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Sample records for avium subespecie avium

  1. Bordetella avium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bordetellosis is an acute, highly contagious disease of the upper respiratory tract of young turkeys (4-8 wk of age). The disease is caused by a gram-negative, nonfermentative bacterium, Bordetella avium. Members of the genus Bordetella are well known for their ability to colonize and damage ciliate...

  2. The Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Inderlied, C B; Kemper, C A; Bermudez, L E

    1993-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease emerged early in the epidemic of AIDS as one of the common opportunistic infections afflicting human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. However, only over the past few years has a consensus developed about its significance to the morbidity and mortality of AIDS. M. avium was well known to mycobacteriologists decades before AIDS, and the MAC was known to cause disease, albeit uncommon, in humans and animals. The early interest in the MAC provided a basis for an explosion of studies over the past 10 years largely in response to the role of the MAC in AIDS opportunistic infection. Molecular techniques have been applied to the epidemiology of MAC disease as well as to a better understanding of the genetics of antimicrobial resistance. The interaction of the MAC with the immune system is complex, and putative MAC virulence factors appear to have a direct effect on the components of cellular immunity, including the regulation of cytokine expression and function. There now is compelling evidence that disseminated MAC disease in humans contributes to both a decrease in the quality of life and survival. Disseminated disease most commonly develops late in the course of AIDS as the CD4 cells are depleted below a critical threshold, but new therapies for prophylaxis and treatment offer considerable promise. These new therapeutic modalities are likely to be useful in the treatment of other forms of MAC disease in patients without AIDS. The laboratory diagnosis of MAC disease has focused on the detection of mycobacteria in the blood and tissues, and although the existing methods are largely adequate, there is need for improvement. Indeed, the successful treatment of MAC disease clearly will require an early and rapid detection of the MAC in clinical specimens long before the establishment of the characteristic overwhelming infection of bone marrow, liver, spleen, and other tissue. Also, a standard method of susceptibility testing

  3. Mycobacterium avium in a shower linked to pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Falkinham, Joseph O; Iseman, Michael D; de Haas, Petra; van Soolingen, Dick

    2008-06-01

    Mycobacterium avium was isolated from hot and cold water samples and from sediment (biofilm) collected from the showerhead in the home of a woman with M. avium pulmonary disease lacking known M. avium risk factors. IS1245/IS1311 DNA fingerprinting demonstrated that M. avium isolates from the hot and cold water and showerhead sediment demonstrated a clonal relationship with the patient's M. avium isolate. The data provide evidence that showers may serve as sources of infection by waterborne M. avium.

  4. Iron Acquisition in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joyce; Moolji, Jalal; Dufort, Alex; Staffa, Alfredo; Domenech, Pilar; Reed, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is a host-adapted pathogen that evolved from the environmental bacterium M. avium subsp. hominissuis through gene loss and gene acquisition. Growth of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the laboratory is enhanced by supplementation of the media with the iron-binding siderophore mycobactin J. Here we examined the production of mycobactins by related organisms and searched for an alternative iron uptake system in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Through thin-layer chromatography and radiolabeled iron-uptake studies, we showed that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is impaired for both mycobactin synthesis and iron acquisition. Consistent with these observations, we identified several mutations, including deletions, in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genes coding for mycobactin synthesis. Using a transposon-mediated mutagenesis screen conditional on growth without myobactin, we identified a potential mycobactin-independent iron uptake system on a M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific genomic island, LSPP15. We obtained a transposon (Tn) mutant with a disruption in the LSPP15 gene MAP3776c for targeted study. The mutant manifests increased iron uptake as well as intracellular iron content, with genes downstream of the transposon insertion (MAP3775c to MAP3772c [MAP3775-2c]) upregulated as the result of a polar effect. As an independent confirmation, we observed the same iron uptake phenotypes by overexpressing MAP3775-2c in wild-type M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. These data indicate that the horizontally acquired LSPP15 genes contribute to iron acquisition by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, potentially allowing the subsequent loss of siderophore production by this pathogen. IMPORTANCE Many microbes are able to scavenge iron from their surroundings by producing iron-chelating siderophores. One exception is Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, a fastidious, slow-growing animal pathogen whose growth

  5. MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM AND DRINKING WATER WHAT ARE THE CONNECTIONS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Human Mycobacterium avium infections are only known to be acquired from environmental sources such as water and soil. We compared M. avium isolates from clinical and drinking water sources using molecular tools. Methods: M. avium was isolated from water samples colle...

  6. MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM AND DRINKING WATER WHAT ARE THE CONNECTIONS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Human Mycobacterium avium infections are only known to be acquired from environmental sources such as water and soil. We compared M. avium isolates from clinical and drinking water sources using molecular tools. Methods: M. avium was isolated from water samples colle...

  7. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of thirty Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) organisms were measured. The EPMs of fifteen clinical isolates ranged from -1.9 to -5.0 µm cm V-1s-1, and the EPMs of fifteen environmental isolates ranged from -1...

  8. Disparate host immunity to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens in calves inoculated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, M. avium subsp. avium, M. kansasii and M. bovis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cross-reactivity of mycobacterial antigens in immune-based diagnostic assays has been a major concern and criticism of current tests for the detection of paratuberculosis. In the present study, host immune responses to antigen preparations of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), consis...

  9. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of thirty Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) organisms isolated from clinical and environmental sources were measured in 9.15 mM KH2PO4 buffered water. The EPMs of fifteen clinical isolates ranged from -1.9 to -5.0 µm cm V-1 ...

  10. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium infection in a cat

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Maureen; Taylor, Judith; Woods, Paul

    2002-01-01

    A domestic shorthair cat was presented for lethargy and ataxia. Clinical findings included an abdominal mass, lumbosacral pain, ataxia. Aspirates from the liver and lymph nodes revealed intracellular, negative-staining rods. Treatment for presumptive mycobacterium infection was unsuccessful and the cat was euthanized. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium was confirmed on culture. PMID:12001504

  11. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of thirty Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) organisms were measured. The EPMs of fifteen clinical isolates ranged from -1.9 to -5.0 µm cm V-1s-1, and the EPMs of fifteen environmental isolates ranged from -1...

  12. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of thirty Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) organisms isolated from clinical and environmental sources were measured in 9.15 mM KH2PO4 buffered water. The EPMs of fifteen clinical isolates ranged from -1.9 to -5.0 µm cm V-1 ...

  13. Iron-chelating compound from Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, W G; Merkal, R S

    1976-01-01

    A iron-chelating monohydroxamate was isolated from cultures of Mycobacterium avium grown on an iron-limiting medium. The hydroxyamate metabolite was characterized by chemical degradation and spectral measurements as L-alpha-asparaginyl-L-alpha-(N-hydroxy)-asparagine. PMID:185194

  14. Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium found in raptors exposed to infected domestic fowl.

    PubMed

    Kriz, Petr; Kaevska, Marija; Bartejsova, Iva; Pavlik, Ivo

    2013-09-01

    We report a case of a falcon breeding facility, where raptors (both diurnal and nocturnal) were raised in contact with domestic fowl (Gallus gallus f. domesticus) infected by Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. Fecal and environmental samples from 20 raptors and four common ravens (Corvus corax) were collected. Mycobacterium a. avium DNA was detected in feces of four raptors (bald eagle [Haliaeetus leucocephalus], eagle owl [Bubo bubo], barn owl [Tyto alba], and little owl [Athene noctua]) using triplex quantitative real-time PCR. As both the flock of domestic fowl and one of the infected raptors had the same origin (zoological collection), they might have had a common source of colonization/infection. However, the detection of M. a. avium in feces of three other raptors may point at transmission of the agent between the birds in the facility. Contact of raptors with domestic fowl infected by M. a. avium may pose a risk for transmission of the infection for them; however, raptors from the falcon breeding facility seemed to be relatively resistant to the infection.

  15. Experimental inoculation of BFDV-positive budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) with two Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolates.

    PubMed

    Ledwoń, Aleksandra; Sapierzyński, Rafał; Augustynowicz-Kopeć, Ewa; Szeleszczuk, Piotr; Kozak, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Beak and feather disease virus- (BFDV-) positive (naturally infected) but clinically healthy budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) were inoculated with two isolates of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolated from naturally infected golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) and peafowl (Pavo cristatus). During a period of more than two months after inoculation, samples of cloacal and crop swabs, faeces, and blood were obtained for BFDV and Mycobacterium avium testing with PCR. Birds were euthanized nine weeks after inoculation. All infected budgerigars developed signs typical of mycobacteriosis, but more advanced clinical and pathological changes were visible in the group infected with the pheasant isolate. Only a few cloacal and crop swab samples were positive for Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium despite advanced pathological changes in the internal organs. In the groups infected with mycobacterium isolates the frequency of BFDV-positive samples was higher than in the control group. In the infected groups the frequency of BFDV was substantially higher in the cloacal swabs of birds inoculated with the pheasant isolate than in the peafowl-isolate-infected group.

  16. Experimental Inoculation of BFDV-Positive Budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) with Two Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Sapierzyński, Rafał; Szeleszczuk, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Beak and feather disease virus- (BFDV-) positive (naturally infected) but clinically healthy budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) were inoculated with two isolates of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolated from naturally infected golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) and peafowl (Pavo cristatus). During a period of more than two months after inoculation, samples of cloacal and crop swabs, faeces, and blood were obtained for BFDV and Mycobacterium avium testing with PCR. Birds were euthanized nine weeks after inoculation. All infected budgerigars developed signs typical of mycobacteriosis, but more advanced clinical and pathological changes were visible in the group infected with the pheasant isolate. Only a few cloacal and crop swab samples were positive for Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium despite advanced pathological changes in the internal organs. In the groups infected with mycobacterium isolates the frequency of BFDV-positive samples was higher than in the control group. In the infected groups the frequency of BFDV was substantially higher in the cloacal swabs of birds inoculated with the pheasant isolate than in the peafowl-isolate-infected group. PMID:24738057

  17. Genetic IS901 RFLP diversity among Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolates from four pheasant flocks.

    PubMed

    Moravkova, Monika; Lamka, Jiri; Slany, Michal; Pavlik, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    IS901 RFLP analysis of 36 Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (MAA) isolates from 15 pheasants (Phasianus colchicus) and two goshawks (Accipiter gentilis) from four pheasant farms was performed. Using this method, six different IS901 RFLP types (E, F, G, M, Q, and V) were identified. The distribution of IS901 RFLP profiles was tightly linked to individual flocks. Matching IS901 RFLP profiles observed in the present study indicate MAA transmission between pheasants and goshawks in the same locality. In two flocks, different pheasants within a flock as well as in various organs of five individual pheasants were found to have two distinct IS901 RFLP profiles.

  18. Mycobacterium avium subspecies impair dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Basler, Tina; Brumshagen, Christina; Beineke, Andreas; Goethe, Ralph; Bäumer, Wolfgang

    2013-10-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne's disease, a chronic, granulomatous enteritis of ruminants. Dendritic cells (DC) of the gut are ideally placed to combat invading mycobacteria; however, little is known about their interaction with MAP. Here, we investigated the interaction of MAP and the closely related M. avium ssp. avium (MAA) with murine DC and the effect of infected macrophages on DC maturation. The infection of DC with MAP or MAA induced DC maturation, which differed to that of LPS as maturation was accompanied by higher production of IL-10 and lower production of IL-12. Treatment of maturing DC with supernatants from mycobacteria-infected macrophages resulted in impaired DC maturation, leading to a semi-mature, tolerogenic DC phenotype expressing low levels of MHCII, CD86 and TNF-α after LPS stimulation. Though the cells were not completely differentiated they responded with an increased IL-10 and a decreased IL-12 production. Using recombinant cytokines we provide evidence that the semi-mature DC phenotype results from a combination of secreted cytokines and released antigenic mycobacterial components of the infected macrophage. Our results indicate that MAP and MAA are able to subvert DC function directly by infecting and indirectly via the milieu created by infected macrophages.

  19. Identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis Isolated From Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mycobacterium avium (MA) is divided into four subspecies based primarily on host-range and consists of MA subsp. avium (birds), MA subsp. silvaticum (wood pigeons), MA subsp. paratuberculosis (broad, poorly-defined host range), and the recently described MA subsp. hominissuis (hu...

  20. Identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis Isolated From Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mycobacterium avium (MA) is divided into four subspecies based primarily on host-range and consists of MA subsp. avium (birds), MA subsp. silvaticum (wood pigeons), MA subsp. paratuberculosis (broad, poorly-defined host range), and the recently described MA subsp. hominissuis (hu...

  1. Bacteriocin from Honeybee Beebread Enterococcus avium, Active against Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Audisio, M. Carina; Terzolo, Horacio R.; Apella, María C.

    2005-01-01

    Enterococcus avium isolated from Apis mellifera beebread produces a thermoresistant bacteriocin with a strain-dependent inhibitory effect on Listeria and without effect on gram-negative bacteria. The bacteriocin appeared to be a polypeptide of about 6 kDa. Genetic analyses revealed no extrachromosomal material in E. avium. PMID:15933045

  2. Formulation of indomethacin emulsion using biopolymer of Prunus avium.

    PubMed

    Verma, Shivangi; Dabral, Prashant; Rana, Vinod; Upadhaya, Kumud; Bhardwaj

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the investigation was to formulate Indomethacin Emulsion using Bio-polymer as Emulsifier. Different batches of emulsions were prepared by varying concentration of biopolymer prunus avium. Based evaluation of the prepared polymers, a conclusion can be drawn that in the Prunus avium bio-material can serve as a promising film forming agent for formulating various drug.

  3. Avian mycobacteriosis caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies avium in four ornamental birds and in vitro drug sensitivity testing of isolates.

    PubMed

    Stepień-Pyśniak, Dagmara; Puk, Krzysztof; Guz, Leszek; Wawrzyniak, Agata; Marek, Agnieszka; Kosikowska, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    Avian tuberculosis, one of the most important diseases affecting various species of birds, is most often caused by Mycobacterium (M.) avium. This report describes cases of M. avium subsp. avium (MAA) infection in a white-crested Holland dwarf rooster, a male and a female golden pheasant and a male peacock. We also investigated the prevalence of mycobacteria in 60 other birds and 40 alpacas. Tissue samples of necropsied birds were cultured for mycobacteria. From non-necropsied 60 other birds and alpacas only faecal samples were collected. Clinical signs in the affected white-crested Holland cock included gradual loss of body weight and hoarse attempts at crowing during its last 3 weeks, with a dramatic loss of body condition and depression over the final week. Only slight weakening was observed in the peacock just before its death, and the golden pheasants died suddenly. Diagnosis was confirmed by microbiological, molecular and pathological results. Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium strains were isolated from the internal organs of the affected birds. Only one faecal sample from 60 other birds was culture- and PCR-positive for M. avium subsp. avium, while another one was only PCR-positive for M. chelonae. We did not isolate any Mycobacterium spp. from faecal samples of alpacas and all of them were PCR-negative. All 18 isolated M. avium strains were resistant to rifampicin, isoniazid, ethambutol, ethionamide, capreomycin and ofloxacin, and susceptible to cycloserine and streptomycin.

  4. Drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium Avium subsp. Avium isolates from naturally infected domestic pigeons to avian tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Parvandar, Kaveh; Mayahi, Mansour; Mosavari, Nader; Pajoohi, Reza Aref

    2016-12-01

    Avian tuberculosis is one of the most important infections affecting most species of birds. Several mycobacterial species have been identified causing avian tuberculosis, and the organisms confirmed most frequently are Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium genavense. Any species of birds can be infected with M. avium. Generally, domesticated fowl or captive wild birds are affected more frequently than those living in the wild. M. avium can not only infect all species of birds, but can also infect some domesticated mammals to cause disease, usually with localized lesion. In immunocompetent individuals, M. avium complex isolates produce localized soft tissue infections, including chronic pulmonary infections in the elderly and cervical lymphadenitis in children, but rarely any disseminated disease. In patients infected with HIV and AIDS or in other immunocompromised individuals, M. avium complex isolates frequently cause severe systemic infections. The importance of avian tuberculosis and the risk of its zoonotic spread motivated our interest to determine the drug susceptibility testing of M. avium subsp. avium isolates from naturally infected domestic pigeons to avian tuberculosis. Based on their clinical signs, 80 pigeons suspected with avian tuberculosis were subjected to the study. Out of the 51 identified isolates, 20 M. avium subsp. avium were subjected to the test. Drug susceptibly testing was performed according to the guidelines by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and using proportional method. In the drug susceptibility testing, all isolates were resistant to streptomycin, kanamycin, ethionamide, and thiophene carboxylic acid hydrazide. Additionally, 3, 2, and 1 isolates were susceptible to isoniazid, rifampin, and ethambutol, respectively. To date, no study has documented the drug susceptibility testing of M. avium isolates from infected birds to avian tuberculosis. Pigeons are extensively kept in urban and rural areas for homing and racing

  5. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium infections in a tule elk (Cervus elaphus nannodes) herd.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Graham C; Ziccardi, Michael H; Gonzales, Ben J; Woods, Leslie M; Fischer, Jon K; Manning, Elizabeth J B; Mazet, Jonna A K

    2006-10-01

    Between 2 August and 22 September 2000, 37 hunter-killed tule elk (Cervus elaphus nannodes) were evaluated at the Grizzly Island Wildlife Area, California, USA, for evidence of paratuberculosis. Elk were examined post-mortem, and tissue and fecal samples were submitted for radiometric mycobacterial culture. Acid-fast isolates were identified by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that discriminates among members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). Histopathologic evaluations were completed, and animals were tested for antibodies using a Johne's enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and agar gel immunodiffusion. In addition, 104 fecal samples from tule elk remaining in the herd were collected from the ground and submitted for radiometric mycobacterial culture. No gross lesions were detected in any of the hunter-killed animals. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) was cultured once from ileocecal tissue of one adult elk and was determined to be a strain (A18) found commonly in infected cattle. One or more isolates of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (MAA) were isolated from tissues of five additional adult elk. Gastrointestinal tract and lymph node tissues from 17 of the 37 elk (46%) examined had histopathologic lesions commonly seen with mycobacterial infection; however, acid-fast bacteria were not observed. All MAC infections were detected from adult elk (P = 0.023). In adult elk, a statistically significant association was found between MAA infection and ELISA sample-to-positive ratio (S/P) > or = 0.25 (P=0.021); four of five MAA culture-positive elk tested positive by ELISA. Sensitivity and specificity of ELISA S/P > or = 0.25 for detection of MAA in adult elk were 50% and 93%, respectively. No significant associations were found between MAC infection and sex or histopathologic lesions. Bacteriologic culture confirmed infection with MAP and MAA in this asymptomatic tule elk herd. The Johne's ELISA was useful in signaling

  6. Activation of macrophages and interference with CD4+ T-cell stimulation by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium subspecies avium

    PubMed Central

    Lage, Susanne Zur; Goethe, Ralph; Darji, Ayub; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Weiss, Siegfried

    2003-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. ptb) and M. avium subspecies avium (M. avium) are closely related but exhibit significant differences in their interaction with the host immune system. The macrophage line, J774, was infected with M. ptb and M. avium and analysed for cytokine production and stimulatory capacity towards antigen-specific CD4+ T cells. Under all conditions J774 cells were activated to produce proinflammatory cytokines. No influence on the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II, intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), B7.1, B7.2 or CD40 was found. However, the antigen-specific stimulatory capacity of J774 cells for a CD4+ T-cell line was significantly inhibited after infection with M. ptb, but not with M. avium. When a T-cell hybridoma expressing a T-cell receptor identical to that of the T-cell line was used, this inhibition was not observed, suggesting that costimulation which is essential for the CD4+ T-cell line is influenced by the pathogenic bacterium M. ptb. PMID:12519304

  7. Inactivation of Mycobacterium avium with monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Luh, Jeanne; Tong, Ning; Raskin, Lutgarde; Mariñas, Benito J

    2008-11-01

    Batch experiments were performed to study the inactivation kinetics of Mycobacterium avium in the presence of monochloramine at 5-30 degrees C, pH 6-10, and 0.30-42.3 mg Cl2/ L. For each temperature and pH investigated, limiting high and low inactivation rates were observed for high and low disinfectant concentrations, respectively, within the range investigated. The rate of inactivation transitioned from high to low over a relatively narrow range of intermediate monochloramine concentrations. The observed temperature dependence of inactivation was consistent with an Arrhenius expression with activation energies of 58.0 and 71.7 kJ/mol for the high and low concentration ranges, respectively. The rate of inactivation increased with decreasing pH, consistent with trends reported for the reaction of monochloramine with protein thiols. Experiments performed at pH approximately 3.5 showed that dichloramine was a weaker disinfectant than monochloramine, and that its contribution to the overall inactivation of M. avium with combined chlorine was negligible at pH 6-10. A kinetic model incorporating disinfectant concentration, temperature, and pH effects was used to illustrate that monochloramine efficiency to inactivate M. avium in water could vary broadly from adequate (e.g., 99.9% inactivation efficiency in 32 min at 5 mg Cl2/L, pH 6, 30 degrees C) to impractical (e.g., 99.9% inactivation efficiency in 9 d at 1 mg Cl2/L, pH 9, 5 degrees C).

  8. Urinary mycobacterium avium presenting as sterile pyuria

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai; Samplaski, Mary; Mazzulli, Tony; Lo, Kirk; Grober, Ethan; Jarvi, Keith Allen

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old healthy woman presented with persistent, asymptomatic sterile pyuria detected by her family physician. While she did not have symptoms, the patient recounts that she has had cloudy urine for years. Cultures of the urine for bacteria showed no growth and no fungi were identified. First-morning urine samples were sent for both tuberculosis and nontuberculosis mycobacterium species testing. The culture grew genotypically identified Mycobaterium avium complex (MAC). Mantoux skin testing was positive. No urological abnormalities were detected by ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) imaging of the urinary tract. PMID:27790302

  9. Sequencing of hsp65 Distinguishes among Subsets of the Mycobacterium avium Complex

    PubMed Central

    Turenne, Christine Y.; Semret, Makeda; Cousins, Debby V.; Collins, Desmond M.; Behr, Marcel A.

    2006-01-01

    The Mycobacterium avium complex consists of epidemiologically distinct subsets. The classification of these subsets is complicated by a number of factors, including the ambiguous results obtained with phenotypic and genetic assays and the recent appreciation that human and avian strains appear to be distinct. In previous work, sequencing based on a 441-bp portion of the hsp65 gene has proven to efficiently classify isolates within the Mycobacterium genus but provides low resolution for distinguishing among members of the M. avium complex. Therefore, in this study, we have targeted the more variable 3′ region of the hsp65 gene to determine whether it can effectively discriminate M. avium complex isolates at the levels of species and subspecies. Primers designed for this target consistently generated amplicons for all organisms classified as M. avium complex. Sequences obtained indicate that M. intracellulare is genetically divergent from M. avium organisms, and distinct sequevars were obtained for M. avium subsets, including M. avium subsp. avium (bird type), M. avium subsp. hominissuis, and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. In addition, sequence differences served to distinguish bovine from ovine strains of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. A unique profile for M. avium subsp. silvaticum was not obtained. These results indicate that sequencing the 3′ region of the hsp65 gene can simply and unambiguously distinguish species and subspecies of the M. avium complex. PMID:16455896

  10. Cryptosporidium avium n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in birds

    PubMed Central

    Holubová, Nikola; Sak, Bohumil; Horčičková, Michaela; Hlásková, Lenka; Květoňová, Dana; Menchaca, Sarah; McEvoy, John; Kváč, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The morphological, biological, and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium avian genotype V are described, and the species name Cryptosporidium avium is proposed to reflect its specificity for birds under natural and experimental conditions. Oocysts of C. avium measured 5.30–6.90 μm (mean = 6.26 μm) × 4.30–5.50 μm (mean = 4.86 μm) with a length to width ratio of 1.29 (1.14–1.47). Oocysts of C. avium obtained from four naturally infected red-crowned parakeets (Cyanoramphus novaezealandiae) were infectious for 6-month-old budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) and hens (Gallus gallus f. domestica). The prepatent periods in both susceptible bird species was 11 days post infection (DPI). The infection intensity of C. avium in budgerigars and hens was low, with a maximum intensity of 5,000 oocysts per gram of faeces. Oocysts of C. avium were microscopically detected at only 12–16 DPI in hens and 12 DPI in budgerigars, while PCR analyses revealed the presence of specific DNA in faecal samples from 11 to 30 DPI (the conclusion of the experiment). Cryptosporidium avium was not infectious for 8-week-old SCID and BALB/c mice (Mus musculus). Naturally or experimentally infected birds showed no clinical signs of cryptosporidiosis and no pathology was detected. Developmental stages of C. avium were detected in the ileum and caecum using scanning electron microscopy. Phylogenetic analyses based on small subunit rRNA, actin, and heat shock protein 70 gene sequences revealed that C. avium is genetically distinct from previously described Cryptosporidium species. PMID:26905074

  11. Characterization of a Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium Operon Associated with Virulence and Drug Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Viale, Mariana Noelia; Imperiale, Belén; Gioffre, Andrea Karina; Colombatti Olivieri, María Alejandra; Moyano, Roberto Damián; Morcillo, Nora; Santangelo, María de la Paz; Davis, William; Romano, María Isabel

    2014-01-01

    The lprG-p55 operon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis is involved in the transport of toxic compounds. P55 is an efflux pump that provides resistance to several drugs, while LprG is a lipoprotein that modulates the host's immune response against mycobacteria. The knockout mutation of this operon severely reduces the replication of both mycobacterial species during infection in mice and increases susceptibility to toxic compounds. In order to gain insight into the function of LprG in the Mycobacterium avium complex, in this study, we assayed the effect of the deletion of lprG gene in the D4ER strain of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. The replacement of lprG gene with a hygromycin cassette caused a polar effect on the expression of p55. Also, a twofold decrease in ethidium bromide susceptibility was observed and the resistance to the antibiotics rifampicin, amikacin, linezolid, and rifabutin was impaired in the mutant strain. In addition, the mutation decreased the virulence of the bacteria in macrophages in vitro and in a mice model in vivo. These findings clearly indicate that functional LprG and P55 are necessary for the correct transport of toxic compounds and for the survival of MAA in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24967408

  12. Genotyping of Mycobacterium avium complex organisms using multispacer sequence typing.

    PubMed

    Cayrou, Caroline; Turenne, Christine; Behr, Marcel A; Drancourt, Michel

    2010-03-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) currently comprises eight species of environmental and animal-associated, slowly-growing mycobacteria: Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, Mycobacterium chimaera, Mycobacterium colombiense, Mycobacterium arosiense , Mycobacterium bouchedurhonense, Mycobacterium marseillense and Mycobacterium timonense. In humans, MAC organisms are responsible for opportunistic infections whose unique epidemiology remains poorly understood, in part due to the lack of a genotyping method applicable to all eight MAC species. In this study we developed multispacer sequence typing (MST), a sequencing-based method, for the genotyping of MAC organisms. An alignment of the genome sequence of M. avium subsp. hominissuis strain 104 and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strain K-10 revealed 621 intergenic spacers <1000 bp. From these, 16 spacers were selected that ranged from 300 to 800 bp and contained a number of variable bases, <50 within each of the 16 spacers. Four spacers were successfully PCR-amplified and sequenced in 11 reference strains. Combining the sequence of these four spacers in 106 MAC organisms, including 83 M. avium, 11 M. intracellulare , six M. chimaera, two M. colombiense and one each of M. arosiense, M. bouchedurhonense, M. marseillense and M. timonense, yielded a total of 45 spacer types, with an index of discrimination of 0.94. Each spacer type was specific for a species and certain spacer types were specific for subspecies of M. avium. MST is a new method for genotyping of organisms belonging to any one of the eight MAC species tested in this study.

  13. GENETIC FINGERPRINTING OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX (MAC) ORGANISMS ISOLATED FROM HOSPITAL PATIENTS AND THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A particularly pathogenic group of mycobacteria belong to the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), which includes M. avium and M. intracellulare. MAC organisms cause disease in children, the elderly, and immuno-compromised individuals. A critical step in preventing MAC infections...

  14. GENETIC FINGERPRINTING OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX (MAC) ORGANISMS ISOLATED FROM HOSPITAL PATIENTS AND THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A particularly pathogenic group of mycobacteria belong to the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), which includes M. avium and M. intracellulare. MAC organisms cause disease in children, the elderly, and immuno-compromised individuals. A critical step in preventing MAC infections...

  15. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Veterinary Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Harris, N. Beth; Barletta, Raúl G.

    2001-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (basonym M. paratuberculosis) is the etiologic agent of a severe gastroenteritis in ruminants known as Johne's disease. Economic losses to the cattle industry in the United States are staggering, reaching $1.5 billion annually. A potential pathogenic role in humans in the etiology of Crohn's disease is under investigation. In this article, we review the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnostics, and disease control measures of this important veterinary pathogen. We emphasize molecular genetic aspects including the description of markers used for strain identification, diagnostics, and phylogenetic analysis. Recent important advances in the development of animal models and genetic systems to study M. paratuberculosis virulence determinants are also discussed. We conclude with proposals for the applications of these models and recombinant technology to the development of diagnostic, control, and therapeutic measures. PMID:11432810

  16. Evaluation of Subspecies-specific Proteins for the Diagnosis of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis Infections

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map)-specific proteins (35) were identified by comparing the proteomes of Map isolates with those of the genetically similar subspecies IS901+ Mycobacterium avium subspecies avium or silvaticum. This approach identified subspecies-specific proteins in...

  17. Hemolysin as a Virulence Factor for Systemic Infection with Isolates of Mycobacterium avium Complex

    PubMed Central

    Maslow, Joel N.; Dawson, David; Carlin, Elizabeth A.; Holland, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    Isolates of the Mycobacterium avium complex were examined for hemolysin expression. Only invasive isolates of M. avium were observed to be hemolytic (P < 0.001), with activity the greatest for isolates of serovars 4 and 8. Thus, M. avium hemolysin appears to represent a virulence factor necessary for invasive disease. PMID:9889239

  18. A Gene Specific to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, But Only at the Transcription-translation Level

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is no known antibody that detects M. avium subsp paratuberculosis and does not cross react with other M. avium subspecies. In the present study, a monoclonal antibody was identified from mice immunized with a cell membrane fraction of M. avium subsp paratuberculosis strain K-10. This antibod...

  19. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Mycobacterium avium subspecies Obtained from Multiple Host Species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A comparative genomic approach was used to identify large sequence polymorphisms among Mycobacterium avium (M. avium) subspecies obtained from a variety of host animals. DNA microarrays were used as a platform for comparing mycobacterial isolates with the sequenced bovine isolate M. avium subsp. p...

  20. Bordetella avium Antibiotic Resistance, Novel Enrichment Culture, and Antigenic Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Beach, Nathan M.; Thompson, Seth; Mutnick, Rachel; Brown, Lisa; Kettig, Gina; Puffenbarger, Robyn; Miyamoto, David; Temple, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Bordetella avium continues to be an economic issue in the turkey industry as the causative agent of bordetellosis, which often leads to serious secondary infections. This study presents a broad characterization of the antibiotic resistance patterns in this diverse collection of B. avium strains collected over the past thirty years. In addition, the plasmid basis for the antibiotic resistance was characterized. The antibiotic resistance pattern allowed the development of a novel enrichment culture method that was subsequently employed to gather new isolates from diseased turkeys and a healthy sawhet owl. While a healthy turkey flock was shown to seroconvert by four weeks-of-age, attempts to culture B. avium from healthy turkey poults were unsuccessful. Western blot of B. avium strains using pooled serum from diseased and healthy commercial turkey flocks revealed both antigenic similarities and differences between strains. In sum, the work documents the continued exposure of commercial turkey flocks to B. avium and the need for development of an effective, inexpensive vaccine to control spread of the disease. PMID:22721730

  1. Numerical taxonomy of mycobactin-dependent mycobacteria, emended description of Mycobacterium avium, and description of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium subsp. nov., Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis subsp. nov., and Mycobacterium avium subsp. silvaticum subsp. nov.

    PubMed

    Thorel, M F; Krichevsky, M; Lévy-Frébault, V V

    1990-07-01

    We performed a numerical taxonomy analysis of 38 Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and related mycobacterial strains, including wood pigeon mycobacteria; this analysis was based on 22 tests, which were selected for their potential discriminative value from a total of 51 tests studied and produced four well-defined clusters. Cluster 1 contained the M. paratuberculosis strains, including two strains isolated from Crohn's disease patients; cluster 2 contained Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare reference strains; cluster 3 consisted of the wood pigeon mycobacteria; and the only strain in cluster 4 was M. paratuberculosis 316F, which is used for antigen and vaccine production. Strains in cluster 1 were mycobactin dependent even when they were subcultured, whereas strains in cluster 3 were unable to grow on egg medium and their growth was stimulated by pH 5.5. Growth stimulation by pyruvate, resistance to D-cycloserine (50 micrograms/ml), and alkaline phosphatase activity also were characteristics that were useful for discriminating between clusters 1 and 3. The results of previous DNA-DNA hybridization studies have demonstrated that M. avium Chester 1901, M. paratuberculosis Bergey et al. 1923, and the wood pigeon mycobacteria belong to a single genomic species, and we propose that the name of this species should be M. avium. On the basis of the results of previous genomic analyses based on restriction fragment length, the results of polymorphism studies, and DNA patterns determined by field inversion gel electrophoresis as well as the results of our phenotypic study, we propose that the species should be divided into subspecies which correspond to pathogenicity and host range characteristics.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Concentration of Mycobacterium avium by hospital hot water systems.

    PubMed

    du Moulin, G C; Stottmeier, K D; Pelletier, P A; Tsang, A Y; Hedley-Whyte, J

    1988-09-16

    Water from 34 sites on two temporarily vacant hospital floors was analyzed for the presence of mycobacteria. These sites included 18 cold water taps and 16 hot water taps, including shower heads. A total of 14 sites (41%) demonstrated the presence of Mycobacterium avium as confirmed by biochemical characterization, DNA/rRNA probe analysis, and seroagglutination. Of positive sites, 11 were hot water sources with an average temperature of 55 degrees C and yielding up to 500 colony-forming units per 100 mL. Seven of 11 strains analyzed for glycolipid antigens were identified with the type 4 serovar, the preponderant serovar of M avium in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome from the Boston area. Potable hot water systems, particularly those that generate aerosols, may contain concentrations of M avium greater than those found in cold water systems and could serve as an environmental source for colonization and infection of immunocompromised persons.

  3. Chlorine, Chloramine, Chlorine Dioxide, and Ozone Susceptibility of Mycobacterium avium

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Robert H.; Falkinham, Joseph O.; Norton, Cheryl D.; LeChevallier, Mark W.

    2000-01-01

    Environmental and patient isolates of Mycobacterium avium were resistant to chlorine, monochloramine, chlorine dioxide, and ozone. For chlorine, the product of the disinfectant concentration (in parts per million) and the time (in minutes) to 99.9% inactivation for five M. avium strains ranged from 51 to 204. Chlorine susceptibility of cells was the same in washed cultures containing aggregates and in reduced aggregate fractions lacking aggregates. Cells of the more slowly growing strains were more resistant to chlorine than were cells of the more rapidly growing strains. Water-grown cells were 10-fold more resistant than medium-grown cells. Disinfectant resistance may be one factor promoting the persistence of M. avium in drinking water. PMID:10742264

  4. Preservation of monocyte effector functions against Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare in patients with AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, J L; Shiratsuchi, H; Toba, H; Ellner, J J

    1991-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare is a frequent cause of late disseminated infection in patients with AIDS. The ability of human peripheral blood monocytes to phagocytose and kill M. avium was examined in an in vitro model. Monocytes were obtained from 13 healthy volunteers and 11 patients with AIDS, three of whom had documented disseminated M. avium infection. Monocytes were precultured for 2 days before infection with two AIDS-associated and two non-AIDS-associated strains of M. avium. Uptake of M. avium as measured by counting intracellular acid-fast bacilli did not differ among healthy subjects, patients with AIDS, or patients with AIDS and previously documented disseminated M. avium infection. Intracellular growth of M. avium was examined by a CFU assay of cell lysates from M. avium-infected monocytes after 0, 4, and 7 days of culture. Intracellular growth inhibition of M. avium at 7 days after infection was comparable between patients with AIDS and healthy donors for all M. avium strains tested. The effects of the addition of recombinant gamma interferon on M. avium uptake and intracellular growth in monocytes also were studied. Pretreatment of monocytes with gamma interferon prior to infection suppressed monocyte phagocytosis of M. avium. Continuously coculturing of monocytes with gamma interferon after infection augmented killing of M. avium among both patients with AIDS and healthy controls for three of the four strains of M. avium tested. The magnitude of this effect, however, was variable from donor to donor and strain to strain. No significant differences were noted between the growth-inhibiting abilities of gamma-interferon-treated monocytes obtained from healthy volunteers and those obtained from patients with AIDS. PMID:1910011

  5. Cryopreservation of Prunus avium L. embryogenic tissues.

    PubMed

    Grenier-de March, Ghislaine; de Boucaud, Marie-Therese; Chmielarz, Pawel

    2005-01-01

    Embryogenic tissues from wild cherry (Prunus avium L.) were successfully cryopreserved by using a one-step freezing procedure. Cryoprotection consisted of a pretreatment on solid medium with increasing sucrose concentrations (0.25 M for 1 day, 0.5 M for 1 day, 0.75 M for 2 days, and 1.0 M for 3 days), followed by air desiccation to about 20 percent moisture content (fresh weight basis). This method was compared with a pretreatment on solid medium containing 5 percent DMSO and 2 percent proline, followed by immersion in a modified PVS2 cryoprotective solution. Pretreatment on solid medium with increasing concentrations of sucrose led to regrowth of frozen embryogenic tissues, and after 6 weeks of culture, growth was comparable to that of non-dehydrated and non-frozen tissues. By contrast, no regrowth was observed when embryogenic tissues were submitted to the solid/liquid pretreatment with DMSO/proline and a modified PVS2 solution.

  6. Genetic relatedness among Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and M. avium complex.

    PubMed

    Labidi, A; Thoen, C O

    1989-01-01

    Total DNA was extracted from M. paratuberculosis (ATCC 19698) and from M. avium complex (ATCC 25291) cultivated on RVB-10 enriched liquid media. Restriction endonuclease analysis of total DNA was performed with 34 enzymes and DNA digestion profiles were compared. Fifteen enzymes revealed important differences between the two species. Two pairs of enzymes (EcoRII, BstNI) and (MboI, Sau3AI) provide evidence for the presence of dcmI and dam methylation in DNA of M. avium complex and M. paratuberculosis. The differences in DNA fragments of these two species could be of potential value in differentiating these clinically significant mycobacteria.

  7. Molecular analysis and MIRU-VNTR typing of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium, 'hominissuis' and silvaticum strains of veterinary origin.

    PubMed

    Rónai, Zsuzsanna; Csivincsik, Ágnes; Dán, Ádám; Gyuranecz, Miklós

    2016-06-01

    Besides Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), M. avium subsp. avium (MAA), M. avium subsp. silvaticum (MAS), and 'M. avium subsp. hominissuis' (MAH) are equally important members of M. avium complex, with worldwide distribution and zoonotic potential. Genotypic discrimination is a prerequisite to epidemiological studies which can facilitate disease prevention through revealing infection sources and transmission routes. The primary aim of this study was to identify the genetic diversity within 135 MAA, 62 MAS, and 84 MAH strains isolated from wild and domestic mammals, reptiles and birds. Strains were tested for the presence of large sequence polymorphism LSP(A)17 and were submitted to Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable-number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) analysis at 8 loci, including MIRU1, 2, 3, and 4, VNTR25, 32, and 259, and MATR9. In 12 strains hsp65 sequence code type was also determined. LSP(A)17 was present only in 19.9% of the strains. All LSP(A)17 positive strains belonged to subspecies MAH. The discriminatory power of the MIRU-VNTR loci set used reached 0.9228. Altogether 54 different genotypes were detected. Within MAH, MAA, and MAS strains 33, 16, and 5 different genotypes were observed. The described genotypes were not restricted to geographic regions or host species, but proved to be subspecies specific. Our knowledge about MAS is limited due to isolation and identification difficulties. This is the first study including a large number of MAS field strains. Our results demonstrate the high diversity of MAH and MAA strains and the relative uniformity of MAS strains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. High-Density Lipoprotein Binds to Mycobacterium avium and Affects the Infection of THP-1 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ichimura, Naoya; Sato, Megumi; Yoshimoto, Akira; Yano, Kouji; Ohkawa, Ryunosuke; Kasama, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is involved in innate immunity toward various infectious diseases. Concerning bacteria, HDL is known to bind to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and to neutralize its physiological activity. On the other hand, cholesterol is known to play an important role in mycobacterial entry into host cells and in survival in the intracellular environment. However, the pathogenicity of Mycobacterium avium (M. avium) infection, which tends to increase worldwide, remains poorly studied. Here we report that HDL indicated a stronger interaction with M. avium than that with other Gram-negative bacteria containing abundant LPS. A binding of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, the main protein component of HDL, with a specific lipid of M. avium might participate in this interaction. HDL did not have a direct bactericidal activity toward M. avium but attenuated the engulfment of M. avium by THP-1 macrophages. HDL also did not affect bacterial killing after ingestion of live M. avium by THP-1 macrophage. Furthermore, HDL strongly promoted the formation of lipid droplets in M. avium-infected THP-1 macrophages. These observations provide new insights into the relationship between M. avium infection and host lipoproteins, especially HDL. Thus, HDL may help M. avium to escape from host innate immunity. PMID:27516907

  9. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies in the gut associated lymphoid tissue of slaughtered rabbits.

    PubMed

    Arrazuria, Rakel; Sevilla, Iker A; Molina, Elena; Pérez, Valentín; Garrido, Joseba M; Juste, Ramón A; Elguezabal, Natalia

    2015-06-11

    Rabbits are susceptible to infection by different species of the genus Mycobacterium. Particularly, development of specific lesions and isolation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, both subspecies of the M. avium complex, has been reported in wildlife conditions. Although, rabbit meat production worldwide is 200 million tons per year, microbiological data on this source of meat is lacking and more specifically reports of mycobacterial presence in industrially reared rabbit for human consumption have not been published. To this end, we sought mycobacteria by microbiological and histopathological methods paying special attention to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in rabbits from commercial rabbitries from the North East of Spain. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was not detected either by culture or PCR. However, Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium was detected in 15.15% (10/66) and Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis was detected in 1.51% (1/66) of gut associated lymphoid tissue of sampled animals by PCR, whereas caecal contents were negative. 9% (6/66) of the animals presented gross lesions suggestive of lymphoid activation, 6% (4/66) presented granulomatous lesions and 3% (2/66) contained acid fast bacilli. Mycobacterial isolation from samples was not achieved, although colonies of Thermoactinomycetes sp. were identified by 16s rRNA sequencing in 6% (4/66) of sampled animals. Apparently healthy farmed rabbits that go to slaughter may carry M. avium subspecies in gut associated lymphoid tissue.

  10. First identification of Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis sheep strain in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Travería, G E; Zumarraga, M; Etchechoury, I; Romano, M I; Cataldi, A; Pinedo, M F Alvarado; Pavlik, I; Pribylova, R; Romero, J R

    2013-01-01

    We here identified for the first time the presence of Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP) sheep (S) strain in Argentina. IS900 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was positive. The S strain was compared with MAP cattle (C) strains by using IS1311 PCR-restriction endonuclease analysis (PCR-REA), multiplex PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis.

  11. Cellular Interactions in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The study of host immune responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is complicated by a number of factors, including the protracted nature of the disease and the stealthy nature of the pathogen. Noted as one of the more fastidious mycobacteria, infection with MAP is often chara...

  12. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection, immunology and pathology of livestock

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in ruminants leads to a chronic and progressive enteric disease (Johne’s disease) that results in loss of intestinal function, poor body condition, and eventual death. Transmission is primarily through a fecal-oral route in neonates but con...

  13. Tuberculosis in Birds: Insights into the Mycobacterium avium Infections

    PubMed Central

    Dhama, Kuldeep; Mahendran, Mahesh; Tiwari, Ruchi; Dayal Singh, Shambhu; Kumar, Deepak; Singh, Shoorvir; Sawant, Pradeep Mahadev

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis, a List B disease of World Organization for Animal Health, caused by M. avium or M. genavense predominantly affects poultry and pet or captive birds. Clinical manifestations in birds include emaciation, depression and diarrhea along with marked atrophy of breast muscle. Unlike tuberculosis in animals and man, lesions in lungs are rare. Tubercular nodules can be seen in liver, spleen, intestine and bone marrow. Granulomatous lesion without calcification is a prominent feature. The disease is a rarity in organized poultry sector due to improved farm practices, but occurs in zoo aviaries. Molecular techniques like polymerase chain reaction combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism and gene probes aid in rapid identification and characterization of mycobacteria subspecies, and overcome disadvantages of conventional methods which are slow, labour intensive and may at times fail to produce precise results. M. avium subsp. avium with genotype IS901+ and IS1245+ causes infections in animals and human beings too. The bacterium causes sensitivity in cattle to the tuberculin test. The paper discusses in brief the M. avium infection in birds, its importance in a zoonotic perspective, and outlines conventional and novel strategies for its diagnosis, prevention and eradication in domestic/pet birds and humans alike. PMID:21776352

  14. Mechanisms involved in the intrinsic isoniazid resistance of Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed

    Mdluli, K; Swanson, J; Fischer, E; Lee, R E; Barry, C E

    1998-03-01

    Isoniazid (INH), which acts by inhibiting mycolic acid biosynthesis, is very potent against the tuberculous mycobacteria. It is about 100-fold less effective against Mycobacterium avium. This difference has often been attributed to a decreased permeability of the cell wall. We measured the rate of conversion of radiolabelled INH to 4-pyridylmethanol by whole cells and cell-free extracts and estimated the permeability barrier imposed by the cell wall to INH influx in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium. There was no significant difference in the relative permeability to INH between these two species. However, the total conversion rate in M. tuberculosis was found to be four times greater. Examination of in vitro-generated mutants revealed that the major resistance mechanism for both species is loss of the catalase-peroxidase KatG. Analysis of lipid and protein biosynthetic profiles demonstrated that the molecular target of activated INH was identical for both species. M. avium, however, formed colonies at INH concentrations inhibitory for mycolic acid biosynthesis. These mycolate-deficient M. avium exhibited altered colony morphologies, modified cell wall ultrastructure and were 10-fold more sensitive to treatment with hydrophobic antibiotics, such as rifampin. These findings may significantly impact the design of new therapeutic regimens for the treatment of infections with atypical mycobacteria.

  15. Characterization and expression of secA in Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed

    Limia, A; Sangari, F J; Wagner, D; Bermudez, L E

    2001-04-13

    Mycobacterium avium is both a pathogen that infects several hosts such as humans, pigs, and birds, as well as a microorganism that is encountered in environmental sources (soil and water). Protein secretion by the bacterium is likely to influence its ability to overcome adverse and competitive conditions both within or outside the host. Using a combination of cloning and information available in the databank, we characterized the secA gene from M. avium, encoding for a major preprotein translocase subunit associated with the secretion system of prokaryotics. In addition, we cloned the secA promoter sequence in a reporter construct upstream of a promoterless gfp. It was determined that the secA of M. avium shares large homology with the secA of Mycobacterium tuberculosis but not with secA of Mycobacterium leprae. secA expression was determined to be greater at logarithmic growth phase although it was also expressed at low levels during the stationary phase. secA expression was also observed when the bacteria were incubated in water as well as within human monocyte-derived macrophages and in conditions that are associated with biofilm formation. Future evaluation of the sec pathway in M. avium might provide important information about secreted proteins that are required for survival in different environments.

  16. Mycobacterium avium Complex Cervical Lymphadenitis in an Immunocompetent Adult▿

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Joshua B.; Koeppe, John

    2010-01-01

    Nontuberculosis mycobacterial cervical lymphadenitis is a relatively common disease in immunocompetent children but a rare disease in immunocompetent adults. We report the diagnosis and treatment of Mycobacterium avium complex cervical lymphadenitis in an adult female. Our evaluation of immune competence, including gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-12 (IL-12) signaling, found no evidence of deficiency. PMID:20668140

  17. Susceptibility of beige mice to Mycobacterium avium: role of neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Appelberg, R; Castro, A G; Gomes, S; Pedrosa, J; Silva, M T

    1995-01-01

    The beige mutation in C57BL/6 mice has been shown to increase the susceptibility to infection by Mycobacterium avium. In this study, we confirmed those results and showed that the effect of the beige mutation was most obvious after infection with a strain of lower virulence than with a highly virulent isolate of M. avium. The dissemination of M. avium from the gut was observed with both C57BL/6 and beige mice but was faster in the latter. The expression of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and the priming for tumor necrosis factor production during an in vivo infection were similar between beige and immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice. IFN-gamma produced during the infection of beige mice was protective in the spleen, and the administration of recombinant IFN-gamma restored the resistance in the spleen to levels similar to those found in control mice. There were no histological differences between wild-type and beige mice with respect to granuloma formation in the liver. The increased susceptibility of beige mice to M. avium as manifested in the liver was reduced by transfusing neutrophils from wild-type C57BL/6 mice. Likewise, depletion of neutrophils from C57BL/6 mice rendered them as susceptible to M. avium infection of the liver as beige mice. Our results point to the participation of neutrophils in the defect of beige mice in addition to other defects. Furthermore, these results show that neutrophils play a significant role in the defense mechanisms against mycobacterial infections and that beige animals may be a useful model for study of the role of neutrophils in mycobacteriosis. PMID:7642266

  18. Genotyping of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolates from naturally infected lofts of domestic pigeons in Ahvaz by IS901 RFLP

    PubMed Central

    Parvandar-Asadollahi, Kaveh; Mosavari, Nader; Mayahi, Mansoor

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Avian tuberculosis is one of the most important infections affecting most species of birds. Mycobacterium avium can not only infect all species of birds, but also infect some domesticated mammals. The most crucial aspect of control and eradication scheme is identification of infection sources and transmission routs. Molecular techniques such as restriction fragment length polymorphism and pulse field gel electrophoresis have been shown to be much more discriminatory and suitable for use in the epidemiological study. Materials and Methods: Eighty suspected pigeons to avian tuberculosis based on their clinical signs, were subjected to the study. Forty Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolates out of a total of 51 identified isolates were subjected to the test. Results: IS901-RFLP using Pvu II was successfully conducted and produced 7 patterns. The majority of isolates (60%) were RFLP type PI.1. This type was the most similar type to standard strain. However, all the patterns obtained in this study were different from the standard strain. Conclusion: The result of this study indicate that these isolates probably are limited to Khuzestan region. We recommend DNA fingerprinting differentiation of non tuberculous Mycobacteria particularly Mycobacterium avium complex isolated from infected birds and human to possibly find source of infections. PMID:26719782

  19. Genotyping of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolates from naturally infected lofts of domestic pigeons in Ahvaz by IS901 RFLP.

    PubMed

    Parvandar-Asadollahi, Kaveh; Mosavari, Nader; Mayahi, Mansoor

    2015-10-01

    Avian tuberculosis is one of the most important infections affecting most species of birds. Mycobacterium avium can not only infect all species of birds, but also infect some domesticated mammals. The most crucial aspect of control and eradication scheme is identification of infection sources and transmission routs. Molecular techniques such as restriction fragment length polymorphism and pulse field gel electrophoresis have been shown to be much more discriminatory and suitable for use in the epidemiological study. Eighty suspected pigeons to avian tuberculosis based on their clinical signs, were subjected to the study. Forty Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolates out of a total of 51 identified isolates were subjected to the test. IS901-RFLP using Pvu II was successfully conducted and produced 7 patterns. The majority of isolates (60%) were RFLP type PI.1. This type was the most similar type to standard strain. However, all the patterns obtained in this study were different from the standard strain. The result of this study indicate that these isolates probably are limited to Khuzestan region. We recommend DNA fingerprinting differentiation of non tuberculous Mycobacteria particularly Mycobacterium avium complex isolated from infected birds and human to possibly find source of infections.

  20. Insertion and deletion events that define the pathogen Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Alexander, David C; Turenne, Christine Y; Behr, Marcel A

    2009-02-01

    Mycobacterium avium comprises genetically related yet phenotypically distinct subspecies. Consistent with their common origin, whole-genome sequence comparisons have revealed extensive synteny among M. avium organisms. However, the sequenced strains also display numerous regions of heterogeneity that likely contribute to the diversity of the individual subspecies. Starting from a phylogenetic framework derived by multilocus sequence analysis, we examined the distribution of 25 large sequence polymorphisms across a panel of genetically defined M. avium strains. This distribution was most variable among M. avium subsp. hominissuis isolates. In contrast, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains exhibited a characteristic profile, with all isolates containing a set of genomic insertions absent from other M. avium strains. The emergence of the pathogen from its putative M. avium subsp. hominissuis ancestor entailed the acquisition of approximately 125 kb of novel genetic material, followed by a second phase, characterized by reductive genomics. One genomic deletion is common to all isolates while additional deletions distinguish two major lineages of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. For the average strain, these losses total at least 38 kb (sheep lineage) to 90 kb (cattle lineage). This biphasic pattern of evolution, characterized by chromosomal gene acquisition with subsequent gene loss, describes the emergence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and may serve as a general model for the origin of pathogenic mycobacteria.

  1. Host and bacterial factors control the Mycobacterium avium-induced chronic peritoneal granulocytosis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Appelberg, R; Pedrosa, J M; Silva, M T

    1991-01-01

    Persistent peritoneal granulocytosis and elevated macrophage counts have been found in nine mouse strains from 8 to 90 days after infection with Mycobacterium avium. Peritoneal granulocytosis was higher in M. avium-resistant BALB/c. Bcgr (C.D2) mice, compared with congenic M. avium-susceptible BALB/c (Bcgs) animals. Although maximal granulocytosis values were not related to virulence of the inocula, the kinetics of the granulocytic response varied with the virulence of M. avium. Following infections by avirulent (rough) strains of M. avium, the peritoneal granulocytosis progressively declined in BALB/c and C3H/He mice. A similar decline in granulocyte number was observed in resistant C3H/He mice infected with virulent M. avium (smooth transparent strain). In both instances the decline in the peritoneal granulocytosis was associated with a progressive elimination of the inoculum. In the susceptible BALB/c mice, virulent M. avium strains induced progressive infection accompanied with a rapid decline in granulocyte number, whereas the infection with attenuated M. avium, which caused a chronic infection, induced persistent granulocytosis. The ability to recruit granulocytes following the intraperitoneal inoculation of a phlogistic substance (casein hydrolysate) was decreased in infected susceptible but not in infected resistant mice at 90 days of infection with virulent M. avium. PMID:1993357

  2. Thermal Inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Artificially Contaminated Milk by Direct Steam Injection.

    PubMed

    Peterz, Mats; Butot, Sophie; Jagadeesan, Balamurugan; Bakker, Douwe; Donaghy, John

    2016-05-01

    The efficiency of direct steam injection (DSI) at 105 °C for 3 s to inactivate Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk at a pilot-plant scale was investigated. Milk samples were artificially contaminated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and also with cow fecal material naturally infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. We also tested milk artificially contaminated with Mycobacterium smegmatis as a candidate surrogate to compare thermal inactivation between M. smegmatis and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Following the DSI process, no viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis or M. smegmatis was recovered using culture methods for both strains. For pure M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cultures, a minimum reduction of 5.6 log10 was achieved with DSI, and a minimum reduction of 5.7 log10 was found with M. smegmatis. The minimum log10 reduction for wild-type M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis naturally present in feces was 3.3. In addition, 44 dairy and nondairy powdered infant formula (PIF) ingredients used during the manufacturing process of PIF were tested for an alternate source for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and were found to be negative by quantitative PCR (qPCR). In conclusion, the results obtained from this study indicate that a >7-fold-log10 reduction of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk can be achieved with the applied DSI process. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is widespread in dairy herds in many countries. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease in cattle, and infected animals can directly or indirectly (i.e., fecal contamination) contaminate milk. Despite much research and debate, there is no conclusive evidence that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is a zoonotic bacterium, i.e., one that causes disease in humans. The presence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis or its DNA has been reported in dairy products, including pasteurized milk, cheese, and infant formula. In light of this

  3. Comparative genomic analysis of Mycobacterium avium subspecies obtained from multiple host species

    PubMed Central

    Paustian, Michael L; Zhu, Xiaochun; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Robbe-Austerman, Suelee; Kapur, Vivek; Bannantine, John P

    2008-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium avium (M. avium) subspecies vary widely in both pathogenicity and host specificity, but the genetic features contributing to this diversity remain unclear. Results A comparative genomic approach was used to identify large sequence polymorphisms among M. avium subspecies obtained from a variety of host animals. DNA microarrays were used as a platform for comparing mycobacterial isolates with the sequenced bovine isolate M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) K-10. Open reading frames (ORFs) were classified as present or divergent based on the relative fluorescent intensities of the experimental samples compared to MAP K-10 DNA. Multiple large polymorphic regions were found in the genomes of MAP isolates obtained from sheep. One of these clusters encodes glycopeptidolipid biosynthesis enzymes which have not previously been identified in MAP. M. avium subsp. silvaticum isolates were observed to have a hybridization profile very similar to yet distinguishable from M. avium subsp. avium. Isolates obtained from cattle (n = 5), birds (n = 4), goats (n = 3), bison (n = 3), and humans (n = 9) were indistinguishable from cattle isolate MAP K-10. Conclusion Genome diversity in M. avium subspecies appears to be mediated by large sequence polymorphisms that are commonly associated with mobile genetic elements. Subspecies and host adapted isolates of M. avium were distinguishable by the presence or absence of specific polymorphisms. PMID:18366709

  4. Clearance of bacteria in turkeys with Bordetella avium-induced tracheitis.

    PubMed

    Ficken, M D; Edwards, J F; Lay, J C

    1986-01-01

    Quantitative clearance of aerosolized Escherichia coli from the trachea, lung, and air sacs was measured in turkeys infected with Bordetella avium. Clearance of E. coli in turkeys with B. avium-induced tracheitis was minimally affected early in infection. Sixteen to 23 days after infection with B. avium, sporadic, mild depressions in clearance of E. coli were observed in the tracheas, which had large areas of deciliated tracheal epithelium or replacement of normal epithelium by immature hyperplastic epithelium or metaplastic squamous epithelium. Clearance of E. coli from the lung and air sacs was minimally affected in turkeys infected with B. avium.

  5. Thermal Inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Artificially Contaminated Milk by Direct Steam Injection

    PubMed Central

    Butot, Sophie; Jagadeesan, Balamurugan; Bakker, Douwe; Donaghy, John

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The efficiency of direct steam injection (DSI) at 105°C for 3 s to inactivate Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk at a pilot-plant scale was investigated. Milk samples were artificially contaminated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and also with cow fecal material naturally infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. We also tested milk artificially contaminated with Mycobacterium smegmatis as a candidate surrogate to compare thermal inactivation between M. smegmatis and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Following the DSI process, no viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis or M. smegmatis was recovered using culture methods for both strains. For pure M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cultures, a minimum reduction of 5.6 log10 was achieved with DSI, and a minimum reduction of 5.7 log10 was found with M. smegmatis. The minimum log10 reduction for wild-type M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis naturally present in feces was 3.3. In addition, 44 dairy and nondairy powdered infant formula (PIF) ingredients used during the manufacturing process of PIF were tested for an alternate source for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and were found to be negative by quantitative PCR (qPCR). In conclusion, the results obtained from this study indicate that a >7-fold-log10 reduction of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk can be achieved with the applied DSI process. IMPORTANCE M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is widespread in dairy herds in many countries. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease in cattle, and infected animals can directly or indirectly (i.e., fecal contamination) contaminate milk. Despite much research and debate, there is no conclusive evidence that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is a zoonotic bacterium, i.e., one that causes disease in humans. The presence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis or its DNA has been reported in dairy products, including pasteurized milk, cheese, and infant formula

  6. Characterization of Mouse Models of Mycobacterium avium Complex Infection and Evaluation of Drug Combinations

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Deepak V.; Tyagi, Sandeep; Converse, Paul J.; Ammerman, Nicole C.; Grosset, Jacques H.

    2015-01-01

    The Mycobacterium avium complex is the most common cause of nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease worldwide; yet, an optimal treatment regimen for M. avium complex infection has not been established. Clarithromycin is accepted as the cornerstone drug for treatment of M. avium lung disease; however, good model systems, especially animal models, are needed to evaluate the most effective companion drugs. We performed a series of experiments to evaluate and use different mouse models (comparing BALB/c, C57BL/6, nude, and beige mice) of M. avium infection and to assess the anti-M. avium activity of single and combination drug regimens, in vitro, ex vivo, and in mice. In vitro, clarithromycin and moxifloxacin were most active against M. avium, and no antagonism was observed between these two drugs. Nude mice were more susceptible to M. avium infection than the other mouse strains tested, but the impact of treatment was most clearly seen in M. avium-infected BALB/c mice. The combination of clarithromycin-ethambutol-rifampin was more effective in all infected mice than moxifloxacin-ethambutol-rifampin; the addition of moxifloxacin to the clarithromycin-containing regimen did not increase treatment efficacy. Clarithromycin-containing regimens are the most effective for M. avium infection; substitution of moxifloxacin for clarithromycin had a negative impact on treatment efficacy. PMID:25624335

  7. Lactoferricin Peptides Increase Macrophages' Capacity To Kill Mycobacterium avium

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Tânia; Moreira, Ana C.; Nazmi, Kamran; Moniz, Tânia; Vale, Nuno; Rangel, Maria; Gomes, Paula; Bolscher, Jan G. M.; Rodrigues, Pedro N.; Bastos, Margarida

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterial infections cause a significant burden of disease and death worldwide. Their treatment is long, toxic, costly, and increasingly prone to failure due to bacterial resistance to currently available antibiotics. New therapeutic options are thus clearly needed. Antimicrobial peptides represent an important source of new antimicrobial molecules, both for their direct activity and for their immunomodulatory potential. We have previously reported that a short version of the bovine antimicrobial peptide lactoferricin with amino acids 17 to 30 (LFcin17–30), along with its variants obtained by specific amino acid substitutions, killed Mycobacterium avium in broth culture. In the present work, those peptides were tested against M. avium living inside its natural host cell, the macrophage. We found that the peptides increased the antimicrobial action of the conventional antibiotic ethambutol inside macrophages. Moreover, the d-enantiomer of the lactoferricin peptide (d-LFcin17–30) was more stable and induced significant killing of intracellular mycobacteria by itself. Interestingly, d-LFcin17–30 did not localize to M. avium-harboring phagosomes but induced the production of proinflammatory cytokines and increased the formation of lysosomes and autophagosome-like vesicles. These results lead us to conclude that d-LFcin17–30 primes macrophages for intracellular microbial digestion through phagosomal maturation and/or autophagy, culminating in mycobacterial killing. IMPORTANCE The genus Mycobacterium comprises several pathogenic species, including M. tuberculosis, M. leprae, M. avium, etc. Infections caused by these bacteria are particularly difficult to treat due to their intrinsic impermeability, low growth rate, and intracellular localization. Antimicrobial peptides are increasingly acknowledged as potential treatment tools, as they have a high spectrum of activity, low tendency to induce bacterial resistance, and immunomodulatory properties. In

  8. Host responses to persistent Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection in surgically isolated bovine ileal segments.

    PubMed

    Charavaryamath, Chandrashekhar; Gonzalez-Cano, Patricia; Fries, Patrick; Gomis, Susantha; Doig, Kimberley; Scruten, Erin; Potter, Andrew; Napper, Scott; Griebel, Philip J

    2013-02-01

    A lack of appropriate disease models has limited our understanding of the pathogenesis of persistent enteric infections with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. A model was developed for the controlled delivery of a defined dose of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis to surgically isolated ileal segments in newborn calves. The stable intestinal segments enabled the characterization of host responses to persistent M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infections after a 9-month period, including an analysis of local mucosal immune responses relative to an adjacent uninfected intestinal compartment. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis remained localized at the initial site of intestinal infection and was not detected by PCR in the mesenteric lymph node. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific T cell proliferative responses included both CD4 and γδ T cell receptor (γδTcR) T cell responses in the draining mesenteric lymph node. The levels of CD8(+) and γδTcR(+) T cells increased significantly (P < 0.05) in the lamina propria, and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and gamma interferon secretion by lamina propria leukocytes was also significantly (P < 0.05) increased. There was a significant (P < 0.05) accumulation of macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) in the lamina propria, but the expression of mucosal toll-like receptors 1 through 10 was not significantly changed by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. In conclusion, surgically isolated ileal segments provided a model system for the establishment of a persistent and localized enteric M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in cattle and facilitated the analysis of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific changes in mucosal leukocyte phenotype and function. The accumulation of DC subpopulations in the lamina propria suggests that further investigation of mucosal DCs may provide insight into host responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection and

  9. Intramacrophage growth of Mycobacterium avium during infection of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Frehel, C; de Chastellier, C; Offredo, C; Berche, P

    1991-01-01

    Growth of the virulent Mycobacterium avium strain TMC 724 in host tissues during persistent infection of mice was studied. Following intravenous infection of C57BL/6 mice, the kinetics of bacterial growth was biphasic in the spleen and liver, with a significant reduction of the multiplication rate after day 21 to 28 of infection. An electron-microscopic study of the liver and spleen of infected mice showed that the bacteria were strictly intracellular. They were observed within inflammatory macrophages populating granulomas disseminated in host tissues. The bacteria were confined to the phagosome compartment, and they were encapsulated. Phagosome-lysosome fusions were encountered, but the bacteria showed no visible signs of degradation and continued to multiply. These results are the first in vivo evidence that virulent M. avium multiplies exclusively intracellularly and that encapsulated bacteria resist the microbicidal mechanisms of macrophages inside the phagosomal compartment. Images PMID:2037382

  10. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare: a rare cause of subacromial bursitis.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Raj; Tuckett, John; Hide, Geoff; Dildey, Petra; Karsandas, Alvin

    2015-01-01

    Septic subacromial bursitis is an uncommon disorder with only a few reported cases in the literature. The most common causative organism is Staphylococcus aureus. We report the case of a 61-year-old female with a septic subacromial bursitis where the causative organism was found to be Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI). The diagnosis was only made following a biopsy, and we use this case to highlight the importance of recognising the need to consider a biopsy and aspiration in atypical situations.

  11. Isolation of Mycobacterium avium from waterfowl with polycystic livers.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roffe, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    An unusual gross appearance of avian tuberculosis, where fluid-filled thin-walled cysts are produced and grossly apparent in preference to granulomas, is presented. Histopathology confirmed the granulomatous nature of the lesions and the presence of intracellular acid-fast organisms. Mycobacterium avium complex was cultured from affected organs. The unusual gross presentation in these cases indicates the need to consider tuberculosis in the differential of cystic diseases of avian livers.

  12. Molecular identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. silvaticum by duplex high-resolution melt analysis and subspecies-specific real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Rónai, Zsuzsanna; Csivincsik, Ágnes; Dán, Ádám

    2015-05-01

    Accurate identification of mycobacterial species and subspecies is essential to evaluate their significance and to perform epidemiological studies. The subspecies of Mycobacterium avium have different attributes but coincide in their zoonotic potential. Our knowledge about M. avium subsp. silvaticum is limited, since its identification is uncertain. Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium and M. avium subsp. silvaticum can be discriminated from each other based only on phenotypic characteristics, as they have almost identical genome sequences. Here we describe the development of a diagnostic method which enables the molecular identification of M. avium subsp. silvaticum and discrimination from M. avium subsp. avium based on genomic differences in a duplex high-resolution melt and M. avium subsp. silvaticum-specific mismatch real-time PCR. The developed assay was tested on reference strains and 199 field isolates, which were analyzed by phenotypic methods previously. This assay not only identified all 63 M. avium subsp. silvaticum and 138 M. avium subsp. avium strains correctly but also enabled the detection of mixed M. avium subsp. avium-M. avium subsp. silvaticum cultures. This is the first time that such a large panel of strains has been analyzed, and we also report the first isolation of M. avium subsp. silvaticum from red fox, red deer, wild boar, cattle, and badger. This assay is reliable, rapid, simple, inexpensive, and robust. It eliminates the long-existing problem of ambiguous phenotypic identification and opens up the possibility for detailed and comprehensive strain studies.

  13. Molecular Identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. silvaticum by Duplex High-Resolution Melt Analysis and Subspecies-Specific Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Csivincsik, Ágnes; Dán, Ádám

    2015-01-01

    Accurate identification of mycobacterial species and subspecies is essential to evaluate their significance and to perform epidemiological studies. The subspecies of Mycobacterium avium have different attributes but coincide in their zoonotic potential. Our knowledge about M. avium subsp. silvaticum is limited, since its identification is uncertain. Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium and M. avium subsp. silvaticum can be discriminated from each other based only on phenotypic characteristics, as they have almost identical genome sequences. Here we describe the development of a diagnostic method which enables the molecular identification of M. avium subsp. silvaticum and discrimination from M. avium subsp. avium based on genomic differences in a duplex high-resolution melt and M. avium subsp. silvaticum-specific mismatch real-time PCR. The developed assay was tested on reference strains and 199 field isolates, which were analyzed by phenotypic methods previously. This assay not only identified all 63 M. avium subsp. silvaticum and 138 M. avium subsp. avium strains correctly but also enabled the detection of mixed M. avium subsp. avium-M. avium subsp. silvaticum cultures. This is the first time that such a large panel of strains has been analyzed, and we also report the first isolation of M. avium subsp. silvaticum from red fox, red deer, wild boar, cattle, and badger. This assay is reliable, rapid, simple, inexpensive, and robust. It eliminates the long-existing problem of ambiguous phenotypic identification and opens up the possibility for detailed and comprehensive strain studies. PMID:25740770

  14. Effect of Prunus avium roots on river bank strong.

    PubMed

    Bibalani, Ghassem Habibi; Bazhrang, Zia; Mohsenifar, Hani; Shibaei, Naeime; Joodi, Lila

    2008-04-15

    A pulling effect by side roots is one way in which roots help to side in-plane strong of a little depth soil mass. In contrast to the effect of vertically-enlarge roots, whereby soil is strengthened by an increase in its shear strength, the pulling effect strengthens the soil by increasing the tensile strength of the rooted soil zone. To verify whether or not a pulling effect exists in the root system of Prunus avium in the Roudsar, North Iran and to study the importance and size of this effect, a direct in situ test was led at a site in the Chaboksar Forests. The results from the site showed that, in the surface soil (0-30 cm), Side roots can provide a pull force of up to 490-712 N (Newtons) over a vertical cross-section area of 20-50 cm2, or an enhance in the pulling stability of the rooted soil by about 48.1%. The test results suggest that, together with the Prunus avium vertical roots, which keep the little depth rooted soil zone to the deep and more stable soil mass, the side roots of the Prunus avium, with their pulling effect, are able to make less against little depth instability in the forest slopes, such as little depth slide, to a certain degree.

  15. Complete genome sequence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, isolated from human breast milk

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis is the etiologic agent of Johne’s disease. We report the draft genome sequences of six M. avium subsp paratuberculosis isolates obtained from diverse hosts including bison, cattle and sheep. These sequences will deepen our understanding of host association ...

  16. REAL-TIME QUANTITATIVE PCR DETECTION OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) includes the species M. avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI), and others. MAC are listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Contaminant Candidate List (CCL) due to their association with human disease and occurrence in public drinkin...

  17. Detection of quantification of Mycobacterium avium complex organisms in drinking water

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) includes the species M. avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI), and others. MAC are listed on the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Contaminant Candidate List 2 (CCL2) due to their association with human disease and occurrence in public dr...

  18. Profiling Host Antibody Responses to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis Infection Using Protein Arrays

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Along with the complete genome sequence of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, technologies are now developed for the construction of protein arrays to detect the presence of antibodies against M. avium subsp paratuberculosis in host serum. The power of this approach is that it enable...

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Bordetella avium Nh1210, an Outbreak Strain of Lockjaw Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Luisa Z; Knöbl, Terezinha; Grespan, André A; Felizardo, Maria R; Gomes, Cleise R; Ferreira, Thais S P; Xavier de Oliveira, Maria Gabriela; Myriantheus, Livia; Moreno, Andrea Micke

    2015-03-12

    Bordetella avium is a highly contagious bacterium that infects the upper respiratory tract of birds. B. avium Nh1210 is an outbreak strain of lockjaw syndrome in juvenile cockatiel chicks (Nymphicus hollandicus). Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain Nh1210. Copyright © 2015 Moreno et al.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Bordetella avium Nh1210, an Outbreak Strain of Lockjaw Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Luisa Z.; Knöbl, Terezinha; Grespan, André A.; Felizardo, Maria R.; Gomes, Cleise R.; Ferreira, Thais S. P.; Xavier de Oliveira, Maria Gabriela; Myriantheus, Livia

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella avium is a highly contagious bacterium that infects the upper respiratory tract of birds. B. avium Nh1210 is an outbreak strain of lockjaw syndrome in juvenile cockatiel chicks (Nymphicus hollandicus). Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain Nh1210. PMID:25767244

  1. Characterization of clinical and environmental Mycobacterium avium spp. isolates and their interaction with human macrophages

    EPA Science Inventory

    Members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are naturally occurring bacteria in the environment. A link has been suggested between M. avium strains in drinking water and clinical isolates from infected individuals. There is a need to develop new screening methodologies tha...

  2. Characterization of clinical and environmental Mycobacterium avium spp. isolates and their interaction with human macrophages

    EPA Science Inventory

    Members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are naturally occurring bacteria in the environment. A link has been suggested between M. avium strains in drinking water and clinical isolates from infected individuals. There is a need to develop new screening methodologies tha...

  3. Detection of quantification of Mycobacterium avium complex organisms in drinking water

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) includes the species M. avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI), and others. MAC are listed on the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Contaminant Candidate List 2 (CCL2) due to their association with human disease and occurrence in public dr...

  4. REAL-TIME QUANTITATIVE PCR DETECTION OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) includes the species M. avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI), and others. MAC are listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Contaminant Candidate List (CCL) due to their association with human disease and occurrence in public drinkin...

  5. Roles for Cell Wall Glycopeptidolipid in Surface Adherence and Planktonic Dispersal of Mycobacterium avium

    EPA Science Inventory

    The opportunistic pathogen Mycobacterium avium is a significant inhabitant of biofilms in drinking water distribution systems. M. avium expresses on its cell surface serovar-specific glycopeptidolipids (ssGPLs). Studies have implicated the core GPL in biofilm formation by M. aviu...

  6. Roles for Cell Wall Glycopeptidolipid in Surface Adherence and Planktonic Dispersal of Mycobacterium avium

    EPA Science Inventory

    The opportunistic pathogen Mycobacterium avium is a significant inhabitant of biofilms in drinking water distribution systems. M. avium expresses on its cell surface serovar-specific glycopeptidolipids (ssGPLs). Studies have implicated the core GPL in biofilm formation by M. aviu...

  7. Draft genome sequence of a Mycobacterium avium complex isolate from a broadbill bird

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We report the draft genome sequences of ten Mycobacterium avium complex isolates obtained from diverse hosts. This collection includes isolates obtained from deer, pig, elephant, ruddy duck and Red-tailed hawk species. The type strain of Mycobacterium avium subspecies silvaticum (ATCC 49884) is also...

  8. Presence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Environmental Samples Collected on Commercial Dutch Dairy Farms ▿

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Susanne W. F.; Koets, Ad P.; Hoeboer, Jeroen; Bouman, Marina; Heederik, Dick; Nielen, Mirjam

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the causative agent of Johne's disease in cattle, was identified in settled-dust samples of Dutch commercial dairy farms, both in the dairy barn and in the young stock housing. Bioaerosols may play a role in within-farm M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis transmission. PMID:20656861

  9. Use of restriction fragment length polymorphism as a genetic marker for typing Mycobacterium avium strains.

    PubMed

    Roiz, M P; Palenque, E; Guerrero, C; Garcia, M J

    1995-05-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was used to study 75 clinical isolates identified as Mycobacterium avium. Two repetitive insertion sequences, IS1311 and IS900, were used as DNA probes. Although less than 25% of isolates showed RFLP patterns with IS900, all strains gave banding patterns with IS1311. M. avium strains isolated from patients with AIDS exhibited marked polymorphism with both probes.

  10. Cell wall peptidolipids of Mycobacterium avium: from genetic prediction to exact structure of a nonribosomal peptide

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Total lipids from an M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) ovine strain (S-type) contained no identifiable glycopeptidolipids or lipopentapeptide, yet both lipids are present in other M. avium subspecies. We determined the genetic and phenotypic basis for this difference using sequence analysis and...

  11. Evaluation of Vitek MS for rapid classification of clinical isolates belonging to Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Daniel P; Zembower, Teresa R; Qi, Chao

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of the Vitek MS system to classify clinical pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex isolates compared to multilocus sequence analysis. Vitek MS accurately identified 55% of the isolates as M. avium and 18% as M. intracellulare, but misidentified 24 (27%) Mycobacterium chimaera isolates as Mycobacterium intracellulare.

  12. Assessing the Inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis during Composting of Livestock Carcasses

    PubMed Central

    Tkachuk, Victoria L.; Krause, Denis O.; McAllister, Tim A.; Buckley, Katherine E.; Reuter, Tim; Hendrick, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis causes Johne's disease (JD) in ruminants, with substantial economic impacts on the cattle industry. Johne's disease is known for its long latency period, and difficulties in diagnosis are due to insensitivities of current detection methods. Eradication is challenging as M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis can survive for extended periods within the environment, resulting in new infections in naïve animals (W. Xu et al., J. Environ. Qual. 38:437-450, 2009). This study explored the use of a biosecure, static composting structure to inactivate M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Mycobacterium smegmatis was also assessed as a surrogate for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Two structures were constructed to hold three cattle carcasses each. Naturally infected tissues and ground beef inoculated with laboratory-cultured M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and M. smegmatis were placed in nylon and plastic bags to determine effects of temperature and compost environment on viability over 250 days. After removal, samples were cultured and growth of both organisms was assessed after 12 weeks. After 250 days, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was still detectable by PCR, while M. smegmatis was not detected after 67 days of composting. Furthermore, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis remained viable in both implanted nylon and plastic bags over the composting period. As the compost never reached a homogenous thermophilic (55 to 65°C) state throughout each structure, an in vitro experiment was conducted to examine viability of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis after exposure to 80°C for 90 days. Naturally infected lymph tissues were mixed with and without compost. After 90 days, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis remained viable despite exposure to temperatures typically higher than that achieved in compost. In conclusion, it is unlikely composting can be used as a means of inactivating M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis associated with cattle

  13. The fibroblast growth factor-2 arrests Mycobacterium avium sp. paratuberculosis growth and immunomodulates host response in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianjun; Wang, Zeyou; Yao, Yongliang; Wu, Jianhong; Tang, Xin; Gu, Tao; Li, Guangxin

    2015-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosisis (M. tb) epidemic is one of the most severe health problem worldwide, while mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis and host immune responses remain unclear. Mycobacterium avium (M. avium), a mycobacterial species related to M. tb, shares similarities with M. tb in many ways. In this study, using M. avium infection of macrophages as a model, we systematically studied the effect of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) on M. avium infection of macrophages. Our results showed that M. avium infection could increase FGF-2 expression on both mRNA and protein levels. M. avium infection elevated TNF-α and IFN-γ production while the addition of FGF-2 could further increase TNF-α but not IFN-γ level. M. avium infection could increase the expression of oxygen/nitrogen metabolism proteins iNOS and SOD-1, and FGF-2 had additive effect on the expression of these two proteins. M. avium infection had inhibitive effect on actin expression while FGF-2 could partly counteract such inhibition. Moreover, FGF-2 could inhibit M. avium proliferation in macrophages. Our results together indicate that macrophage-secreted FGF-2 upon M. avium infection could suppress M. avium proliferation through various ways including cytokine production, enhancement of phagocytosis as well as oxygen/nitrogen metabolism.

  14. Pathogenicity of Mycobacterium avium for human monocytes: absence of macrophage-activating factor activity of gamma interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Toba, H; Crawford, J T; Ellner, J J

    1989-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is a frequent opportunistic pathogen in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). We compared 12 strains of M. avium in an in vitro model of pathogenicity. Peripheral blood-derived monocytes from healthy individuals were infected with M. avium in vitro. Bacterial uptake and intracellular replication were assessed by microscopic count of acid-fast bacilli and CFU of bacteria, respectively, in lysed monocytes. The CFU assay showed that among five AIDS-associated strains, only one replicated in monocytes. Two of seven non-AIDS-associated strains replicated intracellularly. In addition, we examined the effect of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) on M. avium infection. IFN-gamma treatment of monocytes decreased phagocytosis and had no effect on the intracellular replication of M. avium. Thus, most strains of M. avium do not multiply within monocytes from healthy individuals and IFN-gamma does not have macrophage-activating factor activity for M. avium infection of human monocytes. PMID:2491838

  15. Distribution of IS901 in strains of Mycobacterium avium complex from swine by using IS901-detecting primers that discriminate between M. avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare.

    PubMed

    Nishimori, K; Eguchi, M; Nakaoka, Y; Onodera, Y; Ito, T; Tanaka, K

    1995-08-01

    The presence of the mycobacterial insertion sequence IS901 was studied by PCR with reference strains of Mycobacterium avium complex; 122 veterinary strains of mycobacteria, mainly M. avium complex, isolated from swine; and 15 clinical strains. Four kinds of DNA extraction methods for PCR were compared. Use of the commercial extraction matrix allowed for the faster and easier preparation of PCR-amplifiable DNA than use of NaOH heating extraction or sodium dodecyl sulfate extraction of pretreated mycobacteria. It also provided more effective protection than boiling extraction against the destruction of DNA. Four reference strains of serovars 1 to 3 possessed IS901. Nine reference strains of serovars 1, 4 to 6, 8 to 11, and 21 possessed only IS901 insertion sites. A novel PCR product was found in the other reference strains of serovars 7, 12 to 17, 19, and 20 and two clinical strains of serovar 15. It is suggested that the primers that amplified the insertion portion of IS901 divided the M. avium complex into M. avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, and other mycobacteria. None of the 110 strains of M. avium complex isolated from swine possessed IS901. It is suggested that the absence of IS901 might be characteristic of swine-derived strains of M. avium complex.

  16. Systems Analysis of Early Host Gene Expression Provides Clues for Transient Mycobacterium avium ssp avium vs. Persistent Mycobacterium avium ssp paratuberculosis Intestinal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Sangeeta; Drake, Kenneth L.; Lawhon, Sara D.; Nunes, Jairo E. S.; Figueiredo, Josely F.; Rossetti, Carlos A.; Gull, Tamara; Everts, Robin E.; Lewin, Harris. A.; Adams, Leslie Garry

    2016-01-01

    It has long been a quest in ruminants to understand how two very similar mycobacterial species, Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) and Mycobacterium avium ssp. avium (MAA) lead to either a chronic persistent infection or a rapid-transient infection, respectively. Here, we hypothesized that when the host immune response is activated by MAP or MAA, the outcome of the infection depends on the early activation of signaling molecules and host temporal gene expression. To test our hypothesis, ligated jejuno-ileal loops including Peyer’s patches in neonatal calves were inoculated with PBS, MAP, or MAA. A temporal analysis of the host transcriptome profile was conducted at several times post-infection (0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 hours). When comparing the transcriptional responses of calves infected with the MAA versus MAP, discordant patterns of mucosal expression were clearly evident, and the numbers of unique transcripts altered were moderately less for MAA-infected tissue than were mucosal tissues infected with the MAP. To interpret these complex data, changes in the gene expression were further analyzed by dynamic Bayesian analysis. Bayesian network modeling identified mechanistic genes, gene-to-gene relationships, pathways and Gene Ontologies (GO) biological processes that are involved in specific cell activation during infection. MAP and MAA had significant different pathway perturbation at 0.5 and 12 hours post inoculation. Inverse processes were observed between MAP and MAA response for epithelial cell proliferation, negative regulation of chemotaxis, cell-cell adhesion mediated by integrin and regulation of cytokine-mediated signaling. MAP inoculated tissue had significantly lower expression of phagocytosis receptors such as mannose receptor and complement receptors. This study reveals that perturbation of genes and cellular pathways during MAP infection resulted in host evasion by mucosal membrane barrier weakening to access entry in the ileum

  17. Systems Analysis of Early Host Gene Expression Provides Clues for Transient Mycobacterium avium ssp avium vs. Persistent Mycobacterium avium ssp paratuberculosis Intestinal Infections.

    PubMed

    Khare, Sangeeta; Drake, Kenneth L; Lawhon, Sara D; Nunes, Jairo E S; Figueiredo, Josely F; Rossetti, Carlos A; Gull, Tamara; Everts, Robin E; Lewin, Harris A; Adams, Leslie Garry

    It has long been a quest in ruminants to understand how two very similar mycobacterial species, Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) and Mycobacterium avium ssp. avium (MAA) lead to either a chronic persistent infection or a rapid-transient infection, respectively. Here, we hypothesized that when the host immune response is activated by MAP or MAA, the outcome of the infection depends on the early activation of signaling molecules and host temporal gene expression. To test our hypothesis, ligated jejuno-ileal loops including Peyer's patches in neonatal calves were inoculated with PBS, MAP, or MAA. A temporal analysis of the host transcriptome profile was conducted at several times post-infection (0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 hours). When comparing the transcriptional responses of calves infected with the MAA versus MAP, discordant patterns of mucosal expression were clearly evident, and the numbers of unique transcripts altered were moderately less for MAA-infected tissue than were mucosal tissues infected with the MAP. To interpret these complex data, changes in the gene expression were further analyzed by dynamic Bayesian analysis. Bayesian network modeling identified mechanistic genes, gene-to-gene relationships, pathways and Gene Ontologies (GO) biological processes that are involved in specific cell activation during infection. MAP and MAA had significant different pathway perturbation at 0.5 and 12 hours post inoculation. Inverse processes were observed between MAP and MAA response for epithelial cell proliferation, negative regulation of chemotaxis, cell-cell adhesion mediated by integrin and regulation of cytokine-mediated signaling. MAP inoculated tissue had significantly lower expression of phagocytosis receptors such as mannose receptor and complement receptors. This study reveals that perturbation of genes and cellular pathways during MAP infection resulted in host evasion by mucosal membrane barrier weakening to access entry in the ileum

  18. Infection of Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) with Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) bacteria.

    PubMed

    Balseiro, Ana; Merediz, Isabel; Sevilla, Iker A; García-Castro, Carmen; Gortázar, Christian; Prieto, José M; Delahay, Richard J

    2011-05-01

    There are few reports of infection with Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) bacteria in badgers. In this study archive data relating to the isolation of MAC organisms from badgers in the UK is presented, and information derived from recent cases of such infection in Spain is used to illustrate the associated pathology and to characterise strain types. Tissue samples were cultured for mycobacteria and, in the case of Spanish badgers, were examined both histopathologically and using immunohistochemistry, and DNA typing of M. avium isolates was also carried out. A total of 5 (7.35%) and 281 (0.51%) isolates of M. avium spp. were recovered from badgers from the studies in Spain and the UK, respectively. DNA typing of the isolates from Spain identified the sub-species M. avium hominissuis and M. avium avium. These findings provide new information on the prevalence of MAC organisms in badgers in the UK and Spain. The extent to which infected badgers may be involved in the epidemiology of M. avium in other wild or domestic hosts remains unknown.

  19. In Vitro Susceptibility Testing of Bedaquiline against Mycobacterium avium Complex.

    PubMed

    Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Philley, Julie V; Griffith, David E; Thakkar, Foram; Wallace, Richard J

    2017-02-01

    We performed bedaquiline broth microdilution susceptibility testing using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines on 103 respiratory isolates of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), including multidrug-resistant isolates. Approximately 90% of isolates had bedaquiline MICs of ≤0.008 μg/ml, and 102/103 isolates had MICs of ≤0.015 μg/ml. Bedaquiline has excellent potential for use in patients with MAC infections, although for reasons of its metabolism by the cytochrome P450 system, it should not be given with rifampin.

  20. Modulation of the effector function of human monocytes for Mycobacterium avium by human immunodeficiency virus-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120.

    PubMed Central

    Shiratsuchi, H; Johnson, J L; Toossi, Z; Ellner, J J

    1994-01-01

    Disseminated Mycobacterium avium infection in AIDS is associated with high tissue burdens (10(9)-10(10) mycobacteria/g tissue) of organism. The basis for the extraordinary susceptibility of AIDS to M. avium infection is unclear. HIV or its constituents may alter mononuclear phagocyte functions resulting in enhanced intracellular M. avium growth. The effects of an envelope glycoprotein (gp120), a transmembrane protein (p121), and core proteins of HIV-1 on M. avium infection of human monocytes were examined. Preculturing monocytes with gp120 inhibited M. avium phagocytosis and consistently enhanced intracellular growth of six M. avium strains. Pretreatment with p121, gag5, or p24 did not inhibit phagocytosis nor enhance intracellular growth of M. avium. Incubation of gp120 with soluble CD4 before addition to monocyte cultures or pretreatment of monocytes with OKT4A abrogated gp120 effects on M. avium phagocytosis and intracellular growth. gp120 also augmented cytokine production by infected monocytes. These results suggest that gp120, but not p121 or core proteins, modulate monocyte phagocytosis and enhance intracellular growth of M. avium at least in part through monocyte CD4 receptors. Direct effects of HIV-1 products may, therefore, contribute to the diathesis of AIDS to develop disseminated M. avium infection and to the extensive replication of the organisms within tissue macrophages. Images PMID:8113420

  1. Mycobacterium avium subspecies induce differential expression of pro-inflammatory mediators in a murine macrophage model: evidence for enhanced pathogenicity of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Basler, Tina; Geffers, Robert; Weiss, Siegfried; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Goethe, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies (ssp.) paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiological agent of paratuberculosis, a chronic, non-treatable granulomatous enteritis of ruminants. MAP is the only mycobacterium affecting the intestinal tract, which is of interest since it is presently the most favoured pathogen linked to Crohn's disease (CD) in humans due to its frequent detection in CD tissues. MAP is genetically closely related to other M. avium ssp. such as M. avium ssp. avium (MAA) and M. avium ssp. hominissuis (MAH) which can cause mycobacteriosis in animals and immunocompromised humans. We have recently shown that murine macrophage cell lines represent suitable systems to analyse M. avium ssp. patho-mechanisms and could show that MAP, but not MAA, specifically inhibited the antigen-specific stimulatory capacity for CD4(+) T-cells. In the present study, we compared gene expression profiles of murine RAW264.7 macrophages in response to infections with MAP or MAA using murine high-density oligonucleotide Affymetrix microarrays. A comparison of MAP and MAA infection revealed 17 differentially expressed genes. They were expressed at a much lower level in MAP-infected macrophages than in MAA-infected macrophages. Among these were the genes for IL-1beta, IL-1alpha, CXCL2, PTGS2 (COX2), lipocalin (LCN2) and TNF, which are important pro-inflammatory factors. The microarray data were confirmed for selected genes by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR and, by protein array analyses and ELISA. Similar to MAA, infection with MAH also showed robust induction of IL-1beta, CXCL2, COX2, LCN2 and TNF. Taken together, our results from M. avium ssp.-infected murine macrophages provide evidence that MAP in contrast to MAA and MAH specifically suppresses the pro-inflammatory defence mechanisms of infected macrophages.

  2. Molecular characterization and drug susceptibility profile of a Mycobacterium avium subspecies avium isolate from a dog with disseminated infection.

    PubMed

    Armas, Federica; Furlanello, Tommaso; Camperio, Cristina; Trotta, Michele; Novari, Gianluca; Marianelli, Cinzia

    2016-01-12

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infections have been described in many mammalian species including humans and pets. We isolated and molecularly typed the causative agent of a rare case of disseminated mycobacteriosis in a dog. We identified the pathogen as a M. avium subspecies avium by sequencing the partial genes gyrB and rpsA. Considering the zoonotic potential of this infection, and in an attempt to ensure the most effective treatment for the animal, we also determined the drug susceptibility profile of the isolate to the most common drugs used to treat MAC disease in humans. The pathogen was tested in vitro against the macrolide clarithromycin, as well as against amikacin, ciprofloxacin, rifampicin, ethambutol and linezolid by the resazurin microdilution assay. It was found to be sensitive to all tested drugs save ethambutol. Despite the fact that the pathogen was sensitive to the therapies administered, the dog's overall clinical status worsened, and the animal died shortly after antimicrobial susceptibility results became available. Nucleotide sequencing of the embB gene, the target gene most commonly associated with ethambutol resistance, showed new missense mutations when compared to sequences available in public databases. In conclusion, we molecularly identified the MAC pathogen and determined its drug susceptibility profile in a relatively short period of time (seven days). We also characterized new genetic mutations likely to have been involved in the observed ethambutol resistance. Our results confirm the usefulness of both the gyrB and the rpsA genes as biomarkers for an accurate identification and differentiation of MAC pathogens.

  3. Diversity of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis mycobacteria causing lymphadenitis, France.

    PubMed

    Despierres, L; Cohen-Bacrie, S; Richet, H; Drancourt, M

    2012-07-01

    The knowledge of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) genotypes responsible for lymphadenitis is limited. We retrospectively characterized all of the MAC isolates made in our laboratory in the last 18 years by sequence-based identification and genotyping, and compared the clinical and laboratory data for lymphadenitis-associated and non-lymphadenitis-associated MAC isolates. Of 67 MAC-infected patients, 25 lymphadenitis patients were significantly younger than 42 non-lymphadenitis patients, while the male/female ratio did not significantly differ between the two groups. Cervical topography found in 76.5% of lymphadenitis patients was significantly more frequent in non-immunocompromised patients (p=0.04). M. avium subsp. hominissuis was identified in 53 patients (24 lymphadenitis, 29 non-lymphadenitis), M. colombiense in six patients (five non-lymphadenitis, one lymphadenitis), M. intracellulare in four non-lymphadenitis patients, and M. chimaera in three non-lymphadenitis patients, while negative controls remained negative. M. hominissuis was significantly associated with lymphadenitis (p=0.03). M. hominissuis isolates yielded 15 genotypes in 29 non-lymphadenitis isolates (molecular diversity, 0.622) versus 11 genotypes in 24 lymphadenitis isolates (molecular diversity, 0.578), demonstrating a non-significant lower diversity of M. hominissuis isolates cultured from lymphadenitis. The genotypes did not correlate with the clinical features. These data suggest the presence of several environmental reservoirs for M. hominissuis causing lymphadenitis in France.

  4. Trypanosoma avium of raptors (Falconiformes): phylogeny and identification of vectors.

    PubMed

    Votýpka, J; Oborník, M; Volf, P; Svobodová, M; Lukes, J

    2002-09-01

    Avian trypanosomes are widespread parasites of birds, the transmission of which remains mostly unclear, with various blood-sucking insects mentioned as possible vectors. A search for vectors of trypanosomes of sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus), buzzard (Buteo buteo), lesser-spotted eagle (Aquila pomarina) and kestrel (Falco tinnunculus) was performed in Czech and Slovak Republics. Black flies (Eusimulium spp.), hippoboscid flies (Ornithomyia avicularia), mosquitoes (Culex pipiens pipiens) and biting midges (Culicoides spp.), trapped while attempting to feed on raptor nestlings, were found to contain trypanosomatids in their intestine. Trypanosomes from the raptors and blood-sucking insects were isolated, and their 18S rRNA sequences were used for species identification and for the inference of intra- and interspecific relationships. Together with the trypanosome isolated from a black fly, the bird trypanosomes formed a well-supported Trypanosoma avium clade. The isolates derived from hippoboscid flies and mosquitoes are most likely also avian trypanosomes infecting birds other than the studied raptors. Analysis of the kinetoplast, that has features characteristic for the avian trypanosomes (minicircle size; dimensions of the kinetoplast disc), provided further evidence for the identification of vectors. It is suggested that all trypanosomes isolated from raptors included in this study belong to the T. avium complex and are transmitted by the ornithophilic simuliids such as Eusimulium securiforme.

  5. No holes barred: Invasion of the intestinal mucosa by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The infection biology of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) has recently crystalized with added details surrounding intestinal invasion. The involvement of pathogen-derived effector proteins such as the major membrane protein, oxidoreductase and fibronectin attachment proteins hav...

  6. Immunogenicity of Proteome-determined Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific Proteins in Sheep with Paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis causes paratuberculosis, a chronic granulomatous enteritis. Detecting animals with paratuberculosis infections is difficult because the currently available tools have low sensitivity and lack specificity being prone to spurious positive test results ca...

  7. A Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis predicted serine protease is associated with acid stress and intraphagosomal survival

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is an intracellular pathogen that persists inside host macrophages despite severe oxidative stress and nutrient deprivation. Intrabacterial pH homeostasis is vital to pathogenic mycobacteria to preserve cellular biological processes and stability of ...

  8. AMPLIFIED FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM ANALYSIS OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ISOLATES RECOVERED FROM SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fine-scale genotyping methods are necessary in order to identify possible sources of human exposure to opportunistic pathogens belonging to the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). In this study, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was evaluated for fingerprintin...

  9. Epidemiology and Ecology of Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens (OPPPs) that persist and grow in household plumbing, habitats they share with humans. Infections caused by these OPPPs involve individuals with preexis...

  10. Trypanosoma avium incidence, pathogenicity and response to melarsomine in falcons from Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Tarello, W

    2005-03-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies on Trypanosoma avium are lacking in the Middle East. The aims of this study were to determine the T. avium incidence in falcons from Kuwait, report clinical signs and find an effective therapy. Blood smears from 921 diseased and 56 healthy falcons were examined between May 2003 and April 2004. 12 birds 11.3%) were found infected by T. avium and ten of these were treated with melarsomine (Cymelarsan) at a dosage of 0.25 mg/kg intramuscularly for four days. All affected birds presented clinical signs, including incapacity of flying high, poor appetite, lethargy, loosing weight, weakness, dyspnoea and death. Signs disappeared within 1-7 days after administration of melarsomine. Trypomastigotes were not detected in blood smears made 1-7 days after the end of therapy. This study suggests that T. avium induces disease in falcons and that melarsomine can be an effective therapy eliminating both clinical signs and circulating trypomastigotes.

  11. Composition and potency characterization of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis purified protein derivatives

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) purified protein derivatives (PPDs) are immunologic reagents prepared from cultured filtrates of the type strain ATCC 19698. Traditional production consists of floating culture incubation at 37oC, organism inactivation by autoclaving, coarse filtrat...

  12. AMPLIFIED FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM ANALYSIS OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ISOLATES RECOVERED FROM SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fine-scale genotyping methods are necessary in order to identify possible sources of human exposure to opportunistic pathogens belonging to the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). In this study, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was evaluated for fingerprintin...

  13. Epidemiology and Ecology of Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens (OPPPs) that persist and grow in household plumbing, habitats they share with humans. Infections caused by these OPPPs involve individuals with preexis...

  14. Involvement of matrix metalloproteinases in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-induced replication by clinical Mycobacterium avium isolates.

    PubMed

    Dezzutti, C S; Swords, W E; Guenthner, P C; Sasso, D R; Wahl, L M; Drummond, A H; Newman, G W; King, C H; Quinn, F D; Lal, R B

    1999-10-01

    The role of Mycobacterium avium isolates in modulating human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication was examined by use of an in vitro, resting T cell system. Two human clinical isolates (serotypes 1 and 4) but not an environmental M. avium isolate (serotype 2) enhanced HIV-1 replication. The M. avium-induced HIV-1 replication was not associated with cell activation or differential cytokine production or utilization. Addition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors and their in vivo regulators, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases-1 and -2, abrogated M. avium-induced HIV-1 replication 80%-95%. The MMP inhibitors did not have any effect on the HIV-1 protease activity, suggesting that they may affect cellular processes. Furthermore, MMP-9 protein was differentially expressed after infection with clinical M. avium isolates and paralleled HIV-1 p24 production. Collectively, these data suggest that M. avium-induced HIV-1 replication is mediated, in part, through the induction of MMP-9.

  15. Effect of lipoarabinomannan from Mycobacterium avium subsp avium in Freund's incomplete adjuvant on the immune response of cattle

    PubMed Central

    Colavecchia, S.B.; Jolly, A.; Fernández, B.; Fontanals, A.M.; Fernández, E.; Mundo, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether lipoarabinomannan (LAM), in combination with Freund's incomplete adjuvant (FIA), was able to improve cell-mediated and antibody-mediated immune responses against ovalbumin (OVA) in cattle. Twenty-three calves were assigned to four treatment groups, which were subcutaneously immunized with either OVA plus FIA, OVA plus FIA and LAM from Mycobacterium avium subsp avium, FIA plus LAM, or FIA alone. Lymphoproliferation, IFN-γ production and cell subpopulations on peripheral blood mononuclear cells before and 15 days after treatment were evaluated. Delayed hypersensitivity was evaluated on day 57. Specific humoral immune response was measured by ELISA. Inoculation with LAM induced higher levels of lymphoproliferation and IFN-γ production in response to ConA and OVA (P < 0.05). Specific antibody titers were similar in both OVA-immunized groups. Interestingly, our results showed that the use of LAM in vaccine preparations improved specific cell immune response evaluated by lymphoproliferation and IFN-γ production by at least 50 and 25%, respectively, in cattle without interfering with tuberculosis and paratuberculosis diagnosis. PMID:22286534

  16. Effect of lipoarabinomannan from Mycobacterium avium subsp avium in Freund's incomplete adjuvant on the immune response of cattle.

    PubMed

    Colavecchia, S B; Jolly, A; Fernández, B; Fontanals, A M; Fernández, E; Mundo, S L

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether lipoarabinomannan (LAM), in combination with Freund's incomplete adjuvant (FIA), was able to improve cell-mediated and antibody-mediated immune responses against ovalbumin (OVA) in cattle. Twenty-three calves were assigned to four treatment groups, which were subcutaneously immunized with either OVA plus FIA, OVA plus FIA and LAM from Mycobacterium avium subsp avium, FIA plus LAM, or FIA alone. Lymphoproliferation, IFN-γ production and cell subpopulations on peripheral blood mononuclear cells before and 15 days after treatment were evaluated. Delayed hypersensitivity was evaluated on day 57. Specific humoral immune response was measured by ELISA. Inoculation with LAM induced higher levels of lymphoproliferation and IFN-γ production in response to ConA and OVA (P < 0.05). Specific antibody titers were similar in both OVA-immunized groups. Interestingly, our results showed that the use of LAM in vaccine preparations improved specific cell immune response evaluated by lymphoproliferation and IFN-γ production by at least 50 and 25%, respectively, in cattle without interfering with tuberculosis and paratuberculosis diagnosis.

  17. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Drinking Water and Biofilms by Quantitative PCR ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Beumer, Amy; King, Dawn; Donohue, Maura; Mistry, Jatin; Covert, Terry; Pfaller, Stacy

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis has a role in Crohn's disease. The organism may be acquired but is difficult to culture from the environment. We describe a quantitative PCR (qPCR) method to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in drinking water and the results of its application to drinking water and faucet biofilm samples collected in the United States. PMID:20817803

  18. Infection by Mycobacterium avium intracellulare in AIDS: endoscopic duodenal appearance mimicking Whipple's disease.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Iglesias, J L; Yañez, J; Durana, J; Arnal, F

    1988-09-01

    We report the case of a 24-year-old woman who presented with diarrhea, weight loss and abdominal lymph node enlargement. A diagnosis of infection by Mycobacterium avium intracellulare with a clinical picture similar to Whipple's disease was established. The endoscopic study of the duodenum revealed multiple yellow nodules that became confluent in the second portion, entirely replacing the normal mucosa. These endoscopic findings have not been described previously in intestinal infection by Mycobacterium avium intracellulare.

  19. Use of restriction fragment length polymorphism as a genetic marker for typing Mycobacterium avium strains.

    PubMed Central

    Roiz, M P; Palenque, E; Guerrero, C; Garcia, M J

    1995-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was used to study 75 clinical isolates identified as Mycobacterium avium. Two repetitive insertion sequences, IS1311 and IS900, were used as DNA probes. Although less than 25% of isolates showed RFLP patterns with IS900, all strains gave banding patterns with IS1311. M. avium strains isolated from patients with AIDS exhibited marked polymorphism with both probes. PMID:7615764

  20. Pulmonary collectins play distinct roles in host defense against Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed

    Ariki, Shigeru; Kojima, Takashi; Gasa, Shinsei; Saito, Atsushi; Nishitani, Chiaki; Takahashi, Motoko; Shimizu, Takeyuki; Kurimura, Yuichiro; Sawada, Norimasa; Fujii, Nobuhiro; Kuroki, Yoshio

    2011-09-01

    Pulmonary collectins, surfactant protein A (SP-A) and surfactant protein D (SP-D), play important roles in the innate immunity of the lung. Mycobacterium avium is one of the well-known opportunistic pathogens that can replicate within macrophages. We examined the effects of pulmonary collectins in host defense against M. avium infection achieved via direct interaction between bacteria and collectins. Although both pulmonary collectins bound to M. avium in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, these collectins revealed distinct ligand-binding specificity and biological activities. SP-A and SP-D bound to a methoxy group containing lipid and lipoarabinomannan, respectively. Binding of SP-D but not SP-A resulted in agglutination of M. avium. A chimeric protein with the carbohydrate recognition domain of SP-D, which chimera revealed a bouquet-like arrangement similar to SP-A, also agglutinated M. avium. The ligand specificity of the carbohydrate recognition domain of SP-D seems to be necessary for agglutination activity. The binding of SP-A strongly inhibited the growth of M. avium in culture media. Although pulmonary collectins did not increase membrane permeability of M. avium, they attenuated the metabolic rate of the bacteria. Observations under a scanning electron microscope revealed that SP-A almost completely covers bacterial surfaces, whereas SP-D binds to certain areas like scattered dots. These observations suggest that a distinct binding pattern of collectins correlates with the difference of their biological activities. Furthermore, the number of bacteria phagocytosed by macrophages was significantly increased in the presence of SP-D. These data indicate that pulmonary collectins play critical roles in host defense against M. avium.

  1. Maximum growth rate of Mycobacterium avium in continuous culture or chronically infected BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, C M; Taylor, M A; Dennis, M W

    1987-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is a human pathogen which may cause either chronic or disseminated disease and the organism exhibits a slow rate of growth. This study provides information on the growth rate of the organism in chronically infected mice and its maximal growth rate in vitro. M. avium was grown in continuous culture, limited for nitrogen with 0.5 mM ammonium chloride and dilution rates that ranged from 0.054 to 0.153 h-1. The steady-state concentration of ammonia nitrogen and M. avium cells for each dilution rate were determined. The bacterial saturation constant for growth-limiting ammonia was 0.29 mM (4 micrograms nitrogen/ml) and, from this, the maximal growth rate for M. avium was estimated to be 0.206 h-1 or a doubling time of 3.4 h. BALB/c mice were infected intravenously with 3 x 10(6) colony-forming units and a chronic infection resulted, typical of virulent M. avium strains. During a period of 3 months, the number of mycobacteria remained constant in the lungs, but increased 30-fold and 8,900-fold, respectively, in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. The latter increase appeared to be due to proliferation in situ. The generation time of M. avium in the mesenteric lymph nodes was estimated to be 7 days.

  2. Species identification of Mycobacterium avium complex isolates by a variety of molecular techniques.

    PubMed

    Beggs, M L; Stevanova, R; Eisenach, K D

    2000-02-01

    Organisms in the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC; M. avium, M. intracellulare, and "nonspecific or X" MAC) are emerging pathogens among individual organisms of which significant genetic variability is displayed. The objective of the present study was to evaluate various molecular methods for the rapid and definitive identification of MAC species. Isolates were obtained from both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients and HIV-negative patients with and without known predisposing conditions. The isolates were initially hybridized with nucleic acid probes complementary to the rRNA of the respective mycobacterial species (AccuProbe Culture Confirmation kits for M. avium, M. intracellulare, and MAC species; Gen-Probe). Isolates were also examined by PCR and in some cases by Southern blot hybridization for the insertion element IS1245. Two other techniques included a PCR assay that amplifies the mig gene, a putative virulence factor for MAC, and hsp65 gene amplification and sequencing. This study led to the following observations. Eighty-five percent of the isolates from HIV-positive patients were M. avium and 86% of the isolates from HIV-negative patients were M. intracellulare. Fifteen of the M. avium isolates did not contain IS1245 and 7% of the M. intracellulare isolates were found to carry IS1245. All of the M. avium strains were mig positive, and all of the M. intracellulare strains were mig negative.

  3. Biologically distinct subtypes of Mycobacterium avium differ in possession of insertion sequence IS901.

    PubMed

    Kunze, Z M; Portaels, F; McFadden, J J

    1992-09-01

    Mycobacterium avium causes disease, principally tuberculosis in immunocompromised individuals. It is the most frequent cause of disseminated infections in AIDS patients in the West. The pathogen is also associated with disease in animals, chiefly birds and livestock, and may be isolated from environmental samples such as soil and water. Analysis of strains of M. avium isolated from clinical, veterinary, and environmental sources for the presence of the mycobacterial insertion sequences IS900 and IS901 demonstrates the specific association of IS901 to animal pathogenic M. avium strains. In contrast, most clinical M. avium strains and all AIDS-derived strains examined so far lacked IS901. Significant differences in the plasmid contents and serotypes of strains with and without IS901 were also found. We therefore suggest that the presence of IS901 divides M. avium into two clearly distinct subtypes with differing host range, virulence, plasmid possession, and serotyping antigens. By using DNA sequence data from IS901 and M. avium DNA, a set of polymerase chain reactions were developed for the specific detection and differentiation of these subtypes.

  4. Maximizing Capture Efficiency and Specificity of Magnetic Separation for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Cells ▿

    PubMed Central

    Foddai, Antonio; Elliott, Christopher T.; Grant, Irene R.

    2010-01-01

    In order to introduce specificity for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis prior to a phage amplification assay, various magnetic-separation approaches, involving either antibodies or peptides, were evaluated in terms of the efficiency of capture (expressed as a percentage) of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells and the percentage of nonspecific binding by other Mycobacterium spp. A 50:50 mixture of MyOne Tosylactivated Dynabeads coated with the chemically synthesized M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific peptides biotinylated aMp3 and biotinylated aMptD (i.e., peptide-mediated magnetic separation [PMS]) proved to be the best magnetic-separation approach for achieving 85 to 100% capture of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and minimal (<1%) nonspecific recovery of other Mycobacterium spp. (particularly if beads were blocked with 1% skim milk before use) from broth samples containing 103 to 104 CFU/ml. When PMS was coupled with a recently optimized phage amplification assay and used to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in 50-ml volumes of spiked milk, the mean 50% limit of detection (LOD50) was 14.4 PFU/50 ml of milk (equivalent to 0.3 PFU/ml). This PMS-phage assay represents a novel, rapid method for the detection and enumeration of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis organisms in milk, and potentially other sample matrices, with results available within 48 h. PMID:20851966

  5. Mycobacterium avium MAV2054 protein induces macrophage apoptosis by targeting mitochondria and reduces intracellular bacterial growth

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kang-In; Whang, Jake; Choi, Han-Gyu; Son, Yeo-Jin; Jeon, Haet Sal; Back, Yong Woo; Park, Hye-Soo; Paik, Seungwha; Park, Jeong-Kyu; Choi, Chul Hee; Kim, Hwa-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex induces macrophage apoptosis. However, the M. avium components that inhibit or trigger apoptosis and their regulating mechanisms remain unclear. We recently identified the immunodominant MAV2054 protein by fractionating M. avium culture filtrate protein by multistep chromatography; this protein showed strong immuno-reactivity in M. avium complex pulmonary disease and in patients with tuberculosis. Here, we investigated the biological effects of MAV2054 on murine macrophages. Recombinant MAV2054 induced caspase-dependent macrophage apoptosis. Enhanced reactive oxygen species production and JNK activation were essential for MAV2054-mediated apoptosis and MAV2054-induced interleukin-6, tumour necrosis factor, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production. MAV2054 was targeted to the mitochondrial compartment of macrophages treated with MAV2054 and infected with M. avium. Dissipation of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) and depletion of cytochrome c also occurred in MAV2054-treated macrophages. Apoptotic response, reactive oxygen species production, and ΔΨm collapse were significantly increased in bone marrow-derived macrophages infected with Mycobacterium smegmatis expressing MAV2054, compared to that in M. smegmatis control. Furthermore, MAV2054 expression suppressed intracellular growth of M. smegmatis and increased the survival rate of M. smegmatis-infected mice. Thus, MAV2054 induces apoptosis via a mitochondrial pathway in macrophages, which may be an innate cellular response to limit intracellular M. avium multiplication. PMID:27901051

  6. Comparative genome analyses of Mycobacterium avium reveal genomic features of its subspecies and strains that cause progression of pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Uchiya, Kei-ichi; Tomida, Shuta; Nakagawa, Taku; Asahi, Shoki; Nikai, Toshiaki; Ogawa, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is increasing worldwide. Mycobacterium avium is the most clinically significant NTM species in humans and animals, and comprises four subspecies: M. avium subsp. avium (MAA), M. avium subsp. silvaticum (MAS), M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), and M. avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH). To improve our understanding of the genetic landscape and diversity of M. avium and its role in disease, we performed a comparative genome analysis of 79 M. avium strains. Our analysis demonstrated that MAH is an open pan-genome species. Phylogenetic analysis based on single nucleotide variants showed that MAH had the highest degree of sequence variability among the subspecies, and MAH strains isolated in Japan and those isolated abroad possessed distinct phylogenetic features. Furthermore, MAP strains, MAS and MAA strains isolated from birds, and many MAH strains that cause the progression of pulmonary disease were grouped in each specific cluster. Comparative genome analysis revealed the presence of genetic elements specific to each lineage, which are thought to be acquired via horizontal gene transfer during the evolutionary process, and identified potential genetic determinants accounting for the pathogenic and host range characteristics of M. avium. PMID:28045086

  7. Imidazo[1,2-a]Pyridine-3-Carboxamides Are Active Antimicrobial Agents against Mycobacterium avium Infection In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Moraski, Garrett C.; Cheng, Yong; Cho, Sanghyun; Cramer, Jeffrey W.; Godfrey, Alexander; Masquelin, Thierry; Franzblau, Scott G.; Miller, Marvin J.

    2016-01-01

    A panel of six imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3-carboxamides (IAPs) were shown to have low-micromolar activity against Mycobacterium avium strains. Compound ND-10885 (compound 2) showed significant activity in the lung, spleen, and liver in a mouse M. avium infection model. A combined regimen consisting of ND-10885 (compound 2) and rifampin was additive in its anti-M. avium activity in the lung. Our data indicate that IAPs represent a new class of antibiotics that are active against M. avium and could potentially serve as an effective addition to a combined treatment regimen. PMID:27216051

  8. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, Crohn's disease and the Doomsday scenario

    PubMed Central

    Hermon-Taylor, John

    2009-01-01

    Johne's disease is chronic inflammation of the intestine caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis. Infection and disease are mainly in domestic livestock but can affect many species including primates. Johne's is a new disease which emerged at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries and principally involved Europe and North America. It has since spread to former low incidence regions to become a global problem. Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammation of the intestine in humans which emerged in Europe and North America mid 20th century and increased to become a major healthcare problem. It has now spread to former low incidence regions. Infected animals shed Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in milk and into the environment. Human populations are widely exposed. Outcomes maybe influenced by microbial phenotype. Exposure to extracellular forms of these pathogens may confer some natural protection; exposure to intracellular forms which have passaged through milk macrophages or environmental protists may pose a greater threat to humans particularly individuals with an inherited or acquired susceptibility. Hot spots of human disease such as in Winnipeg which sits on rock at the junction of two rivers may result from local exposure to high levels of waterborne pathogens brought down from farmland. When appropriate methods are used most people with Crohn's disease are found to be infected. There are no data which demonstrate that these pathogens are harmless to humans. An overwhelming balance of probability and Public health risk favours the conclusion that Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis is also pathogenic for people. A two tier co-operative pathogenic mechanism is proposed in Crohn's disease. Intracellular infection with the primary pathogen widely distributed throughout the gut causes an immune dysregulation and a specific chronic enteric neuropathy with loss of mucosal integrity. Segments of gross inflammatory disease

  9. Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis on Dairy Farms.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingling; Katani, Robab; Schilling, Megan; Kapur, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiological agent of severe chronic intestinal inflammatory disease in ruminants, termed Johne's disease, and can infect many other animal species, including humans. MAP has a long incubation period prior to manifestation of clinical signs including diarrhea, weight loss, and loss of production. MAP has a high prevalence in dairy herds and results in considerable adverse impacts on animal health and productivity throughout the world. Recent investigations have leveraged the characterization of the MAP genome for the development of powerful new molecular techniques for MAP strain differentiation. These approaches are providing key insights into the epidemiology and transmission of MAP on and between dairy herds. We summarize the state of the art for MAP diagnostics and strain differentiation and our current knowledge of mechanisms of within- and between-herd transmission of MAP, along with future needs for the development of rational MAP infection control programs.

  10. Emphysematous pyometra secondary to Enterococcus avium infection in a dog.

    PubMed

    Chang, An-Chi; Cheng, Ching-Chang; Wang, Hsien-Chi; Lee, Wei-Ming; Shyu, Ching-Lin; Lin, Cheng-Chung; Chen, Kuan-Sheng

    2016-06-16

    A 5-year-old female intact Mastiff dog was presented with a history of vaginal discharge for 1 day. Physical examination revealed a sanguineo-purulent vaginal discharge and systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Abdominal radiographs showed several dilated and gas- filled tubular loops. The differential diagnoses included emphysematous pyometra or small intestinal mechanical ileus. Surgical exploration of the abdomen demonstrated a severely dilated and gas-filled uterus, and emphysematous pyometra was confirmed. The patient's clinical signs resolved after ovariohysterectomy. Histopathology revealed mild endometrial cystic hyperplasia with infiltration of inflammatory cells in the superficial endometrial epithelia. Enterococcus avium, an α-hemolytic gram-positive coccus, was isolated from the uterus. This paper highlights the radiographic features of emphysematous pyometra and a pathogen that has never been reported to be associated with canine pyometra previously.

  11. Understanding Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis microaggregate mediated pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Leite, Fernando Lopes Leivas

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis (MAH) is an opportunistic pathogen and causes nontuberculous infections in immune compromised individuals, an emerging problem that has been recognized worldwide. Understanding the pathogenesis of this organism is important as better treatment and prevention options are needed. Microaggregates form when two or more bacterial cells join at a surface. MAH forms micgroaggregates to promote its entry in to epithelial cells and cause infection. The mechanisms involved in the interaction between the microaggregate and the host are becoming clearer as the molecules involved in this process are being uncovered. Microaggregate Invasion Protein-1 (MIP-1) is now described as having a major role in the invasion of epithelial cells by MAH.

  12. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in cherry (Prunus avium L.) fruit during development.

    PubMed

    Walker, Robert P; Battistelli, Alberto; Moscatello, Stefano; Chen, Zhi-Hui; Leegood, Richard C; Famiani, Franco

    2011-11-01

    In this study the abundance and location of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) was determined in the flesh and skin of the sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) cultivar Durone Nero II during development. PEPCK was not present in young fruit but appeared in both tissues as the fruit increased in size. In these there was no net dissimilation of malic acid, which accounts for the bulk of their organic acid contents when PEPCK was present. To assist in understanding the function of PEPCK, the abundance of a number of other enzymes was determined. These enzymes were aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT), glutamine synthetase (GS), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), pyruvate, orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK), and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco). A potential role for PEPCK in the regulation of pH and the utilization of malate in gluconeogenesis in the flesh and skin of cherries is presented.

  13. Influence of cultivar and processing on cherry (Prunus avium) allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Primavesi, L; Brenna, O V; Pompei, C; Pravettoni, V; Farioli, L; Pastorello, E A

    2006-12-27

    Oral allergy syndrome is an immediate food allergic event that affects lips, mouth, and pharynx, is often triggered by fruits and vegetables, and may be associated with pollinosis. Here, we report on the allergenic pattern of different varieties of cherry (Prunus avium) and results obtained by applying several technological processes to the selected varieties. Whole cherries were submitted to chemical peeling, thermal treatment, and syruping processes, and the relative protein extracts were analyzed by in vitro (sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting analysis) and in vivo tests (skin prick test). Electrophoretic analyses demonstrated that there was no marked difference among cherry cultivars. Chemical peeling successfully removed Pru av 3, a lipid transfer protein (LTP) responsible for oral allergy syndrome in patients without pollinosis, leading to the industrial production of cherry hypoallergenic derivatives. Furthermore, the syruping process removed almost all allergenic proteins to whom patients with pollinosis are responsive. In vivo tests confirmed electrophoretic results.

  14. Metal worker's lung: spatial association with Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed

    James, Phillip L; Cannon, Julie; Barber, Christopher M; Crawford, Laura; Hughes, Heather; Jones, Meinir; Szram, Joanna; Cowman, Steven; Cookson, William O C; Moffatt, Miriam F; Cullinan, Paul

    2017-08-29

    Outbreaks of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) are not uncommon in workplaces where metal working fluid (MWF) is used to facilitate metal turning. Inhalation of microbe-contaminated MWF has been assumed to be the cause, but previous investigations have failed to establish a spatial relationship between a contaminated source and an outbreak. After an outbreak of five cases of HP in a UK factory, we carried out blinded, molecular-based microbiological investigation of MWF samples in order to identify potential links between specific microbial taxa and machines in the outbreak zone. Custom-quantitative PCR assays, microscopy and phylogenetic analyses were performed on blinded MWF samples to quantify microbial burden and identify potential aetiological agents of HP in metal workers. MWF from machines fed by a central sump, but not those with an isolated supply, was contaminated by mycobacteria. The factory sump and a single linked machine at the centre of the outbreak zone, known to be the workstation of the index cases, had very high levels of detectable organisms. Phylogenetic placement of mycobacterial taxonomic marker genes generated from these samples indicated that the contaminating organisms were closely related to Mycobacterium avium. We describe, for the first time, a close spatial relationship between the abundance of a mycobacterium-like organism, most probably M. avium, and a localised outbreak of MWF-associated HP. The further development of sequence-based analytic techniques should assist in the prevention of this important occupational disease. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Efficient Differentiation of Mycobacterium avium Complex Species and Subspecies by Use of Five-Target Multiplex PCR▿

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sung Jae; Lee, Byung Soo; Koh, Won-Jung; Manning, Elizabeth J. B.; Anklam, Kelly; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Lambrecht, Randall S.; Collins, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Infections caused by the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are on the rise in both human and veterinary medicine. A means of effectively discriminating among closely related yet pathogenetically diverse members of the MAC would enable better diagnosis and treatment as well as further our understanding of the epidemiology of these pathogens. In this study, a five-target multiplex PCR designed to discriminate MAC organisms isolated from liquid culture media was developed. This MAC multiplex was designed to amplify a 16S rRNA gene target common to all Mycobacterium species, a chromosomal target called DT1 that is unique to M. avium subsp. avium serotypes 2 and 3, to M. avium subsp. silvaticum, and to M. intracellulare, and three insertion sequences, IS900, IS901, and IS1311. The pattern of amplification results allowed determination of whether isolates were mycobacteria, whether they were members of the MAC, and whether they belonged to one of three major MAC subspecies, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, M. avium subsp. avium, and M. avium subsp. hominissuis. Analytical sensitivity was 10 fg of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genomic DNA, 5 to 10 fg of M. avium subsp. avium genomic DNA, and 2 to 5 fg of DNA from other mycobacterial species. Identification accuracy of the MAC multiplex was evaluated by testing 53 bacterial reference strains consisting of 28 different mycobacterial species and 12 nonmycobacterial species. Identification accuracy in a clinical setting was evaluated for 223 clinical MAC isolates independently identified by other methods. Isolate identification agreement between the MAC multiplex and these comparison assays was 100%. The novel MAC multiplex is a rapid, reliable, and simple assay for discrimination of MAC species and subspecies in liquid culture media. PMID:20810779

  16. Zoonotic aspects of Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC).

    PubMed

    Biet, Franck; Boschiroli, Maria Laura; Thorel, Marie Françoise; Guilloteau, Laurence A

    2005-01-01

    Pathogens that are transmitted between the environment, wildlife, livestock and humans represent major challenges for the protection of human and domestic animal health, the economic sustainability of agriculture, and the conservation of wildlife. Among such pathogens, the genus Mycobacterium is well represented by M. bovis, the etiological agent of bovine tuberculosis, M. avium ssp. paratuberculosis (Map) the etiological agent of Johne disease, M. avium ssp. avium (Maa) and in a few common cases by other emergent environmental mycobacteria. Epidemiologic surveys performed in Europe, North America and New Zealand have demonstrated the existence and importance of environmental and wildlife reservoirs of mycobacterial infections that limit the attempts of disease control programmes. The aim of this review is to examine the zoonotic aspects of mycobacteria transmitted from the environment and wildlife. This work is focused on the species of two main groups of mycobacteria classified as important pathogens for humans and animals: first, M. bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis, which belongs to the M. tuberculosis complex and has a broad host range including wildlife, captive wildlife, domestic livestock, non-human primates and humans; the second group examined, is the M. avium-intracellulare complex (MAC) which includes M. avium ssp. avium causing major health problems in AIDS patients and M. avium ssp. paratuberculosis the etiological agent of Johne disease in cattle and identified in patients with Crohn disease. MAC agents, in addition to a broad host range, are environmental mycobacteria found in numerous biotopes including the soil, water, aerosols, protozoa, deep litter and fresh tropical vegetation. This review examines the possible reservoirs of these pathogens in the environment and in wildlife, their role as sources of infection in humans and animals and their health impact on humans. The possibilities of control and management programmes for

  17. Proposal to elevate Mycobacterium avium complex ITS sequevar MAC-Q to Mycobacterium vulneris sp. nov.

    PubMed

    van Ingen, J; Boeree, M J; Kösters, K; Wieland, A; Tortoli, E; Dekhuijzen, P N R; van Soolingen, D

    2009-09-01

    The Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) consists of four recognized species, Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium colombiense, Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium chimaera, and a variety of other strains that may be members of undescribed taxa. We report on two isolates of a scotochromogenic, slowly growing, non-tuberculous Mycobacterium species within the M. avium complex from a lymph node and an infected wound after a dogbite of separate patients in The Netherlands. The extrapulmonary infections in immunocompetent patients suggested a high level of virulence. These isolates were characterized by a unique nucleotide sequence in the 16S rRNA gene, 99% similar to Mycobacterium colombiense, and the MAC-Q 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence. Sequence analyses of the hsp65 gene revealed 97% similarity to M. avium. The rpoB gene sequence was 98% similar to M. colombiense. Phenotypically, the scotochromogenicity, positive semi-quantitative catalase and heat-stable catalase tests, negative tellurite reductase and urease tests and susceptibility to hydroxylamine and oleic acid set these isolates apart from related species. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of cell-wall mycolic acid content revealed a unique pattern, related to that of M. avium and M. colombiense. Together, these findings supported a separate species status within the Mycobacterium avium complex. We propose elevation of scotochromogenic M. avium complex strains sharing this 16S gene and MAC-Q ITS sequence to separate species status, for which the name Mycobacterium vulneris sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NLA000700772T (=DSM 45247T=CIP 109859T).

  18. Survival of Mycobacterium avium in drinking water biofilms as affected by water flow velocity, availability of phosphorus, and temperature.

    PubMed

    Torvinen, Eila; Lehtola, Markku J; Martikainen, Pertti J; Miettinen, Ilkka T

    2007-10-01

    Mycobacterium avium is a potential pathogen occurring in drinking water systems. It is a slowly growing bacterium producing a thick cell wall containing mycolic acids, and it is known to resist chlorine better than many other microbes. Several studies have shown that pathogenic bacteria survive better in biofilms than in water. By using Propella biofilm reactors, we studied how factors generally influencing the growth of biofilms (flow rate, phosphorus concentration, and temperature) influence the survival of M. avium in drinking water biofilms. The growth of biofilms was followed by culture and DAPI (4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining, and concentrations of M. avium were determined by culture and fluorescence in situ hybridization methods. The spiked M. avium survived in biofilms for the 4-week study period without a dramatic decline in concentration. The addition of phosphorus (10 microg/liter) increased the number of heterotrophic bacteria in biofilms but decreased the culturability of M. avium. The reason for this result is probably that phosphorus increased competition with other microbes. An increase in flow velocity had no effect on the survival of M. avium, although it increased the growth of biofilms. A higher temperature (20 degrees C versus 7 degrees C) increased both the number of heterotrophic bacteria and the survival of M. avium in biofilms. In conclusion, the results show that in terms of affecting the survival of slowly growing M. avium in biofilms, temperature is a more important factor than the availability of nutrients like phosphorus.

  19. ISOLATION OF THE GENOME SEQUENCE STRAIN MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM 104 FROM MULTIPLE PATIENTS OVER A 17-YEAR PERIOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The genome sequence strain 104 of the opportunistic pathogen Mycobacterium avium was isolated form an adult AIDS patient in Southern California in 1983. Isolates of non-paratuberculosis M. avium from 207 other patients in Southern California and elsewhere were examined for genoty...

  20. ISOLATION OF THE GENOME SEQUENCE STRAIN MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM 104 FROM MULTIPLE PATIENTS OVER A 17-YEAR PERIOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The genome sequence strain 104 of the opportunistic pathogen Mycobacterium avium was isolated form an adult AIDS patient in Southern California in 1983. Isolates of non-paratuberculosis M. avium from 207 other patients in Southern California and elsewhere were examined for genoty...

  1. Assessing the effectiveness of low-pressure ultraviolet light for inactivating Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) micro-organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: To assess low-pressure ultraviolet light (LP-UV) inactivation kinetics of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) strains in a water matrix using collimated beam apparatus. Methods and Results: Strains of M. avium (n = 3) and Mycobacterium intracellulare (n = 2) were exposed t...

  2. The persistence of Mycobacterium avium in a drinking water system, what is the risk to human health?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water is believed to be a major source of human exposure to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) such as Mycobacterium avium. We monitored the prevalence of M. avium in a drinking water system during the addition of filtration treatment. Our goal was to determine if the pre...

  3. Survival of Mycobacterium avium in Drinking Water Biofilms as Affected by Water Flow Velocity, Availability of Phosphorus, and Temperature▿

    PubMed Central

    Torvinen, Eila; Lehtola, Markku J.; Martikainen, Pertti J.; Miettinen, Ilkka T.

    2007-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is a potential pathogen occurring in drinking water systems. It is a slowly growing bacterium producing a thick cell wall containing mycolic acids, and it is known to resist chlorine better than many other microbes. Several studies have shown that pathogenic bacteria survive better in biofilms than in water. By using Propella biofilm reactors, we studied how factors generally influencing the growth of biofilms (flow rate, phosphorus concentration, and temperature) influence the survival of M. avium in drinking water biofilms. The growth of biofilms was followed by culture and DAPI (4′,6′-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining, and concentrations of M. avium were determined by culture and fluorescence in situ hybridization methods. The spiked M. avium survived in biofilms for the 4-week study period without a dramatic decline in concentration. The addition of phosphorus (10 μg/liter) increased the number of heterotrophic bacteria in biofilms but decreased the culturability of M. avium. The reason for this result is probably that phosphorus increased competition with other microbes. An increase in flow velocity had no effect on the survival of M. avium, although it increased the growth of biofilms. A higher temperature (20°C versus 7°C) increased both the number of heterotrophic bacteria and the survival of M. avium in biofilms. In conclusion, the results show that in terms of affecting the survival of slowly growing M. avium in biofilms, temperature is a more important factor than the availability of nutrients like phosphorus. PMID:17675427

  4. Concomitant Mycobacterium avium infection and Hodgkin's disease in a lymph node from an HIV-negative child.

    PubMed

    de Armas, Yaxsier; Capó, Virginia; González, Ida; Mederos, Lilian; Díaz, Raúl; de Waard, Jacobus H; Rodríguez, Alberto; García, Yarmila; Cabanas, Ricardo

    2011-03-01

    We report a case of an immunocompetent child with simultaneously an infection with Mycobacterium avium and Hodgkin's disease in a cervical lymph node. A positive PCR result for M. avium on a biopsy of the lymph node directed the definitive diagnosis for both etiologies and avoided a possible dissemination of this infection after chemotherapy was started.

  5. Mycobacterium avium infections of Acanthamoeba strains: host strain variability, grazing-acquired infections, and altered dynamics of inactivation with monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Berry, David; Horn, Matthias; Xi, Chuanwu; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2010-10-01

    Stable Mycobacterium avium infections of several Acanthamoeba strains were characterized by increased infection resistance of recent environmental isolates and reduced infectivity in the presence of other bacteria. Exposure of M. avium in coculture with Acanthamoeba castellanii to monochloramine yielded inactivation kinetics markedly similar to those observed for A. castellanii alone.

  6. Lymphadenitis in children is caused by Mycobacterium avium hominissuis and not related to ‘bird tuberculosis’

    PubMed Central

    de Haas, P. E. W.; Lindeboom, J. A.; Kuijper, E. J.; van Soolingen, D.

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is the most commonly encountered mycobacterium species among non-Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (nontuberculous mycobacteria) isolates worldwide and frequently causes lymphadenitis in children. During a multi-centre study in The Netherlands that was performed to determine the optimal treatment for mycobacterial lymphadenitis, concern was expressed in the media about the possible role of birds as sources of these M. avium infections, referred to as ‘bird tuberculosis.’ To examine the involvement of birds in mycobacterial lymphadenitis, 34 M. avium isolates from lymphadenitis cases were subjected to IS1245 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) typing. This genotyping method enables the distinction of the subspecies M. avium subsp. hominissuis and the ‘bird-type’ M. avium spp. avium. Highly variable RFLP patterns were found among the lymphadenitis M. avium isolates, and all belonged to the M. avium hominissuis subspecies. A relation to pet birds in the etiology of mycobacterial lymphadenitis could not be established, and the source of the infections may be environmental. PMID:18320245

  7. Assessing the effectiveness of low-pressure ultraviolet light for inactivating Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) micro-organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: To assess low-pressure ultraviolet light (LP-UV) inactivation kinetics of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) strains in a water matrix using collimated beam apparatus. Methods and Results: Strains of M. avium (n = 3) and Mycobacterium intracellulare (n = 2) were exposed t...

  8. Rapid and sensitive method to identify Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in cow's milk by DNA methylase genotyping.

    PubMed

    Mundo, Silvia Leonor; Gilardoni, Liliana Rosa; Hoffman, Federico José; Lopez, Osvaldo Jorge

    2013-03-01

    Paratuberculosis is an infectious, chronic, and incurable disease that affects ruminants, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. This bacterium is shed primarily through feces of infected cows but can be also excreted in colostrum and milk and might survive pasteurization. Since an association of genomic sequences of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in patients with Crohn's disease has been described; it is of interest to rapidly detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk for human consumption. IS900 insertion is used as a target for PCR amplification to identify the presence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in biological samples. Two target sequences were selected: IS1 (155 bp) and IS2 (94 bp). These fragments have a 100% identity among all M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains sequenced. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was specifically concentrated from milk samples by immunomagnetic separation prior to performing PCR. The amplicons were characterized using DNA methylase Genotyping, i.e., the amplicons were methylated with 6-methyl-adenine and digested with restriction enzymes to confirm their identity. The methylated amplicons from 100 CFU of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis can be visualized in a Western blot format using an anti-6-methyl-adenine monoclonal antibody. The use of DNA methyltransferase genotyping coupled to a scintillation proximity assay allows for the detection of up to 10 CFU of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis per ml of milk. This test is rapid and sensitive and allows for automation and thus multiple samples can be tested at the same time.

  9. Rapid and Sensitive Method To Identify Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Cow's Milk by DNA Methylase Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Mundo, Silvia Leonor; Gilardoni, Liliana Rosa; Hoffman, Federico José

    2013-01-01

    Paratuberculosis is an infectious, chronic, and incurable disease that affects ruminants, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. This bacterium is shed primarily through feces of infected cows but can be also excreted in colostrum and milk and might survive pasteurization. Since an association of genomic sequences of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in patients with Crohn's disease has been described; it is of interest to rapidly detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk for human consumption. IS900 insertion is used as a target for PCR amplification to identify the presence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in biological samples. Two target sequences were selected: IS1 (155 bp) and IS2 (94 bp). These fragments have a 100% identity among all M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains sequenced. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was specifically concentrated from milk samples by immunomagnetic separation prior to performing PCR. The amplicons were characterized using DNA methylase Genotyping, i.e., the amplicons were methylated with 6-methyl-adenine and digested with restriction enzymes to confirm their identity. The methylated amplicons from 100 CFU of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis can be visualized in a Western blot format using an anti-6-methyl-adenine monoclonal antibody. The use of DNA methyltransferase genotyping coupled to a scintillation proximity assay allows for the detection of up to 10 CFU of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis per ml of milk. This test is rapid and sensitive and allows for automation and thus multiple samples can be tested at the same time. PMID:23275511

  10. The persistence of Mycobacterium avium in a drinking water system, what is the risk to human health?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water is believed to be a major source of human exposure to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) such as Mycobacterium avium. We monitored the prevalence of M. avium in a drinking water system during the addition of filtration treatment. Our goal was to determine if the pre...

  11. Relationship between Presence of Cows with Milk Positive for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-Specific Antibody by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay and Viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Dust in Cattle Barns

    PubMed Central

    Chuchaisangrat, Ruj; Nielen, Mirjam; Koets, Ad P.

    2013-01-01

    Paratuberculosis, or Johne's disease, in cattle is caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, which has recently been suspected to be transmitted through dust. This longitudinal study on eight commercial M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-positive dairy farms studied the relationship between the number of cows with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antibody-positive milk and the presence of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in settled-dust samples, including their temporal relationship. Milk and dust samples were collected in parallel monthly for 2 years. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antibodies in milk were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and used as a proxy for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis shedding. Settled-dust samples were collected by using electrostatic dust collectors (EDCs) at six locations in housing for dairy cattle and young stock. The presence of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was identified by liquid culture and PCR. The results showed a positive relationship (odds ratio [OR], 1.2) between the number of cows with ELISA-positive milk and the odds of having positive EDCs in the same airspace as the adult dairy cattle. Moreover, the total number of lactating cows also showed an OR slightly above 1. This relationship remained the same for settled-dust samples collected up to 2 months before or after the time of milk sampling. The results suggest that removal of adult cows with milk positive for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific antibody by ELISA might result in a decrease in the presence of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in dust and therefore in the environment. However, this decrease is likely delayed by several weeks at least. In addition, the data support the notion that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis exposure of young stock is reduced by separate housing. PMID:23793639

  12. Identification of Mycobacterium avium genes associated with resistance to host antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    Motamedi, Nima; Danelishvili, Lia

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are an important component of the innate immune defence. Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (M. avium) is an organism that establishes contact with the respiratory and gastrointestinal mucosa as a necessary step for infection. M. avium is resistant to high concentrations of polymyxin B, a surrogate for antimicrobial peptides. To determine gene-encoding proteins that are associated with this resistance, we screened a transposon library of M. avium strain 104 for susceptibility to polymyxin B. Ten susceptible mutants were identified and the inactivated genes sequenced. The great majority of the genes were related to cell wall synthesis and permeability. The mutants were then examined for their ability to enter macrophages and to survive macrophage killing. Three clones among the mutants had impaired uptake by macrophages compared with the WT strain, and all ten clones were attenuated in macrophages. The mutants were also shown to be susceptible to cathelicidin (LL-37), in contrast to the WT bacterium. All but one of the mutants were significantly attenuated in mice. In conclusion, this study indicated that the M. avium envelope is the primary defence against host antimicrobial peptides. PMID:24836414

  13. Induction and expression of protective T cells during Mycobacterium avium infections in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Appelberg, R; Pedrosa, J

    1992-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is an opportunistic pathogen that infects individuals suffering from chronic lung disease or immunocompromised patients such as AIDS patients. Here we show that a highly virulent isolate of M. avium proliferated as extensively in T cell deficient as in immunocompetent mice. T cell deficient mice allowed a progressive growth of a less virulent AIDS-derived isolate of M. avium while immunocompetent mice arrested the growth of this isolate. Adoptive transfer of T cell enriched spleen cells between congenic strains of mice differing at the Bcg/Ity/Lsh locus showed that only naturally resistant BALB/c.Bcgr (C.D2) mice infected with the highly virulent strain of M. avium or the naturally susceptible BALB/c mice infected with the lower virulence isolate developed protective T cells and that these cells only mediated protection when transferred to naturally susceptible, but not to naturally resistant, mice. Both strains of M. avium proliferated in bone marrow-derived macrophages cultured in vitro and they were both susceptible to the bacteriostatic effects induced in the macrophages by crude lymphokines produced by concanavalin A-stimulated spleen cells. PMID:1544223

  14. Investigation of Spa Pools Associated with Lung Disorders Caused by Mycobacterium avium Complex in Immunocompetent Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lumb, Richard; Stapledon, Richard; Scroop, Andrew; Bond, Peter; Cunliffe, David; Goodwin, Allan; Doyle, Robyn; Bastian, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    Three cases of Mycobacterium avium complex-related lung disorders were associated with two poorly maintained spa pools by genotypic investigations. Inadequate disinfection of the two spas had reduced the load of environmental bacteria to less than 1 CFU/ml but allowed levels of M. avium complex of 4.3 × 104 and 4.5 × 103 CFU/ml. Persistence of the disease-associated genotype was demonstrated in one spa pool for over 5 months until repeated treatments with greater than 10 mg of chlorine per liter for 1-h intervals eliminated M. avium complex from the spa pool. A fourth case of Mycobacterium avium complex-related lung disease was associated epidemiologically but not genotypically with another spa pool that had had no maintenance undertaken. This spa pool contained low numbers of mycobacteria by smear and was culture positive for M. avium complex, and the nonmycobacterial organism count was 5.2 × 106 CFU/ml. Public awareness about the proper maintenance of private (residential) spa pools must be promoted by health departments in partnership with spa pool retailers. PMID:15294830

  15. Mycobacterium avium bacilli grow saprozoically in coculture with Acanthamoeba polyphaga and survive within cyst walls.

    PubMed

    Steinert, M; Birkness, K; White, E; Fields, B; Quinn, F

    1998-06-01

    Protozoans are gaining recognition as environmental hosts for a variety of waterborne pathogens. We compared the growth of Mycobacterium avium, a human pathogen associated with domestic water supplies, in coculture with the free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba polyphaga with the growth of M. avium when it was separated from amoebae by a 0.1-micron-pore-size polycarbonate membrane (in a parachamber). Although viable mycobacteria were observed within amoebal vacuoles, there was no significant difference between bacterial growth in coculture and bacterial growth in the parachamber. This suggests that M. avium is able to grow saprozoically on products secreted by the amoebae. In contrast, Legionella pneumophila, a well-studied intracellular parasite of amoebae, multiplied only in coculture. A comparison of amoebae infected with L. pneumophila and amoebae infected with M. avium by electron microscopy demonstrated that there were striking differences in the locations of the bacteria within amoebal cysts. While L. pneumophila resided within the cysts, M. avium was found within the outer walls of the double-walled cysts of A. polyphaga. These locations may provide a reservoir for the bacteria when environmental conditions become unfavorable.

  16. Estimation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis growth parameters: strain characterization and comparison of methods.

    PubMed

    Elguezabal, Natalia; Bastida, Felix; Sevilla, Iker A; González, Nuria; Molina, Elena; Garrido, Joseba M; Juste, Ramón A

    2011-12-01

    The growth rate of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis was assessed by different methods in 7H9 medium supplemented with OADC (oleic acid, albumin, dextrose, catalase), Tween 80, and mycobactin J. Generation times and maximum specific growth rates were determined by wet weight, turbidometric measurement, viable count, and quantitative PCR (ParaTB-Kuanti; F57 gene) for 8 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains (K10, 2E, 316F, 81, 445, 764, 22G, and OVICAP 49). Strain-to-strain differences were observed in growth curves and calculated parameters. The quantification methods gave different results for each strain at specific time points. Generation times ranged from an average of 1.4 days for viable count and qPCR to approximately 10 days for wet weight and turbidometry. The wet-weight, turbidometry, and ParaTB-Kuanti qPCR methods correlated best with each other. Generally, viability has been assessed by viable count as a reference method; however, due to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis clumping problems and the presence of noncultivable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells, we conclude that qPCR of a single-copy gene may be used reliably for rapid estimation of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis bacterial numbers in a sample.

  17. Intracellular Mycobacterium avium Intersect Transferrin in the Rab11+ Recycling Endocytic Pathway and Avoid Lipocalin 2 Trafficking the Lysosomal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Halaas, Øyvind; Steigedal, Magnus; Haug, Markus; Awuh, Jane A.; Ryan, Liv; Brech, Andreas; Sato, Shintaro; Husebye, Harald; Cangelosi, Gerard A.; Akira, Shizuo; Strong, Roland K.; Espevik, Terje; Flo, Trude H.

    2009-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for microbes and many pathogenic bacteria depend on siderophores to obtain iron. The mammalian innate immunity protein lipocalin 2 (Lcn2, NGAL, 24p3, Siderocalin) binds the siderophore carboxymycobactin, an essential component of the iron acquisition apparatus of mycobacteria. Here we show that Lcn2 suppressed growth of Mycobacterium avium in culture, and M. avium induced Lcn2 production from mouse macrophages. Lcn2 was also elevated and initially limited the growth of M. avium in the blood of infected mice, but did not impede growth in tissues and during long-term infections. M. avium is an intracellular pathogen. Subcellular imaging of infected macrophages revealed that Lcn2 trafficked to lysosomes separate from M. avium, whereas transferrin was efficiently transported to the mycobacteria. Thus mycobacteria seem to reside in the Rab11+ endocytic recycling pathway, thereby retaining access to nutrition and avoiding endocytosed immunoproteins like Lcn2. PMID:20121435

  18. Immunoreactivity of protein tyrosine phosphatase A (PtpA) in sera from sheep infected with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gurung, Ratna B; Begg, Douglas J; Purdie, Auriol C; Bach, Horacio; Whittington, Richard J

    2014-07-15

    Evasion of host defense mechanisms and survival inside infected host macrophages are features of pathogenic mycobacteria including Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, the causative agent of Johne's disease in ruminants. Protein tyrosine phosphatase A (PtpA) has been identified as a secreted protein critical for survival of mycobacteria within infected macrophages. The host may mount an immune response to such secreted proteins. In this study, the humoral immune response to purified recombinant M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis PtpA was investigated using sera from a cohort of sheep infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and compared with uninfected healthy controls. A significantly higher level of reactivity to PtpA was observed in sera collected from M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis infected sheep when compared to those from uninfected healthy controls. PtpA could be a potential candidate antigen for detection of humoral immune responses in sheep infected with M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

  19. Detecting local establishment strategies of wild cherry (Prunus avium L.).

    PubMed

    Höltken, Aki M; Gregorius, Hans-Rolf

    2006-10-04

    P. avium, a pioneer tree species that colonizes early forest successional stages, is assumed to require an effective strategy allowing stably repeatable rounds of local establishment, dispersal and local extinction. Consequently, the early replacement of cherry by climax tree species makes the establishment of several local generations very unlikely, especially in central European continuous cover forests. This has to be seen in connection with the mixed reproduction system involving asexual reproduction as a complementary adaptational strategy. Tests of the local establishment of wild cherry must therefore consider the possibility of first generation establishment via seedling recruitment potentially followed by an asexual generation (root suckering). Successful establishment can therefore be determined only among adult individuals with the option of detecting vegetative reproduction at these stages. To test the implied suggestion about local establishment strategies of wild cherry, nuclear microsatellites were used to analyse patterns of asexual propagation among adult stages that have been subjected to one of two major types of forest management. These management types, the historical "coppice with standards system" (CWS) and the "high forest system" (HFS), can be reasonably assumed to have affected the reproduction system of P. avium. Clear differences were found in the reproduction pattern between two stands representing the two forest management types: 1) Clonal propagation is observed in both management systems, but with a distinctly higher frequency in the CWS. Hence, sexual recruitment as a first local generation is followed by a second asexual generation in both, whereas in the CWS there is evidence for an additional clonal generation. 2) The estimation of amounts of clonal reproduction critically depends on the assumptions about multilocus gene associations. This is revealed by the application of newly developed methods of quantifying gene associations

  20. Detecting local establishment strategies of wild cherry (Prunus avium L.)

    PubMed Central

    Höltken, Aki M; Gregorius, Hans-Rolf

    2006-01-01

    Backround P. avium, a pioneer tree species that colonizes early forest successional stages, is assumed to require an effective strategy allowing stably repeatable rounds of local establishment, dispersal and local extinction. Consequently, the early replacement of cherry by climax tree species makes the establishment of several local generations very unlikely, especially in central European continuous cover forests. This has to be seen in connection with the mixed reproduction system involving asexual reproduction as a complementary adaptational strategy. Tests of the local establishment of wild cherry must therefore consider the possibility of first generation establishment via seedling recruitment potentially followed by an asexual generation (root suckering). Successful establishment can therefore be determined only among adult individuals with the option of detecting vegetative reproduction at these stages. To test the implied suggestion about local establishment strategies of wild cherry, nuclear microsatellites were used to analyse patterns of asexual propagation among adult stages that have been subjected to one of two major types of forest management. These management types, the historical "coppice with standards system" (CWS) and the "high forest system" (HFS), can be reasonably assumed to have affected the reproduction system of P. avium. Results Clear differences were found in the reproduction pattern between two stands representing the two forest management types: 1) Clonal propagation is observed in both management systems, but with a distinctly higher frequency in the CWS. Hence, sexual recruitment as a first local generation is followed by a second asexual generation in both, whereas in the CWS there is evidence for an additional clonal generation. 2) The estimation of amounts of clonal reproduction critically depends on the assumptions about multilocus gene associations. This is revealed by the application of newly developed methods of quantifying

  1. Virulence and molecular aspects of Bordetella avium isolated from cockatiel chicks (Nymphicus hollandicus) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Grespan, A; Camera, O; Knöbl, T; Gomes, C R; Felizardo, M R; Ferreira, T S P; Gobbi, D D S; Moreno, M; Sanches, A A; Ferreira, C S A; Ferreira, A J P; Moreno, A M

    2012-12-07

    Bordetella avium is an opportunistic pathogen that presents tropism for ciliated epithelia, leading to upper respiratory tract disease in turkeys. This agent has also been associated with Lockjaw Syndrome in psittacine birds, but literatures describing the importance of this agent in such species are rare. The purpose of the present study was to report the first outbreak of B. avium infection in juvenile cockatiels demonstrating the Lockjaw Syndrome in Brazil and to investigate the antimicrobial resistance profile and phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of these strains. Surprising, the strains obtained from five infected cockatiel chicks from three different breeders from different Brazilian states showed a clonal relationship using the Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis and Single Enzyme Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism techniques. The virulence potentials of the B. avium strains were assessed using tracheal adherence and cytotoxic effects on a VERO cell monolayer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Pathogenesis of systemic Mycobacterium avium infection in pigs through histological analysis of hepatic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Hibiya, Kenji; Utsunomiya, Kimiko; Yoshida, Takashi; Toma, Satoshi; Higa, Futoshi; Tateyama, Masao; Fujita, Jiro

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium causes systemic infections through primary intestinal lesions in pigs. However, its pathogenesis is not well understood. The aim of this study was to confirm the effects on swine after enteral infection. One hundred and twelve pigs with hepatic lesions infected with M. avium were used in this study. We investigated the involvement of other organs and the distribution of hepatic lesions in the lobular structure. Most lesions involved the mesenteric lymph nodes. Hepatic lymph nodes were the secondary nodes involved. In 74 cases (66.1%), the hepatic lesions were predominantly distributed in the portal tract of the affected livers. The other 38 cases (33.9%) showed granulomatous lesions in the hepatic lobule. Many cases showed interface hepatitis. There was a significant relationship between focal lesions within hepatic lobule and splenic lesions. These findings suggest that granulomatous lesions formed in hepatic lobules upon establishment of bacteremia in pigs systemically infected with M. avium. PMID:21197224

  3. Disseminated mycobacteriosis due to Mycobacterium avium in captive Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris).

    PubMed

    Cho, Ho-Seong; Kim, Yong-Hwan; Park, Nam-Yong

    2006-05-01

    A 2-year-old captive female Bengal Tiger (Panthera tigris) died after prolonged anorexia in the Gwangju Uchi Park Zoo, Gwangju, Republic of Korea. Necropsy revealed multiple nodules of varying sizes in the lung, liver, kidney, and spleen. Histopathologic examination revealed a typical granuloma composed of caseous necrotic areas surrounded by lymphocytes with a few giant cells and foamy macrophages. Periodic acid-Schiff stain and Gomori methenamine silver stain did not reveal any fungal bodies. The Ziehl-Neelsen acid-fast stain revealed few acid-fast organisms in the lung, liver, kidney, and spleen. A polymerase chain reaction assay of the lung, liver, kidney, and spleen yielded a positive result for Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. This is an unusual case of disseminated infection of a wild mammal with avian mycobacteriosis, and is believed to be most likely associated with the feeding of tigers with culled chickens infected with M. avium.

  4. Tracheal mucus transport rate in normal turkeys and in turkeys infected with Bordetella avium (Alcaligenes faecalis).

    PubMed

    Ficken, M D; Edwards, J F; Lay, J C; Tveter, D E

    1986-01-01

    Using the radiopharmaceutical 99mtechnetium-sulfur colloid, the tracheal mucus transport rate (TMTR) was measured in healthy unanesthetized turkeys and in turkeys infected with Bordetella avium. The TMTR of uninfected turkeys was 35.6 +/- 14.4 cm/min. The TMTR of B. avium-infected turkeys was normal on days 0 through 14 postexposure (PE), despite heavy bacterial colonization of the tracheal epithelium. On day 21 PE, the TMTR of B. avium-infected turkeys was significantly depressed (P less than or equal to 0.01) compared with that of control turkeys. Depressed transport was associated with extensive loss of ciliated epithelium from the tracheal mucosa and replacement of the normal mucosa by immature nonciliated epithelium or metaplastic squamous epithelium.

  5. The relationship of temperature to desiccation and starvation tolerance of the Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed

    Archuleta, Rebecca Joy; Mullens, Patricia; Primm, Todd P

    2002-10-01

    Mycobacterium avium grew in media at 14-37 degrees C, and persisted at 4 degrees C and 42 degrees C. The bacteria lost approximately 90% viability after 3 months in reverse-osmosis deionized water at 4-37 degrees C. Cooler temperatures lowered the death rate. Death rates also decreased after a 5- to 10-day starvation adaptation period. Alterations of the steady-state levels of different mycolic acid classes, presumably to facilitate thermoadaptation, were found. Following desiccation, M. avium lost viability at a constant rate (half-life of 2.3 days). This implies that bacilli contaminating dry medical surfaces would persist for short periods of time. The remarkable stress survival exhibited by M. avium further suggests persistence in a range of environmental and clinical settings.

  6. Whole chromosomal DNA probes for rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, M C; McMillan, C; Coyle, M B

    1987-01-01

    Whole chromosomal DNA probes were used to identify clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium complex, and Mycobacterium gordonae. The probe for M. tuberculosis was prepared from Mycobacterium bovis BCG, which has been shown to be closely related to M. tuberculosis. A probe for the M. avium complex was prepared from three strains representing each of the three DNA homology groups in the M. avium complex. The probes were used in dot blot assays to identify clinical isolates of mycobacteria. The dot blot test correctly identified 57 of the 61 (93%) cultures grown on solid media, and 100% of antibiotic-treated broth-grown cells were correctly identified. Identification by dot blot required a maximum of 48 h. When the probes were tested against 63 positive BACTEC (Johnston Laboratories, Inc., Towson, Md.) cultures of clinical specimens, 59% were correctly identified. However, of the 14 BACTEC cultures that had been treated with antibiotics before being lysed, 13 (93%) were correctly identified. PMID:3112180

  7. Formulation and efficacy of liposome-encapsulated antibiotics for therapy of intracellular Mycobacterium avium infection.

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Y K; Nix, D E; Straubinger, R M

    1995-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is an intracellular pathogen that can invade and multiply within macrophages of the reticuloendothelial system. Current therapy is not highly effective. Particulate drug carriers that are targeted to the reticuloendothelial system may provide a means to deliver antibiotics more efficiently to M. avium-infected cells. We investigated the formulation of the antibiotics ciprofloxacin and azithromycin in liposomes and tested their antibacterial activities in vitro against M. avium residing within J774, a murine macrophage-like cell line. A conventional passive-entrapment method yielded an encapsulation efficiency of 9% for ciprofloxacin and because of aggregation mediated by the cationic drug, was useful only with liposomes containing < or = 50 mol% negatively charged phospholipid. In contrast, ciprofloxacin was encapsulated with > 90% efficiency, regardless of the content of negatively charged lipids, by a remote-loading technique that utilized both pH and potential gradients to drive drug into preformed liposomes. Both the cellular accumulation and the antimycobacterial activity of ciprofloxacin increased in proportion to the liposome negative charge; the maximal enhancement of potency was 43-fold in liposomes of distearoylphosphatidylglycerol-cholesterol (DSPG-Chol) (10:5). Azithromycin liposomes were prepared as a freeze-dried preparation to avoid chemical instability during storage, and drug could be incorporated at 33 mol% (with respect to phospholipid). Azithromycin also showed enhanced antimycobacterial effect in liposomes, and the potency increased in parallel to the moles percent of negatively charged lipids; azithromycin in DSPG-Chol (10:5) liposomes inhibited intracellular M. avium growth 41-fold more effectively than did free azithromycin. Thus, ciprofloxacin or azithromycin encapsulated in stable liposomes having substantial negative surface charge is superior to nonencapsulated drug in inhibition of M.avium growth within cultured

  8. Immunoreactivity of the Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis 19-kDa lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Huntley, Jason FJ; Stabel, Judith R; Bannantine, John P

    2005-01-01

    Background The Mycobacterium tuberculosis 19-kDa lipoprotein has been reported to stimulate both T and B cell responses as well as induce a number of Th1 cytokines. In order to evaluate the Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis) 19-kDa lipoprotein as an immunomodulator in cattle with Johne's disease, the gene encoding the 19-kDa protein (MAP0261c) was analyzed. Results MAP0261c is conserved in mycobacteria, showing a 95% amino acid identity in M. avium subspecies avium, 84% in M. intracellulare and 76% in M. bovis and M. tuberculosis. MAP0261c was cloned, expressed, and purified as a fusion protein with the maltose-binding protein (MBP-19 kDa) in Escherichia coli. IFN-γ production was measured from 21 naturally infected and 9 control cattle after peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with a whole cell lysate (WCL) of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis or the recombinant MBP-19 kDa. Overall, the mean response to MBP-19 kDa was not as strong as the mean response to the WCL. By comparison, cells from control, non-infected cattle did not produce IFN-γ after stimulation with either WCL or MBP-19 kDa. To assess the humoral immune response to the 19-kDa protein, sera from cattle with clinical Johne's disease were used in immunoblot analysis. Reactivity to MBP-19 kDa protein, but not MBP alone, was observed in 9 of 14 infected cattle. Antibodies to the 19-kDa protein were not observed in 8 of 9 control cows. Conclusions Collectively, these results demonstrate that while the 19-kDa protein from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis stimulates a humoral immune response and weak IFN-γ production in infected cattle, the elicited responses are not strong enough to be used in a sensitive diagnostic assay. PMID:15663791

  9. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis: pathogen, pathogenesis and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Manning, E J; Collins, M T

    2001-04-01

    Johne's disease, or paratuberculosis, is a chronic intestinal infection caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The usually fatal disease is characterised by cachexia, and in some species diarrhoea, after a long pre-clinical phase. Treatment is ineffective and economically impracticable. The infection primarily affects domestic and free-ranging ruminants, but has also been reported in primates, rabbits, stoats and foxes. Since paratuberculosis is often subclinical, under-reporting is suspected, even though the disease is notifiable in numerous countries. Herd prevalence of bovine paratuberculosis in Europe ranges from 7% to 55%. In the United States of America, herd prevalence is strongly associated with herd size; 40% of herds of more than 300 head were found to be infected. In Australia, reported dairy herd infection rates range between 9% and 22%. Paratuberculosis in domestic livestock entails significant economic losses due to several factors (e.g. reduced production, premature culling and increased veterinary costs). Free-ranging and captive wildlife are also at risk from paratuberculosis.

  10. Ascorbic acid metabolism during sweet cherry (Prunus avium) fruit development

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Zhiyou; Lin, Lijin; Tang, Yi; Wang, Zhihui; Wang, Xun; Wang, Jin; Lv, Xiulan; Xia, Hui

    2017-01-01

    To elucidate metabolism of ascorbic acid (AsA) in sweet cherry fruit (Prunus avium ‘Hongdeng’), we quantified AsA concentration, cloned sequences involved in AsA metabolism and investigated their mRNA expression levels, and determined the activity levels of selected enzymes during fruit development and maturation. We found that AsA concentration was highest at the petal-fall period (0 days after anthesis) and decreased progressively during ripening, but with a slight increase at maturity. AsA did nevertheless continue to accumulate over time because of the increase in fruit fresh weight. Full-length cDNAs of 10 genes involved in the L-galactose pathway of AsA biosynthesis and 10 involved in recycling were obtained. Gene expression patterns of GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (GGP2), L-galactono-1, 4-lactone dehydrogenase (GalLDH), ascorbate peroxidase (APX3), ascorbate oxidase (AO2), glutathione reductase (GR1), and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR1) were in accordance with the AsA concentration pattern during fruit development, indicating that genes involved in ascorbic acid biosynthesis, degradation, and recycling worked in concert to regulate ascorbic acid accumulation in sweet cherry fruit. PMID:28245268

  11. Peptides specific for Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection: diagnostic potential.

    PubMed

    Casey, J L; Sanalla, A M; Tamvakis, D; Thalmann, C; Carroll, E L; Parisi, K; Coley, A M; Stewart, D J; Vaughan, J A; Michalski, W P; Luke, R; Foley, M

    2011-08-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map) is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD). Current serological diagnostic tests for JD are limited by their sensitivity when used in sub-clinical stages of the disease. Our objective was to identify peptides that mimic diagnostically important Map epitopes that might be incorporated into a new-generation JD diagnostic. Four peptides were isolated from a phage-displayed random peptide library by screening on antibodies derived from Map-infected goats. The peptides were recognised by antibodies from Map-infected goats but not by antibodies from uninfected goats. The peptides elicited immune responses in rabbits, which reacted strongly with bona fide Map antigens proving the peptides were true epitope mimics. To assess the diagnostic value a panel of goat sera was screened for reactivity's with peptides. The peptides were recognised by antibodies from a proportion of goats infected with Map compared with control animals with a diagnostic specificity of 100% and the sensitivity ranged from 50 to 75%. Combinations of any two peptides improved sensitivity 62.5-87.5% and 100% sensitivity was achieved with three of the four peptides in combination. These data suggest peptides representing diagnostically important Map epitopes could be incorporated into a sensitive diagnostic test.

  12. Identification of immunoreactive proteins of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Piras, Cristian; Soggiu, Alessio; Bonizzi, Luigi; Greco, Viviana; Ricchi, Matteo; Arrigoni, Norma; Bassols, Anna; Urbani, Andrea; Roncada, Paola

    2015-02-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the cause of a chronic enteritis of ruminants (bovine paratuberculosis (PTB)--Johne's disease) that is associated with enormous worldwide economic losses for the animal production. Diagnosis is based on observation of clinical signs, the detection of antibodies in milk or serum, or evaluation of bacterial culture from feces. The limit of these methods is that they are not able to detect the disease in the subclinical stage and are applicable only when the disease is already advanced. For this reason, the main purpose of this study is to use the MAP proteome to detect novel immunoreactive proteins that may be helpful for PTB diagnoses. 2DE and 2D immunoblotting of MAP proteins were performed using sera of control cattle and PTB-infected cattle in order to highlight the specific immunoreactive proteins. Among the assigned identifiers to immunoreactive spots it was found that most of them correspond to surface-located proteins while three of them have never been described before as antigens. The identification of these proteins improves scientific knowledge that could be useful for PTB diagnoses. The sequence of the identified protein can be used for the synthesis of immunoreactive peptides that could be screened for their immunoreaction against bovine sera infected with MAP. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange consortium with identifier PXD001159 and DOI 10.6019/PXD001159.

  13. Development of vaccines to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Johne's disease or paratuberculosis is a chronic debilitating disease in ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The disease causes significant economic losses in livestock industries worldwide. There are no effective control measures to eradicate the disease because there are no appropriate diagnostic methods to detect subclinically infected animals. Therefore, it is very difficult to control the disease using only test and cull strategies. Vaccination against paratuberculosis has been considered as an alternative strategy to control the disease when combined with management interventions. Understanding host-pathogen interactions is extremely important to development of vaccines. It has long been known that Th1-mediated cellular immune responses are play a crucial role in protection against MAP infection. However, recent studies suggested that innate immune responses are more closely related to protective effects than adaptive immunity. Based on this understanding, several attempts have been made to develop vaccines against paratuberculosis. A variety of ideas for designing novel vaccines have emerged, and the tests of the efficacy of these vaccines are conducted constantly. However, no effective vaccines are commercially available. In this study, studies of the development of vaccines for MAP were reviewed and summarized. PMID:27489800

  14. Control of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in agricultural species.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, D J; Benedictus, G

    2001-04-01

    Paratuberculosis or Johne's disease is a chronic intestinal disease caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, which continues to spread in agricultural species. Control of paratuberculosis is challenging and should not be underestimated. Due to the long incubation period of the infection, disease is largely subclinical in domesticated livestock. Hence, direct effects on animal productivity and welfare are often masked and may appear insufficient to justify large investments in control programmes by individual farmers, livestock industries or governments. Furthermore, in some countries the main effects of the disease are indirect, resulting from the impact of market discrimination against herds and flocks known to be infected, or from the control measures enforced to reduce transmission. In such circumstances, producers may be unwilling to co-operate with surveillance that may detect infection in herds or flocks. As control programmes are rarely successful in eliminating the infection from a herd or flock in the short term without an aggressive and costly programme, financial and community support assists producers to deal with the challenge. Successful prevention and control depends on animal health authorities and livestock industries acquiring a good understanding of the nature and epidemiology of infection, and of the application of tools for diagnosis and control. Building support for control programmes under the leadership of the affected livestock industries is critical, as programmes are unlikely to be successful without ongoing political will, supported by funding for research, surveillance and control.

  15. Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis in wild boars in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Myung; Ku, Bok Kyung; Lee, Haet-nim; Hwang, In-Yeong; Jang, Young-Boo; Kim, Jaejo; Hyun, Bang-Hun; Jung, Suk Chan

    2013-04-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes chronic infectious enteritis in various domestic and wild mammals and is widely distributed globally. Interspecies transmission has been frequently reported. We investigated the presence of MAP from December 2010 to March 2011 in blood and feces collected from 222 hunter-killed wild boars. We collected 197 serum and 180 fecal samples and examined them by culture, PCR, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We investigated the status of MAP infection and the MAP genotypes in the wild boar population of Korea by using IS900 PCR and IS1311-restriction endonuclease analysis typing. Of the 180 fecal samples cultured, MAP colonies were recovered from two. By PCR, 18 animals were positive for MAP and one serum sample had a strong humoral response to MAP. The PCR-positive DNA samples from the colonies and the feces samples were genotyped as "cattle type" and "bison type," which are major MAP genotypes infecting domestic species in Korea. Our study provides new information on mycobacterial infection among wild boars, and suggests that a more effective program should be developed to monitor mycobacterial infections in wild animal populations in Korea.

  16. Ascorbic acid metabolism during sweet cherry (Prunus avium) fruit development.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dong; Zhu, Tingting; Ni, Zhiyou; Lin, Lijin; Tang, Yi; Wang, Zhihui; Wang, Xun; Wang, Jin; Lv, Xiulan; Xia, Hui

    2017-01-01

    To elucidate metabolism of ascorbic acid (AsA) in sweet cherry fruit (Prunus avium 'Hongdeng'), we quantified AsA concentration, cloned sequences involved in AsA metabolism and investigated their mRNA expression levels, and determined the activity levels of selected enzymes during fruit development and maturation. We found that AsA concentration was highest at the petal-fall period (0 days after anthesis) and decreased progressively during ripening, but with a slight increase at maturity. AsA did nevertheless continue to accumulate over time because of the increase in fruit fresh weight. Full-length cDNAs of 10 genes involved in the L-galactose pathway of AsA biosynthesis and 10 involved in recycling were obtained. Gene expression patterns of GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (GGP2), L-galactono-1, 4-lactone dehydrogenase (GalLDH), ascorbate peroxidase (APX3), ascorbate oxidase (AO2), glutathione reductase (GR1), and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR1) were in accordance with the AsA concentration pattern during fruit development, indicating that genes involved in ascorbic acid biosynthesis, degradation, and recycling worked in concert to regulate ascorbic acid accumulation in sweet cherry fruit.

  17. Splenic Involvement in Disseminated Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare Infection: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Clark, Haley; Khatri, Gaurav; Kapur, Payal; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2017-07-13

    We report the imaging findings of a patient with disseminated Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex presenting with multiple splenic lesions incompletely characterized on computed tomography in whom magnetic resonance imaging helped narrow the differential diagnosis. We discuss the magnetic resonance imaging findings suggesting the diagnosis, including the presence of focal susceptibility artifact within the lesions (ie, signal drop on T1 in-phase imaging), marked hypointensity on diffusion-weighted imaging, and faint progressive peripheral enhancement after contrast administration. We provide pathologic correlation to explain these imaging characteristics and a review of the literature of imaging characteristics in splenic involvement of M. avium-intracellulare complex infection.

  18. PD-L2 induction on dendritic cells exposed to Mycobacterium avium downregulates BCG-specific T cell response.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Coronel, Elizabeth; Camacho-Sandoval, Rosa; Bonifaz, Laura C; López-Vidal, Yolanda

    2011-01-01

    The exposure to certain species of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) can modulate the immune response induced by Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Mycobacterium avium has been postulated as a weak inducer of dendritic cell (DC) maturation. However, how the DC exposure to M. avium could contribute to the modulation of a BCG-specific CD4+ T cell response and the molecules involved remain unknown. Here, we exposed bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) to M. avium either prior to exposure to BCG or as a unique stimulus. We found that M. avium induces high expression of PD-L2 (B7-DC) in BMDCs. This was dependent on IL-10 production through the TLR2-p38 MAPK signaling pathway. Exposure to M. avium prior to BCG results in BMDCs that do not express co-stimulatory molecules and pro-inflammatory cytokines, while the expression of PD-L2 and IL-10 was maintained. BMDCs exposed to M. avium impaired the activation of BCG-specific T cells through the PD-1: PD-L interaction. This suggests that a M. avium-induced phenotype in DCs might be implicated in the induction of mechanisms of tolerance that could impact the T cell response induced by BCG vaccination.

  19. Detection of Bordetella avium by TaqMan real-time PCR in tracheal swabs from wildlife birds.

    PubMed

    Stenzel, T; Pestka, D; Tykałowski, B; Śmiałek, M; Koncicki, A; Bancerz-Kisiel, A

    2017-03-28

    Bordetella avium, the causing agent of bordetellosis, a highly contagious infection of the respiratory tract in young poultry, causes significant losses in poultry farming throughout the world. Wildlife birds can be a reservoir of various pathogens that infect farm animals. For this reason the studies were conducted to estimate the prevalence of Bordetella avium in wildlife birds in Poland. Tracheal swab samples were collected from 650 birds representing 27 species. The bacterial DNA was isolated directly from the swabs and screened for Bordetella avium by TaqMan real-time PCR. The assay specificity was evaluated by testing DNA isolated from 8 other bacteria that can be present in avian respiratory tract, and there was no amplification from non-Bordetella avium agents. Test sensitivity was determined by preparing standard tenfold serial dilutions of DNA isolated from positive control. The assay revealed to be sensitive, with detection limit of approximately 4.07x10^2 copies of Bordetella avium DNA. The genetic material of Bordetella avium was found in 54.54% of common pheasants, in 9.09% of Eurasian coots, in 3.22% of black-headed gulls and in 2.77% of mallard ducks. The results of this study point to low prevalence of Bordetella avium infections in wildlife birds. The results also show that described molecular assay proved to be suitable for the rapid diagnosis of bordetellosis in the routine diagnostic laboratory.

  20. Tuberculosis in swine co-infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis and Mycobacterium bovis in a cluster from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Barandiaran, S; Pérez, A M; Gioffré, A K; Martínez Vivot, M; Cataldi, A A; Zumárraga, M J

    2015-04-01

    SUMMARY In Argentina little is known about the epidemiology of tuberculosis (TB) infection in swine. We characterized the epidemiological dynamics of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection in a swine population of Argentina using molecular tools and spatial analysis techniques. Isolates (n = 196) obtained from TB-like lesions (n = 200) were characterized by polymerase chain reaction. The isolates were positive to either M. bovis (IS6110) (n = 160) or M. avium (IS1245) (n = 16) while the remaining 20 (10.2%) isolates were positive to both M. bovis and M. avium. The detection of both bacteria together suggests co-infection at the animal level. In addition, MAC-positive isolates (n = 36) were classified as M. avium subsp. avium (MAA) (n = 30) and M. avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH) (n = 6), which resulted in five genotypes when they were typed using mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit, variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR). One significant (P = 0.017) spatial clustering of genotypes was detected, in which the proportion of MAH isolates was larger than expected under the null hypothesis of even distribution of genotypes. These results show that in Argentina the proportion of TB cases in pigs caused by M. avium is larger than that reported in earlier studies. The proportion of M. bovis-MAC co-infections was also higher than in previous reports. These results provide valuable information on the epidemiology of MAC infection in swine in Argentina.

  1. Bovine Immunoinhibitory Receptors Contribute to Suppression of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-Specific T-Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Okagawa, Tomohiro; Konnai, Satoru; Nishimori, Asami; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Mizorogi, Seiko; Nagata, Reiko; Kawaji, Satoko; Tanaka, Shogo; Kagawa, Yumiko; Murata, Shiro; Mori, Yasuyuki; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2015-10-19

    Johne's disease (paratuberculosis) is a chronic enteritis in cattle that is caused by intracellular infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. This infection is characterized by the functional exhaustion of T-cell responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens during late subclinical and clinical stages, presumably facilitating the persistence of this bacterium and the formation of clinical lesions. However, the mechanisms underlying T-cell exhaustion in Johne's disease are poorly understood. Thus, we performed expression and functional analyses of the immunoinhibitory molecules programmed death-1 (PD-1)/PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1) and lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3)/major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected cattle during the late subclinical stage. Flow cytometric analyses revealed the upregulation of PD-1 and LAG-3 in T cells in infected animals, which suffered progressive suppression of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) responses to the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigen. In addition, PD-L1 and MHC-II were expressed on macrophages from infected animals, consistent with PD-1 and LAG-3 pathways contributing to the suppression of IFN-γ responses during the subclinical stages of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. Furthermore, dual blockade of PD-L1 and LAG-3 enhanced M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific IFN-γ responses in blood from infected animals, and in vitro LAG-3 blockade enhanced IFN-γ production from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Taken together, the present data indicate that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific T-cell exhaustion is in part mediated by PD-1/PD-L1 and LAG-3/MHC-II interactions and that LAG-3 is a molecular target for the control of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific T-cell responses.

  2. Bovine Immunoinhibitory Receptors Contribute to Suppression of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-Specific T-Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Okagawa, Tomohiro; Konnai, Satoru; Nishimori, Asami; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Mizorogi, Seiko; Nagata, Reiko; Kawaji, Satoko; Tanaka, Shogo; Kagawa, Yumiko; Murata, Shiro; Mori, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Johne's disease (paratuberculosis) is a chronic enteritis in cattle that is caused by intracellular infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. This infection is characterized by the functional exhaustion of T-cell responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens during late subclinical and clinical stages, presumably facilitating the persistence of this bacterium and the formation of clinical lesions. However, the mechanisms underlying T-cell exhaustion in Johne's disease are poorly understood. Thus, we performed expression and functional analyses of the immunoinhibitory molecules programmed death-1 (PD-1)/PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1) and lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3)/major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected cattle during the late subclinical stage. Flow cytometric analyses revealed the upregulation of PD-1 and LAG-3 in T cells in infected animals, which suffered progressive suppression of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) responses to the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigen. In addition, PD-L1 and MHC-II were expressed on macrophages from infected animals, consistent with PD-1 and LAG-3 pathways contributing to the suppression of IFN-γ responses during the subclinical stages of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. Furthermore, dual blockade of PD-L1 and LAG-3 enhanced M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific IFN-γ responses in blood from infected animals, and in vitro LAG-3 blockade enhanced IFN-γ production from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Taken together, the present data indicate that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific T-cell exhaustion is in part mediated by PD-1/PD-L1 and LAG-3/MHC-II interactions and that LAG-3 is a molecular target for the control of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific T-cell responses. PMID:26483406

  3. Divergent Immune Responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection Correlate with Kinome Responses at the Site of Intestinal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Määttänen, Pekka; Trost, Brett; Scruten, Erin; Potter, Andrew; Kusalik, Anthony; Griebel, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD) in cattle. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infects the gastrointestinal tract of calves, localizing and persisting primarily in the distal ileum. A high percentage of cattle exposed to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis do not develop JD, but the mechanisms by which they resist infection are not understood. Here, we merge an established in vivo bovine intestinal segment model for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection with bovine-specific peptide kinome arrays as a first step to understanding how infection influences host kinomic responses at the site of infection. Application of peptide arrays to in vivo tissue samples represents a critical and ambitious step in using this technology to understand host-pathogen interactions. Kinome analysis was performed on intestinal samples from 4 ileal segments subdivided into 10 separate compartments (6 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected compartments and 4 intra-animal controls) using bovine-specific peptide arrays. Kinome data sets clustered into two groups, suggesting unique binary responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Similarly, two M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific immune responses, characterized by different antibody, T cell proliferation, and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses, were also observed. Interestingly, the kinomic groupings segregated with the immune response groupings. Pathway and gene ontology analyses revealed that differences in innate immune and interleukin signaling and particular differences in the Wnt/β-catenin pathway distinguished the kinomic groupings. Collectively, kinome analysis of tissue samples offers insight into the complex cellular responses induced by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the ileum and provides a novel method to understand mechanisms that alter the balance between cell-mediated and antibody responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. PMID

  4. Bioactive components of Prunus avium L. black gold (red cherry) and Prunus avium L. stark gold (white cherry) juices, wines and vinegars.

    PubMed

    Budak, Nilgün H

    2017-01-01

    Cherries are one of the most popular fruits, characterized by attractive colour, firmness, appearance and delicious tastes. Cherries are consumed fresh as well as in jams, wine, dried, candy and other processed products. Cherries vary in antioxidant properties and phenolic substances. The aim of the study was to determine the effects of ethanol and acetic acid fermentation on total antioxidant activities and phenolic substances of cherry juice. Total investigation of solids, pH, soluble solids, phenolic substances, ORAC and TEAC of Prunus avium L. cherry juices, macerated cherries wine, and vinegars were analyzed. All samples had 300.1-854.79 mg GAE/L of total phenolic contents, and 6.62-17.97 µmol/mL of ORAC values, and 1.5-5.5 mmol/mL of TEAC. Chlorogenic acid was present in the highest amount P. avium L. black gold vinegar.

  5. Association of ISMav6 with the Pattern of Antibiotic Resistance in Korean Mycobacterium avium Clinical Isolates but No Relevance between Their Genotypes and Clinical Features

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su-Young; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Park, Hye Yun; Jeon, Kyeongman; Han, Seung Jung; Shin, Sung Jae; Koh, Won-Jung

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to genetically characterize clinical isolates from patients diagnosed with Mycobacterium avium lung disease and to investigate the clinical significance. Multi-locus sequencing analysis (MLSA) and pattern of insertion sequence analysis of M. avium isolates from 92 Korean patients revealed that all isolates were M. avium subspecies hominissuis. In hsp65 sequevar analysis, codes 2, 15, and 16 were most frequently found (88/92) with similar proportions among cases additionally two isolates belonging to code N2 and an unreported code were identified, respectively. In insertion element analysis, all isolates were IS1311 positive and IS900 negative. Four of the M. avium subsp. hominissuis isolates did not harbor IS1245 and 1 of the M. avium isolates intriguingly harbored DT1, which is thought to be a M. intracellulare-specific element. M. avium subsp. hominissuis harboring ISMav6 is prevalent in Korea. No significant association between clinical manifestation and treatment response has been found in patients with the hsp65 code type and ISMav6, indicating that no specific strain/genotype among M. avium subsp. hominissuis organisms was a major source of M. avium lung disease. Interestingly, the presence of ISMav6 was correlated with greater resistance to moxifloxacin. Conclusively, the genotype of Korean M. avium subsp. hominissuis isolates is not a disease determinant responsible for lung disease and specific virulent factors of M. avium subsp. hominissuis need to be investigated further. PMID:26859598

  6. Phagosome-lysosome fusions in macrophages infected by Mycobacterium avium: role of mycosides-C and other cells surface components.

    PubMed

    Fréhel, C; Rastogi, N

    1989-01-01

    The phagosome-lysosome fusions (PLE) were assessed in case of bone-marrow macrophages infected by the opportunistic species Mycobacterium avium, employing the acid-phosphatase (AcPase) electron-cytochemistry. The role of surface components was evaluated by coating the bacteria prior to phagocytosis by specific M. avium antiserum or the anti-mycosides-C serum raised in rabbit. PLF was evaluated under the electron microscope during (2, 4 hours), or after (24 hours) phagocytosis. The preliminary results suggest that although M. avium surface components intervene in PLF inhibition, the role of mycosides-C among these surface components (effectively intervening in PLF inhibition) is questionable.

  7. Thioridazine as Chemotherapy for Mycobacterium avium Complex Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Devyani; Srivastava, Shashikant; Musuka, Sandirai

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC) causes an intractable intracellular infection that presents as chronic pulmonary disease. Currently, therapy consists of ethambutol and macrolides and takes several years to complete. The neuroleptic phenothiazine thioridazine kills mycobacteria by inhibiting the electron transport chain. In several experiments with bacterial populations of up to 1012 CFU/ml, we failed to isolate any bacteria resistant to 3 times the MIC of thioridazine, suggesting the absence of resistant mutants at bacterial burdens severalfold higher than those encountered in patients. In the hollow-fiber model of intracellular MAC (HFS-MAC), thioridazine achieved an extracellular half-life of 16.8 h and an intracellular half-life of 19.7 h. Thioridazine concentrations were >28,000-fold higher inside infected macrophages than in the HFS-MAC central compartment (equivalent to plasma). Thioridazine maximal kill was 5.20 ± 0.75 log10 CFU/ml on day 7 (r2 = 0.96) and 7.19 ± 0.31 log10 CFU/ml on day 14 (r2 = 0.99), the highest seen with any drug in the system. Dose fractionation studies revealed that thioridazine efficacy and acquired drug resistance were driven by the peak concentation-to-MIC ratio, with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 2.78 ± 0.44 for microbial killing. Acquired drug resistance was encountered by day 21 with suboptimal doses, demonstrating that fluctuating drug concentrations drive evolution faster than static concentrations in mutation frequency studies. However, the thioridazine EC50 changed 16.14-fold when the concentration of fetal bovine serum was changed from 0% to 50%, suggesting that intracellular potency could be heavily curtailed by protein binding. Efficacy in patients will depend on the balance between trapping of the drug in the pulmonary system and the massive intracellular concentrations versus very high protein binding of thioridazine. PMID:27216055

  8. Environmental contamination with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in endemically infected dairy herds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Environmental contamination with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is thought to be the primary source of infection for dairy cattle. The exact link between fecal shedding of MAP by individual cows and environmental contamination levels at the herd level was explored with a cross-se...

  9. Shared Mycobacterium avium genotypes observed among unlinked clinical and environmental isolates*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our understanding of the sources of Mycobacterium avium infection is partially based on genotypic matching of pathogen isolates from cases and environmental sources. These approaches assume that genotypic identity is rare in isolates from unlinked cases or sources. To test this a...

  10. Bordetella avium causes induction of apoptosis and nitric oxide synthase in turkey tracheal explant cultures.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, David M; Ruff, Kristin; Beach, Nathan M; Stockwell, Stephanie B; Dorsey-Oresto, Angella; Masters, Isaac; Temple, Louise M

    2011-09-01

    Bordetellosis is an upper respiratory disease of turkeys caused by Bordetella avium in which the bacteria attach specifically to ciliated respiratory epithelial cells. Little is known about the mechanisms of pathogenesis of this disease, which has a negative impact in the commercial turkey industry. In this study, we produced a novel explant organ culture system that was able to successfully reproduce pathogenesis of B. avium in vitro, using tracheal tissue derived from 26 day-old turkey embryos. Treatment of the explants with whole cells of B. avium virulent strain 197N and culture supernatant, but not lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or tracheal cytotoxin (TCT), specifically induced apoptosis in ciliated cells, as shown by annexin V and TUNEL staining. LPS and TCT are known virulence factors of Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough. Treatment with whole cells of B. avium and LPS specifically induced NO response in ciliated cells, shown by uNOS staining and diaphorase activity. The explant system is being used as a model to elucidate specific molecules responsible for the symptoms of bordetellosis.

  11. From mouth to macrophage: mechanisms of innate immune subversion by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Johne’s disease (JD) is a chronic enteric infection of cattle caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The high economic cost and potential zoonotic threat of JD have driven efforts to develop tools and approaches to effectively manage this disease within livestock herds. Efforts...

  12. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in Drinking Water and Biofilms Using Quantitative PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne’s disease in domestic animals and has been implicated in Crohn’s disease in humans. This bacterium is a slow growing, gram-positive, acid-fast organism which can be difficult to culture from the environment. For ...

  13. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Drinking Water and Biofilms Using Quantitative PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne’s disease in domestic animals and has been implicated in Crohn’s disease in humans. Cows infected with Johne’s disease shed large quantities of MAP into soil. Further, MAP has been isolated from surface water, is resi...

  14. Assessment of Food as a Source of Exposure to Mycobacterium avium Subspecies Paratuberculosis (MAP)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The National Advisory Committee on Microbiological Criteria for Foods (NACMCF or Committee) was asked to assess the importance of food as a source of exposure to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne’s disease, which affects primarily the small intestin...

  15. THE EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON THE GROWTH OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX (MAC) ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MAC organisms are able to grow, persist, and colonize in water distribution systems and may amplify in hospital hot water systems. This study examined the response of MAC organisms (M. avium, M. intracellulare, and MX) to a range of temperatures commonly associated with drinking...

  16. CD4 T Cell Dependent Colitis Exacerbation Following Re-Exposure of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Suwandi, Abdulhadi; Bargen, Imke; Pils, Marina C.; Krey, Martina; Zur Lage, Susanne; Singh, Anurag K.; Basler, Tina; Falk, Christine S.; Seidler, Ursula; Hornef, Mathias W.; Goethe, Ralph; Weiss, Siegfried

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD), a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of cattle characterized by intermittent to chronic diarrhea. In addition, MAP has been isolated from Crohn's disease (CD) patients. The impact of MAP on severity of clinical symptoms in JD as well as its role in CD are yet unknown. We have previously shown that MAP is able to colonize inflamed enteric tissue and to exacerbate the inflammatory tissue response (Suwandi et al., 2014). In the present study, we analyzed how repeated MAP administration influences the course of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. In comparison to mice exposed to DSS or MAP only, repeated exposure of DSS-treated mice to MAP (DSS/MAP) revealed a significantly enhanced clinical score, reduction of colon length as well as severe CD4+ T cell infiltration into the colonic lamina propria. Functional analysis identified a critical role of CD4+ T cells in the MAP-induced disease exacerbation. Additionally, altered immune responses were observed when closely related mycobacteria species such as M. avium ssp. avium and M. avium ssp. hominissuis were administered. These data reveal the specific ability of MAP to aggravate intestinal inflammation and clinical symptoms. Overall, this phenotype is compatible with similar disease promoting capabilites of MAP in JD and CD. PMID:28361039

  17. COMPARISON OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM ISOLATES FROM DRINKING WATER AND FROM THE POPULATION SERVED BY THE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Current evidence suggests that drinking water, soil, and produce are potential sources of Mycobacterium avium infections, a pathogen not known to be transmitted person-to-person.

    Methods: We sampled water during 2000 - 2002 from a large municipal drinking wate...

  18. Characteristics of an Extensive Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis Recombinant Protein Set

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the first step of a comprehensive large-scale antigen discovery project, 651 Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis proteins were produced in Escherichia coli. All of these were purified by affinity chromatography, dialyzed in phosphate buffered saline, and analyzed on SDS-PAGE gels. C...

  19. Transcriptional profiling of ileocecal valve of Holstein dairy cows infected with mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Johne’s disease is a chronic infection of the small intestine caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), an intracellular bacterium. The events of pathogen survival within the host cell(s), chronic inflammation and the progression from asymptomatic subclinical stage to an advan...

  20. Immunologic Responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Neonatal Calves After Oral or Intraperitoneal Experimental Infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infection models are useful for studying host responses to infection to aid in the development of diagnostic tools and vaccines. The majority of experimental models for ruminants have utilized an oral inoculation of live Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in order to establish infecti...

  1. Induction of B Cell Responses Upon Experimental Infection of Neonatal Calves with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Animal models are useful for studying host responses to infection and aid in the development of diagnostic tools and vaccines. The current study was designed to compare the effects of different methods of experimental infection: Oral (Mycobacterium avium subsp. parauberculosis (MAP) strain K-10; Or...

  2. Induction of B Cell Responses upon Experimental Infection of Neonatal Calves with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Animal models are useful for studying host responses to infection and aid in the development of diagnostic tools and vaccines. The current study was designed to compare the effects of different methods of experimental infection: Oral (Mycobacterium avium subsp. parauberculosis (MAP) strain K-10; Or...

  3. Pathogenesis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Neonatal Calves after Oral or Intraperitoneal Experimental Infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Understanding the infection process to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is tantamount to the development of effective vaccines and therapeutics for the control of this disease in the field. The current study compared the effectiveness of oral and intraperitoneal methods of experimental in...

  4. Iron-sparing Response of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is Strain Dependent

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Two genotypically and microbiologically distinct strains of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) exist – the type I and type II strains that primarily infect sheep and cattle, respectively. Concentration of iron in the cultivation medium has been suggested as one contributin...

  5. Shared Mycobacterium avium genotypes observed among unlinked clinical and environmental isolates

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our understanding of the sources of Mycobacterium avium infection is partially based on genotypic matching of pathogen isolates from cases and environmental sources. These approaches assume that genotypic identity is rare in isolates from unlinked cases or sources. To test this, ...

  6. Population analysis of Fecal Microbiota from Cows Infected with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) is a gram-positive, acid-fast bacillus that is the causative agent of Johne’s disease, a chronic infection of ruminant animals characterized by inflammation of the digestive tract leading to nutrient malabsorption and eventually ...

  7. COMPARISON OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM ISOLATES FROM DRINKING WATER AND FROM THE POPULATION SERVED BY THE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Current evidence suggests that drinking water, soil, and produce are potential sources of Mycobacterium avium infections, a pathogen not known to be transmitted person-to-person.

    Methods: We sampled water during 2000 - 2002 from a large municipal drinking wate...

  8. Shared Mycobacterium avium genotypes observed among unlinked clinical and environmental isolates*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our understanding of the sources of Mycobacterium avium infection is partially based on genotypic matching of pathogen isolates from cases and environmental sources. These approaches assume that genotypic identity is rare in isolates from unlinked cases or sources. To test this a...

  9. Optimization of hexadecylpyridinium chloride decontamination for culture of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from milk

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cows in advanced stages of Johne’s disease shed Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) into both their milk and feces, allowing for transmission of the bacteria between animals. The objective of this study was to formulate an optimized protocol for the isolation of MAP from milk and colos...

  10. Immunlogic responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis protein cocktail vaccines in a mouse model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Johne’s disease is a chronic granulomatous enteritis characterized by severe diarrhea, wasting, and a decline in milk production caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The vaccine currently on the market has some limitations including a severe injection site react...

  11. Immunologic responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculois protein cocktail vaccines in a mouse model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Johne’s disease is a chronic granulomatous enteritis characterized by severe diarrhea, wasting and a decline in milk production caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculois (MAP). The vaccine currently on the market has some limitations including a severe injection site reactio...

  12. Osteopontin Expression in Periparturient Dairy Cows Naturally Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Johne’s disease (JD), caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), is estimated to infect more than 22% of US dairy herds. Periods of immunosuppression, typically seen at parturition, may contribute to the transition from the subclinical, or asymptomatic, to the clinical stage of inf...

  13. Inferring biomarkers for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection and disease progression using experimental data

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Available diagnostic assays for Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (MAP) have poor sensitivities and cannot detect early stages of the infection, therefore, there is need to find new diagnostic markers for early infection detection and disease stages. We analyzed longitudinal IFN- gamma, ELI...

  14. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Drinking Water and Biofilms Using Quantitative PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne’s disease in domestic animals and has been implicated in Crohn’s disease in humans. Cows infected with Johne’s disease shed large quantities of MAP into soil. Further, MAP has been isolated from surface water, is resi...

  15. Molecular Analysis of Mycobacterium avium Isolates by Using Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and PCR

    PubMed Central

    Pestel-Caron, Martine; Graff, Gabriel; Berthelot, Gilles; Pons, Jean-Louis; Lemeland, Jean-François

    1999-01-01

    Genetic relationships among 46 isolates of Mycobacterium avium recovered from 37 patients in a 2,500-bed hospital from 1993 to 1998 were assessed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and PCR amplification of genomic sequences located between the repetitive elements IS1245 and IS1311. Each technique enabled the identification of 27 to 32 different patterns among the 46 isolates, confirming that the genetic heterogeneity of M. avium strains is high in a given community. Furthermore, this retrospective analysis of sporadic isolates allowed us (i) to suggest the existence of two remanent strains in our region, (ii) to raise the question of the possibility of nosocomial acquisition of M. avium strains, and (iii) to document laboratory contamination. The methods applied in the present study were found to be useful for the typing of M. avium isolates. In general, both methods yielded similar results for both related and unrelated isolates. However, the isolates in five of the six PCR clusters were distributed among two to three PFGE patterns, suggesting that this PCR-based method may have limitations for the analysis of strains with low insertion sequence copy numbers or for resolution of extended epidemiologic relationships. PMID:10405383

  16. Primary transcriptomes of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis reveal proprietary pathways in tissue and macrophages

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis persistently infect intestines and mesenteric lymph nodes leading to a prolonged subclinical disease. We investigated the intracellular lifestyle of MAP in the intestines and lymph nodes to understand the MAP pathways that function to govern th...

  17. Survival of Mycobacterium avium attached to polyethylene terephtalate (PET) water bottles.

    PubMed

    Tatchou-Nyamsi-König, J-A; Dailloux, M; Block, J-C

    2009-03-01

    The main objective of our study was to assess the persistence of Mycobacterium avium in an oligotrophic environment such as bottled groundwater. Filtered groundwater samples were spiked with washed Myco. avium suspension and stored in dark and under static conditions, at 20 degrees C, for 3 months in 500 ml PET bottles. The loss of Myco. avium cultivability was slow in water. On the contrary, after a 3-month storage at 20 degrees C, growth of attached cells was observed and cell adhesiveness to the PET wall increased with time. It could probably be because of the presence of an extracellular matrix. This study has shown the great stability of Myco. avium in bulk water as well as their adhesiveness and their growth on a PET bottle wall in an oligotrophic environment. Slowly growing mycobacteria are well adapted to oligotrophic environments such as groundwater. As they stick very well to surfaces, they could be used for determining the efficiency of the cleaning of contaminated surfaces.

  18. Shared Mycobacterium avium genotypes observed among unlinked clinical and environmental isolates

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our understanding of the sources of Mycobacterium avium infection is partially based on genotypic matching of pathogen isolates from cases and environmental sources. These approaches assume that genotypic identity is rare in isolates from unlinked cases or sources. To test this, ...

  19. Surface Proteome of “Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis” during the Early Stages of Macrophage Infection

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Michael; Tzeng, Shin-Cheng; Maier, Claudia; Zhang, Li

    2012-01-01

    “Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis” is a robust and pervasive environmental bacterium that can cause opportunistic infections in humans. The bacterium overcomes the host immune response and is capable of surviving and replicating within host macrophages. Little is known about the bacterial mechanisms that facilitate these processes, but it can be expected that surface-exposed proteins play an important role. In this study, the selective biotinylation of surface-exposed proteins, streptavidin affinity purification, and shotgun mass spectrometry were used to characterize the surface-exposed proteome of M. avium subsp. hominissuis. This analysis detected more than 100 proteins exposed at the bacterial surface of M. avium subsp. hominissuis. Comparisons of surface-exposed proteins between conditions simulating early infection identified several groups of proteins whose presence on the bacterial surface was either constitutive or appeared to be unique to specific culture conditions. This proteomic profile facilitates an improved understanding of M. avium subsp. hominissuis and how it establishes infection. Additionally, surface-exposed proteins are excellent targets for the host adaptive immune system, and their identification can inform the development of novel treatments, diagnostic tools, and vaccines for mycobacterial disease. PMID:22392927

  20. THE EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON THE GROWTH OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX (MAC) ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MAC organisms are able to grow, persist, and colonize in water distribution systems and may amplify in hospital hot water systems. This study examined the response of MAC organisms (M. avium, M. intracellulare, and MX) to a range of temperatures commonly associated with drinking...

  1. CD4 T Cell Dependent Colitis Exacerbation Following Re-Exposure of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Suwandi, Abdulhadi; Bargen, Imke; Pils, Marina C; Krey, Martina; Zur Lage, Susanne; Singh, Anurag K; Basler, Tina; Falk, Christine S; Seidler, Ursula; Hornef, Mathias W; Goethe, Ralph; Weiss, Siegfried

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD), a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of cattle characterized by intermittent to chronic diarrhea. In addition, MAP has been isolated from Crohn's disease (CD) patients. The impact of MAP on severity of clinical symptoms in JD as well as its role in CD are yet unknown. We have previously shown that MAP is able to colonize inflamed enteric tissue and to exacerbate the inflammatory tissue response (Suwandi et al., 2014). In the present study, we analyzed how repeated MAP administration influences the course of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. In comparison to mice exposed to DSS or MAP only, repeated exposure of DSS-treated mice to MAP (DSS/MAP) revealed a significantly enhanced clinical score, reduction of colon length as well as severe CD4(+) T cell infiltration into the colonic lamina propria. Functional analysis identified a critical role of CD4(+) T cells in the MAP-induced disease exacerbation. Additionally, altered immune responses were observed when closely related mycobacteria species such as M. avium ssp. avium and M. avium ssp. hominissuis were administered. These data reveal the specific ability of MAP to aggravate intestinal inflammation and clinical symptoms. Overall, this phenotype is compatible with similar disease promoting capabilites of MAP in JD and CD.

  2. High-polarity Mycobacterium avium-derived lipids interact with murine macrophage lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-García, G; Chico-Ortiz, M; Lopez-Marin, L M; Sánchez-García, F J

    2004-11-01

    Cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich membrane microdomains (lipid rafts) are widely recognized as portals for pathogenic micro-organisms. A growing body of evidence demonstrates mobilization of host plasma cell membrane lipid rafts towards the site of contact with several pathogens as well as a strict dependence on cholesterol for appropriate internalization. The fate of lipid rafts once the pathogen has been internalized and the nature of the pathogen components that interact with them is however less understood. To address both these issues, infection of the J774 murine cell line with Mycobacterium avium was used as a model. After demonstrating that M. avium induces lipid raft mobilization and that M. avium infects J774 by a cholesterol-dependent mechanism, it is shown here that mycobacterial phagosomes harbour lipid rafts, which are, at least in part, of plasma cell membrane origin. On the other hand, by using latex microbeads coated with any of the three fractions of M. avium-derived lipids of different polarity, we provide evidence that high-polarity, in contrast to low-polarity and intermediate-polarity, mycobacterial lipids or uncoated latex beads have a strong capacity to induce lipid raft mobilization. These results suggest that high-polarity mycobacterial lipid(s) interact with host cell cholesterol-enriched microdomains which may in turn influence the course of infection.

  3. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in Drinking Water and Biofilms Using Quantitative PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne’s disease in domestic animals and has been implicated in Crohn’s disease in humans. This bacterium is a slow growing, gram-positive, acid-fast organism which can be difficult to culture from the environment. For ...

  4. Functional Characterization of Iron Dependent Regulator (IdeR) of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study we investigated an iron dependent regulator (IdeR) of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). IdeR is a transcriptional factor that plays a global iron regulatory role in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) with a 19-bp recognition sequence. IdeR recognition sites within MAP ge...

  5. Survival of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Biofilms on Livestock Watering Trough Materials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Despite the ubiquitous occurrence of Mycobacterium sp. in nature and the fact that Johne’s disease has been reported worldwide, little research has been done to assess the survival of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) in agricultural environments. The goal of this stu...

  6. Envelope protein complexes of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and their antigenicity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne’s disease, a chronic enteric disease of ruminant animals. In the present study, blue native PAGE electrophoresis and 2D SDS-PAGE were used to separate MAP envelope protein complexes, followed by mass spectrometry (MS) ...

  7. Comparison of fecal DNA extraction kits for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fecal culture is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of paratuberculosis, however, PCR for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in fecal material is widely used today, having demonstrated great sensitivity and specificity. To insure the most efficient and rep...

  8. Comparison of fecal DNA extraction kits for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fecal culture is considered the gold standard for the diagnostics of paratuberculosis, however, PCR for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in fecal material is widely used today, having demonstrated great sensitivity and specificity. To insure the most efficient and r...

  9. Structure of a New Glycolipid from the Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare Complex

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Motoko; Ohta, Akihiro; Sasaki, Shun-ichi; Minnikin, David E.

    1999-01-01

    From the lipid fraction of a freeze-dried cell mass of a strain of the Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare complex, a new glycolipid was isolated and was characterized as 5-mycoloyl-α-arabinofuranosyl (1→1′)-glycerol, mainly on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies. PMID:10094713

  10. Lymphoproliferative and gamma interferon responses to stress-regulated Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis recombinant proteins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Johne’s disease in ruminants is a chronic infection of the intestines caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Economic losses associated with Johne’s disease arise due to premature culling, reduced production of milk and wool and mortalities. The disease is characterised by a long inc...

  11. The thioamides methimazole and thiourea inhibit growth of M. avium Subspecies paratuberculosis in culture.

    PubMed

    Greenstein, Robert J; Su, Liya; Brown, Sheldon T

    2010-06-14

    Thyrotoxicosis is conceptualized as an "autoimmune" disease with no accepted infectious etiology. There are increasingly compelling data that another "autoimmune" affliction, Crohn disease, may be caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). Like M. tb, MAP is systemic. We hypothesized that some cases of thyrotoxicosis may be initiated by a MAP infection. Because other thioamides treat tuberculosis, leprosy and M. avium complex, we hypothesized that a mode of action of some thioamide anti-thyrotoxicosis medications may include MAP growth inhibition. The effect of the thioamides, thiourea, methimazole and 6-propo-2-thiouracil (6-PTU) were studied in radiometric Bactec culture, on ten strains of three mycobacterial species (six of MAP, two of M. avium and two of M. tb. complex). Data are presented as "cumulative growth index," (cGI) or "percent decrease in cumulative GI" (%-DeltacGI). Methimazole was the most effective thioamide at inhibiting MAP growth. At 128microg/ml: MAP UCF-4; 65%-DeltacGI & MAP ATCC 19698; 90%-DeltacGI. Thiourea inhibited MAP "Ben" maximally; 70%-DeltacGI. Neither methimazole nor thiourea inhibited M. avium or M. tb. at the doses tested. 6-PTU has no inhibition on any strain studied, although a structurally analogous control, 5-PTU, was the most inhibitory thioamide tested. We show inhibition of MAP growth by the thioamides, thiourea and methimazole in culture. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that these thioamides may have anti-prokaryotic in addition to their well-established eukaryotic actions in thyrotoxic individuals.

  12. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis recombinant proteins modulate antimycobacterial functions of bovine macrophages

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It has been shown that Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) activates the Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) p38 pathway, yet it is unclear which components of M. paratuberculosis are involved in the process. Therefore, a set of 42 M. paratuberculosis recombinan...

  13. Improved detection of Mycobacterium avium complex with the Bactec radiometric system

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffner, S.E.

    1988-05-01

    A reconsideration of the laboratory methods used for primary isolation of mycobacteria other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis is needed due to the increasingly recognized importance of such mycobacterial infections in immunocompromised patients. One example of this is the severe opportunistic infections caused by Mycobacterium avium complex among AIDS patients. In this study, the Bactec radiometric system was compared to conventional culture on solid medium for the detection of M. avium complex in 3,612 selected clinical specimens, mainly of extrapulmonary origin. Of a total number of 63 M. avium complex isolates, the Bactec system detected 58 (92%), compared to 37 (59%) for conventional culture. A much more rapid detection was attained with radiometric technique than with conventional culture. The mean detection time for the cultures positive with both methods was 7.1 and 28.3 days, respectively. The Bactec radiometric system achieves a rapid and significantly more sensitive detection and seems to be an excellent complement to conventional culture in the laboratory diagnosis of infections with the M. avium complex.

  14. A Rapid Method for Quantifying Viable Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Cellular Infection Assays

    PubMed Central

    Pooley, Hannah B.; de Silva, Kumudika; Purdie, Auriol C.; Begg, Douglas J.; Whittington, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Determining the viability of bacteria is a key outcome of in vitro cellular infection assays. Currently, this is done by culture, which is problematic for fastidious slow-growing bacteria such as Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, where it can take up to 4 months to confirm growth. This study aimed to identify an assay that can rapidly quantify the number of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells in a cellular sample. Three commercially available bacterial viability assays along with a modified liquid culture method coupled with high-throughput quantitative PCR growth detection were assessed. Criteria for assessment included the ability of each assay to differentiate live and dead M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis organisms and their accuracy at low bacterial concentrations. Using the culture-based method, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis growth was reliably detected and quantified within 2 weeks. There was a strong linear association between the 2-week growth rate and the initial inoculum concentration. The number of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells in an unknown sample was quantified based on the growth rate, by using growth standards. In contrast, none of the commercially available viability assays were suitable for use with samples from in vitro cellular infection assays. IMPORTANCE Rapid quantification of the viability of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in samples from in vitro cellular infection assays is important, as it allows these assays to be carried out on a large scale. In vitro cellular infection assays can function as a preliminary screening tool, for vaccine development or antimicrobial screening, and also to extend findings derived from experimental animal trials. Currently, by using culture, it takes up to 4 months to obtain quantifiable results regarding M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis viability after an in vitro infection assay; however, with the quantitative PCR and liquid culture method

  15. Keap1 regulates inflammatory signaling in Mycobacterium avium-infected human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Awuh, Jane Atesoh; Haug, Markus; Mildenberger, Jennifer; Marstad, Anne; Do, Chau Phuc Ngoc; Louet, Claire; Stenvik, Jørgen; Steigedal, Magnus; Damås, Jan Kristian; Halaas, Øyvind; Flo, Trude Helen

    2015-08-04

    Several mechanisms are involved in controlling intracellular survival of pathogenic mycobacteria in host macrophages, but how these mechanisms are regulated remains poorly understood. We report a role for Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), an oxidative stress sensor, in regulating inflammation induced by infection with Mycobacterium avium in human primary macrophages. By using confocal microscopy, we found that Keap1 associated with mycobacterial phagosomes in a time-dependent manner, whereas siRNA-mediated knockdown of Keap1 increased M. avium-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines and type I interferons (IFNs). We show evidence of a mechanism whereby Keap1, as part of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex with Cul3 and Rbx1, facilitates ubiquitination and degradation of IκB kinase (IKK)-β thus terminating IKK activity. Keap1 knockdown led to increased nuclear translocation of transcription factors NF-κB, IFN regulatory factor (IRF) 1, and IRF5 driving the expression of inflammatory cytokines and IFN-β. Furthermore, knockdown of other members of the Cul3 ubiquitin ligase complex also led to increased cytokine expression, further implicating this ligase complex in the regulation of the IKK family. Finally, increased inflammatory responses in Keap1-silenced cells contributed to decreased intracellular growth of M. avium in primary human macrophages that was reconstituted with inhibitors of IKKβ or TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1). Taken together, we propose that Keap1 acts as a negative regulator for the control of inflammatory signaling in M. avium-infected human primary macrophages. Although this might be important to avoid sustained or overwhelming inflammation, our data suggest that a negative consequence could be facilitated growth of pathogens like M. avium inside macrophages.

  16. Novel Single Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Assay for Genotyping Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Goldstone, Robert J.; McLuckie, Joyce; Smith, David G. E.

    2015-01-01

    Typing of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis strains presents a challenge, since they are genetically monomorphic and traditional molecular techniques have limited discriminatory power. The recent advances and availability of whole-genome sequencing have extended possibilities for the characterization of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, and whole-genome sequencing can provide a phylogenetic context to facilitate global epidemiology studies. In this study, we developed a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay based on PCR and restriction enzyme digestion or sequencing of the amplified product. The SNP analysis was performed using genome sequence data from 133 Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis isolates with different genotypes from 8 different host species and 17 distinct geographic regions around the world. A total of 28,402 SNPs were identified among all of the isolates. The minimum number of SNPs required to distinguish between all of the 133 genomes was 93 and between only the type C isolates was 41. To reduce the number of SNPs and PCRs required, we adopted an approach based on sequential detection of SNPs and a decision tree. By the analysis of 14 SNPs Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis isolates can be characterized within 14 phylogenetic groups with a higher discriminatory power than mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit–variable number tandem repeat assay and other typing methods. Continuous updating of genome sequences is needed in order to better characterize new phylogenetic groups and SNP profiles. The novel SNP assay is a discriminative, simple, reproducible method and requires only basic laboratory equipment for the large-scale global typing of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis isolates. PMID:26677250

  17. Novel Single Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Assay for Genotyping Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Leão, Célia; Goldstone, Robert J; Bryant, Josephine; McLuckie, Joyce; Inácio, João; Smith, David G E; Stevenson, Karen

    2016-03-01

    Typing of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis strains presents a challenge, since they are genetically monomorphic and traditional molecular techniques have limited discriminatory power. The recent advances and availability of whole-genome sequencing have extended possibilities for the characterization of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, and whole-genome sequencing can provide a phylogenetic context to facilitate global epidemiology studies. In this study, we developed a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay based on PCR and restriction enzyme digestion or sequencing of the amplified product. The SNP analysis was performed using genome sequence data from 133 Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis isolates with different genotypes from 8 different host species and 17 distinct geographic regions around the world. A total of 28,402 SNPs were identified among all of the isolates. The minimum number of SNPs required to distinguish between all of the 133 genomes was 93 and between only the type C isolates was 41. To reduce the number of SNPs and PCRs required, we adopted an approach based on sequential detection of SNPs and a decision tree. By the analysis of 14 SNPs Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis isolates can be characterized within 14 phylogenetic groups with a higher discriminatory power than mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat assay and other typing methods. Continuous updating of genome sequences is needed in order to better characterize new phylogenetic groups and SNP profiles. The novel SNP assay is a discriminative, simple, reproducible method and requires only basic laboratory equipment for the large-scale global typing of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis isolates. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Isolates Recovered from Wild Animal Species

    PubMed Central

    Motiwala, Alifiya S.; Amonsin, Alongkorn; Strother, Megan; Manning, Elizabeth J. B.; Kapur, Vivek; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacterial isolates were obtained by radiometric culture from 33 different species of captive or free-ranging animals (n = 106) and environmental sources (n = 3) from six geographic zones within the United States. The identities of all 109 isolates were confirmed by using mycobactin J dependence and characterization of five well-defined molecular markers, including two integration loci of IS900 (loci L1 and L9), one Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis)-specific sequence (locus 251), and one M. avium subsp. avium-specific marker (IS1245), as well as hsp65 and IS1311 restriction endonuclease analyses. Seventy-six acid-fast isolates were identified as M. paratuberculosis, 15 were identified as belonging to the M. avium-M. intracellulare complex (but not M. paratuberculosis), and the remaining 18 were identified as mycobacteria outside the M. avium-M. intracellulare complex. Fingerprinting by multiplex PCR for IS900 integration loci clustered 67 of the 76 M. paratuberculosis strains into a single clade (designated clade A18) and had a Simpson's diversity index (D) of 0.53. In contrast, sequence-based characterization of a recently identified M. paratuberculosis short sequence repeat (SSR) region enabled the differentiation of the M. paratuberculosis isolates in clade A18 into seven distinct alleles (D = 0.75). The analysis revealed eight subtypes among the 33 species of animals, suggesting the interspecies transmission of specific strains. Taken together, the results of our analyses demonstrate that SSR analysis enables the genetic characterization of M. paratuberculosis isolates from different host species and provide evidence for the host specificity of some M. paratuberculosis strains as well as sharing of strains between wild and domesticated animal species. PMID:15071028

  19. Isolation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from Free-Ranging Birds and Mammals on Livestock Premises

    PubMed Central

    Corn, Joseph L.; Manning, Elizabeth J. B.; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Fischer, John R.

    2005-01-01

    Surveys for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in free-ranging mammals and birds were conducted on nine dairy and beef cattle farms in Wisconsin and Georgia. Specimens were collected from 774 animals representing 25 mammalian and 22 avian species. Specimens of ileum, liver, intestinal lymph nodes, and feces were harvested from the larger mammals; a liver specimen and the gastrointestinal tract were harvested from birds and small mammals. Cultures were performed by using radiometric culture and acid-fast isolates were identified by 16S/IS900/IS1311 PCR and mycobactin dependency characteristics. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was cultured from tissues and feces from 39 samples from 30 animals representing nine mammalian and three avian species. The prevalence of infected wild animals by premises ranged from 2.7 to 8.3% in Wisconsin and from 0 to 6.0% in Georgia. Shedding was documented in seven (0.9%) animals: three raccoons, two armadillos, one opossum, and one feral cat. The use of two highly polymorphic short sequence repeat loci for analysis of 29 of the 39 strains identified 10 alleles. One allelic pattern broadly shared in domestic ruminants (“7,5”) appeared in approximately one-third of the wildlife M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates studied. Given the few cases of shedding by free-ranging animals compared to the volume of contaminated manure produced by infected domestic ruminant livestock, contamination of the farm environment by infected wildlife was negligible. Wildlife may, however, have epidemiological significance for farms where M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis recently has been eliminated or on farms free of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis but located in the geographic vicinity of farms with infected livestock. PMID:16269731

  20. Isolation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from free-ranging birds and mammals on livestock premises.

    PubMed

    Corn, Joseph L; Manning, Elizabeth J B; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Fischer, John R

    2005-11-01

    Surveys for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in free-ranging mammals and birds were conducted on nine dairy and beef cattle farms in Wisconsin and Georgia. Specimens were collected from 774 animals representing 25 mammalian and 22 avian species. Specimens of ileum, liver, intestinal lymph nodes, and feces were harvested from the larger mammals; a liver specimen and the gastrointestinal tract were harvested from birds and small mammals. Cultures were performed by using radiometric culture and acid-fast isolates were identified by 16S/IS900/IS1311 PCR and mycobactin dependency characteristics. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was cultured from tissues and feces from 39 samples from 30 animals representing nine mammalian and three avian species. The prevalence of infected wild animals by premises ranged from 2.7 to 8.3% in Wisconsin and from 0 to 6.0% in Georgia. Shedding was documented in seven (0.9%) animals: three raccoons, two armadillos, one opossum, and one feral cat. The use of two highly polymorphic short sequence repeat loci for analysis of 29 of the 39 strains identified 10 alleles. One allelic pattern broadly shared in domestic ruminants ("7,5") appeared in approximately one-third of the wildlife M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates studied. Given the few cases of shedding by free-ranging animals compared to the volume of contaminated manure produced by infected domestic ruminant livestock, contamination of the farm environment by infected wildlife was negligible. Wildlife may, however, have epidemiological significance for farms where M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis recently has been eliminated or on farms free of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis but located in the geographic vicinity of farms with infected livestock.

  1. Osteopontin: A Novel Cytokine Involved in the Regulation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection in Periparturient Dairy Cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Osteopontin (Opn), an important mediator of the cell-mediated immune response, enhances the host immune response against mycobacterial infections. Infections caused by the intracellular bacterium, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), have a devastating impact on the dairy industry. ...

  2. Faecal bacterial composition in dairy cows shedding Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in faeces in comparison with nonshedding cows.

    PubMed

    Kaevska, Marija; Videnska, Petra; Sedlar, Karel; Bartejsova, Iva; Kralova, Alena; Slana, Iva

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine possible differences in the faecal microbiota of dairy cows infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Johne's disease) in comparison with noninfected cows from the same herds. Faecal samples from cows in 4 herds were tested for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis by real-time PCR, and faecal bacterial populations were analysed by 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The most notable differences between shedding and nonshedding cows were an increase in the genus Psychrobacter and a decrease in the genera Oscillospira, Ruminococcus, and Bifidobacterium in cows infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The present study is the first to report the faecal microbial composition in dairy cows infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

  3. Osteopontin Immunoreactivity in the Ileum and Ileoceccal Lymph Node of Dairy Cows Naturally Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Osteopontin (Opn), a highly acidic glycoprotein, promotes cellular adhesion and recruitment and has been shown to be upregulated in the granulomas of mycobacterial infections. Johne’s disease, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), is associated with granulomatous enteritis. ...

  4. Early bactericidal activity of rifabutin versus that of placebo in treatment of disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex bacteremia in AIDS patients.

    PubMed Central

    Dautzenberg, B; Castellani, P; Pellegrin, J L; Vittecoq, D; Truffot-Pernot, C; Pirotta, N; Sassella, D

    1996-01-01

    Rifabutin, 600 mg/day, was compared with a placebo in the early treatment of culture-proven Mycobacterium avium bacteremia in patients with AIDS. Following 14 days' treatment, bacteriological success, defined as a negative culture or a reduction in the number of CFU of M. avium organisms per milliliter of blood by a factor of > or = 0.5 log from the baseline, was observed in 7 of 10 (70%) evaluable rifabutin patients and in 1 of 13 (8%) evaluable placebo patients (P = 0.002). Rifabutin is active against M. avium as a single agent and can make a significant contribution to combination regimens for the treatment of disseminated M. avium infection in AIDS patients. PMID:8807071

  5. [Distribution of PRA patterns of clinical isolates of the Mycobacterium avium complex from Spain and South America].

    PubMed

    Murcia, Martha Isabel; Leao, Sylvia Cardoso; Ritacco, Viviana; Palenque, Elia; de Oliveira, Rosangela Siqueira; Reniero, Ana; Menendez, Maria Carmen; Telles, María Alice da Silva; Hadad, David Jamil; Barrera, Lucía; García, María Jesús

    2004-06-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infections are the most frequent systemic infections associated with advanced AIDS. DNA probes for accurate identification of mycobacteria are available but are very expensive in many Latin American settings. Consequently, most Latin American diagnostic laboratories employ inaccurate and outdated tests for mycobacteria identification. Therefore, PCR restriction analysis (PRA) of the hsp65 gene was evaluated for the identification of 163 MAC human isolates originated from Spain and South America. The predominant PRA type in each country was: M. avium type I in Argentina (23/42, 55%) and Brazil (48/72, 67%), M. avium type II in Spain (18/26, 69%) and M. avium type III in Colombia (10/23, 43%). The Colombia frequency is noteworthy, since the PRA type III was quite infrequent in the other three countries. Furthermore, its presence has not been reported outside the Americas. The advantages and disadvantages of PRA in diagnostic mycobacteriology are discussed.

  6. Contrasting Results of Culture-Dependent and Molecular Analyses of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from Wood Bison

    PubMed Central

    De Buck, Jeroen; Elkin, Brett; Kutz, Susan; van der Meer, Frank; Orsel, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Reduced to near extinction in the late 1800s, a number of wood bison populations (Bison bison athabascae) have been re-established through reintroduction initiatives. Although an invaluable tool for conservation, translocation of animals can spread infectious agents to new areas or expose animals to pathogens in their new environment. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, a bacterium that causes chronic enteritis in ruminants, is among the pathogens of potential concern for wood bison management and conservation. In order to inform translocation decisions, our objectives were to determine the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection status of wood bison herds in Canada and to culture and genetically characterize the infective strain(s). We tested fecal samples from bison (n = 267) in nine herds using direct PCR for three M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific genetic targets with different copy numbers within the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genome. Restriction enzyme analysis (REA) and sequencing of IS1311 were performed on seven samples from five different herds. We also evaluated a panel of different culture conditions for their ability to support M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis growth from feces and tissues of direct-PCR-positive animals. Eighty-one fecal samples (30%) tested positive using direct IS900 PCR, with positive samples from all nine herds; of these, 75% and 21% were also positive using ISMAP02 and F57, respectively. None of the culture conditions supported the growth of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from PCR-positive samples. IS1311 REA and sequencing indicate that at least two different M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strain types exist in Canadian wood bison. The presence of different M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains among wood bison herds should be considered in the planning of translocations. PMID:23686265

  7. Palatal Actinomycosis and Kaposi Sarcoma in an HIV-Infected Subject with Disseminated Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ablanedo-Terrazas, Yuria; Ormsby, Christopher E.; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Actinomyces and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare are facultative intracellular organisms, members of the bacterial order actinomycetales. Although Actinomyces can behave as copathogen when anatomic barriers are compromised, its coinfection with Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare has not previously been reported. We present the first reported case of palatal actinomycosis co-infection with disseminated MAC, in an HIV-infected subject with Kaposi sarcoma and diabetes. We discuss the pathogenesis of the complex condition of this subject. PMID:22481952

  8. Clarithromycin-ciprofloxacin-amikacin for therapy of Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare bacteremia in patients with AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    de Lalla, F; Maserati, R; Scarpellini, P; Marone, P; Nicolin, R; Caccamo, F; Rigoli, R

    1992-01-01

    A combination of clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and amikacin for the treatment of Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare bacteremia was evaluated in 12 AIDS patients. Mycobacteremia cleared in all patients by 2 to 8 weeks of treatment, and symptoms resolved. Four patients died; all had negative blood cultures until death, and disseminated M. avium-M. intracellulare complex infection was not considered the primary cause of death. PMID:1387303

  9. Immune-Enhancing Effects of Taishan Pinus massoniana Pollen Polysaccharides on DNA Vaccine Expressing Bordetella avium ompA

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fujie; Liu, Xiao; Sun, Zhenhong; Yu, Cuilian; Liu, Liping; Yang, Shifa; Li, Bing; Wei, Kai; Zhu, Ruiliang

    2016-01-01

    Bordetella avium is the causative agent of bordetellosis, which remains to be the cause of severe losses in the turkey industry. Given the lack of vaccines that can provide good protection, developing a novel vaccine against B. avium infection is crucial. In this study, we constructed a eukaryotic expression plasmid, which expressed the outer membrane protein A (ompA) of B. avium, to prepare a B. avium recombinant ompA-DNA vaccine. Three concentrations (low, middle, and high) of Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharides (TPPPS), a known immunomodulator, were used as adjuvants, and their immune conditioning effects on the developed DNA vaccine were examined. The pure ompA-DNA vaccine, Freund’s incomplete adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine, and the empty plasmid served as the controls. The chickens in each group were separately inoculated with these vaccines three times at 1, 7, and 14 days old. Dynamic changes in antibody production, cytokine secretion, and lymphocyte count were then determined from 7 to 49 days after the first inoculation. Protective rates of the vaccines were also determined after the third inoculation. Results showed that the pure DNA vaccine obviously induced the production of antibodies, the secretion of cytokines, and the increase in CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte counts in peripheral blood, as well as provided a protective rate of 50% to the B. avium-challenged chickens. The chickens inoculated with the TPPPS adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine and Freund’s adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine demonstrated higher levels of immune responses than those inoculated with pure ompA-DNA vaccine, whereas only the ompA-DNA vaccine with 200 mg/mL TPPPS completely protected the chickens against B. avium infection. These findings indicate that the B. avium ompA-DNA vaccine combined with TPPPS is a potentially effective B. avium vaccine. PMID:26870023

  10. Contrasting results of culture-dependent and molecular analyses of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from wood bison.

    PubMed

    Forde, Taya; De Buck, Jeroen; Elkin, Brett; Kutz, Susan; van der Meer, Frank; Orsel, Karin

    2013-07-01

    Reduced to near extinction in the late 1800s, a number of wood bison populations (Bison bison athabascae) have been re-established through reintroduction initiatives. Although an invaluable tool for conservation, translocation of animals can spread infectious agents to new areas or expose animals to pathogens in their new environment. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, a bacterium that causes chronic enteritis in ruminants, is among the pathogens of potential concern for wood bison management and conservation. In order to inform translocation decisions, our objectives were to determine the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection status of wood bison herds in Canada and to culture and genetically characterize the infective strain(s). We tested fecal samples from bison (n = 267) in nine herds using direct PCR for three M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific genetic targets with different copy numbers within the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genome. Restriction enzyme analysis (REA) and sequencing of IS1311 were performed on seven samples from five different herds. We also evaluated a panel of different culture conditions for their ability to support M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis growth from feces and tissues of direct-PCR-positive animals. Eighty-one fecal samples (30%) tested positive using direct IS900 PCR, with positive samples from all nine herds; of these, 75% and 21% were also positive using ISMAP02 and F57, respectively. None of the culture conditions supported the growth of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from PCR-positive samples. IS1311 REA and sequencing indicate that at least two different M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strain types exist in Canadian wood bison. The presence of different M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains among wood bison herds should be considered in the planning of translocations.

  11. Virulence and immunity orchestrated by the global gene regulator sigL in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Pallab; Steinberg, Howard; Talaat, Adel M

    2014-07-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis causes Johne's disease in ruminants, a chronic enteric disease responsible for severe economic losses in the dairy industry. Global gene regulators, including sigma factors are important in regulating mycobacterial virulence. However, the biological significance of such regulators in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis rremains elusive. To better decipher the role of sigma factors in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis pathogenesis, we targeted a key sigma factor gene, sigL, activated in mycobacterium-infected macrophages. We interrogated an M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis ΔsigL mutant against a selected list of stressors that mimic the host microenvironments. Our data showed that sigL was important in maintaining bacterial survival under such stress conditions. Survival levels further reflected the inability of the ΔsigL mutant to persist inside the macrophage microenvironments. Additionally, mouse infection studies suggested a substantial role for sigL in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis virulence, as indicated by the significant attenuation of the ΔsigL-deficient mutant compared to the parental strain. More importantly, when the sigL mutant was tested for its vaccine potential, protective immunity was generated in a vaccine/challenge model of murine paratuberculosis. Overall, our study highlights critical role of sigL in the pathogenesis and immunity of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection, a potential role that could be shared by similar proteins in other intracellular pathogens.

  12. Toll-like receptor 6 senses Mycobacterium avium and is required for efficient control of mycobacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Marinho, Fábio A V; de Paula, Rafaella R; Mendes, Aline C; de Almeida, Leonardo A; Gomes, Marco T R; Carvalho, Natália B; Oliveira, Fernanda S; Caliari, Marcelo V; Oliveira, Sergio C

    2013-09-01

    Mycobacterium avium has been reported to signal through both Toll-like receptor (TLR2) and TLR9. To investigate the role of TLR6 in innate immune responses to M. avium, TLR6, MyD88, TLR2, and TLR2/6 KO mice were infected with this pathogen. Bacterial burdens were higher in the lungs and livers of infected TLR6, TLR2, TLR2/6, and MyD88 KO mice compared with those in C57BL/6 mice, which indicates that TLR6 is required for the efficient control of M. avium infection. However, TLR6 KO spleen cells presented with normal M. avium induced IFN-γ responses as measured by ELISA and flow cytometry. In contrast, the production of IFN-γ in lung tissue was diminished in all studied KO mice. Furthermore, only MyD88 deficiency reduced granuloma areas in mouse livers. Moreover, we determined that TLR6 plays an important role in controlling bacterial growth within macrophages and in the production of TNF-α, IL-12, and IL-6 by M. avium infected DCs. Finally, the lack of TLR6 reduced activation of MAPKs and NF-κB in DCs. In summary, TLR6 is required for full resistance to M. avium and for the activation of DCs to produce proinflammatory cytokines.

  13. Usability of a gamma interferon release assay in the diagnosis of naturally infected pigs with Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis.

    PubMed

    Faldyna, Martin; Göpfert, Eduard; Kudlackova, Hana; Stepanova, Hana; Kaevska, Marija; Slana, Iva; Pavlik, Ivo

    2012-03-01

    In the current study, the results of an intradermal tuberculin test and a gamma interferon (IFN-γ) release assay were compared. IFN-γ release assay is based on the detection of IFN-γ production after in vitro stimulation with Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium-specific antigen for the discrimination of pigs naturally infected with M. avium subsp. hominissuis. Fifty-five clinically healthy pigs were used in the study. Three of these were proven by culture and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction methods to be infected with M. avium subsp. hominissuis (2 animals) and Mycobacterium xenopi (1 animal). No animals were positive by the tuberculin test. Both M. avium subsp. hominissuis-positive pigs were evaluated as positive by the IFN-γ release assay. Bacteriologically negative and M. xenopi-positive pigs were unresponsive in the IFN-γ release assay, indicating the specificity of the method. The results suggest that the IFN-γ release assay has a higher sensitivity than the tuberculin test and that the assay can be used for diagnosis of M. avium infections in live, naturally infected pigs.

  14. Viable Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis isolated from calf milk replacer.

    PubMed

    Grant, Irene R; Foddai, Antonio C G; Tarrant, James C; Kunkel, Brenna; Hartmann, Faye A; McGuirk, Sheila; Hansen, Chungyi; Talaat, Adel M; Collins, Michael T

    2017-10-04

    When advising farmers on how to control Johne's disease in an infected herd, one of the main recommendations is to avoid feeding waste milk to calves and instead feed calf milk replacer (CMR). This advice is based on the assumption that CMR is free of viable Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) cells, an assumption that has not previously been challenged. We tested commercial CMR products (n = 83) obtained from dairy farms around the United States by the peptide-mediated magnetic separation (PMS)-phage assay, PMS followed by liquid culture (PMS-culture), and direct IS900 quantitative PCR (qPCR). Conventional microbiological analyses for total mesophilic bacterial counts, coliforms, Salmonella, coagulase-negative staphylococci, streptococci, nonhemolytic Corynebacterium spp., and Bacillus spp. were also performed to assess the overall microbiological quality of the CMR. Twenty-six (31.3%) of the 83 CMR samples showed evidence of the presence of MAP. Seventeen (20.5%) tested positive for viable MAP by the PMS-phage assay, with plaque counts ranging from 6 to 1,212 pfu/50 mL of reconstituted CMR (average 248.5 pfu/50 mL). Twelve (14.5%) CMR samples tested positive for viable MAP by PMS-culture; isolates from all 12 of these samples were subsequently confirmed by whole-genome sequencing to be different cattle strains of MAP. Seven (8.4%) CMR samples tested positive for MAP DNA by IS900 qPCR. Four CMR samples tested positive by both PMS-based tests and 5 CMR samples tested positive by IS900 qPCR plus one or other of the PMS-based tests, but only one CMR sample tested positive by all 3 MAP detection tests applied. All conventional microbiology results were within current standards for whole milk powders. A significant association existed between higher total bacterial counts and presence of viable MAP indicated by either of the PMS-based assays. This represents the first published report of the isolation of viable MAP from CMR. Our findings raise concerns

  15. Determination of Genotypic Diversity of Mycobacterium avium Subspecies from Human and Animal Origins by Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive-Unit-Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat and IS1311 Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Typing Methods ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Radomski, Nicolas; Thibault, Virginie C.; Karoui, Claudine; de Cruz, Krystel; Cochard, Thierry; Gutiérrez, Cristina; Supply, Philip; Biet, Frank; Boschiroli, María Laura

    2010-01-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are ubiquitous bacteria that can be found in water, food, and other environmental samples and are considered opportunistic pathogens for numerous animal species, mainly birds and pigs, as well as for humans. We have recently demonstrated the usefulness of a PCR-based mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing for the molecular characterization of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and M. avium strains exclusively isolated from AIDS patients. In the present study we extended our analysis, based on eight MIRU-VNTR markers, to a strain collection comprehensively comprising the other M. avium subspecies, including M. avium subsp. avium, M. avium subsp. hominissuis, and M. avium subsp. silvaticum, isolated from numerous animal species, HIV-positive and HIV-negative humans, and environmental sources. All strains were fully typeable, with the discriminatory index being 0.885, which is almost equal to that obtained by IS1311 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) typing as a reference. In contrast to IS1311 RFLP typing, MIRU-VNTR typing was able to further discriminate M. avium subsp. avium strains. MIRU-VNTR alleles strongly associated with or specific for M. avium subspecies were detected in several markers. Moreover, the MIRU-VNTR typing-based results were consistent with a scenario of the independent evolution of M. avium subsp. avium/M. avium subsp. silvaticum and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from M. avium subsp. hominissuis, previously proposed on the basis of multilocus sequence analysis. MIRU-VNTR typing therefore appears to be a convenient typing method capable of distinguishing the three main subspecies and strains of the complex and providing new epidemiological knowledge on MAC. PMID:20107094

  16. A role for lipopolysaccharide in turkey tracheal colonization by Bordetella avium as demonstrated in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Spears, Patricia A.; Temple, Louise M.; Orndorff, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary We isolated two insertion mutants of Bordetella avium that exhibited a peculiar clumped-growth phenotype and found them to be attenuated in turkey tracheal colonization. The mutants contained transposon insertions in homologues of the wlbA and wlbL genes of Bordetella pertussis. The wlb genetic locus of B. pertussis has been previously described as containing 12 genes involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis. Polyacrylamide gel analysis of LPS from B. avium wlbA and wlbL insertion mutants confirmed an alteration in the LPS profile. Subsequent cloning and complementation of the wlbA and wlbL mutants in trans with a recombinant plasmid containing the homologous wlb locus from B. avium eliminated the clumped-growth phenotype and restored the LPS profile to that of wild-type B. avium. Also, a parental level of tracheal colonization was restored to both mutants by the recombinant plasmid. Interestingly, complementation of the wlbA and wlbL mutants with a recombinant plasmid containing the heterologous wlb locus from B. pertussis, B. bronchiseptica, or Bordetella parapertussis eliminated the clumped-growth phenotype and resulted in a change in the LPS profile, although not to that of wild-type B. avium. The mutants also acquired resistance to a newly identified B. avium-specific bacteriophage, Ba1. Complementation of both wlbA and wlbL mutants with the homologous wlb locus of B. avium, but not the heterologous B. pertussis locus, restored sensitivity to Ba1. Complementation of the wlbL mutant, but not the wlbA mutant, with the heterologous wlb locus of Bordetella bronchiseptica or B. parapertussis restored partial sensitivity to Ba1. Comparisons of the LPS profile and phage sensitivity of the mutants upon complementation by wlb loci from the heterologous species and by B. avium suggested that phage sensitivity required the presence of O-antigen. At the mechanistic level, both mutants showed a dramatic decrease in serum resistance and a decrease in

  17. Reclassification of Pasteurella gallinarum, [Haemophilus] paragallinarum, Pasteurella avium and Pasteurella volantium as Avibacterium gallinarum gen. nov., comb. nov., Avibacterium paragallinarum comb. nov., Avibacterium avium comb. nov. and Avibacterium volantium comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Blackall, Patrick J; Christensen, Henrik; Beckenham, Tim; Blackall, Linda L; Bisgaard, Magne

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a phenotypic and genotypic investigation of the taxonomy of [Haemophilus] paragallinarum, Pasteurella gallinarum, Pasteurella avium and Pasteurella volantium, a major subcluster within the avian 16S rRNA cluster 18 of the family Pasteurellaceae. An extended phenotypic characterization was performed of the type strain of [Haemophilus] paragallinarum, which is NAD-dependent, and eight NAD-independent strains of [Haemophilus] paragallinarum. Complete 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained for one NAD-independent and four NAD-dependent [Haemophilus] paragallinarum strains. These five sequences along with existing 16S rRNA gene sequences for 11 other taxa within avian 16S rRNA cluster 18 as well as seven other taxa from the Pasteurellaceae were subjected to phylogenetic analysis. The analysis demonstrated that [Haemophilus] paragallinarum, Pasteurella gallinarum, Pasteurella avium and Pasteurella volantium formed a monophyletic group with a minimum of 96.8 % sequence similarity. This group can also be separated by phenotypic testing from all other recognized and named taxa within the Pasteurellaceae. As both genotypic and phenotypic testing support the separate and distinct nature of this subcluster, the transfer is proposed of Pasteurella gallinarum, [Haemophilus] paragallinarum, Pasteurella avium and Pasteurella volantium to a new genus Avibacterium as Avibacterium gallinarum gen. nov., comb. nov., Avibacterium paragallinarum comb. nov., Avibacterium avium comb. nov. and Avibacterium volantium comb. nov. The type strains are NCTC 1118T (Avibacterium gallinarum), NCTC 11296T (Avibacterium paragallinarum), NCTC 11297T (Avibacterium avium) and NCTC 3438T (Avibacterium volantium). Key characteristics that separate these four species are catalase activity (absent only in Avibacterium paragallinarum) and production of acid from galactose (negative only in Avibacterium paragallinarum), maltose (negative only in Avibacterium avium) and mannitol (negative

  18. Effect of Soil Slope on the Appearance of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Water Running off Grassland Soil after Application of Contaminated Slurry

    PubMed Central

    Alfaro, M.; Salazar, F.; Troncoso, E.; Mitchell, R. M.; Ramirez, L.; Naguil, A.; Zamorano, P.; Collins, M. T.

    2013-01-01

    The study assessed the effect of soil slope on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis transport into rainwater runoff from agricultural soil after application of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-contaminated slurry. Under field conditions, 24 plots of undisturbed loamy soil 1 by 2 m2 were placed on platforms. Twelve plots were used for water runoff: 6 plots at a 3% slope and 6 plots at a 15% slope. Half of the plots of each slope were treated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-contaminated slurry, and half were not treated. Using the same experimental design, 12 plots were established for soil sampling on a monthly basis using the same spiked slurry application and soil slopes. Runoff following natural rainfall was collected and analyzed for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, coliforms, and turbidity. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was detected in runoff from all plots treated with contaminated slurry and one control plot. A higher slope (15%) increased the likelihood of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis detection but did not affect the likelihood of finding coliforms. Daily rainfall increased the likelihood that runoff would have coliforms and the coliform concentration, but it decreased the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis concentration in the runoff. When there was no runoff, rain was associated with increased M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis concentrations. Coliform counts in runoff were related to runoff turbidity. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis presence/absence, however, was related to turbidity. Study duration decreased bacterial detection and concentration. These findings demonstrate the high likelihood that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in slurry spread on pastures will contaminate water runoff, particularly during seasons with high rainfall. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis contamination of water has potential consequences for both animal and human health. PMID:23542616

  19. Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis of Respiratory and Household Water Biofilm Isolates of “Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis” with Establishment of a PCR Database

    PubMed Central

    Iakhiaeva, Elena; Howard, Susan T.; Brown Elliott, Barbara A.; McNulty, Steven; Newman, Kristopher L.; Falkinham, Joseph O.; Williams, Myra; Kwait, Rebecca; Lande, Leah; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Turenne, Christine

    2016-01-01

    “Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis” is an important cause of pulmonary disease. It is acquired from environmental sources, but there is no methodology for large population studies. We evaluated the potential of variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis. Clinical and household biofilm M. avium isolates underwent molecular identification. Testing for IS901 was done to separate M. avium subsp. avium from M. avium subsp. hominissuis. VNTR types were defined using VNTR loci, and subtyping was performed using 3′ hsp65 and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing. Forty-nine VNTR types and eight subtypes of M. avium subsp. hominissuis (IS901 negative) were identified among 416 isolates of M. avium from 121 patients and 80 biofilm sites. Of those types, 67% were found only among patient isolates, 11% only among household water isolates, and 23% among both. Of 13 VNTR types that included ≥4 patients, the majority (61.5%) represented geographic clustering (same city). Most VNTR types with multiple patients belonged to the same 3′ hsp65 sequence code (sequevar). A total of 44 isolates belonging to four M. avium subsp. hominissuis VNTR types (8%), including three with the rare Mav-F ITS sequence and 0/8 subspecies, produced amplicons with IS901 PCR primers. By sequencing, all 44 amplicons were not IS901 but ISMav6, which was recently observed in Japan but had not been previously described among U.S. isolates. VNTR analysis of M. avium subsp. hominissuis isolates is easier and faster than pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Seven VNTR loci separated 417 isolates into 49 types. No isolates of M. avium subsp. avium were identified. The distributions of the VNTR copy numbers, the allelic diversity, and the low prevalence of ISMav6 differed from the findings for respiratory isolates reported from Japan. PMID:26739155

  20. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in two wild Eurasian otters (Lutra lutra L.) from Portugal.

    PubMed

    Matos, Ana Cristina; Figueira, Luis; Martins, Maria Helena; Matos, Manuela; Alvares, Sofia; Pinto, Maria Lurdes; Coelho, Ana Cláudia

    2013-03-01

    Disseminated Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infections were found in two Eurasian otters (Lutra lutra, L. 1758) killed by vehicular trauma in February and March 2010 in Castelo Branco, Portugal. At postmortem examination, the organs showed no significant gross alterations; however, microscopically, both animals had diffuse lymphadenitis with macrophage infiltration and deposition of hyaline material in the center of the lymphoid follicles. Acid-fast organisms were isolated from gastrointestinal tissue samples via bacteriologic culture. These organisms were identified as M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis by IS900 polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Additionally, direct IS900 PCR-positive results were obtained for multiple organs of both animals. This is the first report of MAP infection of otters in Portugal.

  1. Disseminated mycobacteriosis manifesting as paraplegia in two Parma wallabies (Macropus parma) naturally exposed to Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed

    Robveille, Cynthia; Albaric, Olivier; Gaide, Nicolas; Abadie, Jérome

    2015-11-01

    Two captive female Parma wallabies (Macropus parma) died after a history of flaccid paraplegia. On postmortem examination, granulomatous and suppurative osteomyelitis involving the left ischium and the lumbosacral region, with meningeal extension at the cauda equina, and caseonecrotic mastitis were the most significant changes. Multiple small nodules in the liver and spleen, and an enlargement of some lymph nodes with central caseous necrosis were also observed. Microscopically, a disseminated granulomatous inflammation with numerous multinucleate giant cells was seen. Numerous acid-fast bacilli were detected in macrophages, in multinucleated giant cells, and free in the central necrosis and suppurative exudate. After culture, polymerase chain reaction assays were carried out to detect the 65-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp65) and insertion sequences (IS)1245 and IS900. The causative agent was identified as Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. © 2015 The Author(s).

  2. Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis analysis of the Mycobacterium avium complex and other mycobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Wasem, C F; McCarthy, C M; Murray, L W

    1991-01-01

    Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis analysis was used to evaluate the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), M. paratuberculosis, and nine other mycobacterial species. The average number of alleles per locus was 2.8 for the 35 MAC and 2 M. paratuberculosis strains which represented 24 electrophoretic types (ETs) and two distinct groups. The M. avium group was resolved into 17 ETs and contained the M. paratuberculosis ET. The M. intracellulare group consisted of six ETs. There was complete agreement between Gen-Probe identification and group placement by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. The mean genetic diversity per locus for the 24 MAC ETs was 0.38. This procedure subdivided some serovars and, if implemented, should prove to be a powerful epidemiologic tool for the MAC. Eleven additional ETs were formed after the data for the other mycobacterial species were pooled with those for the MAC. PMID:2007633

  3. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infects and multiplies in enteric glial cells

    PubMed Central

    Sechi, Leonardo A; Ruehl, Anne; Ahmed, Niyaz; Usai, Donatella; Paccagnini, Daniela; Felis, Giovanna E; Zanetti, Stefania

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To establish the role of enteric glial cells during infection with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) in Crohn’s disease. METHODS: In order to establish the role of enteric glial cells during infection with M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) in Crohn’s disease, Map adhesion experiments on enteric glial cells were performed as well as expression analysis of Map sigma factors during infection. RESULTS: In this study, for the first time, we found a high affinity of MAP to enteric glial cells and we analyzed the expression of MAP sigma factors under different conditions of growth. CONCLUSION: The fact that Map showed a high affinity to the glial cells raises concerns about the complicated etiology of the Crohn’s disease. Elucidation of the mechanisms whereby inflammation alters enteric neural control of gut functions may lead to novel treatments for Crohn’s disease. PMID:17963299

  4. Isolation of flavonoids from the heartwood and resin of Prunus avium and some preliminary biological investigations.

    PubMed

    McNulty, James; Nair, Jerald J; Bollareddy, Endreddy; Keskar, Kunal; Thorat, Amol; Crankshaw, Denis J; Holloway, Alison C; Khan, Ghaznia; Wright, Gerard D; Ejim, Linda

    2009-12-01

    An investigation of the constituents in heartwood and resin of Prunus avium is reported. A mini-library of structurally diverse flavanones and flavones was screened for human cytochrome P450 1A1, 3A4 and 19 (aromatase) inhibition, and for antifungal activity against a panel of pathogenic fungi. The defensive role of these natural plant flavonoids as antifungal phytoalexins and phytoanticipins is discussed.

  5. Illegitimate recombination: an efficient method for random mutagenesis in Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis.

    PubMed

    Khattak, Faisal Asghar; Kumar, Ashutosh; Kamal, Elisabeth; Kunisch, Ralph; Lewin, Astrid

    2012-09-11

    The genus Mycobacterium (M.) comprises highly pathogenic bacteria such as M. tuberculosis as well as environmental opportunistic bacteria called non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). While the incidence of tuberculosis is declining in the developed world, infection rates by NTM are increasing. NTM are ubiquitous and have been isolated from soil, natural water sources, tap water, biofilms, aerosols, dust and sawdust. Lung infections as well as lymphadenitis are most often caused by M. avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH), which is considered to be among the clinically most important NTM. Only few virulence genes from M. avium have been defined among other things due to difficulties in generating M. avium mutants. More efforts in developing new methods for mutagenesis of M. avium and identification of virulence-associated genes are therefore needed. We developed a random mutagenesis method based on illegitimate recombination and integration of a Hygromycin-resistance marker. Screening for mutations possibly affecting virulence was performed by monitoring of pH resistance, colony morphology, cytokine induction in infected macrophages and intracellular persistence. Out of 50 randomly chosen Hygromycin-resistant colonies, four revealed to be affected in virulence-related traits. The mutated genes were MAV_4334 (nitroreductase family protein), MAV_5106 (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase), MAV_1778 (GTP-binding protein LepA) and MAV_3128 (lysyl-tRNA synthetase LysS). We established a random mutagenesis method for MAH that can be easily carried out and combined it with a set of phenotypic screening methods for the identification of virulence-associated mutants. By this method, four new MAH genes were identified that may be involved in virulence.

  6. Effective heat inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in raw milk contaminated with naturally infected feces.

    PubMed

    Rademaker, Jan L W; Vissers, Marc M M; Te Giffel, Meike C

    2007-07-01

    The effectiveness of high-temperature, short holding time (HTST) pasteurization and homogenization with respect to inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis was evaluated quantitatively. This allowed a detailed determination of inactivation kinetics. High concentrations of feces from cows with clinical symptoms of Johne's disease were used to contaminate raw milk in order to realistically mimic possible incidents most closely. Final M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis concentrations varying from 10(2) to 3.5 x 10(5) cells per ml raw milk were used. Heat treatments including industrial HTST were simulated on a pilot scale with 22 different time-temperature combinations, including 60 to 90 degrees C at holding (mean residence) times of 6 to 15 s. Following 72 degrees C and a holding time of 6 s, 70 degrees C for 10 and 15 s, or under more stringent conditions, no viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells were recovered, resulting in >4.2- to >7.1-fold reductions, depending on the original inoculum concentrations. Inactivation kinetic modeling of 69 quantitative data points yielded an E(a) of 305,635 J/mol and an lnk(0) of 107.2, corresponding to a D value of 1.2 s at 72 degrees C and a Z value of 7.7 degrees C. Homogenization did not significantly affect the inactivation. The conclusion can be drawn that HTST pasteurization conditions equal to 15 s at > or =72 degrees C result in a more-than-sevenfold reduction of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

  7. Characterization of a Novel Plasmid, pMAH135, from Mycobacterium avium Subsp. hominissuis

    PubMed Central

    Uchiya, Kei-ichi; Takahashi, Hiroyasu; Nakagawa, Taku; Yagi, Tetsuya; Moriyama, Makoto; Inagaki, Takayuki; Ichikawa, Kazuya; Nikai, Toshiaki; Ogawa, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) causes mainly two types of disease. The first is disseminated disease in immunocompromised hosts, such as individuals infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The second is pulmonary disease in individuals without systemic immunosuppression, and the incidence of this type is increasing worldwide. M. avium subsp. hominissuis, a component of MAC, causes infection in pigs as well as in humans. Many aspects of the different modes of M. avium infection and its host specificity remain unclear. Here, we report the characteristics and complete sequence of a novel plasmid, designated pMAH135, derived from M. avium strain TH135 in an HIV-negative patient with pulmonary MAC disease. The pMAH135 plasmid consists of 194,711 nucleotides with an average G + C content of 66.5% and encodes 164 coding sequences (CDSs). This plasmid was unique in terms of its homology to other mycobacterial plasmids. Interestingly, it contains CDSs with sequence homology to mycobactin biosynthesis proteins and type VII secretion system-related proteins, which are involved in the pathogenicity of mycobacteria. It also contains putative conserved domains of the multidrug efflux transporter. Screening of isolates from humans and pigs for genes located on pMAH135 revealed that the detection rate of these genes was higher in clinical isolates from pulmonary MAC disease patients than in those from HIV-positive patients, whereas the genes were almost entirely absent in isolates from pigs. Moreover, variable number tandem repeats typing analysis showed that isolates carrying pMAH135 genes are grouped in a specific cluster. Collectively, the pMAH135 plasmid contains genes associated with M. avium’s pathogenicity and resistance to antimicrobial agents. The results of this study suggest that pMAH135 influence not only the pathological manifestations of MAC disease, but also the host specificity of MAC infection. PMID:25671431

  8. Loci of Mycobacterium avium ser2 gene cluster and their functions.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, J A; McNeil, M R; Belisle, J T; Jacobs, W R; Brennan, P J

    1994-01-01

    The highly antigenic glycopeptidolipids present on the surface of members of the Mycobacterium avium complex serve to distinguish these bacteria from all others and to define the various serovars that compose this complex. Previously, the genes responsible for the biosynthesis of the disaccharide hapten [2,3-di-O-methyl-alpha-L-fucopyranosyl-(1-->3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranose] of serovar 2 of the M. avium complex were isolated, localized to a contiguous 22- to 27-kb fragment of the M. avium genome, and designated the ser2 gene cluster (J. T. Belisle, L. Pascopella, J. M. Inamine, P. J. Brennan, and W. R. Jacobs, Jr., J. Bacteriol. 173:6991-6997, 1991). In the present study, transposon saturation mutagenesis was used to map the specific genetic loci within the ser2 gene cluster required for expression of this disaccharide. Four essential loci, termed ser2A, -B, -C, and -D, constituting a total of 5.7 kb within the ser2 gene cluster, were defined. The ser2B and ser2D loci encode the methyltransferases required to methylate the fucose at the 3 and 2 positions, respectively. The rhamnosyltransferase was encoded by ser2A, whereas either ser2C or ser2D encoded the fucosyltransferase. The ser2C and ser2D loci are also apparently involved in the de novo synthesis of fucose. Isolation of the truncated versions of the hapten induced by the transposon insertions provides genetic evidence that the glycopeptidolipids of M. avium serovar 2 are synthesized by an initial transfer of the rhamnose unit to the peptide core followed by fucose and finally O methylation of the fucosyl unit. PMID:8050992

  9. [Identification of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex by PCR of AIDS and disseminated mycobacteriosis].

    PubMed

    García-Elorriaga, Guadalupe; Degollado-Estrada, Edgar; Villagómez-Ruiz, Alfredo; Cortés-Torres, Nancy; Arreguín-Reséndiz, Lilián; Del Rey-Pineda, Guillermo; González-Bonilla, César

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: el objetivo de este artículo es Identificar y diferenciar el complejo MAC por PCR en pacientes con SIDA y micobacteriosis diseminada. Métodos: se llevó a cabo un estudio transversal para identificar MAC por biología molecular. Se sintetizaron dos conjuntos de iniciadores: MAV y MIN, para M. avium y M. intracellulare, respectivamente. El ADN total de células obtenidas de 29 aislados clínicos y muestras de suero de otros 24 pacientes con SIDA e infección micobacteriana diseminada fue extraído y se amplificó por PCR con los iniciadores MAV y MIN. Cada uno de los iniciadores MAV y MIN amplificó un segmento altamente específico de 1.3 kb del ADN homólogo, respectivamente. Resultados: veintinueve ADN de los aislados clínicos de MAC identificadas por Gen-Probe AccuProbes se amplificaron con los iniciadores MAV (M. avium). De las 24 muestras clínicas, 3 fueron positivas para M. avium y 6 para M. tuberculosis. Conclusiones: nuestros resultados demostraron que la técnica de PCR se puede aplicar para la diferenciación de M. avium y M. intracellulare por iniciadores específicos 16S rRNA. En pacientes con estadio avanzado de SIDA y en quienes se sospecha micobacteriosis diseminada, la presencia de anemia (incluso con cultivos negativos) fosfatasa alcalina elevada y una mediana de CD4 de 15.9/ml, se debe considerar seriamente el diagnóstico de infección por MAC; sugerimos que, de acuerdo con nuestros resultados, se justifica una estratificación más precisa de los pacientes en términos de sus recuentos de células T CD4.

  10. Experimental Reactivation of Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium Complex Infection in a Modified Cornell-Like Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Sik; Kim, Jong-Seok; Kim, Hong Min; Kwon, Kee Woong; Cho, Sang-Nae; Shin, Sung Jae; Koh, Won-Jung

    2015-01-01

    The latency and reactivation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection has been well studied. However, there have been few studies of the latency and reactivation of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), the most common etiological non-tuberculous Mycobacterium species next to M. tuberculosis in humans worldwide. We hypothesized that latent MAC infections can be reactivated following immunosuppression after combination chemotherapy with clarithromycin and rifampicin under experimental conditions. To this end, we employed a modified Cornell-like murine model of tuberculosis and investigated six strains consisting of two type strains and four clinical isolates of M. avium and M. intracellulare. After aerosol infection of each MAC strain, five to six mice per group were euthanized at 2, 4, 10, 18, 28 and 35 weeks post-infection, and lungs were sampled to analyze bacterial burden and histopathology. One strain of each species maintained a culture-negative state for 10 weeks after completion of 6 weeks of chemotherapy, but was reactivated after 5 weeks of immunosuppression in the lungs with dexamethasone (three out of six mice in M. avium infection) or sulfasalazine (four out of six mice in both M. avium and M. intracellulare infection). The four remaining MAC strains exhibited decreased bacterial loads in response to chemotherapy; however, they remained at detectable levels and underwent regrowth after immunosuppression. In addition, the exacerbated lung pathology demonstrated a correlation with bacterial burden after reactivation. In conclusion, our results suggest the possibility of MAC reactivation in an experimental mouse model, and experimentally demonstrate that a compromised immune status can induce reactivation and/or regrowth of MAC infection. PMID:26406237

  11. Prediction of Quinolone Activity against Mycobacterium avium by Molecular Topology and Virtual Computational Screening

    PubMed Central

    Gozalbes, Rafael; Brun-Pascaud, Monique; García-Domenech, Ramon; Gálvez, Jorge; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Doucet, Jean-Pierre; Derouin, Francis

    2000-01-01

    We conducted a quantitative structure-activity relationship study using a database of 158 quinolones previously tested against Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex in order to develop a model capable of predicting the activity of new quinolones against the M. avium-M. intracellulare complex in vitro. Topological indices were used as structural descriptors and were related to anti-M. avium-M. intracellulare complex activity by using the linear discriminant analysis (LDA) statistical technique. The discriminant equation thus obtained correctly classified 137 of the 158 quinolones, including 37 of a test group of 44 randomly chosen compounds. This model was then applied to 24 quinolones, including recently developed fluoroquinolones, whose MICs were subsequently determined in vitro by using the Alamar blue microplate assay; the biological results confirmed the model's predictions. The MICs of these 24 quinolones were then treated by multilinear regression (MLR) to establish a model capable of classifying them according to their in vitro activities. Using this model, a good correlation between measured and predicted MICs was found (r2 = 0.88; r2cv [cross-validation correlation] = 0.82). Moxifloxacin, sparfloxacin, and gatifloxacin were the most potent against the M. avium- M. intracellulare complex, with MICs of 0.2, 0.4, and 0.9 μg/ml, respectively. Finally, virtual modifications of these three drugs were evaluated in LDA and MLR models in order to determine the importance of different substituents in their activity. We conclude that the combination of molecular-topology methods, LDA, and MLR provides an excellent tool for the design of new quinolone structures with enhanced activity. PMID:10991858

  12. The Thioamides Methimazole and Thiourea Inhibit Growth of M. avium Subspecies paratuberculosis in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Greenstein, Robert J.; Su, Liya; Brown, Sheldon T.

    2010-01-01

    Background Thyrotoxicosis is conceptualized as an “autoimmune” disease with no accepted infectious etiology. There are increasingly compelling data that another “autoimmune” affliction, Crohn disease, may be caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). Like M. tb, MAP is systemic. We hypothesized that some cases of thyrotoxicosis may be initiated by a MAP infection. Because other thioamides treat tuberculosis, leprosy and M. avium complex, we hypothesized that a mode of action of some thioamide anti-thyrotoxicosis medications may include MAP growth inhibition. Methods The effect of the thioamides, thiourea, methimazole and 6-propo-2-thiouracil (6-PTU) were studied in radiometric Bactec® culture, on ten strains of three mycobacterial species (six of MAP, two of M. avium and two of M. tb. complex). Data are presented as “cumulative growth index,” (cGI) or “percent decrease in cumulative GI” (%-ΔcGI). Principal Findings Methimazole was the most effective thioamide at inhibiting MAP growth. At 128µg/ml: MAP UCF-4; 65%-ΔcGI & MAP ATCC 19698; 90%-ΔcGI. Thiourea inhibited MAP “Ben” maximally; 70%-ΔcGI. Neither methimazole nor thiourea inhibited M. avium or M. tb. at the doses tested. 6-PTU has no inhibition on any strain studied, although a structurally analogous control, 5-PTU, was the most inhibitory thioamide tested. Significance We show inhibition of MAP growth by the thioamides, thiourea and methimazole in culture. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that these thioamides may have anti-prokaryotic in addition to their well-established eukaryotic actions in thyrotoxic individuals. PMID:20559419

  13. Adherence and biofilm formation of Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium abscessus to household plumbing materials.

    PubMed

    Mullis, S N; Falkinham, J O

    2013-09-01

    Measure adherence and biofilm formation by cells of Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium abscessus on common household plumbing materials namely stainless steel, glass, zinc-galvanized steel, copper and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Coupons in a CDC biofilm reactor were exposed to cell suspensions containing 10(5) NTM colony forming units (CFU) per ml and adherence measured for 6 h. Biofilm formation (increased numbers of adherent CFU) was measured weekly to 21 days in the absence of substantial numbers of suspended mycobacterial cells. Adherence was rapid and substantial with 2000-15 000 CFU cm(-2) adhering within 1-6 h at room temperature. Biofilm numbers reached as high as 10(7)  CFU cm(-2) . Biofilm-grown cells of Myco. avium were more adherent compared with suspension-grown cells. Mycobacterium avium, Myco. intracellulare and Myco. abscessus readily adhered and formed biofilms on all types of plumbing materials. Factors influencing adherence and biofilm formation were species, plumbing material and prior growth. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Factors Influencing Numbers of Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, and Other Mycobacteria in Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    PubMed Central

    Falkinham, Joseph O.; Norton, Cheryl D.; LeChevallier, Mark W.

    2001-01-01

    Eight water distribution systems were sampled over an 18-month period (528 water and 55 biofilm samples) to measure the frequency of recovery and number of mycobacteria, particularly Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare, in raw source waters before and after treatment and within the distribution system. The systems were chosen to assess the influence of source water, treatment, and assimilable organic carbon levels on mycobacterial numbers. Overall, mycobacterial recovery from the systems was low (15% of samples). Numbers of mycobacteria ranged from 10 to 700,000 CFU liter−1. The number of M. avium in raw waters was correlated with turbidity. Water treatment substantially reduced the number of mycobacteria in raw waters by 2 to 4 log units. Mycobacterial numbers were substantially higher in the distribution system samples (average, 25,000-fold) than in those collected immediately downstream from the treatment facilities, indicating that mycobacteria grow in the distribution system. The increase in mycobacterial numbers was correlated with assimilable organic carbon and biodegradable organic carbon levels (r2 = 0.65, P = 0.03). Although M. intracellulare was seldom recovered from water samples, it was frequently recovered (six of eight systems) in high numbers from biofilms (average, 600 CFU/cm2). Evidently, the ecological niches of M. avium and M. intracellulare are distinct. PMID:11229914

  15. Survival and Dormancy of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Whittington, Richard J.; Marshall, D. Jeff; Nicholls, Paul J.; Marsh, Ian B.; Reddacliff, Leslie A.

    2004-01-01

    The survival of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis was studied by culture of fecal material sampled at intervals for up to 117 weeks from soil and grass in pasture plots and boxes. Survival for up to 55 weeks was observed in a dry fully shaded environment, with much shorter survival times in unshaded locations. Moisture and application of lime to soil did not affect survival. UV radiation was an unlikely factor, but infrared wavelengths leading to diurnal temperature flux may be the significant detrimental component that is correlated with lack of shade. The organism survived for up to 24 weeks on grass that germinated through infected fecal material applied to the soil surface in completely shaded boxes and for up to 9 weeks on grass in 70% shade. The observed patterns of recovery in three of four experiments and changes in viable counts were indicative of dormancy, a hitherto unreported property of this taxon. A dps-like genetic element and relA, which are involved in dormancy responses in other mycobacteria, are present in the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genome sequence, providing indirect evidence for the existence of physiological mechanisms enabling dormancy. However, survival of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the environment is finite, consistent with its taxonomic description as an obligate parasite of animals. PMID:15128561

  16. Mycobacteriosis in ostriches (Struthio camelus) due to infection with Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Pamela; Jahns, Hanne; Power, Eugene; Bainbridge, John; Kenny, Kevin; Corpa, Juan M; Cassidy, Joseph P; Callanan, John J

    2013-12-01

    Avian tuberculosis rarely affects ratites compared to other bird species and is typically caused by Mycobacterium avium species. This study describes the pathological and microbiological findings in three adult ostriches with mycobacteriosis, in one of which Mycobacterium bovis was isolated from the lesions. Post mortem examinations on ostriches from two different zoological collections in Ireland revealed multifocal caseous granulomas affecting the spleen and liver in all cases, with additional involvement of intestines in two cases. In one case, granulomas were present within the pharynx, at the thoracic inlet and multifocally on the pleural surface. Acid-fast bacilli were observed in all lesions. Mycobacterium sp. of the M. avium complex was isolated from the intestinal lesions in the two cases with intestinal involvement, and M. bovis sp. oligotype SB0140 was cultured from the liver of the third ostrich. This represents the first reported case of M. bovis infection in an ostrich. Avian tuberculosis due to M. bovis is rare and to date has been reported in only parrots and experimentally inoculated birds. Mycobacterium bovis needs to be considered as a possible cause of tuberculosis in ostriches because the lesions are similar to those observed with M. avium complex infection.

  17. Multiple drug resistance in Mycobacterium avium: is the wall architecture responsible for exclusion of antimicrobial agents?

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, N; Frehel, C; Ryter, A; Ohayon, H; Lesourd, M; David, H L

    1981-01-01

    Whole cells of Mycobacterium avium, characterized by their negative response in the nine biochemical tests used for mycobacterial identification in our laboratory, turned positive for nitrate reductase, Tween-80 hydrolysis, beta-glucosidase, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, penicillinase, and trehalase after their wall portion was removed to yield spheroplasts. This suggested that the negative results in most of the biochemical procedures were caused by the exclusion mechanism at the wall level. Preliminary transmission and scanning electron microscopic studies showed differences at wall level between laboratory-maintained opaque, dome-shaped (SmD) and host-recycled smooth, transparent (SmT) colony type variants of M. avium and suggested the presence of an outer regularly structured layer in SmT variants. Comparative ultrastructural studies utilizing different polysaccharide coloration methods confirmed the presence of an outer polysaccharide layer in SmT variants which was probably related to their enhanced pathogenicity for experimental animals and drug resistance as compared to that of SmD variants. These findings are discussed with respect to multiple drug resistance, virulence, and gene expression of M. avium. Images PMID:6798925

  18. Identification and Characterization of Two Bordetella avium Gene Products Required for Hemagglutination▿

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Louise M.; Miyamoto, David M.; Mehta, Manju; Capitini, Christian M.; Von Stetina, Stephen; Barnes, H. John; Christensen, Vern L.; Horton, John R.; Spears, Patricia A.; Orndorff, Paul E.

    2010-01-01

    Bordetella avium causes bordetellosis in birds, a disease similar to whooping cough caused by Bordetella pertussis in children. B. avium agglutinates guinea pig erythrocytes via an unknown mechanism. Loss of hemagglutination ability results in attenuation. We report the use of transposon mutagenesis to identify two genes required for hemagglutination. The genes (hagA and hagB) were adjacent and divergently oriented and had no orthologs in the genomes of other Bordetella species. Construction of in-frame, unmarked mutations in each gene allowed examination of the role of each in conferring erythrocyte agglutination, explanted tracheal cell adherence, and turkey poult tracheal colonization. In all of the in vitro and in vivo assays, the requirement for the trans-acting products of hagA and hagB (HagA and HagB) was readily shown. Western blotting, using antibodies to purified HagA and HagB, revealed proteins of the predicted sizes of HagA and HagB in an outer membrane-enriched fraction. Antiserum to HagB, but not HagA, blocked B. avium erythrocyte agglutination and explanted turkey tracheal ring binding. Bioinformatic analysis indicated the similarity of HagA and HagB to several two-component secretory apparatuses in which one product facilitates the exposition of the other. HagB has the potential to serve as a useful immunogen to protect turkeys against colonization and subsequent disease. PMID:20351141

  19. Prunus avium: nuclear DNA study in wild populations and sweet cherry cultivars.

    PubMed

    Guarino, Carmine; Santoro, Simona; De Simone, Luciana; Cipriani, Guido

    2009-04-01

    The PCR-SSR technique was used to detect nuclear DNA diversity in five wild populations of Prunus avium from deciduous forests in Italy, Slovenia, and Croatia and 87 sweet cherry accessions from different geographical areas that have been maintained in the sweet cherry collection in Italy. This sweet cherry collection includes local accessions from the Campania Region as well as accessions from different countries. Twenty-eight microsatellites, previously developed in this species, generated polymorphic amplification products. Between 2 and 14 alleles were revealed for the polymorphic loci studied, with the expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.045 to 0.831. The total probability of identity was 56.94 x 10-18. A model-based Bayesian clustering analysis identified nine distinct gene pools in cultivated P. avium. The probability that wild populations were assigned to cultivated gene pools indicated that three gene pools accounted for the genomic origin of 53% of P. avium sampled. A dendrogram was generated using UPGMA (unweighted pair group method with arithmetic averages) based on Nei genetic distance analysis. This dendrogram classified most of the genotypes into one major group with an additional group of five accessions. The results indicate that this set of SSRs is highly informative, and they are discussed in terms of the implications for sweet cherry characterization.

  20. Radioprotection of Swiss albino mice by Prunus avium with special reference to hematopoietic system.

    PubMed

    Sisodia, Rashmi; Singh, Smita; Mundotiya, Chaturbhuj; Meghnani, Ekta; Srivastava, Preeti

    2011-01-01

    Prunus avium (family Rosaceae) has been used ethnomedicinally for the treatment of many diseases,but its radioprotective efficacy has hardly been explored. Presence of high anthocyanin content and phenolic compound with good antioxidative capacity has been reported by researchers. Its radioprotective effect against 5, 7, 10, and 12 Gygamma radiation was evaluated by 30 day survival assay. Regression analysis yielded LD(50/30) 5.81 and 9.43Gy for irradiated only and (P. avium fruit extract) PAE + radiation groups, respectively. The dose reduction factor was computed as 1.62. For biochemical and hematological studies, Swiss albino mice were divided into four groups: (i) control (vehicle treated), (ii) PAE treated (450 mg kg/day for 15 consequetive days), (iii) irradiated (5 Gy), and (4) PAE + irradiated. The irradiation of animals resulted in a significant elevation of lipid peroxidation and depletion in glutathione and protein levels in blood serum and spleen, which could be significantly checked by administration of PAE. Radiation-induced deficit in blood sugar, cholesterol, and hematological constituents could also be modulated by supplementation of PAE before and after irradiation. The possible prophylactic and therapeutic action noted by P. avium against radiation induced metabolic disorders may be due to synergistic action of various antioxidants, minerals, vitamins, etc., present in the fruit. Further mechanistic studies aimed at identifying the role of major ingredients in the extract are needed.

  1. Genetic relationships between diploid and allotetraploid cherry species (Prunus avium, Prunus x gondouinii and Prunus cerasus).

    PubMed

    Tavaud, M; Zanetto, A; David, J L; Laigret, F; Dirlewanger, E

    2004-12-01

    Prunus avium L. (diploid, AA, 2n=2x=16), Prunus cerasus L. (allotetraploid, AAFF, 2n=4x=32) species, and their hybrid Prunus x gondouinii Rehd., constitute the most widely cultivated cherry tree species. P. cerasus is supposed to be an hybrid species produced by the union of unreduced P. avium gametes and normal P. fruticosa gametes. A continuum of morphological traits between these three species makes their assignation difficult. The aim of this paper is to study the genetic relationships between tetraploid and diploid cherry species. In all, 114 genotypes belonging to these species were analyzed using 75 AFLP markers. The coordinates of these genotypes on the first axis of a correspondence analysis allowed us to clearly distinguish each species, to identify misclassifications and to assign unknown genotypes to one species. We showed that there are specific alleles in P. cerasus, which are not present in the A genome of P. avium and which probably come from the F genome of P. cerasus. The frequencies of each marker in the A and the F genomes were estimated in order to identify A and F specific markers. We discuss the utility of these specific markers for finding the origin of the A and F genomes in the allopolyploid species.

  2. Acute toxicity effects of Prunus avium fruit extract and selection of optimum dose against radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Sisodia, Rashmi; Sharma, K; Singh, Smita

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the acute toxicity of different doses of the methanolic extract of the fruit pulp of Prunus avium (family Rosaceae), which is used ethno-medicinally for the treatment of various diseases, and to find out the optimal dose of Prunus avium extract against 10 Gy gamma-radiation exposure. To test acute toxicity in mice, different doses of PAE (Prunus avium fruit extract) were given orally for 15 consecutive days, after which the animals were observed for another 15 days; the LD50/15 of the methanolic extract was calculated to be 4.947 gm/kg body weight (b.wt). In optimum dose selection against radiation exposure, oral administration of 450 mg/kg b.wt/d of PAE for 15 consecutive days before exposure to 10 Gy of gamma-radiation was found to afford maximum protection in terms of body weight and survivability of the mice in comparison to other doses.

  3. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis antibody response, fecal shedding, and antibody cross-reactivity to Mycobacterium bovis in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected cattle herds vaccinated against Johne's disease.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Deepanker; Hovingh, Ernest; Linscott, Rick; Martel, Edmond; Lawrence, John; Wolfgang, David; Griswold, David

    2014-05-01

    Vaccination for Johne's disease with killed inactivated vaccine in cattle herds has shown variable success. The vaccine delays the onset of disease but does not afford complete protection. Johne's disease vaccination has also been reported to interfere with measurements of cell-mediated immune responses for the detection of bovine tuberculosis. Temporal antibody responses and fecal shedding of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the causative agent of Johne's disease, were measured in 2 dairy cattle herds using Johne's disease vaccine (Mycopar) over a period of 7 years. Vaccination against Johne's disease resulted in positive serum M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antibody responses in both herds, and the responses persisted in vaccinated cattle up to 7 years of age. Some vaccinated animals (29.4% in herd A and 36.2% in herd B) showed no serological reactivity to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific antibody responses were also detected in milk from Johne's disease-vaccinated animals, but fewer animals (39.3% in herd A and 49.4% in herd B) had positive results with milk than with serum samples. With vaccination against M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, fecal shedding in both dairy herds was reduced significantly (P < 0.001). In addition, when selected Johne's disease-vaccinated and -infected animals were investigated for serological cross-reactivity to Mycobacterium bovis, no cross-reactivity was observed.

  4. THE ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX (MAC) RECOVERED FROM LOS ANGELES POTABLE WATER, A POSSIBLE SOURCE OF INFECTION IN AIDS PATIENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Los Angeles water was investigated as a possible source of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection in patients with AIDS. MAC consists of M.avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI) and Mycobacterium X (MX)(positive for MAC by DNA probe but not MA or MI). The study included 13 reser...

  5. THE ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX (MAC) RECOVERED FROM LOS ANGELES POTABLE WATER, A POSSIBLE SOURCE OF INFECTION IN AIDS PATIENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Los Angeles water was investigated as a possible source of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection in patients with AIDS. MAC consists of M.avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI) and Mycobacterium X (MX)(positive for MAC by DNA probe but not MA or MI). The study included 13 reser...

  6. Comparative transcriptional analysis of human macrophages exposed to animal and human isolates of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis with diverse genotypes.

    PubMed

    Motiwala, Alifiya S; Janagama, Harish K; Paustian, Michael L; Zhu, Xiaochun; Bannantine, John P; Kapur, Vivek; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2006-11-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease in animals and has been hypothesized to be associated with Crohn's disease in humans. Recently, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates recovered from Crohn's disease patients were shown to have limited diversity, implying the existence of human disease-associated genotypes and strain sharing with animals (A. H. Ghadiali et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 42:5345-5348, 2004). To explore whether these genotypic differences or similarities among human and animal isolates translated to functionally significant attributes such as variance in host preference and/or difference in magnitude of infections, we performed a global scale analysis of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates that were representative of different genotypes and host species using DNA microarrays. Genome-wide characterization of the transcriptional changes was carried out using a human monocytic cell line (THP-1 cells) in response to different genotypes of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates recovered from various hosts. We identified several differentially expressed genes during early intracellular infection, including those involved in common canonical pathways such as NF-kappaB, interleukin-6 (IL-6), mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and Jun N-terminal protein kinase signaling, as well as genes involved in T helper type 1 (Th1) responses (such as CCL5 ligand) and those that encode several proinflammatory cytokines and chemokine receptors. The cattle and human isolates of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, regardless of their short sequence repeat (SSR) genotype, induced similar global gene expression patterns in THP-1 cells. They differentially regulated genes necessary for cell survival without causing major alterations in proinflammatory genes. In contrast, the sheep isolates representing diverse SSR genotypes closely resembled the global gene expression pattern of an M

  7. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the rpoB gene for identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and differentiation of Mycobacterium avium subspecies.

    PubMed

    Whang, Jake; Lee, Byung Soo; Choi, Go-Eun; Cho, Sang-Nae; Kil, Park Young; Collins, Michael T; Shin, Sung Jae

    2011-05-01

    Mycobacterial speciation by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (PRA) of the rpoB gene was evaluated for identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) and other Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) members to the species or subspecies level by comparison with conventional methods including hsp65 sequencing, high-performance liquid chromatography, and PCR for accepted species- or subspecies-specific genomic targets. A total of 185 type and clinical mycobacterial strains from humans, animals, and environments were tested. A 360-bp PCR product was subsequently digested with MspI, HaeIII, and SmaI restriction enzymes. The PRA using SmaI restriction showed a unique digestion pattern for MAP distinguishing it from other MAC members and other Mycobacterium spp. Moreover, HaeIII and MspI restriction of the rpoB gene enabled MAC-species and -subspecies discrimination. The rpoB-PRA using SmaI or MspI and HaeIII restriction of the rpoB gene is a simple, convenient, and reliable confirmatory assay for simultaneous identification of MAP and other MAC members.

  8. Evaluation of quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays targeting Mycobacterium avium, M. intracellulare, and M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis in drinking water biofilms.

    PubMed

    Chern, Eunice C; King, Dawn; Haugland, Richard; Pfaller, Stacy

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium avium (MA), Mycobacterium intracellulare (MI), and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) are difficult to culture due to their slow growing nature. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method for the rapid detection of MA, MI, and MAP can be used to provide data supporting drinking water biofilms as potential sources of human exposure. The aim of this study was to characterize two qPCR assays targeting partial 16S rRNA gene sequences of MA and MI and use these assays, along with two previously reported MAP qPCR assays (IS900 and Target 251), to investigate Mycobacterium occurrence in kitchen faucet biofilms. MA and MI qPCR assays demonstrated 100% specificity and sensitivity when evaluated against 18 non-MA complex, 76 MA, and 17 MI isolates. Both assays detected approximately 1,000 cells from a diluted cell stock inoculated on a sampling swab 100% of the time. DNA analysis by qPCR indicated that 35.3, 56.9 and 11.8% of the 51 kitchen faucet biofilm samples collected contained MA, MI, and MAP, respectively. This study introduces novel qPCR assays designed to specifically detect MA and MI in biofilm. Results support the use of qPCR as an alternative to culture for detection and enumeration of MA, MI, and MAP in microbiologically complex samples.

  9. The relative impact of bacterial virulence and host genetic background on cytokine expression during Mycobacterium avium infection of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Castro, A G; Minóprio, P; Appelberg, R

    1995-01-01

    Resistance to Mycobacterium avium depends on both genetically encoded macrophage functions and acquired T-cell immunity. Cytokines may play a role in either type of resistance. We studied the expression of interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4 and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in naturally susceptible BALB/c (Bcgs) and naturally resistant C.D2 (Bcgr) congenic mice infected with two strains of M. avium (one highly virulent and another of low virulence). We observed that cytokine expression patterns correlated better with the virulence of the micro-organism than with the genetic background of the host. The control of the infection by the low virulence strain in either mouse strain was associated with an increased expression of IFN-gamma and IL-2. Only Bcgs mice infected with a virulent strain of M. avium were unable to restrict bacterial growth. An increased expression of IL-4, early during infection, was detected in the course of the latter infection but played no role in determining the susceptibility to infection. Neutralization of IFN-gamma or IL-2 with specific monoclonal antibodies led to an exacerbation of the infection in Bcgr mice by the two strains of M. avium and in Bcgs mice infected with the low virulence strain of M. avium. PMID:7558149

  10. Hormonal modulation of phagocytosis and intracellular growth of Mycobacterium avium ss. paratuberculosis In bovine peripheral blood monocytes.

    PubMed

    Feola, R P; Collins, M T; Czuprynski, C J

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effects of several hormones (i.e. growth hormone, prolactin, vitamin D3, luteinizing hormone, oxytocin) on the phagocytosis and intracellular survival of Mycobacterium avium ss. paratuberculosis within bovine peripheral blood monocytes. Phagocytosis of M. avium ss. paratuberculosis declined in a dose-dependent manner when monocytes were exposed to increasing amounts of recombinant bovine growth hormone, with little phagocytosis occurring at a growth hormone concentration of 50 ng/ml. The other hormones tested had little effect on phagocytosis. Continuous exposure of bovine monocytes to bovine growth hormone (10 ng per ml) resulted in enhanced intracellular bacillary growth. This was detected within 3 days of monocyte infection, and resulted in a 1 Log10 greater number of M. avium ss. paratuberculosis in growth hormone treated, than control, monocytes at 12 days of infection. When monocytes were incubated with growth hormone for only the first 5 days of a 12 day incubation period, a further increase in bacillary multiplication was observed. A similar increase in bacillary multiplication was observed when M. avium ss. paratuberculosis monocytes were incubated with prolactin for the first 5 days of a 12 day incubation period. These data indicate that varying levels of growth hormone and prolactin can affect the intracellular multiplication of M. avium ss. paratuberculosis in bovine monocytes. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  11. [Disinfection efficiency of peracetic acid, alone and in combination with hypochlorite, against Mycobacterium avium in drinking water].

    PubMed

    Schiavano, G F; Sisti, M; De Santi, M; Brandi, G

    2006-01-01

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is a disinfectant with a wide spectrum of antimicrobial activity, but little is known about the feasibility of using it in the field of drinking water treatment. The aim of this study has been assess disinfectant efficacy of PAA, alone or in combination with hypochlorite, against M. avium in drinking water M. avium is a common opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised subjects that is able to survive and grow in drinking water distribution systems. In this study PAA did not show appreciable activity against the greater number of tested strains (16/21) up to 5 ppm of PAA, a weak activity was seen on 4 strains, while a significant reduction in viable cells (about 50%) was seen only on 1 strain after 48 h of treatment with 5 ppm of PAA. We also evidenced that M. avium was unaffected by chlorine concentration usually present in drinking water distribution system. Finally, the combination of PAA and sodium hypochlorite did not promote enhanced antimicrobial efficacy respect to the single disinfectants. In conclusion, our result would indicate that PAA is an unlikely candidate for the disinfection of drinking water from M. avium and further strategies are required to eliminate M. avium from drinking water system.

  12. Processing and presentation of an antigen of Mycobacterium avium require access to an acidified compartment with active proteases.

    PubMed Central

    Holsti, M A; Allen, P M

    1996-01-01

    We have generated a murine T-cell hybridoma, 1C9, which recognizes an antigen expressed by a virulent clinical isolate of Mycobacterium avium. Both peritoneal exudate macrophages and bone marrow-derived macrophages infected in vitro with M. avium process and present the antigen to the T-cell hybridoma. Gel filtration chromatography of a sonicate of M. avium followed by T-cell Western blotting (immunoblotting) demonstrated that the antigen recognized by hybridoma 1C9 is approximately 50 kDa. In addition, treatment of macrophages with the lysosomotropic agent chloroquine or with inhibitors of acid proteases inhibits processing and presentation of the antigen. These results indicate that the antigen must encounter an acidic compartment with active proteases for processing and presentation to occur. Our results are discussed in the context of our current understanding of how mycobacterial antigens are processed and presented by infected macrophages to T cells. PMID:8926074

  13. Optimization of a phage amplification assay to permit accurate enumeration of viable Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells.

    PubMed

    Foddai, Antonio; Elliott, Christopher T; Grant, Irene R

    2009-06-01

    A commercially available phage amplification assay, FASTPlaqueTB (Biotec Laboratories, Ipswich, United Kingdom), when used according to the manufacturer's instructions, does not permit accurate enumeration of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The aim of this study was to optimize the phage amplification assay conditions to permit accurate quantification of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells. The burst time for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was initially determined to inform decisions about optimal incubation time before plating, and then other test parameters were altered to evaluate how the correlation between plaque and colony counts was affected. The D29 mycobacteriophage replicates more slowly in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis than in Mycobacterium smegmatis (used to optimize the commercial test originally), and the mean burst time for four M. avium subsp. paratuberulosis strains was 210 +/- 36.8 min at 37 degrees C compared to 63 +/- 17.5 min for M. smegmatis mc(2) 155. To achieve 100% correlation between plaque and colony counts, the optimized phage assay includes the following: (i) resuspension of the samples to be tested in Middlebrook 7H9 broth containing 10% oleic acid-albumin-dextrose-catalase and 2 mM calcium chloride, followed by overnight incubation at 37 degrees C before performance of the phage assay; (ii) a 2-h incubation of the sample with D29 mycobacteriophage before viricide treatment; and (iii) a further 90-min incubation after viricide treatment and neutralization up to the burst time (total incubation time, 210 min) before plating with M. smegmatis mc(2) 155 in 7H9 agar. The optimized phage amplification assay was able to detect 1 to 10 CFU/ml of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in spiked milk or broth within 48 h, as demonstrated by the results of several blind trials.

  14. Mycobacterium avium complex in day care hot water systems, and persistence of live cells and DNA in hot water pipes.

    PubMed

    Bukh, Annette S; Roslev, Peter

    2014-04-01

    The Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is a group of opportunistic human pathogens that may thrive in engineered water systems. MAC has been shown to occur in drinking water supplies based on surface water, but less is known about the occurrence and persistence of live cells and DNA in public hot water systems based on groundwater. In this study, we examined the occurrence of MAC in hot water systems of public day care centers and determined the persistence of live and dead M. avium cells and naked DNA in model systems with the modern plumbing material cross-linked polyethylene (PEX). The occurrence of MAC and co-occurrence of Legionella spp. and Legionella pneumophila were determined using cultivation and qPCR. Co-occurrences of MAC and Legionella were detected in water and/or biofilms in all hot water systems at temperatures between 40 and 54 °C. Moderate correlations were observed between abundance of culturable MAC and that of MAC genome copies, and between MAC and total eubacterial genome copies. No quantitative relationship was observed between occurrence of Legionella and that of MAC. Persistence in hot water of live and dead M. avium cells and naked DNA was studied using PEX laboratory model systems at 44 °C. Naked DNA and DNA in dead M. avium cells persisted for weeks. Live M. avium increased tenfold in water and biofilms on PEX. The results suggest that water and biofilms in groundwater-based hot water systems can constitute reservoirs of MAC, and that amplifiable naked DNA is relatively short-lived, whereas PEX plumbing material supports persistence and proliferation of M. avium.

  15. High-throughput direct fecal PCR assay for detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in sheep and cattle.

    PubMed

    Plain, Karren M; Marsh, Ian B; Waldron, Anna M; Galea, Francesca; Whittington, Ann-Michele; Saunders, Vanessa F; Begg, Douglas J; de Silva, Kumudika; Purdie, Auriol C; Whittington, Richard J

    2014-03-01

    Johne's disease (JD) is a chronic enteric disease caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis that affects ruminants. Transmission occurs by the fecal-oral route. A commonly used antemortem diagnostic test for the detection of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in feces is liquid culture; however, a major constraint is the 2- to 3-month incubation period needed for this method. Rapid methods for the detection of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis based on PCR have been reported, but comprehensive validation data are lacking. We describe here a new test, the high-throughput-Johnes (HT-J), to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in feces. Its diagnostic accuracy was compared with that of liquid radiometric (Bactec) fecal culture using samples from cattle (1,330 samples from 23 herds) and sheep (596 samples from 16 flocks). The multistage protocol involves the recovery of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells from a fecal suspension, cell rupture by bead beating, extraction of DNA using magnetic beads, and IS900 quantitative PCR. The limit of detection of the assay was 0.0005 pg, and the limit of quantification was 0.005 pg M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genomic DNA. Only M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was detected from a panel of 51 mycobacterial isolates, including 10 with IS900-like sequences. Of the 549 culture-negative fecal samples from unexposed herds and flocks, 99% were negative in the HT-J test, while 60% of the bovine- and 84% of the ovine-culture-positive samples were positive in the HT-J test. As similar total numbers of samples from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-exposed animals were positive in culture and HT-J tests in both species, and as the results of a McNemar's test were not significant, these methods probably have similar sensitivities, but the true diagnostic sensitivities of these tests are unknown. These validation data meet the consensus-based reporting standards for diagnostic test accuracy studies for paratuberculosis and

  16. Characterization of total deoxyribonucleic acid of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis (ATCC 19698) and of M. avium complex (ATCC 25291) using restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Labidi, A

    1988-01-01

    Total DNA was extracted from M. paratuberculosis (ATCC 19698) and from M. avium complex (ATCC 25291) cultivated on RVB-10 enriched liquid media. Restriction endonuclease analysis was conducted of Total DNA using 34 enzymes and DNA digestion profiles were compared. Fifteen enzymes revealed important differences between the two species. Two pairs of enzymes (EcoRII, BstNI) and (MboI, Sau3AI) provide evidence for the presence of dcmI and dam methylation in DNA of M. avium complex and M. paratuberculosis. The differences in DNA fragments of these two species could be of potential value in differentiating these clinically significant mycobacteria.

  17. High-Throughput Direct Fecal PCR Assay for Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Sheep and Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Waldron, Anna M.; Galea, Francesca; Whittington, Ann-Michele; Saunders, Vanessa F.; Begg, Douglas J.; de Silva, Kumudika; Purdie, Auriol C.; Whittington, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Johne's disease (JD) is a chronic enteric disease caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis that affects ruminants. Transmission occurs by the fecal-oral route. A commonly used antemortem diagnostic test for the detection of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in feces is liquid culture; however, a major constraint is the 2- to 3-month incubation period needed for this method. Rapid methods for the detection of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis based on PCR have been reported, but comprehensive validation data are lacking. We describe here a new test, the high-throughput-Johnes (HT-J), to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in feces. Its diagnostic accuracy was compared with that of liquid radiometric (Bactec) fecal culture using samples from cattle (1,330 samples from 23 herds) and sheep (596 samples from 16 flocks). The multistage protocol involves the recovery of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells from a fecal suspension, cell rupture by bead beating, extraction of DNA using magnetic beads, and IS900 quantitative PCR. The limit of detection of the assay was 0.0005 pg, and the limit of quantification was 0.005 pg M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genomic DNA. Only M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was detected from a panel of 51 mycobacterial isolates, including 10 with IS900-like sequences. Of the 549 culture-negative fecal samples from unexposed herds and flocks, 99% were negative in the HT-J test, while 60% of the bovine- and 84% of the ovine-culture-positive samples were positive in the HT-J test. As similar total numbers of samples from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-exposed animals were positive in culture and HT-J tests in both species, and as the results of a McNemar's test were not significant, these methods probably have similar sensitivities, but the true diagnostic sensitivities of these tests are unknown. These validation data meet the consensus-based reporting standards for diagnostic test accuracy studies for paratuberculosis and

  18. Persistence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis at a Farm-Scale Biogas Plant Supplied with Manure from Paratuberculosis-Affected Dairy Cattle▿

    PubMed Central

    Slana, I.; Pribylova, R.; Kralova, A.; Pavlik, I.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, products from all steps of anaerobic digestion at a farm-scale biogas plant supplied with manure from paratuberculosis-affected dairy cattle were examined and quantified for the presence of the causal agent of paratuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, using culture and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells were detected using culture in fermentors for up to 2 months; the presence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis DNA (101 cells/g) was demonstrated in all anaerobic fermentors and digestate 16 months after initiation of work at a biogas plant, using IS900 qPCR. F57 qPCR was able to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis DNA (102 cells/g) at up to 12 months. According to these results, a fermentation process that extended beyond 2 months removed all viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells and therefore rendered its product M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis free. However, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis DNA was found during all the examined periods (more than 1 year), which could be explained by either residual DNA being released from dead cells or by the presence of viable cells whose amount was under the limit of cultivability. As the latter hypothesis cannot be excluded, the safety of the final products of digestion used for fertilization or animal bedding cannot be defined, and further investigation is necessary to confirm or refute this risk. PMID:21398476

  19. Fluorescent acid-fast microscopy for measuring phagocytosis of Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, and Mycobacterium scrofulaceum by Tetrahymena pyriformis and their intracellular growth.

    PubMed

    Strahl, E D; Gillaspy, G E; Falkinham, J O

    2001-10-01

    Fluorescent acid-fast microscopy (FAM) was used to enumerate intracellular Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, and Mycobacterium scrofulaceum in the ciliated phagocytic protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis. There was a linear relationship between FAM and colony counts of M. avium cells both from cultures and within protozoa. The Ziehl-Neelsen acid-fast stain could not be used to enumerate intracellular mycobacteria because uninfected protozoa contained acid-fast, bacterium-like particles. Starved, 7-day-old cultures of T. pyriformis transferred into fresh medium readily phagocytized M. avium, M. intracellulare, and M. scrofulaceum. Phagocytosis was rapid and reached a maximum in 30 min. M. avium, M. intracellulare, and M. scrofulaceum grew within T. pyriformis, increasing by factors of 4- to 40-fold after 5 days at 30 degrees C. Intracellular M. avium numbers remained constant over a 25-day period of growth (by transfer) of T. pyriformis. Intracellular M. avium cells also survived protozoan encystment and germination. The growth and viability of T. pyriformis were not affected by mycobacterial infection. The results suggest that free-living phagocytic protozoa may be natural hosts and reservoirs for M. avium, M. intracellulare, and M. scrofulaceum.

  20. PRESENCE OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM SUBSP. PARATUBERCULOSIS IN ALPACAS (LAMA PACOS) INHABITING THE CHILEAN ALTIPLANO.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Miguel; Sevilla, Iker; Rios, Carolina; Crossley, Jorge; Tejeda, Carlos; Manning, Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiologic agent of paratuberculosis. The organism causes disease in both domestically managed and wild ruminant species. South American camelids have a long, shared history with indigenous people in the Andes. Over the last few decades, increasing numbers of alpacas were exported to numerous countries outside South America. No paratuberculosis surveillance has been reported for these source herds. In this study, individual fecal samples from 85 adult alpacas were collected from six separate herds in the Chilean Altiplano. A ParaTB mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) liquid culture of each individual fecal sample, followed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol was used for confirmation. DNA extracts from a subset of confirmed MAP isolates were subjected to mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) typing. Fifteen alpaca were fecal culture test-positive. Five false-positive culture samples were negative on PCR analysis for Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (MAA), Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis), and the 16 S rDNA gene. Three MAP isolates subset-tested belonged to the same MIRU-VNTR type, showing four repeats for TR292 (locus 1) in contrast to the three repeats typical of the MAP reference strain K10. The number of repeats found in the remaining loci was identical to that of the K10 strain. It is not known how nor when MAP was introduced into the alpaca population in the Chilean Altiplano. The most plausible hypothesis to explain the presence of MAP in these indigenous populations is transmission by contact with infected domestic small ruminant species that may on occasion share pastures or range with alpacas. Isolation of this mycobacterial pathogen from such a remote region suggests that MAP has found its way beyond the confines of intensively managed domestic agriculture premises.

  1. Analysis of latent tuberculosis and mycobacterium avium infection data using mixture models

    PubMed Central

    Villate, José I; Ibáñez, Berta; Cabriada, Valentín; Pijoán, José I; Taboada, Jorge; Urkaregi, Arantza

    2006-01-01

    Background Estimation of the frequency of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is difficult in areas with low tuberculosis infection rates and high exposure to non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), including BCG vaccination. The objective was to assess LTBI and M avium infection and to estimate their probability based on skin tests responses in an infant population from a region with the aforementioned characteristics. Methods A population-based tuberculin skin test (TST) and sensitin (M avium) survey was conducted on seven years old infants in Biscay, a province from The Basque Country (Spain). 2268 schoolchildren received sensitin and 5277 TST. Participation rate was 89%. Commonly used estimation methods were compared with a method based on the fit of mixture models using the Expectation Maximization algorithm. Functions estimating the probabilities of LTBI and M avium infection given the observed skin tests responses were developed for vaccinated and unvaccinated children. Results LTBI prevalences varied widely according to the estimation method. The mixture model provided prevalences higher than expected although intermediates between those obtained by currently recommended approaches. Exposure to previous BCG vaccine produces an upward shift of an average of about 3 mm on the induration size to attain the same probability of infection. Conclusion Our results confirm the commonplace exposure to NTM which effect should be taken into account when performing and assessing tuberculin surveys. The use of mixture analysis under the empirical Bayes framework allows to better estimate the probability of LTBI in settings with presence of other NTM and high BCG-vaccination coverage. An estimation of the average effect of BCG vaccination on TST induration is also provided. These models maximise information coming from classical tuberculin surveys and could be used together with the newly developed blood tests to improve survey's specificity and cost-effectiveness. PMID

  2. Identification of a lineage specific zinc responsive genomic island in Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Eckelt, Elke; Jarek, Michael; Frömke, Cornelia; Meens, Jochen; Goethe, Ralph

    2014-12-06

    Maintenance of metal homeostasis is crucial in bacterial pathogenicity as metal starvation is the most important mechanism in the nutritional immunity strategy of host cells. Thus, pathogenic bacteria have evolved sensitive metal scavenging systems to overcome this particular host defence mechanism. The ruminant pathogen Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) displays a unique gut tropism and causes a chronic progressive intestinal inflammation. MAP possesses eight conserved lineage specific large sequence polymorphisms (LSP), which distinguish MAP from its ancestral M. avium ssp. hominissuis or other M. avium subspecies. LSP14 and LSP15 harbour many genes proposed to be involved in metal homeostasis and have been suggested to substitute for a MAP specific, impaired mycobactin synthesis. In the present study, we found that a LSP14 located putative IrtAB-like iron transporter encoded by mptABC was induced by zinc but not by iron starvation. Heterologous reporter gene assays with the lacZ gene under control of the mptABC promoter in M. smegmatis (MSMEG) and in a MSMEG∆furB deletion mutant revealed a zinc dependent, metalloregulator FurB mediated expression of mptABC via a conserved mycobacterial FurB recognition site. Deep sequencing of RNA from MAP cultures treated with the zinc chelator TPEN revealed that 70 genes responded to zinc limitation. Remarkably, 45 of these genes were located on a large genomic island of approximately 90 kb which harboured LSP14 and LSP15. Thirty-five of these genes were predicted to be controlled by FurB, due to the presence of putative binding sites. This clustering of zinc responsive genes was exclusively found in MAP and not in other mycobacteria. Our data revealed a particular genomic signature for MAP given by a unique zinc specific locus, thereby suggesting an exceptional relevance of zinc for the metabolism of MAP. MAP seems to be well adapted to maintain zinc homeostasis which might contribute to the peculiarity of MAP

  3. What Role Does Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Play in Crohn's Disease?

    PubMed

    Bach, Horacio

    2015-02-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic, debilitating inflammatory bowel disease with no etiological agent yet identified. Studies have demonstrated that the bacterium Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is present in a high percentage of CD patients. Although MAP has been isolated from human specimens, current techniques fail to show the presence of MAP in 100 % of tissues or biopsies obtained from CD patient lesions, and thus MAP cannot meet Koch's postulate as the etiological agent of CD. In this report, the effect of genetic and immune factors as well as the presence of MAP as a potential environmental factor is analyzed.

  4. Systemic infection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis and fungus in a pet dog.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung-Chul; Kim, JaeMyung; Kang, WoonKi; Jang, Yunho; Kim, Yongbaek

    2016-01-01

    A 3-year-old neutered female poodle with a long history of dermatophytic skin disease was presented with lethargy, anorexia and progressive weight loss. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed markedly enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes and multiple hypoechoic foci in the spleen. Cytology of the mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen showed granulomatous inflammation with fungal organisms and negatively stained intracytoplasmic bacterial rods consistent with Mycobacteria spp. Based on culture, multiplex polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis, the bacterium was identified as Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis. Despite treatment with antibiotics, the dog's condition deteriorated, and it died approximately 3 weeks after first presentation.

  5. Systemic infection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis and fungus in a pet dog

    PubMed Central

    KIM, Myung-Chul; KIM, JaeMyung; KANG, WoonKi; JANG, Yunho; KIM, Yongbaek

    2015-01-01

    A 3-year-old neutered female poodle with a long history of dermatophytic skin disease was presented with lethargy, anorexia and progressive weight loss. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed markedly enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes and multiple hypoechoic foci in the spleen. Cytology of the mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen showed granulomatous inflammation with fungal organisms and negatively stained intracytoplasmic bacterial rods consistent with Mycobacteria spp. Based on culture, multiplex polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis, the bacterium was identified as Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis. Despite treatment with antibiotics, the dog’s condition deteriorated, and it died approximately 3 weeks after first presentation. PMID:26412202

  6. Abdominal CT findings of disseminated Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare in AIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Nyberg, D.A.; Federle, M.P.; Jeffrey, R.B.; Bottles, K.; Wofsy, C.B.

    1985-08-01

    Disseminated infection from Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI) has recently been recognized as a common and serious complication of the acquired immuno-deficiency syndrome (AIDS). The authors report the computed tomographic (CT) findings of 17 patients with AIDS and disseminated MAI referred for abdominal CT examination. Multiple large retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymph nodes were demonstrated in 14 patients (82%). The authors concluded that large, bulky, intraabdominal adenopathy in AIDS patients should suggest the diagnosis of MAI infection as well as other known causes of adenopathy, including lymphoma and metastatic Kaposi sarcoma. The authors recommend percutaneous aspiration of enlarged intraabdominal lymph nodes to establish the correct diagnosis.

  7. Cell-free system responsible for internal radiolabeling of glycopeptidolipids of the Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Ramasesh, N; Wright, E L; Barrow, W W

    1992-01-01

    Internal radiolabeling of serotype-specific glycopeptidolipids with [14C]mannose was accomplished with a cell-free system derived from serotype 20 of the Mycobacterium avium complex. Similar radiolabeling was not apparent with a cell-free system derived from the rough colony variant, previously shown to be devoid of glycopeptidolipids. Although a comparative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protein analysis of the parent and rough variant strains revealed a close similarity, there were some proteins unique to the parent strain. Images PMID:1729193

  8. Molecular identification of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in oral biopsies of Crohn's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Molicotti, Paola; Scanu, Antonio M; Lumbau, Aurea; Cannas, Sara; Bua, Alessandra; Lugliè, Pietrina; Zanetti, Stefania

    2013-07-10

    Oral lesions may be found in patients with Crohn's disease (CD), in a percentage up to 20%. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible relationship between Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) and oral lesions in CD patients. 23 oral biopsies were examined performing IS900 Nested PCR; 9 of them were positive: 8 from CD patients and 1 from a control. Our purpose is to go on with this study, amplifying the number of subjects examined and testing subjects with oral lesions related to diseases other than CD to verify the specific association between MAP and oral lesions in CD patients.

  9. Molecular identification of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in oral biopsies of Crohn’s disease patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Oral lesions may be found in patients with Crohn’s disease (CD), in a percentage up to 20%. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible relationship between Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) and oral lesions in CD patients. 23 oral biopsies were examined performing IS900 Nested PCR; 9 of them were positive: 8 from CD patients and 1 from a control. Our purpose is to go on with this study, amplifying the number of subjects examined and testing subjects with oral lesions related to diseases other than CD to verify the specific association between MAP and oral lesions in CD patients. PMID:23842143

  10. Facts, myths and hypotheses on the zoonotic nature of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Atreya, Raja; Bülte, Michael; Gerlach, Gerald-F; Goethe, Ralph; Hornef, Mathias W; Köhler, Heike; Meens, Jochen; Möbius, Petra; Roeb, Elke; Weiss, Siegfried

    2014-10-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of paratuberculosis (Johne's disease [JD]), a chronic granulomatous enteritis in ruminants. JD is one of the most widespread bacterial diseases of domestic animals with significant economic impact. The histopathological picture of JD resembles that of Crohn's disease (CD), a human chronic inflammatory bowel disease of still unresolved aetiology. An aetiological relevance of MAP for CD has been proposed. This and the ambiguity of other published epidemiological findings raise the question whether MAP represents a zoonotic agent. In this review, we will discuss evidence that MAP has zoonotic capacity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Cutaneous gallium uptake in patients with AIDS with mycobacterium avium-intracellulare septicemia

    SciTech Connect

    Allwright, S.J.; Chapman, P.R.; Antico, V.F.; Gruenewald, S.M.

    1988-07-01

    Gallium imaging is increasingly being used for the early detection of complications in patients with AIDS. A 26-year-old homosexual man who was HIV antibody positive underwent gallium imaging for investigation of possible Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Widespread cutaneous focal uptake was seen, which was subsequently shown to be due to mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI) septicemia. This case demonstrates the importance of whole body imaging rather than imaging target areas only, the utility of gallium imaging in aiding the early detection of clinically unsuspected disease, and shows a new pattern of gallium uptake in disseminated MAI infection.

  12. The pncA gene from naturally pyrazinamide-resistant Mycobacterium avium encodes pyrazinamidase and confers pyrazinamide susceptibility to resistant M. tuberculosis complex organisms.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z; Scorpio, A; Zhang, Y

    1997-10-01

    The antituberculosis drug pyrazinamide (PZA) needs to be converted into pyrazinoic acid (POA) by the bacterial pyrazinamidase (PZase) in order to show bactericidal activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. M. avium is naturally resistant to PZA. To investigate whether this natural resistance to PZA is due to inability of the M. avium PZase to convert PZA to bactericidal POA, the M. avium PZase gene (pncA) was cloned by using the M. tuberculosis pncA gene as a probe. Sequence analysis showed that the M. avium pncA gene is 561 bp long, encoding a protein with a predicted size of about 19.8 kDa; but Western blotting showed that the M. avium PZase migrated as a 24 kDa band when expressed in M. bovis BCG and Escherichia coli. Sequence comparison revealed that M. avium PZase has 67.7% and 32.8% amino acid identity with the corresponding enzymes from M. tuberculosis and E. coli, respectively. Southern blot analysis with the M. avium pncA gene as a probe showed that M. terrae, M. gastri, M. marinum, M. fortuitum, M. xenopi, M. gordonae, M. szulgai, M. celatum and M. kansasii have close pncA homologues, whereas M. chelonae and M. smegmatis did not give significant hybridization signals. Transformation with the M. avium pncA gene conferred PZA susceptibility to PZA-resistant M. tuberculosis complex organisms, indicating that the nonsusceptibility of M. avium to PZA is not due to an ineffective PZase enzyme, but appears to be related to other factors such as transport of POA.

  13. Culture- and quantitative IS900 real-time PCR-based analysis of the persistence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in a controlled dairy cow farm environment.

    PubMed

    Moravkova, M; Babak, V; Kralova, A; Pavlik, I; Slana, I

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor the persistence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in environmental samples taken from a Holstein farm with a long history of clinical paratuberculosis. A herd of 606 head was eradicated, and mechanical cleaning and disinfection with chloramine B with ammonium (4%) was carried out on the farm; in the surrounding areas (on the field and field midden) lime was applied. Environmental samples were collected before and over a period of 24 months after destocking. Only one sample out of 48 (2%) examined on the farm (originating from a waste pit and collected before destocking) was positive for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis by cultivation on solid medium (Herrold's egg yolk medium). The results using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) showed that a total of 81% of environmental samples with an average mean M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cell number of 3.09 × 10(3) were positive for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis before destocking compared to 43% with an average mean M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cell number of 5.86 × 10(2) after 24 months. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-positive samples were detected in the cattle barn as well as in the calf barn and surrounding areas. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was detected from different matrices: floor and instrument scrapings, sediment, or scraping from watering troughs, waste pits, and cobwebs. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis DNA was also detected in soil and plants collected on the field midden and the field 24 months after destocking. Although the proportion of positive samples decreased from 64% to 23% over time, the numbers of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells were comparable.

  14. Construction of chimeric phagosomes that shelter Mycobacterium avium and Coxiella burnetii (phase II) in doubly infected mouse macrophages: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    de Chastellier, C; Thibon, M; Rabinovitch, M

    1999-08-01

    Dual infection of cells may divert pathogens to intracellular compartments different from those occupied in mono-infected cells. In the present studies, mouse bone marrow in vitro-derived macrophages were first infected with virulent Mycobacterium avium, which are normally singly lodged within tight phagosomes. These phagosomes do not mature; they undergo homotypic fusion with early endosomes and do not fuse with lysosomes. Seven days later, the cultures were superinfected with phase II (non-virulent) Coxiella burnetii, organisms sheltered in lysosome- (or prelysosome)-like, multi-occupancy phagosomes. The latter can attain large size and engage in efficient homo- and heterotypic fusion with other phagosomes. Cultures were fixed for transmission electron microscopy 6, 12, 24, and 48 h later. Other M. avium-infected cultures were superinfected with amastigotes of the trypanosomatid flagellate Leishmania amazonensis, which are also sheltered in lysosome- (or prelysosome)-like multi-occupancy vacuoles, and fixed at the same time periods. Chimeric phagosomes containing both M. avium and C. burnetii, were found already at 6 h and the proportion of M. avium that colocalized with C. burnetii in the same phagosomes reached over 90% after 48 h. In such phagosomes, both organisms were ultrastructurally well preserved. In contrast, colocalization of M. avium and L. amazonensis was rarely found. Speculative scenarios that could underlie the formation of chimeric phagosomes could involve delayed maturation of C. burnetii-containing phagosomes in presence of M. avium, which would allow for fusion of C. burnetii- and M. avium-containing phagosomes; the production, by C. burnetii, of molecules that upregulate the fusion of M. avium-containing phagosomes with those that contain C. burnetii; and the secretion of factors that could favour the survival of M. avium within chimeric vacuoles.

  15. [A case of environmental infection with pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex disease from a residential bathroom of a patient suggested by variable-number tandem-repeat typing of Mycobacterium avium tandem repeat loci].

    PubMed

    Taga, Shu; Niimi, Masaki; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Nakagawa, Taku; Ogawa, Kenji

    2012-05-01

    A 63-year-old woman was referred to our hospital because of bilateral infiltrations and nodular opacities in her chest radiograph taken in the mass radiography screening in September 2010. The chest computed tomography showed patchy infiltrations with bronchiectasis in the lower lung fields on both sides. She was diagnosed with pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease based on the bacteria recovered from the sputum and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. To elucidate an environmental MAC source, we investigated her home, and isolated M. avium and M. gordonae from the bathtub and shower tap, respectively, in her residential bathroom. Analysis of the hsp65-PRA variants digested with BamHI and some insertion sequences showed that the clinical strains recovered from sputum and strains from the bathtub were M. avium subsp. hominissuis. A dendrogram of the Mycobacterium avium tandem repeat loci variable-number tandem-repeat (MATR-VNTR) analysis of the MAC strains showed that the bathtub strains formed a polyclonal colonization, and that 1 of the 5 MATR-VNTR patterns was identical to the corresponding pattern of the sputum strain from the patient. In conclusion, we believe that the residential bathroom of the patient was the environmental source of her pulmonary MAC disease, as has been previously reported.

  16. Antigenicity of recombinant maltose binding protein-Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis fusion proteins with and without factor Xa cleaving

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne’s disease (JD) in ruminants. Proteomic studies have shown that MAP expresses certain proteins when exposed to in vitro physiological stress conditions similar to the conditions experienced within a host during natural infection. Such prot...

  17. Evaluation of eight live attenuated vaccine candidates for protection against challenge with virulent Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Johne’s disease is caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), which results in serious economic losses worldwide in farmed livestock such as cattle, sheep and goats. To control this disease, an effective vaccine with minimal adverse effects is needed. In order to identify a live va...

  18. NlpC/P60 domain-containing proteins of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis that differentially bind and hydrolyze peptidoglycan

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    While intense research is being conducted to develop faster and more reliable methods for diagnosis of Johne’s disease, there are still significant knowledge gaps concerning the molecular function of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis proteins. Therefore, we describe atomic resolution ...

  19. How does a Mycobacterium change its spots? Applying molecular tools to track diverse strains of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Defining genetic diversity in the wake of the release of several Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) genome sequences has become a major emphasis in the molecular biology and epidemiology of Johne’s disease research. These data can now be used to define the extent of strain diversity ...

  20. Identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Biopsy Specimens from Patients with Crohn's Disease Identified by In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Sechi, Leonardo A.; Manuela, Mura; Francesco, Tanda; Amelia, Lissia; Antonello, Solinas; Giovanni, Fadda; Stefania, Zanetti

    2001-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract of unknown etiology. We report on the presence of cell wall-deficient Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in 35 of 48 paraffin-embedded tissue specimens from 33 patients with Crohn's disease by in situ hybridization with IS900 as a probe. PMID:11724871

  1. CD4 T Cells From Intestinal Biopsies of Crohn's Disease Patients React to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The role of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) in Crohn’s disease (CD) remains controversial. One issue that has been raised is the lack of data showing a cellular immune response to MAP. Earlier studies have mostly focused on responses in peripheral blood which have several limit...

  2. Longitudinal data collection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies Paratuberculosis infections in dairy herds. Collection and use of observational data

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Longitudinal infection data on Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) was collected on three dairy farms in Northeastern United States during approximately 10 years. Precise data on animal characteristics and animal location within farm were collected on these farms. Cows were followe...

  3. Analysis of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis mutant libraries reveals loci-dependent transposition biases and strategies to novel mutant discovery

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the etiologic agent of Johne’s disease, is one of the most important bacterial pathogens in ruminants. The lack of efficacious control measures demands a thorough understanding of MAP pathogenesis to develop new vaccines and diagnostic tests. The ge...

  4. Analysis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis mutant libraries reveals loci-dependent transcription biases and strategies to novel mutant discovery

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiologic agent of Johne’s disease in ruminants and it has been implicated as a cause of Crohn’s disease in humans. The generation of comprehensive random mutant banks by transposon mutagenesis is a fundamental wide genomic technology utilized...

  5. Early Immune Markers Associated with Experimental Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) Infection in a Neonatal Calf Model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to observe early markers of cell-mediated immunity in naïve calves infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) and how expression of these markers evolved over the 12-month period of infection. Methods of experimental infection included: Control (n...

  6. Culture and molecular method for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk and dairy products.

    PubMed

    Messelhäusser, U; Kämpf, P; Hörmansdorfer, S; Wagner, B; Schalch, B; Busch, U; Höller, C; Wallner, P; Barth, G; Rampp, A

    2012-01-01

    A combined molecular and cultural method for the detection of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis was developed and tested with artificially contaminated milk and dairy products. Results indicate that the method can be used for a reliable detection as a basis for first risk assessments.

  7. Clinical Evaluation of COBAS TaqMan PCR for the Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ikegame, Satoshi; Sakoda, Yoritake; Fujino, Nao; Taguchi, Kazuhito; Kawasaki, Masayuki; Kajiki, Akira

    2012-01-01

    A retrospective observational study was performed to determine the sensitivity and limitation of PCR test for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium complex. We obtained clinical specimens collected from the respiratory tract, cultured M. tuberculosis or M. avium complex, and performed PCR analysis. A total of 299 samples (M. tuberculosis, 177; M. avium, 35; M. intracellulare, 87) were analyzed by COBAS TaqMan PCR from April 2007 to March 2011. The PCR positivity rates were 50–55%, 70–100%, 88–98%, and 100% in smear-negative, smear 1+, 2+, and 3+ groups, respectively. The PCR positivity of tuberculosis in smear 1+ was 80.6%, which was statistically significantly (P < 0.001) lower than that of smear 2+ (97.3%). From January 2005 to March 2007, we collected an additional 138 samples (M. tuberculosis, 74; M. avium, 21; M. intracellulare, 43), which were analyzed by COBAS Amplicor PCR. The PCR positivity rates obtained using COBAS TaqMan PCR and COBAS Amplicor PCR were not significantly different. The sensitivity of PCR test for mycobacteria is not sufficient in case of smear 1+. Careful consideration must be given to the interpretation of negative PCR test results in smear 1+, because smear-positive tuberculosis is the criterion for isolation. PMID:23029612

  8. Comparative analysis of the genomes of clinical isolates of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis regarding virulence-related genes.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, Brendan; Rose, Sasha J; Gilbert, Kerrigan; Lewis, Matthew; Bermudez, Luiz E

    2017-07-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis is a member of the M. avium complex, a heterogeneous group of bacteria that cause lung infection in immunocompetent patients or disseminated infection in patients with immunosuppression. The bacteria belonging to this complex have variable virulence, depending on the strain considered, and therefore a representative of the most common clinical phenotype was analysed. The genomic sequences of four M. avium subsp. hominissuis isolates obtained from clinical specimens were completed. Mav101, Mav100 and MavA5 were isolated from the blood of patients with AIDS. MavA5 was disseminated from the lung, while Mav3388 was isolated from the lungs of a patient with chronic lung disease. The sequences were annotated using the published Mav104 genome as a blueprint. Functional and virulence analyses of the sequences were carried out. Mice studies comparing the virulence of the strains were performed. Findings showed that while Mav101 was very similar to Mav104, there were numerous differences between Mav104 and the remaining strains at nucleotide and predicted protein levels. The presence of genes associated with biofilm formation and several known virulence-related genes were sometimes differentially present among the isolates, suggesting overlapping functions by different genetic determinants. The sequences provided important information about M. avium heterogenicity and evolution as a pathogen. The limitation is the lack of understanding on possible overlapping functions of genes/proteins.

  9. COMPARISON OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM ISOLATES FROM A DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM AND FROM THE POPULATION SERVED BY THE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Current evidence suggests that drinking water, soil, and produce are potential sources of Mycobacterium avium infections, a pathogen not known to be transmitted person-to-person.

    Methods: We sampled water during 2000-2002 from a large municipal drinking water ...

  10. A Novel Cell Wall Lipopeptide Is Important for Biofilm Formation and Pathogenicity of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biofilm formation by pathogenic bacteria plays a key role in their pathogenesis. Previously, the pstA gene was shown to be involved in the virulence of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. ap), the causative agent of Johne's disease in cattle and a potential risk factor for Crohn's d...

  11. Optimization of methods for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk and colostrum of naturally infected dairy cows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is primarily shed into the feces but it has also been isolated from the milk and colostrum of cows. Because of this, there exists concern about transfer of the organism from dam to calf and about the prevalence of MAP in the milk supply. The prevalen...

  12. Optimization of methods for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk and colostrum of naturally infected dairy cows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two decontamination chemicals, hexadecylpyridinium choride (HPC) and N-acetyl-L-cysteine-sodium hydroxide (NALC-NaOH), were compared for their efficacy of reducing the growth of non-specific microorganisms in milk while minimally affecting the recovery of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis ...

  13. Shedding of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis into milk and colostrum of naturally infected dairy cows over complete lactation cycles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The primary mode of transmission of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is fecal-oral. However, MAP is also shed into the milk and colostrum of infected cows. The objective of this study was to identify if an association exists between stage of MAP infection and days in lactation with ...

  14. Isolation of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis Reactive T-cells from Intestinal Biopsies of Crohn's Disease Patients

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic granulomatous inflammation of the intestine. The etiology is still unknown. One hypothesis is that CD is caused by infection with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) in genetically predisposed individuals. MAP causes a similar disease in ruminants,...

  15. Mediation of host immune responses after immunization of neonatal calves with a heat-killed Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis vaccine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A major drawback of current whole-cell vaccines for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis(MAP) is the interference with diagnostic tests for bovine tuberculosis and paratuberculosis. The current study was designed to explore effects of immunization with a heat-killed whole cell vaccine (Mycop...

  16. Divergent cellular responses during asymptomatic subclinical and clinical states of disease in cows naturally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infection of the host with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) results in a chronic and progressive enteritis that traverses both subclinical and clinical stages. The mechanism(s) for the shift from asymptomatic subclinical disease state to advanced clinical disease are not fully under...

  17. The effects of progressing and nonprogressing Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis infection on milk production in dairy cows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Longitudinal data from three commercial dairy herds in the northeast United States, collected from 2004 to 2011, were analyzed to determine the effect of Johne’s disease status and path on milk production. Disease status, as indicated by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis test results, was ...

  18. Differences in intermittent and continuous fecal shedding patterns between natural and experimental Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infections in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this paper is to study shedding patterns of cows infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). While multiple single farm studies of MAP dynamics were reported, there is not large-scale meta-analysis of both natural and experimental infections. Large difference...

  19. Gamma-delta T cell responses in subclinical and clinical stages of Bovine Mycobacterium Avium Paratuberculosis infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The early immune response to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in cattle is characterized by a Th1-like immune response effective in controlling bacterial proliferation during the subclinical stage of infection. In young calves nearly 60% of circulating lymphocytes are gamma delta T ...

  20. MOLECULAR COMPARISON OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM ISOLATED FROM A FRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM AND FROM THE POPULATION SERVED BY THE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is evidence that drinking water, soil, and produce may be sources of Mycobacterium avium infections, a pathogen not known to be transmitted person-to-person. We sampled water from a large municipal drinking water distribution system in which surface source water is used. M...

  1. Isolated Endobronchial Mycobacterium avium Disease Associated with Lobar Atelectasis in an Immunocompetent Young Adult: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye In; Kim, Ji Won; Kim, Jun Young; Kim, Young Nam; Kim, Jin Hae; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Chung, Myung Jin; Koh, Won-Jung

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of lung diseases caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is increasing worldwide. Unlike pulmonary tuberculosis, endobronchial NTM diseases are very rare with the majority of cases reported in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome. We reported a rare case of endobronchial Mycobacterium avium disease associated with lobar atelectasis in a young immunocompetent patient and reviewed the relevant iterature.

  2. A 38-Kilobase Pathogenicity Island Specific for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Encodes Cell Surface Proteins Expressed in the Host

    PubMed Central

    Stratmann, Janin; Strommenger, Birgit; Goethe, Ralph; Dohmann, Karen; Gerlach, Gerald-F.; Stevenson, Karen; Li, Ling-ling; Zhang, Qing; Kapur, Vivek; Bull, Tim J.

    2004-01-01

    We have used representational difference analysis to identify a novel Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific ABC transporter operon (mpt), which comprises six open reading frames designated mptA to -F and is immediately preceded by two putative Fur boxes. Functional genomics revealed that the mpt operon is flanked on one end by a fep cluster encoding proteins involved in the uptake of Fe3+ and on the other end by a sid cluster encoding non-ribosome-dependent heterocyclic siderophore synthases. Together these genes form a 38-kb M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific locus flanked by an insertion sequence similar to IS1110. Expression studies using Western blot analyses showed that MptC is present in the envelope fraction of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The MptD protein was shown to be surface exposed, using a specific phage (fMptD) isolated from a phage-peptide library, by differential screening of Mycobacterium smegmatis transformants. The phage fMptD-derived peptide could be used in a peptide-mediated capture PCR with milk from infected dairy herds, thereby showing surface-exposed expression of the MptD protein in the host. Together, these data suggest that the 38-kb locus constitutes an M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis pathogenicity island. PMID:14977927

  3. COMPARISON OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM ISOLATES FROM A DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM AND FROM THE POPULATION SERVED BY THE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Current evidence suggests that drinking water, soil, and produce are potential sources of Mycobacterium avium infections, a pathogen not known to be transmitted person-to-person.

    Methods: We sampled water during 2000-2002 from a large municipal drinking water ...

  4. Characterization of the inflammatory phenotype of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis using a novel cell culture passage model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Understanding the pathogenic mechanisms and host responses to Johne’s disease, a chronic enteritis of ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), is complicated by the multifaceted disease progression, late-onset host reaction, and the lack of ex vivo infection models ...

  5. Persistence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in soil, crops, and ensiled feed following manure spreading on infected dairy farms

    PubMed Central

    Fecteau, Marie-Eve; Hovingh, Ernest; Whitlock, Robert H.; Sweeney, Raymond W.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the persistence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in soil, crops, and ensiled feeds following manure spreading. This bacterium was often found in soil samples, but less frequently in harvested feeds and silage. Spreading of manure on fields used for crop harvest is preferred to spreading on grazing pastures. PMID:24179246

  6. ZAP-70, CTLA-4 and proximal T cell receptor signaling in cows infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Paratuberculosis is a chronic intestinal disease of ruminant animals caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). A hallmark of paratuberculosis is a transition from a cell-mediated Th1 type response to a humoral Th2 response with the progression of disease from a subclinical to clin...

  7. ZAP-70, CTLA-4, and proximal T cell receptor signaling in cows infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Paratuberculosis is a chronic intestinal disease of ruminant animals caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). A hallmark of paratuberculosis is a transition from a cell-mediated Th1 type response to a humoral Th2 response with the progression of disease from a subclinical to clin...

  8. Comparison of fecal DNA extraction kits for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis by polymerase chain reaction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Culture of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) from feces has been considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of paratuberculosis for many years. However, direct fecal PCR is becoming more widely used today, demonstrating similar sensitivity and specificity to culture. To ensure ef...

  9. Immunization with a DNA Vaccine Cocktail Induces a Th1 Response and Protects Mice Against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several novel antigens of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis have been studied as vaccine components and their immunogenicity has been evaluated. Previously, we reported that 85 antigen complex (85A, 85B, and 85C), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and 35kDa protein could induce significant lymph...

  10. Prevention of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) Infection in Balb/c Mice by Feeding Probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus NP-51

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to examine effects of feeding Lactobacillus acidophilus strain NP51 to mice challenged with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne’s disease. We hypothesized that feeding NP51 would increase Th-1 responses and decrease prog...

  11. Prevention of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) Infection in BALB/c Mice by Feeding Probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus NP-51

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to examine effects of feeding Lactobacillus acidophilus strain NP51 to mice challenged with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). Mice were randomized to ten treatment groups; sentinels, control, heat-killed MAP, viable MAP, heat-killed NP51, viable ...

  12. Prevention of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in Balb/c mice by feeding probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus NP-51

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to examine effects of feeding Lactobacillus acidophilus strain NP51 to mice challenged with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne’s disease. We hypothesized that feeding NP51 would increase Th-1 responses and decrease prog...

  13. Prevention of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection in BALB/c Mice by Feeding Lactobacillus acidophilus Strain NP-51

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The immune responses of 390 BALB/c mice fed the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus strain NP51® and infected with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) were evaluated in a 6-month trial. Mice were randomized to nine treatment groups fed either viable- or heat-killed NP51 and inocula...

  14. Prevention of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in BALB/c mice by feeding probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus NP-51

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to examine effects of feeding Lactobacillus acidophilus strain NP51 to mice challenged with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). Mice were randomized to ten treatment groups; sentinels, control, heat-killed MAP, viable MAP, heat-killed NP51, viable ...

  15. Rapid assessment of the viability of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells after heat treatment, using an optimized phage amplification assay.

    PubMed

    Foddai, Antonio; Elliott, Christopher T; Grant, Irene R

    2010-03-01

    Thermal inactivation experiments were carried out to assess the utility of a recently optimized phage amplification assay to accurately enumerate viable Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells in milk. Ultra-heat-treated (UHT) whole milk was spiked with large numbers of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis organisms (10(6) to 10(7) CFU/ml) and dispensed in 100-microl aliquots in thin-walled 200-microl PCR tubes. A Primus 96 advanced thermal cycler (Peqlab, Erlangen, Germany) was used to achieve the following time and temperature treatments: (i) 63 degrees C for 3, 6, and 9 min; (ii) 68 degrees C for 20, 40, and 60 s; and (iii) 72 degrees C for 5, 10, 15, and 25 s. After thermal stress, the number of surviving M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells was assessed by both phage amplification assay and culture on Herrold's egg yolk medium (HEYM). A high correlation between PFU/ml and CFU/ml counts was observed for both unheated (r(2) = 0.943) and heated (r(2) = 0.971) M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells. D and z values obtained using the two types of counts were not significantly different (P > 0.05). The D(68 degrees C), mean D(63 degrees C), and D(72 degrees C) for four M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains were 81.8, 9.8, and 4.2 s, respectively, yielding a mean z value of 6.9 degrees C. Complete inactivation of 10(6) to 10(7) CFU of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis/ml milk was not observed for any of the time-temperature combinations studied; 5.2- to 6.6-log(10) reductions in numbers were achieved depending on the temperature and time. Nonlinear thermal inactivation kinetics were consistently observed for this bacterium. This study confirms that the optimized phage assay can be employed in place of conventional culture on HEYM to speed up the acquisition of results (48 h instead of a minimum of 6 weeks) for inactivation experiments involving M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-spiked samples.

  16. Coexistent Pseudogout and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare Septic Arthritis in a Patient with HIV and ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Wali, Omer M.; Cervellione, Kelly L.; Singh, Bhupinder B.; Bagheri, Farshad

    2016-01-01

    Pseudogout is a crystal-induced arthropathy characterized by the deposition of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals in synovial fluid, menisci, or articular cartilage. Although not very common, this entity can be seen in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Septic arthritis due to Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI) is a rare entity that can affect immunocompromised patients such as those with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or those who are on immunosuppressive drugs. Here, we describe a 51-year-old female who presented with fever, right knee pain, swelling, warmth, and decreased range of motion for several days. The initial assessment was consistent with pseudogout, with negative bacterial and fungal cultures. However, due to high white blood cell (WBC) count in the synovial fluid analysis, she was empirically started on intravenous (IV) vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam and discharged on IV vancomycin and cefepime, while acid-fast bacilli (AFB) culture was still in process. Seventeen days later, AFB culture grew Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI), and she was readmitted for relevant management. This case illustrates that septic arthritis due to MAI should be considered in the differential diagnosis of septic arthritis in immunocompromised patients. PMID:27803833

  17. Therapeutic efficacy of liposomal rifabutin in a Mycobacterium avium model of infection.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, M M; Neves, S; Portaels, F; Pedrosa, J; Silva, M T; Cruz, M E

    2000-09-01

    Liposomal formulations of rifabutin were developed, and the effects of some parameters on the incorporation efficiency were studied. The antimycobacterial activity of rifabutin incorporated into liposomes prepared with phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine (molar ratio, 7:3) was evaluated in a murine model of infection with a virulent Mycobacterium avium strain (strain P1581) and was compared with that of free rifabutin. The influences of the size of the liposomal rifabutin formulation, the administered doses, and the treatment schedules on the evolution of infection were studied. Two types of treatment schedules were assayed: therapeutic and prophylactic. The therapeutic treatment started 2 weeks after infection, while the prophylactic treatment began 1 day before the experimental infection with mycobacteria. Incorporation of rifabutin in liposomes resulted in a significant enhancement of activity against M. avium infection compared to that of rifabutin in the free form in both schedules. These results demonstrate that liposomal formulations of antibiotics such as rifabutin may be effective for the treatment or prophylaxis of infectious diseases.

  18. Environmental Survival of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Different Climatic Zones of Eastern Australia

    PubMed Central

    Begg, Douglas J.; Dhand, Navneet K.; Watt, Bruce; Whittington, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    The duration of survival of both the S and C strains of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in feces was quantified in contrasting climatic zones of New South Wales, Australia, and detailed environmental temperature data were collected. Known concentrations of S and C strains in feces placed on soil in polystyrene boxes were exposed to the environment with or without the provision of shade (70%) at Bathurst, Armidale, Condobolin, and Broken Hill, and subsamples taken every 2 weeks were cultured for the presence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The duration of survival ranged from a minimum of 1 week to a maximum of 16 weeks, and the provision of 70% shade was the most important factor in extending the survival time. The hazard of death for exposed compared to shaded samples was 20 and 9 times higher for the S and C strains, respectively. Site did not affect the survival of the C strain, but for the S strain, the hazard of death was 2.3 times higher at the two arid zone sites (Broken Hill and Condobolin) than at the two temperate zone sites (Bathurst and Armidale). Temperature measurements revealed maximum temperatures exceeding 60°C and large daily temperature ranges at the soil surface, particularly in exposed boxes. PMID:24463974

  19. Antibody recognition to secreted proteins of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in sera from infected ruminants.

    PubMed

    Pradenas, M; Jara, M C; Hernández, N; Zambrano, A; Collins, M T; Kruze, J

    2009-09-18

    Two liquid culture media to obtain secreted proteins of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis at different incubation periods were evaluated. Middlebrook 7H9-OADC (7H9) and Watson-Reid (WR) broths were inoculated with a field strain of M. paratuberculosis and growth curves determined using nonlinear regression analysis. Most culture filtrate (CF) proteins were of low molecular weight and reacted strongly against sera from cultured-positive cases of paratuberculosis. CF proteins obtained in WR yielded a higher number of bands and were detected earlier than those obtained from 7H9. A high degree of variability in CF protein immunoreactivity was seen among infected animals. Sera from cattle with clinical paratuberculosis or heavy fecal shedders of M. paratuberculosis reacted more intensively and to more CF proteins than did sera from other infected cattle. Immunoblots showed differences in antibody binding to CF proteins when sera were absorbed with M. avium but not with others environmental mycobacteria. Immunoblots with sera from infected goats and a sheep showed reactivity with proteins of 32, 33 and 46kDa both before and after the sera were absorbed with M. phlei. Antibodies found in serum of infected deer reacted with CF proteins in a similar way as did for cattle. These results suggest that a pool of CF proteins of M. paratuberculosis could be good candidates as antigens for serodiagnosis of paratuberculosis.

  20. A photoelectrocatalytic process that disinfects water contaminated with Mycobacterium kansasii and Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed

    Brugnera, Michelle Fernanda; Miyata, Marcelo; Zocolo, Guilherme Julião; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura; Zanoni, Maria Valnice Boldrin

    2013-11-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria are resistant to conventional water treatment; indeed, they have been recovered from a wide variety of environmental sources. Here, we applied the photoelectrocatalytic technique using a Ti/TiO2-Ag photoanode to inactivate mycobacteria. For a mycobacteria population of 5 × 10(8) CFU mL(-1), we achieved 99.9 and 99.8% inactivation of Mycobacterium kansasii and Mycobacterium avium with rate constant of 6.2 × 10(-3) and 4.2 × 10(-3) min(-1), respectively, after 240 min. We compared the proposed method with the photolytic and photocatalytic methods. Using a mycobacteria population of 7.5 × 10(4) CFU mL(-1), the proposed Ti/TiO2-Ag photoanode elicited total mycobacteria inactivation within 3 min of treatment; the presence of Ag nanoparticles in the electrode provided 1.5 larger degradation rate constant as compared with the Ti/TiO2 anode (1.75 × 10(-2) for M. kansassi and 1.98 × 10(-2) for M. avium). We monitored the degradation of the metabolites released during cellular lysis by TOC removal, sugar release, chromatography, and mass spectrometry measurements; photoelectrocatalysis and Ti/TiO2-Ag photoanodes furnished the best results.

  1. Investigation of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) in Australian commercial milk using qPCR.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Shraddha; Caro Tohme, Tanya; Whiley, Harriet

    2017-02-01

    This technical research communication describes the first study to use quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to investigate the presence of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) in Australian pasteurised milk. MAC is the most common NTM responsible for human illnesses and includes M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). MAC is a causative agent of lymphadenitis in children, with contaminated food and water considered as a likely source. As such the presence of MAC in milk would have public health significance. MAP has been linked to Crohn's disease and is also the causative agent of Johne's disease in cattle. Previous studies have detected MAP in pasteurised milk from Brazil, India, Czech Republic, USA, Argentina, UK, Iran, Ireland and the United Kingdom. This study investigated a total of 180 commercially available Australian pasteurised milk samples which were tested for MAC DNA in triplicate using PCR. All samples were negative for MAC DNA. An additional 14 milk samples were tested, incubated for 3 weeks at 37 °C to potentially increase the concentration of any viable MAC that may be present and then retested. All samples were again negative for MAC DNA. This could be due to concentrations below the limit of detection, limited sample size or could be reflective of the Australian biosecurity control protocols and surveillance of Johne's disease in ruminant animals.

  2. Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis Recombinant Proteins Modulate Antimycobacterial Functions of Bovine Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bannantine, John P; Stabel, Judith R; Laws, Elizabeth; D Cardieri, Maria Clara; Souza, Cleverson D

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) activates the Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) p38 pathway, yet it is unclear which components of M. paratuberculosis are involved in the process. Therefore, a set of 42 M. paratuberculosis recombinant proteins expressed from coding sequences annotated as lipoproteins were screened for their ability to induce IL-10 expression, an indicator of MAPKp38 activation, in bovine monocyte-derived macrophages. A recombinant lipoprotein, designated as MAP3837c, was among a group of 6 proteins that strongly induced IL-10 gene transcription in bovine macrophages, averaging a 3.1-fold increase compared to non-stimulated macrophages. However, a parallel increase in expression of IL-12 and TNF-α was only observed in macrophages exposed to a subset of these 6 proteins. Selected recombinant proteins were further analyzed for their ability to enhance survival of M. avium within bovine macrophages as measured by recovered viable bacteria and nitrite production. All 6 IL-10 inducing MAP recombinant proteins along with M. paratuberculosis cells significantly enhanced phosphorylation of MAPK-p38 in bovine macrophages. Although these proteins are likely not post translationally lipidated in E. coli and thus is a limitation in this study, these results form the foundation of how the protein component of the lipoprotein interacts with the immune system. Collectively, these data reveal M. paratuberculosis proteins that might play a role in MAPK-p38 pathway activation and hence in survival of this organism within bovine macrophages.

  3. Shared Mycobacterium avium Genotypes Observed among Unlinked Clinical and Environmental Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, Kris M.; Yakrus, Mitchell A.; Becker, Annie L.; Chen, Hui-Ling; Fridley, Gina; Sikora, Arthur; Speake, Cate; Hilborn, Elizabeth D.; Pfaller, Stacy

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of the sources of Mycobacterium avium infection is partially based on genotypic matching of pathogen isolates from cases and environmental sources. These approaches assume that genotypic identity is rare in isolates from unlinked cases or sources. To test this assumption, a high-resolution PCR-based genotyping approach, large-sequence polymorphism (LSP)-mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit–variable-number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR), was selected and used to analyze clinical and environmental isolates of M. avium from geographically diverse sources. Among 127 clinical isolates from seven locations in North America, South America, and Europe, 42 genotypes were observed. Among 12 of these genotypes, matches were seen in isolates from apparently unlinked patients in two or more geographic locations. Six of the 12 were also observed in environmental isolates. A subset of these isolates was further analyzed by alternative strain genotyping methods, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and MIRU-VNTR, which confirmed the existence of geographically dispersed strain genotypes. These results suggest that caution should be exercised in interpreting high-resolution genotypic matches as evidence for an acquisition event. PMID:23851084

  4. Modified lymphocyte response to mitogens after intraperitoneal injection of glycopeptidolipid antigens from Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Brownback, P E; Barrow, W W

    1988-01-01

    Intraperitoneal injection of glycopeptidolipid (GPL) antigens from Mycobacterium avium complex serovar 4 resulted in the decreased ability of murine splenic lymphocytes to respond to nonspecific-mitogen-induced blastogenesis when exposed to concanavalin A, phytohemagglutinin, and lipopolysaccharide. Adherent cell depletion and cell mixing experiments with T lymphocytes indicated that macrophages were not a major contributor to the immunosuppression observed in this study. Enumeration of splenic lymphocytes by means of flow-cytometry with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that intraperitoneal injection of GPL antigens resulted in a significant decrease in Thy-1+ and Lyt-1+ cells but no change in the numbers of Lyt-2+ cells. Treatment with GPL antigens in vitro affected the ability of splenic mononuclear cells to respond optimally for concanavalin A-induced blastogenesis at 40 micrograms of GPL per 4 X 10(5) cells per 0.2 ml and lipopolysaccharide-induced blastogenesis at concentrations ranging from 5 to 40 micrograms of GPL per 4 X 10(5) cells per 0.2 ml. However, in vitro treatment with GPL antigens did not affect phytohemagglutinin-induced blastogenesis at concentrations ranging from 5 to 40 micrograms of GPL per 4 X 10(5) cells per 0.2 ml. These findings suggest that GPL antigens or their metabolites affect lymphocyte function and may be important cofactors in the overall pathogenesis of M. avium complex infections. PMID:3258582

  5. Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis infection in swine associated with peat used for bedding.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Tone Bjordal; Agdestein, Angelika; Lium, Bjørn; Jørgensen, Anne; Djønne, Berit

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis is an environmental bacterium causing opportunistic infections in swine, resulting in economic losses. Additionally, the zoonotic aspect of such infections is of concern. In the southeastern region of Norway in 2009 and 2010, an increase in condemnation of pig carcasses with tuberculous lesions was seen at the meat inspection. The use of peat as bedding in the herds was suspected to be a common factor, and a project examining pigs and environmental samples from the herds was initiated. Lesions detected at meat inspection in pigs originating from 15 herds were sampled. Environmental samples including peat from six of the herds and from three peat production facilities were additionally collected. Samples were analysed by culture and isolates genotyped by MLVA analysis. Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis was detected in 35 out of 46 pigs, in 16 out of 20 samples of peat, and in one sample of sawdust. MLVA analysis demonstrated identical isolates from peat and pigs within the same farms. Polyclonal infection was demonstrated by analysis of multiple isolates from the same pig. To conclude, the increase in condemnation of porcine carcasses at slaughter due to mycobacteriosis seemed to be related to untreated peat used as bedding.

  6. Characterization of activity and expression of isocitrate lyase in Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Höner Zu Bentrup, K; Miczak, A; Swenson, D L; Russell, D G

    1999-12-01

    Analysis by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that Mycobacterium avium expresses several proteins unique to an intracellular infection. One abundant protein with an apparent molecular mass of 50 kDa was isolated, and the N-terminal sequence was determined. It matches a sequence in the M. tuberculosis database (Sanger) with similarity to the enzyme isocitrate lyase of both Corynebacterium glutamicum and Rhodococcus fascians. Only marginal similarity was observed between this open reading frame (ORF) (termed icl) and a second distinct ORF (named aceA) which exhibits a low similarity to other isocitrate lyases. Both ORFs can be found as distinct genes in the various mycobacterial databases recently published. Isocitrate lyase is a key enzyme in the glyoxylate cycle and is essential as an anapleurotic enzyme for growth on acetate and certain fatty acids as carbon source. In this study we express and purify Icl, as well as AceA proteins, and show that both exhibit isocitrate lyase activity. Various known inhibitors for isocitrate lyase were effective. Furthermore, we present evidence that in both M. avium and M. tuberculosis the production and activity of the isocitrate lyase is enhanced under minimal growth conditions when supplemented with acetate or palmitate.

  7. Therapeutic Efficacy of Liposomal Rifabutin in a Mycobacterium avium Model of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Maria Manuela; Neves, Susana; Portaels, Françoise; Pedrosa, Jorge; Silva, Manuel T.; Cruz, Maria Eugénia M.

    2000-01-01

    Liposomal formulations of rifabutin were developed, and the effects of some parameters on the incorporation efficiency were studied. The antimycobacterial activity of rifabutin incorporated into liposomes prepared with phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine (molar ratio, 7:3) was evaluated in a murine model of infection with a virulent Mycobacterium avium strain (strain P1581) and was compared with that of free rifabutin. The influences of the size of the liposomal rifabutin formulation, the administered doses, and the treatment schedules on the evolution of infection were studied. Two types of treatment schedules were assayed: therapeutic and prophylactic. The therapeutic treatment started 2 weeks after infection, while the prophylactic treatment began 1 day before the experimental infection with mycobacteria. Incorporation of rifabutin in liposomes resulted in a significant enhancement of activity against M. avium infection compared to that of rifabutin in the free form in both schedules. These results demonstrate that liposomal formulations of antibiotics such as rifabutin may be effective for the treatment or prophylaxis of infectious diseases. PMID:10952590

  8. Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis Infection in Swine Associated with Peat Used for Bedding

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Tone Bjordal; Lium, Bjørn; Jørgensen, Anne; Djønne, Berit

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis is an environmental bacterium causing opportunistic infections in swine, resulting in economic losses. Additionally, the zoonotic aspect of such infections is of concern. In the southeastern region of Norway in 2009 and 2010, an increase in condemnation of pig carcasses with tuberculous lesions was seen at the meat inspection. The use of peat as bedding in the herds was suspected to be a common factor, and a project examining pigs and environmental samples from the herds was initiated. Lesions detected at meat inspection in pigs originating from 15 herds were sampled. Environmental samples including peat from six of the herds and from three peat production facilities were additionally collected. Samples were analysed by culture and isolates genotyped by MLVA analysis. Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis was detected in 35 out of 46 pigs, in 16 out of 20 samples of peat, and in one sample of sawdust. MLVA analysis demonstrated identical isolates from peat and pigs within the same farms. Polyclonal infection was demonstrated by analysis of multiple isolates from the same pig. To conclude, the increase in condemnation of porcine carcasses at slaughter due to mycobacteriosis seemed to be related to untreated peat used as bedding. PMID:25431762

  9. Hyperhydricity of Prunus avium shoots cultured on gelrite: a controlled stress response.

    PubMed

    Franck, Thierry; Kevers, Claire; Gaspar, Thomas; Dommes, Jacques; Deby, Carol; Greimers, Roland; Serteyn, Didier; Deby-Dupont, Ginette

    2004-06-01

    Hyperhydricity is a physiological disorder frequently affecting shoots vegetatively propagated in vitro. Hyperhydric shoots are characterised by a translucent aspect due to a chlorophyll deficiency, a not very developed cell wall and a high water content. Hyperhydricity of Prunus avium shoots was expressed in vitro in one multiplication cycle by replacing the gelling agent agar (normal shoots: NS) by gelrite (hyperhydric shoots: HS). P. avium shoots evolving towards the hyperhydric state produced higher amounts of ethylene, polyamines (PAs) and proline, which are substances considered as stress markers. A higher activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPX; EC 1.11.1.9), involved in organic hydroperoxide elimination, suggested an increased production of these compounds in HS. The unchanged free fatty acid composition indicated no HS membrane damages compared to NS. The ploidy level of HS nuclei was not affected, but the bigger size and the lower percentage of nuclei during the S phase suggested a slowing down of the cell cycle. The results argued for a stress response of the HS, but no signs of oxidative damages of lipid membrane and nucleus were observed. The discussion points out paradoxical results in a classical analysis of stress and suggests an alternative way of defense mechanisms in HS, involving homeostatic regulation and controlled degradation processes to maintain integrity and vital functions of the cell.

  10. Environmental survival of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in different climatic zones of eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Eppleston, Jeffrey; Begg, Douglas J; Dhand, Navneet K; Watt, Bruce; Whittington, Richard J

    2014-04-01

    The duration of survival of both the S and C strains of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in feces was quantified in contrasting climatic zones of New South Wales, Australia, and detailed environmental temperature data were collected. Known concentrations of S and C strains in feces placed on soil in polystyrene boxes were exposed to the environment with or without the provision of shade (70%) at Bathurst, Armidale, Condobolin, and Broken Hill, and subsamples taken every 2 weeks were cultured for the presence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The duration of survival ranged from a minimum of 1 week to a maximum of 16 weeks, and the provision of 70% shade was the most important factor in extending the survival time. The hazard of death for exposed compared to shaded samples was 20 and 9 times higher for the S and C strains, respectively. Site did not affect the survival of the C strain, but for the S strain, the hazard of death was 2.3 times higher at the two arid zone sites (Broken Hill and Condobolin) than at the two temperate zone sites (Bathurst and Armidale). Temperature measurements revealed maximum temperatures exceeding 60°C and large daily temperature ranges at the soil surface, particularly in exposed boxes.

  11. Rapid broth macrodilution method for determination of MICs for Mycobacterium avium isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, S H; Heifets, L B; Cynamon, M H; Hooper, N M; Laszlo, A; Libonati, J P; Lindholm-Levy, P J; Pearson, N

    1993-01-01

    A multicenter study was done to investigate the accuracy and reproducibility of a method for determining the MICs of antimicrobial agents against the Mycobacterium avium complex in 7H12 broth with the BACTEC system. In phase I, with eight drugs and 10 strains, intralaboratory reproducibility was 95.7 to 100%, allowing a 1-dilution difference upon repeat testing. The results of phase II testing with 41 additional strains were consistent with those obtained in phase I, with good interlaboratory reproducibility. The radiometric method was validated by sampling and plating of the same broth cultures and determining, by the number of CFU per milliliter, the lowest drug concentration that inhibited more than 99% of the initial bacterial population. Three test concentrations of each drug and the tentative interpretation of results are proposed. Radiometric MIC determination has the potential to become the method of choice for clinical microbiology laboratories and evaluation of new agents for the treatment of M. avium infections, both pulmonary and disseminated. Images PMID:8408551

  12. Differential immune responses of red Deer (Cervus elaphus) following experimental challenge with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Mark; O'Brien, Rory; Mackintosh, Colin; Griffin, Frank

    2008-06-01

    Immune responses of red deer (Cervus elaphus) that presented with different levels of paucibacillary pathology were profiled to detail immune changes during the progression of Johne's disease. Immune responses were monitored using an immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), a gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) ELISA, and flow cytometry. Animals in the study were divided into outcome groups postmortem according to disease severity. All animals mounted IgG1 antibody and IFN-gamma responses to both the vaccination and experimental challenges. The Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific IgG1 antibody responses in the challenged group showed marked differences between infected and severely diseased animals. Slightly higher IFN-gamma responses were seen in infected animals compared with severely diseased animals. No significant changes were seen in the phenotype of lymphocyte populations investigated. Vaccination with killed M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in mineral oil adjuvant reduced the level of severe disease; however, it obscured immunological differences between the infected and severely diseased groups. This suggests protection is not exclusively mediated via the presence of a type 1 response and, furthermore, the presence of a type 2 response is compatible with protection. These profiles provide information on the different immune processes in Johne's disease progression.

  13. Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis disseminated infection in a Basset Hound dog.

    PubMed

    Campora, Luca; Corazza, Michele; Zullino, Cristina; Ebani, Valentina V; Abramo, Francesca

    2011-09-01

    In the current report, a case in Italy of disseminated Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis infection in a dog from an American lineage of Basset Hounds is described. A 2-year-old intact female Basset Hound presented with persistent lymphadenopathy, lameness, and a history characterized by coccidiosis, bacterial gastroenteritis, and alopecia. Lymphadenitis, with macrophages containing a few intracytoplasmic, negative staining, Ziehl-Neelsen-positive bacilli, was detected by a popliteal fine-needle aspirate leading to the diagnosis of mycobacteriosis. Ultrasound and X-ray examinations revealed visceral and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Because of the extent of the disease, the dog was humanely euthanized. Significant gross abnormalities, such as enlargement of the cranial mediastinal lymph nodes with encapsulated areas of caseous necrosis and generalized lymphadenopathy, were observed at necropsy. Granulomatous lesions were histopathologically detected in the liver and spleen. Ziehl-Neelsen-positive bacilli were observed in all examined lymph node, liver, spleen, lung, and bone marrow smears. Lymph nodes and liver were collected in order to pursue speciation by bacterial culture and molecular biology; multiplex polymerase chain reaction results classified the pathogen as M. avium subsp. hominissuis. Although an immune system deficiency was not investigated, anamnesis suggests that the dog was immunocompromised. Furthermore, the dog came from an American stock of Basset Hound, and for some of this breed, a predisposition to this infection has been hypothesized.

  14. rpoB sequence-based identification of Mycobacterium avium complex species.

    PubMed

    Ben Salah, Iskandar; Adékambi, Toidi; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2008-12-01

    The Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) comprises slowly growing mycobacteria responsible for opportunistic infections and zoonoses. The ability to speciate MAC isolates in the clinical microbiology laboratory is critical for determining the organism implicated in clinical disease and for epidemiological investigation of the source of infection. Investigation of a 711 bp variable fragment of rpoB flanked by the Myco-F/Myco-R primers found a 0.7-5.1 % divergence among MAC reference strains, with Mycobacterium chimaera and Mycobacterium intracellulare being the most closely related. Using a 0.7 % divergence cut-off, 83 % of 100 clinical isolates, which had been previously identified by phenotypic characteristics and 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (ITS) probing, were identified as M. avium, 8 % as M. intracellulare and 2 % as M. chimaera. The uniqueness of seven isolates, exhibiting < 99.3 % rpoB sequence similarity with MAC reference strains, was confirmed by 16S rDNA, ITS and hsp65 sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. Partial rpoB gene sequencing using the Myco-F/Myco-R primers permits one-step identification of MAC isolates at the species level and the detection of potentially novel MAC species.

  15. Results of Multiple Diagnostic Tests for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease and in Controls

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Michael T.; Lisby, Gorm; Moser, Claus; Chicks, Debra; Christensen, Steen; Reichelderfer, Mark; Høiby, Niels; Harms, Bruce A.; Thomsen, Ole Ø.; Skibsted, Ulrik; Binder, Vibeke

    2000-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis has been incriminated as a cause of Crohn's disease (CD); however, studies to date have been relatively small and generally only used a single diagnostic assay. The objective of the study was to reexamine the association of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and CD using multiple diagnostic tests. Five methods were used to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infections in 439 inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and 324 control subjects in the United States and Denmark. Most assays were adaptations of diagnostic tests for this infection performed routinely on animals. PCR for IS900, a genetic element unique to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, was positive significantly more often on resected bowel and lymph node tissues from CD patients (19.0%) and ulcerative colitis (UC) patients (26.2%) than from controls (6.3%) (P < 0.05). Positive IS900 PCR results occurred more often in U.S. than in Danish IBD patients, 32.0 versus 13.3% (P = 0.025). The majority of Danish patients were bacillus Calmette-Guérin (Mycobacterium bovis BCG) vaccinated (CD, 77.5%; UC, 86.6%; controls, 83.0%) whereas none of the U.S. patients with IBD and only 2% of U.S. controls were vaccinated. Among Danish IBD patients, positive PCR findings were four times more common among subjects who were not BCG vaccinated (33.3%) than among BCG vaccinates (8.8%, P = 0.02). Culture of the same tissues tested by PCR using modified BACTEC 12B medium failed to grow M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from patients or controls. U.S. CD patients had the highest serological evidence (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] for serum antibodies) of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection (20.7% of patients positive) which was higher than for all UC patients studied (6.1%) or healthy controls (3.8%, P < 0.005). Among Danish patients alone, however, no significant differences in rates of ELISA-positive results among CD, UC, or control patients were found. For 181

  16. Identification and characterization of an immunogenic 22 kDa exported protein of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Chris; Thompson, Keith; Heuer, Cord; Gicquel, Brigitte; Murray, Alan

    2005-11-01

    An exported 22 kDa putative lipoprotein was identified in an alkaline phosphatase gene fusion library of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and expressed in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The full nucleic acid sequence of the gene encoding P22 was determined and the ORF was cloned into a mycobacterial expression vector, enabling full-length P22 to be produced as a C-terminal polyhistidine-tagged protein in M. smegmatis. N-terminal sequencing of the recombinant protein confirmed cleavage of a signal sequence. Native P22 was detected in culture supernatants and cell sonicates of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strain 316F using rabbit antibody raised to recombinant P22. Investigation of the presence of similar genes in other mycobacterial species revealed that the gene was present in Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium and similar genes existed in Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium scrofulaceum. Database searches showed that P22 belonged to the LppX/LprAFG family of mycobacterial lipoproteins also found in Mycobacterium leprae and in members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. P22 shared less than 75% identity to these proteins. Recombinant P22 was able to elicit interferon-gamma secretion in blood from eight of a group of nine sheep vaccinated with a live attenuated strain of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (strain 316F) compared to none from a group of five unvaccinated sheep. Antibody to P22 was detected by Western blot analysis in 10 out of 11 vaccinated sheep, in two out of two clinically affected cows and in 11 out of 13 subclinically infected cows.

  17. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium Complexes by Real-Time PCR in Bovine Milk from Brazilian Dairy Farms.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, André Vinícius Andrade; Dos Reis, Emily Marques; Rodrigues, Rogério Oliveira; Cenci, Alexander; Cerva, Cristine; Mayer, Fabiana Quoos

    2015-05-01

    Foodborne diseases are a public health problem worldwide. The consumption of contaminated raw milk has been recognized as a major cause of transmission of bovine tuberculosis to humans. Other mycobacteria that may be present in raw milk and may cause diseases are those belonging to the Mycobacterium avium complex. In this study, molecular biology tools were applied to investigate raw milk contamination with Mycobacterium spp. in family dairy farms from Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil. Furthermore, different variables related to the source of the milk, herd characteristics, and management were evaluated for their effect on milk contamination. Five hundred and two samples were analyzed, of which 354 were from the Northwest region (102 farms with samples from 93 bulk tanks and 261 animals) and 148 from the South region of the state (22 farms with samples from 23 bulk tanks and 125 animals). Among them, 10 (1.99%) and 7 (1.39%) were positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (9 confirmed as Mycobacterium bovis) and M. avium complexes, respectively. There was no difference in the frequencies of positive samples between the regions or the sample sources. Of the positive samples, 4 were collected from a bulk tank (1 positive for M. avium and 3 for M. tuberculosis). Moreover, 1 sample was positive concomitantly for M. tuberculosis and M. avium complexes. On risk analysis, no variable was associated with raw milk contamination by M. tuberculosis complex species. However, washing the udders of all animals and drying them with paper towels were weakly classified as risk factors for M. avium contamination. Positive samples were obtained from both animals and bulk tanks, which emphasizes the importance of tuberculosis control programs and provides evidence that milk monitoring can be used as a control practice. Moreover, the findings of this study reinforce the need for awareness of the problems of raw milk consumption among the general population.

  18. Effect of Feeding Heat-Treated Colostrum on Preweaning Health, Economics and Transmission of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Dairy Calves: Phase I

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction and Objectives Colostrum provides protective immunoglobulins (Ig) and nutrients essential for calf health and performance. However, colostrum may also represent an early source of pathogen exposure including Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). Pilot studies have suggest...

  19. Production and Evaluation of an Improved Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Purified Protein Derivative for Use in In-Vivo and In-Vitro Diagnostic Testing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Purified protein derivatives (PPD’s) were prepared from the cultured filtrate of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) ATCC strain 19698. Production of PPD has historically been problematic for maintaining optimal floating cultures yielding defined immunogenic components. To obtain mor...

  20. Treatment with antibiotics is detrimental to the recovery of viable Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis cultured from milk and colostrum of dairy cows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antibiotic cocktails are frequently used as secondary decontaminants prior to the culture of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). This study investigated whether secondary incubation with an antibiotic cocktail containing vancomycin, nalidixic acid, and amphotericin B after primary exp...

  1. Mycobacterium avium infection in mice is associated with time-related expression of Th1 and Th2 CD4+ T-lymphocyte response.

    PubMed Central

    Azouaou, N; Petrofsky, M; Young, L S; Bermudez, L E

    1997-01-01

    Disseminated infection caused by organisms of Mycobacterium avium complex is common in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. M. avium is an intracellular bacterium that multiplies within macrophages. We examined the effect of M. avium infection on the T-helper cell response in C57/BL/6 black mice. At weekly intervals, CD4+ T-cells were isolated from spleens and lines were created. T-cell lines were exposed to sonicated M. avium in the presence of feeder cells and macrophages and the supernatant were collected to measure the concentrations of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma and interleukin-10 (IL-10). Production of IFN-gamma in CD4+ T-cells obtained from uninfected mice did not vary significantly during the 5 weeks. Levels of IFN-gamma produced by T-cell lines of infected mice were similar to the control mice during the first 2 weeks but significantly reduced (approximately 30 ng/ml) thereafter. In contrast, production of IL-10 by T-cell lines of infected mice was in a range of 190 to 342 pg/ml in weeks 1, 2 and 3, but increased to an average of 1300 pg/ml at weeks 4 and 5. Pre-immunized mice, when infected with M. avium strain 101, showed a different profile of T-cell cytokines, with high IFN-gamma and low IL-10 production. Proteins purified from a number of disease-associated (D-A) and non-D-A strains of M. avium were tested for the ability to induce IL-10. 65,000 MW and 60,000 MW proteins of M. avium induced significantly more IL-10 than 45,000 MW, 33,000 MW and 27,000 MW proteins. These results showed that M. avium predominantly stimulates either Th1 or Th2 T-helper cells according to the phase of the infection. PMID:9301531

  2. Efficacy of Various Pasteurization Time-Temperature Conditions in Combination with Homogenization on Inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Milk

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Irene R.; Williams, Alan G.; Rowe, Michael T.; Muir, D. Donald

    2005-01-01

    The effect of various pasteurization time-temperature conditions with and without homogenization on the viability of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis was investigated using a pilot-scale commercial high-temperature, short-time (HTST) pasteurizer and raw milk spiked with 101 to 105 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells/ml. Viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was cultured from 27 (3.3%) of 816 pasteurized milk samples overall, 5 on Herrold's egg yolk medium and 22 by BACTEC culture. Therefore, in 96.7% of samples, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis had been completely inactivated by HTST pasteurization, alone or in combination with homogenization. Heat treatments incorporating homogenization at 2,500 lb/in2, applied upstream (as a separate process) or in hold (at the start of a holding section), resulted in significantly fewer culture-positive samples than pasteurization treatments without homogenization (P < 0.001 for those in hold and P < 0.05 for those upstream). Where colony counts were obtained, the number of surviving M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells was estimated to be 10 to 20 CFU/150 ml, and the reduction in numbers achieved by HTST pasteurization with or without homogenization was estimated to be 4.0 to 5.2 log10. The impact of homogenization on clump size distribution in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis broth suspensions was subsequently assessed using a Mastersizer X spectrometer. These experiments demonstrated that large clumps of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells were reduced to single-cell or “miniclump” status by homogenization at 2,500 lb/in2. Consequently, when HTST pasteurization was being applied to homogenized milk, the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells would have been present as predominantly declumped cells, which may possibly explain the greater inactivation achieved by the combination of pasteurization and homogenization. PMID:15932977

  3. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Inhibits Gamma Interferon-Induced Signaling in Bovine Monocytes: Insights into the Cellular Mechanisms of Johne's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arsenault, Ryan J.; Li, Yue; Bell, Kelli; Doig, Kimberley; Potter, Andrew; Griebel, Philip J.; Kusalik, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease in cattle and may have implications for human health. Establishment of chronic infection by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis depends on its subversion of host immune responses. This includes blocking the ability of infected macrophages to be activated by gamma interferon (IFN-γ) for clearance of this intracellular pathogen. To define the mechanism by which M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis subverts this critical host cell function, patterns of signal transduction to IFN-γ stimulation of uninfected and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected bovine monocytes were determined through bovine-specific peptide arrays for kinome analysis. Pathway analysis of the kinome data indicated activation of the JAK-STAT pathway, a hallmark of IFN-γ signaling, in uninfected monocytes. In contrast, IFN-γ stimulation of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected monocytes failed to induce patterns of peptide phosphorylation consistent with JAK-STAT activation. The inability of IFN-γ to induce differential phosphorylation of peptides corresponding to early JAK-STAT intermediates in infected monocytes indicates that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis blocks responsiveness at, or near, the IFN-γ receptor. Consistent with this hypothesis, increased expression of negative regulators of the IFN-γ receptors SOCS1 and SOCS3 as well as decreased expression of IFN-γ receptor chains 1 and 2 is observed in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected monocytes. These patterns of expression are functionally consistent with the kinome data and offer a mechanistic explanation for this critical M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis behavior. Understanding this mechanism may contribute to the rational design of more effective vaccines and/or therapeutics for Johne's disease. PMID:22689821

  4. Efficacy of various pasteurization time-temperature conditions in combination with homogenization on inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk.

    PubMed

    Grant, Irene R; Williams, Alan G; Rowe, Michael T; Muir, D Donald

    2005-06-01

    The effect of various pasteurization time-temperature conditions with and without homogenization on the viability of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis was investigated using a pilot-scale commercial high-temperature, short-time (HTST) pasteurizer and raw milk spiked with 10(1) to 10(5) M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells/ml. Viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was cultured from 27 (3.3%) of 816 pasteurized milk samples overall, 5 on Herrold's egg yolk medium and 22 by BACTEC culture. Therefore, in 96.7% of samples, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis had been completely inactivated by HTST pasteurization, alone or in combination with homogenization. Heat treatments incorporating homogenization at 2,500 lb/in2, applied upstream (as a separate process) or in hold (at the start of a holding section), resulted in significantly fewer culture-positive samples than pasteurization treatments without homogenization (P < 0.001 for those in hold and P < 0.05 for those upstream). Where colony counts were obtained, the number of surviving M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells was estimated to be 10 to 20 CFU/150 ml, and the reduction in numbers achieved by HTST pasteurization with or without homogenization was estimated to be 4.0 to 5.2 log10. The impact of homogenization on clump size distribution in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis broth suspensions was subsequently assessed using a Mastersizer X spectrometer. These experiments demonstrated that large clumps of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells were reduced to single-cell or "miniclump" status by homogenization at 2,500 lb/in2. Consequently, when HTST pasteurization was being applied to homogenized milk, the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells would have been present as predominantly declumped cells, which may possibly explain the greater inactivation achieved by the combination of pasteurization and homogenization.

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium avium, Isolated from Commercial Domestic Pekin Ducks (Anas platyrhynchos domestica), Determined Using PacBio Single-Molecule Real-Time Technology.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiao-Heng; Chen, Hong-Xi; Zhou, Wang-Shu; Wang, Jiang-Bo; Liu, Ma-Feng; Wang, Ming-Shu; Cheng, An-Chun; Jia, Ren-Yong; Chen, Shun; Sun, Kun-Feng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Chen, Xiao-Yue; Zhu, De-Kang

    2016-09-01

    Mycobacterium avium is an important pathogenic bacterium in birds and has never, to our knowledge, reported to be isolated from domestic ducks. We present here the complete genome sequence of a virulent strain of Mycobacterium avium, isolated from domestic Pekin ducks for the first time, which was determined by PacBio single-molecule real-time technology. Copyright © 2016 Song et al.

  6. Identification of two novel Mycobacterium avium allelic variants in pig and human isolates from Brazil by PCR-restriction enzyme analysis.

    PubMed

    Leão, S C; Briones, M R; Sircili, M P; Balian, S C; Mores, N; Ferreira-Neto, J S

    1999-08-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is composed of environmental mycobacteria found widely in soil, water, and aerosols that can cause disease in animals and humans, especially disseminated infections in AIDS patients. MAC consists of two closely related species, M. avium and M. intracellulare, and may also include other, less-defined groups. The precise differentiation of MAC species is a fundamental step in epidemiological studies and for the evaluation of possible reservoirs for MAC infection in humans and animals. In this study, which included 111 pig and 26 clinical MAC isolates, two novel allelic M. avium PCR-restriction enzyme analysis (PRA) variants were identified, differing from the M. avium PRA prototype in the HaeIII digestion pattern. Mutations in HaeIII sites were confirmed by DNA sequencing. Identification of these isolates as M. avium was confirmed by PCR with DT1-DT6 and IS1245 primers, nucleic acid hybridization with the AccuProbe system, 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing, and biochemical tests. The characterization of M. avium PRA variants can be useful in the elucidation of factors involved in mycobacterial virulence and routes of infection and also has diagnostic significance, since they can be misidentified as M. simiae II and M. kansasii I if the PRA method is used in the clinical laboratory for identification of mycobacteria.

  7. Inter- and Intra-subtype genotypic differences that differentiate Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis strains

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map) is the aetiological agent of Johne’s disease or paratuberculosis and is included within the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). Map strains are of two major types often referred to as ‘Sheep’ or ‘S-type’ and ‘Cattle’ or ‘C-type’. With the advent of more discriminatory typing techniques it has been possible to further classify the S-type strains into two groups referred to as Type I and Type III. This study was undertaken to genotype a large panel of S-type small ruminant isolates from different hosts and geographical origins and to compare them with a large panel of well documented C-type isolates to assess the genetic diversity of these strain types. Methods used included Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Units - Variable-Number Tandem Repeat analysis (MIRU-VNTR), analysis of Large Sequence Polymorphisms by PCR (LSP analysis), Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) analysis of gyr genes, Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism analysis coupled with hybridization to IS900 (IS900-RFLP) analysis. Results The presence of LSPA4 and absence of LSPA20 was confirmed in all 24 Map S-type strains analysed. SNPs within the gyr genes divided the S-type strains into types I and III. Twenty four PFGE multiplex profiles and eleven different IS900-RFLP profiles were identified among the S-type isolates, some of them not previously published. Both PFGE and IS900-RFLP segregated the S-type strains into types I and III and the results concurred with those of the gyr SNP analysis. Nine MIRU-VNTR genotypes were identified in these isolates. MIRU-VNTR analysis differentiated Map strains from other members of Mycobacterium avium Complex, and Map S-type from C-type but not type I from III. Pigmented Map isolates were found of type I or III. Conclusion This is the largest panel of S-type strains investigated to date. The S-type strains could be further divided

  8. Application of the C(18)-carboxypropylbetaine specimen processing method to recovery of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from ruminant tissue specimens.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Charles G; MacLellan, Kerry M; Stabel, Judith R; Carothers, Christine; Whitlock, Robert H; Passen, Selvin

    2002-05-01

    The causative agent of Johne's disease is Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. This is a chronic, debilitating gastrointestinal disorder that affects ruminants and is responsible for significant economic loss. The specimen processing method that combines C(18)-carboxypropylbetaine (CB-18) treatment and lytic enzyme decontamination has been shown to improve the diagnosis of mycobacterioses. This processing method was applied to the isolation of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from ruminant tissue samples. The BACTEC 12B liquid culture system was used but was supplemented with 1% egg yolk emulsion, 4 microg of mycobactin J, and 0.5% pyruvate (12B/EMP) for use in conjunction with this method. The final concentration of antibiotics used was 10 microg of vancomycin, 30 microg of amphotericin B, and 20 microg of nalidixic acid (VAN) per ml. A 7H10-based solid medium was also used that included mycobactin J, pyruvate, and VAN but excluded the egg yolk emulsion (7H10/MPV). Several M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates were examined during the evaluation of this processing method. It was observed that treatment with lytic enzymes stimulated the growth of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis; however, the growth of one isolate was markedly inhibited due to the presence of vancomycin. Subsequently, the vancomycin concentration in the VAN formulation was reduced to 2 microg/ml. A blinded panel of 60 previously characterized tissue samples from bovine and bison were then processed and analyzed by smear and culture. Historically, 31 and 37 specimens were classified as positive by histology and culture, respectively. The overall sensitivity and specificity of smear relative to culture following CB-18 processing were 97.6 and 89.5%, respectively. The 12B/EMP/VAN liquid culture system recovered M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from 39 specimens, whereas 7H10/MPV and Herrold's egg yolk media recovered M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from 26 and 16 specimens, respectively

  9. Clofazimine Prevents the Regrowth of Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium avium Type Strains Exposed to Amikacin and Clarithromycin

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Beatriz E.; Meletiadis, Joseph; Wattenberg, Melanie; de Jong, Arjan; van Soolingen, Dick; Mouton, Johan W.

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug therapy is a standard practice when treating infections by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), but few treatment options exist. We conducted this study to define the drug-drug interaction between clofazimine and both amikacin and clarithromycin and its contribution to NTM treatment. Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium avium type strains were used. Time-kill assays for clofazimine alone and combined with amikacin or clarithromycin were performed at concentrations of 0.25× to 2× MIC. Pharmacodynamic interactions were assessed by response surface model of Bliss independence (RSBI) and isobolographic analysis of Loewe additivity (ISLA), calculating the percentage of statistically significant Bliss interactions and interaction indices (I), respectively. Monte Carlo simulations with predicted human lung concentrations were used to calculate target attainment rates for combination and monotherapy regimens. Clofazimine alone was bacteriostatic for both NTM. Clofazimine-amikacin was synergistic against M. abscessus (I = 0.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29 to 0.55) and M. avium (I = 0.027; 95% CI, 0.007 to 0.048). Based on RSBI analysis, synergistic interactions of 28.4 to 29.0% and 23.2 to 56.7% were observed at 1× to 2× MIC and 0.25× to 2× MIC for M. abscessus and M. avium, respectively. Clofazimine-clarithromycin was also synergistic against M. abscessus (I = 0.53; 95% CI, 0.35 to 0.72) and M. avium (I = 0.16; 95% CI, 0.04 to 0.35), RSBI analysis showed 23.5% and 23.3 to 53.3% at 2× MIC and 0.25× to 0.5× MIC for M. abscessus and M. avium, respectively. Clofazimine prevented the regrowth observed with amikacin or clarithromycin alone. Target attainment rates of combination regimens were >60% higher than those of monotherapy regimens for M. abscessus and M. avium. The combination of clofazimine with amikacin or clarithromycin was synergistic in vitro. This suggests a potential role for clofazimine in treatment regimens that warrants further

  10. Interferon gamma response to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis specific lipopentapeptide antigen L5P in cattle.

    PubMed

    Holbert, Sébastien; Branger, Maxime; Souriau, Armel; Lamoureux, Bérénice; Ganneau, Christelle; Richard, Gaëlle; Cochard, Thierry; Tholoniat, Christophe; Bay, Sylvie; Winter, Nathalie; Moyen, Jean Louis; Biet, Franck

    2015-10-01

    After Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) infection the cell-mediated immune (CMI) response indicative of early Th1 activation may be detected using interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA). Currently, the purified protein derivatives (PPDs), i.e., the total extract of mycobacteria antigens are used to recall CMI responses against Map. This study aimed to assess the ability of the chemically synthesized Map specific cell wall lipopentapeptide L5P to induce CMI response in cows infected by Map compared to PPD. L5P and PPD elicited an IFN-γ response in 12 and 35 animals from two Map infected herds respectively, but IFN-γ was not detected in the 13 cows recruited from a non-infected herd. Levels of IFN-γ detected were higher with PPD than with L5P. There was no correlation between the IFN-γ response and the humoral response to Map or faecal culture.

  11. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis sheep strains isolated from Cyprus sheep and goats.

    PubMed

    Liapi, M; Botsaris, G; Slana, I; Moravkova, M; Babak, V; Avraam, M; Di Provvido, A; Georgiadou, S; Pavlik, I

    2015-04-01

    Paratuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map), is a chronic incurable infection of intestinal tract of animals. Molecular characterization of Map isolates classifies them into two major groups, 'Cattle' or Type II and 'Sheep' or Type I/III with a different phenotype, epidemiology, virulence and pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to examine 192 Map ELISA-positive sheep and goats from Cyprus using faecal culture and genotype Map isolates using IS1311 PCR and restriction endonuclease analysis (IS1311 PCR-REA) with HinfI restriction enzyme. Map was isolated from only four (4.6%) faecal samples out of 88 sheep and 15 (14.4%) faecal samples out of 104 goats. Genotyping of the isolates using IS1311 PCR-REA revealed that sheep and goat populations on the island are infected primarily by 'Sheep' strains. Only three Map isolates from goats originated from one farm were characterized as 'Cattle' strains.

  12. Spread of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis through soil and grass on a mouflon (Ovis aries) pasture.

    PubMed

    Kaevska, Marija; Lvoncik, S; Lamka, J; Pavlik, I; Slana, I

    2014-10-01

    The aims of this study were to describe spatial contamination of the environment on a mouflon pasture, as well as to assess the contamination of grass and roots after surface contamination and in depth contamination with feces and buried tissues from animals infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. a. paratuberculosis). Samples of soil, roots, and aerial parts of plants were collected from different locations inside the mouflon pasture, and one control sample site was chosen outside the area where the animals are living. M. a. paratuberculosis DNA was present in all the examined sites and was more often detected in roots than in soil. DNA was detected at up to 80 cm of depth and was spatially more widespread than the initial hypothesis of M. a. paratuberculosis leaching vertically into deeper layers of soil. This study broadens our knowledge of the spread and persistence of M. a. paratuberculosis in an environment with highly infected animals.

  13. Rapid susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium avium complex and Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from AIDS patients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhople, Arvind M.

    1994-01-01

    In ominous projections issued by both U.S. Public Health Service and the World Health Organization, the epidemic of HIV infection will continue to rise more rapidly worldwide than predicted earlier. The AIDS patients are susceptible to diseases called opportunistic infections of which tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection are most common. This has created an urgent need to uncover new drugs for the treatment of these infections. In the seventies, NASA scientists at Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, had adopted a biochemical indicator, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), to detect presence of life in extraterrestrial space. We proposed to develop ATP assay technique to determine sensitivity of antibacterial compounds against MAC and M. tuberculosis.

  14. Infection of Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) with Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium complex in Spain.

    PubMed

    Balseiro, Ana; Rodríguez, Oscar; González-Quirós, Pablo; Merediz, Isabel; Sevilla, Iker A; Davé, Dipesh; Dalley, Deanna J; Lesellier, Sandrine; Chambers, Mark A; Bezos, Javier; Muñoz, Marta; Delahay, Richard J; Gortázar, Christian; Prieto, José M

    2011-11-01

    The prevalence, distribution and pathology related to infection with Mycobacterium bovis and other mycobacteria were determined in trapped (n=36) and road-killed (n=121) badgers in Spain from 2006 to 2010. The prevalence of M. bovis based on bacteriological culture from road-killed badgers was 8/121 (6.6%) and from trapped badgers was 0/36 (0%). Tuberculosis/M. bovis infection was evident in 15/121 (12.4%) road-killed badgers when bacteriology and histopathology were combined. Mycobacterium avium complex was isolated by culture from the tracheal aspirate of 1/36 (2.8%) trapped badgers and from tissue pools from 8/121 (6.6%) road-killed badgers.

  15. DRESS syndrome presenting after initiation of mycobacterium avium complex osteomyelitis treatment.

    PubMed

    Blair, Paul W; Herrin, Douglas; Abaalkhail, Nawaf; Fiser, Wesley

    2015-10-05

    Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is characterised by fever, rash, eosinophilia and organ damage that develops 2-6 weeks after the initiation of a medication. We report a case of DRESS syndrome in a 79-year-old man that developed after the introduction of rifabutin, ethambutol and clarithromycin used to treat Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) vertebral osteomyelitis. This case highlights treatment and management challenges in a patient with known MAC vertebral osteomyelitis requiring prolonged steroids. Steroids are the mainstays of treatment for moderate to severe cases of DRESS syndrome. Initiation of steroids for the treatment of DRESS syndrome among patients with concomitant infections requires multidisciplinary collaboration for optimal management. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  16. Evaluation of a PCR assay on overgrown individual fecal samples cultured for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Saray; Arango-Sabogal, Juan C; Labrecque, Olivia; Paré, Julie; Fairbrother, Julie-Hélène; Buczinski, Sébastien; Roy, Jean-Philippe; Côté, Geneviève; Wellemans, Vincent; Fecteau, Gilles

    2017-08-01

    Microbial overgrowth can interfere with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) growth and detection. We estimated the percentage of positive samples by PCR performed on the incubated media of individual fecal samples classified as non-interpretable (NI) by bacteriologic culture of liquid media. A total of 262 liquid cultures declared NI and 88 samples declared negative were included in the study. MAP DNA was detected in 7 NI samples (2.7%; 95% CI: 1.1-5.4%) and in 1 negative sample (1.1%; 95% CI: 0.3-6.2%). The PCR allowed the detection of MAP-positive samples that had been missed in the initial bacteriologic culture. However, the benefit of these few additional positive results must be weighed against the additional costs incurred. Using PCR to classify overgrown cultures optimizes the detection process and eliminates the NI outcome.

  17. Identification and comparative analysis of a genomic island in Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Annesha; Sanchini, Andrea; Semmler, Torsten; Schäfer, Hubert; Lewin, Astrid

    2014-11-03

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH) is an environmental bacterium causing opportunistic infections. The objective of this study was to identify flexible genome regions in MAH isolated from different sources. By comparing five complete and draft MAH genomes we identified a genomic island conferring additional flexibility to the MAH genomes. The island was absent in one of the five strains and had sizes between 16.37 and 84.85kb in the four other strains. The genes present in the islands differed among strains and included phage- and plasmid-derived genes, integrase genes, hypothetical genes, and virulence-associated genes like mmpL or mce genes. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Opportunistic Pathogens Mycobacterium Avium Complex (MAC) and Legionella spp. Colonise Model Shower.

    PubMed

    Whiley, Harriet; Giglio, Steven; Bentham, Richard

    2015-07-24

    Legionella spp. and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are opportunistic pathogens of public health concern. Hot water systems, including showers, have been identified as a potential source of infection. This paper describes the colonization of Legionella and MAC on the flexible tubing within a model potable shower system, utilizing thermostatic mixing and a flexible shower head. A MAC qPCR method of enumeration was also developed. MAC and Legionella spp. were detected within the biofilm at maximum concentrations of 7.0 × 104 and 2.0 × 103 copies/cm2 PVC tubing respectively. No significant changes were observed between sample of the flexible shower tubing that dried between uses and those that remained filled with water. This suggested the "unhooking" showerheads and allowing them to dry is not an effective method to reduce the risk of Legionella or MAC colonisation.

  19. Mycobacterium avium-related epizootic in free-ranging lesser flamingos in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kock, N D; Kock, R A; Wambua, J; Kamau, G J; Mohan, K

    1999-04-01

    An epizootic in free-ranging lesser flamingos (Phoeniconaias minor) in Kenya resulted in more than 18,500 deaths from August through mid-November 1993. Disease was concentrated along the shores of Rift Valley Lakes Bogoria and Nakuru (Kenya) and did not involve any of the other avian or mammalian species frequenting the lakes. Coincidental to the outbreak was a bloom of algae on Lake Bogoria, toxins from which were first suspected to be causative. Discrete necrotic and granulomatous lesions were often noted in spleen and liver, and Mycobacterium avium serovar I was isolated from both organs. Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa also were often recovered in pure culture from liver. Gross and histopathological evaluation of the cases disclosed signs of acute sepsis and also chronic, potentially life-threatening lesions of mycobacteriosis, primarily involving the spleen and liver. Lesions typical for algae toxicosis were not seen in any birds. Deaths were attributed to septicemia complicated in those affected, by mycobacteriosis.

  20. Seroprevalence of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in Korean black goats (Capra hircus aegagrus).

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Woo; Jung, Byeong Yeal; Moon, Oun Kyoung; Yang, Dong Kun; Lee, Su Hwa; Kim, Ji Yeon; Kweon, Chang Hee

    2006-12-01

    In total, 582 sera from 116 black goat herds were analyzed by a commercially available ELISA kit to monitor the seroprevalence of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Mpt) in Korean black goats (Capra hircus aegagrus). The mean number of goats sampled per herd was 5.11, 4.66, and 5.38 for the northern, central, and southern regions of Korea, respectively. The apparent regional prevalence of Mpt was estimated at 18.2-38.2% and 4.6-15.3% for herds and goats, respectively. The Mpt-positive goats were predominantly detected in the south (n=28), compared to either the northern (n=9) or central (n=11) regions (chi=14.459, P<0.05). Our findings indicate that Mpt is prevalent among the goat population, but regional variation exists.

  1. Mycobacterium avium Complex Osteomyelitis in Persons With Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Case Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Brian R.; Buitrago, Martha O.; Patel, Sugat; Hachey, David H.; Haneuse, Sebastien; Harrington, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    In persons with advanced immunosuppression, Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) typically causes disseminated disease with systemic symptoms. We report 2 cases in which MAC caused localized osteomyelitis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy with rising CD4 counts. We summarize 17 additional cases of HIV-associated MAC osteomyelitis from the literature and compare CD4 count at presentation for vertebral cases versus nonvertebral cases, which reveals a significantly higher CD4 at presentation for vertebral cases (median 251 cells/µL vs 50 cells/µL; P = .043; Mann–Whitney U test). The literature review demonstrates that the majority of cases of MAC osteomyelitis, especially vertebral, occurs in individuals with CD4 counts that have increased to above 100 cells/µL on antiretroviral therapy. Among HIV-infected individuals with osteomyelitis, MAC should be considered a possible etiology, particularly in the setting of immune reconstitution. PMID:26180837

  2. [Measurement of sitafloxacin MIC for Mycobacterium avium complex and application for treatment of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteriosis].

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masaki; Matsumoto, Takemasa; Hirano, Ryousuke; Harada, Eiji; Ikegame, Satoshi; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Watanabe, Kentaro

    2014-12-01

    Treatment for pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteriosis is difficult. Since current treatment has limitation, new application is needed. Fluoroquinolone is one of candidates. We have investigated the feasibility of sitafloxacin (STFX). At first, the drug of MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) was determined by the methods based on BrothMIC NTM. The MICs of STFX, moxifloxacin (MFLX), gatifloxacin (GFLX) were low. On contrast, the MICs of garenoxacin (GRNX) and tosufloxacin (TFLX) were high. Two cases of pulmonary Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC) disease were treated by STFX-contained regimen. In all cases of pulmonary MAC disease, improve of symptoms and chest CT images were attained. Adverse events were slight. These MIC studies and case reports suggest that STFX might have excellent in vitro and in vivo antimicrobial activities against MAC and is considered to be a candidate for the medication against pulmonary MAC disease.

  3. Association between cattle herd Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection and infection of a hare population.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Miguel; Monti, Gustavo; Sevilla, Iker; Manning, Elizabeth

    2014-10-01

    Paratuberculosis has long been considered a disease of domestic and wild ruminants only. The known host range of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) was recently extended to include non-ruminant wildlife species believed to be exposed to spillover of MAP from infected domestic cattle herds. The aim of the present study was to assess the association between cattle herd MAP infection pressure level and the infection level of a hare population in two dairy farms of southern Chile. Fifty hares from a herd A and 42 hares from herd B were captured and sampled for MAP culture. The results showed a statistically significant association between the cattle herds' infection prevalence and the hare infection prevalence.

  4. Heat inactivation of Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare complex organisms in meat products.

    PubMed Central

    Merkal, R S; Crawford, J A; Whipple, D L

    1979-01-01

    Wieners and sausages were prepared which contained the most heat-tolerant representative of the Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare complex we were able to obtain. They also were prepared with infected tissues obtained from tuberculous swine. Processing conditions were as varied as possible. Neither incorporation of sodium nitrite in the emulsion nor presence of smoke during processing altered the heat susceptibility of the organisms. Substantial killing of the organisms occurred as wieners reached the upper processing temperatures, but hot oil or radiant heating of the "precooked" sausages allowed very short times within the killing range; hence, higher peak internal temperatures were necessary. The lethalities for these organisms of reaching and maintaining various processing temperatures are given. PMID:575610

  5. Evidence of disseminated infection by Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis in a pet ferret (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    Bezos, Javier; Álvarez-Carrión, Beatriz; Rodríguez-Bertos, Antonio; Fernández-Manzano, Álvaro; de Juan, Lucía; Huguet, Cristina; Briones, Víctor; Romero, Beatriz

    2016-12-01

    The infection caused by the zoonotic opportunistic pathogen Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (Mah) was reported for the first time in a pet ferret. Both owners were HIV-positive. Euthanasia of the pet was recommended due to medical reasons and as a preventive action. Disseminated and open tuberculosis lesions were observed in the gastrointestinal and respiratory systems of the ferret. Ecographic and radiographic surveys showed a severe generalized lymphadenopathy, strong thickening of the gastric wall and peritoneum layer. The histopathological findings revealed a disseminated, granulomatous, chronic inflammation affecting the gastrointestinal tract, lungs, lymphoid tissues (spleen, tonsils and lymph nodes) and liver. Ziehl-Neelsen staining displayed the presence of positive acid-fast bacilli within these granulomas. Bacteriology and sequencing of the isolates yielded Mah sequevar code 3. Ferrets can act as reservoirs of mycobacteria exposing their owners to the infection, which is of major concern in immunodeficient individuals, as those HIV-infected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Rapid drug susceptibility of Mycobacterium avium complex using a fluorescence quenching method.

    PubMed

    Marone, P; Bono, L; Carretto, E; Barbarini, D; Telecco, S

    1997-08-01

    Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT) is a recently introduced rapid growth detection method which uses an oxygen quenched fluorescent indicator. The present study evaluated the ability of this new method to determine the drug susceptibility of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). Thirty strains recovered from patients with AIDS were tested for susceptibility to clarithromycin, rifabutin, ciprofloxacin, azithromycin and amikacin using MGIT. Results were compared to susceptibilities determined by the agar dilution method. The results obtained showed a 100% correlation between MGIT and the agar dilution method for rifabutin and clarithromycin. There was a 100% correlation between the two methods for azithromycin against 27 strains. MGIT was well correlated with the agar dilution method for detecting resistance to clarithromycin, rifabutin and azithromycin in 4 days, but the correlation was poor when susceptibilities to ciprofloxacin and amikacin were determined. This rapid method is non-radiometric, noninvasive and does not require any special instruments.

  7. Genetic diversity in wild sweet cherries (Prunus avium) in Turkey revealed by SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Ercisli, S; Agar, G; Yildirim, N; Duralija, B; Vokurka, A; Karlidag, H

    2011-06-21

    Wild sweet cherry (Prunus avium) trees are abundant in the northern part of Turkey, including the Coruh Valley. We analyzed 18 wild sweet cherry genotypes collected from diverse environments in the upper Coruh Valley in Turkey to determine genetic variation, using 10 SSR primers. These SSR primers generated 46 alleles; the number of alleles per primer ranged from 3 to 7, with a mean of 4.6. The primer PS12A02 gave the highest number of polymorphic bands (N = 7), while CPSCT010, UDAp-401 and UDAp-404 gave the lowest number (N = 3). Seven groups were separated in the dendrogram, although most of the genotypes did not cluster according to phenological and morphological traits. This level of genetic diversity in these wild sweet cherry genotypes is very high and therefore these trees would be useful as breeders for crosses between cultivated sweet cherry and wild genotypes.

  8. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex disease in a patient with left ventricular assist device (Heart Mate II).

    PubMed

    Cordioli, Maddalena; Del Bravo, Paola; Rigo, Fabio; Azzini, Anna Maria; Merighi, Mara; Forni, Alberto; Concia, Ercole

    2015-09-01

    Although disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex disease occurs mainly in immunocompromised hosts, especially HIV-infected patients in the last stage of the disease (AIDS), this condition is still rare in immunocompetent subjects. We report the case of a Caucasian man who received a left ventricular assist device two years before as a bridge to heart transplantation, that began to present signs and symptoms of mycobacterial infection. The diagnostic work-up we performed showed the presence of Mycobacterium intracellulare in lungs and both peripherical and bone marrow blood. Although evaluated, we found no abnormalities in the patient's immune system that can be related to mycobacterial infection. The beginning of a specific therapy made the patient slowly improve and further nuclear medicine assay (PET-TC) showed a good reduction in radio-labelled drug captation.

  9. Utilization of a ts-sacB selection system for the generation of a Mycobacterium avium serovar-8 specific glycopeptidolipid allelic exchange mutant

    PubMed Central

    Irani, Vida R; Lee, Sun-Hwa; Eckstein, Torsten M; Inamine, Julia M; Belisle, John T; Maslow, Joel N

    2004-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium avium are ubiquitous environmental organisms and a cause of disseminated infection in patients with end-stage AIDS. The glycopeptidolipids (GPL) of M. avium are proposed to participate in the pathogenesis of this organism, however, establishment of a clear role for GPL in disease production has been limited by the inability to genetically manipulate M. avium. Methods To be able to study the role of the GPL in M. avium pathogenesis, a ts-sacB selection system, not previously used in M. avium, was employed as a means to achieve homologous recombination for the rhamnosyltransferase (rtfA) gene of a pathogenic serovar 8 strain of M. avium to prevent addition of serovar-specific sugars to rhamnose of the fatty acyl-peptide backbone of GPL. The genotype of the resultant rtfA mutant was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction and southern hybridization. Disruption in the proximal sugar of the haptenic oligosaccharide resulted in the loss of serovar specific GPL with no change in the pattern of non-serovar specific GPL moieties as shown by thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Complementation of wild type (wt) rtfA in trans through an integrative plasmid restored serovar-8 specific GPL expression identical to wt serovar 8 parent strain. Results In this study, we affirm our results that rtfA encodes an enzyme responsible for the transfer of Rha to 6d-Tal and provide evidence of a second allelic exchange mutagenesis system suitable for M. avium. Conclusion We report the second allelic exchange system for M. avium utilizing ts-sacB as double-negative and xylE as positive counter-selection markers, respectively. This system of allelic exchange would be especially useful for M. avium strains that demonstrate significant isoniazid (INH) resistance despite transformation with katG. Through the construction of mutants in GPL or other mycobacterial components, their roles in M. avium pathogenesis, biosynthesis, or drug

  10. Induction of murine macrophage TNF-alpha synthesis by Mycobacterium avium is modulated through complement-dependent interaction via complement receptors 3 and 4 in relation to M. avium glycopeptidolipid.

    PubMed

    Irani, Vida R; Maslow, Joel N

    2005-05-15

    We studied whether complement receptor (CR) mediated Mycobacterium avium interaction modulated macrophage TNF-alpha expression. Compared to control conditions, infections performed with C3-depletion yielded significantly higher TNF-alpha levels. Blockage of the CR4 iC3b site yielded increases in TNF-alpha for all morphotypic variants of a virulent serovar-8 strain (smooth transparent (SmT), smooth opaque (SmO), serovar-specific glycopeptidolipid (ssGPL) deficient knockout mutant) whereas CR3 blockage increased TNF-alpha only for SmT and ssGPL-deficient strains. Thus, complement-mediated binding of M. avium to CR3 and CR4 was shown to modulate TNF-alpha expression. The differential activation of morphotypic and isogenic variants of a single strain provides an excellent model system to delineate signaling pathways.

  11. Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis Recombinant Proteins Modulate Antimycobacterial Functions of Bovine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bannantine, John P.; Stabel, Judith R.; Laws, Elizabeth; D. Cardieri, Maria Clara; Souza, Cleverson D.

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) activates the Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) p38 pathway, yet it is unclear which components of M. paratuberculosis are involved in the process. Therefore, a set of 42 M. paratuberculosis recombinant proteins expressed from coding sequences annotated as lipoproteins were screened for their ability to induce IL-10 expression, an indicator of MAPKp38 activation, in bovine monocyte-derived macrophages. A recombinant lipoprotein, designated as MAP3837c, was among a group of 6 proteins that strongly induced IL-10 gene transcription in bovine macrophages, averaging a 3.1-fold increase compared to non-stimulated macrophages. However, a parallel increase in expression of IL-12 and TNF-α was only observed in macrophages exposed to a subset of these 6 proteins. Selected recombinant proteins were further analyzed for their ability to enhance survival of M. avium within bovine macrophages as measured by recovered viable bacteria and nitrite production. All 6 IL-10 inducing MAP recombinant proteins along with M. paratuberculosis cells significantly enhanced phosphorylation of MAPK-p38 in bovine macrophages. Although these proteins are likely not post translationally lipidated in E. coli and thus is a limitation in this study, these results form the foundation of how the protein component of the lipoprotein interacts with the immune system. Collectively, these data reveal M. paratuberculosis proteins that might play a role in MAPK-p38 pathway activation and hence in survival of this organism within bovine macrophages. PMID:26076028

  12. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in naturally exposed dairy heifers and associated risk factors.

    PubMed

    Bolton, M W; Pillars, R B; Kaneene, J B; Mauer, W A; Grooms, D L

    2011-09-01

    An observational prospective study was conducted to identify risk factors associated with fecal shedding of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in naturally exposed dairy heifers. The study population consisted of heifers from 8 dairy herds in Michigan participating in a MAP control demonstration project. Ten heifers from 4 age groups (0 to 3, 4 to 6, 7 to 14, and 15 to 24 mo) were selected from each herd every 4 mo for 28 mo and tested for the presence of MAP by fecal culture (FC). Heifers from dams testing positive for MAP by serum ELISA or FC were preferentially selected, with the remainder of the age cohort filled with randomly selected heifers. Logistic regression using generalized estimating equations to account for clustering of data within herds and repeated measures across heifers was used to evaluate the relationship between MAP FC status of heifers and herd risk factors. In total, 1,842 fecal samples were collected from 1,202 heifers. Thirty-six (2%) fecal samples, representing 27 individual heifers, cultured positive for MAP. Heifers shedding MAP were more likely to occur in herds with adult-cow MAP ELISA prevalence >10% (odds ratio = 4.7; 95% confidence interval: 2.0-11.1) and herds milking >300 cows (odds ratio = 5.7; 95% confidence interval: 2.4-13.4). Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis can be cultured from the feces of naturally infected dairy heifers. The future performance of these MAP FC-positive heifers is unknown and needs to be explored. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Involvement of reactive oxygen intermediates in tumor necrosis factor alpha-dependent bacteriostasis of Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed Central

    Sarmento, A; Appelberg, R

    1996-01-01

    We studied the involvement of reactive oxygen intermediates and reactive nitrogen intermediates in the bacteriostasis of two Mycobacterium avium strains differing in virulence by resident peritoneal macrophages. We found that both the highly virulent strain (25291) and the low-virulence strain (1983) of M. avium induced superoxide production but inhibited nitrite production in vitro. This inhibition was due to the production of superoxide, a nitric oxide scavenger. The stimulation of superoxide production was two- to fivefold higher in strain 1983-infected than in strain 25291-infected resident peritoneal macrophages and was independent of contaminating T cells or NK cells. Superoxide secretion was dependent on the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) produced endogenously by the macrophages. This was also true when macrophages were isolated from infected mice. Addition of TNF to the infected resident peritoneal macrophages caused only a slight, albeit significant, increase in superoxide production by strain 25291-infected macrophages. Incubation of resident peritoneal macrophages with different scavengers of reactive oxygen intermediates showed that strain 1983 was susceptible to hydrogen peroxide produced by resident peritoneal macrophages. Strain 25291 was shown to decrease superoxide secretion inside heavily infected bone marrow-derived macrophages. This strain was also shown to be a better trigger for production of reactive oxygen intermediates than strain 1983. In summary, strain 1983 induced high levels of TNF synthesis that acted in an autocrine fashion to stimulate production of reactive oxygen intermediates by macrophages leading to growth restriction mediated by hydrogen peroxide. The highly virulent strain 25291 induced low levels of TNF synthesis, and therefore little reactive oxygen intermediate production, and could also inhibit superoxide production by the infected macrophages. PMID:8757857

  14. Host responses to the pathogen Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and beneficial microbes exhibit host sex specificity.

    PubMed

    Karunasena, Enusha; McMahon, K Wyatt; Chang, David; Brashears, Mindy M

    2014-08-01

    Differences between microbial pathogenesis in male and female hosts are well characterized in disease conditions connected to sexual transmission. However, limited biological insight is available on variances attributed to sex specificity in host-microbe interactions, and it is most often a minimized variable outside these transmission events. In this work, we studied two gut microbes-a pathogen, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and a probiotic, Lactobacillus animalis NP-51-and the interaction between each agent and the male and female gastrointestinal systems. This trial was conducted in BALB/c mice (n=5 per experimental group and per sex at a given time point), with analysis at four time points over 180 days. Host responses to M.avium subsp. paratuberculosis and L. animalis were sensitive to sex. Cytokines that were significantly different (P ≤ 0.05) betweenthe sexes included interleukin-1α/β (IL-1α/β), IL-17, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and gamma interferon (IFN-) and were dependent on experimental conditions. However, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and IL-13/23 showed no sex specificity. A metabolomics study indicated a 0.5- to 2.0-fold (log2 scale) increase in short-chain fatty acids (butyrate and acetate) in males and greater increases in o-phosphocholine or histidine from female colon tissues; variances distinct to each sex were observed with age or long-term probiotic consumption. Two genera, Staphylococcus and Roseburia, were consistently overrepresented in females compared to males; other species were specific to one sex but fluctuated depending on experimental conditions. The differences observed suggest that male and female gut tissues and microbiota respond to newly introduced microorganisms differently and that gut-associated microorganisms with host immune system responses and metabolic activity are supported by biology distinct to the host sex.

  15. Superoxide dismutase activity of Mycobacterium avium, M. intracellulare, and M. scrofulaceum.

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, B K; Falkinham, J O

    1986-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1) (SOD) activity has been detected in crude cell extracts of representative strains of the Mycobacterium avium, M. intracellulare, and M. scrofulaceum (MAIS) group. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated a single SOD activity band for each of the MAIS strains, though there were differences in mobility. All M. avium and M. intracellulare and two of five M. scrofulaceum strains demonstrated a single activity band of identical mobility (Rf = 0.83), while the SOD activity band for the three remaining M. scrofulaceum strains migrated farther (Rf = 0.85). The differences in mobility correlated with differences in sensitivity to NaN3 and H2O2. The SOD activities of the majority of the MAIS strains which displayed the slower-migrating activity band were inhibited 22 to 81% after 15 min of exposure to 5 mM H2O2, suggesting that both iron and manganese may be present in a single enzyme. The SOD activities of the three M. scrofulaceum strains which had the faster-migrating activity band were inhibited 100% after only 5 min of exposure to 5 mM H2O2 and exhibited greater sensitivity to 5 and 10 mM NaN3, characteristics of an iron-containing SOD. A concentration of 1 mM KCN did not cause inhibition of enzyme activity in any of the MAIS strains tested. Extracellular SOD activity was detected in four of six MAIS strains and was shown to be identical in mobility to the SOD activity of the crude extracts. Images PMID:3744555

  16. [Strategies for Mycobacterium avium complex infection control in Japan: how do they improve the present situation?].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kenji; Sano, Chiaki

    2013-03-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) were the most frequently isolated (about 80%) and most common cause of lung nontuberculosis. Its rate of infection is globally increasing, especially in Japan. In this situation, it is urgently needed to provide scientific evidences and develop therapeutic interventions in MAC infections. Recently, more and more patients are elderly women with no history of smoking, and they have reticulonodular infiltrates and patchy bilateral bronchiectasis. However the prognostic and intractable factors of MAC infections are poorly known. In this symposium, we address five novel strategies for MAC infection, concerning the more accurate incidence and prevalence rates compared with other countries, host defense associated with Th1/Th17 balance, route of MAC infection related soil exposure, MAC IgA antibody as a diagnosis maker, and improved chemotherapy including aminoglycoside or new quinolone. Appropriate clinical intervention may help to reduce the prolongation of MAC infection or enhance the activity of chemotherapy for the improved control of MAC. Below are the abstracts for each of the five speakers. 1. Review of current epidemiological study of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease in Japan and the rest of the world: Kozo MORIMOTO (Respiratory Center, Fukujuji Hospital, Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association) The studies on pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) disease prevalence were started in early 1970s in Japan by the Mycobacteriosis Research Group of National Chest Hospitals. They were followed by a questionnaire survey in 1990s, by the National Tuberculosis and NTM Survey in late 1990s, and recently by the questionnaire surveys conducted by the NTM Disease Research Committee. The latest data in Japan (from 2007) indicated a morbidity rate of 5.7 per 100,000 population. Deaths from NTM disease were reported for the first time in 1970 and showed a marked, steady increase until 2007, with 912 deaths in that year. We

  17. Removal of Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis (MAH) from drinking water by coagulation, flocculation and sedimentation processes.

    PubMed

    Wong, E A; Shin, G-A

    2015-03-01

    There has been a growing concern over human exposure to Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis (MAH) through drinking water due to its ubiquitous presence in natural waters and remarkable resistance to both chemical and physical disinfectants in drinking water treatment processes. However, little is known about the effectiveness of physico-chemical water treatment processes to remove MAH. Therefore, we determined the removal of MAH by alum coagulation, flocculation and sedimentation processes in optimized drinking water treatment conditions using standard jar test equipment. Contrary to the prevailing hypothesis, the results of this study show that removal of MAH by coagulation, flocculation and sedimentation processes was only moderate (approx. 0.65 log10) under low turbidity treatment conditions and the removal of MAH was actually lower than that of Escherichia coli (reference bacterium) in all the waters tested. Overall, the results of this study suggested that coagulation, flocculation and sedimentation processes may not be a reliable treatment option for removing MAH, and more efforts to find an effective control measures against MAH should be made to reduce the risk of MAH infection from drinking water. Despite a growing concern over human exposure to Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis (MAH) through drinking water and its remarkable resistance to water disinfectants, little is known about the effectiveness of physico-chemical water treatment processes to remove MAH. Contrary to the prevailing hypothesis, the results of this study suggest that coagulation, flocculation and sedimentation processes may not be a reliable treatment option for MAH removal. As these processes have been the last remaining conventional drinking water treatment processes that might be effective against MAH, more efforts should be urgently made to find an effective control measures against this important waterborne pathogen. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Azithromycin Dose To Maximize Efficacy and Suppress Acquired Drug Resistance in Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium Disease

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Devyani; Pasipanodya, Jotam G.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex is now the leading mycobacterial cause of chronic pneumonia in the United States. Macrolides and ethambutol form the backbone of the regimen used in the treatment of pulmonary disease. However, therapy outcomes remain poor, with microbial cure rates of 4% in cavitary disease. The treatment dose of azithromycin has mostly been borrowed from that used to treat other bacterial pneumonias; there are no formal dose-response studies in pulmonary M. avium disease and the optimal dose is unclear. We utilized population pharmacokinetics and pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics-derived azithromycin exposures associated with optimal microbial kill or resistance suppression to perform 10,000 patient Monte Carlo simulations of dose effect studies for daily azithromycin doses of 0.5 to 10 g. The currently recommended dose of 500 mg per day achieved the target exposures in 0% of patients. Exposures associated with optimal kill and resistance suppression were achieved in 87 and 54% of patients, respectively, only by the very high dose of 8 g per day. The azithromycin susceptibility breakpoint above which patients failed therapy on the very high doses of 8 g per day was an MIC of 16 mg/liter, suggesting a critical concentration of 32 mg/liter, which is 8-fold lower than the currently used susceptibility breakpoint of 256 mg/liter. If the standard dose of 500 mg a day were used, then the critical concentration would fall to 2 mg/liter, 128-fold lower than 256 mg/liter. The misclassification of resistant isolates as susceptible could explain the high failure rates of current doses. PMID:26810646

  19. Novel Mycobacterium avium Complex Species Isolated From Black Wildebeest (Connochaetes gnou) in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kabongo-Kayoka, P N; Obi, C L; Nakajima, C; Suzuki, Y; Hattori, T; Eloff, J N; Wright, J; Mbelle, N; McGaw, L J

    2017-06-01

    A study was undertaken to isolate and characterize Mycobacterium species from black wildebeest suspected of being infected with tuberculosis in South Africa. This led to the discovery of a new Mycobacterium avium complex species, provisionally referred to as the Gnou isolate from black wildebeest (Connochaetes gnou). Sixteen samples from nine black wildebeest were processed for Mycobacterium isolation. Following decontamination, samples were incubated in an ordinary incubator at 37°C on Löwenstein-Jensen slants and in liquid medium tubes using the BACTEC(™) MGIT(™) 960 system, respectively. Identification of the isolate was carried out by standard biochemical tests and using the line probe assay from the GenoType(®) CM/AS kit (Hain Lifescience GmbH, Nehren, Germany). The DNA extract was also analysed using gene sequencing. Partial gene sequencing and analysis of 16S rRNA gene, and 16S-23S rRNA (ITS), rpoB and hsp65 and phylogenetic analyses by searching GenBank using the BLAST algorithm were conducted. Phylogenetic trees were constructed using four methods, namely Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony and neighbour-joining methods. The isolate was identified as Mycobacterium intracellulare using the GenoType(®) CM/AS kit and as Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) by gene sequencing. The gene sequence targeting all the genes, ITS, 16S rRNA, rpoB and hsp65 and phylogenetic analyses indicated that this isolate presented a nucleotide sequence different from all currently published sequences, and its position was far enough from other MAC species to suggest that it might be a new species. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. The international epidemiology of disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex infection in AIDS. International MAC Study Group.

    PubMed

    Fordham von Reyn, C; Arbeit, R D; Tosteson, A N; Ristola, M A; Barber, T W; Waddell, R; Sox, C H; Brindle, R J; Gilks, C F; Ranki, A; Bartholomew, C; Edwards, J; Falkinham, J O; O'Connor, G T

    1996-08-01

    To determine rates of disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection among AIDS patients in developed and developing countries, and to determine whether different rates reflect differences in exposure or immunity, or both. Prospective cohort study. University hospitals and outpatient AIDS programs. HIV-infected subjects with CD4 counts < 200 x 10(6)/l were interviewed and had CD4 lymphocyte counts, blood cultures for mycobacteria (baseline and at 6 months), and skin tests with purified protein derivative (PPD) and M. avium sensitin. Among 566 study patients rates of disseminated MAC were 10.5-21.6% in New Hampshire, Boston and Finland compared to 2.4-2.6% in Trinidad and Kenya (P < 0.001). PPD skin test reactions > or = 5 mm were present in 20% of patients from Kenya compared to 1% at other sites (P < 0.001). Among patients from the United States and Finland, multiple logistic regression indicated that occupational exposure to soil and water was associated with a decreased risk of disseminated MAC, whereas the following were associated with an increased risk of disseminated MAC: low CD4 count, swimming in an indoor pool, history of bronchoscopy, regular consumption of raw or partially cooked fish/shellfish and treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Rates of disseminated MAC in AIDS are higher in developed than developing countries and are due to both differences in exposure and differences in immunity. These data provide a rationale for prevention of MAC through both active immunization and reduction in exposure to the organism.

  1. Comparative in vivo activities of rifabutin and rifapentine against Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Klemens, S P; Grossi, M A; Cynamon, M H

    1994-01-01

    The dose-response activity of rifabutin and the comparative activities of rifabutin and rifapentine were evaluated in the beige mouse model of disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection. In the dose-response study, mice were infected intravenously with approximately 10(7) viable M. avium ATCC 49601. Treatment with rifabutin at 10, 20, or 40 mg/kg of body weight was started 7 days postinfection and was administered daily for 10 days. The mice were sacrificed 3 to 5 days after the last dose. Spleens, livers, and lungs were homogenized, and viable cell counts were determined by serial dilution and plating onto Middlebrook 7H10 agar. A dose-related reduction in MAC cell counts in the organs was noted for this MAC isolate. The comparative activities of rifabutin and rifapentine were determined against a total of five MAC isolates in the beige mouse model. Rifabutin or rifapentine (20 mg/kg each) was administered to infected mice for 10 days. Groups of treated mice were compared with untreated control animals. Despite favorable in vitro susceptibility results, rifabutin and rifapentine had activities in the spleens against only two of the five MAC isolates. For these two MAC isolates, rifabutin was more active than rifapentine. These agents had activities in the lungs against three of five isolates. Further study of rifabutin or rifapentine against a broader range of clinical isolates in a murine infection model may be useful as part of the continuing development of newer rifamycins as anti-MAC agents. PMID:8192449

  2. The phagosomal environment protects virulent Mycobacterium avium from killing and destruction by clarithromycin.

    PubMed Central

    Fréhel, C; Offredo, C; de Chastellier, C

    1997-01-01

    Murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (Mphis) infected with virulent strains of Mycobacterium avium (TMC 724 and a human clinical isolate) or with an avirulent opaque variant that spontaneously dissociates from the virulent human clinical isolate were subjected to a prolonged and continuous treatment with clarithromycin added at the MIC. The efficiency of this antibiotic in terms of inhibition of bacterial growth and bacterial degradation was evaluated during a 21-day treatment period. Growth was assessed by determination of CFU of intracellular bacteria and by a quantitative ultrastructural analysis which allowed us also to determine the extent of bacterial degradation. A similar treatment was applied to the same strains growing in liquid medium. Our data show that in liquid medium, clarithromycin caused a 90% decrease in CFU within 7 days of treatment. When applied to Mphis infected with virulent M. avium, clarithromycin immediately arrested bacterial growth but was unable to fully kill and degrade intracellularly growing virulent bacteria. After 21 days of treatment, 25% of intracellular bacteria were still morphologically intact. These bacteria resumed growth upon removal of the antibiotic, with a normal replication rate. These bacteria had not become more resistant to the drug, since the MIC was unchanged as compared to the one determined for the initial stock used to infect Mphis. Our data therefore suggest that the intraphagosomal environment protects bacteria from degradation. We propose that the inability of the drug to completely destroy bacteria is the result of a limited accessibility of the drug due to prevention of fusions between the immature phagosomes in which virulent bacteria reside and lysosomes in which clarithromycin accumulates. In accord with our proposal, we show that the avirulent opaque variant, which does not prevent phagosome-lysosome fusions (unpublished data), is finally destroyed by clarithromycin even within the phagosomal

  3. GENETIC DIVERSITY OF SOME IRANIAN SWEET CHERRY (PRUNUS AVIUM) CULTIVARS USING MICROSATELLITE MARKERS AND MORPHOLOGICAL TRAITS.

    PubMed

    Farsad, A; Esna-Ashari, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize 23 important Iranian sweet cherry (Prunus avium) cultivars collected from different provinces of Iran and 1 foreign cultivar, which was used as control, considered for breeding programs by using 21 microsatellite markers and 27 morphological traits. In sweet cherry (Prunus avium) accessions, leaf, fruit, and stone morphological characters were evaluated during two consecutive years. The study revealed a high variability in the set of evaluated sweet cherry accessions. The majority of important correlations were determined among variables representing fruit and leaf size and variables related to color. Cluster analysis distinguished sweet cherry accessions into two distinct groups. Principal component analysis (PCA) of qualitative and quantitative morphological parameters explained over 86.59% of total variability in the first seven axes. In PCA, leaf traits such as leaf length and width, and fruit traits such as length, width, and weight, and fruit flesh and juice color were predominant in the first two components, indicating that they were useful for the assessment of sweet cherry germplasm characterization. Out of 21 SSR markers, 16 were polymorphic, producing 177 alleles that varied from 4 to 16 alleles (9.35 on average) with a mean heterozygosity value of 0.82 that produced successful amplifications and revealed DNA polymorphisms. Allele size varied from 95 to 290 bp. Cluster analyses showed that the studied sweet cherry genotypes were classified intofive main groups based mainly on their species characteristics and SSR data. In general, our results did not show a clear structuring of genetic variability within the Iranian diffusion area of sweet cherry, so it was not possible to draw any indications on regions of provenance delimitation. The results of this study contribute to a better understanding of sweet cherry genetic variations in Iran, thus making for more efficient programs aimed at preserving biodiversity and

  4. Mycobacterium avium Possesses Extracellular DNA that Contributes to Biofilm Formation, Structural Integrity, and Tolerance to Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Rose, Sasha J; Babrak, Lmar M; Bermudez, Luiz E

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis is an opportunistic pathogen that is associated with biofilm-related infections of the respiratory tract and is difficult to treat. In recent years, extracellular DNA (eDNA) has been found to be a major component of bacterial biofilms, including many pathogens involved in biofilm-associated infections. To date, eDNA has not been described as a component of mycobacterial biofilms. In this study, we identified and characterized eDNA in a high biofilm-producing strain of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH). In addition, we surveyed for presence of eDNA in various MAH strains and other nontuberculous mycobacteria. Biofilms of MAH A5 (high biofilm-producing strain) and MAH 104 (reference strain) were established at 22°C and 37°C on abiotic surfaces. Acellular biofilm matrix and supernatant from MAH A5 7 day-old biofilms both possess abundant eDNA, however very little eDNA was found in MAH 104 biofilms. A survey of MAH clinical isolates and other clinically relevant nontuberculous mycobacterial species revealed many species and strains that also produce eDNA. RAPD analysis demonstrated that eDNA resembles genomic DNA. Treatment with DNase I reduced the biomass of MAH A5 biofilms when added upon biofilm formation or to an already established biofilm both on abiotic surfaces and on top of human pharyngeal epithelial cells. Furthermore, co-treatment of an established biofilm with DNase 1 and either moxifloxacin or clarithromycin significantly increased the susceptibility of the bacteria within the biofilm to these clinically used antimicrobials. Collectively, our results describe an additional matrix component of mycobacterial biofilms and a potential new target to help treat biofilm-associated nontuberculous mycobacterial infections.

  5. Mycobacterium avium Possesses Extracellular DNA that Contributes to Biofilm Formation, Structural Integrity, and Tolerance to Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Sasha J.; Babrak, Lmar M.; Bermudez, Luiz E.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis is an opportunistic pathogen that is associated with biofilm-related infections of the respiratory tract and is difficult to treat. In recent years, extracellular DNA (eDNA) has been found to be a major component of bacterial biofilms, including many pathogens involved in biofilm-associated infections. To date, eDNA has not been described as a component of mycobacterial biofilms. In this study, we identified and characterized eDNA in a high biofilm-producing strain of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH). In addition, we surveyed for presence of eDNA in various MAH strains and other nontuberculous mycobacteria. Biofilms of MAH A5 (high biofilm-producing strain) and MAH 104 (reference strain) were established at 22°C and 37°C on abiotic surfaces. Acellular biofilm matrix and supernatant from MAH A5 7 day-old biofilms both possess abundant eDNA, however very little eDNA was found in MAH 104 biofilms. A survey of MAH clinical isolates and other clinically relevant nontuberculous mycobacterial species revealed many species and strains that also produce eDNA. RAPD analysis demonstrated that eDNA resembles genomic DNA. Treatment with DNase I reduced the biomass of MAH A5 biofilms when added upon biofilm formation or to an already established biofilm both on abiotic surfaces and on top of human pharyngeal epithelial cells. Furthermore, co-treatment of an established biofilm with DNase 1 and either moxifloxacin or clarithromycin significantly increased the susceptibility of the bacteria within the biofilm to these clinically used antimicrobials. Collectively, our results describe an additional matrix component of mycobacterial biofilms and a potential new target to help treat biofilm-associated nontuberculous mycobacterial infections. PMID:26010725

  6. Cloning and sequencing of a gene encoding a 21-kilodalton outer membrane protein from Bordetella avium and expression of the gene in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Gentry-Weeks, C R; Hultsch, A L; Kelly, S M; Keith, J M; Curtiss, R

    1992-01-01

    Three gene libraries of Bordetella avium 197 DNA were prepared in Escherichia coli LE392 by using the cosmid vectors pCP13 and pYA2329, a derivative of pCP13 specifying spectinomycin resistance. The cosmid libraries were screened with convalescent-phase anti-B. avium turkey sera and polyclonal rabbit antisera against B. avium 197 outer membrane proteins. One E. coli recombinant clone produced a 56-kDa protein which reacted with convalescent-phase serum from a turkey infected with B. avium 197. In addition, five E. coli recombinant clones were identified which produced B. avium outer membrane proteins with molecular masses of 21, 38, 40, 43, and 48 kDa. At least one of these E. coli clones, which encoded the 21-kDa protein, reacted with both convalescent-phase turkey sera and antibody against B. avium 197 outer membrane proteins. The gene for the 21-kDa outer membrane protein was localized by Tn5seq1 mutagenesis, and the nucleotide sequence was determined by dideoxy sequencing. DNA sequence analysis of the 21-kDa protein revealed an open reading frame of 582 bases that resulted in a predicted protein of 194 amino acids. Comparison of the predicted amino acid sequence of the gene encoding the 21-kDa outer membrane protein with protein sequences in the National Biomedical Research Foundation protein sequence data base indicated significant homology to the OmpA proteins of Shigella dysenteriae, Enterobacter aerogenes, E. coli, and Salmonella typhimurium and to Neisseria gonorrhoeae outer membrane protein III, Haemophilus influenzae protein P6, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa porin protein F. The gene (ompA) encoding the B. avium 21-kDa protein hybridized with 4.1-kb DNA fragments from EcoRI-digested, chromosomal DNA of Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica and with 6.0- and 3.2-kb DNA fragments from EcoRI-digested, chromosomal DNA of B. avium and B. avium-like DNA, respectively. A 6.75-kb DNA fragment encoding the B. avium 21-kDa protein was subcloned into the

  7. Bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities of benzoxazinorifamycin KRM-1648 against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium in human macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Mor, N; Simon, B; Heifets, L

    1996-01-01

    Inhibitory and bactericidal activities of KRM-1648 were determined against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium residing in human monocyte-derived macrophages and extracellular M. tuberculosis and M. avium. MICs and MBCs of KRM-1648 against intracellular and extracellular bacteria were substantially lower than those of rifampin. The MICs and MBCs of either drug against the intracellular bacteria were only twofold lower than or equal to the values found for extracellular bacteria. The prolonged effect of KRM-1648 found in this study is probably associated with high ratios of intracellular accumulation, which were 50- to 100-fold higher than that found for rifampin. Further studies on intracellular distribution of KRM-1648 and on the sites of actual interaction between the drug and bacteria residing in macrophages are necessary, as well as evaluation of combined effects of KRM-1648 with other drugs in long-term macrophage culture experiments. PMID:8726023

  8. A DNA sequence capture extraction method for detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in feces and tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Vansnick, Elke; de Rijk, Pim; Vercammen, Francis; Rigouts, Leen; Portaels, Françoise; Geysen, Dirk

    2007-05-16

    Culturing of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map) remains difficult and is time consuming. An alternative for the rapid detection of Map in samples is PCR. We have developed a sensitive DNA-extraction method based on sequence capture for the rapid detection of M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis by PCR in fecal and tissue samples. The method detected 10(2)Map/g feces using spiked samples, and reached a diagnostic sensitivity of 33,7% compared to 22% for culture. Analysis of tissue samples gave 65 polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-positive (42.2%) and 49 culture-positive samples (31.8%). Therefore, the detection limit of the DNA-extraction is the same as previously reported for culture, the PCR assay could detect more positive samples than the culture method.

  9. Effects of interleukin-12 in the long-term protection conferred by a Mycobacterium avium subunit vaccine.

    PubMed

    Silva, R A; Pais, T F; Appelberg, R

    2000-12-01

    The effects of the addition of recombinant interleukin (IL)-12 to a mycobacterial subunit vaccine were analyzed in terms of the longevity of the protective immunity generated. BALB/c mice were immunized with culture filtrate proteins from Mycobacterium avium with dimethyl-dioctadecilammonium bromide (DDA) as an adjuvant. This subunit vaccine induced protection against a challenge by M. avium which lasted for at least 6 months while waning with time until 1 year postvaccination. Whereas the addition of IL-12 enhanced the initial protective efficacy of this subunit vaccine during the first 6 months, it accelerated the loss of protective efficacy observed at 1 year postvaccination. These data confirm the adjuvant properties of IL-12 in vaccines against mycobacteria and raise the possibility of late counter-protective untoward effects.

  10. Short communication: Heritability estimates for susceptibility to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection defined by ELISA and fecal culture test results in Jersey cattle.

    PubMed

    Zare, Y; Shook, G E; Collins, M T; Kirkpatrick, B W

    2014-07-01

    Paratuberculosis (Johne's disease), an enteric disorder in ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis, causes economic losses in excess of $200 million annually to the US dairy industry. Costly diagnostic testing, cumbersome control programs, incurability, and ineffective vaccination all make M. avium ssp. paratuberculosis susceptibility a good candidate for genetic studies and genetic selection a potentially useful adjunct to management-based control programs. No report has been published for heritability of susceptibility to M. avium ssp. paratuberculosis infection in Jersey cattle. The objective of this study was to estimate variance components and heritability for susceptibility to M. avium ssp. paratuberculosis infection in US Jersey cattle. Data consisted of complete serum ELISA and partial fecal culture results on a total of 2,861 Jersey cows from 23 commercial herds throughout the United States after editing. Four M. avium ssp. paratuberculosis susceptibility phenotypes were defined using (1) ELISA sample-to-positive ratios as a continuous trait, (2) ELISA results as a binary trait (positive=1, negative=0), (3) ELISA results as an ordered categorical trait, and (4) a combined test in which ELISA and fecal culture results were both taken into account in a binary analysis. Three statistical models, including linear, binary threshold, and ordered threshold sire models, were used to analyze the data. All analyses were executed using the restricted maximum likelihood method in ASReml 3 software. The heritability estimates were low to moderate and ranged from 0.08 (±0.03) to 0.27 (±0.11) based on different trait definitions. The nonzero heritability indicates that susceptibility to M. avium ssp. paratuberculosis infection in Jersey cattle is influenced by genetic factors. Therefore, selection of the least susceptible animals could decrease genetic predisposition to M. avium ssp. paratuberculosis infection in Jersey populations in future

  11. Detection of Mycobacteria, Mycobacterium avium Subspecies, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex by a Novel Tetraplex Real-Time PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Elena; Elguezabal, Natalia; Pérez, Valentín; Garrido, Joseba M.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, Mycobacterium avium, and many other nontuberculous mycobacteria are worldwide distributed microorganisms of major medical and veterinary importance. Considering the growing epidemiologic significance of wildlife-livestock-human interrelation, developing rapid detection tools of high specificity and sensitivity is vital to assess their presence and accelerate the process of diagnosing mycobacteriosis. Here we describe the development and evaluation of a novel tetraplex real-time PCR for simultaneous detection of Mycobacterium genus, M. avium subspecies, and M. tuberculosis complex in an internally monitored single assay. The method was evaluated using DNA from mycobacterial (n = 38) and nonmycobacterial (n = 28) strains, tissues spiked with different CFU amounts of three mycobacterial species (n = 57), archival clinical samples (n = 233), and strains isolated from various hosts (n = 147). The minimum detectable DNA amount per reaction was 50 fg for M. bovis BCG and M. kansasii and 5 fg for M. avium subsp. hominissuis. When spiked samples were analyzed, the method consistently detected as few as 100 to 1,000 mycobacterial CFU per gram. The sensitivity and specificity values for the panel of clinical samples were 97.5 and 100% using a verified culture-based method as the reference method. The assays performed on clinical isolates confirmed these results. This PCR was able to identify M. avium and M. tuberculosis complex in the same sample in one reaction. In conclusion, the tetraplex real-time PCR we designed represents a highly specific and sensitive tool for the detection and identification of mycobacteria in routine laboratory diagnosis with potential additional uses. PMID:25588660

  12. Identification of (+)-erythro-mefloquine as an active enantiomer with greater efficacy than mefloquine against Mycobacterium avium infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, Luiz E; Inderlied, Clark B; Kolonoski, Peter; Chee, Christopher B; Aralar, Priscilla; Petrofsky, Mary; Parman, Toufan; Green, Carol E; Lewin, Anita H; Ellis, William Y; Young, Lowell S

    2012-08-01

    Infection caused by Mycobacterium avium is common in AIDS patients who do not receive treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) or who develop resistance to anti-HIV therapy. Mefloquine, a racemic mixture used for malaria prophylaxis and treatment, is bactericidal against M. avium in mice. MICs of (+)-erythro-, (-)-erythro-, (+)-threo-, and (-)-threo-mefloquine were 32 μg/ml, 32 μg/ml, 64 μg/ml, and 64 μg/ml, respectively. The postantibiotic effect for (+)-erythro-mefloquine was 36 h (MIC) and 41 h for a concentration of 4× MIC. The mefloquine postantibiotic effect was 25 h (MIC and 4× MIC). After baseline infection was established (7 days), the (+)- and (-)-isomers of the diastereomeric threo- and erythro-α-(2-piperidyl)-2,8-bis(trifluoromethyl)-4-quinolinemethanol were individually used to orally treat C57BL/6 bg(+)/bg(+) beige mice that were infected intravenously with M. avium. Mice were also treated with commercial mefloquine and diluent as controls. After 4 weeks of treatment, the mice were harvested, and the number of bacteria in spleen and liver was determined. Mice receiving (+)- or (-)-threo-mefloquine or (-)-erythro-mefloquine had numbers of bacterial load in tissues similar to those of untreated control mice at 4 weeks. Commercial mefloquine had a bactericidal effect. However, mice given the (+)-erythro-enantiomer for 4 weeks had a significantly greater reduction of bacterial load than those given mefloquine. Thus, (+)-erythro-mefloquine is the active enantiomer of mefloquine against M. avium and perhaps other mycobacteria.

  13. Detection of mycobacteria, Mycobacterium avium subspecies, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by a novel tetraplex real-time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Sevilla, Iker A; Molina, Elena; Elguezabal, Natalia; Pérez, Valentín; Garrido, Joseba M; Juste, Ramón A

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, Mycobacterium avium, and many other nontuberculous mycobacteria are worldwide distributed microorganisms of major medical and veterinary importance. Considering the growing epidemiologic significance of wildlife-livestock-human interrelation, developing rapid detection tools of high specificity and sensitivity is vital to assess their presence and accelerate the process of diagnosing mycobacteriosis. Here we describe the development and evaluation of a novel tetraplex real-time PCR for simultaneous detection of Mycobacterium genus, M. avium subspecies, and M. tuberculosis complex in an internally monitored single assay. The method was evaluated using DNA from mycobacterial (n = 38) and nonmycobacterial (n = 28) strains, tissues spiked with different CFU amounts of three mycobacterial species (n = 57), archival clinical samples (n = 233), and strains isolated from various hosts (n = 147). The minimum detectable DNA amount per reaction was 50 fg for M. bovis BCG and M. kansasii and 5 fg for M. avium subsp. hominissuis. When spiked samples were analyzed, the method consistently detected as few as 100 to 1,000 mycobacterial CFU per gram. The sensitivity and specificity values for the panel of clinical samples were 97.5 and 100% using a verified culture-based method as the reference method. The assays performed on clinical isolates confirmed these results. This PCR was able to identify M. avium and M. tuberculosis complex in the same sample in one reaction. In conclusion, the tetraplex real-time PCR we designed represents a highly specific and sensitive tool for the detection and identification of mycobacteria in routine laboratory diagnosis with potential additional uses.

  14. Mycobacterium avium complex suppurative parotitis in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus infection presenting with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Babiker, Zahir Osman Eltahir; Beeston, Christine; Purcell, Janet; Desai, Niranjan; Ustianowski, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    Restoration of the immune system following initiation of antiretroviral therapy can result in an adverse phenomenon known as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). Herein, we report a case of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) suppurative parotitis associated with IRIS in a patient with advanced human immunodeficiency virus disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of MAC parotitis in the setting of IRIS and clinicians should be aware of this condition.

  15. The clinical efficacy of a clarithromycin-based regimen for Mycobacterium avium complex disease: A nationwide post-marketing study.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Jun-Ichi; Kurashima, Atsuyuki; Suzuki, Katsuhiro

    2017-05-01

    The revised 2007 American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America statement recommend clarithromycin-based combination therapy for treatment of Mycobacterium avium complex lung disease and stipulates approximately 1 year of continuous treatment after bacilli negative conversion. However, supporting data are insufficient. Our objective was to obtain data on the clinical outcome of clarithromycin-based daily regimens by conducting a nationwide retrospective post-marketing study of M. avium complex lung disease. In accordance with the Japanese guidelines, patients were enrolled in this survey according to their chest radiographic findings and microbiologic test results. They were treated with a multidrug regimen including clarithromycin, rifampicin, and ethambutol (clarithromycin-based regimen) until bacilli negative conversion, and the treatment was continued for approximately 1 year after the initial conversion. Data were collected before administration, at the time of bacilli negative conversion, at the end of treatment, and at 6 months after the end of treatment. Of the 466 subjects enrolled in the study, 271 patients who received clarithromycin at 800 mg/day underwent evaluation for M. avium complex disease. The final bacilli negative conversion rate in those patients was 94.7%. The bacteriological relapse rate was 5.0% (5/100 patients). Bacteriological relapse was noted in patients treated for less than 15 months after conversion. No life-threatening or serious adverse drug reactions were observed. This study demonstrated that a clarithromycin-based daily regimen can yield a high bacteriological conversion rate in M. avium complex disease. After conversion, treatment for less than 15 months might be insufficient to prevent bacteriological relapse. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mycobacterium avium MAV2052 protein induces apoptosis in murine macrophage cells through Toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang-In; Choi, Han-Gyu; Son, Yeo-Jin; Whang, Jake; Kim, Kwangwook; Jeon, Heat Sal; Park, Hye-Soo; Back, Yong Woo; Choi, Seunga; Kim, Seong-Woo; Choi, Chul Hee; Kim, Hwa-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterium avium and its sonic extracts induce apoptosis in macrophages. However, little is known about the M. avium components regulating macrophage apoptosis. In this study, using multidimensional fractionation, we identified MAV2052 protein, which induced macrophage apoptosis in M. avium culture filtrates. The recombinant MAV2052 induced macrophage apoptosis in a caspase-dependent manner. The loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm), mitochondrial translocation of Bax, and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria were observed in macrophages treated with MAV2052. Further, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was required for the apoptosis induced by MAV2052. In addition, ROS and mitogen-activated protein kinases were involved in MAV2052-mediated TNF-α and IL-6 production. ROS-mediated activation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1)-JNK pathway was a major signaling pathway for MAV2052-induced apoptosis. Moreover, MAV2052 bound to Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 molecule and MAV2052-induced ROS production, ΔΨm loss, and apoptosis were all significantly reduced in TLR4(-/-) macrophages. Altogether, our results suggest that MAV2052 induces apoptotic cell death through TLR4 dependent ROS production and JNK pathway in murine macrophages.

  17. IS1245 restriction fragment length polymorphism typing of Mycobacterium avium from patients admitted to a reference hospital in Campinas, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Panunto, A C; Villares, M C B; Ramos, M C

    2003-10-01

    Mycobacterium avium is an important pathogen among immunodeficient patients, especially patients with AIDS. The natural history of this disease is unclear. Several environmental sources have been implicated as the origin of this infection. Polyclonal infection with this species is observed, challenging the understanding of its pathogenesis and treatment. In the present study 45 M. avium strains were recovered from 39 patients admitted to a reference hospital between 1996 and 1998. Species identification was performed using a species-specific nucleic acid hybridization test (AccuProbe) from Gen-Probe. Strains were genotyped using IS1245 restriction fragment length polymorphism typing. Blood was the main source of the organism. In one patient with disseminated disease, M. avium could be recovered more than once from potentially sterile sites. Strains isolated from this patient had different genotypes, indicating that the infection was polyclonal. Four patient clones were characterized in this population, the largest clone being detected in eight patients. This finding points to a common-source transmission of the organism.

  18. Killing of Mycobacterium avium by Lactoferricin Peptides: Improved Activity of Arginine- and d-Amino-Acid-Containing Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Tânia; Magalhães, Bárbara; Maia, Sílvia; Gomes, Paula; Nazmi, Kamran; Bolscher, Jan G. M.; Rodrigues, Pedro N.; Bastos, Margarida

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium causes respiratory disease in susceptible individuals, as well as disseminated infections in immunocompromised hosts, being an important cause of morbidity and mortality among these populations. Current therapies consist of a combination of antibiotics taken for at least 6 months, with no more than 60% overall clinical success. Furthermore, mycobacterial antibiotic resistance is increasing worldwide, urging the need to develop novel classes of antimicrobial drugs. One potential and interesting alternative strategy is the use of antimicrobial peptides (AMP). These are present in almost all living organisms as part of their immune system, acting as a first barrier against invading pathogens. In this context, we investigated the effect of several lactoferrin-derived AMP against M. avium. Short peptide sequences from both human and bovine lactoferricins, namely, hLFcin1-11 and LFcin17-30, as well as variants obtained by specific amino acid substitutions, were evaluated. All tested peptides significantly inhibited the axenic growth of M. avium, the bovine peptides being more active than the human. Arginine residues were found to be crucial for the display of antimycobacterial activity, whereas the all-d-amino-acid analogue of the bovine sequence displayed the highest mycobactericidal activity. These findings reveal the promising potential of lactoferricins against mycobacteria, thus opening the way for further research on their development and use as a new weapon against mycobacterial infections. PMID:24709266

  19. Virulence-related Mycobacterium avium subsp hominissuis MAV_2928 gene is associated with vacuole remodeling in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium avium subsp hominissuis (previously Mycobacterium avium subsp avium) is an environmental organism associated with opportunistic infections in humans. Mycobacterium hominissuis infects and replicates within mononuclear phagocytes. Previous study characterized an attenuated mutant in which the PPE gene (MAV_2928) homologous to Rv1787 was inactivated. This mutant, in contrast to the wild-type bacterium, was shown both to have impaired the ability to replicate within macrophages and to have prevented phagosome/lysosome fusion. Results MAV_2928 gene is primarily upregulated upon phagocytosis. The transcriptional profile of macrophages infected with the wild-type bacterium and the mutant were examined using DNA microarray, which showed that the two bacteria interact uniquely with mononuclear phagocytes. Based on the results, it was hypothesized that the phagosome environment and vacuole membrane of the wild-type bacterium might differ from the mutant. Wild-type bacterium phagosomes expressed a number of proteins different from those infected with the mutant. Proteins on the phagosomes were confirmed by fluorescence microscopy and Western blot. The environment in the phagosome of macrophages infected with the mutant differed from the environment of vacuoles with M. hominissuis wild-type in the concentration of zinc, manganese, calcium and potassium. Conclusion The results suggest that the MAV_2928 gene/operon might participate in the establishment of bacterial intracellular environment in macrophages. PMID:20359357

  20. Apa antigen of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis as a target for species-specific immunodetection of the bacteria in infected tissues of cattle with paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Souza, Giliane S; Rodrigues, Ana Bárbara F; Gioffré, Andrea; Romano, Maria I; Carvalho, Eulógio C Q; Ventura, Thatiana L B; Lasunskaia, Elena B

    2011-09-15

    Comparative genomics of Mycobacterium spp. have revealed conservative genes and respective proteins differently expressed in mycobacteria that could be used as targets for the species-specific immunodiagnostics. The alanine and proline-rich antigen Apa is a mycobacterial protein that present significant variability in primary sequence length and composition between members of M. avium and M. tuberculosis complexes. In this study, the recombinant Apa protein encoded by the MAP1569/ModD gene of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) was used to generate a panel of monoclonal antibodies which were shown to recognize the most important veterinary pathogens of the M. avium complex, specifically Map and M. avium subsp. hominissuis, and which did not cross-react with M. bovis or M. tuberculosis. The produced antibodies were demonstrated to be a useful tool for the species-specific immunofluorescence or immunohistochemical detection of Map in experimentally infected cell cultures or intestinal tissues from cattle with bovine paratuberculosis and, additionally, they may be employed for the discrimination of pathogenic M. avium subspecies via Western blotting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare isolated in Puerto Rico from clinical samples by the use of a non-radioactive DNA probe.

    PubMed

    García, M T; Peña, I; Zlotnik, H

    1994-06-01

    The Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), especially M. avium, is an important opportunistic pathogen of AIDS patients in the United States. In Puerto Rico, the incidence of infections caused by MAC has not been determined. This is due, in part, to the difficulties associated to the microbiological identification of the microorganisms. In this work, a commercially available kit (AccuProbe, Gen-Probe, Inc., San Diego, CA) utilizing a DNA probe complementary to rRNA of M. avium and M. intracellulare was used to identify seventeen MAC strains and one unknown atypical mycobacterium recovered in culture in Puerto Rico from clinical samples. The results obtained revealed that M. avium was the predominant species recovered (83% of isolates tested). Only two cultures were identified as M. intracellulare. The unknown culture, which did not react with either probe, turned out to be M. gordonae. The probe tests not only are simple to perform, but provide cultural identification results in as little as two hours. This study, the first one of its kind in Puerto Rico, demonstrates that the nucleic acid probes for the cultural identification of M. avium and M. intracellulare offer the potential of providing a prompt diagnosis and much needed data on the epidemiology of MAC infections in Puerto Rico.

  2. Infection Sources of a Common Non-tuberculous Mycobacterial Pathogen, Mycobacterium avium Complex

    PubMed Central

    Nishiuchi, Yukiko; Iwamoto, Tomotada; Maruyama, Fumito

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have revealed a continuous increase in the worldwide incidence and prevalence of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) diseases, especially pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) diseases. Although it is not clear why NTM diseases have been increasing, one possibility is an increase of mycobacterial infection sources in the environment. Thus, in this review, we focused on the infection sources of pathogenic NTM, especially MAC. The environmental niches for MAC include water, soil, and dust. The formation of aerosols containing NTM arising from shower water, soil, and pool water implies that these niches can be infection sources. Furthermore, genotyping has shown that clinical isolates are identical to environmental ones from household tap water, bathrooms, potting soil, and garden soil. Therefore, to prevent and treat MAC diseases, it is essential to identify the infection sources for these organisms, because patients with these diseases often suffer from reinfections and recurrent infections with them. In the environmental sources, MAC and other NTM organisms can form biofilms, survive within amoebae, and exist in a free-living state. Mycobacterial communities are also likely to occur in these infection sources in households. Water distribution systems are a transmission route from natural water reservoirs to household tap water. Other infection sources include areas with frequent human contact, such as soil and bathrooms, indicating that individuals may carry NTM organisms that concomitantly attach to their household belongings. To explore the mechanisms associated with the global spread of infection and MAC transmission routes, an epidemiological population-wide genotyping survey would be very useful. A good example of the power of genotyping comes from M. avium subsp. hominissuis, where close genetic relatedness was found between isolates of it from European patients and pigs in Japan and Europe, implying global transmission of this bacterium

  3. Epidemiology and Ecology of Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hilborn, Elizabeth D.; Arduino, Matthew J.; Pruden, Amy; Edwards, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens (OPPPs) that persist and grow in household plumbing, habitats they share with humans. Infections caused by these OPPPs involve individuals with preexisting risk factors and frequently require hospitalization. Objectives The objectives of this report are to alert professionals of the impact of OPPPs, the fact that 30% of the population may be exposed to OPPPs, and the need to develop means to reduce OPPP exposure. We herein present a review of the epidemiology and ecology of these three bacterial OPPPs, specifically to identify common and unique features. Methods A Water Research Foundation–sponsored workshop gathered experts from across the United States to review the characteristics of OPPPs, identify problems, and develop a list of research priorities to address critical knowledge gaps with respect to increasing OPPP-associated disease. Discussion OPPPs share the common characteristics of disinfectant resistance and growth in biofilms in water distribution systems or premise plumbing. Thus, they share a number of habitats with humans (e.g., showers) that can lead to exposure and infection. The frequency of OPPP-infected individuals is rising and will likely continue to rise as the number of at-risk individuals is increasing. Improved reporting of OPPP disease and increased understanding of the genetic, physiologic, and structural characteristics governing the persistence and growth of OPPPs in drinking water distribution systems and premise plumbing is needed. Conclusions Because broadly effective community-level engineering interventions for the control of OPPPs have yet to be identified, and because the number of at-risk individuals will continue to rise, it is likely that OPPP-related infections will continue to increase. However, it is possible that individuals can take measures (e.g., raise hot water heater temperatures and filter

  4. Primary transcriptomes of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis reveal proprietary pathways in tissue and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) persistently infects intestines and mesenteric lymph nodes leading to a prolonged subclinical disease. The MAP genome sequence was published in 2005, yet its transcriptional organization in natural infection is unknown. While prior research analyzed regulated gene sets utilizing defined, in vitro stress related or advanced surgical methods with various animal species, we investigated the intracellular lifestyle of MAP in the intestines and lymph nodes to understand the MAP pathways that function to govern this persistence. Results Our transcriptional analysis shows that 21%, 8% and 3% of the entire MAP genome was represented either inside tissues, macrophages or both, respectively. Transcripts belonging to latency and cell envelope biogenesis were upregulated in the intestinal tissues whereas those belonging to intracellular trafficking and secretion were upregulated inside the macrophages. Transcriptomes of natural infection and in vitro macrophage infection shared genes involved in transcription and inorganic ion transport and metabolism. MAP specific genes within large sequence polymorphisms of ancestral M. avium complex were downregulated exclusively in natural infection. Conclusions We have unveiled common and unique MAP pathways associated with persistence, cell wall biogenesis and virulence in naturally infected cow intestines, lymph nodes and in vitro infected macrophages. This dichotomy also suggests that in vitro macrophage models may be insufficient in providing accurate information on the events that transpire during natural infection. This is the first report to examine the primary transcriptome of MAP at the local infection site (i.e. intestinal tissue). Regulatory pathways that govern the lifecycle of MAP appear to be specified by tissue and cell type. While tissues show a "shut-down" of major MAP metabolic genes, infected macrophages upregulate several MAP specific genes along with a

  5. Infection Sources of a Common Non-tuberculous Mycobacterial Pathogen, Mycobacterium avium Complex.

    PubMed

    Nishiuchi, Yukiko; Iwamoto, Tomotada; Maruyama, Fumito

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have revealed a continuous increase in the worldwide incidence and prevalence of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) diseases, especially pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) diseases. Although it is not clear why NTM diseases have been increasing, one possibility is an increase of mycobacterial infection sources in the environment. Thus, in this review, we focused on the infection sources of pathogenic NTM, especially MAC. The environmental niches for MAC include water, soil, and dust. The formation of aerosols containing NTM arising from shower water, soil, and pool water implies that these niches can be infection sources. Furthermore, genotyping has shown that clinical isolates are identical to environmental ones from household tap water, bathrooms, potting soil, and garden soil. Therefore, to prevent and treat MAC diseases, it is essential to identify the infection sources for these organisms, because patients with these diseases often suffer from reinfections and recurrent infections with them. In the environmental sources, MAC and other NTM organisms can form biofilms, survive within amoebae, and exist in a free-living state. Mycobacterial communities are also likely to occur in these infection sources in households. Water distribution systems are a transmission route from natural water reservoirs to household tap water. Other infection sources include areas with frequent human contact, such as soil and bathrooms, indicating that individuals may carry NTM organisms that concomitantly attach to their household belongings. To explore the mechanisms associated with the global spread of infection and MAC transmission routes, an epidemiological population-wide genotyping survey would be very useful. A good example of the power of genotyping comes from M. avium subsp. hominissuis, where close genetic relatedness was found between isolates of it from European patients and pigs in Japan and Europe, implying global transmission of this bacterium

  6. Mycobacterium avium restriction fragment length polymorphism-IS IS1245 and the simple double repetitive element polymerase chain reaction typing method to screen genetic diversity in Brazilian strains.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Patrícia Carvalho de; Fonseca, Leila de Souza; Silva, Marlei Gomes da; Saad, Maria Helena Féres

    2005-11-01

    Simple double repetitive element polymerase chain reaction (MaDRE-PCR) and Pvu II-IS1245 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) typing methods were used to type 41 Mycobacterium avium isolates obtained from 14 AIDS inpatients and 10 environment and animals specimens identified among 53 mycobacteria isolated from 237 food, chicken, and pig. All environmental and animals strains showed orphan patterns by both methods. By MaDRE-PCR four patients, with multiple isolates, showed different patterns, suggesting polyclonal infection that was confirmed by RFLP in two of them. This first evaluation of MaDRE-PCR on Brazilian M. avium strains demonstrated that the method seems to be useful as simple and less expensive typing method for screening genetic diversity in M. avium strains on selected epidemiological studies, although with limitation on analysis identical patterns except for one band.

  7. TGF-β-Mediated Sustained ERK1/2 Activity Promotes the Inhibition of Intracellular Growth of Mycobacterium avium in Epithelioid Cells Surrogates

    PubMed Central

    L'Abbate, Carolina; Cipriano, Ivone; Pérez-Hurtado, Elizabeth Cristina; Leão, Sylvia Cardoso; Carneiro, Célia Regina Whitaker; Machado, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases including infection with intracellular pathogens such as the Mycobacterium avium complex. Infection of macrophages with M. avium induces TGF-β production and neutralization of this cytokine has been associated with decreased intracellular bacterial growth. We have previously demonstrated that epithelioid cell surrogates (ECs) derived from primary murine peritoneal macrophages through a process of differentiation induced by IL-4 overlap several features of epithelioid cells found in granulomas. In contrast to undifferentiated macrophages, ECs produce larger amounts of TGF-β and inhibit the intracellular growth of M. avium. Here we asked whether the levels of TGF-β produced by ECs are sufficient to induce a self-sustaining autocrine TGF-β signaling controlling mycobacterial replication in infected-cells. We showed that while exogenous addition of increased concentration of TGF-β to infected-macrophages counteracted M. avium replication, pharmacological blockage of TGF-β receptor kinase activity with SB-431542 augmented bacterial load in infected-ECs. Moreover, the levels of TGF-β produced by ECs correlated with high and sustained levels of ERK1/2 activity. Inhibition of ERK1/2 activity with U0126 increased M. avium replication in infected-cells, suggesting that modulation of intracellular bacterial growth is dependent on the activation of ERK1/2. Interestingly, blockage of TGF-β receptor kinase activity with SB-431542 in infected-ECs inhibited ERK1/2 activity, enhanced intracellular M. avium burden and these effects were followed by a severe decrease in TGF-β production. In summary, our findings indicate that the amplitude of TGF-β signaling coordinates the strength and duration of ERK1/2 activity that is determinant for the control of intracellular mycobacterial growth. PMID:21731758

  8. Genetic structure of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis population in cattle herds in Quebec as revealed by using a combination of multilocus genomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Sohal, Jagdip Singh; Arsenault, Julie; Labrecque, Olivia; Fairbrother, Julie-Hélène; Roy, Jean-Philippe; Fecteau, Gilles; L'Homme, Yvan

    2014-08-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the etiological agent of paratuberculosis, a granulomatous enteritis affecting a wide range of domestic and wild ruminants worldwide. A variety of molecular typing tools are used to distinguish M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains, contributing to a better understanding of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis epidemiology. In the present study, PCR-based typing methods, including mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units/variable-number tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) and small sequence repeats (SSR) in addition to IS1311 PCR-restriction enzyme analysis (PCR-REA), were used to investigate the genetic heterogeneity of 200 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains from dairy herds located in the province of Quebec, Canada. The majority of strains were of the "cattle type," or type II, although 3 strains were of the "bison type." A total of 38 genotypes, including a novel one, were identified using a combination of 17 genetic markers, which generated a Simpson's index of genetic diversity of 0.876. Additional analyses revealed no differences in genetic diversity between environmental and individual strains. Of note, a spatial and spatiotemporal cluster was evidenced regarding the distribution of one of the most common genotypes. The population had an overall homogeneous genetic structure, although a few strains stemmed out of the consensus cluster, including the bison-type strains. The genetic structure of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis populations within most herds suggested intraherd dissemination and microevolution, although evidence of interherd contamination was also revealed. The level of genetic diversity obtained by combining MIRU-VNTR and SSR markers shows a promising avenue for molecular epidemiology investigations of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis transmission patterns.

  9. Relationship between virulence of Mycobacterium avium strains and induction of tumor necrosis factor alpha production in infected mice and in in vitro-cultured mouse macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Sarmento, A M; Appelberg, R

    1995-01-01

    We studied the ability of two Mycobacterium avium strains with different virulences to induce tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) synthesis by mouse resident peritoneal macrophages (RPM phi) in vitro in an experiment to look for a possible correlation between virulence and this TNF-inducing capacity. The low-virulence strain, 1983, induced significantly higher production of TNF by RPM phi than did the high-virulence strain, ATCC 25291. TNF neutralization during culture of infected RPM phi resulted in enhancement of growth of strain 1983 and had no effect on growth of strain ATCC 25291; TNF treatment of strain ATCC 25291-infected macrophages had no effect on mycobacterial growth. The extent of M. avium growth and the amount of TNF synthesis were independent of the presence of contaminating T cells or NK cells in the macrophage monolayers. Intraperitoneal administration of anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies to BALB/c mice infected intravenously with M. avium 1983 abrogated the elimination of the bacteria in the liver and caused a slight increase in bacterial growth in the spleen. Neutralization of TNF led to a minor increase in the proliferation of M. avium ATCC 25291 in the liver and spleen of BALB/c mice late in infection. Anti-TNF treatment did not affect the growth of the two M. avium strains in BALB/c.Bcgr (C.D2) mice, suggesting that restriction of M. avium strains to induce TNF production by macrophages may limit their ability to proliferate both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:7558277

  10. Presence of PPE proteins in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates and their immunogenicity in cattle.

    PubMed

    Newton, Victoria; McKenna, Shawn L; De Buck, Jeroen

    2009-03-30

    Johne's disease or paratuberculosis in cattle is caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). Although the stages of infection have been well described, very few virulence factors of MAP have been studied in detail. We aimed to study the localization and immunogenicity of members of the polymorphic PPE protein family which is unique to Mycobacteria and has been linked to virulence in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The presence of PPE proteins in the cell wall was investigated by enzymatic digest of surface exposed proteins of live MAP bacteria and analysis by LC-MS/MS. Polyclonal antisera were generated against a recombinant fragment of one PPE protein and a synthetic peptide of the other to confirm their surface exposure. Sera from naturally infected cows were investigated for the presence of specific antibodies against the recombinant PPE protein. Two PPE proteins, Map3420c and Map1506, were detected by mass spectrometry and confirmed to be surface exposed on live MAP cells by immunohistochemistry. The sera from naturally infected animals contained specific antibodies against recombinantly expressed Map3420c as demonstrated by western blotting. These findings show the in vitro expression of two PPE proteins. Additionally the surface exposure and immunogenicity of PPE proteins of MAP was demonstrated.

  11. Genome-Wide Diversity and Phylogeography of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Canadian Dairy Cattle.

    PubMed

    Ahlstrom, Christina; Barkema, Herman W; Stevenson, Karen; Zadoks, Ruth N; Biek, Roman; Kao, Rowland; Trewby, Hannah; Haupstein, Deb; Kelton, David F; Fecteau, Gilles; Labrecque, Olivia; Keefe, Greg P; McKenna, Shawn L B; Tahlan, Kapil; De Buck, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative bacterium of Johne's disease (JD) in ruminants. The control of JD in the dairy industry is challenging, but can be improved with a better understanding of the diversity and distribution of MAP subtypes. Previously established molecular typing techniques used to differentiate MAP have not been sufficiently discriminatory and/or reliable to accurately assess the population structure. In this study, the genetic diversity of 182 MAP isolates representing all Canadian provinces was compared to the known global diversity, using single nucleotide polymorphisms identified through whole genome sequencing. MAP isolates from Canada represented a subset of the known global diversity, as there were global isolates intermingled with Canadian isolates, as well as multiple global subtypes that were not found in Canada. One Type III and six "Bison type" isolates were found in Canada as well as one Type II subtype that represented 86% of all Canadian isolates. Rarefaction estimated larger subtype richness in Québec than in other Canadian provinces using a strict definition of MAP subtypes and lower subtype richness in the Atlantic region using a relaxed definition. Significant phylogeographic clustering was observed at the inter-provincial but not at the intra-provincial level, although most major clades were found in all provinces. The large number of shared subtypes among provinces suggests that cattle movement is a major driver of MAP transmission at the herd level, which is further supported by the lack of spatial clustering on an intra-provincial scale.

  12. New PCR systems to confirm real-time PCR detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Herthnek, David; Bölske, Göran

    2006-01-01

    Background Johne's disease, a serious chronic form of enteritis in ruminants, is caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). As the organism is very slow-growing and fastidious, several PCR-based methods for detection have been developed, based mainly on the MAP-specific gene IS900. However, because this gene is similar to genes in other mycobacteria, there is a need for sensitive and reliable methods to confirm the presence of MAP. As described here, two new real-time PCR systems on the IS900 gene and one on the F57 gene were developed and carefully validated on 267 strains and 56 positive clinical faecal samples. Results Our confirmatory PCR systems on IS900 were found sensitive and specific, only yielding weak false positive reactions in one strain for each system. The PCR system on F57 did not elicit any false positives and was only slightly less sensitive than our primary IS900-system. DNA from both naturally infected and spiked faeces that tested positive with our primary system could be confirmed with all new systems, except one low-level infected sample that tested negative with the F57 system. Conclusion We recommend using the newly constructed DH3 PCR system on the F57 gene as the primary confirmatory test for PCR positives, but should it fail due to its lower sensitivity, the DH1 and DH2 PCR systems should be used. PMID:17020599

  13. Characterization of the S-RNase promoters from sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.).

    PubMed

    Ishizaka, Takako; Nakano, Hideaki; Suzuki, Takashi; Kitashiba, Hiroyasu

    2003-04-01

    Genomic DNA fragments containing the S(3)-, S(4)-, and S(6)-RNase genes were isolated from the sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) and sequenced. Comparison of the 5'-flanking sequences of these three S-RNases indicated that a highly conserved region (designated CR) existed just upstream from the putative TATA boxes. We postulate that CR contains cis-regulatory element(s) involved in pistil expression. To examine the activity of the isolated S-RNase promoters of sweet cherry in the pistil, we transiently introduced approximately 650-bp fragments of the S(4)- and S(6)-RNase promoters fused to beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene into the pistil of the petunia using a particle bombardment technique. Histochemical analysis showed that the 5'-flanking region of each S-RNase was active in the pistil. This suggests that cis-regulatory element(s) for pistil-specific expression may exist(s) within the 650-bp region upstream from the TATA box in the sweet cherry S-RNase promoter.

  14. Expression of NRAMP1 and iNOS in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis naturally infected cattle.

    PubMed

    Delgado, F; Estrada-Chávez, C; Romano, M; Paolicchi, F; Blanco-Viera, F; Capellino, F; Chavez-Gris, G; Pereira-Suárez, A L

    2010-09-01

    Paratuberculosis (PTB) is a chronic disease caused by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) that affects several animal species, and some studies have suggested that there may be a relationship between Crohn's disease and PTB. Significant aspects of PTB pathogenesis are not yet completely understood, such as the role of macrophages. Natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (NRAMP1) and the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) molecules have shown nonspecific effects against several intracellular pathogens residing within macrophages. However, these molecules have been scarcely studied during natural infection with MAP. In this work, changes in NRAMP1 and iNOS expression were surveyed by immunohistochemistry in tissue samples from MAP-infected cattle and healthy controls. Our findings show strong specific immunolabeling against both NRAMP1 and iNOS molecules, throughout granulomatous PTB-compatible lesions in ileum and ileocaecal lymph nodes from paratuberculous cattle compared with uninfected controls, suggesting a relationship between the expression of these molecules and the pathogenesis of PTB disease. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Macrophage polarization in cattle experimentally exposed to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Thirunavukkarasu, Shyamala; de Silva, Kumudika; Begg, Douglas J; Whittington, Richard J; Plain, Karren M

    2015-12-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD) in cattle, has significant impacts on the livestock industry and has been implicated in the etiology of Crohn's disease. Macrophages play a key role in JD pathogenesis, which is driven by the manipulation of host immune mechanisms by MAP. A change in the macrophage microenvironment due to pathogenic or host-derived stimuli can lead to classical (M1) or alternative (M2) polarization of macrophages. In addition, prior exposure to antigenic stimuli has been reported to alter the response of macrophages to subsequent stimuli. However, macrophage polarization in response to MAP exposure and its possible implications have not been previously addressed. In this study, we have comprehensively examined monocyte/macrophage polarization and responsiveness to antigens from MAP-exposed and unexposed animals. At 3 years post-exposure, there was a heterogeneous macrophage activation pattern characterized by both classical and alternate phenotypes. Moreover, subsequent exposure of macrophages from MAP-exposed cattle to antigens from MAP and other mycobacterial species led to significant variation in the production of nitric oxide, interleukin-10 and tumour necrosis factor α. These results indicate the previously unreported possibility of changes in the activation state and responsiveness of circulating monocytes/macrophages from MAP-exposed cattle.

  16. Attenuated strains of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis as vaccine candidates against Johne's disease.

    PubMed

    Settles, Erik W; Kink, John A; Talaat, Adel

    2014-04-11

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) is the causative agent of Johne's disease in ruminants. Johne's disease has a severe economic impact on the dairy industry in the USA and worldwide. In an effort to combat this disease, we screened several transposon mutants that were attenuated in the murine model of paratuberculosis for the potential use as live attenuated vaccines. Using the murine model, two vaccine candidates (pgs1360, pgs3965 with mutations of fabG2_2 and umaA1, respectively) were at or below the limit of detection for tissue colonization suggesting their low level persistence and hence safety. Prior to challenge, both candidates induced a M. paratuberculosis-specific IFN-γ, an indication of eliciting cell-mediated immunity. Following challenge with a virulent strain of M. paratuberculosis, the two vaccine candidates significantly reduced bacterial colonization in organs with reduced histological scores compared to control animals. In addition, one of the vaccine candidates (pgs3965) also induced IL-17a, a cytokine associated with protective immunity in mycobacterial infection. Our analysis suggested that the pgs3965 vaccine candidate is a potential live-attenuated vaccine that could be tested further in ruminant models of paratuberculosis. The analysis also validated our screening strategy to identify effective vaccine candidates against intracellular pathogens.

  17. Metabolic phenotype of clinical and environmental Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis isolates

    PubMed Central

    Sanchini, Andrea; Dematheis, Flavia; Semmler, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH) is an emerging opportunistic human pathogen. It can cause pulmonary infections, lymphadenitis and disseminated infections in immuno-compromised patients. In addition, MAH is widespread in the environment, since it has been isolated from water, soil or dust. In recent years, knowledge on MAH at the molecular level has increased substantially. In contrast, knowledge of the MAH metabolic phenotypes remains limited. Methods In this study, for the first time we analyzed the metabolic substrate utilization of ten MAH isolates, five from a clinical source and five from an environmental source. We used BIOLOG Phenotype MicroarrayTM technology for the analysis. This technology permits the rapid and global analysis of metabolic phenotypes. Results The ten MAH isolates tested showed different metabolic patterns pointing to high intra-species diversity. Our MAH isolates preferred to use fatty acids such as Tween, caproic, butyric and propionic acid as a carbon source, and L-cysteine as a nitrogen source. Environmental MAH isolates resulted in being more metabolically active than clinical isolates, since the former metabolized more strongly butyric acid (p = 0.0209) and propionic acid (p = 0.00307). Discussion Our study provides new insight into the metabolism of MAH. Understanding how bacteria utilize substrates during infection might help the developing of strategies to fight such infections. PMID:28070460

  18. Generation and screening of a comprehensive Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis transposon mutant bank.

    PubMed

    Rathnaiah, Govardhan; Lamont, Elise A; Harris, N Beth; Fenton, Robert J; Zinniel, Denise K; Liu, Xiaofei; Sotos, Josh; Feng, Zhengyu; Livneh-Kol, Ayala; Shpigel, Nahum Y; Czuprynski, Charles J; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Barletta, Raúl G

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiologic agent of Johne's Disease in ruminants. This enteritis has significant economic impact and worldwide distribution. Vaccination is one of the most cost effective infectious disease control measures. Unfortunately, current vaccines reduce clinical disease and shedding, but are of limited efficacy and do not provide long-term protective immunity. Several strategies have been followed to mine the MAP genome for virulence determinants that could be applied to vaccine and diagnostic assay development. In this study, a comprehensive mutant bank of 13,536 MAP K-10 Tn5367 mutants (P > 95%) was constructed and screened in vitro for phenotypes related to virulence. This strategy was designated to maximize identification of genes important to MAP pathogenesis without relying on studies of other mycobacterial species that may not translate into similar effects in MAP. This bank was screened for mutants with colony morphology alterations, susceptibility to D-cycloserine, impairment in siderophore production or secretion, reduced cell association, and decreased biofilm and clump formation. Mutants with interesting phenotypes were analyzed by PCR, Southern blotting and DNA sequencing to determine transposon insertion sites. These insertion sites mapped upstream from the MAP1152-MAP1156 cluster, internal to either the Mod operon gene MAP1566 or within the coding sequence of lsr2, and several intergenic regions. Growth curves in broth cultures, invasion assays and kinetics of survival and replication in primary bovine macrophages were also determined. The ability of vectors carrying Tn5370 to generate stable MAP mutants was also investigated.

  19. Application of multiple laboratory tests for Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis detection in Crohn's disease patient specimens.

    PubMed

    Banche, Giuliana; Allizond, Valeria; Sostegni, Raffaello; Lavagna, Alessandro; Bergallo, Massimiliano; Sidoti, Francesca; Daperno, Marco; Rocca, Rodolfo; Cuffini, Anna Maria

    2015-07-01

    The difficulties involved in detecting and enumerating Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) as a pathogen potentially involved in Crohn's disease (CD) are well known. This study aimed to improve this situation through the application of multiple laboratory diagnostic tests to detect and isolate this bacterium from different specimens collected from CD-patients and non-CD subjects as controls. A total of 120 samples (terminal ileum and colon biopsies, blood and stool) were obtained from 19 CD-patients and from 11 individuals who did not have a clinicopathological diagnosis of CD (non-CD controls) attending for ileocolonoscopy. All samples were processed by staining techniques, culture on both solid and liquid media, and Insertion Sequence 900/F57 real-time PCR. The MAP frequency in CD-patients was found in a significantly greater proportion than in non-CD subjects; the most positive samples were biopsies from CD-patients tested by real-time PCR. MAP detection in biopsies, and in the other samples, by applying multiple and validated laboratory diagnostic tests, could be a marker of active infection, supporting MAP involvement in CD.

  20. Ecology and genomic features of infection with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Amin, Adel S; Hsu, Chung-Yi; Darwish, Samah F; Ghosh, Pallab; AbdEl-Fatah, Eman M; Behour, Tahani S; Talaat, Adel M

    2015-04-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) is the causative agent of paratuberculosis, or Johne's disease, in cattle, with potential involvement in cases of Crohn's disease in humans. Johne's disease is found worldwide and is economically important for both beef and dairy industries. In an effort to characterize this important infection in Egypt, we analysed the ecological and genomic features of recent isolates of M. paratuberculosis. In this report, we examined 26 Holstein dairy herds distributed throughout Egypt, from 2010 to 2013. Using PCR analysis of faecal samples, we estimated a mean herd-level prevalence of 65.4 %, with animal-level infection that reached a mean of 13.6 % among animals suffering from diarrhoea. Whole genome sequencing of field isolates identified numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms among field isolates relative to the standard M. paratuberculosis K10 genome. Interestingly, the virulence of M. paratuberculosis isolates from Egypt revealed diverse virulence phenotypes in the murine model of paratuberculosis, with significant differences in tissue colonization, particularly during the chronic stage of infection. Overall, our analysis confirmed that Johne's disease is a newly identified problem in Egypt and indicated that M. paratuberculosis has potentially diverse genotypes that impact its virulence. Further ecological mapping and genomic analysis of M. paratuberculosis will enhance our understanding of the transmission and evolutionary dynamics of this pathogen under natural field conditions.

  1. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in bovine milk from the state of Pernambuco, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Pedro Paulo Feitosa de; Santos, André de Souza; Souza Neto, Orestes Luiz de; Kim, Pomy de Cássia Peixoto; Cavalcanti, Erika Fernanda Torres Samico Fernandes; Oliveira, Júnior Mário Baltazar de; Mota, Rinaldo Aparecido; Júnior, José Wilton Pinheiro

    The aim of this study was to detect the IS900 region of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in bovine milk samples using real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and conventional PCR, and to study the agreement between these tests. A total of 121 bovine milk samples were collected from herds considered positive for MAP, from the State of Pernambuco, Brazil. MAP DNA was detected in 20 samples (16.5%) using conventional PCR and in 34 samples (28.1%) using qPCR. MAP DNA was detected in all of the 6 animal farms studied. Moderate agreement was found between qPCR and conventional PCR results, where the sensitivity and specificity of conventional PCR in relation to qPCR were 50% and 96.6%, respectively. Thus, the IS900 region of MAP was found in bovine milk samples from the State of Pernambuco. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of MAP DNA found in bovine milk in Northeast Brazil. We also demonstrated the qPCR technique is more sensitive than conventional PCR with respect to detection of MAP in milk samples.

  2. The role of IL-10 in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Tariq; Shah, Syed Zahid Ali; Zhao, Deming; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Zhou, Xiangmei

    2016-12-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is an intracellular pathogen and is the causative agent of Johne's disease of domestic and wild ruminants. Johne's disease is characterized by chronic granulomatous enteritis leading to substantial economic losses to the livestock sector across the world. MAP persistently survives in phagocytic cells, most commonly in macrophages by disrupting its early antibacterial activity. MAP triggers several signaling pathways after attachment to pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs) of phagocytic cells. MAP adopts a survival strategy to escape the host defence mechanisms via the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. The signaling mechanism initiated through toll like receptor 2 (TLR2) activates MAPK-p38 results in up-regulation of interleukin-10 (IL-10), and subsequent repression of inflammatory cytokines. The anti-inflammatory response of IL-10 is mediated through membrane-bound IL-10 receptors, leading to trans-phosphorylation and activation of Janus Kinase (JAK) family receptor-associated tyrosine kinases (TyKs), that promotes the activation of latent transcription factors, signal transducer and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3). IL-10 is an important inhibitory cytokine playing its role in blocking phagosome maturation and apoptosis. In the current review, we describe the importance of IL-10 in early phases of the MAP infection and regulatory mechanisms of the IL-10 dependent pathways in paratuberculosis. We also highlight the strategies to target IL-10, MAPK and STAT3 in other infections caused by intracellular pathogens.

  3. The Association of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Timms, Verlaine J; Daskalopoulos, George; Mitchell, Hazel M; Neilan, Brett A

    2016-01-01

    The association of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) with Crohn's disease is a controversial issue. M. paratuberculosis is detected by amplifying the IS900 gene, as microbial culture is unreliable from humans. We determined the presence of M. paratuberculosis in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) (n = 22), ulcerative colitis (UC) (n = 20), aphthous ulcers (n = 21) and controls (n = 42) using PCR assays validated on bovine tissue. Culture from human tissue was also performed. M. paratuberculosis prevalence in the CD and UC groups was compared to the prevalence in age and sex matched non-inflammatory bowel disease controls. Patients and controls were determined to be M. paratuberculosis positive if all three PCR assays were positive. A significant association was found between M. paratuberculosis and Crohn's disease (p = 0.02) that was not related to age, gender, place of birth, smoking or alcohol intake. No significant association was detected between M. paratuberculosis and UC or aphthous ulcers; however, one M. paratuberculosis isolate was successfully cultured from a patient with UC. We report the resistance of this isolate to ethambutol, rifampin, clofazamine and streptomycin. Interestingly this isolate could not only survive but could grow slowly at 5°C. We demonstrate a significant association between M. paratuberculosis and CD using multiple pre-validated PCR assays and that M. paratuberculosis can be isolated from patients with UC.

  4. Host Transcriptional Profiles and Immunopathologic Response following Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Shin, Min-Kyoung; Park, Hongtae; Shin, Seung Won; Jung, Myunghwan; Lee, Su-Hyung; Kim, Dae-Yong; Yoo, Han Sang

    2015-01-01

    Paratuberculosis or Johne's disease is a chronic granulomatous enteropathy in ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection. In the present study, we examined the host response to MAP infection in spleens of mice in order to investigate the host immunopathology accompanying host-pathogen interaction. Transcriptional profiles of the MAP-infected mice at 3 and 6 weeks p.i. showed severe histopathological changes, whereas those at 12 weeks p.i. displayed reduced lesion severity in the spleen and liver. MAP-infected mice at 3 and 6 weeks p.i. showed up-regulation of interferon-related genes, scavenger receptor, and complement components, suggesting an initial innate immune reaction, such as macrophage activation, bactericidal activity, and macrophage invasion of MAP. Concurrently, MAP-infected mice at 3 and 6 weeks p.i. were also suggested to express M2 macrophage phenotype with up-regulation of Mrc1, and Marco and down-regulation of MHC class II, Ccr7, and Irf5, and canonical pathways related to the T cell response including ICOS-ICOSL signaling in T helper cells, calcium-induced T lymphocyte apoptosis, and CD28 signaling in T helper cell. These results provide information which furthers the understanding of the immunopathologic response to MAP infection in mice, thereby providing insights valuable for research into the pathogenesis for MAP infection.

  5. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in the etiology of Crohn's disease, cause or epiphenomenon?

    PubMed

    Liverani, Elisa; Scaioli, Eleonora; Cardamone, Carla; Dal Monte, Paola; Belluzzi, Andrea

    2014-09-28

    The origin of inflammatory bowel disease is unknown. Attempts have been made to isolate a microorganism that could explain the onset of inflammation, but no pathological agent has ever been identified. Johne's disease is a granulomatous chronic enteritis of cattle and sheep caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) and shows some analogies with Crohn's disease (CD). Several studies have tried to clarify if MAP has a role in the etiology of CD. The present article provides an overview of the evidence in favor and against the "MAP-hypothesis", analyzing the methods commonly adopted to detect MAP and the role of antimycobacterial therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Studies were identified through the electronic database, MEDLINE, and were selected based on their relevance to the objective of the review. The presence of MAP was investigated using multiple diagnostic methods for MAP detection and in different tissue samples from patients affected by CD or ulcerative colitis and in healthy controls. On the basis of their studies, several authors support a close relationship between MAP and CD. Although increasing evidence of MAP detection in CD patients is unquestionable, a clear etiological link still needs to be proven.

  6. Development of a Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay for Rapid Detection of the Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Sören; Schäfer, Jenny; Fechner, Kim; Czerny, Claus-Peter; Abd El Wahed, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Background The detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infections in ruminants is crucial to control spread among animals and to humans. Cultivation of MAP is seen as the gold standard for detection, although it is very time consuming and labour intensive. In addition, several PCR assays have been developed to detect MAP in around 90 minutes, but these assays required highly sophisticated equipment as well as lengthy and complicated procedure. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we have developed a rapid assay for the detection of MAP based on the recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) assay targeting a MAP specific region, the IS900 gene. The detection limit was 16 DNA molecules in 15 minutes as determined by the probit analysis on eight runs of the plasmid standard. Cross reactivity with other mycobacterial and environmentally associated bacterial strains was not observed. The clinical performance of the MAP RPA assay was tested using 48 MAP-positive and 20 MAP-negative blood, sperm, faecal and tissue samples. All results were compared with reads of a highly sensitive real-time PCR assay. The specificity of the MAP RPA assay was 100%, while the sensitivity was 89.5%. Conclusions/Significance The RPA assay is quicker and much easier to handle than real-time PCR. All RPA reagents were cold-chain independent. Moreover, combining RPA assay with a simple extraction protocol will maximize its use at point of need for rapid detection of MAP. PMID:27992571

  7. Enhanced expression of codon optimized Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens in Lactobacillus salivarius

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Christopher D.; Bannantine, John P.; Govender, Rodney; Endersen, Lorraine; Pletzer, Daniel; Weingart, Helge; Coffey, Aidan; O'Mahony, Jim; Sleator, Roy D.

    2014-01-01

    It is well documented that open reading frames containing high GC content show poor expression in A+T rich hosts. Specifically, G+C-rich codon usage is a limiting factor in heterologous expression of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) proteins using Lactobacillus salivarius. However, re-engineering opening reading frames through synonymous substitutions can offset codon bias and greatly enhance MAP protein production in this host. In this report, we demonstrate that codon-usage manipulation of MAP2121c can enhance the heterologous expression of the major membrane protein (MMP), analogous to the form in which it is produced natively by MAP bacilli. When heterologously over-expressed, antigenic determinants were preserved in synthetic MMP proteins as shown by monoclonal antibody mediated ELISA. Moreover, MMP is a membrane protein in MAP, which is also targeted to the cellular surface of recombinant L. salivarius at levels comparable to MAP. Additionally, we previously engineered MAP3733c (encoding MptD) and show herein that MptD displays the tendency to associate with the cytoplasmic membrane boundary under confocal microscopy and the intracellularly accumulated protein selectively adheres to the MptD-specific bacteriophage fMptD. This work demonstrates there is potential for L. salivarius as a viable antigen delivery vehicle for MAP, which may provide an effective mucosal vaccine against Johne's disease. PMID:25237653

  8. Serodiagnosis of Mycobacterium avium complex disease in humans: translational research from basic mycobacteriology to clinical medicine.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Rapid and accurate diagnosis of infectious diseases, including mycobacterial disease such as tuberculosis (TB) and diseases due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), is a very important element of global health. The gold standard in diagnosis of mycobacterial diseases remains clinical examination, combined with direct microscopic examination of sputum and culture of bacteria. Culture of slowly growing mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and NTM (such as M. avium complex: MAC), can take up to 4 to 6 weeks, and in 10-20% of cases the bacillus is not successfully cultivated. Diagnosis of MAC pulmonary disease (MAC-PD) is complicated and time-consuming (usually at least 1 month). I have characterized the nature of MAC antigens and immune responses from the aspect of basic mycobacteriology, and then translated to clinical science. My multicenter study in Japan has demonstrated the usefulness of a serodiagnostic test to determine serum IgA antibodies against mycobacterial glycopeptidolipid (GPL) core antigen for diagnosing MAC-PD within a few hours. To validate in a larger number of patients, at diverse geographic locations, and among other races, the test was also assessed the usefulness internationally in the United States and Taiwan. In this review, I discuss development of serodiagnosis of MAC-PD by translational research and international collaboration study.

  9. Isolation of Mycobacterium avium complex from bone marrow aspirates of AIDS patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barreto, J A; Palaci, M; Ferrazoli, L; Martins, M C; Suleiman, J; Lorenço, R; Ferreira, O C; Riley, L W; Johnson, W D; Galvão, P A

    1993-09-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection has not been reported as a major opportunistic infection among patients with AIDS in Latin America or Africa. In this study, 125 AIDS patients who had persistent fever, anemia, and leukopenia were examined among 2628 AIDS patients admitted to Instituto de Infectologia Emilio Ribas between May 1990 and April 1992. From the bone marrow aspirates of the 125 patients, MAC was isolated from 23 (18.4%) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis was isolated from 9 (7.2%). Between 1985 and 1990, only 11 MAC isolations among 60,000 cultures obtained from human immunodeficiency virus-seronegative patients were documented in São Paulo. Hence, the minimal estimated rate of MAC infection in AIDS patients in this city was 23/2628, or 0.88%. These findings suggest that MAC infection is an important opportunistic infection, especially among a subset of patients with AIDS in Brazil who have clinical characteristics and risk activities similar to those associated with MAC infections in North America and Europe.

  10. A new compartmental model of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection dynamics in cattle

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rebecca L.; Schukken, Ynte H.; Gröhn, Yrjö T.

    2015-01-01

    Models of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), a chronic infectious agent of cattle, are used to identify effective control programs. However, new biological findings show that adult infections occur and that infected animals can be separated into 2 paths: animals that will become high-shedding and, eventually, experience clinical disease (high-path); and animals that will shed only small quantities of MAP and will remain subclinical (low-path). Longitudinal data analysis found that high-path animals progress more quickly than previously believed. A standard model of MAP transmission in dairy herds was modified to include adult low-path infections and 2 infection pathways for infected calves. Analysis of this model showed that adult infection may play an important role in MAP dynamics on a dairy farm, and that the increased rate of progression for high-path animals influences both the prevalence and the persistence of MAP on a dairy farm. This new model will be able to determine the effectiveness of MAP control programs more accurately than previous models. PMID:26520176

  11. On deaf ears, Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis in pathogenesis Crohn’s and other diseases

    PubMed Central

    Davis, William C

    2015-01-01

    The historic suggestion that Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) might be a zoonotic pathogen was based on the apparent similarity of lesions in the intestine of patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) with those present in cattle infected with Map, the etiological agent of Johne’s disease. Reluctance to fully explore this possibility has been attributed to the difficulty in demonstrating the presence of Map in tissues from patients with CD. Advances in technology have resolved this problem and revealed the presence of Map in a significant proportion of patients with CD and other diseases. The seminal finding from recent investigations, however, is the detection of Map in healthy individuals with no clinical signs of disease. The latter observation indicates all humans are susceptible to infection with Map and lends support to the thesis that Map is zoonotic, with a latent stage of infection similar to tuberculosis, where infection leads to the development of an immune response that controls but does not eliminate the pathogen. This clarifies one of the reasons why it has been so difficult to document that Map is zoonotic and associated with the pathogenesis of CD and other diseases. As discussed in the present review, a better understanding of the immune response to Map is needed to determine how infection is usually kept under immune control during the latent stage of infection and elucidate the triggering events that lead to disease progression in the natural host and pathogenesis of CD and immune related diseases in humans. PMID:26730151

  12. Macrophage polarization in cattle experimentally exposed to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Thirunavukkarasu, Shyamala; de Silva, Kumudika; Begg, Douglas J; Whittington, Richard J; Plain, Karren M

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD) in cattle, has significant impacts on the livestock industry and has been implicated in the etiology of Crohn's disease. Macrophages play a key role in JD pathogenesis, which is driven by the manipulation of host immune mechanisms by MAP. A change in the macrophage microenvironment due to pathogenic or host-derived stimuli can lead to classical (M1) or alternative (M2) polarization of macrophages. In addition, prior exposure to antigenic stimuli has been reported to alter the response of macrophages to subsequent stimuli. However, macrophage polarization in response to MAP exposure and its possible implications have not been previously addressed. In this study, we have comprehensively examined monocyte/macrophage polarization and responsiveness to antigens from MAP-exposed and unexposed animals. At 3 years post-exposure, there was a heterogeneous macrophage activation pattern characterized by both classical and alternate phenotypes. Moreover, subsequent exposure of macrophages from MAP-exposed cattle to antigens from MAP and other mycobacterial species led to significant variation in the production of nitric oxide, interleukin-10 and tumour necrosis factor α. These results indicate the previously unreported possibility of changes in the activation state and responsiveness of circulating monocytes/macrophages from MAP-exposed cattle. PMID:26454271

  13. Effect of temperature on pollen tube kinetics and dynamics in sweet cherry, Prunus avium (Rosaceae).

    PubMed

    Hedhly, A; Hormaza, J I; Herrero, M

    2004-04-01

    Prevailing ambient temperature during the reproductive phase is one of several important factors for seed and fruit set in different plant species, and its consequences on reproductive success may increase with global warming. The effect of temperature on pollen performance was evaluated in sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.), comparing as pollen donors two cultivars that differ in their adaptation to temperature. 'Sunburst' is a cultivar that originated in Canada with a pedigree of cultivars from Northern Europe, while 'Cristobalina' is a cultivar native to southeast Spain, adapted to warmer conditions. Temperature effects were tested either in controlled-temperature chambers or in the field in a plastic cage. In both genotypes, an increase in temperature reduced pollen germination, but accelerated pollen tube growth. However, a different genotypic response, which reflected the overall adaptation of the pollen donor, was obtained for pollen tube dynamics, expressed as the census of the microgametophyte population that successfully reached the base of the style. While both cultivars performed similarly at 20°C, the microgametophyte population was reduced at 30°C for Sunburst and at 10°C for Cristobalina. These results indicate a differential genotypic response to temperature during the reproductive phase, which could be important in terms of the time needed for a plant species to adapt to rapid temperature changes.

  14. Composition and Potency Characterization of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Purified Protein Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Capsel, Randal T.; Thoen, Charles O.; Reinhardt, Timothy A.; Lippolis, John D.; Olsen, Renee; Stabel, Judith R.; Bannantine, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) purified protein derivatives (PPDs) are immunologic reagents prepared from cultured filtrates of the type strain. Traditional production consists of floating culture incubation at 37°C, organism inactivation by autoclaving, coarse filtration, and protein precipitation. Three traditional production PPDs were used in this study including lot 9801, which served as a reference and has been used in the field for decades. Alternative production PPDs (0902A and 0902B), in which the autoclaving step was removed, were also analyzed in this study. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed protein smearing in traditional PPDs, but distinct bands were observed in the alternative PPD preparations. Antibody bound distinct protein bands in the alternative PPDs by immunoblot analysis, whereas an immunoreactive smear was observed with the traditional PPDs. Mass spectrometry identified 194 proteins among three PPD lots representing the two different production methods, ten of which were present in all PPDs examined. Selected proteins identified by mass spectrometry were recombinantly expressed and purified from E. coli and evaluated by the guinea pig potency test. Seven recombinant proteins showed greater erythema as compared to the reference PPD lot 9801 in paired guinea pigs and were able to stimulate interferon-gamma production in blood from Johne’s positive animals. These results suggest that autoclaving culture suspensions is not a necessary step in PPD production and specific proteins could supplant the PPD antigen for intradermal skin testing procedures and for use as in-vitro assay reagents. PMID:27136199

  15. Seroprevalence and risk factors of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection in domestic sika deer in China.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qing-Feng; Li, Ying; Yang, Fan; Yao, Gui-Zhi; Qian, Ai-Dong; Wang, Wei-Li; Cong, Wei

    2015-06-01

    Paratuberculosis or Johne's disease (JD), caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), is a chronic infectious granulomatous enteritis of ruminants and other animals, which has a worldwide occurrence, but little is known of MAP infection in domestic sika deer in Jilin Province, China. The objective of the present investigation was to examine seroprevalence and risk factors of MAP infection in Jilin Province. Serum samples collected from 1400 sika deer from 16 sika deer herds were collected in the 4 districts of the province between May 2013 and August 2014 and were tested independently for the presence of antibodies against MAP. A total of 247 (17.64 %) sika deer tested positive for MAP antibodies using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay kit. The management level of farm and collecting region of sika deer was the main risk factor associated with MAP infection. The present study revealed the seroprevalence of MAP infection in sika deer in Jilin Province, China, which provided the baseline data for taking comprehensive countermeasures and measures in effectively preventing and controlling MAP infection in sika deer.

  16. Evidence for genes associated with the ability of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis to escape apoptotic macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, Luiz E; Danelishvili, Lia; Babrack, Lmar; Pham, Tuan

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH) is an environmental bacteria that infects immunocompromised humans. MAH cases are increasing in incidence, making it crucial to gain knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms associated with the bacterium. MAH infects macrophages and after several days the infection triggers the phagocyte apoptosis. Many of the intracellular MAH escape the cell undergoing apoptosis leading to infection of neighboring macrophages. We screened a transposon bank of MAH mutants in U937 mononuclear phagocytes for the inability to escape macrophages undergoing apoptosis. Mutations in genes; MAV_2235, MAV_2120, MAV_2410, and MAV_4563 resulted in the inability of the bacteria to exit macrophages upon apoptosis. Complementation of the mutations corrected the phenotype either completely or partially. Testing for the ability of the mutants to survive in macrophages compared to the wild-type bacterium revealed that the mutant clones were not attenuated up to 4 days of infection. Testing in vivo, however, demonstrated that all the MAH clones were attenuated compared with the wild-type MAC 104 in tissues of mice. Although the mechanism associated with the bacterial inability to leave apoptotic macrophages is unknown, the identification of macrophage cytoplasm targets for the MAH proteins suggest that they interfere either with protein degradation machinery or post-translation mechanisms. The identification of tatC as a MAH protein involved in the ability of MAH to leave macrophages, suggests that secreted effector(s) are involved in the process. The study reveals a pathway of escape from macrophages, not shared with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  17. Mycobacterium avium complex--the role of potable water in disease transmission.

    PubMed

    Whiley, H; Keegan, A; Giglio, S; Bentham, R

    2012-08-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is a group of opportunistic pathogens of major public health concern. It is responsible for a wide spectrum of disease dependent on subspecies, route of infection and patients pre-existing conditions. Presently, there is limited research on the incidence of MAC infection that considers both pulmonary and other clinical manifestations. MAC has been isolated from various terrestrial and aquatic environments including natural waters, engineered water systems and soils. Identifying the specific environmental sources responsible for human infection is essential in minimizing disease prevalence. This paper reviews current literature and case studies regarding the wide spectrum of disease caused by MAC and the role of potable water in disease transmission. Potable water was recognized as a putative pathway for MAC infection. Contaminated potable water sources associated with human infection included warm water distribution systems, showers, faucets, household drinking water, swimming pools and hot tub spas. MAC can maintain long-term contamination of potable water sources through its high resistance to disinfectants, association with biofilms and intracellular parasitism of free-living protozoa. Further research is required to investigate the efficiency of water treatment processes against MAC and into construction and maintenance of warm water distribution systems and the role they play in MAC proliferation. No claim to Australian Government works Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis: Human Exposure through Environmental and Domestic Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Glenn; Richardson, Hollian; Hermon-Taylor, John; Weightman, Andrew; Higham, Andrew; Pickup, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map) causes Johne’s disease in animals and is significantly associated with Crohn’s disease (CD) in humans. Our previous studies have shown Map to be present in U.K. rivers due to land deposition from chronic livestock infection and runoff driven by rainfall. The epidemiology of CD in Cardiff showed a significant association with the River Taff, in which Map can be detected on a regular basis. We have previously hypothesized that aerosols from the river might influence the epidemiology of CD. In this preliminary study, we detected Map by quantitative PCR in one of five aerosol samples collected above the River Taff. In addition, we examined domestic showers from different regions in the U.K. and detected Map in three out of 30 independent samples. In detecting Map in river aerosols and those from domestic showers, this is the first study to provide evidence that aerosols are an exposure route for Map to humans and may play a role in the epidemiology of CD. PMID:25438013

  19. Rapid susceptibility testing of mycobacterium avium complex and mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from AIDS patients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhople, Arvind M.

    1993-01-01

    In ominous projections issued by both U.S. Public Health Service and the World Health Organization, the epidemic of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection will continue to rise more rapidly worldwide than predicted earlier. The Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients are susceptible to diseases called opportunistic infections of which tuberculosis and M. avium Complex (MAC) infection are most common. This has created an urgent need to uncover new drugs for the treatment of these infections. In the seventies, NASA scientists at Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, had adopted a biochemical indicator, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), to detect presence of life in extraterrestrial space. Therefore, we proposed to develop ATP assay technique to determine sensitivity of antibacterial compounds against MAC and M. tuberculosis. The work was initiated in June 1992. In the last report, we described our efforts in developing ATP assay method using MAC. Studies were continued further, and during the period of this report, we established the relationship between colony forming units and ATP levels of these organisms during the growth cycle. Also, we evaluated the effects of standard antimycobacterial drugs using ATP assay technique and compared the results with those obtained with conventional tube dilution proportional method.

  20. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in ruminants in different parts of India.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Ganesh G; Narnaware, Shirish D; Tripathi, Bhupendra N

    2016-03-01

    Paratuberculosis is an economically important, chronic, and incurable disease in ruminants, caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). Understanding the genetic variability of MAP strains is important in diagnosis, epidemiological investigation, and the formation of strategies for prevention and control of the disease. In the present study, a total of 61 MAP isolates obtained from different parts and species of India were typed using IS1311 polymerase chain reaction-restriction endonuclease analysis (PCR-REA) to analyze the genetic difference(s), if any, between them and the host adaptation. Based on PCR-REA results, bison B type was detected in 54 (87%) MAP isolates obtained from cattle, sheep, and goats. Of these, 19 were from sheep of the Rajasthan (n=17) and Bareilly (n=2), North India regions, 28 were from cattle of Chennai, South India (n=3), Bareilly, North India (n=3), and Nagpur, West India (n=22), and seven goat isolates from Bareilly, North India region. The 'C' type strain was detected in only seven cattle isolates obtained from the Bareilly region. The study revealed that in India, bison B-type MAP strains were prevalent in most of the ruminant species. These results have important epidemiological implications with regard to control and prevention of paratuberculosis in India. Copyright © 2015 Asian African Society for Mycobacteriology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. LAMP technology: Rapid identification of Brucella and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Trangoni, Marcos D.; Gioffré, Andrea K.; Cerón Cucchi, María E.; Caimi, Karina C.; Ruybal, Paula; Zumárraga, Martín J.; Cravero, Silvio L.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we developed new sets of primers to detect Brucella spp. and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) through isothermal amplification. We selected a previously well-characterized target gene, bscp31, specific for Brucella spp. and IS900 for MAP. The limits of detection using the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) protocols described herein were similar to those of conventional PCR targeting the same sequences. Hydroxynaphtol blue and SYBR GreenTM allowed direct naked-eye detection with identical sensitivity as agarose gel electrophoresis. We included the LAMP-based protocol in a rapid identification scheme of the respective pathogens, and all tested isolates were correctly identified within 2 to 3 h. In addition, both protocols were suitable for specifically identifying the respective pathogens; in the case of Brucella, it also allowed the identification of all the biovars tested. We conclude that LAMP is a suitable rapid molecular typing tool that could help to shorten the time required to identify insidious bacteria in low-complexity laboratories, mainly in developing countries. PMID:26273282

  2. Impact of the shedding level on transmission of persistent infections in Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP).

    PubMed

    Slater, Noa; Mitchell, Rebecca Mans; Whitlock, Robert H; Fyock, Terry; Pradhan, Abani Kumar; Knupfer, Elena; Schukken, Ynte Hein; Louzoun, Yoram

    2016-02-29

    Super-shedders are infectious individuals that contribute a disproportionate amount of infectious pathogen load to the environment. A super-shedder host may produce up to 10,000 times more pathogens than other infectious hosts. Super-shedders have been reported for multiple human and animal diseases. If their contribution to infection dynamics was linear to the pathogen load, they would dominate infection dynamics. We here focus on quantifying the effect of super-shedders on the spread of infection in natural environments to test if such an effect actually occurs in Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). We study a case where the infection dynamics and the bacterial load shed by each host at every point in time are known. Using a maximum likelihood approach, we estimate the parameters of a model with multiple transmission routes, including direct contact, indirect contact and a background infection risk. We use longitudinal data from persistent infections (MAP), where infectious individuals have a wide distribution of infectious loads, ranging upward of three orders of magnitude. We show based on these parameters that the effect of super-shedders for MAP is limited and that the effect of the individual bacterial load is limited and the relationship between bacterial load and the infectiousness is highly concave. A 1000-fold increase in the bacterial contribution is equivalent to up to a 2-3 fold increase in infectiousness.

  3. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis as a trigger of type-1 diabetes: destination Sardinia, or beyond?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease in which the insulin producing β cell population is destroyed by the infiltrated T lymphocytes. Even though the exact cause of T1DM is yet to be ascertained, varying degree of genetic susceptibility and environmental factors have been linked to the disease progress and outcome. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is an obligate zoonotic pathogen that causes chronic infection of intestines in ruminants, the Johne's disease. MAP that can even survive pasteurization and chlorination has also been implicated to cause similar type of enteritis in humans called Crohn's disease. With the increasing recognition of the link between MAP and Crohn's disease, it has been postulated that MAP is an occult antigen which besides Crohn's could as well be thought to trigger T1DM. Epitope homologies between mycobacterial proteins (Hsp 65) and pancreatic glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD 65) and infant nutrition studies implicate MAP as one of the triggers for T1DM. PCR and ELISA analyses in diabetic patients from Sardinia suggest that MAP acts as a possible trigger for T1DM. Systematic mechanistic insights are needed to prove this link. Unfortunately, no easy animal model(s) or in-vitro systems are available to decipher the complex immunological network that is triggered in MAP infection leading to T1DM. PMID:20350307

  4. The activity of grepafloxacin in two murine models of Mycobacterium avium infection.

    PubMed

    Cynamon, Michael H; Sklaney, Mary; Yeo, Anthony E T

    2004-06-01

    The activity against Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) of varying doses of grepafloxacin (GRE; 25 mg/kg, 50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg, and 200 mg/kg) were compared to clarithromycin (CLA; 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg), ethambutol (EMB; 100 mg/kg), and rifabutin (RBT; 10 mg/kg) using an intranasal (IN) infection model compared to an intravenous (IV) infection model. Beige mice (C57BL6/J-Lyst bg J/+) were infected intranasally with about 10(6) organisms and for the IV model about 10(7) organisms. Treatment for both models was started 1 week postinfection and given by gavage 5 days/week for 4 weeks. At the initiation of therapy, an early control group was killed to determine the initial organism load. Three days following the completion of therapy, drug-treated groups of mice and the late control group were killed and the response to therapy measured. The most effective agents were CLA and RBT. GRE and EMB had modest activities in both the IN and the IV models. A matched comparison between IN and IV challenges for each of the agents used revealed greater suppression of MAC in the IN model compared to the IV model.

  5. Evaluation of the in vitro activity of gallium nitrate against Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Fecteau, Marie-Eve; Fyock, Terry L; McAdams, Susan C; Boston, Raymond C; Whitlock, Robert H; Sweeney, Raymond W

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the in vitro susceptibility of various field isolates of Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (MAP) to gallium nitrate. 10 isolates of MAP, including 4 isolated from cattle, 2 isolated from bison, 1 isolated from an alpaca, and 3 isolated from humans. The in vitro susceptibility to gallium nitrate was tested by use of broth culture with detection of MAP growth by means of a nonradiometric automated detection method. For each MAP isolate, a series of 7 dilutions of gallium nitrate (concentrations ranging from 200 to 1,000 μM) were tested. Gallium nitrate was considered to have caused 90% and 99% inhibition of the MAP growth when the time to detection for culture of the MAP stock solution and a specific concentration of gallium nitrate was delayed and was similar to that obtained for culture of the MAP stock solution (without the addition of gallium nitrate) diluted 1:10 and 1:100, respectively. Gallium nitrate inhibited MAP growth in all 10 isolates. The susceptibility to gallium nitrate was variable among isolates, and all isolates of MAP were inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, the concentration that resulted in 90% inhibition ranged from < 200 μM for the most susceptible isolates to 743 μM for the least susceptible isolates. Gallium nitrate had activity against all 10 isolates of MAP tested in vitro and could potentially be used as a prophylactic agent to aid in the control of MAP infections during the neonatal period.

  6. Lessons from Mycobacterium avium complex-associated pneumonitis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zota, Victor; Angelis, Sheryn M; Fraire, Armando E; McNamee, Ciaran; Kielbasa, Shasta; Libraty, Daniel H

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is an increasingly recognized cause of pulmonary disease in immunocompetent individuals. An acute form of MAC lung disease, MAC-associated pneumonitis, has generally been associated with the use of hot tubs. There is controversy in the literature about whether MAC-associated pneumonitis is a classic hypersensitivity pneumonitis or is a direct manifestation of mycobacterial infection. Case presentation We report the second case in the literature of MAC-associated pneumonitis not related to the use of hot tubs. The source of MAC in a 52-year-old immunocompetent patient was an intrapulmonary cyst containing numerous acid-fast bacilli. The patient developed disseminated miliary nodules throughout both lung fields. Histological examination of resected lung tissue revealed well-formed, acid-fast negative granulomas composed predominantly of CD4+ T-cells and CD68+ histiocytes. The granulomas were strongly positive for tumor necrosis factor-α, a pro-inflammatory cytokine. Conclusion The attempt to classify MAC-associated pneumonitis as either a classic hypersensitivity pneumonitis or a direct manifestation of mycobacterial infection is not particularly useful. Our case demonstrates that MAC-associated pneumonitis is characterized by a vigorous T-helper 1-like, pro-inflammatory, immune response to pulmonary mycobacterial infection. The immunopathology provides a rationale for clinical studies of anti-MAC therapy with the addition of anti-inflammatory agents (for example, corticosteroids) to hasten the resolution of infection and symptoms. PMID:18477401

  7. Lessons from Mycobacterium avium complex-associated pneumonitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zota, Victor; Angelis, Sheryn M; Fraire, Armando E; McNamee, Ciaran; Kielbasa, Shasta; Libraty, Daniel H

    2008-05-13

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is an increasingly recognized cause of pulmonary disease in immunocompetent individuals. An acute form of MAC lung disease, MAC-associated pneumonitis, has generally been associated with the use of hot tubs. There is controversy in the literature about whether MAC-associated pneumonitis is a classic hypersensitivity pneumonitis or is a direct manifestation of mycobacterial infection. We report the second case in the literature of MAC-associated pneumonitis not related to the use of hot tubs. The source of MAC in a 52-year-old immunocompetent patient was an intrapulmonary cyst containing numerous acid-fast bacilli. The patient developed disseminated miliary nodules throughout both lung fields. Histological examination of resected lung tissue revealed well-formed, acid-fast negative granulomas composed predominantly of CD4+ T-cells and CD68+ histiocytes. The granulomas were strongly positive for tumor necrosis factor-alpha, a pro-inflammatory cytokine. The attempt to classify MAC-associated pneumonitis as either a classic hypersensitivity pneumonitis or a direct manifestation of mycobacterial infection is not particularly useful. Our case demonstrates that MAC-associated pneumonitis is characterized by a vigorous T-helper 1-like, pro-inflammatory, immune response to pulmonary mycobacterial infection. The immunopathology provides a rationale for clinical studies of anti-MAC therapy with the addition of anti-inflammatory agents (for example, corticosteroids) to hasten the resolution of infection and symptoms.

  8. Short communication: effect of homogenization on heat inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in milk.

    PubMed

    Hammer, P; Kiesner, C; Walte, H-G C

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) can be present in cow milk and low numbers may survive high-temperature, short-time (HTST) pasteurization. Although HTST treatment leads to inactivation of at least 5 log10 cycles, it might become necessary to enhance the efficacy of HTST by additional treatments such as homogenization if the debate about the role of MAP in Crohn's disease of humans concludes that MAP is a zoonotic agent. This study aimed to determine whether disrupting the clumps of MAP in milk by homogenization during the heat treatment process would enhance the inactivation of MAP. We used HTST pasteurization in a continuous-flow pilot-plant pasteurizer and evaluated the effect of upstream, downstream, and in-hold homogenization on inactivation of MAP. Reduction of MAP at 72°C with a holding time of 28s was between 3.7 and 6.9 log10 cycles, with an overall mean of 5.5 log10 cycles. None of the 3 homogenization modes applied showed a statistically significant additional effect on the inactivation of MAP during HTST treatment.

  9. Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease: is Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis the common villain?

    PubMed

    Pierce, Ellen S

    2010-12-17

    Mycobacterium avium, subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) causes a chronic disease of the intestines in dairy cows and a wide range of other animals, including nonhuman primates, called Johne's ("Yo-knee's") disease. MAP has been consistently identified by a variety of techniques in humans with Crohn's disease. The research investigating the presence of MAP in patients with Crohn's disease has often identified MAP in the "negative" ulcerative colitis controls as well, suggesting that ulcerative colitis is also caused by MAP. Like other infectious diseases, dose, route of infection, age, sex and genes influence whether an individual infected with MAP develops ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. The apparently opposite role of smoking, increasing the risk of Crohn's disease while decreasing the risk of ulcerative colitis, is explained by a more careful review of the literature that reveals smoking causes an increase in both diseases but switches the phenotype from ulcerative colitis to Crohn's disease. MAP as the sole etiologic agent of both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease explains their common epidemiology, geographic distribution and familial and sporadic clusters, providing a unified hypothesis for the prevention and cure of the no longer "idiopathic" inflammatory bowel diseases.

  10. Assessment of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae component binding to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis using bovine epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ziwei; You, Qiumei; Ossa, Faisury; Mead, Philip; Quinton, Margaret; Karrow, Niel A

    2016-03-01

    Since yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its components are being used for the prevention and treatment of enteric diseases in different species, they may also be useful for preventing Johne's disease, a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium spp. paratuberculosis (MAP). This study aimed to identify potential yeast derivatives that may be used to help prevent MAP infection. The adherence of mCherry-labeled MAP to bovine mammary epithelial cell line (MAC-T cells) and bovine primary epithelial cells (BECs) co-cultured with yeast cell wall components (CWCs) from four different yeast strains (A, B, C and D) and two forms of dead yeast from strain A was investigated. The CWCs from all four yeast strains and the other two forms of dead yeast from strain A reduced MAP adhesion to MAC-T cells and BECs in a concentration-dependent manner after 6-h of exposure, with the dead yeast having the greatest effect. The following in vitro binding studies suggest that dead yeast and its' CWCs may be useful for reducing risk of MAP infection.

  11. Detection of a novel catalase in extracts of Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare.

    PubMed Central

    Wayne, L G; Diaz, G A

    1988-01-01

    A novel class of catalase, which differs from the previously described M- and T-catalases of mycobacteria, was detected in strains of Mycobacterium avium and M. intracellulare. Designated A-catalase, this enzyme resisted inactivation at 68 degrees C, was inactivated by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (aminotriazole), and exhibited no peroxidase activity. All of these properties distinguished the enzyme from T-catalase. The A-catalase exhibited a Km of 70 mM H2O2, which is between the upper and lower extremes of the ranges reported for T- and M-catalases, respectively. The A-catalase appeared to be more hydrophobic than M-catalase and did not react with antiserum to a representative sample of this class. The banding patterns of T- and M-catalases seen by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) were essentially unaffected by the incorporation of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) into the PAGE system, whereas the single band of A-catalase seen by PAGE without SDS resolved into as many as five bands in the presence of SDS; these bands were all of slower mobility than the original band. The banding pattern seen with SDS appeared to be related more to counterion charge effects than to molecular size increases that could be attributed to SDS complexed to the protein. It remains to be determined whether the multiple A-catalase bands reflect different proteins or different SDS micellar complexes of a single protein. Images PMID:3346077

  12. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and multiple sclerosis in Sardinian patients: epidemiology and clinical features.

    PubMed

    Frau, J; Cossu, D; Coghe, G; Lorefice, L; Fenu, G; Melis, M; Paccagnini, D; Sardu, C; Murru, M R; Tranquilli, S; Marrosu, M G; Sechi, L A; Cocco, E

    2013-10-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is an infectious factor recently found in association with multiple sclerosis (MS) in Sardinia. The objectives of this study were to confirm this association and evaluate its role in clinical features. A total of 436 patients and 264 healthy controls (HCs) were included. We examined the blood of each individual for MAPDNA and MAP2694 antibodies using IS900-specific PCR and ELISA, respectively. Differences in MAP presence between the MS group and HCs were evaluated. In MS patients, we considered: gender, age, age at onset, duration of disease, course, EDSS, therapy, relapse/steroids at study time, and oligoclonal bands (OBs). MAPDNA and MAP2694 antibodies were detected in 68 MS and six HCs (p = 1.14 × 10(-11)), and 123 MS and 10 HCs (p = 2.59 × 10(-23)), respectively. OBs were found with reduced frequency in MAP-positive patients (OR = 0.52; p = 0.02). MAP2694 antibodies were detected more in patients receiving MS treatments (OR = 2.26; p = 0.01), and MAPDNA in subjects on steroids (OR = 2.65; p = 0.02). Our study confirmed the association of MAP and MS in Sardinia. The low OB frequency in MAP patients suggests a peripheral role as a trigger in autoimmunity. MAP positivity might be influenced by steroids and MS therapy. Studies in other populations are needed to confirm the role of MAP in MS.

  13. Short communication: Investigation into Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis in pasteurized milk in Italy.

    PubMed

    Serraino, A; Bonilauri, P; Giacometti, F; Ricchi, M; Cammi, G; Piva, S; Zambrini, V; Canever, A; Arrigoni, N

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the presence of viable Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in pasteurized milk produced by Italian industrial dairy plants to verify the prediction of a previously performed risk assessment. The study analyzed 160 one-liter bottles of pasteurized milk from 2 dairy plants located in 2 different regions. Traditional cultural protocols were applied to 500mL of pasteurized milk for each sample. The investigation focused also on the pasteurization parameters and data on the microbiological characteristics of raw milk (total bacterial count) and pasteurized milk (Enterobacteriaceae and Listeria monocytogenes). No sample was positive for MAP, the pasteurization parameters complied with European Union legislation, and the microbiological analysis of raw and pasteurized milk showed good microbiological quality. The results show that a 7-log (or >7) reduction could be a plausible value for commercial pasteurization. The combination of hygiene practices at farm level and commercial pasteurization yield very low or absent levels of MAP contamination in pasteurized milk, suggesting that pasteurized milk is not a significant source of human exposure to MAP in the dairies investigated. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ultraviolet-irradiated monocytes efficiently inhibit the intracellular replication of Mycobacterium avium intracellulare.

    PubMed Central

    Mirando, W S; Shiratsuchi, H; Tubesing, K; Toba, H; Ellner, J J; Elmets, C A

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the antimicrobial activities of monocytes for the intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium avium intracellulare (MAI). UV radiation augmented monocyte antimicrobial activity for MAI in a dose-dependent fashion. UVB doses of greater than or equal to 25 J/m2 resulted in a 50-100-fold reduction in MAI growth 7 d after initiation of culture. The increased monocyte antibacterial effect could be blocked by a plate glass filter, indicating that wavelengths within the UVB were responsible for the effect. UV radiation did not stimulate monocyte phagocytosis, and enhanced inhibition of MAI growth was observed in populations of adherent mononuclear cells that were devoid of T cells. This suggested that UV radiation acted directly to augment intrinsic monocyte antimicrobial activities. The administration of 8-methoxypsoralen plus UVA radiation to monocytes also augmented their antimicrobial activities against MAI. UV radiation thus may serve as a unique agent by which to evaluate the mechanisms by which mononuclear phagocytes control the growth of MAI. Images PMID:1556188

  15. Treatment of intracellular Mycobacterium avium complex infection by free and liposome-encapsulated sparfloxacin.

    PubMed Central

    Düzgüneş, N; Flasher, D; Reddy, M V; Luna-Herrera, J; Gangadharam, P R

    1996-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex (MAC) is the most frequent cause of opportunistic bacterial infection in patients with AIDS. Previous studies have indicated that liposome-encapsulated aminoglycosides are highly effective in treating MAC infections in mice. We investigated whether the fluoroquinolone sparfloxacin is effective in treating MAC infection in the murine macrophage-like cell line J774. Sparfloxacin was encapsulated in the membrane phase of multilamellar liposomes composed of phosphatidylglycerol-phosphatidylcholine-cholesterol (1:1:1 molar ratio). MAC-infected macrophages were treated for either 24 h or 4 days with free or liposome-encapsulated sparfloxacin. Treatment with free or liposome-encapsulated sparfloxacin (6 micrograms/ml) for 24 h resulted in the reduction of the growth index to 25 and 30% of that of untreated controls, respectively. When cultures were treated for 4 days, free sparfloxacin reduced the growth index to 6% of that of the untreated control, while liposome-encapsulated sparfloxacin reduced it to 8% of that of the control. PMID:8913475

  16. Genomic variations associated with attenuation in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis vaccine strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) whole cell vaccines have been widely used tools in the control of Johne’s disease in animals despite being unable to provide complete protection. Current vaccine strains derive from stocks created many decades ago; however their genotypes, underlying mechanisms and relative degree of their attenuation are largely unknown. Results Using mouse virulence studies we confirm that MAP vaccine strains 316 F, II and 2e have diverse but clearly attenuated survival and persistence characteristics compared with wild type strains. Using a pan genomic microarray we characterise the genomic variations in a panel of vaccine strains sourced from stocks spanning over 40 years of maintenance. We describe multiple genomic variations specific for individual vaccine stocks in both deletion (26–32 Kbp) and tandem duplicated (11–40 Kbp) large variable genomic islands and insertion sequence copy numbers. We show individual differences suitable for diagnostic differentiation between vaccine and wild type genotypes and provide evidence for functionality of some of the deleted MAP-specific genes and their possible relation to attenuation. Conclusions This study shows how culture environments have influenced MAP genome diversity resulting in large tandem genomic duplications, deletions and transposable element activity. In combination with classical selective systematic subculture this has led to fixation of specific MAP genomic alterations in some vaccine strain lineages which link the resulting attenuated phenotypes with deficiencies in high reactive oxygen species handling. PMID:23339684

  17. Transcriptional analysis of diverse strains Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in primary bovine monocyte derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaochun; Tu, Zheng J; Coussens, Paul M; Kapur, Vivek; Janagama, Harish; Naser, Saleh; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2008-10-01

    In this study we analyzed the macrophage-induced gene expression of three diverse genotypes of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). Using selective capture of transcribed sequences (SCOTS) on three genotypically diverse MAP isolates from cattle, human, and sheep exposed to primary bovine monocyte derived macrophages for 48 h and 120 h we created and sequenced six cDNA libraries. Sequence annotations revealed that the cattle isolate up-regulated 27 and 241 genes; the human isolate up-regulated 22 and 53 genes, and the sheep isolate up-regulated 35 and 358 genes, at the two time points respectively. Thirteen to thirty-three percent of the genes identified did not have any annotated function. Despite variations in the genes identified, the patterns of expression fell into overlapping cellular functions as inferred by pathway analysis. For example, 10-12% of the genes expressed by all three strains at each time point were associated with cell-wall biosynthesis. All three strains of MAP studied up-regulated genes in pathways that combat oxidative stress, metabolic and nutritional starvation, and cell survival. Taken together, this comparative transcriptional analysis suggests that diverse MAP genotypes respond with similar modus operandi for survival in the host.

  18. Short communication: Viable Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in retail artisanal Coalho cheese from Northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Faria, A C S; Schwarz, D G G; Carvalho, I A; Rocha, B B; De Carvalho Castro, K N; Silva, M R; Moreira, M A S

    2014-07-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiologic agent of paratuberculosis and it potentially plays a role in Crohn's disease. In humans, the main route of transmission of MAP might be the intake of contaminated milk and dairy products. Considering that MAP has already been detected in many types of cheese in different counties, and that Coalho cheese is an important dairy product in northeastern Brazil, the aim of this study was to report the first detection of MAP in retail Coalho cheese in Brazil by PCR and culture. Of 30 retail Coalho cheese samples, 3 (10%) amplified fragments of a similar size to that expected (626 bp) were obtained and viable MAP was recovered by culture from 1 (3.3%) sample. The DNA from the positive culture sample was sequenced and showed 99% identity with the insertion sequence IS900 deposited in GenBank. It was possible to identify the presence of MAP-specific DNA in the analyzed samples for the first time in Brazil, and to recover viable cells from retail Coalho cheese. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Survey of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in road-killed wild carnivores in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Matos, Ana Cristina; Figueira, Luis; Martins, Maria Helena; Loureiro, Filipa; Pinto, Maria Lurdes; Matos, Manuela; Coelho, Ana Cláudia

    2014-12-01

    A survey to determine the occurrence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in wild carnivores in Portugal was conducted by testing samples from road-killed animals between 2009 and 2012. Postmortem examinations were performed and tissues were collected from wild carnivores representing four families and six different species, with a total of 74 animals analyzed. Cultures were performed by using Löwenstein-Jensen and Middlebrook 7H11 solid media and acid-fast isolates were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and mycobactin dependency characteristics. Tissues were also screened for MAP by directly extracting DNA and testing for the MAP-specific sequences. The occurrence of infected animals (an animal had at least one tissue that was positive for culture or direct PCR) was 27.0% (n = 20). MAP was isolated from culture of 25 tissue samples (3.8%) and was detected by direct PCR in 40 (6.0%) samples. Infection was recorded in 5/6 studied species: 7/49 (14.3%) red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), 3/3 (100%) beech martens (Martes foina), 2/4 (50.0%) Eurasian otters (Lutra lutra), 7/15 (46.7%) Egyptian mongooses (Herpestes ichneumon), and 1/1 (100%) European badger (Meles meles). These species represent three different taxonomic families: Canidae (14.3% were positive), Mustelidae (75.0% were positive), and Herpestidae (46.7% were positive). The results of this study confirm the presence of MAP infection in wild carnivores in Portugal.

  20. Host Transcriptional Profiles and Immunopathologic Response following Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Min-Kyoung; Park, Hongtae; Shin, Seung Won; Jung, Myunghwan; Lee, Su-Hyung; Kim, Dae-Yong; Yoo, Han Sang

    2015-01-01

    Paratuberculosis or Johne’s disease is a chronic granulomatous enteropathy in ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection. In the present study, we examined the host response to MAP infection in spleens of mice in order to investigate the host immunopathology accompanying host-pathogen interaction. Transcriptional profiles of the MAP-infected mice at 3 and 6 weeks p.i. showed severe histopathological changes, whereas those at 12 weeks p.i. displayed reduced lesion severity in the spleen and liver. MAP-infected mice at 3 and 6 weeks p.i. showed up-regulation of interferon-related genes, scavenger receptor, and complement components, suggesting an initial innate immune reaction, such as macrophage activation, bactericidal activity, and macrophage invasion of MAP. Concurrently, MAP-infected mice at 3 and 6 weeks p.i. were also suggested to express M2 macrophage phenotype with up-regulation of Mrc1, and Marco and down-regulation of MHC class II, Ccr7, and Irf5, and canonical pathways related to the T cell response including ICOS-ICOSL signaling in T helper cells, calcium-induced T lymphocyte apoptosis, and CD28 signaling in T helper cell. These results provide information which furthers the understanding of the immunopathologic response to MAP infection in mice, thereby providing insights valuable for research into the pathogenesis for MAP infection. PMID:26439498