01

    The well-developed body of theory and research on men's gender role conflict provides an excellent foundation for developing increasingly complex models of men's gender-related concerns. Theorists and researchers are encouraged to incorporate themes related to social structural aspects of gender as well as to examine the ways in which men's…

  11. Toward a Complexity Paradigm for Understanding Gender Role Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enns, Carolyn Zerbe

    2008-01-01

    The well-developed body of theory and research on men's gender role conflict provides an excellent foundation for developing increasingly complex models of men's gender-related concerns. Theorists and researchers are encouraged to incorporate themes related to social structural aspects of gender as well as to examine the ways in which men's…

  12. Rapid Mycobacterial Liquid Culture-Screening Method for Mycobacterium avium Complex Based on Secreted Antigen-Capture Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay▿

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sung Jae; Anklam, Kelly; Manning, Elizabeth J. B.; Collins, Michael T.

    2009-01-01

    Sensors in automated liquid culture systems for mycobacteria, such as MGIT, BacT/Alert 3D, and Trek ESP II, flag growth of any type of bacteria; a positive signal does not mean that the target mycobacteria are present. All signal-positive cultures thus require additional and often laborious testing. An immunoassay was developed to screen liquid mycobacterial cultures for evidence of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). The method, called the MAC-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), relies on detection of MAC-specific secreted antigens in liquid culture. Secreted MAC antigens were captured by the MAC-ELISA with polyclonal anti- Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis chicken immunoglobulin Y (IgY), detected using rabbit anti-MAC IgG, and then revealed using horseradish peroxidase-conjugated goat anti-rabbit IgG. When the MAC-ELISA was evaluated using pure cultures of known mycobacterial (n = 75) and nonmycobacterial (n = 17) organisms, no false-positive or false-negative MAC-ELISA results were found. By receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis of 1,275 previously identified clinical isolates, at the assay optimal cutoff the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the MAC-ELISA were 92.6% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 90.3 to 94.5) and 99.9% (95% CI, 99.2 to 100), respectively, with an area under the ROC curve of 0.992. Prospective evaluation of the MAC-ELISA with an additional 652 clinical samples inoculated into MGIT ParaTB medium and signaling positive per the manufacturer's instructions found that the MAC-ELISA was effective in determining those cultures that actually contained MAC species and warranting the resources required to identify the organism by PCR. Of these 652 MGIT-positive cultures, the MAC-ELISA correctly identified 96.8% (of 219 MAC-ELISA-positive cultures) as truly containing MAC mycobacteria, based on PCR or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) as reference tests. Only 6 of 433 MGIT signal-positive cultures (1

  13. Rapid mycobacterial liquid culture-screening method for Mycobacterium avium complex based on secreted antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sung Jae; Anklam, Kelly; Manning, Elizabeth J B; Collins, Michael T

    2009-05-01

    Sensors in automated liquid culture systems for mycobacteria, such as MGIT, BacT/Alert 3D, and Trek ESP II, flag growth of any type of bacteria; a positive signal does not mean that the target mycobacteria are present. All signal-positive cultures thus require additional and often laborious testing. An immunoassay was developed to screen liquid mycobacterial cultures for evidence of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). The method, called the MAC-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), relies on detection of MAC-specific secreted antigens in liquid culture. Secreted MAC antigens were captured by the MAC-ELISA with polyclonal anti- Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis chicken immunoglobulin Y (IgY), detected using rabbit anti-MAC IgG, and then revealed using horseradish peroxidase-conjugated goat anti-rabbit IgG. When the MAC-ELISA was evaluated using pure cultures of known mycobacterial (n = 75) and nonmycobacterial (n = 17) organisms, no false-positive or false-negative MAC-ELISA results were found. By receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis of 1,275 previously identified clinical isolates, at the assay optimal cutoff the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the MAC-ELISA were 92.6% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 90.3 to 94.5) and 99.9% (95% CI, 99.2 to 100), respectively, with an area under the ROC curve of 0.992. Prospective evaluation of the MAC-ELISA with an additional 652 clinical samples inoculated into MGIT ParaTB medium and signaling positive per the manufacturer's instructions found that the MAC-ELISA was effective in determining those cultures that actually contained MAC species and warranting the resources required to identify the organism by PCR. Of these 652 MGIT-positive cultures, the MAC-ELISA correctly identified 96.8% (of 219 MAC-ELISA-positive cultures) as truly containing MAC mycobacteria, based on PCR or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) as reference tests. Only 6 of 433 MGIT signal-positive cultures (1

  14. Descriptive analysis of the prevalence and the molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium avium complex-infected pigs that were slaughtered on the main island of Okinawa.

    PubMed

    Hibiya, K; Kazumi, Y; Nishiuchi, Y; Sugawara, I; Miyagi, K; Oda, Y; Oda, E; Fujita, J

    2010-09-01

    Recent genetic studies have revealed that several epidemiological factors affect Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection in pig populations. However, mechanisms underlying the spread of MAC infection among hog farms have not been clarified. In consideration of this situation, we cross-sectionally investigated the mechanisms underlying the spread of MAC on the island of Okinawa. Pigs slaughtered (n=706,763) and 331 hog farms on Okinawa were surveyed during the years 2002-2004. Two outbreaks of MAC infection were occurred in several farms during survey period. Bacteria were isolated from randomly selected pigs and genotype of isolates was determined by using genetic finger printing methods with the insertion sequence (IS) 1245 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Most isolates had large numbers of IS1245 copies, while strains with low copy numbers of IS1245 and isolates without IS1245 were seen in few farms. MACs strains were repeatedly isolated from pigs of the affected farms during the survey period. Those farms with an identical pig rearing systems showed synchronic changes in the prevalence of MAC infection. An industrial farm without an outbreak had an independent pig flow, but maintained distinct MAC strains. Multivariate analysis did not reveal independent factors for the prevalence of the MAC infection. These findings suggest that there were three clusters distinguished genetically in the main island of Okinawa, which were potentially spread by common pig flow. However, the outbreaks occurred because of unspecified conditions on each farm environment.

  15. Persimmon-derived tannin has bacteriostatic and anti-inflammatory activity in a murine model of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Yoko; Kitabatake, Masahiro; Ouji-Sageshima, Noriko; Yasui, Satsuki; Mochida, Naoko; Nakano, Ryuichi; Kasahara, Kei; Tomoda, Koichi; Yano, Hisakazu; Kayano, Shin-Ichi; Ito, Toshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), including Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), cause opportunistic chronic pulmonary infections. Notably, MAC susceptibility is regulated by various factors, including the host immune system. Persimmon (Ebenaceae Diospyros kaki Thunb.) tannin is a condensed tannin composed of a polymer of catechin groups. It is well known that condensed tannins have high antioxidant activity and bacteriostatic properties. However, it is hypothesized that condensed tannins might need to be digested and/or fermented into smaller molecules in vivo prior to being absorbed into the body to perform beneficial functions. In this study, we evaluated the effects of soluble persimmon-derived tannins on opportunistic MAC disease. Soluble tannins were hydrolyzed and evaluated by the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) method. The ORAC value of soluble tannin hydrolysate was approximately five times greater than that of soluble tannin powder. In addition, soluble tannin hydrolysate exhibited high bacteriostatic activity against MAC in vitro. Furthermore, in an in vivo study, MAC infected mice fed a soluble tannin-containing diet showed significantly higher anti-bacterial activity against MAC and less pulmonary granuloma formation compared with those fed a control diet. Tumor necrosis factor α and inducible nitric oxide synthase levels were significantly lower in lungs of the soluble tannin diet group compared with the control diet group. Moreover, proinflammatory cytokines induced by MAC stimulation of bone marrow-derived macrophages were significantly decreased by addition of soluble tannin hydrolysate. These data suggest that soluble tannin from persimmons might attenuate the pathogenesis of pulmonary NTM infection.

  16. Attenuation of lymphocyte immune responses during Mycobacterium avium complex-induced lung disease due to increasing expression of programmed death-1 on lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Chin-Chung; Wang, Jann-Yuan; Wu, Ming-Fang; Wu, Chen-Tu; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Lee, Li-Na; Chiang, Bor-Luen; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex-induced lung disease (MAC-LD) becomes important due to its increasing prevalence. Attenuated cellular immunity associated with programmed cell death (PD)–1 may play a pathophysiological role in MAC-LD but lacks of investigation. We enrolled 80 participants in this prospective study, including 50 with MAC-LD and 30 healthy controls. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), lymphocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages were used for MAC antigen stimulation. Patients with MAC-LD had lower tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ responses compared to the healthy controls in PBMC stimulation assays with MAC bacilli. These responses improved after MAC treatment. The PD-1 and PD ligand expressions and apoptosis were higher in the lymphocytes of the patients with MAC-LD compared to the controls. Both PD-1 and apoptosis on T lymphocytes were significantly increased in the patients with MAC-LD, either by direct MAC stimulation or by MAC-primed macrophage activation. Partially blocking PD-1 and the PD ligand with antagonizing antibodies in the stimulation assay significantly increased the cytokine production of IFN-γ and decreased the apoptosis on T lymphocytes. In conclusion, the patients with MAC-LD have attenuated lymphocyte immunity, which might be associated with increasing activation of PD-1 and PD-1 ligand. Regulating such activation might improve the lymphocytic secretion of IFN-γ and reduce apoptosis. PMID:28169347

  17. Persimmon-derived tannin has bacteriostatic and anti-inflammatory activity in a murine model of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Yoko; Kitabatake, Masahiro; Ouji-Sageshima, Noriko; Yasui, Satsuki; Mochida, Naoko; Nakano, Ryuichi; Kasahara, Kei; Tomoda, Koichi; Yano, Hisakazu; Kayano, Shin-ichi

    2017-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), including Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), cause opportunistic chronic pulmonary infections. Notably, MAC susceptibility is regulated by various factors, including the host immune system. Persimmon (Ebenaceae Diospyros kaki Thunb.) tannin is a condensed tannin composed of a polymer of catechin groups. It is well known that condensed tannins have high antioxidant activity and bacteriostatic properties. However, it is hypothesized that condensed tannins might need to be digested and/or fermented into smaller molecules in vivo prior to being absorbed into the body to perform beneficial functions. In this study, we evaluated the effects of soluble persimmon-derived tannins on opportunistic MAC disease. Soluble tannins were hydrolyzed and evaluated by the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) method. The ORAC value of soluble tannin hydrolysate was approximately five times greater than that of soluble tannin powder. In addition, soluble tannin hydrolysate exhibited high bacteriostatic activity against MAC in vitro. Furthermore, in an in vivo study, MAC infected mice fed a soluble tannin-containing diet showed significantly higher anti-bacterial activity against MAC and less pulmonary granuloma formation compared with those fed a control diet. Tumor necrosis factor α and inducible nitric oxide synthase levels were significantly lower in lungs of the soluble tannin diet group compared with the control diet group. Moreover, proinflammatory cytokines induced by MAC stimulation of bone marrow-derived macrophages were significantly decreased by addition of soluble tannin hydrolysate. These data suggest that soluble tannin from persimmons might attenuate the pathogenesis of pulmonary NTM infection. PMID:28827842

  18. Human health risks for Legionella and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) from potable and non-potable uses of roof-harvested rainwater.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Kerry A; Ahmed, Warish; Toze, Simon; Haas, Charles N

    2017-08-01

    A quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) of opportunistic pathogens Legionella pneumophila (LP) and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) was undertaken for various uses of roof-harvested rainwater (RHRW) reported in Queensland, Australia to identify appropriate usages and guide risk management practices. Risks from inhalation of aerosols due to showering, swimming in pools topped up with RHRW, use of a garden hose, car washing, and toilet flushing with RHRW were considered for LP while both ingestion (drinking, produce consumption, and accidental ingestion from various activities) and inhalation risks were considered for MAC. The drinking water route of exposure presented the greatest risks due to cervical lymphadenitis and disseminated infection health endpoints for children and immune-compromised populations, respectively. It is therefore not recommended that these populations consume untreated rainwater. LP risks were up to 6 orders of magnitude higher than MAC risks for the inhalation route of exposure for all scenarios. Both inhalation and ingestion QMRA simulations support that while drinking, showering, and garden hosing with RHRW may present the highest risks, car washing and clothes washing could constitute appropriate uses of RHRW for all populations, and toilet flushing and consumption of lettuce irrigation with RHRW would be appropriate for non- immune-compromised populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Thin-section CT findings of nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary diseases: comparison between Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex and Mycobacterium abscessus infection.

    PubMed

    Chung, Myung Jin; Lee, Kyung Soo; Koh, Won-Jung; Lee, Ju Hyun; Kim, Tae Sung; Kwon, O Jung; Kim, Seonwoo

    2005-10-01

    We aimed to compare the CT findings of nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary diseases caused by Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC) and Mycobacterium abscessus. Two chest radiologists analyzed retrospectively the thin-section CT findings of 51 patients with MAC and 36 with M. abscessus infection in terms of patterns and forms of lung lesions. No significant difference was found between MAC and M. abscessus infection in the presence of small nodules, tree-in-bud pattern, and bronchiectasis. However, lobar volume decrease (p=0.001), nodule (p=0.018), airspace consolidation (p=0.047) and thin-walled cavity (p=0.009) were more frequently observed in MAC infection. The upper lobe cavitary form was more frequent in the MAC (19 of 51 patients, 37%) group than M. abscessus (5 of 36, 14%) (p=0.029), whereas the nodular bronchiectatic form was more frequent in the M. abscessus group ([29 of 36, 81%] vs. [27 of 51, 53%] in MAC) (p=0.012). In conclusion, there is considerable overlap in common CT findings of MAC and M. abscessus pulmonary infection; however, lobar volume loss, nodule, airspace consolidation, and thin-walled cavity are more frequently seen in MAC than M. abscessus infection.

  20. Paradigms of Complexity: Fractals and Structures in the Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Miroslav M.

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Preface * The Origin of Complexity (invited talk) * On the Existence of Spatially Uniform Scaling Laws in the Climate System * Multispectral Backscattering: A Fractal-Structure Probe * Small-Angle Multiple Scattering on a Fractal System of Point Scatterers * Symmetric Fractals Generated by Cellular Automata * Bispectra and Phase Correlations for Chaotic Dynamical Systems * Self-Organized Criticality Models of Neural Development * Altered Fractal and Irregular Heart Rate Behavior in Sick Fetuses * Extract Multiple Scaling in Long-Term Heart Rate Variability * A Semi-Continous Box Counting Method for Fractal Dimension Measurement of Short Single Dimension Temporal Signals - Preliminary Study * A Fractional Brownian Motion Model of Cracking * Self-Affine Scaling Studies on Fractography * Coarsening of Fractal Interfaces * A Fractal Model of Ocean Surface Superdiffusion * Stochastic Subsurface Flow and Transport in Fractal Fractal Conductivity Fields * Rendering Through Iterated Function Systems * The σ-Hull - The Hull Where Fractals Live - Calculating a Hull Bounded by Log Spirals to Solve the Inverse IFS-Problem by the Detected Orbits * On the Multifractal Properties of Passively Convected Scalar Fields * New Statistical Textural Transforms for Non-Stationary Signals: Application to Generalized Mutlifractal Analysis * Laplacian Growth of Parallel Needles: Their Mullins-Sekerka Instability * Entropy Dynamics Associated with Self-Organization * Fractal Properties in Economics (invited talk) * Fractal Approach to the Regional Seismic Event Discrimination Problem * Fractal and Topological Complexity of Radioactive Contamination * Pattern Selection: Nonsingular Saffman-Taylor Finger and Its Dynamic Evolution with Zero Surface Tension * A Family of Complex Wavelets for the Characterization of Singularities * Stabilization of Chaotic Amplitude Fluctuations in Multimode, Intracavity-Doubled Solid-State Lasers * Chaotic

  1. Challenging the Limits of Critique in Education through Morin's Paradigm of Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alhadeff-Jones, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The position adopted in this paper is inspired by Edgar Morin's paradigm of complexity and his critique of scientific and philosophical forms of reductionism. This paper is based on research focusing on the diversity of conceptions of critique developed in academic discourses. It aims to challenge the fragmentation and the reduction framing the…

  2. Challenging the Limits of Critique in Education through Morin's Paradigm of Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alhadeff-Jones, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The position adopted in this paper is inspired by Edgar Morin's paradigm of complexity and his critique of scientific and philosophical forms of reductionism. This paper is based on research focusing on the diversity of conceptions of critique developed in academic discourses. It aims to challenge the fragmentation and the reduction framing the…

  3. Complexity aided design. The FuturICT technological innovation paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, A.; Ajmone-Marsan, M.; Axhausen, K. W.; Batty, M.; Masera, M.; Rome, E.

    2012-11-01

    "In the next century, planet earth will don an electronic skin. It will use the Internet as a scaffold to support and transmit its sensations. This skin is already being stitched together. It consists of millions of embedded electronic measuring devices: thermostats, pressure gauges, pollution detectors, cameras, microphones, glucose sensors, EKGs, electroencephalographs. These will probe and monitor cities and endangered species, the atmosphere, our ships, highways and fleets of trucks, our conversations, our bodies-even our dreams ....What will the earth's new skin permit us to feel? How will we use its surges of sensation? For several years-maybe for a decade-there will be no central nervous system to manage this vast signaling network. Certainly there will be no central intelligence...some qualities of self-awareness will emerge once the Net is sensually enhanced. Sensuality is only one force pushing the Net toward intelligence". These statements are quoted by an interview by Cherry Murray, Dean of the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and Professor of Physics. It is interesting to outline the timeliness and highly predicting power of these statements. In particular, we would like to point to the relevance of the question "What will the earth's new skin permit us to feel?" to the work we are going to discuss in this paper. There are many additional compelling questions, as for example: "How can the electronic earth's skin be made more resilient?"; "How can the earth's electronic skin be improved to better satisfy the need of our society?";"What can the science of complex systems contribute to this endeavour?"

  4. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies in the gut associated lymphoid tissue of slaughtered rabbits.

    PubMed

    Arrazuria, Rakel; Sevilla, Iker A; Molina, Elena; Pérez, Valentín; Garrido, Joseba M; Juste, Ramón A; Elguezabal, Natalia

    2015-06-11

    Rabbits are susceptible to infection by different species of the genus Mycobacterium. Particularly, development of specific lesions and isolation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, both subspecies of the M. avium complex, has been reported in wildlife conditions. Although, rabbit meat production worldwide is 200 million tons per year, microbiological data on this source of meat is lacking and more specifically reports of mycobacterial presence in industrially reared rabbit for human consumption have not been published. To this end, we sought mycobacteria by microbiological and histopathological methods paying special attention to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in rabbits from commercial rabbitries from the North East of Spain. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was not detected either by culture or PCR. However, Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium was detected in 15.15% (10/66) and Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis was detected in 1.51% (1/66) of gut associated lymphoid tissue of sampled animals by PCR, whereas caecal contents were negative. 9% (6/66) of the animals presented gross lesions suggestive of lymphoid activation, 6% (4/66) presented granulomatous lesions and 3% (2/66) contained acid fast bacilli. Mycobacterial isolation from samples was not achieved, although colonies of Thermoactinomycetes sp. were identified by 16s rRNA sequencing in 6% (4/66) of sampled animals. Apparently healthy farmed rabbits that go to slaughter may carry M. avium subspecies in gut associated lymphoid tissue.

  5. Activation of macrophages and interference with CD4+ T-cell stimulation by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium subspecies avium

    PubMed Central

    Lage, Susanne Zur; Goethe, Ralph; Darji, Ayub; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Weiss, Siegfried

    2003-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. ptb) and M. avium subspecies avium (M. avium) are closely related but exhibit significant differences in their interaction with the host immune system. The macrophage line, J774, was infected with M. ptb and M. avium and analysed for cytokine production and stimulatory capacity towards antigen-specific CD4+ T cells. Under all conditions J774 cells were activated to produce proinflammatory cytokines. No influence on the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II, intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), B7.1, B7.2 or CD40 was found. However, the antigen-specific stimulatory capacity of J774 cells for a CD4+ T-cell line was significantly inhibited after infection with M. ptb, but not with M. avium. When a T-cell hybridoma expressing a T-cell receptor identical to that of the T-cell line was used, this inhibition was not observed, suggesting that costimulation which is essential for the CD4+ T-cell line is influenced by the pathogenic bacterium M. ptb. PMID:12519304

  6. Pilot Quasi-Randomized Controlled Study of Herbal Medicine Hochuekkito as an Adjunct to Conventional Treatment for Progressed Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium Complex Disease

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Yasunori; Hagiwara, Eri; Komatsu, Shigeru; Nishihira, Ryuichi; Baba, Tomohisa; Kitamura, Hideya; Sekine, Akimasa; Nakazawa, Atsuhito; Ogura, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Hochuekkito, a traditional herbal medicine, is occasionally prescribed in Japan to treat patients with a poor general condition. We aimed to examine whether this medicine was beneficial and tolerable for patients with progressed pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease. Methods This pilot open-label quasi-randomized controlled trial enrolled 18 patients with progressed pulmonary MAC disease who had initiated antimycobacterial treatment over one year ago but were persistently culture-positive or intolerant. All patients continued their baseline treatment regimens with (n = 9) or without (n = 9) oral Hochuekkito for 24 weeks. Results Baseline characteristics were generally similar between the groups. Most patients were elderly (median age 70 years), female, had a low body mass index (<20 kg/m2), and a long-term disease duration (median approximately 8 years). After the 24-week treatment period, no patient achieved sputum conversion. Although the number of colonies in sputum tended to increase in the control group, it generally remained stable in the Hochuekkito group. Radiological disease control was frequently observed in the Hochuekkito group than the control group (8/9 vs. 3/9; p = 0.05). Patients in the Hochuekkito group tended to experience increase in body weight and serum albumin level compared with those in the control group (median body weight change: +0.4 kg vs. −0.8 kg; median albumin change: +0.2 g/dl vs. ±0.0 g/dl). No severe adverse events occurred. Conclusions Hochuekkito could be an effective, feasible adjunct to conventional therapy for patients with progressed pulmonary MAC disease. Future study is needed to explore this possibility. Trial Registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry UMIN000009920 PMID:25093868

  7. Trends in overall opportunistic illnesses, Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, cerebral toxoplasmosis and Mycobacterium avium complex incidence rates over the 30 years of the HIV epidemic: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Lara; Veloso, Valdiléa Gonçalves; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Luz, Paula Mendes

    2014-01-01

    The natural history of HIV infection has changed dramatically after the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Currently, opportunistic illnesses still represent a major cause of death and hospitalization in this population. In this study, we review the trends in opportunistic illnesses incidence rates and compare the results observed in high-income settings with that for low/middle-income settings, with special attention given to studies from Brazil. We systematically searched Pubmed, Web of Science, Lilacs and Google scholar for publications on HIV associated opportunistic illness. Studies reporting rates based on person-time for all opportunistic illnesses and/or the three opportunistic infections of interest, namely, Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, cerebral toxoplasmosis, and Mycobacterium avium complex were included. Significant reductions in the incidence rates were demonstrated for opportunistic illnesses overall and also for the specific opportunistic infections included in the present study, both in high and low/middle-income settings. Out of the 37 studies included in the present review, almost 70% were from high-income settings. All the studies conducted in low/middle-income settings were single center studies and four were from Brazil. We found no study from Brazil reporting annual incidence rates of opportunistic illnesses. Opportunistic illnesses remain an important public health problem. To better guide health policies in low/middle-income settings, multicenter cohort studies should be encouraged. Studies from Brazil are urgently needed to assess the current burden of opportunistic illnesses in our population and to support the planning of HIV/AIDS health care services organization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Nutritional indicators are correlated with the radiological severity score in patients with Mycobacterium avium complex pulmonary disease: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Kozo; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Kurashima, Atsuyuki; Sasaki, Yuka; Hoshino, Yoshihiko; Yoshimori, Kouzou; Ogata, Hideo; Gemma, Akihiko; Kudoh, Shoji; Shiraishi, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Body weight loss in patients with Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) pulmonary disease can be fatal. The administration of nutritional supplements should be an important component in the treatment of this disease. Objective data regarding the association between the nutritional status and disease severity have not been reported. This cross-sectional study aimed to compare the nutritional status and radiological severity scores in MAC pulmonary disease patients. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 40 patients who were admitted to our institution for the treatment of MAC pulmonary disease between July 2008 and July 2010. Nutritional indices, including the ideal body weight ratio, triceps skinfold, mid-upper arm muscle circumference, and percentage of predicted resting energy expenditure, were compared with the radiological severity scores. Quantitative values of the extent of nodules, infiltration shadows, cavities, and bronchiectasis on the computed tomography scans were used to evaluate the radiological severity scores. The patients suffered from a significantly decreased percentage of ideal body weight, body fat and muscle mass. The average radiological score was 17.6±8.4 points. The percentage of ideal body weight (p<0.001), percentage of triceps skinfold (p<0.001) and percentage of mid-upper arm muscle circumference (p<0.002) were negatively correlated with the radiological scores, while the percentage of the predicted resting energy expenditure (p<0.001) was positively correlated with the scores. A poor nutritional status is common in patients with progressive MAC pulmonary disease, which supports the hypothesis that aggressive nutritional interventions are indicated in the treatment of this disease.

  9. Diagnostic test accuracy of anti-glycopeptidolipid-core IgA antibodies for Mycobacterium avium complex pulmonary disease: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Yuji; Horita, Nobuyuki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Tsukahara, Toshinori; Nagakura, Hideyuki; Tashiro, Ken; Watanabe, Hiroki; Nagai, Kenjiro; Nakashima, Kentaro; Ushio, Ryota; Ikeda, Misako; Narita, Atsuya; Kanai, Akinori; Sato, Takashi; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2016-07-04

    Currently, an anti-glycopeptidolipid (GPL)-core IgA antibody assay kit for diagnosing Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is commercially available. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis to reveal the precise diagnostic accuracy of anti-GPL-core IgA antibodies for MAC pulmonary disease (MAC-PD). We systematically searched reports that could provide data for both sensitivity and specificity by anti-GPL-core IgA antibody for clinically diagnosed MAC-PD. Diagnostic test accuracy was estimated using the bivariate model. Of the 257 articles that we had found through primary search, we finally included 16 reports consisted of 1098 reference positive subjects and 2270 reference negative subjects. The diagnostic odds ratio was 24.8 (95% CI 11.6-52.8, I(2) = 5.5%) and the area under the hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic curves was 0.873 (95% CI 0.837-0.913). With a cutoff value of 0.7 U/mL, the summary estimates of sensitivity and specificity were 0.696 (95% CI 0.621-0.761) and 0.906 (95% CI 0.836-0.951), respectively. The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 7.4 (95% CI 4.1-13.8) and 0.34 (95% CI 0.26-0.43), respectively. The demanding clinical diagnostic criteria may be a cause of false positive of the index test. The index test had good overall diagnostic accuracy and was useful to ruling in MAC-PD with the cutoff value.

  10. PCR-Based Rapid Identification System Using Bridged Nucleic Acids for Detection of Clarithromycin-Resistant Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare Complex Isolates.

    PubMed

    Hirama, Takashi; Shiono, Ayako; Egashira, Hiroshi; Kishi, Etsuko; Hagiwara, Koichi; Nakamura, Hidetoshi; Kanazawa, Minoru; Nagata, Makoto

    2016-03-01

    The nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) cause miscellaneous disorders in humans, especially in the lungs, which present with a variety of radiological features. To date, knowledge of the pathogenic role of the Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC) in the human lung and the definitive criteria for initiating multidrug therapy are still lacking. However, there is little doubt that clarithromycin is the most efficacious drug among the various treatment regimens for lung NTM. In this study, with the use of a bridged nucleic acid (BNA) probe a detection system based on a real-time PCR (BNA-PCR) for the identification of the point mutations at position 2058 or 2059 in domain V of the 23S rRNA gene responsible for clarithromycin resistance was developed and has been assessed using MAC isolates from clinical samples. Out of 199 respiratory specimens, the drug susceptibility test demonstrated 12 strains resistant to clarithromycin, while the BNA-PCR showed 8 strains carrying the point mutation at position 2058 or 2059 of the 23S rRNA gene. This system revealed that there were mycobacterial strains resistant to clarithromycin which do not carry previously identified resistance genes. This paper documents a novel system for detecting clarithromycin-resistant strains and demonstrates that although these mutations are tacitly assumed to account for >90% of the reported resistant mutants, there is a significant fraction of resistant mutants that do not harbor these mutations. Therefore, unknown mechanisms affecting clarithromycin resistance remain to be elucidated. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Diagnostic test accuracy of anti-glycopeptidolipid-core IgA antibodies for Mycobacterium avium complex pulmonary disease: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Yuji; Horita, Nobuyuki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Tsukahara, Toshinori; Nagakura, Hideyuki; Tashiro, Ken; Watanabe, Hiroki; Nagai, Kenjiro; Nakashima, Kentaro; Ushio, Ryota; Ikeda, Misako; Narita, Atsuya; Kanai, Akinori; Sato, Takashi; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Currently, an anti-glycopeptidolipid (GPL)-core IgA antibody assay kit for diagnosing Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is commercially available. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis to reveal the precise diagnostic accuracy of anti-GPL-core IgA antibodies for MAC pulmonary disease (MAC-PD). We systematically searched reports that could provide data for both sensitivity and specificity by anti-GPL-core IgA antibody for clinically diagnosed MAC-PD. Diagnostic test accuracy was estimated using the bivariate model. Of the 257 articles that we had found through primary search, we finally included 16 reports consisted of 1098 reference positive subjects and 2270 reference negative subjects. The diagnostic odds ratio was 24.8 (95% CI 11.6–52.8, I2 = 5.5%) and the area under the hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic curves was 0.873 (95% CI 0.837–0.913). With a cutoff value of 0.7 U/mL, the summary estimates of sensitivity and specificity were 0.696 (95% CI 0.621–0.761) and 0.906 (95% CI 0.836–0.951), respectively. The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 7.4 (95% CI 4.1–13.8) and 0.34 (95% CI 0.26–0.43), respectively. The demanding clinical diagnostic criteria may be a cause of false positive of the index test. The index test had good overall diagnostic accuracy and was useful to ruling in MAC-PD with the cutoff value. PMID:27373718

  12. Impact of cavity and infiltration on pulmonary function and health-related quality of life in pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex disease: A 3-dimensional computed tomographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Takanori; Yamada, Yoshitake; Namkoong, Ho; Suzuki, Shoji; Niijima, Yuki; Kamata, Hirofumi; Funatsu, Yohei; Yagi, Kazuma; Okamori, Satoshi; Sugiura, Hiroaki; Ishii, Makoto; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Naoki

    2017-05-01

    Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (pMAC) disease manifests as various types of lesions, such as infiltrates, nodules, cavities, and bronchiectasis. However, the important determinants for clinical parameters in lung involvement are poorly understood. The objective of this study was to obtain quantitative parameters by 3-dimensional CT, and investigate the relationship between these parameters and the pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and health-related quality of life. Quantitative analysis using CT was performed in 67 pMAC patients. The relationship between new quantitative parameters for evaluating lung involvement using 3-dimensional CT and PFTs or St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) was evaluated. The ratio of infiltration to total lung volume showed significant correlation with the PFT results, especially the percent-predicted forced vital capacity (%FVC; ρ = -0.52), residual volume (ρ = -0.51), and total lung capacity (ρ = -0.59). The cavity volume was strongly correlated with the %FVC (ρ = -0.78) in the cavity group, while the ratio of infiltration to total lung volume was strongly correlated with the %FVC (ρ = -0.53) in the non-cavity group. The ratio of infiltration to total lung volume was significantly correlated with all SGRQ parameters (ρ = 0.41-0.52) in the non-cavity group. Infiltration was an important parameter for the PFTs and SGRQ in pMAC patients according to the 3-dimensional CT analysis. Moreover, cavity volume was an important parameter of the PFTs in the cavity group. Therefore, infiltration and cavity volume are key features for the management of pMAC disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An Eye-Tracking Paradigm for Analyzing the Processing Time of Sentences with Different Linguistic Complexities

    PubMed Central

    Wendt, Dorothea; Brand, Thomas; Kollmeier, Birger

    2014-01-01

    An eye-tracking paradigm was developed for use in audiology in order to enable online analysis of the speech comprehension process. This paradigm should be useful in assessing impediments in speech processing. In this paradigm, two scenes, a target picture and a competitor picture, were presented simultaneously with an aurally presented sentence that corresponded to the target picture. At the same time, eye fixations were recorded using an eye-tracking device. The effect of linguistic complexity on language processing time was assessed from eye fixation information by systematically varying linguistic complexity. This was achieved with a sentence corpus containing seven German sentence structures. A novel data analysis method computed the average tendency to fixate the target picture as a function of time during sentence processing. This allowed identification of the point in time at which the participant understood the sentence, referred to as the decision moment. Systematic differences in processing time were observed as a function of linguistic complexity. These differences in processing time may be used to assess the efficiency of cognitive processes involved in resolving linguistic complexity. Thus, the proposed method enables a temporal analysis of the speech comprehension process and has potential applications in speech audiology and psychoacoustics. PMID:24950184

  14. An eye-tracking paradigm for analyzing the processing time of sentences with different linguistic complexities.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Dorothea; Brand, Thomas; Kollmeier, Birger

    2014-01-01

    An eye-tracking paradigm was developed for use in audiology in order to enable online analysis of the speech comprehension process. This paradigm should be useful in assessing impediments in speech processing. In this paradigm, two scenes, a target picture and a competitor picture, were presented simultaneously with an aurally presented sentence that corresponded to the target picture. At the same time, eye fixations were recorded using an eye-tracking device. The effect of linguistic complexity on language processing time was assessed from eye fixation information by systematically varying linguistic complexity. This was achieved with a sentence corpus containing seven German sentence structures. A novel data analysis method computed the average tendency to fixate the target picture as a function of time during sentence processing. This allowed identification of the point in time at which the participant understood the sentence, referred to as the decision moment. Systematic differences in processing time were observed as a function of linguistic complexity. These differences in processing time may be used to assess the efficiency of cognitive processes involved in resolving linguistic complexity. Thus, the proposed method enables a temporal analysis of the speech comprehension process and has potential applications in speech audiology and psychoacoustics.

  15. Paradigm oil and gas complex of Russia at the present stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontorovich, A. E.; Eder, L. V.; Filimonova, I. V.

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents the features of the Russian oil complex development paradigm in the 20th century, including the priority search and development of unique and major fields; expansion of the oil industry geographical location; priority input into the development of reserves that are characterized by high quality characteristics. It is substantiated that at the present stage there is a need to change the development paradigm as well as the transition from extensive to intensive development, including the development of sedimentary basins of the Russian shelf of the Arctic Ocean; poorly studied petroleum provinces in the east of the country; unique oil resources of nonconventional sources; complex and rational use of residual reserves of unique and major fields.

  16. Characterization of clinical and environmental Mycobacterium avium spp. isolates and their interaction with human macrophages

    EPA Science Inventory

    Members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are naturally occurring bacteria in the environment. A link has been suggested between M. avium strains in drinking water and clinical isolates from infected individuals. There is a need to develop new screening methodologies tha...

  17. Characterization of clinical and environmental Mycobacterium avium spp. isolates and their interaction with human macrophages

    EPA Science Inventory

    Members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are naturally occurring bacteria in the environment. A link has been suggested between M. avium strains in drinking water and clinical isolates from infected individuals. There is a need to develop new screening methodologies tha...

  18. Clinical findings in relation to mortality in non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections: patients with Mycobacterium avium complex have better survival than patients with other mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kotilainen, H; Valtonen, V; Tukiainen, P; Poussa, T; Eskola, J; Järvinen, A

    2015-09-01

    We compared the clinical findings and survival in patients with Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) and other non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). A total of 167 adult non-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients with at least one positive culture for NTM were included. Medical records were reviewed. The patients were categorised according to the 2007 American Thoracic Society (ATS) criteria. MAC comprised 59 % of all NTM findings. MAC patients were more often female (70 % vs. 34 %, p < 0.001) and had less fatal underlying diseases (23 % vs. 47 %, p = 0.001) as compared to other NTM patients. Symptoms compatible with NTM infection had lasted for less than a year in 34 % of MAC patients but in 54 % of other NTM patients (p = 0.037). Pulmonary MAC patients had a significantly lower risk of death compared to pulmonary other NTM (hazard ratio [HR] 0.50, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.33-0.77, p = 0.002) or subgroup of other slowly growing NTM (HR 0.55, 95 % CI 0.31-0.99, p = 0.048) or as rapidly growing NTM (HR 0.47, 95 % CI 0.25-0.87, p = 0.02). The median survival time was 13.0 years (95 % CI 5.9-20.1) for pulmonary MAC but 4.6 years (95 % CI 3.4-5.9) for pulmonary other NTM. Serious underlying diseases (HR 3.21, 95 % CI 2.05-5.01, p < 0.001) and age (HR 1.07, 95 % CI 1.04-1.09, p < 0.001) were the significant predictors of mortality and female sex was a predictor of survival (HR 0.38, 95 % CI 0.24-0.59, p < 0.001) in the multivariate analysis. Pulmonary MAC patients had better prognosis than pulmonary other NTM patients. The symptom onset suggests a fairly rapid disease course.

  19. Paradigms in the structural biology of the mitogenic ternary complex FGF:FGFR:heparin.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2016-08-01

    The main achievements regarding the molecular interaction involving fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), canonical receptors (FGFRs) and the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) heparan sulfate (HS)/heparin (Hp) are overviewed. Despite the recent works concerning the subject, conflicting paradigms in the structural biology of the resultant ternary complex FGF:FGFR:HS/Hp seem to persist up to these days. The principal dilemma, centered on the functional intermolecular complex of mitogenesis and angiogenesis, has been lasting for approximately a decade and a half since the publications of the two contradicting crystal structures, the asymmetric 2:2:1 versus the symmetric 2:2:2 complex model. When the principal results regarding this ternary complex are analyzed as a whole and through an impartial manner, conclusion heavily and reliably supports the existence and activity of both complex models. Selection of each complex is driven by multiple factors of different degrees of impact. Specificity in protein-binding motifs in ligands (although the minimal binding sequences are yet controversial), slight differences on the structure of the GAG-binding sites of FGF and of FGFR isoforms as well as on the possible ligand-induced conformational changes of FGFR are examples of these factors. Here, the structural biology of the mitogenic FGF:FGFR:HS/Hp ternary complex is revisited. Discussion is focused on the major attributes of this intermolecular complex including the existing conflicts about the righter biologically active model and information regarding ligand structure, conformation and minimal length required for binding to the growth factors and receptors. This review is very timely in light of the 100(th) anniversary of the discovery of Hp.

  20. Using Common Graphics Paradigms Implemented in a Java Applet to Represent Complex Scheduling Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaap, John; Meyer, Patrick; Davis, Elizabeth

    1997-01-01

    The experiments planned for the International Space Station promise to be complex, lengthy and diverse. The scarcity of the space station resources will cause significant competition for resources between experiments. The scheduling job facing the Space Station mission planning software requires a concise and comprehensive description of the experiments' requirements (to ensure a valid schedule) and a good description of the experiments' flexibility (to effectively utilize available resources). In addition, the continuous operation of the station, the wide geographic dispersion of station users, and the budgetary pressure to reduce operations manpower make a low-cost solution mandatory. A graphical representation of the scheduling requirements for station payloads implemented via an Internet-based application promises to be an elegant solution that addresses all of these issues. The graphical representation of experiment requirements permits a station user to describe his experiment by defining "activities" and "sequences of activities". Activities define the resource requirements (with alternatives) and other quantitative constraints of tasks to be performed. Activities definitions use an "outline" graphics paradigm. Sequences define the time relationships between activities. Sequences may also define time relationships with activities of other payloads or space station systems. Sequences of activities are described by a "network" graphics paradigm. The bulk of this paper will describe the graphical approach to representing requirements and provide examples that show the ease and clarity with which complex requirements can be represented. A Java applet, to run in a web browser, is being developed to support the graphical representation of payload scheduling requirements. Implementing the entry and editing of requirements via the web solves the problems introduced by the geographic dispersion of users. Reducing manpower is accomplished by developing a concise

  1. Using Common Graphics Paradigms Implemented in a Java Applet to Represent Complex Scheduling Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaap, John; Meyer, Patrick; Davis, Elizabeth

    1997-01-01

    The experiments planned for the International Space Station promise to be complex, lengthy and diverse. The scarcity of the space station resources will cause significant competition for resources between experiments. The scheduling job facing the Space Station mission planning software requires a concise and comprehensive description of the experiments' requirements (to ensure a valid schedule) and a good description of the experiments' flexibility (to effectively utilize available resources). In addition, the continuous operation of the station, the wide geographic dispersion of station users, and the budgetary pressure to reduce operations manpower make a low-cost solution mandatory. A graphical representation of the scheduling requirements for station payloads implemented via an Internet-based application promises to be an elegant solution that addresses all of these issues. The graphical representation of experiment requirements permits a station user to describe his experiment by defining "activities" and "sequences of activities". Activities define the resource requirements (with alternatives) and other quantitative constraints of tasks to be performed. Activities definitions use an "outline" graphics paradigm. Sequences define the time relationships between activities. Sequences may also define time relationships with activities of other payloads or space station systems. Sequences of activities are described by a "network" graphics paradigm. The bulk of this paper will describe the graphical approach to representing requirements and provide examples that show the ease and clarity with which complex requirements can be represented. A Java applet, to run in a web browser, is being developed to support the graphical representation of payload scheduling requirements. Implementing the entry and editing of requirements via the web solves the problems introduced by the geographic dispersion of users. Reducing manpower is accomplished by developing a concise

  2. In vitro activity of amikacin against isolates of Mycobacterium avium complex with proposed MIC breakpoints and finding of a 16S rRNA gene mutation in treated isolates.

    PubMed

    Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Iakhiaeva, Elena; Griffith, David E; Woods, Gail L; Stout, Jason E; Wolfe, Cameron R; Turenne, Christine Y; Wallace, Richard J

    2013-10-01

    Amikacin is a major drug used for the treatment of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease, but standard laboratory guidelines for susceptibility testing are not available. This study presents in vitro amikacin MICs for 462 consecutive clinical isolates of the MAC using a broth microdilution assay. Approximately 50% of isolates had amikacin MICs of 8 μg/ml, and 86% had MICs of ≤16 μg/ml. Of the eight isolates (1.7%) with MICs of 64 μg/ml, five had an MIC of 32 μg/ml on repeat testing. Ten isolates (2.1%) had an initial amikacin MIC of >64 μg/ml, of which seven (1.5%) had MICs of >64 μg/ml on repeat testing. These seven isolates had a 16S rRNA gene A1408G mutation and included M. avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, and Mycobacterium chimaera. Clinical data were available for five of these seven isolates, all of which had received prolonged (>6 months) prior therapy, with four that were known to be treated with amikacin. The 16S mutation was not detected in isolates with MICs of ≤64 μg/ml. We recommend primary testing of amikacin against isolates of the MAC and propose MIC guidelines for breakpoints that are identical to the CLSI guidelines for Mycobacterium abscessus: ≤16 μg/ml for susceptible, 32 μg/ml for intermediate, and ≥64 μg/ml for resistant. If considered and approved by the CLSI, this will be only the second drug recommended for primary susceptibility testing against the MAC and should facilitate its use for both intravenous and inhaled drug therapies.

  3. Urinary mycobacterium avium presenting as sterile pyuria

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai; Samplaski, Mary; Mazzulli, Tony; Lo, Kirk; Grober, Ethan; Jarvi, Keith Allen

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old healthy woman presented with persistent, asymptomatic sterile pyuria detected by her family physician. While she did not have symptoms, the patient recounts that she has had cloudy urine for years. Cultures of the urine for bacteria showed no growth and no fungi were identified. First-morning urine samples were sent for both tuberculosis and nontuberculosis mycobacterium species testing. The culture grew genotypically identified Mycobaterium avium complex (MAC). Mantoux skin testing was positive. No urological abnormalities were detected by ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) imaging of the urinary tract. PMID:27790302

  4. Determination of Genotypic Diversity of Mycobacterium avium Subspecies from Human and Animal Origins by Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive-Unit-Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat and IS1311 Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Typing Methods ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Radomski, Nicolas; Thibault, Virginie C.; Karoui, Claudine; de Cruz, Krystel; Cochard, Thierry; Gutiérrez, Cristina; Supply, Philip; Biet, Frank; Boschiroli, María Laura

    2010-01-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are ubiquitous bacteria that can be found in water, food, and other environmental samples and are considered opportunistic pathogens for numerous animal species, mainly birds and pigs, as well as for humans. We have recently demonstrated the usefulness of a PCR-based mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing for the molecular characterization of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and M. avium strains exclusively isolated from AIDS patients. In the present study we extended our analysis, based on eight MIRU-VNTR markers, to a strain collection comprehensively comprising the other M. avium subspecies, including M. avium subsp. avium, M. avium subsp. hominissuis, and M. avium subsp. silvaticum, isolated from numerous animal species, HIV-positive and HIV-negative humans, and environmental sources. All strains were fully typeable, with the discriminatory index being 0.885, which is almost equal to that obtained by IS1311 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) typing as a reference. In contrast to IS1311 RFLP typing, MIRU-VNTR typing was able to further discriminate M. avium subsp. avium strains. MIRU-VNTR alleles strongly associated with or specific for M. avium subspecies were detected in several markers. Moreover, the MIRU-VNTR typing-based results were consistent with a scenario of the independent evolution of M. avium subsp. avium/M. avium subsp. silvaticum and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from M. avium subsp. hominissuis, previously proposed on the basis of multilocus sequence analysis. MIRU-VNTR typing therefore appears to be a convenient typing method capable of distinguishing the three main subspecies and strains of the complex and providing new epidemiological knowledge on MAC. PMID:20107094

  5. Characterization of a Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium Operon Associated with Virulence and Drug Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Viale, Mariana Noelia; Imperiale, Belén; Gioffre, Andrea Karina; Colombatti Olivieri, María Alejandra; Moyano, Roberto Damián; Morcillo, Nora; Santangelo, María de la Paz; Davis, William; Romano, María Isabel

    2014-01-01

    The lprG-p55 operon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis is involved in the transport of toxic compounds. P55 is an efflux pump that provides resistance to several drugs, while LprG is a lipoprotein that modulates the host's immune response against mycobacteria. The knockout mutation of this operon severely reduces the replication of both mycobacterial species during infection in mice and increases susceptibility to toxic compounds. In order to gain insight into the function of LprG in the Mycobacterium avium complex, in this study, we assayed the effect of the deletion of lprG gene in the D4ER strain of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. The replacement of lprG gene with a hygromycin cassette caused a polar effect on the expression of p55. Also, a twofold decrease in ethidium bromide susceptibility was observed and the resistance to the antibiotics rifampicin, amikacin, linezolid, and rifabutin was impaired in the mutant strain. In addition, the mutation decreased the virulence of the bacteria in macrophages in vitro and in a mice model in vivo. These findings clearly indicate that functional LprG and P55 are necessary for the correct transport of toxic compounds and for the survival of MAA in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24967408

  6. Molecular analysis and MIRU-VNTR typing of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium, 'hominissuis' and silvaticum strains of veterinary origin.

    PubMed

    Rónai, Zsuzsanna; Csivincsik, Ágnes; Dán, Ádám; Gyuranecz, Miklós

    2016-06-01

    Besides Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), M. avium subsp. avium (MAA), M. avium subsp. silvaticum (MAS), and 'M. avium subsp. hominissuis' (MAH) are equally important members of M. avium complex, with worldwide distribution and zoonotic potential. Genotypic discrimination is a prerequisite to epidemiological studies which can facilitate disease prevention through revealing infection sources and transmission routes. The primary aim of this study was to identify the genetic diversity within 135 MAA, 62 MAS, and 84 MAH strains isolated from wild and domestic mammals, reptiles and birds. Strains were tested for the presence of large sequence polymorphism LSP(A)17 and were submitted to Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable-number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) analysis at 8 loci, including MIRU1, 2, 3, and 4, VNTR25, 32, and 259, and MATR9. In 12 strains hsp65 sequence code type was also determined. LSP(A)17 was present only in 19.9% of the strains. All LSP(A)17 positive strains belonged to subspecies MAH. The discriminatory power of the MIRU-VNTR loci set used reached 0.9228. Altogether 54 different genotypes were detected. Within MAH, MAA, and MAS strains 33, 16, and 5 different genotypes were observed. The described genotypes were not restricted to geographic regions or host species, but proved to be subspecies specific. Our knowledge about MAS is limited due to isolation and identification difficulties. This is the first study including a large number of MAS field strains. Our results demonstrate the high diversity of MAH and MAA strains and the relative uniformity of MAS strains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. "To Give an Example Is a Complex Act": Agamben's Pedagogy of the Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meskin, Jacob; Shapiro, Harvey

    2014-01-01

    Agamben's notion of the "paradigm" has far-reaching implications for educational thinking, curriculum design and pedagogical conduct. In his approach, examples--or paradigms--deeply engage our powers of analogy, enabling us to discern previously unseen affinities among singular objects by stepping outside established systems of…

  8. "To Give an Example Is a Complex Act": Agamben's Pedagogy of the Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meskin, Jacob; Shapiro, Harvey

    2014-01-01

    Agamben's notion of the "paradigm" has far-reaching implications for educational thinking, curriculum design and pedagogical conduct. In his approach, examples--or paradigms--deeply engage our powers of analogy, enabling us to discern previously unseen affinities among singular objects by stepping outside established systems of…

  9. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium infections in a tule elk (Cervus elaphus nannodes) herd.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Graham C; Ziccardi, Michael H; Gonzales, Ben J; Woods, Leslie M; Fischer, Jon K; Manning, Elizabeth J B; Mazet, Jonna A K

    2006-10-01

    Between 2 August and 22 September 2000, 37 hunter-killed tule elk (Cervus elaphus nannodes) were evaluated at the Grizzly Island Wildlife Area, California, USA, for evidence of paratuberculosis. Elk were examined post-mortem, and tissue and fecal samples were submitted for radiometric mycobacterial culture. Acid-fast isolates were identified by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that discriminates among members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). Histopathologic evaluations were completed, and animals were tested for antibodies using a Johne's enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and agar gel immunodiffusion. In addition, 104 fecal samples from tule elk remaining in the herd were collected from the ground and submitted for radiometric mycobacterial culture. No gross lesions were detected in any of the hunter-killed animals. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) was cultured once from ileocecal tissue of one adult elk and was determined to be a strain (A18) found commonly in infected cattle. One or more isolates of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (MAA) were isolated from tissues of five additional adult elk. Gastrointestinal tract and lymph node tissues from 17 of the 37 elk (46%) examined had histopathologic lesions commonly seen with mycobacterial infection; however, acid-fast bacteria were not observed. All MAC infections were detected from adult elk (P = 0.023). In adult elk, a statistically significant association was found between MAA infection and ELISA sample-to-positive ratio (S/P) > or = 0.25 (P=0.021); four of five MAA culture-positive elk tested positive by ELISA. Sensitivity and specificity of ELISA S/P > or = 0.25 for detection of MAA in adult elk were 50% and 93%, respectively. No significant associations were found between MAC infection and sex or histopathologic lesions. Bacteriologic culture confirmed infection with MAP and MAA in this asymptomatic tule elk herd. The Johne's ELISA was useful in signaling

  10. Lymphadenitis in children is caused by Mycobacterium avium hominissuis and not related to ‘bird tuberculosis’

    PubMed Central

    de Haas, P. E. W.; Lindeboom, J. A.; Kuijper, E. J.; van Soolingen, D.

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is the most commonly encountered mycobacterium species among non-Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (nontuberculous mycobacteria) isolates worldwide and frequently causes lymphadenitis in children. During a multi-centre study in The Netherlands that was performed to determine the optimal treatment for mycobacterial lymphadenitis, concern was expressed in the media about the possible role of birds as sources of these M. avium infections, referred to as ‘bird tuberculosis.’ To examine the involvement of birds in mycobacterial lymphadenitis, 34 M. avium isolates from lymphadenitis cases were subjected to IS1245 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) typing. This genotyping method enables the distinction of the subspecies M. avium subsp. hominissuis and the ‘bird-type’ M. avium spp. avium. Highly variable RFLP patterns were found among the lymphadenitis M. avium isolates, and all belonged to the M. avium hominissuis subspecies. A relation to pet birds in the etiology of mycobacterial lymphadenitis could not be established, and the source of the infections may be environmental. PMID:18320245

  11. Mycobacterium avium in a shower linked to pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Falkinham, Joseph O; Iseman, Michael D; de Haas, Petra; van Soolingen, Dick

    2008-06-01

    Mycobacterium avium was isolated from hot and cold water samples and from sediment (biofilm) collected from the showerhead in the home of a woman with M. avium pulmonary disease lacking known M. avium risk factors. IS1245/IS1311 DNA fingerprinting demonstrated that M. avium isolates from the hot and cold water and showerhead sediment demonstrated a clonal relationship with the patient's M. avium isolate. The data provide evidence that showers may serve as sources of infection by waterborne M. avium.

  12. Genotyping of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolates from naturally infected lofts of domestic pigeons in Ahvaz by IS901 RFLP

    PubMed Central

    Parvandar-Asadollahi, Kaveh; Mosavari, Nader; Mayahi, Mansoor

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Avian tuberculosis is one of the most important infections affecting most species of birds. Mycobacterium avium can not only infect all species of birds, but also infect some domesticated mammals. The most crucial aspect of control and eradication scheme is identification of infection sources and transmission routs. Molecular techniques such as restriction fragment length polymorphism and pulse field gel electrophoresis have been shown to be much more discriminatory and suitable for use in the epidemiological study. Materials and Methods: Eighty suspected pigeons to avian tuberculosis based on their clinical signs, were subjected to the study. Forty Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolates out of a total of 51 identified isolates were subjected to the test. Results: IS901-RFLP using Pvu II was successfully conducted and produced 7 patterns. The majority of isolates (60%) were RFLP type PI.1. This type was the most similar type to standard strain. However, all the patterns obtained in this study were different from the standard strain. Conclusion: The result of this study indicate that these isolates probably are limited to Khuzestan region. We recommend DNA fingerprinting differentiation of non tuberculous Mycobacteria particularly Mycobacterium avium complex isolated from infected birds and human to possibly find source of infections. PMID:26719782

  13. Genotyping of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolates from naturally infected lofts of domestic pigeons in Ahvaz by IS901 RFLP.

    PubMed

    Parvandar-Asadollahi, Kaveh; Mosavari, Nader; Mayahi, Mansoor

    2015-10-01

    Avian tuberculosis is one of the most important infections affecting most species of birds. Mycobacterium avium can not only infect all species of birds, but also infect some domesticated mammals. The most crucial aspect of control and eradication scheme is identification of infection sources and transmission routs. Molecular techniques such as restriction fragment length polymorphism and pulse field gel electrophoresis have been shown to be much more discriminatory and suitable for use in the epidemiological study. Eighty suspected pigeons to avian tuberculosis based on their clinical signs, were subjected to the study. Forty Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolates out of a total of 51 identified isolates were subjected to the test. IS901-RFLP using Pvu II was successfully conducted and produced 7 patterns. The majority of isolates (60%) were RFLP type PI.1. This type was the most similar type to standard strain. However, all the patterns obtained in this study were different from the standard strain. The result of this study indicate that these isolates probably are limited to Khuzestan region. We recommend DNA fingerprinting differentiation of non tuberculous Mycobacteria particularly Mycobacterium avium complex isolated from infected birds and human to possibly find source of infections.

  14. Mycobacterium avium MAV2054 protein induces macrophage apoptosis by targeting mitochondria and reduces intracellular bacterial growth

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kang-In; Whang, Jake; Choi, Han-Gyu; Son, Yeo-Jin; Jeon, Haet Sal; Back, Yong Woo; Park, Hye-Soo; Paik, Seungwha; Park, Jeong-Kyu; Choi, Chul Hee; Kim, Hwa-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex induces macrophage apoptosis. However, the M. avium components that inhibit or trigger apoptosis and their regulating mechanisms remain unclear. We recently identified the immunodominant MAV2054 protein by fractionating M. avium culture filtrate protein by multistep chromatography; this protein showed strong immuno-reactivity in M. avium complex pulmonary disease and in patients with tuberculosis. Here, we investigated the biological effects of MAV2054 on murine macrophages. Recombinant MAV2054 induced caspase-dependent macrophage apoptosis. Enhanced reactive oxygen species production and JNK activation were essential for MAV2054-mediated apoptosis and MAV2054-induced interleukin-6, tumour necrosis factor, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production. MAV2054 was targeted to the mitochondrial compartment of macrophages treated with MAV2054 and infected with M. avium. Dissipation of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) and depletion of cytochrome c also occurred in MAV2054-treated macrophages. Apoptotic response, reactive oxygen species production, and ΔΨm collapse were significantly increased in bone marrow-derived macrophages infected with Mycobacterium smegmatis expressing MAV2054, compared to that in M. smegmatis control. Furthermore, MAV2054 expression suppressed intracellular growth of M. smegmatis and increased the survival rate of M. smegmatis-infected mice. Thus, MAV2054 induces apoptosis via a mitochondrial pathway in macrophages, which may be an innate cellular response to limit intracellular M. avium multiplication. PMID:27901051

  15. Isolation of Mycobacterium avium from waterfowl with polycystic livers.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roffe, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    An unusual gross appearance of avian tuberculosis, where fluid-filled thin-walled cysts are produced and grossly apparent in preference to granulomas, is presented. Histopathology confirmed the granulomatous nature of the lesions and the presence of intracellular acid-fast organisms. Mycobacterium avium complex was cultured from affected organs. The unusual gross presentation in these cases indicates the need to consider tuberculosis in the differential of cystic diseases of avian livers.

  16. Emergence and decline of scientific paradigms in a dynamic complex network.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chao; Zhang, Mei

    2013-01-01

    We study the idea spreading process by extending a recent model proposed by Bornholdt et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 058701 (2011)] to the population on a two-dimensional square area either in the presence of static topological randomness or in which agents are allowed to freely move. We find that the static topological randomness induced by the random distribution of agents in the square area disfavors the common pattern of scientific paradigms, which is characterized by quick rise and slow decline of an arbitrary dominant idea. However, the common pattern of scientific paradigms is recovered when the movement of agents is enabled. In addition, we find that, when the moving speed of agents is low, the average lifetime of a dominant idea displays an optimal behavior. In contrast, the evolution of the model is no more sensitive to the movement speed once it is high enough.

  17. Liposome encapsulation of clofazimine reduces toxicity in vitro and in vivo and improves therapeutic efficacy in the beige mouse model of disseminated Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex infection.

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, R T

    1996-01-01

    Disseminated infections caused by the Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex (MAC) are the most frequent opportunistic bacterial infections in patients with AIDS. MAC isolates are resistant to many of the standard antituberculous drugs. Failure to obtain significant activities of certain drugs is due to difficulty in achieving high concentrations at the sites where the infections reside. New and improved agents for the treatment of mycobacterial infections are therefore required. Earlier, the anti-MAC activities of various agents in free or liposomal form were studied; liposomes were used as drug carriers to ultimately target the drugs to macrophages where mycobacterial infections reside. Clofazimine was chosen for further studies because it could be effectively encapsulated and its activity was well maintained in liposomal form. The present studies with both erythrocytes and macrophages as the model systems show that liposomal drug is far less toxic in vitro than the free drug. The in vivo toxicity of clofazimine was also significantly reduced after liposome encapsulation. The therapeutic efficacies of free and liposomal drugs were compared in a beige mouse model of disseminated MAC infection. An equivalent dose of liposomal drug (10 mg/kg of body weight) was more effective in eliminating the bacterial from the various organs studied, particularly from the liver. Moreover, because of the reduced toxicity of liposomal drug, higher doses could be administered, resulting in a significant reduction in the numbers of CFU in the liver, spleen, and kidneys. The data demonstrate that liposomal clofazimine is highly effective in the treatment of MAC infections, even if the treatment is initiated after a disseminated infection has been established. The present studies thus suggest the potential usefulness of liposomal clofazimine for the treatment of disseminated MAC infections. PMID:8843300

  18. Tuberculosis in swine co-infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis and Mycobacterium bovis in a cluster from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Barandiaran, S; Pérez, A M; Gioffré, A K; Martínez Vivot, M; Cataldi, A A; Zumárraga, M J

    2015-04-01

    SUMMARY In Argentina little is known about the epidemiology of tuberculosis (TB) infection in swine. We characterized the epidemiological dynamics of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection in a swine population of Argentina using molecular tools and spatial analysis techniques. Isolates (n = 196) obtained from TB-like lesions (n = 200) were characterized by polymerase chain reaction. The isolates were positive to either M. bovis (IS6110) (n = 160) or M. avium (IS1245) (n = 16) while the remaining 20 (10.2%) isolates were positive to both M. bovis and M. avium. The detection of both bacteria together suggests co-infection at the animal level. In addition, MAC-positive isolates (n = 36) were classified as M. avium subsp. avium (MAA) (n = 30) and M. avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH) (n = 6), which resulted in five genotypes when they were typed using mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit, variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR). One significant (P = 0.017) spatial clustering of genotypes was detected, in which the proportion of MAH isolates was larger than expected under the null hypothesis of even distribution of genotypes. These results show that in Argentina the proportion of TB cases in pigs caused by M. avium is larger than that reported in earlier studies. The proportion of M. bovis-MAC co-infections was also higher than in previous reports. These results provide valuable information on the epidemiology of MAC infection in swine in Argentina.

  19. The SocioBox: A Novel Paradigm to Assess Complex Social Recognition in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Krueger-Burg, Dilja; Winkler, Daniela; Mitkovski, Mišo; Daher, Fernanda; Ronnenberg, Anja; Schlüter, Oliver M.; Dere, Ekrem; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2016-01-01

    Impairments in social skills are central to mental disease, and developing tools for their assessment in mouse models is essential. Here we present the SocioBox, a new behavioral paradigm to measure social recognition. Using this paradigm, we show that male wildtype mice of different strains can readily identify an unfamiliar mouse among 5 newly acquainted animals. In contrast, female mice exhibit lower locomotor activity during social exploration in the SocioBox compared to males and do not seem to discriminate between acquainted and unfamiliar mice, likely reflecting inherent differences in gender-specific territorial tasks. In addition to a simple quantification of social interaction time of mice grounded on predefined spatial zones (zone-based method), we developed a set of unbiased, data-driven analysis tools based on heat map representations and characterized by greater sensitivity. First proof-of-principle that the SocioBox allows diagnosis of social recognition deficits is provided using male PSD-95 heterozygous knockout mice, a mouse model related to psychiatric pathophysiology. PMID:27563287

  20. The SocioBox: A Novel Paradigm to Assess Complex Social Recognition in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Krueger-Burg, Dilja; Winkler, Daniela; Mitkovski, Mišo; Daher, Fernanda; Ronnenberg, Anja; Schlüter, Oliver M; Dere, Ekrem; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2016-01-01

    Impairments in social skills are central to mental disease, and developing tools for their assessment in mouse models is essential. Here we present the SocioBox, a new behavioral paradigm to measure social recognition. Using this paradigm, we show that male wildtype mice of different strains can readily identify an unfamiliar mouse among 5 newly acquainted animals. In contrast, female mice exhibit lower locomotor activity during social exploration in the SocioBox compared to males and do not seem to discriminate between acquainted and unfamiliar mice, likely reflecting inherent differences in gender-specific territorial tasks. In addition to a simple quantification of social interaction time of mice grounded on predefined spatial zones (zone-based method), we developed a set of unbiased, data-driven analysis tools based on heat map representations and characterized by greater sensitivity. First proof-of-principle that the SocioBox allows diagnosis of social recognition deficits is provided using male PSD-95 heterozygous knockout mice, a mouse model related to psychiatric pathophysiology.

  1. Bovine Immunoinhibitory Receptors Contribute to Suppression of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-Specific T-Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Okagawa, Tomohiro; Konnai, Satoru; Nishimori, Asami; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Mizorogi, Seiko; Nagata, Reiko; Kawaji, Satoko; Tanaka, Shogo; Kagawa, Yumiko; Murata, Shiro; Mori, Yasuyuki; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2015-10-19

    Johne's disease (paratuberculosis) is a chronic enteritis in cattle that is caused by intracellular infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. This infection is characterized by the functional exhaustion of T-cell responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens during late subclinical and clinical stages, presumably facilitating the persistence of this bacterium and the formation of clinical lesions. However, the mechanisms underlying T-cell exhaustion in Johne's disease are poorly understood. Thus, we performed expression and functional analyses of the immunoinhibitory molecules programmed death-1 (PD-1)/PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1) and lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3)/major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected cattle during the late subclinical stage. Flow cytometric analyses revealed the upregulation of PD-1 and LAG-3 in T cells in infected animals, which suffered progressive suppression of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) responses to the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigen. In addition, PD-L1 and MHC-II were expressed on macrophages from infected animals, consistent with PD-1 and LAG-3 pathways contributing to the suppression of IFN-γ responses during the subclinical stages of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. Furthermore, dual blockade of PD-L1 and LAG-3 enhanced M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific IFN-γ responses in blood from infected animals, and in vitro LAG-3 blockade enhanced IFN-γ production from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Taken together, the present data indicate that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific T-cell exhaustion is in part mediated by PD-1/PD-L1 and LAG-3/MHC-II interactions and that LAG-3 is a molecular target for the control of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific T-cell responses.

  2. Bovine Immunoinhibitory Receptors Contribute to Suppression of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-Specific T-Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Okagawa, Tomohiro; Konnai, Satoru; Nishimori, Asami; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Mizorogi, Seiko; Nagata, Reiko; Kawaji, Satoko; Tanaka, Shogo; Kagawa, Yumiko; Murata, Shiro; Mori, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Johne's disease (paratuberculosis) is a chronic enteritis in cattle that is caused by intracellular infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. This infection is characterized by the functional exhaustion of T-cell responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens during late subclinical and clinical stages, presumably facilitating the persistence of this bacterium and the formation of clinical lesions. However, the mechanisms underlying T-cell exhaustion in Johne's disease are poorly understood. Thus, we performed expression and functional analyses of the immunoinhibitory molecules programmed death-1 (PD-1)/PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1) and lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3)/major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected cattle during the late subclinical stage. Flow cytometric analyses revealed the upregulation of PD-1 and LAG-3 in T cells in infected animals, which suffered progressive suppression of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) responses to the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigen. In addition, PD-L1 and MHC-II were expressed on macrophages from infected animals, consistent with PD-1 and LAG-3 pathways contributing to the suppression of IFN-γ responses during the subclinical stages of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. Furthermore, dual blockade of PD-L1 and LAG-3 enhanced M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific IFN-γ responses in blood from infected animals, and in vitro LAG-3 blockade enhanced IFN-γ production from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Taken together, the present data indicate that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific T-cell exhaustion is in part mediated by PD-1/PD-L1 and LAG-3/MHC-II interactions and that LAG-3 is a molecular target for the control of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific T-cell responses. PMID:26483406

  3. Divergent Immune Responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection Correlate with Kinome Responses at the Site of Intestinal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Määttänen, Pekka; Trost, Brett; Scruten, Erin; Potter, Andrew; Kusalik, Anthony; Griebel, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD) in cattle. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infects the gastrointestinal tract of calves, localizing and persisting primarily in the distal ileum. A high percentage of cattle exposed to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis do not develop JD, but the mechanisms by which they resist infection are not understood. Here, we merge an established in vivo bovine intestinal segment model for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection with bovine-specific peptide kinome arrays as a first step to understanding how infection influences host kinomic responses at the site of infection. Application of peptide arrays to in vivo tissue samples represents a critical and ambitious step in using this technology to understand host-pathogen interactions. Kinome analysis was performed on intestinal samples from 4 ileal segments subdivided into 10 separate compartments (6 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected compartments and 4 intra-animal controls) using bovine-specific peptide arrays. Kinome data sets clustered into two groups, suggesting unique binary responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Similarly, two M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific immune responses, characterized by different antibody, T cell proliferation, and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses, were also observed. Interestingly, the kinomic groupings segregated with the immune response groupings. Pathway and gene ontology analyses revealed that differences in innate immune and interleukin signaling and particular differences in the Wnt/β-catenin pathway distinguished the kinomic groupings. Collectively, kinome analysis of tissue samples offers insight into the complex cellular responses induced by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the ileum and provides a novel method to understand mechanisms that alter the balance between cell-mediated and antibody responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. PMID

  4. Palatal Actinomycosis and Kaposi Sarcoma in an HIV-Infected Subject with Disseminated Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ablanedo-Terrazas, Yuria; Ormsby, Christopher E.; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Actinomyces and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare are facultative intracellular organisms, members of the bacterial order actinomycetales. Although Actinomyces can behave as copathogen when anatomic barriers are compromised, its coinfection with Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare has not previously been reported. We present the first reported case of palatal actinomycosis co-infection with disseminated MAC, in an HIV-infected subject with Kaposi sarcoma and diabetes. We discuss the pathogenesis of the complex condition of this subject. PMID:22481952

  5. Clarithromycin-ciprofloxacin-amikacin for therapy of Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare bacteremia in patients with AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    de Lalla, F; Maserati, R; Scarpellini, P; Marone, P; Nicolin, R; Caccamo, F; Rigoli, R

    1992-01-01

    A combination of clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and amikacin for the treatment of Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare bacteremia was evaluated in 12 AIDS patients. Mycobacteremia cleared in all patients by 2 to 8 weeks of treatment, and symptoms resolved. Four patients died; all had negative blood cultures until death, and disseminated M. avium-M. intracellulare complex infection was not considered the primary cause of death. PMID:1387303

  6. Viewing Complex, Dynamic Scenes “Through the Eyes” of Another Person: The Gaze-Replay Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Morin Duchesne, Xavier; Kagemann, Sebastian Alexander; Kennedy, Daniel Patrick

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel “Gaze-Replay” paradigm that allows the experimenter to directly test how particular patterns of visual input—generated from people’s actual gaze patterns—influence the interpretation of the visual scene. Although this paradigm can potentially be applied across domains, here we applied it specifically to social comprehension. Participants viewed complex, dynamic scenes through a small window displaying only the foveal gaze pattern of a gaze “donor.” This was intended to simulate the donor’s visual selection, such that a participant could effectively view scenes “through the eyes” of another person. Throughout the presentation of scenes presented in this manner, participants completed a social comprehension task, assessing their abilities to recognize complex emotions. The primary aim of the study was to assess the viability of this novel approach by examining whether these Gaze-Replay windowed stimuli contain sufficient and meaningful social information for the viewer to complete this social perceptual and cognitive task. The results of the study suggested this to be the case; participants performed better in the Gaze-Replay condition compared to a temporally disrupted control condition, and compared to when they were provided with no visual input. This approach has great future potential for the exploration of experimental questions aiming to unpack the relationship between visual selection, perception, and cognition. PMID:26252493

  7. Splenic Involvement in Disseminated Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare Infection: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Clark, Haley; Khatri, Gaurav; Kapur, Payal; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2017-07-13

    We report the imaging findings of a patient with disseminated Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex presenting with multiple splenic lesions incompletely characterized on computed tomography in whom magnetic resonance imaging helped narrow the differential diagnosis. We discuss the magnetic resonance imaging findings suggesting the diagnosis, including the presence of focal susceptibility artifact within the lesions (ie, signal drop on T1 in-phase imaging), marked hypointensity on diffusion-weighted imaging, and faint progressive peripheral enhancement after contrast administration. We provide pathologic correlation to explain these imaging characteristics and a review of the literature of imaging characteristics in splenic involvement of M. avium-intracellulare complex infection.

  8. Iron Acquisition in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joyce; Moolji, Jalal; Dufort, Alex; Staffa, Alfredo; Domenech, Pilar; Reed, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is a host-adapted pathogen that evolved from the environmental bacterium M. avium subsp. hominissuis through gene loss and gene acquisition. Growth of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the laboratory is enhanced by supplementation of the media with the iron-binding siderophore mycobactin J. Here we examined the production of mycobactins by related organisms and searched for an alternative iron uptake system in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Through thin-layer chromatography and radiolabeled iron-uptake studies, we showed that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is impaired for both mycobactin synthesis and iron acquisition. Consistent with these observations, we identified several mutations, including deletions, in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genes coding for mycobactin synthesis. Using a transposon-mediated mutagenesis screen conditional on growth without myobactin, we identified a potential mycobactin-independent iron uptake system on a M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific genomic island, LSPP15. We obtained a transposon (Tn) mutant with a disruption in the LSPP15 gene MAP3776c for targeted study. The mutant manifests increased iron uptake as well as intracellular iron content, with genes downstream of the transposon insertion (MAP3775c to MAP3772c [MAP3775-2c]) upregulated as the result of a polar effect. As an independent confirmation, we observed the same iron uptake phenotypes by overexpressing MAP3775-2c in wild-type M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. These data indicate that the horizontally acquired LSPP15 genes contribute to iron acquisition by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, potentially allowing the subsequent loss of siderophore production by this pathogen. IMPORTANCE Many microbes are able to scavenge iron from their surroundings by producing iron-chelating siderophores. One exception is Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, a fastidious, slow-growing animal pathogen whose growth

  9. A paradigm shift in the construction of heterobimetallic complexes: synthesis of group 2 & 4 metal-calix[6]arene complexes.

    PubMed

    Petrella, Antonella J; Craig, Donald C; Lamb, Robert N; Raston, Colin L; Roberts, Nicholas K

    2004-01-21

    Deprotonation of calix[6]arenes with barium in methanol followed by the addition of [Ti(OPr(i))(4)] or [Zr(OBu(n))(4)] is effective in the formation of novel dimeric 2:1 barium-titanium(IV)/zirconium(IV) calix[6]arene complexes. In these complexes a central Ti(IV)/Zr(IV) coordinated in the exo-position connects the two calix[6]arenes in the 1,3-alternate conformation, each with an endo-barium sharing common phenolate groups with the titanium/zirconium centre and participating in cation-pi interactions. A homometallic barium calix[6]arene dimer was also prepared wherein the calix[6]arenes are in the 1,3-alternate conformation with each coordinating one endo- and one exo-barium centre. The exo-barium cations connect the two calix[6]arenes through bridging methanol ligands. In this and the heterometallic complexes, cation-pi complexation of the Ba(2+) ion within the 1,3 alternate conformation of calix[6]arene facilitates the formation of the dimeric complexes in methanol. In contrast, the smaller Sr(2+) ion did not form similar complexes in methanol, and the formation of an analogous 2:1 strontium-titanium calixarene complex required the use of the more sterically demanding donor alcohol, isopropanol, the resulting complex being devoid of cation-pi interaction. The results show (i) that a subtle interplay of solvation strength, coordination array type and cavity/cation size influences the accessibility of heterobimetallic complexes based on calix[6]arenes, and (ii) a synergistic endo-exo binding behaviour.

  10. Complexity and Chaos Theories as Potential Paradigms for Understanding and Treating Dissociative Disorders.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drinkard, Lynne Bradford

    1995-01-01

    Early systems theory was a precursor of complexity theory, a global theory that suggests that the universe is an open system interacting on many dimensions. Chaos theory, a subset of complexity theory, states that in seeming chaos there is an underlying order. Between chaos and order lies emergence, from which healthy growth and change occur. Twenty years ago, chaos theory did not have a name and dissociative disorders were largely written off as rare or more imaginative than real. After physicists and mathematicians explained chaos and complexity in language understood by those outside their fields, scientists and practitioners from disparate disciplines were struck by the potential for applying the theories to their respective fields. Complexity and chaos theory combine reductionistic and holistic approaches to explain phenomena. Many mental health practitioners have suggested that a systems framework based in complexity theory may lead to greater understanding of human nature and ultimately toward more effective treatment of different disorders. This paper proposes that complexity and chaos theories may offer insight into the efficacy of various treatments for dissociative disorders.

  11. Biological Complexities in Radiation Carcinogenesis and Cancer Radiotherapy: Impact of New Biological Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Mozdarani, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Although radiation carcinogenesis has been shown both experimentally and epidemiologically, the use of ionizing radiation is also one of the major modalities in cancer treatment. Various known cellular and molecular events are involved in carcinogenesis. Apart from the known phenomena, there could be implications for carcinogenesis and cancer prevention due to other biological processes such as the bystander effect, the abscopal effect, intrinsic radiosensitivity and radioadaptation. Bystander effects have consequences for mutation initiated cancer paradigms of radiation carcinogenesis, which provide the mechanistic justification for low-dose risk estimates. The abscopal effect is potentially important for tumor control and is mediated through cytokines and/or the immune system (mainly cell-mediated immunity). It results from loss of growth and stimulatory and/or immunosuppressive factors from the tumor. Intrinsic radiosensitivity is a feature of some cancer prone chromosomal breakage syndromes such as ataxia telangectiasia. Radiosensitivity is manifested as higher chromosomal aberrations and DNA repair impairment is now known as a good biomarker for breast cancer screening and prediction of prognosis. However, it is not yet known whether this effect is good or bad for those receiving radiation or radiomimetic agents for treatment. Radiation hormesis is another major concern for carcinogenesis. This process which protects cells from higher doses of radiation or radio mimic chemicals, may lead to the escape of cells from mitotic death or apoptosis and put cells with a lower amount of damage into the process of cancer induction. Therefore, any of these biological phenomena could have impact on another process giving rise to genome instability of cells which are not in the field of radiation but still receiving a lower amount of radiation. For prevention of radiation induced carcinogenesis or risk assessment as well as for successful radiation therapy, all these

  12. Complex Glycan Catabolism by the Human Gut Microbiota: The Bacteroidetes Sus-like Paradigm*

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Eric C.; Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Smith, Thomas J.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2009-01-01

    Trillions of microbes inhabit the distal gut of adult humans. They have evolved to compete efficiently for nutrients, including a wide array of chemically diverse, complex glycans present in our diets, secreted by our intestinal mucosa, and displayed on the surfaces of other gut microbes. Here, we review how members of the Bacteroidetes, one of two dominant gut-associated bacterial phyla, process complex glycans using a series of similarly patterned, cell envelope-associated multiprotein systems. These systems provide insights into how gut, as well as terrestrial and aquatic, Bacteroidetes survive in highly competitive ecosystems. PMID:19553672

  13. Network, degeneracy and bow tie. Integrating paradigms and architectures to grasp the complexity of the immune system

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the network paradigm, an application of graph theory to biology, has proven to be a powerful approach to gaining insights into biological complexity, and has catalyzed the advancement of systems biology. In this perspective and focusing on the immune system, we propose here a more comprehensive view to go beyond the concept of network. We start from the concept of degeneracy, one of the most prominent characteristic of biological complexity, defined as the ability of structurally different elements to perform the same function, and we show that degeneracy is highly intertwined with another recently-proposed organizational principle, i.e. 'bow tie architecture'. The simultaneous consideration of concepts such as degeneracy, bow tie architecture and network results in a powerful new interpretative tool that takes into account the constructive role of noise (stochastic fluctuations) and is able to grasp the major characteristics of biological complexity, i.e. the capacity to turn an apparently chaotic and highly dynamic set of signals into functional information. PMID:20701759

  14. Protein folding and misfolding: a paradigm of self-assembly and regulation in complex biological systems.

    PubMed

    Vendruscolo, Michele; Zurdo, Jesús; MacPhee, Cait E; Dobson, Christopher M

    2003-06-15

    Understanding biological complexity is one of the grand scientific challenges for the future. A living organism is a highly evolved system made up of a large number of interwoven molecular networks. These networks primarily involve proteins, the macromolecules that enable and control virtually every chemical process that takes place in the cell. Proteins are also key elements in the essential characteristic of living systems, their ability to function and replicate themselves through controlled molecular interactions. Recent progress in understanding the most fundamental aspect of polypeptide self-organization, the process by which proteins fold to attain their active conformations, provides a global platform to gain knowledge about the function of biological systems and the regulatory mechanisms that underpin their ability to adapt to changing conditions. In order to exploit such progress effectively, we are developing a variety of approaches, including procedures that use experimental data to restrain the properties of complex systems in computer simulations, to describe their behaviour under a wide variety of conditions. We believe that such approaches can lead to significant advances in understanding biological complexity, in general, and protein folding and misfolding in particular. These advances would contribute to: a more effective exploitation of the information from genome sequences; more rational therapeutic approaches to diseases, particularly those associated with ageing; the responsible control of our own evolution; and the development of new technologies based on mimicking the principles of biological self-assembly, for instance in nanotechnology. More fundamentally, we believe that this research will result in a more coherent understanding of the origin, evolution and functional properties of living systems.

  15. Design and control strategies for CELSS - Integrating mechanistic paradigms and biological complexities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, B., III; Kaufmann, R.; Reinhold, C.

    1981-01-01

    Systems analysis and control theory consideration are given to simulations of both individual components and total systems, in order to develop a reliable control strategy for a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) which includes complex biological components. Because of the numerous nonlinearities and tight coupling within the biological component, classical control theory may be inadequate and the statistical analysis of factorial experiments more useful. The range in control characteristics of particular species may simplify the overall task by providing an appropriate balance of stability and controllability to match species function in the overall design. The ultimate goal of this research is the coordination of biological and mechanical subsystems in order to achieve a self-supporting environment.

  16. Laser chimeras as a paradigm for multistable patterns in complex systems

    PubMed Central

    Larger, Laurent; Penkovsky, Bogdan; Maistrenko, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    A chimera state is a rich and fascinating class of self-organized solutions developed in high-dimensional networks. Necessary features of the network for the emergence of such complex but structured motions are non-local and symmetry breaking coupling. An accurate understanding of chimera states is expected to bring important insights on deterministic mechanism occurring in many structurally similar high-dimensional dynamics such as living systems, brain operation principles and even turbulence in hydrodynamics. Here we report on a powerful and highly controllable experiment based on an optoelectronic delayed feedback applied to a wavelength tuneable semiconductor laser, with which a wide variety of chimera patterns can be accurately investigated and interpreted. We uncover a cascade of higher-order chimeras as a pattern transition from N to N+1 clusters of chaoticity. Finally, we follow visually, as the gain increases, how chimera state is gradually destroyed on the way to apparent turbulence-like system behaviour. PMID:26169585

  17. Laser chimeras as a paradigm for multistable patterns in complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larger, Laurent; Penkovsky, Bogdan; Maistrenko, Yuri

    2015-07-01

    A chimera state is a rich and fascinating class of self-organized solutions developed in high-dimensional networks. Necessary features of the network for the emergence of such complex but structured motions are non-local and symmetry breaking coupling. An accurate understanding of chimera states is expected to bring important insights on deterministic mechanism occurring in many structurally similar high-dimensional dynamics such as living systems, brain operation principles and even turbulence in hydrodynamics. Here we report on a powerful and highly controllable experiment based on an optoelectronic delayed feedback applied to a wavelength tuneable semiconductor laser, with which a wide variety of chimera patterns can be accurately investigated and interpreted. We uncover a cascade of higher-order chimeras as a pattern transition from N to N+1 clusters of chaoticity. Finally, we follow visually, as the gain increases, how chimera state is gradually destroyed on the way to apparent turbulence-like system behaviour.

  18. Genomics and Machine Learning for Taxonomy Consensus: The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Azé, Jérôme; Sola, Christophe; Zhang, Jian; Lafosse-Marin, Florian; Yasmin, Memona; Siddiqui, Rubina; Kremer, Kristin; van Soolingen, Dick; Refrégier, Guislaine

    2015-01-01

    Infra-species taxonomy is a prerequisite to compare features such as virulence in different pathogen lineages. Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex taxonomy has rapidly evolved in the last 20 years through intensive clinical isolation, advances in sequencing and in the description of fast-evolving loci (CRISPR and MIRU-VNTR). On-line tools to describe new isolates have been set up based on known diversity either on CRISPRs (also known as spoligotypes) or on MIRU-VNTR profiles. The underlying taxonomies are largely concordant but use different names and offer different depths. The objectives of this study were 1) to explicit the consensus that exists between the alternative taxonomies, and 2) to provide an on-line tool to ease classification of new isolates. Genotyping (24-VNTR, 43-spacers spoligotypes, IS6110-RFLP) was undertaken for 3,454 clinical isolates from the Netherlands (2004-2008). The resulting database was enlarged with African isolates to include most human tuberculosis diversity. Assignations were obtained using TB-Lineage, MIRU-VNTRPlus, SITVITWEB and an algorithm from Borile et al. By identifying the recurrent concordances between the alternative taxonomies, we proposed a consensus including 22 sublineages. Original and consensus assignations of the all isolates from the database were subsequently implemented into an ensemble learning approach based on Machine Learning tool Weka to derive a classification scheme. All assignations were reproduced with very good sensibilities and specificities. When applied to independent datasets, it was able to suggest new sublineages such as pseudo-Beijing. This Lineage Prediction tool, efficient on 15-MIRU, 24-VNTR and spoligotype data is available on the web interface “TBminer.” Another section of this website helps summarizing key molecular epidemiological data, easing tuberculosis surveillance. Altogether, we successfully used Machine Learning on a large dataset to set up and make available the first

  19. MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM AND DRINKING WATER WHAT ARE THE CONNECTIONS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Human Mycobacterium avium infections are only known to be acquired from environmental sources such as water and soil. We compared M. avium isolates from clinical and drinking water sources using molecular tools. Methods: M. avium was isolated from water samples colle...

  20. MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM AND DRINKING WATER WHAT ARE THE CONNECTIONS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Human Mycobacterium avium infections are only known to be acquired from environmental sources such as water and soil. We compared M. avium isolates from clinical and drinking water sources using molecular tools. Methods: M. avium was isolated from water samples colle...

  1. Paradigm in aetiology and management of zygomatic complex fractures in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Assad; Syed, Iffat Batool; Abbas, Hasnain; Abbas, Iram

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the outcome of wire osteosynthesis with bone plating in the management of zygomatic complex (ZMC) fractures. The rationale was to enable the oral and maxillofacial surgeon to select either of the treatment procedure with confidence. In this quasi experimental study, Sixty five patients of ZMC fractures were randomly allocated in groups of bone plating and wire osteosynthesis. This was done through envelope draw method. Three points fixation with either of the treatment modality was undertaken. Titanium bone plating or stain less steel wire osteosynthesis was carried out at frontozygomatic suture, infra orbital rim and at zygomaticomaxillary buttress. In this quasi experimental study, three patients failed to follow up. There were 31 patients in each group. Infra orbital step defect was observed in one patient of wire osteosynthesis and two patients of bone plating. Mild facial deformity was observed in two patients of wire osteosynthesis while none in that of bone plating. There is insignificant difference of proportion of infra orbital step defect and facial deformity between wire osteosynthesis and bone plating.

  2. Evolving paradigms in the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma: increased options and increased complexity

    PubMed Central

    Cornell, R F; Kassim, A A

    2016-01-01

    The use of modern therapies such as thalidomide, bortezomib and lenalidomide coupled with upfront high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) has resulted in improved survival in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM). However, patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM) often have poorer clinical outcomes and might benefit from novel therapeutic strategies. Emerging therapies, such as deacetylase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies and new proteasome inhibitors, appear promising and may change the therapeutic landscape in RRMM. A limited number of studies has shown a benefit with salvage ASCT in patients with RRMM, although there remains ongoing debate about its timing and effectiveness. Improvement in transplant outcomes has re-ignited a debate on the timing and possible role for salvage ASCT and allogeneic stem cell transplant in RRMM. As the treatment options for management of patients with RRMM become increasingly complex, physicians must consider both disease- and patient-related factors in choosing the appropriate therapeutic approach, with the goal of improving efficacy while minimizing toxicity. PMID:26726946

  3. Virus-host swinging party in the oceans: Incorporating biological complexity into paradigms of antagonistic coexistence.

    PubMed

    Avrani, Sarit; Schwartz, Daniel A; Lindell, Debbie

    2012-03-01

    Bacteria and their viruses (phages) are antagonists, yet have coexisted in nature for billions of years. Models proposed to explain the paradox of antagonistic coexistence generally reach two types of solutions: Arms race-like dynamics that lead to hosts and viruses with increasing resistance and infection ranges; and population fluctuations between diverse host and viral types due to a metabolic cost of resistance. Recently, we found that populations of the marine cyanobacterium, Prochlorococcus, consist of cells with extreme hypervariability in gene sequence and gene content in a viral susceptibility region of the genome. Furthermore, we found a novel cost of resistance where resistance to one set of viruses is accompanied by changes in infection dynamics by other viruses. In this combined mini-review and commentary paper we discuss these findings in the context of existing ecological, evolutionary and genetic models of host-virus coexistence. We suggest that this coexistence is governed mainly by fluctuations between microbial subpopulations with differing viral susceptibility regions and that these fluctuations are driven by both metabolic and enhanced infection costs of resistance. Furthermore, we suggest that enhanced infection leads to passive host-switching by viruses, preventing the development of hosts with universal resistance. These findings highlight the vital importance of community complexity for host-virus coexistence.

  4. THE HUMAN MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX AS A PARADIGM IN GENOMICS RESEARCH

    PubMed Central

    Vandiedonck, Claire; Knight, Julian C

    2010-01-01

    Since its discovery more than 50 years ago, the human Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) on chromosome 6p21.3 has been at the forefront of human genetic research. Here, we review from a historical perspective the major advances in our understanding of the nature and consequences of genetic variation which have involved the MHC, as well as highlighting likely future directions. As a consequence of its particular genomic structure, its remarkable polymorphism and its early implication in numerous diseases, the MHC has been considered as a model region for genomics, being the first substantial region to be sequenced and establishing fundamental concepts of linkage disequilibrium, haplotypic structure and meiotic recombination. Recently, the MHC became the first genomic region to be entirely re-sequenced for common haplotypes, while studies mapping gene expression phenotypes across the genome have strongly implicated variation in the MHC. This review shows how the MHC continues to provide new insights and remains in the vanguard of contemporary research in human genomics. PMID:19468039

  5. Naïve Simplicity: The Overlooked Piece of the Complexity-Simplicity Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Franklin W; Liu, Ganming; Aggarwal, Pradeep; Schwartz, Cynthia M

    2017-09-01

    Concepts of simplicity and complexity in modeling have been explored in papers, editorials, and talks. The concept is not well understood because there are at least two flavors of simplicity. Modelers envision simplicity (i.e., elegant simplicity) as the sought-after goal in modeling, but naïve simplicity, which is the focus of this paper, is commonly unrecognized and dangerous. The problem is that naïve or simple ideas are often mistaken for settled science and come with the prospect of being more wrong than right. The concept of the so-called simplicity cycle, in relation to classical problems of carbon-14 age and salinity in closed-basin lakes, is used to illustrate these points. The emerging problems of water-mosquitoes-diseases show the value of mapping new problems to the simplicity cycle. Researchers can "know what they do not know" and avoid the dangers of naïve simplicity. © 2017, National Ground Water Association.

  6. From link-prediction in brain connectomes and protein interactomes to the local-community-paradigm in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio; Alanis-Lobato, Gregorio; Ravasi, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Growth and remodelling impact the network topology of complex systems, yet a general theory explaining how new links arise between existing nodes has been lacking, and little is known about the topological properties that facilitate link-prediction. Here we investigate the extent to which the connectivity evolution of a network might be predicted by mere topological features. We show how a link/community-based strategy triggers substantial prediction improvements because it accounts for the singular topology of several real networks organised in multiple local communities - a tendency here named local-community-paradigm (LCP). We observe that LCP networks are mainly formed by weak interactions and characterise heterogeneous and dynamic systems that use self-organisation as a major adaptation strategy. These systems seem designed for global delivery of information and processing via multiple local modules. Conversely, non-LCP networks have steady architectures formed by strong interactions, and seem designed for systems in which information/energy storage is crucial. PMID:23563395

  7. Syndromal complexity, paradigm shifts, and the future of validation research: comments on Nichols and Rogers, Sewell, Harrison, and Jordan.

    PubMed

    Weed, Nathan C

    2006-10-01

    In this comment, I address a number of the points raised in the reviews of the MMPI-2 Restructured Clinical (RC; Tellegen et al., 2003) Scales by Nichols (2006/this issue) and Rogers, Sewell, Harrison, and Jordan (2006/this issue), and I advocate for changes in assessment validation research. There is little evidence that the "syndromal complexity" Nichols ascribes to the original MMPI-2 (Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen, & Kaemmer, 1989) Clinical Scales is worth preserving. Although their construction does not constitute the paradigm shift claimed by Rogers et al., the RC Scales are promising, psychometrically defensible measures of core features of the original MMPI-2 Clinical Scales. However, validation of inferences from multiscale inventories such as the MMPI-2 is limited at present by a disconnection between the integrative manner in which MMPI-2 profiles are interpreted and the scale-by-scale nature of most MMPI-2 validation studies. Q-sort procedures show promise for operationalizing integrated MMPI-2 interpretations, with both research and teaching applications.

  8. The thioamides methimazole and thiourea inhibit growth of M. avium Subspecies paratuberculosis in culture.

    PubMed

    Greenstein, Robert J; Su, Liya; Brown, Sheldon T

    2010-06-14

    Thyrotoxicosis is conceptualized as an "autoimmune" disease with no accepted infectious etiology. There are increasingly compelling data that another "autoimmune" affliction, Crohn disease, may be caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). Like M. tb, MAP is systemic. We hypothesized that some cases of thyrotoxicosis may be initiated by a MAP infection. Because other thioamides treat tuberculosis, leprosy and M. avium complex, we hypothesized that a mode of action of some thioamide anti-thyrotoxicosis medications may include MAP growth inhibition. The effect of the thioamides, thiourea, methimazole and 6-propo-2-thiouracil (6-PTU) were studied in radiometric Bactec culture, on ten strains of three mycobacterial species (six of MAP, two of M. avium and two of M. tb. complex). Data are presented as "cumulative growth index," (cGI) or "percent decrease in cumulative GI" (%-DeltacGI). Methimazole was the most effective thioamide at inhibiting MAP growth. At 128microg/ml: MAP UCF-4; 65%-DeltacGI & MAP ATCC 19698; 90%-DeltacGI. Thiourea inhibited MAP "Ben" maximally; 70%-DeltacGI. Neither methimazole nor thiourea inhibited M. avium or M. tb. at the doses tested. 6-PTU has no inhibition on any strain studied, although a structurally analogous control, 5-PTU, was the most inhibitory thioamide tested. We show inhibition of MAP growth by the thioamides, thiourea and methimazole in culture. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that these thioamides may have anti-prokaryotic in addition to their well-established eukaryotic actions in thyrotoxic individuals.

  9. Dirichlet spectra of the paradigm model of complex PT-symmetric potential: V(x) = -(ix) N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Zafar; Kumar, Sachin; Sharma, Dhruv

    2017-08-01

    So far the spectra En(N) of the paradigm model of complex PT(Parity-Time)-symmetric potential VBB(x , N) = -(ix) N is known to be analytically continued for N > 4. Consequently, the well known eigenvalues of the Hermitian cases (N = 6 , 10) cannot be recovered. Here, we illustrate Kato's theorem that even if a Hamiltonian H(λ) is an analytic function of a real parameter λ, its eigenvalues En(λ) may not be analytic at finite number of Isolated Points (IPs). In this light, we present the Dirichlet spectra En(N) of VBB(x , N) for 2 ≤ N < 12 using the numerical integration of Schrödinger equation with ψ(x = ± ∞) = 0 and the diagonalization of H =p2 / 2 μ +VBB(x , N) in the harmonic oscillator basis. We show that these real discrete spectra are consistent with the most simple two-turning point CWKB (C refers to complex turning points) method provided we choose the maximal turning points (MxTP) [ - a + ib , a + ib , a , b ∈ R] such that | a | is the largest for a given energy among all (multiple) turning points. We find that En(N) are continuous function of N but non-analytic (their first derivative is discontinuous) at IPs N = 4 , 8; where the Dirichlet spectrum is null (as VBB becomes a Hermitian flat-top potential barrier). At N = 6 and 10, VBB(x , N) becomes a Hermitian well and we recover its well known eigenvalues.

  10. Keap1 regulates inflammatory signaling in Mycobacterium avium-infected human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Awuh, Jane Atesoh; Haug, Markus; Mildenberger, Jennifer; Marstad, Anne; Do, Chau Phuc Ngoc; Louet, Claire; Stenvik, Jørgen; Steigedal, Magnus; Damås, Jan Kristian; Halaas, Øyvind; Flo, Trude Helen

    2015-08-04

    Several mechanisms are involved in controlling intracellular survival of pathogenic mycobacteria in host macrophages, but how these mechanisms are regulated remains poorly understood. We report a role for Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), an oxidative stress sensor, in regulating inflammation induced by infection with Mycobacterium avium in human primary macrophages. By using confocal microscopy, we found that Keap1 associated with mycobacterial phagosomes in a time-dependent manner, whereas siRNA-mediated knockdown of Keap1 increased M. avium-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines and type I interferons (IFNs). We show evidence of a mechanism whereby Keap1, as part of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex with Cul3 and Rbx1, facilitates ubiquitination and degradation of IκB kinase (IKK)-β thus terminating IKK activity. Keap1 knockdown led to increased nuclear translocation of transcription factors NF-κB, IFN regulatory factor (IRF) 1, and IRF5 driving the expression of inflammatory cytokines and IFN-β. Furthermore, knockdown of other members of the Cul3 ubiquitin ligase complex also led to increased cytokine expression, further implicating this ligase complex in the regulation of the IKK family. Finally, increased inflammatory responses in Keap1-silenced cells contributed to decreased intracellular growth of M. avium in primary human macrophages that was reconstituted with inhibitors of IKKβ or TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1). Taken together, we propose that Keap1 acts as a negative regulator for the control of inflammatory signaling in M. avium-infected human primary macrophages. Although this might be important to avoid sustained or overwhelming inflammation, our data suggest that a negative consequence could be facilitated growth of pathogens like M. avium inside macrophages.

  11. Molecular characterization and drug susceptibility profile of a Mycobacterium avium subspecies avium isolate from a dog with disseminated infection.

    PubMed

    Armas, Federica; Furlanello, Tommaso; Camperio, Cristina; Trotta, Michele; Novari, Gianluca; Marianelli, Cinzia

    2016-01-12

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infections have been described in many mammalian species including humans and pets. We isolated and molecularly typed the causative agent of a rare case of disseminated mycobacteriosis in a dog. We identified the pathogen as a M. avium subspecies avium by sequencing the partial genes gyrB and rpsA. Considering the zoonotic potential of this infection, and in an attempt to ensure the most effective treatment for the animal, we also determined the drug susceptibility profile of the isolate to the most common drugs used to treat MAC disease in humans. The pathogen was tested in vitro against the macrolide clarithromycin, as well as against amikacin, ciprofloxacin, rifampicin, ethambutol and linezolid by the resazurin microdilution assay. It was found to be sensitive to all tested drugs save ethambutol. Despite the fact that the pathogen was sensitive to the therapies administered, the dog's overall clinical status worsened, and the animal died shortly after antimicrobial susceptibility results became available. Nucleotide sequencing of the embB gene, the target gene most commonly associated with ethambutol resistance, showed new missense mutations when compared to sequences available in public databases. In conclusion, we molecularly identified the MAC pathogen and determined its drug susceptibility profile in a relatively short period of time (seven days). We also characterized new genetic mutations likely to have been involved in the observed ethambutol resistance. Our results confirm the usefulness of both the gyrB and the rpsA genes as biomarkers for an accurate identification and differentiation of MAC pathogens.

  12. Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Isolates Recovered from Wild Animal Species

    PubMed Central

    Motiwala, Alifiya S.; Amonsin, Alongkorn; Strother, Megan; Manning, Elizabeth J. B.; Kapur, Vivek; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacterial isolates were obtained by radiometric culture from 33 different species of captive or free-ranging animals (n = 106) and environmental sources (n = 3) from six geographic zones within the United States. The identities of all 109 isolates were confirmed by using mycobactin J dependence and characterization of five well-defined molecular markers, including two integration loci of IS900 (loci L1 and L9), one Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis)-specific sequence (locus 251), and one M. avium subsp. avium-specific marker (IS1245), as well as hsp65 and IS1311 restriction endonuclease analyses. Seventy-six acid-fast isolates were identified as M. paratuberculosis, 15 were identified as belonging to the M. avium-M. intracellulare complex (but not M. paratuberculosis), and the remaining 18 were identified as mycobacteria outside the M. avium-M. intracellulare complex. Fingerprinting by multiplex PCR for IS900 integration loci clustered 67 of the 76 M. paratuberculosis strains into a single clade (designated clade A18) and had a Simpson's diversity index (D) of 0.53. In contrast, sequence-based characterization of a recently identified M. paratuberculosis short sequence repeat (SSR) region enabled the differentiation of the M. paratuberculosis isolates in clade A18 into seven distinct alleles (D = 0.75). The analysis revealed eight subtypes among the 33 species of animals, suggesting the interspecies transmission of specific strains. Taken together, the results of our analyses demonstrate that SSR analysis enables the genetic characterization of M. paratuberculosis isolates from different host species and provide evidence for the host specificity of some M. paratuberculosis strains as well as sharing of strains between wild and domesticated animal species. PMID:15071028

  13. Diversity of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis mycobacteria causing lymphadenitis, France.

    PubMed

    Despierres, L; Cohen-Bacrie, S; Richet, H; Drancourt, M

    2012-07-01

    The knowledge of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) genotypes responsible for lymphadenitis is limited. We retrospectively characterized all of the MAC isolates made in our laboratory in the last 18 years by sequence-based identification and genotyping, and compared the clinical and laboratory data for lymphadenitis-associated and non-lymphadenitis-associated MAC isolates. Of 67 MAC-infected patients, 25 lymphadenitis patients were significantly younger than 42 non-lymphadenitis patients, while the male/female ratio did not significantly differ between the two groups. Cervical topography found in 76.5% of lymphadenitis patients was significantly more frequent in non-immunocompromised patients (p=0.04). M. avium subsp. hominissuis was identified in 53 patients (24 lymphadenitis, 29 non-lymphadenitis), M. colombiense in six patients (five non-lymphadenitis, one lymphadenitis), M. intracellulare in four non-lymphadenitis patients, and M. chimaera in three non-lymphadenitis patients, while negative controls remained negative. M. hominissuis was significantly associated with lymphadenitis (p=0.03). M. hominissuis isolates yielded 15 genotypes in 29 non-lymphadenitis isolates (molecular diversity, 0.622) versus 11 genotypes in 24 lymphadenitis isolates (molecular diversity, 0.578), demonstrating a non-significant lower diversity of M. hominissuis isolates cultured from lymphadenitis. The genotypes did not correlate with the clinical features. These data suggest the presence of several environmental reservoirs for M. hominissuis causing lymphadenitis in France.

  14. Trypanosoma avium of raptors (Falconiformes): phylogeny and identification of vectors.

    PubMed

    Votýpka, J; Oborník, M; Volf, P; Svobodová, M; Lukes, J

    2002-09-01

    Avian trypanosomes are widespread parasites of birds, the transmission of which remains mostly unclear, with various blood-sucking insects mentioned as possible vectors. A search for vectors of trypanosomes of sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus), buzzard (Buteo buteo), lesser-spotted eagle (Aquila pomarina) and kestrel (Falco tinnunculus) was performed in Czech and Slovak Republics. Black flies (Eusimulium spp.), hippoboscid flies (Ornithomyia avicularia), mosquitoes (Culex pipiens pipiens) and biting midges (Culicoides spp.), trapped while attempting to feed on raptor nestlings, were found to contain trypanosomatids in their intestine. Trypanosomes from the raptors and blood-sucking insects were isolated, and their 18S rRNA sequences were used for species identification and for the inference of intra- and interspecific relationships. Together with the trypanosome isolated from a black fly, the bird trypanosomes formed a well-supported Trypanosoma avium clade. The isolates derived from hippoboscid flies and mosquitoes are most likely also avian trypanosomes infecting birds other than the studied raptors. Analysis of the kinetoplast, that has features characteristic for the avian trypanosomes (minicircle size; dimensions of the kinetoplast disc), provided further evidence for the identification of vectors. It is suggested that all trypanosomes isolated from raptors included in this study belong to the T. avium complex and are transmitted by the ornithophilic simuliids such as Eusimulium securiforme.

  15. Disparate host immunity to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens in calves inoculated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, M. avium subsp. avium, M. kansasii and M. bovis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cross-reactivity of mycobacterial antigens in immune-based diagnostic assays has been a major concern and criticism of current tests for the detection of paratuberculosis. In the present study, host immune responses to antigen preparations of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), consis...

  16. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium infection in a cat

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Maureen; Taylor, Judith; Woods, Paul

    2002-01-01

    A domestic shorthair cat was presented for lethargy and ataxia. Clinical findings included an abdominal mass, lumbosacral pain, ataxia. Aspirates from the liver and lymph nodes revealed intracellular, negative-staining rods. Treatment for presumptive mycobacterium infection was unsuccessful and the cat was euthanized. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium was confirmed on culture. PMID:12001504

  17. Iron-chelating compound from Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, W G; Merkal, R S

    1976-01-01

    A iron-chelating monohydroxamate was isolated from cultures of Mycobacterium avium grown on an iron-limiting medium. The hydroxyamate metabolite was characterized by chemical degradation and spectral measurements as L-alpha-asparaginyl-L-alpha-(N-hydroxy)-asparagine. PMID:185194

  18. Systems Analysis of Early Host Gene Expression Provides Clues for Transient Mycobacterium avium ssp avium vs. Persistent Mycobacterium avium ssp paratuberculosis Intestinal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Sangeeta; Drake, Kenneth L.; Lawhon, Sara D.; Nunes, Jairo E. S.; Figueiredo, Josely F.; Rossetti, Carlos A.; Gull, Tamara; Everts, Robin E.; Lewin, Harris. A.; Adams, Leslie Garry

    2016-01-01

    It has long been a quest in ruminants to understand how two very similar mycobacterial species, Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) and Mycobacterium avium ssp. avium (MAA) lead to either a chronic persistent infection or a rapid-transient infection, respectively. Here, we hypothesized that when the host immune response is activated by MAP or MAA, the outcome of the infection depends on the early activation of signaling molecules and host temporal gene expression. To test our hypothesis, ligated jejuno-ileal loops including Peyer’s patches in neonatal calves were inoculated with PBS, MAP, or MAA. A temporal analysis of the host transcriptome profile was conducted at several times post-infection (0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 hours). When comparing the transcriptional responses of calves infected with the MAA versus MAP, discordant patterns of mucosal expression were clearly evident, and the numbers of unique transcripts altered were moderately less for MAA-infected tissue than were mucosal tissues infected with the MAP. To interpret these complex data, changes in the gene expression were further analyzed by dynamic Bayesian analysis. Bayesian network modeling identified mechanistic genes, gene-to-gene relationships, pathways and Gene Ontologies (GO) biological processes that are involved in specific cell activation during infection. MAP and MAA had significant different pathway perturbation at 0.5 and 12 hours post inoculation. Inverse processes were observed between MAP and MAA response for epithelial cell proliferation, negative regulation of chemotaxis, cell-cell adhesion mediated by integrin and regulation of cytokine-mediated signaling. MAP inoculated tissue had significantly lower expression of phagocytosis receptors such as mannose receptor and complement receptors. This study reveals that perturbation of genes and cellular pathways during MAP infection resulted in host evasion by mucosal membrane barrier weakening to access entry in the ileum

  19. Systems Analysis of Early Host Gene Expression Provides Clues for Transient Mycobacterium avium ssp avium vs. Persistent Mycobacterium avium ssp paratuberculosis Intestinal Infections.

    PubMed

    Khare, Sangeeta; Drake, Kenneth L; Lawhon, Sara D; Nunes, Jairo E S; Figueiredo, Josely F; Rossetti, Carlos A; Gull, Tamara; Everts, Robin E; Lewin, Harris A; Adams, Leslie Garry

    It has long been a quest in ruminants to understand how two very similar mycobacterial species, Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) and Mycobacterium avium ssp. avium (MAA) lead to either a chronic persistent infection or a rapid-transient infection, respectively. Here, we hypothesized that when the host immune response is activated by MAP or MAA, the outcome of the infection depends on the early activation of signaling molecules and host temporal gene expression. To test our hypothesis, ligated jejuno-ileal loops including Peyer's patches in neonatal calves were inoculated with PBS, MAP, or MAA. A temporal analysis of the host transcriptome profile was conducted at several times post-infection (0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 hours). When comparing the transcriptional responses of calves infected with the MAA versus MAP, discordant patterns of mucosal expression were clearly evident, and the numbers of unique transcripts altered were moderately less for MAA-infected tissue than were mucosal tissues infected with the MAP. To interpret these complex data, changes in the gene expression were further analyzed by dynamic Bayesian analysis. Bayesian network modeling identified mechanistic genes, gene-to-gene relationships, pathways and Gene Ontologies (GO) biological processes that are involved in specific cell activation during infection. MAP and MAA had significant different pathway perturbation at 0.5 and 12 hours post inoculation. Inverse processes were observed between MAP and MAA response for epithelial cell proliferation, negative regulation of chemotaxis, cell-cell adhesion mediated by integrin and regulation of cytokine-mediated signaling. MAP inoculated tissue had significantly lower expression of phagocytosis receptors such as mannose receptor and complement receptors. This study reveals that perturbation of genes and cellular pathways during MAP infection resulted in host evasion by mucosal membrane barrier weakening to access entry in the ileum

  20. Effects of Stop-Signal Probability in the Stop-Signal Paradigm: The N2/p3 Complex Further Validated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramautar, J.R.; Kok, A.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of frequency of occurrence of stop signals in the stop-signal paradigm. Presenting stop signals less frequently resulted in faster reaction times to the go stimulus and a lower probability of inhibition. Also, go stimuli elicited larger and somewhat earlier P3 responses when stop signals occurred…

  1. Mycobacterium avium infection in mice is associated with time-related expression of Th1 and Th2 CD4+ T-lymphocyte response.

    PubMed Central

    Azouaou, N; Petrofsky, M; Young, L S; Bermudez, L E

    1997-01-01

    Disseminated infection caused by organisms of Mycobacterium avium complex is common in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. M. avium is an intracellular bacterium that multiplies within macrophages. We examined the effect of M. avium infection on the T-helper cell response in C57/BL/6 black mice. At weekly intervals, CD4+ T-cells were isolated from spleens and lines were created. T-cell lines were exposed to sonicated M. avium in the presence of feeder cells and macrophages and the supernatant were collected to measure the concentrations of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma and interleukin-10 (IL-10). Production of IFN-gamma in CD4+ T-cells obtained from uninfected mice did not vary significantly during the 5 weeks. Levels of IFN-gamma produced by T-cell lines of infected mice were similar to the control mice during the first 2 weeks but significantly reduced (approximately 30 ng/ml) thereafter. In contrast, production of IL-10 by T-cell lines of infected mice was in a range of 190 to 342 pg/ml in weeks 1, 2 and 3, but increased to an average of 1300 pg/ml at weeks 4 and 5. Pre-immunized mice, when infected with M. avium strain 101, showed a different profile of T-cell cytokines, with high IFN-gamma and low IL-10 production. Proteins purified from a number of disease-associated (D-A) and non-D-A strains of M. avium were tested for the ability to induce IL-10. 65,000 MW and 60,000 MW proteins of M. avium induced significantly more IL-10 than 45,000 MW, 33,000 MW and 27,000 MW proteins. These results showed that M. avium predominantly stimulates either Th1 or Th2 T-helper cells according to the phase of the infection. PMID:9301531

  2. Immunization with a DNA Vaccine Cocktail Induces a Th1 Response and Protects Mice Against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several novel antigens of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis have been studied as vaccine components and their immunogenicity has been evaluated. Previously, we reported that 85 antigen complex (85A, 85B, and 85C), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and 35kDa protein could induce significant lymph...

  3. Identification of two novel Mycobacterium avium allelic variants in pig and human isolates from Brazil by PCR-restriction enzyme analysis.

    PubMed

    Leão, S C; Briones, M R; Sircili, M P; Balian, S C; Mores, N; Ferreira-Neto, J S

    1999-08-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is composed of environmental mycobacteria found widely in soil, water, and aerosols that can cause disease in animals and humans, especially disseminated infections in AIDS patients. MAC consists of two closely related species, M. avium and M. intracellulare, and may also include other, less-defined groups. The precise differentiation of MAC species is a fundamental step in epidemiological studies and for the evaluation of possible reservoirs for MAC infection in humans and animals. In this study, which included 111 pig and 26 clinical MAC isolates, two novel allelic M. avium PCR-restriction enzyme analysis (PRA) variants were identified, differing from the M. avium PRA prototype in the HaeIII digestion pattern. Mutations in HaeIII sites were confirmed by DNA sequencing. Identification of these isolates as M. avium was confirmed by PCR with DT1-DT6 and IS1245 primers, nucleic acid hybridization with the AccuProbe system, 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing, and biochemical tests. The characterization of M. avium PRA variants can be useful in the elucidation of factors involved in mycobacterial virulence and routes of infection and also has diagnostic significance, since they can be misidentified as M. simiae II and M. kansasii I if the PRA method is used in the clinical laboratory for identification of mycobacteria.

  4. Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium found in raptors exposed to infected domestic fowl.

    PubMed

    Kriz, Petr; Kaevska, Marija; Bartejsova, Iva; Pavlik, Ivo

    2013-09-01

    We report a case of a falcon breeding facility, where raptors (both diurnal and nocturnal) were raised in contact with domestic fowl (Gallus gallus f. domesticus) infected by Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. Fecal and environmental samples from 20 raptors and four common ravens (Corvus corax) were collected. Mycobacterium a. avium DNA was detected in feces of four raptors (bald eagle [Haliaeetus leucocephalus], eagle owl [Bubo bubo], barn owl [Tyto alba], and little owl [Athene noctua]) using triplex quantitative real-time PCR. As both the flock of domestic fowl and one of the infected raptors had the same origin (zoological collection), they might have had a common source of colonization/infection. However, the detection of M. a. avium in feces of three other raptors may point at transmission of the agent between the birds in the facility. Contact of raptors with domestic fowl infected by M. a. avium may pose a risk for transmission of the infection for them; however, raptors from the falcon breeding facility seemed to be relatively resistant to the infection.

  5. Experimental inoculation of BFDV-positive budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) with two Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolates.

    PubMed

    Ledwoń, Aleksandra; Sapierzyński, Rafał; Augustynowicz-Kopeć, Ewa; Szeleszczuk, Piotr; Kozak, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Beak and feather disease virus- (BFDV-) positive (naturally infected) but clinically healthy budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) were inoculated with two isolates of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolated from naturally infected golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) and peafowl (Pavo cristatus). During a period of more than two months after inoculation, samples of cloacal and crop swabs, faeces, and blood were obtained for BFDV and Mycobacterium avium testing with PCR. Birds were euthanized nine weeks after inoculation. All infected budgerigars developed signs typical of mycobacteriosis, but more advanced clinical and pathological changes were visible in the group infected with the pheasant isolate. Only a few cloacal and crop swab samples were positive for Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium despite advanced pathological changes in the internal organs. In the groups infected with mycobacterium isolates the frequency of BFDV-positive samples was higher than in the control group. In the infected groups the frequency of BFDV was substantially higher in the cloacal swabs of birds inoculated with the pheasant isolate than in the peafowl-isolate-infected group.

  6. Experimental Inoculation of BFDV-Positive Budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) with Two Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Sapierzyński, Rafał; Szeleszczuk, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Beak and feather disease virus- (BFDV-) positive (naturally infected) but clinically healthy budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) were inoculated with two isolates of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolated from naturally infected golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) and peafowl (Pavo cristatus). During a period of more than two months after inoculation, samples of cloacal and crop swabs, faeces, and blood were obtained for BFDV and Mycobacterium avium testing with PCR. Birds were euthanized nine weeks after inoculation. All infected budgerigars developed signs typical of mycobacteriosis, but more advanced clinical and pathological changes were visible in the group infected with the pheasant isolate. Only a few cloacal and crop swab samples were positive for Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium despite advanced pathological changes in the internal organs. In the groups infected with mycobacterium isolates the frequency of BFDV-positive samples was higher than in the control group. In the infected groups the frequency of BFDV was substantially higher in the cloacal swabs of birds inoculated with the pheasant isolate than in the peafowl-isolate-infected group. PMID:24738057

  7. Prediction of Quinolone Activity against Mycobacterium avium by Molecular Topology and Virtual Computational Screening

    PubMed Central

    Gozalbes, Rafael; Brun-Pascaud, Monique; García-Domenech, Ramon; Gálvez, Jorge; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Doucet, Jean-Pierre; Derouin, Francis

    2000-01-01

    We conducted a quantitative structure-activity relationship study using a database of 158 quinolones previously tested against Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex in order to develop a model capable of predicting the activity of new quinolones against the M. avium-M. intracellulare complex in vitro. Topological indices were used as structural descriptors and were related to anti-M. avium-M. intracellulare complex activity by using the linear discriminant analysis (LDA) statistical technique. The discriminant equation thus obtained correctly classified 137 of the 158 quinolones, including 37 of a test group of 44 randomly chosen compounds. This model was then applied to 24 quinolones, including recently developed fluoroquinolones, whose MICs were subsequently determined in vitro by using the Alamar blue microplate assay; the biological results confirmed the model's predictions. The MICs of these 24 quinolones were then treated by multilinear regression (MLR) to establish a model capable of classifying them according to their in vitro activities. Using this model, a good correlation between measured and predicted MICs was found (r2 = 0.88; r2cv [cross-validation correlation] = 0.82). Moxifloxacin, sparfloxacin, and gatifloxacin were the most potent against the M. avium- M. intracellulare complex, with MICs of 0.2, 0.4, and 0.9 μg/ml, respectively. Finally, virtual modifications of these three drugs were evaluated in LDA and MLR models in order to determine the importance of different substituents in their activity. We conclude that the combination of molecular-topology methods, LDA, and MLR provides an excellent tool for the design of new quinolone structures with enhanced activity. PMID:10991858

  8. Loci of Mycobacterium avium ser2 gene cluster and their functions.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, J A; McNeil, M R; Belisle, J T; Jacobs, W R; Brennan, P J

    1994-01-01

    The highly antigenic glycopeptidolipids present on the surface of members of the Mycobacterium avium complex serve to distinguish these bacteria from all others and to define the various serovars that compose this complex. Previously, the genes responsible for the biosynthesis of the disaccharide hapten [2,3-di-O-methyl-alpha-L-fucopyranosyl-(1-->3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranose] of serovar 2 of the M. avium complex were isolated, localized to a contiguous 22- to 27-kb fragment of the M. avium genome, and designated the ser2 gene cluster (J. T. Belisle, L. Pascopella, J. M. Inamine, P. J. Brennan, and W. R. Jacobs, Jr., J. Bacteriol. 173:6991-6997, 1991). In the present study, transposon saturation mutagenesis was used to map the specific genetic loci within the ser2 gene cluster required for expression of this disaccharide. Four essential loci, termed ser2A, -B, -C, and -D, constituting a total of 5.7 kb within the ser2 gene cluster, were defined. The ser2B and ser2D loci encode the methyltransferases required to methylate the fucose at the 3 and 2 positions, respectively. The rhamnosyltransferase was encoded by ser2A, whereas either ser2C or ser2D encoded the fucosyltransferase. The ser2C and ser2D loci are also apparently involved in the de novo synthesis of fucose. Isolation of the truncated versions of the hapten induced by the transposon insertions provides genetic evidence that the glycopeptidolipids of M. avium serovar 2 are synthesized by an initial transfer of the rhamnose unit to the peptide core followed by fucose and finally O methylation of the fucosyl unit. PMID:8050992

  9. Infants with complex congenital heart diseases show poor short-term memory in the mobile paradigm at 3 months of age.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao-Ying; Harrison, Tondi; Heathcock, Jill

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine learning, short-term memory and general development including cognitive, motor, and language domains in infants with Complex Congenital Heart Defects (CCDH). Ten infants with CCHD (4 males, 6 females) and 14 infants with typical development (TD) were examined at 3 months of age. The mobile paradigm, where an infant's leg is tethered to an overhead mobile, was used to evaluate learning and short-term memory. The Bayley Scales of Infant Development 3rd edition (Bayley-III) was used to evaluate general development in cognitive, motor, and language domains. Infants with CCHD and infants with TD both showed learning with significant increase in kicking rate (p<0.001) across periods of the mobile paradigm, but only infants with TD demonstrated short-term memory (p=0.017) in the mobile paradigm. There were no differences on cognitive, motor, and language development between infants with CCHD and infants with TD on the Bayley-III. Early assessment is necessary to guide targeted treatment in infants with CCHD. One-time assessment may fail to detect potential cognitive impairments during early infancy in infants with CCHD. Supportive intervention programs for infants with CCHD that focuses on enhancing short-term memory are recommended. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetic IS901 RFLP diversity among Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolates from four pheasant flocks.

    PubMed

    Moravkova, Monika; Lamka, Jiri; Slany, Michal; Pavlik, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    IS901 RFLP analysis of 36 Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (MAA) isolates from 15 pheasants (Phasianus colchicus) and two goshawks (Accipiter gentilis) from four pheasant farms was performed. Using this method, six different IS901 RFLP types (E, F, G, M, Q, and V) were identified. The distribution of IS901 RFLP profiles was tightly linked to individual flocks. Matching IS901 RFLP profiles observed in the present study indicate MAA transmission between pheasants and goshawks in the same locality. In two flocks, different pheasants within a flock as well as in various organs of five individual pheasants were found to have two distinct IS901 RFLP profiles.

  11. Mycobacterium avium subspecies impair dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Basler, Tina; Brumshagen, Christina; Beineke, Andreas; Goethe, Ralph; Bäumer, Wolfgang

    2013-10-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne's disease, a chronic, granulomatous enteritis of ruminants. Dendritic cells (DC) of the gut are ideally placed to combat invading mycobacteria; however, little is known about their interaction with MAP. Here, we investigated the interaction of MAP and the closely related M. avium ssp. avium (MAA) with murine DC and the effect of infected macrophages on DC maturation. The infection of DC with MAP or MAA induced DC maturation, which differed to that of LPS as maturation was accompanied by higher production of IL-10 and lower production of IL-12. Treatment of maturing DC with supernatants from mycobacteria-infected macrophages resulted in impaired DC maturation, leading to a semi-mature, tolerogenic DC phenotype expressing low levels of MHCII, CD86 and TNF-α after LPS stimulation. Though the cells were not completely differentiated they responded with an increased IL-10 and a decreased IL-12 production. Using recombinant cytokines we provide evidence that the semi-mature DC phenotype results from a combination of secreted cytokines and released antigenic mycobacterial components of the infected macrophage. Our results indicate that MAP and MAA are able to subvert DC function directly by infecting and indirectly via the milieu created by infected macrophages.

  12. Identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis Isolated From Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mycobacterium avium (MA) is divided into four subspecies based primarily on host-range and consists of MA subsp. avium (birds), MA subsp. silvaticum (wood pigeons), MA subsp. paratuberculosis (broad, poorly-defined host range), and the recently described MA subsp. hominissuis (hu...

  13. Identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis Isolated From Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mycobacterium avium (MA) is divided into four subspecies based primarily on host-range and consists of MA subsp. avium (birds), MA subsp. silvaticum (wood pigeons), MA subsp. paratuberculosis (broad, poorly-defined host range), and the recently described MA subsp. hominissuis (hu...

  14. Bacteriocin from Honeybee Beebread Enterococcus avium, Active against Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Audisio, M. Carina; Terzolo, Horacio R.; Apella, María C.

    2005-01-01

    Enterococcus avium isolated from Apis mellifera beebread produces a thermoresistant bacteriocin with a strain-dependent inhibitory effect on Listeria and without effect on gram-negative bacteria. The bacteriocin appeared to be a polypeptide of about 6 kDa. Genetic analyses revealed no extrachromosomal material in E. avium. PMID:15933045

  15. Formulation of indomethacin emulsion using biopolymer of Prunus avium.

    PubMed

    Verma, Shivangi; Dabral, Prashant; Rana, Vinod; Upadhaya, Kumud; Bhardwaj

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the investigation was to formulate Indomethacin Emulsion using Bio-polymer as Emulsifier. Different batches of emulsions were prepared by varying concentration of biopolymer prunus avium. Based evaluation of the prepared polymers, a conclusion can be drawn that in the Prunus avium bio-material can serve as a promising film forming agent for formulating various drug.

  16. The Thioamides Methimazole and Thiourea Inhibit Growth of M. avium Subspecies paratuberculosis in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Greenstein, Robert J.; Su, Liya; Brown, Sheldon T.

    2010-01-01

    Background Thyrotoxicosis is conceptualized as an “autoimmune” disease with no accepted infectious etiology. There are increasingly compelling data that another “autoimmune” affliction, Crohn disease, may be caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). Like M. tb, MAP is systemic. We hypothesized that some cases of thyrotoxicosis may be initiated by a MAP infection. Because other thioamides treat tuberculosis, leprosy and M. avium complex, we hypothesized that a mode of action of some thioamide anti-thyrotoxicosis medications may include MAP growth inhibition. Methods The effect of the thioamides, thiourea, methimazole and 6-propo-2-thiouracil (6-PTU) were studied in radiometric Bactec® culture, on ten strains of three mycobacterial species (six of MAP, two of M. avium and two of M. tb. complex). Data are presented as “cumulative growth index,” (cGI) or “percent decrease in cumulative GI” (%-ΔcGI). Principal Findings Methimazole was the most effective thioamide at inhibiting MAP growth. At 128µg/ml: MAP UCF-4; 65%-ΔcGI & MAP ATCC 19698; 90%-ΔcGI. Thiourea inhibited MAP “Ben” maximally; 70%-ΔcGI. Neither methimazole nor thiourea inhibited M. avium or M. tb. at the doses tested. 6-PTU has no inhibition on any strain studied, although a structurally analogous control, 5-PTU, was the most inhibitory thioamide tested. Significance We show inhibition of MAP growth by the thioamides, thiourea and methimazole in culture. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that these thioamides may have anti-prokaryotic in addition to their well-established eukaryotic actions in thyrotoxic individuals. PMID:20559419

  17. Comparative analysis of the genomes of clinical isolates of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis regarding virulence-related genes.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, Brendan; Rose, Sasha J; Gilbert, Kerrigan; Lewis, Matthew; Bermudez, Luiz E

    2017-07-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis is a member of the M. avium complex, a heterogeneous group of bacteria that cause lung infection in immunocompetent patients or disseminated infection in patients with immunosuppression. The bacteria belonging to this complex have variable virulence, depending on the strain considered, and therefore a representative of the most common clinical phenotype was analysed. The genomic sequences of four M. avium subsp. hominissuis isolates obtained from clinical specimens were completed. Mav101, Mav100 and MavA5 were isolated from the blood of patients with AIDS. MavA5 was disseminated from the lung, while Mav3388 was isolated from the lungs of a patient with chronic lung disease. The sequences were annotated using the published Mav104 genome as a blueprint. Functional and virulence analyses of the sequences were carried out. Mice studies comparing the virulence of the strains were performed. Findings showed that while Mav101 was very similar to Mav104, there were numerous differences between Mav104 and the remaining strains at nucleotide and predicted protein levels. The presence of genes associated with biofilm formation and several known virulence-related genes were sometimes differentially present among the isolates, suggesting overlapping functions by different genetic determinants. The sequences provided important information about M. avium heterogenicity and evolution as a pathogen. The limitation is the lack of understanding on possible overlapping functions of genes/proteins.

  18. Late-Onset Disseminated Mycobacterium avium intracellulare Complex Infection (MAC), Cerebral Toxoplasmosis and Salmonella Sepsis in a German Caucasian Patient with Unusual Anti-Interferon-Gamma IgG1 Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Hanitsch, Leif G; Löbel, Madlen; Müller-Redetzky, Holger; Schürmann, Mariana; Suttorp, Norbert; Unterwalder, Nadine; Mönnich, Ulrike; Meisel, Christian; Wittke, Kirsten; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Scheibenbogen, Carmen; Kölsch, Uwe

    2015-05-01

    Since we described for the first time a patient with IgG4 autoantibodies to IFN-γ more than 10 years ago, many patients with IFN-γ IgG4 autoantibodies have been described, mostly in Mongolian/ Asian patients with a particular HLA background and in association with disseminated nontuberculous mycobacterial infections. Very recently, the first Caucasian US patient was reported and we now present the case of a 65-year old Caucasian woman with severe disseminated Mycobacterium avium infection, cerebral toxoplasmosis and salmonella sepsis who was tested positive for IFN-γ deficiency due to unusual anti-IFN-γ IgG1 autoantibodies. IFN-γ production after ex vivo ConA stimulation of the patient's whole blood and isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells was assessed. Anti-human IFN-γ antibodies were measured by Ig/Ig-subclass-specific ELISA. In vitro physiologic relevance and blocking capacity of IFN-γ-stimulation by patient's serum was analysed by flow cytometric assessment of cytokine-induced phosphorylation of pSTAT1(Y701). Severely impaired IFN-γ production in the patient's whole blood but normal production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the absence of autologous serum was observed. High titre anti-IFN-γ antibodies of the IgG1 subclass could be demonstrated in the patient's serum by ELISA. Further, the addition of patient's serum to IFN-γ-stimulated immune cells showed inhibition of STAT1 phosphorylation. IFN-γ autoantibodies of any IgG-isotype should be considered in patients with severe opportunistic infections independent of age at onset and ethnicity.

  19. Avian mycobacteriosis caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies avium in four ornamental birds and in vitro drug sensitivity testing of isolates.

    PubMed

    Stepień-Pyśniak, Dagmara; Puk, Krzysztof; Guz, Leszek; Wawrzyniak, Agata; Marek, Agnieszka; Kosikowska, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    Avian tuberculosis, one of the most important diseases affecting various species of birds, is most often caused by Mycobacterium (M.) avium. This report describes cases of M. avium subsp. avium (MAA) infection in a white-crested Holland dwarf rooster, a male and a female golden pheasant and a male peacock. We also investigated the prevalence of mycobacteria in 60 other birds and 40 alpacas. Tissue samples of necropsied birds were cultured for mycobacteria. From non-necropsied 60 other birds and alpacas only faecal samples were collected. Clinical signs in the affected white-crested Holland cock included gradual loss of body weight and hoarse attempts at crowing during its last 3 weeks, with a dramatic loss of body condition and depression over the final week. Only slight weakening was observed in the peacock just before its death, and the golden pheasants died suddenly. Diagnosis was confirmed by microbiological, molecular and pathological results. Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium strains were isolated from the internal organs of the affected birds. Only one faecal sample from 60 other birds was culture- and PCR-positive for M. avium subsp. avium, while another one was only PCR-positive for M. chelonae. We did not isolate any Mycobacterium spp. from faecal samples of alpacas and all of them were PCR-negative. All 18 isolated M. avium strains were resistant to rifampicin, isoniazid, ethambutol, ethionamide, capreomycin and ofloxacin, and susceptible to cycloserine and streptomycin.

  20. Apa antigen of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis as a target for species-specific immunodetection of the bacteria in infected tissues of cattle with paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Souza, Giliane S; Rodrigues, Ana Bárbara F; Gioffré, Andrea; Romano, Maria I; Carvalho, Eulógio C Q; Ventura, Thatiana L B; Lasunskaia, Elena B

    2011-09-15

    Comparative genomics of Mycobacterium spp. have revealed conservative genes and respective proteins differently expressed in mycobacteria that could be used as targets for the species-specific immunodiagnostics. The alanine and proline-rich antigen Apa is a mycobacterial protein that present significant variability in primary sequence length and composition between members of M. avium and M. tuberculosis complexes. In this study, the recombinant Apa protein encoded by the MAP1569/ModD gene of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) was used to generate a panel of monoclonal antibodies which were shown to recognize the most important veterinary pathogens of the M. avium complex, specifically Map and M. avium subsp. hominissuis, and which did not cross-react with M. bovis or M. tuberculosis. The produced antibodies were demonstrated to be a useful tool for the species-specific immunofluorescence or immunohistochemical detection of Map in experimentally infected cell cultures or intestinal tissues from cattle with bovine paratuberculosis and, additionally, they may be employed for the discrimination of pathogenic M. avium subspecies via Western blotting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization of a Novel Plasmid, pMAH135, from Mycobacterium avium Subsp. hominissuis

    PubMed Central

    Uchiya, Kei-ichi; Takahashi, Hiroyasu; Nakagawa, Taku; Yagi, Tetsuya; Moriyama, Makoto; Inagaki, Takayuki; Ichikawa, Kazuya; Nikai, Toshiaki; Ogawa, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) causes mainly two types of disease. The first is disseminated disease in immunocompromised hosts, such as individuals infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The second is pulmonary disease in individuals without systemic immunosuppression, and the incidence of this type is increasing worldwide. M. avium subsp. hominissuis, a component of MAC, causes infection in pigs as well as in humans. Many aspects of the different modes of M. avium infection and its host specificity remain unclear. Here, we report the characteristics and complete sequence of a novel plasmid, designated pMAH135, derived from M. avium strain TH135 in an HIV-negative patient with pulmonary MAC disease. The pMAH135 plasmid consists of 194,711 nucleotides with an average G + C content of 66.5% and encodes 164 coding sequences (CDSs). This plasmid was unique in terms of its homology to other mycobacterial plasmids. Interestingly, it contains CDSs with sequence homology to mycobactin biosynthesis proteins and type VII secretion system-related proteins, which are involved in the pathogenicity of mycobacteria. It also contains putative conserved domains of the multidrug efflux transporter. Screening of isolates from humans and pigs for genes located on pMAH135 revealed that the detection rate of these genes was higher in clinical isolates from pulmonary MAC disease patients than in those from HIV-positive patients, whereas the genes were almost entirely absent in isolates from pigs. Moreover, variable number tandem repeats typing analysis showed that isolates carrying pMAH135 genes are grouped in a specific cluster. Collectively, the pMAH135 plasmid contains genes associated with M. avium’s pathogenicity and resistance to antimicrobial agents. The results of this study suggest that pMAH135 influence not only the pathological manifestations of MAC disease, but also the host specificity of MAC infection. PMID:25671431

  2. Inactivation of Mycobacterium avium with monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Luh, Jeanne; Tong, Ning; Raskin, Lutgarde; Mariñas, Benito J

    2008-11-01

    Batch experiments were performed to study the inactivation kinetics of Mycobacterium avium in the presence of monochloramine at 5-30 degrees C, pH 6-10, and 0.30-42.3 mg Cl2/ L. For each temperature and pH investigated, limiting high and low inactivation rates were observed for high and low disinfectant concentrations, respectively, within the range investigated. The rate of inactivation transitioned from high to low over a relatively narrow range of intermediate monochloramine concentrations. The observed temperature dependence of inactivation was consistent with an Arrhenius expression with activation energies of 58.0 and 71.7 kJ/mol for the high and low concentration ranges, respectively. The rate of inactivation increased with decreasing pH, consistent with trends reported for the reaction of monochloramine with protein thiols. Experiments performed at pH approximately 3.5 showed that dichloramine was a weaker disinfectant than monochloramine, and that its contribution to the overall inactivation of M. avium with combined chlorine was negligible at pH 6-10. A kinetic model incorporating disinfectant concentration, temperature, and pH effects was used to illustrate that monochloramine efficiency to inactivate M. avium in water could vary broadly from adequate (e.g., 99.9% inactivation efficiency in 32 min at 5 mg Cl2/L, pH 6, 30 degrees C) to impractical (e.g., 99.9% inactivation efficiency in 9 d at 1 mg Cl2/L, pH 9, 5 degrees C).

  3. Chemotaxis in Densely Populated Tissue Determines Germinal Center Anatomy and Cell Motility: A New Paradigm for the Development of Complex Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Jared B.; Jones, Mark T.; Plassmann, Paul E.; Thorley-Lawson, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Germinal centers (GCs) are complex dynamic structures that form within lymph nodes as an essential process in the humoral immune response. They represent a paradigm for studying the regulation of cell movement in the development of complex anatomical structures. We have developed a simulation of a modified cyclic re-entry model of GC dynamics which successfully employs chemotaxis to recapitulate the anatomy of the primary follicle and the development of a mature GC, including correctly structured mantle, dark and light zones. We then show that correct single cell movement dynamics (including persistent random walk and inter-zonal crossing) arise from this simulation as purely emergent properties. The major insight of our study is that chemotaxis can only achieve this when constrained by the known biological properties that cells are incompressible, exist in a densely packed environment, and must therefore compete for space. It is this interplay of chemotaxis and competition for limited space that generates all the complex and biologically accurate behaviors described here. Thus, from a single simple mechanism that is well documented in the biological literature, we can explain both higher level structure and single cell movement behaviors. To our knowledge this is the first GC model that is able to recapitulate both correctly detailed anatomy and single cell movement. This mechanism may have wide application for modeling other biological systems where cells undergo complex patterns of movement to produce defined anatomical structures with sharp tissue boundaries. PMID:22145018

  4. Identification of Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare isolated in Puerto Rico from clinical samples by the use of a non-radioactive DNA probe.

    PubMed

    García, M T; Peña, I; Zlotnik, H

    1994-06-01

    The Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), especially M. avium, is an important opportunistic pathogen of AIDS patients in the United States. In Puerto Rico, the incidence of infections caused by MAC has not been determined. This is due, in part, to the difficulties associated to the microbiological identification of the microorganisms. In this work, a commercially available kit (AccuProbe, Gen-Probe, Inc., San Diego, CA) utilizing a DNA probe complementary to rRNA of M. avium and M. intracellulare was used to identify seventeen MAC strains and one unknown atypical mycobacterium recovered in culture in Puerto Rico from clinical samples. The results obtained revealed that M. avium was the predominant species recovered (83% of isolates tested). Only two cultures were identified as M. intracellulare. The unknown culture, which did not react with either probe, turned out to be M. gordonae. The probe tests not only are simple to perform, but provide cultural identification results in as little as two hours. This study, the first one of its kind in Puerto Rico, demonstrates that the nucleic acid probes for the cultural identification of M. avium and M. intracellulare offer the potential of providing a prompt diagnosis and much needed data on the epidemiology of MAC infections in Puerto Rico.

  5. Identification and characterization of an immunogenic 22 kDa exported protein of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Chris; Thompson, Keith; Heuer, Cord; Gicquel, Brigitte; Murray, Alan

    2005-11-01

    An exported 22 kDa putative lipoprotein was identified in an alkaline phosphatase gene fusion library of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and expressed in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The full nucleic acid sequence of the gene encoding P22 was determined and the ORF was cloned into a mycobacterial expression vector, enabling full-length P22 to be produced as a C-terminal polyhistidine-tagged protein in M. smegmatis. N-terminal sequencing of the recombinant protein confirmed cleavage of a signal sequence. Native P22 was detected in culture supernatants and cell sonicates of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strain 316F using rabbit antibody raised to recombinant P22. Investigation of the presence of similar genes in other mycobacterial species revealed that the gene was present in Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium and similar genes existed in Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium scrofulaceum. Database searches showed that P22 belonged to the LppX/LprAFG family of mycobacterial lipoproteins also found in Mycobacterium leprae and in members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. P22 shared less than 75% identity to these proteins. Recombinant P22 was able to elicit interferon-gamma secretion in blood from eight of a group of nine sheep vaccinated with a live attenuated strain of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (strain 316F) compared to none from a group of five unvaccinated sheep. Antibody to P22 was detected by Western blot analysis in 10 out of 11 vaccinated sheep, in two out of two clinically affected cows and in 11 out of 13 subclinically infected cows.

  6. Cryptosporidium avium n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in birds

    PubMed Central

    Holubová, Nikola; Sak, Bohumil; Horčičková, Michaela; Hlásková, Lenka; Květoňová, Dana; Menchaca, Sarah; McEvoy, John; Kváč, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The morphological, biological, and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium avian genotype V are described, and the species name Cryptosporidium avium is proposed to reflect its specificity for birds under natural and experimental conditions. Oocysts of C. avium measured 5.30–6.90 μm (mean = 6.26 μm) × 4.30–5.50 μm (mean = 4.86 μm) with a length to width ratio of 1.29 (1.14–1.47). Oocysts of C. avium obtained from four naturally infected red-crowned parakeets (Cyanoramphus novaezealandiae) were infectious for 6-month-old budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) and hens (Gallus gallus f. domestica). The prepatent periods in both susceptible bird species was 11 days post infection (DPI). The infection intensity of C. avium in budgerigars and hens was low, with a maximum intensity of 5,000 oocysts per gram of faeces. Oocysts of C. avium were microscopically detected at only 12–16 DPI in hens and 12 DPI in budgerigars, while PCR analyses revealed the presence of specific DNA in faecal samples from 11 to 30 DPI (the conclusion of the experiment). Cryptosporidium avium was not infectious for 8-week-old SCID and BALB/c mice (Mus musculus). Naturally or experimentally infected birds showed no clinical signs of cryptosporidiosis and no pathology was detected. Developmental stages of C. avium were detected in the ileum and caecum using scanning electron microscopy. Phylogenetic analyses based on small subunit rRNA, actin, and heat shock protein 70 gene sequences revealed that C. avium is genetically distinct from previously described Cryptosporidium species. PMID:26905074

  7. Concise review: new paradigms for Down syndrome research using induced pluripotent stem cells: tackling complex human genetic disease.

    PubMed

    Briggs, James A; Mason, Elizabeth A; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A; Wells, Christine A; Wolvetang, Ernst J

    2013-03-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a complex developmental disorder with diverse pathologies that affect multiple tissues and organ systems. Clear mechanistic description of how trisomy of chromosome 21 gives rise to most DS pathologies is currently lacking and is limited to a few examples of dosage-sensitive trisomic genes with large phenotypic effects. The recent advent of cellular reprogramming technology offers a promising way forward, by allowing derivation of patient-derived human cell types in vitro. We present general strategies that integrate genomics technologies and induced pluripotent stem cells to identify molecular networks driving different aspects of DS pathogenesis and describe experimental approaches to validate the causal requirement of candidate network defects for particular cellular phenotypes. This overall approach should be applicable to many poorly understood complex human genetic diseases, whose pathogenic mechanisms might involve the combined effects of many genes.

  8. Evaluation of quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays targeting Mycobacterium avium, M. intracellulare, and M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis in drinking water biofilms.

    PubMed

    Chern, Eunice C; King, Dawn; Haugland, Richard; Pfaller, Stacy

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium avium (MA), Mycobacterium intracellulare (MI), and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) are difficult to culture due to their slow growing nature. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method for the rapid detection of MA, MI, and MAP can be used to provide data supporting drinking water biofilms as potential sources of human exposure. The aim of this study was to characterize two qPCR assays targeting partial 16S rRNA gene sequences of MA and MI and use these assays, along with two previously reported MAP qPCR assays (IS900 and Target 251), to investigate Mycobacterium occurrence in kitchen faucet biofilms. MA and MI qPCR assays demonstrated 100% specificity and sensitivity when evaluated against 18 non-MA complex, 76 MA, and 17 MI isolates. Both assays detected approximately 1,000 cells from a diluted cell stock inoculated on a sampling swab 100% of the time. DNA analysis by qPCR indicated that 35.3, 56.9 and 11.8% of the 51 kitchen faucet biofilm samples collected contained MA, MI, and MAP, respectively. This study introduces novel qPCR assays designed to specifically detect MA and MI in biofilm. Results support the use of qPCR as an alternative to culture for detection and enumeration of MA, MI, and MAP in microbiologically complex samples.

  9. Rethinking the longitudinal stream temperature paradigm: region-wide comparison of thermal infrared imagery reveals unexpected complexity of river temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fullerton, Aimee H.; Torgersen, Christian; Lawler, Joshua J.; Faux, Russell N.; Steel, E. Ashley; Beechie, Timothy J.; Ebersole, Joseph L.; Leibowitz, Scott J.

    2015-01-01

    Prevailing theory suggests that stream temperature warms asymptotically in a downstream direction, beginning at the temperature of the source in the headwaters and leveling off downstream as it converges to match meteorological conditions. However, there have been few empirical examples of longitudinal patterns of temperature in large rivers due to a paucity of data. We constructed longitudinal thermal profiles (temperature versus distance) for 53 rivers in the Pacific Northwest (USA) using an extensive dataset of remotely sensed summertime river temperatures and classified each profile into one of five patterns of downstream warming: asymptotic (increasing then flattening), linear (increasing steadily), uniform (not changing), parabolic (increasing then decreasing), or complex (not fitting other classes). We evaluated (1) how frequently profiles warmed asymptotically downstream as expected, and (2) whether relationships between river temperature and common hydroclimatic variables differed by profile class. We found considerable diversity in profile shape, with 47% of rivers warming asymptotically, and 53% having alternative profile shapes. Water temperature did not warm substantially over the course of the river for coastal parabolic and uniform profiles, and for some linear and complex profiles. Profile classes showed no clear geographical trends. The degree of correlation between river temperature and hydroclimatic variables differed among profile classes, but there was overlap among classes. Water temperature in rivers with asymptotic or parabolic profiles was positively correlated with August air temperature, tributary temperature and velocity, and negatively correlated with elevation, August precipitation, gradient, and distance upstream. Conversely, associations were less apparent in rivers with linear, uniform, or complex profiles. Factors contributing to the unique shape of parabolic profiles differed for coastal and inland rivers, where downstream cooling

  10. Mechanical properties and fibrin characteristics of endovascular coil–clot complexes: relevance to endovascular cerebral aneurysm repair paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, Kevin J; Weidner, Christopher R; Abruzzo, Todd A; Shearn, Jason T; Holland, Christy K

    2015-01-01

    Background Although coil embolization is known to prevent rebleeding from acutely ruptured cerebral aneurysms, the underlying biological and mechanical mechanisms have not been characterized. We sought to determine if microcoil-dependent interactions with thrombus induce structural and mechanical changes in the adjacent fibrin network. Such changes could play an important role in the prevention of aneurysm rebleeding. Methods The stiffness of in vitro human blood clots and coil–clot complexes implanted into aneurysm phantoms were measured immediately after formation and after retraction for 3 days using unconfined uniaxial compression assays. Scanning electron microscopy of the coil–clot complexes showed the effect of coiling on clot structure. Results The coil packing densities achieved were in the range of clinical practice. Bare platinum coils increased clot stiffness relative to clot alone (Young’s modulus 6.9 kPa and 0.83 kPa, respectively) but did not affect fibrin structure. Hydrogel-coated coils prevented formation of a clot and had no significant effect on clot stiffness (Young’s modulus 2 kPa) relative to clot alone. Clot age decreased fiber density by 0.2 fibers/µm2 but not the stiffness of the bare platinum coil–clot complex. Conclusions The stiffness of coil–clot complexes is related to the summative stiffness of the fibrin network and associated microcoils. Hydrogel-coated coils exhibit significantly less stiffness due to the mechanical properties of the hydrogel and the inhibition of fibrin network formation by the hydrogel. These findings have important implications for the design and engineering of aneurysm occlusion devices. PMID:24668257

  11. Hyper-longevity, a late-modern paradigm for understanding longevity, ageing and their complexities in Western developed globalised countries.

    PubMed

    Alzetta, Roberto; Cesario, Alfredo; Fini, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    If longevity is a biological and demographic indicator to determine human lifetime extension, hyper-longevity notion can represent a heuristic tool to better disentangle the complex bio-psycho-social implications of ageing and elderly in Western developed globalised countries. Departing from the assumption of a holistic approach to human condition understanding, it is possible to reveal the grounds and patterns of a multilayered and multidimensional structuring of longevity and ageing in our societies that would lead to a form of hyper-longevity. Socio-cultural processes, underlying hyper-longevity notion, rise the question of transition from modern/ latemodern societies to post-modern ones and it offers room for a cultural analysis of concepts, such as space time compression, digital capitalism, knowledge and mass information society. These are relevant ideas that can contribute to reshape and rethink the boundaries and traits of ageing experience in 21(st) century societies. To better catch the point emerging social category of Baby Boomers is presented and used to provide a concrete context related example on how hyper-longevity can better explain complex social evidences in many cultural respects and social domains. As a conclusive step some preliminary reflections, largely centered on the relation between Baby Boomers, hyper-longevity and bio-medical sciences are presented and discussed to provide a starting point for further future analyses within a trans and inter-disciplinary framework.

  12. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Veterinary Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Harris, N. Beth; Barletta, Raúl G.

    2001-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (basonym M. paratuberculosis) is the etiologic agent of a severe gastroenteritis in ruminants known as Johne's disease. Economic losses to the cattle industry in the United States are staggering, reaching $1.5 billion annually. A potential pathogenic role in humans in the etiology of Crohn's disease is under investigation. In this article, we review the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnostics, and disease control measures of this important veterinary pathogen. We emphasize molecular genetic aspects including the description of markers used for strain identification, diagnostics, and phylogenetic analysis. Recent important advances in the development of animal models and genetic systems to study M. paratuberculosis virulence determinants are also discussed. We conclude with proposals for the applications of these models and recombinant technology to the development of diagnostic, control, and therapeutic measures. PMID:11432810

  13. Evaluation of Subspecies-specific Proteins for the Diagnosis of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis Infections

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map)-specific proteins (35) were identified by comparing the proteomes of Map isolates with those of the genetically similar subspecies IS901+ Mycobacterium avium subspecies avium or silvaticum. This approach identified subspecies-specific proteins in...

  14. A Gene Specific to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, But Only at the Transcription-translation Level

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is no known antibody that detects M. avium subsp paratuberculosis and does not cross react with other M. avium subspecies. In the present study, a monoclonal antibody was identified from mice immunized with a cell membrane fraction of M. avium subsp paratuberculosis strain K-10. This antibod...

  15. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Mycobacterium avium subspecies Obtained from Multiple Host Species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A comparative genomic approach was used to identify large sequence polymorphisms among Mycobacterium avium (M. avium) subspecies obtained from a variety of host animals. DNA microarrays were used as a platform for comparing mycobacterial isolates with the sequenced bovine isolate M. avium subsp. p...

  16. TGF-β-Mediated Sustained ERK1/2 Activity Promotes the Inhibition of Intracellular Growth of Mycobacterium avium in Epithelioid Cells Surrogates

    PubMed Central

    L'Abbate, Carolina; Cipriano, Ivone; Pérez-Hurtado, Elizabeth Cristina; Leão, Sylvia Cardoso; Carneiro, Célia Regina Whitaker; Machado, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases including infection with intracellular pathogens such as the Mycobacterium avium complex. Infection of macrophages with M. avium induces TGF-β production and neutralization of this cytokine has been associated with decreased intracellular bacterial growth. We have previously demonstrated that epithelioid cell surrogates (ECs) derived from primary murine peritoneal macrophages through a process of differentiation induced by IL-4 overlap several features of epithelioid cells found in granulomas. In contrast to undifferentiated macrophages, ECs produce larger amounts of TGF-β and inhibit the intracellular growth of M. avium. Here we asked whether the levels of TGF-β produced by ECs are sufficient to induce a self-sustaining autocrine TGF-β signaling controlling mycobacterial replication in infected-cells. We showed that while exogenous addition of increased concentration of TGF-β to infected-macrophages counteracted M. avium replication, pharmacological blockage of TGF-β receptor kinase activity with SB-431542 augmented bacterial load in infected-ECs. Moreover, the levels of TGF-β produced by ECs correlated with high and sustained levels of ERK1/2 activity. Inhibition of ERK1/2 activity with U0126 increased M. avium replication in infected-cells, suggesting that modulation of intracellular bacterial growth is dependent on the activation of ERK1/2. Interestingly, blockage of TGF-β receptor kinase activity with SB-431542 in infected-ECs inhibited ERK1/2 activity, enhanced intracellular M. avium burden and these effects were followed by a severe decrease in TGF-β production. In summary, our findings indicate that the amplitude of TGF-β signaling coordinates the strength and duration of ERK1/2 activity that is determinant for the control of intracellular mycobacterial growth. PMID:21731758

  17. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the rpoB gene for identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and differentiation of Mycobacterium avium subspecies.

    PubMed

    Whang, Jake; Lee, Byung Soo; Choi, Go-Eun; Cho, Sang-Nae; Kil, Park Young; Collins, Michael T; Shin, Sung Jae

    2011-05-01

    Mycobacterial speciation by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (PRA) of the rpoB gene was evaluated for identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) and other Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) members to the species or subspecies level by comparison with conventional methods including hsp65 sequencing, high-performance liquid chromatography, and PCR for accepted species- or subspecies-specific genomic targets. A total of 185 type and clinical mycobacterial strains from humans, animals, and environments were tested. A 360-bp PCR product was subsequently digested with MspI, HaeIII, and SmaI restriction enzymes. The PRA using SmaI restriction showed a unique digestion pattern for MAP distinguishing it from other MAC members and other Mycobacterium spp. Moreover, HaeIII and MspI restriction of the rpoB gene enabled MAC-species and -subspecies discrimination. The rpoB-PRA using SmaI or MspI and HaeIII restriction of the rpoB gene is a simple, convenient, and reliable confirmatory assay for simultaneous identification of MAP and other MAC members.

  18. Bordetella avium Antibiotic Resistance, Novel Enrichment Culture, and Antigenic Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Beach, Nathan M.; Thompson, Seth; Mutnick, Rachel; Brown, Lisa; Kettig, Gina; Puffenbarger, Robyn; Miyamoto, David; Temple, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Bordetella avium continues to be an economic issue in the turkey industry as the causative agent of bordetellosis, which often leads to serious secondary infections. This study presents a broad characterization of the antibiotic resistance patterns in this diverse collection of B. avium strains collected over the past thirty years. In addition, the plasmid basis for the antibiotic resistance was characterized. The antibiotic resistance pattern allowed the development of a novel enrichment culture method that was subsequently employed to gather new isolates from diseased turkeys and a healthy sawhet owl. While a healthy turkey flock was shown to seroconvert by four weeks-of-age, attempts to culture B. avium from healthy turkey poults were unsuccessful. Western blot of B. avium strains using pooled serum from diseased and healthy commercial turkey flocks revealed both antigenic similarities and differences between strains. In sum, the work documents the continued exposure of commercial turkey flocks to B. avium and the need for development of an effective, inexpensive vaccine to control spread of the disease. PMID:22721730

  19. Oral traditions: a contextual framework for complex science concepts—laying the foundation for a paradigm of promise in rural science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avery, Leanne M.; Hains, Bryan J.

    2017-03-01

    The overarching goal of this paper is to bring a diverse educational context—rural sayings and oral traditions situated in ecological habitats—to light and emphasize that they need to be taken into consideration regarding twenty-first century science education. The rural sayings or tenets presented here are also considered alternative ways of learning and knowing that rural people (elders and children) acquire outside of school in rural places of home and habitat. Throughout this paper we explore the complex nature of rural sayings or tenets that have been shared by community elders and examine their historic scientific roots. In so doing, we uncover a wealth of information regarding the diverse rural sociocultural and ecological connections and the situated macro and micro-contexts from which these tenets arise. We argue for a preservation and educational revitalization of these tenets for current and future generations. We show how this knowledge both augments and differs from traditional western science and science curricula by illuminating the ways in which oral traditions are embedded in place, people, memory and culture. We close by presenting an alternative paradigm for science education that incorporates pluralism as a means to enrich current place-based pedagogies and practices. We suggest that in order to tackle the complex problems in this new age of the Anthropocene, revitalizing elders' wisdom as well as valuing rural children's diverse knowledge and the inherent connectivity to their habitats needs be cultivated and not expunged by the current trends that standardize learning. As stated in the call for this special issue, "rurality has a real positionality" and much can be learned from individual and unique rural contexts.

  20. Oral traditions: a contextual framework for complex science concepts—laying the foundation for a paradigm of promise in rural science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avery, Leanne M.; Hains, Bryan J.

    2016-08-01

    The overarching goal of this paper is to bring a diverse educational context—rural sayings and oral traditions situated in ecological habitats—to light and emphasize that they need to be taken into consideration regarding twenty-first century science education. The rural sayings or tenets presented here are also considered alternative ways of learning and knowing that rural people (elders and children) acquire outside of school in rural places of home and habitat. Throughout this paper we explore the complex nature of rural sayings or tenets that have been shared by community elders and examine their historic scientific roots. In so doing, we uncover a wealth of information regarding the diverse rural sociocultural and ecological connections and the situated macro and micro-contexts from which these tenets arise. We argue for a preservation and educational revitalization of these tenets for current and future generations. We show how this knowledge both augments and differs from traditional western science and science curricula by illuminating the ways in which oral traditions are embedded in place, people, memory and culture. We close by presenting an alternative paradigm for science education that incorporates pluralism as a means to enrich current place-based pedagogies and practices. We suggest that in order to tackle the complex problems in this new age of the Anthropocene, revitalizing elders' wisdom as well as valuing rural children's diverse knowledge and the inherent connectivity to their habitats needs be cultivated and not expunged by the current trends that standardize learning. As stated in the call for this special issue, "rurality has a real positionality" and much can be learned from individual and unique rural contexts.

  1. Numerical taxonomy of mycobactin-dependent mycobacteria, emended description of Mycobacterium avium, and description of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium subsp. nov., Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis subsp. nov., and Mycobacterium avium subsp. silvaticum subsp. nov.

    PubMed

    Thorel, M F; Krichevsky, M; Lévy-Frébault, V V

    1990-07-01

    We performed a numerical taxonomy analysis of 38 Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and related mycobacterial strains, including wood pigeon mycobacteria; this analysis was based on 22 tests, which were selected for their potential discriminative value from a total of 51 tests studied and produced four well-defined clusters. Cluster 1 contained the M. paratuberculosis strains, including two strains isolated from Crohn's disease patients; cluster 2 contained Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare reference strains; cluster 3 consisted of the wood pigeon mycobacteria; and the only strain in cluster 4 was M. paratuberculosis 316F, which is used for antigen and vaccine production. Strains in cluster 1 were mycobactin dependent even when they were subcultured, whereas strains in cluster 3 were unable to grow on egg medium and their growth was stimulated by pH 5.5. Growth stimulation by pyruvate, resistance to D-cycloserine (50 micrograms/ml), and alkaline phosphatase activity also were characteristics that were useful for discriminating between clusters 1 and 3. The results of previous DNA-DNA hybridization studies have demonstrated that M. avium Chester 1901, M. paratuberculosis Bergey et al. 1923, and the wood pigeon mycobacteria belong to a single genomic species, and we propose that the name of this species should be M. avium. On the basis of the results of previous genomic analyses based on restriction fragment length, the results of polymorphism studies, and DNA patterns determined by field inversion gel electrophoresis as well as the results of our phenotypic study, we propose that the species should be divided into subspecies which correspond to pathogenicity and host range characteristics.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Concentration of Mycobacterium avium by hospital hot water systems.

    PubMed

    du Moulin, G C; Stottmeier, K D; Pelletier, P A; Tsang, A Y; Hedley-Whyte, J

    1988-09-16

    Water from 34 sites on two temporarily vacant hospital floors was analyzed for the presence of mycobacteria. These sites included 18 cold water taps and 16 hot water taps, including shower heads. A total of 14 sites (41%) demonstrated the presence of Mycobacterium avium as confirmed by biochemical characterization, DNA/rRNA probe analysis, and seroagglutination. Of positive sites, 11 were hot water sources with an average temperature of 55 degrees C and yielding up to 500 colony-forming units per 100 mL. Seven of 11 strains analyzed for glycolipid antigens were identified with the type 4 serovar, the preponderant serovar of M avium in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome from the Boston area. Potable hot water systems, particularly those that generate aerosols, may contain concentrations of M avium greater than those found in cold water systems and could serve as an environmental source for colonization and infection of immunocompromised persons.

  3. Chlorine, Chloramine, Chlorine Dioxide, and Ozone Susceptibility of Mycobacterium avium

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Robert H.; Falkinham, Joseph O.; Norton, Cheryl D.; LeChevallier, Mark W.

    2000-01-01

    Environmental and patient isolates of Mycobacterium avium were resistant to chlorine, monochloramine, chlorine dioxide, and ozone. For chlorine, the product of the disinfectant concentration (in parts per million) and the time (in minutes) to 99.9% inactivation for five M. avium strains ranged from 51 to 204. Chlorine susceptibility of cells was the same in washed cultures containing aggregates and in reduced aggregate fractions lacking aggregates. Cells of the more slowly growing strains were more resistant to chlorine than were cells of the more rapidly growing strains. Water-grown cells were 10-fold more resistant than medium-grown cells. Disinfectant resistance may be one factor promoting the persistence of M. avium in drinking water. PMID:10742264

  4. Preservation of monocyte effector functions against Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare in patients with AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, J L; Shiratsuchi, H; Toba, H; Ellner, J J

    1991-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare is a frequent cause of late disseminated infection in patients with AIDS. The ability of human peripheral blood monocytes to phagocytose and kill M. avium was examined in an in vitro model. Monocytes were obtained from 13 healthy volunteers and 11 patients with AIDS, three of whom had documented disseminated M. avium infection. Monocytes were precultured for 2 days before infection with two AIDS-associated and two non-AIDS-associated strains of M. avium. Uptake of M. avium as measured by counting intracellular acid-fast bacilli did not differ among healthy subjects, patients with AIDS, or patients with AIDS and previously documented disseminated M. avium infection. Intracellular growth of M. avium was examined by a CFU assay of cell lysates from M. avium-infected monocytes after 0, 4, and 7 days of culture. Intracellular growth inhibition of M. avium at 7 days after infection was comparable between patients with AIDS and healthy donors for all M. avium strains tested. The effects of the addition of recombinant gamma interferon on M. avium uptake and intracellular growth in monocytes also were studied. Pretreatment of monocytes with gamma interferon prior to infection suppressed monocyte phagocytosis of M. avium. Continuously coculturing of monocytes with gamma interferon after infection augmented killing of M. avium among both patients with AIDS and healthy controls for three of the four strains of M. avium tested. The magnitude of this effect, however, was variable from donor to donor and strain to strain. No significant differences were noted between the growth-inhibiting abilities of gamma-interferon-treated monocytes obtained from healthy volunteers and those obtained from patients with AIDS. PMID:1910011

  5. Cryopreservation of Prunus avium L. embryogenic tissues.

    PubMed

    Grenier-de March, Ghislaine; de Boucaud, Marie-Therese; Chmielarz, Pawel

    2005-01-01

    Embryogenic tissues from wild cherry (Prunus avium L.) were successfully cryopreserved by using a one-step freezing procedure. Cryoprotection consisted of a pretreatment on solid medium with increasing sucrose concentrations (0.25 M for 1 day, 0.5 M for 1 day, 0.75 M for 2 days, and 1.0 M for 3 days), followed by air desiccation to about 20 percent moisture content (fresh weight basis). This method was compared with a pretreatment on solid medium containing 5 percent DMSO and 2 percent proline, followed by immersion in a modified PVS2 cryoprotective solution. Pretreatment on solid medium with increasing concentrations of sucrose led to regrowth of frozen embryogenic tissues, and after 6 weeks of culture, growth was comparable to that of non-dehydrated and non-frozen tissues. By contrast, no regrowth was observed when embryogenic tissues were submitted to the solid/liquid pretreatment with DMSO/proline and a modified PVS2 solution.

  6. Rapid broth macrodilution method for determination of MICs for Mycobacterium avium isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, S H; Heifets, L B; Cynamon, M H; Hooper, N M; Laszlo, A; Libonati, J P; Lindholm-Levy, P J; Pearson, N

    1993-01-01

    A multicenter study was done to investigate the accuracy and reproducibility of a method for determining the MICs of antimicrobial agents against the Mycobacterium avium complex in 7H12 broth with the BACTEC system. In phase I, with eight drugs and 10 strains, intralaboratory reproducibility was 95.7 to 100%, allowing a 1-dilution difference upon repeat testing. The results of phase II testing with 41 additional strains were consistent with those obtained in phase I, with good interlaboratory reproducibility. The radiometric method was validated by sampling and plating of the same broth cultures and determining, by the number of CFU per milliliter, the lowest drug concentration that inhibited more than 99% of the initial bacterial population. Three test concentrations of each drug and the tentative interpretation of results are proposed. Radiometric MIC determination has the potential to become the method of choice for clinical microbiology laboratories and evaluation of new agents for the treatment of M. avium infections, both pulmonary and disseminated. Images PMID:8408551

  7. High-Density Lipoprotein Binds to Mycobacterium avium and Affects the Infection of THP-1 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ichimura, Naoya; Sato, Megumi; Yoshimoto, Akira; Yano, Kouji; Ohkawa, Ryunosuke; Kasama, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is involved in innate immunity toward various infectious diseases. Concerning bacteria, HDL is known to bind to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and to neutralize its physiological activity. On the other hand, cholesterol is known to play an important role in mycobacterial entry into host cells and in survival in the intracellular environment. However, the pathogenicity of Mycobacterium avium (M. avium) infection, which tends to increase worldwide, remains poorly studied. Here we report that HDL indicated a stronger interaction with M. avium than that with other Gram-negative bacteria containing abundant LPS. A binding of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, the main protein component of HDL, with a specific lipid of M. avium might participate in this interaction. HDL did not have a direct bactericidal activity toward M. avium but attenuated the engulfment of M. avium by THP-1 macrophages. HDL also did not affect bacterial killing after ingestion of live M. avium by THP-1 macrophage. Furthermore, HDL strongly promoted the formation of lipid droplets in M. avium-infected THP-1 macrophages. These observations provide new insights into the relationship between M. avium infection and host lipoproteins, especially HDL. Thus, HDL may help M. avium to escape from host innate immunity. PMID:27516907

  8. First identification of Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis sheep strain in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Travería, G E; Zumarraga, M; Etchechoury, I; Romano, M I; Cataldi, A; Pinedo, M F Alvarado; Pavlik, I; Pribylova, R; Romero, J R

    2013-01-01

    We here identified for the first time the presence of Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP) sheep (S) strain in Argentina. IS900 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was positive. The S strain was compared with MAP cattle (C) strains by using IS1311 PCR-restriction endonuclease analysis (PCR-REA), multiplex PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis.

  9. Cellular Interactions in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The study of host immune responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is complicated by a number of factors, including the protracted nature of the disease and the stealthy nature of the pathogen. Noted as one of the more fastidious mycobacteria, infection with MAP is often chara...

  10. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection, immunology and pathology of livestock

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in ruminants leads to a chronic and progressive enteric disease (Johne’s disease) that results in loss of intestinal function, poor body condition, and eventual death. Transmission is primarily through a fecal-oral route in neonates but con...

  11. Tuberculosis in Birds: Insights into the Mycobacterium avium Infections

    PubMed Central

    Dhama, Kuldeep; Mahendran, Mahesh; Tiwari, Ruchi; Dayal Singh, Shambhu; Kumar, Deepak; Singh, Shoorvir; Sawant, Pradeep Mahadev

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis, a List B disease of World Organization for Animal Health, caused by M. avium or M. genavense predominantly affects poultry and pet or captive birds. Clinical manifestations in birds include emaciation, depression and diarrhea along with marked atrophy of breast muscle. Unlike tuberculosis in animals and man, lesions in lungs are rare. Tubercular nodules can be seen in liver, spleen, intestine and bone marrow. Granulomatous lesion without calcification is a prominent feature. The disease is a rarity in organized poultry sector due to improved farm practices, but occurs in zoo aviaries. Molecular techniques like polymerase chain reaction combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism and gene probes aid in rapid identification and characterization of mycobacteria subspecies, and overcome disadvantages of conventional methods which are slow, labour intensive and may at times fail to produce precise results. M. avium subsp. avium with genotype IS901+ and IS1245+ causes infections in animals and human beings too. The bacterium causes sensitivity in cattle to the tuberculin test. The paper discusses in brief the M. avium infection in birds, its importance in a zoonotic perspective, and outlines conventional and novel strategies for its diagnosis, prevention and eradication in domestic/pet birds and humans alike. PMID:21776352

  12. Mechanisms involved in the intrinsic isoniazid resistance of Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed

    Mdluli, K; Swanson, J; Fischer, E; Lee, R E; Barry, C E

    1998-03-01

    Isoniazid (INH), which acts by inhibiting mycolic acid biosynthesis, is very potent against the tuberculous mycobacteria. It is about 100-fold less effective against Mycobacterium avium. This difference has often been attributed to a decreased permeability of the cell wall. We measured the rate of conversion of radiolabelled INH to 4-pyridylmethanol by whole cells and cell-free extracts and estimated the permeability barrier imposed by the cell wall to INH influx in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium. There was no significant difference in the relative permeability to INH between these two species. However, the total conversion rate in M. tuberculosis was found to be four times greater. Examination of in vitro-generated mutants revealed that the major resistance mechanism for both species is loss of the catalase-peroxidase KatG. Analysis of lipid and protein biosynthetic profiles demonstrated that the molecular target of activated INH was identical for both species. M. avium, however, formed colonies at INH concentrations inhibitory for mycolic acid biosynthesis. These mycolate-deficient M. avium exhibited altered colony morphologies, modified cell wall ultrastructure and were 10-fold more sensitive to treatment with hydrophobic antibiotics, such as rifampin. These findings may significantly impact the design of new therapeutic regimens for the treatment of infections with atypical mycobacteria.

  13. Characterization and expression of secA in Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed

    Limia, A; Sangari, F J; Wagner, D; Bermudez, L E

    2001-04-13

    Mycobacterium avium is both a pathogen that infects several hosts such as humans, pigs, and birds, as well as a microorganism that is encountered in environmental sources (soil and water). Protein secretion by the bacterium is likely to influence its ability to overcome adverse and competitive conditions both within or outside the host. Using a combination of cloning and information available in the databank, we characterized the secA gene from M. avium, encoding for a major preprotein translocase subunit associated with the secretion system of prokaryotics. In addition, we cloned the secA promoter sequence in a reporter construct upstream of a promoterless gfp. It was determined that the secA of M. avium shares large homology with the secA of Mycobacterium tuberculosis but not with secA of Mycobacterium leprae. secA expression was determined to be greater at logarithmic growth phase although it was also expressed at low levels during the stationary phase. secA expression was also observed when the bacteria were incubated in water as well as within human monocyte-derived macrophages and in conditions that are associated with biofilm formation. Future evaluation of the sec pathway in M. avium might provide important information about secreted proteins that are required for survival in different environments.

  14. Susceptibility of beige mice to Mycobacterium avium: role of neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Appelberg, R; Castro, A G; Gomes, S; Pedrosa, J; Silva, M T

    1995-01-01

    The beige mutation in C57BL/6 mice has been shown to increase the susceptibility to infection by Mycobacterium avium. In this study, we confirmed those results and showed that the effect of the beige mutation was most obvious after infection with a strain of lower virulence than with a highly virulent isolate of M. avium. The dissemination of M. avium from the gut was observed with both C57BL/6 and beige mice but was faster in the latter. The expression of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and the priming for tumor necrosis factor production during an in vivo infection were similar between beige and immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice. IFN-gamma produced during the infection of beige mice was protective in the spleen, and the administration of recombinant IFN-gamma restored the resistance in the spleen to levels similar to those found in control mice. There were no histological differences between wild-type and beige mice with respect to granuloma formation in the liver. The increased susceptibility of beige mice to M. avium as manifested in the liver was reduced by transfusing neutrophils from wild-type C57BL/6 mice. Likewise, depletion of neutrophils from C57BL/6 mice rendered them as susceptible to M. avium infection of the liver as beige mice. Our results point to the participation of neutrophils in the defect of beige mice in addition to other defects. Furthermore, these results show that neutrophils play a significant role in the defense mechanisms against mycobacterial infections and that beige animals may be a useful model for study of the role of neutrophils in mycobacteriosis. PMID:7642266

  15. Leadership Prescription Paradigms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stech, Ernest L.

    2007-01-01

    The three most common paradigms used to develop leadership prescriptions are the empirical, biographical, and ideological. The empirical paradigm is subdivided into quantitative and qualitative versions. Similarly, there are two forms of the biographical paradigm: historical and autobiographical. The ideological paradigm involves an appeal to…

  16. Insertion and deletion events that define the pathogen Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Alexander, David C; Turenne, Christine Y; Behr, Marcel A

    2009-02-01

    Mycobacterium avium comprises genetically related yet phenotypically distinct subspecies. Consistent with their common origin, whole-genome sequence comparisons have revealed extensive synteny among M. avium organisms. However, the sequenced strains also display numerous regions of heterogeneity that likely contribute to the diversity of the individual subspecies. Starting from a phylogenetic framework derived by multilocus sequence analysis, we examined the distribution of 25 large sequence polymorphisms across a panel of genetically defined M. avium strains. This distribution was most variable among M. avium subsp. hominissuis isolates. In contrast, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains exhibited a characteristic profile, with all isolates containing a set of genomic insertions absent from other M. avium strains. The emergence of the pathogen from its putative M. avium subsp. hominissuis ancestor entailed the acquisition of approximately 125 kb of novel genetic material, followed by a second phase, characterized by reductive genomics. One genomic deletion is common to all isolates while additional deletions distinguish two major lineages of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. For the average strain, these losses total at least 38 kb (sheep lineage) to 90 kb (cattle lineage). This biphasic pattern of evolution, characterized by chromosomal gene acquisition with subsequent gene loss, describes the emergence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and may serve as a general model for the origin of pathogenic mycobacteria.

  17. Host and bacterial factors control the Mycobacterium avium-induced chronic peritoneal granulocytosis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Appelberg, R; Pedrosa, J M; Silva, M T

    1991-01-01

    Persistent peritoneal granulocytosis and elevated macrophage counts have been found in nine mouse strains from 8 to 90 days after infection with Mycobacterium avium. Peritoneal granulocytosis was higher in M. avium-resistant BALB/c. Bcgr (C.D2) mice, compared with congenic M. avium-susceptible BALB/c (Bcgs) animals. Although maximal granulocytosis values were not related to virulence of the inocula, the kinetics of the granulocytic response varied with the virulence of M. avium. Following infections by avirulent (rough) strains of M. avium, the peritoneal granulocytosis progressively declined in BALB/c and C3H/He mice. A similar decline in granulocyte number was observed in resistant C3H/He mice infected with virulent M. avium (smooth transparent strain). In both instances the decline in the peritoneal granulocytosis was associated with a progressive elimination of the inoculum. In the susceptible BALB/c mice, virulent M. avium strains induced progressive infection accompanied with a rapid decline in granulocyte number, whereas the infection with attenuated M. avium, which caused a chronic infection, induced persistent granulocytosis. The ability to recruit granulocytes following the intraperitoneal inoculation of a phlogistic substance (casein hydrolysate) was decreased in infected susceptible but not in infected resistant mice at 90 days of infection with virulent M. avium. PMID:1993357

  18. Thermal Inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Artificially Contaminated Milk by Direct Steam Injection.

    PubMed

    Peterz, Mats; Butot, Sophie; Jagadeesan, Balamurugan; Bakker, Douwe; Donaghy, John

    2016-05-01

    The efficiency of direct steam injection (DSI) at 105 °C for 3 s to inactivate Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk at a pilot-plant scale was investigated. Milk samples were artificially contaminated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and also with cow fecal material naturally infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. We also tested milk artificially contaminated with Mycobacterium smegmatis as a candidate surrogate to compare thermal inactivation between M. smegmatis and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Following the DSI process, no viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis or M. smegmatis was recovered using culture methods for both strains. For pure M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cultures, a minimum reduction of 5.6 log10 was achieved with DSI, and a minimum reduction of 5.7 log10 was found with M. smegmatis. The minimum log10 reduction for wild-type M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis naturally present in feces was 3.3. In addition, 44 dairy and nondairy powdered infant formula (PIF) ingredients used during the manufacturing process of PIF were tested for an alternate source for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and were found to be negative by quantitative PCR (qPCR). In conclusion, the results obtained from this study indicate that a >7-fold-log10 reduction of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk can be achieved with the applied DSI process. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is widespread in dairy herds in many countries. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease in cattle, and infected animals can directly or indirectly (i.e., fecal contamination) contaminate milk. Despite much research and debate, there is no conclusive evidence that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is a zoonotic bacterium, i.e., one that causes disease in humans. The presence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis or its DNA has been reported in dairy products, including pasteurized milk, cheese, and infant formula. In light of this

  19. Comparative genomic analysis of Mycobacterium avium subspecies obtained from multiple host species

    PubMed Central

    Paustian, Michael L; Zhu, Xiaochun; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Robbe-Austerman, Suelee; Kapur, Vivek; Bannantine, John P

    2008-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium avium (M. avium) subspecies vary widely in both pathogenicity and host specificity, but the genetic features contributing to this diversity remain unclear. Results A comparative genomic approach was used to identify large sequence polymorphisms among M. avium subspecies obtained from a variety of host animals. DNA microarrays were used as a platform for comparing mycobacterial isolates with the sequenced bovine isolate M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) K-10. Open reading frames (ORFs) were classified as present or divergent based on the relative fluorescent intensities of the experimental samples compared to MAP K-10 DNA. Multiple large polymorphic regions were found in the genomes of MAP isolates obtained from sheep. One of these clusters encodes glycopeptidolipid biosynthesis enzymes which have not previously been identified in MAP. M. avium subsp. silvaticum isolates were observed to have a hybridization profile very similar to yet distinguishable from M. avium subsp. avium. Isolates obtained from cattle (n = 5), birds (n = 4), goats (n = 3), bison (n = 3), and humans (n = 9) were indistinguishable from cattle isolate MAP K-10. Conclusion Genome diversity in M. avium subspecies appears to be mediated by large sequence polymorphisms that are commonly associated with mobile genetic elements. Subspecies and host adapted isolates of M. avium were distinguishable by the presence or absence of specific polymorphisms. PMID:18366709

  20. Clearance of bacteria in turkeys with Bordetella avium-induced tracheitis.

    PubMed

    Ficken, M D; Edwards, J F; Lay, J C

    1986-01-01

    Quantitative clearance of aerosolized Escherichia coli from the trachea, lung, and air sacs was measured in turkeys infected with Bordetella avium. Clearance of E. coli in turkeys with B. avium-induced tracheitis was minimally affected early in infection. Sixteen to 23 days after infection with B. avium, sporadic, mild depressions in clearance of E. coli were observed in the tracheas, which had large areas of deciliated tracheal epithelium or replacement of normal epithelium by immature hyperplastic epithelium or metaplastic squamous epithelium. Clearance of E. coli from the lung and air sacs was minimally affected in turkeys infected with B. avium.

  1. Thermal Inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Artificially Contaminated Milk by Direct Steam Injection

    PubMed Central

    Butot, Sophie; Jagadeesan, Balamurugan; Bakker, Douwe; Donaghy, John

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The efficiency of direct steam injection (DSI) at 105°C for 3 s to inactivate Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk at a pilot-plant scale was investigated. Milk samples were artificially contaminated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and also with cow fecal material naturally infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. We also tested milk artificially contaminated with Mycobacterium smegmatis as a candidate surrogate to compare thermal inactivation between M. smegmatis and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Following the DSI process, no viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis or M. smegmatis was recovered using culture methods for both strains. For pure M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cultures, a minimum reduction of 5.6 log10 was achieved with DSI, and a minimum reduction of 5.7 log10 was found with M. smegmatis. The minimum log10 reduction for wild-type M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis naturally present in feces was 3.3. In addition, 44 dairy and nondairy powdered infant formula (PIF) ingredients used during the manufacturing process of PIF were tested for an alternate source for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and were found to be negative by quantitative PCR (qPCR). In conclusion, the results obtained from this study indicate that a >7-fold-log10 reduction of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk can be achieved with the applied DSI process. IMPORTANCE M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is widespread in dairy herds in many countries. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease in cattle, and infected animals can directly or indirectly (i.e., fecal contamination) contaminate milk. Despite much research and debate, there is no conclusive evidence that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is a zoonotic bacterium, i.e., one that causes disease in humans. The presence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis or its DNA has been reported in dairy products, including pasteurized milk, cheese, and infant formula

  2. Utilization of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-MS) to Identify environmental Strains of Mycobacterium Complex

    EPA Science Inventory

    Species within the Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) group are found to be both prevalent and persistent in drinking water distribution systems. The MAC is composed of two predominant species: M. avium and M. intracellulare. These species have the ability to survive drinking ...

  3. Utilization of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-MS) to Identify environmental Strains of Mycobacterium Complex

    EPA Science Inventory

    Species within the Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) group are found to be both prevalent and persistent in drinking water distribution systems. The MAC is composed of two predominant species: M. avium and M. intracellulare. These species have the ability to survive drinking ...

  4. Lactoferricin Peptides Increase Macrophages' Capacity To Kill Mycobacterium avium

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Tânia; Moreira, Ana C.; Nazmi, Kamran; Moniz, Tânia; Vale, Nuno; Rangel, Maria; Gomes, Paula; Bolscher, Jan G. M.; Rodrigues, Pedro N.; Bastos, Margarida

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterial infections cause a significant burden of disease and death worldwide. Their treatment is long, toxic, costly, and increasingly prone to failure due to bacterial resistance to currently available antibiotics. New therapeutic options are thus clearly needed. Antimicrobial peptides represent an important source of new antimicrobial molecules, both for their direct activity and for their immunomodulatory potential. We have previously reported that a short version of the bovine antimicrobial peptide lactoferricin with amino acids 17 to 30 (LFcin17–30), along with its variants obtained by specific amino acid substitutions, killed Mycobacterium avium in broth culture. In the present work, those peptides were tested against M. avium living inside its natural host cell, the macrophage. We found that the peptides increased the antimicrobial action of the conventional antibiotic ethambutol inside macrophages. Moreover, the d-enantiomer of the lactoferricin peptide (d-LFcin17–30) was more stable and induced significant killing of intracellular mycobacteria by itself. Interestingly, d-LFcin17–30 did not localize to M. avium-harboring phagosomes but induced the production of proinflammatory cytokines and increased the formation of lysosomes and autophagosome-like vesicles. These results lead us to conclude that d-LFcin17–30 primes macrophages for intracellular microbial digestion through phagosomal maturation and/or autophagy, culminating in mycobacterial killing. IMPORTANCE The genus Mycobacterium comprises several pathogenic species, including M. tuberculosis, M. leprae, M. avium, etc. Infections caused by these bacteria are particularly difficult to treat due to their intrinsic impermeability, low growth rate, and intracellular localization. Antimicrobial peptides are increasingly acknowledged as potential treatment tools, as they have a high spectrum of activity, low tendency to induce bacterial resistance, and immunomodulatory properties. In

  5. Inter- and Intra-subtype genotypic differences that differentiate Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis strains

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map) is the aetiological agent of Johne’s disease or paratuberculosis and is included within the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). Map strains are of two major types often referred to as ‘Sheep’ or ‘S-type’ and ‘Cattle’ or ‘C-type’. With the advent of more discriminatory typing techniques it has been possible to further classify the S-type strains into two groups referred to as Type I and Type III. This study was undertaken to genotype a large panel of S-type small ruminant isolates from different hosts and geographical origins and to compare them with a large panel of well documented C-type isolates to assess the genetic diversity of these strain types. Methods used included Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Units - Variable-Number Tandem Repeat analysis (MIRU-VNTR), analysis of Large Sequence Polymorphisms by PCR (LSP analysis), Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) analysis of gyr genes, Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism analysis coupled with hybridization to IS900 (IS900-RFLP) analysis. Results The presence of LSPA4 and absence of LSPA20 was confirmed in all 24 Map S-type strains analysed. SNPs within the gyr genes divided the S-type strains into types I and III. Twenty four PFGE multiplex profiles and eleven different IS900-RFLP profiles were identified among the S-type isolates, some of them not previously published. Both PFGE and IS900-RFLP segregated the S-type strains into types I and III and the results concurred with those of the gyr SNP analysis. Nine MIRU-VNTR genotypes were identified in these isolates. MIRU-VNTR analysis differentiated Map strains from other members of Mycobacterium avium Complex, and Map S-type from C-type but not type I from III. Pigmented Map isolates were found of type I or III. Conclusion This is the largest panel of S-type strains investigated to date. The S-type strains could be further divided

  6. Host responses to persistent Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection in surgically isolated bovine ileal segments.

    PubMed

    Charavaryamath, Chandrashekhar; Gonzalez-Cano, Patricia; Fries, Patrick; Gomis, Susantha; Doig, Kimberley; Scruten, Erin; Potter, Andrew; Napper, Scott; Griebel, Philip J

    2013-02-01

    A lack of appropriate disease models has limited our understanding of the pathogenesis of persistent enteric infections with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. A model was developed for the controlled delivery of a defined dose of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis to surgically isolated ileal segments in newborn calves. The stable intestinal segments enabled the characterization of host responses to persistent M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infections after a 9-month period, including an analysis of local mucosal immune responses relative to an adjacent uninfected intestinal compartment. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis remained localized at the initial site of intestinal infection and was not detected by PCR in the mesenteric lymph node. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific T cell proliferative responses included both CD4 and γδ T cell receptor (γδTcR) T cell responses in the draining mesenteric lymph node. The levels of CD8(+) and γδTcR(+) T cells increased significantly (P < 0.05) in the lamina propria, and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and gamma interferon secretion by lamina propria leukocytes was also significantly (P < 0.05) increased. There was a significant (P < 0.05) accumulation of macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) in the lamina propria, but the expression of mucosal toll-like receptors 1 through 10 was not significantly changed by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. In conclusion, surgically isolated ileal segments provided a model system for the establishment of a persistent and localized enteric M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in cattle and facilitated the analysis of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific changes in mucosal leukocyte phenotype and function. The accumulation of DC subpopulations in the lamina propria suggests that further investigation of mucosal DCs may provide insight into host responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection and

  7. Intramacrophage growth of Mycobacterium avium during infection of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Frehel, C; de Chastellier, C; Offredo, C; Berche, P

    1991-01-01

    Growth of the virulent Mycobacterium avium strain TMC 724 in host tissues during persistent infection of mice was studied. Following intravenous infection of C57BL/6 mice, the kinetics of bacterial growth was biphasic in the spleen and liver, with a significant reduction of the multiplication rate after day 21 to 28 of infection. An electron-microscopic study of the liver and spleen of infected mice showed that the bacteria were strictly intracellular. They were observed within inflammatory macrophages populating granulomas disseminated in host tissues. The bacteria were confined to the phagosome compartment, and they were encapsulated. Phagosome-lysosome fusions were encountered, but the bacteria showed no visible signs of degradation and continued to multiply. These results are the first in vivo evidence that virulent M. avium multiplies exclusively intracellularly and that encapsulated bacteria resist the microbicidal mechanisms of macrophages inside the phagosomal compartment. Images PMID:2037382

  8. Serologic tests for detecting antibodies against Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa scrofa).

    PubMed

    Boadella, Mariana; Lyashchenko, Konstantin; Greenwald, Reena; Esfandiari, Javan; Jaroso, Raquel; Carta, Tania; Garrido, Joseba M; Vicente, Joaquín; de la Fuente, José; Gortázar, Christian

    2011-01-01

    New tools to detect exposure of free-range Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa scrofa) to pathogenic mycobacteria would be valuable for improved disease surveillance and wildlife management. Two hundred sera from wild boar of known Mycobacterium bovis infection status were used to evaluate test suitability for the detection of antibodies against M. bovis and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (or cross-reacting members of the M. avium complex). Two traditional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were evaluated using M. bovis purified protein derivative (bPPD) and paratuberculosis protoplasmatic antigen 3 (PPA3) as antigens, respectively, and a new point-of-care test format for bovine tuberculosis (bTB) that uses the innovative dual-path platform (DPP TB) test. The effect of individual factors (sex, age, lesions) on the diagnostic performance of the serologic tests was also determined. Although the DPP had a sensitivity of 89.6% and a specificity of 90.4%, for bPPD, the sensitivity was 79.2% and the specificity 100%. Both tests had a kappa agreement of 0.80. Sixty-five of 68 (95.6%) wild boar sera with antibodies against the PPA3 antigen corresponded to known M. bovis-infected wild boar. Significant differences were not observed in the bPPD and DPP readings among lesion categories or between age classes. A slight sex-related difference in sensitivity toward males in the DPP was found, but it was not detected in the bPPD enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results support the use of antibody-based diagnostic tests for both large-scale and individual bTB testing of Eurasian wild boar and suggest that wild boar cannot be used as sentinels for infections caused by M. avium complex members.

  9. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare: a rare cause of subacromial bursitis.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Raj; Tuckett, John; Hide, Geoff; Dildey, Petra; Karsandas, Alvin

    2015-01-01

    Septic subacromial bursitis is an uncommon disorder with only a few reported cases in the literature. The most common causative organism is Staphylococcus aureus. We report the case of a 61-year-old female with a septic subacromial bursitis where the causative organism was found to be Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI). The diagnosis was only made following a biopsy, and we use this case to highlight the importance of recognising the need to consider a biopsy and aspiration in atypical situations.

  10. Beyond desertification: New paradigms for dryland landscapes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The dryland desertification paradigm focuses on losses of ecosystem services accompanying transitions from grasslands to systems dominated by bare ground or woody plants unpalatable for domestic livestock. However, recent studies reveal complex transitions across a range of environmental conditions ...

  11. Molecular identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. silvaticum by duplex high-resolution melt analysis and subspecies-specific real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Rónai, Zsuzsanna; Csivincsik, Ágnes; Dán, Ádám

    2015-05-01

    Accurate identification of mycobacterial species and subspecies is essential to evaluate their significance and to perform epidemiological studies. The subspecies of Mycobacterium avium have different attributes but coincide in their zoonotic potential. Our knowledge about M. avium subsp. silvaticum is limited, since its identification is uncertain. Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium and M. avium subsp. silvaticum can be discriminated from each other based only on phenotypic characteristics, as they have almost identical genome sequences. Here we describe the development of a diagnostic method which enables the molecular identification of M. avium subsp. silvaticum and discrimination from M. avium subsp. avium based on genomic differences in a duplex high-resolution melt and M. avium subsp. silvaticum-specific mismatch real-time PCR. The developed assay was tested on reference strains and 199 field isolates, which were analyzed by phenotypic methods previously. This assay not only identified all 63 M. avium subsp. silvaticum and 138 M. avium subsp. avium strains correctly but also enabled the detection of mixed M. avium subsp. avium-M. avium subsp. silvaticum cultures. This is the first time that such a large panel of strains has been analyzed, and we also report the first isolation of M. avium subsp. silvaticum from red fox, red deer, wild boar, cattle, and badger. This assay is reliable, rapid, simple, inexpensive, and robust. It eliminates the long-existing problem of ambiguous phenotypic identification and opens up the possibility for detailed and comprehensive strain studies.

  12. Molecular Identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. silvaticum by Duplex High-Resolution Melt Analysis and Subspecies-Specific Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Csivincsik, Ágnes; Dán, Ádám

    2015-01-01

    Accurate identification of mycobacterial species and subspecies is essential to evaluate their significance and to perform epidemiological studies. The subspecies of Mycobacterium avium have different attributes but coincide in their zoonotic potential. Our knowledge about M. avium subsp. silvaticum is limited, since its identification is uncertain. Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium and M. avium subsp. silvaticum can be discriminated from each other based only on phenotypic characteristics, as they have almost identical genome sequences. Here we describe the development of a diagnostic method which enables the molecular identification of M. avium subsp. silvaticum and discrimination from M. avium subsp. avium based on genomic differences in a duplex high-resolution melt and M. avium subsp. silvaticum-specific mismatch real-time PCR. The developed assay was tested on reference strains and 199 field isolates, which were analyzed by phenotypic methods previously. This assay not only identified all 63 M. avium subsp. silvaticum and 138 M. avium subsp. avium strains correctly but also enabled the detection of mixed M. avium subsp. avium-M. avium subsp. silvaticum cultures. This is the first time that such a large panel of strains has been analyzed, and we also report the first isolation of M. avium subsp. silvaticum from red fox, red deer, wild boar, cattle, and badger. This assay is reliable, rapid, simple, inexpensive, and robust. It eliminates the long-existing problem of ambiguous phenotypic identification and opens up the possibility for detailed and comprehensive strain studies. PMID:25740770

  13. Effect of Prunus avium roots on river bank strong.

    PubMed

    Bibalani, Ghassem Habibi; Bazhrang, Zia; Mohsenifar, Hani; Shibaei, Naeime; Joodi, Lila

    2008-04-15

    A pulling effect by side roots is one way in which roots help to side in-plane strong of a little depth soil mass. In contrast to the effect of vertically-enlarge roots, whereby soil is strengthened by an increase in its shear strength, the pulling effect strengthens the soil by increasing the tensile strength of the rooted soil zone. To verify whether or not a pulling effect exists in the root system of Prunus avium in the Roudsar, North Iran and to study the importance and size of this effect, a direct in situ test was led at a site in the Chaboksar Forests. The results from the site showed that, in the surface soil (0-30 cm), Side roots can provide a pull force of up to 490-712 N (Newtons) over a vertical cross-section area of 20-50 cm2, or an enhance in the pulling stability of the rooted soil by about 48.1%. The test results suggest that, together with the Prunus avium vertical roots, which keep the little depth rooted soil zone to the deep and more stable soil mass, the side roots of the Prunus avium, with their pulling effect, are able to make less against little depth instability in the forest slopes, such as little depth slide, to a certain degree.

  14. The Reception Learning Paradigm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Joseph D.

    This report suggests that research in education, as well as the design of instruction, can be importantly influenced by the paradigm that guides the work. The application of a paradigm to educational research is illustrated, and two paradigms (reception learning and discovery learning) are contrasted. Finally, it is suggested that all educational…

  15. The Reception Learning Paradigm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Joseph D.

    This report suggests that research in education, as well as the design of instruction, can be importantly influenced by the paradigm that guides the work. The application of a paradigm to educational research is illustrated, and two paradigms (reception learning and discovery learning) are contrasted. Finally, it is suggested that all educational…

  16. Complete genome sequence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, isolated from human breast milk

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis is the etiologic agent of Johne’s disease. We report the draft genome sequences of six M. avium subsp paratuberculosis isolates obtained from diverse hosts including bison, cattle and sheep. These sequences will deepen our understanding of host association ...

  17. Profiling Host Antibody Responses to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis Infection Using Protein Arrays

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Along with the complete genome sequence of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, technologies are now developed for the construction of protein arrays to detect the presence of antibodies against M. avium subsp paratuberculosis in host serum. The power of this approach is that it enable...

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Bordetella avium Nh1210, an Outbreak Strain of Lockjaw Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Luisa Z; Knöbl, Terezinha; Grespan, André A; Felizardo, Maria R; Gomes, Cleise R; Ferreira, Thais S P; Xavier de Oliveira, Maria Gabriela; Myriantheus, Livia; Moreno, Andrea Micke

    2015-03-12

    Bordetella avium is a highly contagious bacterium that infects the upper respiratory tract of birds. B. avium Nh1210 is an outbreak strain of lockjaw syndrome in juvenile cockatiel chicks (Nymphicus hollandicus). Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain Nh1210. Copyright © 2015 Moreno et al.

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Bordetella avium Nh1210, an Outbreak Strain of Lockjaw Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Luisa Z.; Knöbl, Terezinha; Grespan, André A.; Felizardo, Maria R.; Gomes, Cleise R.; Ferreira, Thais S. P.; Xavier de Oliveira, Maria Gabriela; Myriantheus, Livia

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella avium is a highly contagious bacterium that infects the upper respiratory tract of birds. B. avium Nh1210 is an outbreak strain of lockjaw syndrome in juvenile cockatiel chicks (Nymphicus hollandicus). Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain Nh1210. PMID:25767244

  20. Roles for Cell Wall Glycopeptidolipid in Surface Adherence and Planktonic Dispersal of Mycobacterium avium

    EPA Science Inventory

    The opportunistic pathogen Mycobacterium avium is a significant inhabitant of biofilms in drinking water distribution systems. M. avium expresses on its cell surface serovar-specific glycopeptidolipids (ssGPLs). Studies have implicated the core GPL in biofilm formation by M. aviu...

  1. Roles for Cell Wall Glycopeptidolipid in Surface Adherence and Planktonic Dispersal of Mycobacterium avium

    EPA Science Inventory

    The opportunistic pathogen Mycobacterium avium is a significant inhabitant of biofilms in drinking water distribution systems. M. avium expresses on its cell surface serovar-specific glycopeptidolipids (ssGPLs). Studies have implicated the core GPL in biofilm formation by M. aviu...

  2. Presence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Environmental Samples Collected on Commercial Dutch Dairy Farms ▿

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Susanne W. F.; Koets, Ad P.; Hoeboer, Jeroen; Bouman, Marina; Heederik, Dick; Nielen, Mirjam

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the causative agent of Johne's disease in cattle, was identified in settled-dust samples of Dutch commercial dairy farms, both in the dairy barn and in the young stock housing. Bioaerosols may play a role in within-farm M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis transmission. PMID:20656861

  3. Use of restriction fragment length polymorphism as a genetic marker for typing Mycobacterium avium strains.

    PubMed

    Roiz, M P; Palenque, E; Guerrero, C; Garcia, M J

    1995-05-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was used to study 75 clinical isolates identified as Mycobacterium avium. Two repetitive insertion sequences, IS1311 and IS900, were used as DNA probes. Although less than 25% of isolates showed RFLP patterns with IS900, all strains gave banding patterns with IS1311. M. avium strains isolated from patients with AIDS exhibited marked polymorphism with both probes.

  4. Cell wall peptidolipids of Mycobacterium avium: from genetic prediction to exact structure of a nonribosomal peptide

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Total lipids from an M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) ovine strain (S-type) contained no identifiable glycopeptidolipids or lipopentapeptide, yet both lipids are present in other M. avium subspecies. We determined the genetic and phenotypic basis for this difference using sequence analysis and...

  5. Azithromycin Dose To Maximize Efficacy and Suppress Acquired Drug Resistance in Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium Disease

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Devyani; Pasipanodya, Jotam G.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex is now the leading mycobacterial cause of chronic pneumonia in the United States. Macrolides and ethambutol form the backbone of the regimen used in the treatment of pulmonary disease. However, therapy outcomes remain poor, with microbial cure rates of 4% in cavitary disease. The treatment dose of azithromycin has mostly been borrowed from that used to treat other bacterial pneumonias; there are no formal dose-response studies in pulmonary M. avium disease and the optimal dose is unclear. We utilized population pharmacokinetics and pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics-derived azithromycin exposures associated with optimal microbial kill or resistance suppression to perform 10,000 patient Monte Carlo simulations of dose effect studies for daily azithromycin doses of 0.5 to 10 g. The currently recommended dose of 500 mg per day achieved the target exposures in 0% of patients. Exposures associated with optimal kill and resistance suppression were achieved in 87 and 54% of patients, respectively, only by the very high dose of 8 g per day. The azithromycin susceptibility breakpoint above which patients failed therapy on the very high doses of 8 g per day was an MIC of 16 mg/liter, suggesting a critical concentration of 32 mg/liter, which is 8-fold lower than the currently used susceptibility breakpoint of 256 mg/liter. If the standard dose of 500 mg a day were used, then the critical concentration would fall to 2 mg/liter, 128-fold lower than 256 mg/liter. The misclassification of resistant isolates as susceptible could explain the high failure rates of current doses. PMID:26810646

  6. Assessing the Inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis during Composting of Livestock Carcasses

    PubMed Central

    Tkachuk, Victoria L.; Krause, Denis O.; McAllister, Tim A.; Buckley, Katherine E.; Reuter, Tim; Hendrick, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis causes Johne's disease (JD) in ruminants, with substantial economic impacts on the cattle industry. Johne's disease is known for its long latency period, and difficulties in diagnosis are due to insensitivities of current detection methods. Eradication is challenging as M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis can survive for extended periods within the environment, resulting in new infections in naïve animals (W. Xu et al., J. Environ. Qual. 38:437-450, 2009). This study explored the use of a biosecure, static composting structure to inactivate M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Mycobacterium smegmatis was also assessed as a surrogate for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Two structures were constructed to hold three cattle carcasses each. Naturally infected tissues and ground beef inoculated with laboratory-cultured M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and M. smegmatis were placed in nylon and plastic bags to determine effects of temperature and compost environment on viability over 250 days. After removal, samples were cultured and growth of both organisms was assessed after 12 weeks. After 250 days, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was still detectable by PCR, while M. smegmatis was not detected after 67 days of composting. Furthermore, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis remained viable in both implanted nylon and plastic bags over the composting period. As the compost never reached a homogenous thermophilic (55 to 65°C) state throughout each structure, an in vitro experiment was conducted to examine viability of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis after exposure to 80°C for 90 days. Naturally infected lymph tissues were mixed with and without compost. After 90 days, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis remained viable despite exposure to temperatures typically higher than that achieved in compost. In conclusion, it is unlikely composting can be used as a means of inactivating M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis associated with cattle

  7. The fibroblast growth factor-2 arrests Mycobacterium avium sp. paratuberculosis growth and immunomodulates host response in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianjun; Wang, Zeyou; Yao, Yongliang; Wu, Jianhong; Tang, Xin; Gu, Tao; Li, Guangxin

    2015-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosisis (M. tb) epidemic is one of the most severe health problem worldwide, while mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis and host immune responses remain unclear. Mycobacterium avium (M. avium), a mycobacterial species related to M. tb, shares similarities with M. tb in many ways. In this study, using M. avium infection of macrophages as a model, we systematically studied the effect of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) on M. avium infection of macrophages. Our results showed that M. avium infection could increase FGF-2 expression on both mRNA and protein levels. M. avium infection elevated TNF-α and IFN-γ production while the addition of FGF-2 could further increase TNF-α but not IFN-γ level. M. avium infection could increase the expression of oxygen/nitrogen metabolism proteins iNOS and SOD-1, and FGF-2 had additive effect on the expression of these two proteins. M. avium infection had inhibitive effect on actin expression while FGF-2 could partly counteract such inhibition. Moreover, FGF-2 could inhibit M. avium proliferation in macrophages. Our results together indicate that macrophage-secreted FGF-2 upon M. avium infection could suppress M. avium proliferation through various ways including cytokine production, enhancement of phagocytosis as well as oxygen/nitrogen metabolism.

  8. Pathogenicity of Mycobacterium avium for human monocytes: absence of macrophage-activating factor activity of gamma interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Toba, H; Crawford, J T; Ellner, J J

    1989-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is a frequent opportunistic pathogen in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). We compared 12 strains of M. avium in an in vitro model of pathogenicity. Peripheral blood-derived monocytes from healthy individuals were infected with M. avium in vitro. Bacterial uptake and intracellular replication were assessed by microscopic count of acid-fast bacilli and CFU of bacteria, respectively, in lysed monocytes. The CFU assay showed that among five AIDS-associated strains, only one replicated in monocytes. Two of seven non-AIDS-associated strains replicated intracellularly. In addition, we examined the effect of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) on M. avium infection. IFN-gamma treatment of monocytes decreased phagocytosis and had no effect on the intracellular replication of M. avium. Thus, most strains of M. avium do not multiply within monocytes from healthy individuals and IFN-gamma does not have macrophage-activating factor activity for M. avium infection of human monocytes. PMID:2491838

  9. Linking metacommunity paradigms to spatial coexistence mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Lauren G; Melbourne, Brett A

    2016-09-01

    Four metacommunity paradigms-usually called neutral, species sorting, mass effects, and patch dynamics, respectively-are widely used for empirical and theoretical studies of spatial community dynamics. The paradigm framework highlights key ecological mechanisms operating in metacommunities, such as dispersal limitation, competition-colonization tradeoffs, or species equivalencies. However, differences in coexistence mechanisms between the paradigms and in situations with combined influences of multiple paradigms are not well understood. Here, we create a common model for competitive metacommunities, with unique parameterizations for each metacommunity paradigm and for scenarios with multiple paradigms operating simultaneously. We derive analytical expressions for the strength of Chesson's spatial coexistence mechanisms and quantify these for each paradigm via simulation. For our model, fitness-density covariance, a concentration effect measuring the importance of intraspecific aggregation of individuals, is the dominant coexistence mechanism in all three niche-based metacommunity paradigms. Increased dispersal between patches erodes intraspecific aggregation, leading to lower coexistence strength in the mass effects paradigm compared to species sorting. Our analysis demonstrates the potential importance of aggregation of individuals (fitness-density covariance) over co-variation in abiotic environments and competition between species (the storage effect), as fitness-density covariance can be stronger than the storage effect and is the sole stabilizing mechanism in the patch dynamics paradigm. As expected, stable coexistence does not occur in the neutral paradigm, which requires species to be equal and emphasizes the role of stochasticity. We show that stochasticity also plays an important role in niche-structured metacommunities by altering coexistence strength. We conclude that Chesson's spatial coexistence mechanisms provide a flexible framework for comparing

  10. B-cell epitopes in the immunodominant p34 antigen of mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis recognized by antibodies from infected cattle.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, M; Mundo, S L; Harris, N B; Barletta, R G; Lopez, O J

    2003-11-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) causes Johne's disease, a chronic and fatal enteritis in ruminants. In the last stage of the disease, antibody titres rise and levels of interferon-gamma decrease, suggesting that the host-immune response is switching from a T helper 1 (Th1) to a Th2 profile. In infected cattle, the membrane protein p34 elicits the predominant humoral response against M. paratuberculosis. To map the B-cell epitopes of this antigen, affinity-purified bovine antibodies against the carboxy-terminal region of p34 were used to screen a 12-mer phage display library. Several phage clones carrying peptides resembling fragments of p34 were affinity selected. Based on the predicted amino acid sequence, peptides were chemically synthesized, which demonstrated reactivity with serum from naturally infected and p34-vaccinated cattle. Immunization of mice with these peptides elicited an anti-p34 antibody response. Two B-cell epitopes were identified and characterized. Based on the reactivity and the type of immune response elicited, epitope A was determined to be conformational, whereas epitope B was demonstrated to be sequential. Both epitopes were shown to be present in p34 proteins from M. avium ssp. avium or M. paratuberculosis but absent from M. intracellulare, the other member of the M. avium complex. Furthermore, both epitopes were mapped to regions of p34 that display high variability when compared to homologous proteins from other mycobacterial species of public and animal health importance. We hypothesize that these variable regions of p34 may play a role in the immunobiology of M. paratuberculosis infections.

  11. Modulation of the effector function of human monocytes for Mycobacterium avium by human immunodeficiency virus-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120.

    PubMed Central

    Shiratsuchi, H; Johnson, J L; Toossi, Z; Ellner, J J

    1994-01-01

    Disseminated Mycobacterium avium infection in AIDS is associated with high tissue burdens (10(9)-10(10) mycobacteria/g tissue) of organism. The basis for the extraordinary susceptibility of AIDS to M. avium infection is unclear. HIV or its constituents may alter mononuclear phagocyte functions resulting in enhanced intracellular M. avium growth. The effects of an envelope glycoprotein (gp120), a transmembrane protein (p121), and core proteins of HIV-1 on M. avium infection of human monocytes were examined. Preculturing monocytes with gp120 inhibited M. avium phagocytosis and consistently enhanced intracellular growth of six M. avium strains. Pretreatment with p121, gag5, or p24 did not inhibit phagocytosis nor enhance intracellular growth of M. avium. Incubation of gp120 with soluble CD4 before addition to monocyte cultures or pretreatment of monocytes with OKT4A abrogated gp120 effects on M. avium phagocytosis and intracellular growth. gp120 also augmented cytokine production by infected monocytes. These results suggest that gp120, but not p121 or core proteins, modulate monocyte phagocytosis and enhance intracellular growth of M. avium at least in part through monocyte CD4 receptors. Direct effects of HIV-1 products may, therefore, contribute to the diathesis of AIDS to develop disseminated M. avium infection and to the extensive replication of the organisms within tissue macrophages. Images PMID:8113420

  12. A new paradigm and computational framework to estimate stop-signal reaction time distributions from the inhibition of complex motor sequences

    PubMed Central

    Teichert, Tobias; Ferrera, Vincent P.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitory control is an important component of executive function that allows organisms to abort emerging behavioral plans or ongoing actions on the fly as new sensory information becomes available. Current models treat inhibitory control as a race between a Go- and a Stop process that may be mediated by partially distinct neural substrates, i.e., the direct and the hyper-direct pathway of the basal ganglia. The fact that finishing times of the Stop process (Stop-Signal Reaction Time, SSRT) cannot be observed directly has precluded a precise comparison of the functional properties that govern the initiation (GoRT) and inhibition (SSRT) of a motor response. To solve this problem, we modified an existing inhibitory paradigm and developed a non-parametric framework to measure the trial-by-trial variability of SSRT. A series of simulations verified that the non-parametric approach is on par with a parametric approach and yields accurate estimates of the entire SSRT distribution from as few as ~750 trials. Our results show that in identical settings, the distribution of SSRT is very similar to the distribution of GoRT albeit somewhat shorter, wider and significantly less right-skewed. The ability to measure the precise shapes of SSRT distributions opens new avenues for research into the functional properties of the hyper-direct pathway that is believed to mediate inhibitory control. PMID:26236226

  13. Mycobacterium avium subspecies induce differential expression of pro-inflammatory mediators in a murine macrophage model: evidence for enhanced pathogenicity of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Basler, Tina; Geffers, Robert; Weiss, Siegfried; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Goethe, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies (ssp.) paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiological agent of paratuberculosis, a chronic, non-treatable granulomatous enteritis of ruminants. MAP is the only mycobacterium affecting the intestinal tract, which is of interest since it is presently the most favoured pathogen linked to Crohn's disease (CD) in humans due to its frequent detection in CD tissues. MAP is genetically closely related to other M. avium ssp. such as M. avium ssp. avium (MAA) and M. avium ssp. hominissuis (MAH) which can cause mycobacteriosis in animals and immunocompromised humans. We have recently shown that murine macrophage cell lines represent suitable systems to analyse M. avium ssp. patho-mechanisms and could show that MAP, but not MAA, specifically inhibited the antigen-specific stimulatory capacity for CD4(+) T-cells. In the present study, we compared gene expression profiles of murine RAW264.7 macrophages in response to infections with MAP or MAA using murine high-density oligonucleotide Affymetrix microarrays. A comparison of MAP and MAA infection revealed 17 differentially expressed genes. They were expressed at a much lower level in MAP-infected macrophages than in MAA-infected macrophages. Among these were the genes for IL-1beta, IL-1alpha, CXCL2, PTGS2 (COX2), lipocalin (LCN2) and TNF, which are important pro-inflammatory factors. The microarray data were confirmed for selected genes by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR and, by protein array analyses and ELISA. Similar to MAA, infection with MAH also showed robust induction of IL-1beta, CXCL2, COX2, LCN2 and TNF. Taken together, our results from M. avium ssp.-infected murine macrophages provide evidence that MAP in contrast to MAA and MAH specifically suppresses the pro-inflammatory defence mechanisms of infected macrophages.

  14. The Investment Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perna, Mark C.

    2005-01-01

    Is marketing an expense or an investment? Most accountants will claim that marketing is an expense, and clearly that seems true when cutting the checks to fund these efforts. When it is done properly, marketing is the best investment. A key principle to Smart Marketing is the Investment Paradigm. The Investment Paradigm is understanding that every…

  15. An Integrative Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammack, Phillip L.

    2005-01-01

    Through the application of life course theory to the study of sexual orientation, this paper specifies a new paradigm for research on human sexual orientation that seeks to reconcile divisions among biological, social science, and humanistic paradigms. Recognizing the historical, social, and cultural relativity of human development, this paradigm…

  16. The Investment Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perna, Mark C.

    2005-01-01

    Is marketing an expense or an investment? Most accountants will claim that marketing is an expense, and clearly that seems true when cutting the checks to fund these efforts. When it is done properly, marketing is the best investment. A key principle to Smart Marketing is the Investment Paradigm. The Investment Paradigm is understanding that every…

  17. Organizational Paradigm Shifts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of College and University Business Officers, Washington, DC.

    This collection of essays explores a new paradigm of higher education. The first essay, "Beyond Re-engineering: Changing the Organizational Paradigm" (L. Edwin Coate), suggests a model of quality process management and a structure for managing organizational change. "Thinking About Consortia" (Mary Jo Maydew) discusses…

  18. An Integrative Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammack, Phillip L.

    2005-01-01

    Through the application of life course theory to the study of sexual orientation, this paper specifies a new paradigm for research on human sexual orientation that seeks to reconcile divisions among biological, social science, and humanistic paradigms. Recognizing the historical, social, and cultural relativity of human development, this paradigm…

  19. The Reception Learning Paradigm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Joseph D.

    1979-01-01

    Presented is a paradigm for science education research. The paradigm advances the reception learning theory, where regularities to be learned are presented explicitly to the learner. A tool for the study of knowledge production in science education, the Gowin "V," is presented. (RE)

  20. The Generative Paradigm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loynes, Chris

    2002-01-01

    The "algorithmic" model of outdoor experiential learning is based in military tradition and characterized by questionable scientific rationale, production line metaphor, and the notion of learning as marketable commodity. Alternatives are the moral paradigm; the ecological paradigm "friluftsliv"; and the emerging…

  1. Communication Policy at the Chalk Face in Scotland and Jamaica: Complexity as a New Paradigm for Understanding Language Policy Interpretation and Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Beth

    2003-01-01

    Examples from upper primary classrooms in Scotland and Jamaica demonstrate the subtle ways in which teachers support or restrict the classroom use of community languages (Scots and Patwa) through their broad or narrow implementation of language policy. The metaphor of fractals, derived from complexity theory, can form a sensitive and appropriate…

  2. Communication Policy at the Chalk Face in Scotland and Jamaica: Complexity as a New Paradigm for Understanding Language Policy Interpretation and Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Beth

    2003-01-01

    Examples from upper primary classrooms in Scotland and Jamaica demonstrate the subtle ways in which teachers support or restrict the classroom use of community languages (Scots and Patwa) through their broad or narrow implementation of language policy. The metaphor of fractals, derived from complexity theory, can form a sensitive and appropriate…

  3. No holes barred: Invasion of the intestinal mucosa by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The infection biology of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) has recently crystalized with added details surrounding intestinal invasion. The involvement of pathogen-derived effector proteins such as the major membrane protein, oxidoreductase and fibronectin attachment proteins hav...

  4. Immunogenicity of Proteome-determined Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific Proteins in Sheep with Paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis causes paratuberculosis, a chronic granulomatous enteritis. Detecting animals with paratuberculosis infections is difficult because the currently available tools have low sensitivity and lack specificity being prone to spurious positive test results ca...

  5. A Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis predicted serine protease is associated with acid stress and intraphagosomal survival

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is an intracellular pathogen that persists inside host macrophages despite severe oxidative stress and nutrient deprivation. Intrabacterial pH homeostasis is vital to pathogenic mycobacteria to preserve cellular biological processes and stability of ...

  6. Epidemiology and Ecology of Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens (OPPPs) that persist and grow in household plumbing, habitats they share with humans. Infections caused by these OPPPs involve individuals with preexis...

  7. Trypanosoma avium incidence, pathogenicity and response to melarsomine in falcons from Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Tarello, W

    2005-03-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies on Trypanosoma avium are lacking in the Middle East. The aims of this study were to determine the T. avium incidence in falcons from Kuwait, report clinical signs and find an effective therapy. Blood smears from 921 diseased and 56 healthy falcons were examined between May 2003 and April 2004. 12 birds 11.3%) were found infected by T. avium and ten of these were treated with melarsomine (Cymelarsan) at a dosage of 0.25 mg/kg intramuscularly for four days. All affected birds presented clinical signs, including incapacity of flying high, poor appetite, lethargy, loosing weight, weakness, dyspnoea and death. Signs disappeared within 1-7 days after administration of melarsomine. Trypomastigotes were not detected in blood smears made 1-7 days after the end of therapy. This study suggests that T. avium induces disease in falcons and that melarsomine can be an effective therapy eliminating both clinical signs and circulating trypomastigotes.

  8. Composition and potency characterization of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis purified protein derivatives

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) purified protein derivatives (PPDs) are immunologic reagents prepared from cultured filtrates of the type strain ATCC 19698. Traditional production consists of floating culture incubation at 37oC, organism inactivation by autoclaving, coarse filtrat...

  9. Epidemiology and Ecology of Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens (OPPPs) that persist and grow in household plumbing, habitats they share with humans. Infections caused by these OPPPs involve individuals with preexis...

  10. Involvement of matrix metalloproteinases in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-induced replication by clinical Mycobacterium avium isolates.

    PubMed

    Dezzutti, C S; Swords, W E; Guenthner, P C; Sasso, D R; Wahl, L M; Drummond, A H; Newman, G W; King, C H; Quinn, F D; Lal, R B

    1999-10-01

    The role of Mycobacterium avium isolates in modulating human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication was examined by use of an in vitro, resting T cell system. Two human clinical isolates (serotypes 1 and 4) but not an environmental M. avium isolate (serotype 2) enhanced HIV-1 replication. The M. avium-induced HIV-1 replication was not associated with cell activation or differential cytokine production or utilization. Addition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors and their in vivo regulators, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases-1 and -2, abrogated M. avium-induced HIV-1 replication 80%-95%. The MMP inhibitors did not have any effect on the HIV-1 protease activity, suggesting that they may affect cellular processes. Furthermore, MMP-9 protein was differentially expressed after infection with clinical M. avium isolates and paralleled HIV-1 p24 production. Collectively, these data suggest that M. avium-induced HIV-1 replication is mediated, in part, through the induction of MMP-9.

  11. Effect of lipoarabinomannan from Mycobacterium avium subsp avium in Freund's incomplete adjuvant on the immune response of cattle

    PubMed Central

    Colavecchia, S.B.; Jolly, A.; Fernández, B.; Fontanals, A.M.; Fernández, E.; Mundo, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether lipoarabinomannan (LAM), in combination with Freund's incomplete adjuvant (FIA), was able to improve cell-mediated and antibody-mediated immune responses against ovalbumin (OVA) in cattle. Twenty-three calves were assigned to four treatment groups, which were subcutaneously immunized with either OVA plus FIA, OVA plus FIA and LAM from Mycobacterium avium subsp avium, FIA plus LAM, or FIA alone. Lymphoproliferation, IFN-γ production and cell subpopulations on peripheral blood mononuclear cells before and 15 days after treatment were evaluated. Delayed hypersensitivity was evaluated on day 57. Specific humoral immune response was measured by ELISA. Inoculation with LAM induced higher levels of lymphoproliferation and IFN-γ production in response to ConA and OVA (P < 0.05). Specific antibody titers were similar in both OVA-immunized groups. Interestingly, our results showed that the use of LAM in vaccine preparations improved specific cell immune response evaluated by lymphoproliferation and IFN-γ production by at least 50 and 25%, respectively, in cattle without interfering with tuberculosis and paratuberculosis diagnosis. PMID:22286534

  12. Effect of lipoarabinomannan from Mycobacterium avium subsp avium in Freund's incomplete adjuvant on the immune response of cattle.

    PubMed

    Colavecchia, S B; Jolly, A; Fernández, B; Fontanals, A M; Fernández, E; Mundo, S L

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether lipoarabinomannan (LAM), in combination with Freund's incomplete adjuvant (FIA), was able to improve cell-mediated and antibody-mediated immune responses against ovalbumin (OVA) in cattle. Twenty-three calves were assigned to four treatment groups, which were subcutaneously immunized with either OVA plus FIA, OVA plus FIA and LAM from Mycobacterium avium subsp avium, FIA plus LAM, or FIA alone. Lymphoproliferation, IFN-γ production and cell subpopulations on peripheral blood mononuclear cells before and 15 days after treatment were evaluated. Delayed hypersensitivity was evaluated on day 57. Specific humoral immune response was measured by ELISA. Inoculation with LAM induced higher levels of lymphoproliferation and IFN-γ production in response to ConA and OVA (P < 0.05). Specific antibody titers were similar in both OVA-immunized groups. Interestingly, our results showed that the use of LAM in vaccine preparations improved specific cell immune response evaluated by lymphoproliferation and IFN-γ production by at least 50 and 25%, respectively, in cattle without interfering with tuberculosis and paratuberculosis diagnosis.

  13. Straddling a paradigm shift

    SciTech Connect

    Landgren, D.

    1995-05-01

    Paul Meagher made a big mistake when he asked me about my speech. I asked him what I should talk about. He reiterated the title of the conference {open_quotes}Forecasting and DSM: Organizing for Success,{close_quotes} and said that whatever issues I wanted to cover were fine with him. As a result I will cover those areas I`ve been thinking about recently. It is hard for me to extract either Forecasting or Demand-Side Management out from the broader issues unwinding in the industry today. I`ve been around long enough to be involved in two major shifts in the industry. I call these paradigm shifts because as a planner I tend to build models in my mind to represent business or regulatory structure. Since a paradigm is defined as a clear model of something, I tend to talk about structural shifts in the industry as paradigm shifts. The first paradigm shift was brought about by the rapid escalation of energy prices in the 1970s. The second paradigm shift, brought about in part because of the first and because of growing concerns about the environment, ushered in the era of utility conservation and load management programs (components of a broader DSM concept - unfortunately today many people limit DSM to only these two pieces). The third paradigm shift is just starting, driven by partial deregulation and the subsequent increase in competition. My talk today will focus on issues related to the second paradigm, particularly in terms of utility planners getting more organized to deal with the synergies in the fields of forecasting, demand-side planning, and evaluation. I will also reflect on two new issues within the existing paradigm that influence these functional areas, namely beneficial electrification and integration of DSM into T&D planning. Finally I will talk about what I see coming as we go through another paradigm shift, particularly as it impacts forecasting and DSM.

  14. Detection of a novel catalase in extracts of Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare.

    PubMed Central

    Wayne, L G; Diaz, G A

    1988-01-01

    A novel class of catalase, which differs from the previously described M- and T-catalases of mycobacteria, was detected in strains of Mycobacterium avium and M. intracellulare. Designated A-catalase, this enzyme resisted inactivation at 68 degrees C, was inactivated by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (aminotriazole), and exhibited no peroxidase activity. All of these properties distinguished the enzyme from T-catalase. The A-catalase exhibited a Km of 70 mM H2O2, which is between the upper and lower extremes of the ranges reported for T- and M-catalases, respectively. The A-catalase appeared to be more hydrophobic than M-catalase and did not react with antiserum to a representative sample of this class. The banding patterns of T- and M-catalases seen by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) were essentially unaffected by the incorporation of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) into the PAGE system, whereas the single band of A-catalase seen by PAGE without SDS resolved into as many as five bands in the presence of SDS; these bands were all of slower mobility than the original band. The banding pattern seen with SDS appeared to be related more to counterion charge effects than to molecular size increases that could be attributed to SDS complexed to the protein. It remains to be determined whether the multiple A-catalase bands reflect different proteins or different SDS micellar complexes of a single protein. Images PMID:3346077

  15. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Drinking Water and Biofilms by Quantitative PCR ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Beumer, Amy; King, Dawn; Donohue, Maura; Mistry, Jatin; Covert, Terry; Pfaller, Stacy

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis has a role in Crohn's disease. The organism may be acquired but is difficult to culture from the environment. We describe a quantitative PCR (qPCR) method to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in drinking water and the results of its application to drinking water and faucet biofilm samples collected in the United States. PMID:20817803

  16. Infection by Mycobacterium avium intracellulare in AIDS: endoscopic duodenal appearance mimicking Whipple's disease.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Iglesias, J L; Yañez, J; Durana, J; Arnal, F

    1988-09-01

    We report the case of a 24-year-old woman who presented with diarrhea, weight loss and abdominal lymph node enlargement. A diagnosis of infection by Mycobacterium avium intracellulare with a clinical picture similar to Whipple's disease was established. The endoscopic study of the duodenum revealed multiple yellow nodules that became confluent in the second portion, entirely replacing the normal mucosa. These endoscopic findings have not been described previously in intestinal infection by Mycobacterium avium intracellulare.

  17. Use of restriction fragment length polymorphism as a genetic marker for typing Mycobacterium avium strains.

    PubMed Central

    Roiz, M P; Palenque, E; Guerrero, C; Garcia, M J

    1995-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was used to study 75 clinical isolates identified as Mycobacterium avium. Two repetitive insertion sequences, IS1311 and IS900, were used as DNA probes. Although less than 25% of isolates showed RFLP patterns with IS900, all strains gave banding patterns with IS1311. M. avium strains isolated from patients with AIDS exhibited marked polymorphism with both probes. PMID:7615764

  18. Pulmonary collectins play distinct roles in host defense against Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed

    Ariki, Shigeru; Kojima, Takashi; Gasa, Shinsei; Saito, Atsushi; Nishitani, Chiaki; Takahashi, Motoko; Shimizu, Takeyuki; Kurimura, Yuichiro; Sawada, Norimasa; Fujii, Nobuhiro; Kuroki, Yoshio

    2011-09-01

    Pulmonary collectins, surfactant protein A (SP-A) and surfactant protein D (SP-D), play important roles in the innate immunity of the lung. Mycobacterium avium is one of the well-known opportunistic pathogens that can replicate within macrophages. We examined the effects of pulmonary collectins in host defense against M. avium infection achieved via direct interaction between bacteria and collectins. Although both pulmonary collectins bound to M. avium in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, these collectins revealed distinct ligand-binding specificity and biological activities. SP-A and SP-D bound to a methoxy group containing lipid and lipoarabinomannan, respectively. Binding of SP-D but not SP-A resulted in agglutination of M. avium. A chimeric protein with the carbohydrate recognition domain of SP-D, which chimera revealed a bouquet-like arrangement similar to SP-A, also agglutinated M. avium. The ligand specificity of the carbohydrate recognition domain of SP-D seems to be necessary for agglutination activity. The binding of SP-A strongly inhibited the growth of M. avium in culture media. Although pulmonary collectins did not increase membrane permeability of M. avium, they attenuated the metabolic rate of the bacteria. Observations under a scanning electron microscope revealed that SP-A almost completely covers bacterial surfaces, whereas SP-D binds to certain areas like scattered dots. These observations suggest that a distinct binding pattern of collectins correlates with the difference of their biological activities. Furthermore, the number of bacteria phagocytosed by macrophages was significantly increased in the presence of SP-D. These data indicate that pulmonary collectins play critical roles in host defense against M. avium.

  19. Paradigms for machine learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlimmer, Jeffrey C.; Langley, Pat

    1991-01-01

    Five paradigms are described for machine learning: connectionist (neural network) methods, genetic algorithms and classifier systems, empirical methods for inducing rules and decision trees, analytic learning methods, and case-based approaches. Some dimensions are considered along with these paradigms vary in their approach to learning, and the basic methods are reviewed that are used within each framework, together with open research issues. It is argued that the similarities among the paradigms are more important than their differences, and that future work should attempt to bridge the existing boundaries. Finally, some recent developments in the field of machine learning are discussed, and their impact on both research and applications is examined.

  20. Maximum growth rate of Mycobacterium avium in continuous culture or chronically infected BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, C M; Taylor, M A; Dennis, M W

    1987-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is a human pathogen which may cause either chronic or disseminated disease and the organism exhibits a slow rate of growth. This study provides information on the growth rate of the organism in chronically infected mice and its maximal growth rate in vitro. M. avium was grown in continuous culture, limited for nitrogen with 0.5 mM ammonium chloride and dilution rates that ranged from 0.054 to 0.153 h-1. The steady-state concentration of ammonia nitrogen and M. avium cells for each dilution rate were determined. The bacterial saturation constant for growth-limiting ammonia was 0.29 mM (4 micrograms nitrogen/ml) and, from this, the maximal growth rate for M. avium was estimated to be 0.206 h-1 or a doubling time of 3.4 h. BALB/c mice were infected intravenously with 3 x 10(6) colony-forming units and a chronic infection resulted, typical of virulent M. avium strains. During a period of 3 months, the number of mycobacteria remained constant in the lungs, but increased 30-fold and 8,900-fold, respectively, in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. The latter increase appeared to be due to proliferation in situ. The generation time of M. avium in the mesenteric lymph nodes was estimated to be 7 days.

  1. Biologically distinct subtypes of Mycobacterium avium differ in possession of insertion sequence IS901.

    PubMed

    Kunze, Z M; Portaels, F; McFadden, J J

    1992-09-01

    Mycobacterium avium causes disease, principally tuberculosis in immunocompromised individuals. It is the most frequent cause of disseminated infections in AIDS patients in the West. The pathogen is also associated with disease in animals, chiefly birds and livestock, and may be isolated from environmental samples such as soil and water. Analysis of strains of M. avium isolated from clinical, veterinary, and environmental sources for the presence of the mycobacterial insertion sequences IS900 and IS901 demonstrates the specific association of IS901 to animal pathogenic M. avium strains. In contrast, most clinical M. avium strains and all AIDS-derived strains examined so far lacked IS901. Significant differences in the plasmid contents and serotypes of strains with and without IS901 were also found. We therefore suggest that the presence of IS901 divides M. avium into two clearly distinct subtypes with differing host range, virulence, plasmid possession, and serotyping antigens. By using DNA sequence data from IS901 and M. avium DNA, a set of polymerase chain reactions were developed for the specific detection and differentiation of these subtypes.

  2. Maximizing Capture Efficiency and Specificity of Magnetic Separation for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Cells ▿

    PubMed Central

    Foddai, Antonio; Elliott, Christopher T.; Grant, Irene R.

    2010-01-01

    In order to introduce specificity for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis prior to a phage amplification assay, various magnetic-separation approaches, involving either antibodies or peptides, were evaluated in terms of the efficiency of capture (expressed as a percentage) of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells and the percentage of nonspecific binding by other Mycobacterium spp. A 50:50 mixture of MyOne Tosylactivated Dynabeads coated with the chemically synthesized M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific peptides biotinylated aMp3 and biotinylated aMptD (i.e., peptide-mediated magnetic separation [PMS]) proved to be the best magnetic-separation approach for achieving 85 to 100% capture of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and minimal (<1%) nonspecific recovery of other Mycobacterium spp. (particularly if beads were blocked with 1% skim milk before use) from broth samples containing 103 to 104 CFU/ml. When PMS was coupled with a recently optimized phage amplification assay and used to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in 50-ml volumes of spiked milk, the mean 50% limit of detection (LOD50) was 14.4 PFU/50 ml of milk (equivalent to 0.3 PFU/ml). This PMS-phage assay represents a novel, rapid method for the detection and enumeration of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis organisms in milk, and potentially other sample matrices, with results available within 48 h. PMID:20851966

  3. Comparative genome analyses of Mycobacterium avium reveal genomic features of its subspecies and strains that cause progression of pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Uchiya, Kei-ichi; Tomida, Shuta; Nakagawa, Taku; Asahi, Shoki; Nikai, Toshiaki; Ogawa, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is increasing worldwide. Mycobacterium avium is the most clinically significant NTM species in humans and animals, and comprises four subspecies: M. avium subsp. avium (MAA), M. avium subsp. silvaticum (MAS), M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), and M. avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH). To improve our understanding of the genetic landscape and diversity of M. avium and its role in disease, we performed a comparative genome analysis of 79 M. avium strains. Our analysis demonstrated that MAH is an open pan-genome species. Phylogenetic analysis based on single nucleotide variants showed that MAH had the highest degree of sequence variability among the subspecies, and MAH strains isolated in Japan and those isolated abroad possessed distinct phylogenetic features. Furthermore, MAP strains, MAS and MAA strains isolated from birds, and many MAH strains that cause the progression of pulmonary disease were grouped in each specific cluster. Comparative genome analysis revealed the presence of genetic elements specific to each lineage, which are thought to be acquired via horizontal gene transfer during the evolutionary process, and identified potential genetic determinants accounting for the pathogenic and host range characteristics of M. avium. PMID:28045086

  4. Imidazo[1,2-a]Pyridine-3-Carboxamides Are Active Antimicrobial Agents against Mycobacterium avium Infection In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Moraski, Garrett C.; Cheng, Yong; Cho, Sanghyun; Cramer, Jeffrey W.; Godfrey, Alexander; Masquelin, Thierry; Franzblau, Scott G.; Miller, Marvin J.

    2016-01-01

    A panel of six imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3-carboxamides (IAPs) were shown to have low-micromolar activity against Mycobacterium avium strains. Compound ND-10885 (compound 2) showed significant activity in the lung, spleen, and liver in a mouse M. avium infection model. A combined regimen consisting of ND-10885 (compound 2) and rifampin was additive in its anti-M. avium activity in the lung. Our data indicate that IAPs represent a new class of antibiotics that are active against M. avium and could potentially serve as an effective addition to a combined treatment regimen. PMID:27216051

  5. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, Crohn's disease and the Doomsday scenario

    PubMed Central

    Hermon-Taylor, John

    2009-01-01

    Johne's disease is chronic inflammation of the intestine caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis. Infection and disease are mainly in domestic livestock but can affect many species including primates. Johne's is a new disease which emerged at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries and principally involved Europe and North America. It has since spread to former low incidence regions to become a global problem. Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammation of the intestine in humans which emerged in Europe and North America mid 20th century and increased to become a major healthcare problem. It has now spread to former low incidence regions. Infected animals shed Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in milk and into the environment. Human populations are widely exposed. Outcomes maybe influenced by microbial phenotype. Exposure to extracellular forms of these pathogens may confer some natural protection; exposure to intracellular forms which have passaged through milk macrophages or environmental protists may pose a greater threat to humans particularly individuals with an inherited or acquired susceptibility. Hot spots of human disease such as in Winnipeg which sits on rock at the junction of two rivers may result from local exposure to high levels of waterborne pathogens brought down from farmland. When appropriate methods are used most people with Crohn's disease are found to be infected. There are no data which demonstrate that these pathogens are harmless to humans. An overwhelming balance of probability and Public health risk favours the conclusion that Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis is also pathogenic for people. A two tier co-operative pathogenic mechanism is proposed in Crohn's disease. Intracellular infection with the primary pathogen widely distributed throughout the gut causes an immune dysregulation and a specific chronic enteric neuropathy with loss of mucosal integrity. Segments of gross inflammatory disease

  6. The fictionalist paradigm.

    PubMed

    Paley, John

    2011-01-01

    The fictionalist paradigm is introduced, and differentiated from other paradigms, using the Lincoln & Guba template. Following an initial overview, the axioms of fictionalism are delineated by reference to standard metaphysical categories: the nature of reality, the relationship between knower and known, the possibility of generalization, the possibility of causal linkages, and the role of values in inquiry. Although a paradigm's 'basic beliefs' are arbitrary and can be assumed for any reason, in this paper the fictionalist axioms are supported with philosophical considerations, and the key differences between fictionalism, positivism, and constructivism are briefly explained. Paradigm characteristics are then derived, focusing particularly on the methodological consequences. Towards the end of the paper, various objections and misunderstandings are discussed. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. HIT paradigms and paradoxes.

    PubMed

    Warkentin, T E

    2011-07-01

    The current major problem with HIT is its overdiagnosis. This concept follows from the HIT central paradigm: HIT is caused by a subset of antibodies against platelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin complexes that have strong platelet-activating properties. Prospective studies show that only a minority of sera containing such antibodies exhibit platelet-activating properties. Ironically, the earliest tests for HIT--platelet activation assays--remain today the most diagnostically useful, particularly the washed platelet assays. But the wider application of PF4-dependent immunoassays, and their much greater sensitivity for the larger subset of non-platelet-activating (and non-HIT-inducing) antibodies, has resulted in HIT overdiagnosis in many centres. Studies of anti-PF4/heparin immunization in diverse clinical situations have provided insights into the factors that influence the HIT immune response. Besides the conundrum of anticoagulant-induced thrombosis (including its potentiation of coumarin-induced microthrombosis), HIT evinces numerous other paradoxes: (i) it is a platelet-activating disorder with venous thrombosis as its predominant clinical manifestation; (ii) 'delayed-onset' (or 'autoimmune') HIT can lead to dramatic worsening of HIT-associated thrombosis despite cessation of heparin; (iii) partial thromboplastin time (PTT) monitoring of direct thrombin inhibitor treatment - and confounding of PTT monitoring by HIT-associated consumptive coagulopathy - infers that the worst subset of HIT patients may fail this therapeutic approach; (iv) the highly sulfated pentasaccharide anticoagulant, fondaparinux, can (rarely) cause HIT yet appears to be an effective treatment for this disorder; and (v) the transience of the HIT immune response means that many patients with previous HIT can safely receive future heparin. © 2011 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  8. Results of volume-staged fractionated Gamma Knife radiosurgery for large complex arteriovenous malformations: obliteration rates and clinical outcomes of an evolving treatment paradigm.

    PubMed

    Franzin, Alberto; Panni, Pietro; Spatola, Giorgio; Vecchio, Antonella Del; Gallotti, Alberto L; Gigliotti, Carmen R; Cavalli, Andrea; Donofrio, Carmine A; Mortini, Pietro

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE There are few reported series regarding volume-staged Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for the treatment of large, complex, cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The object of this study was to report the results of using volume-staged Gamma Knife radiosurgery for patients affected by large and complex AVMs. METHODS Data from 20 patients with large AVMs were prospectively included in the authors' AVM database between 2004 and 2012. A staging strategy was used when treating lesion volumes larger than 10 cm(3). Hemorrhage and seizures were the presenting clinical feature for 6 (30%) and 8 (40%) patients, respectively. The median AVM volume was 15.9 cm(3) (range 10.1-34.3 cm(3)). The mean interval between stages (± standard deviation) was 15 months (± 9 months). The median margin dose for each stage was 20 Gy (range 18-25 Gy). RESULTS Obliteration was confirmed in 8 (42%) patients after a mean follow-up of 45 months (range 19-87 months). A significant reduction (> 75%) of the original nidal volume was achieved in 4 (20%) patients. Engel Class I-II seizure status was reported by 75% of patients presenting with seizures (50% Engel Class I and 25% Engel Class II) after radiosurgery. After radiosurgery, 71.5% (5/7) of patients who had presented with a worsening neurological deficit reported a complete resolution or amelioration. None of the patients who presented acutely because of hemorrhage experienced a new bleeding episode during follow-up. One (5%) patient developed radionecrosis that caused sensorimotor hemisyndrome. Two (10%) patients sustained a bleeding episode after GKRS, although only 1 (5%) was symptomatic. High nidal flow rate and a time interval between stages of less than 11.7 months were factors significantly associated with AVM obliteration (p = 0.021 and p = 0.041, respectively). Patient age younger than 44 years was significantly associated with a greater than 75% reduction in AVM volume but not with AVM obliteration (p = 0

  9. Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis on Dairy Farms.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingling; Katani, Robab; Schilling, Megan; Kapur, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiological agent of severe chronic intestinal inflammatory disease in ruminants, termed Johne's disease, and can infect many other animal species, including humans. MAP has a long incubation period prior to manifestation of clinical signs including diarrhea, weight loss, and loss of production. MAP has a high prevalence in dairy herds and results in considerable adverse impacts on animal health and productivity throughout the world. Recent investigations have leveraged the characterization of the MAP genome for the development of powerful new molecular techniques for MAP strain differentiation. These approaches are providing key insights into the epidemiology and transmission of MAP on and between dairy herds. We summarize the state of the art for MAP diagnostics and strain differentiation and our current knowledge of mechanisms of within- and between-herd transmission of MAP, along with future needs for the development of rational MAP infection control programs.

  10. Emphysematous pyometra secondary to Enterococcus avium infection in a dog.

    PubMed

    Chang, An-Chi; Cheng, Ching-Chang; Wang, Hsien-Chi; Lee, Wei-Ming; Shyu, Ching-Lin; Lin, Cheng-Chung; Chen, Kuan-Sheng

    2016-06-16

    A 5-year-old female intact Mastiff dog was presented with a history of vaginal discharge for 1 day. Physical examination revealed a sanguineo-purulent vaginal discharge and systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Abdominal radiographs showed several dilated and gas- filled tubular loops. The differential diagnoses included emphysematous pyometra or small intestinal mechanical ileus. Surgical exploration of the abdomen demonstrated a severely dilated and gas-filled uterus, and emphysematous pyometra was confirmed. The patient's clinical signs resolved after ovariohysterectomy. Histopathology revealed mild endometrial cystic hyperplasia with infiltration of inflammatory cells in the superficial endometrial epithelia. Enterococcus avium, an α-hemolytic gram-positive coccus, was isolated from the uterus. This paper highlights the radiographic features of emphysematous pyometra and a pathogen that has never been reported to be associated with canine pyometra previously.

  11. Understanding Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis microaggregate mediated pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Leite, Fernando Lopes Leivas

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis (MAH) is an opportunistic pathogen and causes nontuberculous infections in immune compromised individuals, an emerging problem that has been recognized worldwide. Understanding the pathogenesis of this organism is important as better treatment and prevention options are needed. Microaggregates form when two or more bacterial cells join at a surface. MAH forms micgroaggregates to promote its entry in to epithelial cells and cause infection. The mechanisms involved in the interaction between the microaggregate and the host are becoming clearer as the molecules involved in this process are being uncovered. Microaggregate Invasion Protein-1 (MIP-1) is now described as having a major role in the invasion of epithelial cells by MAH.

  12. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in cherry (Prunus avium L.) fruit during development.

    PubMed

    Walker, Robert P; Battistelli, Alberto; Moscatello, Stefano; Chen, Zhi-Hui; Leegood, Richard C; Famiani, Franco

    2011-11-01

    In this study the abundance and location of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) was determined in the flesh and skin of the sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) cultivar Durone Nero II during development. PEPCK was not present in young fruit but appeared in both tissues as the fruit increased in size. In these there was no net dissimilation of malic acid, which accounts for the bulk of their organic acid contents when PEPCK was present. To assist in understanding the function of PEPCK, the abundance of a number of other enzymes was determined. These enzymes were aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT), glutamine synthetase (GS), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), pyruvate, orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK), and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco). A potential role for PEPCK in the regulation of pH and the utilization of malate in gluconeogenesis in the flesh and skin of cherries is presented.

  13. Influence of cultivar and processing on cherry (Prunus avium) allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Primavesi, L; Brenna, O V; Pompei, C; Pravettoni, V; Farioli, L; Pastorello, E A

    2006-12-27

    Oral allergy syndrome is an immediate food allergic event that affects lips, mouth, and pharynx, is often triggered by fruits and vegetables, and may be associated with pollinosis. Here, we report on the allergenic pattern of different varieties of cherry (Prunus avium) and results obtained by applying several technological processes to the selected varieties. Whole cherries were submitted to chemical peeling, thermal treatment, and syruping processes, and the relative protein extracts were analyzed by in vitro (sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting analysis) and in vivo tests (skin prick test). Electrophoretic analyses demonstrated that there was no marked difference among cherry cultivars. Chemical peeling successfully removed Pru av 3, a lipid transfer protein (LTP) responsible for oral allergy syndrome in patients without pollinosis, leading to the industrial production of cherry hypoallergenic derivatives. Furthermore, the syruping process removed almost all allergenic proteins to whom patients with pollinosis are responsive. In vivo tests confirmed electrophoretic results.

  14. Primary transcriptomes of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis reveal proprietary pathways in tissue and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) persistently infects intestines and mesenteric lymph nodes leading to a prolonged subclinical disease. The MAP genome sequence was published in 2005, yet its transcriptional organization in natural infection is unknown. While prior research analyzed regulated gene sets utilizing defined, in vitro stress related or advanced surgical methods with various animal species, we investigated the intracellular lifestyle of MAP in the intestines and lymph nodes to understand the MAP pathways that function to govern this persistence. Results Our transcriptional analysis shows that 21%, 8% and 3% of the entire MAP genome was represented either inside tissues, macrophages or both, respectively. Transcripts belonging to latency and cell envelope biogenesis were upregulated in the intestinal tissues whereas those belonging to intracellular trafficking and secretion were upregulated inside the macrophages. Transcriptomes of natural infection and in vitro macrophage infection shared genes involved in transcription and inorganic ion transport and metabolism. MAP specific genes within large sequence polymorphisms of ancestral M. avium complex were downregulated exclusively in natural infection. Conclusions We have unveiled common and unique MAP pathways associated with persistence, cell wall biogenesis and virulence in naturally infected cow intestines, lymph nodes and in vitro infected macrophages. This dichotomy also suggests that in vitro macrophage models may be insufficient in providing accurate information on the events that transpire during natural infection. This is the first report to examine the primary transcriptome of MAP at the local infection site (i.e. intestinal tissue). Regulatory pathways that govern the lifecycle of MAP appear to be specified by tissue and cell type. While tissues show a "shut-down" of major MAP metabolic genes, infected macrophages upregulate several MAP specific genes along with a

  15. Metal worker's lung: spatial association with Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed

    James, Phillip L; Cannon, Julie; Barber, Christopher M; Crawford, Laura; Hughes, Heather; Jones, Meinir; Szram, Joanna; Cowman, Steven; Cookson, William O C; Moffatt, Miriam F; Cullinan, Paul

    2017-08-29

    Outbreaks of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) are not uncommon in workplaces where metal working fluid (MWF) is used to facilitate metal turning. Inhalation of microbe-contaminated MWF has been assumed to be the cause, but previous investigations have failed to establish a spatial relationship between a contaminated source and an outbreak. After an outbreak of five cases of HP in a UK factory, we carried out blinded, molecular-based microbiological investigation of MWF samples in order to identify potential links between specific microbial taxa and machines in the outbreak zone. Custom-quantitative PCR assays, microscopy and phylogenetic analyses were performed on blinded MWF samples to quantify microbial burden and identify potential aetiological agents of HP in metal workers. MWF from machines fed by a central sump, but not those with an isolated supply, was contaminated by mycobacteria. The factory sump and a single linked machine at the centre of the outbreak zone, known to be the workstation of the index cases, had very high levels of detectable organisms. Phylogenetic placement of mycobacterial taxonomic marker genes generated from these samples indicated that the contaminating organisms were closely related to Mycobacterium avium. We describe, for the first time, a close spatial relationship between the abundance of a mycobacterium-like organism, most probably M. avium, and a localised outbreak of MWF-associated HP. The further development of sequence-based analytic techniques should assist in the prevention of this important occupational disease. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Bayesian kriging of seroprevalence to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis and Neospora caninum in Alberta beef and dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Thompson, James A; Scott, H Morgan

    2007-12-01

    Identifying spatial patterns of risk is important in the study of diseases with ecologic causes. Furthermore, relatively complex hierarchical modeling is required to determine how factors that are organized across levels interact, such as how an ecologic cause interacts with farm management and with animal characteristics. The objective of this study was to map the risk for Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP - the causative agent of Johne's disease) and Neospora caninum (NC - the cause of neosporosis) infections in Alberta beef and dairy cattle. This objective utilized Bayesian generalized linear kriging to partition herd effects into a portion attributable to location and a portion that was independent of location. Seropositivity to NC in beef cattle showed strong support for spatial covariance, suggesting that ecologic causes were important for beef cattle but not dairy cattle. There was little evidence of spatial covariance for MAP seropositivity in either beef or dairy cattle.

  17. Bayesian kriging of seroprevalence to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis and Neospora caninum in Alberta beef and dairy cattle

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, James A.; Scott, H. Morgan

    2007-01-01

    Identifying spatial patterns of risk is important in the study of diseases with ecologic causes. Furthermore, relatively complex hierarchical modeling is required to determine how factors that are organized across levels interact, such as how an ecologic cause interacts with farm management and with animal characteristics. The objective of this study was to map the risk for Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP — the causative agent of Johne’s disease) and Neospora caninum (NC — the cause of neosporosis) infections in Alberta beef and dairy cattle. This objective utilized Bayesian generalized linear kriging to partition herd effects into a portion attributable to location and a portion that was independent of location. Seropositivity to NC in beef cattle showed strong support for spatial covariance, suggesting that ecologic causes were important for beef cattle but not dairy cattle. There was little evidence of spatial covariance for MAP seropositivity in either beef or dairy cattle. PMID:18189052

  18. Hbim Challenge among the Paradigm of Complexity, Tools and Preservation: the Basilica DI Collemaggio 8 Years after the Earthquake (l'aquila)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumana, R.; Della Torre, S.; Oreni, D.; Previtali, M.; Cantini, L.; Barazzetti, L.; Franchi, A.; Banfi, F.

    2017-08-01

    In December 2012 ENIservizi (the Italian multi-national energy agency operating in many countries), after the Earthquake that occurred in April 2009, decided to undertake the project `Re-start from Collemaggio' with the aim of giving new hope to the L'Aquila community, funding around 14 million Euro to restore the Basilica di Collemaggio. The Superintendence Office carried on the restoration project with the scientific support of the Università degli Studi de L'Aquila and the Università La Sapienza di Roma, under the coordination of the Politecnico di Milano. ENIservizi, aware of the BIM potential in the complex building and infrastructure domain in the world, required an advanced HBIM from the laser scanner and photogrammetric surveying to support the diagnostic analysis, the design project, the tender and the restoration itself, today still on course. Plans and vertical sections were delivered (2012) starting from the surveying campaigns (February and June 2013), together with the first HBIM advancement from the end of 2012 in support of the preliminary-definitive-executive steps of the restoration design project (2013-14-15). Five years later, this paper tries to make a synthesis of the different lessons learnt, in addition to the positive and critical aspects relating HBIM feasibility, sustainability and usefulness to the challenging restoration work. In particular, the Collemaggio BIM experience anticipated the new Italian Public Procurement Legislation (D.Lgs 50/2016, Nuovo Codice degli Appalti pubblici) aligned with to the EUPPD 24/2014: the EU Directive on Public Procurement asked all the 28 EU countries to adopt building informative modelling by February 2016 in order to support the whole LCM (Life Cycle Management), starting from the project and the intervention, through rewarding scores or mandatory regulations. Many analyses foresees to save from around 5% to 15% of the overall investment by adopting mature BIM (Level 3 to 5), particularly 4D remotely

  19. [Paradigm errors in the old biomedical science].

    PubMed

    Skurvydas, Albertas

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this article was to review the basic drawbacks of the deterministic and reductionistic thinking in biomedical science and to provide ways for dealing with them. The present paradigm of research in biomedical science has not got rid of the errors of the old science yet, i.e. the errors of absolute determinism and reductionism. These errors restrict the view and thinking of scholars engaged in the studies of complex and dynamic phenomena and mechanisms. Recently, discussions on science paradigm aimed at spreading the new science paradigm that of complex dynamic systems as well as chaos theory are in progress all over the world. It is for the nearest future to show which of the two, the old or the new science, will be the winner. We have come to the main conclusion that deterministic and reductionistic thinking applied in improper way can cause substantial damage rather than prove benefits for biomedicine science.

  20. LAMP technology: Rapid identification of Brucella and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Trangoni, Marcos D.; Gioffré, Andrea K.; Cerón Cucchi, María E.; Caimi, Karina C.; Ruybal, Paula; Zumárraga, Martín J.; Cravero, Silvio L.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we developed new sets of primers to detect Brucella spp. and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) through isothermal amplification. We selected a previously well-characterized target gene, bscp31, specific for Brucella spp. and IS900 for MAP. The limits of detection using the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) protocols described herein were similar to those of conventional PCR targeting the same sequences. Hydroxynaphtol blue and SYBR GreenTM allowed direct naked-eye detection with identical sensitivity as agarose gel electrophoresis. We included the LAMP-based protocol in a rapid identification scheme of the respective pathogens, and all tested isolates were correctly identified within 2 to 3 h. In addition, both protocols were suitable for specifically identifying the respective pathogens; in the case of Brucella, it also allowed the identification of all the biovars tested. We conclude that LAMP is a suitable rapid molecular typing tool that could help to shorten the time required to identify insidious bacteria in low-complexity laboratories, mainly in developing countries. PMID:26273282

  1. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis as a trigger of type-1 diabetes: destination Sardinia, or beyond?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease in which the insulin producing β cell population is destroyed by the infiltrated T lymphocytes. Even though the exact cause of T1DM is yet to be ascertained, varying degree of genetic susceptibility and environmental factors have been linked to the disease progress and outcome. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is an obligate zoonotic pathogen that causes chronic infection of intestines in ruminants, the Johne's disease. MAP that can even survive pasteurization and chlorination has also been implicated to cause similar type of enteritis in humans called Crohn's disease. With the increasing recognition of the link between MAP and Crohn's disease, it has been postulated that MAP is an occult antigen which besides Crohn's could as well be thought to trigger T1DM. Epitope homologies between mycobacterial proteins (Hsp 65) and pancreatic glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD 65) and infant nutrition studies implicate MAP as one of the triggers for T1DM. PCR and ELISA analyses in diabetic patients from Sardinia suggest that MAP acts as a possible trigger for T1DM. Systematic mechanistic insights are needed to prove this link. Unfortunately, no easy animal model(s) or in-vitro systems are available to decipher the complex immunological network that is triggered in MAP infection leading to T1DM. PMID:20350307

  2. The activity of grepafloxacin in two murine models of Mycobacterium avium infection.

    PubMed

    Cynamon, Michael H; Sklaney, Mary; Yeo, Anthony E T

    2004-06-01

    The activity against Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) of varying doses of grepafloxacin (GRE; 25 mg/kg, 50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg, and 200 mg/kg) were compared to clarithromycin (CLA; 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg), ethambutol (EMB; 100 mg/kg), and rifabutin (RBT; 10 mg/kg) using an intranasal (IN) infection model compared to an intravenous (IV) infection model. Beige mice (C57BL6/J-Lyst bg J/+) were infected intranasally with about 10(6) organisms and for the IV model about 10(7) organisms. Treatment for both models was started 1 week postinfection and given by gavage 5 days/week for 4 weeks. At the initiation of therapy, an early control group was killed to determine the initial organism load. Three days following the completion of therapy, drug-treated groups of mice and the late control group were killed and the response to therapy measured. The most effective agents were CLA and RBT. GRE and EMB had modest activities in both the IN and the IV models. A matched comparison between IN and IV challenges for each of the agents used revealed greater suppression of MAC in the IN model compared to the IV model.

  3. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis as a trigger of type-1 diabetes: destination Sardinia, or beyond?

    PubMed

    Rani, Pittu Sandhya; Sechi, Leonardo A; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2010-03-29

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease in which the insulin producing beta cell population is destroyed by the infiltrated T lymphocytes. Even though the exact cause of T1DM is yet to be ascertained, varying degree of genetic susceptibility and environmental factors have been linked to the disease progress and outcome. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is an obligate zoonotic pathogen that causes chronic infection of intestines in ruminants, the Johne's disease. MAP that can even survive pasteurization and chlorination has also been implicated to cause similar type of enteritis in humans called Crohn's disease. With the increasing recognition of the link between MAP and Crohn's disease, it has been postulated that MAP is an occult antigen which besides Crohn's could as well be thought to trigger T1DM. Epitope homologies between mycobacterial proteins (Hsp 65) and pancreatic glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD 65) and infant nutrition studies implicate MAP as one of the triggers for T1DM. PCR and ELISA analyses in diabetic patients from Sardinia suggest that MAP acts as a possible trigger for T1DM. Systematic mechanistic insights are needed to prove this link. Unfortunately, no easy animal model(s) or in-vitro systems are available to decipher the complex immunological network that is triggered in MAP infection leading to T1DM.

  4. LAMP technology: Rapid identification of Brucella and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Trangoni, Marcos D; Gioffré, Andrea K; Cerón Cucchi, María E; Caimi, Karina C; Ruybal, Paula; Zumárraga, Martín J; Cravero, Silvio L

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we developed new sets of primers to detect Brucella spp. and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) through isothermal amplification. We selected a previously well-characterized target gene, bscp31, specific for Brucella spp. and IS900 for MAP. The limits of detection using the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) protocols described herein were similar to those of conventional PCR targeting the same sequences. Hydroxynaphtol blue and SYBR Green(TM) allowed direct naked-eye detection with identical sensitivity as agarose gel electrophoresis. We included the LAMP-based protocol in a rapid identification scheme of the respective pathogens, and all tested isolates were correctly identified within 2 to 3 h. In addition, both protocols were suitable for specifically identifying the respective pathogens; in the case of Brucella, it also allowed the identification of all the biovars tested. We conclude that LAMP is a suitable rapid molecular typing tool that could help to shorten the time required to identify insidious bacteria in low-complexity laboratories, mainly in developing countries.

  5. Isolation, identification, and structural analysis of the mycobactins of Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, Mycobacterium scrofulaceum, and Mycobacterium paratuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, R; Ewing, D F; Ratledge, C

    1985-01-01

    Methods were devised to purify the cell-associated, iron-binding compounds known as mycobactins from the closely related species Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, and Mycobacterium scrofulaceum (i.e., the MAIS complex of organisms). The mycobactins from these three species showed a structure that is common to the mycobactins from all the mycobacteria examined to date. However, these mycobactins were unique in that they had more than one alkyl chain. The M. scrofulaceum mycobactins differed from other MAIS mycobactins by a shift in the position of the double bond in the R1 alkyl chain. Traces of other mycobactin types were observed in ethanol extracts of the three species, and examination of the chromatographic properties of these mycobactins showed that each species produced five mycobactin types. Each mycobactin could be subdivided further by the length of its R1 alkyl chain. No differences in the production of these novel mycobactin were observed among species. Mycobactins from three strains of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and two wood pigeon strains of Mycobacterium avium which had lost their original growth requirements for mycobactin after repeated subculturing in laboratory growth media were examined by thin-layer chromatography and high-pressure liquid chromatography. Each organism produced a mycobactin with similar chromatographic properties to those synthesized by MAIS organisms. M. paratuberculosis NADC 18 produced at least two components in our laboratory, and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of the major component showed this mycobactin to be identical to that produced by M. intracellulare M12. However, a sample of mycobactin J isolated by Merkal and McCullough (Curr. Microbiol. 7:333-335, 1982) from M. paratuberculosis NADC 18 was different from our isolates and appeared to correspond to a minor mycobactin component we had seen by thin-layer chromatography. No reason for this difference could be evinced. Our findings indicate that

  6. Effect of verbal task complexity in a working memory paradigm in patients with type 1 diabetes. A fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    mechanisms that are devoted to improving efficiency while solving more complex cognitive tasks. PMID:28582399

  7. Effect of verbal task complexity in a working memory paradigm in patients with type 1 diabetes. A fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Guàrdia-Olmos, Joan; Gallardo-Moreno, Geisa B; Gudayol-Ferré, Esteve; Peró-Cebollero, Maribel; González-Garrido, Andrés A

    2017-01-01

    mechanisms that are devoted to improving efficiency while solving more complex cognitive tasks.

  8. Changing the Paradigm of Air Pollution Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Historically, approaches for monitoring air pollution generally use expensive, complex, stationary equipment,1,2 which limits who collects data, why data are collected, and how data are accessed. This paradigm is changing with the materialization of lower-cost, easy-to...

  9. Changing the Paradigm of Air Pollution Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Historically, approaches for monitoring air pollution generally use expensive, complex, stationary equipment,1,2 which limits who collects data, why data are collected, and how data are accessed. This paradigm is changing with the materialization of lower-cost, easy-to...

  10. Survival of Mycobacterium avium in drinking water biofilms as affected by water flow velocity, availability of phosphorus, and temperature.

    PubMed

    Torvinen, Eila; Lehtola, Markku J; Martikainen, Pertti J; Miettinen, Ilkka T

    2007-10-01

    Mycobacterium avium is a potential pathogen occurring in drinking water systems. It is a slowly growing bacterium producing a thick cell wall containing mycolic acids, and it is known to resist chlorine better than many other microbes. Several studies have shown that pathogenic bacteria survive better in biofilms than in water. By using Propella biofilm reactors, we studied how factors generally influencing the growth of biofilms (flow rate, phosphorus concentration, and temperature) influence the survival of M. avium in drinking water biofilms. The growth of biofilms was followed by culture and DAPI (4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining, and concentrations of M. avium were determined by culture and fluorescence in situ hybridization methods. The spiked M. avium survived in biofilms for the 4-week study period without a dramatic decline in concentration. The addition of phosphorus (10 microg/liter) increased the number of heterotrophic bacteria in biofilms but decreased the culturability of M. avium. The reason for this result is probably that phosphorus increased competition with other microbes. An increase in flow velocity had no effect on the survival of M. avium, although it increased the growth of biofilms. A higher temperature (20 degrees C versus 7 degrees C) increased both the number of heterotrophic bacteria and the survival of M. avium in biofilms. In conclusion, the results show that in terms of affecting the survival of slowly growing M. avium in biofilms, temperature is a more important factor than the availability of nutrients like phosphorus.

  11. ISOLATION OF THE GENOME SEQUENCE STRAIN MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM 104 FROM MULTIPLE PATIENTS OVER A 17-YEAR PERIOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The genome sequence strain 104 of the opportunistic pathogen Mycobacterium avium was isolated form an adult AIDS patient in Southern California in 1983. Isolates of non-paratuberculosis M. avium from 207 other patients in Southern California and elsewhere were examined for genoty...

  12. ISOLATION OF THE GENOME SEQUENCE STRAIN MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM 104 FROM MULTIPLE PATIENTS OVER A 17-YEAR PERIOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The genome sequence strain 104 of the opportunistic pathogen Mycobacterium avium was isolated form an adult AIDS patient in Southern California in 1983. Isolates of non-paratuberculosis M. avium from 207 other patients in Southern California and elsewhere were examined for genoty...

  13. The persistence of Mycobacterium avium in a drinking water system, what is the risk to human health?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water is believed to be a major source of human exposure to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) such as Mycobacterium avium. We monitored the prevalence of M. avium in a drinking water system during the addition of filtration treatment. Our goal was to determine if the pre...

  14. Survival of Mycobacterium avium in Drinking Water Biofilms as Affected by Water Flow Velocity, Availability of Phosphorus, and Temperature▿

    PubMed Central

    Torvinen, Eila; Lehtola, Markku J.; Martikainen, Pertti J.; Miettinen, Ilkka T.

    2007-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is a potential pathogen occurring in drinking water systems. It is a slowly growing bacterium producing a thick cell wall containing mycolic acids, and it is known to resist chlorine better than many other microbes. Several studies have shown that pathogenic bacteria survive better in biofilms than in water. By using Propella biofilm reactors, we studied how factors generally influencing the growth of biofilms (flow rate, phosphorus concentration, and temperature) influence the survival of M. avium in drinking water biofilms. The growth of biofilms was followed by culture and DAPI (4′,6′-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining, and concentrations of M. avium were determined by culture and fluorescence in situ hybridization methods. The spiked M. avium survived in biofilms for the 4-week study period without a dramatic decline in concentration. The addition of phosphorus (10 μg/liter) increased the number of heterotrophic bacteria in biofilms but decreased the culturability of M. avium. The reason for this result is probably that phosphorus increased competition with other microbes. An increase in flow velocity had no effect on the survival of M. avium, although it increased the growth of biofilms. A higher temperature (20°C versus 7°C) increased both the number of heterotrophic bacteria and the survival of M. avium in biofilms. In conclusion, the results show that in terms of affecting the survival of slowly growing M. avium in biofilms, temperature is a more important factor than the availability of nutrients like phosphorus. PMID:17675427

  15. Concomitant Mycobacterium avium infection and Hodgkin's disease in a lymph node from an HIV-negative child.

    PubMed

    de Armas, Yaxsier; Capó, Virginia; González, Ida; Mederos, Lilian; Díaz, Raúl; de Waard, Jacobus H; Rodríguez, Alberto; García, Yarmila; Cabanas, Ricardo

    2011-03-01

    We report a case of an immunocompetent child with simultaneously an infection with Mycobacterium avium and Hodgkin's disease in a cervical lymph node. A positive PCR result for M. avium on a biopsy of the lymph node directed the definitive diagnosis for both etiologies and avoided a possible dissemination of this infection after chemotherapy was started.

  16. Mycobacterium avium infections of Acanthamoeba strains: host strain variability, grazing-acquired infections, and altered dynamics of inactivation with monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Berry, David; Horn, Matthias; Xi, Chuanwu; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2010-10-01

    Stable Mycobacterium avium infections of several Acanthamoeba strains were characterized by increased infection resistance of recent environmental isolates and reduced infectivity in the presence of other bacteria. Exposure of M. avium in coculture with Acanthamoeba castellanii to monochloramine yielded inactivation kinetics markedly similar to those observed for A. castellanii alone.

  17. Rapid and sensitive method to identify Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in cow's milk by DNA methylase genotyping.

    PubMed

    Mundo, Silvia Leonor; Gilardoni, Liliana Rosa; Hoffman, Federico José; Lopez, Osvaldo Jorge

    2013-03-01

    Paratuberculosis is an infectious, chronic, and incurable disease that affects ruminants, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. This bacterium is shed primarily through feces of infected cows but can be also excreted in colostrum and milk and might survive pasteurization. Since an association of genomic sequences of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in patients with Crohn's disease has been described; it is of interest to rapidly detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk for human consumption. IS900 insertion is used as a target for PCR amplification to identify the presence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in biological samples. Two target sequences were selected: IS1 (155 bp) and IS2 (94 bp). These fragments have a 100% identity among all M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains sequenced. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was specifically concentrated from milk samples by immunomagnetic separation prior to performing PCR. The amplicons were characterized using DNA methylase Genotyping, i.e., the amplicons were methylated with 6-methyl-adenine and digested with restriction enzymes to confirm their identity. The methylated amplicons from 100 CFU of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis can be visualized in a Western blot format using an anti-6-methyl-adenine monoclonal antibody. The use of DNA methyltransferase genotyping coupled to a scintillation proximity assay allows for the detection of up to 10 CFU of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis per ml of milk. This test is rapid and sensitive and allows for automation and thus multiple samples can be tested at the same time.

  18. Rapid and Sensitive Method To Identify Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Cow's Milk by DNA Methylase Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Mundo, Silvia Leonor; Gilardoni, Liliana Rosa; Hoffman, Federico José

    2013-01-01

    Paratuberculosis is an infectious, chronic, and incurable disease that affects ruminants, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. This bacterium is shed primarily through feces of infected cows but can be also excreted in colostrum and milk and might survive pasteurization. Since an association of genomic sequences of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in patients with Crohn's disease has been described; it is of interest to rapidly detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk for human consumption. IS900 insertion is used as a target for PCR amplification to identify the presence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in biological samples. Two target sequences were selected: IS1 (155 bp) and IS2 (94 bp). These fragments have a 100% identity among all M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains sequenced. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was specifically concentrated from milk samples by immunomagnetic separation prior to performing PCR. The amplicons were characterized using DNA methylase Genotyping, i.e., the amplicons were methylated with 6-methyl-adenine and digested with restriction enzymes to confirm their identity. The methylated amplicons from 100 CFU of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis can be visualized in a Western blot format using an anti-6-methyl-adenine monoclonal antibody. The use of DNA methyltransferase genotyping coupled to a scintillation proximity assay allows for the detection of up to 10 CFU of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis per ml of milk. This test is rapid and sensitive and allows for automation and thus multiple samples can be tested at the same time. PMID:23275511

  19. The persistence of Mycobacterium avium in a drinking water system, what is the risk to human health?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water is believed to be a major source of human exposure to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) such as Mycobacterium avium. We monitored the prevalence of M. avium in a drinking water system during the addition of filtration treatment. Our goal was to determine if the pre...

  20. Relationship between Presence of Cows with Milk Positive for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-Specific Antibody by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay and Viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Dust in Cattle Barns

    PubMed Central

    Chuchaisangrat, Ruj; Nielen, Mirjam; Koets, Ad P.

    2013-01-01

    Paratuberculosis, or Johne's disease, in cattle is caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, which has recently been suspected to be transmitted through dust. This longitudinal study on eight commercial M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-positive dairy farms studied the relationship between the number of cows with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antibody-positive milk and the presence of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in settled-dust samples, including their temporal relationship. Milk and dust samples were collected in parallel monthly for 2 years. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antibodies in milk were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and used as a proxy for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis shedding. Settled-dust samples were collected by using electrostatic dust collectors (EDCs) at six locations in housing for dairy cattle and young stock. The presence of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was identified by liquid culture and PCR. The results showed a positive relationship (odds ratio [OR], 1.2) between the number of cows with ELISA-positive milk and the odds of having positive EDCs in the same airspace as the adult dairy cattle. Moreover, the total number of lactating cows also showed an OR slightly above 1. This relationship remained the same for settled-dust samples collected up to 2 months before or after the time of milk sampling. The results suggest that removal of adult cows with milk positive for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific antibody by ELISA might result in a decrease in the presence of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in dust and therefore in the environment. However, this decrease is likely delayed by several weeks at least. In addition, the data support the notion that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis exposure of young stock is reduced by separate housing. PMID:23793639

  1. Identification of Mycobacterium avium genes associated with resistance to host antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    Motamedi, Nima; Danelishvili, Lia

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are an important component of the innate immune defence. Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (M. avium) is an organism that establishes contact with the respiratory and gastrointestinal mucosa as a necessary step for infection. M. avium is resistant to high concentrations of polymyxin B, a surrogate for antimicrobial peptides. To determine gene-encoding proteins that are associated with this resistance, we screened a transposon library of M. avium strain 104 for susceptibility to polymyxin B. Ten susceptible mutants were identified and the inactivated genes sequenced. The great majority of the genes were related to cell wall synthesis and permeability. The mutants were then examined for their ability to enter macrophages and to survive macrophage killing. Three clones among the mutants had impaired uptake by macrophages compared with the WT strain, and all ten clones were attenuated in macrophages. The mutants were also shown to be susceptible to cathelicidin (LL-37), in contrast to the WT bacterium. All but one of the mutants were significantly attenuated in mice. In conclusion, this study indicated that the M. avium envelope is the primary defence against host antimicrobial peptides. PMID:24836414

  2. Induction and expression of protective T cells during Mycobacterium avium infections in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Appelberg, R; Pedrosa, J

    1992-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is an opportunistic pathogen that infects individuals suffering from chronic lung disease or immunocompromised patients such as AIDS patients. Here we show that a highly virulent isolate of M. avium proliferated as extensively in T cell deficient as in immunocompetent mice. T cell deficient mice allowed a progressive growth of a less virulent AIDS-derived isolate of M. avium while immunocompetent mice arrested the growth of this isolate. Adoptive transfer of T cell enriched spleen cells between congenic strains of mice differing at the Bcg/Ity/Lsh locus showed that only naturally resistant BALB/c.Bcgr (C.D2) mice infected with the highly virulent strain of M. avium or the naturally susceptible BALB/c mice infected with the lower virulence isolate developed protective T cells and that these cells only mediated protection when transferred to naturally susceptible, but not to naturally resistant, mice. Both strains of M. avium proliferated in bone marrow-derived macrophages cultured in vitro and they were both susceptible to the bacteriostatic effects induced in the macrophages by crude lymphokines produced by concanavalin A-stimulated spleen cells. PMID:1544223

  3. Mycobacterium avium bacilli grow saprozoically in coculture with Acanthamoeba polyphaga and survive within cyst walls.

    PubMed

    Steinert, M; Birkness, K; White, E; Fields, B; Quinn, F

    1998-06-01

    Protozoans are gaining recognition as environmental hosts for a variety of waterborne pathogens. We compared the growth of Mycobacterium avium, a human pathogen associated with domestic water supplies, in coculture with the free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba polyphaga with the growth of M. avium when it was separated from amoebae by a 0.1-micron-pore-size polycarbonate membrane (in a parachamber). Although viable mycobacteria were observed within amoebal vacuoles, there was no significant difference between bacterial growth in coculture and bacterial growth in the parachamber. This suggests that M. avium is able to grow saprozoically on products secreted by the amoebae. In contrast, Legionella pneumophila, a well-studied intracellular parasite of amoebae, multiplied only in coculture. A comparison of amoebae infected with L. pneumophila and amoebae infected with M. avium by electron microscopy demonstrated that there were striking differences in the locations of the bacteria within amoebal cysts. While L. pneumophila resided within the cysts, M. avium was found within the outer walls of the double-walled cysts of A. polyphaga. These locations may provide a reservoir for the bacteria when environmental conditions become unfavorable.

  4. Estimation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis growth parameters: strain characterization and comparison of methods.

    PubMed

    Elguezabal, Natalia; Bastida, Felix; Sevilla, Iker A; González, Nuria; Molina, Elena; Garrido, Joseba M; Juste, Ramón A

    2011-12-01

    The growth rate of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis was assessed by different methods in 7H9 medium supplemented with OADC (oleic acid, albumin, dextrose, catalase), Tween 80, and mycobactin J. Generation times and maximum specific growth rates were determined by wet weight, turbidometric measurement, viable count, and quantitative PCR (ParaTB-Kuanti; F57 gene) for 8 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains (K10, 2E, 316F, 81, 445, 764, 22G, and OVICAP 49). Strain-to-strain differences were observed in growth curves and calculated parameters. The quantification methods gave different results for each strain at specific time points. Generation times ranged from an average of 1.4 days for viable count and qPCR to approximately 10 days for wet weight and turbidometry. The wet-weight, turbidometry, and ParaTB-Kuanti qPCR methods correlated best with each other. Generally, viability has been assessed by viable count as a reference method; however, due to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis clumping problems and the presence of noncultivable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells, we conclude that qPCR of a single-copy gene may be used reliably for rapid estimation of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis bacterial numbers in a sample.

  5. Intracellular Mycobacterium avium Intersect Transferrin in the Rab11+ Recycling Endocytic Pathway and Avoid Lipocalin 2 Trafficking the Lysosomal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Halaas, Øyvind; Steigedal, Magnus; Haug, Markus; Awuh, Jane A.; Ryan, Liv; Brech, Andreas; Sato, Shintaro; Husebye, Harald; Cangelosi, Gerard A.; Akira, Shizuo; Strong, Roland K.; Espevik, Terje; Flo, Trude H.

    2009-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for microbes and many pathogenic bacteria depend on siderophores to obtain iron. The mammalian innate immunity protein lipocalin 2 (Lcn2, NGAL, 24p3, Siderocalin) binds the siderophore carboxymycobactin, an essential component of the iron acquisition apparatus of mycobacteria. Here we show that Lcn2 suppressed growth of Mycobacterium avium in culture, and M. avium induced Lcn2 production from mouse macrophages. Lcn2 was also elevated and initially limited the growth of M. avium in the blood of infected mice, but did not impede growth in tissues and during long-term infections. M. avium is an intracellular pathogen. Subcellular imaging of infected macrophages revealed that Lcn2 trafficked to lysosomes separate from M. avium, whereas transferrin was efficiently transported to the mycobacteria. Thus mycobacteria seem to reside in the Rab11+ endocytic recycling pathway, thereby retaining access to nutrition and avoiding endocytosed immunoproteins like Lcn2. PMID:20121435

  6. Immunoreactivity of protein tyrosine phosphatase A (PtpA) in sera from sheep infected with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gurung, Ratna B; Begg, Douglas J; Purdie, Auriol C; Bach, Horacio; Whittington, Richard J

    2014-07-15

    Evasion of host defense mechanisms and survival inside infected host macrophages are features of pathogenic mycobacteria including Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, the causative agent of Johne's disease in ruminants. Protein tyrosine phosphatase A (PtpA) has been identified as a secreted protein critical for survival of mycobacteria within infected macrophages. The host may mount an immune response to such secreted proteins. In this study, the humoral immune response to purified recombinant M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis PtpA was investigated using sera from a cohort of sheep infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and compared with uninfected healthy controls. A significantly higher level of reactivity to PtpA was observed in sera collected from M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis infected sheep when compared to those from uninfected healthy controls. PtpA could be a potential candidate antigen for detection of humoral immune responses in sheep infected with M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

  7. Alternative Evaluation Research Paradigm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    This monograph is one of a continuing series initiated to provide materials for teachers, parents, school administrators, and governmental decision-makers that might encourage reexamination of a range of evaluation issues and perspectives about schools and schooling. This monograph is a description and analysis of two contrasting paradigms: one…

  8. The "New Environmental Paradigm"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Riley E.; Van Liere, Kent D.

    2008-01-01

    The "New Environmental Paradigm" or NEP appears to have gained considerable popularity in academic and intellectual circles, as well as among many college students; however, very little is known concerning the degree to which the general public has come to accept the ideas embodied in it. Thus, although there have been dozens of studies…

  9. Paradigms of School Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrigley, Terry

    2011-01-01

    This short paper points to some paradigm issues in the field of school development (leadership, effectiveness, improvement) and their relationship to social justice. It contextualises the dominant School Effectiveness and School Improvement models within neo-liberal marketisation, paying attention to their transformation through a "marriage of…

  10. The Learning Paradigm College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tagg, John

    The author of this book argues that innovations do not transform colleges because higher education faces a problem of scale. The book identifies two paradigms: "organizational," which is the overall theory-in-use of an organization; and "instructional," which incorporates the mission of higher education institutions to provide instruction in the…

  11. Deconstructing Research: Paradigms Lost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trifonas, Peter Pericles

    2009-01-01

    In recent decades, proponents of naturalistic and/or critical modes of inquiry advocating the use of ethnographic techniques for the narrative-based study of phenomena within pedagogical contexts have challenged the central methodological paradigm of educational research: that is, the tendency among its practitioners to adhere to quantitative…

  12. Forest restoration paradigms

    Treesearch

    John Stanturf; Brian J. Palik; Mary I. Williams; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2014-01-01

    An estimated 2 billion ha of forests are degraded globally and global change suggests even greater need for forest restoration. Four forest restoration paradigms are identified and discussed: revegetation, ecological restoration, functional restoration, and forest landscape restoration. Restoration is examined in terms of a degraded starting point and an ending point...

  13. Paradigms of School Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrigley, Terry

    2011-01-01

    This short paper points to some paradigm issues in the field of school development (leadership, effectiveness, improvement) and their relationship to social justice. It contextualises the dominant School Effectiveness and School Improvement models within neo-liberal marketisation, paying attention to their transformation through a "marriage of…

  14. Common Sense and Paradigms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosford, Helga

    1981-01-01

    Discusses problems connected with grammar presentation in elementary German textbooks, focusing especially on the still widespread use of paradigms and on terminological inadequacies. Suggests some simplifying formulas to collapse and summarize the morphological system of German for descriptive and pedagogical purposes. (MES)

  15. Detecting local establishment strategies of wild cherry (Prunus avium L.).

    PubMed

    Höltken, Aki M; Gregorius, Hans-Rolf

    2006-10-04

    P. avium, a pioneer tree species that colonizes early forest successional stages, is assumed to require an effective strategy allowing stably repeatable rounds of local establishment, dispersal and local extinction. Consequently, the early replacement of cherry by climax tree species makes the establishment of several local generations very unlikely, especially in central European continuous cover forests. This has to be seen in connection with the mixed reproduction system involving asexual reproduction as a complementary adaptational strategy. Tests of the local establishment of wild cherry must therefore consider the possibility of first generation establishment via seedling recruitment potentially followed by an asexual generation (root suckering). Successful establishment can therefore be determined only among adult individuals with the option of detecting vegetative reproduction at these stages. To test the implied suggestion about local establishment strategies of wild cherry, nuclear microsatellites were used to analyse patterns of asexual propagation among adult stages that have been subjected to one of two major types of forest management. These management types, the historical "coppice with standards system" (CWS) and the "high forest system" (HFS), can be reasonably assumed to have affected the reproduction system of P. avium. Clear differences were found in the reproduction pattern between two stands representing the two forest management types: 1) Clonal propagation is observed in both management systems, but with a distinctly higher frequency in the CWS. Hence, sexual recruitment as a first local generation is followed by a second asexual generation in both, whereas in the CWS there is evidence for an additional clonal generation. 2) The estimation of amounts of clonal reproduction critically depends on the assumptions about multilocus gene associations. This is revealed by the application of newly developed methods of quantifying gene associations

  16. Detecting local establishment strategies of wild cherry (Prunus avium L.)

    PubMed Central

    Höltken, Aki M; Gregorius, Hans-Rolf

    2006-01-01

    Backround P. avium, a pioneer tree species that colonizes early forest successional stages, is assumed to require an effective strategy allowing stably repeatable rounds of local establishment, dispersal and local extinction. Consequently, the early replacement of cherry by climax tree species makes the establishment of several local generations very unlikely, especially in central European continuous cover forests. This has to be seen in connection with the mixed reproduction system involving asexual reproduction as a complementary adaptational strategy. Tests of the local establishment of wild cherry must therefore consider the possibility of first generation establishment via seedling recruitment potentially followed by an asexual generation (root suckering). Successful establishment can therefore be determined only among adult individuals with the option of detecting vegetative reproduction at these stages. To test the implied suggestion about local establishment strategies of wild cherry, nuclear microsatellites were used to analyse patterns of asexual propagation among adult stages that have been subjected to one of two major types of forest management. These management types, the historical "coppice with standards system" (CWS) and the "high forest system" (HFS), can be reasonably assumed to have affected the reproduction system of P. avium. Results Clear differences were found in the reproduction pattern between two stands representing the two forest management types: 1) Clonal propagation is observed in both management systems, but with a distinctly higher frequency in the CWS. Hence, sexual recruitment as a first local generation is followed by a second asexual generation in both, whereas in the CWS there is evidence for an additional clonal generation. 2) The estimation of amounts of clonal reproduction critically depends on the assumptions about multilocus gene associations. This is revealed by the application of newly developed methods of quantifying

  17. Virulence and molecular aspects of Bordetella avium isolated from cockatiel chicks (Nymphicus hollandicus) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Grespan, A; Camera, O; Knöbl, T; Gomes, C R; Felizardo, M R; Ferreira, T S P; Gobbi, D D S; Moreno, M; Sanches, A A; Ferreira, C S A; Ferreira, A J P; Moreno, A M

    2012-12-07

    Bordetella avium is an opportunistic pathogen that presents tropism for ciliated epithelia, leading to upper respiratory tract disease in turkeys. This agent has also been associated with Lockjaw Syndrome in psittacine birds, but literatures describing the importance of this agent in such species are rare. The purpose of the present study was to report the first outbreak of B. avium infection in juvenile cockatiels demonstrating the Lockjaw Syndrome in Brazil and to investigate the antimicrobial resistance profile and phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of these strains. Surprising, the strains obtained from five infected cockatiel chicks from three different breeders from different Brazilian states showed a clonal relationship using the Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis and Single Enzyme Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism techniques. The virulence potentials of the B. avium strains were assessed using tracheal adherence and cytotoxic effects on a VERO cell monolayer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Pathogenesis of systemic Mycobacterium avium infection in pigs through histological analysis of hepatic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Hibiya, Kenji; Utsunomiya, Kimiko; Yoshida, Takashi; Toma, Satoshi; Higa, Futoshi; Tateyama, Masao; Fujita, Jiro

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium causes systemic infections through primary intestinal lesions in pigs. However, its pathogenesis is not well understood. The aim of this study was to confirm the effects on swine after enteral infection. One hundred and twelve pigs with hepatic lesions infected with M. avium were used in this study. We investigated the involvement of other organs and the distribution of hepatic lesions in the lobular structure. Most lesions involved the mesenteric lymph nodes. Hepatic lymph nodes were the secondary nodes involved. In 74 cases (66.1%), the hepatic lesions were predominantly distributed in the portal tract of the affected livers. The other 38 cases (33.9%) showed granulomatous lesions in the hepatic lobule. Many cases showed interface hepatitis. There was a significant relationship between focal lesions within hepatic lobule and splenic lesions. These findings suggest that granulomatous lesions formed in hepatic lobules upon establishment of bacteremia in pigs systemically infected with M. avium. PMID:21197224

  19. Disseminated mycobacteriosis due to Mycobacterium avium in captive Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris).

    PubMed

    Cho, Ho-Seong; Kim, Yong-Hwan; Park, Nam-Yong

    2006-05-01

    A 2-year-old captive female Bengal Tiger (Panthera tigris) died after prolonged anorexia in the Gwangju Uchi Park Zoo, Gwangju, Republic of Korea. Necropsy revealed multiple nodules of varying sizes in the lung, liver, kidney, and spleen. Histopathologic examination revealed a typical granuloma composed of caseous necrotic areas surrounded by lymphocytes with a few giant cells and foamy macrophages. Periodic acid-Schiff stain and Gomori methenamine silver stain did not reveal any fungal bodies. The Ziehl-Neelsen acid-fast stain revealed few acid-fast organisms in the lung, liver, kidney, and spleen. A polymerase chain reaction assay of the lung, liver, kidney, and spleen yielded a positive result for Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. This is an unusual case of disseminated infection of a wild mammal with avian mycobacteriosis, and is believed to be most likely associated with the feeding of tigers with culled chickens infected with M. avium.

  20. Tracheal mucus transport rate in normal turkeys and in turkeys infected with Bordetella avium (Alcaligenes faecalis).

    PubMed

    Ficken, M D; Edwards, J F; Lay, J C; Tveter, D E

    1986-01-01

    Using the radiopharmaceutical 99mtechnetium-sulfur colloid, the tracheal mucus transport rate (TMTR) was measured in healthy unanesthetized turkeys and in turkeys infected with Bordetella avium. The TMTR of uninfected turkeys was 35.6 +/- 14.4 cm/min. The TMTR of B. avium-infected turkeys was normal on days 0 through 14 postexposure (PE), despite heavy bacterial colonization of the tracheal epithelium. On day 21 PE, the TMTR of B. avium-infected turkeys was significantly depressed (P less than or equal to 0.01) compared with that of control turkeys. Depressed transport was associated with extensive loss of ciliated epithelium from the tracheal mucosa and replacement of the normal mucosa by immature nonciliated epithelium or metaplastic squamous epithelium.

  1. The Nature of Paradigms and Paradigm Shifts in Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panaiotidi, Elvira

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the author attempts to extend the paradigm approach into the philosophy of music education and to build upon this basis a model for structuring music education discourse. The author begins with an examination of Peter Abbs' account of paradigms and paradigm shifts in arts education. Then she turns to Kuhn's conception and to his…

  2. Complexity.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Hernández, J Jaime

    2006-01-01

    It is difficult to define complexity in modeling. Complexity is often associated with uncertainty since modeling uncertainty is an intrinsically difficult task. However, modeling uncertainty does not require, necessarily, complex models, in the sense of a model requiring an unmanageable number of degrees of freedom to characterize the aquifer. The relationship between complexity, uncertainty, heterogeneity, and stochastic modeling is not simple. Aquifer models should be able to quantify the uncertainty of their predictions, which can be done using stochastic models that produce heterogeneous realizations of aquifer parameters. This is the type of complexity addressed in this article.

  3. Formulation and efficacy of liposome-encapsulated antibiotics for therapy of intracellular Mycobacterium avium infection.

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Y K; Nix, D E; Straubinger, R M

    1995-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is an intracellular pathogen that can invade and multiply within macrophages of the reticuloendothelial system. Current therapy is not highly effective. Particulate drug carriers that are targeted to the reticuloendothelial system may provide a means to deliver antibiotics more efficiently to M. avium-infected cells. We investigated the formulation of the antibiotics ciprofloxacin and azithromycin in liposomes and tested their antibacterial activities in vitro against M. avium residing within J774, a murine macrophage-like cell line. A conventional passive-entrapment method yielded an encapsulation efficiency of 9% for ciprofloxacin and because of aggregation mediated by the cationic drug, was useful only with liposomes containing < or = 50 mol% negatively charged phospholipid. In contrast, ciprofloxacin was encapsulated with > 90% efficiency, regardless of the content of negatively charged lipids, by a remote-loading technique that utilized both pH and potential gradients to drive drug into preformed liposomes. Both the cellular accumulation and the antimycobacterial activity of ciprofloxacin increased in proportion to the liposome negative charge; the maximal enhancement of potency was 43-fold in liposomes of distearoylphosphatidylglycerol-cholesterol (DSPG-Chol) (10:5). Azithromycin liposomes were prepared as a freeze-dried preparation to avoid chemical instability during storage, and drug could be incorporated at 33 mol% (with respect to phospholipid). Azithromycin also showed enhanced antimycobacterial effect in liposomes, and the potency increased in parallel to the moles percent of negatively charged lipids; azithromycin in DSPG-Chol (10:5) liposomes inhibited intracellular M. avium growth 41-fold more effectively than did free azithromycin. Thus, ciprofloxacin or azithromycin encapsulated in stable liposomes having substantial negative surface charge is superior to nonencapsulated drug in inhibition of M.avium growth within cultured

  4. Immunoreactivity of the Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis 19-kDa lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Huntley, Jason FJ; Stabel, Judith R; Bannantine, John P

    2005-01-01

    Background The Mycobacterium tuberculosis 19-kDa lipoprotein has been reported to stimulate both T and B cell responses as well as induce a number of Th1 cytokines. In order to evaluate the Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis) 19-kDa lipoprotein as an immunomodulator in cattle with Johne's disease, the gene encoding the 19-kDa protein (MAP0261c) was analyzed. Results MAP0261c is conserved in mycobacteria, showing a 95% amino acid identity in M. avium subspecies avium, 84% in M. intracellulare and 76% in M. bovis and M. tuberculosis. MAP0261c was cloned, expressed, and purified as a fusion protein with the maltose-binding protein (MBP-19 kDa) in Escherichia coli. IFN-γ production was measured from 21 naturally infected and 9 control cattle after peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with a whole cell lysate (WCL) of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis or the recombinant MBP-19 kDa. Overall, the mean response to MBP-19 kDa was not as strong as the mean response to the WCL. By comparison, cells from control, non-infected cattle did not produce IFN-γ after stimulation with either WCL or MBP-19 kDa. To assess the humoral immune response to the 19-kDa protein, sera from cattle with clinical Johne's disease were used in immunoblot analysis. Reactivity to MBP-19 kDa protein, but not MBP alone, was observed in 9 of 14 infected cattle. Antibodies to the 19-kDa protein were not observed in 8 of 9 control cows. Conclusions Collectively, these results demonstrate that while the 19-kDa protein from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis stimulates a humoral immune response and weak IFN-γ production in infected cattle, the elicited responses are not strong enough to be used in a sensitive diagnostic assay. PMID:15663791

  5. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis: pathogen, pathogenesis and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Manning, E J; Collins, M T

    2001-04-01

    Johne's disease, or paratuberculosis, is a chronic intestinal infection caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The usually fatal disease is characterised by cachexia, and in some species diarrhoea, after a long pre-clinical phase. Treatment is ineffective and economically impracticable. The infection primarily affects domestic and free-ranging ruminants, but has also been reported in primates, rabbits, stoats and foxes. Since paratuberculosis is often subclinical, under-reporting is suspected, even though the disease is notifiable in numerous countries. Herd prevalence of bovine paratuberculosis in Europe ranges from 7% to 55%. In the United States of America, herd prevalence is strongly associated with herd size; 40% of herds of more than 300 head were found to be infected. In Australia, reported dairy herd infection rates range between 9% and 22%. Paratuberculosis in domestic livestock entails significant economic losses due to several factors (e.g. reduced production, premature culling and increased veterinary costs). Free-ranging and captive wildlife are also at risk from paratuberculosis.

  6. Ascorbic acid metabolism during sweet cherry (Prunus avium) fruit development

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Zhiyou; Lin, Lijin; Tang, Yi; Wang, Zhihui; Wang, Xun; Wang, Jin; Lv, Xiulan; Xia, Hui

    2017-01-01

    To elucidate metabolism of ascorbic acid (AsA) in sweet cherry fruit (Prunus avium ‘Hongdeng’), we quantified AsA concentration, cloned sequences involved in AsA metabolism and investigated their mRNA expression levels, and determined the activity levels of selected enzymes during fruit development and maturation. We found that AsA concentration was highest at the petal-fall period (0 days after anthesis) and decreased progressively during ripening, but with a slight increase at maturity. AsA did nevertheless continue to accumulate over time because of the increase in fruit fresh weight. Full-length cDNAs of 10 genes involved in the L-galactose pathway of AsA biosynthesis and 10 involved in recycling were obtained. Gene expression patterns of GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (GGP2), L-galactono-1, 4-lactone dehydrogenase (GalLDH), ascorbate peroxidase (APX3), ascorbate oxidase (AO2), glutathione reductase (GR1), and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR1) were in accordance with the AsA concentration pattern during fruit development, indicating that genes involved in ascorbic acid biosynthesis, degradation, and recycling worked in concert to regulate ascorbic acid accumulation in sweet cherry fruit. PMID:28245268

  7. Peptides specific for Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection: diagnostic potential.

    PubMed

    Casey, J L; Sanalla, A M; Tamvakis, D; Thalmann, C; Carroll, E L; Parisi, K; Coley, A M; Stewart, D J; Vaughan, J A; Michalski, W P; Luke, R; Foley, M

    2011-08-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map) is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD). Current serological diagnostic tests for JD are limited by their sensitivity when used in sub-clinical stages of the disease. Our objective was to identify peptides that mimic diagnostically important Map epitopes that might be incorporated into a new-generation JD diagnostic. Four peptides were isolated from a phage-displayed random peptide library by screening on antibodies derived from Map-infected goats. The peptides were recognised by antibodies from Map-infected goats but not by antibodies from uninfected goats. The peptides elicited immune responses in rabbits, which reacted strongly with bona fide Map antigens proving the peptides were true epitope mimics. To assess the diagnostic value a panel of goat sera was screened for reactivity's with peptides. The peptides were recognised by antibodies from a proportion of goats infected with Map compared with control animals with a diagnostic specificity of 100% and the sensitivity ranged from 50 to 75%. Combinations of any two peptides improved sensitivity 62.5-87.5% and 100% sensitivity was achieved with three of the four peptides in combination. These data suggest peptides representing diagnostically important Map epitopes could be incorporated into a sensitive diagnostic test.

  8. Identification of immunoreactive proteins of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Piras, Cristian; Soggiu, Alessio; Bonizzi, Luigi; Greco, Viviana; Ricchi, Matteo; Arrigoni, Norma; Bassols, Anna; Urbani, Andrea; Roncada, Paola

    2015-02-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the cause of a chronic enteritis of ruminants (bovine paratuberculosis (PTB)--Johne's disease) that is associated with enormous worldwide economic losses for the animal production. Diagnosis is based on observation of clinical signs, the detection of antibodies in milk or serum, or evaluation of bacterial culture from feces. The limit of these methods is that they are not able to detect the disease in the subclinical stage and are applicable only when the disease is already advanced. For this reason, the main purpose of this study is to use the MAP proteome to detect novel immunoreactive proteins that may be helpful for PTB diagnoses. 2DE and 2D immunoblotting of MAP proteins were performed using sera of control cattle and PTB-infected cattle in order to highlight the specific immunoreactive proteins. Among the assigned identifiers to immunoreactive spots it was found that most of them correspond to surface-located proteins while three of them have never been described before as antigens. The identification of these proteins improves scientific knowledge that could be useful for PTB diagnoses. The sequence of the identified protein can be used for the synthesis of immunoreactive peptides that could be screened for their immunoreaction against bovine sera infected with MAP. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange consortium with identifier PXD001159 and DOI 10.6019/PXD001159.

  9. Development of vaccines to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Johne's disease or paratuberculosis is a chronic debilitating disease in ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The disease causes significant economic losses in livestock industries worldwide. There are no effective control measures to eradicate the disease because there are no appropriate diagnostic methods to detect subclinically infected animals. Therefore, it is very difficult to control the disease using only test and cull strategies. Vaccination against paratuberculosis has been considered as an alternative strategy to control the disease when combined with management interventions. Understanding host-pathogen interactions is extremely important to development of vaccines. It has long been known that Th1-mediated cellular immune responses are play a crucial role in protection against MAP infection. However, recent studies suggested that innate immune responses are more closely related to protective effects than adaptive immunity. Based on this understanding, several attempts have been made to develop vaccines against paratuberculosis. A variety of ideas for designing novel vaccines have emerged, and the tests of the efficacy of these vaccines are conducted constantly. However, no effective vaccines are commercially available. In this study, studies of the development of vaccines for MAP were reviewed and summarized. PMID:27489800

  10. Control of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in agricultural species.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, D J; Benedictus, G

    2001-04-01

    Paratuberculosis or Johne's disease is a chronic intestinal disease caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, which continues to spread in agricultural species. Control of paratuberculosis is challenging and should not be underestimated. Due to the long incubation period of the infection, disease is largely subclinical in domesticated livestock. Hence, direct effects on animal productivity and welfare are often masked and may appear insufficient to justify large investments in control programmes by individual farmers, livestock industries or governments. Furthermore, in some countries the main effects of the disease are indirect, resulting from the impact of market discrimination against herds and flocks known to be infected, or from the control measures enforced to reduce transmission. In such circumstances, producers may be unwilling to co-operate with surveillance that may detect infection in herds or flocks. As control programmes are rarely successful in eliminating the infection from a herd or flock in the short term without an aggressive and costly programme, financial and community support assists producers to deal with the challenge. Successful prevention and control depends on animal health authorities and livestock industries acquiring a good understanding of the nature and epidemiology of infection, and of the application of tools for diagnosis and control. Building support for control programmes under the leadership of the affected livestock industries is critical, as programmes are unlikely to be successful without ongoing political will, supported by funding for research, surveillance and control.

  11. Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis in wild boars in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Myung; Ku, Bok Kyung; Lee, Haet-nim; Hwang, In-Yeong; Jang, Young-Boo; Kim, Jaejo; Hyun, Bang-Hun; Jung, Suk Chan

    2013-04-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes chronic infectious enteritis in various domestic and wild mammals and is widely distributed globally. Interspecies transmission has been frequently reported. We investigated the presence of MAP from December 2010 to March 2011 in blood and feces collected from 222 hunter-killed wild boars. We collected 197 serum and 180 fecal samples and examined them by culture, PCR, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We investigated the status of MAP infection and the MAP genotypes in the wild boar population of Korea by using IS900 PCR and IS1311-restriction endonuclease analysis typing. Of the 180 fecal samples cultured, MAP colonies were recovered from two. By PCR, 18 animals were positive for MAP and one serum sample had a strong humoral response to MAP. The PCR-positive DNA samples from the colonies and the feces samples were genotyped as "cattle type" and "bison type," which are major MAP genotypes infecting domestic species in Korea. Our study provides new information on mycobacterial infection among wild boars, and suggests that a more effective program should be developed to monitor mycobacterial infections in wild animal populations in Korea.

  12. Ascorbic acid metabolism during sweet cherry (Prunus avium) fruit development.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dong; Zhu, Tingting; Ni, Zhiyou; Lin, Lijin; Tang, Yi; Wang, Zhihui; Wang, Xun; Wang, Jin; Lv, Xiulan; Xia, Hui

    2017-01-01

    To elucidate metabolism of ascorbic acid (AsA) in sweet cherry fruit (Prunus avium 'Hongdeng'), we quantified AsA concentration, cloned sequences involved in AsA metabolism and investigated their mRNA expression levels, and determined the activity levels of selected enzymes during fruit development and maturation. We found that AsA concentration was highest at the petal-fall period (0 days after anthesis) and decreased progressively during ripening, but with a slight increase at maturity. AsA did nevertheless continue to accumulate over time because of the increase in fruit fresh weight. Full-length cDNAs of 10 genes involved in the L-galactose pathway of AsA biosynthesis and 10 involved in recycling were obtained. Gene expression patterns of GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (GGP2), L-galactono-1, 4-lactone dehydrogenase (GalLDH), ascorbate peroxidase (APX3), ascorbate oxidase (AO2), glutathione reductase (GR1), and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR1) were in accordance with the AsA concentration pattern during fruit development, indicating that genes involved in ascorbic acid biosynthesis, degradation, and recycling worked in concert to regulate ascorbic acid accumulation in sweet cherry fruit.

  13. Fault Tolerant Paradigms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-26

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0105 BRI) Fault Tolerant Paradigms BENJAMIN ONG MICHIGAN STATE UNIV EAST LANSING Final Report 02/26/2016 DISTRIBUTION A...property allows the algorithm to outperform FFTW over a wide range of sparsity and noise values, and is to the best of our knowledge novel in the...best of our knowledge novel. The new algorithm gives excellent performance in the noisy setting without significantly increasing the computational

  14. A synchronous paradigm for modeling stable reactive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, V.L.

    1998-12-01

    This paper describes a modeling technique for single-agent reactive systems, that is influenced by the modeling paradigm of Parnas as well as by the synchronous paradigms of LUSTRE and ESTEREL. In this paradigm, single-agent reactive systems are modeled in a universe having a discrete clock. This discretization of time greatly reduces the temporal complexity of the model. He believes that the advantage of this reduction in temporal complexity is that the resulting model is in many ways better suited to automated software construction and analysis techniques (e.g., deductive synthesis, transformation, and verification) than models that are based on continuous representations of time.

  15. PD-L2 induction on dendritic cells exposed to Mycobacterium avium downregulates BCG-specific T cell response.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Coronel, Elizabeth; Camacho-Sandoval, Rosa; Bonifaz, Laura C; López-Vidal, Yolanda

    2011-01-01

    The exposure to certain species of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) can modulate the immune response induced by Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Mycobacterium avium has been postulated as a weak inducer of dendritic cell (DC) maturation. However, how the DC exposure to M. avium could contribute to the modulation of a BCG-specific CD4+ T cell response and the molecules involved remain unknown. Here, we exposed bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) to M. avium either prior to exposure to BCG or as a unique stimulus. We found that M. avium induces high expression of PD-L2 (B7-DC) in BMDCs. This was dependent on IL-10 production through the TLR2-p38 MAPK signaling pathway. Exposure to M. avium prior to BCG results in BMDCs that do not express co-stimulatory molecules and pro-inflammatory cytokines, while the expression of PD-L2 and IL-10 was maintained. BMDCs exposed to M. avium impaired the activation of BCG-specific T cells through the PD-1: PD-L interaction. This suggests that a M. avium-induced phenotype in DCs might be implicated in the induction of mechanisms of tolerance that could impact the T cell response induced by BCG vaccination.

  16. Detection of Bordetella avium by TaqMan real-time PCR in tracheal swabs from wildlife birds.

    PubMed

    Stenzel, T; Pestka, D; Tykałowski, B; Śmiałek, M; Koncicki, A; Bancerz-Kisiel, A

    2017-03-28

    Bordetella avium, the causing agent of bordetellosis, a highly contagious infection of the respiratory tract in young poultry, causes significant losses in poultry farming throughout the world. Wildlife birds can be a reservoir of various pathogens that infect farm animals. For this reason the studies were conducted to estimate the prevalence of Bordetella avium in wildlife birds in Poland. Tracheal swab samples were collected from 650 birds representing 27 species. The bacterial DNA was isolated directly from the swabs and screened for Bordetella avium by TaqMan real-time PCR. The assay specificity was evaluated by testing DNA isolated from 8 other bacteria that can be present in avian respiratory tract, and there was no amplification from non-Bordetella avium agents. Test sensitivity was determined by preparing standard tenfold serial dilutions of DNA isolated from positive control. The assay revealed to be sensitive, with detection limit of approximately 4.07x10^2 copies of Bordetella avium DNA. The genetic material of Bordetella avium was found in 54.54% of common pheasants, in 9.09% of Eurasian coots, in 3.22% of black-headed gulls and in 2.77% of mallard ducks. The results of this study point to low prevalence of Bordetella avium infections in wildlife birds. The results also show that described molecular assay proved to be suitable for the rapid diagnosis of bordetellosis in the routine diagnostic laboratory.

  17. An engineering paradigm in the biomedical sciences: Knowledge as epistemic tool.

    PubMed

    Boon, Mieke

    2017-04-04

    In order to deal with the complexity of biological systems and attempts to generate applicable results, current biomedical sciences are adopting concepts and methods from the engineering sciences. Philosophers of science have interpreted this as the emergence of an engineering paradigm, in particular in systems biology and synthetic biology. This article aims at the articulation of the supposed engineering paradigm by contrast with the physics paradigm that supported the rise of biochemistry and molecular biology. This articulation starts from Kuhn's notion of a disciplinary matrix, which indicates what constitutes a paradigm. It is argued that the core of the physics paradigm is its metaphysical and ontological presuppositions, whereas the core of the engineering paradigm is the epistemic aim of producing useful knowledge for solving problems external to the scientific practice. Therefore, the two paradigms involve distinct notions of knowledge. Whereas the physics paradigm entails a representational notion of knowledge, the engineering paradigm involves the notion of 'knowledge as epistemic tool'.

  18. Antemortem and postmortem examinations of the cattle calf naturally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Appana, Gangadhararao; Das, Dipankar; Veerasami, Maroudam; Senthilkumar, Ramachandran Lakshmikanthan; Durishetty, Munishkumar; Ramalakshmi, B.; Bahekar, Vijay; Mukherjee, Falguni; Chandran, Dev; Kumar, P. Uday; Sesikeran, B.

    2013-01-01

    A male cattle calf was detected as subclinically and naturally infected with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) by a series of antemortem and postmortem tests. The MAP infection was identified by strong antibody and cell-mediated immune (CMI) response by a commercial ELISA kit and an intradermal Johnin test, respectively, in the initial antemortem examination. The antemortem status of the calf was further confirmed by MAP-specific interferon gamma (IFN-γ) response. For detection of IFN-γ response, MAP-specific IFN-γ release assays (IGRAs): (a) immuno capture ELISA (IC-ELISA) and (b) ELISPOT was employed. In addition, the presence of intracellular cytokine IFN-γ was detected by flow cytometry. For all cytokine assays, MAP-specific recombinant antigens HSP65 and 35 kDa were employed to overcome the poor sensitivity and specificity resulting from the use of Johnin, the crude protein purified derivative of MAP. Postmortem examination of the MAP-infected/suspected cattle calf did not reveal any pathognomonic gross lesions in the gastro-intestinal tract. Histopathological examination of multiple organs showed the presence of epithelioid cells/macrophages and edematous lesions in the mesenteric lymph nodes suggestive of MAP; however, no granulomas were observed in the intestinal tract. The necropsy samples of rectum and mesenteric lymph nodes were positive for isolation of MAP by culture in the BACTEC™ MGIT™ 960 system, and acid fast bacilli were demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy confirming the infection. Due to differential and complex expression patterns of MAP antigens reported in literature, a combination of assays such as those based on IGRAs and antibody detection is essential. Therefore, the current experimental evidence confirms the efficacy of the approach adopted. However, further studies will be needed to understand the optimal combination MAP-specific antigens for use in IGRAs or antibody assays that can be used for detecting

  19. In Vivo Volatile Organic Compound Signatures of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Andreas; Trefz, Phillip; Fischer, Sina; Klepik, Klaus; Walter, Gudrun; Steffens, Markus; Ziller, Mario; Schubert, Jochen K.; Reinhold, Petra; Köhler, Heike; Miekisch, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of a chronic enteric disease of ruminants. Available diagnostic tests are complex and slow. In vitro, volatile organic compound (VOC) patterns emitted from MAP cultures mirrored bacterial growth and enabled distinction of different strains. This study was intended to determine VOCs in vivo in the controlled setting of an animal model. VOCs were pre-concentrated from breath and feces of 42 goats (16 controls and 26 MAP-inoculated animals) by means of needle trap microextraction (breath) and solid phase microextraction (feces) and analyzed by gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry. Analyses were performed 18, 29, 33, 41 and 48 weeks after inoculation. MAP-specific antibodies and MAP-specific interferon-γ-response were determined from blood. Identities of all marker-VOCs were confirmed through analysis of pure reference substances. Based on detection limits in the high pptV and linear ranges of two orders of magnitude more than 100 VOCs could be detected in breath and in headspace over feces. Twenty eight substances differed between inoculated and non-inoculated animals. Although patterns of most prominent substances such as furans, oxygenated substances and hydrocarbons changed in the course of infection, differences between inoculated and non-inoculated animals remained detectable at any time for 16 substances in feces and 3 VOCs in breath. Differences of VOC concentrations over feces reflected presence of MAP bacteria. Differences in VOC profiles from breath were linked to the host response in terms of interferon-γ-response. In a perspective in vivo analysis of VOCs may help to overcome limitations of established tests. PMID:25915653

  20. Surveillance system sensitivities and probability of freedom from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in Swedish cattle.

    PubMed

    Frössling, Jenny; Wahlström, Helene; Agren, Estelle Carina Constance; Cameron, Angus; Lindberg, Ann; Sternberg Lewerin, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations suggest that the prevalence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in Swedish cattle is low and all recent cases have been linked to imported animals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the surveillance system for MAP infection in Swedish cattle and to estimate the probability that the Swedish cattle population is free from this infection. Calculations of surveillance sensitivities and probability of freedom were made using stochastic scenario-tree modelling, which allows inclusion of information from several different sources, of complex surveillance data including results from non-representative sampling, as well as of documentations of differences in risk of being infected. The surveillance components included in the model were: (1) clinical surveillance, (2) fallen stock investigations, (3) the national surveillance programme (mainly beef herds), (4) a survey involving dairy herds and (5) a risk-based survey targeting herds with imported cattle. Previous or current presence of imported animals and participation in the on-going control programme was specified for each tested herd, in order to adjust for differences in risk. Calculations were made for each year from the start of 2005 to the end of 2008, and this formed the basis for a final estimate covering the whole study period and predictions of future probabilities of freedom from MAP. Results show that when applying a design prevalence of one animal in 0.1% of the herds, the probability of freedom at the end of 2008 was 0.63. At the design prevalence of one animal in 0.5% of herds, the estimated probability is >95% and it is demonstrated that the prevalence of MAP in Swedish cattle is below this level or absent. In order to increase the annual surveillance sensitivity in the future and thereby improve the probability of freedom, new surveillance activities or an intensification of current ones are needed.

  1. Bioactive components of Prunus avium L. black gold (red cherry) and Prunus avium L. stark gold (white cherry) juices, wines and vinegars.

    PubMed

    Budak, Nilgün H

    2017-01-01

    Cherries are one of the most popular fruits, characterized by attractive colour, firmness, appearance and delicious tastes. Cherries are consumed fresh as well as in jams, wine, dried, candy and other processed products. Cherries vary in antioxidant properties and phenolic substances. The aim of the study was to determine the effects of ethanol and acetic acid fermentation on total antioxidant activities and phenolic substances of cherry juice. Total investigation of solids, pH, soluble solids, phenolic substances, ORAC and TEAC of Prunus avium L. cherry juices, macerated cherries wine, and vinegars were analyzed. All samples had 300.1-854.79 mg GAE/L of total phenolic contents, and 6.62-17.97 µmol/mL of ORAC values, and 1.5-5.5 mmol/mL of TEAC. Chlorogenic acid was present in the highest amount P. avium L. black gold vinegar.

  2. A randomized, double-blind trial comparing azithromycin and clarithromycin in the treatment of disseminated Mycobacterium avium infection in patients with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Dunne, M; Fessel, J; Kumar, P; Dickenson, G; Keiser, P; Boulos, M; Mogyros, M; White Jr, A C; Cahn, P; O'Connor, M; Lewi, D; Green, S; Tilles, J; Hicks, C; Bissett, J; Schneider, M M; Benner, R

    2000-11-01

    Two hundred and forty-six patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who also had disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex received either azithromycin 250 mg every day, azithromycin 600 mg every day, or clarithromycin 500 mg twice a day, each combined with ethambutol, for 24 weeks. Samples drawn from patients were cultured and clinically assessed every 3 weeks up to week 12, then monthly thereafter through week 24 of double-blind therapy and every 3 months while on open-label therapy through the conclusion of the trial. The azithromycin 250 mg arm of the study was dropped after an interim analysis showed a lower rate of clearance of bacteremia. At 24 weeks of therapy, the likelihood of patients' developing 2 consecutive negative cultures (46% vs. 56%, P=.24) or 1 negative culture (59% vs. 61%, P=.80) was similar for azithromycin 600 mg (n=68) and clarithromycin (n=57), respectively. The likelihood of relapse was 39% versus 27% (P=.21) on azithromycin compared with clarithromycin, respectively. Of the 6 patients who experienced relapse, none of those randomized to receive azithromycin developed isolates resistant to macrolides, compared with 2 of 3 patients randomized to receive clarithromycin [corrected]. Mortality was similar in patients comprising each arm of the study (69% vs. 63%; hazard, 95.1% confidence interval, 1.1 [0.7, 1.7]). Azithromycin 600 mg, when given in combination with ethambutol, is an effective agent for the treatment of disseminated M. avium disease in patients infected with HIV.

  3. Association of ISMav6 with the Pattern of Antibiotic Resistance in Korean Mycobacterium avium Clinical Isolates but No Relevance between Their Genotypes and Clinical Features

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su-Young; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Park, Hye Yun; Jeon, Kyeongman; Han, Seung Jung; Shin, Sung Jae; Koh, Won-Jung

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to genetically characterize clinical isolates from patients diagnosed with Mycobacterium avium lung disease and to investigate the clinical significance. Multi-locus sequencing analysis (MLSA) and pattern of insertion sequence analysis of M. avium isolates from 92 Korean patients revealed that all isolates were M. avium subspecies hominissuis. In hsp65 sequevar analysis, codes 2, 15, and 16 were most frequently found (88/92) with similar proportions among cases additionally two isolates belonging to code N2 and an unreported code were identified, respectively. In insertion element analysis, all isolates were IS1311 positive and IS900 negative. Four of the M. avium subsp. hominissuis isolates did not harbor IS1245 and 1 of the M. avium isolates intriguingly harbored DT1, which is thought to be a M. intracellulare-specific element. M. avium subsp. hominissuis harboring ISMav6 is prevalent in Korea. No significant association between clinical manifestation and treatment response has been found in patients with the hsp65 code type and ISMav6, indicating that no specific strain/genotype among M. avium subsp. hominissuis organisms was a major source of M. avium lung disease. Interestingly, the presence of ISMav6 was correlated with greater resistance to moxifloxacin. Conclusively, the genotype of Korean M. avium subsp. hominissuis isolates is not a disease determinant responsible for lung disease and specific virulent factors of M. avium subsp. hominissuis need to be investigated further. PMID:26859598

  4. Phagosome-lysosome fusions in macrophages infected by Mycobacterium avium: role of mycosides-C and other cells surface components.

    PubMed

    Fréhel, C; Rastogi, N

    1989-01-01

    The phagosome-lysosome fusions (PLE) were assessed in case of bone-marrow macrophages infected by the opportunistic species Mycobacterium avium, employing the acid-phosphatase (AcPase) electron-cytochemistry. The role of surface components was evaluated by coating the bacteria prior to phagocytosis by specific M. avium antiserum or the anti-mycosides-C serum raised in rabbit. PLF was evaluated under the electron microscope during (2, 4 hours), or after (24 hours) phagocytosis. The preliminary results suggest that although M. avium surface components intervene in PLF inhibition, the role of mycosides-C among these surface components (effectively intervening in PLF inhibition) is questionable.

  5. Environmental contamination with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in endemically infected dairy herds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Environmental contamination with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is thought to be the primary source of infection for dairy cattle. The exact link between fecal shedding of MAP by individual cows and environmental contamination levels at the herd level was explored with a cross-se...

  6. Shared Mycobacterium avium genotypes observed among unlinked clinical and environmental isolates*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our understanding of the sources of Mycobacterium avium infection is partially based on genotypic matching of pathogen isolates from cases and environmental sources. These approaches assume that genotypic identity is rare in isolates from unlinked cases or sources. To test this a...

  7. Bordetella avium causes induction of apoptosis and nitric oxide synthase in turkey tracheal explant cultures.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, David M; Ruff, Kristin; Beach, Nathan M; Stockwell, Stephanie B; Dorsey-Oresto, Angella; Masters, Isaac; Temple, Louise M

    2011-09-01

    Bordetellosis is an upper respiratory disease of turkeys caused by Bordetella avium in which the bacteria attach specifically to ciliated respiratory epithelial cells. Little is known about the mechanisms of pathogenesis of this disease, which has a negative impact in the commercial turkey industry. In this study, we produced a novel explant organ culture system that was able to successfully reproduce pathogenesis of B. avium in vitro, using tracheal tissue derived from 26 day-old turkey embryos. Treatment of the explants with whole cells of B. avium virulent strain 197N and culture supernatant, but not lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or tracheal cytotoxin (TCT), specifically induced apoptosis in ciliated cells, as shown by annexin V and TUNEL staining. LPS and TCT are known virulence factors of Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough. Treatment with whole cells of B. avium and LPS specifically induced NO response in ciliated cells, shown by uNOS staining and diaphorase activity. The explant system is being used as a model to elucidate specific molecules responsible for the symptoms of bordetellosis.

  8. From mouth to macrophage: mechanisms of innate immune subversion by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Johne’s disease (JD) is a chronic enteric infection of cattle caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The high economic cost and potential zoonotic threat of JD have driven efforts to develop tools and approaches to effectively manage this disease within livestock herds. Efforts...

  9. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in Drinking Water and Biofilms Using Quantitative PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne’s disease in domestic animals and has been implicated in Crohn’s disease in humans. This bacterium is a slow growing, gram-positive, acid-fast organism which can be difficult to culture from the environment. For ...

  10. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Drinking Water and Biofilms Using Quantitative PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne’s disease in domestic animals and has been implicated in Crohn’s disease in humans. Cows infected with Johne’s disease shed large quantities of MAP into soil. Further, MAP has been isolated from surface water, is resi...

  11. Assessment of Food as a Source of Exposure to Mycobacterium avium Subspecies Paratuberculosis (MAP)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The National Advisory Committee on Microbiological Criteria for Foods (NACMCF or Committee) was asked to assess the importance of food as a source of exposure to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne’s disease, which affects primarily the small intestin...

  12. CD4 T Cell Dependent Colitis Exacerbation Following Re-Exposure of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Suwandi, Abdulhadi; Bargen, Imke; Pils, Marina C.; Krey, Martina; Zur Lage, Susanne; Singh, Anurag K.; Basler, Tina; Falk, Christine S.; Seidler, Ursula; Hornef, Mathias W.; Goethe, Ralph; Weiss, Siegfried

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD), a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of cattle characterized by intermittent to chronic diarrhea. In addition, MAP has been isolated from Crohn's disease (CD) patients. The impact of MAP on severity of clinical symptoms in JD as well as its role in CD are yet unknown. We have previously shown that MAP is able to colonize inflamed enteric tissue and to exacerbate the inflammatory tissue response (Suwandi et al., 2014). In the present study, we analyzed how repeated MAP administration influences the course of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. In comparison to mice exposed to DSS or MAP only, repeated exposure of DSS-treated mice to MAP (DSS/MAP) revealed a significantly enhanced clinical score, reduction of colon length as well as severe CD4+ T cell infiltration into the colonic lamina propria. Functional analysis identified a critical role of CD4+ T cells in the MAP-induced disease exacerbation. Additionally, altered immune responses were observed when closely related mycobacteria species such as M. avium ssp. avium and M. avium ssp. hominissuis were administered. These data reveal the specific ability of MAP to aggravate intestinal inflammation and clinical symptoms. Overall, this phenotype is compatible with similar disease promoting capabilites of MAP in JD and CD. PMID:28361039

  13. COMPARISON OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM ISOLATES FROM DRINKING WATER AND FROM THE POPULATION SERVED BY THE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Current evidence suggests that drinking water, soil, and produce are potential sources of Mycobacterium avium infections, a pathogen not known to be transmitted person-to-person.

    Methods: We sampled water during 2000 - 2002 from a large municipal drinking wate...

  14. Characteristics of an Extensive Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis Recombinant Protein Set

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the first step of a comprehensive large-scale antigen discovery project, 651 Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis proteins were produced in Escherichia coli. All of these were purified by affinity chromatography, dialyzed in phosphate buffered saline, and analyzed on SDS-PAGE gels. C...

  15. Transcriptional profiling of ileocecal valve of Holstein dairy cows infected with mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Johne’s disease is a chronic infection of the small intestine caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), an intracellular bacterium. The events of pathogen survival within the host cell(s), chronic inflammation and the progression from asymptomatic subclinical stage to an advan...

  16. Immunologic Responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Neonatal Calves After Oral or Intraperitoneal Experimental Infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infection models are useful for studying host responses to infection to aid in the development of diagnostic tools and vaccines. The majority of experimental models for ruminants have utilized an oral inoculation of live Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in order to establish infecti...

  17. Induction of B Cell Responses Upon Experimental Infection of Neonatal Calves with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Animal models are useful for studying host responses to infection and aid in the development of diagnostic tools and vaccines. The current study was designed to compare the effects of different methods of experimental infection: Oral (Mycobacterium avium subsp. parauberculosis (MAP) strain K-10; Or...

  18. Induction of B Cell Responses upon Experimental Infection of Neonatal Calves with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Animal models are useful for studying host responses to infection and aid in the development of diagnostic tools and vaccines. The current study was designed to compare the effects of different methods of experimental infection: Oral (Mycobacterium avium subsp. parauberculosis (MAP) strain K-10; Or...

  19. Pathogenesis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Neonatal Calves after Oral or Intraperitoneal Experimental Infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Understanding the infection process to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is tantamount to the development of effective vaccines and therapeutics for the control of this disease in the field. The current study compared the effectiveness of oral and intraperitoneal methods of experimental in...

  20. Iron-sparing Response of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is Strain Dependent

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Two genotypically and microbiologically distinct strains of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) exist – the type I and type II strains that primarily infect sheep and cattle, respectively. Concentration of iron in the cultivation medium has been suggested as one contributin...

  1. Shared Mycobacterium avium genotypes observed among unlinked clinical and environmental isolates

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our understanding of the sources of Mycobacterium avium infection is partially based on genotypic matching of pathogen isolates from cases and environmental sources. These approaches assume that genotypic identity is rare in isolates from unlinked cases or sources. To test this, ...

  2. Population analysis of Fecal Microbiota from Cows Infected with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) is a gram-positive, acid-fast bacillus that is the causative agent of Johne’s disease, a chronic infection of ruminant animals characterized by inflammation of the digestive tract leading to nutrient malabsorption and eventually ...

  3. COMPARISON OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM ISOLATES FROM DRINKING WATER AND FROM THE POPULATION SERVED BY THE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Current evidence suggests that drinking water, soil, and produce are potential sources of Mycobacterium avium infections, a pathogen not known to be transmitted person-to-person.

    Methods: We sampled water during 2000 - 2002 from a large municipal drinking wate...

  4. Shared Mycobacterium avium genotypes observed among unlinked clinical and environmental isolates*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our understanding of the sources of Mycobacterium avium infection is partially based on genotypic matching of pathogen isolates from cases and environmental sources. These approaches assume that genotypic identity is rare in isolates from unlinked cases or sources. To test this a...

  5. Optimization of hexadecylpyridinium chloride decontamination for culture of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from milk

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cows in advanced stages of Johne’s disease shed Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) into both their milk and feces, allowing for transmission of the bacteria between animals. The objective of this study was to formulate an optimized protocol for the isolation of MAP from milk and colos...

  6. Immunlogic responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis protein cocktail vaccines in a mouse model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Johne’s disease is a chronic granulomatous enteritis characterized by severe diarrhea, wasting, and a decline in milk production caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The vaccine currently on the market has some limitations including a severe injection site react...

  7. Immunologic responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculois protein cocktail vaccines in a mouse model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Johne’s disease is a chronic granulomatous enteritis characterized by severe diarrhea, wasting and a decline in milk production caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculois (MAP). The vaccine currently on the market has some limitations including a severe injection site reactio...

  8. Osteopontin Expression in Periparturient Dairy Cows Naturally Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Johne’s disease (JD), caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), is estimated to infect more than 22% of US dairy herds. Periods of immunosuppression, typically seen at parturition, may contribute to the transition from the subclinical, or asymptomatic, to the clinical stage of inf...

  9. Inferring biomarkers for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection and disease progression using experimental data

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Available diagnostic assays for Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (MAP) have poor sensitivities and cannot detect early stages of the infection, therefore, there is need to find new diagnostic markers for early infection detection and disease stages. We analyzed longitudinal IFN- gamma, ELI...

  10. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Drinking Water and Biofilms Using Quantitative PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne’s disease in domestic animals and has been implicated in Crohn’s disease in humans. Cows infected with Johne’s disease shed large quantities of MAP into soil. Further, MAP has been isolated from surface water, is resi...

  11. Molecular Analysis of Mycobacterium avium Isolates by Using Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and PCR

    PubMed Central

    Pestel-Caron, Martine; Graff, Gabriel; Berthelot, Gilles; Pons, Jean-Louis; Lemeland, Jean-François

    1999-01-01

    Genetic relationships among 46 isolates of Mycobacterium avium recovered from 37 patients in a 2,500-bed hospital from 1993 to 1998 were assessed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and PCR amplification of genomic sequences located between the repetitive elements IS1245 and IS1311. Each technique enabled the identification of 27 to 32 different patterns among the 46 isolates, confirming that the genetic heterogeneity of M. avium strains is high in a given community. Furthermore, this retrospective analysis of sporadic isolates allowed us (i) to suggest the existence of two remanent strains in our region, (ii) to raise the question of the possibility of nosocomial acquisition of M. avium strains, and (iii) to document laboratory contamination. The methods applied in the present study were found to be useful for the typing of M. avium isolates. In general, both methods yielded similar results for both related and unrelated isolates. However, the isolates in five of the six PCR clusters were distributed among two to three PFGE patterns, suggesting that this PCR-based method may have limitations for the analysis of strains with low insertion sequence copy numbers or for resolution of extended epidemiologic relationships. PMID:10405383

  12. Primary transcriptomes of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis reveal proprietary pathways in tissue and macrophages

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis persistently infect intestines and mesenteric lymph nodes leading to a prolonged subclinical disease. We investigated the intracellular lifestyle of MAP in the intestines and lymph nodes to understand the MAP pathways that function to govern th...

  13. Survival of Mycobacterium avium attached to polyethylene terephtalate (PET) water bottles.

    PubMed

    Tatchou-Nyamsi-König, J-A; Dailloux, M; Block, J-C

    2009-03-01

    The main objective of our study was to assess the persistence of Mycobacterium avium in an oligotrophic environment such as bottled groundwater. Filtered groundwater samples were spiked with washed Myco. avium suspension and stored in dark and under static conditions, at 20 degrees C, for 3 months in 500 ml PET bottles. The loss of Myco. avium cultivability was slow in water. On the contrary, after a 3-month storage at 20 degrees C, growth of attached cells was observed and cell adhesiveness to the PET wall increased with time. It could probably be because of the presence of an extracellular matrix. This study has shown the great stability of Myco. avium in bulk water as well as their adhesiveness and their growth on a PET bottle wall in an oligotrophic environment. Slowly growing mycobacteria are well adapted to oligotrophic environments such as groundwater. As they stick very well to surfaces, they could be used for determining the efficiency of the cleaning of contaminated surfaces.

  14. Shared Mycobacterium avium genotypes observed among unlinked clinical and environmental isolates

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our understanding of the sources of Mycobacterium avium infection is partially based on genotypic matching of pathogen isolates from cases and environmental sources. These approaches assume that genotypic identity is rare in isolates from unlinked cases or sources. To test this, ...

  15. Surface Proteome of “Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis” during the Early Stages of Macrophage Infection

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Michael; Tzeng, Shin-Cheng; Maier, Claudia; Zhang, Li

    2012-01-01

    “Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis” is a robust and pervasive environmental bacterium that can cause opportunistic infections in humans. The bacterium overcomes the host immune response and is capable of surviving and replicating within host macrophages. Little is known about the bacterial mechanisms that facilitate these processes, but it can be expected that surface-exposed proteins play an important role. In this study, the selective biotinylation of surface-exposed proteins, streptavidin affinity purification, and shotgun mass spectrometry were used to characterize the surface-exposed proteome of M. avium subsp. hominissuis. This analysis detected more than 100 proteins exposed at the bacterial surface of M. avium subsp. hominissuis. Comparisons of surface-exposed proteins between conditions simulating early infection identified several groups of proteins whose presence on the bacterial surface was either constitutive or appeared to be unique to specific culture conditions. This proteomic profile facilitates an improved understanding of M. avium subsp. hominissuis and how it establishes infection. Additionally, surface-exposed proteins are excellent targets for the host adaptive immune system, and their identification can inform the development of novel treatments, diagnostic tools, and vaccines for mycobacterial disease. PMID:22392927

  16. CD4 T Cell Dependent Colitis Exacerbation Following Re-Exposure of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Suwandi, Abdulhadi; Bargen, Imke; Pils, Marina C; Krey, Martina; Zur Lage, Susanne; Singh, Anurag K; Basler, Tina; Falk, Christine S; Seidler, Ursula; Hornef, Mathias W; Goethe, Ralph; Weiss, Siegfried

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD), a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of cattle characterized by intermittent to chronic diarrhea. In addition, MAP has been isolated from Crohn's disease (CD) patients. The impact of MAP on severity of clinical symptoms in JD as well as its role in CD are yet unknown. We have previously shown that MAP is able to colonize inflamed enteric tissue and to exacerbate the inflammatory tissue response (Suwandi et al., 2014). In the present study, we analyzed how repeated MAP administration influences the course of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. In comparison to mice exposed to DSS or MAP only, repeated exposure of DSS-treated mice to MAP (DSS/MAP) revealed a significantly enhanced clinical score, reduction of colon length as well as severe CD4(+) T cell infiltration into the colonic lamina propria. Functional analysis identified a critical role of CD4(+) T cells in the MAP-induced disease exacerbation. Additionally, altered immune responses were observed when closely related mycobacteria species such as M. avium ssp. avium and M. avium ssp. hominissuis were administered. These data reveal the specific ability of MAP to aggravate intestinal inflammation and clinical symptoms. Overall, this phenotype is compatible with similar disease promoting capabilites of MAP in JD and CD.

  17. High-polarity Mycobacterium avium-derived lipids interact with murine macrophage lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-García, G; Chico-Ortiz, M; Lopez-Marin, L M; Sánchez-García, F J

    2004-11-01

    Cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich membrane microdomains (lipid rafts) are widely recognized as portals for pathogenic micro-organisms. A growing body of evidence demonstrates mobilization of host plasma cell membrane lipid rafts towards the site of contact with several pathogens as well as a strict dependence on cholesterol for appropriate internalization. The fate of lipid rafts once the pathogen has been internalized and the nature of the pathogen components that interact with them is however less understood. To address both these issues, infection of the J774 murine cell line with Mycobacterium avium was used as a model. After demonstrating that M. avium induces lipid raft mobilization and that M. avium infects J774 by a cholesterol-dependent mechanism, it is shown here that mycobacterial phagosomes harbour lipid rafts, which are, at least in part, of plasma cell membrane origin. On the other hand, by using latex microbeads coated with any of the three fractions of M. avium-derived lipids of different polarity, we provide evidence that high-polarity, in contrast to low-polarity and intermediate-polarity, mycobacterial lipids or uncoated latex beads have a strong capacity to induce lipid raft mobilization. These results suggest that high-polarity mycobacterial lipid(s) interact with host cell cholesterol-enriched microdomains which may in turn influence the course of infection.

  18. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in Drinking Water and Biofilms Using Quantitative PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne’s disease in domestic animals and has been implicated in Crohn’s disease in humans. This bacterium is a slow growing, gram-positive, acid-fast organism which can be difficult to culture from the environment. For ...

  19. Functional Characterization of Iron Dependent Regulator (IdeR) of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study we investigated an iron dependent regulator (IdeR) of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). IdeR is a transcriptional factor that plays a global iron regulatory role in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) with a 19-bp recognition sequence. IdeR recognition sites within MAP ge...

  20. Survival of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Biofilms on Livestock Watering Trough Materials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Despite the ubiquitous occurrence of Mycobacterium sp. in nature and the fact that Johne’s disease has been reported worldwide, little research has been done to assess the survival of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) in agricultural environments. The goal of this stu...

  1. Comparison of fecal DNA extraction kits for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fecal culture is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of paratuberculosis, however, PCR for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in fecal material is widely used today, having demonstrated great sensitivity and specificity. To insure the most efficient and rep...

  2. Comparison of fecal DNA extraction kits for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fecal culture is considered the gold standard for the diagnostics of paratuberculosis, however, PCR for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in fecal material is widely used today, having demonstrated great sensitivity and specificity. To insure the most efficient and r...

  3. Lymphoproliferative and gamma interferon responses to stress-regulated Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis recombinant proteins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Johne’s disease in ruminants is a chronic infection of the intestines caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Economic losses associated with Johne’s disease arise due to premature culling, reduced production of milk and wool and mortalities. The disease is characterised by a long inc...

  4. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis recombinant proteins modulate antimycobacterial functions of bovine macrophages

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It has been shown that Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) activates the Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) p38 pathway, yet it is unclear which components of M. paratuberculosis are involved in the process. Therefore, a set of 42 M. paratuberculosis recombinan...

  5. A Rapid Method for Quantifying Viable Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Cellular Infection Assays

    PubMed Central

    Pooley, Hannah B.; de Silva, Kumudika; Purdie, Auriol C.; Begg, Douglas J.; Whittington, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Determining the viability of bacteria is a key outcome of in vitro cellular infection assays. Currently, this is done by culture, which is problematic for fastidious slow-growing bacteria such as Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, where it can take up to 4 months to confirm growth. This study aimed to identify an assay that can rapidly quantify the number of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells in a cellular sample. Three commercially available bacterial viability assays along with a modified liquid culture method coupled with high-throughput quantitative PCR growth detection were assessed. Criteria for assessment included the ability of each assay to differentiate live and dead M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis organisms and their accuracy at low bacterial concentrations. Using the culture-based method, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis growth was reliably detected and quantified within 2 weeks. There was a strong linear association between the 2-week growth rate and the initial inoculum concentration. The number of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells in an unknown sample was quantified based on the growth rate, by using growth standards. In contrast, none of the commercially available viability assays were suitable for use with samples from in vitro cellular infection assays. IMPORTANCE Rapid quantification of the viability of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in samples from in vitro cellular infection assays is important, as it allows these assays to be carried out on a large scale. In vitro cellular infection assays can function as a preliminary screening tool, for vaccine development or antimicrobial screening, and also to extend findings derived from experimental animal trials. Currently, by using culture, it takes up to 4 months to obtain quantifiable results regarding M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis viability after an in vitro infection assay; however, with the quantitative PCR and liquid culture method

  6. Novel Single Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Assay for Genotyping Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Goldstone, Robert J.; McLuckie, Joyce; Smith, David G. E.

    2015-01-01

    Typing of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis strains presents a challenge, since they are genetically monomorphic and traditional molecular techniques have limited discriminatory power. The recent advances and availability of whole-genome sequencing have extended possibilities for the characterization of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, and whole-genome sequencing can provide a phylogenetic context to facilitate global epidemiology studies. In this study, we developed a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay based on PCR and restriction enzyme digestion or sequencing of the amplified product. The SNP analysis was performed using genome sequence data from 133 Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis isolates with different genotypes from 8 different host species and 17 distinct geographic regions around the world. A total of 28,402 SNPs were identified among all of the isolates. The minimum number of SNPs required to distinguish between all of the 133 genomes was 93 and between only the type C isolates was 41. To reduce the number of SNPs and PCRs required, we adopted an approach based on sequential detection of SNPs and a decision tree. By the analysis of 14 SNPs Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis isolates can be characterized within 14 phylogenetic groups with a higher discriminatory power than mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit–variable number tandem repeat assay and other typing methods. Continuous updating of genome sequences is needed in order to better characterize new phylogenetic groups and SNP profiles. The novel SNP assay is a discriminative, simple, reproducible method and requires only basic laboratory equipment for the large-scale global typing of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis isolates. PMID:26677250

  7. Novel Single Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Assay for Genotyping Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Leão, Célia; Goldstone, Robert J; Bryant, Josephine; McLuckie, Joyce; Inácio, João; Smith, David G E; Stevenson, Karen

    2016-03-01

    Typing of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis strains presents a challenge, since they are genetically monomorphic and traditional molecular techniques have limited discriminatory power. The recent advances and availability of whole-genome sequencing have extended possibilities for the characterization of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, and whole-genome sequencing can provide a phylogenetic context to facilitate global epidemiology studies. In this study, we developed a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay based on PCR and restriction enzyme digestion or sequencing of the amplified product. The SNP analysis was performed using genome sequence data from 133 Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis isolates with different genotypes from 8 different host species and 17 distinct geographic regions around the world. A total of 28,402 SNPs were identified among all of the isolates. The minimum number of SNPs required to distinguish between all of the 133 genomes was 93 and between only the type C isolates was 41. To reduce the number of SNPs and PCRs required, we adopted an approach based on sequential detection of SNPs and a decision tree. By the analysis of 14 SNPs Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis isolates can be characterized within 14 phylogenetic groups with a higher discriminatory power than mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat assay and other typing methods. Continuous updating of genome sequences is needed in order to better characterize new phylogenetic groups and SNP profiles. The novel SNP assay is a discriminative, simple, reproducible method and requires only basic laboratory equipment for the large-scale global typing of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis isolates. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Isolation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from Free-Ranging Birds and Mammals on Livestock Premises

    PubMed Central

    Corn, Joseph L.; Manning, Elizabeth J. B.; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Fischer, John R.

    2005-01-01

    Surveys for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in free-ranging mammals and birds were conducted on nine dairy and beef cattle farms in Wisconsin and Georgia. Specimens were collected from 774 animals representing 25 mammalian and 22 avian species. Specimens of ileum, liver, intestinal lymph nodes, and feces were harvested from the larger mammals; a liver specimen and the gastrointestinal tract were harvested from birds and small mammals. Cultures were performed by using radiometric culture and acid-fast isolates were identified by 16S/IS900/IS1311 PCR and mycobactin dependency characteristics. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was cultured from tissues and feces from 39 samples from 30 animals representing nine mammalian and three avian species. The prevalence of infected wild animals by premises ranged from 2.7 to 8.3% in Wisconsin and from 0 to 6.0% in Georgia. Shedding was documented in seven (0.9%) animals: three raccoons, two armadillos, one opossum, and one feral cat. The use of two highly polymorphic short sequence repeat loci for analysis of 29 of the 39 strains identified 10 alleles. One allelic pattern broadly shared in domestic ruminants (“7,5”) appeared in approximately one-third of the wildlife M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates studied. Given the few cases of shedding by free-ranging animals compared to the volume of contaminated manure produced by infected domestic ruminant livestock, contamination of the farm environment by infected wildlife was negligible. Wildlife may, however, have epidemiological significance for farms where M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis recently has been eliminated or on farms free of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis but located in the geographic vicinity of farms with infected livestock. PMID:16269731

  9. Isolation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from free-ranging birds and mammals on livestock premises.

    PubMed

    Corn, Joseph L; Manning, Elizabeth J B; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Fischer, John R

    2005-11-01

    Surveys for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in free-ranging mammals and birds were conducted on nine dairy and beef cattle farms in Wisconsin and Georgia. Specimens were collected from 774 animals representing 25 mammalian and 22 avian species. Specimens of ileum, liver, intestinal lymph nodes, and feces were harvested from the larger mammals; a liver specimen and the gastrointestinal tract were harvested from birds and small mammals. Cultures were performed by using radiometric culture and acid-fast isolates were identified by 16S/IS900/IS1311 PCR and mycobactin dependency characteristics. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was cultured from tissues and feces from 39 samples from 30 animals representing nine mammalian and three avian species. The prevalence of infected wild animals by premises ranged from 2.7 to 8.3% in Wisconsin and from 0 to 6.0% in Georgia. Shedding was documented in seven (0.9%) animals: three raccoons, two armadillos, one opossum, and one feral cat. The use of two highly polymorphic short sequence repeat loci for analysis of 29 of the 39 strains identified 10 alleles. One allelic pattern broadly shared in domestic ruminants ("7,5") appeared in approximately one-third of the wildlife M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates studied. Given the few cases of shedding by free-ranging animals compared to the volume of contaminated manure produced by infected domestic ruminant livestock, contamination of the farm environment by infected wildlife was negligible. Wildlife may, however, have epidemiological significance for farms where M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis recently has been eliminated or on farms free of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis but located in the geographic vicinity of farms with infected livestock.

  10. Osteopontin: A Novel Cytokine Involved in the Regulation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection in Periparturient Dairy Cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Osteopontin (Opn), an important mediator of the cell-mediated immune response, enhances the host immune response against mycobacterial infections. Infections caused by the intracellular bacterium, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), have a devastating impact on the dairy industry. ...

  11. Faecal bacterial composition in dairy cows shedding Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in faeces in comparison with nonshedding cows.

    PubMed

    Kaevska, Marija; Videnska, Petra; Sedlar, Karel; Bartejsova, Iva; Kralova, Alena; Slana, Iva

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine possible differences in the faecal microbiota of dairy cows infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Johne's disease) in comparison with noninfected cows from the same herds. Faecal samples from cows in 4 herds were tested for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis by real-time PCR, and faecal bacterial populations were analysed by 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The most notable differences between shedding and nonshedding cows were an increase in the genus Psychrobacter and a decrease in the genera Oscillospira, Ruminococcus, and Bifidobacterium in cows infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The present study is the first to report the faecal microbial composition in dairy cows infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

  12. Osteopontin Immunoreactivity in the Ileum and Ileoceccal Lymph Node of Dairy Cows Naturally Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Osteopontin (Opn), a highly acidic glycoprotein, promotes cellular adhesion and recruitment and has been shown to be upregulated in the granulomas of mycobacterial infections. Johne’s disease, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), is associated with granulomatous enteritis. ...

  13. Capacity is the Wrong Paradigm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Florida Gainesville, FL 32611-6120 ABSTRACT At present, \\capacity" is the prevailing paradigm for covert channels. With respect to steganography ...INTRODUCTION Steganography is the art and science of sending a hidden message from Alice to Bob, so that an eavesdropper is not aware that this hidden...discussed a di erent new paradigm con- cerning steganography . The concern of that new paradigm was \\when is something discovered." We feel that both

  14. The WIMP Paradigm: Current Status

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Jonathan

    2011-03-23

    The WIMP paradigm is the glue that joins together much of the high energy and cosmic frontiers. It postulates that most of the matter in the Universe is made of weakly-interacting massive particles, with implications for a broad range of experiments and observations. I will review the WIMP paradigm's underlying motivations, its current status in view of rapid experimental progress on several fronts, and recent theoretical variations on the WIMP paradigm theme.

  15. Contrasting Results of Culture-Dependent and Molecular Analyses of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from Wood Bison

    PubMed Central

    De Buck, Jeroen; Elkin, Brett; Kutz, Susan; van der Meer, Frank; Orsel, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Reduced to near extinction in the late 1800s, a number of wood bison populations (Bison bison athabascae) have been re-established through reintroduction initiatives. Although an invaluable tool for conservation, translocation of animals can spread infectious agents to new areas or expose animals to pathogens in their new environment. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, a bacterium that causes chronic enteritis in ruminants, is among the pathogens of potential concern for wood bison management and conservation. In order to inform translocation decisions, our objectives were to determine the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection status of wood bison herds in Canada and to culture and genetically characterize the infective strain(s). We tested fecal samples from bison (n = 267) in nine herds using direct PCR for three M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific genetic targets with different copy numbers within the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genome. Restriction enzyme analysis (REA) and sequencing of IS1311 were performed on seven samples from five different herds. We also evaluated a panel of different culture conditions for their ability to support M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis growth from feces and tissues of direct-PCR-positive animals. Eighty-one fecal samples (30%) tested positive using direct IS900 PCR, with positive samples from all nine herds; of these, 75% and 21% were also positive using ISMAP02 and F57, respectively. None of the culture conditions supported the growth of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from PCR-positive samples. IS1311 REA and sequencing indicate that at least two different M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strain types exist in Canadian wood bison. The presence of different M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains among wood bison herds should be considered in the planning of translocations. PMID:23686265

  16. Immune-Enhancing Effects of Taishan Pinus massoniana Pollen Polysaccharides on DNA Vaccine Expressing Bordetella avium ompA

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fujie; Liu, Xiao; Sun, Zhenhong; Yu, Cuilian; Liu, Liping; Yang, Shifa; Li, Bing; Wei, Kai; Zhu, Ruiliang

    2016-01-01

    Bordetella avium is the causative agent of bordetellosis, which remains to be the cause of severe losses in the turkey industry. Given the lack of vaccines that can provide good protection, developing a novel vaccine against B. avium infection is crucial. In this study, we constructed a eukaryotic expression plasmid, which expressed the outer membrane protein A (ompA) of B. avium, to prepare a B. avium recombinant ompA-DNA vaccine. Three concentrations (low, middle, and high) of Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharides (TPPPS), a known immunomodulator, were used as adjuvants, and their immune conditioning effects on the developed DNA vaccine were examined. The pure ompA-DNA vaccine, Freund’s incomplete adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine, and the empty plasmid served as the controls. The chickens in each group were separately inoculated with these vaccines three times at 1, 7, and 14 days old. Dynamic changes in antibody production, cytokine secretion, and lymphocyte count were then determined from 7 to 49 days after the first inoculation. Protective rates of the vaccines were also determined after the third inoculation. Results showed that the pure DNA vaccine obviously induced the production of antibodies, the secretion of cytokines, and the increase in CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte counts in peripheral blood, as well as provided a protective rate of 50% to the B. avium-challenged chickens. The chickens inoculated with the TPPPS adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine and Freund’s adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine demonstrated higher levels of immune responses than those inoculated with pure ompA-DNA vaccine, whereas only the ompA-DNA vaccine with 200 mg/mL TPPPS completely protected the chickens against B. avium infection. These findings indicate that the B. avium ompA-DNA vaccine combined with TPPPS is a potentially effective B. avium vaccine. PMID:26870023

  17. Contrasting results of culture-dependent and molecular analyses of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from wood bison.

    PubMed

    Forde, Taya; De Buck, Jeroen; Elkin, Brett; Kutz, Susan; van der Meer, Frank; Orsel, Karin

    2013-07-01

    Reduced to near extinction in the late 1800s, a number of wood bison populations (Bison bison athabascae) have been re-established through reintroduction initiatives. Although an invaluable tool for conservation, translocation of animals can spread infectious agents to new areas or expose animals to pathogens in their new environment. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, a bacterium that causes chronic enteritis in ruminants, is among the pathogens of potential concern for wood bison management and conservation. In order to inform translocation decisions, our objectives were to determine the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection status of wood bison herds in Canada and to culture and genetically characterize the infective strain(s). We tested fecal samples from bison (n = 267) in nine herds using direct PCR for three M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific genetic targets with different copy numbers within the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genome. Restriction enzyme analysis (REA) and sequencing of IS1311 were performed on seven samples from five different herds. We also evaluated a panel of different culture conditions for their ability to support M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis growth from feces and tissues of direct-PCR-positive animals. Eighty-one fecal samples (30%) tested positive using direct IS900 PCR, with positive samples from all nine herds; of these, 75% and 21% were also positive using ISMAP02 and F57, respectively. None of the culture conditions supported the growth of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from PCR-positive samples. IS1311 REA and sequencing indicate that at least two different M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strain types exist in Canadian wood bison. The presence of different M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains among wood bison herds should be considered in the planning of translocations.

  18. The Peter Pan paradigm.

    PubMed

    Cohen, J Craig; Larson, Janet E

    2008-01-08

    Genetic and environmental agents that disrupt organogenesis are numerous and well described. Less well established, however, is the role of delay in the developmental processes that yield functionally immature tissues at birth. Evidence is mounting that organs do not continue to develop postnatally in the context of these organogenesis insults, condemning the patient to utilize under-developed tissues for adult processes. These poorly differentiated organs may appear histologically normal at birth but with age may deteriorate revealing progressive or adult-onset pathology. The genetic and molecular underpinning of the proposed paradigm reveals the need for a comprehensive systems biology approach to evaluate the role of maternal-fetal environment on organogenesis."You may delay, but time will not" Benjamin Franklin, USA Founding Father.

  19. Relational marital paradigm.

    PubMed

    Gostecnik, Christian; Repic, Tanja

    2009-01-01

    The relational marital paradigm presumes that those partners who trigger the strongest impulses of attraction and passionate feelings of love in each other are those who are most likely to marry. However, with time these feelings also awaken memories of the most horrible conflicts and nightmares experienced in the family of origin. The subconscious intention is that the primary drama will, this time, be resolved with more positive outcomes. Relational marital therapy, therefore, sets a new milestone in understanding. It is a different approach to therapeutic practice that is based on the therapeutic relationship/alliance, which addresses and resolves the deepest psychobiological states and affects and brings new potential for better quality of relationships.

  20. Craniofacial growth: evolving paradigms.

    PubMed

    Castaldo, Gennaro; Cerritelli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Numerous theories about craniofacial growth have been formulated in the last century. The most influential hypotheses were: genetic, synthetic and functional matrix revisited. Moreover, a large number of experts from different fields tried to explain craniofacial growth and its developmental mechanisms, in order to deliver the best treatment possible to orthodontic patients. The aim of this review is to summarize recent concepts on craniofacial growth, overlap these theories with the development of the general scientific knowledge, and suggest a more integrated multidisciplinary person-based approach. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Pubmed, CINAHL and Google Scholar were screened from inception to February 2014 for relevant papers. Grey literature was considered as part of the search. The influence of new scientific discoveries and intuitions about craniofacial growth produced further insights in orthodontics care, shifting the paradigm from a pre-determined, sectorial treatment to an individualized, multidisciplinary patient-centered approach aiming to enhance the quality of orthodontic assistance.