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Sample records for avoiding drug development

  1. Development of the Liverpool Adverse Drug Reaction Avoidability Assessment Tool

    PubMed Central

    Bracken, Louise E.; Nunn, Anthony J.; Kirkham, Jamie J.; Peak, Matthew; Arnott, Janine; Smyth, Rosalind L.; Pirmohamed, Munir; Turner, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    Aim To develop and test a new tool to assess the avoidability of adverse drug reactions that is suitable for use in paediatrics but which is also applicable to a variety of other settings. Methods The study involved multiple phases. Preliminary work involved using the Hallas scale and a modification of the existing Hallas scale, to assess two different sets of adverse drug reaction (ADR) case reports. Phase 1 defined, modified and refined a new tool using multidisciplinary teams. Phase 2 involved the assessment of 50 ADR case reports from a prospective study of paediatric inpatients by individual assessors. Phase 3 compared assessments with the new tool for individuals and groups in comparison to the ‘gold standard’ (the avoidability outcome set by a panel of senior investigators: an experienced clinical pharmacologist, paediatrician and pharmacist). Main Outcome Measures Inter-rater reliability (IRR), measure of disagreement and utilization of avoidability categories. Results Preliminary work—Pilot phase: results for the original Hallas cases were fair and pairwise kappa scores ranged from 0.21 to 0.36. Results for the modified Hallas cases were poor, pairwise kappa scores ranged from 0.06 to 0.16. Phase 1: on initial use of the new tool, agreement between the two multidisciplinary groups was found on 13/20 cases with a kappa score of 0.29 (95% CI -0.04 to 0.62). Phase 2: the assessment of 50 ADR case reports by six individual reviewers yielded pairwise kappa scores ranging from poor to good 0.12 to 0.75 and percentage exact agreement (%EA) ranged from 52–90%. Phase 3: Percentage exact agreement ranged from 35–70%. Overall, individuals had better agreement with the ‘gold standard’. Conclusion Avoidability assessment is feasible but needs careful attention to methods. The Liverpool ADR avoidability assessment tool showed mixed IRR. We have developed and validated a method for assessing the avoidability of ADRs that is transparent, more objective than

  2. ADDME – Avoiding Drug Development Mistakes Early: central nervous system drug discovery perspective

    PubMed Central

    Tsaioun, Katya; Bottlaender, Michel; Mabondzo, Aloise

    2009-01-01

    The advent of early absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET) screening has increased the attrition rate of weak drug candidates early in the drug-discovery process, and decreased the proportion of compounds failing in clinical trials for ADMET reasons. This paper reviews the history of ADMET screening and its place in pharmaceutical development, and central nervous system drug discovery in particular. Assays that have been developed in response to specific needs and improvements in technology that result in higher throughput and greater accuracy of prediction of human mechanisms of absorption and toxicity are discussed. The paper concludes with the authors' forecast of new models that will better predict human efficacy and toxicity. PMID:19534730

  3. Utilization of the Bridging Strategy for the Development of New Drugs in Oncology to Avoid Drug Lag.

    PubMed

    Kogure, Seiji; Koyama, Nobuyuki; Hidaka, Shinji

    2017-06-19

    Global trial (GT) strategy and bridging (BG) strategy are currently the main clinical development strategies of oncology drugs in Japan, but the relationship between development style and drug lag and how the bridging strategy has contributed to the solution of drug lag have not been clear. We investigated the potential factors that influenced submission lag (SL), and also compared the differences in SL among early-initiation BG strategy, late-initiation BG strategy, and GT strategy. A stepwise linear regression analysis identified the potential factors that shorten SL: development start lag and development style. Comparison of the differences in SL among the strategies also indicated that the SL in the GT strategy and that in the early-initiation BG strategy were significantly shorter than that in the late-initiation BG strategy. The findings in our study suggest that the late-initiation BG strategy may not contribute to shortening drug lag. Because the number of late-initiation BG studies has not decreased, we propose first that pharmaceutical companies should initiate clinical development as early as possible in Japan so that they can choose the GT strategy as a first option at the next step, and second when they cannot choose the GT strategy after investigating differences in exposure between Japanese and non-Japanese in a phase 1 study, they should select the early BG strategy to avoid future drug lag. It is also important for the regulatory authorities to provide reasonable guidance to have a positive impact on strategic decisions, even for foreign-capital companies. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  4. Avoiding accidental exposure to intravenous cytotoxic drugs.

    PubMed

    Meade, Elizabeth

    Many cytotoxic drugs have been shown to be mutagenic, teratogenic and carcinogenic with second malignancies known to be associated with several specific cancer drugs. Occupational exposure to cytotoxic drugs presents a signification danger to healthcare staff and unwarranted handling of these drugs should be avoided. Guidelines have been established for the safe handling of hazardous drugs but not all professionals are adhering to these recommendations. Recent environmental studies have demonstrated measurable drug contamination on surfaces even when recommended guidelines are followed. It is therefore imperative that healthcare workers are aware of the potential hazards of antineoplastic agents and employ the recommended precautions to minimise exposure. This article outlines the potential risks associated with exposure to cytotoxic drugs for healthcare staff. The safe-handling precautions required in the storage, preparation, transport, administration and waste disposal of cytotoxic drugs are presented.

  5. Towards better patient care: drugs to avoid.

    PubMed

    2013-04-01

    Common sense dictates that one should choose tried and tested drugs with proven, concrete benefits that outweigh their adverse effects. Many new drugs are approved each year, often despite a lack of solid evidence that they are any better than existing treatments. Worse, some are approved despite being less effective or more harmful than current options. Massive promotion is used to ensure that such drugs achieve a positive image in the eyes of healthcare professionals and patients. Renowned "opinion leaders" intervene in their favour at conferences and in specialist media, and their opinions are further propagated by specialists in the field. Finally, campaigns in the lay media are used to highlight the target illness, encouraging patients to request a prescription. New data sometimes show that older, initially promising drugs are less effective or more harmful than first thought. For all these reasons, many drugs that are now present on the market are more harmful than beneficial and should be avoided. Unfortunately, negative assessment data and warnings are often drowned in the flood of promotion and advertising. Front-line healthcare professionals who are determined to act in their patients' best interests can find themselves swimming against a tide of specialist opinion, marketing authorisation, and reimbursement decisions. By leaving drugs that are more harmful than beneficial on the market and contenting themselves with simple half-measures, healthcare authorities are failing in their duty to protect patients. Prescrire, a journal funded solely by its subscribers, does not seek to do the work of health authorities, and does not have the means to do so. Prescrire's goal is simply to help healthcare professionals provide better care. The following text lists the principal drugs that we consider more harmful than beneficial, based on our reviews published between 2010 and 2012 in our French edition. These drugs should not be used. Patients and healthcare

  6. Drug Cost Avoidance in Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Calvin-Lamas, M; Portela-Pereira, P; Rabuñal-Alvarez, M T; Martinez-Breijo, S; Martín-Herranz, M I; Gómez-Veiga, F

    2015-11-01

    Economic impact of prostate cancer is increasing in relation to its increased incidence and increased patient survival. Clinical trials are essential to evaluate the efficacy and safety of new treatments but may also result in economic benefits by avoiding the cost of the drug. Our objective is to determine the avoided cost in investigational drugs in clinical trials of prostate cancer conducted in a period of 18 years in a tertiary center. We carried out an observational of prevalence study with retrospective collected data of clinical trials involving currently marketed drugs and cost avoidance during the study period (1996-2013) was calculated. We include in this review five clinical trials on prostate cancer that met selection criteria of 18 performed. All of them were phase III, multicenter, international and with current marketed drugs. 136 patients were included. Total cost avoidance of 696,002€ and an average cost avoidance by clinical trial of 139,200€ were obtained. Average cost avoidance per patient was 5,118€. Cost avoidance in investigational drugs is a tangible benefit of clinical trials, whose realization is a source of economic benefits for the hospital, not only by directly generated by each trial. Clinical trials are an exceptional framework for progress in clinical research and real savings for the health system. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Healthcare avoidance by people who inject drugs in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Heath, A J; Kerr, T; Ti, L; Kaplan, K; Suwannawong, P; Wood, E; Hayashi, K

    2016-09-01

    Although people who inject drugs (IDU) often contend with various health-related harms, timely access to health care among this population remains low. We sought to identify specific individual, social and structural factors constraining healthcare access among IDU in Bangkok, Thailand. Data were derived from a community-recruited sample of IDU participating in the Mitsampan Community Research Project between July and October 2011. We assessed the prevalence and correlates of healthcare avoidance due to one's drug use using multivariate logistic regression. Among 437 participants, 112 (25.6%) reported avoiding health care because they were IDU. In multivariate analyses, factors independently associated with avoiding health care included having ever been drug tested by police [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.80], experienced verbal abuse (AOR = 3.15), been discouraged from engaging in usual family activities (AOR = 3.27), been refused medical care (AOR = 10.90), experienced any barriers to health care (AOR = 4.87) and received healthcare information and support at a drop-in centre (AOR = 1.92) (all P < 0.05). These findings highlight the need to address the broader policy environment, which perpetuates the criminalization and stigmatization of IDU, and to expand peer-based interventions to facilitate access to health care for IDU in this setting. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Healthcare avoidance by people who inject drugs in Bangkok, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Heath, A.J.; Kerr, T.; Ti, L.; Kaplan, K.; Suwannawong, P.; Wood, E.; Hayashi, K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although people who inject drugs (IDU) often contend with various health-related harms, timely access to health care among this population remains low. We sought to identify specific individual, social and structural factors constraining healthcare access among IDU in Bangkok, Thailand. Methods Data were derived from a community-recruited sample of IDU participating in the Mitsampan Community Research Project between July and October 2011. We assessed the prevalence and correlates of healthcare avoidance due to one's drug use using multivariate logistic regression. Results Among 437 participants, 112 (25.6%) reported avoiding health care because they were IDU. In multivariate analyses, factors independently associated with avoiding health care included having ever been drug tested by police [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.80], experienced verbal abuse (AOR = 3.15), been discouraged from engaging in usual family activities (AOR = 3.27), been refused medical care (AOR = 10.90), experienced any barriers to health care (AOR = 4.87) and received healthcare information and support at a drop-in centre (AOR = 1.92) (all P < 0.05). Conclusions These findings highlight the need to address the broader policy environment, which perpetuates the criminalization and stigmatization of IDU, and to expand peer-based interventions to facilitate access to health care for IDU in this setting. PMID:26491067

  9. 30-Day Potentially Avoidable Readmissions Due to Adverse Drug Events.

    PubMed

    Dalleur, Olivia; Beeler, Patrick E; Schnipper, Jeffrey L; Donzé, Jacques

    2017-03-17

    To analyze the patterns of potentially avoidable readmissions due to adverse drug events (ADEs) to identify the most appropriate risk reduction interventions. In this observational study, we analyzed a random sample of 534 potentially avoidable 30-day readmissions from 10,275 consecutive discharges from the medical department of an academic hospital. Readmissions due to ADEs were reviewed to identify the causative drugs and the severity and interventions to prevent them. Seventy cases (13.1%) of readmission were partially or predominantly due to ADEs, of which, 58 (82.9%) were serious ADEs. Overall, 65 (92.9%) of the ADEs have been confirmed to be preventable. Inappropriate prescribing was identified as the cause of ADE in 34 cases (48.6%) mainly involving diuretics, analgesics, or antithrombotics: misprescribing n = 19 (27.1%), underprescribing n = 8 (11.4%), and overprescribing n = 7 (10.0%). The remaining half of preventable ADEs (n = 36; 51.4%) were related to suboptimal patient monitoring/education, such as adherence issues (n = 6; 8.6%) or lack of monitoring (n = 31; 44.3%). In 64 cases (91.4%), the readmission could have been potentially prevented by better monitoring for drug efficacy/disease control, or for predictable side effect. Thirty-three (97.1%) of the 34 ADEs due to inappropriate prescribing could have also been prevented by better monitoring. Adverse drug events accounted for approximately 13% of 30-day preventable readmissions. A half were due to prescription errors involving mainly diuretics, analgesics, or antithrombotics, and the other half were due to suboptimal patient monitoring/education, most frequently with antineoplastics. Both these avoidable causes may represent opportunities to reduce the total drug-related adverse events.

  10. Avoidance learning: a review of theoretical models and recent developments

    PubMed Central

    Krypotos, Angelos-Miltiadis; Effting, Marieke; Kindt, Merel; Beckers, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Avoidance is a key characteristic of adaptive and maladaptive fear. Here, we review past and contemporary theories of avoidance learning. Based on the theories, experimental findings and clinical observations reviewed, we distill key principles of how adaptive and maladaptive avoidance behavior is acquired and maintained. We highlight clinical implications of avoidance learning theories and describe intervention strategies that could reduce maladaptive avoidance and prevent its return. We end with a brief overview of recent developments and avenues for further research. PMID:26257618

  11. Etoricoxib: new drug. Avoid using cox-2 inhibitors for pain.

    PubMed

    2007-12-01

    (1) Paracetamol is the first-choice analgesic for joint pain. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), especially ibuprofen, are second-line options. Cox-2 inhibitors are no more effective than traditional NSAIDs and have no tangible advantages in terms of gastrointestinal tolerability. In contrast, they expose patients to an increased risk of cardiovascular adverse effects. (2) Etoricoxib is marketed in some European countries to relieve symptoms of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and gout attacks. (3) Many clinical trials have tested etoricoxib in these indications, as well as in ankylosing spondylitis, low back pain, and various types of acute pain. Etoricoxib was no more effective than other NSAIDs such as ibuprofen, naproxen or diclofenac in these situations. (4) Comparative trials showed a higher overall mortality rate with etoricoxib than with naproxen. A combined analysis of long-term comparative trials including 5441 patients, mainly versus naproxen, showed that etoricoxib does not reduce the risk of perforation, ulcer or severe gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Similarly, it does not reduce the risk of mild gastrointestinal events in at-risk patients: those with a history of gastrointestinal disorders, aspirin use, etc. (5) Three trials including a total of 34 701 patients (MEDAL programme) compared cardiovascular thrombotic events associated with etoricoxib and diclofenac. Overall, the cardiovascular risks appear to be similar but the thrombotic risk may be slightly higher with diclofenac than with other conventional NSAIDs. (6) Etoricoxib provoked arterial hypertension, oedema and heart failure during clinical trials. Serious skin reactions were reported both during clinical trials and after marketing, but their precise incidence is not known. Etoricoxib is partly metabolised by the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme CYP 3A4 and increases the bioavailability of ethinylestradiol. (7) When a NSAID is considered, drugs with which we have the most experience

  12. How to avoid unbounded drug accumulation with fractional pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Hennion, Maud; Hanert, Emmanuel

    2013-12-01

    A number of studies have shown that certain drugs follow an anomalous kinetics that can hardly be represented by classical models. Instead, fractional-order pharmacokinetics models have proved to be better suited to represent the time course of these drugs in the body. Unlike classical models, fractional models can represent memory effects and a power-law terminal phase. They give rise to a more complex kinetics that better reflects the complexity of the human body. By doing so, they also spotlight potential issues that were ignored by classical models. Among those issues is the accumulation of drug that carries on indefinitely when the infusion rate is constant and the elimination flux is fractional. Such an unbounded accumulation could have important clinical implications and thus requires a solution to reach a steady state. We have considered a fractional one-compartment model with a continuous intravenous infusion and studied how the infusion rate influences the total amount of drug in the compartment. By taking an infusion rate that decays like a power law, we have been able to stabilize the amount of drug in the compartment. In the case of multiple dosing administration, we propose recurrence relations for the doses and the dosing times that also prevent drug accumulation. By introducing a numerical discretization of the model equations, we have been able to consider a more realistic two-compartment model with both continuous infusion and multiple dosing administration. That numerical model has been applied to amiodarone, a drug known to have an anomalous kinetics. Numerical results suggest that unbounded drug accumulation can again be prevented by using a drug input function that decays as a power law.

  13. Drug-Avoidance Self-Efficacy Among Exclusive Cannabis Users vs. Other Drug Users Visiting the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Clingan, Sarah E; Woodruff, Susan I

    2017-07-29

    Medical care in the emergency department (ED) is a growing and complex area of outpatient care, with about 256 visits made to EDs every minute in 2013. Studies report that, compared to people who do not use drugs, people who use illicit drugs are more likely to use the ED for their medical care. Self-efficacy has been shown to be a predictor of abstinence or reduced use among drug-using individuals. The current study describes drug avoidance self-efficacy among exclusive cannabis-using individuals and other drug-using individuals who use the ED for any reason. Participants were 693 adult patients visiting the trauma units and EDs of two large urban "safety net" hospitals (i.e., providing care to low-income, uninsured, and vulnerable population) in Southern California who reported using illicit drugs in the past 30 days. For people who use only cannabis, higher drug-avoidance self-efficacy was associated with older age, lower drug involvement scores, lower drug severity scores, and higher readiness to change use. For people who use other drugs, higher drug avoidance self-efficacy scores was associated with lower drug severity scores, lower psychiatric severity scores, higher medical severity scores, and higher readiness to change use. This study identified several factors (some common, some unique) related to higher drug-avoidance self-efficacy for both groups. Results may be important when designing intervention protocols for use in the ED.

  14. Development and Validation of the Athlete Fear Avoidance Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Dover, Geoffrey; Amar, Vanessa

    2015-06-01

    The fear-avoidance model was developed in an attempt to explain the process by which "pain experience" and "pain behavior" become dissociated from the actual pain sensation in individuals who manifest the phenomenon of exaggerated pain perception. High levels of fear avoidance can lead to chronic pain and disability and have successfully predicted rehabilitation time in the work-related-injury population. Existing fear-avoidance questionnaires have all been developed for the general population, but these questionnaires may not be specific enough to fully assess fear avoidance in an athletic population that copes with pain differently than the general population. To develop and validate the Athlete Fear Avoidance Questionnaire (AFAQ). Qualitative research to develop the AFAQ and a cross-sectional study to validate the scale. For questionnaire development, a total of 8 experts in the fields of athletic therapy, sport psychology, and fear avoidance were called upon to generate and rate items for the AFAQ. For determining concurrent validity, 99 varsity athletes from various sports participated. A total of 99 varsity athletes completed the AFAQ, the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire, and the Pain Catastrophizing Scale. We used Pearson correlations to establish concurrent validity. Concurrent validity was established with significant correlations between the AFAQ and the Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire-Physical Activity (r = 0.352, P > .001) as well as with the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (r = 0.587, P > .001). High internal consistency of our questionnaire was established with a Cronbach α coefficient of 0.805. The final version of the questionnaire includes 10 items with good internal validity (P < .05). We developed a questionnaire with good internal and external validity. The AFAQ is a scale that measures sport-injury-related fear avoidance in athletes and could be used to identify potential psychological barriers to rehabilitation.

  15. Evaluation of the Effects of Pharmacist Intervention for Adverse Drug Reaction Detection and Exacerbation Avoidance.

    PubMed

    Imaura, Masaharu; Yamaya, Takeshi; Uehara, Nozomi; Mano, Narutoshi; Nagase, Satoshi; Kimura, Koji; Kanno, Hiroshi; Yamada, Yasuhiko

    2017-01-01

     We evaluated the effects of pharmacist intervention for adverse drug reaction detection and exacerbation avoidance, as well as the severity and outcome of reactions based on analyses of pharmacist involvement in a collaborative approach to medicine. Of 5436 cases with pharmacist involvement, adverse drug reaction prevention was seen in 440, accounting for 8.1%, and exacerbation avoidance in 213, accounting for 3.9%. We concluded that pharmacist involvement contributes to detect adverse drug reactions and avoid exacerbation, and improves pharmacotherapy safety. We also analyzed 131 cases in which the course after intervention was followed. When categorized by adverse drug reaction severity, Grade 1 and 2 were the same at 45.8%, Grade 3 at 8.4%, respectively. Those findings suggested that pharmacist intervention contributes to early detection of an adverse drug reaction. Also, the relationship between clues for detecting adverse drug reactions by a pharmacist and their severity showed that objective evaluations such as clinical laboratory test results, physical assessments and medication history were important for detecting reactions that became more serious. Patients recovered or recovering from an adverse reaction comprised 76.4%, indicating that pharmacist intervention contributed to exacerbation avoidance and improvement. Our findings revealed the effects of pharmacist intervention for adverse drug reaction detection and exacerbation avoidance, and for safety improvement of pharmacotherapy. Additionally, we considered it necessary for the future pharmacist intervention to improve skills of assessing an adverse drug reaction objectively.

  16. The brief experiential avoidance questionnaire: development and initial validation.

    PubMed

    Gámez, Wakiza; Chmielewski, Michael; Kotov, Roman; Ruggero, Camilo; Suzuki, Nadia; Watson, David

    2014-03-01

    The 62-item Multidimensional Experiential Avoidance Questionnaire (MEAQ) was recently developed to assess a broad range of experiential avoidance (EA) content. However, practical clinical and research considerations made a briefer measure of EA desirable. Using items from the original 62-item MEAQ, a 15-item scale was created that tapped content from each of the MEAQ's six dimensions. Items were selected on the basis of their performance in 3 samples: undergraduates (n = 363), psychiatric outpatients (n = 265), and community adults (n = 215). These items were then evaluated using 2 additional samples (314 undergraduates and 201 psychiatric outpatients) and cross-validated in 2 new, independent samples (283 undergraduates and 295 community adults). The resulting measure (Brief Experiential Avoidance Questionnaire; BEAQ) demonstrated good internal consistency. It also exhibited strong convergence with respect to each of the MEAQ's 6 dimensions. The BEAQ demonstrated expected associations with measures of avoidance, psychopathology, and quality of life and was distinguishable from negative affectivity and neuroticism.

  17. Development of Bone Targeting Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Molly; Sawamoto, Kazuki; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J.; Mackenzie, William G.; Mason, Robert W.; Orii, Tadao; Tomatsu, Shunji

    2017-01-01

    The skeletal system, comprising bones, ligaments, cartilage and their connective tissues, is critical for the structure and support of the body. Diseases that affect the skeletal system can be difficult to treat, mainly because of the avascular cartilage region. Targeting drugs to the site of action can not only increase efficacy but also reduce toxicity. Bone-targeting drugs are designed with either of two general targeting moieties, aimed at the entire skeletal system or a specific cell type. Most bone-targeting drugs utilize an affinity to hydroxyapatite, a major component of the bone matrix that includes a high concentration of positively-charged Ca2+. The strategies for designing such targeting moieties can involve synthetic and/or biological components including negatively-charged amino acid peptides or bisphosphonates. Efficient delivery of bone-specific drugs provides significant impact in the treatment of skeletal related disorders including infectious diseases (osteoarthritis, osteomyelitis, etc.), osteoporosis, and metabolic skeletal dysplasia. Despite recent advances, however, both delivering the drug to its target without losing activity and avoiding adverse local effects remain a challenge. In this review, we investigate the current development of bone-targeting moieties, their efficacy and limitations, and discuss future directions for the development of these specific targeted treatments. PMID:28644392

  18. Contamination sensitivity and the development of disease-avoidant behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Siegal, Michael; Fadda, Roberta; Overton, Paul G.

    2011-01-01

    Owing to their developing cognitive abilities and their limited knowledge about the biological basis of illness, children often have less expertise at disease avoidance than adults. However, affective reactions to contaminants through the acquisition of disgust and the social and cultural transmissions of knowledge about contamination and contagion provide impetus for children to learn effective disease-avoidant behaviours early in their development. In this article, we review the ontogenetic development of knowledge about contamination and contagion with particular attention to the role of socialization and culture. Together with their emerging cognitive abilities and affective reactions to contaminants, informal and formal cultural learning shape children's knowledge about disease. Through this process, the perceptual cues of contamination are linked to threats of disease outcomes and can act as determinants of disease-avoidant behaviours. PMID:22042919

  19. Hepatitis C Avoidance in Injection Drug Users: A Typology of Possible Protective Practices

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Catherine; Harris, Magdalena; Rhodes, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hepatitis C virus (HCV) represents a serious public health concern. People who inject drugs (PWID) are at particular risk and nearly half (45%) of PWID in England may be infected. HCV prevention interventions have only had moderate impact on the prevalence of HCV in this population. Using qualitative methods, we sought to detail the protective practices potentially linked to HCV avoidance among PWID, and explore the motivations for these. Methods The study used a life history approach allowing participants to detail their lived experience both before and during the course of their injecting careers. Thirty-seven participants were recruited from drug services in London, and from referrals within local injecting networks. A baseline and follow-up in-depth qualitative interview was carried out with each participant, and for half, a third interview was also undertaken. All underwent testing for HCV antibody. Analyses focused on developing a descriptive typology of protective practices potentially linked to HCV avoidance. Results Practices were deemed to be protective against HCV if they could be expected a priori to reduce the number of overall injections and/or the number of injections using shared injecting equipment. Participants reported engaging in various protective practices which fell into three categories identified through thematic analysis: principles about injecting, preparedness, and flexibility. Conclusions All participants engaged in protective practices irrespective of serostatus. It is important to consider the relative importance of different motivations framing protective practices in order to formulate harm reduction interventions which appeal to the situated concerns of PWID, especially given that these protective practices may also help protect against HIV and other blood borne infections. PMID:24194855

  20. Federal Drug Development Programs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-17

    of Child 1971 6.7 0 Health and Human Development Caries National Institute of Dental 1971 0.6 0 ( tooth decay ) Research Sickle cell National Heart...industry was marketed in the late 1960s. The caries ( tooth decay ) drug development program was started in 1971 by the National Institute of Dental...Malaria/tropical diseases 280,000 Vaccines 60 Epilepsy 4,400 Antivirals 50 Contraceptives 2,800 Caries ( tooth decay ) 300 Sickle cell anemia 25 Narcotic

  1. Development of a Measure of Experiential Avoidance: The Multidimensional Experiential Avoidance Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamez, Wakiza; Chmielewski, Michael; Kotov, Roman; Ruggero, Camilo; Watson, David

    2011-01-01

    Experiential avoidance (EA) has been conceptualized as the tendency to avoid negative internal experiences and is an important concept in numerous conceptualizations of psychopathology as well as theories of psychotherapy. Existing measures of EA have either been narrowly defined or demonstrated unsatisfactory internal consistency and/or evidence…

  2. Development of a Measure of Experiential Avoidance: The Multidimensional Experiential Avoidance Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamez, Wakiza; Chmielewski, Michael; Kotov, Roman; Ruggero, Camilo; Watson, David

    2011-01-01

    Experiential avoidance (EA) has been conceptualized as the tendency to avoid negative internal experiences and is an important concept in numerous conceptualizations of psychopathology as well as theories of psychotherapy. Existing measures of EA have either been narrowly defined or demonstrated unsatisfactory internal consistency and/or evidence…

  3. Myasthenia Gravis Medication Information Card (Drugs to be Avoided or Used with Caution in Myasthenia Gravis)

    MedlinePlus

    MYASTHENIA GRAVIS MEDICATION INFORMATION CARD Drugs to be Avoided or Used with Caution in MG My Name _______________________________________________ Address ________________________________________________ ... the MGFA web site; reference document “Medications and Myasthenia Gravis (A Reference for Health Care Professionals.” www.myasthenia. ...

  4. Adherence to Guidelines for Avoiding Drug Interactions Associated with Warfarin - A Nationwide Swedish Register Study

    PubMed Central

    Lindh, Jonatan D.; Andersson, Marine L.; Mannheimer, Buster

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the extent to which clinicians avoid well-established drug-drug interactions associated with warfarin. We hypothesised that clinicians would avoid combining non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), tramadol and sulfamethoxazole with warfarin. Methods A cross-sectional analysis of nationwide dispensing data was performed in Swedish individuals 18 years or older (n =  7 563 649). Odds ratios of interacting NSAIDs, tramadol and sulfamethoxazole versus respective prevalence of comparator drugs codeine, and ciprofloxacin in patients co-dispensed interacting warfarin versus patients unexposed was calculated. Results The odds of receiving an interacting NSAID versus the comparator codeine was markedly lower in patients with warfarin than in the remaining population (adjusted OR 0.21; 95% CI 0.20 – 0.22). Also, the interacting drugs tramadol and sulfamethoxazole were less common among patients dispensed warfarin as compared to the remaining population, although the decrease was much more modest (adjusted OR 0.83; CI 0.80–0.87 and 0.81; CI 0.73 – 0.90). Conclusions In conclusion, Swedish doctors in the vast majority of cases refrain from prescribing NSAIDs to patients already on warfarin. Tramadol and sulfamethoxazole are however rarely avoided. PMID:24830709

  5. Impediments to drug development.

    PubMed

    Robson, Martin C

    2003-01-01

    There is a continual need for new products for wound care, as well as a desire by scientists and clinicians to translate information into wound healing improvements for patients. Pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies devote immense resources to fulfilling these needs and desires. However, there are many impediments to drug development that are poorly understood by caregivers, patients, and the public at large. Among these impediments are the tremendous costs involved, the short patent protection time, and regulatory issues. In addition, there is a marked attrition of potential drugs as they progress through the various stages of development. When the costs, time, regulatory issues, and attrition impediments are overcome, the problems with reimbursement become an impediment. This is especially true in the elderly population in which most chronic wound healing problems occur. Finally, academic societies such as the Wound Healing Society and its members pose an impediment to drug development. There is a need to interact with various governmental agencies and industry to facilitate translating science to patient care. This has not been done with a strong, uniform voice. These are but a few of the impediments that prevent scientific advances from resulting in new products available at the bedside to improve the quality of life of our patients.

  6. Avoidable interruptions during drug administration in an intensive rehabilitation ward: improvement project.

    PubMed

    Buchini, Sara; Quattrin, Rosanna

    2012-04-01

    To record the frequency of interruptions and their causes, to identify 'avoidable' interruptions and to build an improvement project to reduce 'avoidable' interruptions. In Italy each year 30,000-35,000 deaths per year are attributed to health-care system errors, of which 19% are caused by medication errors. The factors that contribute to drug management error also include interruptions and carelessness during treatment administration. A descriptive study design was used to record the frequency of interruptions and their causes and to identify 'avoidable' interruptions in an intensive rehabilitation ward in Northern Italy. A data collection grid was used to record the data over a 6-month period. A total of 3000 work hours were observed. During the study period 1170 interruptions were observed. The study identified 14 causes of interruption. The study shows that of the 14 cases of interruptions at least nine can be defined as 'avoidable'. An improvement project has been proposed to reduce unnecessary interruptions and distractions to avoid making errors. An additional useful step to reduce the incidence of treatment errors would be to implement the use of a single patient medication sheet for the recording of drug prescription, preparation and administration and also the incident reporting. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Current development of UAV sense and avoid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhahir, A.; Razali, A.; Mohd Ajir, M. R.

    2016-10-01

    As unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are now gaining high interests from civil and commercialised market, the automatic sense and avoid (SAA) system is currently one of the essential features in research spotlight of UAV. Several sensor types employed in current SAA research and technology of sensor fusion that offers a great opportunity in improving detection and tracking system are presented here. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of SAA system development in general, as well as the current challenges facing UAV researchers and designers.

  8. 77 FR 51816 - Notice of Opportunity To Withdraw Abbreviated New Drug Applications To Avoid Backlog Fee Obligations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... Applications To Avoid Backlog Fee Obligations AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... opportunity to withdraw them as soon as possible to avoid paying a fee. The fee in question is a one-time... wish to pursue and by timely notice of withdrawal avoid paying the new backlog fee on such applications...

  9. The Risk Avoidance Partnership: Training Active Drug Users as Peer Health Advocates

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, Margaret R.; Dickson-Gomez, Julia; Mosack, Katie E.; Convey, Mark; Martinez, Maria; Clair, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Efforts have expanded to create AIDS prevention programs for drug users that consider the social context and interpersonal relationships within which risky practices take place. The Risk Avoidance Partnership (RAP) project is designed to train active drug users as “Peer/Public Health Advocates” (PHAs) to bring a structured, peer-led intervention into the sites where they and their drug-using social networks use illicit drugs. The RAP Peer Health Advocacy training curriculum and peer-led intervention promote harm reduction among drug users and support drug-user organization to reduce infectious disease and other harm in the context of injection drug use, crack cocaine use, and sexual activity. Initial findings suggest that RAP PHAs perceive a significant positive role change in themselves while conducting health advocacy work, and willingly and successfully carry the peer-led intervention into locations of high-risk drug activity to deliver it to their peers even in the absence of project staff support. PMID:19337568

  10. Covalent inhibitors in drug discovery: from accidental discoveries to avoided liabilities and designed therapies.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Renato A

    2015-09-01

    Drugs that covalently bond to their biological targets have a long history in drug discovery. A look at drug approvals in recent years suggests that covalent drugs will continue to make impacts on human health for years to come. Although fraught with concerns about toxicity, the high potencies and prolonged effects achievable with covalent drugs may result in less-frequent drug dosing and in wide therapeutic margins for patients. Covalent inhibition can also dissociate drug pharmacodynamics (PD) from pharmacokinetics (PK), which can result in desired drug efficacy for inhibitors that have short systemic exposure. Evidence suggests that there is a reduced risk for the development of resistance against covalent drugs, which is a major challenge in areas such as oncology and infectious disease.

  11. Melatonergic drugs in development

    PubMed Central

    Carocci, Alessia; Catalano, Alessia; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is widely known as “the darkness hormone”. It is a major chronobiological regulator involved in circadian phasing and sleep-wake cycle in humans. Numerous other functions, including cyto/neuroprotection, immune modulation, and energy metabolism have been ascribed to melatonin. A variety of studies have revealed a role for melatonin and its receptors in different pathophysiological conditions. However, the suitability of melatonin as a drug is limited because of its short half-life, poor oral bioavailability, and ubiquitous action. Due to the therapeutic potential of melatonin in a wide variety of clinical conditions, the development of new agents able to interact selectively with melatonin receptors has become an area of great interest during the last decade. Therefore, the field of melatonergic receptor agonists comprises a great number of structurally different chemical entities, which range from indolic to nonindolic compounds. Melatonergic agonists are suitable for sleep disturbances, neuropsychiatric disorders related to circadian dysphasing, and metabolic diseases associated with insulin resistance. The results of preclinical studies on animal models show that melatonin receptor agonists can be considered promising agents for the treatment of central nervous system-related pathologies. An overview of recent advances in the field of investigational melatonergic drugs will be presented in this review. PMID:25258560

  12. Melatonergic drugs in development.

    PubMed

    Carocci, Alessia; Catalano, Alessia; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is widely known as "the darkness hormone". It is a major chronobiological regulator involved in circadian phasing and sleep-wake cycle in humans. Numerous other functions, including cyto/neuroprotection, immune modulation, and energy metabolism have been ascribed to melatonin. A variety of studies have revealed a role for melatonin and its receptors in different pathophysiological conditions. However, the suitability of melatonin as a drug is limited because of its short half-life, poor oral bioavailability, and ubiquitous action. Due to the therapeutic potential of melatonin in a wide variety of clinical conditions, the development of new agents able to interact selectively with melatonin receptors has become an area of great interest during the last decade. Therefore, the field of melatonergic receptor agonists comprises a great number of structurally different chemical entities, which range from indolic to nonindolic compounds. Melatonergic agonists are suitable for sleep disturbances, neuropsychiatric disorders related to circadian dysphasing, and metabolic diseases associated with insulin resistance. The results of preclinical studies on animal models show that melatonin receptor agonists can be considered promising agents for the treatment of central nervous system-related pathologies. An overview of recent advances in the field of investigational melatonergic drugs will be presented in this review.

  13. Avoiding drug resistance through extended drug target interfaces: a case for stapled peptides

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Siau Jia; Chee, Sharon; Yurlova, Larisa; Lane, David; Verma, Chandra; Brown, Christopher; Ghadessy, Farid

    2016-01-01

    Cancer drugs often fail due to the emergence of clinical resistance. This can manifest through mutations in target proteins that selectively exclude drug binding whilst retaining aberrant function. A priori knowledge of resistance-inducing mutations is therefore important for both drug design and clinical surveillance. Stapled peptides represent a novel class of antagonists capable of inhibiting therapeutically relevant protein-protein interactions. Here, we address the important question of potential resistance to stapled peptide inhibitors. HDM2 is the critical negative regulator of p53, and is often overexpressed in cancers that retain wild-type p53 function. Interrogation of a large collection of randomly mutated HDM2 proteins failed to identify point mutations that could selectively abrogate binding by a stapled peptide inhibitor (PM2). In contrast, the same interrogation methodology has previously uncovered point mutations that selectively inhibit binding by Nutlin, the prototypical small molecule inhibitor of HDM2. Our results demonstrate both the high level of structural p53 mimicry employed by PM2 to engage HDM2, and the potential resilience of stapled peptide antagonists to mutations in target proteins. This inherent feature could reduce clinical resistance should this class of drugs enter the clinic. PMID:27057630

  14. Drug Development Process

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products ... Research Drugs undergo laboratory and animal testing to answer basic questions about safety. More Information ...

  15. Development of Tactical Lightning Avoidance Product for Terminal Weather Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, E.; Yoshida, S.; Adachi, T.; Kusunoki, K.; Ushio, T.

    2015-12-01

    Aircraft initiated or intercepted lightning is one of significant issues for civilian flight operation in Japan. It is much less possible than the past that lightning strikes cause fatal aircraft accidents thanks to both of certifications of aircraft design for lightning strikes and many of weather supports for aircraft operation. However, hundreds of lightning strikes to aircrafts have still been reported in each recent year in Japan, and airlines have been forced to delay or cancel most of those flights and to cost several hundred millions of yen for repair. Especially, lightning discharges during winter in the coastal area of the Sea of Japan frequently cause heavy damages on aircrafts due to their large charge transfer. It is important in actual aircraft operation that observed meteorological parameters are converted to decision-making information. Otherwise, pilots, controllers, or operators need to learn meteorology as much as weather experts, and to owe hard work load to interpret observed meteorological data to their risk. Ideally, it is desired to automatically provide them with predicted operation risk, for example, delay time, possibility of flight cancellation, and repair cost caused by lightning.Our research group has just started development of tactical lightning avoidance product, where a risk index of an aircraft operation due to lightning is calculated mainly from three novel observation devices: The phased array weather radar has potential to detect thunderstorms in their early stage due to the high volume scan rate of 10 - 30 sec. A lightning mapping system, such as Broadband Observation network for Lightning and Thunderstorm, indicates electrical structure inside clouds in concert with a co-located radar data. Aircraft sounding and real-time data downlink, especially high-frequency data provided by Secondary Surveillance Radar mode S, gives in-situ measurements of wind and temperature. Especially the in-situ temperature data can indicate

  16. Fixing flaws in Medicare drug coverage that prompt insurers to avoid low-income patients.

    PubMed

    Hsu, John; Fung, Vicki; Huang, Jie; Price, Mary; Brand, Richard; Hui, Rita; Fireman, Bruce; Dow, William H; Bertko, John; Newhouse, Joseph P

    2010-12-01

    Since 2006 numerous insurers have stopped serving the low-income segment of the Medicare Part D program, forcing millions of beneficiaries to change prescription drug plans. Using data from participating plans, we found that Medicare payments do not sufficiently reimburse insurers for the relatively high medication use among this population, creating perverse incentives for plans to avoid this part of the Part D market. Plans can accomplish this by increasing their premiums for all beneficiaries to an amount above regional benchmarks. We demonstrate that improving the accuracy of Medicare's risk and subsidy adjustments could mitigate these perverse incentives.

  17. How to transport veterinary drugs in insulated boxes to avoid thermal damage by heating or freezing.

    PubMed

    Horak, Johannes; Haberleitner, Astrid; Schauberger, Günther

    2017-05-25

    The transport of veterinary drugs must comply with the general standards for drug storage. Although many vehicles are equipped with active heating and/or cooling devices assuring recommended storage conditions, simple insulated transport boxes are also often used. In this study, measurements for typical transport boxes were performed under laboratory conditions by the use of a climate chamber for a temperature of -20 °C and 45 °C to investigate the impact of box size, insulation material, liquid vs. dry filling products, filling degree and other parameters on the thermal performance of insulated boxes. Model calculations and instructions are presented to predict the retention time of recommended drug storage temperatures. The measurements and the model calculations showed that the loading of the transport boxes with additional water bottles to increase the heat capacity is appropriate to prolong the retention time of the recommended temperature range of the drugs. Insulated transport boxes are not suitable to store drugs over a period of more than approximately 12 h. For practical use a recipe is presented to measure the thermal properties of a transport box and the related retention time for which the recommended storage temperatures can be assured. The following principles for drug transportation in vehicles are recommended: (1) Before transfer into boxes, drugs should always be thermally preconditioned (2) Increase the filling degree of the boxes with thermally preconditioned water bottles or re-usable thermal packs will increase the heat capacity. Do not deep-freeze the bottles or packs below 0 °C to avoid drug freezing due to contact. (3) Open the lid of the boxes only to uncase drugs that are immediately needed. (4) The bigger the box and the higher the filling degree, the longer the retention time of the transport box. (5) Wherever possible, place the drug box at a cool site inside the vehicle. (6) The monitoring of the inside temperature of the

  18. Drug development and manufacturing

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Burrell, Anthony K.

    2015-10-13

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry has been used for detecting binding events and measuring binding selectivities between chemicals and receptors. XRF may also be used for estimating the therapeutic index of a chemical, for estimating the binding selectivity of a chemical versus chemical analogs, for measuring post-translational modifications of proteins, and for drug manufacturing.

  19. New Zealand's drug development industry.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, Michelle Marie; Babar, Zaheer-Ud-Din; Carswell, Christopher; Garg, Sanjay

    2013-09-13

    The pharmaceutical industry's profitability depends on identifying and successfully developing new drug candidates while trying to contain the increasing costs of drug development. It is actively searching for new sources of innovative compounds and for mechanisms to reduce the enormous costs of developing new drug candidates. There is an opportunity for academia to further develop as a source of drug discovery. The rising levels of industry outsourcing also provide prospects for organisations that can reduce the costs of drug development. We explored the potential returns to New Zealand (NZ) from its drug discovery expertise by assuming a drug development candidate is out-licensed without clinical data and has anticipated peak global sales of $350 million. We also estimated the revenue from NZ's clinical research industry based on a standard per participant payment to study sites and the number of industry-sponsored clinical trials approved each year. Our analyses found that NZ's clinical research industry has generated increasing foreign revenue and appropriate policy support could ensure that this continues to grow. In addition the probability-based revenue from the out-licensing of a drug development candidate could be important for NZ if provided with appropriate policy and financial support.

  20. Concept development of automatic guidance for rotorcraft obstacle avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Victor H. L.

    1990-01-01

    The automatic guidance of rotorcraft for obstacle avoidance in nap-of-the-earth flight is studied. A hierarchical breakdown of the guidance components is used to identify the functional requirements. These requirements and anticipated sensor capabilities lead to a preliminary guidance concept, which has been evaluated via computer simulations.

  1. [New strategies for drug development].

    PubMed

    Veit, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The strategy how new drugs are being developed has dramatically changed during the last decade. Until then a rational, target-aimed design of drugs was not possible, because the molecular basis of disease was largely unexplored. The progress in basic science has revealed that many diseases are caused by the malfunction of proteins. These proteins are targets for drugs, which should bind to the protein and inhibit its function. Knowledge of the three dimensional structure of the target protein is helpful to find binding pockets for the drug on the molecular surface. The strategy of this knowledge-based or structure-based drug-design is explained with the help of several examples for recently approved drugs, antivirals against influenza and AIDS, and a drug against a rare cancer, chronic myeloic leukemia.

  2. The significance of mitochondrial toxicity testing in drug development.

    PubMed

    Dykens, James A; Will, Yvonne

    2007-09-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is increasingly implicated in the etiology of drug-induced toxicities. Members of diverse drug classes undermine mitochondrial function, and among the most potent are drugs that have been withdrawn from the market, or have received Black Box warnings from the FDA. To avoid mitochondrial liabilities, routine screens need to be positioned within the drug-development process. Assays for mitochondrial function, cell models that better report mitochondrial impairment, and new animal models that more faithfully reflect clinical manifestations of mitochondrial dysfunction are discussed in the context of how such data can reduce late stage attrition of drug candidates and can yield safer drugs in the future.

  3. Translation of the Risk Avoidance Partnership (RAP) for Implementation in Outpatient Drug Treatment Clinics.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Margaret R; Kostick, Kristin; Li, Jianghong; Dunn, Jennifer; McLaughlin, Paul; Richmond, Phil; Choudhury, Shonali; Obidoa, Chinekwu; Mosher, Heather; Martinez, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Scientific literature increasingly calls for studies to translate evidence-based interventions into real-world contexts balancing fidelity to the original design and fit to the new setting. The Risk Avoidance Partnership (RAP) is a health promotion intervention originally designed to train active drug users to become Peer Health Advocates. A theoretically driven approach was used to adapt RAP to fit implementation in outpatient methadone treatment clinics and pilot it with clinic patients. Ethnographic observations and process tracking documented the RAP translation and pilot experience, and clinic and community characteristics relevant to program implementation. Clinic administrators, staff, and patients were interviewed on their values, capacities, interest in RAP, perceived challenges of implementing RAP in drug treatment clinics, and experiences during the pilot. Findings indicated that RAP core components can be met when implemented in these settings and RAP can fit with the goals, interests, and other programs of the clinic. Balancing fidelity and fit requires recognition of the mutual impacts RAP and the clinic have on each other, which generate new interactions among staff and require ongoing specification of RAP to keep abreast of clinic and community changes. Collaboration of multiple stakeholders significantly benefited translation and pilot processes.

  4. Translation of the Risk Avoidance Partnership (RAP) for Implementation in Outpatient Drug Treatment Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Kostick, Kristin; Li, Jianghong; Dunn, Jennifer; McLaughlin, Paul; Richmond, Phil; Choudhury, Shonali; Obidoa, Chinekwu; Mosher, Heather; Martinez, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background Scientific literature increasingly calls for studies to translate evidence-based interventions into real-world contexts balancing fidelity to the original design and fit to the new setting. The Risk Avoidance Partnership (RAP) is a health promotion intervention originally designed to train active drug users to become Peer Health Advocates. Objectives A theoretically driven approach was used to adapt RAP to fit implementation in outpatient methadone treatment clinics and pilot it with clinic patients. Methods Ethnographic observations and process tracking documented the RAP translation and pilot experience, and clinic and community characteristics relevant to program implementation. Clinic administrators, staff, and patients were interviewed on their values, capacities, interest in RAP, perceived challenges of implementing RAP in drug treatment clinics, and experiences during the pilot. Results Findings indicated that RAP core components can be met when implemented in these settings and RAP can fit with the goals, interests, and other programs of the clinic. Conclusions Balancing fidelity and fit requires recognition of the mutual impacts RAP and the clinic have on each other, which generate new interactions among staff and require ongoing specification of RAP to keep abreast of clinic and community changes. Collaboration of multiple stakeholders significantly benefited translation and pilot processes. PMID:26098970

  5. New antituberculous drugs in development.

    PubMed

    Lalloo, Umesh G; Ambaram, Anish

    2010-08-01

    There have been no new antituberculous drugs since the introduction of rifampin in 1952. The collision of the HIV and tuberculosis (TB) epidemics in developing regions of the world together with the emergence of multidrug resistance and extensively drug-resistant strains of TB has emphasized the urgent need for newer antituberculous drugs. There is a need for drugs that are safe, effective against resistant strains, are able to shorten the course of treatment, are effective for latent TB infection, and that have minimal interactions with antiretroviral drugs. Drugs that are currently in phase 3 development are moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin. In phase 2 development are PA-824 and TMC207; and in phase 1 are SQ109, AZD5847, and linezolid. Nanotechnology holds future promise for targeted drug delivery. Immunotherapy such as new vaccines and vitamin D may serve as adjunctive treatment for prevention and active disease, together with shortening the course of treatment. Bringing newer and more effective antituberculous drugs to market is a global priority and the process must be accelerated.

  6. The adolescents training and learning to avoid steroids program: preventing drug use and promoting health behaviors.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, L; MacKinnon, D P; Elliot, D L; Moe, E L; Clarke, G; Cheong, J

    2000-04-01

    Use of alcohol and other illicit drugs by adolescent male athletes is a significant problem. Participation in sports may encourage use of drugs that enhance athletic performance, especially anabolic steroids (AS). Because, to our knowledge, no other intervention has successfully altered substance abuse by athletes, we developed and assessed the efficacy of a team-centered, sex-specific education program designed to reduce adolescent athletes' intentions to use and use of AS and alcohol and other illicit drugs. We studied 31 high school football teams that comprised 3207 athletes in 3 successive annual cohorts (1994-1996). The intervention included interactive classroom and exercise training sessions given by peer educators and facilitated by coaches and strength trainers. Program content included discussion of sports nutrition, exercise alternatives to AS and sport supplements, and the effects of substance abuse in sports, drug refusal role-playing, and the creation of health promotion messages. Questionnaires assessing AS, the use of sport supplements and alcohol and other illicit drugs, and potential risk and protective factors were administered before and after the intervention (before and after the football season) and up to 1 year after the program. At season's end, intentions to use (P<.05) and actual AS use (P<.04) were significantly lower among students who participated in the study. Although AS reduction did not achieve significance at 1 year (P<.08), intentions to use AS remained lower (P = .02). Illicit drug use (marijuana, amphetamines, and narcotics) was reduced at 1 year, whether alcohol was included (P = .04) or excluded (P = .02) from the index. Other long-term effects included fewer students reporting drinking and driving (P = .004), less sport supplement use (P = .009), and improved nutrition behaviors (P<.02). Use of alcohol and other illicit drugs and associated harmful activities can be prevented with a sex-specific, team-centered education

  7. Imaging in drug development.

    PubMed

    Nairne, James; Iveson, Peter B; Meijer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Imaging has played an important part in the diagnosis of disease and development of the understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms and is now poised to make an impact in the development of new pharmaceuticals. This chapter discusses the underlying technologies that make the field ready for this challenge. In particular, the potentials of magnetic resonance imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging are outlined, including the new methods developed to provide additional information from the scans carried out. The field of nuclear medicine has seen a rapid increase in interest as advances in radiochemistry have enabled a wide range of new radiotracers to be synthesised.

  8. Membrane transporters in drug development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Membrane transporters can be major determinants of the pharmacokinetic, safety and efficacy profiles of drugs. This presents several key questions for drug development, including which transporters are clinically important in drug absorption and disposition, and which in vitro methods are suitable for studying drug interactions with these transporters. In addition, what criteria should trigger follow-up clinical studies, and which clinical studies should be conducted if needed. In this article, we provide the recommendations of the International Transporter Consortium on these issues, and present decision trees that are intended to help guide clinical studies on the currently recognized most important drug transporter interactions. The recommendations are generally intended to support clinical development and filing of a new drug application. Overall, it is advised that the timing of transporter investigations should be driven by efficacy, safety and clinical trial enrolment questions (for example, exclusion and inclusion criteria), as well as a need for further understanding of the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion properties of the drug molecule, and information required for drug labeling. PMID:20190787

  9. Drug development to protozoan diseases.

    PubMed

    Monzote, Lianet; Siddiq, Afshan

    2011-01-01

    The diseases caused by protozoan parasite are responsible for considerable mortality and morbidity, affecting more than 500 million of people in the world. The epidemiological control of protozoan is unsatisfactory due to difficulties of vector and reservoir control; while the progress in the development of vaccine tends to be slow and arduous. Currently, the chemotherapy remains essential component of both clinical management and disease control programmer in endemic areas. The drugs in use as anti-protozoan agents were discovered over 50 years and a number of factors limit their utility such as: high cost, poor compliance, drug resistance, low efficacy and poor safety. In the recent years, the searches about the development of new drugs against protozoa parasite have been increased. This special issue of The Open Medicinal Chemistry Journal will present some of developments in this field with the aim to shown the significant advances in the discovery of new anti-protozoan drugs.

  10. Synthetic lethals in HIV: ways to avoid drug resistance : Running title: Preventing HIV resistance.

    PubMed

    Petitjean, Michel; Badel, Anne; Veitia, Reiner A; Vanet, Anne

    2015-04-17

    RNA viruses rapidly accumulate genetic variation, which can give rise to synthetic lethal (SL) and deleterious (SD) mutations. Synthetic lethal mutations (non-lethal when alone but lethal when combined in one genome) have been studied to develop cancer therapies. This principle can also be used against fast-evolving RNA-viruses. Indeed, targeting protein sites involved in SD + SL interactions with a drug would render any mutation of such sites, lethal. Here, we set up a strategy to detect intragenic pairs of SL and SD at the surface of the protein to predict less escapable drug target sites. For this, we detected SD + SL, studying HIV protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) sequence alignments from two groups of VIH(+) individuals: treated with drugs (T) or not (NT). Using a series of statistical approaches, we were able to propose bona fide SD + SL couples. When focusing on spatially close co-variant SD + SL couples at the surface of the protein, we found 5 SD + SL groups (2 in the protease and 3 in the reverse transcriptase), which could be good candidates to form pockets to accommodate potential drugs. Thus, designing drugs targeting these specific SD + SL groups would not allow the virus to mutate any residue involved in such groups without losing an essential function. Moreover, we also show that the selection pressure induced by the treatment leads to the appearance of new mutations, which change the mutational landscape of the protein. This drives the existence of differential SD + SL couples between the drug-treated and non-treated groups. Thus, new anti-viral drugs should be designed differently to target such groups.

  11. Pediatric drug development: formulation considerations.

    PubMed

    Ali, Areeg Anwer; Charoo, Naseem Ahmad; Abdallah, Daud Baraka

    2014-10-01

    Absence of safe, effective and appropriate treatment is one of the main causes of high mortality and morbidity rates among the pediatric group. This review provides an overview of pharmacokinetic differences between pediatric and adult population and their implications in pharmaceutical development. Different pediatric dosage forms, their merits and demerits are discussed. Food and Drug Administration Act of 1997 and the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act 2002 added 6 months patent extension and exclusivity incentives to pharmaceutical companies for evaluation of medicinal products in children. Prescription Drug User Fee Act and Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 made it mandatory for pharmaceutical companies to perform pediatric clinical studies on new drug products. Drug development program should include additional clinical bridge studies to evaluate differences in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs in adult and child populations. Additionally, pharmaceutical development should consider ease of administration, palatability, appropriate excipients, stability and therapeutic equivalency of pediatric dosage forms. Pediatric population is diverse with individual preferences and demand for custom made dosage formulations. Practically it is not feasible to have different pharmaceutical dosage forms for each group. Hence, an appropriate dosage form that can be administered across pediatric population is warranted.

  12. Drug Development Against Metastatic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Huang, Sui

    2017-01-01

    While combinational diagnostic and treatment strategies over the past decades have significantly improved the overall survival of cancer patients, metastatic cancer remains a leading cause of death in developed countries. The lack of successful treatment strategies for the disease is in large part due to the complexity of the metastatic transformation, which embodies extensive cellular and extracellular alterations, enabling metastatic cancer cells to reach and colonize other organs. The mode of action for the majority of anti-cancer drugs used in clinics today is primarily tumor growth inhibition. While they are effective in destroying cancer cells, they fall short in blocking metastasis. Here we discuss the evolution of past and current anti-cancer drug development, the limits of current strategies, and possible alternative approaches for future drug development against metastatic cancers. PMID:28356899

  13. Drug Interaction and Serotonin Toxicity with Opioid Use: Another Reason to Avoid Opioids in Headache and Migraine Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Hossein; Kouti, Leila

    2016-08-01

    Treatment of headache, specifically migraine attacks, has always been a challenging subject, especially for neurologist and pain specialists. Triptans are generally underutilized, despite being the gold standard abortive medication for migraine attacks. On the other hand, opioid analgesics are overused as a treatment for headache. One reason for this could be physician unfamiliarity with drug interactions between opioids and other medications, especially the possibility of serotonin toxicity. The general awareness of potential serotonin toxicity with using opioid analgesics is low. In this review, we will conduct a theoretic and evidence-based review of the potential for developing serotonin syndrome in patients who are using opioids analgesics, especially in combination with antidepressants, a common co-prescribed combination. We also review the current diagnostic criteria for serotonin syndrome and identify possible shortcomings of those criteria. Our aim is to increase the awareness of health care providers about potential drug interaction of opioid analgesics with other classes of medication. We place particular emphasis on tramadol since this drug is one of the most commonly used opioid analgesics for headache. The potential for developing serotonin syndrome is relatively high in the patients who are using opioid for pain control. The use of opioids in migraine headache is already discouraged due to the high risk of medication overuse headache and also an increase in headache-related disability (Katsarava et al. Neurology 62:788-790, 2004; Bigal and Lipton. Neurology 71:1821-8, 2008; Casucci and Cevoli. Neurol Sci. 34 Suppl 1:S125-8, 2013). This is another reason that physicians and health care providers should avoid using this class of medication for pain, specifically headache and migraine treatment.

  14. Computational toxicology in drug development.

    PubMed

    Muster, Wolfgang; Breidenbach, Alexander; Fischer, Holger; Kirchner, Stephan; Müller, Lutz; Pähler, Axel

    2008-04-01

    Computational tools for predicting toxicity have been envisaged for their potential to considerably impact the attrition rate of compounds in drug discovery and development. In silico techniques like knowledge-based expert systems (quantitative) structure activity relationship tools and modeling approaches may therefore help to significantly reduce drug development costs by succeeding in predicting adverse drug reactions in preclinical studies. It has been shown that commercial as well as proprietary systems can be successfully applied in the pharmaceutical industry. As the prediction has been exhaustively optimized for early safety-relevant endpoints like genotoxicity, future activities will now be directed to prevent the occurrence of undesired toxicity in patients by making these tools more relevant to human disease.

  15. Design and management of development projects to avoid health hazards.

    PubMed

    Ackers, G L; Smith, D H

    1988-06-01

    By drawing from the examples of two dissimilar irrigation development projects it is concluded that for the success of a healthy land development project: (i) by deliberate design a suitable management organization must be set up which has the willing support of all the interested parties, which is given substance by statute and loan agreement, and which has the active support of government; (ii) the staffing should be headed by an enthusiastic person of high rank to provide historical continuity with an adequate secretariat to give effective technical and administrative support; (iii) a deterioration in health may actually threaten the continued existence of a development programme, and health services should be considered part of the development process and integrated with it at all stages from initial planning to several years after commissioning; (iv) health programmes should be responsive to the changing health needs of the settled populations which should be monitored to allow appropriate intervention and which must involve community participation; (v) although the operation of nationally accepted levels of health care facilities should be the responsibility of the national health authority, interventions attributable to the development should be part of the development cost; (vi) interventions should be based on pre-project epidemiology surveys and forecasts of its changes taking account of the disease experience of the settlement populations; (vii) to limit intervention to disease specific problems begs the basic issues. It should be possible to provide better cost-effective health facilities for populations of development projects than for their rural counterparts because they are better defined and more settled; (viii) such interventions by way of changes in fundamental design criteria for the primary engineering works are unlikely to be cost effective; (ix) adequate health facilities must be in place and capable of operation before settlement commences.

  16. Adolescent Brain Development and Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Ken C.; Arria, Amelia

    2011-01-01

    Research now suggests that the human brain is still maturing during adolescence. The developing brain may help explain why adolescents sometimes make decisions that are risky and can lead to safety or health concerns, including unique vulnerabilities to drug abuse. This article explores how this new science may be put to use in our prevention and…

  17. Adolescent Brain Development and Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Ken C.; Arria, Amelia

    2011-01-01

    Research now suggests that the human brain is still maturing during adolescence. The developing brain may help explain why adolescents sometimes make decisions that are risky and can lead to safety or health concerns, including unique vulnerabilities to drug abuse. This article explores how this new science may be put to use in our prevention and…

  18. Drug Development against Viral Diseases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-01

    DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING 07 ANTI-VIRAL DRUGS SECONDARY TESTING, PtIMATE NODEL YALE ARBOVIRUS RESUACR UNIT FINAL REPORT DATE OF REPORT: 10/24/86 TOXICITY...50 mg/kg Age/wt of animal: Adult; 526 gos Animal identification number and weight: 43; 526 gis Other treatments given: Anesthesia Bled (1.5 mls), Days

  19. Avoiding Substantive Errors in Individualized Education Program Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yell, Mitchell L.; Katsiyannis, Antonis; Ennis, Robin Parks; Losinski, Mickey; Christle, Christine A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss major substantive errors that school personnel may make when developing students' Individualized Education Programs (IEPs). School IEP team members need to understand the importance of the procedural and substantive requirements of the IEP, have an awareness of the five serious substantive errors that IEP…

  20. Avoiding Substantive Errors in Individualized Education Program Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yell, Mitchell L.; Katsiyannis, Antonis; Ennis, Robin Parks; Losinski, Mickey; Christle, Christine A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss major substantive errors that school personnel may make when developing students' Individualized Education Programs (IEPs). School IEP team members need to understand the importance of the procedural and substantive requirements of the IEP, have an awareness of the five serious substantive errors that IEP…

  1. Overview of drug product development.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Padma

    2011-12-01

    The process for developing drug delivery systems has evolved over the past two decades with more scientific rigor, involving a collaboration of various fields, i.e., biology, chemistry, engineering, and pharmaceutics. Drug products, also commonly known in the pharmaceutical industry as formulations or "dosage forms," are used for administering the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) for purposes of assessing safety in preclinical models, early- to late-phase human clinical trials, and for routine clinical/commercial use. This overview discusses approaches for creating small-molecule API dosage forms, from preformulation to commercial manufacturing. © 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Systems pharmacology to predict drug safety in drug development.

    PubMed

    Trame, Mirjam N; Biliouris, Konstantinos; Lesko, Lawrence J; Mettetal, Jerome T

    2016-10-30

    Ensuring that drugs are safe and effective is a very high priority for drug development and the US Food and Drug Administration review process. This is especially true today because of faster approval times and smaller clinical trials, especially in oncology and rare diseases. In light of these trends, systems pharmacology is seen as an essential strategy to understand and predict adverse drug events during drug development by analyzing interactions between drugs and multiple targets rather than the traditional "one-drug-one-target" approach. This commentary offers an overview of the current trends and challenges of using systems pharmacology to reduce the risks of unintended adverse events.

  3. Drug development: portals of discovery.

    PubMed

    Bates, Susan E; Amiri-Kordestani, Laleh; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    A British humorist said, "There is much to be said for failure. It is much more interesting than success." This CCR Focus section is aimed at identifying lessons to be learned from difficulties encountered in recent years during development of anticancer agents. Clearly, we have not found a silver bullet tyrosine kinase inhibitor against solid tumors comparable with imatinib in chronic myelogenous leukemia. Although vemurafenib for B-Raf-mutated melanoma and crizotinib for non-small cell lung cancers with echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements were developed rapidly and offer hope for individualized targeted therapies, the development of agents targeting a number of other pathways has been slower and less successful. These agents include drugs for blocking the insulin-like growth factor I/insulin receptor pathways, mitotic kinase inhibitors, and Hsp90 antagonists. Several potentially useful, if not groundbreaking, agents have had setbacks in clinical development, including trastuzumab emtansine, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, and satraplatin. From experience, we have learned the following: (i) not every altered protein or pathway is a valid anticancer target; (ii) drugs must effectively engage the target; (iii) the biology of the systems we use must be very well understood; and (iv) clinical trials must be designed to assess whether the drug reached and impaired the target. It is also important that we improve the drug development enterprise to enhance enrollment, streamline clinical trials, reduce financial risk, and encourage the development of agents for niche indications. Such enormous challenges are offset by potentially tremendous gains in our understanding and treatment of cancer.

  4. Antiepileptic drugs and brain development.

    PubMed

    Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Turski, Lechoslaw

    2010-01-01

    Epilepsy, the most common neurological disorder in young humans, has its highest incidence during the first year of life. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) which are used to treat seizures in infants, children and pregnant women target ion channels, neurotransmitters and second messenger systems in the brain. The same targets regulate brain processes essential both for propagation of seizures and for brain development, learning, memory and emotional behavior. Here we review adverse effects of AEDs in the developing mammalian brain. In addition, we discuss mechanisms explaining adverse effects of AEDs in the developing mammalian brain including interference with cell proliferation and migration, neurogenesis, axonal arborization, synaptogenesis, synaptic plasticity and physiological apoptotic cell death.

  5. Developing a corporate drug testing program

    SciTech Connect

    Hanrath, D.A. )

    1990-10-01

    Management reaction to employee drug abuse at a gas distribution company resulted in the development and implementation of a corporate drug testing program before DOT mandated drug testing. The author explains the background, planning, operation and communication work involved.

  6. Development of Mission Avoidance Zones in the Eglin Gulf Test and Training Range

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-01

    Navy will use to predict marine mammal habitat and distribution along the U.S. Atlantic coast . The models use static and dynamic environmental...Department of Defense Legacy Resource Management Program PROJECT NUMBER 05-270 Development of Mission Avoidance Zones in the Eglin Gulf ...3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2005 to 00-00-2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Development of Mission Avoidance Zones in the Eglin Gulf Test and Training

  7. Do companion diagnostics make economic sense for drug developers?

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amit

    2012-09-15

    Drug developers are grappling with the impact of personalized medicine on their portfolios. The combination of molecular diagnostics with targeted biologic therapies has been hailed as a recent innovation with few historical analogs to guide behavior. However, if the definition of companion diagnostics is broadened to include any drug whose FDA approved label requires diagnostic testing before prescription then over 50 drugs across multiple therapeutic areas arise. Most importantly for current drug developers, these drugs represent a wide variety of market situations and with sufficient historical data to evaluate different commercialization strategies for the combination. Included in these examples are drugs which were not initially launched with companion diagnostics but were required to implement companion diagnostics after they were on the market for a period of time. The historical case studies demonstrate that companion diagnostics are neither a universal panacea nor an unmitigated disaster for drug developers but require an understanding of specific situations to determine the utility of companion diagnostics. Numerous case studies highlight how companion diagnostics have been a boon to drug developers including Iressa, statins, Soriatane, Arthrotec, Promacta, Nplate, Letairis, and Tracleer. Other examples provide lessons on how to avoid pitfalls such as Accutane, Ticlid, Tegretol, Ziagen, Actigall and Clozaril. By carefully evaluating these case studies, drug developers can gain insight on the appropriate companion diagnostic strategy to implement for their specific situation and develop the elements of a successful companion diagnostic strategy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Radionuclide imaging in drug development.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Alan C; Frier, Malcolm

    2004-01-01

    Radioactive tracers have made an immense contribution to the understanding of human physiology and pathology. At the start of the 21st century nuclear imaging has emerged as the main metabolic imaging modality which is of growing importance in drug development and clinical pharmacology. Using techniques adapted from those undertaken in clinical radiopharmacy and nuclear medicine facilities drug molecules and carrier systems may be radiolabelled and their release, biodistribution and uptake may be visualized in human subjects. Imaging studies are capable of locating the uptake of specific receptors in the brain, the site of disintegration of a tablet in the GI tract, the penetration of a nebulized solution into the lung and the residence time of an eye drop on the cornea. The technology uses suitable gamma emitting radionuclides such as 99mTc, 111In, 123I and 153Sm, which may be imaged with a gamma camera or positron emitters such as 11C, 13N, 15O and 18F for positron emission tomography (PET). Positron emitters are more appropriate for the direct labeling of drug molecules rather than metals such a 99mTc or 111In. A particular asset of these techniques is that the in vivo distribution and kinetics of a radiolabelled pharmaceutical formulation may be quantified. In this way correlation between the observed pharmacological effects and the precise site of delivery may be made. A powerful feature of nuclear molecular imaging is the evaluation of drug delivery systems in patient groups for whom the treatment is intended. Such studies not only provide data on the nature and characteristics of a product, such as reliability and reproducibility, but can demonstrate proof of principle for the new generation of targeted therapeutics. Imaging data are increasingly being used in product registration dossiers for submission to Regulatory Authorities.

  9. Drug-induced liver injury and drug development: industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Regev, Arie

    2014-05-01

    Despite intensive ongoing research, drug-induced live injury (DILI) remains a serious issue for care providers and patients, and has been a major cause of drug withdrawal and non-approval by regulatory authorities in the past 50 years. Consequently, DILI remains a major concern for the pharmaceutical industry and a leading cause for attrition during drug development. In most instances, severe DILI is an uncommon idiosyncratic reaction, which typically does not present during preclinical phases or early clinical phases of drug development. In the majority of cases, drugs that caused severe DILI in humans have not shown clear and consistent hepatotoxic signals in preclinical assessment including animal studies, cell cultures, or other methods. Despite intensive efforts to develop better biomarkers that would help in predicting DILI risk in earlier phases of drug development, such biomarkers are currently not supported by sufficient evidence and are not yet available for routine use by drug makers. Due to the lack of effective and accurate methods for prediction of idiosyncratic DILI during preclinical phases of drug development, different drug makers have adopted different approaches, which are often not supported by strong systematic evidence. Based on growing experience, it is becoming increasingly evident that milder forms of liver injury occurring during clinical development, when assessed correctly, may significantly enhance our ability to predict the drug's potential to cause more severe liver injury postmarketing. Strategies based on this concept have been adopted by many drug makers, and are being increasingly implemented during drug development. Meticulous causality assessment of individual hepatic cases and adherence to strict hepatic discontinuation rules are critical components of this approach and have to rely on thorough clinical evaluation and occasionally on assessment by liver experts experienced with DILI and drug development.

  10. Development of collision avoidance system for useful UAV applications using image sensors with laser transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, M. K.; Bahiki, M. R.; Azrad, S.

    2016-10-01

    The main goal of this study is to demonstrate the approach of achieving collision avoidance on Quadrotor Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (QUAV) using image sensors with colour- based tracking method. A pair of high definition (HD) stereo cameras were chosen as the stereo vision sensor to obtain depth data from flat object surfaces. Laser transmitter was utilized to project high contrast tracking spot for depth calculation using common triangulation. Stereo vision algorithm was developed to acquire the distance from tracked point to QUAV and the control algorithm was designed to manipulate QUAV's response based on depth calculated. Attitude and position controller were designed using the non-linear model with the help of Optitrack motion tracking system. A number of collision avoidance flight tests were carried out to validate the performance of the stereo vision and control algorithm based on image sensors. In the results, the UAV was able to hover with fairly good accuracy in both static and dynamic collision avoidance for short range collision avoidance. Collision avoidance performance of the UAV was better with obstacle of dull surfaces in comparison to shiny surfaces. The minimum collision avoidance distance achievable was 0.4 m. The approach was suitable to be applied in short range collision avoidance.

  11. Avoidable challenges of a nuclear medicine facility in a developing nation.

    PubMed

    Adedapo, Kayode Solomon; Onimode, Yetunde Ajoke; Ejeh, John Enyi; Adepoju, Adewale Oluwaseun

    2013-10-01

    The role of nuclear medicine in disease management in a developing nation is as impactful as it is in other regions of the world. However, in the developing world, the practice of nuclear medicine is faced with a myriad of challenges, which can be easily avoided. In this review, we examine the many avoidable challenges to the practice of nuclear medicine in a developing nation. The review is largely based on personal experiences of the authors who are the pioneers and current practitioners of nuclear medicine in a typical developing nation. If the challenges examined in this review are avoided, the practice of nuclear medicine in such a nation will be more effective and practitioners will be more efficient in service delivery. Hence, the huge benefits of nuclear medicine will be made available to patients in such a developing nation.

  12. Avoidable challenges of a nuclear medicine facility in a developing nation

    PubMed Central

    Adedapo, Kayode Solomon; Onimode, Yetunde Ajoke; Ejeh, John Enyi; Adepoju, Adewale Oluwaseun

    2013-01-01

    The role of nuclear medicine in disease management in a developing nation is as impactful as it is in other regions of the world. However, in the developing world, the practice of nuclear medicine is faced with a myriad of challenges, which can be easily avoided. In this review, we examine the many avoidable challenges to the practice of nuclear medicine in a developing nation. The review is largely based on personal experiences of the authors who are the pioneers and current practitioners of nuclear medicine in a typical developing nation. If the challenges examined in this review are avoided, the practice of nuclear medicine in such a nation will be more effective and practitioners will be more efficient in service delivery. Hence, the huge benefits of nuclear medicine will be made available to patients in such a developing nation. PMID:24379527

  13. Positive deviance control-case life history: a method to develop grounded hypotheses about successful long-term avoidance of infection

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Samuel R; Mateu-Gelabert, Pedro; Sandoval, Milagros; Hagan, Holly; Jarlais, Don C Des

    2008-01-01

    Background Prevalence rates for long-term injection drug users in some localities surpass 60% for HIV and 80% for HCV. We describe methods for developing grounded hypotheses about how some injectors avoid infection with either virus. Methods Subjects: 25 drug injectors who have injected drugs 8 – 15 years in New York City. 17 remain without antibody to either HIV or HCV; 3 are double-positives; and 5 are positive for HCV but not HIV. "Staying Safe" methodology compares serostatus groups using detailed biographical timelines and narratives; and information about how subjects maintain access to physical resources and social support; their strategies and tactics to remain safe; how they handle problems of addiction and demands by drug dealers and other drug users; and how their behaviors and strategies do or do not become socially-embedded practices. Grounded theory and life-history analysis techniques compare and contrast doubly-uninfected with those infected with both viruses or only with HCV. Results Themes and initial hypotheses emerging from analyses included two master hypotheses that, if confirmed, should help shape preventive interventions: 1) Staying uninfected is not simply a question of social structure or social position. It involves agency by drug injectors, including sustained hard work and adaptation to changing circumstances. 2) Multiple intentionalities contribute to remaining uninfected. These conscious goals include balancing one's need for drugs and one's income; developing ways to avoid drug withdrawal sickness; avoiding situations where other drug users importune you to share drugs; and avoiding HIV (and perhaps HCV) infection. Thus, focusing on a single goal in prevention might be sub-optimal. Other hypotheses specify mechanisms of enacting these intentionalities. One example is finding ways to avoid extreme social ostracism. Conclusion We have identified strategies and tactics that some doubly-uninfected IDUs have developed to stay safe

  14. Development of Sense and Avoid system based on multi sensor integration for unmanned vehicle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legowo, Ari; Ramli, M. Faiz Bin; Syafiq Shamsudin, Syariful

    2017-03-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) have a great potential to replace manned aircraft in many tasks or missions. However, in order to allow these UAVs to execute their mission appropriately and especially to deploy them in national or civil airspace, UAVs must have a proper and reliable collision avoidance system. This avoidance system is known as a Sense and avoidance (SAA) system. The purpose of the system is to detect any obstacles either in static or moving condition and respond with proper avoidance maneuvers in order to maintain minimum separation distances. Therefore the research project deals with the development of a unique SAA system which is based on multisensory integration. In particular, it focuses on sensors, processing logic and hardware required on the UAVs to acquire situational awareness. Dissimilar kind of sensors which is optical and laser type is proposed to be employed, so that weaknesses from each individual sensor can be tolerated. Proper logics or algorithm related to the fusion of output from each sensor will also be studied.The combination of Extended KalmanFilter (EKF) and Differential Evolution(DE) method is used for the purpose of development of detection and tracking system which considered to be the main challenges in SAA system development. Subsequently, once the algorithms are put together, including maneuvers avoidance technique algorithm, the developed SAA system will be experimentally tested in order to validate and evaluate the overall capability of the system.

  15. Avoidance of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs after negative provocation tests in urticaria/angioedema reactions: Real-world experience.

    PubMed

    Bommarito, Luisa; Zisa, Giuliana; Riccobono, Francesca; Villa, Elisa; D'Antonio, Cristian; Calamari, Ambra M; Poppa, Mariangela; Moschella, Adele; Di Pietrantonj, Carlo; Galimberti, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Drug provocation tests (DPTs) are the gold standard in diagnosing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) hypersensitivity; however, only few data about follow-up of patients with negative DPTs are actually available. The aim of this study was to assess patients' behavior in taking NSAIDs again and to evaluate NSAID tolerability after negative allergological workup. This is a follow-up study involving patients evaluated for history of cutaneous reactions (urticaria and or angioedema) after NSAID intake and with negative DPTs with the suspected NSAID. Patients were asked during a phone interview about the intake of NSAIDs, tolerance, or reasons of avoidance. The negative predictive value (NPV) of NSAIDs DPTs was calculated. One hundred eleven of 142 patients were successfully contacted; 46/111 (41.44%) took the same NSAID previously tested with two adverse reactions reported (4.34%). Fifty-three of 111 (47.74%) patients did not take the same NSAID, but 34 of them took at least another strong cyclooxygenase (COX) 1 inhibitor, with 1 adverse reaction (2.94%) and 19 of them took only weak COX-1 inhibitors. Twelve of 111 patients (10.8%) did not take any NSAID. Reasons for drug avoidance were mainly fear of reactions (70.8%) and no need (29.2%). NPV, overall, was 96.97% (95% confidence interval, 91-99%). Although NSAID hypersensitivity diagnosis was ruled out by oral provocation test, the majority of patients with a history of urticaria/angioedema avoided the intake of the tested NSAIDs for fear of new reactions, particularly when strong COX-1 inhibitor NSAIDs were involved. The high NPV value of DPT resulting from this study should reassure NSAID intake.

  16. The staying safe intervention: training people who inject drugs in strategies to avoid injection-related HCV and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Mateu-Gelabert, Pedro; Gwadz, Marya Viorst; Guarino, Honoria; Sandoval, Milagros; Cleland, Charles M; Jordan, Ashly; Hagan, Holly; Lune, Howard; Friedman, Samuel R

    2014-04-01

    This pilot study explores the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of the Staying Safe Intervention, an innovative, strengths-based program to facilitate prevention of infection with the human immunodeficiency virus and with the hepatitis C virus among people who inject drugs (PWID). The authors explored changes in the intervention's two primary endpoints: (a) frequency and amount of drug intake, and (b) frequency of risky injection practices. We also explored changes in hypothesized mediators of intervention efficacy: planning skills, motivation/self-efficacy to inject safely, skills to avoid PWID-associated stigma, social support, drug-related withdrawal symptoms, and injection network size and risk norms. A 1-week, five-session intervention (10 hours total) was evaluated using a pre- versus 3-month posttest design. Fifty-one participants completed pre- and posttest assessments. Participants reported significant reductions in drug intake and injection-related risk behavior. Participants also reported significant increases in planning skills, motivation/self-efficacy, and stigma management strategies, while reducing their exposure to drug withdrawal episodes and risky injection networks.

  17. THE STAYING SAFE INTERVENTION: TRAINING PEOPLE WHO INJECT DRUGS IN STRATEGIES TO AVOID INJECTION-RELATED HCV AND HIV INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    Mateu-Gelabert, Pedro; Gwadz, Marya Viorst; Guarino, Honoria; Sandoval, Milagros; Cleland, Charles M.; Jordan, Ashly; Hagan, Holly; Lune, Howard; Friedman, Samuel R.

    2014-01-01

    This pilot study explores the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of the Staying Safe Intervention, an innovative, strengths-based program to facilitate prevention of infection with the human immunodeficiency virus and with the hepatitis C virus among people who inject drugs (PWID). The authors explored changes in the intervention's two primary endpoints: (a) frequency and amount of drug intake, and (b) frequency of risky injection practices. We also explored changes in hypothesized mediators of intervention efficacy: planning skills, motivation/self-efficacy to inject safely, skills to avoid PWID-associated stigma, social support, drug-related withdrawal symptoms, and injection network size and risk norms. A 1-week, five-session intervention (10 hours total) was evaluated using a pre- versus 3-month posttest design. Fifty-one participants completed pre- and posttest assessments. Participants reported significant reductions in drug intake and injection-related risk behavior. Participants also reported significant increases in planning skills, motivation/self-efficacy, and stigma management strategies, while reducing their exposure to drug withdrawal episodes and risky injection networks. PMID:24694328

  18. Antidote: Civic Responsibility. Drug Avoidance Lessons for Middle & High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Jack C.; Maddalena, Gracemarie

    This book contains nine lessons focusing on legal issues raised by the illegal use and abuse of alcohol and other drugs and efforts by the criminal justice system to curb that use and abuse. The lessons are interactive and sequential, although individual lessons can stand alone. The lessons are designed to be presented to middle and high school…

  19. Hybrid aortoiliac revascularization to avoid nonautogenous groin reconstruction in an intravenous drug abuser.

    PubMed

    Kanka, Kristin C; Pak, Jimmy J; Hadley, Douglas; Alexander, Jason Q

    2011-04-01

    Traditional methods for revascularization of an occluded aortoiliac system have necessitated either in-line aortic reconstruction through an aortobifemoral bypass or extra-anatomic bypass. However, both these approaches require artificial material to be placed in the groin. The consequence of groin infection can be devastating leading to high rates of both limb loss and mortality. One of the most feared patient populations presenting with groin complications is that of the intravenous drug abuser. We present the case of a patient with a long history of intravenous drug abuse with severe aortoiliac disease. Instead of resorting to a more traditional open surgical approach necessitating artificial reconstruction in the groin, we chose to proceed with a hybrid open and endovascular procedure through a direct open surgical access to the aortic bifurcation. This allowed for revascularization without the placement of artificial material in the groin.

  20. Quantitative analysis to guide orphan drug development.

    PubMed

    Lesko, L J

    2012-08-01

    The development of orphan drugs for rare diseases has made impressive strides in the past 10 years. There has been a surge in orphan drug designations, but new drug approvals have not kept up. This article presents a three-pronged hierarchical strategy for quantitative analysis of data at the descriptive, mechanistic, and systems levels of the biological system that could represent a standardized and rational approach to orphan drug development. Examples are provided to illustrate the concept.

  1. Seedling development in buckwheat and the discovery of the photomorphogenic shade-avoidance response.

    PubMed

    Kutschera, U; Briggs, W R

    2013-11-01

    Numerous botanists of the early 19th century investigated the effect of sunlight on plant development, but no clear picture developed. One hundred and fifty years ago, Julius Sachs (1863) systematically analysed the light-plant relationships, using developing garden nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus) and seedlings of buckwheat (Fagopyron esculentum) as experimental material. From these studies, Sachs elucidated the phenomenon of photomorphogenesis (plant development under the influence of daylight) and the associated 'shade-avoidance response'. We have reproduced the classical buckwheat experiments of Sachs (1863) and document the original shade-avoidance syndrome with reference to hypocotyl elongation and cotyledon development in darkness (skotomorphogenesis), white light and shade induced by a canopy of green leaves. In subsequent publications, Sachs elaborated his concepts of 1863 and postulated the occurrence of 'flower-inducing substances'. In addition, he argued that the shade-avoidance response in cereals, such as wheat and maize, is responsible for lodging in crowded plant communities. We discuss these processes with respect to the red- to far-red light/phytochrome B relationships. Finally, we summarise the phytochrome B-phytohormone (auxin, brassinosteroids) connection within the cells of shaded Arabidopsis plants, and present a simple model to illustrate the shade-avoidance syndrome. In addition, we address the relationship between plant density and health of the corresponding population, a topic that was raised for the first time by Sachs (1863) in his seminal paper and elaborated in his textbooks.

  2. Outcomes of a Peer HIV Prevention Program with Injection Drug and Crack Users: The Risk Avoidance Partnership

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, Margaret R.; Li, Jianghong; Dickson-Gomez, Julia; Convey, Mark; Martinez, Maria; Radda, Kim; Clair, Scott

    2010-01-01

    The Risk Avoidance Partnership (RAP) Project conducted in Hartford, Connecticut, tested a program to train active drug injectors and crack cocaine users as “Peer Health Advocates” (PHAs) to deliver a modular HIV, hepatitis, and STI prevention intervention to hard-to-reach drug users in their networks and others in the city. The intervention was designed to diffuse health promotion and risk reduction interventions by supporting PHAs to model prevention practices and deliver risk and harm reduction materials and information. We compared change in behaviors and attitudes between baseline and 6-month follow-up of 112 primarily African American and Latino PHAs, 223 of their drug-network Contact Referrals, and 118 other study recruits (total n=523). Results indicated significant HIV risk reduction among all study participants, associated with significant health advocacy action conducted by PHAs, and a relationship between exposure to the RAP peer-delivered intervention and risk reduction among all study groups. Findings suggest that active drug users' engagement in peer health advocacy can set in motion a feedback and diffusion process that supports both the continued work of the PHAs and the adoption of harm reduction and mimicking of health advocacy by their peers. PMID:19142824

  3. Orphan drug: Development trends and strategies

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Aarti; Jacob, Abraham; Tandon, Manas; Kumar, Dushyant

    2010-01-01

    The growth of pharma industries has slowed in recent years because of various reasons such as patent expiries, generic competition, drying pipelines, and increasingly stringent regulatory guidelines. Many blockbuster drugs will loose their exclusivity in next 5 years. Therefore, the current economic situation plus the huge generic competition shifted the focus of pharmaceutical companies from the essential medicines to the new business model — niche busters, also called orphan drugs. Orphan drugs may help pharma companies to reduce the impact of revenue loss caused by patent expiries of blockbuster drugs. The new business model of orphan drugs could offer an integrated healthcare solution that enables pharma companies to develop newer areas of therapeutics, diagnosis, treatment, monitoring, and patient support. Incentives for drug development provided by governments, as well as support from the FDA and EU Commission in special protocols, are a further boost for the companies developing orphan drugs. Although there may still be challenges ahead for the pharmaceutical industry, orphan drugs seem to offer the key to recovery and stability within the market. In our study, we have compared the policies and orphan drug incentives worldwide alongwith the challenges faced by the pharmaceutical companies. Recent developments are seen in orphan drug approval, the various drugs in orphan drug pipeline, and the future prospectives for orphan drugs and diseases. PMID:21180460

  4. Orphan drug: Development trends and strategies.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aarti; Jacob, Abraham; Tandon, Manas; Kumar, Dushyant

    2010-10-01

    The growth of pharma industries has slowed in recent years because of various reasons such as patent expiries, generic competition, drying pipelines, and increasingly stringent regulatory guidelines. Many blockbuster drugs will loose their exclusivity in next 5 years. Therefore, the current economic situation plus the huge generic competition shifted the focus of pharmaceutical companies from the essential medicines to the new business model - niche busters, also called orphan drugs. Orphan drugs may help pharma companies to reduce the impact of revenue loss caused by patent expiries of blockbuster drugs. The new business model of orphan drugs could offer an integrated healthcare solution that enables pharma companies to develop newer areas of therapeutics, diagnosis, treatment, monitoring, and patient support. Incentives for drug development provided by governments, as well as support from the FDA and EU Commission in special protocols, are a further boost for the companies developing orphan drugs. Although there may still be challenges ahead for the pharmaceutical industry, orphan drugs seem to offer the key to recovery and stability within the market. In our study, we have compared the policies and orphan drug incentives worldwide alongwith the challenges faced by the pharmaceutical companies. Recent developments are seen in orphan drug approval, the various drugs in orphan drug pipeline, and the future prospectives for orphan drugs and diseases.

  5. [Pharmacogenomic research for avoiding adverse reactions by anti-cancer drugs].

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshiro

    2011-02-01

    Anti-cancer drugs have relatively low effective rates and high frequencies of adverse reactions, occasionally leading to cessation of their treatments. Use of pharmacogenomic (PGx) information could be able to select the patients with high-response and less-adverse reactions, resulting in increase of patients' QOL and proper use of drugs. We have been collaborating with National Cancer Center for PGx analysis of anti-cancer drugs including irinotecan and gemcitabine in Japanese cancer patients. Irinotecan, now used for treatments of many cancers, is metabolically activated to SN-38 and then inactivated to SN-38 glucuronide by a UDP-glucuronosyltransferase UGT1A1. In the UGT1A1 gene, two representative genetic polymorphisms, *28 and *6, were detected at 0.138 and 0.167, respectively in 177 Japanese cancer patients. When the patients were homozygotes of *28 or *6, or compound heterozygotes of them, statistically significant decreases were observed in the SN-38 glucuronidation activity and increases in the rate of severe neutropenia, compared to those in the patients without *28 or *6. Our results and papers were cited in the Japanese package inserts of irinotecan. Gemcitabine was inactivated by cytidine deaminase (CDA) into 2'-2'-difluorodeoxyuridine. A CDA polymorphism 208G>A (Ala70Thr) was detected at 0.037 frequency in 256 Japanese cancer patients and associated with reduced gemcitabine clearance as well as increased frequency of severe neutropenia. In the 4 patients suffered from very severe bone marrow toxicities, 3 patients were homozygous CDA*3, suggesting that this polymorphism is exquisite for predicting severe adverse reactions by gemcitabine in Japanese.

  6. Economics of new oncology drug development.

    PubMed

    DiMasi, Joseph A; Grabowski, Henry G

    2007-01-10

    Review existing studies and provide new results on the development, regulatory, and market aspects of new oncology drug development. We utilized data from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), company surveys, and publicly available commercial business intelligence databases on new oncology drugs approved in the United States and on investigational oncology drugs to estimate average development and regulatory approval times, clinical approval success rates, first-in-class status, and global market diffusion. We found that approved new oncology drugs to have a disproportionately high share of FDA priority review ratings, of orphan drug designations at approval, and of drugs that were granted inclusion in at least one of the FDA's expedited access programs. US regulatory approval times were shorter, on average, for oncology drugs (0.5 years), but US clinical development times were longer on average (1.5 years). Clinical approval success rates were similar for oncology and other drugs, but proportionately more of the oncology failures reached expensive late-stage clinical testing before being abandoned. In relation to other drugs, new oncology drug approvals were more often first-in-class and diffused more widely across important international markets. The market success of oncology drugs has induced a substantial amount of investment in oncology drug development in the last decade or so. However, given the great need for further progress, the extent to which efforts to develop new oncology drugs will grow depends on future public-sector investment in basic research, developments in translational medicine, and regulatory reforms that advance drug-development science.

  7. Towards a sustainable system of drug development.

    PubMed

    Moors, Ellen H M; Cohen, Adam F; Schellekens, Huub

    2014-11-01

    Drug development has become the exclusive activity of large pharmaceutical companies. However, the output of new drugs has been decreasing for the past decade and the prices of new drugs have risen steadily, leading to access problems for many patients. By analyzing the history of drug development and the pharmaceutical industry, we identified the main factors causing this system failure. Although many solutions have been suggested to fix the drug development system, we believe that a combination of reforms of the regulatory and patent systems is necessary to make drug development sustainable. These reforms must be combined with a larger, open-access role for public research institutes in the discovery, clinical evaluation and safety evaluation of new drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Avoiding the quality assurance boondoggle in drug treatment programs through total quality management.

    PubMed

    Fountain, D L

    1992-01-01

    This paper considers limitations to three often-used approaches for improving treatment quality in a drug abuse treatment program: supervisory review, internal program evaluations, and standard quality assurance. Total Quality Management (TQM) is then presented as a technique that maximizes the effectiveness of quality-improvement strategies and builds on them by establishing a more comprehensive approach to improving treatment quality. This paper recommends issues for treatment providers to consider in designing an efficacious TQM approach. Specific organizational characteristics are discussed that can either enhance or defeat TQM. The program should be goal oriented and have the broad commitment of staff and management to quality improvement. It should also have a well-defined and tailored system for monitoring, feedback, and change. Moreover, the program should delegate authority and responsibility to staff for improvements, possess organizational readiness, and contain an evaluative component that can determine whether TQM is meeting the program's needs.

  9. Biomarker method validation in anticancer drug development.

    PubMed

    Cummings, J; Ward, T H; Greystoke, A; Ranson, M; Dive, C

    2008-02-01

    Over recent years the role of biomarkers in anticancer drug development has expanded across a spectrum of applications ranging from research tool during early discovery to surrogate endpoint in the clinic. However, in Europe when biomarker measurements are performed on samples collected from subjects entered into clinical trials of new investigational agents, laboratories conducting these analyses become subject to the Clinical Trials Regulations. While these regulations are not specific in their requirements of research laboratories, quality assurance and in particular assay validation are essential. This review, therefore, focuses on a discussion of current thinking in biomarker assay validation. Five categories define the majority of biomarker assays from 'absolute quantitation' to 'categorical'. Validation must therefore take account of both the position of the biomarker in the spectrum towards clinical end point and the level of quantitation inherent in the methodology. Biomarker assay validation should be performed ideally in stages on 'a fit for purpose' basis avoiding unnecessarily dogmatic adherence to rigid guidelines but with careful monitoring of progress at the end of each stage. These principles are illustrated with two specific examples: (a) absolute quantitation of protein biomarkers by mass spectrometry and (b) the M30 and M65 ELISA assays as surrogate end points of cell death.

  10. Evaluation of DILI Predictive Hypotheses in Early Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Chan, Rosa; Benet, Leslie Z

    2017-04-17

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a leading cause of drug failure in clinical trials and a major reason for drug withdrawals. DILI has been shown to be dependent on both daily dose and extent of hepatic metabolism. Yet, early in drug development daily dose is unknown. Here, we perform a comprehensive analysis of the published hypotheses that attempt to predict DILI, including a new analysis of the Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System (BDDCS) in evaluating the severity of DILI warnings in drug labels approved by the FDA and the withdrawal status due to adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Our analysis confirms that higher doses ≥50 mg/day lead to increased DILI potential, but this property alone is not sufficient to predict the DILI potential. We evaluate prior attempts to categorize DILI such as Rule of 2, BSEP inhibition, and measures of key mechanisms of toxicity compared to BDDCS classification. Our results show that BDDCS Class 2 drugs exhibit the highest DILI severity and that all of the published methodologies evaluated here, except when daily dose is known, do not yield markedly better predictions than BDDCS. The assertion that extensive metabolized compounds are at higher risk of developing DILI is confirmed but can be enhanced by differentiating BDDCS Class 2 from Class 1 drugs. We do not propose that the BDDCS classification, which does not require knowledge of the clinical dose, is sufficiently predictive/accurate of DILI potential for new molecular entities but suggest that comparison of proposed DILI prediction methodologies with BDDCS classification is a useful tool to evaluate the potential reliability of newly proposed algorithms. The most successful approaches to predict DILI potential all include a measure of dose, yet there is a quantifiable uncertainty associated with the predicted dose early in drug development. Here, we compare the possibility of predicting DILI potential using the BDDCS classification versus previously

  11. Opening up drug development to everyone.

    PubMed

    Adelman, Burt

    2013-01-01

    Effective drug therapies are a cornerstone of medical practice. The path from drug discovery to approval is expensive and commonly associated with failure. The cost of drug development exceeds 800 million dollars per product. Late failure due to lack of clinical efficacy is a common cause of high costs. Recent attempts to improve the process of drug development involve the formation of public-private partnerships, which are facilitating the creation of new collaborations among corporate and nonprofit entities to find solutions that will accelerate innovative drug discovery.

  12. Medical imaging in new drug clinical development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Xiang; Deng, Min

    2010-12-01

    Medical imaging can help answer key questions that arise during the drug development process. The role of medical imaging in new drug clinical trials includes identification of likely responders; detection and diagnosis of lesions and evaluation of their severity; and therapy monitoring and follow-up. Nuclear imaging techniques such as PET can be used to monitor drug pharmacokinetics and distribution and study specific molecular endpoints. In assessing drug efficacy, imaging biomarkers and imaging surrogate endpoints can be more objective and faster to measure than clinical outcomes, and allow small group sizes, quick results and good statistical power. Imaging also has important role in drug safety monitoring, particularly when there is no other suitable biomarkers available. Despite the long history of radiological sciences, its application to the drug development process is relatively recent. This review highlights the processes, opportunities, and challenges of medical imaging in new drug development.

  13. Drug companies cut HIV drug prices in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Yamey, G

    2000-05-20

    The UN has reported that five multinational pharmaceutical companies would cut down HIV drug prices in the developing world. One of these drug companies is GlaxoWellcome, which has promised to reduce the price of zidovudine and lamivudine to US$2 in the poorest nations, a fifth of its price in the US. Although Peter Piot, director of the UN Program on HIV/AIDS, welcomed the companies' promises, he warned that price cuts alone will not curb the epidemic. He stated that this initiative is only one critical factor in what must become a much broader and more urgent effort to help people living with HIV/AIDS. Moreover, health and development agencies expressed concern that AIDS drugs will still be unaffordable for the vast majority of those in need in developing countries. In addition, poor countries lack the infrastructure to deliver these drugs safely and effectively. During the time of the UN announcement, US President Bill Clinton also signed an executive order allowing sub-Saharan Africa to adopt legal measures to obtain cheap HIV drugs. Meanwhile, South Africa's reaction to the offer to cut antiretroviral drug prices has been lukewarm.

  14. Anesthetic drug development: Novel drugs and new approaches

    PubMed Central

    Chitilian, Hovig V.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Raines, Douglas E.

    2013-01-01

    The ideal sedative–hypnotic drug would be a rapidly titratable intravenous agent with a high therapeutic index and minimal side effects. The current efforts to develop such agents are primarily focused on modifying the structures of existing drugs to improve their pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties. Drugs currently under development using this rational design approach include analogues of midazolam, propofol, and etomidate, such as remimazolam, PF0713, and cyclopropyl methoxycarbonyl-etomidate (MOC-etomidate), respectively. An alternative approach involves the rapid screening of large libraries of molecules for activity in structural or phenotypic assays that approximate anesthetic and target receptor interactions. Such high-throughput screening offers the potential for identifying completely novel classes of drugs. Anesthetic drug development is experiencing a resurgence of interest because there are new demands on our clinical practice that can be met, at least in part, with better agents. The goal of this review is to provide the reader with a glimpse of the novel anesthetic drugs and new developmental approaches that lie on the horizon. PMID:23653886

  15. Pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic-driven drug development.

    PubMed

    Gallo, James M

    2010-01-01

    The drug discovery and development enterprise, traditionally an industrial juggernaut, has spanned into the academic arena that is partially motivated by the National Institutes of Health Roadmap highlighting translational science and medicine. Because drug discovery and development represents a pipeline of basic to clinical investigations, it meshes well with the "bench to the bedside" prime directive of translational medicine. The renewed interest in drug discovery and development in academia provides an opportunity to rethink the hiearchary of studies with the hope of improving the staid approaches that have been criticized for lacking innovation. One area that has received limited attention concerns the use of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies in the drug-development process. Using anticancer drug development as a focus, this review will address past and current deficencies in how pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies are conducted and offer new strategies that might bridge the gap between preclinical and clinical trials. 2010 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  16. From promising molecules to orphan drugs: Early clinical drug development

    PubMed Central

    Dooms, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Summary Phase-1 (also known as “First-in-Man”) clinical trials initiate the early clinical development of possible new medicines. Patient participation in this early phase of clinical trials is rather limited. After successful phase 1 trials, further phase 2 and phase 3 clinical trials in patients may lead to a marketing authorization. In the first 15 years of the European Union Orphan Drug Directive, 4.5% of the orphan drug applications were authorized. However, for many of these orphan drugs, no phase 1 studies were required, as these products were already well known pharmaceutical substances, with a clearly defined pharmacological profile. Furthermore, for 19 orphan drugs, already authorized by the European Medicines Agency (EMA), the original rare indication was extended to another rare disease and no phase 1 trials were needed. Phase 1 studies need to be performed in a sufficient number of volunteers even for medicinal products intended for a very limited number of patients. PMID:28357178

  17. Avoidable iatrogenic hypoglycemia in patients on peritoneal dialysis: the risks of nonspecific glucose monitoring devices and drug-device interaction.

    PubMed

    Firanek, Catherine A; Jacob, Dalia T; Sloand, James A

    2014-12-01

    Health care professionals (HCPs) depend upon "point-of-care" (POC) glucometers to provide appropriate treatment in emergency and hospital environments. Most devices located in these settings use nonspecific test strip methodology (NSTSM), which is unable to distinguish glucose from nonglucose sugars, including maltose. This flaw can result in erroneous administration of insulin and harm to patients. Icodextrin is a colloidal osmotic agent used in peritoneal dialysis (PD) solutions to augment ultrafiltration and waste removal. The main metabolite of icodextrin is maltose. Three representative case reports of inappropriate medical action related to in-hospital use of NSTSM monitoring in PD patients using icodextrin are provided to emphasize importance of this interaction and HCP awareness. PD patients using icodextrin before hospitalization exhibited marked discrepancy between blood glucose (BG) measurements obtained from POC-NSTSM glucometers and those obtained by glucose-specific methods in clinical chemistry laboratories leading to inappropriate administration of insulin by HCPs and symptomatic hypoglycemia in all patients. None of the patients received icodextrin during hospitalization. Non-nephrology HCPs are unaware that POC glucometers are nonglucose specific and do not possess comprehensive knowledge of drug metabolism, particularly for uncommonly seen agents. The case reports highlight the absolute need for use of glucose-specific assays in BG determinations for patients using icodextrin within 2 weeks of hospitalization. To avoid future devastating consequences including severe hypoglycemia, coma, or death related to the drug-device interaction described, hospital protocols should require that all PD patients' BGs are measured in central chemistry laboratories.

  18. The changing world of drug development.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Christian

    2014-06-01

    Cancer drug development is undergoing a substantial shift nowadays. The underlying drivers are multi-factorial. On the one side, drug development is performed more rationally than ever, profiting from the scientific advances in molecular biology in general and the elucidation of the various "omes" from genome to metabolome in particular. On the other side, it is based on enormous technological progress, e.g., in the field of genome sequencing, and in that of adequate handling of the resulting plethora of data. The high attrition rate of oncologic drugs under development in the past and the pressure from the side of the payers make it necessary to find permanently new answers for and adaptations of the process of drug development. In this context, it is necessary to respect arguments and views from the various perspectives of all the relevant stakeholders. Together with a group of international experts from different perspectives of drug development, this special issue will illustrate the respective role of patients, laboratory, clinical trials, drug companies, regulatory bodies, and also the economic principle in drug development, aiming at facilitating drug research in the near future.

  19. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic-Driven Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, James M.

    2010-01-01

    The drug discovery and development enterprise, traditionally an industrial juggernaut, has spanned into the academic arena that is partially motivated by the National Institutes of Health Roadmap highlighting translational science and medicine. Since drug discovery and development represents a pipeline of basic to clinical investigations it meshes well with the prime “bench to the bedside” directive of translational medicine. The renewed interest in drug discovery and develpoment in academia provides an opportunity to rethink the hiearchary of studies with the hope to improve the staid approaches that have been critizied for lacking innovation. One area that has received limited attention concerns the use of pharmacokinetic [PK] and pharmacodynamic [PD] studies in the drug development process. Using anticancer drug development as a focus, this review will address past and current deficencies in how PK/PD studies are conducted and offer new strategies that might bridge the gap between preclinical and clinical trials. PMID:20687184

  20. Drug Development for Alzheimer's Disease: Recent Progress

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wonjin

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease, the most common cause of dementia, is characterized by two major pathological hallmarks: amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Based on these two indicators, an amyloid cascade hypothesis was proposed, and accordingly, most current therapeutic approaches are now focused on the removal of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ from the brain. Additionally, strategies for blocking tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation have been suggested, including the development of drugs that can block the formation of tangles. However, there are no true disease-modifying drugs in the current market, though many drugs based on theories other than Aβ and tau pathology are under development. The purpose of this review was to provide information on the current development of AD drugs and to discuss the issues related to drug development. PMID:22110351

  1. Development and Certification of a New Stall Warning and Avoidance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gertsen, W. M.; Hawkins, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    Several methods may be employed to improve natural stall characteristics. The method employed on all learjets to obtain improved stall characteristics is a stall warning and avoidance system that employs angle of attack vanes, an electronic computer, a control column shaker motor, and a torquer which drives the control column in a pusher mode to avoid unwanted further buildup of angle of attack. The new system was developed with changes that improve system response with no performance penalty or increase in turbulence sensitivity. The following changes were made included modified system time constants and (alpha) time rate of change of vane angle dead zone and the addition of an alpha signal limiter and an alpha cut out below a specified angle of attack.

  2. Orphan drug development in the United States.

    PubMed

    Groft, S C

    1985-05-01

    Drug research and development in the U.S. tends to focus on drugs to treat common diseases because of the anticipated return on investment. To stimulate pharmaceutical manufacturers to pursue the development of drugs for rare conditions, the Orphan Drug Act was enacted by Congress on January 4, 1983. Under the provisions of this Act, the FDA can make recommendations on the investigations necessary for marketing approval; exclusive marketing privileges can be obtained; tax credits for expenses incurred are allowed; availability of orphan drugs on an investigational basis is encouraged; and the Orphan Product Board is established for the coordination of research efforts and their reimbursement. The effects of this legislation are evident in the continuing increase in orphan drug designations.

  3. Molecular science for drug development and biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wei-Zhu; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2014-11-04

    With the avalanche of biological sequences generated in the postgenomic age, molecular science is facing an unprecedented challenge, i.e., how to timely utilize the huge amount of data to benefit human beings. Stimulated by such a challenge, a rapid development has taken place in molecular science, particularly in the areas associated with drug development and biomedicine, both experimental and theoretical. The current thematic issue was launched with the focus on the topic of "Molecular Science for Drug Development and Biomedicine", in hopes to further stimulate more useful techniques and findings from various approaches of molecular science for drug development and biomedicine.[...].

  4. Application of radar for automotive collision avoidance. Volume 2: Development plan and progress reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenberg, Christopher L. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this project was research and development of an automobile collision avoidance radar system. Items within the scope of the one-year effort were to: (1) review previous authors' work in this field; (2) select a suitable radar approach; (3) develop a system design; (4) perform basic analyses and observations pertinent to radar design, performance, and effects; (5) fabricate and collect radar data from a data collection radar; (6) analyze and derive conclusions from the radar data; and (7) make recommendations about the likelihood of success of the investigated radar techniques. The final technical report presenting all conclusions is contained in Volume 1.

  5. Single-cell sequencing for drug discovery and drug development.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongjin; Wang, Charles; Wu, Shixiu

    2016-11-16

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS), particularly single-cell sequencing, has revolutionized the scale and scope of genomic and biomedical research. Recent technological advances in NGS and single-cell studies have made the deep whole-genome (DNA-seq), whole epigenome and whole-transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) at single-cell level feasible. NGS at the single-cell level expands our view of genome, epigenome and transcriptome and allows the genome, epigenome and transcriptome of any organism to be explored without a priori assumptions and with unprecedented throughput. And it does so with single-nucleotide resolution. NGS is also a very powerful tool for drug discovery and drug development. In this review, we describe the current state of single-cell sequencing techniques, which can provide a new, more powerful and precise approach for analyzing effects of drugs on treated cells and tissues. Our review discusses single-cell whole genome/exome sequencing (scWGS/scWES), single-cell transcriptome sequencing (scRNA-seq), single-cell bisulfite sequencing (scBS), and multiple omics of single-cell sequencing. We also highlight the advantages and challenges of each of these approaches. Finally, we describe, elaborate and speculate the potential applications of single-cell sequencing for drug discovery and drug development.

  6. Development of a novel 3-month drug releasing risperidone microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Yerragunta, Bhanusree; Jogala, Satheesh; Chinnala, Krishna Mohan; Aukunuru, Jithan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop an ideal microsphere formulation of risperidone that would prolong the drug release for 3 months in vivo and avoid the need for co-administration of oral tablets. Materials and Methods: Polycaprolactones (PCL) were used as polymers to prepare microspheres. The research included screening and optimizing of suitable commercial polymers of variable molecular weights: PCL-14000, PCL-45000, PCL-80000 or the blends of these polymers to prepare microspheres with zero-order drug-releasing properties without the lag phase. In the present study, the sustained release risperidone microspheres were prepared by o/w emulsion solvent evaporation technique and the yield was determined. Microspheres were evaluated for their drug content and in vitro drug release. Microspheres prepared using a blend of PCL-45000 and PCL-80000 at a ratio of 1:1 resulted in the release of the drug in a time frame of 90 days, demonstrated zero-order drug release without lag time and burst release. This formulation was considered optimized formulation. Optimized formulation was characterized for solid state of the drug using differential scanning calorimetry, surface morphology using scanning electron microscopy and in vivo drug release in rats. Results: The surface of the optimized formulation was smooth, and the drug changed its physical form in the presence of blends of polymers and upon fabrication of microspheres. The optimized formulation also released the drug in vivo for a period of 90 days. Conclusions: From our study, it was concluded that these optimized microspheres showed great potential for a better depot preparation than the marketed Risperdal Consta™ and, therefore, could further improve patient compliance. PMID:25709335

  7. Indoles - A promising scaffold for drug development.

    PubMed

    Sravanthi, T V; Manju, S L

    2016-08-25

    Generally, heterocycles occupy a prominent place in chemistry due to their wide range of applications in the fields of drug design, photochemistry, agrochemicals, dyes and so on. Among them, indole scaffolds have been found in most of the important synthetic drug molecules and paved a faithful way to develop effective targets. Privileged structures bind to multiple receptors with high affinity, thus aiding the development of novel biologically active compounds. Among the indole class of compounds, 2-arylindoles appear to be a most promising lead for drug development. The derivatives of 2-arylindoles exhibits antibacterial, anticancer, anti-oxidants, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, antiviral, antiproliferative, antituberculosis activity, etc. This article would provide a clear knowledge on the wide-ranging biological activities of 2-arylindoles over the past two decades, which would be beneficial for the designing of more potent drug targets in order to compete with the existing drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A review of antimycobacterial drugs in development.

    PubMed

    Asif, Mohammad

    2012-11-01

    The needs of newly developed antitubercular agents are required for the control of tuberculosis in the present time. In the discovery of new antitubercular drugs, the emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug resistant (XDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has encouraged the researchers to intensify the efforts to discover novel antitubercular drugs. These novel drugs will predominantly target the persistent state of mycobacterium strains, which are resistant to conventional drugs including non resistant mycobacterium strains. In the last three to four decades no new effective drug has been developed for the treatment of resistant tuberculosis. However, in recent years, the research and development programs for the control of TB, there is a lot works is going on to enhancement of the anti-TB activity of new drugs particularly against resistant mycobacterium strains. Simultaneously, practical usefulness of some new targets is being identified and validated for the treatment of TB. Some compounds are presently in clinical trials, while others are being investigated in an attempt to explore new compounds for the target based treatment. The present review provides an overview of the new anti-TB agents with different molecular structures that are being clinically used and advanced stages of preclinical as well as clinical stages and also attempted to highlight the efforts that are being made in the development of new drug molecules as lead anti-TB agents.

  9. Re-engineering drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, Garret A

    2011-10-01

    The rate of new drug approvals in the US has remained essentially constant since 1950, while the costs of drug development have soared. Many commentators question the sustainability of the current model of drug development, in which large pharmaceutical companies incur markedly escalating costs to deliver the same number of products to market. This Issue Brief summarizes the problem, describes ongoing governmental efforts to influence the process, and suggests changes in regulatory science and translational medicine that may promote more successful development of safe and effective therapeutics

  10. Avoidance behavior by prairie grouse: implications for development of wind energy.

    PubMed

    Pruett, Christin L; Patten, Michael A; Wolfe, Donald H

    2009-10-01

    New wind-energy facilities and their associated power transmission lines and roads are being constructed at a rapid pace in the Great Plains of North America. Nevertheless, little is known about the possible negative effects these anthropogenic features might have on prairie birds, one of the most threatened groups in North America. We examined radiotelemetry tracking locations of Lesser Prairie-Chickens (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) and Greater Prairie-Chickens (T. cupido) in two locations in Oklahoma to determine whether these birds avoided or changed movement behavior near power lines and paved highways. We tracked 463 Lesser Prairie-Chickens (15,071 tracking locations) and 216 Greater Prairie-Chickens (5,750 locations) for 7 and 3 years, respectively. Individuals of both species avoided power lines by at least 100 m and Lesser Prairie-Chickens avoided one of the two highways by 100 m. Prairie-chickens crossed power lines less often than expected if birds moved randomly (p < 0.05) but did not appear to perceive highways as a movement barrier (p > 0.05). In addition, home ranges of Lesser Prairie-Chickens overlapped the power line less often than would be expected by chance placement of home ranges; this result was supported by kernel-density estimation of home ranges. It is likely that new power lines (and other tall structures such as wind turbines) will lead to avoidance of previously suitable habitat and will serve as barriers to movement. These two factors will likely increase fragmentation in an already fragmented landscape if wind energy development continues in prairie habitats.

  11. Bioanalysis in drug discovery and development

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Saurabh; Pandey, Preeti; Tiwari, Gaurav; Tiwari, Ruchi

    2010-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed the introduction of several high-quality review articles into the literature covering various scientific and technical aspects of bioanalysis. Now it is widely accepted that bioanalysis is an integral part of the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic characterization of a novel chemical entity from the time of its discovery and during various stages of drug development, leading to its market authorization. In this compilation, the important bioanalytical parameters and its application to drug discovery and development approaches are discussed, which will help in the development of safe and more efficacious drugs with reduced development time and cost. It is intended to give some general thoughts in this area which will form basis of a general framework as to how one would approach bioanalysis from inception (i.e., discovery of a lead molecule) and progressing through various stages of drug development. PMID:23781412

  12. Failed Pediatric Drug Development Trials.

    PubMed

    Momper, J D; Mulugeta, Y; Burckart, G J

    2015-09-01

    Pediatric product development initiatives have stimulated the development of therapies for children, resulting in improved product labeling, increased identification of adverse events, and development of new pediatric formulations. However, 42% of recently completed pediatric trials have failed to establish either safety or efficacy, leading to an inability to label the product for use in children.(1) Characterizing these failed trials, including common contributing factors, is imperative to designing better pediatric trials in the future. © 2015 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  13. Pre-exposure to cocaine or morphine attenuates taste avoidance conditioning in adolescent rats: Drug specificity in the US pre-exposure effect.

    PubMed

    Clasen, Matthew M; Hempel, Briana J; Riley, Anthony L

    2017-03-28

    Although the attenuating effects of drug history on conditioned taste avoidance (CTA) learning have been widely investigated in adults, such effects in adolescents have not been well characterized. Recent research has suggested that the display of the drug pre-exposure effect during adolescence may be drug dependent given that pre-exposure to ethanol attenuates subsequent conditioning, whereas pre-exposure to the classic emetic lithium chloride (LiCl) fails to do so. The present study began investigating the possible drug-dependent nature of the effects of drug pre-exposure by pre-exposing and conditioning adolescent male Sprague-Dawley rats to drugs from two additional classes, specifically psychostimulants (cocaine; Experiment 1) and opioids (morphine; Experiment 2). Consistent with prior work with ethanol (but not LiCl), prior exposure to both cocaine and morphine attenuated taste avoidance induced by these compounds. Although this work supports the view of drug-dependent pre-exposure effects on taste avoidance learning during adolescence, research is needed to assess its mechanisms.

  14. Clinical drugs that interact with St. John's wort and implication in drug development.

    PubMed

    Di, Yuan Ming; Li, Chun Guang; Xue, Charlie Changli; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2008-01-01

    St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum, SJW) is one of the most commonly used herbal antidepressants for the treatment of minor to moderate depression. A major safety concern about SJW is its ability to alter the pharmacokinetics and/or clinical response of a variety of clinically important drugs that have distinctive chemical structure, mechanism of action and metabolic pathways. This review highlights and updates the knowledge on clinical interactions of prescribed drugs with SJW and the implication in drug development. A number of clinically significant interactions of SJW have been identified with conventional drugs, including anticancer agents (imatinib and irinotecan), anti-HIV agents (e.g. indinavir, lamivudine and nevirapine), anti-inflammatory agents (e.g. ibuprofen and fexofenadine), antimicrobial agents (e.g. erythromycin and voriconazole), cardiovascular drugs (e.g. digoxin, ivabradine, warfarin, verapamil, nifedipine and talinolol), central nervous system agents (e.g. amitriptyline, buspirone, phenytoin, methadone, midazolam, alprazolam, and sertraline), hypoglycaemic agents (e.g. tolbutamide and gliclazide), immuno-modulating agents (e.g. cyclosporine and tacrolimus), oral contraceptives, proton pump inhibitor (e.g. omeprazole), respiratory system agent (e.g. theophylline), statins (e.g. atorvastatin and pravastatin). Both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic components may play a role in the interactions of drugs with SJW. For pharmacokinetic changes of drugs by SJW, induction of cytochrome P450s (e.g. CYP2C9 and 3A4) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) are considered the major mechanism. Thus, it is not a surprise that many drugs that interact with SJW are substrates of CYP3A4, CYP2C9 and P-gp. A comprehensive understanding of clinical drugs that interact with SJW has important implications in drug development. New drugs may be designed to minimize interactions with SJW; and new SJW formulations may be designed to avoid drug interactions. Further clinical and

  15. The significance of chirality in drug design and development.

    PubMed

    Brooks, W H; Guida, W C; Daniel, K G

    2011-01-01

    Proteins are often enantioselective towards their binding partners. When designing small molecules to interact with these targets, one should consider stereoselectivity. As considerations for exploring structure space evolve, chirality is increasingly important. Binding affinity for a chiral drug can differ for diastereomers and between enantiomers. For the virtual screening and computational design stage of drug development, this problem can be compounded by incomplete stereochemical information in structure libraries leading to a "coin toss" as to whether or not the "ideal" chiral structure is present. Creating every stereoisomer for each chiral compound in a structure library leads to an exponential increase in the number of structures resulting in potentially unmanageable file sizes and screening times. Therefore, only key chiral structures, enantiomeric pairs based on relative stereochemistry need be included, and lead to a compromise between exploration of chemical space and maintaining manageable libraries. In clinical environments, enantiomers of chiral drugs can have reduced, no, or even deleterious effects. This underscores the need to avoid mixtures of compounds and focus on chiral synthesis. Governmental regulations emphasizing the need to monitor chirality in drug development have increased. The United States Food and Drug Administration issued guidelines and policies in 1992 concerning the development of chiral compounds. These guidelines require that absolute stereochemistry be known for compounds with chiral centers and that this information should be established early in drug development in order that the analysis can be considered valid. From exploration of structure space to governmental regulations it is clear that the question of chirality in drug design is of vital importance.

  16. Biopharmaceutic planning in pediatric drug development.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Vivek S

    2012-09-01

    Pediatric drug development is a required consideration for all drug development programs. Age-appropriate formulations such as suspensions, chewable tablets, oral disintegrating tablets, etc., are typically developed and used in the pediatric clinical studies. However, it is not uncommon to use enabling formulations in the pivotal pediatric clinical study followed by bridging bioavailability and/or bioequivalence studies. Development of age-appropriate formulations is an essential part of pediatric drug development and adds additional biopharmaceutical considerations to an already complex problem. Careful planning of biopharmaceutic data collection during the adult and pediatric development program can contribute significantly to the biopharmaceutic risk assessment and planning of appropriate clinical studies leading to successful development of pediatric formulations.

  17. Discovery and Development of Novel Drugs.

    PubMed

    Erakovic Haber, Vesna; Spaventi, Radan

    Drug discovery and development process is nowadays conducted in relatively standardised sequence of phases, starting with Discovery and being followed by Preclinical, Clinical and Non-Clinical Development. Discovery phase is divided in Hit Finding, Lead generation, Lead Optimisation and Candidate Identification Phase. Main drivers of the whole process are regulatory requirements and the aim to eliminate the unnecessary spending by early elimination of unlikely drug candidates. Marine products, once purified, isolated and produced in required quantities, follow the same route as any other synthetic drug.

  18. The Fear-avoidance Components Scale (FACS): Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a New Measure of Pain-related Fear Avoidance.

    PubMed

    Neblett, Randy; Mayer, Tom G; Hartzell, Meredith M; Williams, Mark J; Gatchel, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Pain-related fear avoidance (FA), a common problem for patients with painful medical conditions, involves pain-related catastrophizing cognitions, hypervigilance, and avoidance behaviors, which can ultimately lead to decreased functioning, depression, and disability. Several patient-reported instruments have been developed to measure FA, but they have been criticized for limited construct validity, inadequate item specificity, lack of cutoff scores, and missing important FA components. The Fear-Avoidance Components Scale (FACS) is a new patient-reported measure designed to comprehensively evaluate FA in patients with painful medical conditions. It combines important components of FA found in prior FA scales, while trying to correct some of their deficiencies, within a framework of the most current FA model. Psychometric evaluation of the FACS found high internal consistency (α = 0.92) and high test/retest reliability (r = 0.90-0.94, P < 0.01). FACS scores differentiated between 2 separate chronic pain patient samples and a nonpatient comparison group. When clinically relevant severity levels were created, FACS severity scores were highly associated with FA-related patient-reported psychosocial and objective lifting performance variables. These results suggest that the FACS is a psychometrically strong and reliable measure that can help healthcare providers assess FA-related barriers to function and recovery. © 2015 World Institute of Pain.

  19. Recent advances in (therapeutic protein) drug development

    PubMed Central

    Lagassé, H.A. Daniel; Alexaki, Aikaterini; Simhadri, Vijaya L.; Katagiri, Nobuko H.; Jankowski, Wojciech; Sauna, Zuben E.; Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic protein drugs are an important class of medicines serving patients most in need of novel therapies. Recently approved recombinant protein therapeutics have been developed to treat a wide variety of clinical indications, including cancers, autoimmunity/inflammation, exposure to infectious agents, and genetic disorders. The latest advances in protein-engineering technologies have allowed drug developers and manufacturers to fine-tune and exploit desirable functional characteristics of proteins of interest while maintaining (and in some cases enhancing) product safety or efficacy or both. In this review, we highlight the emerging trends and approaches in protein drug development by using examples of therapeutic proteins approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration over the previous five years (2011–2016, namely January 1, 2011, through August 31, 2016). PMID:28232867

  20. Development and sensitivity of a 12-h laboratory test with Daphnia magna Straus based on avoidance of pulp mill effluents.

    PubMed

    Rosa, R; Moreira-Santos, M; Lopes, I; Picado, A; Mendonça, E; Ribeiro, R

    2008-11-01

    Studies on avoidance of contaminants by aquatic organisms verified that such behavior may have crucial ecological implications. Yet, avoidance tests have not been considered in ecological risk assessments. This study aimed at developing a short-term test with Daphnia magna Straus based on avoidance of pulp mill effluents and at comparing its sensitivity to the standard 21 d D. magna reproduction test. The avoidance effective dilution values (12 h EDil20 and EDil50) were as sensitive as the 21 d EDil20 and EDil50 values for reproduction. Therefore, this easily standardizable short-term test can be recommended as a valuable complementary tool in ecological risk assessments.

  1. Psychological Inflexibility in Childhood and Adolescence: Development and Evaluation of the Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greco, Laurie A.; Lambert, Warren; Baer, Ruth A.

    2008-01-01

    The authors describe the development and validation of the Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth (AFQ-Y), a child-report measure of psychological inflexibility engendered by high levels of cognitive fusion and experiential avoidance. Consistent with the theory underlying acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), items converged into a…

  2. Psychological Inflexibility in Childhood and Adolescence: Development and Evaluation of the Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greco, Laurie A.; Lambert, Warren; Baer, Ruth A.

    2008-01-01

    The authors describe the development and validation of the Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth (AFQ-Y), a child-report measure of psychological inflexibility engendered by high levels of cognitive fusion and experiential avoidance. Consistent with the theory underlying acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), items converged into a…

  3. Regional intestinal drug permeation: biopharmaceutics and drug development.

    PubMed

    Lennernäs, Hans

    2014-06-16

    Over the last 25 years, profound changes have been seen in both the development and regulation of pharmaceutical dosage forms, due primarily to the extensive use of the biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS) in both academia and industry. The BCS and the FDA scale-up and post-approval change guidelines were both developed during the 1990s and both are currently widely used to claim biowaivers. The development of the BCS and its wide acceptance were important steps in pharmaceutical science that contributed to the more rational development of oral dosage forms. The effective permeation (Peff) of drugs through the intestine often depends on the combined outcomes of passive diffusion and multiple parallel transport processes. Site-specific jejunal Peff cannot reflect the permeability of the whole intestinal tract, since this varies along the length of the intestine, but is a useful approximation of the fraction of the oral dose that is absorbed. It appears that drugs with a jejunal Peff>1.5×10(-4)cm/s will be completely absorbed no matter which transport mechanisms are utilized. In this paper, historical clinical data originating from earlier open, single-pass perfusion studies have been used to calculate the Peff of different substances from sites in the jejunum and ileum. More exploratory in vivo studies are required in order to obtain reliable data on regional intestinal drug absorption. The development of experimental and theoretical methods of assessing drug absorption from both small intestine and various sites in the colon is encouraged. Some of the existing human in vivo data are discussed in relation to commonly used cell culture models. It is crucial to accurately determine the input parameters, such as the regional intestinal Peff, as these will form the basis for the expected increase in modeling and simulation of all the processes involved in GI drug absorption, thus facilitating successful pharmaceutical development in the future. It is suggested

  4. Alzheimer's disease drug development: translational neuroscience strategies.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Jeffrey L; Banks, Sarah J; Gary, Ronald K; Kinney, Jefferson W; Lombardo, Joseph M; Walsh, Ryan R; Zhong, Kate

    2013-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an urgent public health challenge that is rapidly approaching epidemic proportions. New therapies that defer or prevent the onset, delay the decline, or improve the symptoms are urgently needed. All phase 3 drug development programs for disease-modifying agents have failed thus far. New approaches to drug development are needed. Translational neuroscience focuses on the linkages between basic neuroscience and the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic products that will improve the lives of patients or prevent the occurrence of brain disorders. Translational neuroscience includes new preclinical models that may better predict human efficacy and safety, improved clinical trial designs and outcomes that will accelerate drug development, and the use of biomarkers to more rapidly provide information regarding the effects of drugs on the underlying disease biology. Early translational research is complemented by later stage translational approaches regarding how best to use evidence to impact clinical practice and to assess the influence of new treatments on the public health. Funding of translational research is evolving with an increased emphasis on academic and NIH involvement in drug development. Translational neuroscience provides a framework for advancing development of new therapies for AD patients.

  5. Dosage Form Developments of Nanosuspension Drug Delivery System for Oral Administration Route.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ang; Shi, Ye; Yan, Zhiqiang; Hao, Hongxun; Zhang, Yong; Zhong, Jian; Hou, Huiming

    2015-01-01

    A large amount of new drug candidates are practically insoluble in aqueous solvents and are even simultaneously poorly soluble in organic solvents. Nanosuspension drug delivery system (DDS) was firstly developed in 1994 and has attracted more and more attention as a formation solution for the poorly soluble drugs. By nansizing the poorly soluble drugs, nanosuspensions have several outstanding advantages for drug delivery. Among many administration routes of drug delivery, oral administration is the most preferred route due to its advantages such as ease of ingestion, versatility to accommodate various types of drug candidates, low production cost, high safety, good patient compliance, and pain avoidance. Current marketed pharmaceutical nanosuspension DDS products are mostly for oral administration. This review is to systematically summarize the nanosuspension DDS dosage form developments of poorly soluble drugs for oral administration use.

  6. [Avoidance coping style and the risk of developing an eating disorder in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Pamies Aubalat, Lidia; Quiles Marcos, Yolanda

    2012-05-01

    The first aim of this study was to analyse the relationship between coping styles and strategies in Spanish adolescents of both genders, with high and low eating disorder risk. Secondly, this study aims to examine the relation of coping styles and coping strategies with eating disorder risk. The sample comprised 2142 adolescents (1.130 girls and 1.012 boys), mean age 13,96 years (SD= 1.34). They completed the Adolescent Coping Scale (ACS) and the Eating Attitude Test (EAT-40). The results showed high use of intropunitive avoidance coping in both female and male adolescents with high EAT-40 scores. The regression analysis indicated that, in both girls and boys, the intropunitive avoidance and the tension reduction coping strategy explained a high percentage of variance of eating disorder risk. The results of this study have implications for the prevention of these behaviours in adolescents, because people with a high risk of developing an eating disorder present a maladaptive coping style before the onset of the eating disorder.

  7. TRPV3 in Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Broad, Lisa M; Mogg, Adrian J; Eberle, Elizabeth; Tolley, Marcia; Li, Dominic L; Knopp, Kelly L

    2016-09-09

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 3 (TRPV3) is a member of the TRP (Transient Receptor Potential) super-family. It is a relatively underexplored member of the thermo-TRP sub-family (Figure 1), however, genetic mutations and use of gene knock-outs and selective pharmacological tools are helping to provide insights into its role and therapeutic potential. TRPV3 is highly expressed in skin, where it is implicated in skin physiology and pathophysiology, thermo-sensing and nociception. Gain of function TRPV3 mutations in rodent and man have enabled the role of TRPV3 in skin health and disease to be particularly well defined. Pre-clinical studies provide some rationale to support development of TRPV3 antagonists for therapeutic application for the treatment of inflammatory skin conditions, itch and pain. However, to date, only one compound directed towards block of the TRPV3 receptor (GRC15300) has progressed into clinical trials. Currently, there are no known clinical trials in progress employing a TRPV3 antagonist.

  8. TRPV3 in Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Broad, Lisa M.; Mogg, Adrian J.; Eberle, Elizabeth; Tolley, Marcia; Li, Dominic L.; Knopp, Kelly L.

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 3 (TRPV3) is a member of the TRP (Transient Receptor Potential) super-family. It is a relatively underexplored member of the thermo-TRP sub-family (Figure 1), however, genetic mutations and use of gene knock-outs and selective pharmacological tools are helping to provide insights into its role and therapeutic potential. TRPV3 is highly expressed in skin, where it is implicated in skin physiology and pathophysiology, thermo-sensing and nociception. Gain of function TRPV3 mutations in rodent and man have enabled the role of TRPV3 in skin health and disease to be particularly well defined. Pre-clinical studies provide some rationale to support development of TRPV3 antagonists for therapeutic application for the treatment of inflammatory skin conditions, itch and pain. However, to date, only one compound directed towards block of the TRPV3 receptor (GRC15300) has progressed into clinical trials. Currently, there are no known clinical trials in progress employing a TRPV3 antagonist. PMID:27618069

  9. Effect of allergen avoidance on development of allergic disorders in infancy.

    PubMed

    Arshad, S H; Matthews, S; Gant, C; Hide, D W

    1992-06-20

    There is much evidence that the development of allergic disorders may be related to early exposure of allergens, including those in breastmilk. We have tried to find out whether avoidance of food and inhaled allergens in infancy protects against the development of allergic disorders in high-risk infants. In a prenatally randomised, controlled study 120 infants with family history of atopy and high (greater than 0.5 kU/l) cord-blood concentrations of total IgE were allocated randomly to prophylactic and control groups. In the prophylactic group (n = 58), lactating mothers avoided allergenic foods (milk, egg, fish, and nuts) and avoided feeding their infants these foods and soya, wheat, and orange up to the age of 12 months; the infants' bedrooms and living rooms were treated with an acaricidal powder and foam every 3 months, and concentrations of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus antigen(Der p l) in dust samples were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the control group (n = 62), the diet of mothers and infants was unrestricted; no acaricidal treatment was done and Der p l concentrations were measured at birth and at 9 months. A paediatric allergy specialist unaware of group assignment examined the infants for allergic disorders at 10-12 months. Odds ratios were calculated by logistic regression analysis for various factors with control for other confounding variables. At 12 months, allergic disorders had developed in 25 (40%) control infants and in 8 (13%) of the prophylactic group (odds ratio 6.34, 95% confidence intervals 2.0-20.1). The prevalences at 12 months of asthma (4.13, 1.1-15.5) and eczema (3.6, 1.0-12.5) were also significantly greater in the control group. Parental smoking was a significant risk factor for total allergy at 12 months whether only one parent smoked (3.97, 1.2-13.6) or both parents smoked (4.72, 1.2-18.2).

  10. Advances in Statistical Approaches Oncology Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Anastasia; Rosner, Gary L.; Marchenko, Olga; Parke, Tom; Perevozskaya, Inna; Wang, Yanping

    2014-01-01

    We describe some recent developments in statistical methodology and practice in oncology drug development from an academic and an industry perspective. Many adaptive designs were pioneered in oncology, and oncology is still at the forefront of novel methods to enable better and faster Go/No-Go decision making while controlling the cost. PMID:25949927

  11. The Development of a Test to Assess Drug Using Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Althoff, Michael E.

    The objective of the study was to develop a test which could measure both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of drug-using behavior, including such factors as attitudes toward drugs, experience with drugs, and knowledge about drugs. The Drug Use Scale was developed containing 134 items and dealing with five classes of drugs: marijuana,…

  12. A Drug-Centric View of Drug Development: How Drugs Spread from Disease to Disease.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul

    2016-04-01

    Drugs are often seen as ancillary to the purpose of fighting diseases. Here an alternative view is proposed in which they occupy a spearheading role. In this view, drugs are technologies with an inherent therapeutic potential. Once created, they can spread from disease to disease independently of the drug creator's original intentions. Through the analysis of extensive literature and clinical trial records, it can be observed that successful drugs follow a life cycle in which they are studied at an increasing rate, and for the treatment of an increasing number of diseases, leading to clinical advancement. Such initial growth, following a power law on average, has a degree of momentum, but eventually decelerates, leading to stagnation and decay. A network model can describe the propagation of drugs from disease to disease in which diseases communicate with each other by receiving and sending drugs. Within this model, some diseases appear more prone to influence other diseases than be influenced, and vice versa. Diseases can also be organized into a drug-centric disease taxonomy based on the drugs that each adopts. This taxonomy reflects not only biological similarities across diseases, but also the level of differentiation of existing therapies. In sum, this study shows that drugs can become contagious technologies playing a driving role in the fight against disease. By better understanding such dynamics, pharmaceutical developers may be able to manage drug projects more effectively.

  13. A Drug-Centric View of Drug Development: How Drugs Spread from Disease to Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Drugs are often seen as ancillary to the purpose of fighting diseases. Here an alternative view is proposed in which they occupy a spearheading role. In this view, drugs are technologies with an inherent therapeutic potential. Once created, they can spread from disease to disease independently of the drug creator’s original intentions. Through the analysis of extensive literature and clinical trial records, it can be observed that successful drugs follow a life cycle in which they are studied at an increasing rate, and for the treatment of an increasing number of diseases, leading to clinical advancement. Such initial growth, following a power law on average, has a degree of momentum, but eventually decelerates, leading to stagnation and decay. A network model can describe the propagation of drugs from disease to disease in which diseases communicate with each other by receiving and sending drugs. Within this model, some diseases appear more prone to influence other diseases than be influenced, and vice versa. Diseases can also be organized into a drug-centric disease taxonomy based on the drugs that each adopts. This taxonomy reflects not only biological similarities across diseases, but also the level of differentiation of existing therapies. In sum, this study shows that drugs can become contagious technologies playing a driving role in the fight against disease. By better understanding such dynamics, pharmaceutical developers may be able to manage drug projects more effectively. PMID:27124390

  14. Success rates for product development strategies in new drug development.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, E; Nelson, G M; Haynes, M; Sargeant, F

    2016-04-01

    While research has examined the likelihood that drugs progress across phases of clinical trials, no research to date has examined the types of product development strategies that are the most likely to be successful in clinical trials. This research seeks to identify the strategies that are most likely to reach the market-those generated using a novel product development strategy or strategies that combine a company's expertise with both drugs and indications, which we call combined experience strategies. We evaluate the success of product development strategies in the drug development process for a sample of 2562 clinical trials completed by 406 US pharmaceutical companies. To identify product development strategies, we coded each clinical trial according to whether it consisted of an indication or a drug that was new to the firm. Accordingly, a clinical trial that consists of both an indication and a drug that were both new to the firm represents a novel product development strategy; indication experience is a product development strategy that consists of an indication that a firm had tested previously in a clinical trial, but with a drug that was new to the firm; drug experience is a product development strategy that consists of a drug that the firm had prior experience testing in clinical trials, but with an indication that was new to the firm; combined experience consists of both a drug and an indication that the firm had experience testing in clinical trials. Success rates for product development strategies across clinical phases were calculated for the clinical trials in our sample. Combined experience strategies had the highest success rate. More than three and a half percent (0·036) of the trials that combined experience with drugs and indications eventually reached the market. The next most successful strategy is drug experience (0·025) with novel strategies trailing closely (0·024). Indication experience strategies are the least successful (0·008

  15. International small dam safety assurance policy benchmarks to avoid dam failure flood disasters in developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisaniello, John D.; Dam, Tuyet Thi; Tingey-Holyoak, Joanne L.

    2015-12-01

    In developing countries small dam failure disasters are common yet research on their dam safety management is lacking. This paper reviews available small dam safety assurance policy benchmarks from international literature, synthesises them for applicability in developing countries, and provides example application through a case study of Vietnam. Generic models from 'minimum' to 'best' practice (Pisaniello, 1997) are synthesised with the World Bank's 'essential' and 'desirable' elements (Bradlow et al., 2002) leading to novel policy analysis and design criteria for developing countries. The case study involved 22 on-site dam surveys finding micro level physical and management inadequacies that indicates macro dam safety management policy performs far below the minimum benchmark in Vietnam. Moving assurance policy towards 'best practice' is necessary to improve the safety of Vietnam's considerable number of hazardous dams to acceptable community standards, but firstly achieving 'minimum practice' per the developed guidance is essential. The policy analysis/design process provides an exemplar for other developing countries to follow for avoiding dam failure flood disasters.

  16. Dengue human infection models supporting drug development.

    PubMed

    Whitehorn, James; Van, Vinh Chau Nguyen; Simmons, Cameron P

    2014-06-15

    Dengue is a arboviral infection that represents a major global health burden. There is an unmet need for effective dengue therapeutics to reduce symptoms, duration of illness and incidence of severe complications. Here, we consider the merits of a dengue human infection model (DHIM) for drug development. A DHIM could allow experimentally controlled studies of candidate therapeutics in preselected susceptible volunteers, potentially using smaller sample sizes than trials that recruited patients with dengue in an endemic country. In addition, the DHIM would assist the conduct of intensive pharmacokinetic and basic research investigations and aid in determining optimal drug dosage. Furthermore, a DHIM could help establish proof of concept that chemoprophylaxis against dengue is feasible. The key challenge in developing the DHIM for drug development is to ensure the model reliably replicates the typical clinical and laboratory features of naturally acquired, symptomatic dengue. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  17. Practice of Regulatory Science (Drug Development).

    PubMed

    Kawanishi, Toru

    2017-01-01

     The practice of regulatory science (RS) for drug development is described. In the course material for education in pharmaceutical sciences drafted by the RS Division of the Pharmaceutical Society of Japan, RS for pharmaceuticals is defined as the science of predicting, assessing, and judging the quality, efficacy, and safety of pharmaceutical products throughout their lifespan. RS is also described as an integrated science based on basic and applied biomedical sciences, including analytical chemistry, biochemistry, pharmacology, toxicology, genetics, biostatistics, epidemiology, and clinical trial methodology, and social sciences such as decision science, risk assessment, and communication science. The involvement of RS in drug development generally starts after the optimization of lead compounds. RS plays important roles governing pharmaceuticals during their entire life cycle management phase as well as the drug development phase.

  18. [Strategy for the development of dipeptide drugs].

    PubMed

    Gudasheva, T A

    2011-01-01

    The author describes an original approach to the development of dipeptide drugs based on the concept of the leading role of the beta-bend in the interaction of biologically active endogenous peptides with their receptors. The approach called "peptide-based drug design" includes both developments from the structure of a known psychotropic agent toward its topological peptide analog and developments from the active dipeptide site of a neuropeptide toward its mimetic. This strategy has been worked out at the V.V. Zakusov Research Institute of Pharmacology for 25 years. Results of investigations that discovered endogenous peptide prototypes of the known non-peptidic drugs (piracetam and sulpiride) are presented. They provided a basis for the creation of highly active non-toxic oral dipeptide preparations, such as nootrop Noopept, potential anti psychotic Dilept, and potential selective anxiolytic GB-115.

  19. The Challenges of Precision Oncology Drug Development and Implementation.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Simon J; Biankin, Andrew V

    2015-01-01

    The drivers of precision medicine are clear: for patients (and physicians)--more options, durable clinical benefit, reduced exposure to non-effective drugs and potential to leverage current scientific and technological advances; for the pharmaceutical industry--the potential to tackle core challenges in discovering and developing better and more efficacious medicines, to reduce rates of attrition in drug development and to reduce development costs; for healthcare systems and payers--improved efficiency through the provision of effective care and avoiding ineffective treatments. Oncology has been at the vanguard, the improvements gained in patient survival notable. However, the increasing number of molecular subgroups requires an equally increasing number (and new generation) of highly selective agents targeting inevitably lower incidence molecular segments. Innovative trial designs (umbrella/basket studies) are emerging as a patient-centric approach to drug development, and the rise in public-private partnerships, cross-industry, government and non-profit sector collaborations is enabling implementation of complex clinical trial designs. This poses significant challenges for healthcare systems and regulatory approval. Further substantial evolution of policy and processes, particularly regulatory requirements for approval for new therapeutics, are required.

  20. Drug development: from concept to marketing!

    PubMed

    Tamimi, Nihad A M; Ellis, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Drug development is an expensive, long and high-risk business taking 10-15 years and is associated with a high attrition rate. It is driven by medical need, disease prevalence and the likelihood of success. Drug candidate selection is an iterative process between chemistry and biology, refining the molecular properties until a compound suitable for advancing to man is found. Typically, about one in a thousand synthesised compounds is ever selected for progression to the clinic. Prior to administration to humans, the pharmacology and biochemistry of the drug is established using an extensive range of in vitro and in vivo test procedures. It is also a regulatory requirement that the drug is administered to animals to assess its safety. Later-stage animal testing is also required to assess carcinogenicity and effects on the reproductive system. Clinical phases of drug development include phase I in healthy volunteers to assess primarily pharmacokinetics, safety and toleration, phase II in a cohort of patients with the target disease to establish efficacy and dose-response relationship and large-scale phase III studies to confirm safety and efficacy. Experience tells us that approximately only 1 in 10 drugs that start the clinical phase will make it to the market. Each drug must demonstrate safety and efficacy in the intended patient population and its benefits must outweigh its risks before it will be approved by the regulatory agencies. Strict regulatory standards govern the conduct of pre-clinical and clinical trials as well as the manufacturing of pharmaceutical products. The assessment of the new medicinal product's safety continues beyond the initial drug approval through post-marketing monitoring of adverse events. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Impact of Training High School Female Students in Ahvaz, Iran in the Social Skills Required to Avoid the Use of Drugs.

    PubMed

    Alavijeh, Freshteh Zamani; Raisi, Zahra; Asadollahi, Abdolrahim; Irani, Reza Davasaz; Kalhori, Sharareh Rostam Niakan

    2016-05-01

    Gender composition and the soaring trends of drug and tobacco dependency reveal the priority of social skills training related to drug avoidance self-efficacy among female students. The aim of this study was to verify the impact training high school female students to have the social skills needed to avoid the use of drugs. This study was conducted from September 2012 to May 2013 in two high schools in Ahvaz City in southwest Iran. The participants were divided randomly into two groups of 60 students, one experimental group and one control group using the multi-stage simple sampling method. Two questionnaires, i.e. the ASES and TISS questionnaires, were completed before and after the intervention. Descriptive statistics, chi squared, paired-samples t-test, and the independent-samples t-test were used. The participants had a mean age of 14.93 years. Among the 120 participants, 90.8% indicated that they had never smoked a cigarette, and 51.7% of the participants denied having smoked a hookah. There was no significant relationship between the self-sufficiency means of drug avoidance in the two groups of girls before intervention (p ≥ 0.05). However, after intervention, a significant difference was found in test score of self-efficacy of drug avoidance between the two groups, i.e., 94.91 ± 8.3 for the control group versus 99.16 ± 3.8 for the experimental group, p < 0.05). Significant increases were observed for the pre- and post-test scores of self-efficacy of drug avoidance in the experimental group compared to the control group (99.16 ± 3.8 (p = 0.001) vs. 96.58 ± 6.98 (p > 0.05). The mean values of the pre- and post-test scores of social skill before and after intervention increased significantly only for the experimental group (97.60 ± 19.19 vs. 100.58 ± 12.37, p = 0.03). Educational intervention can significantly enhance social skills for drug avoidance self-efficacy, so it is recommended that such skills be taught in the high school curriculum.

  2. Impact of Training High School Female Students in Ahvaz, Iran in the Social Skills Required to Avoid the Use of Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Alavijeh, Freshteh Zamani; Raisi, Zahra; Asadollahi, Abdolrahim; Irani, Reza Davasaz; Kalhori, Sharareh Rostam Niakan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gender composition and the soaring trends of drug and tobacco dependency reveal the priority of social skills training related to drug avoidance self-efficacy among female students. The aim of this study was to verify the impact training high school female students to have the social skills needed to avoid the use of drugs. Methods This study was conducted from September 2012 to May 2013 in two high schools in Ahvaz City in southwest Iran. The participants were divided randomly into two groups of 60 students, one experimental group and one control group using the multi-stage simple sampling method. Two questionnaires, i.e. the ASES and TISS questionnaires, were completed before and after the intervention. Descriptive statistics, chi squared, paired-samples t-test, and the independent-samples t-test were used. Results The participants had a mean age of 14.93 years. Among the 120 participants, 90.8% indicated that they had never smoked a cigarette, and 51.7% of the participants denied having smoked a hookah. There was no significant relationship between the self-sufficiency means of drug avoidance in the two groups of girls before intervention (p ≥ 0.05). However, after intervention, a significant difference was found in test score of self-efficacy of drug avoidance between the two groups, i.e., 94.91 ± 8.3 for the control group versus 99.16 ± 3.8 for the experimental group, p < 0.05). Significant increases were observed for the pre- and post-test scores of self-efficacy of drug avoidance in the experimental group compared to the control group (99.16 ± 3.8 (p = 0.001) vs. 96.58 ± 6.98 (p > 0.05). The mean values of the pre- and post-test scores of social skill before and after intervention increased significantly only for the experimental group (97.60 ± 19.19 vs. 100.58 ± 12.37, p = 0.03). Conclusion Educational intervention can significantly enhance social skills for drug avoidance self-efficacy, so it is recommended that such skills be taught

  3. Neoadjuvant breast cancer therapy and drug development.

    PubMed

    Cortazar, Patricia; Kluetz, Paul G

    2015-11-01

    Neoadjuvant treatment of breast cancer initially was limited to patients with locally advanced breast cancer in which downstaging was necessary. Now, neoadjuvant trials have become an increasingly common way to facilitate the rapid assessment of new cancer therapies. The appeal of neoadjuvant trials is that they provide the opportunity to study translational science, tumor biomarkers, and intermediate endpoints in response to systemic therapy within a shortened period. This review summarizes the data that contribute to our understanding of the association between pathological complete response and long-term outcomes, describes the implications of drug development and accelerated approval in neoadjuvant treatment of breast cancer, and provides a perspective on future neoadjuvant drug development.

  4. Drug Repurposing Is a New Opportunity for Developing Drugs against Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong-Min; Kim, Yuna

    2016-01-01

    Better the drugs you know than the drugs you do not know. Drug repurposing is a promising, fast, and cost effective method that can overcome traditional de novo drug discovery and development challenges of targeting neuropsychiatric and other disorders. Drug discovery and development targeting neuropsychiatric disorders are complicated because of the limitations in understanding pathophysiological phenomena. In addition, traditional de novo drug discovery and development are risky, expensive, and time-consuming processes. One alternative approach, drug repurposing, has emerged taking advantage of off-target effects of the existing drugs. In order to identify new opportunities for the existing drugs, it is essential for us to understand the mechanisms of action of drugs, both biologically and pharmacologically. By doing this, drug repurposing would be a more effective method to develop drugs against neuropsychiatric and other disorders. Here, we review the difficulties in drug discovery and development in neuropsychiatric disorders and the extent and perspectives of drug repurposing. PMID:27073698

  5. Role of Hepatic Drug Transporters in Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Houfu; Sahi, Jasminder

    2016-07-01

    Hepatic drug transporters can play an important role in pharmacokinetics and the disposition of therapeutic drugs and endogenous substances. Altered function of hepatic drug transporters due to drug-drug interactions (DDIs), genetic polymorphisms, and disease states can often result in a change in systemic and/or tissue exposure and subsequent pharmacological/toxicological effects of their substrates. Regulatory agencies including the US Food and Drug Administration, European Medicines Agency, and Japan Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency have issued guidance for industry on drug interaction studies, which contain comprehensive recommendations on in vitro and in vivo study tools and cutoff values to evaluate the DDI potential of new molecular entities mediated by hepatic drug transporters. In this report we summarize the latest regulatory and scientific progress of hepatic drug transporters in clinical DDIs, pharmacogenetics, drug-induced liver injury (DILI), as well as methods for predicting transporter-mediated pharmacokinetics and DDIs. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  6. Shade avoidance 6 encodes an Arabidopsis flap endonuclease required for maintenance of genome integrity and development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yijuan; Wen, Chunhong; Liu, Songbai; Zheng, Li; Shen, Binghui; Tao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Flap endonuclease-1 (FEN1) belongs to the Rad2 family of structure-specific nucleases. It is required for several DNA metabolic pathways, including DNA replication and DNA damage repair. Here, we have identified a shade avoidance mutant, sav6, which reduces the mRNA splicing efficiency of SAV6. We have demonstrated that SAV6 is an FEN1 homologue that shows double-flap endonuclease and gap-dependent endonuclease activity, but lacks exonuclease activity. sav6 mutants are hypersensitive to DNA damage induced by ultraviolet (UV)-C radiation and reagents that induce double-stranded DNA breaks, but exhibit normal responses to chemicals that block DNA replication. Signalling components that respond to DNA damage are constitutively activated in sav6 mutants. These data indicate that SAV6 is required for DNA damage repair and the maintenance of genome integrity. Mutant sav6 plants also show reduced root apical meristem (RAM) size and defective quiescent centre (QC) development. The expression of SMR7, a cell cycle regulatory gene, and ERF115 and PSK5, regulators of QC division, is increased in sav6 mutants. Their constitutive induction is likely due to the elevated DNA damage responses in sav6 and may lead to defects in the development of the RAM and QC. Therefore, SAV6 assures proper root development through maintenance of genome integrity. PMID:26721386

  7. Shade avoidance 6 encodes an Arabidopsis flap endonuclease required for maintenance of genome integrity and development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yijuan; Wen, Chunhong; Liu, Songbai; Zheng, Li; Shen, Binghui; Tao, Yi

    2016-02-18

    Flap endonuclease-1 (FEN1) belongs to the Rad2 family of structure-specific nucleases. It is required for several DNA metabolic pathways, including DNA replication and DNA damage repair. Here, we have identified a shade avoidance mutant, sav6, which reduces the mRNA splicing efficiency of SAV6. We have demonstrated that SAV6 is an FEN1 homologue that shows double-flap endonuclease and gap-dependent endonuclease activity, but lacks exonuclease activity. sav6 mutants are hypersensitive to DNA damage induced by ultraviolet (UV)-C radiation and reagents that induce double-stranded DNA breaks, but exhibit normal responses to chemicals that block DNA replication. Signalling components that respond to DNA damage are constitutively activated in sav6 mutants. These data indicate that SAV6 is required for DNA damage repair and the maintenance of genome integrity. Mutant sav6 plants also show reduced root apical meristem (RAM) size and defective quiescent centre (QC) development. The expression of SMR7, a cell cycle regulatory gene, and ERF115 and PSK5, regulators of QC division, is increased in sav6 mutants. Their constitutive induction is likely due to the elevated DNA damage responses in sav6 and may lead to defects in the development of the RAM and QC. Therefore, SAV6 assures proper root development through maintenance of genome integrity. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Pathology in drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Jubb, Adrian M; Koeppen, Hartmut; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2014-01-01

    The rapid pace of drug discovery and drug development in oncology, immunology and ophthalmology brings new challenges; the efficient and effective development of new targeted drugs will require more detailed molecular classifications of histologically homogeneous diseases that show heterogeneous clinical outcomes. To this end, single companion diagnostics for specific drugs will be replaced by multiplex diagnostics for entire therapeutic areas, preserving tissue and enabling rapid molecular taxonomy. The field will move away from the development of new molecular entities as single agents, to which resistance is common. Instead, a detailed understanding of the pathological mechanisms of resistance, in patients and in preclinical models, will be key to the validation of scientifically rational and clinically effective drug combinations. To remain at the heart of disease diagnosis and appropriate management, pathologists must evolve into translational biologists and biomarker scientists. Herein, we provide examples of where this metamorphosis has already taken place, in lung cancer and melanoma, where the transformation has yet to begin, in the use of immunotherapies for ophthalmology and oncology, and where there is fertile soil for a revolution in treatment, in efforts to classify glioblastoma and personalize treatment. The challenges of disease heterogeneity, the regulatory environment and adequate tissue are ever present, but these too are being overcome in dedicated academic centres. In summary, the tools necessary to overcome the 'whens' and 'ifs' of the molecular revolution are in the hands of pathologists today; it is a matter of standardization, training and leadership to bring these into routine practice and translate science into patient benefit. This Annual Review Issue of the Journal of Pathology highlights the central role for pathology in modern drug discovery and development.

  9. Aptamers : The New Frontier In Drug Development?

    PubMed Central

    CARLSON, BOB

    2007-01-01

    Often called chemical antibodies, aptamers are poised to take on the monoclonal antibodies in therapeutics, diagnostics, and drug development. Stability, low toxicity and immunogenicity, and, perhaps, a higher safety profile – not to mention low-cost advantages – are drawing the attention of big pharma and biotech. PMID:23372509

  10. Drugs and development: the global impact of drug use and trafficking on social and economic development.

    PubMed

    Singer, Merrill

    2008-12-01

    Locating development efforts within the context of globalism and global drug capitalism, this article examines the significant health and social impact both legal and illegal drugs have on international development efforts. The paper takes on an issue that is generally overlooked in the development debate and is not much addressed in the current international development standard, the Millennium Development Goals, and yet is one that places serious constraints on the ability of underdeveloped nations to achieve improvement. The relationship between psychotropic or "mind/mood altering" drugs and sustainable development is rooted in the contribution that the legal and illegal drug trade makes to a set of barriers to development, including: (1) interpersonal crime and community violence; (2) the corruption of public servants and the disintegration of social institutions; (3) the emergence of new or enhanced health problems; (4) the lowering of worker productivity; (5) the ensnarement of youth in drug distribution and away from productive education or employment; (6) the skewing of economies to drug production and money laundering. The paper emphasizes the need for new approaches for diminishing the burden placed by drugs on development.

  11. Safe procedure development to manage hazardous drugs in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Gaspar Carreño, Marisa; Achau Muñoz, Rubén; Torrico Martín, Fátima; Agún Gonzalez, Juan José; Sanchez Santos, Jose Cristobal; Cercos Lletí, Ana Cristina; Ramos Orozco, Pedro

    2017-03-01

    To develop a safety working procedure for the employees in the Intermutual Hospital de Levante (HIL) in those areas of activity that deal with the handling of hazardous drugs (MP). The procedure was developed in six phases: 1) hazard definition; 2) definition and identification of processes and development of general correct work practices about hazardous drugs' selection and special handling; 3) detection, selection and set of specific recommendations to handle with hazardous drugs during the processes of preparation and administration included in the hospital GFT; 4) categorization of risk during the preparation/administration and development of an identification system; 5) information and training of professionals; 6) implementation of the identification measures and prevention guidelines. Six processes were detected handling HD. During those processes, thirty HD were identified included in the hospital GFT and a safer alternative was found for 6 of them. The HD were classified into 4 risk categories based on those measures to be taken during the preparation and administration of each of them. The development and implementation of specific safety-work processes dealing with medication handling, allows hospital managers to accomplish effectively with their legal obligations about the area of prevention and provides healthcare professional staff with the adequate techniques and safety equipment to avoid possible dangers and risks of some drugs. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  12. Persistent pharmacokinetic challenges to pediatric drug development.

    PubMed

    Sage, Daniel P; Kulczar, Christopher; Roth, Wyatt; Liu, Wanqing; Knipp, Gregory T

    2014-01-01

    The development of new therapeutic agents for the mitigation of pediatric disorders is largely hindered by the inability for investigators to assess pediatric pharmacokinetics (PK) in healthy patients due to substantial safety concerns. Pediatric patients are a clinical moving target for drug delivery due to changes in absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) and the potential for PK related toxicological (T) events to occur throughout development. These changes in ADMET can have profound effects on drug delivery, and may lead to toxic or sub-therapeutic outcomes. Ethical, economical, logistical, and technical barriers have resulted in insufficient investigation of these changes by industrial, regulatory, and academic bodies, leading to the classification of pediatric patients as therapeutic orphans. In response to these concerns, regulatory agencies have incentivized investigation into these ontogenic changes and their effects on drug delivery in pediatric populations. The intent of this review is to briefly present a synopsis of the development changes that occur in pediatric patients, discuss the effects of these changes on ADME and drug delivery strategies, highlight the hurdles that are still being faced, and present some opportunities to overcome these challenges.

  13. Persistent pharmacokinetic challenges to pediatric drug development

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Daniel P.; Kulczar, Christopher; Roth, Wyatt; Liu, Wanqing; Knipp, Gregory T.

    2014-01-01

    The development of new therapeutic agents for the mitigation of pediatric disorders is largely hindered by the inability for investigators to assess pediatric pharmacokinetics (PK) in healthy patients due to substantial safety concerns. Pediatric patients are a clinical moving target for drug delivery due to changes in absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) and the potential for PK related toxicological (T) events to occur throughout development. These changes in ADMET can have profound effects on drug delivery, and may lead to toxic or sub-therapeutic outcomes. Ethical, economical, logistical, and technical barriers have resulted in insufficient investigation of these changes by industrial, regulatory, and academic bodies, leading to the classification of pediatric patients as therapeutic orphans. In response to these concerns, regulatory agencies have incentivized investigation into these ontogenic changes and their effects on drug delivery in pediatric populations. The intent of this review is to briefly present a synopsis of the development changes that occur in pediatric patients, discuss the effects of these changes on ADME and drug delivery strategies, highlight the hurdles that are still being faced, and present some opportunities to overcome these challenges. PMID:25221567

  14. Development of mefloquine as an antimalarial drug*

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    The spread of multiresistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum in south-east Asia and South America and the appearance of chloroquine resistance in Africa indicates the urgent need for alternative drugs against these parasites. Mefloquine, a 4-quinoline methanol, is the only new drug that is currently at an advanced stage of development. Studies in animal models and in the clinic have shown that it is highly active as a blood schizontocide against strains that are resistant to many established antimalarials, e.g., chloroquine and pyrimethamine. It is not, however, effective as a causal prophylactic agent. Preclinical toxicological, teratological, and carcinogenicity studies do not indicate any major contraindications to its use. Intensive clinical studies have been carried out in Africa, North and South America, south-east Asia, and Europe. These studies have indicated that the compound is generally well tolerated, safe, and effective in the treatment of malaria, particularly infections with chloroquine-resistant parasites. In order to protect this new and promising drug against the development of resistance to it in endemic areas, it is important that its introduction should be accomplished in a rational and deliberate manner. Appropriate precautionary measures include the development of mefloquine combinations (a combination of mefloquine with pyrimethamine—sulfadoxine is presently under investigation), its use with primaquine as a gametocytocidal drug to prevent transmission, and its deployment primarily for treatment, being used for prophylaxis only in special risk groups. PMID:6407767

  15. Current scenario of drug development for leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Croft, Simon L; Seifert, Karin; Yardley, Vanessa

    2006-03-01

    Although three new drugs or drug formulations, liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome), miltefosine and paromomycin should be available for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) within the next year, they all suffer from limitations of either cost, specific toxicities or parenteral administration. As part of research to identify better treatments for VL and cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), alternative and potentially cheaper formulations of amphotericin B, alklyphosphocholines other than miltefosine and improved formulations of paromomycin for CL have been identified. Other drugs or compounds that have demonstrated activity in experimental rodent models of infection include licochalcone derivatives, quinoline derivatives, bisphosphonates and a maesabalide; further chemistry based upon these leads is warranted. The process for discovery and development of new antileishmanials would also benefit from improved models, for example, transfected parasites, and non invasive methods of measuring parasite load in rodent models of infection.

  16. Development and evaluation of collision warning/collision avoidance algorithms using an errable driver model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hsin-Hsiang; Peng, Huei

    2010-12-01

    Collision warning/collision avoidance (CW/CA) systems must be designed to work seamlessly with a human driver, providing warning or control actions when the driver's response (or lack of) is deemed inappropriate. The effectiveness of CW/CA systems working with a human driver needs to be evaluated thoroughly because of legal/liability and other (e.g. traffic flow) concerns. CW/CA systems tuned only under open-loop manoeuvres were frequently found to work unsatisfactorily with human-in-the-loop. However, tuning CW/CA systems with human drivers co-existing is slow and non-repeatable. Driver models, if constructed and used properly, can capture human/control interactions and accelerate the CW/CA development process. Design and evaluation methods for CW/CA algorithms can be categorised into three approaches, scenario-based, performance-based and human-centred. The strength and weakness of these approaches were discussed in this paper and a humanised errable driver model was introduced to improve the developing process. The errable driver model used in this paper is a model that emulates human driver's functions and can generate both nominal (error-free) and devious (with error) behaviours. The car-following data used for developing and validating the model were obtained from a large-scale naturalistic driving database. Three error-inducing behaviours were introduced: human perceptual limitation, time delay and distraction. By including these error-inducing behaviours, rear-end collisions with a lead vehicle were found to occur at a probability similar to traffic accident statistics in the USA. This driver model is then used to evaluate the performance of several existing CW/CA algorithms. Finally, a new CW/CA algorithm was developed based on this errable driver model.

  17. [Social development of twins: the need for intervention to avoid adverse effects of twin language].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Chisato; Hayakawa, Kazuo; Maeda, Chiho; Nishihara, Reiko; Onoi, Miyuki

    2008-10-01

    Social competence is one of the most important accomplishments of human development, and this skill in human relationships is learned through communication. Therefore, it is considered that delays in language development could be a barrier to building human relationships and social competence. Although it is well known that there are delays in language development in twins compared with that of singletons, little is known about how these linguistic delays affect the development of social competence. Because twin language is a language that is unique to each pair of twins and cannot be understood by either their mother or others, it may be assumed that the social competence of twins who have a twin language is less than that of twins who don't have a twin language. Therefore, in this prospective longitudinal study we also investigated the relationship between twin language and social competence. A mailed questionnaire survey was conducted in 958 mothers as a follow-up of a study conducted in 2004. As a result, 522 respondents returned the questionnaire (53.9%). In this study, we used only 256 twins aged 6- 12-years-old (school-age children) for analysis, excluding those with missing values. Multiple logistic regression analysis was employed. In the second child of twins, a low birth weight, the appearance of twin language and gestosis of the mother were positively related with social unbalance (OR = 1.846, 2.022 and 1.903). On the other hand, with the first child, however, there was no such link. The present results indicate that twin language might influence social competence in school-age children. It has been believed that linguistic intervention is unnecessary, because most twin language disappears spontaneously. However, early intervention, for example linguistic assistance by public health nurses or psychologists and early enrollment in a preschool may be necessary for twins with a twin language, to avoid adverse consequences in social competence at school-age.

  18. Heterocyclic Scaffolds: Centrality in Anticancer Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Ali, Imran; Lone, Mohammad Nadeem; Al-Othman, Zeid A; Al-Warthan, Abdulrahman; Sanagi, Mohd Marsin

    2015-01-01

    Cancer has been cursed for human beings for long time. Millions people lost their lives due to cancer. Despite of the several anticancer drugs available, cancer cannot be cured; especially at the late stages without showing any side effect. Heterocyclic compounds exhibit exciting medicinal properties including anticancer. Some market selling heterocyclic anticancer drugs include 5-flourouracil, methortrexate, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, etc. Besides, some natural products such as vinblastine and vincristine are also used as anticancer drugs. Overall, heterocyclic moeities have always been core parts in the expansion of anticancer drugs. This article describes the importance of heterocyclic nuclei in the development of anticancer drugs. Besides, the attempts have been made to discuss both naturally occurring and synthetic heterocyclic compounds as anticancer agents. In addition, some market selling anticancer heterocyclic compounds have been described. Moreover, the efforts have been made to discuss the mechanisms of actions and recent advances in heterocyclic compounds as anticancer agents. The current challenges and future prospectives of heterocyclic compounds have also been discussed. Finally, the suggestions for syntheses of effective, selective, fast and human friendly anticancer agents are discussed into the different sections.

  19. Cannabinoids increase conditioned ultrasonic vocalisations and cat odour avoidance in rats: strain differences in drug-induced anxiety.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Jonathon C; Dielenberg, Robert A; McGregor, Iain S

    2010-10-23

    Genetic disposition modulates the psychoactive effects of cannabis. Cannabinoids have a greater impact on brain regions that subserve anxiety in Wistar compared to Lewis strain rats. Here we aim to show that this correlates with strain differences in cannabinoid-induced anxiety-related behaviour. Lewis and Wistar rats were administered vehicle or the synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonist, CP 55,940 (10, 25 and 50μg/kg) before testing in the conditioned ultrasonic vocalization (USV), cat odour avoidance or open area avoidance models. Animals were placed in a chamber in which they had previously received footshock. Wistar but not Lewis rats re-exposed under the influence of all CP 55,940 doses emitted significantly more USVs than vehicle-treated rats. In the cat odour avoidance model, rats were exposed to cat odour and given the opportunity to hide in a small box. In Wistar but not Lewis rats, 50μg/kg of CP 55,940 magnified hiding behaviour promoted by cat odour exposure. Animals were also tested in the open area avoidance model which occurred in the same arena as the predatory avoidance model but without cat odour. In Wistar, but not Lewis rats, 25 and 50μg/kg of CP 55,940 increased the avoidance of the open space. CP 55,940 increased anxiety-related behaviour in Wistar rats but not Lewis rats providing a model to dissect the genetic basis of cannabinoid-induced anxiety. We show for the first time that cannabinoids magnify conditioned USVs and cat odour avoidance behaviour dependent on the strain being tested. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Drugs and Driving Research in Medicinal Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Ramaekers, J G

    2017-04-01

    Medicinal drugs that cause drowsiness and inattentiveness may impair driving. The FDA recently emphasized that standardized procedures for measuring drug effects on driving are needed as part of drug registration. Here, I provide an overview of a standardized on-the-road driving test that offers maximal drug sensitivity and uses a real-life outcome measure of driver impairment that is strongly associated with crash risk.

  1. pH-dependent drug-drug interactions for weak base drugs: potential implications for new drug development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Wu, F; Lee, S C; Zhao, H; Zhang, L

    2014-08-01

    Absorption of an orally administered drug with pH-dependent solubility may be altered when it is coadministered with a gastric acid-reducing agent (ARA). Assessing a drug's potential for pH-dependent drug-drug interactions (DDIs), considering study design elements for such DDI studies, and interpreting and communicating study results in the drug labeling to guide drug dosing are important for drug development. We collected pertinent information related to new molecular entities approved from January 2003 to May 2013 by the US Food and Drug Administration for which clinical DDI studies with ARAs were performed. On the basis of assessments of data on pH solubility and in vivo DDIs with ARAs, we proposed a conceptual framework for assessing the need for clinical pH-dependent DDI studies for weak base drugs (WBDs). Important study design considerations include selection of ARAs and timing of dosing of an ARA relative to the WBD in a DDI study. Labeling implications for drugs having DDIs with ARAs are also illustrated.

  2. The Development of Drugs against Acanthamoeba Infections.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Aqeel, Yousuf; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2016-11-01

    For the past several decades, there has been little improvement in the morbidity and mortality associated with Acanthamoeba keratitis and Acanthamoeba encephalitis, respectively. The discovery of a plethora of antiacanthamoebic compounds has not yielded effective marketed chemotherapeutics. The rate of development of novel antiacanthamoebic chemotherapies of translational value and the lack of interest of the pharmaceutical industry in developing such chemotherapies have been disappointing. On the other hand, the market for contact lenses/contact lens disinfectants is a multi-billion-dollar industry and has been successful and profitable. A better understanding of drugs, their targets, and mechanisms of action will facilitate the development of more-effective chemotherapies. Here, we review the progress toward phenotypic drug discovery, emphasizing the shortcomings of useable therapies. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. The Development of Drugs against Acanthamoeba Infections

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Aqeel, Yousuf

    2016-01-01

    For the past several decades, there has been little improvement in the morbidity and mortality associated with Acanthamoeba keratitis and Acanthamoeba encephalitis, respectively. The discovery of a plethora of antiacanthamoebic compounds has not yielded effective marketed chemotherapeutics. The rate of development of novel antiacanthamoebic chemotherapies of translational value and the lack of interest of the pharmaceutical industry in developing such chemotherapies have been disappointing. On the other hand, the market for contact lenses/contact lens disinfectants is a multi-billion-dollar industry and has been successful and profitable. A better understanding of drugs, their targets, and mechanisms of action will facilitate the development of more-effective chemotherapies. Here, we review the progress toward phenotypic drug discovery, emphasizing the shortcomings of useable therapies. PMID:27600042

  4. Drugs in development for relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rehiana; Nicholas, Richard St John; Muraro, Paolo Antonio

    2013-05-01

    Drug development for multiple sclerosis (MS), as with any other neurological disease, faces numerous challenges, with many drugs failing at various stages of development. The disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) first introduced for MS are only moderately effective, but given the lack of competition, they have been widely accepted in clinical practice. Although safety and efficacy continue to be the two main metrics by which drugs will be judged, the newer agents in the market also face challenges of a more comparative nature-are they more efficacious than the currently available drugs on the market? Are they safer or better tolerated? Do they offer any practical advantages over current treatments? Fingolimod represented a milestone following its approval as an oral drug for MS in 2010, offering patients a far more convenient administration route. However, association with cardiovascular complications has led to a more cautious approach in its initial prescribing, now requiring cardiac monitoring for the first 6 h as well as subsequent monitoring of blood pressure and for macular oedema. Natalizumab, amongst licensed drugs, represents the current benchmark for efficacy. The risk of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy during natalizumab treatment is now more quantifiable. Other monoclonal antibodies are in various phases of development. Marketing authorisation for alemtuzumab has been filed, and whilst trial data suggest that its efficacy outperforms both licensed drugs and others in development, there is a significant risk of secondary autoimmunity. Its once-yearly administration, however, seems particularly advantageous. Rituximab is unlikely to be developed further as its license will expire, but ocrelizumab, another monoclonal antibody directly targeting B cells, is currently in phase 2 development and looks promising. Daclizumab is also moderately efficacious but may struggle to establish itself given its monthly subcutaneous dosing. There are new oral

  5. Development And Guidance Of A Mobile Robot With Object Avoidance Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeltekin, Aysin; Javoori, Kasmijan

    1989-03-01

    In this work we had developed an autonomous mobile robot with capabilities of object avoidance as well as finding the minimum path among two dimensional polygonal objects. The mobile unit moves on wheels and it can be controlled by the main control software loaded to the machine. A remote controller activates and stops the operation of the main controller. The vehicle can find its way among static polygonal objects with the help of a vision sensor. The main controller is responsible from the execution of the main navigation software as well as commanding the driving circuits for motors of wheels and the vision system. The vision system consists of a microdigital camera used as the vision sensor for object detection. There is a stepper motor which aligns the camera on the direction of motion along the path of the mobile robot. The software package consists of a main navigation program which is written in C language and functional subroutines which are written in Assembly for fast execution and easy access to hardware control. The autonomous mobile robot is a self guiding unit and it does not need teleoperators or other guidance units.

  6. Effects of music therapy on drug avoidance self-efficacy in patients on a detoxification unit: a three-group randomized effectiveness study.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Self-efficacy is a component of Bandura's social cognitive theory and can lead to abstinence and a reduction of relapse potential for people who have substance abuse disorders. To date, no music therapy researcher has utilized this theoretical model to address abstinence and reduce the likelihood of relapse in people who have addictions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of music therapy on drug avoidance self-efficacy in a randomized three-group wait-list control design with patients on a detoxification unit. Participants (N = 131) were cluster randomized to one of three single-session conditions: music therapy, verbal therapy, or wait-list control. Music therapy participants received a group lyric analysis intervention, verbal therapy participants received a group talk therapy session, and wait-list control participants eventually received a group recreational music therapy intervention. Although there was no significant between-group difference in drug avoidance self-efficacy, participants in the music therapy condition tended to have the highest mean drug avoidance self-efficacy scores. Posttest written comments supported the use of both music therapy and verbal therapy sessions. Two music therapy participants specifically noted that their initial skepticism had dissipated after receiving music therapy. Despite a lack of significant differences, the theoretical support of self-efficacy for substance abuse rehabilitation suggests that this may be an area of continued clinical focus and empirical investigation. Clinical anecdotes, limitations of the study, and suggestions for future research are provided.

  7. Parasitic diarrheal disease: drug development and targets

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Amir; Peerzada, Mudasir N.; Ahmad, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Diarrhea is the manifestation of gastrointestinal infection and is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity specifically among the children of less than 5 years age worldwide. Moreover, in recent years there has been a rise in the number of reports of intestinal infections continuously in the industrialized world. These are largely related to waterborne and food borne outbreaks. These occur by the pathogenesis of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms like bacteria and parasites. The parasitic intestinal infection has remained mostly unexplored and under assessed in terms of therapeutic development. The lack of new drugs and the risk of resistance have led us to carry out this review on drug development for parasitic diarrheal diseases. The major focus has been depicted on commercially available drugs, currently synthesized active heterocyclic compounds and unique drug targets, that are vital for the existence and growth of the parasites and can be further exploited for the search of therapeutically active anti-parasitic agents. PMID:26617574

  8. Drug development against tuberculosis: Impact of alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Shardendu K; Tripathi, Garima; Kishore, Navneet; Singh, Rakesh K; Singh, Archana; Tiwari, Vinod K

    2017-09-08

    Despite of the advances made in the treatment and management, tuberculosis (TB) still remains one of main public health problem. The contrary effects of first and second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs have generated extended research interest in natural products in the hope of devising new antitubercular leads. Interestingly, plethoras of natural products have been discovered to exhibit activity towards various resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. Extensive applications of alkaloids in the field of therapeutics is well-established and nowday's researches being pursued to develop new potent drugs from natural sources for tuberculosis. Alkaloids are categorized in quite a few groups according to their structures and isolation from both terrestrial and marine sources. These new drugs might be a watershed in the battle against tuberculosis. This review summarizes alkaloids, which were found active against Mycobacteria since last ten years with special attention on the study of structure-activity relationship (SAR) and mode of action with their impact in drug discovery and development against tuberculosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Targets for anti-metastatic drug development.

    PubMed

    Stock, Anna-Maria; Troost, Gabriele; Niggemann, Bernd; Zänker, Kurt S; Entschladen, Frank

    2013-01-01

    With a constant focus on the primary tumor, the current approaches in drug development in oncology yield dismal results. However over 90 percent of cancer deaths today are due to metastasis formation and yet there is no anti-metastatic drug on the market. Tumor cell migration is the essential prerequisite for invasion and metastasis formation. It is regulated by signal substances in terms of the grade of activity and in terms of direction (chemotaxis). The latter is important for the organotropism, the localization of metastasis in certain organs. Ligands to G protein-coupled receptors, mainly chemokines and neurotransmitters, as well as ligands to receptor kinases, mainly cytokines and growth factors, form the most important group of such regulators. We provide an overview of currently available agonists and antagonists to these receptors, which have a potential as anti-metastatic targets. Moreover we provide with the example of beta-blockers, how established drugs in other indications are possibly effective and can be co-opted as such anti-metastatics. The increasing knowledge of such regulators opens new opportunities to target cancer spreading and may put forth the development of antimetastatic drugs for oncological therapy.

  10. Who avoids going to the doctor and why? Audience segmentation analysis for application of message development.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Viji Diane; Veazie, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study examines the prevalent and detrimental health care phenomenon of patient delay in order to inform formative research leading to the design of communication strategies. Delayed medical care diminishes optimal treatment choices, negatively impacts prognosis, and increases medical costs. Various communication strategies have been employed to combat patient delay, with limited success. This study fills a gap in research informing those interventions by focusing on the portion of patient delay occurring after symptoms have been assessed as a sign of illness and the need for medical care has been determined. We used CHAID segmentation analysis to produce homogeneous segments from the sample according to the propensity to avoid medical care. CHAID is a criterion-based predictive cluster analysis technique. CHAID examines a variety of characteristics to find the one most strongly associated with avoiding doctor visits through a chi-squared test and assessment of statistical significance. The characteristics identified then define the segments. Fourteen segments were produced. Age was the first delineating characteristic, with younger age groups comprising a greater proportion of avoiders. Other segments containing a comparatively larger percent of avoiders were characterized by lower income, lower education, being uninsured, and being male. Each segment was assessed for psychographic properties associated with avoiding care, reasons for avoiding care, and trust in health information sources. While the segments display distinct profiles, having had positive provider experiences, having high health self-efficacy, and having an internal rather than external or chance locus of control were associated with low avoidance among several segments. Several segments were either more or less likely to cite time or money as the reason for avoiding care. And several older aged segments were less likely than the remaining sample to trust the government as a source

  11. Effectiveness of a Clinical Pharmacist Medication Therapy Management Program in Discontinuation of Drugs to Avoid in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Caffiero, Nicole; Delate, Thomas; Ehizuelen, Mercy D; Vogel, Kris

    2017-05-01

    Despite evidence of fall risk associated with some drugs to avoid in the elderly (DAEs), many aged patients continue to receive them. To assess the effectiveness of a clinical pharmacist medication therapy management program (MTM) on discontinuation of prescribed DAEs. This was a retrospective cohort study conducted at an integrated health care delivery system. Kaiser Permanente Colorado beneficiaries aged ≥65 years who were MTM-eligible and targeted for a DAE dispensing between 01/01/2015 and 09/30/2015 were included in the observation group. Medicare beneficiaries who were not eligible for MTM but had a targeted DAE dispensing during the same time period were included in the control group. The percentage of patients with another DAE dispensing of the same specified medication (no matter the strength) during the 100 days following index DAE dispensing was assessed. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted. A total of 9,059 Medicare beneficiaries were included, with 226 beneficiaries in the MTM group and 8,833 beneficiaries in the non-MTM group. Beneficiaries were primarily female and white and had a high burden of chronic disease. The percentages of patients with another dispensing of the specified DAE were 7.1% (95% CI = 3.7%-10.4%) for the MTM beneficiaries and 35.3% (95% CI 34.2%-36.2%) for the non-MTM beneficiaries (P < 0.001). The OR for the MTM group to have received another dispensing of the specified DAE was 0.12 (95% CI = 0.08-0.22) with adjustment for potential confounders. A clinical pharmacist-provided MTM intervention was associated with decreased DAE dispensing in Medicare beneficiaries. Future studies should evaluate means to further decrease DAE use in the aged. This study was funded by the Kaiser Permanente Colorado Pharmacy Department. The funder had no role in the study design, collection, analysis and interpretation of data, writing of the report, or the decision to submit the manuscript for publication. Delate

  12. A Case for Developing Community Drug Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loughran, Hilda; McCann, Mary Ellen

    2011-01-01

    The EU Action Plan on Drugs (2005-2008) calls for member states of the European Union to provide information on five key epidemiological indicators. These are: general population surveys, prevalence and patterns of problem drug use, drug related infectious diseases, drug related deaths and mortality of drug users, and demand for drug treatment.…

  13. A Case for Developing Community Drug Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loughran, Hilda; McCann, Mary Ellen

    2011-01-01

    The EU Action Plan on Drugs (2005-2008) calls for member states of the European Union to provide information on five key epidemiological indicators. These are: general population surveys, prevalence and patterns of problem drug use, drug related infectious diseases, drug related deaths and mortality of drug users, and demand for drug treatment.…

  14. Environmental enrichment protects against the acquisition of cocaine self-administration in adult male rats, but does not eliminate avoidance of a drug-associated saccharin cue.

    PubMed

    Puhl, Matthew D; Blum, Joshua S; Acosta-Torres, Stefany; Grigson, Patricia S

    2012-02-01

    One of the most menacing consequences of drug addiction is the devaluation of natural rewards (e.g. food, sex, work, money, caring for one's offspring). However, evidence also suggests that natural rewards, such as an enriched environment, can devalue drugs of abuse. Thus, this study used a rodent model to test whether exposure to an enriched environment could protect adult rats from acquiring cocaine self-administration and from the resultant drug-induced devaluation of a natural saccharin reward cue. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with intravenous jugular catheters. Rats were then separated into two housing conditions: an enriched condition, including social companions(four/cage) and novel objects (e.g. balls, polyethylene tubes, paper, etc.), and a nonenriched condition where the rats were singly housed with no novel objects. During testing, the rats were given 5-min access to 0.15% saccharin, followed by 1 h to self-administer saline or cocaine (0.167 mg/infusion) on fixed ratio and progressive ratio schedules of reinforcement. The results showed that rats that were singly housed in the nonenriched environment fell into two groups: low drug-takers (n=34) and high drug-takers (n=12). In comparison, only one out of the 22 rats housed in the enriched environment was a high drug-taker. Thus, all rats in the enriched environment, except one, behaved like low drug-takers under the nonenriched condition. As such, these rats self-administered almost no drug on either the fixed ratio or the progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement and were extremely slow to self-administer their first cocaine infusion. Interestingly, despite their very low levels of drug self-administration, low-drug-taking rats housed in the enriched environment continued to avoid intake of the drug-associated saccharin cue. Taken together, these data suggest that the enriched environment itself served as a salient natural reward that reduced cocaine seeking and cocaine taking, but

  15. A perspective on the prediction of drug pharmacokinetics and disposition in drug research and development.

    PubMed

    Di, Li; Feng, Bo; Goosen, Theunis C; Lai, Yurong; Steyn, Stefanus J; Varma, Manthena V; Obach, R Scott

    2013-12-01

    Prediction of human pharmacokinetics of new drugs, as well as other disposition attributes, has become a routine practice in drug research and development. Prior to the 1990s, drug disposition science was used in a mostly descriptive manner in the drug development phase. With the advent of in vitro methods and availability of human-derived reagents for in vitro studies, drug-disposition scientists became engaged in the compound design phase of drug discovery to optimize and predict human disposition properties prior to nomination of candidate compounds into the drug development phase. This has reaped benefits in that the attrition rate of new drug candidates in drug development for reasons of unacceptable pharmacokinetics has greatly decreased. Attributes that are predicted include clearance, volume of distribution, half-life, absorption, and drug-drug interactions. In this article, we offer our experience-based perspectives on the tools and methods of predicting human drug disposition using in vitro and animal data.

  16. Drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae: latest developments.

    PubMed

    Suay-García, B; Pérez-Gracia, M T

    2017-07-01

    Gonorrhea is the second most frequently reported notifiable disease in the United States and is becoming increasingly common in Europe. The purpose of this review was to assess the current state of drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae in order to evaluate future prospects for its treatment. An exhaustive literature search was conducted to include the latest research regarding drug resistance and treatment guidelines for gonorrhea. Gonococci have acquired all known resistance mechanisms to all antimicrobials used for treatment. Currently, the European Union, the United States, and the United Kingdom have established surveillance programs to assess, on a yearly basis, the development of gonococcal resistance. Current treatment guidelines are being threatened by the increasing number of ceftriaxone-, cefixime-, and azithromycin-resistant N. gonorrhoeae strains being detected worldwide. This has led the scientific community to develop new treatment options with new molecules in order to persevere in the battle against this "superbug".

  17. 75 FR 32482 - Investigational New Drug Applications; Co-development of Investigational Drugs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Investigational New Drug Applications; Co-development of Investigational Drugs AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; establishment of docket; request for comments. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is establishing a public docket...

  18. Anticancer Alkaloids from Trees: Development into Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Isah, Tasiu

    2016-01-01

    Trees have made an enormous phytochemical contribution in anticancer drugs' development more than any other life form. The contributions include alkaloids that are biosynthesized in various ways and yield. Lead alkaloids isolated from the trees are taxol and camptothecins that currently have annual sales in billion dollars. Other important alkaloids isolated from these life forms include rohitukine, harringtonine, acronycine, thalicarpine, usambarensine, ellipticine, and matrines. Studies on their mechanism of action and target on the DNA and protein of cancerous cells aided the development of potent hemisynthesized congeners. The molecules and their congeners passed/are passing a long period of historical development before approved as antineoplastic drugs for cancer chemotherapy. Some of them did not find the application as anticancer drugs due to ineffectiveness in clinical trials; others are generating research interest in the antineoplastic activity at the present and have reached clinical trial stages. Potentials in antineoplastic molecules from trees are high and are hoped to be commensurate with cancer types afflicting human society in the future. PMID:28082790

  19. Malaria drug resistance: new observations and developments

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Juliana M.; Chong, Jason L.; Wellems, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Drug-resistant micro-organisms became widespread in the 20th Century, often with devastating consequences, in response to widespread use of natural and synthetic drugs against infectious diseases. Antimalarial resistance provides one of the earliest examples, following the introduction of new medicines that filled important needs for prophylaxis and treatment around the globe. In the present chapter, we offer a brief synopsis of major antimalarial developments from two natural remedies, the qinghaosu and cinchona bark infusions, and of synthetic drugs inspired by the active components of these remedies. We review some contributions that early efficacy studies of antimalarial treatment brought to clinical pharmacology, including convincing documentation of atebrine-resistant malaria in the 1940s, prior to the launching of what soon became first-choice antimalarials, chloroquine and amodiaquine. Finally, we discuss some new observations on the molecular genetics of drug resistance, including delayed parasite clearances that have been increasingly observed in response to artemisinin derivatives in regions of South-East Asia. PMID:22023447

  20. Drug Development of Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mould, Diane R; Meibohm, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have become a substantial part of many pharmaceutical company portfolios. However, the development process of MAbs for clinical use is quite different than for small-molecule drugs. MAb development programs require careful interdisciplinary evaluations to ensure the pharmacology of both the MAb and the target antigen are well-understood. Selection of appropriate preclinical species must be carefully considered and the potential development of anti-drug antibodies (ADA) during these early studies can limit the value and complicate the performance and possible duration of preclinical studies. In human studies, many of the typical pharmacology studies such as renal or hepatic impairment evaluations may not be needed but the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of these agents is complex, often necessitating more comprehensive evaluation of clinical data and more complex bioanalytical assays than might be used for small molecules. This paper outlines concerns and strategies for development of MAbs from the early in vitro assessments needed through preclinical and clinical development. This review focuses on how to develop, submit, and comply with regulatory requirements for MAb therapeutics.

  1. Drugs in development: bisphosphonates and metalloproteinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Catterall, Jon B; Cawston, Tim E

    2003-01-01

    The destruction of bone and cartilage is characteristic of the progression of musculoskeletal diseases. The present review discusses the developments made with two different classes of drugs, the bisphosphonates and matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors. Bisphosphonates have proven to be an effective and safe treatment for the prevention of bone loss, especially in osteoporotic disease, and may have a role in the treatment of arthritic diseases. The development of matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors and their role as potential therapies are also discussed, especially in the light of the disappointing human trials data so far published. PMID:12716443

  2. New Strategies for Drug Discovery and Development for Plasmodium Falciparum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-12-01

    potential drug target enzymes. The yeast expression system should allow rapid screening of new drugs , greatly increasing the rate at which new...medication yet the world faces a crisis--drug resistance is emerging and spreading faster than drugs are being developed and the flow in the pipeline of new ... drugs has all but stopped. This represents a particular threat to the U.S. Military. A new strategy for drug development is urgently needed. Current

  3. SU-C-BRA-06: Developing Clinical and Quantitative Guidelines for a 4DCT-Ventilation Functional Avoidance Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Vinogradskiy, Y; Waxweiler, T; Diot, Q; Kavanagh, B; Schubert, L; Miften, M; Castillo, R; Guerrero, T; Castillo, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: 4DCT-ventilation is an exciting new imaging modality that uses 4DCTs to calculate lung ventilation. Because 4DCTs are acquired as part of routine care, calculating 4DCT-ventilation allows for lung function evaluation without additional cost or inconvenience to the patient. Development of a clinical trial is underway at our institution to use 4DCT-ventilation for thoracic functional avoidance with the idea that preferential sparing of functional lung regions can decrease pulmonary toxicity. The purpose of our work was to develop the practical aspects of a 4DCT-ventilation functional avoidance clinical trial including: 1.assessing patient eligibility 2.developing trial inclusion criteria and 3.developing treatment planning and dose-function evaluation strategies. Methods: 96 stage III lung cancer patients from 2 institutions were retrospectively reviewed. 4DCT-ventilation maps were calculated using the patient’s 4DCTs, deformable image registrations, and a density-change-based algorithm. To assess patient eligibility and develop trial inclusion criteria we used an observer-based binary end point noting the presence or absence of a ventilation defect and developed an algorithm based on the percent ventilation in each lung third. Functional avoidance planning integrating 4DCT-ventilation was performed using rapid-arc and compared to the patient’s clinically used plan. Results: Investigator-determined clinical ventilation defects were present in 69% of patients. Our regional/lung-thirds ventilation algorithm identified that 59% of patients have lung functional profiles suitable for functional avoidance. Compared to the clinical plan, functional avoidance planning was able to reduce the mean dose to functional lung by 2 Gy while delivering comparable target coverage and cord/heart doses. Conclusions: 4DCT-ventilation functional avoidance clinical trials have great potential to reduce toxicity, and our data suggest that 59% of lung cancer patients have lung

  4. Biologically active peptides: prospects for drug development.

    PubMed

    Hughes, J

    1980-08-11

    Biologically active peptides aree typified by their unbiquity of distribution, their high receptor affinity and an almost infinite diversity of structure. For these reasons, considerable effort is now being expended to elucidate the possible role of peptides in brain function. This effort has been stimulated by the discovery of a number of new endogenous peptides, such as the enkephalins, endorphins, vasoactive intestinal peptide and neurotensin. At present, there is no clearly defined role for these peptides, although they may form an important basis for the chemical coding of various brain functions, including pain, mood and memory. At present, the potential for drug development of peptide agonists remains in fairly circumscribed areas such as analgesia, pituitary hormone control, and gastrointestinal motor and secretory control. Peptide antagonists may provide a vast field for future development, although only one area, that of antifertility drugs based on LHRH antagonists, shows any promise of immediate success. Industrial research approaches to new peptide agonists and antagonists mainly rely at present on rational drug design through structural analogies. Other fruitful approaches to be considered are the screening of natural microbial and plant products and the possible application of genetic engineering techniques.

  5. New drug development in metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Andrew J; George, Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, drug development in castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer (CRPC) remains challenging, due to the number of potentially viable molecular targets and clinical trials available, the lack of established surrogates for overall survival, and competing causes of mortality. This review will highlight the highest impact phase II and phase III trials of novel agents in the current CRPC landscape, and focus on both molecular targets and clinical trial designs that are more likely to demonstrate clinical benefit. The need for tissue correlative studies for target evaluation and drug mechanism is stressed to continue to advance the field and to define biomarkers that may identify patient populations that may derive a greater benefit from these molecular agents.

  6. Effects of psychotropic drugs on impairment of acquisition of shuttle avoidance produced by pretreatment with pairs of tone signal and shock in mice.

    PubMed

    Kuribara, H

    1994-09-01

    The acquisition of discrete shuttle avoidance of mouse was significantly impaired by presentation of 120 pairs of a tone signal and an unavoidable/unescapable shock at 30 sec intervals for 3 consecutive days prior to the training session. Caffeine (3 and 10 mg/kg s.c.) reduced such an impairment of the avoidance acquisition, whereas diazepam (0.5-2 mg/kg s.c.), imipramine (30 mg/kg i.p.) and chlorpromazine (2 mg/kg s.c.) enhanced it, when these drugs were administered 10 min before each shock-presenting session. Ethanol (0.8-2.4 g/kg p.o.), nicotine (0.1-1 mg/kg s.c.), methamphetamine (0.1-1 mg/kg s.c.) and morphine (1-10 mg/kg s.c.) did not modify the avoidance acquisition. These results indicate that the nature of impairment of the avoidance acquisition caused by this condition is different from learned helplessness, and elicits different responses to psychotropics.

  7. Ocular drug development--future directions.

    PubMed

    Sherris, David

    2007-01-01

    Technology has caught up with retinal diseases of neovasculature. Work with anti-cancer, anti-angiogenic agents has fueled the way for ocular therapeutics. The market size for age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy is huge. Fifteen million people in the United States alone have age-related macular degeneration with 2 million new cases each year (1). About 20.8 million people in the United States have diabetes. Of those, 14.6 million are diagnosed and 6.2 million are undiagnosed (2). Of patients who have had type 1 diabetics for more than 20 years, 50% will have proliferative diabetic retinopathy (3). Between 60% and 80% of type 2 diabetics will manifest retinopathy after 15 years, and 20% will progress to proliferative retinopathy after 25 years of duration (4). Big pharma and biotech were complacent in developing drugs capable of having effect on ocular neovascular diseases even though technologies were available, at least on the research level, long before there was serious activity to bring such technologies to the clinic. Finally, over the last three years, triple digit million dollar business development deals have been consummated, mostly for VEGF-A targeted modalities. Such biodollar partnerships were the eye openers which have now led to a concerted action to develop ocular drugs to combat ocular neovascularization. Anti-VEGF-A technologies do not constitute the whole story. Agents with broader activity, activity that occurs later down the angiogenic pathway and those drugs which are capable to synergize with anti-VEGF-A technologies will dominate the next wave in ocular diseases of neovascularization and will lead the next round of significant business development deals.

  8. Drug development in oncology: a regulatory perspective.

    PubMed

    Augustus, Stella

    2011-07-01

    The ultimate goal of any drug development, including that in oncology, is to register the new medicinal product. A number of challenges remain in this field, primarily in demonstrating the efficacy of the new oncology products to the satisfaction of the regulatory authorities worldwide. Key aspects of clinical trial design, conduct, and analysis that require careful consideration by the sponsors before initiation of drug development programs in oncology include the choice of primary and secondary end points, the choice of comparators, the necessity for independent radiologic review of a disease-related end point such as progression-free survival and tumor response, and the relative value of the independently reviewed and investigator-assessed clinical end points. Many of these aspects, including the choice of comparators and choice of primary/secondary end points, may have a crucial impact on both the eventual registrability of the new medicine and on the feasibility of conducting the clinical trials in the first place. Although both the industry and the regulators share a common goal of developing promising new oncology products that make a tangible contribution to the care of patients with cancer, more harmonized expectations for "proof of efficacy" and more pragmatic, clinically driven decision-making approaches from regulatory authorities would go a long way in making oncology drug development process less fraught with uncertainties and will result in a more efficient path from clinical trials to the clinic for new medicines. An open dialogue and greater collaboration between the industry and the regulators may help in achieving clarity around these goals and in bringing these to fruition.

  9. Alzheimer’s Disease Drug Development in 2008 and Beyond: Problems and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Robert E.; Greig, Nigel H.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, a number of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) multi-center clinical trials (CT) have failed to provide statistically significant evidence of drug efficacy. To test for possible design or execution flaws we analyzed in detail CTs for two failed drugs that were strongly supported by preclinical evidence and by proven CT AD efficacy for other drugs in their class. Studies of the failed commercial trials suggest that methodological flaws may contribute to the failures and that these flaws lurk within current drug development practices ready to impact other AD drug development [1]. To identify and counter risks we considered the relevance to AD drug development of the following factors: (1) effective dosing of the drug product, (2) reliable evaluations of research subjects, (3) effective implementation of quality controls over data at research sites, (4) resources for practitioners to effectively use CT results in patient care, (5) effective disease modeling, (6) effective research designs. New drugs currently under development for AD address a variety of specific mechanistic targets. Mechanistic targets provide AD drug development opportunities to escape from many of the factors that currently undermine AD clinical pharmacology, especially the problems of inaccuracy and imprecision associated with using rated outcomes. In this paper we conclude that many of the current problems encountered in AD drug development can be avoided by changing practices. Current problems with human errors in clinical trials make it difficult to differentiate drugs that fail to evidence efficacy from apparent failures due to Type II errors. This uncertainty and the lack of publication of negative data impede researchers’ abilities to improve methodologies in clinical pharmacology and to develop a sound body of knowledge about drug actions. We consider the identification of molecular targets as offering further opportunities for overcoming current failures in drug development. PMID

  10. Anticancer Drug Development: The Way Forward.

    PubMed

    Connors

    1996-01-01

    Cancer chemotherapy celebrated its fiftieth anniversary last year. It was in 1945 that wartime research on the nitrogen mustards, which uncovered their potential use in the treatment of leukaemias and other cancers, was first made public. Fifty years later, more than sixty drugs have been registered in the USA for the treatment of cancer, but there are still lessons to be learnt. One problem, paradoxically, is that many anticancer agents produce a response in several different classes of the disease. This means that once a new agent has been shown to be effective in one cancer, much effort is devoted to further investigations of the same drug in various combinations for different disorders. While this approach has led to advances in the treatment of many childhood cancers and some rare diseases, a plethora of studies on metastatic colon cancer, for example, has yielded little benefit. 5-fluorouracil continues to be used in trials, yet there is no evidence for an increase in survival. The lesson to be learnt is that many common cancers are not adequately treated by present-day chemotherapy, and most trials of this sort are a waste of time. Significant increases in survival will only occur if the selectivity of present-day anticancer agents can be increased or new classes of more selective agents can be discovered. There are two fundamental problems in drug development: a lack of suitable laboratory tests and the difficulty of conducting early clinical trials. Firstly, no existing laboratory method can accurately predict which chemical will be effective against a particular class of human cancer. At best, tests can demonstrate a general 'anticancer' property. This is well exemplified by the discovery of cisplatin. The fact that cisplatin caused regression in a number of transplanted rodent tumours created no great excitement amongst chemotherapists. It was only later when it was tested clinically against ovarian cancer that results were sufficiently positive to

  11. The development and maintenance of drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Wise, Roy A; Koob, George F

    2014-01-01

    What is the defining property of addiction? We dust off a several-decades-long debate about the relative importance of two forms of reinforcement—positive reinforcement, subjectively linked to drug-induced euphoria, and negative reinforcement, subjectively linked to the alleviation of pain—both of which figure importantly in addiction theory; each of these forms has dominated addiction theory in its time. We agree that addiction begins with the formation of habits through positive reinforcement and that drug-opposite physiological responses often establish the conditions for negative reinforcement to come into play at a time when tolerance, in the form of increasing reward thresholds, appears to develop into positive reinforcement. Wise’s work has tended to focus on positive-reinforcement mechanisms that are important for establishing drug-seeking habits and reinstating them quickly after periods of abstinence, whereas Koob’s work has tended to focus on the negative-reinforcement mechanisms that become most obvious in the late stages of sustained addiction. While we tend to agree with each other about the early and late stages of addiction, we hold different views as to (i) the point between early and late at which the diagnosis of ‘addiction’ should be invoked, (ii) the relative importance of positive and negative reinforcement leading up to this transition, and (iii) the degree to which the specifics of negative reinforcement can be generalized across the range of addictive agents.

  12. Translational Bioinformatics Approaches to Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Readhead, Ben; Dudley, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Significance A majority of therapeutic interventions occur late in the pathological process, when treatment outcome can be less predictable and effective, highlighting the need for new precise and preventive therapeutic development strategies that consider genomic and environmental context. Translational bioinformatics is well positioned to contribute to the many challenges inherent in bridging this gap between our current reactive methods of healthcare delivery and the intent of precision medicine, particularly in the areas of drug development, which forms the focus of this review. Recent Advances A variety of powerful informatics methods for organizing and leveraging the vast wealth of available molecular measurements available for a broad range of disease contexts have recently emerged. These include methods for data driven disease classification, drug repositioning, identification of disease biomarkers, and the creation of disease network models, each with significant impacts on drug development approaches. Critical Issues An important bottleneck in the application of bioinformatics methods in translational research is the lack of investigators who are versed in both biomedical domains and informatics. Efforts to nurture both sets of competencies within individuals and to increase interfield visibility will help to accelerate the adoption and increased application of bioinformatics in translational research. Future Directions It is possible to construct predictive, multiscale network models of disease by integrating genotype, gene expression, clinical traits, and other multiscale measures using causal network inference methods. This can enable the identification of the “key drivers” of pathology, which may represent novel therapeutic targets or biomarker candidates that play a more direct role in the etiology of disease. PMID:24527359

  13. The Cross-Lagged Relations between Children's Academic Skill Development, Task-Avoidance, and Parental Beliefs about Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magi, Katrin; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Rasku-Puttonen, Helena; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2011-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigated the cross-lagged associations between children's academic skill development, task-avoidant behaviour in the context of homework, and parental beliefs about their child's success from kindergarten to Grade 2. The participants were 1267 children. The children's pre-skills were assessed at the end of the…

  14. Drug-induced psychosis: how to avoid star gazing in schizophrenia research by looking at more obvious sources of light.

    PubMed

    Paparelli, Alessandra; Di Forti, Marta; Morrison, Paul D; Murray, Robin M

    2011-01-01

    The prevalent view today is that schizophrenia is a syndrome rather than a specific disease. Liability to schizophrenia is highly heritable. It appears that multiple genetic and environmental factors operate together to push individuals over a threshold into expressing the characteristic clinical picture. One environmental factor which has been curiously neglected is the evidence that certain drugs can induce schizophrenia-like psychosis. In the last 60 years, improved understanding of the relationship between drug abuse and psychosis has contributed substantially to our modern view of the disorder suggesting that liability to psychosis in general, and to schizophrenia in particular, is distributed trough the general population in a similar continuous way to liability to medical disorders such as hypertension and diabetes. In this review we examine the main hypotheses resulting from the link observed between the most common psychotomimetic drugs (lysergic acid diethylamide, amphetamines, cannabis, phencyclidine) and schizophrenia.

  15. Drug-Induced Psychosis: How to Avoid Star Gazing in Schizophrenia Research by Looking at More Obvious Sources of Light

    PubMed Central

    Paparelli, Alessandra; Di Forti, Marta; Morrison, Paul D.; Murray, Robin M.

    2010-01-01

    The prevalent view today is that schizophrenia is a syndrome rather than a specific disease. Liability to schizophrenia is highly heritable. It appears that multiple genetic and environmental factors operate together to push individuals over a threshold into expressing the characteristic clinical picture. One environmental factor which has been curiously neglected is the evidence that certain drugs can induce schizophrenia-like psychosis. In the last 60 years, improved understanding of the relationship between drug abuse and psychosis has contributed substantially to our modern view of the disorder suggesting that liability to psychosis in general, and to schizophrenia in particular, is distributed trough the general population in a similar continuous way to liability to medical disorders such as hypertension and diabetes. In this review we examine the main hypotheses resulting from the link observed between the most common psychotomimetic drugs (lysergic acid diethylamide, amphetamines, cannabis, phencyclidine) and schizophrenia. PMID:21267359

  16. Development and application of a methodology for a clean development mechanism to avoid methane emissions in closed landfills.

    PubMed

    Janke, Leandro; Lima, André O S; Millet, Maurice; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2013-01-01

    In Brazil, Solid Waste Disposal Sites have operated without consideration of environmental criteria, these areas being characterized by methane (CH4) emissions during the anaerobic degradation of organic matter. The United Nations organization has made efforts to control this situation, through the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Kyoto Protocol, where projects that seek to reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) can be financially rewarded through Certified Emission Reductions (CERs) if they respect the requirements established by the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), such as the use of methodologies approved by the CDM Executive Board (CDM-EB). Thus, a methodology was developed according to the CDM standards related to the aeration, excavation and composting of closed Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills, which was submitted to CDM-EB for assessment and, after its approval, applied to a real case study in Maringá City (Brazil) with a view to avoiding negative environmental impacts due the production of methane and leachates even after its closure. This paper describes the establishment of this CDM-EB-approved methodology to determine baseline emissions, project emissions and the resultant emission reductions with the application of appropriate aeration, excavation and composting practices at closed MSW landfills. A further result obtained through the application of the methodology in the landfill case study was that it would be possible to achieve an ex-ante emission reduction of 74,013 tCO2 equivalent if the proposed CDM project activity were implemented.

  17. Current trends in the treatment of hepatitis C: interventions to avoid adverse effects and increase effectiveness of anti-HCV drugs.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Ammara; Akhtar, Muhammad Furqan; Mushtaq, Muhammed Fahd; Saleem, Muhammad; Muhammad, Syed Taqi; Akhtar, Bushra; Sharif, Ali; Peerzada, Sohaib

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis, an inflammatory liver disease, is caused by various genotypes of hepatitis C viruses (HCV). Hepatitis C slowly sprouts into fibrosis, which progresses to cirrhosis. Over a prolonged period of time compensated cirrhosis can advance to decompensated cirrhosis culminating in hepatic failure and death. Conventional treatment of HCV involves the administration of interferons. However, association of interferon with the adverse drug reactions led to the development of novel anti-HCV drugs given as monotherapy or in combination with the other drugs. Advances in drug delivery systems (DDS) improved the pharmacokinetic profile and stability of drugs, ameliorated tissue damages on extravasation and increased the targeting of affected sites. Liposomes and lipid based vehicles have been employed with polyethylene glycol (PEG) so as to stabilize the formulations as PEG drug complex. Sofosbuvir, a novel anti-HCV drug, is administered as monotherapy or in combination with daclatasvir, ledipasivir, protease inhibitors, ribavirin and interferon for the treatment of HCV genotypes 1, 2 and 3. These drug combinations are highly effective in eradicating the interferon resistance, recurrent HCV infection in liver transplant, concurrent HIV infection and preventing interferon related adverse effects. Further investigations to improve drug targeting and identification of new drug targets are highly warranted due to the rapid emergence of drug resistance in HCV.

  18. Current trends in the treatment of hepatitis C: interventions to avoid adverse effects and increase effectiveness of anti-HCV drugs

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Ammara; Akhtar, Muhammad Furqan; Mushtaq, Muhammed Fahd; Saleem, Muhammad; Muhammad, Syed Taqi; Akhtar, Bushra; Sharif, Ali; Peerzada, Sohaib

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis, an inflammatory liver disease, is caused by various genotypes of hepatitis C viruses (HCV). Hepatitis C slowly sprouts into fibrosis, which progresses to cirrhosis. Over a prolonged period of time compensated cirrhosis can advance to decompensated cirrhosis culminating in hepatic failure and death. Conventional treatment of HCV involves the administration of interferons. However, association of interferon with the adverse drug reactions led to the development of novel anti-HCV drugs given as monotherapy or in combination with the other drugs. Advances in drug delivery systems (DDS) improved the pharmacokinetic profile and stability of drugs, ameliorated tissue damages on extravasation and increased the targeting of affected sites. Liposomes and lipid based vehicles have been employed with polyethylene glycol (PEG) so as to stabilize the formulations as PEG drug complex. Sofosbuvir, a novel anti-HCV drug, is administered as monotherapy or in combination with daclatasvir, ledipasivir, protease inhibitors, ribavirin and interferon for the treatment of HCV genotypes 1, 2 and 3. These drug combinations are highly effective in eradicating the interferon resistance, recurrent HCV infection in liver transplant, concurrent HIV infection and preventing interferon related adverse effects. Further investigations to improve drug targeting and identification of new drug targets are highly warranted due to the rapid emergence of drug resistance in HCV. PMID:28096788

  19. To Set Up Norms for Drug Safety and Inspection: To Guarantee Administrative Sufficiency and Avoid Regulators from Being Wrongly Punished.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Qingsheng; Dong, Zuojun; Shao, Mingli

    2015-09-01

    Currently, as there is no systematic norm or standard for drug safety and inspection, it cannot be judged whether the regulatory authority or regulators have fulfilled their administrative responsibilities entirely or not, when a drug safety-related incident occurs. And there is a probability that some may even be wrongly punished. In this study, we have analyzed the risk of not having appropriate norms in place and also put forward recommendations for the government or the regulatory authorities to set up norms to be fulfilled for drug safety and inspection issues. This, on one hand, could provide a basic guideline for the regulatory authorities and regulators to improve their professional levels and administrative acumen and on the other hand, it could also provide a baseline for society to judge whether the regulatory authorities and regulators have fulfilled their responsibilities correctly and thereby also help prevent regulators from being mistakenly punished. This study proposes that a systematic and functional norm for drug safety and inspection could be set up relating to the determination of the responsibilities of regulatory authorities and scope of various inspections, number and frequency of inspections, number and qualifications of regulators, handling of inspection results, inspection records, and disciplinary codes for inspectors. This study also puts forward suggestions on who should be responsible for drafting the norms and what are the factors that need to be considered while formulating the norms.

  20. Into Adolescence: Avoiding Drugs. A Curriculum for Grades 5-8. Contemporary Health Series. [Teacher's Guide and] Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Dale; Giarratano, Susan

    A drug abuse prevention curriculum for middle school students in grades five through eight is presented in this document, one of a series that is designed to provide educators with the curricular tools necessary to challenge students to take personal responsibility for their health. Each of the 11 lessons includes information of the lesson…

  1. Developments in Diagnosis and Antileishmanial Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Prachi; Singh, Rajni

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis ranks the third in disease burden in disability-adjusted life years caused by neglected tropical diseases and is the second cause of parasite-related deaths after malaria; but for a variety of reasons, it is not receiving the attention that would be justified seeing its importance. Leishmaniasis is a diverse group of clinical syndromes caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania. It is estimated that 350 million people are at risk in 88 countries, with a global incidence of 1–1.5 million cases of cutaneous and 500,000 cases of visceral leishmaniasis. Improvements in diagnostic methods for early case detection and latest combitorial chemotherapeutic methods have given a new hope for combating this deadly disease. The cell biology of Leishmania and mammalian cells differs considerably and this distinctness extends to the biochemical level. This provides the promise that many of the parasite's proteins should be sufficiently different from hosts and can be successfully exploited as drug targets. This paper gives a brief overview of recent developments in the diagnosis and approaches in antileishmanial drug discovery and development. PMID:23118748

  2. Chemical signatures and new drug targets for gametocytocidal drug development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei; Tanaka, Takeshi Q.; Magle, Crystal T.; Huang, Wenwei; Southall, Noel; Huang, Ruili; Dehdashti, Seameen J.; McKew, John C.; Williamson, Kim C.; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Control of parasite transmission is critical for the eradication of malaria. However, most antimalarial drugs are not active against P. falciparum gametocytes, responsible for the spread of malaria. Consequently, patients can remain infectious for weeks after the clearance of asexual parasites and clinical symptoms. Here we report the identification of 27 potent gametocytocidal compounds (IC50 < 1 μM) from screening 5,215 known drugs and compounds. All these compounds were active against three strains of gametocytes with different drug sensitivities and geographical origins, 3D7, HB3 and Dd2. Cheminformatic analysis revealed chemical signatures for P. falciparum sexual and asexual stages indicative of druggability and suggesting potential targets. Torin 2, a top lead compound (IC50 = 8 nM against gametocytes in vitro), completely blocked oocyst formation in a mouse model of transmission. These results provide critical new leads and potential targets to expand the repertoire of malaria transmission-blocking reagents.

  3. Drugging the undruggables: exploring the ubiquitin system for drug development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaodong; Dixit, Vishva M

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic modulation of protein levels is tightly controlled in response to physiological cues. In mammalian cells, much of the protein degradation is carried out by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Similar to kinases, components of the ubiquitin system are often dysregulated, leading to a variety of diseases, including cancer and neurodegeneration, making them attractive drug targets. However, so far there are only a handful of drugs targeting the ubiquitin system that have been approved by the FDA. Here, we review possible therapeutic intervention nodes in the ubiquitin system, analyze the challenges, and highlight the most promising strategies to target the UPS. PMID:27002218

  4. Preventing Drug Abuse Among Hispanic Adolescents: Developing a Responsive Intervention Approach

    PubMed Central

    Schinke, Steven P.; Schwinn, Traci M.; Hursh, Hilary A.

    2014-01-01

    Intervention research is essential to help Hispanic American adolescents avoid drug use. This article describes an intervention research program aimed at preventing drug use among these youths. Grounded in salient epidemiological data, the program is informed by bicultural competence, social learning, and motivational interviewing theories. The program, called Vamos, is aimed at the risk and protective factors as well as the cultural prerogatives that demark the adolescent years of Hispanic American youths. Innovative in its approach, the program is delivered through a smartphone application (app). By interacting with engaging content presented via the app, youths can acquire the cognitive–behavioral skills necessary to avoid risky situations, urges, and pressures associated with early drug use. The intervention development process is presented in detail, and an evaluation plan to determine the program's efficacy is outlined. Lessons for practice and intervention programming are discussed. PMID:26500421

  5. Recent advances in antimultiple myeloma drug development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nuozhou; Bartlow, Patrick; Ouyang, Qin; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematological malignancy and is characterized by the aberrant proliferation of terminally differentiated plasma B cells with impairment in apoptosis capacity. Particularly, osteolytic bone diseases and renal failure resulting from hyperparaproteinemia and hypercalcemia have been the major serious sequelae that are inextricably linked with MM tumor progression. Despite the introduction of new treatment regimens, problematic neuropathy, thrombocytopenia, drug resistance and high MM relapse rates continue to plague the current therapies. New chemical agents are in development on the basis of understanding several signaling pathways and molecular mechanisms like tumor necrosis factor-α, proteasome, PI3K and MARKs. This review focuses on the most recent patents and clinical trials in the development of new medicine for the treatment of multiple myeloma. Furthermore, the important signaling pathways involved in the proliferation, survival and apoptosis of myeloma cells will be discussed. PMID:24998287

  6. Active controlled studies in antibiotic drug development.

    PubMed

    Dane, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    The increasing concern of antibacterial resistance has been well documented, as has the relative lack of antibiotic development. This paradox is in part due to challenges with clinical development of antibiotics. Because of their rapid progression, untreated bacterial infections are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. As a consequence, placebo-controlled studies of new agents are unethical. Rather, pivotal development studies are mostly conducted using non-inferiority designs versus an active comparator. Further, infections because of comparator-resistant isolates must usually be excluded from the trial programme. Unfortunately, the placebo-controlled data classically used in support of non-inferiority designs are largely unavailable for antibiotics. The only available data are from the 1930s and 1940s and their use is associated with significant concerns regarding constancy and assay sensitivity. Extended public debate on this challenge has led to proposed solutions by some in which these concerns are addressed by using very conservative approaches to trial design, endpoints and non-inferiority margins, in some cases leading to potentially impractical studies. To compound this challenge, different Regulatory Authorities seem to be taking different approaches to these key issues. If harmonisation does not occur, antibiotic development will become increasingly challenging, with the risk of further decreases in the amount of antibiotic drug development. However with clarity on Regulatory requirements and an ability to feasibly conduct global development programmes, it should be possible to bring much needed additional antibiotics to patients. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Botanicals as "new" drugs: US development.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Freddie Ann

    2015-11-01

    Botanicals are ingredients that can be marketed as foods, drugs, cosmetics, and medical devices in the United States. When a botanical is intended to diagnose, treat, prevent, mitigate, or cure a disease, it is considered to be a "drug". This article reviews the US regulatory requirements for botanicals as "new" drugs. An overview of the regulatory principles used to determine product category and the basic elements of an Investigational New Drug application and New Drug Application with the US Food and Drug Administration are presented. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Botanicals for Epilepsy".

  8. Can repeated IVF-ICSI-cycles be avoided by using blastocysts developing from poor-quality cleavage stage embryos?

    PubMed

    Kaartinen, Noora; Das, Pia; Kananen, Kirsi; Huhtala, Heini; Tinkanen, Helena

    2015-03-01

    In many clinics, good-quality embryos are selected for embryo transfer and cryopreservation at the cleavage stage, and poor-quality embryos are discarded. The aim of this retrospective study was to examine how many repeated IVF cycles could be avoided by culturing the cleavage stage poor-quality embryos to blastocyst stage and transferring them after vitrification and warming (604 IVF and intracytoplasmic sperm injection [IVF-ICSI] cycles were included). Poor-quality cleavage stage embryos not eligible for transfer or cryopreservation were cultured until day 5 or 6, and those developing to the blastocyst stage were vitrified. The rate of vitrified blastocysts and clinical pregnancy and delivery rate of the warmed blastocysts was evaluated. The effect of the extended culture on the cumulative delivery rate, and the number of avoided new treatment cycles was calculated. The surplus blastocysts resulted in clinical pregnancy, spontaneous abortion and delivery rates of 24.6%, 27.3% and 17.2% respectively. The use of surplus blastocysts raised cumulative delivery rate from 43% to 47% and 53 repeated new cycles were avoided. This study shows that the cumulative delivery rate can be increased, and repeated IVF-ICSI treatments avoided by using blastocysts developing from poor-quality cleavage stage embryos, which otherwise would have been discarded.

  9. Barriers to Alzheimer disease drug discovery and drug development in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Anand, Ravi

    2002-01-01

    The drug development process in the pharmaceutical industry has evolved from separate programs, specific for each country, into one coordinated, global development scheme. As a result, such a development program must meet regulatory requirements for all countries in which approval for the new drug will be sought. Barriers to Alzheimer disease (AD) drug discovery and development in the pharmaceutical industry can be categorized as (1) regulatory, (2) logistical, and (3) drug development issues. Some of the regulatory barriers could be overcome by international harmonization of guidelines for the development of antidementia drugs. The logistical issues can be reduced through international collaboration in the conduct of clinical studies, and the developmental issues can be addressed by using an expedited drug development plan that not only can reduce the time but also the resources required to develop the drug.

  10. Lead Phytochemicals for Anticancer Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sukhdev; Sharma, Bhupender; Kanwar, Shamsher S.; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a serious concern at present. A large number of patients die each year due to cancer illnesses in spite of several interventions available. Development of an effective and side effects lacking anticancer therapy is the trending research direction in healthcare pharmacy. Chemical entities present in plants proved to be very potential in this regard. Bioactive phytochemicals are preferential as they pretend differentially on cancer cells only, without altering normal cells. Carcinogenesis is a complex process and includes multiple signaling events. Phytochemicals are pleiotropic in their function and target these events in multiple manners; hence they are most suitable candidate for anticancer drug development. Efforts are in progress to develop lead candidates from phytochemicals those can block or retard the growth of cancer without any side effect. Several phytochemicals manifest anticancer function in vitro and in vivo. This article deals with these lead phytomolecules with their action mechanisms on nuclear and cellular factors involved in carcinogenesis. Additionally, druggability parameters and clinical development of anticancer phytomolecules have also been discussed. PMID:27877185

  11. Lead Phytochemicals for Anticancer Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sukhdev; Sharma, Bhupender; Kanwar, Shamsher S; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a serious concern at present. A large number of patients die each year due to cancer illnesses in spite of several interventions available. Development of an effective and side effects lacking anticancer therapy is the trending research direction in healthcare pharmacy. Chemical entities present in plants proved to be very potential in this regard. Bioactive phytochemicals are preferential as they pretend differentially on cancer cells only, without altering normal cells. Carcinogenesis is a complex process and includes multiple signaling events. Phytochemicals are pleiotropic in their function and target these events in multiple manners; hence they are most suitable candidate for anticancer drug development. Efforts are in progress to develop lead candidates from phytochemicals those can block or retard the growth of cancer without any side effect. Several phytochemicals manifest anticancer function in vitro and in vivo. This article deals with these lead phytomolecules with their action mechanisms on nuclear and cellular factors involved in carcinogenesis. Additionally, druggability parameters and clinical development of anticancer phytomolecules have also been discussed.

  12. Drug Metabolism in Preclinical Drug Development: A Survey of the Discovery Process, Toxicology, and Computational Tools.

    PubMed

    Issa, Naiem T; Wathieu, Henri; Ojo, Abiola; Byers, Stephen W; Dakshanamurthy, Sivanesan

    2017-03-15

    Increased R & D spending and high failure rates exist in drug development, due in part to inadequate prediction of drug metabolism and its consequences in the human body. Hence, there is a need for computational methods to supplement and complement current biological assessment strategies. In this review, we provide an overview of drug metabolism in pharmacology, and discuss the current in vitro and in vivo strategies for assessing drug metabolism in preclinical drug development. We highlight computational tools available to the scientific community for the in silico prediction of drug metabolism, and examine how these tools have been implemented to produce drug-target signatures relevant to metabolic routes. Computational workflows that assess drug metabolism and its toxicological and pharmacokinetic effects, such as by applying the adverse outcome pathway framework for risk assessment, may improve the efficiency and speed of preclinical drug development.

  13. Recent developments in nitric oxide donor drugs

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M R; Megson, I L

    2007-01-01

    During the 1980s, the free radical, nitric oxide (NO), was discovered to be a crucial signalling molecule, with wide-ranging functions in the cardiovascular, nervous and immune systems. Aside from providing a credible explanation for the actions of organic nitrates and sodium nitroprusside that have long been used in the treatment of angina and hypertensive crises respectively, the discovery generated great hopes for new NO-based treatments for a wide variety of ailments. Decades later, however, we are still awaiting novel licensed agents in this arena, despite an enormous research effort to this end. This review explores some of the most promising recent advances in NO donor drug development and addresses the challenges associated with NO as a therapeutic agent. PMID:17401442

  14. Neurodegenerative disorders and nanoformulated drug development

    PubMed Central

    Nowacek, Ari; Kosloski, Lisa M; Gendelman, Howard E

    2009-01-01

    Degenerative and inflammatory diseases of the CNS include, but are not limited to, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, multiple sclerosis and HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. These are common, debilitating and, unfortunately, hold few therapeutic options. In recent years, the application of nanotechnologies as commonly used or developing medicines has served to improve pharmacokinetics and drug delivery specifically to CNS-diseased areas. In addition, nanomedical advances are leading to therapies that target CNS pathobiology and as such, can interrupt disordered protein aggregation, deliver functional neuroprotective proteins and alter the oxidant state of affected neural tissues. This article focuses on the pathobiology of common neurodegenerative disorders with a view towards how nanomedicine may be used to improve the clinical course of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19572820

  15. Development of new drugs for COPD.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an increasing global health problem and cause of death. COPD is a chronic inflammatory disease predominantly affecting small airways and lung parenchyma that leads to progressive airway obstruction. However, current therapies fail to prevent either disease progression or mortality. The mainstay of current drug therapy is long-acting bronchodilators. Several once daily inhaled β(2)-agonists and muscarinic antagonists (and combinations) are now in development. No treatments effectively suppress chronic inflammation in COPD lungs. With better understanding of the inflammatory and destructive process in the pathophysiology of COPD, several new therapeutic targets have been identified. Several mediator antagonists or inhibitors tested in COPD have so far been disappointing, but CXCR2 antagonists that block pulmonary neutrophil and monocyte recruitment are more promising. Broad spectrum anti-inflammatory drugs may be more effective, and include inhibitors of the proinflammatory enzymes phosphodiesterase-4, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, Janus kinases, NF-κB kinase and PI3 kinase-γ and -δ, but side effects after oral administration are a major limitation so that in future inhaled delivery may be necessary. A new promising approach is reversal of corticosteroid resistance through increasing histone deacetylase-2 (HDAC2) activity. This might be achieved by existing treatments such as theophylline, nortriptyline and macrolides, or more selectively by PI3 kinase-δ inhibitors. Thus although there have been major advances in the development of long-acting bronchodilators for COPD, it has proved difficult to find anti-inflammatory treatments that are safe and effective.

  16. Developing a Molecular Roadmap of Drug-Food Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kasper; Ni, Yueqiong; Panagiotou, Gianni; Kouskoumvekaki, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that consumption of food -especially fruits and vegetables- can alter the effects of drugs by interfering either with their pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic processes. Despite the recognition of such drug-food associations as an important element for successful therapeutic interventions, a systematic approach for identifying, predicting and preventing potential interactions between food and marketed or novel drugs is not yet available. The overall objective of this work was to sketch a comprehensive picture of the interference of ∼ 4,000 dietary components present in ∼1800 plant-based foods with the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics processes of medicine, with the purpose of elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved. By employing a systems chemical biology approach that integrates data from the scientific literature and online databases, we gained a global view of the associations between diet and dietary molecules with drug targets, metabolic enzymes, drug transporters and carriers currently deposited in DrugBank. Moreover, we identified disease areas and drug targets that are most prone to the negative effects of drug-food interactions, showcasing a platform for making recommendations in relation to foods that should be avoided under certain medications. Lastly, by investigating the correlation of gene expression signatures of foods and drugs we were able to generate a completely novel drug-diet interactome map. PMID:25668218

  17. Developing a molecular roadmap of drug-food interactions.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kasper; Ni, Yueqiong; Panagiotou, Gianni; Kouskoumvekaki, Irene

    2015-02-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that consumption of food -especially fruits and vegetables- can alter the effects of drugs by interfering either with their pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic processes. Despite the recognition of such drug-food associations as an important element for successful therapeutic interventions, a systematic approach for identifying, predicting and preventing potential interactions between food and marketed or novel drugs is not yet available. The overall objective of this work was to sketch a comprehensive picture of the interference of ∼ 4,000 dietary components present in ∼1800 plant-based foods with the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics processes of medicine, with the purpose of elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved. By employing a systems chemical biology approach that integrates data from the scientific literature and online databases, we gained a global view of the associations between diet and dietary molecules with drug targets, metabolic enzymes, drug transporters and carriers currently deposited in DrugBank. Moreover, we identified disease areas and drug targets that are most prone to the negative effects of drug-food interactions, showcasing a platform for making recommendations in relation to foods that should be avoided under certain medications. Lastly, by investigating the correlation of gene expression signatures of foods and drugs we were able to generate a completely novel drug-diet interactome map.

  18. Personalized Medicine: Pharmacogenomics and Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Mirsadeghi, Somayeh; Larijani, Bagher

    2017-03-01

    Personalized medicine aims is to supply the proper drug to the proper patient within the right dose. Pharmacogenomics (PGx) is to recognize genetic variants that may influence drug efficacy and toxicity. All things considered, the fields cover a wide area, including basic drug discovery researches, the genetic origin of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, novel drug improvement, patient genetic assessment and clinical patient administration. At last, the objective of Pharmacogenomics is to anticipate a patient's genetic response to a particular drug as a way of presenting the best possible medical treatment. By predicting the drug response of an individual, it will be possible to increase the success of therapies and decrease the incidence of adverse side effect.

  19. Magneto-inductive skin sensor for robot collision avoidance: A new development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chauhan, D. S.; Dehoff, Paul H.

    1989-01-01

    Safety is a primary concern for robots operating in space. The tri-mode sensor addresses that concern by employing a collision avoidance/management skin around the robot arms. This rf-based skin sensor is at present a dual mode (proximity and tactile). The third mode, pyroelectric, will complement the other two. The proximity mode permits the robot to sense an intruding object, to range the object, and to detect the edges of the object. The tactile mode permits the robot to sense when it has contacted an object, where on the arm it has made contact, and provides a three-dimensional image of the shape of the contact impression. The pyroelectric mode will be added to permit the robot arm to detect the proximity of a hot object and to add sensing redundancy to the two other modes. The rf-modes of the sensing skin are presented. These modes employ a highly efficient magnetic material (amorphous metal) in a sensing technique. This results in a flexible sensor array which uses a primarily inductive configuration to permit both capacitive and magnetoinductive sensing of object; thus optimizing performance in both proximity and tactile modes with the same sensing skin. The fundamental operating principles, design particulars, and theoretical models are provided to aid in the description and understanding of this sensor. Test results are also given.

  20. Do national drug policies influence antiretroviral drug prices? Evidence from the Southern African Development community.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao; Galárraga, Omar

    2017-03-01

    The efficacy of low- and middle-income countries’ (LMIC) national drug policies in managing antiretroviral (ARV) pharmaceutical prices is not well understood. Though ARV drug prices have been declining in LMIC over the past decade, little research has been done on the role of their national drug policies. This study aims to (i) analyse global ARV prices from 2004 to 2013 and (ii) examine the relationship of national drug policies to ARV prices. Analysis of ARV drug prices utilized data from the Global Price Reporting Mechanism from the World Health Organization (WHO). Ten of the most common ARV drugs (first-line and second-line) were selected. National drug policies were also assessed for 12 countries in the South African Development Community (SADC), which self-reported their policies through WHO surveys. The best predictor of ARV drug price was generic status—the generic versions of 8 out of 10 ARV drugs were priced lower than branded versions. However, other factors such as transaction volume, HIV prevalence, national drug policies and PEPFAR/CHAI involvement were either not associated with ARV drug price or were not consistent predictors of price across different ARV drugs. In the context of emerging international trade agreements, which aim to strengthen patent protections internationally and potentially delay the sale of generic drugs in LMIC, this study shines a spotlight on the importance of generic drugs in controlling ARV prices. Further research is needed to understand the impact of national drug policies on ARV prices.

  1. Scientific visualization in drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Albensi, B C

    2001-03-01

    Scientific visualization has progressed significantly over the last century since the discovery of X-rays in 1895 and is used widely in many industries. In the pharmaceutical industry, there is a growing need for visualizing disease progression (or reversal) and for visualizing the effectiveness of a drug in animal models and in humans during clinical studies. Improvements in imaging technology could assist in decreasing the time from proof-of-concept to when a drug is finally launched. Many new drugs are entering the pipeline and progress in visualization technology should enhance the objective determination for predicting success or failure in a drug program. "A picture is worth a thousand words." Therefore, by collecting images, which provide information on molecular events, gene expression, biochemical subsystems, anatomical modifications and physiological perturbations, we positively and creatively alter our perception in our explorations of anatomy, disease mechanisms and drug interventions. (c) 2001 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  2. [PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY AND PERSONALIZED MEDICINE: A PARADIGM SHIFT IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF NEW DRUGS].

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2015-01-01

    The cost of pharmacotherapy is increasing in the health care budget. The pharmaceutical industry is facing the exhaustion of medications that are largely prescribed and have a high profitability (blockbusters). Because of patient heterogeneity, there is a great interindividual variability of the responses to drug therapy. Thus, it is essential to better detect potential to avoid waste of resources resulting from the prescription of expensive drugs to poor responders. The development of personalized medicine, or precision medicine, certainly offers opportunities to the pharmaceutical industry, but also exposes it to new big challenges.

  3. TCM-based new drug discovery and development in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wan-Ying; Hou, Jin-Jun; Long, Hua-Li; Yang, Wen-Zhi; Liang, Jian; Guo, De-An

    2014-04-01

    Over the past 30 years, China has significantly improved the drug development environment by establishing a series of policies for the regulation of new drug approval. The regulatory system for new drug evaluation and registration in China was gradually developed in accordance with international standards. The approval and registration of TCM in China became as strict as those of chemical drugs and biological products. In this review, TCM-based new drug discovery and development are introduced according to the TCM classification of nine categories.

  4. Imaging sigma receptors: applications in drug development.

    PubMed

    Collier, Thomas Lee; Waterhouse, Rikki N; Kassiou, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Sigma receptors have been implicated in a myriad of cellular functions, biological processes and diseases. While the precise biological functions of sigma receptors have not been elucidated, recent work has shed some light on to these enigmatic systems. Sigma receptors have recently been a target of drug development related to psychiatric and neurological disorders. Sigma ligands have also been shown to modulate endothelial cell proliferation and can control angiogenesis which makes them a promising target for oncology applications. Other areas currently being investigated include treatment of gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, endocrine and immune system disorders. Of interest is that the human sigma-1 receptor gene contains a steroid binding component, and several gonadal steroids, including progesterone, testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), interact with sigma-1 receptors. Of the steroids examined thus far, progesterone binds with the highest affinity to human sigma-1 receptors, with a reported affinity (Ki) as high as 30 nM while the other steroids exhibit lower affinity. For this and other reasons, sigma-1 receptors have been proposed as a link between the central nervous system and the endocrine and reproductive systems. Taken together, the above information highlights an important yet largely unexplored but promising area of research to examine the biological function and therapeutic potential of sigma receptors. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of these sites with a focus on specific areas where in vivo sigma receptor imaging is currently being investigated.

  5. Development of Antisense Drugs for Dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Fumito; Harada-Shiba, Mariko

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal elevation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in plasma as well as dysfunction of anti-atherogenic high-density lipoprotein (HDL) have both been recognized as essential components of the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and are classified as dyslipidemia. This review describes the arc of development of antisense oligonucleotides for the treatment of dyslipidemia. Chemically-armed antisense candidates can act on various kinds of transcripts, including mRNA and miRNA, via several different endogenous antisense mechanisms, and have exhibited potent systemic anti-dyslipidemic effects. Here, we present specific cutting-edge technologies have recently been brought into antisense strategies, and describe how they have improved the potency of antisense drugs in regard to pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. In addition, we discuss perspectives for the use of armed antisense oligonucleotides as new clinical options for dyslipidemia, in the light of outcomes of recent clinical trials and safety concerns indicated by several clinical and preclinical studies. PMID:27466159

  6. New drug developments in the Netherlands. "Tetracyclic" psychotropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Itil, T M; Polvan, N; Dincmen, K; Egilmez, S; Sungerbey, K

    1974-07-01

    Based on qualitative and quantitative EEG findings, the psychotropic properties of GB-94, GC-46, and GC-94 were predicted. According to the EEG model, GB-94 was predicted to be similar to amitriptyline and GC-46 t( imipramine. GC-94 was found to be much less effective on the CNS than GB-94 and GC-46 and was predicted to have "stimulatory" clinical effects similar to desipramine. The clinical trials demonstrated that GB-94 is indeed an antidepressive psychotropic compound similar to amitriptyline. GB-94 in lower dosages was also found to be effective in anxiety syndromes. In some schizophrenics GB-94 showed some therapeutic effects, while in others it obviously exacerbrated the psychotic symptomatology. GC-94 was not found to be significantly effective in a heterogenous psychiatric population. Only slight improvement in some schizophrenic patients was observed However, a noticeable worsening in the symptomatology of manic and hypomanic patients was seen. The study demonstarted that GC-94 indeed has a central stimulatory effect, but no minor or major tranquilizer properties or sedative antidepressive qualities were observed. GC-46 was tried in only three subjects. Based on this pilot trial, no conclusion can be made about the psychotropic properties of this compound. Our quantitative pharmaco-EEG and clinical trials clearly demonstrated the significant value of quantitative EEG in early screening of psychoactive drugs in order to predict their clinical values and effective dosage ranges.

  7. Ethnobotany and its role in drug development.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, M

    2000-11-01

    The botanical collections of early explorers and the later ethnobotany have played important roles in the development of new drugs for many centuries. In the middle of the last century interest in this approach had declined dramatically, but has risen again during its last decade, and new foci have developed. The systematic evaluation of indigenous pharmacopoeias in order to contribute to improved health care in marginalized regions has been placed on the agenda of international and national organizations and of NGOs. In this paper the results of various projects on Mexican Indian ethnobotany and some of the subsequent pharmacological and phytochemical studies are summarized. Medicinal plants are an important element of indigenous medical systems in Mexico. This study uses the medicinal plants in four indigenous groups of Mexican Indians-Maya, Nahua, Zapotec and Mixe-as an example. The relative importance of a medicinal plant within a culture is documented using a quantitative method and the data are compared intra- and interculturally. While the species used by the indigenous groups vary, the data indicate that there exist well-defined criteria specific for each culture, which lead to the selection of a plant as a medicine. For example, a large number of species are used for gastrointestinal illnesses by two or more of the indigenous groups. At least in this case, the multiple transfers of species and their uses within -Mexico seems to be an important reason for the widespread use of a species. Some of the data we gathered in order to evaluate the indigenous claims are also discussed, focusing on the transcription factor NF-kappaB as a molecular target. This led to the identification of sesquiterpene lactones such as parthenolide as potent and relatively specific inhibitors of this transcription factor.

  8. Improvement in sodium cromoglycate delivery from a spacer device by use of an antistatic lining, immediate inhalation, and avoiding multiple actuations of drug.

    PubMed Central

    O'Callaghan, C; Lynch, J; Cant, M; Robertson, C

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Aerosols generated from metered dose inhalers may be highly charged. The aim of this study was to determine whether lining the walls of a polycarbonate spacer device with an antistatic agent would result in an increase in drug output. The effects of multiple actuations of drug into the spacer device and increasing residence time of drug within the spacer were also determined. METHODS--The amount of sodium cromoglycate contained in particles of various size available for inhalation (per 5 mg actuation) from a 750 ml polycarbonate spacer was determined by impinger measurement and spectrophotometric assay. RESULTS--Lining the spacer with an antistatic agent increased the mean (SD) amount of sodium cromoglycate in particles < 5 microns available for inhalation (per 5 mg actuation) by 244% from (0.59 (0.03) to 1.44 (0.2) mg). When there was a 20 second interval between actuation into the spacer device and inhalation, sodium cromoglycate available for inhalation in particles < 5 micrograms decreased by 67% (from 0.59 (0.03) mg to 0.2 (0.01) mg). Use of the spacer device increased sodium cromoglycate available for inhalation in respirable particles (< 5 microns) by 18% compared with direct delivery by metered dose inhaler. Multiple actuations into the spacer decreased the amount of sodium cromoglycate available for inhalation in particles < 5 microns by 31% after two actuations and 56% after three acutations. CONCLUSIONS--Multiple actuations of sodium cromoglycate into a spacer device before inhalation should be avoided, and inhalation from spacer devices should take place immediately after actuation to ensure maximum dose. Lining of a standard spacer device with an antistatic agent significantly increased output of sodium cromoglycate. This may have implications for improved therapeutic response and drug cost. Images PMID:8346488

  9. The challenge of developing robust drugs to overcome resistance

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Amy C.; Schiffer, Celia; Pollastri, Michael; Peet, Norton P.

    2012-01-01

    Drug resistance is problematic in microbial disease, viral disease and cancer. Understanding at the outset that resistance will impact the effectiveness of any new drug that is developed for these disease categories is imperative. In this Feature, we detail approaches that have been taken with selected drug targets to reduce the susceptibility of new drugs to resistance mechanisms. We will also define the concepts of robust drugs and resilient targets, and discuss how the design of robust drugs and the selection of resilient targets can lead to successful strategies for combating resistance. PMID:21784168

  10. Polymer-Drug Conjugates: Recent Development in Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun; Wallace, Sidney

    2008-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery aims to increase the therapeutic index by making more drug molecules available at the diseased sites while reducing systemic drug exposure. In this update, we provide an overview of polymer-drug conjugates that have advanced into the clinical trials. These systems use synthetic water-soluble polymers as the drug carriers. The preclinical pharmacology and recent data in clinical trials with poly(L-glutamic acid)-paclitaxel (PG-TXL) are discussed first. This is followed by a summary of conjugates of a variety of polymeric conjugates with chemotherapeutic agents. Results from early clinical trials of these polymer-drug conjugates have demonstrated several advantages over the corresponding parent drugs, including fewer side effects, enhanced therapeutic efficacy, ease of drug administration, and improved patient compliance. Collectively, these data warrant further clinical development of polymer-drug conjugates as a new class of anticancer agents. PMID:18374448

  11. The clinical pharmacologist in drug discovery and development

    PubMed Central

    LEWIS, PETER

    1996-01-01

    1Clinical pharmacology is a key activity in drug discovery and drug development with much to contribute to drug innovation. 2However, very few clinical pharmacologists choose the pharmaceutical industry as their ultimate career. 3Medical alumni of the RPMS clinical pharmacology department illustrate this; only four industrial careers vs thirty professors of clinical pharmacology or medicine. PMID:8807154

  12. Evolution and intelligent design in drug development

    PubMed Central

    Agafonov, Roman V.; Wilson, Christopher; Kern, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    Sophisticated protein kinase networks, empowering complexity in higher organisms, are also drivers of devastating diseases such as cancer. Accordingly, these enzymes have become major drug targets of the twenty-first century. However, the holy grail of designing specific kinase inhibitors aimed at specific cancers has not been found. Can new approaches in cancer drug design help win the battle with this multi-faced and quickly evolving enemy? In this perspective we discuss new strategies and ideas that were born out of a recent breakthrough in understanding the molecular basis underlying the clinical success of the cancer drug Gleevec. An “old” method, stopped-flow kinetics, combined with old enzymes, the ancestors dating back up to about billion years, provides an unexpected outlook for future intelligent design of drugs. PMID:26052517

  13. Evolution and intelligent design in drug development.

    PubMed

    Agafonov, Roman V; Wilson, Christopher; Kern, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    Sophisticated protein kinase networks, empowering complexity in higher organisms, are also drivers of devastating diseases such as cancer. Accordingly, these enzymes have become major drug targets of the twenty-first century. However, the holy grail of designing specific kinase inhibitors aimed at specific cancers has not been found. Can new approaches in cancer drug design help win the battle with this multi-faced and quickly evolving enemy? In this perspective we discuss new strategies and ideas that were born out of a recent breakthrough in understanding the molecular basis underlying the clinical success of the cancer drug Gleevec. An "old" method, stopped-flow kinetics, combined with old enzymes, the ancestors dating back up to about billion years, provides an unexpected outlook for future intelligent design of drugs.

  14. Investigation of toxic metabolites during drug development

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Kevin . E-mail: bkpark@liv.ac.uk; Williams, Dominic P.; Naisbitt, Dean J.; Kitteringham, Neil R.; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2005-09-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a significant human health problem. Any organ system can be affected, including the liver, skin and kidney. Drug-induced liver injury is the most frequent reason for the withdrawal of an approved drug from the market, and it also accounts for up to 50% of cases of acute liver failure. The clinical picture is often diverse, even for the same drug. Mild, asymptomatic effects occur at a relatively high frequency with a number of drugs. Idiosyncratic toxicity is rare but potentially life-threatening. Many serious ADRs that occur in man are unpredictable from routine pathology and clinical chemistry in laboratory animals and are therefore poorly understood. The drug metabolist can determine the propensity of a novel chemical entity to either accumulate in the hepatocyte or undergo bioactivation in numerous model systems, from expressed enzymes, genetically engineered cells to whole animals. Bioactivation can be measured using trapping experiments with model nucleophiles or by measurement of non-specific covalent binding. The chemistry of the process is defined and the medicinal chemist can address the issue by seeking a metabolically stable pharmacophore to replace the potential toxicophore. However, we require a more fundamental understanding of the role of drug chemistry and biochemistry in ADRs. This requires knowledge of the ultimate toxin, signalling in cell defense and the sequence of molecular events, which ultimately lead to cell and tissue damage. It is imperative that such studies have a clinical level, but then translated into laboratory-based molecular studies. This will provide a deeper understanding of potential toxicophores for drug design and define candidate genes for pharmacogenomic approaches to individualized medicines.

  15. Biomarker-Guided Repurposing of Chemotherapeutic Drugs for Cancer Therapy: A Novel Strategy in Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Stenvang, Jan; Kümler, Iben; Nygård, Sune Boris; Smith, David Hersi; Nielsen, Dorte; Brünner, Nils; Moreira, José M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of mortality worldwide and matters are only set to worsen as its incidence continues to rise. Traditional approaches to combat cancer include improved prevention, early diagnosis, optimized surgery, development of novel drugs, and honing regimens of existing anti-cancer drugs. Although discovery and development of novel and effective anti-cancer drugs is a major research area, it is well known that oncology drug development is a lengthy process, extremely costly and with high attrition rates. Furthermore, those drugs that do make it through the drug development mill are often quite expensive, laden with severe side-effects and unfortunately, to date, have only demonstrated minimal increases in overall survival. Therefore, a strong interest has emerged to identify approved non-cancer drugs that possess anti-cancer activity, thus shortcutting the development process. This research strategy is commonly known as drug repurposing or drug repositioning and provides a faster path to the clinics. We have developed and implemented a modification of the standard drug repurposing strategy that we review here; rather than investigating target-promiscuous non-cancer drugs for possible anti-cancer activity, we focus on the discovery of novel cancer indications for already approved chemotherapeutic anti-cancer drugs. Clinical implementation of this strategy is normally commenced at clinical phase II trials and includes pre-treated patients. As the response rates to any non-standard chemotherapeutic drug will be relatively low in such a patient cohort it is a pre-requisite that such testing is based on predictive biomarkers. This review describes our strategy of biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy, taking the repurposing of topoisomerase I (Top1) inhibitors and Top1 as a potential predictive biomarker as case in point. PMID:24400218

  16. Potential of metabolomics in preclinical and clinical drug development.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Baldeep; Prakash, Ajay; Ruhela, Rakesh Kumar; Medhi, Bikash

    2014-12-01

    Metabolomics is an upcoming technology system which involves detailed experimental analysis of metabolic profiles. Due to its diverse applications in preclinical and clinical research, it became an useful tool for the drug discovery and drug development process. This review covers the brief outline about the instrumentation and interpretation of metabolic profiles. The applications of metabolomics have a considerable scope in the pharmaceutical industry, almost at each step from drug discovery to clinical development. These include finding drug target, potential safety and efficacy biomarkers and mechanisms of drug action, the validation of preclinical experimental models against human disease profiles, and the discovery of clinical safety and efficacy biomarkers. As we all know, nowadays the drug discovery and development process is a very expensive, and risky business. Failures at any stage of drug discovery and development process cost millions of dollars to the companies. Some of these failures or the associated risks could be prevented or minimized if there were better ways of drug screening, drug toxicity profiling and monitoring adverse drug reactions. Metabolomics potentially offers an effective route to address all the issues associated with the drug discovery and development. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  17. An introduction to MS imaging in drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Lodén, Henrik; Shariatgorji, Mohammadreza; Nilsson, Anna; Andrén, Per E

    2015-01-01

    A vital process in drug discovery and development is to assess the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicology of potentially therapeutic compounds in the body. The potential utility of MS imaging has been demonstrated in many studies focusing on molecules including peptides, proteins and lipids. However, MS imaging also permits the direct analysis of drugs and drug metabolites in tissue samples without requiring the use of target-specific labels or reagents. Here, a brief technical description of the technique is presented along with examples of its usefulness at different stages of the drug discovery and development process including absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicology, and blood-brain barrier drug penetration investigations.

  18. Attempts to develop radioactive anticancer drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.S.; Brown, I.; Chir, B.; Carpenter, R.N.

    1983-01-01

    Since 1953, attempts have been made to develop radioactive drugs. Preparations of tritiated menadiol sodium diphosphate (T-MNDP) of high specific activity showed a definite, though limited, but sometimes useful effect in the treatment of certain patients with advanced tumors, especially adenocarcinoma of the colon and of the pancreas and malignant melanoma of the skin. The next step was to use a much more effective isotope. 6-/sup 125/I-iodo-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinol bis (diammonium phosphate) - abbreviated 6-/sup 125/I-iodo-MNDP - has been synthesized, and in laboratory studies appears more promising. /sup 125/I provides radiations which behave predominately like high LET radiation, despite the accompanying X and gamma radiations. The astatine analogue, 6-/sup 211/At-astato-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinol bis (disodium phosphate) has also been synthesized. Confirming and greatly extending the earlier findings with T-MNDP, in vitro experiments showed that 6-/sup 125/I-iodo-MNDP is concentrated selectively in the cells of some human malignant tumors by a factor of about 15 to 20 or more in relation to the cells of normal origin that were studied. Macrodosimetric considerations and comparison with clinical treatments with T-MNDP suggest practical dosage. A typical treatment for a patient of body weight 70 kg with localized inoperable carcinoma of the colon could be 8 intravenous injections each of approximately 120mCi of 6-/sup 125/I-iodo-MNDP to a toal of 0.97 Ci in 25 days. Risks of late carcinogenesis and leukemogenesis are calculated to be less than 1%. Clinical indications are discussed briefly. Animal experiments are in progress and further preclinical studies are required.

  19. The tuberculosis drug discovery and development pipeline and emerging drug targets.

    PubMed

    Mdluli, Khisimuzi; Kaneko, Takushi; Upton, Anna

    2015-01-29

    The recent accelerated approval for use in extensively drug-resistant and multidrug-resistant-tuberculosis (MDR-TB) of two first-in-class TB drugs, bedaquiline and delamanid, has reinvigorated the TB drug discovery and development field. However, although several promising clinical development programs are ongoing to evaluate new TB drugs and regimens, the number of novel series represented is few. The global early-development pipeline is also woefully thin. To have a chance of achieving the goal of better, shorter, safer TB drug regimens with utility against drug-sensitive and drug-resistant disease, a robust and diverse global TB drug discovery pipeline is key, including innovative approaches that make use of recently acquired knowledge on the biology of TB. Fortunately, drug discovery for TB has resurged in recent years, generating compounds with varying potential for progression into developable leads. In parallel, advances have been made in understanding TB pathogenesis. It is now possible to apply the lessons learned from recent TB hit generation efforts and newly validated TB drug targets to generate the next wave of TB drug leads. Use of currently underexploited sources of chemical matter and lead-optimization strategies may also improve the efficiency of future TB drug discovery. Novel TB drug regimens with shorter treatment durations must target all subpopulations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis existing in an infection, including those responsible for the protracted TB treatment duration. This review summarizes the current TB drug development pipeline and proposes strategies for generating improved hits and leads in the discovery phase that could help achieve this goal.

  20. Avoiding health information.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Joshua B; Rintamaki, Lance S; Ramsey, Jason A; Brashers, Dale E

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated why and how individuals avoid health information to support the development of models of uncertainty and information management and offer insights for those dealing with the information and uncertainty inherent to health and illness. Participants from student (n = 507) and community (n = 418) samples reported that they avoided health information to (a) maintain hope or deniability, (b) resist overexposure, (c) accept limits of action, (d) manage flawed information, (e) maintain boundaries, and (f) continue with life/activities. They also reported strategies for avoiding information, including removing or ignoring stimuli (e.g., avoiding people who might provide health advice) and controlling conversations (e.g., withholding information, changing the subject). Results suggest a link between previous experience with serious illness and health information avoidance. Building on uncertainty management theory, this study demonstrated that health information avoidance is situational, relatively common, not necessarily unhealthy, and may be used to accomplish multiple communication goals.

  1. The worldwide trend of using botanical drugs and strategies for developing global drugs.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Kyungseop

    2017-03-01

    Natural product drugs, or botanical drugs, are drugs composed of natural substances which have constituents with healthenhancing or medicinal activities. In Korea, government-led projects brought attention to botanical drugs invigorating domestic botanical drug industry. Foreign markets, as well, are growing bigger as the significance of botanical drugs stood out. To follow along with the tendency, Korea puts a lot of effort on developing botanical drugs suitable for global market. However, standards for approving drug sales vary by countries. And also, thorough standardization, certification, clinical studies and data of these will be required as well as data confirming safety and effectiveness. Meanwhile, as an international exchange in botanical drug market continues, the importance of plant resources was emphasized. Thus countries' ownership of domestic natural resources became vital. Not only establishing a systematic method to secure domestic plant resources, but also cooperation with other countries on sharing natural resources is essential to procure natural resources effectively. Korea started to show visible results with botanical drugs, and asthma/COPD treatment made out of speedwell is one example. Sufficient investment and government's active support for basic infrastructure for global botanical drugs will bring Korea to much higher level of botanical drug development. [BMB Reports 2017; 50(3): 111-116].

  2. Developing new drugs for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis: a regulatory perspective.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Leonard V; Behrman, Rachel E

    2008-08-01

    Simplifying and shortening treatment for drug-sensitive tuberculosis and providing new treatment options for drug-resistant tuberculosis constitute two principal goals in the development of novel drugs for tuberculosis. Demonstration of clinical efficacy in drug-sensitive tuberculosis is challenging, given high success rates for existing regimens, concerns about substituting an investigational agent for the most effective agents in a regimen and difficulties in determining the effect size of the components of a combination regimen. Large and prolonged studies would be needed either to show superiority over existing regimens or statistically defensible non-inferiority compared to existing regimens. In contrast, exploring efficacy of novel treatments in the setting of drug-resistant disease may present certain opportunities. In drug-resistant disease, the efficacy of existing regimens is comparatively poor, and companion drugs used to treat drug-resistant disease are weak or ineffective, enabling demonstration of the effect of the new drug. Other advantages of this approach, which has been used successfully in the development of antiretroviral agents, include the possibility of demonstrating drug efficacy using smaller studies, the possibility of accelerated approval based on a surrogate endpoint and the opportunity to address an urgent public health need. Experience with the activity and the safety of new agents in drug-resistant disease may provide a platform from which their indication can be broadened to include drug-sensitive disease.

  3. Overcoming drug crystallization in electrospun fibers--Elucidating key parameters and developing strategies for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Seif, Salem; Franzen, Lutz; Windbergs, Maike

    2015-01-15

    For the development of novel therapeutics, uncontrolled crystallization of drugs within delivery systems represents a major challenge. Especially for thin and flexible polymeric systems such as oral films or dermal wound dressings, the formation and growth of drug crystals can significantly affect drug distribution and release kinetics as well as physical storage stability. In this context, electrospinning was introduced as a fabrication technique with the potential to encapsulate drugs within ultrafine fibers by rapid solvent evaporation overcoming drug crystallization during fabrication and storage. However, these effects could so far only be shown for specific drug-polymer combinations and an in-depth understanding of the underlying processes of drug-loaded fiber formation and influencing key parameters is still missing. In this study, we systematically investigated crystal formation of caffeine as a model drug in electrospun fibers comparing different polymers. The solvent polarity was found to have a major impact on the drug crystal formation, whereas only a minor effect was attributed to the electrospinning process parameters. Based on an in-depth understanding of the underlying processes determining drug crystallization processes in electrospun fibers, key parameters could be identified which allow for the rational development of drug-loaded electrospun fibers overcoming drug crystallization.

  4. The worldwide trend of using botanical drugs and strategies for developing global drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Kyungseop

    2017-01-01

    Natural product drugs, or botanical drugs, are drugs composed of natural substances which have constituents with health-enhancing or medicinal activities. In Korea, government-led projects brought attention to botanical drugs invigorating domestic botanical drug industry. Foreign markets, as well, are growing bigger as the significance of botanical drugs stood out. To follow along with the tendency, Korea puts a lot of effort on developing botanical drugs suitable for global market. However, standards for approving drug sales vary by countries. And also, thorough standardization, certification, clinical studies and data of these will be required as well as data confirming safety and effectiveness. Meanwhile, as an international exchange in botanical drug market continues, the importance of plant resources was emphasized. Thus countries’ ownership of domestic natural resources became vital. Not only establishing a systematic method to secure domestic plant resources, but also cooperation with other countries on sharing natural resources is essential to procure natural resources effectively. Korea started to show visible results with botanical drugs, and asthma/COPD treatment made out of speedwell is one example. Sufficient investment and government’s active support for basic infrastructure for global botanical drugs will bring Korea to much higher level of botanical drug development. PMID:27998396

  5. Recent developments in genomics, bioinformatics and drug discovery to combat emerging drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Soumya; Sundaramurthi, Jagadish Chandrabose; Palaniappan, Alangudi Natarajan; Narayanan, Sujatha

    2016-12-01

    Emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) is a big challenge in TB control. The delay in diagnosis of DR-TB leads to its increased transmission, and therefore prevalence. Recent developments in genomics have enabled whole genome sequencing (WGS) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) from 3-day-old liquid culture and directly from uncultured sputa, while new bioinformatics tools facilitate to determine DR mutations rapidly from the resulting sequences. The present drug discovery and development pipeline is filled with candidate drugs which have shown efficacy against DR-TB. Furthermore, some of the FDA-approved drugs are being evaluated for repurposing, and this approach appears promising as several drugs are reported to enhance efficacy of the standard TB drugs, reduce drug tolerance, or modulate the host immune response to control the growth of intracellular M. tuberculosis. Recent developments in genomics and bioinformatics along with new drug discovery collectively have the potential to result in synergistic impact leading to the development of a rapid protocol to determine the drug resistance profile of the infecting strain so as to provide personalized medicine. Hence, in this review, we discuss recent developments in WGS, bioinformatics and drug discovery to perceive how they would transform the management of tuberculosis in a timely manner.

  6. UAS Integration into the NAS: Detect and Avoid Display Evaluations in Support of SC-228 MOPS Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fern, Lisa; Rorie, Conrad; Shively, Jay

    2015-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the work the Human Systems Integration (HSI) sub-project has done on detect and avoid (DAA) displays while working on the UAS Integration into the NAS project. Much of the work has been used to support the ongoing development of minimum operational performance standards (MOPS) for UAS by RTCA Special Committee 228. The design and results of three different human-in-the-loop simulations are discussed, with particular emphasis on the role of the UAS pilot in the Self Separation Timeline.

  7. COMPUTER-AIDED DRUG DISCOVERY AND DEVELOPMENT (CADDD): in silico-chemico-biological approach

    PubMed Central

    Kapetanovic, I.M.

    2008-01-01

    It is generally recognized that drug discovery and development are very time and resources consuming processes. There is an ever growing effort to apply computational power to the combined chemical and biological space in order to streamline drug discovery, design, development and optimization. In biomedical arena, computer-aided or in silico design is being utilized to expedite and facilitate hit identification, hit-to-lead selection, optimize the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity profile and avoid safety issues. Commonly used computational approaches include ligand-based drug design (pharmacophore, a 3-D spatial arrangement of chemical features essential for biological activity), structure-based drug design (drug-target docking), and quantitative structure-activity and quantitative structure-property relationships. Regulatory agencies as well as pharmaceutical industry are actively involved in development of computational tools that will improve effectiveness and efficiency of drug discovery and development process, decrease use of animals, and increase predictability. It is expected that the power of CADDD will grow as the technology continues to evolve. PMID:17229415

  8. Recent Developments in Intellectual Property Law: Avoiding Traps in the Pursuit of University Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garabedian, Todd E.

    2004-01-01

    U.S. patent laws have undergone many changes in recent years, both through Congress and the courts. This article summarizes recent developments relating to judicial decisions, legislative initiatives, and patent office policy, and provides some practical advice relating to administration of intellectual property. As illustrated by the latest…

  9. The Evolution of Drug Development in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, William T; Koenig, James I

    2008-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a disease syndrome with major public health implications. The primary advance in pharmacotherapeutics was in 1952 with the introduction of antipsychotic medications (ie, chlorpromazine, dopamine D2 antagonism). Barriers to progress have been substantial, but many will be subject to rapid change based on current knowledge. There are attractive psychopathology indications for drug discovery (eg, impaired cognition and negative symptoms), and drugs with efficacy in these domains may have application across a number of disease classes. These pathologies are observed prior to psychosis raising the possibility of very early intervention and secondary prevention. Success in drug discovery for cognition and negative symptom pathologies may bring forth issues in ethics as the potential for enhancing normal function is explored. PMID:18046305

  10. A development perspective on adolescent drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Baumrind, D; Moselle, K A

    1985-01-01

    Adolescent drug use is placed in an historical and developmental perspective. Existing evidence concerning causes and consequences of adolescent drug use is inconclusive. In the absence of conclusive empirical evidence and cogent theories, we present a prima facie case against early adolescent drug use by defending six propositions which posit specific cognitive, conative, and affective negative consequences including impairment of attention and memory; developmental lag imposing categorical limitations on the level of maximum functioning available to the user in cognitive, moral and psychosocial domains; amotivational syndrome; consolidation of diffuse or negative identity; and social alienation and estrangement. We call for a program of research which could provide credible evidence to support or rebut these propositions, and thus address the factual claims underlying the sociomoral concerns of social policy planners.

  11. Neurophysiological biomarkers for drug development in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Javitt, Daniel C.; Spencer, Kevin M.; Thaker, Gunvant K.; Winterer, Georg; Hajós, Mihály

    2009-01-01

    Schizophrenia represents a pervasive deficit in brain function, leading to hallucinations and delusions, social withdrawal and a decline in cognitive performance. As the underlying genetic and neuronal abnormalities in schizophrenia are largely unknown, it is challenging to measure the severity of its symptoms objectively, or to design and evaluate psychotherapeutic interventions. Recent advances in neurophysiological techniques provide new opportunities to measure abnormal brain functions in patients with schizophrenia and to compare these with drug-induced alterations. Moreover, many of these neurophysiological processes are phylogenetically conserved and can be modelled in preclinical studies, offering unique opportunities for use as translational biomarkers in schizophrenia drug discovery. PMID:18064038

  12. CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference White Paper

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Victor A.; Tonge, Peter J.; Gallo, James M.; Birtwistle, Marc R.; Dar, Arvin C.; Iavarone, Antonio; Paddison, Patrick J.; Heffron, Timothy P.; Elmquist, William F.; Lachowicz, Jean E.; Johnson, Ted W.; White, Forest M.; Sul, Joohee; Smith, Quentin R.; Shen, Wang; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Samala, Ramakrishna; Wen, Patrick Y.; Berry, Donald A.; Petter, Russell C.

    2015-01-01

    Following the first CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference, the speakers from the first 4 sessions and organizers of the conference created this White Paper hoping to stimulate more and better CNS anticancer drug discovery and development. The first part of the White Paper reviews, comments, and, in some cases, expands on the 4 session areas critical to new drug development: pharmacological challenges, recent drug approaches, drug targets and discovery, and clinical paths. Following this concise review of the science and clinical aspects of new CNS anticancer drug discovery and development, we discuss, under the rubric “Accelerating Drug Discovery and Development for Brain Tumors,” further reasons why the pharmaceutical industry and academia have failed to develop new anticancer drugs for CNS malignancies and what it will take to change the current status quo and develop the drugs so desperately needed by our patients with malignant CNS tumors. While this White Paper is not a formal roadmap to that end, it should be an educational guide to clinicians and scientists to help move a stagnant field forward. PMID:26403167

  13. CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference White Paper.

    PubMed

    Levin, Victor A; Tonge, Peter J; Gallo, James M; Birtwistle, Marc R; Dar, Arvin C; Iavarone, Antonio; Paddison, Patrick J; Heffron, Timothy P; Elmquist, William F; Lachowicz, Jean E; Johnson, Ted W; White, Forest M; Sul, Joohee; Smith, Quentin R; Shen, Wang; Sarkaria, Jann N; Samala, Ramakrishna; Wen, Patrick Y; Berry, Donald A; Petter, Russell C

    2015-11-01

    Following the first CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference, the speakers from the first 4 sessions and organizers of the conference created this White Paper hoping to stimulate more and better CNS anticancer drug discovery and development. The first part of the White Paper reviews, comments, and, in some cases, expands on the 4 session areas critical to new drug development: pharmacological challenges, recent drug approaches, drug targets and discovery, and clinical paths. Following this concise review of the science and clinical aspects of new CNS anticancer drug discovery and development, we discuss, under the rubric "Accelerating Drug Discovery and Development for Brain Tumors," further reasons why the pharmaceutical industry and academia have failed to develop new anticancer drugs for CNS malignancies and what it will take to change the current status quo and develop the drugs so desperately needed by our patients with malignant CNS tumors. While this White Paper is not a formal roadmap to that end, it should be an educational guide to clinicians and scientists to help move a stagnant field forward.

  14. Development of a salt drug with improved solubility: Ethionamide nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniz, Luan F.; Carvalho, Paulo S.; de Melo, Cristiane C.; Ellena, Javier

    2017-06-01

    To avoid drug resistance, an adequate tuberculosis treatment should include not only a first-line drug but also at least one second-line drug such as, for example, Ethionamide (ETH). However, the dissolution rate and oral absorption of ETH is highly limited by its low aqueous solubility. Considering that a salt is in general more soluble than its parent compound, herein we depicted a new supramolecular modification of ETH, an Ethionamide nitrate salt (ETHNO3). This salt is the first ETH structure that has been crystallized with four independent ionic pairs (ETH+NO3-) in the asymmetric unit. In addition to the structural study, the salt formation was also identified on the FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. The thermal behavior of ETHNO3 was also investigated here together with its solubility profile in three dissolution media (purified water, pH 4.0 and 7.0).

  15. Ethanol inducible expression of a mesophilic cellulase avoids adverse effects on plant development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant-produced biomass-degrading enzymes are promising tools for the processing of lignocellulose to fermentable sugars. A major limitation of in planta production is that high-level expression of such enzymes could potentially affect the structure and integrity of the plant cell wall and negatively influence plant growth and development. Results Here, we evaluate the impact on tobacco plant development of constitutive versus alcohol-inducible expression of the endoglucanase TrCel5A from the mesophilic fungus Trichoderma reesei. Using this system, we are able to demonstrate that constitutive expression of the enzyme, controlled by the doubled Cauliflower Mosaic Virus promoter, leads to lower cellulose content of the plant combined with severe effects on plant growth. However, using an alcohol-inducible expression of the endoglucanase in the plant leaves, we achieved similar enzymatic expression levels with no changes in the crystalline cellulose content. Conclusion We were able to produce significant amounts of cellulase in the plant leaves without detrimental effects to plant development. These results demonstrate the potential feasibility of an inducible expression system for producing biomass degrading enzymes in plants. PMID:23587418

  16. Pediatric drug development programs for type 2 diabetes: A review.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Michael L; Franklin, Brandi E; Momper, Jeremiah D; Reed, Michael D

    2015-07-01

    Considerable progress has been made in pediatric drug development. Despite these gains there remain certain therapeutic areas where a high percentage of drugs approved for use in adults do not gain approval for use in children. Lack of sufficient US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved labeling correlates with diminished therapeutic efficacy and increased risk for adverse drug reactions. Despite the increasing prevalence and important clinical challenge with pediatric type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), only 1 drug (metformin) of the first 4 T2DM drugs to complete testing in children gained FDA approval. This analysis reviews 4 pediatric drug development programs for orally administered antidiabetic agents that have undergone FDA review and discusses factors influencing failure to meet specified end points for approval. Recommendations to guide future study are also provided. © 2015, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  17. Pharmacologic considerations in use and development of antituberculosis drugs.

    PubMed

    Davies, Geraint

    2014-09-18

    Rational development and deployment of antituberculosis drugs depend on a comprehensive understanding of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics that underlie their clinical behavior. Successful implementation of a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic approach faces difficulties that, although not unique to tuberculosis as a therapeutic area, in combination pose a significant scientific challenge. In recent years, a multidisciplinary response combining new technological and analytical approaches has begun to directly address many of these issues, shedding light on some previously poorly understood aspects of drug distribution and response. These advances have important implications for optimization of existing and development of novel drug regimens, putting quantitative pharmacology at the heart of preclinical and early drug development.

  18. Emerging role of drug interaction studies in drug development: the good, the bad, and the unknown.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, C L

    2001-01-01

    Significant scientific advancements in the last decade have armed researchers with tools to assess drug metabolism and the effects of drugs on metabolic pathways; however, most of this research has focused on cytochrome P450 isozymes. Early delineation of this information aids in the prediction of potential drug-drug interactions, which may ultimately determine whether a compound is pursued in the drug development process. The recent withdrawals of medications such as terfenadine, astemizole, cisapride, and mibefradil from the market demonstrate the relevance of this a priori approach--the risk of drug interactions was largely unrecognized prior to their approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Drug interaction studies for new drug applications (NDAs) field between 1987 and 1991 were largely in vivo studies with potential coadministered drugs, whereas for NDAs field between 1992 and 1997, the majority of studies involved metabolic mechanisms and in vitro methodology. Despite current limitations in the extrapolation of in vitro drug metabolism data to the in vivo environment, in vitro studies remain the mainstay of initial evaluations in this area primarily because of the high throughput nature of these investigations and the reduced cost compared with in vivo studies. The FDA has published several guidance documents in the area of drug metabolism and drug interaction studies in drug development with suggestions for in vitro as well as in vivo approaches to these investigations. Current and future research will likely focus on in vitro models for cytochrome P450 induction, Phase II metabolism, and drug transporters, and include validation and extrapolation of these approaches in vivo.

  19. Shade Avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Casal, Jorge J.

    2012-01-01

    The presence of neighboring vegetation modifies the light environment experienced by plants, generating signals that are perceived by phytochromes and cryptochromes. These signals cause large changes in plant body form and function, including enhanced growth of the hypocotyl and petioles, a more erect position of the leaves and early flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana. Collectively, these so-called shade-avoidance responses tend to reduce the degree of current or future shade by neighbors. Shade light signals increase the abundance of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4) and PIF5 proteins, promote the synthesis and redirection of auxin, favor the degradation of DELLA proteins and increase the expression of auxin, gibberellins and brassinosteroid-promoted genes, among other events downstream the photoreceptors. Selectively disrupting these events by genetic or pharmacological approaches affects shade-avoidance responses with an intensity that depends on the developmental context and the environment. Shade-avoidance responses provide a model to investigate the signaling networks used by plants to take advantage of the cues provided by the environment to adjust to the challenges imposed by the environment itself. PMID:22582029

  20. Open source drug discovery--a new paradigm of collaborative research in tuberculosis drug development.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Anshu; Scaria, Vinod; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh; Lynn, Andrew Michael; Chandra, Nagasuma; Banerjee, Sulagna; Raghunandanan, Muthukurussi V; Pandey, Vikas; Taneja, Bhupesh; Yadav, Jyoti; Dash, Debasis; Bhattacharya, Jaijit; Misra, Amit; Kumar, Anil; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Thomas, Zakir; Brahmachari, Samir K

    2011-09-01

    It is being realized that the traditional closed-door and market driven approaches for drug discovery may not be the best suited model for the diseases of the developing world such as tuberculosis and malaria, because most patients suffering from these diseases have poor paying capacity. To ensure that new drugs are created for patients suffering from these diseases, it is necessary to formulate an alternate paradigm of drug discovery process. The current model constrained by limitations for collaboration and for sharing of resources with confidentiality hampers the opportunities for bringing expertise from diverse fields. These limitations hinder the possibilities of lowering the cost of drug discovery. The Open Source Drug Discovery project initiated by Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, India has adopted an open source model to power wide participation across geographical borders. Open Source Drug Discovery emphasizes integrative science through collaboration, open-sharing, taking up multi-faceted approaches and accruing benefits from advances on different fronts of new drug discovery. Because the open source model is based on community participation, it has the potential to self-sustain continuous development by generating a storehouse of alternatives towards continued pursuit for new drug discovery. Since the inventions are community generated, the new chemical entities developed by Open Source Drug Discovery will be taken up for clinical trial in a non-exclusive manner by participation of multiple companies with majority funding from Open Source Drug Discovery. This will ensure availability of drugs through a lower cost community driven drug discovery process for diseases afflicting people with poor paying capacity. Hopefully what LINUX the World Wide Web have done for the information technology, Open Source Drug Discovery will do for drug discovery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Beyond the ITC White Paper: emerging sciences in drug transporters and opportunities for drug development.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yurong; Hsiao, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Over the recent years there has been a greater appreciation in the important roles drug transporters play in drug-drug interactions (DDI), safety and effectiveness of drugs. Notable consequence of this recognition includes the white paper published by the International Transporter Consortium (ITC) and the guidance documents drafted by regulatory agencies for investigating transporter-mediated DDIs during drug development. While DDIs as a result of transporter-mediated alterations in drug absorption, disposition, or excretion are typically undesirable, there are exceptions. When specific transporters selectively regulate the exposure of a drug at the site of action and/or toxicity, the use of these transporters as molecular targets has been proposed as a promising strategy for tissue-selective drug delivery to enhance efficacy or mitigate toxicity. Furthermore, membrane transporters play a pivotal role in the transport of nutrients and endogenous compounds into or out of cells to sustain cell survival. Genetic polymorphism of drug transporters as well as transporter-inhibiting drugs can alter the transporter functional activity and/or protein expression, causing transporter-specific diseases. Therefore, investigating drug-transporter interactions is a critical aspect in candidate drug selection, in order to enhance the pharmacological effects and/or prevent the unintended off-target toxicity. The goal of this review is to provide the drug discovery scientists with a cadre of concepts beyond the ITC White Paper that facilitate rational drug design for optimal safety and efficacy. To that end, this review focuses on the following aspects: 1) regulatory landscape on drug transporter-mediated DDIs, 2) transporter related organ toxicity, 3) utility of drug transporters for target organ delivery, and 4) to highlight the diseases known thus far that are associated with variants of transporter genes.

  2. Psychological inflexibility in childhood and adolescence: development and evaluation of the Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth.

    PubMed

    Greco, Laurie A; Lambert, Warren; Baer, Ruth A

    2008-06-01

    The authors describe the development and validation of the Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth (AFQ-Y), a child-report measure of psychological inflexibility engendered by high levels of cognitive fusion and experiential avoidance. Consistent with the theory underlying acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), items converged into a 17-item scale (AFQ-Y) and an 8-item short form (AFQ-Y8). A multimethod psychometric approach provides preliminary support for the reliability and validity of the AFQ-Y and AFQ-Y8. In 5 substudies, 3 samples (total N = 1369) were used to establish (a) item comprehension (n = 181), (b) initial item selection (n = 513), (c) final item reduction and development of a short form for research (n = 346), (d) comprehensive psychometric evaluation of the AFQ-Y and AFQ-Y8 (n = 329), and (e) convergent and construct validity for both versions of the AFQ-Y. Overall, results suggest that the AFQ-Y and AFQ-Y8 may be useful child-report measures of core ACT processes.

  3. Recent developments in silicones for topical and transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Aliyar, Hyder; Schalau, Gerald

    2015-07-01

    Silicones have been used in medicines, cosmetics and medical devices for over 60 years. Polydimethylsiloxanes are polymers that are typically used either as an active in oral drug products or as excipients in topical and transdermal drug products. Inherent characteristics like hydrophobicity, adhesion and aesthetics allow silicones to offer function and performance to drug products. Recent technologies like swollen crosslinked silicone elastomer blend networks, sugar siloxanes, amphiphilic resin linear polymers and silicone hybrid pressure sensitive adhesives promise potential performance advantages and improved drug delivery efficacy. This article presents a review of recent silicone material developments focusing on their function as excipients influencing drug delivery in topical and transdermal systems.

  4. Multiscale Modeling in the Clinic: Drug Design and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Clancy, Colleen E.; An, Gary; Cannon, William R.; Liu, Yaling; May, Elebeoba E.; Ortoleva, Peter; Popel, Aleksander S.; Sluka, James P.; Su, Jing; Vicini, Paolo; Zhou, Xiaobo; Eckmann, David M.

    2016-02-17

    A wide range of length and time scales are relevant to pharmacology, especially in drug development, drug design and drug delivery. Therefore, multi-scale computational modeling and simulation methods and paradigms that advance the linkage of phenomena occurring at these multiple scales have become increasingly important. Multi-scale approaches present in silico opportunities to advance laboratory research to bedside clinical applications in pharmaceuticals research. This is achievable through the capability of modeling to reveal phenomena occurring across multiple spatial and temporal scales, which are not otherwise readily accessible to experimentation. The resultant models, when validated, are capable of making testable predictions to guide drug design and delivery. In this review we describe the goals, methods, and opportunities of multi-scale modeling in drug design and development. We demonstrate the impact of multiple scales of modeling in this field. We indicate the common mathematical techniques employed for multi-scale modeling approaches used in pharmacology and present several examples illustrating the current state-of-the-art regarding drug development for: Excitable Systems (Heart); Cancer (Metastasis and Differentiation); Cancer (Angiogenesis and Drug Targeting); Metabolic Disorders; and Inflammation and Sepsis. We conclude with a focus on barriers to successful clinical translation of drug development, drug design and drug delivery multi-scale models.

  5. Optimizing drug development of anti-cancer drugs in children using modelling and simulation

    PubMed Central

    van Hasselt, Johan GC; van Eijkelenburg, Natasha KA; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan HM; Huitema, Alwin DR

    2013-01-01

    Modelling and simulation (M&S)-based approaches have been proposed to support paediatric drug development in order to design and analyze clinical studies efficiently. Development of anti-cancer drugs in the paediatric population is particularly challenging due to ethical and practical constraints. We aimed to review the application of M&S in the development of anti-cancer drugs in the paediatric population, and to identify where M&S-based approaches could provide additional support in paediatric drug development of anti-cancer drugs. A structured literature search on PubMed was performed. The majority of identified M&S-based studies aimed to use population PK modelling approaches to identify determinants of inter-individual variability, in order to optimize dosing regimens and to develop therapeutic drug monitoring strategies. Prospective applications of M&S approaches for PK-bridging studies have scarcely been reported for paediatric oncology. Based on recent developments of M&S in drug development there are several opportunities where M&S could support more informative bridging between children and adults, and increase efficiency of the design and analysis of paediatric clinical trials, which should ultimately lead to further optimization of drug treatment strategies in this population. PMID:23216601

  6. Communicating to Influence Drug Development and Regulatory Decisions: A Tutorial

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, S

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacometricians require three skills to be influential: technical, business (e.g., drug development), and soft skills (e.g., communication). Effective communication is required to translate technical and often complicated quantitative findings to interdisciplinary team members in order to influence drug development or regulatory decisions. In this tutorial, we highlight important aspects related to communicating pharmacometric analysis to influence decisions. PMID:27299706

  7. An active role for machine learning in drug development

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the complexity of biological systems, cutting-edge machine-learning methods will be critical for future drug development. In particular, machine-vision methods to extract detailed information from imaging assays and active-learning methods to guide experimentation will be required to overcome the dimensionality problem in drug development. PMID:21587249

  8. Model-based drug development: the road to quantitative pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liping; Sinha, Vikram; Forgue, S Thomas; Callies, Sophie; Ni, Lan; Peck, Richard; Allerheiligen, Sandra R B

    2006-06-01

    High development costs and low success rates in bringing new medicines to the market demand more efficient and effective approaches. Identified by the FDA as a valuable prognostic tool for fulfilling such a demand, model-based drug development is a mathematical and statistical approach that constructs, validates, and utilizes disease models, drug exposure-response models, and pharmacometric models to facilitate drug development. Quantitative pharmacology is a discipline that learns and confirms the key characteristics of new molecular entities in a quantitative manner, with goal of providing explicit, reproducible, and predictive evidence for optimizing drug development plans and enabling critical decision making. Model-based drug development serves as an integral part of quantitative pharmacology. This work reviews the general concept, basic elements, and evolving role of model-based drug development in quantitative pharmacology. Two case studies are presented to illustrate how the model-based drug development approach can facilitate knowledge management and decision making during drug development. The case studies also highlight the organizational learning that comes through implementation of quantitative pharmacology as a discipline. Finally, the prospects of quantitative pharmacology as an emerging discipline are discussed. Advances in this discipline will require continued collaboration between academia, industry and regulatory agencies.

  9. Rethinking the paradigm for the development of inhaled drugs.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, John N

    2015-12-30

    Nebulized treatment is an important delivery option for the young, elderly, and those with severe chronic respiratory disease, but there is a lack of new nebulized drug products being produced for these patients, leading to the potential for under-treatment. This communication describes a new drug development paradigm as a timely solution to this issue. Often, drug development is initiated with nebulizers in the early stages, to provide cheaper and faster drug development, and then switched to inhaler devices in later clinical trials to address the majority of patients. However, the waste of resource on parallel development of the inhaler can be large due to the high early attrition rate of new drug development. The new paradigm uses the nebulizer to continue drug development through to market, and initiates inhaler development after completion of the riskier early phase studies. New drug safety and efficacy can be assessed faster and more efficiently by using a nebulized formulation rather than developing an inhaler. The results of calculations of expected net present value showed that the new paradigm produced higher expected net present values than the conventional model over a range of economic scenarios. This new paradigm could therefore provide improved returns on investments, as well as more modern drugs in nebulized form for those patients unable to use inhalers.

  10. Phenotypic Screening Approaches to Develop Aurora Kinase Inhibitors: Drug Discovery Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Marugán, Carlos; Torres, Raquel; Lallena, María José

    2016-01-01

    Targeting mitotic regulators as a strategy to fight cancer implies the development of drugs against key proteins, such as Aurora-A and -B. Current drugs, which target mitosis through a general mechanism of action (stabilization/destabilization of microtubules), have several side effects (neutropenia, alopecia, and emesis). Pharmaceutical companies aim at avoiding these unwanted effects by generating improved and selective drugs that increase the quality of life of the patients. However, the development of these drugs is an ambitious task that involves testing thousands of compounds through biochemical and cell-based assays. In addition, molecules usually target complex biological processes, involving several proteins and different molecular pathways, further emphasizing the need for high-throughput screening techniques and multiplexing technologies in order to identify drugs with the desired phenotype. We will briefly describe two multiplexing technologies [high-content imaging (HCI) and flow cytometry] and two key processes for drug discovery research (assay development and validation) following our own published industry quality standards. We will further focus on HCI as a useful tool for phenotypic screening and will provide a concrete example of HCI assay to detect Aurora-A or -B selective inhibitors discriminating the off-target effects related to the inhibition of other cell cycle or non-cell cycle key regulators. Finally, we will describe other assays that can help to characterize the in vitro pharmacology of the inhibitors. PMID:26779442

  11. Mechanisms of drug toxicity and relevance to pharmaceutical development.

    PubMed

    Guengerich, F Peter

    2011-01-01

    Toxicity has been estimated to be responsible for the attrition of approximately one-third of drug candidates and is a major contributor to the high cost of drug development, particularly when not recognized until late in clinical trials or post-marketing. The causes of drug toxicity can be classified in several ways and include mechanism-based (on-target) toxicity, immune hypersensitivity, off-target toxicity, and bioactivation/covalent modification. In addition, idiosyncratic responses are rare but can be one of the most problematic issues; several hypotheses for these have been advanced. Although covalent binding of drugs to proteins was described almost 40 years ago, the significance to toxicity has been difficult to establish; recent literature in this field is considered. The development of more useful biomarkers and short-term assays for rapid screening of drug toxicity early in the drug discovery/development process is a major goal, and some progress has been made using "omics" approaches.

  12. Ex Vivo Metrics, a preclinical tool in new drug development.

    PubMed

    Curtis, C Gerald; Bilyard, Kevin; Stephenson, Hugo

    2008-01-23

    Among the challenges facing translational medicine today is the need for greater productivity and safety during the drug development process. To meet this need, practitioners of translational medicine are developing new technologies that can facilitate decision making during the early stages of drug discovery and clinical development. Ex Vivo Metrics is an emerging technology that addresses this need by using intact human organs ethically donated for research. After hypothermic storage, the organs are reanimated by blood perfusion, providing physiologically and biochemically stable preparations. In terms of emulating human exposure to drugs, Ex Vivo Metrics is the closest biological system available for clinical trials. Early application of this tool for evaluating drug targeting, efficacy, and toxicity could result in better selection among promising drug candidates, greater drug productivity, and increased safety.

  13. Delays in clinical development of neurological drugs in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Masayuki

    2017-06-28

    The delays in the approval and development of neurological drugs between Japan and other countries have been a major issue for patients with neurological diseases. The objective of this study was to analyze factors contributing to the delay in the launching of neurological drugs in Japan. We analyzed data from Japan and the US for the approval of 42 neurological drugs, all of which were approved earlier in the US than in Japan, and examined the potential factors that may cause the delay of their launch. Introductions of the 42 drugs in Japan occurred at a median of 87 months after introductions in the US. The mean review time of new drug applications for the 20 drugs introduced in Japan in January 2011 or later (15 months) was significantly shorter than that for the other 22 drugs introduced in Japan in December 2010 or earlier (24 months). The lag in the Japan's review time behind the US could not explain the approval delays. In the 31 of the 42 drugs, the application data package included overseas data. The mean review time of these 31 drugs (17 months) was significantly shorter than that of the other 11 drugs without overseas data (26 months). The mean approval lag behind the US of the 31 drugs (78 months) was also significantly shorter than that of the other 11 drugs (134 months). These results show that several important reforms in the Japanese drug development and approval system (e.g., inclusion of global clinical trial data) have reduced the delays in the clinical development of neurological drugs.

  14. Development of a closed drug preparation method for oral anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Wakui, Nobuyuki; Ookubo, Tetuo; Iwasaki, Yusuke; Ito, Rie; Saito, Koichi; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this article is to reduce the preparation time for oral anticancer drugs, reduce the exposure to drug preparations, and develop drug preparation equipment without external drug leaks in a closed state. In the newly developed closed oral drug preparation device, a 10 mL disposable syringe that was replaced with one projection for crushing tablets and a no-processing 30 mL disposable syringe were connected to a three-way stopcock. Using this instrument, Endoxan(®) tablets (principal components: cyclophosphamide) were crushed and suspended in water in a closed state. The drug was prepared to suspension and flowed out via a feeding tube by switching the handle of the three-way stopcock. To assess human exposure to cyclophosphamide, a high-performance volatile organic compound-solvent desorption passive sampler was attached to the preparer's mouth to collect air drifting in the vicinity, and cyclophosphamide levels were subsequently measured by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Using the developed drug preparation equipment, Endoxan(®) tablets were suspended in a closed state. According to liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry analysis, the exposure of the preparer to cyclophosphamide was greatly reduced when using the developed device; cyclophosphamide was detected in only two of the five samples, though only at trace levels. The closed oral drug preparation device may permit the preparation and administration of toxic drugs to patients while greatly reducing the risk of occupational exposure among health-care workers and caregivers.

  15. FDA critical path initiatives: opportunities for generic drug development.

    PubMed

    Lionberger, Robert A

    2008-01-01

    FDA's critical path initiative documents have focused on the challenges involved in the development of new drugs. Some of the focus areas identified apply equally to the production of generic drugs. However, there are scientific challenges unique to the development of generic drugs as well. In May 2007, FDA released a document "Critical Path Opportunities for Generic Drugs" that identified some of the specific challenges in the development of generic drugs. The key steps in generic product development are usually characterization of the reference product, design of a pharmaceutically equivalent and bioequivalent product, design of a consistent manufacturing process and conduct of the pivotal bioequivalence study. There are several areas of opportunity where scientific progress could accelerate the development and approval of generic products and expand the range of products for which generic versions are available, while maintaining high standards for quality, safety, and efficacy. These areas include the use of quality by design to develop bioequivalent products, more efficient bioequivalence methods for systemically acting drugs (expansion of BCS waivers, highly variable drugs), and development of new bioequivalence methods for locally acting drugs.

  16. Recent advances in the design and development of soft drugs.

    PubMed

    Buchwald, P; Bodor, N

    2014-06-01

    This paper summarizes recent developments in the field of soft drug development as collected and reviewed for the 9th Retrometabolism-Based Drug Design and Targeting Conference. Soft drugs are still often confused with prodrugs because they both require metabolic transformations; however, they are conceptual opposites: whereas, prodrugs are pharmacologically inactive and are converted by a predictable mechanism to the active drug, soft drugs are active therapeutic agents as such and are designed to undergo a predictable and controllable metabolic deactivation after exerting their desired therapeutic effect. Several rationally designed soft drug examples including clinically approved ones (e.g., clevidipine, esmolol, landiolol, loteprednol etabonate, and remifentanil) as well as others that have reached clinical investigations within different therapeutic areas (e.g., budiodarone, naronapride, remimazolam, tecarfarine) are briefly summarized. Anesthesiology, which requires a high degree of pharmacologic control during the surgical procedure to maintain the anesthetic state together with a quick return to responsiveness at the end of this procedure, is a particularly well-suited area for soft drug development. Several new initiatives (e.g., MOC-etomidate, AZD3043) are focused in this area; they are also briefly reviewed. Finally, just as there are many 'accidental' prodrugs, there are 'accidental' soft drugs too: i.e., therapeutics that were not intentionally designed to be soft drugs, but turned out to be essentially soft drugs. Some examples, such as articaine or methylphenidate, are briefly reviewed.

  17. A comprehensive study on regulatory requirements for development and filing of generic drugs globally

    PubMed Central

    Handoo, Shweta; Arora, Vandana; Khera, Deepak; Nandi, Prafulla Kumar; Sahu, Susanta Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The regulatory requirements of various countries of the world vary from each other. Therefore, it is challenging for the companies to develop a single drug which can be simultaneously submitted in all the countries for approval. The regulatory strategy for product development is essentially to be established before commencement of developmental work in order to avoid major surprises after submission of the application. The role of the regulatory authorities is to ensure the quality, safety, and efficacy of all medicines in circulation in their country. It not only includes the process of regulating and monitoring the drugs but also the process of manufacturing, distribution, and promotion of it. One of the primary challenges for regulatory authority is to ensure that the pharmaceutical products are developed as per the regulatory requirement of that country. This process involves the assessment of critical parameters during product development. PMID:23373001

  18. A comprehensive study on regulatory requirements for development and filing of generic drugs globally.

    PubMed

    Handoo, Shweta; Arora, Vandana; Khera, Deepak; Nandi, Prafulla Kumar; Sahu, Susanta Kumar

    2012-07-01

    The regulatory requirements of various countries of the world vary from each other. Therefore, it is challenging for the companies to develop a single drug which can be simultaneously submitted in all the countries for approval. The regulatory strategy for product development is essentially to be established before commencement of developmental work in order to avoid major surprises after submission of the application. The role of the regulatory authorities is to ensure the quality, safety, and efficacy of all medicines in circulation in their country. It not only includes the process of regulating and monitoring the drugs but also the process of manufacturing, distribution, and promotion of it. One of the primary challenges for regulatory authority is to ensure that the pharmaceutical products are developed as per the regulatory requirement of that country. This process involves the assessment of critical parameters during product development.

  19. Current status of orphan disease drug development.

    PubMed

    Thoene, J G

    1994-04-01

    The Orphan Drug Act has successfully stimulated the production of many orphan products for a number of orphan diseases. The success of its exclusive marketing provision in bringing otherwise unprofitable products to market has attracted the attention of manufacturers who use this provision to gain a monopoly for products with much larger annual sales than were contemplated by the original legislation. Corrective legislation to close this loophole is being prepared for introduction to Congress.

  20. Drug Development Against Viral Diseases (Biological Testing)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    any. sip of infection or disese (11. Also, laboratory work with CCHF has beeni limited because accidental infections which have had serious or even fata...were unldrgoir. i,,¢rois. No leb’ons were found in submaxillary or sublingual salivary gland, kidney , heart, eye, lacrimal gland, thyroid, trachea, or...examined including kidney , lung, liver and brain. e. Active chemotherapeutic agents in the vaccinia tail lesion model. Most drugs tested in thit model gave

  1. Nano-formulations of drugs: Recent developments, impact and challenges.

    PubMed

    Jeevanandam, Jaison; Chan, Yen San; Danquah, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Nano-formulations of medicinal drugs have attracted the interest of many researchers for drug delivery applications. These nano-formulations enhance the properties of conventional drugs and are specific to the targeted delivery site. Dendrimers, polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes, nano-emulsions and micelles are some of the nano-formulations that are gaining prominence in pharmaceutical industry for enhanced drug formulation. Wide varieties of synthesis methods are available for the preparation of nano-formulations to deliver drugs in biological system. The choice of synthesis methods depend on the size and shape of particulate formulation, biochemical properties of drug, and the targeted site. This article discusses recent developments in nano-formulation and the progressive impact on pharmaceutical research and industries. Additionally, process challenges relating to consistent generation of nano-formulations for drug delivery are discussed.

  2. Avoiding transport bottlenecks in an expanding root system: xylem vessel development in fibrous and pioneer roots under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Bagniewska-Zadworna, Agnieszka; Byczyk, Julia; Eissenstat, David M; Oleksyn, Jacek; Zadworny, Marcin

    2012-09-01

    Root systems develop to effectively absorb water and nutrients and to rapidly transport these materials to the transpiring shoot. In woody plants, roots can be born with different functions: fibrous roots are primarily used for water and nutrient absorption, whereas pioneer roots have a greater role in transport. Because pioneer roots extend rapidly in the soil and typically quickly produce fibrous roots, they need to develop transport capacity rapidly so as to avoid becoming a bottleneck to the absorbed water of the developing fibrous roots and, as we hypothesized, immediately activate a specific type of autophagy at a precise time of their development. Using microscopy techniques, we monitored xylem development in Populus trichocarpa roots in the first 7 d after emergence under field conditions. Newly formed pioneer roots contained more primary xylem poles and had larger diameter tracheary elements than fibrous roots. While xylogenesis started later in pioneer roots than in fibrous, it was completed at the same time, resulting in functional vessels on the third to fourth day following root emergence. Programmed cell death was responsible for creating the water conducting capacity of xylem. Although the early xylogenesis processes were similar in fibrous and pioneer roots, secondary vascular development proceeded much more rapidly in pioneer roots. Compared to fibrous roots, rapid development of transport capacity in pioneer roots is not primarily caused by accelerated xylogenesis but by larger and more numerous tracheary elements and by rapid initiation of secondary growth.

  3. Drug discovery and development with plant-derived compounds.

    PubMed

    Potterat, Olivier; Hamburger, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    An overview is given on current efforts in drug development based on plant-derived natural products. Emphasis is on projects which have advanced to clinical development. Therapeutic areas covered include cancer, viral infections including HIV, malaria, inflammatory diseases, nociception and vaccine adjuvants, metabolic disorders, and neurodegenerative diseases. Aspects which are specific to plant-based drug discovery and development are also addressed, such as supply issues in the commercial development, and the Convention on Biological Diversity.

  4. Multiscale Modeling in the Clinic: Drug Design and Development.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Colleen E; An, Gary; Cannon, William R; Liu, Yaling; May, Elebeoba E; Ortoleva, Peter; Popel, Aleksander S; Sluka, James P; Su, Jing; Vicini, Paolo; Zhou, Xiaobo; Eckmann, David M

    2016-09-01

    A wide range of length and time scales are relevant to pharmacology, especially in drug development, drug design and drug delivery. Therefore, multiscale computational modeling and simulation methods and paradigms that advance the linkage of phenomena occurring at these multiple scales have become increasingly important. Multiscale approaches present in silico opportunities to advance laboratory research to bedside clinical applications in pharmaceuticals research. This is achievable through the capability of modeling to reveal phenomena occurring across multiple spatial and temporal scales, which are not otherwise readily accessible to experimentation. The resultant models, when validated, are capable of making testable predictions to guide drug design and delivery. In this review we describe the goals, methods, and opportunities of multiscale modeling in drug design and development. We demonstrate the impact of multiple scales of modeling in this field. We indicate the common mathematical and computational techniques employed for multiscale modeling approaches used in pharmacometric and systems pharmacology models in drug development and present several examples illustrating the current state-of-the-art models for (1) excitable systems and applications in cardiac disease; (2) stem cell driven complex biosystems; (3) nanoparticle delivery, with applications to angiogenesis and cancer therapy; (4) host-pathogen interactions and their use in metabolic disorders, inflammation and sepsis; and (5) computer-aided design of nanomedical systems. We conclude with a focus on barriers to successful clinical translation of drug development, drug design and drug delivery multiscale models.

  5. Multiscale Modeling in the Clinic: Drug Design and Development

    PubMed Central

    An, Gary; Cannon, William R; Liu, Yaling; May, Elebeoba E.; Ortoleva, Peter; Popel, Aleksander S.; Sluka, James P.; Su, Jing; Vicini, Paolo; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of length and time scales are relevant to pharmacology, especially in drug development, drug design and drug delivery. Therefore, multiscale computational modeling and simulation methods and paradigms that advance the linkage of phenomena occurring at these multiple scales have become increasingly important. Multiscale approaches present in silico opportunities to advance laboratory research to bedside clinical applications in pharmaceuticals research. This is achievable through the capability of modeling to reveal phenomena occurring across multiple spatial and temporal scales, which are not otherwise readily accessible to experimentation. The resultant models, when validated, are capable of making testable predictions to guide drug design and delivery. In this review we describe the goals, methods, and opportunities of multiscale modeling in drug design and development. We demonstrate the impact of multiple scales of modeling in this field. We indicate the common mathematical and computational techniques employed for multiscale modeling approaches used in pharmacometric and systems pharmacology models in drug development and present several examples illustrating the current state-of-the-art models for (i) excitable systems and applications in cardiac disease; (ii) stem cell driven complex biosystems; (iii) nanoparticle delivery, with applications to angiogenesis and cancer therapy; (iv) host-pathogen interactions and their use in metabolic disorders, inflammation and sepsis; and (v) computer-aided design of nanomedical systems. We conclude with a focus on barriers to successful clinical translation of drug development, drug design and drug delivery multiscale models. PMID:26885640

  6. Integration of Regulatory Guidelines into Protein Drug Product Development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The drug product development process for proteins went through its infancy in the early eighties of last century and is in its maturity today. This has been driven largely by the rapid growth of the biotechnology industry, which led to the development and issuance of many regulatory guidelines/directories, especially those through the International Conference of Harmonization (ICH). These guidelines have certainly guided different aspects of a drug product development process. On the other hand, they were issued separately on different topics and in different time periods. An integration of all relevant guidelines into the corresponding areas in drug product development would greatly facilitate the development process. The purpose of this short review is to integrate the relevant (mainly ICH) regulatory guidelines into protein drug product development and to discuss remaining issues, which may lead to further revision of existing guidelines or development of new ones. Drug product development scientists need to collect adequate and relevant development data for a successful product registration. The key is the ability to justify the final drug product in terms of choice of the drug product formulation, container closure system, and manufacturing process. The drug product development process for proteins has matured today, largely due to the rapid growth of the biotechnology industry. In this process, many regulatory guidelines/directories were developed and issued, especially through the International Conference of Harmonization (ICH). However, they were issued separately on different topics and in different time periods. An integration of all relevant guidelines into the corresponding areas in drug product development would greatly facilitate the development process. The purpose of this short review is to integrate the relevant (mainly ICH) regulatory guidelines into protein drug product development and to discuss remaining issues, which may lead to further

  7. Qualification of biomarkers for drug development in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Burckart, Gilbert J; Amur, Shashi; Goodsaid, Federico M; Lesko, Lawrence J; Frueh, Felix W; Huang, Shiew-Mei; Cavaille-Coll, Marc W

    2008-02-01

    The drug development process is dependent upon having established end points for measuring drug efficacy and adverse effects. New drug development in organ transplantation suffers from having end points which are either outdated or which do not serve the purpose of addressing the current critical drug therapy problems. Numerous biomarkers have been examined in organ transplantation, but almost all would be classified as exploratory for drug development purposes. Some of the possible pathways out of this dilemma include investigator- or consortium-initiated research that would qualify the biomarkers as either probable or known valid biomarkers, help in identification of new end points in transplantation and their associated biomarkers, co-development of a new biomarker and drug for transplantation and the use of new clinical trial design methods which facilitate enriched or stratified transplant patient populations. With new biomarkers and new study design methodologies for drug development, improvement in the drug development process for transplantation is a real possibility that the transplant clinical and research community can help to bring about.

  8. Defining "innovativeness" in drug development: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kesselheim, A S; Wang, B; Avorn, J

    2013-09-01

    Some observers of drug development argue that the pace of pharmaceutical innovation is declining, but others deny that contention. This controversy may be due to different methods of defining and assessing innovation. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to develop a taxonomy of methods for measuring innovation in drug development. The 42 studies fell into four main categories: counts of new drugs approved, assessments of therapeutic value, economic outcomes, and patents issued. The definition determined whether a study found a positive or negative trend in innovative drug development. Of 21 studies that relied on counts, 9 (43%) concluded that the trend for drug discovery was favorable, 11 (52%) concluded that the trend was not favorable, and 1 reached no conclusion. By contrast, of 21 studies that used other measures of innovation, 0 concluded that the trend was favorable, 8 (47%) concluded that the trend was not favorable, and 13 reached no conclusion (P = 0.03).

  9. Pharmacogenomics in clinical drug development and potential for alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Warner, Amelia W

    2013-12-01

    Alopecia areata, alopecia totalis, and alopecia universalis likely represent a constellation of related diseases with similar, yet distinct heritability markers. There is currently no known curative therapy that works universally for all patients. Pharmacogenomic research enables the pharmaceutical industry to understand variability of patient responses to drugs during clinical drug development and during post-marketing surveillance. Understanding the genetic basis for patient response/non-response can enable the development of individualized therapies for those patients with an inherited basis for altered response to drug therapy. There are multiple examples of drugs that now contain a recommendation for genetic testing before dosing in their drug labels, directing clinicians to obtain genetic information for each individual patient in order to help direct drug therapy.

  10. Single cell analytic tools for drug discovery and development

    PubMed Central

    Heath, James R.; Ribas, Antoni; Mischel, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    The genetic, functional, or compositional heterogeneity of healthy and diseased tissues presents major challenges in drug discovery and development.1-3 In cancers, heterogeneity may be essential for tumor stability,4 but its precise role in tumor biology is poorly resolved. This challenges the design of accurate disease models for use in drug development, and can confound the interpretation of biomarker levels, and of patient responses to specific therapies. The complex nature of heterogeneous tissues has motivated the development of tools for single cell genomic, transcriptomic, and multiplex proteomic analysis. We review these tools, assess their advantages and limitations, and explore their potential applications in drug discovery and development. PMID:26669673

  11. Influence of intracerebroventricular administration of histaminergic drugs on morphine state-dependent memory in the step-down passive avoidance test.

    PubMed

    Zarrindast, Mohammad R; Khalilzadeh, Azita; Rezayat, S Mehdi; Sahebgharani, Mousa; Djahanguiri, Bijan

    2005-05-01

    The effects of histaminergic drugs on morphine state-dependent memory of a passive avoidance task were examined in mice. Pre-training administration of morphine (5 mg/kg) led to state-dependent learning with impaired memory recall on the test day which was reversed by pre-test administration of the same dose of the opioid. The pre-test intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of the H(1) blocker (pyrilamine) prevented the restoration of memory by morphine. The H(2) blocker (ranitidine) was ineffective in this regard and the H(3) blocker (clobenpropit) potentiated the effect of morphine on memory recall. The pre-test i.c.v. administration of histamine alone (5, 10, and 20 microg/mouse) not only mimicked the effect of pre-test morphine treatment, but also increased this action of the opioid. The effect of histamine on memory recall was not changed by the pre-test administration of mu-opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone. In conclusion, the improvement of memory recall by morphine treatment, on the test day, seems to be, at least in part, through the release of histamine followed by the stimulation of H(1) receptors. Histamine by itself, when administered on the test day, mimicked morphine-induced memory improvement by a mechanism independent of the mu-opioid receptors.

  12. The Metabolism of Anticancer Drugs by the Liver: Current Approaches to the Drug Development Process.

    PubMed

    Belka, Mariusz; Bączek, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide scientific community is in agreement that the activities of metabolic enzymes greatly impact the efficacies of anticancer drugs. Elucidation of the influences of these drugs on metabolism, especially that occurring in the liver, appears to be an extremely important step in the development of new anticancer drugs. Considering the continuous need to search for safe and effective chemotherapeutics, studies of the metabolism of new potent drugs are very important and should be included in the modern, innovative drug development pipeline. This article summarizes most of the current metabolic case studies involving anticancer drug development. Firstly, the impacts of diverse metabolic enzymes, particularly cytochrome P450, and the utilities of a few model in vitro enzymatic systems are described. Then, different analytical techniques, with particular emphasis on liquid chromatography- mass spectrometry detection and structural elucidation, are discussed. Finally, some computer-aided strategies for decision making in the drug design process are described. Recent advances in drug development, including microdosing, in vitro-in vivo correlation and pharmacologic audit trail, are also discussed in relation to metabolic studies.

  13. Exploring the ocean for new drug developments: Marine pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Malve, Harshad

    2016-01-01

    Disease ailments are changing the patterns, and the new diseases are emerging due to changing environments. The enormous growth of world population has overburdened the existing resources for the drugs. And hence, the drug manufacturers are always on the lookout for new resources to develop effective and safe drugs for the increasing demands of the world population. Seventy-five percentage of earth's surface is covered by water but research into the pharmacology of marine organisms is limited, and most of it still remains unexplored. Marine environment represents countless and diverse resource for new drugs to combat major diseases such as cancer or malaria. It also offers an ecological resource comprising a variety of aquatic plants and animals. These aquatic organisms are screened for antibacterial, immunomodulator, anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antimicrobial, neuroprotective, analgesic, and antimalarial properties. They are used for new drug developments extensively across the world. Marine pharmacology offers the scope for research on these drugs of marine origin. Few institutes in India offer such opportunities which can help us in the quest for new drugs. This is an extensive review of the drugs developed and the potential new drug candidates from marine origin along with the opportunities for research on marine derived products. It also gives the information about the institutes in India which offer marine pharmacology related courses. PMID:27134458

  14. Exploring the ocean for new drug developments: Marine pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Malve, Harshad

    2016-01-01

    Disease ailments are changing the patterns, and the new diseases are emerging due to changing environments. The enormous growth of world population has overburdened the existing resources for the drugs. And hence, the drug manufacturers are always on the lookout for new resources to develop effective and safe drugs for the increasing demands of the world population. Seventy-five percentage of earth's surface is covered by water but research into the pharmacology of marine organisms is limited, and most of it still remains unexplored. Marine environment represents countless and diverse resource for new drugs to combat major diseases such as cancer or malaria. It also offers an ecological resource comprising a variety of aquatic plants and animals. These aquatic organisms are screened for antibacterial, immunomodulator, anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antimicrobial, neuroprotective, analgesic, and antimalarial properties. They are used for new drug developments extensively across the world. Marine pharmacology offers the scope for research on these drugs of marine origin. Few institutes in India offer such opportunities which can help us in the quest for new drugs. This is an extensive review of the drugs developed and the potential new drug candidates from marine origin along with the opportunities for research on marine derived products. It also gives the information about the institutes in India which offer marine pharmacology related courses.

  15. Prediction of resistance development against drug combinations by collateral responses to component drugs

    PubMed Central

    Munck, Christian; Gumpert, Heidi K.; Nilsson Wallin, Annika I.; Wang, Harris H.; Sommer, Morten O. A.

    2015-01-01

    Resistance arises quickly during chemotherapeutic selection and is particularly problematic during long-term treatment regimens such as those for tuberculosis, HIV infections, or cancer. Although drug combination therapy reduces the evolution of drug resistance, drug pairs vary in their ability to do so. Thus, predictive models are needed to rationally design resistance-limiting therapeutic regimens. Using adaptive evolution, we studied the resistance response of the common pathogen Escherichia coli to 5 different single antibiotics and all 10 different antibiotic drug pairs. By analyzing the genomes of all evolved E. coli lineages, we identified the mutational events that drive the differences in drug resistance levels and found that the degree of resistance development against drug combinations can be understood in terms of collateral sensitivity and resistance that occurred during adaptation to the component drugs. Then, using engineered E. coli strains, we confirmed that drug resistance mutations that imposed collateral sensitivity were suppressed in a drug pair growth environment. These results provide a framework for rationally selecting drug combinations that limit resistance evolution. PMID:25391482

  16. Tumor Growth Model with PK Input for Neuroblastoma Drug Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0103 TITLE: Tumor Growth Model with PK Input for Neuroblastoma Drug Development PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Clinton...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0103 Tumor Growth Model with PK Input for Neuroblastoma Drug Development 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The long-term goal for our project is to develop a

  17. Big Data: transforming drug development and health policy decision making.

    PubMed

    Alemayehu, Demissie; Berger, Marc L

    The explosion of data sources, accompanied by the evolution of technology and analytical techniques, has created considerable challenges and opportunities for drug development and healthcare resource utilization. We present a systematic overview these phenomena, and suggest measures to be taken for effective integration of the new developments in the traditional medical research paradigm and health policy decision making. Special attention is paid to pertinent issues in emerging areas, including rare disease drug development, personalized medicine, Comparative Effectiveness Research, and privacy and confidentiality concerns.

  18. Clinical development of fenretinide as an antineoplastic drug: Pharmacology perspectives.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jason P; Reynolds, C Patrick; Cho, Hwangeui; Kang, Min H

    2017-06-01

    Fenretinide (4-HPR) is a synthetic retinoid that has cytotoxic activity against cancer cells. Despite substantial in vitro cytotoxicity, response rates in early clinical trials with 4-HPR have been less than anticipated, likely due to the low bioavailability of the initial oral capsule formulation. Several clinical studies have shown that the oral capsule formulation at maximum tolerated dose (MTD) achieved <10 µmol/L concentrations in patients. To improve bioavailability of 4-HPR, new oral powder (LYM-X-SORB®, LXS) and intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) formulations are being tested in early-phase clinical trials. ILE 4-HPR administered as five-day continuous infusion achieved over 50 µmol/L at MTD with minimal systemic toxicities; multiple complete and partial responses were observed in peripheral T cell lymphomas. The LXS oral powder 4-HPR formulation increased plasma levels approximately two-fold at MTD in children without dose-limiting toxicities and demonstrated multiple complete responses in recurrent neuroblastoma. The clinical activity observed with new 4-HPR formulations is attributed to increased bioavailability. Phase I and II clinical trials of both LXS 4-HPR and ILE 4-HPR are in progress as a single agent or in combination with other drugs. Impact statement One of the critical components in drug development is understanding pharmacology (especially pharmacokinetics) of the drugs being developed. Often the pharmacokinetic properties, such as poor solubility leading to poor bioavailability, of the drug can limit further development of the drug. The development of numerous drugs has often halted at clinical testing stages, and several of them were due to the pharmacological properties of the agents, resulting in increased drug development cost. The current review provides an example of how improved clinical activity can be achieved by changing the formulations of a drug with poor bioavailability. Thus, it emphasizes the importance of understanding

  19. How the Probability and Potential Clinical Significance of Pharmacokinetically Mediated Drug-Drug Interactions Are Assessed in Drug Development: Desvenlafaxine as an Example

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Alice I.; Preskorn, Sheldon H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The avoidance of adverse drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is a high priority in terms of both the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the individual prescriber. With this perspective in mind, this article illustrates the process for assessing the risk of a drug (example here being desvenlafaxine) causing or being the victim of DDIs, in accordance with FDA guidance. Data Sources/Study Selection: DDI studies for the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor desvenlafaxine conducted by the sponsor and published since 2009 are used as examples of the systematic way that the FDA requires drug developers to assess whether their new drug is either capable of causing clinically meaningful DDIs or being the victim of such DDIs. In total, 8 open-label studies tested the effects of steady-state treatment with desvenlafaxine (50–400 mg/d) on the pharmacokinetics of cytochrome (CYP) 2D6 and/or CYP 3A4 substrate drugs, or the effect of CYP 3A4 inhibition on desvenlafaxine pharmacokinetics. The potential for DDIs mediated by the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transporter was assessed in in vitro studies using Caco-2 monolayers. Data Extraction: Changes in area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC; CYP studies) and efflux (P-gp studies) were reviewed for potential DDIs in accordance with FDA criteria. Results: Desvenlafaxine coadministration had minimal effect on CYP 2D6 and/or 3A4 substrates per FDA criteria. Changes in AUC indicated either no interaction (90% confidence intervals for the ratio of AUC geometric least-squares means [GM] within 80%–125%) or weak inhibition (AUC GM ratio 125% to < 200%). Coadministration with ketoconazole resulted in a weak interaction with desvenlafaxine (AUC GM ratio of 143%). Desvenlafaxine was not a substrate (efflux ratio < 2) or inhibitor (50% inhibitory drug concentration values > 250 μM) of P-gp. Conclusions: A 2-step process based on FDA guidance can be used first to determine whether a pharmacokinetically mediated

  20. Novel drug development for neuromuscular blockade.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Amit; Kaye, Alan D; Wyche, Melville Q; Salinas, Orlando J; Mancuso, Kenneth; Urman, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological advances in anesthesia in recent decades have resulted in safer practice and better outcomes. These advances include improvement in anesthesia drugs with regard to efficacy and safety profiles. Although neuromuscular blockers were first introduced over a half century ago, few new neuromuscular blockers and reversal agents have come to market and even fewer have remained as common clinically employed medications. In recent years, newer agents have been studied and are presented in this review. With regard to nondepolarizer neuromuscular blocker agents, the enantiomers Gantacurium and CW002, which are olefinic isoquinolinium diester fumarates, have shown potential for clinical application. Advantages include ultra rapid reversal of neuromuscular blockade via cysteine adduction and minimal systemic hemodynamic effects with administration.

  1. New drug development in digestive neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Durán, I; Salazar, R; Casanovas, O; Arrazubi, V; Vilar, E; Siu, L L; Yao, J; Tabernero, J

    2007-08-01

    The traditional cytotoxic agents are of limited efficacy in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract (NETs). Recent investigations have brought up a number of biological features in this family of neoplasms that could represent targets for anticancer treatment. NETs seem to have an extraordinary tumor vascularization with high expression of proangiogenic molecules such as the vascular endothelial growth factor along with overexpression of certain tyrosine kinase receptors such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the insulin growth factor receptor (IGFR) and their downstream signaling pathway components (PI3K-AKT-mTOR). The rationale of an antiangiogenic approach in the treatment of NETs and the use of other pharmacological strategies such as EGFR, IGFR and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors are discussed. Additionally, the emerging results of recent clinical trials with these targeted drugs are presented.

  2. Tumor lymphangiogenesis and new drug development.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Lothar C; Detmar, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally, tumor-associated lymphatic vessels have been regarded as passive by-standers, serving simply as a drainage system for interstitial fluid generated within the tumor. However, with growing evidence that tumors actively induce lymphangiogenesis, and that the number of lymphatic vessels closely correlates with metastasis and clinical outcome in various types of cancer, this picture has changed dramatically in recent years. Tumor-associated lymphatic vessels have now emerged as a valid therapeutic target to control metastatic disease, and the first specific anti-lymphangiogenic drugs have recently entered clinical testing. Furthermore, we are just beginning to understand the whole functional spectrum of tumor-associated lymphatic vessels, which not only concerns transport of fluid and metastatic cells, but also includes the regulation of cancer stemness and specific inhibition of immune responses, opening new venues for therapeutic applications. Therefore, we predict that specific targeting of lymphatic vessels and their function will become an important tool for future cancer treatment.

  3. New science-based endpoints to accelerate oncology drug development.

    PubMed

    Kelloff, Gary J; Sigman, Caroline C

    2005-03-01

    Although several new oncology drugs have reached the market, more than 80% of drugs for all indications entering clinical development do not get marketing approval, with many failing late in development often in Phase III trials, because of unexpected safety issues or difficulty determining efficacy, including confounded outcomes. These factors contribute to the high costs of oncology drug development and clearly show the need for faster, more cost-effective strategies for evaluating oncology drugs and better definition of patients who will benefit from treatment. Remarkable advances in the understanding of neoplastic progression at the cellular and molecular levels have spurred the discovery of molecularly targeted drugs. This progress along with advances in imaging and bioassay technologies are the basis for describing and evaluating new biomarker endpoints as well as for defining other biomarkers for identifying patient populations, potential toxicity, and providing evidence of drug effect and efficacy. Definitions and classifications of these biomarkers for use in oncology drug development are presented in this paper. Science-based and practical criteria for validating biomarkers have been developed including considerations of mechanistic plausibility, available methods and technology, and clinical feasibility. New promising tools for measuring biomarkers have also been developed and are based on genomics and proteomics, direct visualisation by microscopy (e.g., confocal microscopy and computer-assisted image analysis of cellular features), nanotechnologies, and direct and remote imaging (e.g., fluorescence endoscopy and anatomical, functional and molecular imaging techniques). The identification and evaluation of potential surrogate endpoints and other biomarkers require access to and analysis of large amounts of data, new technologies and extensive research resources. Further, there is a requirement for a convergence of research, regulatory and drug developer

  4. Promoting Antibacterial Drug Development: Select Policies and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Sertkaya, Aylin; Jessup, Amber; Wong, Hui-Hsing

    2017-02-01

    The development pipeline for antibacterial drugs has not met the demand of hospitals and healthcare providers struggling to cope with increasing problems of antibacterial resistance. Although the challenges associated with antibacterial drug development have been known for some time, previous efforts to address them have not been sufficient. There remains an urgent need for targeted incentives to foster antibacterial drug development while encouraging prudent use. We examine the effects of two types of incentives, a 5-year delay in competition from generics and a lump-sum US$50 million prize payment upon successful US Food and Drug Administration approval, on antibacterial drug company returns. We use the decision-tree framework developed in a study for the US Department of Health and Human Services, which models the drug company's decision process as a revenue maximizer under uncertainty. Our results show that, to maximize societal benefit, such incentives need to take into consideration the indication(s) the new antibacterial drug is designed to treat as well as the drug development stage. Optimal policies should maximize the difference between societal benefit, primarily measured as the reduction in public health burden from the development of a new antibacterial drug that treats an infectious disease while ensuring prudent use, and social cost. Here, we show that the two types of policies examined under-incentivize early-stage developers (i.e., do not achieve the desired outcome) and over-incentivize late-stage developers (i.e., achieve the desired outcome but at a cost that is higher than needed) ceteris paribus.

  5. Pros and cons for the development of new antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Bialer, Meir; Walker, Matthew C; Sander, Josemir W

    2002-01-01

    There continues to be an escalation in the number of new antiepileptic drugs, with many recently marketed drugs and many more entering clinical trials. This growth begs the question as to whether we need additional antiepileptic drugs. We consider the answer to this question from the medical perspective and also from the viewpoint of the pharmaceutical industry, health providers and from a more global, international perspective. There is undoubtedly a medical need for new antiepileptic drugs, and despite growing competition, the antiepileptic drug market remains profitable. However, in health services with limited resources, it is important that this expense is not offset by failure to research more appropriate use of existing antiepileptic drugs that may have a greater impact on healthcare. This is especially true for developing countries where resources would be much better spent on prevention and closing the treatment gap (the difference between those who can be treated and those who are treated).

  6. Phase 0 clinical trials in oncology new drug development

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Umesh Chandra; Bhatia, Sandeep; Garg, Amit; Sharma, Amit; Choudhary, Vaibhav

    2011-01-01

    Research focus of pharmaceutical industry has expanded to a larger extent in last few decades putting many more new molecules, particularly targeted agents, for the clinical development. On the other hand, researchers are facing serious challenges due to high failure rates of new molecules in clinical studies. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in combination with academia and industry experts identified many factors responsible for failures of new molecules, and with a vision of taking traditional drug development model toward an innovative paradigm shift, issued regulatory guidance on conduct of exploratory investigational new drug (exploratory IND) studies, often called as phase 0 clinical trials, requiring reduced preclinical testing, which has special relevance to life-threatening diseases such as cancer. Phase 0 trials, utilizing much lower drug doses, provide an opportunity to explore the clinical behavior of new molecules very early in the drug development pathway, helping to identify the promising candidates and eliminating non-promising molecules, thus improving the efficiency of overall drug development with significant savings of resources. Being non-therapeutic in nature, these studies, however, pose certain ethical challenges requiring careful study designing and informed consent process. This article reviews the insights and perspectives for the feasibility, utility, planning, designing and conduct of phase 0 clinical trials, in addition to ethical issues and industrial perspective focused at oncology new drug development. PMID:21584177

  7. Phase 0 clinical trials in oncology new drug development.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Umesh Chandra; Bhatia, Sandeep; Garg, Amit; Sharma, Amit; Choudhary, Vaibhav

    2011-01-01

    Research focus of pharmaceutical industry has expanded to a larger extent in last few decades putting many more new molecules, particularly targeted agents, for the clinical development. On the other hand, researchers are facing serious challenges due to high failure rates of new molecules in clinical studies. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in combination with academia and industry experts identified many factors responsible for failures of new molecules, and with a vision of taking traditional drug development model toward an innovative paradigm shift, issued regulatory guidance on conduct of exploratory investigational new drug (exploratory IND) studies, often called as phase 0 clinical trials, requiring reduced preclinical testing, which has special relevance to life-threatening diseases such as cancer. Phase 0 trials, utilizing much lower drug doses, provide an opportunity to explore the clinical behavior of new molecules very early in the drug development pathway, helping to identify the promising candidates and eliminating non-promising molecules, thus improving the efficiency of overall drug development with significant savings of resources. Being non-therapeutic in nature, these studies, however, pose certain ethical challenges requiring careful study designing and informed consent process. This article reviews the insights and perspectives for the feasibility, utility, planning, designing and conduct of phase 0 clinical trials, in addition to ethical issues and industrial perspective focused at oncology new drug development.

  8. Orphan drug development in China – Turning challenges into opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiaowei; Chen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Summary Of over 7,000 known rare diseases, only 5% currently have an available treatment option worldwide. Moreover, the vast majority of rare disease patients in China have no access to treatment due to limited availability and the lack of appropriate infrastructure in China's healthcare system. Despite increased interest in orphan drug development, drug companies in China with active programs on drugs to treat rare diseases are still limited. Hence, there is a huge unmet need in China, with over 10 million patients suffering from rare diseases. Nonetheless, this has created unprecedented opportunities for the Chinese drug development market. Life science innovation in China has recently received a healthy boost from the 13th National Five-Year Plan and from on-going reform of the China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA). Rare diseases are now recognized as a national priority with increasing governmental support, creating tremendous opportunities for both domestic and multinational drug companies. China is anticipated to play an increasingly important role in the global fight against rare diseases. To ensure future success, Chinese drug companies should leverage the valuable knowledge assembled over the past three decades by Western countries in the area of orphan drug development. PMID:27904831

  9. Orphan drug development in China - Turning challenges into opportunities.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaowei; Chen, Li

    2016-11-01

    Of over 7,000 known rare diseases, only 5% currently have an available treatment option worldwide. Moreover, the vast majority of rare disease patients in China have no access to treatment due to limited availability and the lack of appropriate infrastructure in China's healthcare system. Despite increased interest in orphan drug development, drug companies in China with active programs on drugs to treat rare diseases are still limited. Hence, there is a huge unmet need in China, with over 10 million patients suffering from rare diseases. Nonetheless, this has created unprecedented opportunities for the Chinese drug development market. Life science innovation in China has recently received a healthy boost from the 13th National Five-Year Plan and from on-going reform of the China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA). Rare diseases are now recognized as a national priority with increasing governmental support, creating tremendous opportunities for both domestic and multinational drug companies. China is anticipated to play an increasingly important role in the global fight against rare diseases. To ensure future success, Chinese drug companies should leverage the valuable knowledge assembled over the past three decades by Western countries in the area of orphan drug development.

  10. Drug development against tuberculosis: Past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Vasava, Mahesh S; Bhoi, Manoj N; Rathwa, Sanjay K; Borad, Mayuri A; Nair, Sneha G; Patel, Hitesh D

    2017-10-01

    Infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) was observed as early as 5000 years ago with evidence, which is a primeval enemy of the humanoid race. MTB is the pathogen which is responsible for causing the infectious disease tuberculosis; it remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in poor low-income countries as well as in developing countries because of non-availability of reliable laboratory facilities. The current treatment for drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is lengthy, complex, and connected with severe harmful side effects and poor outcomes. The present cure against tuberculosis has substantial restrictions, in terms of their efficiency, side-effect outline, and complication of handling. Furthermore, the emergence of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) outbreaks during the 1990s and additionally in recent times the vast deadly strains of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) and totally drug resistance tuberculosis (TDR-TB) is hampering efforts to control and manage tuberculosis (TB). As a result, novel methodologies for the treatment of multi-drug-resistant and extensive drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) are severely desired. A number of new potential anti-tuberculosis drug candidates with novel modes of action have been entered in clinical trials in recent years. These agents are most likely to be effective against resistant strains. The treatment landscape is beginning to shift, with the recent approvals by Food and Drug Administration to the new TB drugs bedaquiline and delamanid. Also, the pipeline of potential new treatments has been fulfilled with several compounds in clinical trials or preclinical development with promising activities against sensitive and resistant MTB bacteria. An additional new chemical entity is also under development. The already existing drugs with their suggested mode of treatment as well as new probable anti-tuberculosis drug moieties which are at present in the pipeline has been summarized in this

  11. Drug Repurposing for the Development of Novel Analgesics.

    PubMed

    Sisignano, Marco; Parnham, Michael J; Geisslinger, Gerd

    2016-03-01

    Drug development consumes huge amounts of time and money and the search for novel analgesics, which are urgently required, is particularly difficult, having resulted in many setbacks in the past. Drug repurposing - the identification of new uses for existing drugs - is an alternative approach, which bypasses most of the time- and cost-consuming components of drug development. Recent, unexpected findings suggest a role for several existing drugs, such as minocycline, ceftriaxone, sivelestat, and pioglitazone, as novel analgesics in chronic and neuropathic pain states. Here, we discuss these findings as well as their proposed antihyperalgesic mechanisms and outline the merits of pathway-based repurposing screens, in combination with bioinformatics and novel cellular reprogramming techniques, for the identification of novel analgesics.

  12. [Development of antituberculous drugs: current status and future prospects].

    PubMed

    Tomioka, Haruaki; Namba, Kenji

    2006-12-01

    Worldwide, tuberculosis (TB) remains the most frequent and important infectious disease causing morbidity and death. One-third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), the etiologic agent of TB. The World Health Organization estimates that about eight to ten million new TB cases occur annually worldwide and the incidence of TB is currently increasing. In this context, TB is in the top three, with malaria and HIV being the leading causes of death from a single infectious agent, and approximately two million deaths are attributable to TB annually. In particular, pulmonary TB, the most common form of TB, is a highly contagious and life-threatening infection. Moreover, enhanced susceptibility to TB in HIV-infected populations is another serious health problem throughout the world. In addition, multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) has been increasing in incidence in many areas, not only in developing countries but industrialized countries as well, during the past decade. These situations, particularly the global resurgence of TB and the rapid emergence of MDR-TB, underscore the importance of the development of new antituberculous drugs and new protocols for efficacious clinical control of TB patients using ordinary antimycobacterial drugs. Concerning the development of new antituberculous drugs, the following points are of particular importance. (1) Development of drugs which display lasting antimycobacterial activity in vivo is desirable, since they can be administered with long intervals and consequently facilitate directly observed therapy and enhance patient compliance. (2) Development of novel antituberculosis compounds to combat MDR-TB is urgently needed. (3) The eradication of slowly metabolizing and, if possible, dormant populations of MTB organisms that cause relapse, using new classes of anti-TB drugs is very promising for prevention of TB incidence, because it will markedly reduce the incidence of active TB from persons who are

  13. Development of Chemical Compound Libraries for In Silico Drug Screening.

    PubMed

    Fukunishi, Yoshifumi; Lintuluoto, Masami

    2010-01-01

    Chemical compound libraries are the basic database for virtual (in silico) drug screening, and the number of entries has reached 20 million. Many drug-like compound libraries for virtual drug screening have been developed and released. In this review, the process of constructing a database for virtual screening is reviewed, and several popular databases are introduced. Several kinds of focused libraries have been developed. The author has developed databases for metalloproteases, and the details of the libraries are described. The library for metalloproteases was developed by improving the generation of the dominant-ion forms. For instance, the SH group is treated as S- in this library while all SH groups are protonated in the conventional libraries. In addition, metal complexes were examined as new candidates of drug-like compounds. Finally, a method for generating chemical space is introduced, and the diversity of compound libraries is discussed.

  14. Critical parameters in targeted drug development: the pharmacological audit trail.

    PubMed

    Banerji, Udai; Workman, Paul

    2016-08-01

    The Pharmacological Audit Trail (PhAT) comprises a set of critical questions that need to be asked during discovery and development of an anticancer drug. Key aspects include: (1) defining a patient population; (2) establishing pharmacokinetic characteristics; (3) providing evidence of target engagement, pathway modulation, and biological effect with proof of concept pharmacodynamic biomarkers; (4) determining intermediate biomarkers of response; (5) assessing tumor response; and (6) determining how to overcome resistance by combination or sequential therapy and new target/drug discovery. The questions asked in the PhAT should be viewed as a continuum and not used in isolation. Different drug development programmes derive different types of benefit from these questions. The PhAT is critical in making go-no-go decisions in the development of currently studied drugs and will continue to be relevant to discovery and development of future generations of anticancer agents.

  15. Drug development against sleeping sickness: old wine in new bottles?

    PubMed

    Stein, J; Mogk, S; Mudogo, C N; Sommer, B P; Scholze, M; Meiwes, A; Huber, M; Gray, A; Duszenko, M

    2014-01-01

    Atoxyl, the first medicinal drug against human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also known as sleeping sickness, was applied more than 100 years ago. Ever since, the search for more effective, more specific and less toxic drugs continued, leading to a set of compounds currently in use against this devastating disease. Unfortunately, none of these medicines fulfill modern pharmaceutical requirements and may be considered as therapeutic ultima ratio due to the many, often severe side effects. Starting with a historic overview on drug development against HAT, we present a selection of trypanosome specific pathways and enzymes considered as highly potent druggable targets. In addition, we describe cellular mechanisms the parasite uses for differentiation and cell density regulation and present our considerations how interference with these steps, elementary for life cycle progression and infection, may lead to new aspects of drug development. Finally we refer to our recent work about CNS infection that offers novel insights in how trypanosomes hide in an immune privileged area to establish a chronic state of the disease, thereby considering new ways for drug application. Depressingly, HAT specific drug development has failed over the last 30 years to produce better suited medicine. However, unraveling of parasite-specific pathways and cellular behavior together with the ability to produce high resolution structures of essential parasite proteins by X-ray crystallography, leads us to the optimistic view that development of an ultimate drug to eradicate sleeping sickness from the globe might just be around the corner.

  16. Model-based drug development: strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats for broad application of pharmacometrics in drug development.

    PubMed

    Wetherington, Jeffrey D; Pfister, Marc; Banfield, Christopher; Stone, Julie A; Krishna, Rajesh; Allerheiligen, Sandy; Grasela, Dennis M

    2010-09-01

    Systematic implementation of model-based drug development (MBDD) to drug discovery and development has the potential to significantly increase the rate of medical breakthroughs and make available new and better treatments to patients. An analysis of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (ie, SWOT) was conducted through focus group discussions that included 24 members representing 8 pharmaceutical companies to systematically assess the challenges to implementing MBDD into the drug development decision-making process. The application of the SWOT analysis to the successful implementation of MBDD yielded 19 strengths, 27 weaknesses, 34 opportunities, and 22 threats, which support the following conclusions. The shift from empirical drug development to MBDD requires a question-based mentality; early, proactive planning; dynamic access to multisource data; quantitative knowledge integration; multidisciplinary collaboration; effective communication and leadership skills; and innovative, impactful application of pharmacometrics focused on enhancing quantitative decision making. The ultimate goal of MBDD is to streamline discovery and development of innovative medicines to benefit patients.

  17. Nasal drug delivery - recent developments and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Illum, Lisbeth

    2012-07-20

    The present review sets out to discuss recent developments and prospects of absorption promoters and absorption modulator systems being developed commercially by companies specialising in nasal drug delivery of normal small molecular weight drugs and biological drugs such as peptide and proteins. The absorption promoter systems selected for discussion in this review are those with the most promising preclinical and/or clinical data and sufficient toxicology data and/or company development efforts to warrant use in marketed products i.e. CPE-215 (cyclopenta decalactone (azone)) developed by CPEX Pharma, Intravail (alkylsaccharides) developed by Aegis Therapeutics, ChiSys(TM) (chitosan) and PecSys(TM) (low methylated pectin) in development by Archimedes Pharma and CriticalSorb(TM) (polyglycol mono- and diesters of 12-hydroxystearate (70%), polyethylene glycol (30%)) developed by Critical Pharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. 75 FR 33317 - Antibacterial Resistance and Diagnostic Device and Drug Development Research for Bacterial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Antibacterial Resistance and Diagnostic Device and Drug... resistance, rapid diagnostic device development for bacterial diseases, and antibacterial drug development. The workshop will address antibacterial drug resistance, mechanisms of resistance, epidemiology...

  19. Developing a paediatric drug formulary for the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van der Zanden, Tjitske M; de Wildt, Saskia N; Liem, Yves; Offringa, Martin; de Hoog, Matthijs

    2017-04-01

    As many drugs in paediatrics are used off-label, prescribers face a lack of evidence-based dosing guidelines. A Dutch framework was developed to provide dosing guidelines based on best available evidence from registration data, investigator-initiated research, professional guidelines, clinical experience and consensus. This has clarified the scientific grounds of drug use for children and encouraged uniformity in prescribing habits in the Netherlands. The developed framework and the current content of the Dutch Paediatric Formulary could be used as basis for similar initiatives worldwide, preferably in a concerted effort to ultimately provide children with effective and safe drug therapy.

  20. Development and Validation of the Behavioral Avoidance Test-Back Pain (BAT-Back) for Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Holzapfel, Sebastian; Riecke, Jenny; Rief, Winfried; Schneider, Jessica; Glombiewski, Julia A

    2016-11-01

    Pain-related fear and avoidance of physical activities are central elements of the fear-avoidance model of musculoskeletal pain. Pain-related fear has typically been measured by self-report instruments. In this study, we developed and validated a Behavioral Avoidance Test (BAT) for chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients with the aim of assessing pain-related avoidance behavior by direct observation. The BAT-Back was administered to a group of CLBP patients (N=97) and pain-free controls (N=31). Furthermore, pain, pain-related fear, disability, catastrophizing, and avoidance behavior were measured using self-report instruments. Reliability was assessed with intraclass correlation coefficient and Cronbach α. Validity was assessed by examining correlation and regression analysis. The intraclass correlation coefficient for the BAT-Back avoidance score was r=0.76. Internal consistency was α=0.95. CLBP patients and controls differed significantly on BAT-Back avoidance scores as well as self-report measures. BAT-Back avoidance scores were significantly correlated with scores on each of the self-report measures (rs=0.27 to 0.54). They were not significantly correlated with general anxiety and depression, age, body mass index, and pain duration. The BAT-Back avoidance score was able to capture unique variance in disability after controlling for other variables (eg, pain intensity and pain-related fear). Results indicate that the BAT-Back is a reliable and valid measure of pain-related avoidance behavior. It may be useful for clinicians in tailoring treatments for chronic pain as well as an outcome measure for exposure treatments.

  1. Investigational drugs in early development for treating dengue infection.

    PubMed

    Beesetti, Hemalatha; Khanna, Navin; Swaminathan, Sathyamangalam

    2016-09-01

    Dengue has emerged as the most significant arboviral disease of the current century. A drug for dengue is an urgent unmet need. As conventional drug discovery efforts have not produced any promising clinical candidates, there is a shift toward re-positioning pre-existing drugs for dengue to fast-track dengue drug development. This article provides an update on the current status of recently completed and ongoing dengue drug trials. All dengue drug trials described in this article were identified from a list of >230 trials that were returned upon searching the World Health Organization's International Clinical Trials Registry Platform web portal using the search term 'dengue' on December 31(st), 2015. None of the handful of drugs tested so far has yielded encouraging results. Early trial experience has served to emphasize the challenge of drug testing in the short therapeutic time window available, the need for tools to predict 'high-risk' patients early on and the limitations of the existing pre-clinical model systems. Significant investment of efforts and resources is a must before the availability of a safe, effective and inexpensive dengue drug becomes a reality. Currently, supportive fluid therapy remains the only option available for dengue treatment.

  2. Molecular Targets for Antiepileptic Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Meldrum, Brian S.; Rogawski, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary This review considers how recent advances in the physiology of ion channels and other potential molecular targets, in conjunction with new information on the genetics of idiopathic epilepsies, can be applied to the search for improved antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Marketed AEDs predominantly target voltage-gated cation channels (the α subunits of voltage-gated Na+ channels and also T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels) or influence GABA-mediated inhibition. Recently, α2–δ voltage-gated Ca2+ channel subunits and the SV2A synaptic vesicle protein have been recognized as likely targets. Genetic studies of familial idiopathic epilepsies have identified numerous genes associated with diverse epilepsy syndromes, including genes encoding Na+ channels and GABAA receptors, which are known AED targets. A strategy based on genes associated with epilepsy in animal models and humans suggests other potential AED targets, including various voltage-gated Ca2+ channel subunits and auxiliary proteins, A- or M-type voltage-gated K+ channels, and ionotropic glutamate receptors. Recent progress in ion channel research brought about by molecular cloning of the channel subunit proteins and studies in epilepsy models suggest additional targets, including G-protein-coupled receptors, such as GABAB and metabotropic glutamate receptors; hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channel subunits, responsible for hyperpolarization-activated current Ih; connexins, which make up gap junctions; and neurotransmitter transporters, particularly plasma membrane and vesicular transporters for GABA and glutamate. New information from the structural characterization of ion channels, along with better understanding of ion channel function, may allow for more selective targeting. For example, Na+ channels underlying persistent Na+ currents or GABAA receptor isoforms responsible for tonic (extrasynaptic) currents represent attractive targets. The growing understanding of the

  3. [Development of anti-cancer drugs under new renewed GCP--from the viewpoint of drug development company developer].

    PubMed

    Ueno, T; Kobayashi, T; Inoue, K; Yanagi, Y; Yamada, Y

    1998-04-01

    During the past 7 years since the enforcement of Japan's first GCP in October 1990, various standards and guidelines have been introduced in Japan. On the other hand, the harmonization of GCP has been the subject of major discussion at ICH in order to allow the mutual acceptance of clinical data from different countries. In order to further improve the reliability and consistency of clinical data and the ethics of clinical trials in Japan, the new GCP was enforced in April 1997. A clinical study is conducted by the sponsor, but will only be successful with the collaboration of trial subjects, medical institutions, heads of medical institutions, investigators, subinvestigators, pharmacists, nurses, laboratory technicians, and other assisting staff. Before the full enforcement of the new GCP, we, as sponsors of clinical trials, carried out a survey of the current status of clinical trials centering on the reactions of medical institutions to the new GCP, future of clinical trials on anti-cancer drugs in Japan, and differences in time from clinical trials to registration in Japan, the United State and Europe. We sent a questionnaire by facsimile to 21 pharmaceutical companies which have developed or are developing anti-cancer drugs and obtained replies from 20 companies (95%) from August 25 to 30, 1997. This paper reports issues concerning clinical trials on anti-cancer drugs based on the results of our survey.

  4. Advances in Alzheimer's disease drug development.

    PubMed

    Rafii, Michael S; Aisen, Paul S

    2015-03-25

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the foremost cause of dementia worldwide. Clinically, AD manifests as progressive memory impairment followed by a gradual decline in other cognitive abilities leading to complete functional dependency. Recent biomarker studies indicate that AD is characterized by a long asymptomatic phase, with the development of pathology occurring at least a decade prior to the onset of any symptoms. Current FDA-approved treatments target neurotransmitter abnormalities associated with the disease but do not affect what is believed to be the underlying etiology. In this review, we briefly discuss the most recent therapeutic strategies being employed in AD clinical trials, as well the scientific rationale with which they have been developed.

  5. Waterborne psychoactive drugs impair the initial development of Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kalichak, Fabiana; Idalencio, Renan; Rosa, João Gabriel S; de Oliveira, Thiago A; Koakoski, Gessi; Gusso, Darlan; de Abreu, Murilo S; Giacomini, Ana Cristina V; Barcellos, Heloísa H A; Fagundes, Michele; Piato, Angelo L; Barcellos, Leonardo J G

    2016-01-01

    The contamination of rivers and other natural water bodies, including underground waters, is a current reality. Human occupation and some economic activities generate a wide range of contaminated effluents that reach these water resources, including psychotropic drug residues. Here we show that fluoxetine, diazepam and risperidone affected the initial development of zebrafish. All drugs increased mortality rate and heart frequency and decreased larvae length. In addition, risperidone and fluoxetine decreased egg hatching. The overall results points to a strong potential of these drugs to cause a negative impact on zebrafish initial development and, since the larvae viability was reduced, promote adverse effects at the population level. We hypothesized that eggs and larvae absorbed the drugs that exert its effects in the central nervous system. These effects on early development may have significant environmental implications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Drug development: how academia, industry and authorities interact.

    PubMed

    Garattini, Silvio; Perico, Norberto

    2014-10-01

    Unfortunately, abundant examples could be given of pitfalls in the current drug development paradigm-including in the design, conduct and evaluation of phase III clinical trials. This article discusses issues of particular relevance to clinical trials in nephrology, including the inappropriate use of placebo, publication of reports that emphasize potential treatment benefits over adverse reactions, the sometimes dubious impartiality of independent guidelines, and inadequate recruitment of elderly patients. This Perspectives article aims to highlight and summarize the flaws in the current drug development process, while suggesting a way forward that equally satisfies the requirements of academia, patients and the pharmaceutical industry. We suggest improvements to the drug development process and related legislation that intend to balance public needs with commercial aims and ensure effective drug evaluation by regulatory authorities.

  7. Precision medicine in oncology drug development: a pharma perspective.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Simon J

    2015-12-01

    A rapid expansion in precision medicine founded on the potential for durable clinical benefit through matching a drug to a predictive marker used to select patients has driven the development of targeted drugs with accompanied companion diagnostics for patient selection. Oncology has been at the forefront, with the improvements in patient survival notable. Increasing numbers of molecular subgroups require an equally increasing number (and new generation) of highly selective agents targeting inevitably lower incidence molecular segments, posing significant challenges for drug development. Innovative trial designs (umbrella or basket studies) are emerging as patient-centric approaches and public-private partnerships, cross-industry, government and non-profit sector collaborations are enabling implementation. Success will require continued innovation, new paradigms in oncology drug development and market approval and continued collaboration.

  8. Challenges in the clinical development of new antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, Stefan K

    2002-02-01

    The very nature of epilepsy makes the clinical development of new antiepileptic drugs a lengthy and costly process. The underlying disease mechanisms are largely unknown, reflecting the paucity of animal models that mirror the human condition. The risks of untreated epilepsy usually preclude the use of placebo as a control treatment except in patients receiving background medication. Thus, new AEDs must first display a treatment effect in patients with seizures known to be resistant to drug therapy, using study designs that are confounded by the potential pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions associated with polytherapy. Moreover, the unpredictable nature of epilepsy often means lengthy clinical trials. Clinical development for antiepileptic drugs is inevitably more complex and time-consuming than for many other drugs. As a result the interval between product approval and loss of patent is often shorter. Creative methods of accelerating the development process without compromising the quality of research are needed.

  9. Model-Informed Drug Development for Malaria Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Kayla Ann; Wesche, David; McCarthy, James; Möhrle, Jörg J; Tarning, Joel; Phillips, Luann; Kern, Steven; Grasela, Thaddeus

    2017-10-06

    Malaria is a critical public health problem resulting in substantial morbidity and mortality, particularly in developing countries. Owing to the development of resistance toward current therapies, novel approaches to accelerate the development efforts of new malaria therapeutics are urgently needed. There have been significant advancements in the development of in vitro and in vivo experiments that generate data used to inform decisions about the potential merit of new compounds. A comprehensive disease-drug model capable of integrating discrete data from different preclinical and clinical components would be a valuable tool across all stages of drug development. This could have an enormous impact on the otherwise slow and resource-intensive process of traditional clinical drug development. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology Volume 58 is January 6, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  10. Hurdles in anticancer drug development from a regulatory perspective.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Bertil; Bergh, Jonas

    2012-02-21

    Between January 2001 and January 2012, 48 new medicinal products for cancer treatment were licensed within the EU, and 77 new indications were granted for products already licensed. In some cases, a major improvement to existing therapies was achieved, for example, trastuzumab in breast cancer. In other cases, new fields for effective drug therapy opened up, such as in chronic myeloid leukemia, and renal-cell carcinoma. In most cases, however, the benefit-risk balance was considered to be only borderline favorable. Based on our assessment of advice procedures for marketing authorization, 'need for speed' seems to be the guiding principle in anticancer drug development. Although, for drugs that make a difference, early licensure is of obvious importance to patients, this is less evident in the case of borderline drugs. Without proper incentives and with hurdles inside and outside companies, a change in drug development cannot be expected; drugs improving benefit-risk modestly over available therapies will be brought forward towards licensure. In this Perspectives article, we discuss some hurdles to biomarker-driven drug development and provide some suggestions to overcome them.

  11. An industry statistician's perspective on PHC drug development.

    PubMed

    Fridlyand, Jane; Yeh, Ru-Fang; Mackey, Howard; Bengtsson, Thomas; Delmar, Paul; Spaniolo, Greg; Lieberman, Grazyna

    2013-11-01

    In the past decade, the cost of drug development has increased significantly. The estimates vary widely but frequently quoted numbers are staggering-it takes 10-15 years and billions of dollars to bring a drug to patients. To a large extent this is due to many long, expensive and ultimately unsuccessful drug trials. While one approach to combat the low yield on investment could be to continue searching for new blockbusters, an alternative method would lead us to focus on testing new targeted treatments that have a strong underlying scientific rationale and are more likely to provide enhanced clinical benefit in population subsets defined by molecular diagnostics. Development of these new treatments, however, cannot follow the usual established path; new strategies and approaches are required for the co-development of novel therapeutics and the diagnostic. In this paper we will review, from the point of view of industry, the approaches to, and challenges of drug development strategies incorporating predictive biomarkers into clinical programs. We will outline the basic concepts behind co-development with predictive biomarkers and summarize the current regulatory paradigm. We will present guiding principles of personalized health care (PHC) development and review the statistical, strategic, regulatory and operational challenges that statisticians regularly encounter on development programs with a PHC component. Some practical recommendations for team statisticians involved in PHC drug development are included. The majority of the examples and recommendations are drawn from oncology but broader concepts apply across all therapeutic areas.

  12. Drug discovery and development for neglected diseases: the DNDi model.

    PubMed

    Chatelain, Eric; Ioset, Jean-Robert

    2011-03-16

    New models of drug discovery have been developed to overcome the lack of modern and effective drugs for neglected diseases such as human African trypanosomiasis (HAT; sleeping sickness), leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease, which have no financial viability for the pharmaceutical industry. With the purpose of combining the skills and research capacity in academia, pharmaceutical industry, and contract researchers, public-private partnerships or product development partnerships aim to create focused research consortia that address all aspects of drug discovery and development. These consortia not only emulate the projects within pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, eg, identification and screening of libraries, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology and pharmacodynamics, formulation development, and manufacturing, but also use and strengthen existing capacity in disease-endemic countries, particularly for the conduct of clinical trials. The Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) has adopted a model closely related to that of a virtual biotechnology company for the identification and optimization of drug leads. The application of this model to the development of drug candidates for the kinetoplastid infections of HAT, Chagas disease, and leishmaniasis has already led to the identification of new candidates issued from DNDi's own discovery pipeline. This demonstrates that the model DNDi has been implementing is working but its DNDi, neglected diseases sustainability remains to be proven.

  13. Drug-Induced Torsade de Pointes and Implications for Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Fenichel, Robert R.; Malik, Marek; Antzelevitch, Charles; Sanguinetti, Michael; Roden, Dan M.; Priori, Silvia G.; Ruskin, Jeremy N.; Lipicky, Raymond J.; Cantilena, Lou

    2006-01-01

    Torsade de pointes is a potentially lethal arrhythmia that occasionally appears as an adverse effect of pharmacotherapy. Recently-developed understanding of the underlying electrophysiology allows better estimation of the drug-induced risks, and explains the failures of older approaches through the surface electrocardiogram. The article expresses a consensus reached by an independent academic task force on the physiologic understanding of drug-induced repolarisation changes, on their preclinical and clinical evaluation, and on the risk-benefit interpretation of drug-induced torsade de pointes. The consensus of the task force includes suggestions on how to evaluate the risk of torsade within drug development program. Individual sections of the text discuss the techniques and limitations of methods directed at drug-related ion-channel phenomena, investigations aimed at action potentials changes, preclinical studies of phenomena seen only in the whole (or nearly whole) heart, and at interpretation of human electrocardiograms obtained in clinical studies. Final section of the text discusses drug-induced torsade within the larger evaluation of drug-related risks and benefits. PMID:15090000

  14. Anticonvulsant drug-induced cell death in the developing white matter of the rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Suhasini; Tamer, Zenab; Opoku, Freda; Forcelli, Patrick A

    2016-05-01

    During critical periods of brain development, both seizures and anticonvulsant medications can affect neurodevelopmental outcomes. In rodent models, many anticonvulsants trigger neuronal apoptosis. However, white matter apoptosis (WMA) has not been examined after anticonvulsant drug treatment. Herein, we sought to determine if anticonvulsant drugs induced apoptosis in the developing white matter (WM) in a rodent model. Postnatal day (P)7 rats were treated with phenobarbital (PB-75), MK-801 (dizocilpine, 0.5), lamotrigine (LTG-20), carbamazepine (CBZ-100), phenytoin (PHT-50), levetiracetam (LEV-250), or saline; all doses are mg/kg. Brain tissue collected 24 h after treatment was stained using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling method. The number of degenerating cells within WM, that is, anterior commissure (AC), corpus callosum, cingulum, and hippocampus-associated WM tracts, was quantified. Saline-treated rats showed low baseline level of apoptosis in developing WM on P8 in all the areas examined. PB, PHT, and MK-801 significantly increased apoptosis in all four brain areas examined. Exposure to CBZ, LTG, or LEV failed to increase apoptosis in all regions. Commonly used anticonvulsants (PB, PHT) cause apoptosis in the developing WM in a rat model; the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist MK-801 has a similar effect. These results are consistent with reports of anesthesia-induced WMA during brain development. Consistent with the lack of neuronal apoptosis caused by LTG, LEV, and CBZ, these drugs did not cause WMA. Many infants treated with anticonvulsant drugs have underlying neurologic injury, including WM damage (e.g., following intraventricular hemorrhage [IVH] or hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy [HIE]). The degree to which anticonvulsant drug treatment will alter outcomes in the presence of underlying injury remains to be examined, but avoiding drugs (when possible) that induce WMA may be beneficial. Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  15. Positron Emission Tomography - Tracer Kinetic Modelling in Drug Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Vincent J.; Gunn, Roger N.

    2006-04-01

    There is a growing interest in the application of imaging techniques to drug discovery and development to enable earlier decisions to be made on the suitability of a given drug for the treatment of disease in humans. PET has the ability to image pharmacological functions in vivo in conscious humans and is ideally suited to this task. Either the drug itself can be radiolabelled and its biodistribution in tissues measured directly, or alternatively, a given pharmacological target can be labelled, enabling quantification of exogenous drug interaction. A wide range of mathematical modelling techniques may be applied to the spatial and kinetic PET data giving rise to functional images or regional parameter values that reflect the pharmacology of the drug under study. Examples will be shown and some of the mathematical techniques behind quantification will be discussed.

  16. Regulatory considerations in oncologic biosimilar drug development.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Judith C; Hartman, Helen; Jacobs, Ira A

    2015-01-01

    Biosimilar monoclonal antibodies are being developed globally for patients with different types of solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. Applications for proposed biosimilar monoclonal antibodies are being submitted to the regulatory authorities around the world and may increase patient access to key treatment options upon approval. An understanding among stakeholders (e.g., physicians, patients and their caregivers, pharmacists, payers) of the approval criteria, as well as the similarities and differences in regulatory pathways involved in biosimilar approval in different countries, as presented in this review, will facilitate identification of high-quality, safe, monoclonal antibodies that have been developed according to strict, biosimilar regulatory standards. Further guidance and resolution of the ongoing discussions on biosimilar labeling, naming, automatic substitution, and indication extrapolation may ensure, in the future, an effective and appropriate use of biosimilar monoclonal antibodies by oncologists and other stakeholders in daily clinical practice.

  17. Novel Synthetic Lethality Approaches for Drug Combinations and Early Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Ocana, Alberto; Pandiella, Atanasio

    2017-01-01

    Preclinical evaluation of drug combinations is challenging. In this mini-review we discuss the concept of synthetic lethality and how this can impact on the evaluation of drug combinations and its clinical development. We will also review novel combinations with immunologic agents and the concept of collateral lethality. We suggest that identification of synthetic lethality interactions including collateral lethality using novel drug combinations can speed up the drug development process. This approach may identify synergistic combinations in tumors with a specific molecular alteration, limiting toxicity to normal tissue. In addition, the combination of an immunotherapy with an agent targeting cancer cells have the potential for acting on different functions with no overlapping of toxicities. Here, we also discuss potential consequences of this approach in the design of early clinical studies.

  18. BCS class IV drugs: Highly notorious candidates for formulation development.

    PubMed

    Ghadi, Rohan; Dand, Neha

    2017-02-28

    BCS class IV drugs (e.g., amphotericin B, furosemide, acetazolamide, ritonavir, paclitaxel) exhibit many characteristics that are problematic for effective oral and per oral delivery. Some of the problems associated include low aqueous solubility, poor permeability, erratic and poor absorption, inter and intra subject variability and significant positive food effect which leads to low and variable bioavailability. Also, most of the class IV drugs are substrate for P-glycoprotein (low permeability) and substrate for CYP3A4 (extensive pre systemic metabolism) which further potentiates the problem of poor therapeutic potential of these drugs. A decade back, extreme examples of class IV compounds were an exception rather than the rule, yet today many drug candidates under development pipeline fall into this category. Formulation and development of an efficacious delivery system for BCS class IV drugs are herculean tasks for any formulator. The inherent hurdles posed by these drugs hamper their translation to actual market. The importance of the formulation composition and design to successful drug development is especially illustrated by the BCS class IV case. To be clinically effective these drugs require the development of a proper delivery system for both oral and per oral delivery. Ideal oral dosage forms should produce both a reasonably high bioavailability and low inter and intra subject variability in absorption. Also, ideal systems for BCS class IV should produce a therapeutic concentration of the drug at reasonable dose volumes for intravenous administration. This article highlights the various techniques and upcoming strategies which can be employed for the development of highly notorious BCS class IV drugs. Some of the techniques employed are lipid based delivery systems, polymer based nanocarriers, crystal engineering (nanocrystals and co-crystals), liquisolid technology, self-emulsifying solid dispersions and miscellaneous techniques addressing the P

  19. [Development of new drugs: opportunities and benefits for Peru].

    PubMed

    Bayona, Andrés; Fajardo, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    The development of innovative drugs allows coming up with new medicines to prevent and better treat illnesses. This improves people's quality of life and makes it more productive. Therefore, the mission of pharmaceutical research is to develop safe and effective drugs. Clinical trials allow the evaluation of the safety and efficacy profiles of new medicines, medical devices and diagnostic tests. Research and development (R&D) of new drugs is a long and costly process, where out of every 5000 to 10000 new components that enter preclinical testing, only one is approved. Compared to 2011, drug development has increased by 7.6%. According to ClinicalTrials.gov, 5% of the trials take place in Latin America, and Peru is in the fifth position. On the other hand, according to the Global Competitiveness Report issued by the World Economic Forum, Peru ranks 61st, its biggest challenges being the functioning of its public institutions, investment in R&D and technological capacity. The complexity of drug R&D results in a search for competitive places to develop clinical trials. Clinical Research is a humanized industry due to its ethical platform, stated in the guidelines of good clinical practices. This industry demands our country to develop a differentiating value that contributes to the development of knowledge and its competitiveness.

  20. The use of psychotropic drugs in developing countries*

    PubMed Central

    Harding, T. W.; Chrusciel, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    Psychotropic drug therapy combined with other forms of treatment provides an effective means for the control and treatment of a number of mental disorders. In developing countries a wide range of health workers must be prepared to use psychotropic drugs if there is to be a significant improvement in mental health care. A number of problems are involved: not all mental disorders respond to drug treatment; the range of available drugs is very wide; side effects are relatively common; patients may not take prescribed drugs regularly; and there are dangers of overuse, abuse, and overdose. Some of the problems could be overcome by: (a) focusing on a limited number of conditions of public health importance; (b) establishing a clear policy as to which drugs should be available at various points in the health service and limiting the range of such drugs; (c) adopting a more flexible system of task sharing in psychotropic drug therapy; (d) coordinating training programmes; and (e) setting up a central policy body concerned with mental health in health ministries. PMID:1084806

  1. Development of braided drug-loaded nanofiber sutures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wen; Huang, Zheng-Ming; Liu, Xiang-Yang

    2010-08-01

    The objectives of this work are twofold. Firstly, while most work on electrospinning is limited to the development of only functional materials, a structural application of electrospun nanofibers is explored. Secondly, a drug-loaded tissue suture is fabricated and its various properties are characterized. Braided drug-loaded nanofiber sutures are obtained by combining an electrospinning process with a braiding technique followed by a coating procedure. Two different electrospinning techniques, i.e. blend and coaxial electrospinning, to incorporate a model drug cefotaxime sodium (CFX-Na) into poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) nanofibers have been applied and compared with each other. Properties of the braided drug-loaded sutures are characterized through a variety of methods including SEM, TEM and tensile testing. The results show that the nanofibers had a preferable micromorphology. The drug was incorporated into the polymer nanofibers homogeneously, with no cross-linking. The nanofibers maintained their fibrous structures. An in vitro release study indicates that the drug-loaded nanofibers fabricated by blend electrospinning and coaxial electrospinning had a different drug release behavior. An inhibition zone experiment shows that both sutures obtained from the nanofibers of the different electrospinning techniques had favorable antibacterial properties. The drug-loaded sutures had preferable histological compatibility performance compared with commercial silk sutures in an in vivo comparative study.

  2. Histone deacetylases: Targets for antifungal drug development

    PubMed Central

    Kmetzsch, Livia

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of pathogens and its hosts causes a drastic change in the transcriptional landscape in both cells. Among the several mechanisms of gene regulation, transcriptional initiation is probably the main point. In such scenario, the access of transcriptional machinery to promoter is highly regulated by post-translational modification of histones, such as acetylation, phosphorylation and others. Inhibition of histone deacetylases is able to reduce fungal pathogens fitness during infection and, therefore, is currently being considered for the development of new antifungal therapy strategies. PMID:26151486

  3. A case for developing antiviral drugs against polio.

    PubMed

    Collett, Marc S; Neyts, Johan; Modlin, John F

    2008-09-01

    Polio eradication is within sight. In bringing the world close to this ultimate goal, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) has relied exclusively on the live, attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). However, as eradication nears, continued OPV use becomes less tenable due to the incidence of vaccine associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP) in vaccine recipients and disease caused by circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) in contacts. Once wild poliovirus transmission has been interrupted globally, OPV use will stop. This will leave the inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) as the only weapon to defend a polio-free world. Outbreaks caused by cVDPVs are expected post-OPV cessation, and accidental or deliberate releases of virus could also occur. There are serious doubts regarding the ability of IPV alone to control outbreaks. Here, we argue that antiviral drugs against poliovirus be added to the arsenal. Anti-poliovirus drugs could be used to treat the infected and protect the exposed, acting rapidly on their own to contain an outbreak and used as a complement to IPV. While there are no polio antiviral drugs today, the technological feasibility of developing such drugs and their probability of clinical success have been established by over three decades of drug development targeting the related rhinoviruses and non-polio enteroviruses (NPEVs). Because of this history, there are known compounds with anti-poliovirus activity in vitro that represent excellent starting points for polio drug development. Stakeholders must come to understand the potential public health benefits of polio drugs, the feasibility of their development, and the relatively modest costs involved. Given the timelines for eradication and those for drug development, the time for action is now.

  4. Paediatric Drug Development and Formulation Design-a European Perspective.

    PubMed

    Van Riet-Nales, Diana A; Kozarewicz, Piotr; Aylward, Brian; de Vries, Rutger; Egberts, Toine C G; Rademaker, Carin M A; Schobben, Alfred F A M

    2017-02-01

    The availability of licensed paediatric drugs is lagging behind those for adults, and there is a lack of safe formulations in suitable doses that children are able and willing to take. As a consequence, children are commonly treated with off-label or unlicensed drugs. As off-label and unlicensed drug use are associated with a greater risk for harm than on-label drug use, a range of global initiatives have been developed to realize "better" medicines for children. This review describes the challenges and achievements of the European Union to realize this goal, with a focus on paediatric drug development and formulation design. In 2007, a European Paediatric Regulation was installed enforcing companies to consider children in the early development of drugs with a new drug substance, for a new indication or with a new route of administration. The Regulation, e.g. requires companies to develop a paediatric investigation plan discussing the proposed clinical trials in children of different ages and the formulations for future marketing. Since 2013, the pharmaceutical design of any newly marketed paediatric drug should comply with the "Guideline on the Pharmaceutical Development of Medicines for Paediatric Use." Companies should, e.g. justify the route of administration, dosage form, formulation characteristics, safety of excipients, dosing frequency, container closure system, administration device, patient acceptability and user information. In this review, the guideline's key aspects are discussed with a focus on novel formulations such as mini-tablets and orodispersible films, excipients with a potential risk for harm such as azo dyes and adequate user instructions.

  5. Advances in Chagas disease drug development: 2009-2010

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Frederick S.; Navabi, Nazlee

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review The need for better drugs to treat patients with Chagas disease remains urgent. This review summarizes the advancements in drug development over the past two years. Recent Findings Drug development efforts are almost exclusively occurring as preclinical research. The exceptions being Phase I safety studies for the cruzain inhibitor, K-777, and potential Phase II studies for the antifungal drug, posaconazole, and a prodrug of ravuconazole. Several recent laboratory investigations demonstrate anti-T. cruzi activity of novel small molecules in animal models. These include nonpeptidic cruzain inhibitors, novel inhibitors of the sterol 14α-demethylase enzyme, new compounds (arylimidamides) related to pentamidine, derivatives of nifurtimox, compounds using ruthenium complexes, and several natural products. The recent implementation of a high-throughput screen of >300,000 compounds against intracellular T. cruzi amastigotes done at the Broad Institute is an important development, yielding ~300 selective inhibitors, many of which may serve as leads for medicinal chemistry efforts. Summary Progress is slow, but recent advancements in both drug development and advocacy for research on neglected diseases are encouraging. Efforts to define a target product profile and to harmonize methodologies for testing drugs for Chagas disease are described herein. PMID:20885320

  6. Use of biomarkers in ALS drug development and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bakkar, Nadine; Boehringer, Ashley; Bowser, Robert

    2015-05-14

    The past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the discovery of candidate biomarkers for ALS. These biomarkers typically can either differentiate ALS from control subjects or predict disease course (slow versus fast progression). At the same time, late-stage clinical trials for ALS have failed to generate improved drug treatments for ALS patients. Incorporation of biomarkers into the ALS drug development pipeline and the use of biologic and/or imaging biomarkers in early- and late-stage ALS clinical trials have been absent and only recently pursued in early-phase clinical trials. Further clinical research studies are needed to validate biomarkers for disease progression and develop biomarkers that can help determine that a drug has reached its target within the central nervous system. In this review we summarize recent progress in biomarkers across ALS model systems and patient population, and highlight continued research directions for biomarkers that stratify the patient population to enrich for patients that may best respond to a drug candidate, monitor disease progression and track drug responses in clinical trials. It is crucial that we further develop and validate ALS biomarkers and incorporate these biomarkers into the ALS drug development process. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ALS complex pathogenesis.

  7. [Role of Academia in Regulatory Science for Global Drug Development].

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Katsura; Takenaka, Toichi

    2016-01-01

    As diseases know no national boundaries, drug development must be designed at a global level. Drugs are highly regulated to maximize the benefits to public health, which is assessed on a regional basis. The complexity and diversity of stakeholders increase dramatically once multiple international regions are involved. Each stakeholder in drug development depends on customized criteria to make decisions for its own benefit. Thus, a huge gap exists among drug discovery researchers, developers, clinicians, patients, and regulatory bodies. With reasonable scientific evidence gathered and analyzed, mutual agreement can be reached. We believe that this important role of regulatory science and academic involvement will create harmony. By practicing diverse, innovative regulatory scientific research, academia has the potential to become the core of communication among various stakeholder groups. Furthermore, another important responsibility of academia, i.e., knowledge, provides additional aspects to the field of drug development. Those who understand regulatory science can contribute to the efficient achievement of innovative, effective, safe drugs. Thus, research and education are essential roles of academia to allow a better understanding of the balance between benefits and risks. Communication and knowledge will promote the prompt delivery of better medical products to patients in need.

  8. Weaving single photon imaging into new drug development.

    PubMed

    Mozley, P David

    2005-01-01

    The specific aim of this review is to assess the potential contribution of single photon emitting radiopharmaceutical technologies to new drug development. For each phase of therapeutic drug development, published literature was sought that shows single photon emitters can add value by quantifying pharmacokinetics, visualizing mechanisms of drug action, estimating therapeutic safety indices, or measuring dose-dependent pharmacodynamic effects. Not any published reports were found that describe using nuclear medicine techniques to help manage the progress of a new drug development program. As a consequence, most of the case in favor of weaving single photon imaging into the process had to be built on extrapolations from studies that showed feasibility post hoc. The strongest evidence of potential value was found for drug candidates that hope to influence diseases characterized by cell proliferation or cell death, particularly in the fields of oncology, cardiology, nephrology, and inflammation. Receptor occupancy studies were observed to occasionally offer unique advantages over analogous studies with positron emission tomography (PET). Enough hard data sets were found to justify the costs of using single photon imaging in a variety of new drug development paradigms.

  9. Pharmacologic basis for developing rational drug regimens for elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, P B; Roberts, J

    1983-03-01

    Changes in responsiveness with age have been observed for autonomic drugs (agonists as well as antagonists, analgesics, anticonvulsants, bronchodilators, hypoglycemics, corticosteroids, and virtually every other group of drugs). As indicated earlier, however, this review is not meant to present an exhaustive treatment of the area, but rather to focus attention on the factors that contribute to alterations in sensitivity. As a secondary aim, the review serves to focus attention on the problem of adverse drug reactions, particularly those related to the practice of polypharmacy, which compounds the problem through drug interactions. As indicated in the introduction, adverse drug reactions (undesired or unwanted effects of drugs) occur more frequently in the older patient than in the young one. In the elderly, this relates to increased use of drugs, polypharmacy, diminution in the function of organs which play a role in drug distribution and elimination, and poor patient compliance. Drugs which most often result in adverse reactions in the elderly have been listed by Lamy (Table 1). It is of significance that this list includes many drugs that are obtainable over the counter without prescription, such as aspirin and antacids. Because of the widespread practice of polypharmacy in the elderly, there is an increased potential for drug interactions. Examples of drugs and the mechanisms whereby interactions occur, which are of particular significance in geriatric therapeutics, are provided in Table 3. Since monographs summarizing drug interactions have been available for a number of years, it is somewhat surprising that the magnitude of the problem is still so great. It appears clear that the more we understand about the basic changes that occur in the physiology, biochemistry, and structure of an organism as it ages, and the more we learn about basic pharmacologic principles, the better we can combine the knowledge toward the development of rational therapeutic drug

  10. Drugs in development for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Tom H; Brotchie, Jonathan M

    2004-07-01

    Pharmacological treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) is entering a new and exciting era. Real promise now exists for the clinical application of a large range of molecules in development that will combat different aspects and stages of the condition. These include methyl- and ethyl-esterified forms of L-dopa (etilevodopa and melevodopa), inhibitors of enzymes such as monoamine oxidase type-B (eg, rasagiline), catechol-O-methyl transferase (eg, BIA-3202) and the monoamine re-uptake mechanism (eg, brasofensine). In addition, a range of full and partial dopamine agonists (eg, sumanirole, piribedil and BP-897) and their new formulations, for example, patch delivery systems (eg, rotigotine) are being developed. We also highlight non-dopaminergic treatments that will have wide ranging applications in the treatment of PD and L-dopa-induced dyskinesia. These include alpha2 adrenergic receptor antagonists (eg, fipamezole), adenosine A2A receptor antagonists (eg, istradefylline), AMPA receptor antagonists (eg, talampanel), neuronal synchronization modulators (eg, levetiracetam) and agents that interact with serotonergic systems such as 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A agonists (eg, sarizotan) and 5-HT2A antagonists (eg, quetiapine). Lastly, we examine a growing number of neuroprotective agents that seek to halt or even reverse disease progression. These include anti-apoptotic kinase inhibitors (eg, CEP-1347), modulators of mitochondrial function (eg, creatine), growth factors (eg, leteprinim), neuroimmunophilins (eg, V-10367), estrogens (eg, MITO-4509), c-synuclein oligomerization inhibitors (eg, PAN-408) and sonic hedgehog ligands.

  11. Myeloperoxidase: a target for new drug development?

    PubMed

    Malle, E; Furtmüller, P G; Sattler, W; Obinger, C

    2007-11-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), a member of the haem peroxidase-cyclooxygenase superfamily, is abundantly expressed in neutrophils and to a lesser extent in monocytes and certain type of macrophages. MPO participates in innate immune defence mechanism through formation of microbicidal reactive oxidants and diffusible radical species. A unique activity of MPO is its ability to use chloride as a cosubstrate with hydrogen peroxide to generate chlorinating oxidants such as hypochlorous acid, a potent antimicrobial agent. However, evidence has emerged that MPO-derived oxidants contribute to tissue damage and the initiation and propagation of acute and chronic vascular inflammatory disease. The fact that circulating levels of MPO have been shown to predict risks for major adverse cardiac events and that levels of MPO-derived chlorinated compounds are specific biomarkers for disease progression, has attracted considerable interest in the development of therapeutically useful MPO inhibitors. Today, detailed information on the structure of ferric MPO and its complexes with low- and high-spin ligands is available. This, together with a thorough understanding of reaction mechanisms including redox properties of intermediates, enables a rationale attempt in developing specific MPO inhibitors that still maintain MPO activity during host defence and bacterial killing but interfere with pathophysiologically persistent activation of MPO. The various approaches to inhibit enzyme activity of MPO and to ameliorate adverse effects of MPO-derived oxidants will be discussed. Emphasis will be put on mechanism-based inhibitors and high-throughput screening of compounds as well as the discussion of physiologically useful HOCl scavengers.

  12. Minimizing repolarization-related proarrhythmic risk in drug development and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Attila S; Nattel, Stanley

    2010-03-26

    electrocardiographic intervals (particularly QT) and cardiac rhythm are often needed, both prior to drug approval and after successful introduction on the market (postmarketing surveillance). The successful avoidance of proarrhythmic complications is a shared responsibility of the innovative pharmaceutical industry, regulatory authorities, partners in the clinical drug development phase and practicing physicians. This paper reviews the principal forms of proarrhythmia and the methods that can be used to minimize the risk of proarrhythmia in drug development and clinical practice, with particular emphasis on the most common and problematic form, acquired LQTS.

  13. Heteroblastic development and shade-avoidance in response to blue and red light signals in Acacia implexa.

    PubMed

    Forster, Michael A; Bonser, Stephen P

    2009-01-01

    Information from blue (400-500 nm) and red (660-730 nm) wavelengths is used by plants to determine proximity of neighbors or actual shading. Plants undergo trait changes in order to out-compete neighbors or accommodate shading. Heteroblasty, the dramatic shift from one leaf type to another during juvenility, can be influenced by the light environment although it is unknown whether cues from blue or red (or both) are driving the developmental process. Seedlings of three populations of Acacia implexa (Mimosaceae) collected from low, medium and high rainfall habitats were grown in a factorial design of high/low blue and red light to determine how light signals affect heteroblasty and patterns of biomass allocation. Low blue light significantly delayed heteroblasty in the low rainfall population and low red light significantly delayed in the low and high rainfall populations. Low blue light increased stem elongation and decreased root biomass whereas low red light induced a strong shade-avoidance response. These results were consistent across populations although the low rainfall population showed greater trait variability in response to red light signals. We conclude that red light conveys a greater information signal than blue light that affects heteroblasty and seedling development in A. implexa.

  14. Clinical development of imatinib: an anticancer drug

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Dipanjan; Gurule, Sanjay; Lahiry, Abhiroop; Anand, Amit; Khuroo, Arshad; Monif, Tausif

    2016-01-01

    Background: A novel and accurate high-throughput tandem mass spectroscopic method has been developed and validated for determination of imatinib, a protein-tyrosine kinase inhibitor against chronic myeloid leukemia. Materials & methods: Chromatographic separation was carried on XTerra® RP18 column (150 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 µm particle size) manufactured by Waters Corporation, MA, USA. The detection was performed on a triple quadruple tandem mass spectrometer by multiple reactions monitoring mode via electrospray ionization source. Results: The selective and sensitive method was linear in the concentration range of 9.57–4513.29 ng/ml and reported no matrix effect. Conclusion: The mean Cmax was found to be 10–15% lower in European subjects as compared with Indian subjects. PMID:28031942

  15. Polymeric drugs: Advances in the development of pharmacologically active polymers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Yu, Fei; Chen, Yi; Oupický, David

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic polymers play a critical role in pharmaceutical discovery and development. Current research and applications of pharmaceutical polymers are mainly focused on their functions as excipients and inert carriers of other pharmacologically active agents. This review article surveys recent advances in alternative pharmaceutical use of polymers as pharmacologically active agents known as polymeric drugs. Emphasis is placed on the benefits of polymeric drugs that are associated with their macromolecular character and their ability to explore biologically relevant multivalency processes. We discuss the main therapeutic uses of polymeric drugs as sequestrants, antimicrobials, antivirals, and anticancer and anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:26410809

  16. The Valley of Death in anticancer drug development: a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Adams, David J

    2012-04-01

    The past decade has seen an explosion in our understanding of cancer biology and with it many new potential disease targets. Nonetheless, our ability to translate these advances into therapies is poor, with a failure rate approaching 90%. Much discussion has been devoted to this so-called 'Valley of Death' in anticancer drug development, but the problem persists. Could we have overlooked some straightforward explanations to this highly complex problem? Important aspects of tumor physiology, drug pharmacokinetics, preclinical models, drug delivery, and clinical translation are not often emphasized, but could be crucial. This perspective summarizes current views on the problem and suggests feasible alternatives.

  17. Myeloperoxidase: a target for new drug development?

    PubMed Central

    Malle, E; Furtmüller, P G; Sattler, W; Obinger, C

    2007-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), a member of the haem peroxidase-cyclooxygenase superfamily, is abundantly expressed in neutrophils and to a lesser extent in monocytes and certain type of macrophages. MPO participates in innate immune defence mechanism through formation of microbicidal reactive oxidants and diffusible radical species. A unique activity of MPO is its ability to use chloride as a cosubstrate with hydrogen peroxide to generate chlorinating oxidants such as hypochlorous acid, a potent antimicrobial agent. However, evidence has emerged that MPO-derived oxidants contribute to tissue damage and the initiation and propagation of acute and chronic vascular inflammatory disease. The fact that circulating levels of MPO have been shown to predict risks for major adverse cardiac events and that levels of MPO-derived chlorinated compounds are specific biomarkers for disease progression, has attracted considerable interest in the development of therapeutically useful MPO inhibitors. Today, detailed information on the structure of ferric MPO and its complexes with low- and high-spin ligands is available. This, together with a thorough understanding of reaction mechanisms including redox properties of intermediates, enables a rationale attempt in developing specific MPO inhibitors that still maintain MPO activity during host defence and bacterial killing but interfere with pathophysiologically persistent activation of MPO. The various approaches to inhibit enzyme activity of MPO and to ameliorate adverse effects of MPO-derived oxidants will be discussed. Emphasis will be put on mechanism-based inhibitors and high-throughput screening of compounds as well as the discussion of physiologically useful HOCl scavengers. PMID:17592500

  18. The current development of CNS drug research.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Gregers; Rujescu, Dan

    2013-08-01

    In the past few years, several high profiled pharmaceutical companies have decided to shut down major research activities within the central nervous system (CNS) area. For example, in December 2011 Novartis announced that the company is closing its neuroscience facility in Basel, Switzerland, where Novartis is headquartered (Abbott, 2011). It follows similar moves by GlaxoSmithKline and AstraZeneca, both based in the UK, which in 2010 announced the closure of major parts of their neuroscience research divisions globally (Jack, Financial Times, 4 February 2010). Also companies primarily based in the USA, Pfizer and Merck, as well as the French company Sanofi, have pulled back on research into brain disorders. This development is still proceeding, as e.g. AstraZeneca closed their CNS/pain centres (Fiercebiotech, press release, 2 February 2012). Several of the companies have launched smaller new initiatives based on studies of genetics and biomarkers, but as mental disorders such as unipolar depression impose the largest disease burden worldwide, e.g. 6.2% disability-adjusted life year of total (WHO, 2008), and current treatments do not work particularly well for many patients, this has obviously raised a number of concerns related to how the future developments should be carried out, and whether the genetic approach may be sufficient. In June 2012, the International College of Neuropsychopharmacology (http://www.cinp.org) hosted an international workshop in order to discuss and consider the consequences and implications of the withdrawal of these research activities. This paper presents the problem background together with a summary of the viewpoints of the invited speakers and recommendations for future intervention.

  19. Challenges for drug discovery and development in China.

    PubMed

    Hon, Kam Lun; Lee, Vivian W Y

    2017-01-01

    The drug development industry is restructuring worldwide in terms of the research and development process. As with pharmaceuticals in the west, China faces major challenges for drug discovery and development. Areas covered: In this review, the authors discuss anti-cancer, anti-allergy, anti-infectious, and proprietary Chinese Medicines (pCM) for various chronic diseases (such as the allergic diseases: eczema, asthma and allergic rhinitis), which remain the contemporary therapeutic strategies that are being explored and developed. Drug transporters, disease specific biomarkers, pharmacophores, bioactive natural products and pharmacogenetics are some aspects of research technologies. Proprietary Chinese medicine remains one of the most popular strategies. There is however the issue of good research documentation of efficacy versus adverse effects. China has a complex healthcare system involving a large patient pool. Expert opinion: Various factors can impact drug development in China including the concurrent use of both western and Chinese medicines, pharmacogenetic variances, lack of multidisciplinary team impact on disease management and drug safety. China may adopt the current development of big data analysis in other countries such as UK and US to build and centralize a nationwide database for better monitoring and clinical evaluation to provide more efficient care at a lower cost.

  20. PBPK modeling and simulation in drug research and development.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xiaomei; Lu, Chuang

    2016-09-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling and simulation can be used to predict the pharmacokinetic behavior of drugs in humans using preclinical data. It can also explore the effects of various physiologic parameters such as age, ethnicity, or disease status on human pharmacokinetics, as well as guide dose and dose regiment selection and aid drug-drug interaction risk assessment. PBPK modeling has developed rapidly in the last decade within both the field of academia and the pharmaceutical industry, and has become an integral tool in drug discovery and development. In this mini-review, the concept and methodology of PBPK modeling are briefly introduced. Several case studies were discussed on how PBPK modeling and simulation can be utilized through various stages of drug discovery and development. These case studies are from our own work and the literature for better understanding of the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of a drug candidate, and the applications to increase efficiency, reduce the need for animal studies, and perhaps to replace clinical trials. The regulatory acceptance and industrial practices around PBPK modeling and simulation is also discussed.

  1. The future of drug development: advancing clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Orloff, John; Douglas, Frank; Pinheiro, Jose; Levinson, Susan; Branson, Michael; Chaturvedi, Pravin; Ette, Ene; Gallo, Paul; Hirsch, Gigi; Mehta, Cyrus; Patel, Nitin; Sabir, Sameer; Springs, Stacy; Stanski, Donald; Evers, Matthias R; Fleming, Edd; Singh, Navjot; Tramontin, Tony; Golub, Howard

    2009-12-01

    Declining pharmaceutical industry productivity is well recognized by drug developers, regulatory authorities and patient groups. A key part of the problem is that clinical studies are increasingly expensive, driven by the rising costs of conducting Phase II and III trials. It is therefore crucial to ensure that these phases of drug development are conducted more efficiently and cost-effectively, and that attrition rates are reduced. In this article, we argue that moving from the traditional clinical development approach based on sequential, distinct phases towards a more integrated view that uses adaptive design tools to increase flexibility and maximize the use of accumulated knowledge could have an important role in achieving these goals. Applications and examples of the use of these tools--such as Bayesian methodologies--in early- and late-stage drug development are discussed, as well as the advantages, challenges and barriers to their more widespread implementation.

  2. Reinforcement, dopamine and rodent models in drug development for ADHD.

    PubMed

    Tripp, Gail; Wickens, Jeff

    2012-07-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) presents special challenges for drug development. Current treatment with psychostimulants and nonstimulants is effective, but their mechanism of action beyond the cellular level is incompletely understood. We review evidence suggesting that altered reinforcement mechanisms are a fundamental characteristic of ADHD. We show that a deficit in the transfer of dopamine signals from established positive reinforcers to cues that predict such reinforcers may underlie these altered reinforcement mechanisms, and in turn explain key symptoms of ADHD. We argue that the neural substrates controlling the excitation and inhibition of dopamine neurons during the transfer process are a promising target for future drug development. There is a need to develop animal models and behavioral paradigms that can be used to experimentally investigate these mechanisms and their effects on sensitivity to reinforcement. More specific and selective targeting of drug development may be possible through this approach.

  3. Development of biosimilars in an era of oncologic drug shortages

    PubMed Central

    Li, Edward; Subramanian, Janakiraman; Anderson, Scott; Thomas, Dolca; McKinley, Jason; Jacobs, Ira A

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic shortages of various pharmaceuticals and particularly of sterile injectable products are being reported on a global scale, prompting evaluation of more effective strategies to manage current shortages and development of new, high-quality pharmaceutical products to mitigate the risk of potential future shortages. Oncology drugs such as liposomal doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil represent examples of first-choice drugs critically affected by shortages. Survey results indicate that the majority of hospitals and practicing oncologists have experienced drug shortages, which may have compromised patient safety and clinical outcomes, and increased health care costs, due to delays or changes in treatment regimens. Clinical trials evaluating novel agents in combination with standard-of-care drugs are also being affected by drug shortages. Clinical and ethical considerations on treatment objectives, drug indication, and availability of alternative options may help in prioritizing cancer patients involved in active drug shortages. The United States Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency have identified manufacturing problems, delays in supply, and lack of available active ingredients as the most frequent causes of recent or ongoing drug shortages, and have released specific guidance to monitor, manage, and reduce the risk of shortages. The upcoming loss of exclusivity for a number of anticancer biologics, together with the introduction of an abbreviated approval pathway for biosimilars, raises the question of whether these products will be vulnerable to shortages. Future supply by reliable manufacturers of well characterized biosimilar monoclonal antibodies, developed in compliance with regulatory and manufacturing guidelines and with substantial investments, may contribute to prevent future biologics shortages and ensure access to effective and safe treatment options for patients with cancer. Preclinical and clinical characterization

  4. Mechanistic systems modeling to guide drug discovery and development

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Brian J.; Papin, Jason A.; Musante, Cynthia J.

    2013-01-01

    A crucial question that must be addressed in the drug development process is whether the proposed therapeutic target will yield the desired effect in the clinical population. Pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies place a large investment on research and development, long before confirmatory data are available from human trials. Basic science has greatly expanded the computable knowledge of disease processes, both through the generation of large omics data sets and a compendium of studies assessing cellular and systemic responses to physiologic and pathophysiologic stimuli. Given inherent uncertainties in drug development, mechanistic systems models can better inform target selection and the decision process for advancing compounds through preclinical and clinical research. PMID:22999913

  5. Single-cell analysis tools for drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Heath, James R; Ribas, Antoni; Mischel, Paul S

    2016-03-01

    The genetic, functional or compositional heterogeneity of healthy and diseased tissues presents major challenges in drug discovery and development. Such heterogeneity hinders the design of accurate disease models and can confound the interpretation of biomarker levels and of patient responses to specific therapies. The complex nature of virtually all tissues has motivated the development of tools for single-cell genomic, transcriptomic and multiplex proteomic analyses. Here, we review these tools and assess their advantages and limitations. Emerging applications of single cell analysis tools in drug discovery and development, particularly in the field of oncology, are discussed.

  6. Development of a novel osmotically driven drug delivery system for weakly basic drugs.

    PubMed

    Guthmann, C; Lipp, R; Wagner, T; Kranz, H

    2008-06-01

    The drug substance SAG/ZK has a short biological half-life and because of its weakly basic nature a strong pH-dependent solubility was observed. The aim of this study was to develop a controlled release (cr) multiple unit pellet formulation for SAG/ZK with pH-independent drug release. Pellets with a drug load of 60% were prepared by extrusion/spheronization followed by cr-film coating with an extended release polyvinyl acetate/polyvinyl pyrrolidone dispersion (Kollidon SR 30 D). To overcome the problem of pH-dependent drug release the pellets were then coated with a second layer of an enteric methacrylic acid and ethyl acrylate copolymer (Kollicoat MAE 30 DP). To increase the drug release rates from the double layered cr-pellets different osmotically active ionic (sodium and potassium chloride) and nonionic (sucrose) additives were incorporated into the pellet core. Drug release studies were performed in media of different osmotic pressure to clarify the main release mechanism. Extended release coated pellets of SAG/ZK demonstrated pH-dependent drug release. Applying a second enteric coat on top of the extended release film coat failed in order to achieve pH-independent drug release. Already low enteric polymer levels on top of the extended release coated pellets decreased drug release rates at pH 1 drastically, thus resulting in a reversal of the pH-dependency (faster release at pH 6.8 than in 0.1N HCl). The addition of osmotically active ingredients (sodium and potassium chloride, and sucrose) increased the imbibing of aqueous fluids into the pellet cores thus providing a saturated drug solution inside the beads and increasing drug concentration gradients. In addition, for these pellets increased formation of pores and cracks in the polymer coating was observed. Hence drug release rates from double layered beads increased significantly. Therefore, pH-independent osmotically driven SAG/ZK release was achieved from pellets containing osmotically active ingredients

  7. Impact of biomarker development on drug safety assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Marrer, Estelle; Dieterle, Frank

    2010-03-01

    Drug safety has always been a key aspect of drug development. Recently, the Vioxx case and several cases of serious adverse events being linked to high-profile products have increased the importance of drug safety, especially in the eyes of drug development companies and global regulatory agencies. Safety biomarkers are increasingly being seen as helping to provide the clarity, predictability, and certainty needed to gain confidence in decision making: early-stage projects can be stopped quicker, late-stage projects become less risky. Public and private organizations are investing heavily in terms of time, money and manpower on safety biomarker development. An illustrative and 'door opening' safety biomarker success story is the recent recognition of kidney safety biomarkers for pre-clinical and limited translational contexts by FDA and EMEA. This milestone achieved for kidney biomarkers and the 'know how' acquired is being transferred to other organ toxicities, namely liver, heart, vascular system. New technologies and molecular-based approaches, i.e., molecular pathology as a complement to the classical toolbox, allow promising discoveries in the safety biomarker field. This review will focus on the utility and use of safety biomarkers all along drug development, highlighting the present gaps and opportunities identified in organ toxicity monitoring. A last part will be dedicated to safety biomarker development in general, from identification to diagnostic tests, using the kidney safety biomarkers success as an illustrative example.

  8. Accessing external innovation in drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Tufféry, Pierre

    2015-06-01

    A decline in the productivity of the pharmaceutical industry research and development (R&D) pipeline has highlighted the need to reconsider the classical strategies of drug discovery and development, which are based on internal resources, and to identify new means to improve the drug discovery process. Accepting that the combination of internal and external ideas can improve innovation, ways to access external innovation, that is, opening projects to external contributions, have recently been sought. In this review, the authors look at a number of external innovation opportunities. These include increased interactions with academia via academic centers of excellence/innovation centers, better communication on projects using crowdsourcing or social media and new models centered on external providers such as built-to-buy startups or virtual pharmaceutical companies. The buzz for accessing external innovation relies on the pharmaceutical industry's major challenge to improve R&D productivity, a conjuncture favorable to increase interactions with academia and new business models supporting access to external innovation. So far, access to external innovation has mostly been considered during early stages of drug development, and there is room for enhancement. First outcomes suggest that external innovation should become part of drug development in the long term. However, the balance between internal and external developments in drug discovery can vary largely depending on the company strategies.

  9. Drug Design, Development, and Delivery: An Interdisciplinary Course on Pharmaceuticals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prausnitz, Mark R.; Bommarius, Andreas S.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a new interdisciplinary course on pharmaceuticals to address needs of undergraduate and graduate students in chemical engineering and other departments. This course introduces drug design, development, and delivery in an integrated fashion that provides scientific depth in context with broader impacts in business, policy, and ethics.…

  10. Drug Design, Development, and Delivery: An Interdisciplinary Course on Pharmaceuticals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prausnitz, Mark R.; Bommarius, Andreas S.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a new interdisciplinary course on pharmaceuticals to address needs of undergraduate and graduate students in chemical engineering and other departments. This course introduces drug design, development, and delivery in an integrated fashion that provides scientific depth in context with broader impacts in business, policy, and ethics.…

  11. Development of Human Membrane Transporters: Drug Disposition and Pharmacogenetics.

    PubMed

    Mooij, Miriam G; Nies, Anne T; Knibbe, Catherijne A J; Schaeffeler, Elke; Tibboel, Dick; Schwab, Matthias; de Wildt, Saskia N

    2016-05-01

    Membrane transporters play an essential role in the transport of endogenous and exogenous compounds, and consequently they mediate the uptake, distribution, and excretion of many drugs. The clinical relevance of transporters in drug disposition and their effect in adults have been shown in drug-drug interaction and pharmacogenomic studies. Little is known, however, about the ontogeny of human membrane transporters and their roles in pediatric pharmacotherapy. As they are involved in the transport of endogenous substrates, growth and development may be important determinants of their expression and activity. This review presents an overview of our current knowledge on human membrane transporters in pediatric drug disposition and effect. Existing pharmacokinetic and pharmacogenetic data on membrane substrate drugs frequently used in children are presented and related, where possible, to existing ex vivo data, providing a basis for developmental patterns for individual human membrane transporters. As data for individual transporters are currently still scarce, there is a striking information gap regarding the role of human membrane transporters in drug therapy in children.

  12. Flip-flop pharmacokinetics – delivering a reversal of disposition: challenges and opportunities during drug development

    PubMed Central

    Yáñez, Jaime A; Remsberg, Connie M; Sayre, Casey L; Forrest, M Laird; Davies, Neal M

    2011-01-01

    Flip-flop pharmacokinetics is a phenomenon often encountered with extravascularly administered drugs. Occurrence of flip-flop spans preclinical to human studies. The purpose of this article is to analyze both the pharmacokinetic interpretation errors and opportunities underlying the presence of flip-flop pharmacokinetics during drug development. Flip-flop occurs when the rate of absorption is slower than the rate of elimination. If it is not recognized, it can create difficulties in the acquisition and interpretation of pharmacokinetic parameters. When flip-flop is expected or discovered, a longer duration of sampling may be necessary in order to avoid overestimation of fraction of dose absorbed. Common culprits of flip-flop disposition are modified dosage formulations; however, formulation characteristics such as the drug chemical entities themselves or the incorporated excipients can also cause the phenomenon. Yet another contributing factor is the physiological makeup of the extravascular site of administration. In this article, these causes of flip-flop pharmacokinetics are discussed with incorporation of relevant examples and the implications for drug development outlined. PMID:21837267

  13. Development of novel small molecules for imaging and drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yanting

    Small organic molecules, including small molecule based fluorescent probes, small molecule based drugs or prodrugs, and smart multifunctional fluorescent drug delivery systems play important roles in biological research, drug discovery, and clinical practices. Despite the significant progress made in these fields, the development of novel and diverse small molecules is needed to meet various demands for research and clinical applications. My Ph.D study focuses on the development of novel functional molecules for recognition, imaging and drug release. In the first part, a turn-on fluorescent probe is developed for the detection of intracellular adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) levels based on multiplexing recognitions. Considering the unique and complicated structure of ATP molecules, a fluorescent probe has been implemented with improved sensitivity and selectivity due to two synergistic binding recognitions by incorporating of 2, 2'-dipicolylamine (Dpa)-Zn(II) for targeting of phospho anions and phenylboronic acid group for cis-diol moiety. The novel probe is able to detect intracellular ATP levels in SH-SY5Y cells. Meanwhile, the advantages of multiplexing recognition design concept have been demonstrated using two control molecules. In the second part, a prodrug system is developed to deliver multiple drugs within one small molecule entity. The prodrug is designed by using 1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl (NPE) as phototrigger, and biphenol biquaternary ammonium as the prodrug. With controlled photo activation, both DNA cross-linking agents mechlorethamine and o-quinone methide are delivered and released at the preferred site, leading to efficient DNA cross-links formation and cell death. The prodrug shows negligible cytotoxicity towards normal skin cells (Hekn cells) with and without UV activation, but displays potent activity towards cancer cells (HeLa cells) upon UV activation. The multiple drug release system may hold a great potential for practical application. In the

  14. The basics of preclinical drug development for neurodegenerative disease indications.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Karen L; Spack, Edward G

    2009-06-12

    Preclinical development encompasses the activities that link drug discovery in the laboratory to initiation of human clinical trials. Preclinical studies can be designed to identify a lead candidate from several hits; develop the best procedure for new drug scale-up; select the best formulation; determine the route, frequency, and duration of exposure; and ultimately support the intended clinical trial design. The details of each preclinical development package can vary, but all have some common features. Rodent and nonrodent mammalian models are used to delineate the pharmacokinetic profile and general safety, as well as to identify toxicity patterns. One or more species may be used to determine the drug's mean residence time in the body, which depends on inherent absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion properties. For drugs intended to treat Alzheimer's disease or other brain-targeted diseases, the ability of a drug to cross the blood brain barrier may be a key issue. Toxicology and safety studies identify potential target organs for adverse effects and define the Therapeutic Index to set the initial starting doses in clinical trials. Pivotal preclinical safety studies generally require regulatory oversight as defined by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Good Laboratory Practices and international guidelines, including the International Conference on Harmonization. Concurrent preclinical development activities include developing the Clinical Plan and preparing the new drug product, including the associated documentation to meet stringent FDA Good Manufacturing Practices regulatory guidelines. A wide range of commercial and government contract options are available for investigators seeking to advance their candidate(s). Government programs such as the Small Business Innovative Research and Small Business Technology Transfer grants and the National Institutes of Health Rapid Access to Interventional Development Pilot Program provide funding and

  15. PET in anti-cancer drug development and therapy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Lal, Neena

    2007-11-01

    Anti-cancer drug development is a major area of research. Monitoring of response to newer anti-cancer drugs has undergone an evolution from structural imaging modalities to targeting functional metabolic activity at cellular level to better define responsive and non-responsive cancerous tissue. This review article highlights the contribution of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in this field. PET holds a promising role in the future by providing us information pertaining to the drugs effectiveness early in the course of therapy, so that side effects and expenses can be reduced substantially. PET has been used to measure changes in drug induced metabolism, cellular proliferation and tissue perfusion. Also changes induced by immuno-modulating drugs such as apoptosis, telomere activity, growth factor levels and many more can be studied using specific radiolabelled PET tracers whereas conventional imaging modalities which detect changes in tumor size and residual tissue histopathology may not prove useful in such scenario. In future, most PET scanners will be replaced by Hybrid PET-CT scanners, which provide functional and structural information in the same setting. In addition, PET-CT improves characterization of equivocal lesions and decreases interobserver variability. The most important recent patents concerning role of PET in drug development have been presented.

  16. [Alternatives to the drug research and development model].

    PubMed

    Velásquez, Germán

    2015-03-01

    One-third of the global population lacks access to medications; the situation is worse in poor countries, where up to 50% of the population lacks access. The failure of current incentive systems based in intellectual property to offer the necessary pharmaceutical products, especially in the global south, is a call to action. Problems related to drug access cannot be solved solely through improvements or modifications in the existing incentive models. The intellectual property system model does not offer sufficient innovation for developing countries; new mechanisms that effectively promote innovation and drug access simultaneously are needed. A binding international agreement on research and development, negotiated under the auspices of the World Health Organization, could provide an adequate framework for guaranteeing priority-setting, coordination, and sustainable financing of drugs at reasonable prices for developing countries.

  17. [Educative game on drugs for blind individuals: development and assessment].

    PubMed

    Mariano, Monaliza Ribeiro; Rebouças, Cristiana Brasil de Almeida; Pagliuca, Lorita Marlena Freitag

    2013-08-01

    Study aimed to develop and assess an educational game on psychoactive drugs accessible to blind individuals, conducted in three steps: development of the educative game, evaluation by three special education experts, and assessment by twelve blind individuals. As a result, a board game called Drugs: staying clean was developed. In the Alpha version, experts made suggestions regarding the game rules and instructions and the board base, including square texture, game pieces, and Braille writing. In Beta version, we proceeded to the assessment by the blind participants, who suggested changes in the square texture and the addition of Velcro-type material to fix the counters on the board. Then, the Gamma version was played by the last pairs of blind players and was considered by them to be adequate. In the evaluation of the experts, the game was appropriate, as it allowed access to information on psychoactive drugs in a ludic and playful manner.

  18. Recent strategies for drug development in fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, David E; Malemud, Charles J

    2016-12-01

    The US Federal Drug Administration (FDA) approved 3 medications for treating fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). There have been no additional FDA approvals since January 2009 and the efficacy of the FDA-approved medications for FMS has been questioned. Areas covered: The "search for studies" tool using clinicaltrials.gov and PubMed were employed. The term, "fibromyalgia" was used for clinicaltrials.gov. The terms employed for PubMed were "Name-of-Drug Fibromyalgia", "Fibromyalgia Treatment" or "Fibromyalgia Drug Treatment." Clinical trials were reviewed if they were prospective and blinded, and if they employed a comparator, either placebo or another pharmaceutical. Expert commentary: Progress toward standardizing the outcome measures for FMS clinical trials have been made but challenges remain. Several pharmaceutical candidates for FMS have been tested since 2009. The results of these studies with potential novel targets for drug development for FMS were reviewed including the results of trials with sodium oxybate, quetiapine, esreboxetine, nabilone, memantine, naltrexone, and melatonin.

  19. Nanodiamonds: The intersection of nanotechnology, drug development, and personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Dean; Wang, Chung-Huei Katherine; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of nanomedicine in cellular, preclinical, and clinical studies has led to exciting advances ranging from fundamental to translational, particularly in the field of cancer. Many of the current barriers in cancer treatment are being successfully addressed using nanotechnology-modified compounds. These barriers include drug resistance leading to suboptimal intratumoral retention, poor circulation times resulting in decreased efficacy, and off-target toxicity, among others. The first clinical nanomedicine advances to overcome these issues were based on monotherapy, where small-molecule and nucleic acid delivery demonstrated substantial improvements over unmodified drug administration. Recent preclinical studies have shown that combination nanotherapies, composed of either multiple classes of nanomaterials or a single nanoplatform functionalized with several therapeutic agents, can image and treat tumors with improved efficacy over single-compound delivery. Among the many promising nanomaterials that are being developed, nanodiamonds have received increasing attention because of the unique chemical-mechanical properties on their faceted surfaces. More recently, nanodiamond-based drug delivery has been included in the rational and systematic design of optimal therapeutic combinations using an implicitly de-risked drug development platform technology, termed Phenotypic Personalized Medicine–Drug Development (PPM-DD). The application of PPM-DD to rapidly identify globally optimized drug combinations successfully addressed a pervasive challenge confronting all aspects of drug development, both nano and non-nano. This review will examine various nanomaterials and the use of PPM-DD to optimize the efficacy and safety of current and future cancer treatment. How this platform can accelerate combinatorial nanomedicine and the broader pharmaceutical industry toward unprecedented clinical impact will also be discussed. PMID:26601235

  20. Nanodiamonds: The intersection of nanotechnology, drug development, and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Ho, Dean; Wang, Chung-Huei Katherine; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2015-08-01

    The implementation of nanomedicine in cellular, preclinical, and clinical studies has led to exciting advances ranging from fundamental to translational, particularly in the field of cancer. Many of the current barriers in cancer treatment are being successfully addressed using nanotechnology-modified compounds. These barriers include drug resistance leading to suboptimal intratumoral retention, poor circulation times resulting in decreased efficacy, and off-target toxicity, among others. The first clinical nanomedicine advances to overcome these issues were based on monotherapy, where small-molecule and nucleic acid delivery demonstrated substantial improvements over unmodified drug administration. Recent preclinical studies have shown that combination nanotherapies, composed of either multiple classes of nanomaterials or a single nanoplatform functionalized with several therapeutic agents, can image and treat tumors with improved efficacy over single-compound delivery. Among the many promising nanomaterials that are being developed, nanodiamonds have received increasing attention because of the unique chemical-mechanical properties on their faceted surfaces. More recently, nanodiamond-based drug delivery has been included in the rational and systematic design of optimal therapeutic combinations using an implicitly de-risked drug development platform technology, termed Phenotypic Personalized Medicine-Drug Development (PPM-DD). The application of PPM-DD to rapidly identify globally optimized drug combinations successfully addressed a pervasive challenge confronting all aspects of drug development, both nano and non-nano. This review will examine various nanomaterials and the use of PPM-DD to optimize the efficacy and safety of current and future cancer treatment. How this platform can accelerate combinatorial nanomedicine and the broader pharmaceutical industry toward unprecedented clinical impact will also be discussed.

  1. Development and characterization of an orodispersible film containing drug nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bao-de; Shen, Cheng-ying; Yuan, Xu-dong; Bai, Jin-xia; Lv, Qing-yuan; Xu, He; Dai, Ling; Yu, Chao; Han, Jin; Yuan, Hai-long

    2013-11-01

    In this study, a novel orodispersible film (ODF) containing drug nanoparticles was developed with the goal of transforming drug nanosuspensions into a solid dosage form and enhancing oral bioavailability of drugs with poor water solubility. Nanosuspensions were prepared by high pressure homogenization and then transformed into ODF containing drug nanoparticles by mixing with hydroxypropyl methylcellulose solution containing microcrystalline cellulose, low substituted hydroxypropylcellulose and PEG-400 followed by film casting and drying. Herpetrione, a novel and potent antiviral agent with poor water solubility that extracted from Herpetospermum caudigerum, was chosen as a model drug and studied systematically. The uniformity of dosage units of the preparation was acceptable according to the criteria of Japanese Pharmacopoeia 15. The ODF was disintegrated in water within 30s with reconstituted nanosuspensions particle size of 280 ± 11 nm, which was similar to that of drug nanosuspensions, indicating a good redispersibility of the fast dissolving film. Result of X-ray diffraction showed that HPE in the ODF was in the amorphous state. In the in vitro dissolution test, the ODF containing HPE nanoparticles showed an increased dissolution velocity markedly. In the pharmacokinetics study in rats, compared to HPE coarse suspensions, the ODF containing HPE nanoparticles exhibited significant increase in AUC0-24h, Cmax and decrease in Tmax, MRT. The result revealed that the ODF containing drug nanoparticles may provide a potential opportunity in transforming drug nanosuspensions into a solid dosage form as well as enhancing the dissolution rate and oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. African Genetic Diversity: Implications for Cytochrome P450-mediated Drug Metabolism and Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Rajman, Iris; Knapp, Laura; Morgan, Thomas; Masimirembwa, Collen

    2017-03-01

    Genetic diversity is greater in Africa than in other continental populations. Genetic variability in genes encoding drug metabolizing enzymes may contribute to the high numbers of adverse drug reactions reported in Africa. We reviewed publications (1995-April 2016) reporting frequencies of known cytochrome P450 (CYP) variants in African populations. Using principal components analysis (PCA) we identified CYP alleles of potential clinical relevance with a marked difference in distribution in Africa, compared with Asian and Caucasian populations. These were CYP2B6*6, CYP2C8*2, CYP2D6*3, CYP2D6*17, CYP2D6*29, CYP3A5*6, and CYP3A5*7. We show clearly that there is greater diversity in CYP distribution in Africa than in other continental populations and identify a need for optimization of drug therapy and drug development there. Further pharmacogenetic studies are required to confirm the CYP distributions we identified using PCA, to discover uniquely African alleles and to identify populations at a potentially increased risk of drug-induced adverse events or drug inefficacy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Benefits of pharmacogenomics in drug development-earlier launch of drugs and less adverse events.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Wataru; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2010-08-01

    Currently, pharmaceutical companies are reluctant to introduce pharmacogenomics (PGx) in their practice, since cost-benefit of PGx is obscure and methodology to use PGx in drug development has not been fully established yet. The purpose of this study is to investigate advantages obtained by introducing PGx in clinical trials. Particularly, taking Warfarin as an example, we investigate benefits of Enrichment effect that raises response rate of the drug by PGx. When response rate is raised by only 5%, cost of a clinical trial can be reduced to about 40% of a conventional clinical trial. Furthermore, since period necessary for a trial also can be reduced, development period can be shortened by about 750 days. In summary, PGx enables earlier launch of a drug with less cost, representing benefit to pharmaceutical companies, patients and public as a whole.

  4. Assessment of cognitive safety in clinical drug development

    PubMed Central

    Roiser, Jonathan P.; Nathan, Pradeep J.; Mander, Adrian P.; Adusei, Gabriel; Zavitz, Kenton H.; Blackwell, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is increasingly recognised as an important potential adverse effect of medication. However, many drug development programmes do not incorporate sensitive cognitive measurements. Here, we review the rationale for cognitive safety assessment, and explain several basic methodological principles for measuring cognition during clinical drug development, including study design and statistical analysis, from Phase I through to postmarketing. The crucial issue of how cognition should be assessed is emphasized, especially the sensitivity of measurement. We also consider how best to interpret the magnitude of any identified effects, including comparison with benchmarks. We conclude by discussing strategies for the effective communication of cognitive risks. PMID:26610416

  5. Three-Dimensional Cell Cultures in Drug Discovery and Development

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ye; Eglen, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    The past decades have witnessed significant efforts toward the development of three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures as systems that better mimic in vivo physiology. Today, 3D cell cultures are emerging, not only as a new tool in early drug discovery but also as potential therapeutics to treat disease. In this review, we assess leading 3D cell culture technologies and their impact on drug discovery, including spheroids, organoids, scaffolds, hydrogels, organs-on-chips, and 3D bioprinting. We also discuss the implementation of these technologies in compound identification, screening, and development, ranging from disease modeling to assessment of efficacy and safety profiles. PMID:28520521

  6. Drugs, biogenic amine targets and the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Aliya L; Stanwood, Gregg D

    2009-01-01

    Defects in the development of the brain have a profound impact on mature brain functions and underlying psychopathology. Classical neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, such as dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine, acetylcholine, glutamate and GABA, have pleiotropic effects during brain development. In other words, these molecules produce multiple diverse effects to serve as regulators of distinct cellular functions at different times in neurodevelopment. These systems are impacted upon by abuse of a variety of illicit drugs, neurotherapeutics and environmental contaminants. In this review, we describe the impact of drugs and chemicals on brain formation and function in animal models and in human populations, highlighting sensitive periods and effects that may not emerge until later in life.

  7. Scorpion Peptides: Potential Use for New Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Hmed, BenNasr; Serria, Hammami Turky; Mounir, Zeghal Khaled

    2013-01-01

    Several peptides contained in scorpion fluids showed diverse array of biological activities with high specificities to their targeted sites. Many investigations outlined their potent effects against microbes and showed their potential to modulate various biological mechanisms that are involved in immune, nervous, cardiovascular, and neoplastic diseases. Because of their important structural and functional diversity, it is projected that scorpion-derived peptides could be used to develop new specific drugs. This review summarizes relevant findings improving their use as valuable tools for new drugs development. PMID:23843786

  8. Scorpion peptides: potential use for new drug development.

    PubMed

    Hmed, Bennasr; Serria, Hammami Turky; Mounir, Zeghal Khaled

    2013-01-01

    Several peptides contained in scorpion fluids showed diverse array of biological activities with high specificities to their targeted sites. Many investigations outlined their potent effects against microbes and showed their potential to modulate various biological mechanisms that are involved in immune, nervous, cardiovascular, and neoplastic diseases. Because of their important structural and functional diversity, it is projected that scorpion-derived peptides could be used to develop new specific drugs. This review summarizes relevant findings improving their use as valuable tools for new drugs development.

  9. Low hanging fruit in infectious disease drug development.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Carl N

    2008-10-01

    Cost estimates for developing new molecular entities (NME) are reaching non-sustainable levels and coupled with increasing regulatory requirements and oversight have led many pharmaceutical sponsors to divest their anti-microbial development portfolios [Projan SJ: Why is big Pharma getting out of anti-bacterial drug discovery?Curr Opin Microbiol 2003, 6:427-430] [Spellberg B, Powers JH, Brass EP, Miller LG, Edwards JE, Jr: Trends in antimicrobial drug development: implications for the future.Clin Infect Dis 2004, 38:1279-1286]. Operational issues such as study planning and execution are significant contributors to the overall cost of drug development that can benefit from the leveraging of pre-randomization data in an evidence-based approach to protocol development, site selection and patient recruitment. For non-NME products there is even greater benefit from available data resources since these data may permit smaller and shorter study programs. There are now many available open source intelligence (OSINT) resources that are being integrated into drug development programs, permitting an evidence-based or 'operational epidemiology' approach to study planning and execution.

  10. Radiopharmaceuticals for oncology drug development: a pharmaceutical industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Philip S; Bergström, Mats

    2009-01-01

    Oncology remains an increasingly important focus of therapeutic development yet there remain many scientific and operational bottlenecks to deliver optimum treatments efficiently. Radiopharmaceuticals constitute a group of methodologies able to support the many stages of drug development. Methods such as [(18)F]-FDG-PET continue to have a role, evaluating early metabolic response to treatment and supporting more conventional assessments of disease response. Improvements over such tracers (for example, use of [(18)F]-FLT) in certain settings can also widen the impact radiotracers have on clinical development. New categories of tracers able to provide molecular insight into therapeutic intervention are likely grow and aim to remove the ambiguity of how effective a new drug is. It is likely that newer tracers able to define processes such as angiogenesis and apoptosis will supplement other methods in supporting early development decision-making and de-risking expensive, late-stage programs. Labeled drugs themselves also offer the ability to study localised pharmacokinetics in vivo and study issues such as therapeutic combinations. Owing to the significant cost, resource and time investment in developing novel tracers, new opportunities need to be closely matched with emerging drug development needs.

  11. Biological factors that impinge on Chagas disease drug development.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Amanda F; Jayawardhana, Shiromani; Lewis, Michael D; Taylor, Martin C; Kelly, John M

    2017-08-23

    Chagas disease is caused by infection with the insect-transmitted protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, and is the most important parasitic infection in Latin America. The current drugs, benznidazole and nifurtimox, are characterized by limited efficacy and toxic side-effects, and treatment failures are frequently observed. The urgent need for new therapeutic approaches is being met by a combined effort from the academic and commercial sectors, together with major input from not-for-profit drug development consortia. With the disappointing outcomes of recent clinical trials against chronic Chagas disease, it has become clear that an incomplete understanding of parasite biology and disease pathogenesis is impacting negatively on the development of more effective drugs. In addition, technical issues, including difficulties in establishing parasitological cure in both human patients and animal models, have greatly complicated the assessment of drug efficacy. Here, we outline the major questions that need to be addressed and discuss technical innovations that can be exploited to accelerate the drug development pipeline.

  12. Is Open Science the Future of Drug Development?

    PubMed

    Shaw, Daniel L

    2017-03-01

    Traditional drug development models are widely perceived as opaque and inefficient, with the cost of research and development continuing to rise even as production of new drugs stays constant. Searching for strategies to improve the drug discovery process, the biomedical research field has begun to embrace open strategies. The resulting changes are starting to reshape the industry. Open science-an umbrella term for diverse strategies that seek external input and public engagement-has become an essential tool with researchers, who are increasingly turning to collaboration, crowdsourcing, data sharing, and open sourcing to tackle some of the most pressing problems in medicine. Notable examples of such open drug development include initiatives formed around malaria and tropical disease. Open practices have found their way into the drug discovery process, from target identification and compound screening to clinical trials. This perspective argues that while open science poses some risks-which include the management of collaboration and the protection of proprietary data-these strategies are, in many cases, the more efficient and ethical way to conduct biomedical research.

  13. Is Open Science the Future of Drug Development?

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Daniel L.

    2017-01-01

    Traditional drug development models are widely perceived as opaque and inefficient, with the cost of research and development continuing to rise even as production of new drugs stays constant. Searching for strategies to improve the drug discovery process, the biomedical research field has begun to embrace open strategies. The resulting changes are starting to reshape the industry. Open science—an umbrella term for diverse strategies that seek external input and public engagement—has become an essential tool with researchers, who are increasingly turning to collaboration, crowdsourcing, data sharing, and open sourcing to tackle some of the most pressing problems in medicine. Notable examples of such open drug development include initiatives formed around malaria and tropical disease. Open practices have found their way into the drug discovery process, from target identification and compound screening to clinical trials. This perspective argues that while open science poses some risks—which include the management of collaboration and the protection of proprietary data—these strategies are, in many cases, the more efficient and ethical way to conduct biomedical research. PMID:28356902

  14. Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing and Orphan Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Mason, Matthew; Levenson, James; Quillin, John

    2017-08-01

    Since the introduction of the Orphan Drug Act (ODA) in 1983, orphan drug approvals in the United States have jumped from <100 per decade to over 200 per year. This growth is widely attributed to the financial incentives the ODA gives to companies that develop these medicines, and it is likely to continue for a unique reason: partnerships between pharmaceutical firms and direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing companies. This emerging trend is the subject of this article, which begins by considering how rare-disease drugs are regulated and the rising interest in nonclinical genetic testing. It then outlines how DTC companies analyze DNA and how their techniques benefit researchers and drug developers. Then, after an overview of the current partnerships between DTCs and drug developers, it examines concerns about privacy and cost brought up by these partnerships. The article concludes by contrasting the enormous positive potential of DTC-pharma relationships and their concomitant dangers, especially to consumer privacy and cost to the healthcare system.

  15. Recent developments in drug eluting devices with tailored interfacial properties.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Rexach, Eva; Meaurio, Emilio; Sarasua, Jose-Ramon

    2017-05-04

    Drug eluting devices have greatly evolved during past years to become fundamental products of great marketing importance in the biomedical field. There is currently a large diversity of highly specialized devices for specific applications, making the development of these devices an exciting field of research. The replacement of the former bare metal devices by devices loaded with drugs allowed the sustained and controlled release of drugs, to achieve the desired local therapeutic concentration of drug. The newer devices have been "engineered" with surfaces containing micro- and nanoscale features in a well-controlled manner, that have shown to significantly affect cellular and subcellular function of various biological systems. For example, the topography can be structured to form an antifouling surface mimicking the defense mechanisms found in nature, like the skin of the shark. In the case of bone implants, well-controlled nanostructured interfaces can promote osteoblast differentiation and matrix production, and enhance short-term and long-term osteointegration. In any case, the goal of current research is to design implants that induce controlled, guided, and rapid healing. This article reviews recent trends in the development of drug eluting devices, as well as recent developments on the micro/nanotechnology scales, and their future challenges. For this purpose medical devices have been divided according to the different systems of the body they are focused to: orthopedic devices, breathing stents, gastrointestinal and urinary systems, devices for cardiovascular diseases, neuronal implants, and wound dressings. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Liposomes and nanotechnology in drug development: focus on neurological targets

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Cabrer, Pedro; Campos, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Neurological diseases represent a medical, social, and economic problem of paramount importance in developed countries. Although their etiology is generally known, developing therapeutic interventions for the central nervous system is challenging due to the impermeability of the blood–brain barrier. Thus, the fight against neurological diseases usually struggles “at the gates” of the brain. Flooding the bloodstream with drugs, where only a minor fraction reaches its target therapeutic site, is an inefficient, expensive, and dangerous procedure, because of the risk of side effects at nontargeted sites. Currently, advances in the field of nanotechnology have enabled development of a generation of multifunctional molecular platforms that are capable of transporting drugs across the blood–brain barrier, targeting specific cell types or functional states within the brain, releasing drugs in a controlled manner, and enabling visualization of processes in vivo using conventional imaging systems. The marriage between drug delivery and molecular imaging disciplines has resulted in a relatively new discipline, known as theranostics, which represents the basis of the concept of personalized medicine. In this study, we review the concepts of the blood–brain barrier and the strategies used to traverse/bypass it, the role of nanotechnology in theranostics, the wide range of nanoparticles (with emphasis on liposomes) that can be used as stealth drug carriers, imaging probes and targeting devices for the treatment of neurological diseases, and the targets and targeting strategies envisaged in the treatment of different types of brain pathology. PMID:23486739

  17. Anti-Influenza Treatment: Drugs Currently Used and Under Development.

    PubMed

    Amarelle, Luciano; Lecuona, Emilia; Sznajder, Jacob I

    2017-01-01

    Influenza is a very common contagious disease that carries significant morbidity and mortality. Treatment with antiviral drugs is available, which if administered early, can reduce the risk of severe complications. However, many virus types develop resistance to those drugs, leading to a notable loss of efficacy. There has been great interest in the development of new drugs to combat this disease. A wide range of drugs has shown anti-influenza activity, but they are not yet available for use in the clinic. Many of these target viral components, which others are aimed at elements in the host cell which participate in the viral cycle. Modulating host components is a strategy which minimizes the development of resistance, since host components are not subject to the genetic variability of the virus. The main disadvantage is the risk of treatment-related side effects. The aim of this review is to describe the main pharmacological agents currently available and new drugs in the pipeline with potential benefit in the treatment of influenza.

  18. Diabetes mellitus: Exploring the challenges in the drug development process.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Julius A; Patnaik, Ashis

    2012-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportions and continues to be a major burden on society globally. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimated the global burden of diabetes to be 366 million in 2011 and predicted that by 2030 this will have risen to 552 million. In spite of newer and effective treatment options, newer delivery and diagnostic devices, stricter glycaemic targets, better treatment guidelines and increased awareness of the disease, baseline glycosylated hemoglobin remains relatively high in subjects diagnosed and treated with type 2 diabetes. The search continues for an ideal anti diabetic drug that will not only normalize blood glucose but also provide beta cell rest and possibly restoration of beta cell function. The development of anti diabetic drugs is riddled with fundamental challenges. The concept of beta cell rest and restoration is yet to be completely understood and proven on a long term. The ideal therapeutic approach to treating type 2 diabetes is not yet determined. Our understanding of drug safety in early clinical development is primarily limited to "Type A" reactions. Until marketing authorization most drugs are approved based on the principle of confirming non-inferiority with an existing gold standard or determining superiority to a placebo. The need to obtain robust pharmaco-economic data prior to marketing authorization in order to determine appropriate pricing of a new drug remains a major challenge. The present review outlines some of the challenges in drug development of anti-diabetic drugs citing examples of pulmonary insulin, insulin analogues, thiazolidinediones and the GLP1 analogues.

  19. Noninvasive structural, functional, and molecular imaging in drug development.

    PubMed

    Rudin, Markus

    2009-06-01

    Modern drug research is mechanism-based and the development of disease modifying therapies involves the identification of molecular key players in the pathological cascade. Today, noninvasive imaging tools enable the visualization and quantitative assessment of the expression of molecular targets, of their interaction with potential ligands, as well as of the functional consequence of this interaction at a molecular (e.g. activation of signaling cascades), cellular, metabolic, physiological, and morphological level in a temporo-spatially resolved manner. The ability to gather such information from the intact organism with all regulatory processes in place renders imaging highly attractive for the biomedical researcher and for the drug developer in particular. Molecular imaging is potentially capable of providing this information. Today, proof-of-principle has been established that imaging is in fact adding value to the drug discovery and development processes. Numerous studies have used structural and functional imaging readouts to document therapy efficacy, mainly during lead optimization. Similarly, major efforts have been devoted to the development and evaluation of imaging biomarkers that might serve as early readouts for therapy response with the potential of being used in the clinical drug evaluation thereby facilitating translational research. In this contribution, we illustrate the role and potential of imaging in modern drug discovery and development with selected examples. Yet, despite its huge potential the impact of imaging on drug discovery has been modest in the past; potential reasons will be discussed. Nevertheless, noninvasive imaging methods are rapidly evolving and it is beyond doubt that their importance for biomedical research will increase.

  20. Barriers to Alzheimer disease drug discovery and development in academia.

    PubMed

    Van Eldik, Linda J; Koppal, Tanuja; Watterson, D Martin

    2002-01-01

    The drug discovery and the drug development processes represent a continuum of recursive activities that range from initial drug target identification to final Food and Drug Administration approval and marketing of a new therapeutic. Drug discovery, as its name implies, is more exploratory and less focused in many cases, whereas drug development has a clinically defined endpoint and a specific disease goal. Academia has historically made major contributions to this process at the early discovery phases. However, current trends in the organization of the pharmaceutical industry suggest an expanded role for academia in the near future. Megamergers among major pharmaceutical corporations indicate their movement toward a focus on end-stage clinical trials, manufacturing, and marketing. There has been a parallel increase in outsourcing of intermediate steps to specialty small pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and contract service companies. The new paradigm suggests that academia will play an increasingly important role at the proof-of-principle stage of basic and clinical drug discovery research, in training the future skilled work force, and in close partnerships with small pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. However, academic drug discovery research faces a set of barriers to progress, the relative importance of which varies with the home institution and the details of the research area. These barriers fall into four general categories: (1) the historical administrative structure and environment of academia; (2) the structure and emphasis of peer review panels that control research funding by government and private agencies; (3) the organization and operation of the academic infrastructure; and (4) the structure and availability of specialized resources and information management. Selected examples of barriers to drug discovery and drug development research and training in academia are presented, as are some specific recommendations designed to minimize or

  1. Perestroika in pharma: evolution or revolution in drug development?

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, Garret A

    2010-01-01

    New-drug approvals have remained roughly constant since 1950, while the cost of drug development has soared. It seems likely that a more modular approach to drug discovery and development will evolve, deriving some features from the not-for-profit sector. For this to occur, we must address the deficit in human capital with expertise in both translational medicine and therapeutics and also in regulatory science; utilize regulatory reform to incentivize innovation and the expansion of the precompetitive space; and develop an informatics infrastructure that permits the global, secure, and compliant sharing of heterogeneous data across academic and industry sectors. These developments, likely prompted by the perception of crisis rather than opportunity, will require linked initiatives among academia, the pharmaceutical industry, the US National Institutes of Health, and the US Food and Drug Administration, along with a more adventurous role for venture capital. A failure to respond threatens the United States' lead in biomedical science and in the development and regulation of novel therapeutics.

  2. Circular dichroism in drug discovery and development: an abridged review.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, Carlo; Pistolozzi, Marco; De Simone, Angela

    2010-09-01

    Chirality plays a fundamental role in determining the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of drugs, and contributes significantly to our understanding of the mechanisms that lie behind biorecognition phenomena. Circular dichroism spectroscopy is the technique of choice for determining the stereochemistry of chiral drugs and proteins, and for monitoring and characterizing molecular recognition phenomena in solution. The role of chirality in our understanding of recognition phenomena at the molecular level is discussed here via several selected systems of interest in the drug discovery and development area. The examples were selected in order to underline the utility of circular dichroism in emerging studies of protein-protein interactions in biological context. In particular, the following aspects are discussed here: the relationship between stereochemistry and pharmacological activity--stereochemical characterization of new leads and drugs; stereoselective binding of leads and drugs to target proteins--the binding of drugs to serum albumins; conformational transitions of peptides and proteins of physiological relevance, and the stereochemical characterization of therapeutic peptides.

  3. Scorpion venom components as potential candidates for drug development.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Ernesto; Gurrola, Georgina B; Schwartz, Elisabeth Ferroni; Possani, Lourival D

    2015-01-01

    Scorpions are well known for their dangerous stings that can result in severe consequences for human beings, including death. Neurotoxins present in their venoms are responsible for their toxicity. Due to their medical relevance, toxins have been the driving force in the scorpion natural compounds research field. On the other hand, for thousands of years, scorpions and their venoms have been applied in traditional medicine, mainly in Asia and Africa. With the remarkable growth in the number of characterized scorpion venom components, several drug candidates have been found with the potential to tackle many of the emerging global medical threats. Scorpions have become a valuable source of biologically active molecules, from novel antibiotics to potential anticancer therapeutics. Other venom components have drawn attention as useful scaffolds for the development of drugs. This review summarizes the most promising candidates for drug development that have been isolated from scorpion venoms.

  4. [The new era of epithelium-targeted drug development].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yoshimi; Nagase, Shotaro; Yagi, Kiyohito; Kondoh, Masuo

    2014-01-01

    Epithelium plays pivotal roles in biological barrier separating the inside of body and the outside environment. Ninety percent of malignant tumors are derived from epithelium. Most pathological microorganisms invade into the body from mucosal epithelium. Thus, epithelium is potential targets for drug development. Claudins (CLs), a family of tetra-transmembrane protein consisting of over 20 members, are structural and functional components of tight junction-seals in epithelium. Modulation of CL-seals enhanced mucosal absorption of drugs. CLs are often over-expressed in malignant tumors. CL-4 expression is increased in the epithelial cells covering the mucosal immune tissues. Very recently, CLs are also expected to be targets for traumatic brain injury and regenerative therapy. In this review, we overview the past, the present and the future of CLs-targeted drug development.

  5. The price of innovation: new estimates of drug development costs.

    PubMed

    DiMasi, Joseph A; Hansen, Ronald W; Grabowski, Henry G

    2003-03-01

    The research and development costs of 68 randomly selected new drugs were obtained from a survey of 10 pharmaceutical firms. These data were used to estimate the average pre-tax cost of new drug development. The costs of compounds abandoned during testing were linked to the costs of compounds that obtained marketing approval. The estimated average out-of-pocket cost per new drug is 403 million US dollars (2000 dollars). Capitalizing out-of-pocket costs to the point of marketing approval at a real discount rate of 11% yields a total pre-approval cost estimate of 802 million US dollars (2000 dollars). When compared to the results of an earlier study with a similar methodology, total capitalized costs were shown to have increased at an annual rate of 7.4% above general price inflation. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Science B.V.

  6. Overview: medications development for the treatment of drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Vocci, F; Chiang, C N; Cummings, L; Hawks, R

    1995-01-01

    Drug abuse is of great public concern, and effective treatment strategies for opiate and cocaine dependence are urgently needed for the general addict population as well as for pregnant women and their infants. NIDA's effort to develop new pharmacotherapies as an adjunct to the treatment of opiate addiction has already led to the approval of LAAM and an NDA development program for buprenorphine. The momentum achieved by the new Medications Development Program's success with opiate addiction treatment must now be applied to the development of new treatments for cocaine addiction. With recent advances in neuroscience, imaging techniques, and pharmaceutical technology, the development of medications for significantly improving drug abuse treatment in a variety of directions holds real promise.

  7. Validation of analytic methods for biomarkers used in drug development.

    PubMed

    Chau, Cindy H; Rixe, Olivier; McLeod, Howard; Figg, William D

    2008-10-01

    The role of biomarkers in drug discovery and development has gained precedence over the years. As biomarkers become integrated into drug development and clinical trials, quality assurance and, in particular, assay validation become essential with the need to establish standardized guidelines for analytic methods used in biomarker measurements. New biomarkers can revolutionize both the development and use of therapeutics but are contingent on the establishment of a concrete validation process that addresses technology integration and method validation as well as regulatory pathways for efficient biomarker development. This perspective focuses on the general principles of the biomarker validation process with an emphasis on assay validation and the collaborative efforts undertaken by various sectors to promote the standardization of this procedure for efficient biomarker development.

  8. Validation of Analytical Methods for Biomarkers Employed in Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Cindy H.; Rixe, Olivier; McLeod, Howard; Figg, William D.

    2008-01-01

    The role of biomarkers in drug discovery and development has gained precedence over the years. As biomarkers become integrated into drug development and clinical trials, quality assurance and in particular assay validation becomes essential with the need to establish standardized guidelines for analytical methods used in biomarker measurements. New biomarkers can revolutionize both the development and use of therapeutics, but is contingent upon the establishment of a concrete validation process that addresses technology integration and method validation as well as regulatory pathways for efficient biomarker development. This perspective focuses on the general principles of the biomarker validation process with an emphasis on assay validation and the collaborative efforts undertaken by various sectors to promote the standardization of this procedure for efficient biomarker development. PMID:18829475

  9. Vigour in active avoidance.

    PubMed

    Nord, Camilla L; Prabhu, Gita; Nolte, Tobias; Fonagy, Peter; Dolan, Ray; Moutoussis, Michael

    2017-12-01

    It would be maladaptive to learn about catastrophes by trial and error alone. Investment in planning and effort are necessary. Devoting too many resources to averting disaster, however, can impair quality of life, as in anxiety and paranoia. Here, we developed a novel task to explore how people adjust effort expenditure (vigor) so as to avoid negative consequences. Our novel paradigm is immersive, enabling us to measure vigor in the context of (simulated) disaster. We found that participants (N = 118) exerted effort to avoid disaster-associated states, adjusting their effort expenditure according to the baseline probability of catastrophe, in agreement with theoretical predictions. Furthermore, negative subjective emotional states were associated both with threat level and with increasing vigor in the face of disaster. We describe for the first time effort expenditure in the context of irreversible losses, with important implications for disorders marked by excessive avoidance.

  10. Preventing Drug Abuse among Hispanic Adolescents: Developing a Responsive Intervention Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schinke, Steven P.; Schwinn, Traci M.; Hursh, Hilary A.

    2015-01-01

    Intervention research is essential to help Hispanic American adolescents avoid drug use. This article describes an intervention research program aimed at preventing drug use among these youths. Grounded in salient epidemiological data, the program is informed by bicultural competence, social learning, and motivational interviewing theories. The…

  11. Preventing Drug Abuse among Hispanic Adolescents: Developing a Responsive Intervention Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schinke, Steven P.; Schwinn, Traci M.; Hursh, Hilary A.

    2015-01-01

    Intervention research is essential to help Hispanic American adolescents avoid drug use. This article describes an intervention research program aimed at preventing drug use among these youths. Grounded in salient epidemiological data, the program is informed by bicultural competence, social learning, and motivational interviewing theories. The…

  12. Advances in Drug Discovery and Development for Pediatric Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Hoagland, Daniel; Zhao, Ying; Lee, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric tuberculosis is an underappreciated global epidemic estimated to afflict around half a million children worldwide. This problem has historically been overlooked, due in part to their low social status and the difficulty in diagnosis of tuberculosis in children. Children are more susceptible to tuberculosis infection and disease progression, including rapid dissemination into extra-pulmonary infection sites. Treatment of pediatric tuberculosis infections has been traditionally built around agents used to treat the adult disease, but the disease pathology, drug pharmacokinetics and the safety window in children differs from the adult disease. This produces additional concerns for drug discovery and development of new agents. This review examines: (i) the safety concerns for current front and second line agents used to treat complex drug resistant infections and how this knowledge can be used to identify, prioritize and dose agents that may be better tolerated in pediatric populations; (ii) the chemistry and suitability of new drugs in the clinical development pipeline for tuberculosis for the treatment of pediatric infections indicating several new agents may offer significant improvements for the treatment of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis in children. PMID:26202201

  13. Open data in drug discovery and development: lessons from malaria.

    PubMed

    Wells, Timothy N C; Willis, Paul; Burrows, Jeremy N; Hooft van Huijsduijnen, Rob

    2016-10-01

    There is a growing consensus that drug discovery thrives in an open environment. Here, we describe how the malaria community has embraced four levels of open data - open science, open innovation, open access and open source - to catalyse the development of new medicines, and consider principles that could enable open data approaches to be applied to other disease areas.

  14. Ethical challenges in developing drugs for psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Carrier, Felix; Banayan, David; Boley, Randy; Karnik, Niranjan

    2017-03-06

    As the classification of mental disorders advances towards a disease model as promoted by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Research Domain Criteria (RDoC), there is hope that a more thorough neurobiological understanding of mental illness may allow clinicians and researchers to determine treatment efficacy with less diagnostic variability. This paradigm shift has presented a variety of ethical issues to be considered in the development of psychiatric drugs. These challenges are not limited to informed consent practices, industry funding, and placebo use. The consideration for alternative research models and quality of research design also present ethical challenges in the development of psychiatric drugs. The imperatives to create valid and sound research that justify the human time, cost, risk and use of limited resources must also be considered. Clinical innovation, and consideration for special populations are also important aspects to take into account. Based on the breadth of these ethical concerns, it is particularly important that scientific questions regarding the development of psychiatric drugs be answered collaboratively by a variety of stakeholders. As the field expands, new ethical considerations will be raised with increased focus on genetic markers, personalized medicine, patient-centered outcomes research, and tension over funding. We suggest that innovation in trial design is necessary to better reflect practices in clinical settings and that there must be an emphasized focus on expanding the transparency of consent processes, regard for suicidality, and care in working with special populations to support the goal of developing sound psychiatric drug therapies.

  15. Strategies to address low drug solubility in discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Williams, Hywel D; Trevaskis, Natalie L; Charman, Susan A; Shanker, Ravi M; Charman, William N; Pouton, Colin W; Porter, Christopher J H

    2013-01-01

    Drugs with low water solubility are predisposed to low and variable oral bioavailability and, therefore, to variability in clinical response. Despite significant efforts to "design in" acceptable developability properties (including aqueous solubility) during lead optimization, approximately 40% of currently marketed compounds and most current drug development candidates remain poorly water-soluble. The fact that so many drug candidates of this type are advanced into development and clinical assessment is testament to an increasingly sophisticated understanding of the approaches that can be taken to promote apparent solubility in the gastrointestinal tract and to support drug exposure after oral administration. Here we provide a detailed commentary on the major challenges to the progression of a poorly water-soluble lead or development candidate and review the approaches and strategies that can be taken to facilitate compound progression. In particular, we address the fundamental principles that underpin the use of strategies, including pH adjustment and salt-form selection, polymorphs, cocrystals, cosolvents, surfactants, cyclodextrins, particle size reduction, amorphous solid dispersions, and lipid-based formulations. In each case, the theoretical basis for utility is described along with a detailed review of recent advances in the field. The article provides an integrated and contemporary discussion of current approaches to solubility and dissolution enhancement but has been deliberately structured as a series of stand-alone sections to allow also directed access to a specific technology (e.g., solid dispersions, lipid-based formulations, or salt forms) where required.

  16. Protective and Risk Predictors in the Development of Drug Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerevich, Jozsef; Bacskai, Erika

    1996-01-01

    Examines the relationship of 2 dimensions of the theory of social development--vulnerability and protectivity--in 2 samples, schoolchildren aged 10 to 15 (n=1,454) and addictive drug users (n=170). Finds that the most important protective factors act against substance use. Finds that among the predictors of the addicts some forms of escape from…

  17. Reactive Collision Avoidance Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Daniel; Acikmese, Behcet; Ploen, Scott; Hadaegh, Fred

    2010-01-01

    The reactive collision avoidance (RCA) algorithm allows a spacecraft to find a fuel-optimal trajectory for avoiding an arbitrary number of colliding spacecraft in real time while accounting for acceleration limits. In addition to spacecraft, the technology can be used for vehicles that can accelerate in any direction, such as helicopters and submersibles. In contrast to existing, passive algorithms that simultaneously design trajectories for a cluster of vehicles working to achieve a common goal, RCA is implemented onboard spacecraft only when an imminent collision is detected, and then plans a collision avoidance maneuver for only that host vehicle, thus preventing a collision in an off-nominal situation for which passive algorithms cannot. An example scenario for such a situation might be when a spacecraft in the cluster is approaching another one, but enters safe mode and begins to drift. Functionally, the RCA detects colliding spacecraft, plans an evasion trajectory by solving the Evasion Trajectory Problem (ETP), and then recovers after the collision is avoided. A direct optimization approach was used to develop the algorithm so it can run in real time. In this innovation, a parameterized class of avoidance trajectories is specified, and then the optimal trajectory is found by searching over the parameters. The class of trajectories is selected as bang-off-bang as motivated by optimal control theory. That is, an avoiding spacecraft first applies full acceleration in a constant direction, then coasts, and finally applies full acceleration to stop. The parameter optimization problem can be solved offline and stored as a look-up table of values. Using a look-up table allows the algorithm to run in real time. Given a colliding spacecraft, the properties of the collision geometry serve as indices of the look-up table that gives the optimal trajectory. For multiple colliding spacecraft, the set of trajectories that avoid all spacecraft is rapidly searched on

  18. Quantitative EEG Brain Mapping In Psychotropic Drug Development, Drug Treatment Selection, and Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Itil, Turan M.; Itil, Kurt Z.

    1995-05-01

    Quantification of standard electroencephalogram (EEG) by digital computers [computer-analyzed EEG (CEEG)] has transformed the subjective analog EEG into an objective scientific method. Until a few years ago, CEEG was only used to assist in the development of psychotropic drugs by means of the quantitative pharmaco EEG. Thanks to the computer revolution and the accompanying reductions in cost of quantification, CEEG can now also be applied in psychiatric practice. CEEG can assist the physician in confirming clinical diagnoses, selecting psychotropic drugs for treatment, and drug treatment monitoring. Advancements in communications technology allow physicians and researchers to reduce the costs of acquiring a high-technology CEEG brain mapping system by utilizing the more economical telephonic services.

  19. Blood-brain barrier drug targeting: the future of brain drug development.

    PubMed

    Pardridge, William M

    2003-03-01

    As human longevity increases, the likelihood of the onset of diseases of the brain (and other organs) also increases. Clinical therapeutics offer useful long-term treatments, if not cures, if drugs can be delivered appropriately and effectively. Unfortunately, research in drug transport to the brain has not advanced very far. Through better characterization of the transport systems utilized within the blood-brain barrier, a greater understanding of how to exploit these systems will lead to effective treatments for brain disorders. Pardridge reviews the functions of the various known transport systems in the brain and discusses how the development of BBB drug-targeting programs in pharmaceutical and academic settings may lead to more efficacious treatments.

  20. 77 FR 61417 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Sinusitis: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ...: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... entitled ``Acute Bacterial Sinusitis: Developing Drugs for Treatment.'' This guidance addresses FDA's... an indication for the treatment of acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS). This guidance finalizes...

  1. 77 FR 11133 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Complicated Urinary Tract Infections: Developing Drugs for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... Infections: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... guidance for industry entitled ``Complicated Urinary Tract Infections: Developing Drugs for Treatment... treatment of complicated urinary tract infections (cUTIs). Specifically, this guidance addresses...

  2. Cheaper faster drug development validated by the repositioning of drugs against neglected tropical diseases.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kevin; Bilsland, Elizabeth; Sparkes, Andrew; Aubrey, Wayne; Young, Michael; Soldatova, Larisa N; De Grave, Kurt; Ramon, Jan; de Clare, Michaela; Sirawaraporn, Worachart; Oliver, Stephen G; King, Ross D

    2015-03-06

    There is an urgent need to make drug discovery cheaper and faster. This will enable the development of treatments for diseases currently neglected for economic reasons, such as tropical and orphan diseases, and generally increase the supply of new drugs. Here, we report the Robot Scientist 'Eve' designed to make drug discovery more economical. A Robot Scientist is a laboratory automation system that uses artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to discover scientific knowledge through cycles of experimentation. Eve integrates and automates library-screening, hit-confirmation, and lead generation through cycles of quantitative structure activity relationship learning and testing. Using econometric modelling we demonstrate that the use of AI to select compounds economically outperforms standard drug screening. For further efficiency Eve uses a standardized form of assay to compute Boolean functions of compound properties. These assays can be quickly and cheaply engineered using synthetic biology, enabling more targets to be assayed for a given budget. Eve has repositioned several drugs against specific targets in parasites that cause tropical diseases. One validated discovery is that the anti-cancer compound TNP-470 is a potent inhibitor of dihydrofolate reductase from the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium vivax.

  3. Cheaper faster drug development validated by the repositioning of drugs against neglected tropical diseases

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kevin; Bilsland, Elizabeth; Sparkes, Andrew; Aubrey, Wayne; Young, Michael; Soldatova, Larisa N.; De Grave, Kurt; Ramon, Jan; de Clare, Michaela; Sirawaraporn, Worachart; Oliver, Stephen G.; King, Ross D.

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need to make drug discovery cheaper and faster. This will enable the development of treatments for diseases currently neglected for economic reasons, such as tropical and orphan diseases, and generally increase the supply of new drugs. Here, we report the Robot Scientist ‘Eve’ designed to make drug discovery more economical. A Robot Scientist is a laboratory automation system that uses artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to discover scientific knowledge through cycles of experimentation. Eve integrates and automates library-screening, hit-confirmation, and lead generation through cycles of quantitative structure activity relationship learning and testing. Using econometric modelling we demonstrate that the use of AI to select compounds economically outperforms standard drug screening. For further efficiency Eve uses a standardized form of assay to compute Boolean functions of compound properties. These assays can be quickly and cheaply engineered using synthetic biology, enabling more targets to be assayed for a given budget. Eve has repositioned several drugs against specific targets in parasites that cause tropical diseases. One validated discovery is that the anti-cancer compound TNP-470 is a potent inhibitor of dihydrofolate reductase from the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium vivax. PMID:25652463

  4. 5th Antiviral Drug Discovery and Development Summit.

    PubMed

    Blair, Wade; Perros, Manos

    2004-08-01

    The 5th Antiviral Drug Discovery and Development Summit provided an up-to-date snapshot of the ongoing developments in the area. The topics covered ranged from updates on recently launched drugs (Kaletra), Fuzeon) and new investigational inhibitors (T-1249, Reverset, UK-427857, L-870810, PA-457, remofovir, VX-950), to the discovery of new antiviral targets and advances in technologies that may provide the substrate for the next generation of therapeutics. It is apparent from the range of presentations that much of today's efforts are focused on developing new classes of HIV inhibitors (gp41, integrase), while there is also considerable progress in hepatitis C, where a number of inhibitors have or should reach proof-of-concept studies in the coming months. Here we provide the highlights of this meeting, with particular emphasis on the new developments in HIV and hepatitis C virus.

  5. Seizures and antiepileptic drugs: does exposure alter normal brain development?

    PubMed

    Marsh, Eric D; Brooks-Kayal, Amy R; Porter, Brenda E

    2006-12-01

    Seizures and antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) affect brain development and have long-term neurological consequences. The specific molecular and cellular changes, the precise timing of their influence during brain development, and the full extent of the long-term consequences of seizures and AEDs exposure have not been established. This review critically assesses both the basic and clinical science literature on the effects of seizures and AEDs on the developing brain and finds that evidence exists to support the hypothesis that both seizures and antiepileptic drugs influence a variety of biological process, at specific times during development, which alter long-term cognition and epilepsy susceptibility. More research, both clinical and experimental, is needed before changes in current clinical practice, based on the scientific data, can be recommended.

  6. Developing the Social Avoidance and Distressed (SAD) Scale and Fear of Negative Evaluation (FNE) Scale for Application to Thai University Students in the Northern Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chowsilpa, Siriperm

    The reliability and validity of the Social Avoidance and Distress (SAD) and Fear of Negative Evaluation (FNE) scales developed by D. Watson and R. Friend (1969) were tested for their use with university students in Thailand. Thai translations of both tests were administered to 176 university students on two occasions, with a month between…

  7. Drug discovery considerations in the development of covalent inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mah, Robert; Thomas, Jason R; Shafer, Cynthia M

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the number of drug candidates with a covalent mechanism of action progressing through clinical trials or being approved by the FDA has increased significantly. And as interest in covalent inhibitors has increased, the technical challenges for characterizing and optimizing these inhibitors have become evident. A number of new tools have been developed to aid this process, but these have not gained wide-spread use. This review will highlight a number of methods and tools useful for prosecuting covalent inhibitor drug discovery programs.

  8. New drug development for post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Berlant, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    US FDA approval of two serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) agents for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has created new opportunities for drug development. This follows many years of exploring the potential utility of several classes of psychotropic agents for this very common, yet under-recognized and under-treated disorder. This review examines some of the basic neurobiological abnormalities observed in PTSD and summarizes open and controlled drug trials for major classes of medications, including SSRIs, other antidepressants, atypical neuroleptics, noradrenergic modulators and anticonvulsants, while critically evaluating the extent of effectiveness of these agents and reviewing unmet gaps in therapeutic need.

  9. The role of BCS (biopharmaceutics classification system) and BDDCS (biopharmaceutics drug disposition classification system) in drug development.

    PubMed

    Benet, Leslie Z

    2013-01-01

    Biopharmaceutics Classification System and Biopharmaceutics Drug Distribution Classification System are complimentary, not competing, classification systems that aim to improve, simplify, and speed drug development. Although both systems are based on classifying drugs and new molecular entities into four categories using the same solubility criteria, they differ in the criterion for permeability and have different purposes. Here, the details and applications of both systems are reviewed with particular emphasis of their role in drug development. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Developing drug formularies for the "National Medical Holding" JSC.

    PubMed

    Akhmadyar, N S; Khairulin, B E; Amangeldy-Kyzy, S; Ospanov, M A

    2015-01-01

    One of the main problems of drug provision of multidisciplinary hospitals is the necessity to improve the efficiency of budget spending. Despite the efforts undertaken in Kazakhstan for improving the mechanism of drug distribution (creation of the Kazakhstan National Formulary, Unified National Health System, the handbook of medicines (drugs) costs in the electronic register of inpatients (ERI), having a single distributor), the number of unresolved issues still remain."National Medical Holding" JSC (NMH) was established in 2008 and unites 6 innovational healthcare facilities with up to 1431 beds (700 children and 731 adults), located in the medical cluster - which are "National Research Center for Maternal and Child Health" JSC (NRCMC), "Republic Children's Rehabilitation Center" JSC (RCRC), "Republican Diagnostic Center" JSC (RDC), "National Centre for Neurosurgery" JSC (NCN), "National Research Center for Oncology and Transplantation" JSC (NRCOT) and "National Research Cardiac Surgery Center" JSC (NRCSC). The main purpose of NMH is to create an internationally competitive "Hospital of the Future", which will provide the citizens of Kazakhstan and others with a wide range of medical services based on advanced medical technology, modern hospital management, international quality and safety standards. These services include emergency care, outpatient diagnostic services, obstetrics and gynecology, neonatal care, internal medicine, neurosurgery, cardiac surgery, transplantation, cancer care for children and adults, as well as rehabilitation treatment. To create a program of development of a drug formulary of NMH and its subsidiaries. In order to create drug formularies of NMH, analytical, software and statistical methods were used.AII subsidiary organizations of NMH (5 out of 6) except for the NRCOT have been accredited by Joint Commission International (JCI) standards, which ensure the safety of patients and clinical staff, by improving the technological

  11. Toll-like receptor signaling promotes the development and function of sensory neurons required for a C. elegans pathogen-avoidance behavior

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Julia P.; Ringstad, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Summary Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play critical roles in innate immunity in many animal species. The sole TLR of C. elegans - TOL-1 - is required for a pathogen avoidance behavior, yet how it promotes this behavior is unknown. We show that TOL-1 signaling is required in the chemosensory BAG neurons for pathogen avoidance, where it regulates gene expression and is necessary for BAG chemosensory function. Genetic studies revealed that TOL-1 acts together with many conserved components of TLR signaling. BAG neurons are activated by carbon dioxide (CO2) and we found that this modality is required for pathogen avoidance. TLR signaling can, therefore, mediate host responses to microbes through an unexpected mechanism: by promoting the development and function of chemosensory neurons that surveil the metabolic activity of environmental microbes. PMID:26279230

  12. [Post-authorization research, registries, and drug development].

    PubMed

    Patarnello, Francesca; Recchia, Giuseppe

    2013-06-01

    In the last decade regulators, payers and health care providers tried to react to three major problems in drug development and drug use in clinical practice: the pharmaceutical R&D productivity crisis, the immaturity of benefit-risk profile for several newly approved drugs and the overall impact on economic sustainability of reimbursing new high cost drugs in their systems. The potentiality of create a continuum between the evidence requirements relevant for registration, for reimbursement and for post authorization research is clear. All different parties involved, like regulators, HTA agencies, scientific communities and manufacturers, are working to improve the knowledge profile of new drugs in order to anticipate the patient access to innovation, limiting or preventing the clinical and economical risks deriving from an incomplete safety and effectiveness profile. The Italian example of "New Drugs AIFA Registries", with or without the application of risk sharing schemes (cost sharing, pay for performance, etc.), introduced a new process and increased the sensitivity on this topic. However this might probably represents only a partial answer to the problem of how to set up the governance of coverage with evidence, drug utilization monitoring, comparative effectiveness research, outcome research programs and may be how to link them to access, pricing and reimbursement. The step change in post authorization research could be to "integrate" different sources and stakeholders in a wider and continuous approach, in a well designed and inclusive "second generation" HTA approach, where all resources (competencies, data, funding) will concur to increase the evidence profile and reduce the risks, and where any "evidence generation approach" is really compliant with the standard and rules of best research practices.

  13. Developing doctoral scientists for drug discovery: pluridimensional education required.

    PubMed

    Janero, David R

    2013-02-01

    Research universities continue to produce new scientists capable of generating knowledge with the potential to inform disease etiology and treatment. Mounting interest of doctoral-level experimental science students in therapeutics-related research careers is discordant with the widespread lack of direct drug-discovery and development experience, let alone commercialization success, among university faculty and administrators. Likewise, the archetypical publication- and grant-fueled, principal investigator (PI)-focused academic system ("PI-stan") risks commoditization of science students pursuing their doctorates as a labor source, rendering them ill-prepared for career options related to therapeutics innovation by marginalizing their development of "beyond-the-bench" professional skills foundational to modern drug-discovery campaigns and career fluency. To militate against professionalization deficits in doctoral drug-discovery researchers, the author--a scientist-administrator-consultant with decades of discovery research and development (R&D), business, and educator experience in commercial and university settings--posits a critical need for pluridimensionality in graduate education and mentorship that extends well beyond thesis-related scientific domains/laboratory techniques to instill transferable operational-intelligence, project/people-management, and communication competencies. Specific initiatives are advocated to help enhance the doctoral science student's market competitiveness, adaptability, and navigation of the significant research, commercial, and occupational challenges associated with contemporary preclinical drug-discovery R&D.

  14. Conference report: hot topics in antibody-drug conjugate development.

    PubMed

    Thudium, Karen; Bilic, Sanela

    2013-12-01

    American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists National Biotechnology Conference Sheraton San Diego Hotel and Marina, San Diego, CA, USA, 19-23 May 2013 The National Biotechnology Conference, is a premier meeting for biotechnology professionals covering a broad range of hot topics in the biotechnology industry. Attracting participants from academia, industry and regulatory, this meeting features sessions that aim to address emerging subjects of interest and allows for open exchange between scientists. The 2013 conference featured leading researchers in the fields of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) and immunogenicity. Herein, we present a summary of the ADC hot topics, including bioanalytical and PK considerations, quantitative evaluation of the impact of immunogenicity and ADME to understand ADC drug-drug interactions, and clinical considerations for ADC development. This article aims to summarize the recommendations that were made by the speakers during various sessions throughout the conference.

  15. In Vitro Cell Models for Ophthalmic Drug Development Applications

    PubMed Central

    Shafaie, Sara; Hutter, Victoria; Cook, Michael T.; Brown, Marc B.; Chau, David Y.S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Tissue engineering is a rapidly expanding field that aims to establish feasible techniques to fabricate biologically equivalent replacements for diseased and damaged tissues/organs. Emerging from this prospect is the development of in vitro representations of organs for drug toxicity assessment. Due to the ever-increasing interest in ocular drug delivery as a route for administration as well as the rise of new ophthalmic therapeutics, there is a demand for physiologically accurate in vitro models of the eye to assess drug delivery and safety of new ocular medicines. This review summarizes current existing ocular models and highlights the important factors and limitations that need to be considered during their use. PMID:27158563

  16. Trends in risks associated with new drug development: success rates for investigational drugs.

    PubMed

    DiMasi, J A; Feldman, L; Seckler, A; Wilson, A

    2010-03-01

    This study utilizes both public and private data sources to estimate clinical phase transition and clinical approval probabilities for drugs in the development pipelines of the 50 largest pharmaceutical firms (by sales). The study examined the development histories of these investigational compounds from the time point at which they first entered clinical testing (1993-2004) through June 2009. The clinical approval success rate in the United States was 16% for self-originated drugs (originating from the pharmaceutical company itself) during both the 1993-1998 and the 1999-2004 subperiods. For all compounds (including licensed-in and licensed-out drugs in addition to self-originated drugs), the clinical approval success rate for the entire study period was 19%. The estimated clinical approval success rates and phase transition probabilities differed significantly by therapeutic class. The estimated clinical approval success rate for self-originated compounds over the entire study period was 32% for large molecules and 13% for small molecules. The estimated transition probabilities were also higher for all clinical phases with respect to large molecules.

  17. Schizophrenia drug discovery and development in an evolving era: are new drug targets fulfilling expectations?

    PubMed

    Dunlop, John; Brandon, Nicholas J

    2015-02-01

    Current therapeutics for schizophrenia, the typical and atypical antipsychotic class of drugs, derive their therapeutic benefit predominantly by antagonism of the dopamine D2 receptor subtype and have robust clinical benefit on positive symptoms of the disease with limited to no impact on negative symptoms and cognitive impairment. Driven by these therapeutic limitations of current treatments and the recognition that transmitter systems beyond the dopaminergic system in particular glutamatergic transmission contribute to the etiology of schizophrenia significant recent efforts have focused on the discovery and development of novel treatments for schizophrenia with mechanisms of action that are distinct from current drugs. Specifically, compounds selectively targeting the metabotropic glutamate receptor 2/3 subtype, phosphodiesterase subtype 10, glycine transporter subtype 1 and the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor have been the subject of intense drug discovery and development efforts. Here we review recent clinical experience with the most advanced drug candidates targeting each of these novel mechanisms and discuss whether these new agents are living up to expectations.

  18. Development of novel drug delivery systems using phage display technology for clinical application of protein drugs

    PubMed Central

    NAGANO, Kazuya; TSUTSUMI, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Attempts are being made to develop therapeutic proteins for cancer, hepatitis, and autoimmune conditions, but their clinical applications are limited, except in the cases of drugs based on erythropoietin, granulocyte colony–stimulating factor, interferon-alpha, and antibodies, owing to problems with fundamental technologies for protein drug discovery. It is difficult to identify proteins useful as therapeutic seeds or targets. Another problem in using bioactive proteins is pleiotropic actions through receptors, making it hard to elicit desired effects without side effects. Additionally, bioactive proteins have poor therapeutic effects owing to degradation by proteases and rapid excretion from the circulatory system. Therefore, it is essential to establish a series of novel drug delivery systems (DDS) to overcome these problems. Here, we review original technologies in DDS. First, we introduce antibody proteomics technology for effective selection of proteins useful as therapeutic seeds or targets and identification of various kinds of proteins, such as cancer-specific proteins, cancer metastasis–related proteins, and a cisplatin resistance–related protein. Especially Ephrin receptor A10 is expressed in breast tumor tissues but not in normal tissues and is a promising drug target potentially useful for breast cancer treatment. Moreover, we have developed a system for rapidly creating functional mutant proteins to optimize the seeds for therapeutic applications and used this system to generate various kinds of functional cytokine muteins. Among them, R1antTNF is a TNFR1-selective antagonistic mutant of TNF and is the first mutein converted from agonist to antagonist. We also review a novel polymer-conjugation system to improve the in vivo stability of bioactive proteins. Site-specific PEGylated R1antTNF is uniform at the molecular level, and its bioactivity is similar to that of unmodified R1antTNF. In the future, we hope that many innovative protein drugs will

  19. Managing the challenge of chemically reactive metabolites in drug development.

    PubMed

    Park, B Kevin; Boobis, Alan; Clarke, Stephen; Goldring, Chris E P; Jones, David; Kenna, J Gerry; Lambert, Craig; Laverty, Hugh G; Naisbitt, Dean J; Nelson, Sidney; Nicoll-Griffith, Deborah A; Obach, R Scott; Routledge, Philip; Smith, Dennis A; Tweedie, Donald J; Vermeulen, Nico; Williams, Dominic P; Wilson, Ian D; Baillie, Thomas A

    2011-04-01

    The normal metabolism of drugs can generate metabolites that have intrinsic chemical reactivity towards cellular molecules, and therefore have the potential to alter biological function and initiate serious adverse drug reactions. Here, we present an assessment of the current approaches used for the evaluation of chemically reactive metabolites. We also describe how these approaches are being used within the pharmaceutical industry to assess and minimize the potential of drug candidates to cause toxicity. At early stages of drug discovery, iteration between medicinal chemistry and drug metabolism can eliminate perceived reactive metabolite-mediated chemical liabilities without compromising pharmacological activity or the need for extensive safety evaluation beyond standard practices. In the future, reactive metabolite evaluation may also be useful during clinical development for improving clinical risk assessment and risk management. Currently, there remains a huge gap in our understanding of the basic mechanisms that underlie chemical stress-mediated adverse reactions in humans. This review summarizes our views on this complex topic, and includes insights into practices considered by the pharmaceutical industry.

  20. Pharmacogenomics of Alzheimer's disease: novel therapeutic strategies for drug development.

    PubMed

    Cacabelos, Ramón; Cacabelos, Pablo; Torrellas, Clara; Tellado, Iván; Carril, Juan C

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a major problem of health and disability, with a relevant economic impact on our society. Despite important advances in pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment, its primary causes still remain elusive, accurate biomarkers are not well characterized, and the available pharmacological treatments are not cost-effective. As a complex disorder, AD is a polygenic and multifactorial clinical entity in which hundreds of defective genes distributed across the human genome may contribute to its pathogenesis. Diverse environmental factors, cerebrovascular dysfunction, and epigenetic phenomena, together with structural and functional genomic dysfunctions, lead to amyloid deposition, neurofibrillary tangle formation, and premature neuronal death, the major neuropathological hallmarks of AD. Future perspectives for the global management of AD predict that genomics and proteomics may help in the search for reliable biomarkers. In practical terms, the therapeutic response to conventional drugs (cholinesterase inhibitors, multifactorial strategies) is genotype-specific. Genomic factors potentially involved in AD pharmacogenomics include at least five categories of gene clusters: (1) genes associated with disease pathogenesis; (2) genes associated with the mechanism of action of drugs; (3) genes associated with drug metabolism (phase I and II reactions); (4) genes associated with drug transporters; and (5) pleiotropic genes involved in multifaceted cascades and metabolic reactions. The implementation of pharmacogenomic strategies will contribute to optimize drug development and therapeutics in AD and related disorders.

  1. Recent lab-on-chip developments for novel drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Nauman; Kobayashi, Isao; Nakajima, Mitsutoshi

    2017-07-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and micro total analysis systems (μTAS) revolutionized the biochemical and electronic industries, and this miniaturization process became a key driver for many markets. Now, it is a driving force for innovations in life sciences, diagnostics, analytical sciences, and chemistry, which are called 'lab-on-a-chip, (LOC)' devices. The use of these devices allows the development of fast, portable, and easy-to-use systems with a high level of functional integration for applications such as point-of-care diagnostics, forensics, the analysis of biomolecules, environmental or food analysis, and drug development. In this review, we report on the latest developments in fabrication methods and production methodologies to tailor LOC devices. A brief overview of scale-up strategies is also presented together with their potential applications in drug delivery and discovery. The impact of LOC devices on drug development and discovery has been extensively reviewed in the past. The current research focuses on fast and accurate detection of genomics, cell mutations and analysis, drug delivery, and discovery. The current research also differentiates the LOC devices into new terminology of microengineering, like organ-on-a-chip, stem cells-on-a-chip, human-on-a-chip, and body-on-a-chip. Key challenges will be the transfer of fabricated LOC devices from lab-scale to industrial large-scale production. Moreover, extensive toxicological studies are needed to justify the use of microfabricated drug delivery vehicles in biological systems. It will also be challenging to transfer the in vitro findings to suitable and promising in vivo models. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2017, 9:e1381. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1381 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Solution ELISA as a platform of choice for development of robust, drug tolerant immunogenicity assays in support of drug development.

    PubMed

    Mikulskis, Alvydas; Yeung, Dave; Subramanyam, Meena; Amaravadi, Lakshmi

    2011-02-28

    Humanized monoclonal antibody therapeutics are in many ways indistinguishable from the anti-therapeutic/anti-drug antibodies generated in humans. Therefore, immunogenicity assessments to such therapeutics pose unique challenges in clinical trials especially when significant drug interference is encountered. There are several technology platforms based on the bridging immunogenicity assay format, which have been successfully used for detection and quantification of anti-drug antibodies (ADA) in serum or plasma samples. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and Electrochemiluminescent (ECL) immunoassay formats are among the most popular technology platforms. Pretreatment of samples with acid can also be used to lower drug interference. While ECL technology platform offered many advantages over traditional solid-phase ELISA methods, reliance on a single (or limited) vendor source became a significant concern within the biopharmaceutical industry especially for immunogenicity assays that need to be implemented over a period of many years in support of a single drug development program. We describe herein a systematic evaluation of solid-phase ELISA, GYROS, AlphaLISA, ECL Immunoassay, and solution ELISA platforms for detection of anti-drug antibodies with the goal of selection and development of a robust technology platform that meets the desired performance characteristics for most immunogenicity assays and can be easily implemented in a typical immunoassay laboratory. As part of this effort the Design of Experiments (DOE) approach was utilized in optimization of sample acid treatment conditions in order to improve drug tolerance in the evaluated assay platforms. After the initial evaluation of various technology platforms, a solution ELISA format was chosen for further development to support clinical trials for a humanized therapeutic antibody. As part of the assay development, flexible use of digoxigenin and 6-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) aminohexanoic acid (DNP) for

  3. Role of US military research programs in the development of US Food and Drug Administration--approved antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Lynn W; Vaughn, David W; Skillman, Donald R

    2006-07-01

    US military physicians and researchers helped identify the optimum treatment dose of the naturally occurring compound quinine and collaborated with the pharmaceutical industry in the development and eventual US Food and Drug Administration approval of the synthetic antimalarial drugs chloroquine, primaquine, chloroquine-primaquine, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, mefloquine, doxycycline, halofantrine, and atovaquone-proguanil. Because malaria parasites develop drug resistance, the US military must continue to support the creation and testing of new drugs to prevent and treat malaria until an effective malaria vaccine is developed. New antimalarial drugs also benefit civilians residing in and traveling to malarious areas.

  4. Considerations and caveats in anti-virulence drug development.

    PubMed

    Maura, Damien; Ballok, Alicia E; Rahme, Laurence G

    2016-10-01

    As antibiotic resistance remains a major public health threat, anti-virulence therapy research is gaining interest. Hundreds of potential anti-virulence compounds have been examined, but very few have made it to clinical trials and none have been approved. This review surveys the current anti-virulence research field with a focus on the highly resistant and deadly ESKAPE pathogens, especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We discuss timely considerations and caveats in anti-virulence drug development, including target identification, administration, preclinical development, and metrics for success in clinical trials. Development of a defined pipeline for anti-virulence agents, which differs in important ways from conventional antibiotics, is imperative for the future success of these critically needed drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Deconstructing the Drug Development Process: The New Face of Innovation

    PubMed Central

    Kaitin, KI

    2010-01-01

    Forged in the early 1960s, the paradigm for pharmaceutical innovation has remained virtually unchanged for nearly 50 years. During a period when most other research-based industries have made frequent and often sweeping modifications to their R&D processes, the pharmaceutical sector continues to utilize a drug development process that is slow, inefficient, risky, and expensive. Few who work in or follow the activities of the pharmaceutical industry question whether change is coming. They know that the pharmaceutical sector, as currently structured, is unable to deliver enough new products to market to generate revenues sufficient to sustain its own growth. Nearly all major drug developers are critically examining current R&D practices and, in some cases, considering a radical overhaul of their R&D models. But key questions remain. What will the landscape for pharmaceutical innovation look like in the future? And, who will develop tomorrow’s medicines? PMID:20130565

  6. Building better drugs: developing and regulating engineered therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava; Schiller, Tal; Hamasaki-Katagiri, Nobuko; Khan, Mansoor A; Yanover, Chen; Sauna, Zuben E

    2013-10-01

    Most native proteins do not make optimal drugs and thus a second- and third-generation of therapeutic proteins, which have been engineered to improve product attributes or to enhance process characteristics, are rapidly becoming the norm. There has been unprecedented progress, during the past decade, in the development of platform technologies that further these ends. Although the advantages of engineered therapeutic proteins are considerable, the alterations can affect the safety and efficacy of the drugs. We discuss both the key technological innovations with respect to engineered therapeutic proteins and advancements in the underlying basic science. The latter would permit the design of science-based criteria for the prediction and assessment of potential risks and the development of appropriate risk management plans. This in turn holds promise for more predictable criteria for the licensure of a class of products that are extremely challenging to develop but represent an increasingly important component of modern medical practice.

  7. Drug development in Parkinson's disease: from emerging molecules to innovative drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Garbayo, E; Ansorena, E; Blanco-Prieto, M J

    2013-11-01

    Current treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD) are aimed at addressing motor symptoms but there is no therapy focused on modifying the course of the disease. Successful treatment strategies have been so far limited and brain drug delivery remains a major challenge that restricts its treatment. This review provides an overview of the most promising emerging agents in the field of PD drug discovery, discussing improvements that have been made in brain drug delivery for PD. It will be shown that new approaches able to extend the length of the treatment, to release the drug in a continuous manner or to cross the blood-brain barrier and target a specific region are still needed. Overall, the results reviewed here show that there is an urgent need to develop both symptomatic and disease-modifying treatments, giving priority to neuroprotective treatments. Promising perspectives are being provided in this field by rasagiline and by neurotrophic factors like glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. The identification of disease-relevant genes has also encouraged the search for disease-modifying therapies that function by identifying molecularly targeted drugs. The advent of new molecular and cellular targets like α-synuclein, leucine-rich repeat serine/threonine protein kinase 2 or parkin, among others, will require innovative delivery therapies. In this regard, drug delivery systems (DDS) have shown great potential for improving the efficacy of conventional and new PD therapy and reducing its side effects. The new DDS discussed here, which include microparticles, nanoparticles and hydrogels among others, will probably open up possibilities that extend beyond symptomatic relief. However, further work needs to be done before DDS become a therapeutic option for PD patients.

  8. Core competencies for pharmaceutical physicians and drug development scientists.

    PubMed

    Silva, Honorio; Stonier, Peter; Buhler, Fritz; Deslypere, Jean-Paul; Criscuolo, Domenico; Nell, Gerfried; Massud, Joao; Geary, Stewart; Schenk, Johanna; Kerpel-Fronius, Sandor; Koski, Greg; Clemens, Norbert; Klingmann, Ingrid; Kesselring, Gustavo; van Olden, Rudolf; Dubois, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Professional groups, such as IFAPP (International Federation of Pharmaceutical Physicians and Pharmaceutical Medicine), are expected to produce the defined core competencies to orient the discipline and the academic programs for the development of future competent professionals and to advance the profession. On the other hand, PharmaTrain, an Innovative Medicines Initiative project, has become the largest public-private partnership in biomedicine in the European Continent and aims to provide postgraduate courses that are designed to meet the needs of professionals working in medicines development. A working group was formed within IFAPP including representatives from PharmaTrain, academic institutions and national member associations, with special interest and experience on Quality Improvement through education. The objectives were: to define a set of core competencies for pharmaceutical physicians and drug development scientists, to be summarized in a Statement of Competence and to benchmark and align these identified core competencies with the Learning Outcomes (LO) of the PharmaTrain Base Course. The objectives were successfully achieved. Seven domains and 60 core competencies were identified and aligned accordingly. The effective implementation of training programs using the competencies or the PharmaTrain LO anywhere in the world may transform the drug development process to an efficient and integrated process for better and safer medicines. The PharmaTrain Base Course might provide the cognitive framework to achieve the desired Statement of Competence for Pharmaceutical Physicians and Drug Development Scientists worldwide.

  9. [Development of a Drug Discovery Method Targeted to Stromal Tissue].

    PubMed

    Kamada, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Several diseases are characterized by alterations in the molecular distribution of vascular structures, presenting the opportunity to use monoclonal antibodies for clinical therapies. This pharmaceutical strategy, often referred to as "vascular targeting", has promise in promoting the discovery and development of selective biological drugs to regulate angiogenesis-related diseases such as cancer. Various experimental approaches have been utilized to discover accessible vascular markers of health and disease at the protein level. Our group has developed a new chemical proteomics technology to identify and quantify accessible vascular proteins in normal organs and at disease sites. Our developed methodology relies on the perfusion of animal models with suitable ester derivatives of biotin, which react with the primary amine groups of proteins as soon as the molecules are attached. This presentation reports biomedical applications based on vascular targeting strategies, as well as methodologies that have been used to discover new vascular targets. The identification of antigens located in the stromal tissue of pathological blood vessels may provide attractive targets for the development of antibody drugs. This method will also provide an efficient discovery target that could lead to the development of novel antibody drugs.

  10. Core competencies for pharmaceutical physicians and drug development scientists

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Honorio; Stonier, Peter; Buhler, Fritz; Deslypere, Jean-Paul; Criscuolo, Domenico; Nell, Gerfried; Massud, Joao; Geary, Stewart; Schenk, Johanna; Kerpel-Fronius, Sandor; Koski, Greg; Clemens, Norbert; Klingmann, Ingrid; Kesselring, Gustavo; van Olden, Rudolf; Dubois, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Professional groups, such as IFAPP (International Federation of Pharmaceutical Physicians and Pharmaceutical Medicine), are expected to produce the defined core competencies to orient the discipline and the academic programs for the development of future competent professionals and to advance the profession. On the other hand, PharmaTrain, an Innovative Medicines Initiative project, has become the largest public-private partnership in biomedicine in the European Continent and aims to provide postgraduate courses that are designed to meet the needs of professionals working in medicines development. A working group was formed within IFAPP including representatives from PharmaTrain, academic institutions and national member associations, with special interest and experience on Quality Improvement through education. The objectives were: to define a set of core competencies for pharmaceutical physicians and drug development scientists, to be summarized in a Statement of Competence and to benchmark and align these identified core competencies with the Learning Outcomes (LO) of the PharmaTrain Base Course. The objectives were successfully achieved. Seven domains and 60 core competencies were identified and aligned accordingly. The effective implementation of training programs using the competencies or the PharmaTrain LO anywhere in the world may transform the drug development process to an efficient and integrated process for better and safer medicines. The PharmaTrain Base Course might provide the cognitive framework to achieve the desired Statement of Competence for Pharmaceutical Physicians and Drug Development Scientists worldwide. PMID:23986704

  11. Teachers Avoiding Learners' Avoidance: Is It Possible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tadayyon, Maedeh; Zarrinabadi, Nourollah; Ketabi, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Dealing with learners who prefer to take the back seat and avoid classroom participation can be every teacher's nightmare. This lack of participation may cause teacher frustration, and possibly the only way to reduce this lack of participation is to access the concept of avoidance strategy. Avoidance strategy is the abandonment of a classroom task…

  12. Teachers Avoiding Learners' Avoidance: Is It Possible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tadayyon, Maedeh; Zarrinabadi, Nourollah; Ketabi, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Dealing with learners who prefer to take the back seat and avoid classroom participation can be every teacher's nightmare. This lack of participation may cause teacher frustration, and possibly the only way to reduce this lack of participation is to access the concept of avoidance strategy. Avoidance strategy is the abandonment of a classroom task…

  13. Opportunities and Challenges for Drug Development: Public-Private Partnerships, Adaptive Designs and Big Data.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Oktay; Gottwald, Matthias; Schüler, Peter; Michel, Martin C

    2016-01-01

    Drug development faces the double challenge of increasing costs and increasing pressure on pricing. To avoid that lack of perceived commercial perspective will leave existing medical needs unmet, pharmaceutical companies and many other stakeholders are discussing ways to improve the efficiency of drug Research and Development. Based on an international symposium organized by the Medical School of the University of Duisburg-Essen (Germany) and held in January 2016, we discuss the opportunities and challenges of three specific areas, i.e., public-private partnerships, adaptive designs and big data. Public-private partnerships come in many different forms with regard to scope, duration and type and number of participants. They range from project-specific collaborations to strategic alliances to large multi-party consortia. Each of them offers specific opportunities and faces distinct challenges. Among types of collaboration, investigator-initiated studies are becoming increasingly popular but have legal, ethical, and financial implications. Adaptive trial designs are also increasingly discussed. However, adaptive should not be used as euphemism for the repurposing of a failed trial; rather it requires carefully planning and specification before a trial starts. Adaptive licensing can be a counter-part of adaptive trial design. The use of Big Data is another opportunity to leverage existing information into knowledge useable for drug discovery and development. Respecting limitations of informed consent and privacy is a key challenge in the use of Big Data. Speakers and participants at the symposium were convinced that appropriate use of the above new options may indeed help to increase the efficiency of future drug development.

  14. Opportunities and Challenges for Drug Development: Public–Private Partnerships, Adaptive Designs and Big Data

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Oktay; Gottwald, Matthias; Schüler, Peter; Michel, Martin C.

    2016-01-01

    Drug development faces the double challenge of increasing costs and increasing pressure on pricing. To avoid that lack of perceived commercial perspective will leave existing medical needs unmet, pharmaceutical companies and many other stakeholders are discussing ways to improve the efficiency of drug Research and Development. Based on an international symposium organized by the Medical School of the University of Duisburg-Essen (Germany) and held in January 2016, we discuss the opportunities and challenges of three specific areas, i.e., public–private partnerships, adaptive designs and big data. Public–private partnerships come in many different forms with regard to scope, duration and type and number of participants. They range from project-specific collaborations to strategic alliances to large multi-party consortia. Each of them offers specific opportunities and faces distinct challenges. Among types of collaboration, investigator-initiated studies are becoming increasingly popular but have legal, ethical, and financial implications. Adaptive trial designs are also increasingly discussed. However, adaptive should not be used as euphemism for the repurposing of a failed trial; rather it requires carefully planning and specification before a trial starts. Adaptive licensing can be a counter-part of adaptive trial design. The use of Big Data is another opportunity to leverage existing information into knowledge useable for drug discovery and development. Respecting limitations of informed consent and privacy is a key challenge in the use of Big Data. Speakers and participants at the symposium were convinced that appropriate use of the above new options may indeed help to increase the efficiency of future drug development. PMID:27999543

  15. How Multi-Organ Microdevices Can Help Foster Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Esch, Mandy B.; Smith, Alec; Prot, Jean-Matthieu; Sancho, Carlotta Oleaga; Hickman, James; Shuler, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-organ microdevices can mimic tissue-tissue interactions that occur as a result of metabolite travel from one tissue to other tissues in vitro. These systems are capable of simulating human metabolism, including the conversion of a pro-drug to its effective metabolite as well as its subsequent therapeutic actions and toxic side effects. Since tissue-tissue interactions in the human body can play a significant role in determining the success of new pharmaceuticals, the development and use of multi-organ microdevices presents an opportunity to improve the drug development process. The goals are to predict potential toxic side effects with higher accuracy before a drug enters the expensive phase of clinical trials as well as to estimate efficacy and dose response. Multi-organ microdevices also have the potential to aid in the development of new therapeutic strategies by providing a platform for testing in the context of human metabolism (as opposed to animal models). Further, when operated with human biopsy samples, the devices could be a gateway for the development of individualized medicine. Here we review studies in which multi-organ microdevices have been developed and used in a ways that demonstrate how the devices’ capabilities can present unique opportunities for the study of drug action. We also discuss the challenges that are inherent in the development of multi-organ microdevices. Among these are how to design the devices, and how to create devices that mimic the human metabolism with high authenticity. Since single organ devices are testing platforms for tissues that can later be combined with other tissues within multi-organ devices, we will also mention single organ devices where appropriate in the discussion. PMID:24412641

  16. How multi-organ microdevices can help foster drug development.

    PubMed

    Esch, Mandy B; Smith, Alec S T; Prot, Jean-Matthieu; Oleaga, Carlota; Hickman, James J; Shuler, Michael L

    2014-04-01

    Multi-organ microdevices can mimic tissue-tissue interactions that occur as a result of metabolite travel from one tissue to other tissues in vitro. These systems are capable of simulating human metabolism, including the conversion of a pro-drug to its effective metabolite as well as its subsequent therapeutic actions and toxic side effects. Since tissue-tissue interactions in the human body can play a significant role in determining the success of new pharmaceuticals, the development and use of multi-organ microdevices present an opportunity to improve the drug development process. The devices have the potential to predict potential toxic side effects with higher accuracy before a drug enters the expensive phase of clinical trials as well as to estimate efficacy and dose response. Multi-organ microdevices also have the potential to aid in the development of new therapeutic strategies by providing a platform for testing in the context of human metabolism (as opposed to animal models). Further, when operated with human biopsy samples, the devices could be a gateway for the development of individualized medicine. Here we review studies in which multi-organ microdevices have been developed and used in a ways that demonstrate how the devices' capabilities can present unique opportunities for the study of drug action. We will also discuss challenges that are inherent in the development of multi-organ microdevices. Among these are how to design the devices, and how to create devices that mimic the human metabolism with high authenticity. Since single organ devices are testing platforms for tissues that can later be combined with other tissues within multi-organ devices, we will also mention single organ devices where appropriate in the discussion.

  17. Issues and challenges in developing ruminal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, Th F; Ellis, K J

    2004-06-23

    Ruminants have a specialised digestive system that contains anaerobic bacteria and protozoa capable of digesting the cellulosic materials that are so common in plant materials. In addition, their distinct digestive system can change the metabolism and mode of action of some nutrients, medicines or other bioactive materials when delivered orally or may provide opportunities for alternative oral dosing strategies. In particular, there is interest in administering a relatively large depot of some drugs into the rumen, which then provides for a prolonged and sustained release of small quantities of these drugs over time. Any strategy to develop a new ruminal drug delivery system must take into account the characteristics of the digestive system of ruminants and its specific bioactive application. For example, in the case of products to control parasitic infections, the development of the host's immunity against the nematodes, which can be acquired during the pasture season, must be considered; likewise, where pharmacologically active materials are used to manipulate a particular metabolic or biochemical process, one must always be aware of interactions with other processes, which might eventuate. This article reviews the necessary concepts, the issues and the challenges to construct ruminal drug delivery systems.

  18. Magic shotgun methods for developing drugs for CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Musk, Philip

    2004-10-01

    Extract: Development of novel therapeutic entities with which to treat disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) that are both more effective and more specific, poses significant challenges to the drug discovery industry. The normal focus of drug research is the search for a "magic bullet," which acts on a specific protein (or receptor), ideally with no other interactions with other proteins. These are termed "clean" drugs, as they have a single action with few side effects. However, most common CNS disorders are highly polygenic in nature, i.e., they are controlled by complex interactions between numerous gene products. As such, these conditions do not exhibit the single gene defect basis that is so attractive for the development of highly-specific drugs largely free of major undesirable side effects ("the magic bullet"). Secondly, the exact nature of the interactions that occur between the numerous gene products typically involved in CNS disorders remain elusive, and the biological mechanisms underlying mental illnesses are poorly understood.

  19. Antiepileptic drugs and apoptosis in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Bittigau, Petra; Sifringer, Marco; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy

    2003-05-01

    Epilepsy is the most common neurologic disorder in young humans. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), used to treat seizures in children, infants, and pregnant women, cause cognitive impairment, microcephaly, and birth defects by unknown mechanisms. We tested whether common AEDs cause neurodegeneration in the developing rat brain. Rats aged 3-30 days received phenytoin, phenobarbital, diazepam, clonazepam, vigabatrin, or valproic acid. Histologic examination of the brains revealed that these drugs cause widespread and dose-dependent apoptotic neurodegeneration in the developing rat brain during the brain growth spurt period. Apoptotic neurodegeneration was triggered at plasma drug levels relevant for seizure control in humans. Antiepileptic drugs lead to reduced expression of neurotrophins and decreased concentrations of the active forms of ERK1/2, RAF, and AKT. beta-Estradiol, which stimulates pathways that are activated by neurotrophins, ameliorated AEDs-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration. Our findings present one possible mechanism to explain cognitive impairment and reduced brain mass associated with pre- or postnatal exposure of humans to antiepileptic therapy.

  20. Drug development from natural products: exploiting synergistic effects.

    PubMed

    Ulrich-Merzenich, Gudrun; Panek, D; Zeitler, H; Vetter, H; Wagner, H

    2010-03-01

    Drug development in phytomedicine has been focused in the past on the discovery and analysis of new structures from natural products. The search aimed at the determination of the single "active principle" in plants, based on the assumption that a plant has one or a few ingredients which determine its therapeutic effects. But traditional systems of medicines like Ayurveda, traditional Chinese medicine or the European phytotherapy generally assume that a synergy of all ingredients of the plants will bring about the maximum of therapeutic efficacy. This approach has for long been impossible to investigate since adequate methods to standardize complex plant mixtures as well as to rationalize complex mode of actions were lacking. The introduction of high throughput technologies provides the opportunity to determine profiles of plants and to systematically explore the mode of action of combinatory drug regimes. The present review highlights the concept of synergy and gives examples of synergistic effects of plant constituents. It elaborates on how the high throughput technologies can be used in drug development from natural products with the aim of creating evidence-based plant medications in prevention and treatment of different diseases in the form of new single treatments or new combinatory drug regimes while exploiting synergy-effects.

  1. Drug development from natural resource: a systematic approach.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S B; Gupta, Richa

    2015-01-01

    Modern research in drug discovery from medicinal plants involves a multidimensional approach combining botanical, phytochemical, biochemical combinatorial chemistry and bioassay-guided fractionation approaches. Natural sources continue to provide an alternative as pharmacological leads against various devastating diseases such as diabetes, CVD, cancer etc. Nowadays, there is enormous requirement of safe and effective drugs in the world. This has prompted scientists to revert back towards natural resources as a potential source of therapeutics for treatment and management of such chronic and fatal diseases. However, there are certain serious challenges and limitations in this field including scale up and commercialization of active compounds which allow only one in thousand lead molecules to be developed as drug. A systematic and scientific approach is an essential requirement for drug development from natural resource. This mini review provides an overview of the methods involved in natural product research starting from crude plant extract to bioactive pharmacological lead. Moreover, it also discusses the limitations of working concerning the bioactivity of medicinal plants.

  2. Potential Drug Development Candidates for Human Soil-Transmitted Helminthiases

    PubMed Central

    Olliaro, Piero; Seiler, Jürg; Kuesel, Annette; Horton, John; Clark, Jeffrey N.; Don, Robert; Keiser, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Background Few drugs are available for soil-transmitted helminthiasis (STH); the benzimidazoles albendazole and mebendazole are the only drugs being used for preventive chemotherapy as they can be given in one single dose with no weight adjustment. While generally safe and effective in reducing intensity of infection, they are contra-indicated in first-trimester pregnancy and have suboptimal efficacy against Trichuris trichiura. In addition, drug resistance is a threat. It is therefore important to find alternatives. Methodology We searched the literature and the animal health marketed products and pipeline for potential drug development candidates. Recently registered veterinary products offer advantages in that they have undergone extensive and rigorous animal testing, thus reducing the risk, cost and time to approval for human trials. For selected compounds, we retrieved and summarised publicly available information (through US Freedom of Information (FoI) statements, European Public Assessment Reports (EPAR) and published literature). Concomitantly, we developed a target product profile (TPP) against which the products were compared. Principal Findings The paper summarizes the general findings including various classes of compounds, and more specific information on two veterinary anthelmintics (monepantel, emodepside) and nitazoxanide, an antiprotozoal drug, compiled from the EMA EPAR and FDA registration files. Conclusions/Significance Few of the compounds already approved for use in human or animal medicine qualify for development track decision. Fast-tracking to approval for human studies may be possible for veterinary compounds like emodepside and monepantel, but additional information remains to be acquired before an informed decision can be made. PMID:21695247

  3. [Chapter 2. Transitions in drug-discovery technology and drug-development in Japan (1980-2010)].

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Noriko; Yoshioka, Ryuzo; Matsumoto, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    In 1970s, the material patent system was introduced in Japan. Since then, many Japanese pharmaceutical companies have endeavored to create original in-house products. From 1980s, many of the innovative products were small molecular drugs and were developed using powerful medicinal-chemical technologies. Among them were antibiotics and effective remedies for the digestive organs and circulatory organs. During this period, Japanese companies were able to launch some blockbuster drugs. At the same time, the pharmaceutical market, which had grown rapidly for two decades, was beginning to level off. From the late 1990s, drug development was slowing down due to the lack of expertise in biotechnology such as genetic engineering. In response to the circumstances, the research and development on biotechnology-based drugs such as antibody drugs have become more dynamic and popular at companies than small molecule drugs. In this paper, the writers reviewed in detail the transitions in drug discovery and development between 1980 and 2010.

  4. Bioanalysis for plasma protein binding studies in drug discovery and drug development: views and recommendations of the European Bioanalysis Forum.

    PubMed

    Buscher, Brigitte; Laakso, Sirpa; Mascher, Hermann; Pusecker, Klaus; Doig, Mira; Dillen, Lieve; Wagner-Redeker, Winfried; Pfeifer, Thomas; Delrat, Pascal; Timmerman, Philip

    2014-03-01

    Plasma protein binding (PPB) is an important parameter for a drug's efficacy and safety that needs to be investigated during each drug-development program. Even though regulatory guidance exists to study the extent of PPB before initiating clinical studies, there are no detailed instructions on how to perform and validate such studies. To explore how PPB studies involving bioanalysis are currently executed in the industry, the European Bioanalysis Forum (EBF) has conducted three surveys among their member companies: PPB studies in drug discovery (Part I); in vitro PPB studies in drug development (Part II); and in vivo PPB studies in drug development. This paper reflects the outcome of the three surveys, which, together with the team discussions, formed the basis of the EBF recommendation. The EBF recommends a tiered approach to the design of PPB studies and the bioanalysis of PPB samples: 'PPB screening' experiments in (early) drug discovery versus qualified/validated procedures in drug development.

  5. Development of gummi drugs of aripiprazole as hospital formulations.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Shinya; Hiraoka, Shogo; Namiki, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    About half of patients with schizophrenia have poor adherence to taking medication, so many have recurrence, therefore, providing formulations that enable patients to continue their medication without interruption is important. We aimed to develop a gummi drug that contains aripiprazole (which can reduce schizophrenia and manic symptoms in bipolar disorder). We were able to develop gummi drugs (OD-G, PW-G and OS-G) using three commercially available aripiprazole products (Abilify® orally disintegrating tablets, powder formulation, and oral solutions, respectively) as hospital formulations. Furthermore, we developed improved OD-G (iOD-G), which contained high aripiprazole content. Pharmaceutical characteristics of iOD-G were demonstrated to be suitable for hospital formulations, and iOD-G could be stored for ≤1 month. No significant differences in the dissolution and pharmacokinetics of divided portions of iOD-G were observed when compared with commercially available aripiprazole products. This study confirmed that new dosage forms of aripiprazole in gummi drugs can be developed as hospital formulations, which will contribute to improve medication adherence of patients.

  6. Regulatory Circuitry Governing Fungal Development, Drug Resistance, and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Rebecca S.; Robbins, Nicole; Cowen, Leah E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Pathogenic fungi have become a leading cause of human mortality due to the increasing frequency of fungal infections in immunocompromised populations and the limited armamentarium of clinically useful antifungal drugs. Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Aspergillus fumigatus are the leading causes of opportunistic fungal infections. In these diverse pathogenic fungi, complex signal transduction cascades are critical for sensing environmental changes and mediating appropriate cellular responses. For C. albicans, several environmental cues regulate a morphogenetic switch from yeast to filamentous growth, a reversible transition important for virulence. Many of the signaling cascades regulating morphogenesis are also required for cells to adapt and survive the cellular stresses imposed by antifungal drugs. Many of these signaling networks are conserved in C. neoformans and A. fumigatus, which undergo distinct morphogenetic programs during specific phases of their life cycles. Furthermore, the key mechanisms of fungal drug resistance, including alterations of the drug target, overexpression of drug efflux transporters, and alteration of cellular stress responses, are conserved between these species. This review focuses on the circuitry regulating fungal morphogenesis and drug resistance and the impact of these pathways on virulence. Although the three human-pathogenic fungi highlighted in this review are those most frequently encountered in the clinic, they represent a minute fraction of fungal diversity. Exploration of the conservation and divergence of core signal transduction pathways across C. albicans, C. neoformans, and A. fumigatus provides a foundation for the study of a broader diversity of pathogenic fungi and a platform for the development of new therapeutic strategies for fungal disease. PMID:21646428

  7. Recent developments in the use of bioadhesive systems for delivery of drugs to the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Smart, John D

    2004-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutic agents to, or via, the oral cavity is limited by the efficient removal mechanisms that exist in this area. Bioadhesive formulations have been developed to allow prolonged localized therapy and enhanced systemic delivery. The oral mucosa however, while avoiding first-pass effects, is a formidable barrier to drug absorption, especially for "biopharmaceutical" products arising from the recent innovations in genomics and proteomics. Bioadhesive polymers are typically hydrophilic macromolecules containing numerous hydrogen-bonding groups. Second-generation bioadhesives include modified or new polymers that allow enhanced adhesion and/or drug delivery, along with site-specific ligands such as lectins. Over the last 20 years, a range of bioadhesive formulations have been developed for the oral cavity, but only comparatively few have found their way onto the market. This review will consider some recent developments in the use of bioadhesive buccal systems, notably the development of new polymers, advanced delivery systems, and the exploitation of the multifunctional properties of some bioadhesives.

  8. NIPTE: a multi-university partnership supporting academic drug development.

    PubMed

    Gurvich, Vadim J; Byrn, Stephen R

    2013-10-01

    The strategic goal of academic translational research is to accelerate translational science through the improvement and development of resources for moving discoveries across translational barriers through 'first in humans' studies. To achieve this goal, access to drug discovery resources and preclinical IND-enabling infrastructure is crucial. One potential approach of research institutions for coordinating preclinical development, based on a model from the National Institute for Pharmaceutical Technology and Education (NIPTE), can provide academic translational and medical centers with access to a wide variety of enabling infrastructure for developing small molecule clinical candidates in an efficient, cost-effective manner. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [System biology and synthetic biology modify drug discovery and development].

    PubMed

    Haiech, Jacques; Ranjeva, Raoul; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude

    2012-02-01

    Life Sciences are built on observations. Right now, a more systemic approach allowing to integrate the different organizational levels in Biology is emerging. Such an approach uses a set of technologies and strategies allowing to build models that appear to be more and more predictive (omics, bioinformatics, integrative biology, computational biology…). Those models accelerate the rational development of new therapies avoiding an engineering based only on trials and errors. This approach both holistic and predictive radically modifies the discovery and development modalities used today in health industries. Moreover, because of the apparition of new jobs at the interface of disciplines, of private and public sectors and of life sciences and engineering sciences, this implies to rethink the training programs in both their contents and their pedagogical tools.

  10. Alzheimer's disease drug development and the problem of the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Pardridge, William M.

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) drug development is limited by the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). More than 98% of all small molecule drugs, and ∼100% of all large molecule drugs, do not cross the BBB. Despite the fact that the vast majority of AD drug candidates do not cross the BBB, the present-day AD drug development effort is characterized by an imbalance, whereby >99% of the drug development effort is devoted to CNS drug discovery, and <1% of drug development is devoted to CNS drug delivery. Future AD drug development needs a concerted effort to incorporate the BBB sciences early in the CNS drug discovery process. This can be accomplished by a reallocation of resources, and an expansion of the effort in the pure science of BBB biology and the applied science of brain drug targeting technology. PMID:19751922

  11. A physiome interoperability roadmap for personalized drug development

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The goal of developing therapies and dosage regimes for characterized subgroups of the general population can be facilitated by the use of simulation models able to incorporate information about inter-individual variability in drug disposition (pharmacokinetics), toxicity and response effect (pharmacodynamics). Such observed variability can have multiple causes at various scales, ranging from gross anatomical differences to differences in genome sequence. Relevant data for many of these aspects, particularly related to molecular assays (known as ‘-omics’), are available in online resources, but identification and assignment to appropriate model variables and parameters is a significant bottleneck in the model development process. Through its efforts to standardize annotation with consequent increase in data usability, the human physiome project has a vital role in improving productivity in model development and, thus, the development of personalized therapy regimes. Here, we review the current status of personalized medicine in clinical practice, outline some of the challenges that must be overcome in order to expand its applicability, and discuss the relevance of personalized medicine to the more widespread challenges being faced in drug discovery and development. We then review some of (i) the key data resources available for use in model development and (ii) the potential areas where advances made within the physiome modelling community could contribute to physiologically based pharmacokinetic and physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modelling in support of personalized drug development. We conclude by proposing a roadmap to further guide the physiome community in its on-going efforts to improve data usability, and integration with modelling efforts in the support of personalized medicine development. PMID:27051513

  12. A physiome interoperability roadmap for personalized drug development.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Simon; Wolstencroft, Katherine; de Bono, Bernard; Hunter, Peter J

    2016-04-06

    The goal of developing therapies and dosage regimes for characterized subgroups of the general population can be facilitated by the use of simulation models able to incorporate information about inter-individual variability in drug disposition (pharmacokinetics), toxicity and response effect (pharmacodynamics). Such observed variability can have multiple causes at various scales, ranging from gross anatomical differences to differences in genome sequence. Relevant data for many of these aspects, particularly related to molecular assays (known as '-omics'), are available in online resources, but identification and assignment to appropriate model variables and parameters is a significant bottleneck in the model development process. Through its efforts to standardize annotation with consequent increase in data usability, the human physiome project has a vital role in improving productivity in model development and, thus, the development of personalized therapy regimes. Here, we review the current status of personalized medicine in clinical practice, outline some of the challenges that must be overcome in order to expand its applicability, and discuss the relevance of personalized medicine to the more widespread challenges being faced in drug discovery and development. We then review some of (i) the key data resources available for use in model development and (ii) the potential areas where advances made within the physiome modelling community could contribute to physiologically based pharmacokinetic and physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modelling in support of personalized drug development. We conclude by proposing a roadmap to further guide the physiome community in its on-going efforts to improve data usability, and integration with modelling efforts in the support of personalized medicine development.

  13. Regulatory considerations on endpoints in ovarian cancer drug development.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, Sanjeeve; Kim, Geoffrey S; McKee, Amy E; Pazdur, Richard

    2017-07-15

    Ovarian cancer remains a disease entity that is responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality among women worldwide. Modern drug research pipelines and accelerated drug development timelines applied to other disease entities have begun to make an impact on treatment options for patients with advanced ovarian cancer, as exemplified by the recent accelerated approval of 2 agents for this disease as the forerunners of a growing number of registrational trials. Regulatory flexibility for this serious and life-threatening condition spurs the consideration of intermediate endpoints for regulatory trial design, including potential applications in the development of newer therapeutic classes such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies for patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Cancer 2017;123:2604-8. © 2017 American Cancer Society. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  14. Protective and risk predictors in the development of drug use.

    PubMed

    Gerevich, J; Bácskai, E

    1996-01-01

    The authors examined the relationship of two dimensions of the theory of social development--vulnerability (predictors, risk factors) and protectivity--in two samples, schoolchildren aged ten to fifteen years and addictive drug users. On the basis of the Hirschi model of protective factors, they found that the most important protective factors (attachment, commitment, involvement, belief) act against substance use. A surprising finding was that among the predictors of the addicts some forms of escape from the family act against the development of drug use, that is, they can be regarded as a protective predictor. The findings of the study draw attention to the complexity of the vulnerability-protectivity relationship and to the need for further research.

  15. Improving and Accelerating Drug Development for Nervous System Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pankevich, Diana E.; Altevogt, Bruce M.; Dunlop, John; Gage, Fred H.; Hyman, Steve E.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the neurosciences have placed the field in the position where it is poised to significantly reduce the burden of nervous system disorders. However, drug discovery, development and translation for nervous system disorders still pose many unique challenges. The key scientific challenges can be summarized as follows: mechanisms of disease, target identification and validation, predictive models, biomarkers for patient stratification and as endpoints for clinical trials, clear regulatory pathways, reliability and reproducibility of published data, and data sharing and collaboration. To accelerate nervous system drug development the Institute of Medicine’s Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders has hosted a series of public workshops that brought together representatives of industry, government (including both research funding and regulatory agencies), academia, and patient groups to discuss these challenges and offer potential strategies to improve the translational neuroscience. PMID:25442933

  16. The dawn of mesoscopic approach in drug development.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    The feeling of the reaching of a crucial turning point is shared by the whole spectrum of sciences. The main features of this turning point are basically identical across different disciplines and can be interpreted as a re-location of the most relevant level of explanation (and consequently intervention for more applicative fields) from the microscopic to the so called mesoscopic level. Here, the character of the mesoscopic approach in drug development field will be briefly commented.

  17. Ethical Challenges in Biomarker-Driven Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Hey, Spencer Phillips

    2017-09-25

    The increasing importance of biomarkers-as drivers of research and drug development activity, surrogate outcomes in clinical trials, and the centerpiece of precision medicine-raises many new ethical challenges. In what follows, I briefly review some of the major ethical challenges and debates already identified in the literature, and then describe a new ethical challenge that arises from the abstract nature of biomarker hypotheses. © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  18. Tuning HERG out: antitarget QSAR models for drug development.

    PubMed

    Braga, Rodolpho C; Alves, Vinicius M; Silva, Meryck F B; Muratov, Eugene; Fourches, Denis; Tropsha, Alexander; Andrade, Carolina H

    2014-01-01

    Several non-cardiovascular drugs have been withdrawn from the market due to their inhibition of hERG K+ channels that can potentially lead to severe heart arrhythmia and death. As hERG safety testing is a mandatory FDArequired procedure, there is a considerable interest for developing predictive computational tools to identify and filter out potential hERG blockers early in the drug discovery process. In this study, we aimed to generate predictive and well-characterized quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for hERG blockage using the largest publicly available dataset of 11,958 compounds from the ChEMBL database. The models have been developed and validated according to OECD guidelines using four types of descriptors and four different machine-learning techniques. The classification accuracies discriminating blockers from non-blockers were as high as 0.83-0.93 on external set. Model interpretation revealed several SAR rules, which can guide structural optimization of some hERG blockers into non-blockers. We have also applied the generated models for screening the World Drug Index (WDI) database and identify putative hERG blockers and non-blockers among currently marketed drugs. The developed models can reliably identify blockers and non-blockers, which could be useful for the scientific community. A freely accessible web server has been developed allowing users to identify putative hERG blockers and non-blockers in chemical libraries of their interest (http://labmol.farmacia.ufg.br/predherg).

  19. Development and in vitro characterization of drug delivery system of rifapentine for osteoarticular tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Zuo, Yi; Hu, Yunjiu; Wang, Jian; Li, Jidong; Qiao, Bo; Jiang, Dianming

    2015-01-01

    The study was to develop and evaluate the rifapentine-loaded poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres (RPMs) for the treatment of osteoarticular tuberculosis to avoid critical side effects caused by oral regimens of antibiotics or intravenous antibiotics. The RPMs were spherical with rough surfaces, and elevated amounts of rifapentine in the formulation markedly increased the particle size and drug loading, while decreased the size distribution and entrapment efficiency. The highest drug loading and encapsulation efficiency of RPMs were 23.93%±3.93% and 88.49%±8.49%, respectively. After the initial rapid drug release, the release rate gradually decreased, and approximately 80% of the encapsulated rifapentine was released after 30 days of incubation. Moreover, RPMs could effectively inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus. With increasing rifapentine content, the inhibition zones were continuously enlarged while the minimal inhibitory concentration values decreased. These results suggested that RPMs were bioactive and controlled release delivery systems for the treatment of osteoarticular tuberculosis.

  20. Development and in vitro characterization of drug delivery system of rifapentine for osteoarticular tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun; Zuo, Yi; Hu, Yunjiu; Wang, Jian; Li, Jidong; Qiao, Bo; Jiang, Dianming

    2015-01-01

    The study was to develop and evaluate the rifapentine-loaded poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres (RPMs) for the treatment of osteoarticular tuberculosis to avoid critical side effects caused by oral regimens of antibiotics or intravenous antibiotics. The RPMs were spherical with rough surfaces, and elevated amounts of rifapentine in the formulation markedly increased the particle size and drug loading, while decreased the size distribution and entrapment efficiency. The highest drug loading and encapsulation efficiency of RPMs were 23.93%±3.93% and 88.49%±8.49%, respectively. After the initial rapid drug release, the release rate gradually decreased, and approximately 80% of the encapsulated rifapentine was released after 30 days of incubation. Moreover, RPMs could effectively inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus. With increasing rifapentine content, the inhibition zones were continuously enlarged while the minimal inhibitory concentration values decreased. These results suggested that RPMs were bioactive and controlled release delivery systems for the treatment of osteoarticular tuberculosis. PMID:25834394

  1. Improvement of Pediatric Drug Development: Regulatory and Practical Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Katusra; Carroll, Kelly A; Onishi, Taku; Matsumaru, Naoki; Brasseur, Daniel; Nakamura, Hidefumi

    2016-03-01

    A dearth in pediatric drug development often leaves pediatricians with no alternative but to prescribe unlicensed or off-label drugs with a resultant increased risk of adverse events. We present the current status of pediatric drug development and, based on our data analysis, clarify the problems in this area. Further action is proposed to improve the drug development that has pediatric therapeutic orphan status. We analyzed all Phase II/III and Phase III trials in ClinicalTrials.gov that only included pediatric participants (<18 years old) between 2006 and 2014. Performance index, an indicator of pediatric drug development, was calculated by dividing the annual number of pediatric clinical trials by million pediatric populations acquired from Census.gov. Effects of the 2 Japanese premiums introduced in 2010, for the enhancement of pediatric drug development, were analyzed by comparing mean performance index prepremiums (2006-2009) and postpremiums (2010-2014) among Japan, the European Union, and the United States. The European Union Clinical Trials Register and published reports from the European Medicines Agency were also surveyed to investigate the Paediatric Committee effect on pediatric clinical trials in the European Union. Mean difference of the performance index in prepremiums and postpremiums between Japan and the European Union were 0.296 (P < 0.001) and 0.066 (P = 0.498), respectively. Those between Japan and the United States were 0.560 (P < 0.001) and 0.281 (P = 0.002), indicating that pediatric drug development in Japan was more active after the introduction of these premiums, even reaching the level of the European Union. The Pediatric Regulation and the Paediatric Committee promoted pediatric drug development in the European Union. The registered number of clinical trials that includes at least 1 participants <18 years old in the European Union Clinical Trials Register increased by 247 trials (from 672) in the 1000 days after regulation. The ratio

  2. Clinical evaluation of a newly developed method for avoiding artifacts caused by dental fillings on X-ray CT.

    PubMed

    Nakae, Yasuo; Sakamoto, Kiyoshi; Minamoto, Takahiro; Kamakura, Toshiko; Ogata, Yuji; Matsumoto, Mitsuhiro; Johkou, Takeshi

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of gantry tilt scanning as an image reconstruction technique for avoiding artifacts caused by metallic dental fillings. Gantry tilt scanning was used with multidetector-row computed tomography for imaging in patients with dental fillings. Using a novel PC-based program, the oblique images obtained were reconstructed to transverse images using nearest neighbor and bilinear interpolation methodologies in order to avoid metallic streak artifacts. Coronal images were reformatted with the reconstructed transverse images, and the continuity of the reconstructed images was evaluated. Gantry tilt scanning was performed in 12 patients with metal artifacts, and the original and reconstructed images were classified into four grades and assessed by two radiologists. Results of the clinical evaluation indicated that the original images with artifacts, only 4% had good image quality in the region around the medial pterygoid muscle, only 8% depicted areas around the internal carotid artery and internal jugular vein, and only 12% could depict the areas around the parotid gland in the clinical evaluation. These values were improved to 60, 96, and 100%, respectively, in the reconstructed transverse images. Gantry tilt scanning as an image reconstruction technique improves image quality and removes most, if not all, artifacts caused by metallic dental fillings. The resulting images can be used in the evaluation of oropharyngeal lesions in patients with dental fillings.

  3. Positron Emission Tomography Application to Drug Development and Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvadori, Piero A.

    The research for the identification and development of new drugs represents a very complex process implying long times and massive investments. This process was not able to parallel the rate of discoveries made in the field of genomic and molecular biology and a gap created between demand of new drugs and the ability of pharmaceutical companies to select good candidates. Positron Emission Tomography, among the different Molecular Imaging modalities, could represent a new tool for the early assessment and screening of new drug candidates and, due to its physical performances and the characteristics of positron-labeled tracers, gain the role of "Biomarker" accepted by the Companies and the Regulatory Bodies of Drug Agencies. To fulfil this task PET has to exploit all of its special features such as data absolute quantification and modelling, high spatial resolution and dynamic imaging. Relevant efforts need to be directed to the careful design and validation of experimental protocols with the main goal of achieving consistency in multi- centric trials.