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Sample records for avoiding drug development

  1. Towards better patient care: drugs to avoid.

    PubMed

    2013-04-01

    Common sense dictates that one should choose tried and tested drugs with proven, concrete benefits that outweigh their adverse effects. Many new drugs are approved each year, often despite a lack of solid evidence that they are any better than existing treatments. Worse, some are approved despite being less effective or more harmful than current options. Massive promotion is used to ensure that such drugs achieve a positive image in the eyes of healthcare professionals and patients. Renowned "opinion leaders" intervene in their favour at conferences and in specialist media, and their opinions are further propagated by specialists in the field. Finally, campaigns in the lay media are used to highlight the target illness, encouraging patients to request a prescription. New data sometimes show that older, initially promising drugs are less effective or more harmful than first thought. For all these reasons, many drugs that are now present on the market are more harmful than beneficial and should be avoided. Unfortunately, negative assessment data and warnings are often drowned in the flood of promotion and advertising. Front-line healthcare professionals who are determined to act in their patients' best interests can find themselves swimming against a tide of specialist opinion, marketing authorisation, and reimbursement decisions. By leaving drugs that are more harmful than beneficial on the market and contenting themselves with simple half-measures, healthcare authorities are failing in their duty to protect patients. Prescrire, a journal funded solely by its subscribers, does not seek to do the work of health authorities, and does not have the means to do so. Prescrire's goal is simply to help healthcare professionals provide better care. The following text lists the principal drugs that we consider more harmful than beneficial, based on our reviews published between 2010 and 2012 in our French edition. These drugs should not be used. Patients and healthcare

  2. Towards better patient care: drugs to avoid.

    PubMed

    2013-04-01

    Common sense dictates that one should choose tried and tested drugs with proven, concrete benefits that outweigh their adverse effects. Many new drugs are approved each year, often despite a lack of solid evidence that they are any better than existing treatments. Worse, some are approved despite being less effective or more harmful than current options. Massive promotion is used to ensure that such drugs achieve a positive image in the eyes of healthcare professionals and patients. Renowned "opinion leaders" intervene in their favour at conferences and in specialist media, and their opinions are further propagated by specialists in the field. Finally, campaigns in the lay media are used to highlight the target illness, encouraging patients to request a prescription. New data sometimes show that older, initially promising drugs are less effective or more harmful than first thought. For all these reasons, many drugs that are now present on the market are more harmful than beneficial and should be avoided. Unfortunately, negative assessment data and warnings are often drowned in the flood of promotion and advertising. Front-line healthcare professionals who are determined to act in their patients' best interests can find themselves swimming against a tide of specialist opinion, marketing authorisation, and reimbursement decisions. By leaving drugs that are more harmful than beneficial on the market and contenting themselves with simple half-measures, healthcare authorities are failing in their duty to protect patients. Prescrire, a journal funded solely by its subscribers, does not seek to do the work of health authorities, and does not have the means to do so. Prescrire's goal is simply to help healthcare professionals provide better care. The following text lists the principal drugs that we consider more harmful than beneficial, based on our reviews published between 2010 and 2012 in our French edition. These drugs should not be used. Patients and healthcare

  3. Drug related admissions to a cardiology department; frequency and avoidability.

    PubMed

    Hallas, J; Haghfelt, T; Gram, L F; Grodum, E; Damsbo, N

    1990-10-01

    Three hundred and sixty-six consecutive patients admitted to a department of cardiology were evaluated for drug events as a cause of admission. The drug events considered were adverse drug reactions (ADR) and dose-related therapeutic failures (DTF). 'Definite' or 'probable' drug events accounted for 15 admissions (4.1%, 95% confidence limits 2.3-6.7%), of which eleven were ADR and four were DTF. With the inclusion of six 'possible' drug events, the rate of drug-related hospitalizations (DRH) was 5.7%. DRHs were characterized by a preponderance of acute admissions and elderly patients. Hypokalaemia (less than 3.5 mM) was observed in 27 (16%) patients receiving diuretics, and could be related to four cases of arrhythmias (two 'probable' and two 'possible' ADR). The average serum potassium level was similar in diuretic treated patients with or without drugs to counteract hypokalaemia, irrespective of the drugs chosen. Among the 15 'definite'/'probable' DRHs, five were considered to be due to an error in prescription, and a further five cases were judged to have been avoidable had appropriate measures been taken by prescribing physicians. A DRH educational intervention programme should primarily deal with non-compliance or with prescription of diuretics or digoxin, since these problems constitute the majority of cases of DRH. No specific group of doctors could be targeted as responsible for DRH, avoidable or not. PMID:2266347

  4. Conditioned saccharin avoidance and sensitization to drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Fenu, Sandro; Cadoni, Cristina; Di Chiara, Gaetano

    2010-12-25

    Saccharin avoidance conditioned by drugs of abuse (CSA) has been interpreted as an expression of the appetitive, dopamine-dependent, properties of the drug. Repeated exposure to these drugs induces an increase (sensitization) of their motor stimulant properties associated with differential changes in DA transmission in the NAc shell and core. The present study investigated the changes in drug CSA induced by schedules of repeated drug exposure that induce behavioral sensitization. CSA was performed in a two-bottle choice paradigm with two saccharin-drug associations in rats previously sensitized to morphine, cocaine, amphetamine and nicotine. In control rats morphine (1 and 5mg/kg s.c.), cocaine (5 and 10mg/kg i.p.), amphetamine (0.25 and 0.5mg/kg s.c.) and nicotine (0.4 mg/kg s.c.) induced dose-dependent CSA. Sensitization to morphine, cocaine and nicotine, which is known to reduce the responsiveness of NAc shell DA to the same drugs, also reduced CSA. In contrast, sensitization to amphetamine, that does not affect the responsiveness of NAc shell DA to the drug, failed to affect CSA. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that NAc shell DA is a substrate of the appetitive properties of drugs of abuse.

  5. Towards better patient care: drugs to avoid in 2016.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    To help healthcare professionals and patients choose high-quality treatments that minimize the risk of adverse effects, in early 2016 we updated our list of drugs to avoid. Prescrire's assessments of the harm-benefit balance of new drugs and indications are based on a rigorous procedure that includes a systematic and reproducible literature search, identification of patient-relevant outcomes, prioritisation of the supporting data based on the strength of evidence, comparison with standard treatments, and an analysis of both known and potential adverse effects. This 2016 review of medications examined by Prescrire over a six-year period, from 2010 to 2015, identified 74 drugs that are more harmful than beneficial in all the indications for which they have been authorised in France. In most cases, when drug therapy is really necessary, other drugs with a better harm-benefit balance are available. Even in serious situations, when no effective treatment exists, there is no justification for prescribing a drug with no proven efficacy that provokes severe adverse effects. It may be acceptable to test these drugs in clinical trials, but patients must be informed of the uncertainty over their harm-benefit balance, and the trial design must be relevant. Tailored supportive care is the best option when there are no available treatments capable of improving prognosis or quality of life, beyond the placebo effect.

  6. Antiarrhythmic Drug Therapy to Avoid Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Shocks

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Jaber

    2016-01-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are effective in the prevention of arrhythmic sudden cardiac death. Many patients receiving an ICD are affected by heart failure and are at risk of ventricular arrhythmias, which may lead to appropriate shocks. On the other hand, in this population the incidence of atrial fibrillation, giving rise to inappropriate ICD shocks, is high. Accordingly, ICD discharges occur frequently and many patients with an ICD will need concomitant antiarrhythmic drug therapy to avoid or reduce the frequency of shocks. Therapeutic agents such as β-blockers, class I or class III antiarrhythmic drugs effectively suppress arrhythmias, but may have side-effects. Some drugs could eventually influence the function of ICDs by altering defibrillation or pacing threshold. Few prospective randomised trials are available, but current data suggest that amiodarone is most effective for prevention of appropriate or inappropriate ICD shocks. This review article summarises current knowledge regarding the antiarrhythmic management of patients with ICDs.

  7. Antiarrhythmic Drug Therapy to Avoid Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Shocks.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Jaber; R Ehrlich, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are effective in the prevention of arrhythmic sudden cardiac death. Many patients receiving an ICD are affected by heart failure and are at risk of ventricular arrhythmias, which may lead to appropriate shocks. On the other hand, in this population the incidence of atrial fibrillation, giving rise to inappropriate ICD shocks, is high. Accordingly, ICD discharges occur frequently and many patients with an ICD will need concomitant antiarrhythmic drug therapy to avoid or reduce the frequency of shocks. Therapeutic agents such as β-blockers, class I or class III antiarrhythmic drugs effectively suppress arrhythmias, but may have side-effects. Some drugs could eventually influence the function of ICDs by altering defibrillation or pacing threshold. Few prospective randomised trials are available, but current data suggest that amiodarone is most effective for prevention of appropriate or inappropriate ICD shocks. This review article summarises current knowledge regarding the antiarrhythmic management of patients with ICDs. PMID:27617090

  8. Antiarrhythmic Drug Therapy to Avoid Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Shocks

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Jaber

    2016-01-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are effective in the prevention of arrhythmic sudden cardiac death. Many patients receiving an ICD are affected by heart failure and are at risk of ventricular arrhythmias, which may lead to appropriate shocks. On the other hand, in this population the incidence of atrial fibrillation, giving rise to inappropriate ICD shocks, is high. Accordingly, ICD discharges occur frequently and many patients with an ICD will need concomitant antiarrhythmic drug therapy to avoid or reduce the frequency of shocks. Therapeutic agents such as β-blockers, class I or class III antiarrhythmic drugs effectively suppress arrhythmias, but may have side-effects. Some drugs could eventually influence the function of ICDs by altering defibrillation or pacing threshold. Few prospective randomised trials are available, but current data suggest that amiodarone is most effective for prevention of appropriate or inappropriate ICD shocks. This review article summarises current knowledge regarding the antiarrhythmic management of patients with ICDs. PMID:27617090

  9. Drug Development Process

    MedlinePlus

    ... Approvals The Drug Development Process The Drug Development Process Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... public. More Information More in The Drug Development Process Step 1: Discovery and Development Step 2: Preclinical ...

  10. Avoidance learning: a review of theoretical models and recent developments

    PubMed Central

    Krypotos, Angelos-Miltiadis; Effting, Marieke; Kindt, Merel; Beckers, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Avoidance is a key characteristic of adaptive and maladaptive fear. Here, we review past and contemporary theories of avoidance learning. Based on the theories, experimental findings and clinical observations reviewed, we distill key principles of how adaptive and maladaptive avoidance behavior is acquired and maintained. We highlight clinical implications of avoidance learning theories and describe intervention strategies that could reduce maladaptive avoidance and prevent its return. We end with a brief overview of recent developments and avenues for further research. PMID:26257618

  11. Pralatrexate Monitoring Using a Commercially Available Methotrexate Assay to Avoid Potential Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Jordan P; Vrontikis, Alaina; Sedillo, Courtney; Halwani, Ahmad S; Gilreath, Jeffrey A

    2016-02-01

    Pralatrexate (PDX) is a folate antagonist structurally similar to methotrexate (MTX). Unlike MTX, it is currently not known whether PDX exhibits delayed clearance and heightened toxicity in the setting of fluid overload. A specific serum assay for PDX is not commercially available. To our knowledge, we report the first case using an MTX serum assay as a surrogate for PDX concentrations to avoid a potential drug-drug interaction with pralatrexate. We describe a 76-year-old man with refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma who began therapy with weekly PDX 15 mg/m(2) intravenous infusions on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day cycle. He subsequently developed mucositis, a moderate right-sided pleural effusion, and peripheral edema over the next 5 weeks. Aggressive diuresis with furosemide was initiated, which was then withheld the day before his next PDX dose to avoid a potential drug-drug interaction between PDX and furosemide. His baseline MTX/PDX concentration (measured prior to administration of the cycle 2, week 2 PDX dose) was less than 0.20 μmol/L (i.e., undetectable). After PDX administration, his 1-hour peak MTX/PDX concentration increased to 0.58 μmol/L. Aggressive diuresis was withheld until his MTX/PDX concentration was undetectable, 43.5 hours later. PDX is more potent than MTX and displays similar pharmacokinetic properties. PDX concentrations using the serum MTX assay reflect lower values than those reported from PDX-specific assays in clinical studies. Because PDX is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of uncommon malignancies, it is unlikely that a specific assay will be commercially developed. We propose that the MTX serum assay has merit for use in determining when to reinstate possible interacting drug therapies such as loop diuretics.

  12. Development and Validation of the Athlete Fear Avoidance Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Dover, Geoffrey; Amar, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Context The fear-avoidance model was developed in an attempt to explain the process by which “pain experience” and “pain behavior” become dissociated from the actual pain sensation in individuals who manifest the phenomenon of exaggerated pain perception. High levels of fear avoidance can lead to chronic pain and disability and have successfully predicted rehabilitation time in the work-related–injury population. Existing fear-avoidance questionnaires have all been developed for the general population, but these questionnaires may not be specific enough to fully assess fear avoidance in an athletic population that copes with pain differently than the general population. Objective To develop and validate the Athlete Fear Avoidance Questionnaire (AFAQ). Design Qualitative research to develop the AFAQ and a cross-sectional study to validate the scale. Patients or Other Participants For questionnaire development, a total of 8 experts in the fields of athletic therapy, sport psychology, and fear avoidance were called upon to generate and rate items for the AFAQ. For determining concurrent validity, 99 varsity athletes from various sports participated. Data Collection and Analysis A total of 99 varsity athletes completed the AFAQ, the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire, and the Pain Catastrophizing Scale. We used Pearson correlations to establish concurrent validity. Results Concurrent validity was established with significant correlations between the AFAQ and the Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire-Physical Activity (r = 0.352, P > .001) as well as with the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (r = 0.587, P > .001). High internal consistency of our questionnaire was established with a Cronbach α coefficient of 0.805. The final version of the questionnaire includes 10 items with good internal validity (P < .05). Conclusions We developed a questionnaire with good internal and external validity. The AFAQ is a scale that measures sport-injury–related fear avoidance in

  13. Lipidomics in drug development.

    PubMed

    Dehairs, Jonas; Derua, Rita; Rueda-Rincon, Natalia; Swinnen, Johannes V

    2015-06-01

    Numerous human pathologies, including common conditions such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, inflammatory disease and neurodegeneration, involve changes in lipid metabolism. Likewise, a growing number of drugs are being developed that directly or indirectly affect lipid metabolic pathways. Instead of classical and cumbrous radiochemical analyses, lipid profiling by mass spectrometry (MS)-based lipidomics holds great potential as companion diagnostic in several steps along the drug development process. In this review we describe some typical lipidomics set-ups and illustrate how these technologies can be implemented in target discovery, compound screening, in vitro and in vivo preclinical testing, toxicity testing of drugs, and prediction and monitoring of response. PMID:26190681

  14. Contamination sensitivity and the development of disease-avoidant behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Siegal, Michael; Fadda, Roberta; Overton, Paul G.

    2011-01-01

    Owing to their developing cognitive abilities and their limited knowledge about the biological basis of illness, children often have less expertise at disease avoidance than adults. However, affective reactions to contaminants through the acquisition of disgust and the social and cultural transmissions of knowledge about contamination and contagion provide impetus for children to learn effective disease-avoidant behaviours early in their development. In this article, we review the ontogenetic development of knowledge about contamination and contagion with particular attention to the role of socialization and culture. Together with their emerging cognitive abilities and affective reactions to contaminants, informal and formal cultural learning shape children's knowledge about disease. Through this process, the perceptual cues of contamination are linked to threats of disease outcomes and can act as determinants of disease-avoidant behaviours. PMID:22042919

  15. Hepatitis C Avoidance in Injection Drug Users: A Typology of Possible Protective Practices

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Catherine; Harris, Magdalena; Rhodes, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hepatitis C virus (HCV) represents a serious public health concern. People who inject drugs (PWID) are at particular risk and nearly half (45%) of PWID in England may be infected. HCV prevention interventions have only had moderate impact on the prevalence of HCV in this population. Using qualitative methods, we sought to detail the protective practices potentially linked to HCV avoidance among PWID, and explore the motivations for these. Methods The study used a life history approach allowing participants to detail their lived experience both before and during the course of their injecting careers. Thirty-seven participants were recruited from drug services in London, and from referrals within local injecting networks. A baseline and follow-up in-depth qualitative interview was carried out with each participant, and for half, a third interview was also undertaken. All underwent testing for HCV antibody. Analyses focused on developing a descriptive typology of protective practices potentially linked to HCV avoidance. Results Practices were deemed to be protective against HCV if they could be expected a priori to reduce the number of overall injections and/or the number of injections using shared injecting equipment. Participants reported engaging in various protective practices which fell into three categories identified through thematic analysis: principles about injecting, preparedness, and flexibility. Conclusions All participants engaged in protective practices irrespective of serostatus. It is important to consider the relative importance of different motivations framing protective practices in order to formulate harm reduction interventions which appeal to the situated concerns of PWID, especially given that these protective practices may also help protect against HIV and other blood borne infections. PMID:24194855

  16. Ontogenetic development of avoidance learning in rats after eye opening.

    PubMed

    Köllner, O; Köllner, U; Göb, R; Klingberg, F

    1988-01-01

    Five male and one female group of 8 pups were selected from 8 liters on the second postnatal day and returned to 6 dams. The animals were investigated in two subsequent tests; first, in a peripheral field avoidance test using a 60 x 75 x 22 cm open field subdivided into 20 equal squares of 15 x 15 cm with separate floor grids for electrical punishment and, second, in a W-like maze with a start arm falling into a common alley from which left and right each two goal arms branched off. Four qualities were measured in the first test: finding out that only central fields remained unpunished; the stay duration in central fields indicating passive avoidance; the response to a conditioned stimulus, when they entered peripheral fields indicating active avoidance; the quality of extinction. The differences of these qualities changed significantly from week to week as the acquisition speed and the consolidation increased, the extinction was rapid in the third week, very slow in the fourth week and adult-like in the fifth week. The self-chosen strategy of pups showed dominance of escape with subsequent motor inhibition in the third week, dominance of trials and active avoidance in the fourth week, dominance of passive avoidance in the fifth week. We found no difference between males and females, or between blind and control rats. The W-maze test revealed additionally that reversal learning from left goal to right goal was still difficult in the fourth week and that brightness-cued alteration of goals in which wrong choices were punished when a time limit was overcome could not be learned before the sixth week and not consolidated before the end of the seventh week. The results suggest that various brain processes are involved in the development of avoidance and learning strategies which mature unevenly and reach their peaks at different ages. PMID:3254159

  17. Perceptions about Recovery Needs and Drug-Avoidance Recovery Behaviors among Youth in Substance Abuse Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Rachel; Anglin, M. Douglas; Glik, Deborah C.; Zavalza, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study used mixed methods to explore youth attitudes about recovery-related needs and important drug-avoidance behaviors after treatment. Method Focus groups were conducted with 118 substance using youth in treatment (four residential and 10 outpatient settings) throughout Los Angeles County. Results The average age was 17.4 (SD = 2.9); 78.3% were male, 66.1% Latino; and most were in treatment for primary marijuana (40.9%) or methamphetamine (30.4%) abuse. Quantitatve results from the drug-avoidance activity survey identified the following factors youth rated as important to their recovery after treatment: lifestyle improvement activities (95.7%); changing personal drug behaviors (89.6%); drug environment/culture change activities (82.5%); with the least important being therapeutic activities (78.5%). Qualitative findings from focus groups that asked what youth think are important for recovery programs to address after treatment revealed the following four areas: (1) recovery promotion to developmentally appropriate activities (95%); (2) facilitating the use of coping skills to deal with stress (85%); (3) offering alternative recovery support options (not just abstinence only) (75%); and (4) continuing to provide substance use education (65%). Conclusion Findings highlight essential aspects of recovery in terms of need and drug-avoidance behaviors considered important to youth in treatment. Such information will help to better address clinical and recovery support models aimed at relapse prevention to ensure that the perceived problems of substance-abusing youth are adequately met. PMID:24377168

  18. Ecology and neurobiology of toxin avoidance and the paradox of drug reward.

    PubMed

    Hagen, E H; Sullivan, R J; Schmidt, R; Morris, G; Kempter, R; Hammerstein, P

    2009-04-21

    Current neurobiological theory of drug use is based on the observation that all addictive drugs induce changes in activity of dopaminergic circuitry, interfering with reward processing, and thus enhancing drug seeking and consumption behaviors. Current theory of drug origins, in contrast, views almost all major drugs of abuse, including nicotine, cocaine and opiates, as plant neurotoxins that evolved to punish and deter herbivores. According to this latter view, plants should not have evolved compounds that reward or reinforce plant consumption. Mammals, in turn, should not have evolved reinforcement mechanisms easily triggered by toxic substances. Situated in an ecological context, therefore, drug reward is a paradox. In an attempt to resolve the paradox, we review the neurobiology of aversive learning and toxin avoidance and their relationships to appetitive learning. We seek to answer the question: why does aversive learning not prevent the repeated use of plant drugs? We conclude by proposing alternative models of drug seeking and use. Specifically, we suggest that humans, like other animals, might have evolved to counter-exploit plant neurotoxins.

  19. Avoiding adverse drug reactions in the elderly patient: issues and strategies.

    PubMed

    French, D G

    1996-09-01

    Primary care providers are faced with numerous challenges when prescribing drugs for elderly patients. Multiple drug use, coexisting illness, and normal physiologic changes associated with aging place older persons at increased risk for adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Sample selection bias in drug clinical trials and inappropriate prescribing of contraindicated drugs contribute to the risk profile. Because multiple drug use and ADRs are relatively common in the elderly, special caution should be used when prescribing for this population. The primary care provider should have a good understanding of the factors that put the elderly at increased risk for ADR, the classes of drugs inappropriate for elderly patients, the physiologic changes of aging that may produce an altered pharmacologic response, and the issues associated with adherence to drug therapy. This article identifies factors that contribute to ADRs in the elderly and proposes strategies to reduce or avoid risk. Identifying and preventing ADRs in older Americans is a Healthy People 2000 health protection goal, perhaps more important given projected demographics over the next 20 to 30 years. PMID:8884797

  20. 77 FR 51816 - Notice of Opportunity To Withdraw Abbreviated New Drug Applications To Avoid Backlog Fee Obligations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Notice of Opportunity To Withdraw Abbreviated New Drug Applications To Avoid Backlog Fee Obligations AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... longer seeking approval of their pending original abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs) with...

  1. Adherence to Drug Label Recommendations for Avoiding Drug Interactions Causing Statin-Induced Myopathy–A Nationwide Register Study

    PubMed Central

    Settergren, Jennifer; Eiermann, Birgit; Mannheimer, Buster

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the extent to which clinicians avoid well-established drug-drug interactions that cause statin-induced myopathy. We hypothesised that clinicians would avoid combining erythromycin or verapamil/diltiazem respectively with atorvastatin or simvastatin. In patients with statin-fibrate combination therapy, we hypothesised that gemfibrozil was avoided to the preference of bezafibrate or fenofibrate. When combined with verapamil/diltiazem or fibrates, we hypothesized that the dispensed doses of atorvastatin/simvastatin would be decreased. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of nationwide dispensing data. Odds ratios of interacting erythromycin, verapamil/diltiazem versus respective prevalence of comparator drugs doxycycline, amlodipine/felodipine in patients co-dispensed interacting statins simvastatin/atorvastatin versus patients unexposed (pravastatin/fluvastatin/rosuvastatin) was calculated. For fibrates, OR of gemfibrozil versus fenofibrate/bezafibrate in patients co-dispensed any statin was assessed. Results OR of interacting erythromycin versus comparator doxycycline did not differ between patients on interacting and comparator statins either in patients dispensed high or low statin doses (adjusted OR 0.87; 95% CI 0.60–1.25 and 0.92; 95% CI 0.69–1.23). Interacting statins were less common among patients dispensed verapamil/diltiazem as compared to patients on amlodipine/felodipine (OR high dose 0.62; CI 0.56–0.68 and low dose 0.63; CI 0.58–0.68). Patients on any statin were to a lesser extent dispensed gemfibrozil compared to patients not dispensed a statin (OR high dose 0.65; CI 0.55–0.76 and low dose 0.70; CI 0.63–0.78). Mean DDD (SD) for any statin was substantially higher in patients co-dispensed gemfibrozil 178 (149) compared to patients on statin monotherapy 127 (93), (p<0.001). Conclusions Prescribers may to some extent avoid co-prescription of statins with calcium blockers and fibrates with an increased risk of myopathy. We

  2. Avoidance learning, Pavlovian conditioning, and the development of phobias.

    PubMed

    Siddle, D A; Bond, N W

    1988-10-01

    This paper examines the role of Pavlovian conditioning in the acquisition, maintenance and elimination of human phobias. Because many conceptualizations of human fears and phobias are based on data from studies of avoidance learning in animals, we first review theories of avoidance. Our conclusion is that none of the extant theories provides an adequate account of avoidance learning, and we propose a model of avoidance that involves Pavlovian, but not instrumental learning. We then analyse critically arguments that Pavlovian conditioning plays only a small role in the aetiology of fears. Finally, the paper examines the implications of a conditioning model of avoidance for the study of human fears and phobias.

  3. Fixing flaws in Medicare drug coverage that prompt insurers to avoid low-income patients.

    PubMed

    Hsu, John; Fung, Vicki; Huang, Jie; Price, Mary; Brand, Richard; Hui, Rita; Fireman, Bruce; Dow, William H; Bertko, John; Newhouse, Joseph P

    2010-12-01

    Since 2006 numerous insurers have stopped serving the low-income segment of the Medicare Part D program, forcing millions of beneficiaries to change prescription drug plans. Using data from participating plans, we found that Medicare payments do not sufficiently reimburse insurers for the relatively high medication use among this population, creating perverse incentives for plans to avoid this part of the Part D market. Plans can accomplish this by increasing their premiums for all beneficiaries to an amount above regional benchmarks. We demonstrate that improving the accuracy of Medicare's risk and subsidy adjustments could mitigate these perverse incentives.

  4. Development of Tactical Lightning Avoidance Product for Terminal Weather Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, E.; Yoshida, S.; Adachi, T.; Kusunoki, K.; Ushio, T.

    2015-12-01

    Aircraft initiated or intercepted lightning is one of significant issues for civilian flight operation in Japan. It is much less possible than the past that lightning strikes cause fatal aircraft accidents thanks to both of certifications of aircraft design for lightning strikes and many of weather supports for aircraft operation. However, hundreds of lightning strikes to aircrafts have still been reported in each recent year in Japan, and airlines have been forced to delay or cancel most of those flights and to cost several hundred millions of yen for repair. Especially, lightning discharges during winter in the coastal area of the Sea of Japan frequently cause heavy damages on aircrafts due to their large charge transfer. It is important in actual aircraft operation that observed meteorological parameters are converted to decision-making information. Otherwise, pilots, controllers, or operators need to learn meteorology as much as weather experts, and to owe hard work load to interpret observed meteorological data to their risk. Ideally, it is desired to automatically provide them with predicted operation risk, for example, delay time, possibility of flight cancellation, and repair cost caused by lightning.Our research group has just started development of tactical lightning avoidance product, where a risk index of an aircraft operation due to lightning is calculated mainly from three novel observation devices: The phased array weather radar has potential to detect thunderstorms in their early stage due to the high volume scan rate of 10 - 30 sec. A lightning mapping system, such as Broadband Observation network for Lightning and Thunderstorm, indicates electrical structure inside clouds in concert with a co-located radar data. Aircraft sounding and real-time data downlink, especially high-frequency data provided by Secondary Surveillance Radar mode S, gives in-situ measurements of wind and temperature. Especially the in-situ temperature data can indicate

  5. Drug development and manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Benjamin P.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Burrell, Anthony K.

    2015-10-13

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry has been used for detecting binding events and measuring binding selectivities between chemicals and receptors. XRF may also be used for estimating the therapeutic index of a chemical, for estimating the binding selectivity of a chemical versus chemical analogs, for measuring post-translational modifications of proteins, and for drug manufacturing.

  6. Estimation of drug cost avoidance and pathology cost avoidance through participation in NCIC Clinical Trials Group phase III clinical trials in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Tang, P.A.; Hay, A.E.; O’Callaghan, C.J.; Mittmann, N.; Chambers, C.R.; Pater, J.L.; Leighl, N.B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cost avoidance occurs when, because of provision of a drug therapy [drug cost avoidance (dca)] or a pathology test [pathology cost avoidance (pca)] during trial participation, health care payers need not pay for standard treatments or testing. The aim of our study was to estimate the total dca and pca for Canadian patients enrolled in relevant phase iii trials conducted by the ncic Clinical Trials Group. Methods Phase iii trials that had completed accrual and resulted in dca or pca were identified. The pca was calculated based on the number of patients screened and the test cost. The dca was estimated based on patients randomized, the protocol dosing regimen, drug cost, median dose intensity, and median duration of therapy. Costs are presented in Canadian dollars. No adjustment was made for inflation. Results From 1999 to 2011, 4 trials (1479 patients) resulted in pca and 17 trials (3195 patients) resulted in dca. The total pca was estimated at $4,194,849, which included testing for KRAS ($141,058), microsatellite instability ($18,600), and 21-gene recurrence score ($4,035,191). The total dca was estimated at $27,952,512, of which targeted therapy constituted 43% (five trials). The combined pca and dca was $32,147,361. Conclusions Over the study period, trials conducted by the ncic Clinical Trials Group resulted in total cost avoidance (pca and dca) of approximately $7,518 per patient. Although not all trials lead to cost avoidance, such savings should be taken account when the financial impact of conducting clinical research is being considered. PMID:26985151

  7. Validation of a rat behavioral avoidance model from a drug delivery perspective.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Meenakshi G; Jordt, Raymond M; Khan, M Amin; Foley, Christine E; Gilbertson, Timothy A

    2005-10-13

    Conventional taste-masking strategies are used to overcome the bitter taste perception of pharmaceuticals by coating the drug particles and/or adding flavoring agents. However, for certain product categories such as rapid dissolve sublingual tablets, taste-masking is challenging. Programs exploring such formulation strategies in the LO-CS phase or post CS phase possess very little toxicological information available in order to conduct human taste panel studies. The potential of a bitter taste perception can present a significant business risk. The objective of the study was to validate a rat behavioral avoidance model that identifies bitter-tasting compounds. Most classic bitter substances elicit a response in the micromolar concentration range while most drugs elicit a response in the millimolar range, hence a validation exercise was conducted to examine if the existing biological model was sensitive enough to identify known bitter tasting drugs as such. Five compounds: ergotamine tartrate, fluoxetine, sucrose, sumatriptan and povidone were chosen to represent a spectrum of compounds. The bitter tasting compounds were identified as such in the model. Based on these results, the assay may serve as a useful surrogate test to identify compounds that may have bitter taste issues. PMID:16125347

  8. Mixed WTO ruling on generic drug development.

    PubMed

    Elliott, R

    2000-01-01

    On 17 March 2000, the World Trade Organization upheld the provision in Canada's patent laws that allows generic drug manufacturers to develop (but not sell) their cheaper versions of patented medicines before the 20-year patients expire. The decision prevents pharmaceutical companies from enjoying market monopolies beyond their patent terms, avoiding what would otherwise be even lengthier delays in the sale of cheaper, generic drugs in Canada. This decision is of significance not only to Canada, but also to other WTO member countries and to all individuals who use pharmaceutical products. However, the decision is not all positive: the WTO also ruled that Canada is violating international agreements by letting generic manufacturers stockpile their versions of patented drugs before patents expire. This article explains the issues, the arguments, and the decision.

  9. Translation of the Risk Avoidance Partnership (RAP) for Implementation in Outpatient Drug Treatment Clinics.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Margaret R; Kostick, Kristin; Li, Jianghong; Dunn, Jennifer; McLaughlin, Paul; Richmond, Phil; Choudhury, Shonali; Obidoa, Chinekwu; Mosher, Heather; Martinez, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Scientific literature increasingly calls for studies to translate evidence-based interventions into real-world contexts balancing fidelity to the original design and fit to the new setting. The Risk Avoidance Partnership (RAP) is a health promotion intervention originally designed to train active drug users to become Peer Health Advocates. A theoretically driven approach was used to adapt RAP to fit implementation in outpatient methadone treatment clinics and pilot it with clinic patients. Ethnographic observations and process tracking documented the RAP translation and pilot experience, and clinic and community characteristics relevant to program implementation. Clinic administrators, staff, and patients were interviewed on their values, capacities, interest in RAP, perceived challenges of implementing RAP in drug treatment clinics, and experiences during the pilot. Findings indicated that RAP core components can be met when implemented in these settings and RAP can fit with the goals, interests, and other programs of the clinic. Balancing fidelity and fit requires recognition of the mutual impacts RAP and the clinic have on each other, which generate new interactions among staff and require ongoing specification of RAP to keep abreast of clinic and community changes. Collaboration of multiple stakeholders significantly benefited translation and pilot processes.

  10. Membrane transporters in drug development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Membrane transporters can be major determinants of the pharmacokinetic, safety and efficacy profiles of drugs. This presents several key questions for drug development, including which transporters are clinically important in drug absorption and disposition, and which in vitro methods are suitable for studying drug interactions with these transporters. In addition, what criteria should trigger follow-up clinical studies, and which clinical studies should be conducted if needed. In this article, we provide the recommendations of the International Transporter Consortium on these issues, and present decision trees that are intended to help guide clinical studies on the currently recognized most important drug transporter interactions. The recommendations are generally intended to support clinical development and filing of a new drug application. Overall, it is advised that the timing of transporter investigations should be driven by efficacy, safety and clinical trial enrolment questions (for example, exclusion and inclusion criteria), as well as a need for further understanding of the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion properties of the drug molecule, and information required for drug labeling. PMID:20190787

  11. Imaging in drug development.

    PubMed

    Nairne, James; Iveson, Peter B; Meijer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Imaging has played an important part in the diagnosis of disease and development of the understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms and is now poised to make an impact in the development of new pharmaceuticals. This chapter discusses the underlying technologies that make the field ready for this challenge. In particular, the potentials of magnetic resonance imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging are outlined, including the new methods developed to provide additional information from the scans carried out. The field of nuclear medicine has seen a rapid increase in interest as advances in radiochemistry have enabled a wide range of new radiotracers to be synthesised. PMID:25727706

  12. Drug development to protozoan diseases.

    PubMed

    Monzote, Lianet; Siddiq, Afshan

    2011-01-01

    The diseases caused by protozoan parasite are responsible for considerable mortality and morbidity, affecting more than 500 million of people in the world. The epidemiological control of protozoan is unsatisfactory due to difficulties of vector and reservoir control; while the progress in the development of vaccine tends to be slow and arduous. Currently, the chemotherapy remains essential component of both clinical management and disease control programmer in endemic areas. The drugs in use as anti-protozoan agents were discovered over 50 years and a number of factors limit their utility such as: high cost, poor compliance, drug resistance, low efficacy and poor safety. In the recent years, the searches about the development of new drugs against protozoa parasite have been increased. This special issue of The Open Medicinal Chemistry Journal will present some of developments in this field with the aim to shown the significant advances in the discovery of new anti-protozoan drugs.

  13. Chemical probe development versus drug development.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatases as a class of proteins have recently attracted significant attention from the pharmaceutical industry. As our knowledge of this diverse family of proteins has grown, the relationship between phosphatases and human disease has clearly been established, with model systems proving much validation for the potential of some members of this family to be candidate drug targets. This, coupled with the fact that there have been a flood of successful drug development efforts over the past 10 years targeting protein kinases, has led some to propose that phosphatases as a class of enzymes might be equally as rich a source of drug targets as kinases. However to date there remain relatively few molecules targeting protein phosphatases in clinical development. This is less a reflection of their importance in key processes associated with disease, but rather seems to reflect inherent issues with developing drugs for many members of this family. This seems especially so for intracellular phosphatases where the development of selective, potent cell penetrant molecules with good drug-like properties has proven a formidable challenge. This chapter provides a brief outline of the two major processes that have resulted in the existing armament of chemical modulators of protein phosphatases, namely, chemical probe development and drug development. These two processes initially seem to be rather similar and while they do overlap, the stated goals of the two approaches at project initiation are distinct. PMID:23860644

  14. Chemical probe development versus drug development.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatases as a class of proteins have recently attracted significant attention from the pharmaceutical industry. As our knowledge of this diverse family of proteins has grown, the relationship between phosphatases and human disease has clearly been established, with model systems proving much validation for the potential of some members of this family to be candidate drug targets. This, coupled with the fact that there have been a flood of successful drug development efforts over the past 10 years targeting protein kinases, has led some to propose that phosphatases as a class of enzymes might be equally as rich a source of drug targets as kinases. However to date there remain relatively few molecules targeting protein phosphatases in clinical development. This is less a reflection of their importance in key processes associated with disease, but rather seems to reflect inherent issues with developing drugs for many members of this family. This seems especially so for intracellular phosphatases where the development of selective, potent cell penetrant molecules with good drug-like properties has proven a formidable challenge. This chapter provides a brief outline of the two major processes that have resulted in the existing armament of chemical modulators of protein phosphatases, namely, chemical probe development and drug development. These two processes initially seem to be rather similar and while they do overlap, the stated goals of the two approaches at project initiation are distinct.

  15. Atropine, an anticholinergic drug, impairs memory retrieval of a high consolidated avoidance response in mice.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Mariano M; Blake, Mariano G; Acosta, Gabriela B; Baratti, Carlos M

    2003-07-17

    Immediate post-training intraperitoneal administration of the centrally acting anticholinesterase physostigmine (70.0, or 150.0 microg/kg) enhanced retention of male CF-1 mice tested 48 h after training in a one-trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task (0.8 mA, 50 Hz, 1 s footshock). The effect was observed in mice that received saline 30 min before the retention test; on the contrary, the pre-test administration of the centrally active muscarinic cholinergic antagonist, atropine (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.), but not methylatropine (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.), instead of saline, prevents the enhancement of retention induced by both doses of the anticholinesterase when given immediately after training. The high retention performance caused by post-training physostigmine was recovered following a second administration of the same doses of the drug, 10 min after the pre-test injections of atropine. Since, physostigmine do not influence memory retrieval when given prior to the retention test, and its post-training effects are not due to the induction of state-dependency, the recover of the high retention performance was probably due to a classical interaction between a muscarinic competitive antagonist and an indirect cholinergic agonist. Further, atropine probably does not modify the memory trace by erasing it, but by producing a poor retrieval. PMID:12821180

  16. Atropine, an anticholinergic drug, impairs memory retrieval of a high consolidated avoidance response in mice.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Mariano M; Blake, Mariano G; Acosta, Gabriela B; Baratti, Carlos M

    2003-07-17

    Immediate post-training intraperitoneal administration of the centrally acting anticholinesterase physostigmine (70.0, or 150.0 microg/kg) enhanced retention of male CF-1 mice tested 48 h after training in a one-trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task (0.8 mA, 50 Hz, 1 s footshock). The effect was observed in mice that received saline 30 min before the retention test; on the contrary, the pre-test administration of the centrally active muscarinic cholinergic antagonist, atropine (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.), but not methylatropine (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.), instead of saline, prevents the enhancement of retention induced by both doses of the anticholinesterase when given immediately after training. The high retention performance caused by post-training physostigmine was recovered following a second administration of the same doses of the drug, 10 min after the pre-test injections of atropine. Since, physostigmine do not influence memory retrieval when given prior to the retention test, and its post-training effects are not due to the induction of state-dependency, the recover of the high retention performance was probably due to a classical interaction between a muscarinic competitive antagonist and an indirect cholinergic agonist. Further, atropine probably does not modify the memory trace by erasing it, but by producing a poor retrieval.

  17. Drug Interaction and Serotonin Toxicity with Opioid Use: Another Reason to Avoid Opioids in Headache and Migraine Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Hossein; Kouti, Leila

    2016-08-01

    Treatment of headache, specifically migraine attacks, has always been a challenging subject, especially for neurologist and pain specialists. Triptans are generally underutilized, despite being the gold standard abortive medication for migraine attacks. On the other hand, opioid analgesics are overused as a treatment for headache. One reason for this could be physician unfamiliarity with drug interactions between opioids and other medications, especially the possibility of serotonin toxicity. The general awareness of potential serotonin toxicity with using opioid analgesics is low. In this review, we will conduct a theoretic and evidence-based review of the potential for developing serotonin syndrome in patients who are using opioids analgesics, especially in combination with antidepressants, a common co-prescribed combination. We also review the current diagnostic criteria for serotonin syndrome and identify possible shortcomings of those criteria. Our aim is to increase the awareness of health care providers about potential drug interaction of opioid analgesics with other classes of medication. We place particular emphasis on tramadol since this drug is one of the most commonly used opioid analgesics for headache. The potential for developing serotonin syndrome is relatively high in the patients who are using opioid for pain control. The use of opioids in migraine headache is already discouraged due to the high risk of medication overuse headache and also an increase in headache-related disability (Katsarava et al. Neurology 62:788-790, 2004; Bigal and Lipton. Neurology 71:1821-8, 2008; Casucci and Cevoli. Neurol Sci. 34 Suppl 1:S125-8, 2013). This is another reason that physicians and health care providers should avoid using this class of medication for pain, specifically headache and migraine treatment. PMID:27457368

  18. Adolescent Brain Development and Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Ken C.; Arria, Amelia

    2011-01-01

    Research now suggests that the human brain is still maturing during adolescence. The developing brain may help explain why adolescents sometimes make decisions that are risky and can lead to safety or health concerns, including unique vulnerabilities to drug abuse. This article explores how this new science may be put to use in our prevention and…

  19. Overview of drug product development.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Padma

    2011-12-01

    The process for developing drug delivery systems has evolved over the past two decades with more scientific rigor, involving a collaboration of various fields, i.e., biology, chemistry, engineering, and pharmaceutics. Drug products, also commonly known in the pharmaceutical industry as formulations or "dosage forms," are used for administering the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) for purposes of assessing safety in preclinical models, early- to late-phase human clinical trials, and for routine clinical/commercial use. This overview discusses approaches for creating small-molecule API dosage forms, from preformulation to commercial manufacturing.

  20. Improving Training Quality by Avoiding the "What Errors" of Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Robert E.

    Curriculum developers must work hard to avoid the "what errors" of curriculum development. They must avoid failing to teach what should be taught and teaching what is no longer relevant and needed. Curriculum "what errors" are likely to occur when teachers design courses so as to teach what they know best, what they were taught, what they enjoy…

  1. Surrogacy in antiviral drug development

    PubMed Central

    Shaunak, Sunil; Davies, Donald S

    2002-01-01

    The coming of age of molecular biology has resulted in an explosion in our understanding of the pathogenesis of virus related diseases. New pathogens have been identified and characterized as being responsible for old diseases. Empirical clinical evaluation of morbidity and mortality as outcome measures after a therapeutic intervention have started to give way to the use of an increasing number of surrogate markers. Using a combination of these markers, it is now possible to measure and monitor the pathogen as well as the host's response. Nowhere is this better exemplified in virology than in the field of AIDS. We have utilized the advances in pathogenesis and new antiretroviral drug development to: develop a new class of drugs which block the entry of HIV-1 into cells.develop a new approach for effectively delivering these drugs to those tissues in which most viral replication takes place. Over the last 10 years, our work has progressed from concept to clinical trial. Our laboratory based evaluation of the new molecules developed as well as our clinical evaluation of their safety and efficacy have had to respond and adapt to the rapid changes taking place in AIDS research. This paper discusses the problems encountered and the lessons learnt. PMID:12100230

  2. Bridging solubility between drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Di, Li; Fish, Paul V; Mano, Takashi

    2012-05-01

    Solubility has a crucial role in the success of a drug candidate. Compounds with low solubility not only cause problems for in vitro and in vivo assays, but also add significant burdens to drug development. Drug discovery and drug development often have different solubility screening requirements and methodologies have been developed to meet the needs of these different stages.

  3. Developing a corporate drug testing program

    SciTech Connect

    Hanrath, D.A. )

    1990-10-01

    Management reaction to employee drug abuse at a gas distribution company resulted in the development and implementation of a corporate drug testing program before DOT mandated drug testing. The author explains the background, planning, operation and communication work involved.

  4. Phase IV of Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Suvarna, Viraj

    2010-04-01

    Not all Phase IV studies are post-marketing surveillance (PMS) studies but every PMS study is a phase IV study. Phase IV is also an important phase of drug development. In particular, the real world effectiveness of a drug as evaluated in an observational, non-interventional trial in a naturalistic setting which complements the efficacy data that emanates from a pre-marketing randomized controlled trial (RCT). No matter how many patients are studied pre-marketing in a controlled environment, the true safety profile of a drug is characterized only by continuing safety surveillance through a spontaneous adverse event monitoring system and a post-marketing surveillance/non-interventional study. Prevalent practice patterns can generate leads that could result in further evaluation of a new indication via the RCT route or even a signal that may necessitate regulatory action (change in labeling, risk management/minimization action plan). Disease registries are another option as are the large simple hybrid trials. Surveillance of spontaneously reported adverse events continues as long as a product is marketed. And so Phase IV in that sense never ends.

  5. Carbohydrate drugs: current status and development prospect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Fengshan

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, there has been a great effort devoted to the investigation of the roles of carbohydrates in various essential biological processes and the development of carbohydrates to therapeutic drugs. This review summarizes the carbohydrate drugs which have been recorded in several pharmacopoeias, marketed, and under development. A prospect of the future development of carbohydrate drugs is discussed as well.

  6. Supramolecular approaches for drug development.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, K; Ebara, M; Izawa, H; Sanchez-Ballester, N M; Hill, J P; Ariga, K

    2012-01-01

    Various supramolecular systems can be used as drug carriers to alter physicochemical and pharmacokinetic characteristics of drugs. Representative supramolecular systems that can be used for this purpose include surfactant/polymer micelles, (micro)emulsions, liposomes, layer-by-layer assemblies, and various molecular conjugates. Notably, liposomes are established supramolecular drug carriers, which have already been marketed in formulations including AmBisome(®) (for treatment of fungal infection), Doxil(®) (for Kaposi's sarcoma), and Visudyne(®) (for age-related macular degeneration and choroidal neovascularization). Microemulsions have been used oral drug delivery of poorly soluble drugs due to improvements in bioavailability and predictable of absorption behavior. Neoral(®), an immunosuppressant used after transplant operations, is one of the most famous microemulsion-based drugs. Polymer micelles are being increasingly investigated as novel drug carriers and some formulations have already been tested in clinical trials. Supramolecular systems can be functionalized by designing the constituent molecules to achieve efficient delivery of drugs to desired sites in the body. In this review, representative supramolecular drug delivery systems, that may improve usability of candidate drugs or add value to existing drugs, are introduced. PMID:22455591

  7. Synthetic cannabinoids to avoid urine drug screens: Implications for contingency management and other treatments for drug dependence.

    PubMed

    Ninnemann, Andrew L; Lechner, William V; Borges, Allison; Lejuez, C W

    2016-12-01

    Contingency management (CM) is an effective treatment for substance use dependence. Within CM, rewards or vouchers promote continued abstinence by acting as alternative reinforcers to substance use. However, CM relies on the use of accurate biochemical verification methods, such as urinalysis, to verify abstinence. Synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) pose a risk for CM treatment because they are not easily detected by common urinalysis techniques. Although SCs pose a risk, there is limited information regarding current rates of SC use within substance dependent populations as well as rates of substance use and psychiatric disorders among those who use SCs in treatment. We discuss emerging research on these topics and potential implications for CM treatments. Findings suggest CM researchers should test for and query SC use among those being treated for cannabis and cocaine use problems as well as among younger populations of substance users. Implications of other novel psychoactive substances for drug treatment and drug urinalysis are also discussed. PMID:27424166

  8. Incarcerated Women's Relationship-based Strategies to Avoid Drug Use After Community Re-Entry

    PubMed Central

    Snell-Rood, Claire; Staton-Tindall, Michele; Victor, Grant

    2016-01-01

    While recent research has stressed the supportive role that family and friends play for incarcerated persons as they reenter the community, drug-using incarcerated women reentering the community often have to rely on family, community, and intimate relationships that have played a role in their substance abuse and criminalization. In this study the authors conducted qualitative analysis of clinical sessions with rural, drug-using women (N = 20) in a larger prison-based HIV risk reduction intervention in Kentucky during 2012–2014 to examine incarcerated women's perceptions of the role of their family, community, and intimate relationships in their plans to decrease their substance abuse upon community re-entry. Women stressed the obstacles to receiving support in many of their family and drug-using relationships after community re-entry. Nonetheless, they asserted that changes in their relationships could support their desires to end their substance abuse by setting limits on and using their positive relationships, particularly with their children, to motivate them to change. Interventions to promote incarcerated women's health behavior changes—including substance abuse—must acknowledge the complex social environments in which they live. PMID:26643029

  9. Orphan drug: Development trends and strategies

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Aarti; Jacob, Abraham; Tandon, Manas; Kumar, Dushyant

    2010-01-01

    The growth of pharma industries has slowed in recent years because of various reasons such as patent expiries, generic competition, drying pipelines, and increasingly stringent regulatory guidelines. Many blockbuster drugs will loose their exclusivity in next 5 years. Therefore, the current economic situation plus the huge generic competition shifted the focus of pharmaceutical companies from the essential medicines to the new business model — niche busters, also called orphan drugs. Orphan drugs may help pharma companies to reduce the impact of revenue loss caused by patent expiries of blockbuster drugs. The new business model of orphan drugs could offer an integrated healthcare solution that enables pharma companies to develop newer areas of therapeutics, diagnosis, treatment, monitoring, and patient support. Incentives for drug development provided by governments, as well as support from the FDA and EU Commission in special protocols, are a further boost for the companies developing orphan drugs. Although there may still be challenges ahead for the pharmaceutical industry, orphan drugs seem to offer the key to recovery and stability within the market. In our study, we have compared the policies and orphan drug incentives worldwide alongwith the challenges faced by the pharmaceutical companies. Recent developments are seen in orphan drug approval, the various drugs in orphan drug pipeline, and the future prospectives for orphan drugs and diseases. PMID:21180460

  10. Drug Development for Alzheimer's Disease: Recent Progress

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wonjin

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease, the most common cause of dementia, is characterized by two major pathological hallmarks: amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Based on these two indicators, an amyloid cascade hypothesis was proposed, and accordingly, most current therapeutic approaches are now focused on the removal of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ from the brain. Additionally, strategies for blocking tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation have been suggested, including the development of drugs that can block the formation of tangles. However, there are no true disease-modifying drugs in the current market, though many drugs based on theories other than Aβ and tau pathology are under development. The purpose of this review was to provide information on the current development of AD drugs and to discuss the issues related to drug development. PMID:22110351

  11. Molecular science for drug development and biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wei-Zhu; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2014-01-01

    With the avalanche of biological sequences generated in the postgenomic age, molecular science is facing an unprecedented challenge, i.e., how to timely utilize the huge amount of data to benefit human beings. Stimulated by such a challenge, a rapid development has taken place in molecular science, particularly in the areas associated with drug development and biomedicine, both experimental and theoretical. The current thematic issue was launched with the focus on the topic of "Molecular Science for Drug Development and Biomedicine", in hopes to further stimulate more useful techniques and findings from various approaches of molecular science for drug development and biomedicine.[...].

  12. Microengineered vascular systems for drug development.

    PubMed

    Hovell, Candice M; Sei, Yoshitaka J; Kim, YongTae

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in microfabrication technologies and advanced biomaterials have allowed for the development of in vitro platforms that recapitulate more physiologically relevant cellular components and function. Microengineered vascular systems are of particular importance for the efficient assessment of drug candidates to physiological barriers lining microvessels. This review highlights advances in the development of microengineered vascular structures with an emphasis on the potential impact on drug delivery studies. Specifically, this article examines the development of models for the study of drug delivery to the central nervous system and cardiovascular system. We also discuss current challenges and future prospects of the development of microengineered vascular systems. PMID:25424383

  13. LC/MS applications in drug development.

    PubMed

    Lee, M S; Kerns, E H

    1999-01-01

    The combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (LC/MS) has had a significant impact on drug development over the past decade. Continual improvements in LC/MS interface technologies combined with powerful features for structure analysis, qualitative and quantitative, have resulted in a widened scope of application. These improvements coincided with breakthroughs in combinatorial chemistry, molecular biology, and an overall industry trend of accelerated development. New technologies have created a situation where the rate of sample generation far exceeds the rate of sample analysis. As a result, new paradigms for the analysis of drugs and related substances have been developed. The growth in LC/MS applications has been extensive, with retention time and molecular weight emerging as essential analytical features from drug target to product. LC/MS-based methodologies that involve automation, predictive or surrogate models, and open access systems have become a permanent fixture in the drug development landscape. An iterative cycle of "what is it?" and "how much is there?" continues to fuel the tremendous growth of LC/MS in the pharmaceutical industry. During this time, LC/MS has become widely accepted as an integral part of the drug development process. This review describes the utility of LC/MS techniques for accelerated drug development and provides a perspective on the significant changes in strategies for pharmaceutical analysis. Future applications of LC/MS technologies for accelerated drug development and emerging industry trends are also discussed.

  14. Re-engineering drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, Garret A

    2011-10-01

    The rate of new drug approvals in the US has remained essentially constant since 1950, while the costs of drug development have soared. Many commentators question the sustainability of the current model of drug development, in which large pharmaceutical companies incur markedly escalating costs to deliver the same number of products to market. This Issue Brief summarizes the problem, describes ongoing governmental efforts to influence the process, and suggests changes in regulatory science and translational medicine that may promote more successful development of safe and effective therapeutics PMID:22049582

  15. Development and Certification of a New Stall Warning and Avoidance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gertsen, W. M.; Hawkins, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    Several methods may be employed to improve natural stall characteristics. The method employed on all learjets to obtain improved stall characteristics is a stall warning and avoidance system that employs angle of attack vanes, an electronic computer, a control column shaker motor, and a torquer which drives the control column in a pusher mode to avoid unwanted further buildup of angle of attack. The new system was developed with changes that improve system response with no performance penalty or increase in turbulence sensitivity. The following changes were made included modified system time constants and (alpha) time rate of change of vane angle dead zone and the addition of an alpha signal limiter and an alpha cut out below a specified angle of attack.

  16. The significance of chirality in drug design and development.

    PubMed

    Brooks, W H; Guida, W C; Daniel, K G

    2011-01-01

    Proteins are often enantioselective towards their binding partners. When designing small molecules to interact with these targets, one should consider stereoselectivity. As considerations for exploring structure space evolve, chirality is increasingly important. Binding affinity for a chiral drug can differ for diastereomers and between enantiomers. For the virtual screening and computational design stage of drug development, this problem can be compounded by incomplete stereochemical information in structure libraries leading to a "coin toss" as to whether or not the "ideal" chiral structure is present. Creating every stereoisomer for each chiral compound in a structure library leads to an exponential increase in the number of structures resulting in potentially unmanageable file sizes and screening times. Therefore, only key chiral structures, enantiomeric pairs based on relative stereochemistry need be included, and lead to a compromise between exploration of chemical space and maintaining manageable libraries. In clinical environments, enantiomers of chiral drugs can have reduced, no, or even deleterious effects. This underscores the need to avoid mixtures of compounds and focus on chiral synthesis. Governmental regulations emphasizing the need to monitor chirality in drug development have increased. The United States Food and Drug Administration issued guidelines and policies in 1992 concerning the development of chiral compounds. These guidelines require that absolute stereochemistry be known for compounds with chiral centers and that this information should be established early in drug development in order that the analysis can be considered valid. From exploration of structure space to governmental regulations it is clear that the question of chirality in drug design is of vital importance. PMID:21291399

  17. The significance of chirality in drug design and development.

    PubMed

    Brooks, W H; Guida, W C; Daniel, K G

    2011-01-01

    Proteins are often enantioselective towards their binding partners. When designing small molecules to interact with these targets, one should consider stereoselectivity. As considerations for exploring structure space evolve, chirality is increasingly important. Binding affinity for a chiral drug can differ for diastereomers and between enantiomers. For the virtual screening and computational design stage of drug development, this problem can be compounded by incomplete stereochemical information in structure libraries leading to a "coin toss" as to whether or not the "ideal" chiral structure is present. Creating every stereoisomer for each chiral compound in a structure library leads to an exponential increase in the number of structures resulting in potentially unmanageable file sizes and screening times. Therefore, only key chiral structures, enantiomeric pairs based on relative stereochemistry need be included, and lead to a compromise between exploration of chemical space and maintaining manageable libraries. In clinical environments, enantiomers of chiral drugs can have reduced, no, or even deleterious effects. This underscores the need to avoid mixtures of compounds and focus on chiral synthesis. Governmental regulations emphasizing the need to monitor chirality in drug development have increased. The United States Food and Drug Administration issued guidelines and policies in 1992 concerning the development of chiral compounds. These guidelines require that absolute stereochemistry be known for compounds with chiral centers and that this information should be established early in drug development in order that the analysis can be considered valid. From exploration of structure space to governmental regulations it is clear that the question of chirality in drug design is of vital importance.

  18. Application of radar for automotive collision avoidance. Volume 2: Development plan and progress reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenberg, Christopher L. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this project was research and development of an automobile collision avoidance radar system. Items within the scope of the one-year effort were to: (1) review previous authors' work in this field; (2) select a suitable radar approach; (3) develop a system design; (4) perform basic analyses and observations pertinent to radar design, performance, and effects; (5) fabricate and collect radar data from a data collection radar; (6) analyze and derive conclusions from the radar data; and (7) make recommendations about the likelihood of success of the investigated radar techniques. The final technical report presenting all conclusions is contained in Volume 1.

  19. Avoidance behavior by prairie grouse: implications for development of wind energy.

    PubMed

    Pruett, Christin L; Patten, Michael A; Wolfe, Donald H

    2009-10-01

    New wind-energy facilities and their associated power transmission lines and roads are being constructed at a rapid pace in the Great Plains of North America. Nevertheless, little is known about the possible negative effects these anthropogenic features might have on prairie birds, one of the most threatened groups in North America. We examined radiotelemetry tracking locations of Lesser Prairie-Chickens (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) and Greater Prairie-Chickens (T. cupido) in two locations in Oklahoma to determine whether these birds avoided or changed movement behavior near power lines and paved highways. We tracked 463 Lesser Prairie-Chickens (15,071 tracking locations) and 216 Greater Prairie-Chickens (5,750 locations) for 7 and 3 years, respectively. Individuals of both species avoided power lines by at least 100 m and Lesser Prairie-Chickens avoided one of the two highways by 100 m. Prairie-chickens crossed power lines less often than expected if birds moved randomly (p < 0.05) but did not appear to perceive highways as a movement barrier (p > 0.05). In addition, home ranges of Lesser Prairie-Chickens overlapped the power line less often than would be expected by chance placement of home ranges; this result was supported by kernel-density estimation of home ranges. It is likely that new power lines (and other tall structures such as wind turbines) will lead to avoidance of previously suitable habitat and will serve as barriers to movement. These two factors will likely increase fragmentation in an already fragmented landscape if wind energy development continues in prairie habitats.

  20. Regional intestinal drug permeation: biopharmaceutics and drug development.

    PubMed

    Lennernäs, Hans

    2014-06-16

    Over the last 25 years, profound changes have been seen in both the development and regulation of pharmaceutical dosage forms, due primarily to the extensive use of the biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS) in both academia and industry. The BCS and the FDA scale-up and post-approval change guidelines were both developed during the 1990s and both are currently widely used to claim biowaivers. The development of the BCS and its wide acceptance were important steps in pharmaceutical science that contributed to the more rational development of oral dosage forms. The effective permeation (Peff) of drugs through the intestine often depends on the combined outcomes of passive diffusion and multiple parallel transport processes. Site-specific jejunal Peff cannot reflect the permeability of the whole intestinal tract, since this varies along the length of the intestine, but is a useful approximation of the fraction of the oral dose that is absorbed. It appears that drugs with a jejunal Peff>1.5×10(-4)cm/s will be completely absorbed no matter which transport mechanisms are utilized. In this paper, historical clinical data originating from earlier open, single-pass perfusion studies have been used to calculate the Peff of different substances from sites in the jejunum and ileum. More exploratory in vivo studies are required in order to obtain reliable data on regional intestinal drug absorption. The development of experimental and theoretical methods of assessing drug absorption from both small intestine and various sites in the colon is encouraged. Some of the existing human in vivo data are discussed in relation to commonly used cell culture models. It is crucial to accurately determine the input parameters, such as the regional intestinal Peff, as these will form the basis for the expected increase in modeling and simulation of all the processes involved in GI drug absorption, thus facilitating successful pharmaceutical development in the future. It is suggested

  1. Alzheimer's disease drug development: translational neuroscience strategies.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Jeffrey L; Banks, Sarah J; Gary, Ronald K; Kinney, Jefferson W; Lombardo, Joseph M; Walsh, Ryan R; Zhong, Kate

    2013-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an urgent public health challenge that is rapidly approaching epidemic proportions. New therapies that defer or prevent the onset, delay the decline, or improve the symptoms are urgently needed. All phase 3 drug development programs for disease-modifying agents have failed thus far. New approaches to drug development are needed. Translational neuroscience focuses on the linkages between basic neuroscience and the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic products that will improve the lives of patients or prevent the occurrence of brain disorders. Translational neuroscience includes new preclinical models that may better predict human efficacy and safety, improved clinical trial designs and outcomes that will accelerate drug development, and the use of biomarkers to more rapidly provide information regarding the effects of drugs on the underlying disease biology. Early translational research is complemented by later stage translational approaches regarding how best to use evidence to impact clinical practice and to assess the influence of new treatments on the public health. Funding of translational research is evolving with an increased emphasis on academic and NIH involvement in drug development. Translational neuroscience provides a framework for advancing development of new therapies for AD patients.

  2. Trial geography, pharmacogenetics, and global drug development.

    PubMed

    Schuck, R N; Florian, J; Charlab, R; Pacanowski, M

    2015-03-01

    Drug development is increasingly global. The benefits of multiregional trials include worldwide evaluation of safety and efficacy. However, clinical practice, environmental, and genetic factors can vary across geographic regions, significantly influencing trial outcomes within a specific geographic region or the global population relative to the United States (US). Genomic technologies and research discoveries continue to advance at a remarkable pace, offering opportunities to explore intrinsic factors that could account for regional variability in drug pharmacokinetics or response.

  3. A Drug-Centric View of Drug Development: How Drugs Spread from Disease to Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Drugs are often seen as ancillary to the purpose of fighting diseases. Here an alternative view is proposed in which they occupy a spearheading role. In this view, drugs are technologies with an inherent therapeutic potential. Once created, they can spread from disease to disease independently of the drug creator’s original intentions. Through the analysis of extensive literature and clinical trial records, it can be observed that successful drugs follow a life cycle in which they are studied at an increasing rate, and for the treatment of an increasing number of diseases, leading to clinical advancement. Such initial growth, following a power law on average, has a degree of momentum, but eventually decelerates, leading to stagnation and decay. A network model can describe the propagation of drugs from disease to disease in which diseases communicate with each other by receiving and sending drugs. Within this model, some diseases appear more prone to influence other diseases than be influenced, and vice versa. Diseases can also be organized into a drug-centric disease taxonomy based on the drugs that each adopts. This taxonomy reflects not only biological similarities across diseases, but also the level of differentiation of existing therapies. In sum, this study shows that drugs can become contagious technologies playing a driving role in the fight against disease. By better understanding such dynamics, pharmaceutical developers may be able to manage drug projects more effectively. PMID:27124390

  4. The Development of a Test to Assess Drug Using Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Althoff, Michael E.

    The objective of the study was to develop a test which could measure both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of drug-using behavior, including such factors as attitudes toward drugs, experience with drugs, and knowledge about drugs. The Drug Use Scale was developed containing 134 items and dealing with five classes of drugs: marijuana,…

  5. TRPV3 in Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Broad, Lisa M.; Mogg, Adrian J.; Eberle, Elizabeth; Tolley, Marcia; Li, Dominic L.; Knopp, Kelly L.

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 3 (TRPV3) is a member of the TRP (Transient Receptor Potential) super-family. It is a relatively underexplored member of the thermo-TRP sub-family (Figure 1), however, genetic mutations and use of gene knock-outs and selective pharmacological tools are helping to provide insights into its role and therapeutic potential. TRPV3 is highly expressed in skin, where it is implicated in skin physiology and pathophysiology, thermo-sensing and nociception. Gain of function TRPV3 mutations in rodent and man have enabled the role of TRPV3 in skin health and disease to be particularly well defined. Pre-clinical studies provide some rationale to support development of TRPV3 antagonists for therapeutic application for the treatment of inflammatory skin conditions, itch and pain. However, to date, only one compound directed towards block of the TRPV3 receptor (GRC15300) has progressed into clinical trials. Currently, there are no known clinical trials in progress employing a TRPV3 antagonist. PMID:27618069

  6. TRPV3 in Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Broad, Lisa M; Mogg, Adrian J; Eberle, Elizabeth; Tolley, Marcia; Li, Dominic L; Knopp, Kelly L

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 3 (TRPV3) is a member of the TRP (Transient Receptor Potential) super-family. It is a relatively underexplored member of the thermo-TRP sub-family (Figure 1), however, genetic mutations and use of gene knock-outs and selective pharmacological tools are helping to provide insights into its role and therapeutic potential. TRPV3 is highly expressed in skin, where it is implicated in skin physiology and pathophysiology, thermo-sensing and nociception. Gain of function TRPV3 mutations in rodent and man have enabled the role of TRPV3 in skin health and disease to be particularly well defined. Pre-clinical studies provide some rationale to support development of TRPV3 antagonists for therapeutic application for the treatment of inflammatory skin conditions, itch and pain. However, to date, only one compound directed towards block of the TRPV3 receptor (GRC15300) has progressed into clinical trials. Currently, there are no known clinical trials in progress employing a TRPV3 antagonist. PMID:27618069

  7. The Fear-avoidance Components Scale (FACS): Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a New Measure of Pain-related Fear Avoidance.

    PubMed

    Neblett, Randy; Mayer, Tom G; Hartzell, Meredith M; Williams, Mark J; Gatchel, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Pain-related fear avoidance (FA), a common problem for patients with painful medical conditions, involves pain-related catastrophizing cognitions, hypervigilance, and avoidance behaviors, which can ultimately lead to decreased functioning, depression, and disability. Several patient-reported instruments have been developed to measure FA, but they have been criticized for limited construct validity, inadequate item specificity, lack of cutoff scores, and missing important FA components. The Fear-Avoidance Components Scale (FACS) is a new patient-reported measure designed to comprehensively evaluate FA in patients with painful medical conditions. It combines important components of FA found in prior FA scales, while trying to correct some of their deficiencies, within a framework of the most current FA model. Psychometric evaluation of the FACS found high internal consistency (α = 0.92) and high test/retest reliability (r = 0.90-0.94, P < 0.01). FACS scores differentiated between 2 separate chronic pain patient samples and a nonpatient comparison group. When clinically relevant severity levels were created, FACS severity scores were highly associated with FA-related patient-reported psychosocial and objective lifting performance variables. These results suggest that the FACS is a psychometrically strong and reliable measure that can help healthcare providers assess FA-related barriers to function and recovery.

  8. Drug Repurposing Is a New Opportunity for Developing Drugs against Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong-Min; Kim, Yuna

    2016-01-01

    Better the drugs you know than the drugs you do not know. Drug repurposing is a promising, fast, and cost effective method that can overcome traditional de novo drug discovery and development challenges of targeting neuropsychiatric and other disorders. Drug discovery and development targeting neuropsychiatric disorders are complicated because of the limitations in understanding pathophysiological phenomena. In addition, traditional de novo drug discovery and development are risky, expensive, and time-consuming processes. One alternative approach, drug repurposing, has emerged taking advantage of off-target effects of the existing drugs. In order to identify new opportunities for the existing drugs, it is essential for us to understand the mechanisms of action of drugs, both biologically and pharmacologically. By doing this, drug repurposing would be a more effective method to develop drugs against neuropsychiatric and other disorders. Here, we review the difficulties in drug discovery and development in neuropsychiatric disorders and the extent and perspectives of drug repurposing. PMID:27073698

  9. Drug Repurposing Is a New Opportunity for Developing Drugs against Neuropsychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong-Min; Kim, Yuna

    2016-01-01

    Better the drugs you know than the drugs you do not know. Drug repurposing is a promising, fast, and cost effective method that can overcome traditional de novo drug discovery and development challenges of targeting neuropsychiatric and other disorders. Drug discovery and development targeting neuropsychiatric disorders are complicated because of the limitations in understanding pathophysiological phenomena. In addition, traditional de novo drug discovery and development are risky, expensive, and time-consuming processes. One alternative approach, drug repurposing, has emerged taking advantage of off-target effects of the existing drugs. In order to identify new opportunities for the existing drugs, it is essential for us to understand the mechanisms of action of drugs, both biologically and pharmacologically. By doing this, drug repurposing would be a more effective method to develop drugs against neuropsychiatric and other disorders. Here, we review the difficulties in drug discovery and development in neuropsychiatric disorders and the extent and perspectives of drug repurposing.

  10. [Strategy for the development of dipeptide drugs].

    PubMed

    Gudasheva, T A

    2011-01-01

    The author describes an original approach to the development of dipeptide drugs based on the concept of the leading role of the beta-bend in the interaction of biologically active endogenous peptides with their receptors. The approach called "peptide-based drug design" includes both developments from the structure of a known psychotropic agent toward its topological peptide analog and developments from the active dipeptide site of a neuropeptide toward its mimetic. This strategy has been worked out at the V.V. Zakusov Research Institute of Pharmacology for 25 years. Results of investigations that discovered endogenous peptide prototypes of the known non-peptidic drugs (piracetam and sulpiride) are presented. They provided a basis for the creation of highly active non-toxic oral dipeptide preparations, such as nootrop Noopept, potential anti psychotic Dilept, and potential selective anxiolytic GB-115. PMID:21899085

  11. Drug development: from concept to marketing!

    PubMed

    Tamimi, Nihad A M; Ellis, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Drug development is an expensive, long and high-risk business taking 10-15 years and is associated with a high attrition rate. It is driven by medical need, disease prevalence and the likelihood of success. Drug candidate selection is an iterative process between chemistry and biology, refining the molecular properties until a compound suitable for advancing to man is found. Typically, about one in a thousand synthesised compounds is ever selected for progression to the clinic. Prior to administration to humans, the pharmacology and biochemistry of the drug is established using an extensive range of in vitro and in vivo test procedures. It is also a regulatory requirement that the drug is administered to animals to assess its safety. Later-stage animal testing is also required to assess carcinogenicity and effects on the reproductive system. Clinical phases of drug development include phase I in healthy volunteers to assess primarily pharmacokinetics, safety and toleration, phase II in a cohort of patients with the target disease to establish efficacy and dose-response relationship and large-scale phase III studies to confirm safety and efficacy. Experience tells us that approximately only 1 in 10 drugs that start the clinical phase will make it to the market. Each drug must demonstrate safety and efficacy in the intended patient population and its benefits must outweigh its risks before it will be approved by the regulatory agencies. Strict regulatory standards govern the conduct of pre-clinical and clinical trials as well as the manufacturing of pharmaceutical products. The assessment of the new medicinal product's safety continues beyond the initial drug approval through post-marketing monitoring of adverse events.

  12. Psychological Inflexibility in Childhood and Adolescence: Development and Evaluation of the Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greco, Laurie A.; Lambert, Warren; Baer, Ruth A.

    2008-01-01

    The authors describe the development and validation of the Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth (AFQ-Y), a child-report measure of psychological inflexibility engendered by high levels of cognitive fusion and experiential avoidance. Consistent with the theory underlying acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), items converged into a…

  13. Role of Hepatic Drug Transporters in Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Houfu; Sahi, Jasminder

    2016-07-01

    Hepatic drug transporters can play an important role in pharmacokinetics and the disposition of therapeutic drugs and endogenous substances. Altered function of hepatic drug transporters due to drug-drug interactions (DDIs), genetic polymorphisms, and disease states can often result in a change in systemic and/or tissue exposure and subsequent pharmacological/toxicological effects of their substrates. Regulatory agencies including the US Food and Drug Administration, European Medicines Agency, and Japan Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency have issued guidance for industry on drug interaction studies, which contain comprehensive recommendations on in vitro and in vivo study tools and cutoff values to evaluate the DDI potential of new molecular entities mediated by hepatic drug transporters. In this report we summarize the latest regulatory and scientific progress of hepatic drug transporters in clinical DDIs, pharmacogenetics, drug-induced liver injury (DILI), as well as methods for predicting transporter-mediated pharmacokinetics and DDIs. PMID:27385168

  14. Impact of Training High School Female Students in Ahvaz, Iran in the Social Skills Required to Avoid the Use of Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Alavijeh, Freshteh Zamani; Raisi, Zahra; Asadollahi, Abdolrahim; Irani, Reza Davasaz; Kalhori, Sharareh Rostam Niakan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gender composition and the soaring trends of drug and tobacco dependency reveal the priority of social skills training related to drug avoidance self-efficacy among female students. The aim of this study was to verify the impact training high school female students to have the social skills needed to avoid the use of drugs. Methods This study was conducted from September 2012 to May 2013 in two high schools in Ahvaz City in southwest Iran. The participants were divided randomly into two groups of 60 students, one experimental group and one control group using the multi-stage simple sampling method. Two questionnaires, i.e. the ASES and TISS questionnaires, were completed before and after the intervention. Descriptive statistics, chi squared, paired-samples t-test, and the independent-samples t-test were used. Results The participants had a mean age of 14.93 years. Among the 120 participants, 90.8% indicated that they had never smoked a cigarette, and 51.7% of the participants denied having smoked a hookah. There was no significant relationship between the self-sufficiency means of drug avoidance in the two groups of girls before intervention (p ≥ 0.05). However, after intervention, a significant difference was found in test score of self-efficacy of drug avoidance between the two groups, i.e., 94.91 ± 8.3 for the control group versus 99.16 ± 3.8 for the experimental group, p < 0.05). Significant increases were observed for the pre- and post-test scores of self-efficacy of drug avoidance in the experimental group compared to the control group (99.16 ± 3.8 (p = 0.001) vs. 96.58 ± 6.98 (p > 0.05). The mean values of the pre- and post-test scores of social skill before and after intervention increased significantly only for the experimental group (97.60 ± 19.19 vs. 100.58 ± 12.37, p = 0.03). Conclusion Educational intervention can significantly enhance social skills for drug avoidance self-efficacy, so it is recommended that such skills be taught

  15. [Avoidance coping style and the risk of developing an eating disorder in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Pamies Aubalat, Lidia; Quiles Marcos, Yolanda

    2012-05-01

    The first aim of this study was to analyse the relationship between coping styles and strategies in Spanish adolescents of both genders, with high and low eating disorder risk. Secondly, this study aims to examine the relation of coping styles and coping strategies with eating disorder risk. The sample comprised 2142 adolescents (1.130 girls and 1.012 boys), mean age 13,96 years (SD= 1.34). They completed the Adolescent Coping Scale (ACS) and the Eating Attitude Test (EAT-40). The results showed high use of intropunitive avoidance coping in both female and male adolescents with high EAT-40 scores. The regression analysis indicated that, in both girls and boys, the intropunitive avoidance and the tension reduction coping strategy explained a high percentage of variance of eating disorder risk. The results of this study have implications for the prevention of these behaviours in adolescents, because people with a high risk of developing an eating disorder present a maladaptive coping style before the onset of the eating disorder.

  16. [Adaptive clinical study methodologies in drug development].

    PubMed

    Antal, János

    2015-11-29

    The evolution of drug development in human, clinical phase studies triggers the overview of those technologies and procedures which are labelled as adaptive clinical trials. The most relevant procedural and operational aspects will be discussed in this overview from points of view of clinico-methodological aspect.

  17. Aptamers : The New Frontier In Drug Development?

    PubMed Central

    CARLSON, BOB

    2007-01-01

    Often called chemical antibodies, aptamers are poised to take on the monoclonal antibodies in therapeutics, diagnostics, and drug development. Stability, low toxicity and immunogenicity, and, perhaps, a higher safety profile – not to mention low-cost advantages – are drawing the attention of big pharma and biotech. PMID:23372509

  18. pH-dependent drug-drug interactions for weak base drugs: potential implications for new drug development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Wu, F; Lee, S C; Zhao, H; Zhang, L

    2014-08-01

    Absorption of an orally administered drug with pH-dependent solubility may be altered when it is coadministered with a gastric acid-reducing agent (ARA). Assessing a drug's potential for pH-dependent drug-drug interactions (DDIs), considering study design elements for such DDI studies, and interpreting and communicating study results in the drug labeling to guide drug dosing are important for drug development. We collected pertinent information related to new molecular entities approved from January 2003 to May 2013 by the US Food and Drug Administration for which clinical DDI studies with ARAs were performed. On the basis of assessments of data on pH solubility and in vivo DDIs with ARAs, we proposed a conceptual framework for assessing the need for clinical pH-dependent DDI studies for weak base drugs (WBDs). Important study design considerations include selection of ARAs and timing of dosing of an ARA relative to the WBD in a DDI study. Labeling implications for drugs having DDIs with ARAs are also illustrated.

  19. Drugs and development: the global impact of drug use and trafficking on social and economic development.

    PubMed

    Singer, Merrill

    2008-12-01

    Locating development efforts within the context of globalism and global drug capitalism, this article examines the significant health and social impact both legal and illegal drugs have on international development efforts. The paper takes on an issue that is generally overlooked in the development debate and is not much addressed in the current international development standard, the Millennium Development Goals, and yet is one that places serious constraints on the ability of underdeveloped nations to achieve improvement. The relationship between psychotropic or "mind/mood altering" drugs and sustainable development is rooted in the contribution that the legal and illegal drug trade makes to a set of barriers to development, including: (1) interpersonal crime and community violence; (2) the corruption of public servants and the disintegration of social institutions; (3) the emergence of new or enhanced health problems; (4) the lowering of worker productivity; (5) the ensnarement of youth in drug distribution and away from productive education or employment; (6) the skewing of economies to drug production and money laundering. The paper emphasizes the need for new approaches for diminishing the burden placed by drugs on development. PMID:19038724

  20. Drugs and development: the global impact of drug use and trafficking on social and economic development.

    PubMed

    Singer, Merrill

    2008-12-01

    Locating development efforts within the context of globalism and global drug capitalism, this article examines the significant health and social impact both legal and illegal drugs have on international development efforts. The paper takes on an issue that is generally overlooked in the development debate and is not much addressed in the current international development standard, the Millennium Development Goals, and yet is one that places serious constraints on the ability of underdeveloped nations to achieve improvement. The relationship between psychotropic or "mind/mood altering" drugs and sustainable development is rooted in the contribution that the legal and illegal drug trade makes to a set of barriers to development, including: (1) interpersonal crime and community violence; (2) the corruption of public servants and the disintegration of social institutions; (3) the emergence of new or enhanced health problems; (4) the lowering of worker productivity; (5) the ensnarement of youth in drug distribution and away from productive education or employment; (6) the skewing of economies to drug production and money laundering. The paper emphasizes the need for new approaches for diminishing the burden placed by drugs on development.

  1. Implications of pharmacogenomics for drug development.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Randal J; Hung, Jeffrey L; Horner, Scott R; Perez, Jeffrey T

    2008-12-01

    The use of pharmacogenomics (PGx) today is almost ubiquitous in drug development and is advancing into the practice of medicine as an increasing number of drugs come to market with indications that are related to the presence or absence of a specific genetic biomarker. The authors review the history of PGx and its tools in research, in clinical trials and in clinical medicine. The economic, regulatory, and technological driving forces for adoption of PGx are then considered. Current impediments to a more robust proliferation of the benefits of these technologies are discussed-pharmaceutical companies, clinical education, required statistical methods, and intellectual property landscape.

  2. International small dam safety assurance policy benchmarks to avoid dam failure flood disasters in developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisaniello, John D.; Dam, Tuyet Thi; Tingey-Holyoak, Joanne L.

    2015-12-01

    In developing countries small dam failure disasters are common yet research on their dam safety management is lacking. This paper reviews available small dam safety assurance policy benchmarks from international literature, synthesises them for applicability in developing countries, and provides example application through a case study of Vietnam. Generic models from 'minimum' to 'best' practice (Pisaniello, 1997) are synthesised with the World Bank's 'essential' and 'desirable' elements (Bradlow et al., 2002) leading to novel policy analysis and design criteria for developing countries. The case study involved 22 on-site dam surveys finding micro level physical and management inadequacies that indicates macro dam safety management policy performs far below the minimum benchmark in Vietnam. Moving assurance policy towards 'best practice' is necessary to improve the safety of Vietnam's considerable number of hazardous dams to acceptable community standards, but firstly achieving 'minimum practice' per the developed guidance is essential. The policy analysis/design process provides an exemplar for other developing countries to follow for avoiding dam failure flood disasters.

  3. The industrial challenge in reproductive drug development.

    PubMed

    Southern, E M

    1978-01-01

    An enormous expenditure of time, research, and money is required to develop and market a new contraceptive in the U.S. In addition to the investigation of new scientific knowledge, the intricacy of government regulations, which are stricter for contraceptives than for most other drugs, adds to the complexity of the research process. Testing procedures are lengthy, beginning with tests on laboratory animals, and before a new contraceptive drug proven effective in animals can be tested on humans, a series of animal toxicology tests must be performed. Human clinical trials are also prolonged and complex; some 10-15 years may elapse between the discovery of a suitable contraceptive compound and final approval to market a useful product. The history of Depo-Provera illustrates some of the scientific and regulatory difficulties involved in bringing a new contraceptive to market. Because of rejection by Food and Drug Administration, despite recommendations by experts, the impact of this important new contraceptive method involving years of research has been severely curtailed. Research on prostaglandins is another contribution to the development of effective fertility control methods. Were this research to lead to the development of a safe, fully effective, self-administered agent for menstrual regulation available worldwide at a low cost, the impact on fertility could be highly significant. Overriding factors are availability of research funds and approval for marketing. Access to new, improved contraceptives will depend upon decisions by government policy-makers which effect research priorities and drug regulatory procedures.

  4. Pharmacogenomics in clinical practice and drug development

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Andrew R; Topol, Eric J

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of responses to drugs, including clopidogrel, pegylated-interferon and carbamazepine, have led to the identification of specific patient subgroups that benefit from therapy. However, the identification and replication of common sequence variants that are associated with either efficacy or safety for most prescription medications at odds ratios (ORs) >3.0 (equivalent to >300% increased efficacy or safety) has yet to be translated to clinical practice. Although some of the studies have been completed, the results have not been incorporated into therapy, and a large number of commonly used medications have not been subject to proper pharmacogenomic analysis. Adoption of GWAS, exome or whole genome sequencing by drug development and treatment programs is the most striking near-term opportunity for improving the drug candidate pipeline and boosting the efficacy of medications already in use. PMID:23138311

  5. Animal models in drug development for MRSA.

    PubMed

    Marra, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    One of the foremost challenges of drug discovery in any therapeutic area is that of solidifying the correlation between in vitro activity and clinical efficacy. Between these is the confirmation that affecting a particular target in vivo will lead to a therapeutic benefit. In antibacterial drug discovery, there is a key advantage from the start, since the targets are bacteria-therefore, it is simple to ascertain in vitro whether a drug has the desired effect, i.e., bacterial cell inhibition or killing, and to understand the mechanism by which that occurs. The downstream criteria, whether a compound reaches the infection site and achieves appropriately high levels to affect bacterial viability, can be evaluated in animal models of infection. In this way animal models of infection can be a highly valuable and predictive bridge between in vitro drug discovery and early clinical evaluation.The Gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus causes a wide variety of infections in humans (Archer, Clin Infect Dis 26:1179-1181, 1998) and has been said to be able to infect every tissue type. Fortunately, over the years a great deal of effort has been expended toward developing infection models in rodents using this organism, with good success. This chapter will describe the advantages, methods, and outcome measurements of the rodent models most used in drug discovery for S. aureus. Mouse models will be the focus of this chapter, as they are the most economical and thus most commonly used, but a rat infection model is included as well.

  6. Multi-target drugs: the trend of drug research and development.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jin-Jian; Pan, Wei; Hu, Yuan-Jia; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2012-01-01

    Summarizing the status of drugs in the market and examining the trend of drug research and development is important in drug discovery. In this study, we compared the drug targets and the market sales of the new molecular entities approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration from January 2000 to December 2009. Two networks, namely, the target-target and drug-drug networks, have been set up using the network analysis tools. The multi-target drugs have much more potential, as shown by the network visualization and the market trends. We discussed the possible reasons and proposed the rational strategies for drug research and development in the future.

  7. Acceleration of drug development: a collaboration of many stakeholders.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, K S

    2013-06-01

    Modern drugs are used to treat and prevent diseases that previously led to morbidity and mortality. There is a high cost to this achievement--investment for each successful drug can exceed $1.8 billion. Late-phase drug candidate failure decreases efficiency of drug development because each failure represents lost or delayed opportunity to develop successful drugs. Collaboration of stakeholders and the use of new science and knowledge management can reduce late-phase failure and accelerate drug development.

  8. Parasitic diarrheal disease: drug development and targets

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Amir; Peerzada, Mudasir N.; Ahmad, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Diarrhea is the manifestation of gastrointestinal infection and is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity specifically among the children of less than 5 years age worldwide. Moreover, in recent years there has been a rise in the number of reports of intestinal infections continuously in the industrialized world. These are largely related to waterborne and food borne outbreaks. These occur by the pathogenesis of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms like bacteria and parasites. The parasitic intestinal infection has remained mostly unexplored and under assessed in terms of therapeutic development. The lack of new drugs and the risk of resistance have led us to carry out this review on drug development for parasitic diarrheal diseases. The major focus has been depicted on commercially available drugs, currently synthesized active heterocyclic compounds and unique drug targets, that are vital for the existence and growth of the parasites and can be further exploited for the search of therapeutically active anti-parasitic agents. PMID:26617574

  9. Drugs in development for relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rehiana; Nicholas, Richard St John; Muraro, Paolo Antonio

    2013-05-01

    Drug development for multiple sclerosis (MS), as with any other neurological disease, faces numerous challenges, with many drugs failing at various stages of development. The disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) first introduced for MS are only moderately effective, but given the lack of competition, they have been widely accepted in clinical practice. Although safety and efficacy continue to be the two main metrics by which drugs will be judged, the newer agents in the market also face challenges of a more comparative nature-are they more efficacious than the currently available drugs on the market? Are they safer or better tolerated? Do they offer any practical advantages over current treatments? Fingolimod represented a milestone following its approval as an oral drug for MS in 2010, offering patients a far more convenient administration route. However, association with cardiovascular complications has led to a more cautious approach in its initial prescribing, now requiring cardiac monitoring for the first 6 h as well as subsequent monitoring of blood pressure and for macular oedema. Natalizumab, amongst licensed drugs, represents the current benchmark for efficacy. The risk of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy during natalizumab treatment is now more quantifiable. Other monoclonal antibodies are in various phases of development. Marketing authorisation for alemtuzumab has been filed, and whilst trial data suggest that its efficacy outperforms both licensed drugs and others in development, there is a significant risk of secondary autoimmunity. Its once-yearly administration, however, seems particularly advantageous. Rituximab is unlikely to be developed further as its license will expire, but ocrelizumab, another monoclonal antibody directly targeting B cells, is currently in phase 2 development and looks promising. Daclizumab is also moderately efficacious but may struggle to establish itself given its monthly subcutaneous dosing. There are new oral

  10. Drugs in development for relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rehiana; Nicholas, Richard St John; Muraro, Paolo Antonio

    2013-05-01

    Drug development for multiple sclerosis (MS), as with any other neurological disease, faces numerous challenges, with many drugs failing at various stages of development. The disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) first introduced for MS are only moderately effective, but given the lack of competition, they have been widely accepted in clinical practice. Although safety and efficacy continue to be the two main metrics by which drugs will be judged, the newer agents in the market also face challenges of a more comparative nature-are they more efficacious than the currently available drugs on the market? Are they safer or better tolerated? Do they offer any practical advantages over current treatments? Fingolimod represented a milestone following its approval as an oral drug for MS in 2010, offering patients a far more convenient administration route. However, association with cardiovascular complications has led to a more cautious approach in its initial prescribing, now requiring cardiac monitoring for the first 6 h as well as subsequent monitoring of blood pressure and for macular oedema. Natalizumab, amongst licensed drugs, represents the current benchmark for efficacy. The risk of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy during natalizumab treatment is now more quantifiable. Other monoclonal antibodies are in various phases of development. Marketing authorisation for alemtuzumab has been filed, and whilst trial data suggest that its efficacy outperforms both licensed drugs and others in development, there is a significant risk of secondary autoimmunity. Its once-yearly administration, however, seems particularly advantageous. Rituximab is unlikely to be developed further as its license will expire, but ocrelizumab, another monoclonal antibody directly targeting B cells, is currently in phase 2 development and looks promising. Daclizumab is also moderately efficacious but may struggle to establish itself given its monthly subcutaneous dosing. There are new oral

  11. Shade avoidance 6 encodes an Arabidopsis flap endonuclease required for maintenance of genome integrity and development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yijuan; Wen, Chunhong; Liu, Songbai; Zheng, Li; Shen, Binghui; Tao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Flap endonuclease-1 (FEN1) belongs to the Rad2 family of structure-specific nucleases. It is required for several DNA metabolic pathways, including DNA replication and DNA damage repair. Here, we have identified a shade avoidance mutant, sav6, which reduces the mRNA splicing efficiency of SAV6. We have demonstrated that SAV6 is an FEN1 homologue that shows double-flap endonuclease and gap-dependent endonuclease activity, but lacks exonuclease activity. sav6 mutants are hypersensitive to DNA damage induced by ultraviolet (UV)-C radiation and reagents that induce double-stranded DNA breaks, but exhibit normal responses to chemicals that block DNA replication. Signalling components that respond to DNA damage are constitutively activated in sav6 mutants. These data indicate that SAV6 is required for DNA damage repair and the maintenance of genome integrity. Mutant sav6 plants also show reduced root apical meristem (RAM) size and defective quiescent centre (QC) development. The expression of SMR7, a cell cycle regulatory gene, and ERF115 and PSK5, regulators of QC division, is increased in sav6 mutants. Their constitutive induction is likely due to the elevated DNA damage responses in sav6 and may lead to defects in the development of the RAM and QC. Therefore, SAV6 assures proper root development through maintenance of genome integrity. PMID:26721386

  12. A Case for Developing Community Drug Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loughran, Hilda; McCann, Mary Ellen

    2011-01-01

    The EU Action Plan on Drugs (2005-2008) calls for member states of the European Union to provide information on five key epidemiological indicators. These are: general population surveys, prevalence and patterns of problem drug use, drug related infectious diseases, drug related deaths and mortality of drug users, and demand for drug treatment.…

  13. Molecular mechanisms and design principles for promiscuous inhibitors to avoid drug resistance: lessons learned from HIV-1 protease inhibition.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Radhakrishnan, Mala L; Tidor, Bruce

    2015-02-01

    Molecular recognition is central to biology and ranges from highly selective to broadly promiscuous. The ability to modulate specificity at will is particularly important for drug development, and discovery of mechanisms contributing to binding specificity is crucial for our basic understanding of biology and for applications in health care. In this study, we used computational molecular design to create a large dataset of diverse small molecules with a range of binding specificities. We then performed structural, energetic, and statistical analysis on the dataset to study molecular mechanisms of achieving specificity goals. The work was done in the context of HIV-1 protease inhibition and the molecular designs targeted a panel of wild-type and drug-resistant mutant HIV-1 protease structures. The analysis focused on mechanisms for promiscuous binding to bind robustly even to resistance mutants. Broadly binding inhibitors tended to be smaller in size, more flexible in chemical structure, and more hydrophobic in nature compared to highly selective ones. Furthermore, structural and energetic analyses illustrated mechanisms by which flexible inhibitors achieved binding; we found ligand conformational adaptation near mutation sites and structural plasticity in targets through torsional flips of asymmetric functional groups to form alternative, compensatory packing interactions or hydrogen bonds. As no inhibitor bound to all variants, we designed small cocktails of inhibitors to do so and discovered that they often jointly covered the target set through mechanistic complementarity. Furthermore, using structural plasticity observed in experiments, and potentially in simulations, is suggested to be a viable means of designing adaptive inhibitors that are promiscuous binders.

  14. Effects of music therapy on drug avoidance self-efficacy in patients on a detoxification unit: a three-group randomized effectiveness study.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Self-efficacy is a component of Bandura's social cognitive theory and can lead to abstinence and a reduction of relapse potential for people who have substance abuse disorders. To date, no music therapy researcher has utilized this theoretical model to address abstinence and reduce the likelihood of relapse in people who have addictions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of music therapy on drug avoidance self-efficacy in a randomized three-group wait-list control design with patients on a detoxification unit. Participants (N = 131) were cluster randomized to one of three single-session conditions: music therapy, verbal therapy, or wait-list control. Music therapy participants received a group lyric analysis intervention, verbal therapy participants received a group talk therapy session, and wait-list control participants eventually received a group recreational music therapy intervention. Although there was no significant between-group difference in drug avoidance self-efficacy, participants in the music therapy condition tended to have the highest mean drug avoidance self-efficacy scores. Posttest written comments supported the use of both music therapy and verbal therapy sessions. Two music therapy participants specifically noted that their initial skepticism had dissipated after receiving music therapy. Despite a lack of significant differences, the theoretical support of self-efficacy for substance abuse rehabilitation suggests that this may be an area of continued clinical focus and empirical investigation. Clinical anecdotes, limitations of the study, and suggestions for future research are provided. PMID:25514686

  15. Effects of music therapy on drug avoidance self-efficacy in patients on a detoxification unit: a three-group randomized effectiveness study.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Self-efficacy is a component of Bandura's social cognitive theory and can lead to abstinence and a reduction of relapse potential for people who have substance abuse disorders. To date, no music therapy researcher has utilized this theoretical model to address abstinence and reduce the likelihood of relapse in people who have addictions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of music therapy on drug avoidance self-efficacy in a randomized three-group wait-list control design with patients on a detoxification unit. Participants (N = 131) were cluster randomized to one of three single-session conditions: music therapy, verbal therapy, or wait-list control. Music therapy participants received a group lyric analysis intervention, verbal therapy participants received a group talk therapy session, and wait-list control participants eventually received a group recreational music therapy intervention. Although there was no significant between-group difference in drug avoidance self-efficacy, participants in the music therapy condition tended to have the highest mean drug avoidance self-efficacy scores. Posttest written comments supported the use of both music therapy and verbal therapy sessions. Two music therapy participants specifically noted that their initial skepticism had dissipated after receiving music therapy. Despite a lack of significant differences, the theoretical support of self-efficacy for substance abuse rehabilitation suggests that this may be an area of continued clinical focus and empirical investigation. Clinical anecdotes, limitations of the study, and suggestions for future research are provided.

  16. Environmental enrichment protects against the acquisition of cocaine self-administration in adult male rats, but does not eliminate avoidance of a drug-associated saccharin cue.

    PubMed

    Puhl, Matthew D; Blum, Joshua S; Acosta-Torres, Stefany; Grigson, Patricia S

    2012-02-01

    One of the most menacing consequences of drug addiction is the devaluation of natural rewards (e.g. food, sex, work, money, caring for one's offspring). However, evidence also suggests that natural rewards, such as an enriched environment, can devalue drugs of abuse. Thus, this study used a rodent model to test whether exposure to an enriched environment could protect adult rats from acquiring cocaine self-administration and from the resultant drug-induced devaluation of a natural saccharin reward cue. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with intravenous jugular catheters. Rats were then separated into two housing conditions: an enriched condition, including social companions(four/cage) and novel objects (e.g. balls, polyethylene tubes, paper, etc.), and a nonenriched condition where the rats were singly housed with no novel objects. During testing, the rats were given 5-min access to 0.15% saccharin, followed by 1 h to self-administer saline or cocaine (0.167 mg/infusion) on fixed ratio and progressive ratio schedules of reinforcement. The results showed that rats that were singly housed in the nonenriched environment fell into two groups: low drug-takers (n=34) and high drug-takers (n=12). In comparison, only one out of the 22 rats housed in the enriched environment was a high drug-taker. Thus, all rats in the enriched environment, except one, behaved like low drug-takers under the nonenriched condition. As such, these rats self-administered almost no drug on either the fixed ratio or the progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement and were extremely slow to self-administer their first cocaine infusion. Interestingly, despite their very low levels of drug self-administration, low-drug-taking rats housed in the enriched environment continued to avoid intake of the drug-associated saccharin cue. Taken together, these data suggest that the enriched environment itself served as a salient natural reward that reduced cocaine seeking and cocaine taking, but

  17. Development and evaluation of collision warning/collision avoidance algorithms using an errable driver model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hsin-Hsiang; Peng, Huei

    2010-12-01

    Collision warning/collision avoidance (CW/CA) systems must be designed to work seamlessly with a human driver, providing warning or control actions when the driver's response (or lack of) is deemed inappropriate. The effectiveness of CW/CA systems working with a human driver needs to be evaluated thoroughly because of legal/liability and other (e.g. traffic flow) concerns. CW/CA systems tuned only under open-loop manoeuvres were frequently found to work unsatisfactorily with human-in-the-loop. However, tuning CW/CA systems with human drivers co-existing is slow and non-repeatable. Driver models, if constructed and used properly, can capture human/control interactions and accelerate the CW/CA development process. Design and evaluation methods for CW/CA algorithms can be categorised into three approaches, scenario-based, performance-based and human-centred. The strength and weakness of these approaches were discussed in this paper and a humanised errable driver model was introduced to improve the developing process. The errable driver model used in this paper is a model that emulates human driver's functions and can generate both nominal (error-free) and devious (with error) behaviours. The car-following data used for developing and validating the model were obtained from a large-scale naturalistic driving database. Three error-inducing behaviours were introduced: human perceptual limitation, time delay and distraction. By including these error-inducing behaviours, rear-end collisions with a lead vehicle were found to occur at a probability similar to traffic accident statistics in the USA. This driver model is then used to evaluate the performance of several existing CW/CA algorithms. Finally, a new CW/CA algorithm was developed based on this errable driver model.

  18. Drug Development of Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mould, Diane R; Meibohm, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have become a substantial part of many pharmaceutical company portfolios. However, the development process of MAbs for clinical use is quite different than for small-molecule drugs. MAb development programs require careful interdisciplinary evaluations to ensure the pharmacology of both the MAb and the target antigen are well-understood. Selection of appropriate preclinical species must be carefully considered and the potential development of anti-drug antibodies (ADA) during these early studies can limit the value and complicate the performance and possible duration of preclinical studies. In human studies, many of the typical pharmacology studies such as renal or hepatic impairment evaluations may not be needed but the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of these agents is complex, often necessitating more comprehensive evaluation of clinical data and more complex bioanalytical assays than might be used for small molecules. This paper outlines concerns and strategies for development of MAbs from the early in vitro assessments needed through preclinical and clinical development. This review focuses on how to develop, submit, and comply with regulatory requirements for MAb therapeutics. PMID:27342605

  19. Who avoids going to the doctor and why? Audience segmentation analysis for application of message development.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Viji Diane; Veazie, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study examines the prevalent and detrimental health care phenomenon of patient delay in order to inform formative research leading to the design of communication strategies. Delayed medical care diminishes optimal treatment choices, negatively impacts prognosis, and increases medical costs. Various communication strategies have been employed to combat patient delay, with limited success. This study fills a gap in research informing those interventions by focusing on the portion of patient delay occurring after symptoms have been assessed as a sign of illness and the need for medical care has been determined. We used CHAID segmentation analysis to produce homogeneous segments from the sample according to the propensity to avoid medical care. CHAID is a criterion-based predictive cluster analysis technique. CHAID examines a variety of characteristics to find the one most strongly associated with avoiding doctor visits through a chi-squared test and assessment of statistical significance. The characteristics identified then define the segments. Fourteen segments were produced. Age was the first delineating characteristic, with younger age groups comprising a greater proportion of avoiders. Other segments containing a comparatively larger percent of avoiders were characterized by lower income, lower education, being uninsured, and being male. Each segment was assessed for psychographic properties associated with avoiding care, reasons for avoiding care, and trust in health information sources. While the segments display distinct profiles, having had positive provider experiences, having high health self-efficacy, and having an internal rather than external or chance locus of control were associated with low avoidance among several segments. Several segments were either more or less likely to cite time or money as the reason for avoiding care. And several older aged segments were less likely than the remaining sample to trust the government as a source

  20. The development and maintenance of drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Wise, Roy A; Koob, George F

    2014-01-01

    What is the defining property of addiction? We dust off a several-decades-long debate about the relative importance of two forms of reinforcement—positive reinforcement, subjectively linked to drug-induced euphoria, and negative reinforcement, subjectively linked to the alleviation of pain—both of which figure importantly in addiction theory; each of these forms has dominated addiction theory in its time. We agree that addiction begins with the formation of habits through positive reinforcement and that drug-opposite physiological responses often establish the conditions for negative reinforcement to come into play at a time when tolerance, in the form of increasing reward thresholds, appears to develop into positive reinforcement. Wise’s work has tended to focus on positive-reinforcement mechanisms that are important for establishing drug-seeking habits and reinstating them quickly after periods of abstinence, whereas Koob’s work has tended to focus on the negative-reinforcement mechanisms that become most obvious in the late stages of sustained addiction. While we tend to agree with each other about the early and late stages of addiction, we hold different views as to (i) the point between early and late at which the diagnosis of ‘addiction’ should be invoked, (ii) the relative importance of positive and negative reinforcement leading up to this transition, and (iii) the degree to which the specifics of negative reinforcement can be generalized across the range of addictive agents. PMID:24121188

  1. The development and maintenance of drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Wise, Roy A; Koob, George F

    2014-01-01

    What is the defining property of addiction? We dust off a several-decades-long debate about the relative importance of two forms of reinforcement—positive reinforcement, subjectively linked to drug-induced euphoria, and negative reinforcement, subjectively linked to the alleviation of pain—both of which figure importantly in addiction theory; each of these forms has dominated addiction theory in its time. We agree that addiction begins with the formation of habits through positive reinforcement and that drug-opposite physiological responses often establish the conditions for negative reinforcement to come into play at a time when tolerance, in the form of increasing reward thresholds, appears to develop into positive reinforcement. Wise’s work has tended to focus on positive-reinforcement mechanisms that are important for establishing drug-seeking habits and reinstating them quickly after periods of abstinence, whereas Koob’s work has tended to focus on the negative-reinforcement mechanisms that become most obvious in the late stages of sustained addiction. While we tend to agree with each other about the early and late stages of addiction, we hold different views as to (i) the point between early and late at which the diagnosis of ‘addiction’ should be invoked, (ii) the relative importance of positive and negative reinforcement leading up to this transition, and (iii) the degree to which the specifics of negative reinforcement can be generalized across the range of addictive agents.

  2. Vehicle Systems and Excipients Used in Minipig Drug Development Studies.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Margaret L; Grossi, Anette Blak; Schützsack, Jorgen; Parish, Joanna; Løgsted, Jeanet; Bøgh, Ingrid Brück; Cameron, David; Harvey, Warren; Festag, Matthias; Downes, Noel; Venturella, Silvana; Schlichtiger, Julia; Mhedhbi, Sofiene; Ross, Vanessa; Kissner, Thomas; Stark, Claudia; Milano, Stephane; Heining, Peter; Sanchez-Felix, Manual

    2016-04-01

    Minipigs have been used for dermal drug development studies for decades, and they are currently more frequently considered as the second nonrodent species for pivotal nonclinical studies, in lieu of the dog or nonhuman primate, for compounds delivered via standard systemic routes of administration. Little is known about the tolerability of different excipients in minipigs; sharing knowledge of excipient tolerability and compositions previously used in nonclinical studies may avoid testing of inadequate formulations, thereby contributing to reduced animal usage. This article reviews vehicles employed in the Göttingen(®)minipig based on the combined experience from a number of pharmaceutical companies and contract research organizations. The review includes vehicles tolerated for single or multiple dosing by the Göttingen minipig, some of which are not appropriate for administration to other common nonrodent species (e.g., dogs). By presenting these data for dermal, oral, subcutaneous, and intravenous routes of administration, studies to qualify these vehicles in minipigs can be minimized or avoided. Additionally, investigators may more frequently consider using the minipig in place of higher species if the tolerability of a vehicle in the minipig is known. PMID:26674803

  3. Chemical signatures and new drug targets for gametocytocidal drug development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei; Tanaka, Takeshi Q.; Magle, Crystal T.; Huang, Wenwei; Southall, Noel; Huang, Ruili; Dehdashti, Seameen J.; McKew, John C.; Williamson, Kim C.; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Control of parasite transmission is critical for the eradication of malaria. However, most antimalarial drugs are not active against P. falciparum gametocytes, responsible for the spread of malaria. Consequently, patients can remain infectious for weeks after the clearance of asexual parasites and clinical symptoms. Here we report the identification of 27 potent gametocytocidal compounds (IC50 < 1 μM) from screening 5,215 known drugs and compounds. All these compounds were active against three strains of gametocytes with different drug sensitivities and geographical origins, 3D7, HB3 and Dd2. Cheminformatic analysis revealed chemical signatures for P. falciparum sexual and asexual stages indicative of druggability and suggesting potential targets. Torin 2, a top lead compound (IC50 = 8 nM against gametocytes in vitro), completely blocked oocyst formation in a mouse model of transmission. These results provide critical new leads and potential targets to expand the repertoire of malaria transmission-blocking reagents.

  4. SU-C-BRA-06: Developing Clinical and Quantitative Guidelines for a 4DCT-Ventilation Functional Avoidance Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Vinogradskiy, Y; Waxweiler, T; Diot, Q; Kavanagh, B; Schubert, L; Miften, M; Castillo, R; Guerrero, T; Castillo, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: 4DCT-ventilation is an exciting new imaging modality that uses 4DCTs to calculate lung ventilation. Because 4DCTs are acquired as part of routine care, calculating 4DCT-ventilation allows for lung function evaluation without additional cost or inconvenience to the patient. Development of a clinical trial is underway at our institution to use 4DCT-ventilation for thoracic functional avoidance with the idea that preferential sparing of functional lung regions can decrease pulmonary toxicity. The purpose of our work was to develop the practical aspects of a 4DCT-ventilation functional avoidance clinical trial including: 1.assessing patient eligibility 2.developing trial inclusion criteria and 3.developing treatment planning and dose-function evaluation strategies. Methods: 96 stage III lung cancer patients from 2 institutions were retrospectively reviewed. 4DCT-ventilation maps were calculated using the patient’s 4DCTs, deformable image registrations, and a density-change-based algorithm. To assess patient eligibility and develop trial inclusion criteria we used an observer-based binary end point noting the presence or absence of a ventilation defect and developed an algorithm based on the percent ventilation in each lung third. Functional avoidance planning integrating 4DCT-ventilation was performed using rapid-arc and compared to the patient’s clinically used plan. Results: Investigator-determined clinical ventilation defects were present in 69% of patients. Our regional/lung-thirds ventilation algorithm identified that 59% of patients have lung functional profiles suitable for functional avoidance. Compared to the clinical plan, functional avoidance planning was able to reduce the mean dose to functional lung by 2 Gy while delivering comparable target coverage and cord/heart doses. Conclusions: 4DCT-ventilation functional avoidance clinical trials have great potential to reduce toxicity, and our data suggest that 59% of lung cancer patients have lung

  5. Drugging the undruggables: exploring the ubiquitin system for drug development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaodong; Dixit, Vishva M

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic modulation of protein levels is tightly controlled in response to physiological cues. In mammalian cells, much of the protein degradation is carried out by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Similar to kinases, components of the ubiquitin system are often dysregulated, leading to a variety of diseases, including cancer and neurodegeneration, making them attractive drug targets. However, so far there are only a handful of drugs targeting the ubiquitin system that have been approved by the FDA. Here, we review possible therapeutic intervention nodes in the ubiquitin system, analyze the challenges, and highlight the most promising strategies to target the UPS. PMID:27002218

  6. Developments in diagnosis and antileishmanial drugs.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Prachi; Singh, Rajni

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis ranks the third in disease burden in disability-adjusted life years caused by neglected tropical diseases and is the second cause of parasite-related deaths after malaria; but for a variety of reasons, it is not receiving the attention that would be justified seeing its importance. Leishmaniasis is a diverse group of clinical syndromes caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania. It is estimated that 350 million people are at risk in 88 countries, with a global incidence of 1-1.5 million cases of cutaneous and 500,000 cases of visceral leishmaniasis. Improvements in diagnostic methods for early case detection and latest combitorial chemotherapeutic methods have given a new hope for combating this deadly disease. The cell biology of Leishmania and mammalian cells differs considerably and this distinctness extends to the biochemical level. This provides the promise that many of the parasite's proteins should be sufficiently different from hosts and can be successfully exploited as drug targets. This paper gives a brief overview of recent developments in the diagnosis and approaches in antileishmanial drug discovery and development. PMID:23118748

  7. Recent advances in antimultiple myeloma drug development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nuozhou; Bartlow, Patrick; Ouyang, Qin; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematological malignancy and is characterized by the aberrant proliferation of terminally differentiated plasma B cells with impairment in apoptosis capacity. Particularly, osteolytic bone diseases and renal failure resulting from hyperparaproteinemia and hypercalcemia have been the major serious sequelae that are inextricably linked with MM tumor progression. Despite the introduction of new treatment regimens, problematic neuropathy, thrombocytopenia, drug resistance and high MM relapse rates continue to plague the current therapies. New chemical agents are in development on the basis of understanding several signaling pathways and molecular mechanisms like tumor necrosis factor-α, proteasome, PI3K and MARKs. This review focuses on the most recent patents and clinical trials in the development of new medicine for the treatment of multiple myeloma. Furthermore, the important signaling pathways involved in the proliferation, survival and apoptosis of myeloma cells will be discussed. PMID:24998287

  8. Active controlled studies in antibiotic drug development.

    PubMed

    Dane, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    The increasing concern of antibacterial resistance has been well documented, as has the relative lack of antibiotic development. This paradox is in part due to challenges with clinical development of antibiotics. Because of their rapid progression, untreated bacterial infections are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. As a consequence, placebo-controlled studies of new agents are unethical. Rather, pivotal development studies are mostly conducted using non-inferiority designs versus an active comparator. Further, infections because of comparator-resistant isolates must usually be excluded from the trial programme. Unfortunately, the placebo-controlled data classically used in support of non-inferiority designs are largely unavailable for antibiotics. The only available data are from the 1930s and 1940s and their use is associated with significant concerns regarding constancy and assay sensitivity. Extended public debate on this challenge has led to proposed solutions by some in which these concerns are addressed by using very conservative approaches to trial design, endpoints and non-inferiority margins, in some cases leading to potentially impractical studies. To compound this challenge, different Regulatory Authorities seem to be taking different approaches to these key issues. If harmonisation does not occur, antibiotic development will become increasingly challenging, with the risk of further decreases in the amount of antibiotic drug development. However with clarity on Regulatory requirements and an ability to feasibly conduct global development programmes, it should be possible to bring much needed additional antibiotics to patients.

  9. Botanicals as "new" drugs: US development.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Freddie Ann

    2015-11-01

    Botanicals are ingredients that can be marketed as foods, drugs, cosmetics, and medical devices in the United States. When a botanical is intended to diagnose, treat, prevent, mitigate, or cure a disease, it is considered to be a "drug". This article reviews the US regulatory requirements for botanicals as "new" drugs. An overview of the regulatory principles used to determine product category and the basic elements of an Investigational New Drug application and New Drug Application with the US Food and Drug Administration are presented. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Botanicals for Epilepsy".

  10. Preventing Drug Abuse Among Hispanic Adolescents: Developing a Responsive Intervention Approach

    PubMed Central

    Schinke, Steven P.; Schwinn, Traci M.; Hursh, Hilary A.

    2014-01-01

    Intervention research is essential to help Hispanic American adolescents avoid drug use. This article describes an intervention research program aimed at preventing drug use among these youths. Grounded in salient epidemiological data, the program is informed by bicultural competence, social learning, and motivational interviewing theories. The program, called Vamos, is aimed at the risk and protective factors as well as the cultural prerogatives that demark the adolescent years of Hispanic American youths. Innovative in its approach, the program is delivered through a smartphone application (app). By interacting with engaging content presented via the app, youths can acquire the cognitive–behavioral skills necessary to avoid risky situations, urges, and pressures associated with early drug use. The intervention development process is presented in detail, and an evaluation plan to determine the program's efficacy is outlined. Lessons for practice and intervention programming are discussed. PMID:26500421

  11. Intermittent claudication: new targets for drug development.

    PubMed

    Brass, Eric P

    2013-07-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is the result of extensive atherosclerosis in the arterial supply to the lower extremities. PAD is associated with increased systemic cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as well as substantial disability due to walking impairment. Claudication is the classic symptom of leg pain with walking that is relieved by rest, but patients with PAD without typical claudication also have a walking limitation. Treatment of the patient with PAD is directed towards reducing cardiovascular risk and improving exercise capacity. The pathophysiology of the physical impairment is complex as changes in the muscle distal to the arterial stenoses contribute to the limitations. Current treatment options to improve exercise performance have limitations emphasizing the need for new pharmacotherapies for this highly prevalent condition. The multifactorial contributors to the exercise impairment in PAD suggest potential targets for novel drug therapies. Advances in understanding angiogenesis make pharmacologic revascularization possible. However, ensuring that new blood vessels develop in a distribution relevant to the clinical impairment remains a challenge. Skeletal muscle metabolism and its regulation are altered in patients with PAD and strategies to improve the efficient oxidation of fuel substrates may improve muscle function. PAD is associated with increased oxidative stress which may result in injury to the muscle microvasculature and myocyte. Minimizing this oxidative stress by enhancing cellular defense mechanisms, administration of anti-inflammatory agents or by providing antioxidants, could prevent oxidative injury. Given the central role of atherosclerosis in the flow limitation, therapies to induce regression of atherosclerotic lesions could result in improved blood flow and oxygen delivery. Drugs targeting the distribution of blood flow in the microcirculatory environment of the muscle have the potential to better match oxygen delivery with

  12. The Cross-Lagged Relations between Children's Academic Skill Development, Task-Avoidance, and Parental Beliefs about Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magi, Katrin; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Rasku-Puttonen, Helena; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2011-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigated the cross-lagged associations between children's academic skill development, task-avoidant behaviour in the context of homework, and parental beliefs about their child's success from kindergarten to Grade 2. The participants were 1267 children. The children's pre-skills were assessed at the end of the…

  13. Development and application of a methodology for a clean development mechanism to avoid methane emissions in closed landfills.

    PubMed

    Janke, Leandro; Lima, André O S; Millet, Maurice; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2013-01-01

    In Brazil, Solid Waste Disposal Sites have operated without consideration of environmental criteria, these areas being characterized by methane (CH4) emissions during the anaerobic degradation of organic matter. The United Nations organization has made efforts to control this situation, through the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Kyoto Protocol, where projects that seek to reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) can be financially rewarded through Certified Emission Reductions (CERs) if they respect the requirements established by the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), such as the use of methodologies approved by the CDM Executive Board (CDM-EB). Thus, a methodology was developed according to the CDM standards related to the aeration, excavation and composting of closed Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills, which was submitted to CDM-EB for assessment and, after its approval, applied to a real case study in Maringá City (Brazil) with a view to avoiding negative environmental impacts due the production of methane and leachates even after its closure. This paper describes the establishment of this CDM-EB-approved methodology to determine baseline emissions, project emissions and the resultant emission reductions with the application of appropriate aeration, excavation and composting practices at closed MSW landfills. A further result obtained through the application of the methodology in the landfill case study was that it would be possible to achieve an ex-ante emission reduction of 74,013 tCO2 equivalent if the proposed CDM project activity were implemented.

  14. Developing a Molecular Roadmap of Drug-Food Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kasper; Ni, Yueqiong; Panagiotou, Gianni; Kouskoumvekaki, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that consumption of food -especially fruits and vegetables- can alter the effects of drugs by interfering either with their pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic processes. Despite the recognition of such drug-food associations as an important element for successful therapeutic interventions, a systematic approach for identifying, predicting and preventing potential interactions between food and marketed or novel drugs is not yet available. The overall objective of this work was to sketch a comprehensive picture of the interference of ∼ 4,000 dietary components present in ∼1800 plant-based foods with the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics processes of medicine, with the purpose of elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved. By employing a systems chemical biology approach that integrates data from the scientific literature and online databases, we gained a global view of the associations between diet and dietary molecules with drug targets, metabolic enzymes, drug transporters and carriers currently deposited in DrugBank. Moreover, we identified disease areas and drug targets that are most prone to the negative effects of drug-food interactions, showcasing a platform for making recommendations in relation to foods that should be avoided under certain medications. Lastly, by investigating the correlation of gene expression signatures of foods and drugs we were able to generate a completely novel drug-diet interactome map. PMID:25668218

  15. Neurodegenerative disorders and nanoformulated drug development

    PubMed Central

    Nowacek, Ari; Kosloski, Lisa M; Gendelman, Howard E

    2009-01-01

    Degenerative and inflammatory diseases of the CNS include, but are not limited to, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, multiple sclerosis and HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. These are common, debilitating and, unfortunately, hold few therapeutic options. In recent years, the application of nanotechnologies as commonly used or developing medicines has served to improve pharmacokinetics and drug delivery specifically to CNS-diseased areas. In addition, nanomedical advances are leading to therapies that target CNS pathobiology and as such, can interrupt disordered protein aggregation, deliver functional neuroprotective proteins and alter the oxidant state of affected neural tissues. This article focuses on the pathobiology of common neurodegenerative disorders with a view towards how nanomedicine may be used to improve the clinical course of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19572820

  16. Facilitating Antibacterial Drug Development in a Time of Great Need.

    PubMed

    Cox, Edward; Cavaleri, Marco; Eichler, Hans-Georg; Woodcock, Janet; Borio, Luciana

    2016-08-15

    The continued development of new antibacterial drugs is critical to meet patient and public health needs. In this editorial, authors from the US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency reflect on the role of public-private partnerships and the development of clinical trials networks as agents to guide and perform quality studies of antibacterial drugs. PMID:27481949

  17. Industry Perspective of Drug Development for Pregnant/Breastfeeding Women.

    PubMed

    Korth-Bradley, J M

    2016-07-01

    As part of drug development, drug companies conduct experiments to gather data about the potential toxicity of medications in pregnant and lactating animals. Increasingly, physiologically based pharmacokinetic models are developed to simulate drug concentrations in pregnant and lactating women. As these women are not usually included in clinical trials, targeted postapproval safety monitoring, registries, or clinical studies may be performed to gather safety and efficacy information about drug use in these special populations. PMID:27082822

  18. Avoiding charges of fraud and abuse: developing and implementing an effective compliance program.

    PubMed

    Bolin, Jane Nelson; Clark, Linda Sanders

    2004-12-01

    During the last decade the federal government has made investigation of healthcare fraud and abuse a priority. Increasingly, nurses and skilled nursing organizations have been at the center of fraud and abuse cases. The authors examine data of sanctioned nurses obtained from the Office of the Inspector General. Nurses are most frequently sanctioned for license violations, drug convictions, and patient neglect.

  19. TCM-based new drug discovery and development in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wan-Ying; Hou, Jin-Jun; Long, Hua-Li; Yang, Wen-Zhi; Liang, Jian; Guo, De-An

    2014-04-01

    Over the past 30 years, China has significantly improved the drug development environment by establishing a series of policies for the regulation of new drug approval. The regulatory system for new drug evaluation and registration in China was gradually developed in accordance with international standards. The approval and registration of TCM in China became as strict as those of chemical drugs and biological products. In this review, TCM-based new drug discovery and development are introduced according to the TCM classification of nine categories.

  20. Re-engineering drug development: integrating pharmacoeconomic research into the drug development process.

    PubMed

    Data, J L; Willke, R J; Barnes, J R; DiRoma, P J

    1995-01-01

    Pharmacoeconomic research will be an increasingly important aspect of drug development as providers, third-party payers, and worldwide government health agencies use cost-effectiveness and quality-of-life data to assist in making decisions on optimal pharmaceutical treatment protocols, formulary listings, and reimbursement. It is in the best interest of pharmaceutical companies to have an established, well-integrated pharmacoeconomic research program that can respond to the dynamic health-care environment and proactively plan a program to optimize patient care. The new paradigm for pharmacoeconomic research will require establishment and successful management of many internal and external customer relationships. This article discusses one company's organization of these relationships and how they are integrated into the drug development process during each stage of the product life cycle.

  1. DSCAM and DSCAML1 Function in Self-Avoidance in Multiple Cell Types in the Developing Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Fuerst, Peter G.; Bruce, Freyja; Tian, Miao; Wei, Wei; Elstrott, Justin; Feller, Marla B.; Erskine, Lynda; Singer, Joshua H.; Burgess, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    DSCAM and DSCAM-LIKE1 (DSCAML1) serve diverse neurodevelopmental functions, including axon guidance, synaptic adhesion, and self-avoidance, depending on the species, cell type, and gene family member studied. We examined the function of DSCAM and DSCAML1 in the developing mouse retina. In addition to a subset of amacrine cells, Dscam was expressed in most retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). RGCs had fasciculated dendrites and clumped cell bodies in Dscam−/− mice, suggesting a role in self-avoidance. Dscaml1 was expressed in the rod circuit, and mice lacking Dscaml1 had fasciculated rod bipolar cell dendrites and clumped AII amacrine cell bodies, also indicating a role in self-avoidance. Neurons in Dscam or Dscaml1 mutant retinas stratified their processes appropriately in synaptic laminae in the inner plexiform layer, and functional synapses formed in the rod circuit in mice lacking Dscaml1. Therefore, DSCAM and DSCAML1 function similarly in self-avoidance, and are not essential for synaptic specificity in the mouse retina. PMID:19945391

  2. Development of Antisense Drugs for Dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Wada, Fumito; Harada-Shiba, Mariko

    2016-09-01

    Abnormal elevation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in plasma as well as dysfunction of anti-atherogenic high-density lipoprotein (HDL) have both been recognized as essential components of the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and are classified as dyslipidemia. This review describes the arc of development of antisense oligonucleotides for the treatment of dyslipidemia. Chemically-armed antisense candidates can act on various kinds of transcripts, including mRNA and miRNA, via several different endogenous antisense mechanisms, and have exhibited potent systemic anti-dyslipidemic effects. Here, we present specific cutting-edge technologies have recently been brought into antisense strategies, and describe how they have improved the potency of antisense drugs in regard to pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. In addition, we discuss perspectives for the use of armed antisense oligonucleotides as new clinical options for dyslipidemia, in the light of outcomes of recent clinical trials and safety concerns indicated by several clinical and preclinical studies. PMID:27466159

  3. Cryptic prophages as targets for drug development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Wood, Thomas K

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial chromosomes may contain up to 20% phage DNA that encodes diverse proteins ranging from those for photosynthesis to those for autoimmunity; hence, phages contribute greatly to the metabolic potential of pathogens. Active prophages carrying genes encoding virulence factors and antibiotic resistance can be excised from the host chromosome to form active phages and are transmissible among different bacterial hosts upon SOS responses. Cryptic prophages are artifacts of mutagenesis in which lysogenic phage are captured in the bacterial chromosome: they may excise but they do not form active phage particles or lyse their captors. Hence, cryptic prophages are relatively permanent reservoirs of genes, many of which benefit pathogens, in ways we are just beginning to discern. Here we explore the role of active prophage- and cryptic prophage-derived proteins in terms of (i) virulence, (ii) antibiotic resistance, and (iii) antibiotic tolerance; antibiotic tolerance occurs as a result of the non-heritable phenotype of dormancy which is a result of activation of toxins of toxin/antitoxin loci that are frequently encoded in cryptic prophages. Therefore, cryptic prophages are promising targets for drug development. PMID:27449596

  4. Cryptic prophages as targets for drug development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Wood, Thomas K

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial chromosomes may contain up to 20% phage DNA that encodes diverse proteins ranging from those for photosynthesis to those for autoimmunity; hence, phages contribute greatly to the metabolic potential of pathogens. Active prophages carrying genes encoding virulence factors and antibiotic resistance can be excised from the host chromosome to form active phages and are transmissible among different bacterial hosts upon SOS responses. Cryptic prophages are artifacts of mutagenesis in which lysogenic phage are captured in the bacterial chromosome: they may excise but they do not form active phage particles or lyse their captors. Hence, cryptic prophages are relatively permanent reservoirs of genes, many of which benefit pathogens, in ways we are just beginning to discern. Here we explore the role of active prophage- and cryptic prophage-derived proteins in terms of (i) virulence, (ii) antibiotic resistance, and (iii) antibiotic tolerance; antibiotic tolerance occurs as a result of the non-heritable phenotype of dormancy which is a result of activation of toxins of toxin/antitoxin loci that are frequently encoded in cryptic prophages. Therefore, cryptic prophages are promising targets for drug development.

  5. [PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY AND PERSONALIZED MEDICINE: A PARADIGM SHIFT IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF NEW DRUGS].

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2015-01-01

    The cost of pharmacotherapy is increasing in the health care budget. The pharmaceutical industry is facing the exhaustion of medications that are largely prescribed and have a high profitability (blockbusters). Because of patient heterogeneity, there is a great interindividual variability of the responses to drug therapy. Thus, it is essential to better detect potential to avoid waste of resources resulting from the prescription of expensive drugs to poor responders. The development of personalized medicine, or precision medicine, certainly offers opportunities to the pharmaceutical industry, but also exposes it to new big challenges.

  6. Avoiding Ticks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Avoiding ticks On people On pets In the yard Removing a tick Symptoms of tickborne illness Geographic ... ticks on your pets Preventing ticks in the yard File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

  7. The Chemical Biology of New Drugs in Development for Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Clifton E.; Blanchard, John S.

    2010-01-01

    With the worldwide emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) and extensively-drug-resistant (XDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), there are serious concerns about the continued ability to contain this disease. We discuss the most promising new drugs in late stage development that might be useful in treating MDR and XDR forms of the disease. These agents have novel mechanisms of action that are not targeted by the standard drugs used presently to treat susceptible strains. PMID:20452813

  8. Potential of metabolomics in preclinical and clinical drug development.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Baldeep; Prakash, Ajay; Ruhela, Rakesh Kumar; Medhi, Bikash

    2014-12-01

    Metabolomics is an upcoming technology system which involves detailed experimental analysis of metabolic profiles. Due to its diverse applications in preclinical and clinical research, it became an useful tool for the drug discovery and drug development process. This review covers the brief outline about the instrumentation and interpretation of metabolic profiles. The applications of metabolomics have a considerable scope in the pharmaceutical industry, almost at each step from drug discovery to clinical development. These include finding drug target, potential safety and efficacy biomarkers and mechanisms of drug action, the validation of preclinical experimental models against human disease profiles, and the discovery of clinical safety and efficacy biomarkers. As we all know, nowadays the drug discovery and development process is a very expensive, and risky business. Failures at any stage of drug discovery and development process cost millions of dollars to the companies. Some of these failures or the associated risks could be prevented or minimized if there were better ways of drug screening, drug toxicity profiling and monitoring adverse drug reactions. Metabolomics potentially offers an effective route to address all the issues associated with the drug discovery and development. PMID:25443721

  9. Evolution and intelligent design in drug development.

    PubMed

    Agafonov, Roman V; Wilson, Christopher; Kern, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    Sophisticated protein kinase networks, empowering complexity in higher organisms, are also drivers of devastating diseases such as cancer. Accordingly, these enzymes have become major drug targets of the twenty-first century. However, the holy grail of designing specific kinase inhibitors aimed at specific cancers has not been found. Can new approaches in cancer drug design help win the battle with this multi-faced and quickly evolving enemy? In this perspective we discuss new strategies and ideas that were born out of a recent breakthrough in understanding the molecular basis underlying the clinical success of the cancer drug Gleevec. An "old" method, stopped-flow kinetics, combined with old enzymes, the ancestors dating back up to about billion years, provides an unexpected outlook for future intelligent design of drugs.

  10. [Recent developments of drug eluting stent coatings].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-ping; Zhan, Hong-bing

    2011-11-01

    Drug eluting stents (DESs) have revolutionized the interventional cardiology over the past decade since the first DES became commercially available in Europe in 2002. Compared to bare metal stents that are deployed to keep the vessel open by mechanical force, DESs have an additional function of reducing restenosis by the action of the drug on the target site. Coatings on the stent surface which ensure the maximum delivery of therapeutic agents to the target site with minimal systematic toxicity, also play an important role in adjusting the drug release profile. Coating material and technology not only affect the surface biocompatibility and the integrity maintenance during the implanting process, but also decide the way of drug delivering and transmitting from the coating. This paper reviews the basic principles of DES coating design, the categories of DES coatings, the commonly used clinical DES coatings and their efficiency in reducing restenosis, and finally provides the future perspectives for DES coatings. PMID:22260019

  11. Evolution and intelligent design in drug development

    PubMed Central

    Agafonov, Roman V.; Wilson, Christopher; Kern, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    Sophisticated protein kinase networks, empowering complexity in higher organisms, are also drivers of devastating diseases such as cancer. Accordingly, these enzymes have become major drug targets of the twenty-first century. However, the holy grail of designing specific kinase inhibitors aimed at specific cancers has not been found. Can new approaches in cancer drug design help win the battle with this multi-faced and quickly evolving enemy? In this perspective we discuss new strategies and ideas that were born out of a recent breakthrough in understanding the molecular basis underlying the clinical success of the cancer drug Gleevec. An “old” method, stopped-flow kinetics, combined with old enzymes, the ancestors dating back up to about billion years, provides an unexpected outlook for future intelligent design of drugs. PMID:26052517

  12. Overcoming drug crystallization in electrospun fibers--Elucidating key parameters and developing strategies for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Seif, Salem; Franzen, Lutz; Windbergs, Maike

    2015-01-15

    For the development of novel therapeutics, uncontrolled crystallization of drugs within delivery systems represents a major challenge. Especially for thin and flexible polymeric systems such as oral films or dermal wound dressings, the formation and growth of drug crystals can significantly affect drug distribution and release kinetics as well as physical storage stability. In this context, electrospinning was introduced as a fabrication technique with the potential to encapsulate drugs within ultrafine fibers by rapid solvent evaporation overcoming drug crystallization during fabrication and storage. However, these effects could so far only be shown for specific drug-polymer combinations and an in-depth understanding of the underlying processes of drug-loaded fiber formation and influencing key parameters is still missing. In this study, we systematically investigated crystal formation of caffeine as a model drug in electrospun fibers comparing different polymers. The solvent polarity was found to have a major impact on the drug crystal formation, whereas only a minor effect was attributed to the electrospinning process parameters. Based on an in-depth understanding of the underlying processes determining drug crystallization processes in electrospun fibers, key parameters could be identified which allow for the rational development of drug-loaded electrospun fibers overcoming drug crystallization.

  13. Investigation of toxic metabolites during drug development

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Kevin . E-mail: bkpark@liv.ac.uk; Williams, Dominic P.; Naisbitt, Dean J.; Kitteringham, Neil R.; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2005-09-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a significant human health problem. Any organ system can be affected, including the liver, skin and kidney. Drug-induced liver injury is the most frequent reason for the withdrawal of an approved drug from the market, and it also accounts for up to 50% of cases of acute liver failure. The clinical picture is often diverse, even for the same drug. Mild, asymptomatic effects occur at a relatively high frequency with a number of drugs. Idiosyncratic toxicity is rare but potentially life-threatening. Many serious ADRs that occur in man are unpredictable from routine pathology and clinical chemistry in laboratory animals and are therefore poorly understood. The drug metabolist can determine the propensity of a novel chemical entity to either accumulate in the hepatocyte or undergo bioactivation in numerous model systems, from expressed enzymes, genetically engineered cells to whole animals. Bioactivation can be measured using trapping experiments with model nucleophiles or by measurement of non-specific covalent binding. The chemistry of the process is defined and the medicinal chemist can address the issue by seeking a metabolically stable pharmacophore to replace the potential toxicophore. However, we require a more fundamental understanding of the role of drug chemistry and biochemistry in ADRs. This requires knowledge of the ultimate toxin, signalling in cell defense and the sequence of molecular events, which ultimately lead to cell and tissue damage. It is imperative that such studies have a clinical level, but then translated into laboratory-based molecular studies. This will provide a deeper understanding of potential toxicophores for drug design and define candidate genes for pharmacogenomic approaches to individualized medicines.

  14. The tuberculosis drug discovery and development pipeline and emerging drug targets.

    PubMed

    Mdluli, Khisimuzi; Kaneko, Takushi; Upton, Anna

    2015-06-01

    The recent accelerated approval for use in extensively drug-resistant and multidrug-resistant-tuberculosis (MDR-TB) of two first-in-class TB drugs, bedaquiline and delamanid, has reinvigorated the TB drug discovery and development field. However, although several promising clinical development programs are ongoing to evaluate new TB drugs and regimens, the number of novel series represented is few. The global early-development pipeline is also woefully thin. To have a chance of achieving the goal of better, shorter, safer TB drug regimens with utility against drug-sensitive and drug-resistant disease, a robust and diverse global TB drug discovery pipeline is key, including innovative approaches that make use of recently acquired knowledge on the biology of TB. Fortunately, drug discovery for TB has resurged in recent years, generating compounds with varying potential for progression into developable leads. In parallel, advances have been made in understanding TB pathogenesis. It is now possible to apply the lessons learned from recent TB hit generation efforts and newly validated TB drug targets to generate the next wave of TB drug leads. Use of currently underexploited sources of chemical matter and lead-optimization strategies may also improve the efficiency of future TB drug discovery. Novel TB drug regimens with shorter treatment durations must target all subpopulations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis existing in an infection, including those responsible for the protracted TB treatment duration. This review summarizes the current TB drug development pipeline and proposes strategies for generating improved hits and leads in the discovery phase that could help achieve this goal. PMID:25635061

  15. Operant avoidance learning in crayfish, Orconectes rusticus: Computational ethology and the development of an automated learning paradigm.

    PubMed

    Bhimani, Rohan; Huber, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Research in crustaceans offers a valuable perspective for studying the neural implementation of conserved behavioral phenomena, including motivation, escape, aggression, and drug-sensitive reward. The present work adds to this literature by demonstrating that crayfish successfully learn to respond to spatially contingent cues. An integrated video-tracking system automatically delivered a mild electric shock when a test animal entered or remained on a substrate paired with punishment. Following a few instances of shock delivery, crayfish quickly learned to avoid these areas. Comparable changes in substrate preference were not exhibited by yoked controls, but locomotion differed significantly from both pre-conditioning levels and from those of their masters receiving shock in a contingent fashion. The results of this work provide valuable insights into the principles governing avoidance learning in an invertebrate system and provide a behavioral template for exploring the neural changes during associative learning. Serving as a case study, this project introduces a new computer framework for the automated control of learning paradigms. Based on routines contained within the JavaGrinders library (free download at iEthology.com), it integrates real-time video tracking with robotic interfaces, and provides a suitable framework for implementing automated learning paradigms.

  16. Operant avoidance learning in crayfish, Orconectes rusticus: Computational ethology and the development of an automated learning paradigm.

    PubMed

    Bhimani, Rohan; Huber, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Research in crustaceans offers a valuable perspective for studying the neural implementation of conserved behavioral phenomena, including motivation, escape, aggression, and drug-sensitive reward. The present work adds to this literature by demonstrating that crayfish successfully learn to respond to spatially contingent cues. An integrated video-tracking system automatically delivered a mild electric shock when a test animal entered or remained on a substrate paired with punishment. Following a few instances of shock delivery, crayfish quickly learned to avoid these areas. Comparable changes in substrate preference were not exhibited by yoked controls, but locomotion differed significantly from both pre-conditioning levels and from those of their masters receiving shock in a contingent fashion. The results of this work provide valuable insights into the principles governing avoidance learning in an invertebrate system and provide a behavioral template for exploring the neural changes during associative learning. Serving as a case study, this project introduces a new computer framework for the automated control of learning paradigms. Based on routines contained within the JavaGrinders library (free download at iEthology.com), it integrates real-time video tracking with robotic interfaces, and provides a suitable framework for implementing automated learning paradigms. PMID:26542703

  17. Magneto-inductive skin sensor for robot collision avoidance: A new development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chauhan, D. S.; Dehoff, Paul H.

    1989-01-01

    Safety is a primary concern for robots operating in space. The tri-mode sensor addresses that concern by employing a collision avoidance/management skin around the robot arms. This rf-based skin sensor is at present a dual mode (proximity and tactile). The third mode, pyroelectric, will complement the other two. The proximity mode permits the robot to sense an intruding object, to range the object, and to detect the edges of the object. The tactile mode permits the robot to sense when it has contacted an object, where on the arm it has made contact, and provides a three-dimensional image of the shape of the contact impression. The pyroelectric mode will be added to permit the robot arm to detect the proximity of a hot object and to add sensing redundancy to the two other modes. The rf-modes of the sensing skin are presented. These modes employ a highly efficient magnetic material (amorphous metal) in a sensing technique. This results in a flexible sensor array which uses a primarily inductive configuration to permit both capacitive and magnetoinductive sensing of object; thus optimizing performance in both proximity and tactile modes with the same sensing skin. The fundamental operating principles, design particulars, and theoretical models are provided to aid in the description and understanding of this sensor. Test results are also given.

  18. Attempts to develop radioactive anticancer drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.S.; Brown, I.; Chir, B.; Carpenter, R.N.

    1983-01-01

    Since 1953, attempts have been made to develop radioactive drugs. Preparations of tritiated menadiol sodium diphosphate (T-MNDP) of high specific activity showed a definite, though limited, but sometimes useful effect in the treatment of certain patients with advanced tumors, especially adenocarcinoma of the colon and of the pancreas and malignant melanoma of the skin. The next step was to use a much more effective isotope. 6-/sup 125/I-iodo-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinol bis (diammonium phosphate) - abbreviated 6-/sup 125/I-iodo-MNDP - has been synthesized, and in laboratory studies appears more promising. /sup 125/I provides radiations which behave predominately like high LET radiation, despite the accompanying X and gamma radiations. The astatine analogue, 6-/sup 211/At-astato-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinol bis (disodium phosphate) has also been synthesized. Confirming and greatly extending the earlier findings with T-MNDP, in vitro experiments showed that 6-/sup 125/I-iodo-MNDP is concentrated selectively in the cells of some human malignant tumors by a factor of about 15 to 20 or more in relation to the cells of normal origin that were studied. Macrodosimetric considerations and comparison with clinical treatments with T-MNDP suggest practical dosage. A typical treatment for a patient of body weight 70 kg with localized inoperable carcinoma of the colon could be 8 intravenous injections each of approximately 120mCi of 6-/sup 125/I-iodo-MNDP to a toal of 0.97 Ci in 25 days. Risks of late carcinogenesis and leukemogenesis are calculated to be less than 1%. Clinical indications are discussed briefly. Animal experiments are in progress and further preclinical studies are required.

  19. TB drug development: immunology at the table

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, Carl; Barry, Clifton E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Our understanding of the host-pathogen relationship in tuberculosis can help guide tuberculosis (TB) drug discovery in at least two ways. First, the recognition that host immunopathology affects lesional TB drug distribution means that pharmacokinetic evaluation of drug candidates needs to move beyond measurements of drug levels in blood, whole lungs or alveolar epithelial lining fluid to include measurements in specific types of lesions. Second, by restricting the replication of M. tuberculosis (Mtb) subpopulations in latent TB infection and in active disease, the host immune response puts Mtb into a state associated with phenotypic tolerance to TB drugs selected for their activity against replicating Mtb. This has spurred a major effort to conduct high throughput screens in vitro for compounds that can kill Mtb when it is replicating slowly if at all. Each condition used in vitro to slow Mtb’s replication and thereby model the phenotypically drug-tolerant state has advantages and disadvantages. Lead candidates emerging from such in vitro studies face daunting challenges in the design of proof-of-concept studies in animal models. Moreover, some non-replicating subpopulations of Mtb fail to resume replication when plated on agar, although their viability is demonstrable by other means. There is as yet no widely replicated assay in which to screen compounds for their ability to kill this ‘viable but non-culturable’ subpopulation. Despite these hurdles, drugs that can kill slowly replicating or non-replicating Mtb may offer our best hope for treatment-shortening combination chemotherapy of TB. PMID:25703568

  20. Open source drug discovery--a new paradigm of collaborative research in tuberculosis drug development.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Anshu; Scaria, Vinod; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh; Lynn, Andrew Michael; Chandra, Nagasuma; Banerjee, Sulagna; Raghunandanan, Muthukurussi V; Pandey, Vikas; Taneja, Bhupesh; Yadav, Jyoti; Dash, Debasis; Bhattacharya, Jaijit; Misra, Amit; Kumar, Anil; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Thomas, Zakir; Brahmachari, Samir K

    2011-09-01

    It is being realized that the traditional closed-door and market driven approaches for drug discovery may not be the best suited model for the diseases of the developing world such as tuberculosis and malaria, because most patients suffering from these diseases have poor paying capacity. To ensure that new drugs are created for patients suffering from these diseases, it is necessary to formulate an alternate paradigm of drug discovery process. The current model constrained by limitations for collaboration and for sharing of resources with confidentiality hampers the opportunities for bringing expertise from diverse fields. These limitations hinder the possibilities of lowering the cost of drug discovery. The Open Source Drug Discovery project initiated by Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, India has adopted an open source model to power wide participation across geographical borders. Open Source Drug Discovery emphasizes integrative science through collaboration, open-sharing, taking up multi-faceted approaches and accruing benefits from advances on different fronts of new drug discovery. Because the open source model is based on community participation, it has the potential to self-sustain continuous development by generating a storehouse of alternatives towards continued pursuit for new drug discovery. Since the inventions are community generated, the new chemical entities developed by Open Source Drug Discovery will be taken up for clinical trial in a non-exclusive manner by participation of multiple companies with majority funding from Open Source Drug Discovery. This will ensure availability of drugs through a lower cost community driven drug discovery process for diseases afflicting people with poor paying capacity. Hopefully what LINUX the World Wide Web have done for the information technology, Open Source Drug Discovery will do for drug discovery.

  1. The Evolution of Drug Development in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, William T; Koenig, James I

    2008-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a disease syndrome with major public health implications. The primary advance in pharmacotherapeutics was in 1952 with the introduction of antipsychotic medications (ie, chlorpromazine, dopamine D2 antagonism). Barriers to progress have been substantial, but many will be subject to rapid change based on current knowledge. There are attractive psychopathology indications for drug discovery (eg, impaired cognition and negative symptoms), and drugs with efficacy in these domains may have application across a number of disease classes. These pathologies are observed prior to psychosis raising the possibility of very early intervention and secondary prevention. Success in drug discovery for cognition and negative symptom pathologies may bring forth issues in ethics as the potential for enhancing normal function is explored. PMID:18046305

  2. CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference White Paper.

    PubMed

    Levin, Victor A; Tonge, Peter J; Gallo, James M; Birtwistle, Marc R; Dar, Arvin C; Iavarone, Antonio; Paddison, Patrick J; Heffron, Timothy P; Elmquist, William F; Lachowicz, Jean E; Johnson, Ted W; White, Forest M; Sul, Joohee; Smith, Quentin R; Shen, Wang; Sarkaria, Jann N; Samala, Ramakrishna; Wen, Patrick Y; Berry, Donald A; Petter, Russell C

    2015-11-01

    Following the first CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference, the speakers from the first 4 sessions and organizers of the conference created this White Paper hoping to stimulate more and better CNS anticancer drug discovery and development. The first part of the White Paper reviews, comments, and, in some cases, expands on the 4 session areas critical to new drug development: pharmacological challenges, recent drug approaches, drug targets and discovery, and clinical paths. Following this concise review of the science and clinical aspects of new CNS anticancer drug discovery and development, we discuss, under the rubric "Accelerating Drug Discovery and Development for Brain Tumors," further reasons why the pharmaceutical industry and academia have failed to develop new anticancer drugs for CNS malignancies and what it will take to change the current status quo and develop the drugs so desperately needed by our patients with malignant CNS tumors. While this White Paper is not a formal roadmap to that end, it should be an educational guide to clinicians and scientists to help move a stagnant field forward.

  3. COMPUTER-AIDED DRUG DISCOVERY AND DEVELOPMENT (CADDD): in silico-chemico-biological approach

    PubMed Central

    Kapetanovic, I.M.

    2008-01-01

    It is generally recognized that drug discovery and development are very time and resources consuming processes. There is an ever growing effort to apply computational power to the combined chemical and biological space in order to streamline drug discovery, design, development and optimization. In biomedical arena, computer-aided or in silico design is being utilized to expedite and facilitate hit identification, hit-to-lead selection, optimize the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity profile and avoid safety issues. Commonly used computational approaches include ligand-based drug design (pharmacophore, a 3-D spatial arrangement of chemical features essential for biological activity), structure-based drug design (drug-target docking), and quantitative structure-activity and quantitative structure-property relationships. Regulatory agencies as well as pharmaceutical industry are actively involved in development of computational tools that will improve effectiveness and efficiency of drug discovery and development process, decrease use of animals, and increase predictability. It is expected that the power of CADDD will grow as the technology continues to evolve. PMID:17229415

  4. Neurophysiological biomarkers for drug development in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Javitt, Daniel C.; Spencer, Kevin M.; Thaker, Gunvant K.; Winterer, Georg; Hajós, Mihály

    2009-01-01

    Schizophrenia represents a pervasive deficit in brain function, leading to hallucinations and delusions, social withdrawal and a decline in cognitive performance. As the underlying genetic and neuronal abnormalities in schizophrenia are largely unknown, it is challenging to measure the severity of its symptoms objectively, or to design and evaluate psychotherapeutic interventions. Recent advances in neurophysiological techniques provide new opportunities to measure abnormal brain functions in patients with schizophrenia and to compare these with drug-induced alterations. Moreover, many of these neurophysiological processes are phylogenetically conserved and can be modelled in preclinical studies, offering unique opportunities for use as translational biomarkers in schizophrenia drug discovery. PMID:18064038

  5. Optimizing drug development of anti-cancer drugs in children using modelling and simulation

    PubMed Central

    van Hasselt, Johan GC; van Eijkelenburg, Natasha KA; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan HM; Huitema, Alwin DR

    2013-01-01

    Modelling and simulation (M&S)-based approaches have been proposed to support paediatric drug development in order to design and analyze clinical studies efficiently. Development of anti-cancer drugs in the paediatric population is particularly challenging due to ethical and practical constraints. We aimed to review the application of M&S in the development of anti-cancer drugs in the paediatric population, and to identify where M&S-based approaches could provide additional support in paediatric drug development of anti-cancer drugs. A structured literature search on PubMed was performed. The majority of identified M&S-based studies aimed to use population PK modelling approaches to identify determinants of inter-individual variability, in order to optimize dosing regimens and to develop therapeutic drug monitoring strategies. Prospective applications of M&S approaches for PK-bridging studies have scarcely been reported for paediatric oncology. Based on recent developments of M&S in drug development there are several opportunities where M&S could support more informative bridging between children and adults, and increase efficiency of the design and analysis of paediatric clinical trials, which should ultimately lead to further optimization of drug treatment strategies in this population. PMID:23216601

  6. Drugs in the Workplace: Legal Developments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholick, Gary P.

    1989-01-01

    An update on legal aspects of drug testing in the workplace looks at pre-employment screening, reasonable suspicion testing, routine testing in periodic physical examinations, random testing, and unionized employers. Practical guidelines are given for minimizing obtrusiveness, confirmatory tests, laboratory selection, notification of policy,…

  7. Rethinking the paradigm for the development of inhaled drugs.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, John N

    2015-12-30

    Nebulized treatment is an important delivery option for the young, elderly, and those with severe chronic respiratory disease, but there is a lack of new nebulized drug products being produced for these patients, leading to the potential for under-treatment. This communication describes a new drug development paradigm as a timely solution to this issue. Often, drug development is initiated with nebulizers in the early stages, to provide cheaper and faster drug development, and then switched to inhaler devices in later clinical trials to address the majority of patients. However, the waste of resource on parallel development of the inhaler can be large due to the high early attrition rate of new drug development. The new paradigm uses the nebulizer to continue drug development through to market, and initiates inhaler development after completion of the riskier early phase studies. New drug safety and efficacy can be assessed faster and more efficiently by using a nebulized formulation rather than developing an inhaler. The results of calculations of expected net present value showed that the new paradigm produced higher expected net present values than the conventional model over a range of economic scenarios. This new paradigm could therefore provide improved returns on investments, as well as more modern drugs in nebulized form for those patients unable to use inhalers. PMID:26475968

  8. Communicating to Influence Drug Development and Regulatory Decisions: A Tutorial.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, S; Gobburu, J

    2016-04-01

    Pharmacometricians require three skills to be influential: technical, business (e.g., drug development), and soft skills (e.g., communication). Effective communication is required to translate technical and often complicated quantitative findings to interdisciplinary team members in order to influence drug development or regulatory decisions. In this tutorial, we highlight important aspects related to communicating pharmacometric analysis to influence decisions. PMID:27299706

  9. Nano-formulations of drugs: Recent developments, impact and challenges.

    PubMed

    Jeevanandam, Jaison; Chan, Yen San; Danquah, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Nano-formulations of medicinal drugs have attracted the interest of many researchers for drug delivery applications. These nano-formulations enhance the properties of conventional drugs and are specific to the targeted delivery site. Dendrimers, polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes, nano-emulsions and micelles are some of the nano-formulations that are gaining prominence in pharmaceutical industry for enhanced drug formulation. Wide varieties of synthesis methods are available for the preparation of nano-formulations to deliver drugs in biological system. The choice of synthesis methods depend on the size and shape of particulate formulation, biochemical properties of drug, and the targeted site. This article discusses recent developments in nano-formulation and the progressive impact on pharmaceutical research and industries. Additionally, process challenges relating to consistent generation of nano-formulations for drug delivery are discussed. PMID:27436182

  10. Nano-formulations of drugs: Recent developments, impact and challenges.

    PubMed

    Jeevanandam, Jaison; Chan, Yen San; Danquah, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Nano-formulations of medicinal drugs have attracted the interest of many researchers for drug delivery applications. These nano-formulations enhance the properties of conventional drugs and are specific to the targeted delivery site. Dendrimers, polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes, nano-emulsions and micelles are some of the nano-formulations that are gaining prominence in pharmaceutical industry for enhanced drug formulation. Wide varieties of synthesis methods are available for the preparation of nano-formulations to deliver drugs in biological system. The choice of synthesis methods depend on the size and shape of particulate formulation, biochemical properties of drug, and the targeted site. This article discusses recent developments in nano-formulation and the progressive impact on pharmaceutical research and industries. Additionally, process challenges relating to consistent generation of nano-formulations for drug delivery are discussed.

  11. Current status of orphan disease drug development.

    PubMed

    Thoene, J G

    1994-04-01

    The Orphan Drug Act has successfully stimulated the production of many orphan products for a number of orphan diseases. The success of its exclusive marketing provision in bringing otherwise unprofitable products to market has attracted the attention of manufacturers who use this provision to gain a monopoly for products with much larger annual sales than were contemplated by the original legislation. Corrective legislation to close this loophole is being prepared for introduction to Congress.

  12. Developing an effective generic prescription drug program.

    PubMed

    Jones, John D

    2003-01-01

    Pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) use a variety of pricing strategies. When employers have a thorough knowledge of those strategies, they can use them to their advantage to help manage pharmacy benefits. This article discusses PBM strategies in terms of what employers need to know, the questions employers need to ask and goals employers must keep in mind in order to secure the affordable cost and quality prescription drug management programs that they and their employees need and deserve.

  13. UAS Integration into the NAS: Detect and Avoid Display Evaluations in Support of SC-228 MOPS Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fern, Lisa; Rorie, Conrad; Shively, Jay

    2015-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the work the Human Systems Integration (HSI) sub-project has done on detect and avoid (DAA) displays while working on the UAS Integration into the NAS project. Much of the work has been used to support the ongoing development of minimum operational performance standards (MOPS) for UAS by RTCA Special Committee 228. The design and results of three different human-in-the-loop simulations are discussed, with particular emphasis on the role of the UAS pilot in the Self Separation Timeline.

  14. Multiscale Modeling in the Clinic: Drug Design and Development.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Colleen E; An, Gary; Cannon, William R; Liu, Yaling; May, Elebeoba E; Ortoleva, Peter; Popel, Aleksander S; Sluka, James P; Su, Jing; Vicini, Paolo; Zhou, Xiaobo; Eckmann, David M

    2016-09-01

    A wide range of length and time scales are relevant to pharmacology, especially in drug development, drug design and drug delivery. Therefore, multiscale computational modeling and simulation methods and paradigms that advance the linkage of phenomena occurring at these multiple scales have become increasingly important. Multiscale approaches present in silico opportunities to advance laboratory research to bedside clinical applications in pharmaceuticals research. This is achievable through the capability of modeling to reveal phenomena occurring across multiple spatial and temporal scales, which are not otherwise readily accessible to experimentation. The resultant models, when validated, are capable of making testable predictions to guide drug design and delivery. In this review we describe the goals, methods, and opportunities of multiscale modeling in drug design and development. We demonstrate the impact of multiple scales of modeling in this field. We indicate the common mathematical and computational techniques employed for multiscale modeling approaches used in pharmacometric and systems pharmacology models in drug development and present several examples illustrating the current state-of-the-art models for (1) excitable systems and applications in cardiac disease; (2) stem cell driven complex biosystems; (3) nanoparticle delivery, with applications to angiogenesis and cancer therapy; (4) host-pathogen interactions and their use in metabolic disorders, inflammation and sepsis; and (5) computer-aided design of nanomedical systems. We conclude with a focus on barriers to successful clinical translation of drug development, drug design and drug delivery multiscale models. PMID:26885640

  15. Multiscale Modeling in the Clinic: Drug Design and Development.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Colleen E; An, Gary; Cannon, William R; Liu, Yaling; May, Elebeoba E; Ortoleva, Peter; Popel, Aleksander S; Sluka, James P; Su, Jing; Vicini, Paolo; Zhou, Xiaobo; Eckmann, David M

    2016-09-01

    A wide range of length and time scales are relevant to pharmacology, especially in drug development, drug design and drug delivery. Therefore, multiscale computational modeling and simulation methods and paradigms that advance the linkage of phenomena occurring at these multiple scales have become increasingly important. Multiscale approaches present in silico opportunities to advance laboratory research to bedside clinical applications in pharmaceuticals research. This is achievable through the capability of modeling to reveal phenomena occurring across multiple spatial and temporal scales, which are not otherwise readily accessible to experimentation. The resultant models, when validated, are capable of making testable predictions to guide drug design and delivery. In this review we describe the goals, methods, and opportunities of multiscale modeling in drug design and development. We demonstrate the impact of multiple scales of modeling in this field. We indicate the common mathematical and computational techniques employed for multiscale modeling approaches used in pharmacometric and systems pharmacology models in drug development and present several examples illustrating the current state-of-the-art models for (1) excitable systems and applications in cardiac disease; (2) stem cell driven complex biosystems; (3) nanoparticle delivery, with applications to angiogenesis and cancer therapy; (4) host-pathogen interactions and their use in metabolic disorders, inflammation and sepsis; and (5) computer-aided design of nanomedical systems. We conclude with a focus on barriers to successful clinical translation of drug development, drug design and drug delivery multiscale models.

  16. Pulmonary drug delivery systems: recent developments and prospects.

    PubMed

    Courrier, H M; Butz, N; Vandamme, Th F

    2002-01-01

    Targeting drug delivery into the lungs has become one of the most important aspects of systemic or local drug delivery systems. Consequently, in the last few years, techniques and new drug delivery devices intended to deliver drugs into the lungs have been widely developed. Currently, the main drug targeting regimens include direct application of a drug into the lungs, mostly by inhalation therapy using either pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDI) or dry powder inhalers (DPI). Intratracheal administration is commonly used as a first approach in lung drug delivery in vivo. To convey a sufficient dose of drug to the lungs, suitable drug carriers are required. These can be either solid, liquid, or gaseous excipients. Liposomes, nano- and microparticles, cyclodextrins, microemulsions, micelles, suspensions, or solutions are all examples of this type of pharmaceutical carrier that have been successfully used to target drugs into the lungs. The use of microreservoir-type systems offers clear advantages, such as high loading capacity and the possibility of controlling size and permeability, and thus of controlling the release kinetics of the drugs from the carrier systems. These systems make it possible to use relatively small numbers of vector molecules to deliver substantial amounts of a drug to the target. This review discusses the drug carriers administered or intended to be administered into the lungs. The transition to CFC-free inhalers and drug delivery systems formulated with new propellants are also discussed. Finally, in addition to the various advances made in the field of pulmonary-route administration, we describe new systems based on perfluorooctyl bromide, which guarantee oxygen delivery in the event of respiratory distress and drug delivery into the lungs.

  17. Problems in Staff and Educational Development Leadership: Solving, Framing, and Avoiding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackmore, Paul; Wilson, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of interviews using critical incident technique with a sample of leaders in staff and educational development in higher education institutions reveals a limited use of classical problem-solving approaches. However, many leaders are able to articulate ways in which they frame problems. Framing has to do with goals, which may be complex,…

  18. Recent Developments in Intellectual Property Law: Avoiding Traps in the Pursuit of University Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garabedian, Todd E.

    2004-01-01

    U.S. patent laws have undergone many changes in recent years, both through Congress and the courts. This article summarizes recent developments relating to judicial decisions, legislative initiatives, and patent office policy, and provides some practical advice relating to administration of intellectual property. As illustrated by the latest…

  19. Pharmacogenomics in clinical drug development and potential for alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Warner, Amelia W

    2013-12-01

    Alopecia areata, alopecia totalis, and alopecia universalis likely represent a constellation of related diseases with similar, yet distinct heritability markers. There is currently no known curative therapy that works universally for all patients. Pharmacogenomic research enables the pharmaceutical industry to understand variability of patient responses to drugs during clinical drug development and during post-marketing surveillance. Understanding the genetic basis for patient response/non-response can enable the development of individualized therapies for those patients with an inherited basis for altered response to drug therapy. There are multiple examples of drugs that now contain a recommendation for genetic testing before dosing in their drug labels, directing clinicians to obtain genetic information for each individual patient in order to help direct drug therapy. PMID:24326549

  20. [Strategies for pharmaceutical research and development. II. Generic drugs].

    PubMed

    Kuchar, M

    1996-07-01

    When the patent protection is terminated, the original registered-mark preparation becomes a generic drug, which results in a decrease in its price as compared with the original pharmaceutical. The effects of changes in price relation are discussed from the viewpoint of the generic firms and the manufacturers of original preparations. The differences in the insurance system and legislative regulations of the registration of generic preparations can markedly the size influence of the share of generic drugs in the total consumption of drugs. The future development of generic drugs from a general viewpoint is discussed in relation to the contemporary extensive expiration of patent protection of drugs. The hitherto results are summed up and the topics for the present strategy of the development of generic drugs in the Research Institute for Pharmacy and Biochemistry, or in the Czech Republic, respectively are discussed.

  1. Liposomes and nanotechnology in drug development: focus on ocular targets.

    PubMed

    Honda, Miki; Asai, Tomohiro; Oku, Naoto; Araki, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Minoru; Ebihara, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Poor drug delivery to lesions in patients' eyes is a major obstacle to the treatment of ocular diseases. The accessibility of these areas to drugs is highly restricted by the presence of barriers, including the corneal barrier, aqueous barrier, and the inner and outer blood-retinal barriers. In particular, the posterior segment is difficult to reach for drugs because of its structural peculiarities. This review discusses various barriers to drug delivery and provides comprehensive information for designing nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery systems for the treatment of ocular diseases. Nanoparticles can be designed to improve penetration, controlled release, and drug targeting. As highlighted in this review, the therapeutic efficacy of drugs in ocular diseases has been reported to be enhanced by the use of nanoparticles such as liposomes, micro/nanospheres, microemulsions, and dendrimers. Our recent data show that intravitreal injection of targeted liposomes encapsulating an angiogenesis inhibitor caused significantly greater suppression of choroidal neovascularization than did the injection of free drug. Recent progress in ocular drug delivery systems research has provided new insights into drug development, and the use of nanoparticles for drug delivery is thus a promising approach for advanced therapy of ocular diseases. PMID:23439842

  2. Defining "innovativeness" in drug development: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kesselheim, A S; Wang, B; Avorn, J

    2013-09-01

    Some observers of drug development argue that the pace of pharmaceutical innovation is declining, but others deny that contention. This controversy may be due to different methods of defining and assessing innovation. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to develop a taxonomy of methods for measuring innovation in drug development. The 42 studies fell into four main categories: counts of new drugs approved, assessments of therapeutic value, economic outcomes, and patents issued. The definition determined whether a study found a positive or negative trend in innovative drug development. Of 21 studies that relied on counts, 9 (43%) concluded that the trend for drug discovery was favorable, 11 (52%) concluded that the trend was not favorable, and 1 reached no conclusion. By contrast, of 21 studies that used other measures of innovation, 0 concluded that the trend was favorable, 8 (47%) concluded that the trend was not favorable, and 13 reached no conclusion (P = 0.03).

  3. A comprehensive study on regulatory requirements for development and filing of generic drugs globally

    PubMed Central

    Handoo, Shweta; Arora, Vandana; Khera, Deepak; Nandi, Prafulla Kumar; Sahu, Susanta Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The regulatory requirements of various countries of the world vary from each other. Therefore, it is challenging for the companies to develop a single drug which can be simultaneously submitted in all the countries for approval. The regulatory strategy for product development is essentially to be established before commencement of developmental work in order to avoid major surprises after submission of the application. The role of the regulatory authorities is to ensure the quality, safety, and efficacy of all medicines in circulation in their country. It not only includes the process of regulating and monitoring the drugs but also the process of manufacturing, distribution, and promotion of it. One of the primary challenges for regulatory authority is to ensure that the pharmaceutical products are developed as per the regulatory requirement of that country. This process involves the assessment of critical parameters during product development. PMID:23373001

  4. A comprehensive study on regulatory requirements for development and filing of generic drugs globally.

    PubMed

    Handoo, Shweta; Arora, Vandana; Khera, Deepak; Nandi, Prafulla Kumar; Sahu, Susanta Kumar

    2012-07-01

    The regulatory requirements of various countries of the world vary from each other. Therefore, it is challenging for the companies to develop a single drug which can be simultaneously submitted in all the countries for approval. The regulatory strategy for product development is essentially to be established before commencement of developmental work in order to avoid major surprises after submission of the application. The role of the regulatory authorities is to ensure the quality, safety, and efficacy of all medicines in circulation in their country. It not only includes the process of regulating and monitoring the drugs but also the process of manufacturing, distribution, and promotion of it. One of the primary challenges for regulatory authority is to ensure that the pharmaceutical products are developed as per the regulatory requirement of that country. This process involves the assessment of critical parameters during product development.

  5. Shade Avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Casal, Jorge J.

    2012-01-01

    The presence of neighboring vegetation modifies the light environment experienced by plants, generating signals that are perceived by phytochromes and cryptochromes. These signals cause large changes in plant body form and function, including enhanced growth of the hypocotyl and petioles, a more erect position of the leaves and early flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana. Collectively, these so-called shade-avoidance responses tend to reduce the degree of current or future shade by neighbors. Shade light signals increase the abundance of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4) and PIF5 proteins, promote the synthesis and redirection of auxin, favor the degradation of DELLA proteins and increase the expression of auxin, gibberellins and brassinosteroid-promoted genes, among other events downstream the photoreceptors. Selectively disrupting these events by genetic or pharmacological approaches affects shade-avoidance responses with an intensity that depends on the developmental context and the environment. Shade-avoidance responses provide a model to investigate the signaling networks used by plants to take advantage of the cues provided by the environment to adjust to the challenges imposed by the environment itself. PMID:22582029

  6. Ethanol inducible expression of a mesophilic cellulase avoids adverse effects on plant development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant-produced biomass-degrading enzymes are promising tools for the processing of lignocellulose to fermentable sugars. A major limitation of in planta production is that high-level expression of such enzymes could potentially affect the structure and integrity of the plant cell wall and negatively influence plant growth and development. Results Here, we evaluate the impact on tobacco plant development of constitutive versus alcohol-inducible expression of the endoglucanase TrCel5A from the mesophilic fungus Trichoderma reesei. Using this system, we are able to demonstrate that constitutive expression of the enzyme, controlled by the doubled Cauliflower Mosaic Virus promoter, leads to lower cellulose content of the plant combined with severe effects on plant growth. However, using an alcohol-inducible expression of the endoglucanase in the plant leaves, we achieved similar enzymatic expression levels with no changes in the crystalline cellulose content. Conclusion We were able to produce significant amounts of cellulase in the plant leaves without detrimental effects to plant development. These results demonstrate the potential feasibility of an inducible expression system for producing biomass degrading enzymes in plants. PMID:23587418

  7. Single cell analytic tools for drug discovery and development

    PubMed Central

    Heath, James R.; Ribas, Antoni; Mischel, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    The genetic, functional, or compositional heterogeneity of healthy and diseased tissues presents major challenges in drug discovery and development.1-3 In cancers, heterogeneity may be essential for tumor stability,4 but its precise role in tumor biology is poorly resolved. This challenges the design of accurate disease models for use in drug development, and can confound the interpretation of biomarker levels, and of patient responses to specific therapies. The complex nature of heterogeneous tissues has motivated the development of tools for single cell genomic, transcriptomic, and multiplex proteomic analysis. We review these tools, assess their advantages and limitations, and explore their potential applications in drug discovery and development. PMID:26669673

  8. Exploring the ocean for new drug developments: Marine pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Malve, Harshad

    2016-01-01

    Disease ailments are changing the patterns, and the new diseases are emerging due to changing environments. The enormous growth of world population has overburdened the existing resources for the drugs. And hence, the drug manufacturers are always on the lookout for new resources to develop effective and safe drugs for the increasing demands of the world population. Seventy-five percentage of earth's surface is covered by water but research into the pharmacology of marine organisms is limited, and most of it still remains unexplored. Marine environment represents countless and diverse resource for new drugs to combat major diseases such as cancer or malaria. It also offers an ecological resource comprising a variety of aquatic plants and animals. These aquatic organisms are screened for antibacterial, immunomodulator, anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antimicrobial, neuroprotective, analgesic, and antimalarial properties. They are used for new drug developments extensively across the world. Marine pharmacology offers the scope for research on these drugs of marine origin. Few institutes in India offer such opportunities which can help us in the quest for new drugs. This is an extensive review of the drugs developed and the potential new drug candidates from marine origin along with the opportunities for research on marine derived products. It also gives the information about the institutes in India which offer marine pharmacology related courses. PMID:27134458

  9. Exploring the ocean for new drug developments: Marine pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Malve, Harshad

    2016-01-01

    Disease ailments are changing the patterns, and the new diseases are emerging due to changing environments. The enormous growth of world population has overburdened the existing resources for the drugs. And hence, the drug manufacturers are always on the lookout for new resources to develop effective and safe drugs for the increasing demands of the world population. Seventy-five percentage of earth's surface is covered by water but research into the pharmacology of marine organisms is limited, and most of it still remains unexplored. Marine environment represents countless and diverse resource for new drugs to combat major diseases such as cancer or malaria. It also offers an ecological resource comprising a variety of aquatic plants and animals. These aquatic organisms are screened for antibacterial, immunomodulator, anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antimicrobial, neuroprotective, analgesic, and antimalarial properties. They are used for new drug developments extensively across the world. Marine pharmacology offers the scope for research on these drugs of marine origin. Few institutes in India offer such opportunities which can help us in the quest for new drugs. This is an extensive review of the drugs developed and the potential new drug candidates from marine origin along with the opportunities for research on marine derived products. It also gives the information about the institutes in India which offer marine pharmacology related courses. PMID:27134458

  10. Risk assessment and mitigation strategies for reactive metabolites in drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Richard A; Isin, Emre M; Li, Yan; Weaver, Richard; Weidolf, Lars; Wilson, Ian; Claesson, Alf; Page, Ken; Dolgos, Hugues; Kenna, J Gerry

    2011-06-30

    Drug toxicity is a leading cause of attrition of candidate drugs during drug development as well as of withdrawal of drugs post-licensing due to adverse drug reactions in man. These adverse drug reactions cause a broad range of clinically severe conditions including both highly reproducible and dose dependent toxicities as well as relatively infrequent and idiosyncratic adverse events. The underlying risk factors can be split into two groups: (1) drug-related and (2) patient-related. The drug-related risk factors include metabolic factors that determine the propensity of a molecule to form toxic reactive metabolites (RMs), and the RM and non-RM mediated mechanisms which cause cell and tissue injury. Patient related risk factors may vary markedly between individuals, and encompass genetic and non-genetic processes, e.g. environmental, that influence the disposition of drugs and their metabolites, the nature of the adverse responses elicited and the resulting biological consequences. We describe a new strategy, which builds upon the strategies used currently within numerous pharmaceutical companies to avoid and minimize RM formation during drug discovery, and that is intended to reduce the likelihood that candidate drugs will cause toxicity in the human population. The new strategy addresses drug-related safety hazards, but not patient-related risk factors. A common target organ of toxicity is the liver and to decrease the likelihood that candidate drugs will cause liver toxicity (both non-idiosyncratic and idiosyncratic), we propose use of an in vitro Hepatic Liability Panel alongside in vitro methods for the detection of RMs. This will enable design and selection of compounds in discovery that have reduced propensity to cause liver toxicity. In vitro Hepatic Liability is assessed using toxicity assays that quantify: CYP 450 dependent and CYP 450 independent cell toxicity; mitochondrial impairment; and inhibition of the Bile Salt Export Pump. Prior to progression

  11. Risk assessment and mitigation strategies for reactive metabolites in drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Richard A; Isin, Emre M; Li, Yan; Weaver, Richard; Weidolf, Lars; Wilson, Ian; Claesson, Alf; Page, Ken; Dolgos, Hugues; Kenna, J Gerry

    2011-06-30

    Drug toxicity is a leading cause of attrition of candidate drugs during drug development as well as of withdrawal of drugs post-licensing due to adverse drug reactions in man. These adverse drug reactions cause a broad range of clinically severe conditions including both highly reproducible and dose dependent toxicities as well as relatively infrequent and idiosyncratic adverse events. The underlying risk factors can be split into two groups: (1) drug-related and (2) patient-related. The drug-related risk factors include metabolic factors that determine the propensity of a molecule to form toxic reactive metabolites (RMs), and the RM and non-RM mediated mechanisms which cause cell and tissue injury. Patient related risk factors may vary markedly between individuals, and encompass genetic and non-genetic processes, e.g. environmental, that influence the disposition of drugs and their metabolites, the nature of the adverse responses elicited and the resulting biological consequences. We describe a new strategy, which builds upon the strategies used currently within numerous pharmaceutical companies to avoid and minimize RM formation during drug discovery, and that is intended to reduce the likelihood that candidate drugs will cause toxicity in the human population. The new strategy addresses drug-related safety hazards, but not patient-related risk factors. A common target organ of toxicity is the liver and to decrease the likelihood that candidate drugs will cause liver toxicity (both non-idiosyncratic and idiosyncratic), we propose use of an in vitro Hepatic Liability Panel alongside in vitro methods for the detection of RMs. This will enable design and selection of compounds in discovery that have reduced propensity to cause liver toxicity. In vitro Hepatic Liability is assessed using toxicity assays that quantify: CYP 450 dependent and CYP 450 independent cell toxicity; mitochondrial impairment; and inhibition of the Bile Salt Export Pump. Prior to progression

  12. A look into the cockpit of the developing locust: looming detectors and predator avoidance.

    PubMed

    Sztarker, Julieta; Rind, F Claire

    2014-11-01

    For many animals, the visual detection of looming stimuli is crucial at any stage of their lives. For example, human babies of only 6 days old display evasive responses to looming stimuli (Bower et al. [1971]: Percept Psychophys 9: 193-196). This means the neuronal pathways involved in looming detection should mature early in life. Locusts have been used extensively to examine the neural circuits and mechanisms involved in sensing looming stimuli and triggering visually evoked evasive actions, making them ideal subjects in which to investigate the development of looming sensitivity. Two lobula giant movement detectors (LGMD) neurons have been identified in the lobula region of the locust visual system: the LGMD1 neuron responds selectively to looming stimuli and provides information that contributes to evasive responses such as jumping and emergency glides. The LGMD2 responds to looming stimuli and shares many response properties with the LGMD1. Both neurons have only been described in the adult. In this study, we describe a practical method combining classical staining techniques and 3D neuronal reconstructions that can be used, even in small insects, to reveal detailed anatomy of individual neurons. We have used it to analyze the anatomy of the fan-shaped dendritic tree of the LGMD1 and the LGMD2 neurons in all stages of the post-embryonic development of Locusta migratoria. We also analyze changes seen during the ontogeny of escape behaviors triggered by looming stimuli, specially the hiding response.

  13. Are improper kinetic models hampering drug development?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Reproducibility of biological data is a significant problem in research today. One potential contributor to this, which has received little attention, is the over complication of enzyme kinetic inhibition models. The over complication of inhibitory models stems from the common use of the inhibitory term (1 + [I]/Ki), an equilibrium binding term that does not distinguish between inhibitor binding and inhibitory effect. Since its initial appearance in the literature, around a century ago, the perceived mechanistic methods used in its production have spurred countless inhibitory equations. These equations are overly complex and are seldom compared to each other, which has destroyed their usefulness resulting in the proliferation and regulatory acceptance of simpler models such as IC50s for drug characterization. However, empirical analysis of inhibitory data recognizing the clear distinctions between inhibitor binding and inhibitory effect can produce simple logical inhibition models. In contrast to the common divergent practice of generating new inhibitory models for every inhibitory situation that presents itself. The empirical approach to inhibition modeling presented here is broadly applicable allowing easy comparison and rational analysis of drug interactions. To demonstrate this, a simple kinetic model of DAPT, a compound that both activates and inhibits γ-secretase is examined using excel. The empirical kinetic method described here provides an improved way of probing disease mechanisms, expanding the investigation of possible therapeutic interventions. PMID:25374788

  14. How the Probability and Potential Clinical Significance of Pharmacokinetically Mediated Drug-Drug Interactions Are Assessed in Drug Development: Desvenlafaxine as an Example

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Alice I.; Preskorn, Sheldon H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The avoidance of adverse drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is a high priority in terms of both the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the individual prescriber. With this perspective in mind, this article illustrates the process for assessing the risk of a drug (example here being desvenlafaxine) causing or being the victim of DDIs, in accordance with FDA guidance. Data Sources/Study Selection: DDI studies for the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor desvenlafaxine conducted by the sponsor and published since 2009 are used as examples of the systematic way that the FDA requires drug developers to assess whether their new drug is either capable of causing clinically meaningful DDIs or being the victim of such DDIs. In total, 8 open-label studies tested the effects of steady-state treatment with desvenlafaxine (50–400 mg/d) on the pharmacokinetics of cytochrome (CYP) 2D6 and/or CYP 3A4 substrate drugs, or the effect of CYP 3A4 inhibition on desvenlafaxine pharmacokinetics. The potential for DDIs mediated by the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transporter was assessed in in vitro studies using Caco-2 monolayers. Data Extraction: Changes in area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC; CYP studies) and efflux (P-gp studies) were reviewed for potential DDIs in accordance with FDA criteria. Results: Desvenlafaxine coadministration had minimal effect on CYP 2D6 and/or 3A4 substrates per FDA criteria. Changes in AUC indicated either no interaction (90% confidence intervals for the ratio of AUC geometric least-squares means [GM] within 80%–125%) or weak inhibition (AUC GM ratio 125% to < 200%). Coadministration with ketoconazole resulted in a weak interaction with desvenlafaxine (AUC GM ratio of 143%). Desvenlafaxine was not a substrate (efflux ratio < 2) or inhibitor (50% inhibitory drug concentration values > 250 μM) of P-gp. Conclusions: A 2-step process based on FDA guidance can be used first to determine whether a pharmacokinetically mediated

  15. Genetically Engineered Mouse Models for Drug Development and Preclinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho

    2014-01-01

    Drug development and preclinical trials are challenging processes and more than 80% to 90% of drug candidates fail to gain approval from the United States Food and Drug Administration. Predictive and efficient tools are required to discover high quality targets and increase the probability of success in the process of new drug development. One such solution to the challenges faced in the development of new drugs and combination therapies is the use of low-cost and experimentally manageable in vivo animal models. Since the 1980’s, scientists have been able to genetically modify the mouse genome by removing or replacing a specific gene, which has improved the identification and validation of target genes of interest. Now genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) are widely used and have proved to be a powerful tool in drug discovery processes. This review particularly covers recent fascinating technologies for drug discovery and preclinical trials, targeted transgenesis and RNAi mouse, including application and combination of inducible system. Improvements in technologies and the development of new GEMMs are expected to guide future applications of these models to drug discovery and preclinical trials. PMID:25143803

  16. The paradigm shift to an "open" model in drug development.

    PubMed

    Au, Regina

    2014-12-01

    The rising cost of healthcare, the rising cost for drug development, the patent cliff for Big pharma, shorter patent protection, decrease reimbursement, and the recession have made it more difficult for the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry to develop drugs. Due to the unsustainable amount of time and money in developing a drug that will have a significant return on investment (ROI) it has become hard to sustain a robust pipeline. The industry is transforming its business model to meet these challenges. In essence a paradigm shift is occurring; the old "closed" model is giving way to a new "open" business model. PMID:27294020

  17. Do national medicinal drug policies and essential drug programs improve drug use?: a review of experiences in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Ratanawijitrasin, S; Soumerai, S B; Weerasuriya, K

    2001-10-01

    Increasing concerns regarding access to and appropriateness of medicinal drug use have led many governments in developing countries to develop national policies and regulations intended to increase the affordability, supply, safety, and rational use of pharmaceuticals. However, little is known about the intended and unintended impacts of these social experiments on actual drug use. We conducted a critical review and synthesis of the international literature in an attempt to define the current state of knowledge regarding drug policy effects on drug use, and to extract from the evidence important lessons for future policy and research. Literature sources included the archives and computerized databases, articles published in medical and pharmacy journals, as well as published annotated bibliographies. The evaluated interventions included three broad categories: (1) multi-component national drug policies including essential drug programs; (2) drug supply and cost-sharing programs; and (3) regulatory measures. Most of these studies utilized weak research designs that evaluated programs solely on the basis of post-intervention measures. Only two studies measured pre-policy utilization, but did not include a control group. Thus, none of the results are conclusive, and the findings represent, at best, hypotheses for more rigorous studies of policy impacts. Some suggestive findings include an association between increases in the supply of essential drugs (combined with training) and more appropriate use of medications in primary care settings. In addition, preliminary data suggest some unintended effects of de-registration of drugs or upward reclassification of specific medicines. Similarly, loosening restrictions have sometimes been accompanied by increased dispensing of specific drugs by unqualified personnel. The available studies focused only on a few categories of national and regulatory policies. Because of poor study design, the results do not provide valid data to

  18. Setting bioequivalence requirements for drug development based on preclinical data: optimizing oral drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Lipka, E; Amidon, G L

    1999-11-01

    The recently proposed Biopharmaceutics Classification System can be used to classify drugs and set standards for scale-up and post-approval changes as well as standards for in vitro/in vivo correlation for immediate and controlled release products. This classification scheme is based on determining the underlying process that is controlling the drug absorption rate and extent, namely, drug solubility and intestinal membrane permeability. Theoretical analysis and experimental results suggest that a permeability/solubility classification scheme can be used to set more rationale drug standards. In particular, high solubility/high permeability, rapidly dissolving drugs may be regulated on the basis of a single point rapid dissolution test while low solubility dissolution rate limited drugs can be regulated based on an in vitro dissolution test that reflects the in vivo dissolution process. This dissolution test may include multiple time points, media change, as well as surfactants in order to reflect the in vivo dissolution process and would be used by the manufacturer for requesting a waiver from a bioequivalence (BE) trial. For controlled release products, the regulation of bioequivalence standards is more complex due to the potential differences in position-dependent permeability/solubility and metabolism of drugs along the gastrointestinal tract. These differences may result in drug absorption rates that are highly transit time dependent. This paper will present the current status of the biopharmaceutic drug classification scheme, the underlying developed data base and its application to optimizing IR and CR products.

  19. Novel drug development for neuromuscular blockade

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, Amit; Kaye, Alan D; Wyche, Melville Q; Salinas, Orlando J; Mancuso, Kenneth; Urman, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological advances in anesthesia in recent decades have resulted in safer practice and better outcomes. These advances include improvement in anesthesia drugs with regard to efficacy and safety profiles. Although neuromuscular blockers were first introduced over a half century ago, few new neuromuscular blockers and reversal agents have come to market and even fewer have remained as common clinically employed medications. In recent years, newer agents have been studied and are presented in this review. With regard to nondepolarizer neuromuscular blocker agents, the enantiomers Gantacurium and CW002, which are olefinic isoquinolinium diester fumarates, have shown potential for clinical application. Advantages include ultra rapid reversal of neuromuscular blockade via cysteine adduction and minimal systemic hemodynamic effects with administration. PMID:27625489

  20. Novel drug development for neuromuscular blockade

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, Amit; Kaye, Alan D; Wyche, Melville Q; Salinas, Orlando J; Mancuso, Kenneth; Urman, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological advances in anesthesia in recent decades have resulted in safer practice and better outcomes. These advances include improvement in anesthesia drugs with regard to efficacy and safety profiles. Although neuromuscular blockers were first introduced over a half century ago, few new neuromuscular blockers and reversal agents have come to market and even fewer have remained as common clinically employed medications. In recent years, newer agents have been studied and are presented in this review. With regard to nondepolarizer neuromuscular blocker agents, the enantiomers Gantacurium and CW002, which are olefinic isoquinolinium diester fumarates, have shown potential for clinical application. Advantages include ultra rapid reversal of neuromuscular blockade via cysteine adduction and minimal systemic hemodynamic effects with administration.

  1. Novel drug development for neuromuscular blockade.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Amit; Kaye, Alan D; Wyche, Melville Q; Salinas, Orlando J; Mancuso, Kenneth; Urman, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological advances in anesthesia in recent decades have resulted in safer practice and better outcomes. These advances include improvement in anesthesia drugs with regard to efficacy and safety profiles. Although neuromuscular blockers were first introduced over a half century ago, few new neuromuscular blockers and reversal agents have come to market and even fewer have remained as common clinically employed medications. In recent years, newer agents have been studied and are presented in this review. With regard to nondepolarizer neuromuscular blocker agents, the enantiomers Gantacurium and CW002, which are olefinic isoquinolinium diester fumarates, have shown potential for clinical application. Advantages include ultra rapid reversal of neuromuscular blockade via cysteine adduction and minimal systemic hemodynamic effects with administration. PMID:27625489

  2. The use of skin models in drug development.

    PubMed

    Mathes, Stephanie H; Ruffner, Heinz; Graf-Hausner, Ursula

    2014-04-01

    Three dimensional (3D) tissue models of the human skin are probably the most developed and understood in vitro engineered constructs. The motivation to accomplish organotypic structures was driven by the clinics to enable transplantation of in vitro grown tissue substitutes and by the cosmetics industry as alternative test substrates in order to replace animal models. Today a huge variety of 3D human skin models exist, covering a multitude of scientific and/or technical demands. This review summarizes and discusses different approaches of skin model development and sets them into the context of drug development. Although human skin models have become indispensable for the cosmetics industry, they have not yet started their triumphal procession in pharmaceutical research and development. For drug development these tissue models may be of particular interest for a) systemically acting drugs applied on the skin, and b) drugs acting at the site of application in the case of skin diseases or disorders. Although quite a broad spectrum of models covering different aspects of the skin as a biologically acting surface exists, these are most often single stand-alone approaches. In order to enable the comprehensive application into drug development processes, the approaches have to be synchronized to allow a cross-over comparison. Besides the development of biological relevant models, other issues are not less important in the context of drug development: standardized production procedures, process automation, establishment of significant analytical methods, and data correlation. For the successful routine use of engineered human skin models in drug development, major requirements were defined. If these requirements can be accomplished in the next few years, human organotypic skin models will become indispensable for drug development, too.

  3. Development of Chemical Compound Libraries for In Silico Drug Screening.

    PubMed

    Fukunishi, Yoshifumi; Lintuluoto, Masami

    2010-01-01

    Chemical compound libraries are the basic database for virtual (in silico) drug screening, and the number of entries has reached 20 million. Many drug-like compound libraries for virtual drug screening have been developed and released. In this review, the process of constructing a database for virtual screening is reviewed, and several popular databases are introduced. Several kinds of focused libraries have been developed. The author has developed databases for metalloproteases, and the details of the libraries are described. The library for metalloproteases was developed by improving the generation of the dominant-ion forms. For instance, the SH group is treated as S- in this library while all SH groups are protonated in the conventional libraries. In addition, metal complexes were examined as new candidates of drug-like compounds. Finally, a method for generating chemical space is introduced, and the diversity of compound libraries is discussed.

  4. Critical parameters in targeted drug development: the pharmacological audit trail.

    PubMed

    Banerji, Udai; Workman, Paul

    2016-08-01

    The Pharmacological Audit Trail (PhAT) comprises a set of critical questions that need to be asked during discovery and development of an anticancer drug. Key aspects include: (1) defining a patient population; (2) establishing pharmacokinetic characteristics; (3) providing evidence of target engagement, pathway modulation, and biological effect with proof of concept pharmacodynamic biomarkers; (4) determining intermediate biomarkers of response; (5) assessing tumor response; and (6) determining how to overcome resistance by combination or sequential therapy and new target/drug discovery. The questions asked in the PhAT should be viewed as a continuum and not used in isolation. Different drug development programmes derive different types of benefit from these questions. The PhAT is critical in making go-no-go decisions in the development of currently studied drugs and will continue to be relevant to discovery and development of future generations of anticancer agents.

  5. Critical parameters in targeted drug development: the pharmacological audit trail.

    PubMed

    Banerji, Udai; Workman, Paul

    2016-08-01

    The Pharmacological Audit Trail (PhAT) comprises a set of critical questions that need to be asked during discovery and development of an anticancer drug. Key aspects include: (1) defining a patient population; (2) establishing pharmacokinetic characteristics; (3) providing evidence of target engagement, pathway modulation, and biological effect with proof of concept pharmacodynamic biomarkers; (4) determining intermediate biomarkers of response; (5) assessing tumor response; and (6) determining how to overcome resistance by combination or sequential therapy and new target/drug discovery. The questions asked in the PhAT should be viewed as a continuum and not used in isolation. Different drug development programmes derive different types of benefit from these questions. The PhAT is critical in making go-no-go decisions in the development of currently studied drugs and will continue to be relevant to discovery and development of future generations of anticancer agents. PMID:27663475

  6. Development and characterization of an orodispersible film containing drug nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bao-de; Shen, Cheng-ying; Yuan, Xu-dong; Bai, Jin-xia; Lv, Qing-yuan; Xu, He; Dai, Ling; Yu, Chao; Han, Jin; Yuan, Hai-long

    2013-11-01

    In this study, a novel orodispersible film (ODF) containing drug nanoparticles was developed with the goal of transforming drug nanosuspensions into a solid dosage form and enhancing oral bioavailability of drugs with poor water solubility. Nanosuspensions were prepared by high pressure homogenization and then transformed into ODF containing drug nanoparticles by mixing with hydroxypropyl methylcellulose solution containing microcrystalline cellulose, low substituted hydroxypropylcellulose and PEG-400 followed by film casting and drying. Herpetrione, a novel and potent antiviral agent with poor water solubility that extracted from Herpetospermum caudigerum, was chosen as a model drug and studied systematically. The uniformity of dosage units of the preparation was acceptable according to the criteria of Japanese Pharmacopoeia 15. The ODF was disintegrated in water within 30s with reconstituted nanosuspensions particle size of 280 ± 11 nm, which was similar to that of drug nanosuspensions, indicating a good redispersibility of the fast dissolving film. Result of X-ray diffraction showed that HPE in the ODF was in the amorphous state. In the in vitro dissolution test, the ODF containing HPE nanoparticles showed an increased dissolution velocity markedly. In the pharmacokinetics study in rats, compared to HPE coarse suspensions, the ODF containing HPE nanoparticles exhibited significant increase in AUC0-24h, Cmax and decrease in Tmax, MRT. The result revealed that the ODF containing drug nanoparticles may provide a potential opportunity in transforming drug nanosuspensions into a solid dosage form as well as enhancing the dissolution rate and oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. PMID:24103635

  7. Molecular Targets for Antiepileptic Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Meldrum, Brian S.; Rogawski, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary This review considers how recent advances in the physiology of ion channels and other potential molecular targets, in conjunction with new information on the genetics of idiopathic epilepsies, can be applied to the search for improved antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Marketed AEDs predominantly target voltage-gated cation channels (the α subunits of voltage-gated Na+ channels and also T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels) or influence GABA-mediated inhibition. Recently, α2–δ voltage-gated Ca2+ channel subunits and the SV2A synaptic vesicle protein have been recognized as likely targets. Genetic studies of familial idiopathic epilepsies have identified numerous genes associated with diverse epilepsy syndromes, including genes encoding Na+ channels and GABAA receptors, which are known AED targets. A strategy based on genes associated with epilepsy in animal models and humans suggests other potential AED targets, including various voltage-gated Ca2+ channel subunits and auxiliary proteins, A- or M-type voltage-gated K+ channels, and ionotropic glutamate receptors. Recent progress in ion channel research brought about by molecular cloning of the channel subunit proteins and studies in epilepsy models suggest additional targets, including G-protein-coupled receptors, such as GABAB and metabotropic glutamate receptors; hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channel subunits, responsible for hyperpolarization-activated current Ih; connexins, which make up gap junctions; and neurotransmitter transporters, particularly plasma membrane and vesicular transporters for GABA and glutamate. New information from the structural characterization of ion channels, along with better understanding of ion channel function, may allow for more selective targeting. For example, Na+ channels underlying persistent Na+ currents or GABAA receptor isoforms responsible for tonic (extrasynaptic) currents represent attractive targets. The growing understanding of the

  8. Widespread functional and molecular imaging in drug development.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Edward A

    2007-11-01

    The numbers of both large- and small-molecule drug candidates have increased substantially over the past decade, while overall and late-stage failure rates have hovered around 80 and 50% respectively. The corresponding rise in research and development expenditures relative to numbers of approved drugs has made it increasingly apparent that new methods are needed to assess potential efficacy in the earliest stages of drug development. It is generally not possible to power early-phase trials sufficiently to demonstrate efficacy using clinical end points. However, functional imaging techniques can often provide both the sensitivity to treatment effects and high reproducibility necessary to obtain statistically supportable evidence of treatment effect, even in relatively small Phase I trials. This article examines both the benefits and potential pitfalls associated with the inclusion of functional and molecular imaging in the drug development process.

  9. Waterborne psychoactive drugs impair the initial development of Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kalichak, Fabiana; Idalencio, Renan; Rosa, João Gabriel S; de Oliveira, Thiago A; Koakoski, Gessi; Gusso, Darlan; de Abreu, Murilo S; Giacomini, Ana Cristina V; Barcellos, Heloísa H A; Fagundes, Michele; Piato, Angelo L; Barcellos, Leonardo J G

    2016-01-01

    The contamination of rivers and other natural water bodies, including underground waters, is a current reality. Human occupation and some economic activities generate a wide range of contaminated effluents that reach these water resources, including psychotropic drug residues. Here we show that fluoxetine, diazepam and risperidone affected the initial development of zebrafish. All drugs increased mortality rate and heart frequency and decreased larvae length. In addition, risperidone and fluoxetine decreased egg hatching. The overall results points to a strong potential of these drugs to cause a negative impact on zebrafish initial development and, since the larvae viability was reduced, promote adverse effects at the population level. We hypothesized that eggs and larvae absorbed the drugs that exert its effects in the central nervous system. These effects on early development may have significant environmental implications. PMID:26667671

  10. Precision medicine in oncology drug development: a pharma perspective.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Simon J

    2015-12-01

    A rapid expansion in precision medicine founded on the potential for durable clinical benefit through matching a drug to a predictive marker used to select patients has driven the development of targeted drugs with accompanied companion diagnostics for patient selection. Oncology has been at the forefront, with the improvements in patient survival notable. Increasing numbers of molecular subgroups require an equally increasing number (and new generation) of highly selective agents targeting inevitably lower incidence molecular segments, posing significant challenges for drug development. Innovative trial designs (umbrella or basket studies) are emerging as patient-centric approaches and public-private partnerships, cross-industry, government and non-profit sector collaborations are enabling implementation. Success will require continued innovation, new paradigms in oncology drug development and market approval and continued collaboration.

  11. Hurdles in anticancer drug development from a regulatory perspective.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Bertil; Bergh, Jonas

    2012-04-01

    Between January 2001 and January 2012, 48 new medicinal products for cancer treatment were licensed within the EU, and 77 new indications were granted for products already licensed. In some cases, a major improvement to existing therapies was achieved, for example, trastuzumab in breast cancer. In other cases, new fields for effective drug therapy opened up, such as in chronic myeloid leukemia, and renal-cell carcinoma. In most cases, however, the benefit-risk balance was considered to be only borderline favorable. Based on our assessment of advice procedures for marketing authorization, 'need for speed' seems to be the guiding principle in anticancer drug development. Although, for drugs that make a difference, early licensure is of obvious importance to patients, this is less evident in the case of borderline drugs. Without proper incentives and with hurdles inside and outside companies, a change in drug development cannot be expected; drugs improving benefit-risk modestly over available therapies will be brought forward towards licensure. In this Perspectives article, we discuss some hurdles to biomarker-driven drug development and provide some suggestions to overcome them. PMID:22349015

  12. [Cannabis and adolescence - drug misuse and development].

    PubMed

    Berthel, T

    2007-02-01

    In the last decades the consumption of Cannabis increased strongly. Parents and teachers are disconcerted. Instruments, to successfully offer assistance, are missing to many physicians and therapists. We need sufficient knowledge of the substance, the effects, side effects and possible damages, so that treatment can be successful. At the same time we have to identify the development phase of adolescence, in which the consumption takes place. Thereby it is particularly important to question, whether the consumption of Cannabis initiates psychoses, the development of addiction is possible or mental and physical development is disturbed. In this article the problem of the consumption of Cannabis in the phases of adolescence will be represented according to the challenges of adolescent people. Further more some intervention approaches, which were successful, will be presented.

  13. [Development of drug delivery systems for targeting to macrophages].

    PubMed

    Chono, Sumio

    2007-09-01

    Drug delivery systems (DDS) using liposomes as drug carriers for targeting to macrophages have been developed for the treatment of diseases that macrophages are related to their progress. Initially, DDS for the treatment of atherosclerosis are described. The influence of particle size on the drug delivery to atherosclerotic lesions that macrophages are richly present and antiatherosclerotic effects following intravenous administration of liposomes containing dexamethasone (DXM-liposomes) was investigated in atherogenic mice. Both the drug delivery efficacy of DXM-liposomes (particle size, 200 nm) to atherosclerotic lesions and their antiatherosclerotic effects were greater than those of 70 and 500 nm. These results indicate that there is an optimal particle size for drug delivery to atherosclerotic lesions. DDS for the treatment of respiratory infections are then described. The influence of particle size and surface mannosylation on the drug delivery to alveolar macrophages (AMs) and antibacterial effects following pulmonary administration of liposomes containing ciprofloxacin (CPFX-liposomes) was investigated in rats. The drug delivery efficacy of CPFX-liposomes to AMs was particle size-dependent over the range 100-1000 nm and then became constant at over 1000 nm. These results indicate that the most effective size is 1000 nm. Both the drug delivery efficacy of mannosylated CPFX-liposomes (particle size, 1000 nm) to AMs and their antibacterial effects were significantly greater than those of unmodified CPFX-liposomes. These results indicate that the surface mannosylation is useful method for drug delivery to AMs. This review provides useful information to help in the development of novel pharmaceutical formulations aimed at drug targeting to macrophages.

  14. [Development of new drugs: opportunities and benefits for Peru].

    PubMed

    Bayona, Andrés; Fajardo, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    The development of innovative drugs allows coming up with new medicines to prevent and better treat illnesses. This improves people's quality of life and makes it more productive. Therefore, the mission of pharmaceutical research is to develop safe and effective drugs. Clinical trials allow the evaluation of the safety and efficacy profiles of new medicines, medical devices and diagnostic tests. Research and development (R&D) of new drugs is a long and costly process, where out of every 5000 to 10000 new components that enter preclinical testing, only one is approved. Compared to 2011, drug development has increased by 7.6%. According to ClinicalTrials.gov, 5% of the trials take place in Latin America, and Peru is in the fifth position. On the other hand, according to the Global Competitiveness Report issued by the World Economic Forum, Peru ranks 61st, its biggest challenges being the functioning of its public institutions, investment in R&D and technological capacity. The complexity of drug R&D results in a search for competitive places to develop clinical trials. Clinical Research is a humanized industry due to its ethical platform, stated in the guidelines of good clinical practices. This industry demands our country to develop a differentiating value that contributes to the development of knowledge and its competitiveness. PMID:23338639

  15. Minimizing repolarization-related proarrhythmic risk in drug development and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Attila S; Nattel, Stanley

    2010-03-26

    electrocardiographic intervals (particularly QT) and cardiac rhythm are often needed, both prior to drug approval and after successful introduction on the market (postmarketing surveillance). The successful avoidance of proarrhythmic complications is a shared responsibility of the innovative pharmaceutical industry, regulatory authorities, partners in the clinical drug development phase and practicing physicians. This paper reviews the principal forms of proarrhythmia and the methods that can be used to minimize the risk of proarrhythmia in drug development and clinical practice, with particular emphasis on the most common and problematic form, acquired LQTS.

  16. Polymeric drugs: Advances in the development of pharmacologically active polymers.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Yu, Fei; Chen, Yi; Oupický, David

    2015-12-10

    Synthetic polymers play a critical role in pharmaceutical discovery and development. Current research and applications of pharmaceutical polymers are mainly focused on their functions as excipients and inert carriers of other pharmacologically active agents. This review article surveys recent advances in alternative pharmaceutical use of polymers as pharmacologically active agents known as polymeric drugs. Emphasis is placed on the benefits of polymeric drugs that are associated with their macromolecular character and their ability to explore biologically relevant multivalency processes. We discuss the main therapeutic uses of polymeric drugs as sequestrants, antimicrobials, antivirals, and anticancer and anti-inflammatory agents.

  17. Development of a novel osmotically driven drug delivery system for weakly basic drugs.

    PubMed

    Guthmann, C; Lipp, R; Wagner, T; Kranz, H

    2008-06-01

    The drug substance SAG/ZK has a short biological half-life and because of its weakly basic nature a strong pH-dependent solubility was observed. The aim of this study was to develop a controlled release (cr) multiple unit pellet formulation for SAG/ZK with pH-independent drug release. Pellets with a drug load of 60% were prepared by extrusion/spheronization followed by cr-film coating with an extended release polyvinyl acetate/polyvinyl pyrrolidone dispersion (Kollidon SR 30 D). To overcome the problem of pH-dependent drug release the pellets were then coated with a second layer of an enteric methacrylic acid and ethyl acrylate copolymer (Kollicoat MAE 30 DP). To increase the drug release rates from the double layered cr-pellets different osmotically active ionic (sodium and potassium chloride) and nonionic (sucrose) additives were incorporated into the pellet core. Drug release studies were performed in media of different osmotic pressure to clarify the main release mechanism. Extended release coated pellets of SAG/ZK demonstrated pH-dependent drug release. Applying a second enteric coat on top of the extended release film coat failed in order to achieve pH-independent drug release. Already low enteric polymer levels on top of the extended release coated pellets decreased drug release rates at pH 1 drastically, thus resulting in a reversal of the pH-dependency (faster release at pH 6.8 than in 0.1N HCl). The addition of osmotically active ingredients (sodium and potassium chloride, and sucrose) increased the imbibing of aqueous fluids into the pellet cores thus providing a saturated drug solution inside the beads and increasing drug concentration gradients. In addition, for these pellets increased formation of pores and cracks in the polymer coating was observed. Hence drug release rates from double layered beads increased significantly. Therefore, pH-independent osmotically driven SAG/ZK release was achieved from pellets containing osmotically active ingredients

  18. The evolving drug development landscape: from blockbusters to niche busters in the orphan drug space.

    PubMed

    Kumar Kakkar, Ashish; Dahiya, Neha

    2014-06-01

    Strategy, Management and Health Policy Large pharmaceutical companies have traditionally focused on the development of blockbuster drugs that target disease states with large patient populations. However, with large-scale patent expirations and competition from generics and biosimilars, anemic pipelines, escalating clinical trial costs, and global health-care reform, the blockbuster model has become less viable. Orphan drug initiatives and the incentives accompanied by these have fostered renewed research efforts in the area of rare diseases and have led to the approval of more than 400 orphan products. Despite targeting much smaller patient populations, the revenue-generating potential of orphan drugs has been shown to be huge, with a greater return on investment than non-orphan drugs. The success of these "niche buster" therapeutics has led to a renewed interest from "Big Pharma" in the rare disease landscape. This article reviews the key drivers for orphan drug research and development, their profitability, and issues surrounding the emergence of large pharmaceutical firms into the orphan drug space.

  19. Development of biosimilars in an era of oncologic drug shortages

    PubMed Central

    Li, Edward; Subramanian, Janakiraman; Anderson, Scott; Thomas, Dolca; McKinley, Jason; Jacobs, Ira A

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic shortages of various pharmaceuticals and particularly of sterile injectable products are being reported on a global scale, prompting evaluation of more effective strategies to manage current shortages and development of new, high-quality pharmaceutical products to mitigate the risk of potential future shortages. Oncology drugs such as liposomal doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil represent examples of first-choice drugs critically affected by shortages. Survey results indicate that the majority of hospitals and practicing oncologists have experienced drug shortages, which may have compromised patient safety and clinical outcomes, and increased health care costs, due to delays or changes in treatment regimens. Clinical trials evaluating novel agents in combination with standard-of-care drugs are also being affected by drug shortages. Clinical and ethical considerations on treatment objectives, drug indication, and availability of alternative options may help in prioritizing cancer patients involved in active drug shortages. The United States Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency have identified manufacturing problems, delays in supply, and lack of available active ingredients as the most frequent causes of recent or ongoing drug shortages, and have released specific guidance to monitor, manage, and reduce the risk of shortages. The upcoming loss of exclusivity for a number of anticancer biologics, together with the introduction of an abbreviated approval pathway for biosimilars, raises the question of whether these products will be vulnerable to shortages. Future supply by reliable manufacturers of well characterized biosimilar monoclonal antibodies, developed in compliance with regulatory and manufacturing guidelines and with substantial investments, may contribute to prevent future biologics shortages and ensure access to effective and safe treatment options for patients with cancer. Preclinical and clinical characterization

  20. Myeloperoxidase: a target for new drug development?

    PubMed Central

    Malle, E; Furtmüller, P G; Sattler, W; Obinger, C

    2007-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), a member of the haem peroxidase-cyclooxygenase superfamily, is abundantly expressed in neutrophils and to a lesser extent in monocytes and certain type of macrophages. MPO participates in innate immune defence mechanism through formation of microbicidal reactive oxidants and diffusible radical species. A unique activity of MPO is its ability to use chloride as a cosubstrate with hydrogen peroxide to generate chlorinating oxidants such as hypochlorous acid, a potent antimicrobial agent. However, evidence has emerged that MPO-derived oxidants contribute to tissue damage and the initiation and propagation of acute and chronic vascular inflammatory disease. The fact that circulating levels of MPO have been shown to predict risks for major adverse cardiac events and that levels of MPO-derived chlorinated compounds are specific biomarkers for disease progression, has attracted considerable interest in the development of therapeutically useful MPO inhibitors. Today, detailed information on the structure of ferric MPO and its complexes with low- and high-spin ligands is available. This, together with a thorough understanding of reaction mechanisms including redox properties of intermediates, enables a rationale attempt in developing specific MPO inhibitors that still maintain MPO activity during host defence and bacterial killing but interfere with pathophysiologically persistent activation of MPO. The various approaches to inhibit enzyme activity of MPO and to ameliorate adverse effects of MPO-derived oxidants will be discussed. Emphasis will be put on mechanism-based inhibitors and high-throughput screening of compounds as well as the discussion of physiologically useful HOCl scavengers. PMID:17592500

  1. The use of imaging in preclinical drug development.

    PubMed

    Vanderheyden, J L

    2009-08-01

    Molecular imaging tools, both equipment and agents, continue to improve and evolve, offering multimodality imaging with greater sensitivity and high-resolution of biological processes in real time. This review summarizes some of these recent developments in preclinical hardware, wetware and software, and their impact on drug development. The focus is on the advances in non-invasive small animal imaging such as positron emission tomography (PET), computed tomography (CT) and solid state detectors in single photon emission tomography (SPECT), which, when combined with labeled tracers serving as biomarkers and functional probes in vivo, are demonstrating the potential to accelerate our understanding of disease and help select drug candidates for development.

  2. Schizophrenia risk genes: Implications for future drug development and discovery.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Garret; Lawrie, Stephen M; McIntosh, Andrew M; Hall, Jeremy

    2011-06-15

    Present-day development of improved treatments for schizophrenia is hindered by uncertain models of disease, inter-individual response variability in clinical trials and a paucity of sensitive measures of treatment effects. Findings from genetic research emphasize the potential for schizophrenia risk genes to help develop focused treatments, discover new drug targets and provide markers of clinical subtypes. Advances in genetic technologies also provide novel modes of drug discovery in schizophrenia such as transcriptomics, epigenetics and transgenic animal models. In this review, we discuss proven and proposed ways risk genes can be used to enhance the development and discovery of treatments for schizophrenia and highlight key studies in these approaches. PMID:21093417

  3. Impact of biomarker development on drug safety assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Marrer, Estelle; Dieterle, Frank

    2010-03-01

    Drug safety has always been a key aspect of drug development. Recently, the Vioxx case and several cases of serious adverse events being linked to high-profile products have increased the importance of drug safety, especially in the eyes of drug development companies and global regulatory agencies. Safety biomarkers are increasingly being seen as helping to provide the clarity, predictability, and certainty needed to gain confidence in decision making: early-stage projects can be stopped quicker, late-stage projects become less risky. Public and private organizations are investing heavily in terms of time, money and manpower on safety biomarker development. An illustrative and 'door opening' safety biomarker success story is the recent recognition of kidney safety biomarkers for pre-clinical and limited translational contexts by FDA and EMEA. This milestone achieved for kidney biomarkers and the 'know how' acquired is being transferred to other organ toxicities, namely liver, heart, vascular system. New technologies and molecular-based approaches, i.e., molecular pathology as a complement to the classical toolbox, allow promising discoveries in the safety biomarker field. This review will focus on the utility and use of safety biomarkers all along drug development, highlighting the present gaps and opportunities identified in organ toxicity monitoring. A last part will be dedicated to safety biomarker development in general, from identification to diagnostic tests, using the kidney safety biomarkers success as an illustrative example.

  4. Drug Design, Development, and Delivery: An Interdisciplinary Course on Pharmaceuticals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prausnitz, Mark R.; Bommarius, Andreas S.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a new interdisciplinary course on pharmaceuticals to address needs of undergraduate and graduate students in chemical engineering and other departments. This course introduces drug design, development, and delivery in an integrated fashion that provides scientific depth in context with broader impacts in business, policy, and ethics.…

  5. Development of novel small molecules for imaging and drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yanting

    Small organic molecules, including small molecule based fluorescent probes, small molecule based drugs or prodrugs, and smart multifunctional fluorescent drug delivery systems play important roles in biological research, drug discovery, and clinical practices. Despite the significant progress made in these fields, the development of novel and diverse small molecules is needed to meet various demands for research and clinical applications. My Ph.D study focuses on the development of novel functional molecules for recognition, imaging and drug release. In the first part, a turn-on fluorescent probe is developed for the detection of intracellular adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) levels based on multiplexing recognitions. Considering the unique and complicated structure of ATP molecules, a fluorescent probe has been implemented with improved sensitivity and selectivity due to two synergistic binding recognitions by incorporating of 2, 2'-dipicolylamine (Dpa)-Zn(II) for targeting of phospho anions and phenylboronic acid group for cis-diol moiety. The novel probe is able to detect intracellular ATP levels in SH-SY5Y cells. Meanwhile, the advantages of multiplexing recognition design concept have been demonstrated using two control molecules. In the second part, a prodrug system is developed to deliver multiple drugs within one small molecule entity. The prodrug is designed by using 1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl (NPE) as phototrigger, and biphenol biquaternary ammonium as the prodrug. With controlled photo activation, both DNA cross-linking agents mechlorethamine and o-quinone methide are delivered and released at the preferred site, leading to efficient DNA cross-links formation and cell death. The prodrug shows negligible cytotoxicity towards normal skin cells (Hekn cells) with and without UV activation, but displays potent activity towards cancer cells (HeLa cells) upon UV activation. The multiple drug release system may hold a great potential for practical application. In the

  6. Reducing attrition in drug development: smart loading preclinical safety assessment.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Ruth A; Kavanagh, Stefan L; Mellor, Howard R; Pollard, Christopher E; Robinson, Sally; Platz, Stefan J

    2014-03-01

    Entry into the crucial preclinical good laboratory practice (GLP) stage of toxicology testing triggers significant R&D investment yet >20% of AstraZeneca's potential new medicines have been stopped for safety reasons in this GLP phase alone. How could we avoid at least some of these costly failures? An analysis of historical toxicities that caused stopping ('stopping toxicities') showed that >50% were attributable to target organ toxicities emerging within 2 weeks of repeat dosing or to acute cardiovascular risks. By frontloading 2-week repeat-dose toxicity studies and a comprehensive assessment of cardiovascular safety, we anticipate a potential 50% reduction in attrition in the GLP phase. This will reduce animal use overall, save significant R&D costs and improve drug pipeline quality.

  7. The basics of preclinical drug development for neurodegenerative disease indications

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Karen L; Spack, Edward G

    2009-01-01

    Preclinical development encompasses the activities that link drug discovery in the laboratory to initiation of human clinical trials. Preclinical studies can be designed to identify a lead candidate from several hits; develop the best procedure for new drug scale-up; select the best formulation; determine the route, frequency, and duration of exposure; and ultimately support the intended clinical trial design. The details of each preclinical development package can vary, but all have some common features. Rodent and nonrodent mammalian models are used to delineate the pharmacokinetic profile and general safety, as well as to identify toxicity patterns. One or more species may be used to determine the drug's mean residence time in the body, which depends on inherent absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion properties. For drugs intended to treat Alzheimer's disease or other brain-targeted diseases, the ability of a drug to cross the blood brain barrier may be a key issue. Toxicology and safety studies identify potential target organs for adverse effects and define the Therapeutic Index to set the initial starting doses in clinical trials. Pivotal preclinical safety studies generally require regulatory oversight as defined by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Good Laboratory Practices and international guidelines, including the International Conference on Harmonisation. Concurrent preclinical development activities include developing the Clinical Plan and preparing the new drug product, including the associated documentation to meet stringent FDA Good Manufacturing Practices regulatory guidelines. A wide range of commercial and government contract options are available for investigators seeking to advance their candidate(s). Government programs such as the Small Business Innovative Research and Small Business Technology Transfer grants and the National Institutes of Health Rapid Access to Interventional Development Pilot Program provide funding and

  8. The basics of preclinical drug development for neurodegenerative disease indications.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Karen L; Spack, Edward G

    2009-01-01

    Preclinical development encompasses the activities that link drug discovery in the laboratory to initiation of human clinical trials. Preclinical studies can be designed to identify a lead candidate from several hits; develop the best procedure for new drug scale-up; select the best formulation; determine the route, frequency, and duration of exposure; and ultimately support the intended clinical trial design. The details of each preclinical development package can vary, but all have some common features. Rodent and nonrodent mammalian models are used to delineate the pharmacokinetic profile and general safety, as well as to identify toxicity patterns. One or more species may be used to determine the drug's mean residence time in the body, which depends on inherent absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion properties. For drugs intended to treat Alzheimer's disease or other brain-targeted diseases, the ability of a drug to cross the blood brain barrier may be a key issue. Toxicology and safety studies identify potential target organs for adverse effects and define the Therapeutic Index to set the initial starting doses in clinical trials. Pivotal preclinical safety studies generally require regulatory oversight as defined by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Good Laboratory Practices and international guidelines, including the International Conference on Harmonization. Concurrent preclinical development activities include developing the Clinical Plan and preparing the new drug product, including the associated documentation to meet stringent FDA Good Manufacturing Practices regulatory guidelines. A wide range of commercial and government contract options are available for investigators seeking to advance their candidate(s). Government programs such as the Small Business Innovative Research and Small Business Technology Transfer grants and the National Institutes of Health Rapid Access to Interventional Development Pilot Program provide funding and

  9. Flip-flop pharmacokinetics – delivering a reversal of disposition: challenges and opportunities during drug development

    PubMed Central

    Yáñez, Jaime A; Remsberg, Connie M; Sayre, Casey L; Forrest, M Laird; Davies, Neal M

    2011-01-01

    Flip-flop pharmacokinetics is a phenomenon often encountered with extravascularly administered drugs. Occurrence of flip-flop spans preclinical to human studies. The purpose of this article is to analyze both the pharmacokinetic interpretation errors and opportunities underlying the presence of flip-flop pharmacokinetics during drug development. Flip-flop occurs when the rate of absorption is slower than the rate of elimination. If it is not recognized, it can create difficulties in the acquisition and interpretation of pharmacokinetic parameters. When flip-flop is expected or discovered, a longer duration of sampling may be necessary in order to avoid overestimation of fraction of dose absorbed. Common culprits of flip-flop disposition are modified dosage formulations; however, formulation characteristics such as the drug chemical entities themselves or the incorporated excipients can also cause the phenomenon. Yet another contributing factor is the physiological makeup of the extravascular site of administration. In this article, these causes of flip-flop pharmacokinetics are discussed with incorporation of relevant examples and the implications for drug development outlined. PMID:21837267

  10. Animal experimentation: a rational approach towards drug development.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Singh, P N; Mishra, B

    2000-06-01

    Man's observation of animals as objects of study undoubtedly began in prehistoric times. The first recorded attempt involving the use of live animals for research was by Ersistratis in Alexandria in 300 B.C. Animal investigation has clearly made possible the enormous advances in drug development in this century. A cursory review of any modern text book of pharmacology or medicine will attest the many drugs currently available to benefit mankind in the struggle to eradicate and control diseases. The main purpose of this article is to describe some of the experimental work on animals which contributed to the discovery and development of drugs benefiting human beings and other animal species. Since animal experimentation has occupied a focal position in all the research leading to useful drugs, one will appreciate that it will be necessary to limit the discussion to certain aspects of this broad and interesting topic. With this in mind, an attempt is made to relate briefly the nature of animal investigations which were instrumental in the development of major classes of drugs. Some attention has also been focused on legislation's on animal experimentation of some developed countries with emphasis on India and to views on animal experimentation. We hope this article will stimulate the minds of the scientists for a rational debate on the future of animal experimentation.

  11. Nanodiamonds: The intersection of nanotechnology, drug development, and personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Dean; Wang, Chung-Huei Katherine; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of nanomedicine in cellular, preclinical, and clinical studies has led to exciting advances ranging from fundamental to translational, particularly in the field of cancer. Many of the current barriers in cancer treatment are being successfully addressed using nanotechnology-modified compounds. These barriers include drug resistance leading to suboptimal intratumoral retention, poor circulation times resulting in decreased efficacy, and off-target toxicity, among others. The first clinical nanomedicine advances to overcome these issues were based on monotherapy, where small-molecule and nucleic acid delivery demonstrated substantial improvements over unmodified drug administration. Recent preclinical studies have shown that combination nanotherapies, composed of either multiple classes of nanomaterials or a single nanoplatform functionalized with several therapeutic agents, can image and treat tumors with improved efficacy over single-compound delivery. Among the many promising nanomaterials that are being developed, nanodiamonds have received increasing attention because of the unique chemical-mechanical properties on their faceted surfaces. More recently, nanodiamond-based drug delivery has been included in the rational and systematic design of optimal therapeutic combinations using an implicitly de-risked drug development platform technology, termed Phenotypic Personalized Medicine–Drug Development (PPM-DD). The application of PPM-DD to rapidly identify globally optimized drug combinations successfully addressed a pervasive challenge confronting all aspects of drug development, both nano and non-nano. This review will examine various nanomaterials and the use of PPM-DD to optimize the efficacy and safety of current and future cancer treatment. How this platform can accelerate combinatorial nanomedicine and the broader pharmaceutical industry toward unprecedented clinical impact will also be discussed. PMID:26601235

  12. Adsorption of drugs on nanodiamond: toward development of a drug delivery platform.

    PubMed

    Mochalin, Vadym N; Pentecost, Amanda; Li, Xue-Mei; Neitzel, Ioannis; Nelson, Matthew; Wei, Chongyang; He, Tao; Guo, Fang; Gogotsi, Yury

    2013-10-01

    Nanodiamond particles produced by detonation synthesis and having ∼5 nm diameter possess unique properties, including low cell toxicity, biocompatibility, stable structure, and highly tailorable surface chemistry, which render them an attractive material for developing drug delivery systems. Although the potential for nanodiamonds in delivery and sustained release of anticancer drugs has been recently demonstrated, very little is known about the details of adsorption/desorption equilibria of these and other drugs on/from nanodiamonds with different purity, surface chemistry, and agglomeration state. Since adsorption is the basic mechanism most commonly used for the loading of drugs onto nanodiamond, the fundamental studies into the details of adsorption and desorption on nanodiamond are critically important for the rational design of the nanodiamond drug delivery systems capable of targeted delivery and triggered release, while minimizing potential leaks of dangerous drugs. In this paper we report on a physical-chemical study of the adsorption of doxorubicin and polymyxin B on nanodiamonds, analyzing the role of purification and surface chemistry of the adsorbent. PMID:23941665

  13. Drug Development and Potential Regulatory Paths for Insulin Biosimilars.

    PubMed

    Minocha, Mukul; Gobburu, Jogarao

    2014-01-01

    Under the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act (BPCI Act), a biological product may be demonstrated to be "biosimilar" if data show that, among other things, the product is "highly similar" to an already-approved biological product. Biosimilar insulins have the potential to reduce ever growing costs associated with insulin treatment by allowing competition. In this article, we describe the current drug development and regulatory paths for biosimilar insulins. Most likely basis of market approval for biosimilar insulins by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and guidance for developing insulin biosimilars by European Medicines Agency (EMA) are discussed in detail. Currently, no product specific biosimilar FDA guidance for insulin biosimilarity assessment exists. We propose efficient and cost-effective drug development and potential regulatory paths based on scientific justification. In addition, novel trial designs for demonstrating interchangeability between the biosimilar and the reference insulin products are presented. PMID:24876531

  14. Scorpion Peptides: Potential Use for New Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Hmed, BenNasr; Serria, Hammami Turky; Mounir, Zeghal Khaled

    2013-01-01

    Several peptides contained in scorpion fluids showed diverse array of biological activities with high specificities to their targeted sites. Many investigations outlined their potent effects against microbes and showed their potential to modulate various biological mechanisms that are involved in immune, nervous, cardiovascular, and neoplastic diseases. Because of their important structural and functional diversity, it is projected that scorpion-derived peptides could be used to develop new specific drugs. This review summarizes relevant findings improving their use as valuable tools for new drugs development. PMID:23843786

  15. Assessment of cognitive safety in clinical drug development

    PubMed Central

    Roiser, Jonathan P.; Nathan, Pradeep J.; Mander, Adrian P.; Adusei, Gabriel; Zavitz, Kenton H.; Blackwell, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is increasingly recognised as an important potential adverse effect of medication. However, many drug development programmes do not incorporate sensitive cognitive measurements. Here, we review the rationale for cognitive safety assessment, and explain several basic methodological principles for measuring cognition during clinical drug development, including study design and statistical analysis, from Phase I through to postmarketing. The crucial issue of how cognition should be assessed is emphasized, especially the sensitivity of measurement. We also consider how best to interpret the magnitude of any identified effects, including comparison with benchmarks. We conclude by discussing strategies for the effective communication of cognitive risks. PMID:26610416

  16. Low hanging fruit in infectious disease drug development.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Carl N

    2008-10-01

    Cost estimates for developing new molecular entities (NME) are reaching non-sustainable levels and coupled with increasing regulatory requirements and oversight have led many pharmaceutical sponsors to divest their anti-microbial development portfolios [Projan SJ: Why is big Pharma getting out of anti-bacterial drug discovery?Curr Opin Microbiol 2003, 6:427-430] [Spellberg B, Powers JH, Brass EP, Miller LG, Edwards JE, Jr: Trends in antimicrobial drug development: implications for the future.Clin Infect Dis 2004, 38:1279-1286]. Operational issues such as study planning and execution are significant contributors to the overall cost of drug development that can benefit from the leveraging of pre-randomization data in an evidence-based approach to protocol development, site selection and patient recruitment. For non-NME products there is even greater benefit from available data resources since these data may permit smaller and shorter study programs. There are now many available open source intelligence (OSINT) resources that are being integrated into drug development programs, permitting an evidence-based or 'operational epidemiology' approach to study planning and execution.

  17. Low hanging fruit in infectious disease drug development.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Carl N

    2008-10-01

    Cost estimates for developing new molecular entities (NME) are reaching non-sustainable levels and coupled with increasing regulatory requirements and oversight have led many pharmaceutical sponsors to divest their anti-microbial development portfolios [Projan SJ: Why is big Pharma getting out of anti-bacterial drug discovery?Curr Opin Microbiol 2003, 6:427-430] [Spellberg B, Powers JH, Brass EP, Miller LG, Edwards JE, Jr: Trends in antimicrobial drug development: implications for the future.Clin Infect Dis 2004, 38:1279-1286]. Operational issues such as study planning and execution are significant contributors to the overall cost of drug development that can benefit from the leveraging of pre-randomization data in an evidence-based approach to protocol development, site selection and patient recruitment. For non-NME products there is even greater benefit from available data resources since these data may permit smaller and shorter study programs. There are now many available open source intelligence (OSINT) resources that are being integrated into drug development programs, permitting an evidence-based or 'operational epidemiology' approach to study planning and execution. PMID:18822387

  18. Diabetes mellitus: Exploring the challenges in the drug development process.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Julius A; Patnaik, Ashis

    2012-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportions and continues to be a major burden on society globally. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimated the global burden of diabetes to be 366 million in 2011 and predicted that by 2030 this will have risen to 552 million. In spite of newer and effective treatment options, newer delivery and diagnostic devices, stricter glycaemic targets, better treatment guidelines and increased awareness of the disease, baseline glycosylated hemoglobin remains relatively high in subjects diagnosed and treated with type 2 diabetes. The search continues for an ideal anti diabetic drug that will not only normalize blood glucose but also provide beta cell rest and possibly restoration of beta cell function. The development of anti diabetic drugs is riddled with fundamental challenges. The concept of beta cell rest and restoration is yet to be completely understood and proven on a long term. The ideal therapeutic approach to treating type 2 diabetes is not yet determined. Our understanding of drug safety in early clinical development is primarily limited to "Type A" reactions. Until marketing authorization most drugs are approved based on the principle of confirming non-inferiority with an existing gold standard or determining superiority to a placebo. The need to obtain robust pharmaco-economic data prior to marketing authorization in order to determine appropriate pricing of a new drug remains a major challenge. The present review outlines some of the challenges in drug development of anti-diabetic drugs citing examples of pulmonary insulin, insulin analogues, thiazolidinediones and the GLP1 analogues. PMID:23125962

  19. Liposomes and nanotechnology in drug development: focus on neurological targets

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Cabrer, Pedro; Campos, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Neurological diseases represent a medical, social, and economic problem of paramount importance in developed countries. Although their etiology is generally known, developing therapeutic interventions for the central nervous system is challenging due to the impermeability of the blood–brain barrier. Thus, the fight against neurological diseases usually struggles “at the gates” of the brain. Flooding the bloodstream with drugs, where only a minor fraction reaches its target therapeutic site, is an inefficient, expensive, and dangerous procedure, because of the risk of side effects at nontargeted sites. Currently, advances in the field of nanotechnology have enabled development of a generation of multifunctional molecular platforms that are capable of transporting drugs across the blood–brain barrier, targeting specific cell types or functional states within the brain, releasing drugs in a controlled manner, and enabling visualization of processes in vivo using conventional imaging systems. The marriage between drug delivery and molecular imaging disciplines has resulted in a relatively new discipline, known as theranostics, which represents the basis of the concept of personalized medicine. In this study, we review the concepts of the blood–brain barrier and the strategies used to traverse/bypass it, the role of nanotechnology in theranostics, the wide range of nanoparticles (with emphasis on liposomes) that can be used as stealth drug carriers, imaging probes and targeting devices for the treatment of neurological diseases, and the targets and targeting strategies envisaged in the treatment of different types of brain pathology. PMID:23486739

  20. Liposomes and nanotechnology in drug development: focus on neurological targets.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Cabrer, Pedro; Campos, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Neurological diseases represent a medical, social, and economic problem of paramount importance in developed countries. Although their etiology is generally known, developing therapeutic interventions for the central nervous system is challenging due to the impermeability of the blood-brain barrier. Thus, the fight against neurological diseases usually struggles "at the gates" of the brain. Flooding the bloodstream with drugs, where only a minor fraction reaches its target therapeutic site, is an inefficient, expensive, and dangerous procedure, because of the risk of side effects at nontargeted sites. Currently, advances in the field of nanotechnology have enabled development of a generation of multifunctional molecular platforms that are capable of transporting drugs across the blood-brain barrier, targeting specific cell types or functional states within the brain, releasing drugs in a controlled manner, and enabling visualization of processes in vivo using conventional imaging systems. The marriage between drug delivery and molecular imaging disciplines has resulted in a relatively new discipline, known as theranostics, which represents the basis of the concept of personalized medicine. In this study, we review the concepts of the blood-brain barrier and the strategies used to traverse/bypass it, the role of nanotechnology in theranostics, the wide range of nanoparticles (with emphasis on liposomes) that can be used as stealth drug carriers, imaging probes and targeting devices for the treatment of neurological diseases, and the targets and targeting strategies envisaged in the treatment of different types of brain pathology.

  1. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling in Pediatric Oncology Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Rioux, Nathalie; Waters, Nigel J

    2016-07-01

    Childhood cancer represents more than 100 rare and ultra-rare diseases, with an estimated 12,400 new cases diagnosed each year in the United States. As such, this much smaller patient population has led to pediatric oncology drug development lagging behind that for adult cancers. Developing drugs for pediatric malignancies also brings with it a number of unique trial design considerations, including flexible enrollment approaches, age-appropriate formulation, acceptable sampling schedules, and balancing the need for age-stratified dosing regimens, given the smaller patient populations. The regulatory landscape for pediatric pharmacotherapy has evolved with U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) legislation such as the 2012 FDA Safety and Innovation Act. In parallel, regulatory authorities have recommended the application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling, for example, in the recently issued FDA Strategic Plan for Accelerating the Development of Therapies for Pediatric Rare Diseases. PBPK modeling provides a quantitative and systems-based framework that allows the effects of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on drug exposure to be modeled in a mechanistic fashion. The application of PBPK modeling in drug development for pediatric cancers is relatively nascent, with several retrospective analyses of cytotoxic therapies, and latterly for targeted agents such as obatoclax and imatinib. More recently, we have employed PBPK modeling in a prospective manner to inform the first pediatric trials of pinometostat and tazemetostat in genetically defined populations (mixed lineage leukemia-rearranged and integrase interactor-1-deficient sarcomas, respectively). In this review, we evaluate the application of PBPK modeling in pediatric cancer drug development and discuss the important challenges that lie ahead in this field.

  2. Perestroika in pharma: evolution or revolution in drug development?

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, Garret A

    2010-01-01

    New-drug approvals have remained roughly constant since 1950, while the cost of drug development has soared. It seems likely that a more modular approach to drug discovery and development will evolve, deriving some features from the not-for-profit sector. For this to occur, we must address the deficit in human capital with expertise in both translational medicine and therapeutics and also in regulatory science; utilize regulatory reform to incentivize innovation and the expansion of the precompetitive space; and develop an informatics infrastructure that permits the global, secure, and compliant sharing of heterogeneous data across academic and industry sectors. These developments, likely prompted by the perception of crisis rather than opportunity, will require linked initiatives among academia, the pharmaceutical industry, the US National Institutes of Health, and the US Food and Drug Administration, along with a more adventurous role for venture capital. A failure to respond threatens the United States' lead in biomedical science and in the development and regulation of novel therapeutics.

  3. Development of new drug delivery system for protein drugs using silicone (I).

    PubMed

    Kajihara, M; Sugie, T; Mizuno, M; Tamura, N; Sano, A; Fujioka, K; Kashiwazaki, Y; Yamaoka, T; Sugawara, S; Urabe, Y

    2000-05-01

    A novel technique, by which protein drugs effective in small doses can be released over a long period, was developed using silicone and a water-soluble substance. In this study, interferon (IFN) was used as a model of the protein drugs. The IFN-silicone formulation released IFN over long periods of time in vitro and suppressed tumor growth in nude mice for about 100 days after a single administration. This indicates that physiologically active IFN is released over a prolonged period of time from the IFN-silicone formulation in vivo. Silicone formulations are expected to be a practically feasible sustained-release formulation. PMID:10708878

  4. Current regulatory perspectives on genotoxicity testing for botanical drug product development in the U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kuei-Meng; Dou, Jinhui; Ghantous, Hanan; Chen, Shaw; Bigger, Anita; Birnkrant, Debra

    2010-02-01

    Genotoxicity testing is an important part of preclinical safety assessment of new drugs and is required prior to Phase I/II clinical trials. It is designed to detect genetic damage such as gene mutations and chromosomal aberration, which may be reflected in tumorigenic or heritable mutation potential of the drug. Botanical new drugs in the U.S. are entitled to a waiver for preclinical pharmacology/toxicology studies, including genotoxicity testing, in support of an initial clinical trial under IND, contingent on previous human experience. Recently, ethical concerns have been raised over conducting Phase I/II clinical trials of new drugs with positive genotoxicity findings in healthy volunteers. Although the relevance of this issue to patients, as opposed to healthy volunteers, depends on the drug's indication, duration of treatment, and specific findings related to the assays, the regulatory view is to avoid exposing patients to genotoxic compounds unnecessarily in clinical trials. This philosophy may impact on herbal supplement marketing and botanical drug development, in that genotoxicity data are often lacking while consumers are exposed to the herbal supplement, or healthy volunteers are tested in an initial Phase I/II clinical trial on the botanical drug. This paper presents results of a survey conducted on genotoxicity data in botanical INDs submitted to the Agency and discusses the significance of this information. The information presented indicates that the sponsors of botanical INDs have increasingly recognized the importance of genotoxicity information and may have prioritized its acquisition in their strategic drug development programs.

  5. [Development of topical drug delivery systems utilizing polymeric materials].

    PubMed

    Machida, Y

    1993-05-01

    Topical drug delivery is important from the view points of improvement of therapeutic effect and reduction of systemic side effects. Utilization of polymeric materials seemed to be as a key for the development of new topical dosage forms including targeting drug delivery systems. Adriamycin ointment for local chemotherapy to breast cancer prepared using polyethylene glycol, ammonium polyacrylate and hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) according to an optimum formulation showed an excellent clinical effect in spite of a decreased drug content. Double-layered mucoadhesive sticks for the treatment of uterine cervix cancer were prepared by direct compression of powder mixture of bleomycin, HPC and carboxyvinyl polymer (CP). Drug release property of the sticks could be controlled by the weight of outer layer, drug combining ratio to each layer and coating of core layer. The results suggested a possibility of a "once-a-week" treatment that is preferable for the patients. Magnetic granules for the treatment of esophageal cancer were prepared using ferrite, HPC and CP. Magnetic guidance and retainment of the granules on esophageal mucosa were confirmed using rabbits in vivo. Buoyant sustained release preparations were prepared using chitosan, soybean protein, HPC and other polymers. Usefulness of the buoyant preparations was suggested from the results in vitro and in vivo. Insulin microspheres (IMS) for targeting delivery to the small intestine were prepared by the newly developed method. Employment of enteric coating material (Eudragit) and combination of protease inhibitor protected insulin from enzymatic attack and gave decreased levels of blood glucose by oral administration.

  6. EMERGING MICROTECHNOLOGIES FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF ORAL DRUG DELIVERY DEVICES

    PubMed Central

    Chirra, Hariharasudhan D.; Desai, Tejal A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of oral drug delivery platforms for administering therapeutics in a safe and effective manner across the gastrointestinal epithelium is of much importance. A variety of delivery systems such as enterically coated tablets, capsules, particles, and liposomes have been developed to improve oral bioavailability of drugs. However, orally administered drugs suffer from poor localization and therapeutic efficacy due to various physiological conditions such as low pH, and high shear intestinal fluid flow. Novel platforms combining controlled release, improved adhesion, tissue penetration, and selective intestinal targeting may overcome these issues and potentially diminish the toxicity and high frequency of administration associated with conventional oral delivery. Microfabrication along with appropriate surface chemistry, provide a means to fabricate these platforms en masse with flexibility in tailoring the shape, size, reservoir volume, and surface characteristics of microdevices. Moreover, the same technology can be used to include integrated circuit technology and sensors for designing sophisticated autonomous drug delivery devices that promise to significantly improve point of care diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications. This review sheds light on some of the fabrication techniques and addresses a few of the microfabricated devices that can be effectively used for controlled oral drug delivery applications. PMID:22981755

  7. Toward the development of podocyte-specific drugs

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, Jochen; Gupta, Vineet; Kistler, Andreas D.

    2014-01-01

    Most kidney diseases that ultimately lead to end-stage renal failure originate within the glomerulus and are associated with proteinuria. Treatment options are unspecific and offer partial cures at best because available therapies do not primarily treat glomerular cells but rather act systemically and thus cause many side effects. Most glomerulopathies directly stem from injury to podocytes, cells that have a key role in the maintenance of the glomerular filter. Thus, these cells constitute an obvious and promising target for the development of novel kidney-protective drugs. During the last decade, enormous advances have been made in the understanding of podocyte structure and function. A number of pathways that are altered during glomerular diseases may be targeted by novel small- and large-molecule drugs as well as biologicals that have been identified in nephrology and other areas of drug development. Cultured podocytes provide a valuable model for high-throughput drug screening assays. Furthermore, podocytes have been shown to possess many features that make them particularly good target cells for renal protection. This mini-review discusses some of the most recent promising data related to potential drug therapy for proteinuria and kidney disease through direct podocyte targeting. PMID:20130528

  8. Quantitative EEG Brain Mapping In Psychotropic Drug Development, Drug Treatment Selection, and Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Itil, Turan M.; Itil, Kurt Z.

    1995-05-01

    Quantification of standard electroencephalogram (EEG) by digital computers [computer-analyzed EEG (CEEG)] has transformed the subjective analog EEG into an objective scientific method. Until a few years ago, CEEG was only used to assist in the development of psychotropic drugs by means of the quantitative pharmaco EEG. Thanks to the computer revolution and the accompanying reductions in cost of quantification, CEEG can now also be applied in psychiatric practice. CEEG can assist the physician in confirming clinical diagnoses, selecting psychotropic drugs for treatment, and drug treatment monitoring. Advancements in communications technology allow physicians and researchers to reduce the costs of acquiring a high-technology CEEG brain mapping system by utilizing the more economical telephonic services. PMID:11850678

  9. Quantitative EEG Brain Mapping In Psychotropic Drug Development, Drug Treatment Selection, and Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Itil, Turan M.; Itil, Kurt Z.

    1995-05-01

    Quantification of standard electroencephalogram (EEG) by digital computers [computer-analyzed EEG (CEEG)] has transformed the subjective analog EEG into an objective scientific method. Until a few years ago, CEEG was only used to assist in the development of psychotropic drugs by means of the quantitative pharmaco EEG. Thanks to the computer revolution and the accompanying reductions in cost of quantification, CEEG can now also be applied in psychiatric practice. CEEG can assist the physician in confirming clinical diagnoses, selecting psychotropic drugs for treatment, and drug treatment monitoring. Advancements in communications technology allow physicians and researchers to reduce the costs of acquiring a high-technology CEEG brain mapping system by utilizing the more economical telephonic services.

  10. Blood-brain barrier drug targeting: the future of brain drug development.

    PubMed

    Pardridge, William M

    2003-03-01

    As human longevity increases, the likelihood of the onset of diseases of the brain (and other organs) also increases. Clinical therapeutics offer useful long-term treatments, if not cures, if drugs can be delivered appropriately and effectively. Unfortunately, research in drug transport to the brain has not advanced very far. Through better characterization of the transport systems utilized within the blood-brain barrier, a greater understanding of how to exploit these systems will lead to effective treatments for brain disorders. Pardridge reviews the functions of the various known transport systems in the brain and discusses how the development of BBB drug-targeting programs in pharmaceutical and academic settings may lead to more efficacious treatments.

  11. 75 FR 33317 - Antibacterial Resistance and Diagnostic Device and Drug Development Research for Bacterial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... Development Research for Bacterial Diseases; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... Diseases Society of America (IDSA) regarding scientific and potential research issues in antibacterial drug resistance, rapid diagnostic device development for bacterial diseases, and antibacterial drug...

  12. Preventing Drug Abuse among Hispanic Adolescents: Developing a Responsive Intervention Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schinke, Steven P.; Schwinn, Traci M.; Hursh, Hilary A.

    2015-01-01

    Intervention research is essential to help Hispanic American adolescents avoid drug use. This article describes an intervention research program aimed at preventing drug use among these youths. Grounded in salient epidemiological data, the program is informed by bicultural competence, social learning, and motivational interviewing theories. The…

  13. Cheaper faster drug development validated by the repositioning of drugs against neglected tropical diseases

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kevin; Bilsland, Elizabeth; Sparkes, Andrew; Aubrey, Wayne; Young, Michael; Soldatova, Larisa N.; De Grave, Kurt; Ramon, Jan; de Clare, Michaela; Sirawaraporn, Worachart; Oliver, Stephen G.; King, Ross D.

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need to make drug discovery cheaper and faster. This will enable the development of treatments for diseases currently neglected for economic reasons, such as tropical and orphan diseases, and generally increase the supply of new drugs. Here, we report the Robot Scientist ‘Eve’ designed to make drug discovery more economical. A Robot Scientist is a laboratory automation system that uses artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to discover scientific knowledge through cycles of experimentation. Eve integrates and automates library-screening, hit-confirmation, and lead generation through cycles of quantitative structure activity relationship learning and testing. Using econometric modelling we demonstrate that the use of AI to select compounds economically outperforms standard drug screening. For further efficiency Eve uses a standardized form of assay to compute Boolean functions of compound properties. These assays can be quickly and cheaply engineered using synthetic biology, enabling more targets to be assayed for a given budget. Eve has repositioned several drugs against specific targets in parasites that cause tropical diseases. One validated discovery is that the anti-cancer compound TNP-470 is a potent inhibitor of dihydrofolate reductase from the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium vivax. PMID:25652463

  14. Cheaper faster drug development validated by the repositioning of drugs against neglected tropical diseases.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kevin; Bilsland, Elizabeth; Sparkes, Andrew; Aubrey, Wayne; Young, Michael; Soldatova, Larisa N; De Grave, Kurt; Ramon, Jan; de Clare, Michaela; Sirawaraporn, Worachart; Oliver, Stephen G; King, Ross D

    2015-03-01

    There is an urgent need to make drug discovery cheaper and faster. This will enable the development of treatments for diseases currently neglected for economic reasons, such as tropical and orphan diseases, and generally increase the supply of new drugs. Here, we report the Robot Scientist 'Eve' designed to make drug discovery more economical. A Robot Scientist is a laboratory automation system that uses artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to discover scientific knowledge through cycles of experimentation. Eve integrates and automates library-screening, hit-confirmation, and lead generation through cycles of quantitative structure activity relationship learning and testing. Using econometric modelling we demonstrate that the use of AI to select compounds economically outperforms standard drug screening. For further efficiency Eve uses a standardized form of assay to compute Boolean functions of compound properties. These assays can be quickly and cheaply engineered using synthetic biology, enabling more targets to be assayed for a given budget. Eve has repositioned several drugs against specific targets in parasites that cause tropical diseases. One validated discovery is that the anti-cancer compound TNP-470 is a potent inhibitor of dihydrofolate reductase from the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium vivax.

  15. Cheaper faster drug development validated by the repositioning of drugs against neglected tropical diseases.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kevin; Bilsland, Elizabeth; Sparkes, Andrew; Aubrey, Wayne; Young, Michael; Soldatova, Larisa N; De Grave, Kurt; Ramon, Jan; de Clare, Michaela; Sirawaraporn, Worachart; Oliver, Stephen G; King, Ross D

    2015-03-01

    There is an urgent need to make drug discovery cheaper and faster. This will enable the development of treatments for diseases currently neglected for economic reasons, such as tropical and orphan diseases, and generally increase the supply of new drugs. Here, we report the Robot Scientist 'Eve' designed to make drug discovery more economical. A Robot Scientist is a laboratory automation system that uses artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to discover scientific knowledge through cycles of experimentation. Eve integrates and automates library-screening, hit-confirmation, and lead generation through cycles of quantitative structure activity relationship learning and testing. Using econometric modelling we demonstrate that the use of AI to select compounds economically outperforms standard drug screening. For further efficiency Eve uses a standardized form of assay to compute Boolean functions of compound properties. These assays can be quickly and cheaply engineered using synthetic biology, enabling more targets to be assayed for a given budget. Eve has repositioned several drugs against specific targets in parasites that cause tropical diseases. One validated discovery is that the anti-cancer compound TNP-470 is a potent inhibitor of dihydrofolate reductase from the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium vivax. PMID:25652463

  16. [International Partnership for Therapeutic Drug Development of NTDs by DNDi].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Haruki; Hirabayashi, Fumiko; Brünger, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi), with headquarters in Geneva, is a non-profit drug research and development (R&D) organization and Product Development Partnership (PDP) which was established in 2003 by 7 founding organizations such as Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), the Pasteur Institute, The Specific Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (WHO-TDR), etc. DNDi has worked mainly on the development of new treatments for neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), which is difficult to achieve under market economy conditions. DNDi has promoted overall drug discovery research including the screening of drug candidates, hit to lead, lead optimization, pre-clinical and clinical studies in the area of infectious diseases with a focus on malaria, sleeping sickness (human African trypanosomiasis; HAT), Chagas disease, leishmaniasis, filarial diseases and pediatric formulations for HIV treatment. DNDi's achievements include the development of novel therapies based on patient needs through innovative partnerships with over 130 organizations in industry, government, academia, and public institutions around the world. To date, DNDi has registered 6 novel treatments adapted to the needs of patients in poor countries, and has another 12 novel entities in development. DNDi Japan is a Japanese non-profit organization (NPO) based on the global principles of DNDi and, as the only PDP in Japan, is supporting NTD drug discovery projects in collaboration with Japanese pharmaceutical companies, academic institutions and government agencies by utilizing Japan's excellent R&D capabilities to develop new treatments for NTDs in order to contribute to global health.

  17. [International Partnership for Therapeutic Drug Development of NTDs by DNDi].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Haruki; Hirabayashi, Fumiko; Brünger, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi), with headquarters in Geneva, is a non-profit drug research and development (R&D) organization and Product Development Partnership (PDP) which was established in 2003 by 7 founding organizations such as Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), the Pasteur Institute, The Specific Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (WHO-TDR), etc. DNDi has worked mainly on the development of new treatments for neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), which is difficult to achieve under market economy conditions. DNDi has promoted overall drug discovery research including the screening of drug candidates, hit to lead, lead optimization, pre-clinical and clinical studies in the area of infectious diseases with a focus on malaria, sleeping sickness (human African trypanosomiasis; HAT), Chagas disease, leishmaniasis, filarial diseases and pediatric formulations for HIV treatment. DNDi's achievements include the development of novel therapies based on patient needs through innovative partnerships with over 130 organizations in industry, government, academia, and public institutions around the world. To date, DNDi has registered 6 novel treatments adapted to the needs of patients in poor countries, and has another 12 novel entities in development. DNDi Japan is a Japanese non-profit organization (NPO) based on the global principles of DNDi and, as the only PDP in Japan, is supporting NTD drug discovery projects in collaboration with Japanese pharmaceutical companies, academic institutions and government agencies by utilizing Japan's excellent R&D capabilities to develop new treatments for NTDs in order to contribute to global health. PMID:26831796

  18. Strategies to address low drug solubility in discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Williams, Hywel D; Trevaskis, Natalie L; Charman, Susan A; Shanker, Ravi M; Charman, William N; Pouton, Colin W; Porter, Christopher J H

    2013-01-01

    Drugs with low water solubility are predisposed to low and variable oral bioavailability and, therefore, to variability in clinical response. Despite significant efforts to "design in" acceptable developability properties (including aqueous solubility) during lead optimization, approximately 40% of currently marketed compounds and most current drug development candidates remain poorly water-soluble. The fact that so many drug candidates of this type are advanced into development and clinical assessment is testament to an increasingly sophisticated understanding of the approaches that can be taken to promote apparent solubility in the gastrointestinal tract and to support drug exposure after oral administration. Here we provide a detailed commentary on the major challenges to the progression of a poorly water-soluble lead or development candidate and review the approaches and strategies that can be taken to facilitate compound progression. In particular, we address the fundamental principles that underpin the use of strategies, including pH adjustment and salt-form selection, polymorphs, cocrystals, cosolvents, surfactants, cyclodextrins, particle size reduction, amorphous solid dispersions, and lipid-based formulations. In each case, the theoretical basis for utility is described along with a detailed review of recent advances in the field. The article provides an integrated and contemporary discussion of current approaches to solubility and dissolution enhancement but has been deliberately structured as a series of stand-alone sections to allow also directed access to a specific technology (e.g., solid dispersions, lipid-based formulations, or salt forms) where required.

  19. Open data in drug discovery and development: lessons from malaria.

    PubMed

    Wells, Timothy N C; Willis, Paul; Burrows, Jeremy N; Hooft van Huijsduijnen, Rob

    2016-10-01

    There is a growing consensus that drug discovery thrives in an open environment. Here, we describe how the malaria community has embraced four levels of open data - open science, open innovation, open access and open source - to catalyse the development of new medicines, and consider principles that could enable open data approaches to be applied to other disease areas.

  20. [Trade-offs in oral drug product development].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hiromu; Sako, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Drug products are developed to meet multiple targets, thereby increasing their value. Pharmaceutical scientists encounter several trade-offs during the development of novel oral formulations. These trade-offs are generated by their desire to supply the highest possible quality products under the prevailing conditions of limited time and cost, and feasible options. When there are two incompatible factors, it is sometimes difficult to dismiss one element. This is because a quality target product profile (QTPP) is critical for each product being developed, and all elements should basically be satisfied with the criteria. Therefore, technological innovation becomes important to overcome the trade-offs. This article introduces examples of such innovations which have been successful in doing this, as well as some encountered in the oral formulation development and in the selection of proper dosage forms. Based on these examples, points to be considered in order to produce the drug product are thoroughly discussed. PMID:25747218

  1. [Post-authorization research, registries, and drug development].

    PubMed

    Patarnello, Francesca; Recchia, Giuseppe

    2013-06-01

    In the last decade regulators, payers and health care providers tried to react to three major problems in drug development and drug use in clinical practice: the pharmaceutical R&D productivity crisis, the immaturity of benefit-risk profile for several newly approved drugs and the overall impact on economic sustainability of reimbursing new high cost drugs in their systems. The potentiality of create a continuum between the evidence requirements relevant for registration, for reimbursement and for post authorization research is clear. All different parties involved, like regulators, HTA agencies, scientific communities and manufacturers, are working to improve the knowledge profile of new drugs in order to anticipate the patient access to innovation, limiting or preventing the clinical and economical risks deriving from an incomplete safety and effectiveness profile. The Italian example of "New Drugs AIFA Registries", with or without the application of risk sharing schemes (cost sharing, pay for performance, etc.), introduced a new process and increased the sensitivity on this topic. However this might probably represents only a partial answer to the problem of how to set up the governance of coverage with evidence, drug utilization monitoring, comparative effectiveness research, outcome research programs and may be how to link them to access, pricing and reimbursement. The step change in post authorization research could be to "integrate" different sources and stakeholders in a wider and continuous approach, in a well designed and inclusive "second generation" HTA approach, where all resources (competencies, data, funding) will concur to increase the evidence profile and reduce the risks, and where any "evidence generation approach" is really compliant with the standard and rules of best research practices.

  2. [Post-authorization research, registries, and drug development].

    PubMed

    Patarnello, Francesca; Recchia, Giuseppe

    2013-06-01

    In the last decade regulators, payers and health care providers tried to react to three major problems in drug development and drug use in clinical practice: the pharmaceutical R&D productivity crisis, the immaturity of benefit-risk profile for several newly approved drugs and the overall impact on economic sustainability of reimbursing new high cost drugs in their systems. The potentiality of create a continuum between the evidence requirements relevant for registration, for reimbursement and for post authorization research is clear. All different parties involved, like regulators, HTA agencies, scientific communities and manufacturers, are working to improve the knowledge profile of new drugs in order to anticipate the patient access to innovation, limiting or preventing the clinical and economical risks deriving from an incomplete safety and effectiveness profile. The Italian example of "New Drugs AIFA Registries", with or without the application of risk sharing schemes (cost sharing, pay for performance, etc.), introduced a new process and increased the sensitivity on this topic. However this might probably represents only a partial answer to the problem of how to set up the governance of coverage with evidence, drug utilization monitoring, comparative effectiveness research, outcome research programs and may be how to link them to access, pricing and reimbursement. The step change in post authorization research could be to "integrate" different sources and stakeholders in a wider and continuous approach, in a well designed and inclusive "second generation" HTA approach, where all resources (competencies, data, funding) will concur to increase the evidence profile and reduce the risks, and where any "evidence generation approach" is really compliant with the standard and rules of best research practices. PMID:23801233

  3. Development of novel drug delivery systems using phage display technology for clinical application of protein drugs

    PubMed Central

    NAGANO, Kazuya; TSUTSUMI, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Attempts are being made to develop therapeutic proteins for cancer, hepatitis, and autoimmune conditions, but their clinical applications are limited, except in the cases of drugs based on erythropoietin, granulocyte colony–stimulating factor, interferon-alpha, and antibodies, owing to problems with fundamental technologies for protein drug discovery. It is difficult to identify proteins useful as therapeutic seeds or targets. Another problem in using bioactive proteins is pleiotropic actions through receptors, making it hard to elicit desired effects without side effects. Additionally, bioactive proteins have poor therapeutic effects owing to degradation by proteases and rapid excretion from the circulatory system. Therefore, it is essential to establish a series of novel drug delivery systems (DDS) to overcome these problems. Here, we review original technologies in DDS. First, we introduce antibody proteomics technology for effective selection of proteins useful as therapeutic seeds or targets and identification of various kinds of proteins, such as cancer-specific proteins, cancer metastasis–related proteins, and a cisplatin resistance–related protein. Especially Ephrin receptor A10 is expressed in breast tumor tissues but not in normal tissues and is a promising drug target potentially useful for breast cancer treatment. Moreover, we have developed a system for rapidly creating functional mutant proteins to optimize the seeds for therapeutic applications and used this system to generate various kinds of functional cytokine muteins. Among them, R1antTNF is a TNFR1-selective antagonistic mutant of TNF and is the first mutein converted from agonist to antagonist. We also review a novel polymer-conjugation system to improve the in vivo stability of bioactive proteins. Site-specific PEGylated R1antTNF is uniform at the molecular level, and its bioactivity is similar to that of unmodified R1antTNF. In the future, we hope that many innovative protein drugs will

  4. Developing doctoral scientists for drug discovery: pluridimensional education required.

    PubMed

    Janero, David R

    2013-02-01

    Research universities continue to produce new scientists capable of generating knowledge with the potential to inform disease etiology and treatment. Mounting interest of doctoral-level experimental science students in therapeutics-related research careers is discordant with the widespread lack of direct drug-discovery and development experience, let alone commercialization success, among university faculty and administrators. Likewise, the archetypical publication- and grant-fueled, principal investigator (PI)-focused academic system ("PI-stan") risks commoditization of science students pursuing their doctorates as a labor source, rendering them ill-prepared for career options related to therapeutics innovation by marginalizing their development of "beyond-the-bench" professional skills foundational to modern drug-discovery campaigns and career fluency. To militate against professionalization deficits in doctoral drug-discovery researchers, the author--a scientist-administrator-consultant with decades of discovery research and development (R&D), business, and educator experience in commercial and university settings--posits a critical need for pluridimensionality in graduate education and mentorship that extends well beyond thesis-related scientific domains/laboratory techniques to instill transferable operational-intelligence, project/people-management, and communication competencies. Specific initiatives are advocated to help enhance the doctoral science student's market competitiveness, adaptability, and navigation of the significant research, commercial, and occupational challenges associated with contemporary preclinical drug-discovery R&D. PMID:23231364

  5. Developing doctoral scientists for drug discovery: pluridimensional education required.

    PubMed

    Janero, David R

    2013-02-01

    Research universities continue to produce new scientists capable of generating knowledge with the potential to inform disease etiology and treatment. Mounting interest of doctoral-level experimental science students in therapeutics-related research careers is discordant with the widespread lack of direct drug-discovery and development experience, let alone commercialization success, among university faculty and administrators. Likewise, the archetypical publication- and grant-fueled, principal investigator (PI)-focused academic system ("PI-stan") risks commoditization of science students pursuing their doctorates as a labor source, rendering them ill-prepared for career options related to therapeutics innovation by marginalizing their development of "beyond-the-bench" professional skills foundational to modern drug-discovery campaigns and career fluency. To militate against professionalization deficits in doctoral drug-discovery researchers, the author--a scientist-administrator-consultant with decades of discovery research and development (R&D), business, and educator experience in commercial and university settings--posits a critical need for pluridimensionality in graduate education and mentorship that extends well beyond thesis-related scientific domains/laboratory techniques to instill transferable operational-intelligence, project/people-management, and communication competencies. Specific initiatives are advocated to help enhance the doctoral science student's market competitiveness, adaptability, and navigation of the significant research, commercial, and occupational challenges associated with contemporary preclinical drug-discovery R&D.

  6. Expression genomics and drug development: towards predictive pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Edison T

    2005-02-01

    Expression genomics can be defined as the study of the dynamic transciptome and its regulatory elements. Technologies are available that can assess transcripts on a genome-wide scale over time and across many samples. This comprehensive and dynamic database is being used to decipher signalling pathways and to identify new biomarkers and targets. Biomarkers emerging from these studies have prognostic potential and can be used to predict therapeutic outcome. The multiplex nature of this approach not only telescopes the time to discovery, but also allows for detection of complex interactions. Taken together, these capabilities, if carefully used, can speed drug development, enhance the identification of potent drug combinations and identify patient populations that will benefit from these new drugs. PMID:15814022

  7. Drug Discovery and Development of Antimalarial Agents: Recent Advances.

    PubMed

    Thota, Sreekanth; Yerra, Rajeshwar

    2016-01-01

    Malaria, a deadly infectious parasitic disease, is a major issue of public health in the world today and already produces serious economic constraints in the endemic countries. Most of the malarial infections and deaths are due to Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax species. The recent emergence of resistance necessitates the search for new antimalarial drugs, which overcome the resistance and act through new mechanisms. Although much effort has been directed towards the discovery of novel antimalarial drugs. 4-anilino quinolone triazines as potent antimalarial agents, their in silico modelling and bioevaluation as Plasmodium falciparum transketolase and β-hematin inhibitors has been reported. This review is primarily focused on the drug discovery of the recent advances in the development of antimalarial agents and their mechanism of action.

  8. Conference report: hot topics in antibody-drug conjugate development.

    PubMed

    Thudium, Karen; Bilic, Sanela

    2013-12-01

    American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists National Biotechnology Conference Sheraton San Diego Hotel and Marina, San Diego, CA, USA, 19-23 May 2013 The National Biotechnology Conference, is a premier meeting for biotechnology professionals covering a broad range of hot topics in the biotechnology industry. Attracting participants from academia, industry and regulatory, this meeting features sessions that aim to address emerging subjects of interest and allows for open exchange between scientists. The 2013 conference featured leading researchers in the fields of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) and immunogenicity. Herein, we present a summary of the ADC hot topics, including bioanalytical and PK considerations, quantitative evaluation of the impact of immunogenicity and ADME to understand ADC drug-drug interactions, and clinical considerations for ADC development. This article aims to summarize the recommendations that were made by the speakers during various sessions throughout the conference. PMID:24320125

  9. In Vitro Cell Models for Ophthalmic Drug Development Applications

    PubMed Central

    Shafaie, Sara; Hutter, Victoria; Cook, Michael T.; Brown, Marc B.; Chau, David Y.S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Tissue engineering is a rapidly expanding field that aims to establish feasible techniques to fabricate biologically equivalent replacements for diseased and damaged tissues/organs. Emerging from this prospect is the development of in vitro representations of organs for drug toxicity assessment. Due to the ever-increasing interest in ocular drug delivery as a route for administration as well as the rise of new ophthalmic therapeutics, there is a demand for physiologically accurate in vitro models of the eye to assess drug delivery and safety of new ocular medicines. This review summarizes current existing ocular models and highlights the important factors and limitations that need to be considered during their use. PMID:27158563

  10. A snapshot of biologic drug development: Challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Andrews, L; Ralston, S; Blomme, E; Barnhart, K

    2015-12-01

    Since the approval of insulin as the first recombinant therapeutic protein, the prominence of biologic therapies in drug development has grown significantly. Many modalities beyond traditional biologics are now being developed or explored for various indications with significant unmet medical needs. From early traditional replacement proteins to more recent, highly engineered antibodies, oligonucleotides, fusion proteins, and gene constructs, biologic agents have delivered life-changing therapies, despite often having scientifically and technically challenging development programs. This brief review outlines some of the major biotherapeutic classes and identifies the advantages and challenges with the development of these products. PMID:26614816

  11. Core competencies for pharmaceutical physicians and drug development scientists

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Honorio; Stonier, Peter; Buhler, Fritz; Deslypere, Jean-Paul; Criscuolo, Domenico; Nell, Gerfried; Massud, Joao; Geary, Stewart; Schenk, Johanna; Kerpel-Fronius, Sandor; Koski, Greg; Clemens, Norbert; Klingmann, Ingrid; Kesselring, Gustavo; van Olden, Rudolf; Dubois, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Professional groups, such as IFAPP (International Federation of Pharmaceutical Physicians and Pharmaceutical Medicine), are expected to produce the defined core competencies to orient the discipline and the academic programs for the development of future competent professionals and to advance the profession. On the other hand, PharmaTrain, an Innovative Medicines Initiative project, has become the largest public-private partnership in biomedicine in the European Continent and aims to provide postgraduate courses that are designed to meet the needs of professionals working in medicines development. A working group was formed within IFAPP including representatives from PharmaTrain, academic institutions and national member associations, with special interest and experience on Quality Improvement through education. The objectives were: to define a set of core competencies for pharmaceutical physicians and drug development scientists, to be summarized in a Statement of Competence and to benchmark and align these identified core competencies with the Learning Outcomes (LO) of the PharmaTrain Base Course. The objectives were successfully achieved. Seven domains and 60 core competencies were identified and aligned accordingly. The effective implementation of training programs using the competencies or the PharmaTrain LO anywhere in the world may transform the drug development process to an efficient and integrated process for better and safer medicines. The PharmaTrain Base Course might provide the cognitive framework to achieve the desired Statement of Competence for Pharmaceutical Physicians and Drug Development Scientists worldwide. PMID:23986704

  12. Core competencies for pharmaceutical physicians and drug development scientists.

    PubMed

    Silva, Honorio; Stonier, Peter; Buhler, Fritz; Deslypere, Jean-Paul; Criscuolo, Domenico; Nell, Gerfried; Massud, Joao; Geary, Stewart; Schenk, Johanna; Kerpel-Fronius, Sandor; Koski, Greg; Clemens, Norbert; Klingmann, Ingrid; Kesselring, Gustavo; van Olden, Rudolf; Dubois, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Professional groups, such as IFAPP (International Federation of Pharmaceutical Physicians and Pharmaceutical Medicine), are expected to produce the defined core competencies to orient the discipline and the academic programs for the development of future competent professionals and to advance the profession. On the other hand, PharmaTrain, an Innovative Medicines Initiative project, has become the largest public-private partnership in biomedicine in the European Continent and aims to provide postgraduate courses that are designed to meet the needs of professionals working in medicines development. A working group was formed within IFAPP including representatives from PharmaTrain, academic institutions and national member associations, with special interest and experience on Quality Improvement through education. The objectives were: to define a set of core competencies for pharmaceutical physicians and drug development scientists, to be summarized in a Statement of Competence and to benchmark and align these identified core competencies with the Learning Outcomes (LO) of the PharmaTrain Base Course. The objectives were successfully achieved. Seven domains and 60 core competencies were identified and aligned accordingly. The effective implementation of training programs using the competencies or the PharmaTrain LO anywhere in the world may transform the drug development process to an efficient and integrated process for better and safer medicines. The PharmaTrain Base Course might provide the cognitive framework to achieve the desired Statement of Competence for Pharmaceutical Physicians and Drug Development Scientists worldwide.

  13. Drug development from natural resource: a systematic approach.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S B; Gupta, Richa

    2015-01-01

    Modern research in drug discovery from medicinal plants involves a multidimensional approach combining botanical, phytochemical, biochemical combinatorial chemistry and bioassay-guided fractionation approaches. Natural sources continue to provide an alternative as pharmacological leads against various devastating diseases such as diabetes, CVD, cancer etc. Nowadays, there is enormous requirement of safe and effective drugs in the world. This has prompted scientists to revert back towards natural resources as a potential source of therapeutics for treatment and management of such chronic and fatal diseases. However, there are certain serious challenges and limitations in this field including scale up and commercialization of active compounds which allow only one in thousand lead molecules to be developed as drug. A systematic and scientific approach is an essential requirement for drug development from natural resource. This mini review provides an overview of the methods involved in natural product research starting from crude plant extract to bioactive pharmacological lead. Moreover, it also discusses the limitations of working concerning the bioactivity of medicinal plants.

  14. Network-Based Approaches in Drug Discovery and Early Development

    PubMed Central

    Harrold, JM; Ramanathan, M; Mager, DE

    2015-01-01

    Identification of novel targets is a critical first step in the drug discovery and development process. Most diseases such as cancer, metabolic disorders, and neurological disorders are complex, and their pathogenesis involves multiple genetic and environmental factors. Finding a viable drug target–drug combination with high potential for yielding clinical success within the efficacy–toxicity spectrum is extremely challenging. Many examples are now available in which network-based approaches show potential for the identification of novel targets and for the repositioning of established targets. The objective of this article is to highlight network approaches for identifying novel targets with greater chances of gaining approved drugs with maximal efficacy and minimal side effects. Further enhancement of these approaches may emerge from effectively integrating computational systems biology with pharmacodynamic systems analysis. Coupling genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics databases with systems pharmacology modeling may aid in the development of disease-specific networks that can be further used to build confidence in target identification. PMID:24025802

  15. Reactive Collision Avoidance Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Daniel; Acikmese, Behcet; Ploen, Scott; Hadaegh, Fred

    2010-01-01

    The reactive collision avoidance (RCA) algorithm allows a spacecraft to find a fuel-optimal trajectory for avoiding an arbitrary number of colliding spacecraft in real time while accounting for acceleration limits. In addition to spacecraft, the technology can be used for vehicles that can accelerate in any direction, such as helicopters and submersibles. In contrast to existing, passive algorithms that simultaneously design trajectories for a cluster of vehicles working to achieve a common goal, RCA is implemented onboard spacecraft only when an imminent collision is detected, and then plans a collision avoidance maneuver for only that host vehicle, thus preventing a collision in an off-nominal situation for which passive algorithms cannot. An example scenario for such a situation might be when a spacecraft in the cluster is approaching another one, but enters safe mode and begins to drift. Functionally, the RCA detects colliding spacecraft, plans an evasion trajectory by solving the Evasion Trajectory Problem (ETP), and then recovers after the collision is avoided. A direct optimization approach was used to develop the algorithm so it can run in real time. In this innovation, a parameterized class of avoidance trajectories is specified, and then the optimal trajectory is found by searching over the parameters. The class of trajectories is selected as bang-off-bang as motivated by optimal control theory. That is, an avoiding spacecraft first applies full acceleration in a constant direction, then coasts, and finally applies full acceleration to stop. The parameter optimization problem can be solved offline and stored as a look-up table of values. Using a look-up table allows the algorithm to run in real time. Given a colliding spacecraft, the properties of the collision geometry serve as indices of the look-up table that gives the optimal trajectory. For multiple colliding spacecraft, the set of trajectories that avoid all spacecraft is rapidly searched on

  16. Regulatory Circuitry Governing Fungal Development, Drug Resistance, and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Rebecca S.; Robbins, Nicole; Cowen, Leah E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Pathogenic fungi have become a leading cause of human mortality due to the increasing frequency of fungal infections in immunocompromised populations and the limited armamentarium of clinically useful antifungal drugs. Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Aspergillus fumigatus are the leading causes of opportunistic fungal infections. In these diverse pathogenic fungi, complex signal transduction cascades are critical for sensing environmental changes and mediating appropriate cellular responses. For C. albicans, several environmental cues regulate a morphogenetic switch from yeast to filamentous growth, a reversible transition important for virulence. Many of the signaling cascades regulating morphogenesis are also required for cells to adapt and survive the cellular stresses imposed by antifungal drugs. Many of these signaling networks are conserved in C. neoformans and A. fumigatus, which undergo distinct morphogenetic programs during specific phases of their life cycles. Furthermore, the key mechanisms of fungal drug resistance, including alterations of the drug target, overexpression of drug efflux transporters, and alteration of cellular stress responses, are conserved between these species. This review focuses on the circuitry regulating fungal morphogenesis and drug resistance and the impact of these pathways on virulence. Although the three human-pathogenic fungi highlighted in this review are those most frequently encountered in the clinic, they represent a minute fraction of fungal diversity. Exploration of the conservation and divergence of core signal transduction pathways across C. albicans, C. neoformans, and A. fumigatus provides a foundation for the study of a broader diversity of pathogenic fungi and a platform for the development of new therapeutic strategies for fungal disease. PMID:21646428

  17. Development of gummi drugs of aripiprazole as hospital formulations.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Shinya; Hiraoka, Shogo; Namiki, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    About half of patients with schizophrenia have poor adherence to taking medication, so many have recurrence, therefore, providing formulations that enable patients to continue their medication without interruption is important. We aimed to develop a gummi drug that contains aripiprazole (which can reduce schizophrenia and manic symptoms in bipolar disorder). We were able to develop gummi drugs (OD-G, PW-G and OS-G) using three commercially available aripiprazole products (Abilify® orally disintegrating tablets, powder formulation, and oral solutions, respectively) as hospital formulations. Furthermore, we developed improved OD-G (iOD-G), which contained high aripiprazole content. Pharmaceutical characteristics of iOD-G were demonstrated to be suitable for hospital formulations, and iOD-G could be stored for ≤1 month. No significant differences in the dissolution and pharmacokinetics of divided portions of iOD-G were observed when compared with commercially available aripiprazole products. This study confirmed that new dosage forms of aripiprazole in gummi drugs can be developed as hospital formulations, which will contribute to improve medication adherence of patients.

  18. Drug-usage evaluation by disease state: developing protocols.

    PubMed

    Enlow, M L

    1996-07-01

    The Joint Commission definition of drug-usage evaluation (DUE) also applies to DUE by disease state. The criteria for disease process selection, key processes being evaluated, methods to develop initial DUE protocols, and DUE validation and approval processes are reviewed. The treatment of community-acquired pneumonia is a disease state DUE performed at Saint Joseph Health Center in Kansas City, Missouri. The preliminary protocol was developed by a collaborative network of clinical pharmacists in the metropolitan area. Outcome measures were included in the evaluation. The results were used as baseline data in the development of a pneumonia clinical pathway.

  19. Redox Platforms in Cancer Drug Discovery and Development

    PubMed Central

    Tew, Kenneth D.; Townsend, Danyelle M.

    2010-01-01

    Redox homeostasis is frequently dysregulated in human disease, particularly cancer. Recent and ongoing efforts seek to validate and extend this platform for the discovery/development of anticancer drugs. As the primary source of cellular redox buffer, thiols (in particular glutathione) have been therapeutically targeted in cancer treatment, myeloproliferation, hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization and immune response. A number of “redox modulating” drugs have been, or are, under development and the pipeline seems viable. Moreover, S-glutathionylation is a protein post-translational modification that influences a number of critical cell pathways and in the medium term, defining the “glutathionome” has the possibility to provide opportunities for target identification for therapeutic intervention perhaps with a relevance that parallels ongoing efforts with the kinome. PMID:21075043

  20. Theory and practice of clinical pharmacodynamics in oncology drug development.

    PubMed

    Parchment, Ralph E; Doroshow, James H

    2016-08-01

    The clinical development of molecularly targeted cancer therapies is enhanced by proof of mechanism of action as well as proof of concept, which relate molecular pharmacodynamics to efficacy via changes in cancer cell biology and physiology resulting from drug action on its intended target. Here, we present an introduction to the field of clinical pharmacodynamics, its medical and laboratory aspects, and its practical incorporation into clinical trials. We also describe key success factors that are useful for judging the quality of clinical pharmacodynamic studies, including biopsy quality and suitability, specimen handling, assay fitness-for-purpose, and reagent quality control. This introduction provides not only context for the following articles in this issue, but also an appreciation of the role of well-conducted clinical pharmacodynamic studies in oncology drug development. PMID:27663474

  1. A physiome interoperability roadmap for personalized drug development.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Simon; Wolstencroft, Katherine; de Bono, Bernard; Hunter, Peter J

    2016-04-01

    The goal of developing therapies and dosage regimes for characterized subgroups of the general population can be facilitated by the use of simulation models able to incorporate information about inter-individual variability in drug disposition (pharmacokinetics), toxicity and response effect (pharmacodynamics). Such observed variability can have multiple causes at various scales, ranging from gross anatomical differences to differences in genome sequence. Relevant data for many of these aspects, particularly related to molecular assays (known as '-omics'), are available in online resources, but identification and assignment to appropriate model variables and parameters is a significant bottleneck in the model development process. Through its efforts to standardize annotation with consequent increase in data usability, the human physiome project has a vital role in improving productivity in model development and, thus, the development of personalized therapy regimes. Here, we review the current status of personalized medicine in clinical practice, outline some of the challenges that must be overcome in order to expand its applicability, and discuss the relevance of personalized medicine to the more widespread challenges being faced in drug discovery and development. We then review some of (i) the key data resources available for use in model development and (ii) the potential areas where advances made within the physiome modelling community could contribute to physiologically based pharmacokinetic and physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modelling in support of personalized drug development. We conclude by proposing a roadmap to further guide the physiome community in its on-going efforts to improve data usability, and integration with modelling efforts in the support of personalized medicine development. PMID:27051513

  2. Tuning HERG out: antitarget QSAR models for drug development.

    PubMed

    Braga, Rodolpho C; Alves, Vinicius M; Silva, Meryck F B; Muratov, Eugene; Fourches, Denis; Tropsha, Alexander; Andrade, Carolina H

    2014-01-01

    Several non-cardiovascular drugs have been withdrawn from the market due to their inhibition of hERG K+ channels that can potentially lead to severe heart arrhythmia and death. As hERG safety testing is a mandatory FDArequired procedure, there is a considerable interest for developing predictive computational tools to identify and filter out potential hERG blockers early in the drug discovery process. In this study, we aimed to generate predictive and well-characterized quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for hERG blockage using the largest publicly available dataset of 11,958 compounds from the ChEMBL database. The models have been developed and validated according to OECD guidelines using four types of descriptors and four different machine-learning techniques. The classification accuracies discriminating blockers from non-blockers were as high as 0.83-0.93 on external set. Model interpretation revealed several SAR rules, which can guide structural optimization of some hERG blockers into non-blockers. We have also applied the generated models for screening the World Drug Index (WDI) database and identify putative hERG blockers and non-blockers among currently marketed drugs. The developed models can reliably identify blockers and non-blockers, which could be useful for the scientific community. A freely accessible web server has been developed allowing users to identify putative hERG blockers and non-blockers in chemical libraries of their interest (http://labmol.farmacia.ufg.br/predherg).

  3. Exosomes in development, metastasis and drug resistance of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dan-dan; Wu, Ying; Shen, Hong-yu; Lv, Meng-meng; Chen, Wei-xian; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Zhong, Shan-liang; Tang, Jin-hai; Zhao, Jian-hua

    2015-08-01

    Transport through the cell membrane can be divided into active, passive and vesicular types (exosomes). Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles released by a variety of cells. Emerging evidence shows that exosomes play a critical role in cancers. Exosomes mediate communication between stroma and cancer cells through the transfer of nucleic acid and proteins. It is demonstrated that the contents and the quantity of exosomes will change after occurrence of cancers. Over the last decade, growing attention has been paid to the role of exosomes in the development of breast cancer, the most life-threatening cancer in women. Breast cancer could induce salivary glands to secret specific exosomes, which could be used as biomarkers in the diagnosis of early breast cancer. Exosome-delivered nucleic acid and proteins partly facilitate the tumorigenesis, metastasis and resistance of breast cancer. Exosomes could also transmit anti-cancer drugs outside breast cancer cells, therefore leading to drug resistance. However, exosomes are effective tools for transportation of anti-cancer drugs with lower immunogenicity and toxicity. This is a promising way to establish a drug delivery system. PMID:26052865

  4. Exosomes in development, metastasis and drug resistance of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dan-dan; Wu, Ying; Shen, Hong-yu; Lv, Meng-meng; Chen, Wei-xian; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Zhong, Shan-liang; Tang, Jin-hai; Zhao, Jian-hua

    2015-08-01

    Transport through the cell membrane can be divided into active, passive and vesicular types (exosomes). Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles released by a variety of cells. Emerging evidence shows that exosomes play a critical role in cancers. Exosomes mediate communication between stroma and cancer cells through the transfer of nucleic acid and proteins. It is demonstrated that the contents and the quantity of exosomes will change after occurrence of cancers. Over the last decade, growing attention has been paid to the role of exosomes in the development of breast cancer, the most life-threatening cancer in women. Breast cancer could induce salivary glands to secret specific exosomes, which could be used as biomarkers in the diagnosis of early breast cancer. Exosome-delivered nucleic acid and proteins partly facilitate the tumorigenesis, metastasis and resistance of breast cancer. Exosomes could also transmit anti-cancer drugs outside breast cancer cells, therefore leading to drug resistance. However, exosomes are effective tools for transportation of anti-cancer drugs with lower immunogenicity and toxicity. This is a promising way to establish a drug delivery system.

  5. Exosomes in development, metastasis and drug resistance of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dan-dan; Wu, Ying; Shen, Hong-yu; Lv, Meng-meng; Chen, Wei-xian; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Zhong, Shan-liang; Tang, Jin-hai; Zhao, Jian-hua

    2015-01-01

    Transport through the cell membrane can be divided into active, passive and vesicular types (exosomes). Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles released by a variety of cells. Emerging evidence shows that exosomes play a critical role in cancers. Exosomes mediate communication between stroma and cancer cells through the transfer of nucleic acid and proteins. It is demonstrated that the contents and the quantity of exosomes will change after occurrence of cancers. Over the last decade, growing attention has been paid to the role of exosomes in the development of breast cancer, the most life-threatening cancer in women. Breast cancer could induce salivary glands to secret specific exosomes, which could be used as biomarkers in the diagnosis of early breast cancer. Exosome-delivered nucleic acid and proteins partly facilitate the tumorigenesis, metastasis and resistance of breast cancer. Exosomes could also transmit anti-cancer drugs outside breast cancer cells, therefore leading to drug resistance. However, exosomes are effective tools for transportation of anti-cancer drugs with lower immunogenicity and toxicity. This is a promising way to establish a drug delivery system. PMID:26052865

  6. Toll-like receptor signaling promotes the development and function of sensory neurons required for a C. elegans pathogen-avoidance behavior

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Julia P.; Ringstad, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Summary Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play critical roles in innate immunity in many animal species. The sole TLR of C. elegans - TOL-1 - is required for a pathogen avoidance behavior, yet how it promotes this behavior is unknown. We show that TOL-1 signaling is required in the chemosensory BAG neurons for pathogen avoidance, where it regulates gene expression and is necessary for BAG chemosensory function. Genetic studies revealed that TOL-1 acts together with many conserved components of TLR signaling. BAG neurons are activated by carbon dioxide (CO2) and we found that this modality is required for pathogen avoidance. TLR signaling can, therefore, mediate host responses to microbes through an unexpected mechanism: by promoting the development and function of chemosensory neurons that surveil the metabolic activity of environmental microbes. PMID:26279230

  7. The drug-minded protein interaction database (DrumPID) for efficient target analysis and drug development

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Meik; Liang, Chunguang; Nilla, Santosh; Cecil, Alexander; Dandekar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The drug-minded protein interaction database (DrumPID) has been designed to provide fast, tailored information on drugs and their protein networks including indications, protein targets and side-targets. Starting queries include compound, target and protein interactions and organism-specific protein families. Furthermore, drug name, chemical structures and their SMILES notation, affected proteins (potential drug targets), organisms as well as diseases can be queried including various combinations and refinement of searches. Drugs and protein interactions are analyzed in detail with reference to protein structures and catalytic domains, related compound structures as well as potential targets in other organisms. DrumPID considers drug functionality, compound similarity, target structure, interactome analysis and organismic range for a compound, useful for drug development, predicting drug side-effects and structure–activity relationships. Database URL: http://drumpid.bioapps.biozentrum.uni-wuerzburg.de PMID:27055828

  8. Halogen bond: its role beyond drug-target binding affinity for drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhijian; Yang, Zhuo; Liu, Yingtao; Lu, Yunxiang; Chen, Kaixian; Zhu, Weiliang

    2014-01-27

    Halogen bond has attracted a great deal of attention in the past years for hit-to-lead-to-candidate optimization aiming at improving drug-target binding affinity. In general, heavy organohalogens (i.e., organochlorines, organobromines, and organoiodines) are capable of forming halogen bonds while organofluorines are not. In order to explore the possible roles that halogen bonds could play beyond improving binding affinity, we performed a detailed database survey and quantum chemistry calculation with close attention paid to (1) the change of the ratio of heavy organohalogens to organofluorines along the drug discovery and development process and (2) the halogen bonds between organohalogens and nonbiopolymers or nontarget biopolymers. Our database survey revealed that (1) an obviously increasing trend of the ratio of heavy organohalogens to organofluorines was observed along the drug discovery and development process, illustrating that more organofluorines are worn and eliminated than heavy organohalogens during the process, suggesting that heavy halogens with the capability of forming halogen bonds should have priority for lead optimization; and (2) more than 16% of the halogen bonds in PDB are formed between organohalogens and water, and nearly 20% of the halogen bonds are formed with the proteins that are involved in the ADME/T process. Our QM/MM calculations validated the contribution of the halogen bond to the binding between organohalogens and plasma transport proteins. Thus, halogen bonds could play roles not only in improving drug-target binding affinity but also in tuning ADME/T property. Therefore, we suggest that albeit halogenation is a valuable approach for improving ligand bioactivity, more attention should be paid in the future to the application of the halogen bond for ligand ADME/T property optimization.

  9. Teachers Avoiding Learners' Avoidance: Is It Possible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tadayyon, Maedeh; Zarrinabadi, Nourollah; Ketabi, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Dealing with learners who prefer to take the back seat and avoid classroom participation can be every teacher's nightmare. This lack of participation may cause teacher frustration, and possibly the only way to reduce this lack of participation is to access the concept of avoidance strategy. Avoidance strategy is the abandonment of a classroom task…

  10. Drug-drug co-crystallization presents a new opportunity for the development of stable vitamins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Rong; Yu, Qihui; Dai, Wenjuan; Mei, Xuefeng

    2016-02-28

    Drug-drug co-crystallization could realize combination drugs at a molecular level. Two polymorphic co-crystals between VD2 and VD3 were successfully designed and synthesized. These enantiotropic polymorphs exhibit significantly different physicochemical stabilities.

  11. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibition: An Approach to Drug Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitzki, Alexander; Gazit, Aviv

    1995-03-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) regulate cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and signaling processes in the cells of the immune system. Uncontrolled signaling from receptor tyrosine kinases and intracellular tyrosine kinases can lead to inflammatory responses and to diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis, and psoriasis. Thus, inhibitors that block the activity of tyrosine kinases and the signaling pathways they activate may provide a useful basis for drug development. This article summarizes recent progress in the development of PTK inhibitors and demonstrates their potential use in the treatment of disease.

  12. Effects of intracerebroventricular administration of ultra low doses of histaminergic drugs on morphine state-dependent memory of passive avoidance in mice.

    PubMed

    Khalilzadeh, Azita; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Djahanguiri, Bijan

    2006-01-01

    The effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of ultra low doses (ULDs) of histamine, clobenpropit and pyrilamine are studied on morphine state-dependent (STD) memory in mice. Although pre-test administration of different doses of histamine and clobenpropit showed no effect on impairment of memory induced by pre-training morphine, when the above drugs were co-administered with morphine, they inhibited the restoration of memory by morphine. These effects were opposite to microgram doses of the same drugs.

  13. Candidiasis drug discovery and development: new approaches targeting virulence for discovering and identifying new drugs

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Christopher G.; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Targeting pathogenetic mechanisms rather than essential processes represents a very attractive alternative for the development of new antibiotics. This may be particularly important in the case of antimycotics, due to the urgent need for novel antifungal drugs and the paucity of selective fungal targets. The opportunistic pathogenic fungus Candida albicans is the main etiological agent of candidiasis, the most common human fungal infection. These infections carry unacceptably high mortality rates, a clear reflection of the many shortcomings of current antifungal therapy, including the limited armamentarium of antifungal agents, their toxicity, and the emergence of resistance. Moreover the antifungal pipeline is mostly dry. Areas covered This review covers some of the most recent progress towards understanding C. albicans pathogenetic processes and how to harness this information for the development of anti-virulence agents. The two principal areas covered are filamentation and biofilm formation, as C. albicans pathogenicity is intimately linked to its ability to undergo morphogenetic conversions between yeast and filamentous morphologies and to its ability to form biofilms. Expert opinion We argue that filamentation and biofilm formation represent high value targets, yet clinically unexploited, for the development of novel anti-virulence approaches against candidiasis. Although this has proved a difficult task despite increasing understanding at the molecular level of C. albicans virulence, we highlight new opportunities and prospects for antifungal drug development targeting these two important biological processes. PMID:23738751

  14. Self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS) for oral delivery of protein drugs: I. Formulation development.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sripriya Venkata Ramana; Shao, Jun

    2008-10-01

    The global aim of this research project was to develop a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) for non-invasive delivery of protein drugs. The specific aim of this study was to develop SNEDDS formulations. An experimental design was adopted to develop SNEDDS. Fluorescent labeled beta-lactamase (FITC-BLM), a model protein, was loaded into SNEDDS through solid dispersion technique. The experimental design provided 720 compositions of different oil, surfactant, and co-surfactant at various ratios, of which 33 SNEDDS prototypes were obtained. Solid dispersion of FITC-BLM in SoyPC prepared was able to dissolve in 16 SNEDDS prototypes (approximately 2200 mU BLM in 1g SNEDDS). SNEDDS NE-12-7 (composition: Lauroglycol FCC, Cremophor EL and Transcutol; ratio: 5:4:3) formed O/W nanoemulsion with mean droplet size in the range of 22-50 nm when diluted with various pH media and different dilution factor with PBS (pH 7.4). The phase diagram of NE-12-7 indicated a broad region of nanoemulsion. BLM-loaded SNEDDS (NE-12-7) stored at 4 degrees C for 12 weeks indicated 10% loss of BLM activity. A SNEDDS was developed to load FITC-BLM into the oil phase which can spontaneously form O/W nanoemulsion upon the addition of water.

  15. Functional GI disorders: from animal models to drug development

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, E A; Bradesi, S; Chang, L; Spiegel, B M R; Bueller, J A; Naliboff, B D

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable efforts by academic researchers and by the pharmaceutical industry, the development of novel pharmacological treatments for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and other functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders has been slow and disappointing. The traditional approach to identifying and evaluating novel drugs for these symptom-based syndromes has relied on a fairly standard algorithm using animal models, experimental medicine models and clinical trials. In the current article, the empirical basis for this process is reviewed, focusing on the utility of the assessment of visceral hypersensitivity and GI transit, in both animals and humans, as well as the predictive validity of preclinical and clinical models of IBS for identifying successful treatments for IBS symptoms and IBS-related quality of life impairment. A review of published evidence suggests that abdominal pain, defecation-related symptoms (urgency, straining) and psychological factors all contribute to overall symptom severity and to health-related quality of life. Correlations between readouts obtained in preclinical and clinical models and respective symptoms are small, and the ability to predict drug effectiveness for specific as well as for global IBS symptoms is limited. One possible drug development algorithm is proposed which focuses on pharmacological imaging approaches in both preclinical and clinical models, with decreased emphasis on evaluating compounds in symptom-related animal models, and more rapid screening of promising candidate compounds in man. PMID:17965064

  16. Alcohol and Drug Use and the Developing Brain.

    PubMed

    Squeglia, Lindsay M; Gray, Kevin M

    2016-05-01

    Adolescence is an important neurodevelopmental period marked by rapidly escalating rates of alcohol and drug use. Over the past decade, research has attempted to disentangle pre- and post-substance use effects on brain development by using sophisticated longitudinal designs. This review focuses on recent, prospective studies and addresses the following important questions: (1) what neuropsychological and neural features predate adolescent substance use, making youth more vulnerable to engage in heavy alcohol or drug use, and (2) how does heavy alcohol and drug use affect normal neural development and cognitive functioning? Findings suggest that pre-existing neural features that relate to increased substance use during adolescence include poorer neuropsychological functioning on tests of inhibition and working memory, smaller gray and white matter volume, changes in white matter integrity, and altered brain activation during inhibition, working memory, reward, and resting state. After substance use is initiated, alcohol and marijuana use are associated with poorer cognitive functioning on tests of verbal memory, visuospatial functioning, psychomotor speed, working memory, attention, cognitive control, and overall IQ. Heavy alcohol use during adolescence is related to accelerated decreases in gray matter and attenuated increases in white matter volume, as well as increased brain activation during tasks of inhibition and working memory, relative to controls. Larger longitudinal studies with more diverse samples are needed to better understand the interactive effects of alcohol, marijuana, and other substances, as well as the role of sex, co-occurring psychopathology, genetics, sleep, and age of initiation on substance use. PMID:26984684

  17. Development of natural anti-tumor drugs by microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Che; Chen, Wei-Chuan; Ho, Tsing-Fen; Wu, Ho-Shing; Wei, Yu-Hong

    2011-05-01

    Discoveries of tumor-resistant pharmacological drugs have mainly resulted from screening of natural products and their analogs. Some are also discovered incidentally when studying organisms. The great biodiversity of microorganisms raises the possibility of producing secondary metabolites (e.g., mevastatin, lovastatin, epothilone, salinosporamide A) to cope with adverse environments. Recently, natural plant pigments with anti-tumor activities such as β-carotene, lycopene, curcumin and anthocyanins have been proposed. However, many plants have a long life cycle. Therefore, pigments from microorganisms represent another option for the development of novel anti-tumor drugs. Prodigiosin (PG) is a natural red pigment produced by microorganisms, i.e., Serratia marcescens and other gram-negative bacteria. The anti-tumor potential of PG has been widely demonstrated. The families of PG (PGs), which share a common pyrrolylpyrromethene (PPM) skeleton, are produced by various bacteria. PGs are bioactive pigments and are known to exert immunosuppressive properties, in vitro apoptotic effects, and in vivo anti-tumor activities. Currently the most common strain used for producing PGs is S. marcescens. However, few reports have discussed PGs production. This review therefore describes the development of an anti-tumor drug, PG, that can be naturally produced by microorganisms, and evaluates the microbial production system, fermentation strategies, purification and identification processes. The application potential of PGs is also discussed. PMID:21277252

  18. Drug Development and Challenges for Neuromuscular Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    El Mouelhi, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    Drug development process faces many challenges, including those encountered in clinical trials for neuromuscular diseases. Drug development is a lengthy and highly costly process. Out of 10 compounds entering first study in man (phase 1), only one compound reaches the market after an average of 14 years with a cost of $2.7 billion. Nevertheless, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid services, prescription drugs constituted only 9 % of each health care dollar spent in USA in 2013. Examples of challenges encountered in neuromuscular clinical trials include lack of validated patient-reported outcome tools, blinding issues, and the use of placebo in addition to lack of health authority guidance for orphan diseases. Patient enrollment challenge is the leading cause of missed clinical trial deadlines observed in about 80 % of clinical trials, resulting in delayed availability of potentially life-saving therapies. Another specific challenge introduced by recent technology is the use of social media and risk of bias. Sharing personal experiences while in the study could easily introduce bias among patients that would interfere with accurate interpretation of collected data. To minimize this risk, recent neuromuscular studies incorporate as an inclusion criterion the patient's agreement not to share any of study experiences through social media with other patients during the study conduct. Consideration of these challenges will allow timely response to the high unmet medical needs for many neuromuscular diseases. PMID:26691331

  19. Development of natural anti-tumor drugs by microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Che; Chen, Wei-Chuan; Ho, Tsing-Fen; Wu, Ho-Shing; Wei, Yu-Hong

    2011-05-01

    Discoveries of tumor-resistant pharmacological drugs have mainly resulted from screening of natural products and their analogs. Some are also discovered incidentally when studying organisms. The great biodiversity of microorganisms raises the possibility of producing secondary metabolites (e.g., mevastatin, lovastatin, epothilone, salinosporamide A) to cope with adverse environments. Recently, natural plant pigments with anti-tumor activities such as β-carotene, lycopene, curcumin and anthocyanins have been proposed. However, many plants have a long life cycle. Therefore, pigments from microorganisms represent another option for the development of novel anti-tumor drugs. Prodigiosin (PG) is a natural red pigment produced by microorganisms, i.e., Serratia marcescens and other gram-negative bacteria. The anti-tumor potential of PG has been widely demonstrated. The families of PG (PGs), which share a common pyrrolylpyrromethene (PPM) skeleton, are produced by various bacteria. PGs are bioactive pigments and are known to exert immunosuppressive properties, in vitro apoptotic effects, and in vivo anti-tumor activities. Currently the most common strain used for producing PGs is S. marcescens. However, few reports have discussed PGs production. This review therefore describes the development of an anti-tumor drug, PG, that can be naturally produced by microorganisms, and evaluates the microbial production system, fermentation strategies, purification and identification processes. The application potential of PGs is also discussed.

  20. [Current Trend of Drug Development for Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs)].

    PubMed

    Kita, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    EBOLA hemorrhagic fever, a typical emerging infectious disease, began in December 2013 in the southern part of Guinea, and killed more than 11000 people by the end of June, 2015. In addition to emerging/re-emerging diseases and the 3 major infectious diseases i.e. HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) have recently become important tropical diseases of the poor. It is remarkable that Japan succeeded in the eradication of malaria and other tropical diseases, which include lymphatic filariasis and schistosomiasis. However, despite these achievements, it is important to sustain our efforts when we consider global health. This review highlights the significance of elimination and/or control of NTDs, and then introduces the current situation of drug development activities in Japan, which are aimed towards combating tropical infectious diseases. They include studies on a novel drug target, the "mitochondrial NADH-fumarate reductase system (Fumarate respiration)" composed of complex I, rhodoquinone and complex II, which plays an important role in the anaerobic energy metabolism of many helminths such as Ascaris suum. An additional interesting finding highlighted herein is that ascofuranone, a recently developed anti-African trypanosome drug, shows specific inhibition of fumarate respiration in Echinococcus multilocularis mitochondria. PMID:26831795

  1. Development of an Acoustic Droplet Vaporization, Ultrasound Drug Delivery Emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabiilli, Mario L.; Sebastian, Ian E.; Fowlkes, J. Brian

    2010-03-01

    Many therapeutic applications of ultrasound (US) include the use of pefluorocarbon (PFC) microbubbles or emulsions. These colloidal systems can be activated in the presence of US, which in the case of emulsions, results in the production of bubbles—a process known as acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV). ADV can be used as a drug delivery mechanism, thereby yielding the localized release of toxic agents such a chemotherapeutics. In this work, emulsions that contain PFC and chlorambucil, a chemotherapy drug, are formulated using albumin or lipid shells. For albumin droplets, the oil phase—which contained CHL—clearly enveloped the PFC phase. The albumin emulsion also displayed better retention of CHL in the absence of US, which was evaluated by incubating Chinese hamster ovary cells with the various formulations. Thus, the developed emulsions are suitable for further testing in ADV-induced release of CHL.

  2. Drug-Diagnostics Co-Development in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Developments in genomics are providing a biological basis for the heterogeneity of clinical course and response to treatment that have long been apparent to clinicians. The ability to molecularly characterize human diseases presents new opportunities to develop more effective treatments and new challenges for the design and analysis of clinical trials. In oncology, treatment of broad populations with regimens that benefit a minority of patients is less economically sustainable with expensive molecularly targeted therapeutics. The established molecular heterogeneity of human diseases requires the development of new paradigms for the design and analysis of randomized clinical trials as a reliable basis for predictive medicine. We review prospective designs for the development of new therapeutics and predictive biomarkers to inform their use. We cover designs for a wide range of settings. At one extreme is the development of a new drug with a single candidate biomarker and strong biological evidence that marker negative patients are unlikely to benefit from the new drug. At the other extreme are phase III clinical trials involving both genome-wide discovery of a predictive classifier and internal validation of that classifier. We have outlined a prediction based approach to the analysis of randomized clinical trials that both preserves the type I error and provides a reliable internally validated basis for predicting which patients are most likely or unlikely to benefit from a new regimen. PMID:24392354

  3. Evolution and development of neural controllers for locomotion, gradient-following, and obstacle-avoidance in artificial insects.

    PubMed

    Kodjabachian, J; Meyer, J A

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes how the SGOCE paradigm has been used to evolve developmental programs capable of generating recurrent neural networks that control the behavior of simulated insects. This paradigm is characterized by an encoding scheme, by an evolutionary algorithm, by syntactic constraints, and by an incremental strategy that are described in turn. The additional use of an insect model equipped with six legs and two antennae made it possible to generate control modules that allowed it to successively add gradient-following and obstacle-avoidance capacities to walking behavior. The advantages of this evolutionary approach, together with directions for future work, are discussed.

  4. Paediatric drug development: the impact of evolving regulations.

    PubMed

    Turner, M A; Catapano, M; Hirschfeld, S; Giaquinto, C

    2014-06-01

    Children deserve medicines that are adapted to their needs. The need to include children in drug development has been recognised increasingly over the past few decades. Legal and regulatory frameworks are well established in the EU and US. The amount of work done to study medicines for children is significantly greater than it was 10 years go. Proof-of-concept has been demonstrated for all segments of the paediatric drug development pipeline. It is now time to examine how the practice of developing medicines for children has evolved within those frameworks and to determine how that work should be generalised. This review describes the development of medicines for children and critically appraises the work that has been done within those frameworks. Significant effort is needed to realize the potential provided by the current regulatory framework. Using the work programme of the Global Research in Paediatrics (GRiP) Network of Excellence as a template we outline current work and future growing points. PMID:24556465

  5. Screening strategy to avoid toxicological hazards of inhaled nanoparticles for drug delivery: The use of a-quartz and nano zinc oxide particles as benchmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyerle, Andrea; Schulz, Holger; Kissel, Thomas; Stoeger, Tobias

    2009-02-01

    Nanotechnology is a broad, revolutionary field with promising advantages for new medicine. In this context the rapid development and improvement of so called nanocarriers is of high pharmaceutical interest and some devices are already on the market. In our project we aim to develop well characterized nanoscaled drug delivery systems for an inhalative application. To this end, we focus on the most adverse side-effects within the lung, the cytotoxic and the proinflammatory responses to these nanoparticles (NPs). Before performing any animal experiments, we start with an in vitro screening for analyzing the cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects of the investigated particles on two murine lung target cell lines, the alveolar epithelial like typ II cell line (LA4) and the alveolar macrophage cell line (MH-S). Three different endpoints were estimated, (i) cellular metabolic activity, determined by the WST-1 assay, (ii) membrane integrity, by detection of LDH release and hemolytic activity, and (iii) secretion of inflammatory mediators. To analyze the relative particle toxicity we choose two reference particles as benchmarks, (i) fine a-quartz, and (ii) ultrafine ZnO particles. The investigation of dose-response and kinetics of proinflammatory and toxic effects caused to the named cell lines provide an insight to a close evaluation of our cell based screening strategy. oc-quartz is well known for its inflammatory and toxic potential caused by inhalation, and nanosized ZnO particles - used in a broad field of nanotechnology like electronics, but also cosmetics and pharmaceuticals - is to a high degree cytotoxic and proinflammatory in vitro. Preliminary experiments indicated not only particle and cell specific inflammatory responses, but also different susceptibilities of the cell types being exposed to our benchmark particles regarding their size and surface activities. Exposure to the μm-sized a-quartz particles affected the viability of epithelia cells less than that of

  6. Potential for Developing Purinergic Drugs for Gastrointestinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa-Cortes, Fernando; Liñán-Rico, Andromeda; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Christofi, Fievos L.

    2014-01-01

    Treatments for IBD, IBS, FD or motility disorders are not adequate, and purinergic drugs offer exciting new possibilities. GI symptoms that could be targeted for therapy include visceral pain, inflammatory pain, dysmotility, constipation and diarrhea. The focus of this review is on potential for developing purinergic drugs for clinical trials to treat GI symptoms. Purinergic receptors are divided into adenosine P1 (A1,A2A,A2B,A3), ionotropic ATP-gated P2X ion channel (P2X1–7) or metabotropic P2Y1,2,4,6,11–14 receptors. There is good experimental evidence for targeting A2A, A2B, A3, P2X7, P2X3 receptors or increasing endogenous adenosine levels to treat IBD, inflammatory pain, IBS/visceral pain, inflammatory-diarrhea and motility disorders. Purine genes are also potential biomarkers of disease. Advances in medicinal-chemistry have an accelerated pace toward clinical trials: Methotrexate and sulfasalazine, used to treat IBD, act by stimulating CD73-dependent adenosine production. ATP protects against NSAID-induced enteropathy and has pain-relieving properties in humans. A P2X7R antagonist AZD9056 is in clinical trials for CD. A3 AR drugs target inflammatory diseases (e.g. CF101; CF102). Dipyridamole, a nucleoside uptake-inhibitor, is in trials for endotoxemia. Drugs for pain in clinical-trials include P2X3/P2X2/3(AF-219) and P2X7(GSK1482160) antagonists and A1(GW493838) or A2A(BVT.115959) agonists. IberogastR is a phytopharmacon targeting purine-mechanisms with efficacy in IBS and FD. Purinergic drugs have excellent safety/efficacy profile for prospective clinical trials in IBD, IBS, FD and inflammatory-diarrhea. Genetic polymorphisms and caffeine consumption may affect susceptibility to treatment. Further studies in animals can clarify mechanisms and test new-generation drugs. Finally, there is still a huge gap in our knowledge of human pathophysiology of purinergic signaling. PMID:24859298

  7. Drug development in Alzheimer's disease: the path to 2025.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Jeffrey; Aisen, Paul S; DuBois, Bruno; Frölich, Lutz; Jack, Clifford R; Jones, Roy W; Morris, John C; Raskin, Joel; Dowsett, Sherie A; Scheltens, Philip

    2016-01-01

    The global impact of Alzheimer's disease (AD) continues to increase, and focused efforts are needed to address this immense public health challenge. National leaders have set a goal to prevent or effectively treat AD by 2025. In this paper, we discuss the path to 2025, and what is feasible in this time frame given the realities and challenges of AD drug development, with a focus on disease-modifying therapies (DMTs). Under the current conditions, only drugs currently in late Phase 1 or later will have a chance of being approved by 2025. If pipeline attrition rates remain high, only a few compounds at best will meet this time frame. There is an opportunity to reduce the time and risk of AD drug development through an improvement in trial design; better trial infrastructure; disease registries of well-characterized participant cohorts to help with more rapid enrollment of appropriate study populations; validated biomarkers to better detect disease, determine risk and monitor disease progression as well as predict disease response; more sensitive clinical assessment tools; and faster regulatory review. To implement change requires efforts to build awareness, educate and foster engagement; increase funding for both basic and clinical research; reduce fragmented environments and systems; increase learning from successes and failures; promote data standardization and increase wider data sharing; understand AD at the basic biology level; and rapidly translate new knowledge into clinical development. Improved mechanistic understanding of disease onset and progression is central to more efficient AD drug development and will lead to improved therapeutic approaches and targets. The opportunity for more than a few new therapies by 2025 is small. Accelerating research and clinical development efforts and bringing DMTs to market sooner would have a significant impact on the future societal burden of AD. As these steps are put in place and plans come to fruition, e.g., approval

  8. Novel approaches in anti-arenaviral drug development

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Andrew M.; Pasquato, Antonella; Kunz, Stefan

    2011-03-15

    Hemorrhagic fevers caused by arenaviruses are among the most devastating emerging human diseases. Considering the number of individuals affected, the current lack of a licensed vaccine, and the limited therapeutic options, arenaviruses are arguably among the most neglected tropical pathogens and the development of efficacious anti-arenaviral drugs is of high priority. Over the past years significant efforts have been undertaken to identify novel potent inhibitors of arenavirus infection. High throughput screening of small molecule libraries employing pseudotype platforms led to the discovery of several potent and broadly active inhibitors of arenavirus cell entry that are effective against the major hemorrhagic arenaviruses. Mechanistic studies revealed that these novel entry inhibitors block arenavirus membrane fusion and provided novel insights into the unusual mechanism of this process. The success of these approaches highlights the power of small molecule screens in antiviral drug discovery and establishes arenavirus membrane fusion as a robust drug target. These broad screenings have been complemented by strategies targeting cellular factors involved in productive arenavirus infection. Approaches targeting the cellular protease implicated in maturation of the fusion-active viral envelope glycoprotein identified the proteolytic processing of the arenavirus glycoprotein precursor as a novel and promising target for anti-arenaviral strategies.

  9. Support Tools in Formulation Development for Poorly Soluble Drugs.

    PubMed

    Fridgeirsdottir, Gudrun A; Harris, Robert; Fischer, Peter M; Roberts, Clive J

    2016-08-01

    The need for solubility enhancement through formulation is a well-known but still problematic issue because of the numbers of poorly water-soluble drugs in development. There are several possible routes that can be taken to increase the bioavailability of drugs intended for immediate-release oral formulation. The best formulation strategy for any given drug will depend on numerous factors, including required dose, shelf life, manufacturability, and the properties of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). Choosing an optimal formulation and manufacturing route for a new API is therefore not a straightforward process. Currently, there are several approaches that are used in the pharmaceutical industry to select the best formulation strategy. These differ in complexity and efficiency, but most try to predict which route will best suit the API based on selected molecular parameters such as molecular weight, lipophilicity (logP), and solubility. These methods range from using no tools, trial and error methods through a variety of complex tools from small in vitro or in vivo experiments or high throughput screening, guidance maps, and decision trees to the most complex methods based on computational modelling tools. This review aims to list available support tools and explain how they are used. PMID:27368122

  10. A two-stage Bayesian design for co-development of new drugs and companion diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Karuri, Stella Wanjugu; Simon, Richard

    2012-05-10

    Most new drug development in oncology is based on targeting specific molecules. Genomic profiles and deregulated drug targets vary from patient to patient making new treatments likely to benefit only a subset of patients traditionally grouped in the same clinical trials. Predictive biomarkers are being developed to identify patients who are most likely to benefit from a particular treatment; however, their biological basis is not always conclusive. The inclusion of marker-negative patients in a trial is therefore sometimes necessary for a more informative evaluation of the therapy. In this paper, we present a two-stage Bayesian design that includes both marker-positive and marker-negative patients in a clinical trial. We formulate a family of prior distributions that represent the degree of a priori confidence in the predictive biomarker. To avoid exposing patients to a treatment to which they may not be expected to benefit, we perform an interim analysis that may stop accrual of marker-negative patients or accrual of all patients. We demonstrate with simulations that the design and priors used control type I errors, give adequate power, and enable the early futility analysis of test-negative patients to be based on prior specification on the strength of evidence in the biomarker.

  11. New advances in models and strategies for developing anti-obesity drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gilbert W.; Lin, Jieru E.; Blomain, Erik S.; Waldman, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is a worldwide pandemic. Obesity-related health and economic costs are staggering. Existing strategies to combat obesity through lifestyle improvements and medical intervention have had limited success. Pharmacotherapy, in combination with lifestyle modification, may play a vital role in reversing the disease burden. However, past and current weight-loss medications have had serious safety risks, notably cardiovascular and psychiatric events. Areas covered We review the strategies for designing new anti-obesity drugs by describing those currently in development. We describe their target, mechanism of action, and developmental or regulatory status. We also discuss the problem of weight regain following weight loss, and its relevance to the long-term success of anti-obesity pharmacotherapy. Expert opinion For weight management drugs to achieve the safety and efficacy required to be impactful, current studies are uncovering and characterizing new targets, including new signaling circuits and hormones regulating appetite and metabolism, and re-evaluating the role of pharmacotherapy in weight management. To avoid the safety failures of many past weight-loss drugs, the models and strategies covered in this article incorporate recent advances in knowledge and technology. We discuss the emergence of cGMP signaling as a potentially transformative target in weight management. Modulating cGMP signaling may represent an ideal goal for an anti-obesity pharmacotherapy, reflecting some of the major themes described in the present review: targeting pathways that are newly realized as relevant for weight management; promoting safety by re-purposing drugs that are safe, proven, and approved for clinical use; and having a synergistic effect on multiple, reinforcing pathways. PMID:23621300

  12. Biology-driven cancer drug development: back to the future

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Most of the significant recent advances in cancer treatment have been based on the great strides that have been made in our understanding of the underlying biology of the disease. Nevertheless, the exploitation of biological insight in the oncology clinic has been haphazard and we believe that this needs to be enhanced and optimized if patients are to receive maximum benefit. Here, we discuss how research has driven cancer drug development in the past and describe how recent advances in biology, technology, our conceptual understanding of cell networks and removal of some roadblocks may facilitate therapeutic advances in the (hopefully) near future. PMID:20385032

  13. Recent advances in flavivirus antiviral drug discovery and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Ray, Debashish; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2006-01-01

    Many flaviviruses, including yellow fever virus, dengue virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, tick-borne encephalitis virus, and West Nile virus, are globally important human pathogens. Despite an emergence and resurgence of flavivirus-mediated disease, specific therapies are not yet available; however, significant progress has been made toward the prevention and treatment of flavivirus infections. In this article we review recent advances made in the areas of (i) flavivirus vaccine development, and (ii) antiflavivirus drug discovery reported in literature and patents, and highlight strategies used in these investigations. PMID:18221133

  14. Lab-on-a-chip for drug development.

    PubMed

    Weigl, Bernhard H; Bardell, Ron L; Cabrera, Catherine R

    2003-02-24

    Significant advances have been made in the development of micro-scale technologies for biomedical and drug discovery applications. The first generation of microfluidics-based analytical devices have been designed and are already functional. Microfluidic devices offer unique advantages in sample handling, reagent mixing, separation, and detection. We introduce and review microfluidic concepts, microconstruction techniques, and methods such as flow-injection analysis, electrokinesis, and cell manipulation. Advances in micro-device technology for proteomics, sample preconditioning, immunoassays, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and polymerase chain reaction are also reviewed. PMID:12628321

  15. Alzheimer's disease drug development based on Computer-Aided Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huahui; Wu, Xiangxiang

    2016-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the excessive deposition of amyloids in the brain. The pathological features mainly include the extracellular amyloid plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, which are the production of amyloid precursor protein (APP) processed by the α-, β- and γ-secretases. Based on the amyloid cascade hypotheses of AD, a large number of amyloid-β agents and secretase inhibitors against AD have been recently developed by using computational methods. This review article describes pathophysiology of AD and the structure of the Aβ plaques, β- and γ-secretases, and discusses the recent advances in the development of the amyloid agents for AD therapy and diagnosis by using Computer-Aided Drug Design approach.

  16. What does systems biology mean for drug development?

    PubMed

    Schrattenholz, André; Soskić, Vukić

    2008-01-01

    regard to a new focus on agents that modulate multiple targets simultaneously. Targeting cellular function as a system rather than on the level of the single protein molecule significantly increases the size of the drugable proteome and is expected to introduce novel classes of multi-target drugs with fewer adverse effects and toxicity. Multiple target approaches have recently been used to design medications against atherosclerosis, cancer, depression, psychosis and neurodegenerative diseases. A focussed approach towards "systemic" drugs will certainly require the development of novel computational and mathematical concepts for appropriate modelling of complex data and extraction of "screenable" information from biological systems essentially ruled by deterministic chaotic processes on a background of individual stochasticity.

  17. Development and model testing of anti-mortem screening methodology to predict prescribed drug withholds in heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple, cow-side test for the presence of drug residues in live animal fluids would provide useful information for tissue drug residue avoidance programs. This work describes adaptation and evaluation of rapid screening tests to detect drug residues in serum and urine. Medicated herd animals had...

  18. Development and model testing of anti-mortem screening methodology to predict prescribed drug withholds in heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: A simple, cow-side test for the presence of drug residues in live animal fluids would provide useful information for tissue drug residue avoidance programs. Live animal tests have the potential to allow verification that an individual animal is free of drug residues before sale for h...

  19. Titanium MEMS Technology Development for Drug Delivery and Microfluidic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandan, Omid

    The use of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology in medical and biological applications has increased dramatically in the past decade due to the potential for enhanced sensitivity, functionality, and performance associated with the miniaturization of devices, as well as the market potential for low-cost, personalized medicine. However, the utility of such devices in clinical medicine is ultimately limited due to factors associated with prevailing micromachined materials such as silicon, as it poses concerns of safety and reliability due to its intrinsically brittle properties, making it prone to catastrophic failure. Recent advances in titanium (Ti) micromachining provides an opportunity to create devices with enhanced safety and performance due to its proven biocompatibility and high fracture toughness, which causes it to fail by means of graceful, plasticity-based deformation. Motivated by this opportunity, we discuss our efforts to advance Ti MEMS technology in two ways: 1) Through the development of titanium-based microneedles (MNs) that seek to provide a safer, simpler, and more efficacious means of ocular drug delivery, and 2) Through the advancement of Ti anodic bonding for future realization of robust microfluidic devices for photocatalysis applications. As for the first of these thrusts, we show that MN devices with in-plane geometry and through-thickness fenestrations that serve as drug reservoirs for passive delivery via diffusive transport from fast-dissolving coatings can be fabricated utilizing Ti deep reactive ion etching (Ti DRIE). Our mechanical testing and finite element analysis (FEA) results suggest that these devices possess sufficient stiffness for reliable corneal insertion. Our MN coating studies show that, relative to solid MNs of identical shank dimension, fenestrated devices can increase drug carrying capacity by 5-fold. Furthermore, we demonstrate that through-etched fenestrations provide a protective cavity for delivering

  20. Applications of toxicogenomics to nonclinical drug development: regulatory science considerations.

    PubMed

    Sistare, Frank D; Degeorge, Joseph J

    2008-01-01

    Scientists in the pharmaceutical industry have ready access to samples from animal toxicology studies carefully designed to test the safety characteristics of a steady pipeline of agents advancing toward clinical testing. Applications of toxicogenomics to the evaluation of compounds could best be realized if this promising technology could be implemented in these studies fully anchored in the traditional study end points currently used to characterize phenotypic outcome and to support the safe conduct of clinical testing. Regulatory authorities worldwide have declared their support for toxicogenomics and related technological tools to positively impact drug development, and guidance has been published. However, applications of exploratory "omics" technologies to compounds undergoing safety testing remain inhibited due to two core data submission responsibility implications and ambiguities: (1) constraints arising from continual literature surveillance and data reanalysis burdens, under the shadow of looming subsequent reporting requirements to regulatory authorities as gene expression end points loosely linked to safety gain attention in the published literature, and (2) ambiguities in interpretation of validation stature remain between exploratory, probable valid, and known valid safety biomarkers. A proposal is offered to address these regulatory implementation barriers to open access for exploring this technology in prospective drug development animal toxicology studies.

  1. Assessment of drug metabolism enzyme and transporter pharmacogenetics in drug discovery and early development: perspectives of the I-PWG.

    PubMed

    Brian, William; Tremaine, Larry M; Arefayene, Million; de Kanter, Ruben; Evers, Raymond; Guo, Yingying; Kalabus, James; Lin, Wen; Loi, Cho-Ming; Xiao, Guangqing

    2016-04-01

    Genetic variants of drug metabolism enzymes and transporters can result in high pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variability, unwanted characteristics of efficacious and safe drugs. Ideally, the contributions of these enzymes and transporters to drug disposition can be predicted from in vitro experiments and in silico modeling in discovery or early development, and then be utilized during clinical development. Recently, regulatory agencies have provided guidance on the preclinical investigation of pharmacogenetics, for application to clinical drug development. This white paper summarizes the results of an industry survey conducted by the Industry Pharmacogenomics Working Group on current practice and challenges with using in vitro systems and in silico models to understand pharmacogenetic causes of variability in drug disposition.

  2. High performance computing for drug development on K computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujitani, Hideaki; Shinoda, Keiko; Yamashita, Takefumi; Kodama, Tatsuhiko

    2013-08-01

    Massively parallel computations (MP-CAFEE) ware developed to calculate absolute binding free energies of small molecules bound to a protein by all-atom molecular dynamics. It uses the nonequilibrium work measurement and Bennett acceptance ratio methods to calculate the free energy difference between the bound and unbound states. The FUJI force field was developed in order to assign force field parameters to arbitrary organic molecules in a unified manner including proteins and nucleic acids. Its dihedral parameters agree with the torsion energy profiles calculated by high-level ab initio molecular orbital theory for the model systems of protein backbone. Comparing with various force fields it agrees well with recent observations by vibrational spectroscopy on Ramachandran angle's population of alanine dipeptide in water. MP-CAFEE with FUJI force field has an efficient parallel algorithm and enough accuracy for computer aided drug design.

  3. Synthetic 3D multicellular systems for drug development.

    PubMed

    Rimann, Markus; Graf-Hausner, Ursula

    2012-10-01

    Since the 1970s, the limitations of two dimensional (2D) cell culture and the relevance of appropriate three dimensional (3D) cell systems have become increasingly evident. Extensive effort has thus been made to move cells from a flat world to a 3D environment. While 3D cell culture technologies are meanwhile widely used in academia, 2D culture technologies are still entrenched in the (pharmaceutical) industry for most kind of cell-based efficacy and toxicology tests. However, 3D cell culture technologies will certainly become more applicable if biological relevance, reproducibility and high throughput can be assured at acceptable costs. Most recent innovations and developments clearly indicate that the transition from 2D to 3D cell culture for industrial purposes, for example, drug development is simply a question of time.

  4. High-throughput process development for biopharmaceutical drug substances.

    PubMed

    Bhambure, Rahul; Kumar, Kaushal; Rathore, Anurag S

    2011-03-01

    Quality by Design (QbD) is gaining industry acceptance as an approach towards development and commercialization of biotechnology therapeutic products that are expressed via microbial or mammalian cell lines. In QbD, the process is designed and controlled to deliver specified quality attributes consistently. To acquire the enhanced understanding that is necessary to achieve the above, however, requires more extensive experimentation to establish the design space for the process and the product. With biotechnology companies operating under ever-increasing pressure towards lowering the cost of manufacturing, the use of high-throughput tools has emerged as a necessary enabler of QbD in a time- and resource-constrained environment. We review this topic for those in academia and industry that are engaged in drug substance process development.

  5. 78 FR 33851 - Lung Cancer Patient-Focused Drug Development; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Lung Cancer Patient-Focused Drug Development; Public Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public meeting; request for comments. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public meeting and an opportunity...

  6. Developing an Occupational Drug Abuse Program: Considerations and Approaches. Services Research Monograph Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephen, Mae; Prentice, Robert

    This monograph, developed as a guide for companies interested in establishing drug abuse programs, begins with a brief summary of studies assessing the extent and costs of employee drug use. The next section addresses some practical and conceptual issues about establishing a drug abuse program. Suggestions for implementing a drug abuse program are…

  7. An alternative single dose parameter to avoid the need for steady-state studies on oral extended-release drug products.

    PubMed

    Paixão, Paulo; Gouveia, Luís F; Morais, José A G

    2012-02-01

    Use of single and multiple-dose studies is required to establish the bioequivalence between two extended-release oral dosage forms under the current European Guidelines. However, FDA is less strict in this regard and only requires a single-dose study. The objective of this work is to use a computer simulation in order to test the two approaches. Three pharmacokinetic models, representing different release mechanisms, were considered, and Monte Carlo simulations with intra- and inter-individual variabilities were performed. Five different bioequivalence protocols were used and a new pharmacokinetic metric -C(τ), the concentration at the end of the intended dosing interval obtained in the single-dose study - is proposed in order to avoid the need for steady-state studies while keeping the ability to detect differences between formulations. Results have shown that the European requirements are more capable to discriminate between two potentially different formulations but at the cost of the multiple-dose study and with an increased number of subjects when compared to the FDA requirements. However, the use of C(max) and AUC(0-)(t) obtained on a single-dose study with the added C(τ) metric equals the discriminatory ability of the current EMA requirements, without the need of a multiple-dose study. This proposed approach results in the reduction in the number of studies and volunteers enrolled in clinical bioequivalence trials, without compromising the quality assurance of a new extended-release oral formulation.

  8. Delayed Administration and Contraindicated Drugs Place Hospitalized Parkinson's Disease Patients at Risk; Doxorubicin Liposomal Mix-up; Avoid Mix-ups Between Hydroxyprogesterone and Medroxyprogesterone.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael R; Smetzer, Judy L

    2015-07-01

    These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again-perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers' names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters' wishes as to the level of detail included in publications. PMID:26448665

  9. Delayed Administration and Contraindicated Drugs Place Hospitalized Parkinson’s Disease Patients at Risk; Doxorubicin Liposomal Mix-up; Avoid Mix-ups Between Hydroxyprogesterone and Medroxyprogesterone

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Michael R.; Smetzer, Judy L.

    2015-01-01

    These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again—perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers’ names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters’ wishes as to the level of detail included in publications. PMID:26448665

  10. Developability assessment of clinical drug products with maximum absorbable doses.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xuan; Rose, John P; Van Gelder, Jan

    2012-05-10

    Maximum absorbable dose refers to the maximum amount of an orally administered drug that can be absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract. Maximum absorbable dose, or D(abs), has proved to be an important parameter for quantifying the absorption potential of drug candidates. The purpose of this work is to validate the use of D(abs) in a developability assessment context, and to establish appropriate protocol and interpretation criteria for this application. Three methods for calculating D(abs) were compared by assessing how well the methods predicted the absorption limit for a set of real clinical candidates. D(abs) was calculated for these clinical candidates by means of a simple equation and two computer simulation programs, GastroPlus and an program developed at Eli Lilly and Company. Results from single dose escalation studies in Phase I clinical trials were analyzed to identify the maximum absorbable doses for these compounds. Compared to the clinical results, the equation and both simulation programs provide conservative estimates of D(abs), but in general D(abs) from the computer simulations are more accurate, which may find obvious advantage for the simulations in developability assessment. Computer simulations also revealed the complex behavior associated with absorption saturation and suggested in most cases that the D(abs) limit is not likely to be achieved in a typical clinical dose range. On the basis of the validation findings, an approach is proposed for assessing absorption potential, and best practices are discussed for the use of D(abs) estimates to inform clinical formulation development strategies.

  11. Drug-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Olney, John W; Wozniak, David F; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna; Farber, Nuri B; Bittigau, Petra; Ikonomidou, Chysanthy

    2002-10-01

    Physiological cell death (PCD), a process by which redundant or unsuccessful neurons are deleted by apoptosis (cell suicide) from the developing central nervous system, has been recognized as a natural phenomenon for many years. Whether environmental factors can interact with PCD mechanisms to increase the number of neurons undergoing PCD, thereby converting this natural phenomenon into a pathological process, is an interesting question for which new answers are just now becoming available. In a series of recent studies we have shown that 2 major classes of drugs (those that block NMDA glutamate receptors and those that promote GABAA receptor activation), when administered to immature rodents during the period of synaptogenesis, trigger widespread apoptotic neurodegeneration throughout the developing brain. In addition, we have found that ethanol, which has both NMDA antagonist and GABAmimetic properties, triggers a robust pattern of apoptotic neurodegeneration, thereby deleting large numbers of neurons from many different regions of the developing brain. These findings provide a more likely explanation than has heretofore been available for the reduced brain mass and lifelong neurobehavioral disturbances associated with the human fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). The period of synaptogenesis, also known as the brain growth spurt period, occurs in different species at different times relative to birth. In rats and mice it is a postnatal event, but in humans it extends from the sixth month of gestation to several years after birth. Thus, there is a period in pre- and postnatal human development, lasting for several years, during which immature CNS neurons are prone to commit suicide if exposed to intoxicating concentrations of drugs with NMDA antagonist or GABAmimetic properties. These findings are important, not only because of their relevance to the FAS, but because there are many agents in the human environment, other than ethanol, that have NMDA antagonist or

  12. Consensus report. Drug concentrations and driving impairment. Consensus Development Panel.

    PubMed

    1985-11-01

    Most drugs that affect the central nervous system have the potential to impair driving ability. For many years, alcohol (ethanol) has been the drug of greatest concern, since it is, by far, the most frequently recognized cause of drug-impaired driving. Yet as more therapeutic agents, such as benzodiazepines, are introduced and widely used, and as social use of unsanctioned drugs such as cannabis (marijuana) increases, attention must be directed toward other drugs. The National Institute on Drug Abuse sponsored a conference on drugs and driving in Durham, NC, in October 1983. The objective was to reach a consensus on several key issues associated with the current state of knowledge about the relationship between body fluid concentrations of drugs and their pharmacologically active metabolites and degree of driving impairment. It was also of interest to ascertain whether a sufficient body of knowledge exists for an expert to form an opinion, which will meet the applicable standards of proof for legal proceedings, that a person's driving ability was impaired based on body fluid concentrations of a drug. The consensus panel, representing the disciplines of clinical pharmacology, analytical and forensic toxicology, law, and forensic medicine agreed on answers to the following questions: Is ethanol a good model for other drugs? What drugs might have a potential for impairing a driver? How is driving impairment measured? What is known about correlations between driving impairment and drug concentrations? Could "per se" concentrations be established for drugs other than alcohol? Can impairment be established from body fluid concentrations?

  13. The role of globalization in drug development and access to orphan drugs: orphan drug legislation in the US/EU and in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Renée J.G.; Bighash, Lida; Bryón Nieto, Alejandro; Tannus Branco de Araújo, Gabriela; Gay-Molina, Juan Gabriel; Augustovski, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Compared to a decade ago, nearly three times as many drugs for rare diseases are slated for development. This article addresses the market access issues associated with orphan drug status in Europe and the United States in contrast to the legislation in five Latin American (LA) countries that have made strides in this regard--Mexico, Brazil, Colombia, Chile and Argentina. Based on the success of orphan drug legislation in the EU and US, LA countries should strive to adopt similar strategies with regard to rare diseases and drug development. With the implementation of new targeted regulations, reimbursement strategies, and drug approvals, accessibility to treatment will be improved for people afflicted with rare diseases in these developing countries. PMID:25844162

  14. Developing a Dissociative Nanocontainer for Peptide Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Patrick; Anand, Prachi; Uvaydov, Alexander; Chakravartula, Srinivas; Sherpa, Chhime; Pires, Elena; O’Neil, Alison; Douglas, Trevor; Holford, Mandë

    2015-01-01

    The potency, selectivity, and decreased side effects of bioactive peptides have propelled these agents to the forefront of pharmacological research. Peptides are especially promising for the treatment of neurological disorders and pain. However, delivery of peptide therapeutics often requires invasive techniques, which is a major obstacle to their widespread application. We have developed a tailored peptide drug delivery system in which the viral capsid of P22 bacteriophage is modified to serve as a tunable nanocontainer for the packaging and controlled release of bioactive peptides. Recent efforts have demonstrated that P22 nanocontainers can effectively encapsulate analgesic peptides and translocate them across blood-brain-barrier (BBB) models. However, release of encapsulated peptides at their target site remains a challenge. Here a Ring Opening Metathesis Polymerization (ROMP) reaction is applied to trigger P22 nanocontainer disassembly under physiological conditions. Specifically, the ROMP substrate norbornene (5-Norbornene-2-carboxylic acid) is conjugated to the exterior of a loaded P22 nanocontainer and Grubbs II Catalyst is used to trigger the polymerization reaction leading to nanocontainer disassembly. Our results demonstrate initial attempts to characterize the ROMP-triggered release of cargo peptides from P22 nanocontainers. This work provides proof-of-concept for the construction of a triggerable peptide drug delivery system using viral nanocontainers. PMID:26473893

  15. Development of drugs for severe malaria in children

    PubMed Central

    Cheah, Phaik Yeong; Parker, Michael; Dondorp, Arjen M.

    2016-01-01

    Over 90% of deaths attributable to malaria are in African children under 5 years old. Yet, new treatments are often tested primarily in adult patients and extrapolations have proven to be sometimes invalid, especially in dosing regimens. For studies in severe malaria an additional complication is that the decline in severe malaria in adult patients precludes sufficiently powered trials in adults, before the intervention can be tested in the ultimate target group, paediatric severe malaria. In this paper we propose an alternative pathway to the development of drugs for use in paediatric severe malaria. We argue that following the classical phase I and II studies, small safety and efficacy studies using well-chosen surrogate endpoints in adult severe malaria be conducted, instead of larger mortality endpoint trials. If the drug appears safe and promising small pilot studies in paediatric severe malaria using the same endpoints can follow. Finally, with carefully observed safeguards in place to ensure high ethical standards, promising candidate interventions can be taken forward into mortality endpoint, well-powered, large paediatric studies in African children with severe malaria. Given the available research capacity, limited numbers of prudently selected interventions can be studied in phase III trials, and adaptive designs should be considered. PMID:27620923

  16. Development of drugs for severe malaria in children.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Phaik Yeong; Parker, Michael; Dondorp, Arjen M

    2016-09-01

    Over 90% of deaths attributable to malaria are in African children under 5 years old. Yet, new treatments are often tested primarily in adult patients and extrapolations have proven to be sometimes invalid, especially in dosing regimens. For studies in severe malaria an additional complication is that the decline in severe malaria in adult patients precludes sufficiently powered trials in adults, before the intervention can be tested in the ultimate target group, paediatric severe malaria. In this paper we propose an alternative pathway to the development of drugs for use in paediatric severe malaria. We argue that following the classical phase I and II studies, small safety and efficacy studies using well-chosen surrogate endpoints in adult severe malaria be conducted, instead of larger mortality endpoint trials. If the drug appears safe and promising small pilot studies in paediatric severe malaria using the same endpoints can follow. Finally, with carefully observed safeguards in place to ensure high ethical standards, promising candidate interventions can be taken forward into mortality endpoint, well-powered, large paediatric studies in African children with severe malaria. Given the available research capacity, limited numbers of prudently selected interventions can be studied in phase III trials, and adaptive designs should be considered. PMID:27620923

  17. Human cytomegalovirus and transplantation: drug development and regulatory issues.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Megan; Hauschild, Benjamin; Miller, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is highly prevalent worldwide and can cause serious disease among immunocompromised individuals, including persons with HIV and transplant recipients on immunosuppressive therapies. It can also result in congenital cytomegalovirus when women are infected during pregnancy. Treatment and prevention of CMV in solid organ and haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients is accomplished in one of three ways: (1) prophylactic therapy to prevent CMV viraemia; (2) pre-emptive therapy for those with low levels of replicating virus; and (3) treatment for established disease. Despite the high prevalence of CMV, there are few available approved drug therapies, and those that are available are hampered by toxicity and less-than-optimal efficacy. New therapies are being developed and tested; however, inconsistency in standardisation of virus levels and questions about potential endpoints in clinical trials present regulatory hurdles that must be addressed. This review covers the current state of CMV therapy, drugs currently under investigation, and clinical trial issues and questions that are in need of resolution. PMID:27482453

  18. Developing drugs for the developing world: an economic, legal, moral, and political dilemma.

    PubMed

    Resnik, D B

    2001-05-01

    This paper discusses the economic, legal, moral, and political difficulties in developing drugs for the developing world. It argues that large, global pharmaceutical companies have social responsibilities to the developing world, and that they may exercise these responsibilities by investing in research and development related to diseases that affect developing nations, offering discounts on drug prices, and initiating drug giveaways. However, these social responsibilities are not absolute requirements and may be balanced against other obligations and commitments in light of economic, social, legal, political, and other conditions. How a company decides to exercise its social responsibilities to the developing world depends on (1) the prospects for a reasonable profit and (2) the prospects for a productive business environment. Developing nations can either help or hinder the pharmaceutical industry's efforts to exercise social responsibility through various policies and practices. To insure that companies can make a reasonable profit, developing nations should honor pharmaceutical product patents and adhere to international intellectual property treaties, such as the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) agreement. To insure the companies have a good business environment, developing nations should try to promote the rule of law, ethical business practices, stable currencies, reliable banking systems, free and open markets, democracy, and other conditions conducive to business. Overall, this paper advocates for reciprocity and cooperation between pharmaceutical companies and developing nations to address the problem of developing drugs for the developing world. In pursuing this cooperative approach, developing nations may use a variety of other techniques to encourage pharmaceutical companies to act responsibly, such as subsidizing pharmaceutical research, helping to design and implement research protocols, providing a guaranteed market, and

  19. Developing drugs for the developing world: an economic, legal, moral, and political dilemma.

    PubMed

    Resnik, D B

    2001-05-01

    This paper discusses the economic, legal, moral, and political difficulties in developing drugs for the developing world. It argues that large, global pharmaceutical companies have social responsibilities to the developing world, and that they may exercise these responsibilities by investing in research and development related to diseases that affect developing nations, offering discounts on drug prices, and initiating drug giveaways. However, these social responsibilities are not absolute requirements and may be balanced against other obligations and commitments in light of economic, social, legal, political, and other conditions. How a company decides to exercise its social responsibilities to the developing world depends on (1) the prospects for a reasonable profit and (2) the prospects for a productive business environment. Developing nations can either help or hinder the pharmaceutical industry's efforts to exercise social responsibility through various policies and practices. To insure that companies can make a reasonable profit, developing nations should honor pharmaceutical product patents and adhere to international intellectual property treaties, such as the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) agreement. To insure the companies have a good business environment, developing nations should try to promote the rule of law, ethical business practices, stable currencies, reliable banking systems, free and open markets, democracy, and other conditions conducive to business. Overall, this paper advocates for reciprocity and cooperation between pharmaceutical companies and developing nations to address the problem of developing drugs for the developing world. In pursuing this cooperative approach, developing nations may use a variety of other techniques to encourage pharmaceutical companies to act responsibly, such as subsidizing pharmaceutical research, helping to design and implement research protocols, providing a guaranteed market, and

  20. The Development of Cognitive Schemas about Drugs among Preschoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zucker, Robert A.; And Others

    This paper reviews several studies on preschoolers' perceptions of alcohol and drug use. The studies make five main points: (1) the process of socialization to alcohol and drug involvement begins earlier than adolescence, and involves the ability to identify alcohol and drugs by name, class, and smell; (2) the process of socialization involves…

  1. Optimizing the science of drug development: opportunities for better candidate selection and accelerated evaluation in humans.

    PubMed

    Lesko, L J; Rowland, M; Peck, C C; Blaschke, T F

    2000-08-01

    Two international meetings were convened in 1998 to review the current science of drug development and the potential opportunities to optimize the evaluation of new drugs in humans. This report represents a synopsis of these meetings, and focuses on the current state of knowledge pertaining to drug development, future scientific and technical needs, and the relative merits of various strategies intended to accelerate the clinical development of drugs. PMID:10934664

  2. Challenges and future in vaccines, drug development, and immunomodulatory therapy.

    PubMed

    Kling, Heather M; Nau, Gerard J; Ross, Ted M; Evans, Thomas G; Chakraborty, Krishnendu; Empey, Kerry M; Flynn, JoAnne L

    2014-08-01

    Pulmonary diseases and infections are among the top contributors to human morbidity and mortality worldwide, and despite the successful history of vaccines and antimicrobial therapeutics, infectious disease still presents a significant threat to human health. Effective vaccines are frequently unavailable in developing countries, and successful vaccines have yet to be developed for major global maladies, such as tuberculosis. Furthermore, antibiotic resistance poses a growing threat to human health. The "Challenges and Future in Vaccines, Drug Development, and Immunomodulatory Therapy" session of the 2013 Pittsburgh International Lung Conference highlighted several recent and current studies related to treatment and prevention of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, highly pathogenic influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis. Research presented here focused on novel antimicrobial therapies, new vaccines that are either in development or currently in clinical trials, and the potential for immunomodulatory therapies. These studies are making important contributions to the areas of microbiology, virology, and immunology related to pulmonary diseases and infections and are paving the way for improvements in the efficacy of vaccines and antimicrobials.

  3. Challenges and Future in Vaccines, Drug Development, and Immunomodulatory Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nau, Gerard J.; Ross, Ted M.; Evans, Thomas G.; Chakraborty, Krishnendu; Empey, Kerry M.; Flynn, JoAnne L.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary diseases and infections are among the top contributors to human morbidity and mortality worldwide, and despite the successful history of vaccines and antimicrobial therapeutics, infectious disease still presents a significant threat to human health. Effective vaccines are frequently unavailable in developing countries, and successful vaccines have yet to be developed for major global maladies, such as tuberculosis. Furthermore, antibiotic resistance poses a growing threat to human health. The “Challenges and Future in Vaccines, Drug Development, and Immunomodulatory Therapy” session of the 2013 Pittsburgh International Lung Conference highlighted several recent and current studies related to treatment and prevention of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, highly pathogenic influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis. Research presented here focused on novel antimicrobial therapies, new vaccines that are either in development or currently in clinical trials, and the potential for immunomodulatory therapies. These studies are making important contributions to the areas of microbiology, virology, and immunology related to pulmonary diseases and infections and are paving the way for improvements in the efficacy of vaccines and antimicrobials. PMID:25148426

  4. Multi-regional clinical trials and global drug development.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Premnath

    2016-01-01

    Drug development has been globalized, and multi-regional clinical trial (MRCT) for regulatory submission has widely been conducted by many discovery based global pharmaceutical companies with the objective of reducing the time lag of launch in key markets and improve patient access to new and innovative treatments. Sponsors are facing several challenges while conducting multiregional clinical trials. Challenges under the heads statistics, clinical, regulatory operational, and ethics have been discussed. Regulators in different countries such as USA, EU-Japan, and China have issued guidance documents in respect of MRCT's. Lack of harmonization in the design and planning of MRCT is perceived to create a difficult situation to sponsors adversely affecting progressing MRCT in more and more discoveries. International conference on hormonisation (ICH) has initiated the process for having a harmonized guidance document on MRCT. This document is likely to be issued in early 2017. PMID:27141471

  5. Bacterial Transcription as a Target for Antibacterial Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cong; Yang, Xiao; Lewis, Peter J

    2016-03-01

    Transcription, the first step of gene expression, is carried out by the enzyme RNA polymerase (RNAP) and is regulated through interaction with a series of protein transcription factors. RNAP and its associated transcription factors are highly conserved across the bacterial domain and represent excellent targets for broad-spectrum antibacterial agent discovery. Despite the numerous antibiotics on the market, there are only two series currently approved that target transcription. The determination of the three-dimensional structures of RNAP and transcription complexes at high resolution over the last 15 years has led to renewed interest in targeting this essential process for antibiotic development by utilizing rational structure-based approaches. In this review, we describe the inhibition of the bacterial transcription process with respect to structural studies of RNAP, highlight recent progress toward the discovery of novel transcription inhibitors, and suggest additional potential antibacterial targets for rational drug design.

  6. Regenerative Medicine: Transforming the Drug Discovery and Development Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Karathanasis, Sotirios K.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the explosion of knowledge in basic biological processes controlling tissue regeneration and the growing interest in repairing/replacing diseased tissues and organs through various approaches (e.g., small and large molecule therapeutics, stem cell injection, tissue engineering), the pharmaceutical industry (pharma) has been reluctant to fully adopt these technologies into the traditional drug discovery and research and development (R&D) process. In this article, I discuss knowledge-base gaps and other possible factors that may delay full incorporation of these innovations in pharma R&D. I hope that this discussion will illuminate key issues that currently limit synergistic relationships between pharma and academic institutions and may even stimulate initiation of such collaborative research. PMID:25085955

  7. Multi-regional clinical trials and global drug development

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Premnath

    2016-01-01

    Drug development has been globalized, and multi-regional clinical trial (MRCT) for regulatory submission has widely been conducted by many discovery based global pharmaceutical companies with the objective of reducing the time lag of launch in key markets and improve patient access to new and innovative treatments. Sponsors are facing several challenges while conducting multiregional clinical trials. Challenges under the heads statistics, clinical, regulatory operational, and ethics have been discussed. Regulators in different countries such as USA, EU-Japan, and China have issued guidance documents in respect of MRCT's. Lack of harmonization in the design and planning of MRCT is perceived to create a difficult situation to sponsors adversely affecting progressing MRCT in more and more discoveries. International conference on hormonisation (ICH) has initiated the process for having a harmonized guidance document on MRCT. This document is likely to be issued in early 2017. PMID:27141471

  8. [Cytochrome P450 enzymes and microbial drug development - A review].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong; Zhang, Wei; Li, Shengying

    2016-03-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes broadly exist in animals, plants and microorganisms. This superfamily of monooxygenases holds the greatest diversity of substrate structures and catalytic reaction types among all enzymes. P450 enzymes play important roles in natural product biosynthesis. In particular, P450 enzymes are capable of catalyzing the regio- and stereospecific oxidation of non-activated C-H bonds in complex organic compounds under mild conditions, which overrides many chemical catalysts. This advantage thus warrants their great potential in microbial drug development. In this review, we introduce a variety of P450 enzymes involved in natural product biosynthesis; provide a brief overview on protein engineering, biotransformation and practical application of P450 enzymes; and discuss the limits, challenges and prospects of industrial application of P450 enzymes.

  9. [Cytochrome P450 enzymes and microbial drug development - A review].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong; Zhang, Wei; Li, Shengying

    2016-03-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes broadly exist in animals, plants and microorganisms. This superfamily of monooxygenases holds the greatest diversity of substrate structures and catalytic reaction types among all enzymes. P450 enzymes play important roles in natural product biosynthesis. In particular, P450 enzymes are capable of catalyzing the regio- and stereospecific oxidation of non-activated C-H bonds in complex organic compounds under mild conditions, which overrides many chemical catalysts. This advantage thus warrants their great potential in microbial drug development. In this review, we introduce a variety of P450 enzymes involved in natural product biosynthesis; provide a brief overview on protein engineering, biotransformation and practical application of P450 enzymes; and discuss the limits, challenges and prospects of industrial application of P450 enzymes. PMID:27382792

  10. [Chapter 2. Transitions in drug-discovery technology and drug-development in Japan (1980-2010)].

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Noriko; Yoshioka, Ryuzo; Matsumoto, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    In 1970s, the material patent system was introduced in Japan. Since then, many Japanese pharmaceutical companies have endeavored to create original in-house products. From 1980s, many of the innovative products were small molecular drugs and were developed using powerful medicinal-chemical technologies. Among them were antibiotics and effective remedies for the digestive organs and circulatory organs. During this period, Japanese companies were able to launch some blockbuster drugs. At the same time, the pharmaceutical market, which had grown rapidly for two decades, was beginning to level off. From the late 1990s, drug development was slowing down due to the lack of expertise in biotechnology such as genetic engineering. In response to the circumstances, the research and development on biotechnology-based drugs such as antibody drugs have become more dynamic and popular at companies than small molecule drugs. In this paper, the writers reviewed in detail the transitions in drug discovery and development between 1980 and 2010. PMID:25272636

  11. Success for Every Teen: Programs that Help Adolescents Avoid Pregnancy, Gangs, Drug Abuse, and School Drop-Out. An Ounce of Prevention Fund Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ounce of Prevention Fund.

    This booklet describes two prevention programs, Peer Power, a program for girls, and Awareness and Development for Adolescent Males (ADAM), a program for boys. It is noted that these programs, designed to reach students before high school age, help young adolescents stay in school, delay sexual activity and pregnancy, and develop realistic career…

  12. Developing a Four-Year Integrated Core Curriculum: Advice for Avoiding the Pitfalls and Building Consensus for Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirabella, Roseanne M.; Balkun, Mary M.

    2011-01-01

    Seton Hall University's new core curriculum includes a pair of Signature Courses and a third-year Signature Course developed within departments, two composition classes, a university life course, and five proficiencies. This article describes the process leading to the development of this new curriculum and provides advice on general education…

  13. Development of polymer-polysaccharide hydrogels for controlling drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Aaron David

    The use of polymers as biomaterials has evolved over the past several decades, encompassing an expanding synthetic toolbox and many bio-mimetic approaches. Both synthetic and natural polymers have been used as components for biomaterials as their unique chemical structures can provide specific functions for desired applications. Of these materials, heparin, a highly sulfated naturally occurring polysaccharide, has been investigated extensively as a core component in drug delivery platforms and tissue engineering. The goal of this work was to further explore the use of heparin via conjugation with synthetic polymers for applications in drug delivery. We begin by investigating low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), a depolymerized heparin that is used medicinally in the prevention of thrombosis by subcutaneous injection or intravenous drip. Certain disease states or disorders require frequent administration with invasive delivery modalities leading to compliance issues for individuals on prolonged therapeutic courses. To address these issues, a long-term delivery method was developed for LMWH via subcutaneous injection of in situ hydrogelators. This therapy was accomplished by chemical modification of LMWH with maleimide functionality so that it may be crosslinked into continuous hydrogel networks with four-arm thiolated polyethylene glycol (PEG-SH). These hydrogels degrade via hydrolysis over a period of weeks and release bioactive LMWH with first-order kinetics as determined by in vitro and in vivo models, thus indicating the possibility of an alternative means of heparin delivery over current accepted methodologies. Evaluation of the maleimide-thiol chemistries applied in the LMWH hydrogels revealed reversibility for some conjugates under reducing conditions. Addition chemistries, such as maleimide-thiol reactions, are widely employed in biological conjugates and are generally accepted as stable. Here we show that the resulting succinimide thioether formed by the

  14. 78 FR 66744 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Pulmonary Tuberculosis... industry entitled ``Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Developing Drugs for Treatment.'' The purpose of the draft... tuberculosis. This guidance applies to the development of a single investigational drug as well as...

  15. 78 FR 58311 - Complex Issues in Developing Drug and Biological Products for Rare Diseases; Public Workshop...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Complex Issues in Developing Drug and Biological Products... announcing the following public workshop entitled ``Complex Issues in Developing Drug and Biological Products for Rare Diseases.'' The purpose of the public workshop is twofold: To discuss complex issues...

  16. 75 FR 65495 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Qualification Process for Drug Development Tools; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Qualification Process for... entitled ``Qualification Process for Drug Development Tools.'' This draft guidance describes the qualification process for drug development tools (DDTs) intended for potential use, over time, in multiple...

  17. Food and Drug Administration process for development and approval of drugs and radiopharmaceuticals: treatments in urologic oncology.

    PubMed

    Ning, Yang-Min; Maher, V Ellen

    2015-03-01

    Regulatory advice and assessment play an important role in the successful development of new drugs and radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of urologic malignancies. Cooperation between the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the pharmaceutical industry has led to the approval of more than 20 new urologic oncology products in the last 2 decades. Despite these advances, more effective treatments need to be developed and approved for the treatment of urologic malignancies. This review provides general information about the FDA's role in the development of investigational new drugs, with an emphasis on the regulatory process and the requirements for marketing approval. In addition, this review summarizes the products for the treatment of urologic malignancies that were approved by the FDA in the last 30 years and the key issues concerning urologic oncology products that were discussed publicly at Oncologic Drug Advisory Committee meetings in the past 10 years.

  18. Development of cup shaped microneedle array for transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Vinayakumar, Kadayar B; Hegde, Gopal M; Ramachandra, Subbaraya G; Nayak, Mangalore M; Dinesh, Narasimhian S; Rajanna, Konandur

    2015-01-01

    Microneedle technology is one of the attractive methods in transdermal drug delivery. However, the clinical applications of this method are limited owing to: complexity in the preparation of multiple coating solutions, drug leakage while inserting the microneedles into the skin and the outer walls of the solid microneedle can hold limited quantity of drug. Here, the authors present the fabrication of an array of rectangular cup shaped silicon microneedles, which provide for reduced drug leakage resulting in improvement of efficiency of drug delivery and possibility of introducing multiple drugs. The fabricated solid microneedles with rectangular cup shaped tip have a total height of 200 μm. These cup shaped tips have dimensions: 60 × 60 μm (length × breadth) with a depth of 60 μm. The cups are filled with drug using a novel in-house built drop coating system. Successful drug dissolution was observed when the coated microneedle was used on mice. Also, using the above method, it is possible to fill the cups selectively with different drugs, which enables simultaneous multiple drug delivery. PMID:25956180

  19. Avoiding the slippery slope: preventing the development of diabetes in women with a history of gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Feig, Denice S

    2012-05-01

    Women with a history of gestational diabetes are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. By identifying this high-risk group who has not yet developed the disease, we have the opportunity to try to prevent this progression to diabetes. In this article, we review the evidence for different strategies used to prevent the onset of diabetes in women with a history of gestational diabetes. These strategies include lifestyle changes, medications and breastfeeding.

  20. Sleep-wake mechanisms and drug discovery: sleep EEG as a tool for the development of CNS-acting drugs

    PubMed Central

    Staner, Luc

    2002-01-01

    Sleep laboratory investigations constitute a unique noninvasive tool to analyze brain functioning, Polysomnographic recordings, even in the very early phase of development in humans, are mandatory in a developmental plan of a new sleep-acting compound. Sleep is also an interesting tool for the development of other drugs acting on the central nervous system (CNS), Indeed, changes in sleep electroencephalographic (EEG) characteristics are a very sensitive indication of the objective central effects of psychoactive drugs, and these changes are specific to the way the drug acts on the brain neurotransmitter systems. Moreover, new compounds can be compared with reference drugs in terms of the sleep EEG profile they induce. For instance, cognitive enhancers involving cholinergic mechanism have been consistently demonstrated to increase rapid eye movement (REM) sleep pressure, and studying drug-induced slow wave sleep (SWS) alteration is a particularly useful tool for the development of CNS compounds acting at the 5-HT2A/C receptor, such as most atypical antipsychotics and some antidepressant drugs. The sleep EEG profile of antidepressants, and particularly their effects on REM sleep, are specific to their ability to enhance noradrenergic or serotonergic transmission, it is suggested that the effects of noradrenergic versus serotonergic reuptake inhibition could be disentangled using specific monoamine depletion tests and by studying drug effects on sleep microsiructure. PMID:22034388

  1. 78 FR 32667 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Rheumatoid Arthritis: Developing Drug Products for Treatment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Rheumatoid Arthritis... guidance for industry entitled ``Rheumatoid Arthritis: Developing Drug Products for Treatment.''...

  2. Avoidable waste management costs

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

  3. Avoiding the Flu

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Flu Avoiding the Flu Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Children ... help avoid getting and passing on the flu. Influenza (Seasonal) The flu is a contagious respiratory illness ...

  4. Stable isotope-resolved metabolomics and applications for drug development

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Teresa W-M.; Lorkiewicz, Pawel; Sellers, Katherine; Moseley, Hunter N.B.; Higashi, Richard M.; Lane, Andrew N.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in analytical methodologies, principally nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS), during the last decade have made large-scale analysis of the human metabolome a reality. This is leading to the reawakening of the importance of metabolism in human diseases, particularly cancer. The metabolome is the functional readout of the genome, functional genome, and proteome; it is also an integral partner in molecular regulations for homeostasis. The interrogation of the metabolome, or metabolomics, is now being applied to numerous diseases, largely by metabolite profiling for biomarker discovery, but also in pharmacology and therapeutics. Recent advances in stable isotope tracer-based metabolomic approaches enable unambiguous tracking of individual atoms through compartmentalized metabolic networks directly in human subjects, which promises to decipher the complexity of the human metabolome at an unprecedented pace. This knowledge will revolutionize our understanding of complex human diseases, clinical diagnostics, as well as individualized therapeutics and drug response. In this review, we focus on the use of stable isotope tracers with metabolomics technologies for understanding metabolic network dynamics in both model systems and in clinical applications. Atom-resolved isotope tracing via the two major analytical platforms, NMR and MS, has the power to determine novel metabolic reprogramming in diseases, discover new drug targets, and facilitates ADME studies. We also illustrate new metabolic tracer-based imaging technologies, which enable direct visualization of metabolic processes in vivo. We further outline current practices and future requirements for biochemoinformatics development, which is an integral part of translating stable isotope-resolved metabolomics into clinical reality. PMID:22212615

  5. Generating carbon finance through avoided deforestation and its potential to create climatic, conservation and human development benefits.

    PubMed

    Ebeling, Johannes; Yasué, Maï

    2008-05-27

    Recent proposals to compensate developing countries for reducing emissions from deforestation (RED) under forthcoming climate change mitigation regimes are receiving increasing attention. Here we demonstrate that if RED credits were traded on international carbon markets, even moderate decreases in deforestation rates could generate billions of Euros annually for tropical forest conservation. We also discuss the main challenges for a RED mechanism that delivers real climatic benefits. These include providing sufficient incentives while only rewarding deforestation reductions beyond business-as-usual scenarios, addressing risks arising from forest degradation and international leakage, and ensuring permanence of emission reductions. Governance may become a formidable challenge for RED because some countries with the highest RED potentials score poorly on governance indices. In addition to climate mitigation, RED funds could help achieve substantial co-benefits for biodiversity conservation and human development. However, this will probably require targeted additional support because the highest biodiversity threats and human development needs may exist in countries that have limited income potentials from RED. In conclusion, how successfully a market-based RED mechanism can contribute to climate change mitigation, conservation and development will strongly depend on accompanying measures and carefully designed incentive structures involving governments, business, as well as the conservation and development communities.

  6. Thirty Years of Orphan Drug Legislation and the Development of Drugs to Treat Rare Seizure Conditions: A Cross Sectional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Georg F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is a serious chronic health condition with a high morbidity impairing the life of patients and afflicted families. Many epileptic conditions, especially those affecting children, are rare disorders generating an urgent medical need for more efficacious therapy options. Therefore, we assessed the output of the US and European orphan drug legislations. Methods Quantitative analysis of the FDA and EMA databases for orphan drug designations according to STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) criteria. Results Within the US Orphan Drug Act 40 designations were granted delivering nine approvals, i.e. clobazam, diazepam viscous solution for rectal administration, felbamate, fosphenytoin, lamotrigine, repository corticotropin, rufinamide, topiramate, and vigabatrin. Since 2000 the EMA granted six orphan drug designations whereof two compounds were approved, i.e. rufinamide and stiripentol. In the US, two orphan drug designations were withdrawn. Orphan drugs were approved for conditions including Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, infantile spasms, Dravet syndrome, and status epilepticus. Comparing time to approval for rufinamide, which was approved in the US and the EU to treat rare seizure conditions, the process seems faster in the EU (2.2 years) than in the US (4.3 years). Conclusion Orphan drug development in the US and in the EU delivered only few molecular entities to treat rare seizure disorders. The development programs focused on already approved antiepileptic drugs or alternative pharmaceutical formulations. Most orphan drugs approved in the US are not approved in the EU to treat rare seizures although some were introduced after 2000 when the EU adopted the Orphan Drug Regulation. PMID:27557111

  7. Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Hunter, Ed.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This document contains the third volume of "Today's Delinquent," an annual publication of the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This volume deals with the issue of drugs and includes articles by leading authorities in delinquency and substance abuse who share their views on causes and cures for the drug problem among youth in this country.…

  8. [Pediatric drug development: ICH harmonized tripartite guideline E11 within the United States of America, the European Union, and Japan].

    PubMed

    Pflieger, M; Bertram, D

    2014-10-01

    supplementary protection. Regarding the approval for new medicinal products in these two regions, regulations require PCs to include, when it is relevant, a pediatric assessment in their drug research and development plan, which must be approved. Although these regions have implemented the ICH guideline, the regulation differs with respect to the timing of studies in children relative to adults and approval of a pediatric drug development plan. Except for special cases, the pediatric investigation plan in the EU is required to be prepared and submitted to the competent authorities upon availability of adult pharmacokinetic studies (after phase I), which means at an early phase of a new drug development plan. In the USA, the pediatric plan is requested later during the phase II or III trials. In practice, it has become difficult for pharmaceutical industries to develop a practicable clinical program for pediatrics including timelines for studies in children that satisfy both EU and USA authorities. Nevertheless, at an early stage of the development strategy, direct support and advice from competent authorities can be obtained. For the ICH regions, pediatric committees are well-established albeit less structured in Japan. Their roles are to review and assess pediatric plans, to issue recommendations, to advise pharmaceutical companies on the content and format of pediatric data to be methodically collected and analyzed, and to avoid exposing children to unnecessary or redundant clinical trials. This regulatory framework encourages the study and the development of pediatric drugs, but it is still quite difficult to actually measure the impact of the ICH E11 on increasing the number of drugs for pediatric use.

  9. [Pediatric drug development: ICH harmonized tripartite guideline E11 within the United States of America, the European Union, and Japan].

    PubMed

    Pflieger, M; Bertram, D

    2014-10-01

    supplementary protection. Regarding the approval for new medicinal products in these two regions, regulations require PCs to include, when it is relevant, a pediatric assessment in their drug research and development plan, which must be approved. Although these regions have implemented the ICH guideline, the regulation differs with respect to the timing of studies in children relative to adults and approval of a pediatric drug development plan. Except for special cases, the pediatric investigation plan in the EU is required to be prepared and submitted to the competent authorities upon availability of adult pharmacokinetic studies (after phase I), which means at an early phase of a new drug development plan. In the USA, the pediatric plan is requested later during the phase II or III trials. In practice, it has become difficult for pharmaceutical industries to develop a practicable clinical program for pediatrics including timelines for studies in children that satisfy both EU and USA authorities. Nevertheless, at an early stage of the development strategy, direct support and advice from competent authorities can be obtained. For the ICH regions, pediatric committees are well-established albeit less structured in Japan. Their roles are to review and assess pediatric plans, to issue recommendations, to advise pharmaceutical companies on the content and format of pediatric data to be methodically collected and analyzed, and to avoid exposing children to unnecessary or redundant clinical trials. This regulatory framework encourages the study and the development of pediatric drugs, but it is still quite difficult to actually measure the impact of the ICH E11 on increasing the number of drugs for pediatric use. PMID:25175054

  10. Photostability of antidotal oxime HI-6, impact on drug development.

    PubMed

    Bogan, Reinhard; Worek, Franz; Koller, Marianne; Klaubert, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    HI-6 exhibits superior efficacy in the therapy of intoxication by different highly toxic organophosphorus nerve agents. Therefore HI-6 is a promising candidate for the development of new antidotes against nerve agents. For ethical and safety reasons antidotes containing HI-6 should get marketing authorization. Active pharmaceutical ingredients of medicinal products have to fulfil regulatory conditions in terms of purity and stability. Photostability is an essential parameter in this testing strategy. HI-6 was tested under conditions of ICH Q1B 'Photostability testing of new drug substances and products'. The data showed a marked degradation of HI-6 after exposure to daylight. The mechanism of degradation could be detected as photoisomerism. The light burden dependent rate of photoisomerism was followed quantitatively. Based on these quantitative results on the amount of light induced isomeric product a pharmacological qualification was made. A standardized in vitro test showed a decreased ability of light exposed HI-6 to reactivate sarin- and paraoxon-inhibited human acetylcholinesterase. These results have an impact on the further development of antidotes containing HI-6, as light protection will probably be necessary during handling, packaging, storage and application.

  11. Rethinking the Food and Drug Administration's 2013 guidance on developing drugs for early-stage Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Lon S

    2014-03-01

    The February 2013 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) draft guidance for developing drugs for early-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD) creates certain challenges as they guide toward the use of one cognitive outcome to gain accelerated marketing approval for preclinical AD drugs, and a composite clinical scale - the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale in particular - for the primary outcome for prodromal AD clinical trials. In light of the developing knowledge regarding early stage diagnoses and clinical trials outcomes, we recommend that FDA describe its requirements for validating preclinical AD diagnoses for drug development purposes, maintain the principle for requiring coprimary outcomes, and encourage the advancement of outcomes for early stage AD trials. The principles for drug development for early stage AD should not differ from those for clinical AD, especially as the diagnoses of prodromal and early AD impinge on each other. The FDA should not recommend that a composite scale be used as a sole primary efficacy outcome to support a marketing claim unless it requires that the cognitive and functional components of such a scale are demonstrated to be individually meaningful. The current draft guidelines may inadvertently constrain efforts to better assess the clinical effects of new drugs and inhibit innovation in an area where evidence-based clinical research practices are still evolving. PMID:24698029

  12. [Discovery, research and development for innovative drug of traditional Chinese medicine under new situations].

    PubMed

    Tu, Peng-fei; Jiang, Yong; Guo, Xiao-yu

    2015-09-01

    Referring to the rapid developed life science and the higher requirements for the approval of innovative Chinese drugs in recent years, this paper described systematically the discovery, research and development (R&D) approaches for the innovative Chinese drugs under the new situation from the following five aspects, i. e., active components discovered from TCMs, the discovery of effective fractions of TCMs and their formulae, the R&D of TCM innovative drugs based on famous classic prescriptions and famous Chinese patent drugs, and the transformation of clinical effective prescriptions, on the basis of analysing the advantages of innovative drugs derived from natural products based on TCM theories and the problems existed in current R&D of new TCM drugs. Moreover, five suggestions are also given for the rapid development of TCM innovative drugs in China. All these will provide reference for the R&D of TCM innovative drugs.

  13. Effects of drugs of abuse on hippocampal plasticity and hippocampus-dependent learning and memory: contributions to development and maintenance of addiction.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Gould, Thomas J

    2016-10-01

    It has long been hypothesized that conditioning mechanisms play major roles in addiction. Specifically, the associations between rewarding properties of drugs of abuse and the drug context can contribute to future use and facilitate the transition from initial drug use into drug dependency. On the other hand, the self-medication hypothesis of drug abuse suggests that negative consequences of drug withdrawal result in relapse to drug use as an attempt to alleviate the negative symptoms. In this review, we explored these hypotheses and the involvement of the hippocampus in the development and maintenance of addiction to widely abused drugs such as cocaine, amphetamine, nicotine, alcohol, opiates, and cannabis. Studies suggest that initial exposure to stimulants (i.e., cocaine, nicotine, and amphetamine) and alcohol may enhance hippocampal function and, therefore, the formation of augmented drug-context associations that contribute to the development of addiction. In line with the self-medication hypothesis, withdrawal from stimulants, ethanol, and cannabis results in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory deficits, which suggest that an attempt to alleviate these deficits may contribute to relapse to drug use and maintenance of addiction. Interestingly, opiate withdrawal leads to enhancement of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. Given that a conditioned aversion to drug context develops during opiate withdrawal, the cognitive enhancement in this case may result in the formation of an augmented association between withdrawal-induced aversion and withdrawal context. Therefore, individuals with opiate addiction may return to opiate use to avoid aversive symptoms triggered by the withdrawal context. Overall, the systematic examination of the role of the hippocampus in drug addiction may help to formulate a better understanding of addiction and underlying neural substrates. PMID:27634143

  14. Effects of drugs of abuse on hippocampal plasticity and hippocampus-dependent learning and memory: contributions to development and maintenance of addiction.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Gould, Thomas J

    2016-10-01

    It has long been hypothesized that conditioning mechanisms play major roles in addiction. Specifically, the associations between rewarding properties of drugs of abuse and the drug context can contribute to future use and facilitate the transition from initial drug use into drug dependency. On the other hand, the self-medication hypothesis of drug abuse suggests that negative consequences of drug withdrawal result in relapse to drug use as an attempt to alleviate the negative symptoms. In this review, we explored these hypotheses and the involvement of the hippocampus in the development and maintenance of addiction to widely abused drugs such as cocaine, amphetamine, nicotine, alcohol, opiates, and cannabis. Studies suggest that initial exposure to stimulants (i.e., cocaine, nicotine, and amphetamine) and alcohol may enhance hippocampal function and, therefore, the formation of augmented drug-context associations that contribute to the development of addiction. In line with the self-medication hypothesis, withdrawal from stimulants, ethanol, and cannabis results in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory deficits, which suggest that an attempt to alleviate these deficits may contribute to relapse to drug use and maintenance of addiction. Interestingly, opiate withdrawal leads to enhancement of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. Given that a conditioned aversion to drug context develops during opiate withdrawal, the cognitive enhancement in this case may result in the formation of an augmented association between withdrawal-induced aversion and withdrawal context. Therefore, individuals with opiate addiction may return to opiate use to avoid aversive symptoms triggered by the withdrawal context. Overall, the systematic examination of the role of the hippocampus in drug addiction may help to formulate a better understanding of addiction and underlying neural substrates.

  15. [Nurturing clinician investigators is the best way to promote innovative drug development from academia].

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Shunichi; Sakushima, Ken; Nishimura, Masaharu

    2012-03-01

    Clinical research in Japan is still lacking in quality and quantity, and that situation is worsening. One important cause of those problems is the dearth of clinician-investigators. A recent change in the system for post-graduate clinical training affected the career paths of medical residents and reduced the number of young doctors who enter graduate school. Even those who are interested in clinical research now have incentives to avoid graduate school. In Japan, 19th-century biological absolutism is still the dominant paradigm in the medical-research community. Science for public health in the 21st century will benefit from a probabilistic paradigm, which can help to restore an appropriate balance between basic sciences and clinical research. Research done by clinician-investigators should be based on clinical questions that arise in medical practice. That research includes investigation of disease and practice, exploration of associations between causes and outcomes, evaluation of diagnostic tests, and studies of the efficacy of treatments and prevention strategies. We emphasize the importance of nurturing clinician-investigators for the development of clinical research in Japan. This may not be the fastest way to promote innovative drug development from academia, but it is certainly the best.

  16. [Nurturing clinician investigators is the best way to promote innovative drug development from academia].

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Shunichi; Sakushima, Ken; Nishimura, Masaharu

    2012-03-01

    Clinical research in Japan is still lacking in quality and quantity, and that situation is worsening. One important cause of those problems is the dearth of clinician-investigators. A recent change in the system for post-graduate clinical training affected the career paths of medical residents and reduced the number of young doctors who enter graduate school. Even those who are interested in clinical research now have incentives to avoid graduate school. In Japan, 19th-century biological absolutism is still the dominant paradigm in the medical-research community. Science for public health in the 21st century will benefit from a probabilistic paradigm, which can help to restore an appropriate balance between basic sciences and clinical research. Research done by clinician-investigators should be based on clinical questions that arise in medical practice. That research includes investigation of disease and practice, exploration of associations between causes and outcomes, evaluation of diagnostic tests, and studies of the efficacy of treatments and prevention strategies. We emphasize the importance of nurturing clinician-investigators for the development of clinical research in Japan. This may not be the fastest way to promote innovative drug development from academia, but it is certainly the best. PMID:22402715

  17. [Consideration of clinical development for new anticancer drugs on Japan, proposal from approval reviewer].

    PubMed

    Urano, Tsutomu

    2007-02-01

    There become problems about a delay on clinical development of anticancer drug in Japan and drug lag. I consider causes and solutions of the problems from a position of drug approval reviewer. I think the drug lag may cause by stating later state in global clinical development or stagnation of clinical trial activities. To prevail against drug lag,it is necessary to attend to multinational clinical studies,and to mature Japanese clinical trial environment and post-market planning. Then, I believe that the most important point is to make a start on early stage of global clinical development.

  18. [Consideration of clinical development for new anticancer drugs on Japan, proposal from approval reviewer].

    PubMed

    Urano, Tsutomu

    2007-02-01

    There become problems about a delay on clinical development of anticancer drug in Japan and drug lag. I consider causes and solutions of the problems from a position of drug approval reviewer. I think the drug lag may cause by stating later state in global clinical development or stagnation of clinical trial activities. To prevail against drug lag,it is necessary to attend to multinational clinical studies,and to mature Japanese clinical trial environment and post-market planning. Then, I believe that the most important point is to make a start on early stage of global clinical development. PMID:17301550

  19. New Developments in Antiepileptic Drug Resistance: An Integrative View

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Dieter; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Current theories on drug resistance in epilepsy include the drug transporter hypothesis, the drug target hypothesis, and a novel approach called the inherent severity model of epilepsy, which posits that the severity of the disease determines its relative response to medication. Valuable as each of these hypotheses is, none is currently a stand-alone theory that is able to convincingly explain drug resistance in human epilepsy. As a consequence, it may be of interest to update and integrate the various hypotheses of drug resistance and to explore possible links to the severity of epilepsy. The observation that a high frequency of seizures prior to onset of treatment is a prognostic signal of increased severity and future drug failure suggests that common neurobiological factors may underlie both disease severity and pharmacoresistance. Such a link has been proposed for depression; however, the evidence for a direct mechanistic link, genetic or otherwise, between drug response and disease severity of human epilepsy is still elusive. Although emerging data from experimental studies suggest that alterations in GABAA receptors may present one example of a mechanistic link, clearly more work is needed to explore whether common neurobiological factors may underlie both epilepsy severity and drug failure. PMID:19421380

  20. Drug promotion and labeling in developing countries: an update.

    PubMed

    Lee, P R; Lurie, P; Silverman, M M; Lydecker, M

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies of drug promotion and labeling in Third World countries since 1972 have observed important changes in the policies of multinational corporations. Earlier studies found that multinational and national drug companies often grossly exaggerated the indications for the drugs and minimized or ignored the hazards. In the latest study, initiated in 1987, considerable improvement in promotional practices of the multinational corporations has been found, but little or no improvement on the part of the national companies. As a result, physicians are still provided with grossly exaggerated claims and the hazards of prescription drugs are covered up or glossed over. A very serious problem--the marketing of fraudulent drug products--has been identified in a number of Third World countries. Drug products are shaped and colored to resemble the original multinational company product, but contain only a small percentage of the active ingredient stated on the label, or perhaps none at all. In Indonesia fraudulent drug products may represent 20-30% of all drug products in the market. Similar fraudulent products have been reported in Brazil, Thailand, Bangladesh and Malaysia.

  1. Homelessness and drug misuse in developing countries: A mathematical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhunu, C. P.

    2014-06-01

    Homelessness and drug-misuse are known to exist like siamese twins. We present a model to capture the dynamics in the growth in the number of homeless (street kids and street adults) and drug misusers. The reproduction numbers of the model are determined and analyzed. Results from this study suggests that adult peer pressure plays a more significant role in the growth of drug-misuse and the number of street kids. This result suggests that in resource constrained settings intervention strategies should be tailor made to target adults whose behaviour influence others to misuse drugs and abuse children. Furthermore, numerical simulations show that homelessness and drug-misuse positively enhances, the growth of each other. Thus, to effectively control these two social problems require strategies targeting both of them.

  2. [A 50-year history of new drugs in Japan-the development and trends of hemostatics and antithrombotic drugs].

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Hikaru; Abiko, Yasushi; Akimoto, Takeshi

    2003-01-01

    The developments and trends of hemostatic and antithrombotic drugs in Japan were investigated chronologically for the last 50 years after the 2nd World War. 1. Hemostatic drugs are classified into three groups ; capillary stabilizers, blood coagulants and antifibrinolytics. l) As to capillary stabilizers, flavonoid (rutin, 1949), adrenochrome derivative (carbazochrome, 1954) and conjugated estrogen (Premarin, 1964) were introduced therapeutically. Especially, the soluble types of adrenochrome compounds (Adona 1956, S-Adchnon, 1962) were devised and used widely in Japan. 2) Drugs concerning blood coagulation, thrombin, introduced in 1953, and hemocoagulase, a snake venom introduced in 1966, were used clinically. V.K. groups producing various coagulation factors were introduced as V.K1 (Phytonadione, 1962) and V.K2 (rnenatetrenone,1972), and they were admitted in "The Japanese Pharmacopoeia"editions 8 and 14, respectively). 3) Regarding antifibrinolytic drugs, Japanese researchers have made remarkable contributions. e-Aminocapronic acid (Ipsilon, 1962) and tranexamic acid (Transamin, 1965) were developed and used for various abnormal bleedings or hemorrhage associated with plasmin over-activation. tranexamic acid also proved to suppress inflammations of the throat such as tonsillitis, pharyngitis or laryngitis. 2. Antithrombotic drugs are also divided into three groups; anticoagulants, antiplatelet drugs and fibrinolytics.1) The anticoagulants used therapeutically by injection are heparins (Na-salt, 1951; Ca-salt, 1962) and low-molecular-weight heparins such as dalteparin (1992), parnaparin (1994) and reviparin (1999). The low molecule compounds are superior to the original heparins in reducing the risk of bleeding. As oral anticoagulants, coumarin derivatives, dicumarol (1950), ethylbiscoumacetate (1954), phenylindandione (1956) and warfarin (1962) are known. Warfarin potassium is the main drug for oral therapy of thromboembolism lately. Gabexate mesilate (1989) and

  3. Development and validation of an HPLC-MS/MS method to quantify clopidogrel acyl glucuronide, clopidogrel acid metabolite, and clopidogrel in plasma samples avoiding analyte back-conversion.

    PubMed

    Silvestro, Luigi; Gheorghe, Mihaela; Iordachescu, Adriana; Ciuca, Valentin; Tudoroniu, Ariana; Rizea Savu, Simona; Tarcomnicu, Isabela

    2011-08-01

    A new sensitive and fast quantitative analytical method for the simultaneous determination of clopidogrel, its main metabolite clopidogrel carboxylic acid, and the newly described acyl glucuronide metabolite, in human plasma samples, is presented. The analytical procedures (plasma storage, handling, and extract storage in the autosampler) were optimized in order to avoid back-conversion; a known drawback in measurements of clopidogrel. Clopidogrel acyl glucuronide was confirmed as a major source of back-conversion to the parent drug in the presence of methanol, and thorough stability experiments were carried out to find the most appropriate conditions for an accurate analysis of clopidogrel and the two metabolites. The method was validated by assessing selectivity, sensitivity, linearity, accuracy, and precision for all three analytes, in accordance to Food and Drug Administration guidelines. Spiked quality controls in plasma as well as incurred samples were used to verify back-conversion in the selected conditions, with results meeting European Medicines Agency acceptance criteria (concentrations within 80-120% of the first reading). The method was then applied to a pharmacokinetic study, and for the first time, a pharmacokinetic curve of clopidogrel acyl glucuronide in human plasma is presented. The concentrations ranged up to 1,048.684 ng/mL, with a mean of 470.268 ng/mL, while clopidogrel had a mean C(max) of 1.348 ng/mL; these orders of magnitude show how much the back-conversion of this metabolite may influence clopidogrel quantification if it is not properly controlled.

  4. Pattern of Drug Resistance and Risk Factors Associated with Development of Drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Irfan; Javaid, Arshad; Tahir, Zarfishan; Ullah, Obaid; Shah, Aamer Ali; Hasan, Fariha; Ayub, Najma

    2016-01-01

    Background Drug resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) is a major public health problem in developing countries such as Pakistan. Objective The current study was conducted to assess the frequency of drug resistant tuberculosis including multi drug resistance (MDR- TB) as well as risk factors for development of DR-TB, in Punjab, Pakistan. Methodology Drug susceptibility testing (DST) was performed, using proportion method, for 2367 culture positive Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) cases that were enrolled from January 2012 to December 2013 in the province of Punjab, Pakistan, against first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs. The data was analyzed using statistical software; SPSS version 18. Results Out of 2367 isolates, 273 (11.5%) were resistant to at least one anti-TB drug, while 221 (9.3%) showed MDR- TB. Risk factors for development of MDR-TB were early age (ranges between 10–25 years) and previously treated TB patients. Conclusion DR-TB is a considerable problem in Pakistan. Major risk factors are previous history of TB treatment and younger age group. It emphasizes the need for effective TB control Program in the country. PMID:26809127

  5. Development of Novel Drugs from Marine Surface Associated Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Penesyan, Anahit; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Egan, Suhelen

    2010-01-01

    While the oceans cover more than 70% of the Earth’s surface, marine derived microbial natural products have been largely unexplored. The marine environment is a habitat for many unique microorganisms, which produce biologically active compounds (“bioactives”) to adapt to particular environmental conditions. For example, marine surface associated microorganisms have proven to be a rich source for novel bioactives because of the necessity to evolve allelochemicals capable of protecting the producer from the fierce competition that exists between microorganisms on the surfaces of marine eukaryotes. Chemically driven interactions are also important for the establishment of cross-relationships between microbes and their eukaryotic hosts, in which organisms producing antimicrobial compounds (“antimicrobials”), may protect the host surface against over colonisation in return for a nutrient rich environment. As is the case for bioactive discovery in general, progress in the detection and characterization of marine microbial bioactives has been limited by a number of obstacles, such as unsuitable culture conditions, laborious purification processes, and a lack of de-replication. However many of these limitations are now being overcome due to improved microbial cultivation techniques, microbial (meta-) genomic analysis and novel sensitive analytical tools for structural elucidation. Here we discuss how these technical advances, together with a better understanding of microbial and chemical ecology, will inevitably translate into an increase in the discovery and development of novel drugs from marine microbial sources in the future. PMID:20411108

  6. Neuropeptides as targets for the development of anticonvulsant drugs.

    PubMed

    Clynen, Elke; Swijsen, Ann; Raijmakers, Marjolein; Hoogland, Govert; Rigo, Jean-Michel

    2014-10-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder characterized by recurrent seizures. These seizures are due to abnormal excessive and synchronous neuronal activity in the brain caused by a disruption of the delicate balance between excitation and inhibition. Neuropeptides can contribute to such misbalance by modulating the effect of classical excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters. In this review, we discuss 21 different neuropeptides that have been linked to seizure disorders. These neuropeptides show an aberrant expression and/or release in animal seizure models and/or epilepsy patients. Many of these endogenous peptides, like adrenocorticotropic hormone, angiotensin, cholecystokinin, cortistatin, dynorphin, galanin, ghrelin, neuropeptide Y, neurotensin, somatostatin, and thyrotropin-releasing hormone, are able to suppress seizures in the brain. Other neuropeptides, such as arginine-vasopressine peptide, corticotropin-releasing hormone, enkephalin, β-endorphin, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide, and tachykinins have proconvulsive properties. For oxytocin and melanin-concentrating hormone both pro- and anticonvulsive effects have been reported, and this seems to be dose or time dependent. All these neuropeptides and their receptors are interesting targets for the development of new antiepileptic drugs. Other neuropeptides such as nesfatin-1 and vasoactive intestinal peptide have been less studied in this field; however, as nesfatin-1 levels change over the course of epilepsy, this can be considered as an interesting marker to diagnose patients who have suffered a recent epileptic seizure.

  7. Toward an optimized therapy for tuberculosis? Drugs in clinical trials and in preclinical development.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhenkun; Lienhardt, Christian

    2009-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be one of the greatest challenges in the global public health arena. Current therapeutic agents against TB are old and inadequate, particularly in the face of many new challenges. Multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) has become prevalent in many parts of the world and extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) is rapidly emerging. There are few or essentially no effective drugs available to treat these drug-resistant forms of TB. TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection has become another major problem in areas with high prevalence of HIV infection. Simultaneous treatment of TB and HIV is difficult due to the severe drug-drug interactions between the first-line rifamycin-containing TB therapy and antiretroviral agents. However, there have been some encouraging developments in TB drug research and development within the past decade. At present there are 6 compounds, including 3 novel agents, in late stages of clinical development. There are even larger numbers of compounds and projects in the TB drug pipeline at the discovery stage and in early stages of clinical development, mainly targeting treatment shortening and drug resistance. Despite these encouraging developments, the current TB drug pipeline is not sufficient to address the multitude of challenges inherent in the current standard of TB therapy. A stronger TB drug pipeline and a new paradigm for the development of novel TB drug combinations are needed.

  8. 78 FR 15371 - Drug Development for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Myalgic Encephalomyelitis; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Drug Development for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Myalgic... effective drug therapies to treat signs and symptoms related to chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and...

  9. Moderate Adolescent Drug Use and the Development of Substance Use Self-Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Percy, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a re-conceptualization of moderate adolescent drug use. It is argued that experimentation with alcohol and other drugs during the teenage years may play an important role in the development of regulatory competency in relation to drug consumption in adulthood. When such regulatory skills fail to emerge in young people, during…

  10. Development of broad-spectrum antibiofilm drugs: strategies and challenges.

    PubMed

    Dharmaprakash, Akhilandeswarre; Thandavarayan, Ramamurthy; Joseph, Iype; Thomas, Sabu

    2015-01-01

    The severity of many chronic bacterial infections is mainly due to the biofilm mode of life adapted by pathogenic bacteria. The bacteria in biofilm-stage exhibit high resistance to host immune responses and antimicrobials, which complicates the treatment process and results in life threatening conditions. Most of the chronic infections are polymicrobial in nature. In order to combat the polymicrobial biofilm infections and to increase the efficiency of antimicrobials, there is an urgent need for broad-spectrum antibiofilm drugs. This review discusses the clinical needs and current status of broad-spectrum antibiofilm drugs with special emphasis on prospective strategies and hurdles in the process of new drug discovery. PMID:26059624

  11. Design and development of a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system for telmisartan for oral drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jaydeep; Kevin, Garala; Patel, Anjali; Raval, Mihir; Sheth, Navin

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aim: Telmisartan (TEL) is an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) antihypertensive agent. The aim of the present investigation was to develop a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) to enhance the oral bioavailability of poorly water soluble TEL. Materials and Methods: The solubility of TEL in various oils was determined to identify the oil phase of a SNEDDS. Various surfactants and co-surfactants were screened for their ability to emulsify the selected oil. Pseudoternary phase diagrams were constructed to identify the efficient self-emulsifying region. A SNEDDS was further evaluated for its percentage transmittance, emulsification time, drug content, phase separation, dilution, droplet size, zeta potential, pH, refractive index, and viscosity. Results: The developed SNEDDS formulation contained TEL (20 mg), Tween® 20 (43.33%w/w), Carbitol® (21.67%w/w), and Acrysol® EL 135 (32%w/w). The optimized formulation of the TEL-loaded SNEDDS exhibited a complete in vitro drug release in 15 min as compared with the plain drug, which had a limited dissolution rate. It was also compared with the pure drug suspension by oral administration in male Wister rats. The in vivo study exhibited a 7.5-fold increase in the oral bioavailability of TEL from the SNEDDS compared with the pure drug suspension. Conclusions: These results suggest the potential use of the SNEDDS to improve the dissolution and oral bioavailability of poorly water soluble TEL. PMID:23071930

  12. Developments of mass spectrometry-based technologies for effective drug development linked with clinical proteomes.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Noboru; Bando, Yasuhiko; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Kawamura, Takeshi; Nakamura, Haruhiko; Marko-Varga, György; Nishimura, Toshihide

    2016-02-01

    A strong demand in drug discovery and development today is to overcome "Big Gaps" encountered by differences in species and races, to accelerate effective developments in cost and time, and to meet medical needs. Moreover, drugs of various types have emerged which cover middle-size molecules and polymers rather than conventional small molecules. Upon those challenges, mass spectrometry (MS)-based technologies, which will be described in this paper, will play an increasingly important role, among which the liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) platform will be powerful as rapid and molecule-based analysis more than ever. nanoPore Optical Interferometry (nPOI) newly introduced can detect even weak interactions in protein-protein and protein-compound, and can be connected directly to LC/MS/MS for identification of binding molecular species, which will be quite useful for affinity ranking and high-throughput interaction screening. Imaging MS provides the molecular information and spatial distribution of targeted molecules within a tissue specimen. MS-based clinical proteomics utilizing clinical specimens and empowered by advanced bioinformatics can attain both key protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks with major protein players responsible for functional mechanisms of a disease subtype. An integration of those MS-based technologies will deliver a seamless platform of drug development from molecules identified in human clinical specimens. PMID:26782309

  13. Genetically Defined Strains in Drug Development and Toxicity Testing.

    PubMed

    Festing, Michael F W

    2016-01-01

    There is growing concern about the poor quality and lack of repeatability of many pre-clinical experiments involving laboratory animals. According to one estimate as much as $28 billion is wasted annually in the USA alone in such studies. A decade ago the FDA's "Critical path" white paper noted that "The traditional tools used to assess product safety-animal toxicology and outcomes from human studies-have changed little over many decades and have largely not benefited from recent gains in scientific knowledge. The inability to better assess and predict product safety leads to failures during clinical development and, occasionally, after marketing." Repeat-dose 28-days and 90-days toxicity tests in rodents have been widely used as part of a strategy to assess the safety of drugs and chemicals but their repeatability and power to detect adverse effects have not been formally evaluated.The guidelines (OECD TG 407 and 408) for these tests specify the dose levels and number of animals per dose but do not specify the strain of animals which should be used. In practice, almost all the tests are done using genetically undefined "albino" rats or mice in which the genetic variation, a major cause of inter-individual and strain variability, is unknown and uncontrolled. This chapter suggests that a better strategy would be to use small numbers of animals of several genetically defined strains of mice or rats instead of the undefined animals used at present. Inbred strains are more stable providing more repeatable data than outbred stocks. Importantly their greater phenotypic uniformity should lead to more powerful and repeatable tests. Any observed strain differences would indicate genetic variation in response to the test substance, providing key data. We suggest that the FDA and other regulators and funding organizations should support research to evaluate this alternative. PMID:27150081

  14. Curious discoveries in antiviral drug development: the role of serendipity.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2015-07-01

    Antiviral drug development has often followed a curious meandrous route, guided by serendipity rather than rationality. This will be illustrated by ten examples. The polyanionic compounds (i) polyethylene alanine (PEA) and (ii) suramin were designed as an antiviral agent (PEA) or known as an antitrypanosomal agent (suramin), before they emerged as, respectively, a depilatory agent, or reverse transcriptase inhibitor. The 2',3'-dideoxynucleosides (ddNs analogues) (iii) have been (and are still) used in the "Sanger" DNA sequencing technique, although they are now commercialized as nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) in the treatment of HIV infections. (E)-5-(2-Bromovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (iv) was discovered as a selective anti-herpes simplex virus compound and is now primarily used for the treatment of varicella-zoster virus infections. The prototype of the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPs), (S)-9-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine [(S)-HPMPA], (v) was never commercialized, although it gave rise to several marketed products (cidofovir, adefovir, and tenofovir). 1-[2-(Hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine (vi) and TIBO (tetrahydroimidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4-benzodiazepin-2(1H)]-one and -thione) (vii) paved the way to a number of compounds (i.e., nevirapine, delavirdine, etravirine, and rilpivirine), which are now collectively called non-NRTIs. The bicyclam AMD3100 (viii) was originally described as an anti-HIV agent before it became later marketed as a stem cell mobilizer. The S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitors (ix), while active against a broad range of (-)RNA viruses and poxviruses may be particularly effective against Ebola virus, and for (x) the O-ANP derivatives, the potential application range encompasses virtually all DNA viruses. PMID:25726922

  15. Methodological aspects of current problems in target-based anticancer drug development.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Takeharu; Okamoto, Tatsuro; Ichinose, Yukito; Oda, Shinya; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2006-06-01

    Differently from the conventional antineoplastic agents, target-based drugs are designed a priori, based on our knowledge of various physiological molecules that has been obtained by the development of molecular biology. This "Copernican revolution" in drug development may imply a paradigm shift in this field. However, contrary to the initial expectations, many drugs developed by this approach are now faced with difficulties, mainly because of the fundamental and theoretical limits of this approach. All of the physiological functions are not always known in all target molecules. In low-molecular-weight drugs, i.e., "inhibitors," targets disperse, due to the structural similarities in physiological molecules. This double-faced "out-of-focusing" causes many problems in various steps of drug development, drug design, clinical trials, and administration to patients. Many drugs are now being abandoned because of unexpectedly lower response rates or unforeseeable adverse effects, and the variety of the drugs exhibits a kaleidoscopic appearance. The double-faced "out-of-focusing" derives from the methodological limits in molecular biology, i.e., elementalism, and limits in our techniques for drug development. To overcome these currently inevitable limits, it appears essential to elucidate the specific changes in target molecules that chiefly promote tumor growth and, consequently, strongly predict response to the administered drugs. Precise and efficient detection of responder populations is the key to the development and establishment of target-based anticancer therapies. PMID:16850122

  16. Development and model testing of antemortem screening methodology to predict required drug withholds in heifers.

    PubMed

    Jones, Shuna A; Salter, Robert S; Goldsmith, Tim; Quintana, Julio; Rapnicki, Paul; Shuck, Karen; Wells, Jim E; Schneider, Marilyn J; Griffin, Dee

    2014-02-01

    A simple, cow-side test for the presence of drug residues in live animal fluids would provide useful information for tissue drug residue avoidance programs. This work describes adaptation and evaluation of rapid screening tests to detect drug residues in serum and urine. Medicated heifers had urine, serum, and tissue biopsy samples taken while on drug treatment. Samples were tested by rapid methods and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The adapted microbial inhibition method, kidney inhibition swab test, was useful in detecting sulfadimethoxine in serum, and its response correlated with the prescribed withdrawal time for the drug, 5 to 6 days posttreatment. The lateral flow screening method for flunixin and beta-lactams, adapted for urine, was useful in predicting flunixin in liver detected by HPLC, 96 h posttreatment. The same adapted methods were not useful to detect ceftiofur in serum or urine due to a lack of sensitivity at the levels of interest. These antemortem screening test studies demonstrated that the method selected, and the sampling matrix chosen (urine or serum), will depend on the drug used and should be based on animal treatment history if available. The live animal tests demonstrated the potential for verification that an individual animal is free of drug residues before sale for human consumption.

  17. Development and characterization of chronomodulated drug delivery system of captopril

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Archana S; Dandagi, Panchaxari M; Masthiholimath, Vinayak S; Gadad, Anand P; Najwade, Basavaraj K

    2011-01-01

    Background: Hypertension shows circadian rhythm that there is a rise in pressure from the time of waking or before (about 4 to 8 a.m.), in most people. Conventional drug delivery system of captopril is inappropriate for the delivery of drug, as they cannot be administered just before the symptoms are worsened, because during this time the patients are asleep, bedtime dosing of captopril will not provide a therapeutic plasma drug concentration at the early hours of morning because of poor pharmacokinetic profile and shorter half-life of 1.9 hours. Thus, this study attempts to design and evaluate a chronomodulated pulsatile drug delivery system of captopril which was aimed to release the drug after a lag time of 6 hours. Materials and Methods: Present delivery system was prepared by rupturable coating method. The core containing captopril as a bioactive compound were prepared by direct compression method and then coated sequentially with an inner swelling layer containing hydrocolloid HPMC E5 and an outer rupturable layer consisted of Eudragit RL/RS (1 : 1). Total 12 formulations with different levels of inner swelling layer and outer polymeric layer were prepared and subjected to various processing and formulative parameters like the effect of core composition, level of swelling layer, and rupturable coating on lag time was investigated. In vitro drug release and rupture tests were performed using United States Pharmacopoeia paddle method at 50 rpm in 0.1N HCl and phosphate buffer of pH 6.8. Results: The results showed that as the amount of inner swelling layer increases, the lag time decreases and as the Eudragit coating level increases, the lag time increases and percent water uptake of time-dependent pulsatile release system decreases. The presence of an osmotic agent and effervescent agent helped in shortening of lag time. Conclusion: The system was found to be satisfactory in terms of release of the drug after the lag time of 6 hours. PMID:23071948

  18. Introducing the Date and Acquaintance Rape Avoidance Scale.

    PubMed

    Resendez, Josephine R; Hughes, Jamie S

    2016-01-01

    We present the Date and Acquaintance Rape Avoidance Scale (DARAS). The DARAS is a measure of a woman's behaviors used to avoid date and acquaintance rape. Three factor structures were possible. The DARAS may have measured several factors related to alcohol and drug use, self-defense, and date behaviors; 2 factors related to behaviors to avoid acquaintance versus date rape; or a single factor that represented general vigilance. The data revealed a highly reliable, 63 item single factor that was correlated with stranger rape avoidance, rejection of rape myths, hostile sexist beliefs about men, and benevolent sexist beliefs about women. The creation of the DARAS adds to the growing body of research on rape avoidance. The DARAS is key to understanding the behaviors women employ to avoid date rape. Rather than placing the responsibility for rape on the victim, the DARAS was developed as a theoretical and applied tool that can be used to improve theory and construct rape education and prevention programs. PMID:27302901

  19. Introducing the Date and Acquaintance Rape Avoidance Scale.

    PubMed

    Resendez, Josephine R; Hughes, Jamie S

    2016-01-01

    We present the Date and Acquaintance Rape Avoidance Scale (DARAS). The DARAS is a measure of a woman's behaviors used to avoid date and acquaintance rape. Three factor structures were possible. The DARAS may have measured several factors related to alcohol and drug use, self-defense, and date behaviors; 2 factors related to behaviors to avoid acquaintance versus date rape; or a single factor that represented general vigilance. The data revealed a highly reliable, 63 item single factor that was correlated with stranger rape avoidance, rejection of rape myths, hostile sexist beliefs about men, and benevolent sexist beliefs about women. The creation of the DARAS adds to the growing body of research on rape avoidance. The DARAS is key to understanding the behaviors women employ to avoid date rape. Rather than placing the responsibility for rape on the victim, the DARAS was developed as a theoretical and applied tool that can be used to improve theory and construct rape education and prevention programs.

  20. Process Pharmacology: A Pharmacological Data Science Approach to Drug Development and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lötsch, Jörn; Ultsch, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    A novel functional-genomics based concept of pharmacology that uses artificial intelligence techniques for mining and knowledge discovery in "big data" providing comprehensive information about the drugs' targets and their functional genomics is proposed. In "process pharmacology", drugs are associated with biological processes. This puts the disease, regarded as alterations in the activity in one or several cellular processes, in the focus of drug therapy. In this setting, the molecular drug targets are merely intermediates. The identification of drugs for therapeutic or repurposing is based on similarities in the high-dimensional space of the biological processes that a drug influences. Applying this principle to data associated with lymphoblastic leukemia identified a short list of candidate drugs, including one that was recently proposed as novel rescue medication for lymphocytic leukemia. The pharmacological data science approach provides successful selections of drug candidates within development and repurposing tasks. PMID:27069773

  1. Membrane transporter proteins: a challenge for CNS drug development

    PubMed Central

    Girardin, François

    2006-01-01

    Drug transporters are membrane proteins present in various tissues such as the lymphocytes, intestine, liver, kidney, testis, placenta, and central nervous system. These transporters play a significant role in drug absorption and distribution to organic systems, particularly if the organs are protected by blood-organ barriers, such as the blood-brain barrier or the maternal-fetal barrier. In contrast to neurotransmitters and receptor-coupled transporters or other modes of interneuronal transmission, drug transporters are not directly involved in specific neuronal functions, but provide global protection to the central nervous system. The lack of capillary fenestration, the low pinocytic activity, and the tight junctions between brain capillary and choroid plexus endothelial cells represent further gatekeepers limiting the entrance of endogenous and exogenous compounds into the central nervous system. Drug transport is a result of the concerted action of efflux and influx pumps (transporters) located both in the basolateral and apical membranes of brain capillary and choroid plexus endothelial cells. By regulating efflux and influx of endogenous or exogenous substances, the blood-brain barrier and, to a lesser extent, the blood-cerebrospinal barrier in the ventricles, represents the main interface between the central nervous system and the blood, ie, the rest of the body. As drug distribution to organs is dependent on the affinity of a substrate for a specific transport system, membrane transporter proteins are increasingly recognized as a key determinant of drug disposition. Many drug transporters are members of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily or the solute-linked carrier (SLC) class. The multidrug resistance protein MDR1 (ABCB1), also called P-glycoprotein, the multidrug resistance-associated proteins MRP1 (ABCC1) and MRP2 (ABCC2), and the breast cancer-resistance protein BCRP (ABCG2) are ATP-dependent efflux

  2. Successful Drug Development Despite Adverse Preclinical Findings Part 1: Processes to Address Issues and Most Important Findings

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Junji; Plassmann, Stephanie; Prentice, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Unexpected adverse preclinical findings (APFs) are not infrequently encountered during drug development. Such APFs can be functional disturbances such as QT prolongation, morphological toxicity or carcinogenicity. The latter is of particular concern in conjunction with equivocal genotoxicity results. The toxicologic pathologist plays an important role in recognizing these effects, in helping to characterize them, to evaluate their risk for man, and in proposing measures to mitigate the risk particularly in early clinical trials. A careful scientific evaluation is crucial while termination of the development of a potentially useful drug must be avoided. This first part of the review discusses processes to address unexpected APFs and provides an overview over typical APFs in particular classes of drugs. If the mode of action (MoA) by which a drug candidate produces an APF is known, this supports evaluation of its relevance for humans. Tailor-made mechanistic studies, when needed, must be planned carefully to test one or several hypotheses regarding the potential MoA and to provide further data for risk evaluation. Safety considerations are based on exposure at no-observed-adverse-effect levels (NOAEL) of the most sensitive and relevant animal species and guide dose escalation in clinical trials. The availability of early markers of toxicity for monitoring of humans adds further safety to clinical studies. Risk evaluation is concluded by a weight of evidence analysis (WoE) with an array of parameters including drug use, medical need and alternatives on the market. In the second part of this review relevant examples of APFs will be discussed in more detail. PMID:22272031

  3. Use of functional imaging across clinical phases in CNS drug development

    PubMed Central

    Borsook, D; Becerra, L; Fava, M

    2013-01-01

    The use of novel brain biomarkers using nuclear magnetic resonance imaging holds potential of making central nervous system (CNS) drug development more efficient. By evaluating changes in brain function in the disease state or drug effects on brain function, the technology opens up the possibility of obtaining objective data on drug effects in the living awake brain. By providing objective data, imaging may improve the probability of success of identifying useful drugs to treat CNS diseases across all clinical phases (I–IV) of drug development. The evolution of functional imaging and the promise it holds to contribute to drug development will require the development of standards (including good imaging practice), but, if well integrated into drug development, functional imaging can define markers of CNS penetration, drug dosing and target engagement (even for drugs that are not amenable to positron emission tomography imaging) in phase I; differentiate objective measures of efficacy and side effects and responders vs non-responders in phase II, evaluate differences between placebo and drug in phase III trials and provide insights into disease modification in phase IV trials. PMID:23860483

  4. Cancer Drug Development Using Drosophila as an in vivo Tool: From Bedside to Bench and Back.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Amarish Kumar; Srikrishna, Saripella; Gupta, Subash Chandra

    2016-09-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been used for modeling cancer and as an in vivo tool for the validation and/or development of cancer therapeutics. The impetus for the use of Drosophila in cancer research stems from the high conservation of its signaling pathways, lower genetic redundancy, short life cycle, genetic amenability, and ease of maintenance. Several cell signaling pathways in Drosophila have been used for cancer drug development. The efficacy of combination therapy and uptake/bioavailability of drugs have also been studied. Drosophila has been validated using several FDA-approved drugs, suggesting a potential application of this model in drug repurposing. The model is emerging as a powerful tool for high-throughput screening and should significantly reduce the cost and time associated with drug development. In this review we discuss the applications of Drosophila in cancer drug development. The advantages and limitations of the model are discussed. PMID:27298020

  5. Ion channel profiling to advance drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Zou, Beiyan

    2015-11-01

    In vitro pharmacological profiling provides crucial information to eliminate drug candidates with potential toxicity early in drug discovery and reduce failure in later stages. It has become a common practice in industry to test lead compounds against a panel of ion channel targets for selectivity and safety liability at early drug discovery stages. Ion channel profiling technologies include binding assays, flux assays, fluorescent membrane potential assays, automated and conventional electrophysiology. Instead of examining compound effects on individual ion channel targets, automated current clamp, optical electrophysiology, and multi-electrode assays have evolved to investigate the integrated compound effects on cardiac myocytes. This review aims to provide an overview of ion channel profiling for cardiac safety and comparisons of various technologies.

  6. [Development of the database on nonproprietary names of drugs].

    PubMed

    Hashiba, S; Takenaka, Y; Nakadate, M

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the outline of the database of nonproprietary names of drugs and the characteristics of its online search system. The database includes the records of officially authorized names by WHO, International Nonproprietary Names (INN), and those by Japanese Government, Japanese Accepted Names (JAN). The INN file is merged with the JAN file. The online retrieval system is designed to enable search for drugs by generic names adopted on an international level and a national level in both English and Japanese. It is operated with INQ (DBMS) in the NEC ACOS-6 computer. Data from INN are updated once a year, and those from JAN are added whenever the official announcement of newly approved drugs are published in Yakumu-Koho (official pharmaceutical gazette). PMID:2636918

  7. Drug nanocrystals: four basic prerequisites for formulation development and scale-up.

    PubMed

    Srivalli, Kale Mohana Raghava; Mishra, Brahmeshwar

    2015-01-01

    Drug nanocrystals have been studied since the 1990s and there are already six therapeutic nanocrystal products on market and many more in clinical trials. Nanocrystals are encapsulating-carrier free nanoparticles wherein 100% drug loading could be achieved. This signifies that nanocrystals, among other nanoparticulate products, could be more easily manufactured even at the initial formulation development stages to evaluate the effect of size reduction on the bioavailability of drugs. Additionally, a drug nanocrystal is considered not as a generic product but as a "new drug" by FDA. Process characterization, equipment choice, robust formulation and stability are discussed as four basic prerequisites for formulation development and scale-up of drug nanocrystals. The fast growing and relatively superior market profile of nanocrystals amongst other nanoparticle systems is due to their rational formulation design and production simplicity. In this emerging scenario, keeping an eye on the four basic prerequisites can further improve the success of drug nanocrystals.

  8. 78 FR 68459 - Medical Device Development Tools; Draft Guidance for Industry, Tool Developers, and Food and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... guidance to FDA staff, industry, healthcare providers, researchers, and patient and consumer groups on a... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Medical Device Development Tools; Draft Guidance for Industry, Tool Developers, and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Availability AGENCY: Food and...

  9. Factors affecting the development of adverse drug reactions (Review article)

    PubMed Central

    Alomar, Muaed Jamal

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To discuss the effect of certain factors on the occurrence of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs). Data Sources A systematic review of the literature in the period between 1991 and 2012 was made based on PubMed, the Cochrane database of systematic reviews, EMBASE and IDIS. Key words used were: medication error, adverse drug reaction, iatrogenic disease factors, ambulatory care, primary health care, side effects and treatment hazards. Summary Many factors play a crucial role in the occurrence of ADRs, some of these are patient related, drug related or socially related factors. Age for instance has a very critical impact on the occurrence of ADRs, both very young and very old patients are more vulnerable to these reactions than other age groups. Alcohol intake also has a crucial impact on ADRs. Other factors are gender, race, pregnancy, breast feeding, kidney problems, liver function, drug dose and frequency and many other factors. The effect of these factors on ADRs is well documented in the medical literature. Taking these factors into consideration during medical evaluation enables medical practitioners to choose the best drug regimen. Conclusion Many factors affect the occurrence of ADRs. Some of these factors can be changed like smoking or alcohol intake others cannot be changed like age, presence of other diseases or genetic factors. Understanding the different effects of these factors on ADRs enables healthcare professionals to choose the most appropriate medication for that particular patient. It also helps the healthcare professionals to give the best advice to patients. Pharmacogenomics is the most recent science which emphasizes the genetic predisposition of ADRs. This innovative science provides a new perspective in dealing with the decision making process of drug selection. PMID:24648818

  10. The development of drugs for treatment of sleeping sickness: a historical review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Only four drugs are available for the chemotherapy of human African trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness; Suramin, pentamidine, melarsoprol and eflornithine. The history of the development of these drugs is well known and documented. suramin, pentamidine and melarsoprol were developed in the first half of the last century by the then recently established methods of medicinal chemistry. Eflornithine, originally developed in the 1970s as an anti-cancer drug, became a treatment of sleeping sickness largely by accident. This review summarises the developmental processes which led to these chemotherapies from the discovery of the first bioactive lead compounds to the identification of the final drugs. PMID:20219092

  11. Particle engineering: a strategy for establishing drug substance physical property specifications during small molecule development.

    PubMed

    Iacocca, Ronald G; Burcham, Christopher L; Hilden, Lori R

    2010-01-01

    A strategy for physical property control of a drug substance has been developed that utilizes a science-based approach to define key drivers for particle control. These drivers are based on in vivo performance (or expected performance), content uniformity of the drug substance in drug product, and manufacturability of drug product. Quality by design principles have been used in developing the strategy. The strategy has been designed to provide expectations in terms of particle control at each state of development, translating to early-phase projects and carrying through until launch and beyond.

  12. Avoiding Statistical Mistakes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strasser, Nora

    2007-01-01

    Avoiding statistical mistakes is important for educators at all levels. Basic concepts will help you to avoid making mistakes using statistics and to look at data with a critical eye. Statistical data is used at educational institutions for many purposes. It can be used to support budget requests, changes in educational philosophy, changes to…

  13. [Development of Internet-based system to collect and provide drug information for patients/consumers].

    PubMed

    Kurimoto, Fuki; Hori, Satoko; Satoh, Hiroki; Miki, Akiko; Sawada, Yasufumi

    2013-01-01

    For drug fostering and evolution, it is important to collect information directly from patients on the efficacy and safety of drugs as well as patient needs. At present, however, information gathered by healthcare professionals, pharmaceutical companies, or governments is not sufficient. There is concern that patients may fail to recognize the importance of providing information voluntarily. The present study was conducted to provide drug information to patients/consumers, to enlighten them on the importance of providing drug information by themselves, and to develop an Internet website, called "Minkusu," for collecting drug information from patients. This website is based on a registration system (free of charge). It is designed to provide information on proper drug use, and to collect opinions about drugs. As of May 31, 2012, a total of 1149 people had been registered. The male/female ratio of registered members was approximately 1:1, and patients/consumers accounted for 23%. According to the results of a questionnaire survey, several patient/consumer members appreciated the usefulness of the information service, and they took an opportunity to know of the concepts of drug development and evolution (Ikuyaku, in Japanese) through the information services provided by this site. In conclusion, the developed information system would contribute to the proper use of drugs by patients/consumers and to the promotion of drug development and evolution.

  14. Development of novel polymeric materials for gene therapy and pH-sensitive drug delivery: Modeling, synthesis, characterization, and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Brian Curtis

    The aim of this work was to obtain a fundamental understanding of drug release mechanisms from polymers that undergo thermoreversible gelation and to synthesize new polymers based on these that exhibit both pH and temperature sensitivity. Novel block and random copolymers with cationic character have been developed for drug delivery and gene therapy applications. The development of these materials began with a study of the mechanism of drug release from poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) block copolymers. This study revealed the release rates of drugs from water-soluble hydrogels composed of the PEO-PPO-PEO block copolymer PluronicRTM F127 was dictated almost solely by the rate of interfacial dissolution at the water/gel interface. A setup was designed to measure drug release from such soluble systems in order to avoid confounding hydrodynamic effects as a result of shear on the delicate polymer/gel interface. This study was followed by a complementary analysis of the effect ionic salts play in the phase transitions and drug release profiles in aqueous F127 solutions. In an attempt to incorporate pH sensitivity into such drug release systems, several block copolymers of poly(N,N-diethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDEAEM), PEO and PPO were synthesized via anionic polymerization. Diblock materials (PEO-b-PDEAEM), either with or without a carboxylic acid endcap, were synthesized and characterized. Tablet dissolution experiments demonstrated pH-sensitivity in their drug release profiles relative to PEO tablets. Pentablock materials (PDEAEM-b-PEO-b-PPO- b-PEO-b-PDEAEM) were synthesized that maintain the thermoreversible gelation and micellization properties of F127 while introducing pH-dependent release from aqueous gels of the copolymer. This is the first example of non-crosslinked materials that exhibit both pH- and temperature-sensitive behavior. Using a similar synthesis route, random copolymers of PDEAEM and poly(poly(ethylene glycol) methyl

  15. Development of Crystalline Cellulosic Fibres for Sustained Release of Drug.

    PubMed

    Mishra, D; Yadav, V; Khare, Puja; Jyotshna; Das, M R; Meena, Abha; Shanker, K

    2016-01-01

    Natural quinoline alkaloid camptothecin (CPT) is used for the treatment of colon, lung, breast and ovarian cancers still facing challenges due to low solubility in aqueous and biological fluids. Its lactone form easily converts into a toxic carboxylic form at slightly basic pH, typical in blood and tissue fluid has rapid clearance from systemic administration. We report a new approach based on micro crystalline cellulose (MCC) and nano crystalline cellulose (NCC) isolated from natural sources such as Cymbopogan flexuosus to stabilize and regulate the release kinetics of CPT in physiological solution. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm studies approve that degree of crystallinity i.e. ratio of amorphous and crystalline cellulose regulate the adsorption of CPT. The freeze dried celluloses of Cymbopogan flexuosus origin (MCC and NCC) further were optimized for drug delivery with a mimicked physiologically relevant solution. Both carriers can significantly extend the release of drug as compared to reported values, however, NCC showed better results. Not only the crystallinity but crystal size and hydrogen bonding play critical role in drug release. Free diffusion of drug into physiological solution follows the Ritger- Peppes kinetic model. The coefficient of the model signifies the Fickian diffusion mechanism of release. The investigation indicates that NCC cellulosic matrix can act as a better carrier of CPT for its sustained release formulation. PMID:26876520

  16. Drug Use Disorder (DUD) Questionnaire: Scale Development and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherer, Michael; Furr-Holden, C. Debra; Voas, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Despite the ample interest in the measurement of substance abuse and dependence, obtaining biological samples from participants as a means to validate a scale is considered time and cost intensive and is, subsequently, largely overlooked. Objectives: To report the psychometric properties of the drug use disorder (DUD) questionnaire…

  17. Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swihart, Donald E.; Skoog, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    This document represents two views of the Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT). One viewgraph presentation reviews the development and system design of Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT). Two types of ACAT exist: Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance (AGCAS) and Automatic Air Collision Avoidance (AACAS). The AGCAS Uses Digital Terrain Elevation Data (DTED) for mapping functions, and uses Navigation data to place aircraft on map. It then scans DTED in front of and around aircraft and uses future aircraft trajectory (5g) to provide automatic flyup maneuver when required. The AACAS uses data link to determine position and closing rate. It contains several canned maneuvers to avoid collision. Automatic maneuvers can occur at last instant and both aircraft maneuver when using data link. The system can use sensor in place of data link. The second viewgraph presentation reviews the development of a flight test and an evaluation of the test. A review of the operation and comparison of the AGCAS and a pilot's performance are given. The same review is given for the AACAS is given.

  18. Biomembrane models and drug-biomembrane interaction studies: Involvement in drug design and development

    PubMed Central

    Pignatello, R.; Musumeci, T.; Basile, L.; Carbone, C.; Puglisi, G.

    2011-01-01

    Contact with many different biological membranes goes along the destiny of a drug after its systemic administration. From the circulating macrophage cells to the vessel endothelium, to more complex absorption barriers, the interaction of a biomolecule with these membranes largely affects its rate and time of biodistribution in the body and at the target sites. Therefore, investigating the phenomena occurring on the cell membranes, as well as their different interaction with drugs in the physiological or pathological conditions, is important to exploit the molecular basis of many diseases and to identify new potential therapeutic strategies. Of course, the complexity of the structure and functions of biological and cell membranes, has pushed researchers toward the proposition and validation of simpler two- and three-dimensional membrane models, whose utility and drawbacks will be discussed. This review also describes the analytical methods used to look at the interactions among bioactive compounds with biological membrane models, with a particular accent on the calorimetric techniques. These studies can be considered as a powerful tool for medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical technology, in the steps of designing new drugs and optimizing the activity and safety profile of compounds already used in the therapy. PMID:21430952

  19. Pharmaceutical development and regulatory considerations for nanoparticles and nanoparticulate drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Narang, Ajit S; Chang, Rong-Kun; Hussain, Munir A

    2013-11-01

    Pharmaceutical nanomaterials (NMs) encompass a wide variety of materials including drug nanoparticles (NPs), which can be amorphous or crystalline; or nanoparticulate drug delivery systems, such as micelles, microemulsions, liposomes, drug-polymer conjugates, and antibody-drug conjugates. These NMs are either transient or persistent-depending on whether the integrity of their structure and size is maintained until reaching the site of drug action. Examples of several approved drug products are included as pharmaceutical nanoparticulate systems along with a commentary on the current development issues and paradigms for various categories of NPs. This commentary discusses the preparation of nanoparticulate systems for commercial development, and the biopharmaceutical and pharmacokinetic advantages of these systems. A criterion of criticality is defined that incorporates the structure, in addition to size requirement of pharmaceutical NPs to identify systems that may require special development and regulatory considerations. PMID:24037829

  20. International Conference on Harmonisation; Guidance on Q11 Development and Manufacture of Drug Substances; availability. Notice.

    PubMed

    2012-11-20

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a guidance entitled "Q11 Development and Manufacture of Drug Substances.'' The guidance was prepared under the auspices of the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH). The guidance describes approaches to developing and understanding the manufacturing process of a drug substance and provides guidance on what information should be provided in certain sections of the Common Technical Document (CTD). The guidance is intended to harmonize the scientific and technical principles relating to the description and justification of the development and manufacturing process of drug substances (both chemical entities and biotechnological/biological entities) to enable a consistent approach for providing and evaluating this information across the three regions. The discussion of principles in the guidance is intended to apply only to the manufacture of drug substance, not the manufacture of finished drug products. PMID:23227566

  1. 77 FR 60126 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Otitis Media: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ...; Formerly 2008N-0004] Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Otitis Media: Developing Drugs for Treatment... Media: Developing Drugs for Treatment.'' This guidance addresses FDA's current thinking regarding the... treatment of acute bacterial otitis media (ABOM). This guidance finalizes the revised draft guidance of...

  2. The Role of VET in Alcohol and Other Drugs Workforce Development. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pidd, Ken; Carne, Amanda; Roche, Ann

    2010-01-01

    This document was produced by the authors, based on their research for the report "The Role of VET in Alcohol and Other Drugs Workforce Development", and is an added resource for further information. "The Role of VET in Alcohol and Other Drugs Workforce Development" uncovers concerns managers have around the training content, delivery and…

  3. 69 FR 13540 - Funding Opportunity Title: Development of Comprehensive Drug/Alcohol and Mental Health Treatment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2004-03-23

    ...: Development of Comprehensive Drug/ Alcohol and Mental Health Treatment Systems for Persons Who Are Homeless (Short Title: Treatment for Homeless) Announcement Type: Initial. Funding Opportunity Number: TI 04-001... 2004 funds for the Development of Comprehensive Drug/Alcohol and Mental Health Treatment Systems...

  4. 78 FR 46969 - Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Cure Research; Reopening of Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug... Virus (HIV) Patient-Focused Drug Development and HIV Cure Research,'' published in the Federal Register of May 21, 2013 (78 FR 29755). In that notice, FDA requested public comment regarding...

  5. Drug Cocktail Optimization in Chemotherapy of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Preissner, Saskia; Dunkel, Mathias; Hoffmann, Michael F.; Preissner, Sarah C.; Genov, Nikolai; Rong, Wen Wei; Preissner, Robert; Seeger, Karlheinz

    2012-01-01

    Background In general, drug metabolism has to be considered to avoid adverse effects and ineffective therapy. In particular, chemotherapeutic drug cocktails strain drug metabolizing enzymes especially the cytochrome P450 family (CYP). Furthermore, a number of important chemotherapeutic drugs such as cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, tamoxifen or procarbazine are administered as prodrugs and have to be activated by CYP. Therefore, the genetic variability of these enzymes should be taken into account to design appropriate therapeutic regimens to avoid inadequate drug administration, toxicity and inefficiency. Objective The aim of this work was to find drug interactions and to avoid side effects or ineffective therapy in chemotherapy. Data sources and methods Information on drug administration in the therapy of leukemia and their drug metabolism was collected from scientific literature and various web resources. We carried out an automated textmining approach. Abstracts of PubMed were filtered for relevant articles using specific keywords. Abstracts were automatically screened for antineoplastic drugs and their synonyms in combination with a set of human CYPs in title or abstract. Results We present a comprehensive analysis of over 100 common cancer treatment regimens regarding drug-drug interactions and present alternatives avoiding CYP overload. Typical concomitant medication, e.g. antiemetics or antibiotics is a preferred subject to improvement. A webtool, which allows drug cocktail optimization was developed and is publicly available on http://bioinformatics.charite.de/chemotherapy. PMID:23236419

  6. Advancing cancer drug discovery towards more agile development of targeted combination therapies.

    PubMed

    Carragher, Neil O; Unciti-Broceta, Asier; Cameron, David A

    2012-01-01

    Current drug-discovery strategies are typically 'target-centric' and are based upon high-throughput screening of large chemical libraries against nominated targets and a selection of lead compounds with optimized 'on-target' potency and selectivity profiles. However, high attrition of targeted agents in clinical development suggest that combinations of targeted agents will be most effective in treating solid tumors if the biological networks that permit cancer cells to subvert monotherapies are identified and retargeted. Conventional drug-discovery and development strategies are suboptimal for the rational design and development of novel drug combinations. In this article, we highlight a series of emerging technologies supporting a less reductionist, more agile, drug-discovery and development approach for the rational design, validation, prioritization and clinical development of novel drug combinations.

  7. Process Pharmacology: A Pharmacological Data Science Approach to Drug Development and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ultsch, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    A novel functional‐genomics based concept of pharmacology that uses artificial intelligence techniques for mining and knowledge discovery in “big data” providing comprehensive information about the drugs’ targets and their functional genomics is proposed. In “process pharmacology”, drugs are associated with biological processes. This puts the disease, regarded as alterations in the activity in one or several cellular processes, in the focus of drug therapy. In this setting, the molecular drug targets are merely intermediates. The identification of drugs for therapeutic or repurposing is based on similarities in the high‐dimensional space of the biological processes that a drug influences. Applying this principle to data associated with lymphoblastic leukemia identified a short list of candidate drugs, including one that was recently proposed as novel rescue medication for lymphocytic leukemia. The pharmacological data science approach provides successful selections of drug candidates within development and repurposing tasks. PMID:27069773

  8. Towards novel antifilarial drugs: challenges and recent developments.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Ajay, Arya; Kushwaha, Susheela; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2010-02-01

    Filariasis is caused by thread-like nematode worms, classified according to their presence in the vertebrate host. The cutaneous group includes Onchocerca volvulus, Loa loa and Mansonella streptocerca; the lymphatic group includes Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and Brugia timori and the body cavity group includes Mansonella perstans and Mansonella ozzardi. Lymphatic filariasis, a mosquito-borne disease, is one of the most prevalent diseases in tropical and subtropical countries and is accompanied by a number of pathological conditions. In recent years, there has been rapid progress in filariasis research, which has provided new insights into the pathogenesis of filarial disease, diagnosis, chemotherapy, the host-parasite relationship and the genomics of the parasite. Together, these insights are assisting the identification of novel drug targets and the discovery of antifilarial agents and candidate vaccine molecules. This review discusses the antifilarial activity of various chemical entities, the merits and demerits of antifilarial drugs currently in use, their mechanisms of action, in addition to antifilarial drug targets and their validation. PMID:21426193

  9. [Use of GWAS for drug discovery and development].

    PubMed

    Liou, Shyh-Yuh

    2014-01-01

    The Human Genome Project was completed in 2003. A catalog of common genetic variants in humans was built at the International HapMap Project. These variants, known as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), occur in human DNA and distributed among populations in different parts of the world. By using the Linkage Disequilibrium and mapping blocks are able to define quantitative characters of inherited diseases. Currently 50 K-5.0 M microarray are available commercially, which based on the results of following the ENCODE & 1000 genome projects. Therefore the genome wide association study (GWAS) has become a key tool for discovering variants that contribute to human diseases and provide maximum coverage of the genome, in contrast to the traditional approach in which only a few candidates genes was targeted. The available public GWAS databases provided valuable biological insights and new discovery for many common diseases, due to the availability of low cost microarray. The GWAS has the potential to provide a solution for the lack of new drug targets and reducing drug failure due to adverse drug reactions either. These are critical issues for pharmaceutical companies. Here, the Japan PGx Data Science Consortium (JPDSC), which was established on February 20, 2009 by six leading pharmaceutical companies in Japan, was introduced. We believe that the efforts of stakeholders including the regulatory authorities, health providers, and pharmaceutical companies to understand the potential and ethical risk of using genetic information including GWAS will bring benefits to patients in the future.

  10. Food Avoidance Diets for Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jeffrey F; Hammond, Margaret I; Nedorost, Susan T

    2015-10-01

    Food allergy is relatively common in both children and adults, and its prevalence is increasing. Early exposure of food allergens onto skin with an impaired epidermal barrier predisposes to sensitization and prevents the development of oral tolerance. While immediate-type food allergies are well described, less is known about delayed-type food allergies manifesting as dermatitis. This is due, in part, to limitations with current diagnostic testing for delayed-type food allergy, including atopy patch testing. We conducted a systematic review of food avoidance diets in delayed-type food allergies manifesting as dermatitis. While beneficial in some clinical circumstances, avoidance diets should be used with caution in infants and children, as growth impairment and developmental delay may result. Ultimately, dermatitis is highly multifactorial and avoidance diets may not improve symptoms of delayed-type food allergy until combined with other targeted therapies, including restoring balance in the skin microbiome and re-establishing proper skin barrier function.

  11. Avoidance of late abortion.

    PubMed

    1979-11-24

    Induced abortion is now a common procedure in the United States and Britain. Methods for performing induced abortion are reviewed. Menstrual regulation, aspiration with a hand-held syringe and a flexible cannula within 6 weeks of the last period, is not often practiced in Britain. Several developing countries are using this simple technique to advantage. Vacuum aspiration in the 1st 12 weeks of pregnancy is the main method being used everywhere for 1st trimester procedures. Mortality rates with this method are low and, in well-organized clinics with experienced personnel, the rates can be reduced even further. It is agreed that 2nd trimester procedures are more complex, both physically and emotionally. In the last several years, dilatation and evacuation (D&E) has increased in popularity for 2nd trimester procedures. Dilation of the cervix is generally accomplished with laminaria, evacuation of the uterus with forceps, and then suction curettage applied. This procedure has replaced intraamniotic infusion, hysterotomy, and hysterectomy as the most commonly - practiced method, despite its need for special surgical skills and good clinical backup. Follow-up of abortions is difficult. Different long-term effects have been noted with different abortion procedures. Early abortion seems to have only a modest effect, if that. Whether late abortion has long-lasting effects remains open to question. Late abortion should be avoided.

  12. Avoiding Computer Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Joyce; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The threat of computer sabotage is a real concern to business teachers and others responsible for academic computer facilities. Teachers can minimize the possibility. Eight suggestions for avoiding computer viruses are given. (JOW)

  13. Avoiding Construction Snafus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochefort, Mark; Gosch, Jerry

    2001-01-01

    Discusses risk management planning tips that help schools avoid project-delaying construction problems. Preconstruction planning topics explored include the type of construction method to use, contract selection, and the need for efficient project management. (GR)

  14. Metallomics in drug development: characterization of a liposomal cisplatin drug formulation in human plasma by CE-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tam T T N; Østergaard, Jesper; Stürup, Stefan; Gammelgaard, Bente

    2013-02-01

    A capillary electrophoresis inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry method for separation of free cisplatin from liposome-encapsulated cisplatin and protein-bound cisplatin was developed. A liposomal formulation of cisplatin based on PEGylated liposomes was used as model drug formulation. The effect of human plasma matrix on the analysis of liposome-encapsulated cisplatin and intact cisplatin was studied. The presence of 1 % of dextran and 4 mM of sodium dodecyl sulfate in HEPES buffer was demonstrated to be effective in improving the separation of liposomes and cisplatin bound to proteins in plasma. A detection limit of 41 ng/mL of platinum and a precision of 2.1 % (for 10 μg/mL of cisplatin standard) were obtained. Simultaneous measurements of phosphorous and platinum allows the simultaneous monitoring of the liposomes, liposome-encapsulated cisplatin, free cisplatin and cisplatin bound to plasma constituents in plasma samples. It was demonstrated that this approach is suitable for studies of the stability of liposome formulations as leakage of active drug from the liposomes and subsequent binding to biomolecules in plasma can be monitored. This methodology has not been reported before and will improve characterization of liposomal drugs during drug development and in studies on kinetics.

  15. Avoiding the SCAMs.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Thomas; Condron, Barry

    2007-05-01

    Dendrites from the same neuron usually avoid contact with one another, a behavior known as self-avoidance. In this issue of Neuron and in the upcoming May 4, 2007 issue of Cell, a pair of studies by Soba et al. and Hughes et al. and a study by Matthews et al., respectively, identify products from the highly alternatively spliced Dscam gene as central to this behavior in Drosophila. Signaling induced by adhesion between identical isoforms triggers repulsion between sister dendrites.

  16. Avoided Crossing and Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekii, T.; Shibahashi, H.

    2013-12-01

    We examine avoided crossing of stellar pulsations in the nonlinear regime, where synchronization may occur, based on a simple model of weakly coupled van der Pol oscillators with close frequencies. For this simple case, avoided crossing is unaffected in the sense that there is a frequency difference between the symmetric and antisymmetric modes, but as a result of synchronization, unlike the linear oscillations case, the system can vibrate in only one of the modes.

  17. Operational Collision Avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guit, Bill

    2015-01-01

    This presentation will describe the early days of the EOS Aqua and Aura operational collision avoidance process. It will highlight EOS debris avoidance maneuvers, EOS high interest event statistic and A-Train systematic conjunctions and conclude with future challenges. This is related to earlier e-DAA (tracking number 21692) that an abstract was submitted to a different conference. Eric Moyer, ESMO Deputy Project Manager has reviewed and approved this presentation on May 6, 2015

  18. Drug Development Against the Major Diarrhea-Causing Parasites of the Small Intestine, Cryptosporidium and Giardia

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Yukiko; Eckmann, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Diarrheal diseases are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the world, particularly among young children. A limited number of infectious agents account for most of these illnesses, raising the hope that advances in the treatment and prevention of these infections can have global health impact. The two most important parasitic causes of diarrheal disease are Cryptosporidium and Giardia. Both parasites infect predominantly the small intestine and colonize the lumen and epithelial surface, but do not invade deeper mucosal layers. This review discusses the therapeutic challenges, current treatment options, and drug development efforts against cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis. The goals of drug development against Cryptosporidium and Giardia are different. For Cryptosporidium, only one moderately effective drug (nitazoxanide) is available, so novel classes of more effective drugs are a high priority. Furthermore, new genetic technology to identify potential drug targets and better assays for functional evaluation of these targets throughout the parasite life cycle are needed for advancing anticryptosporidial drug design. By comparison, for Giardia, several classes of drugs with good efficacy exist, but dosing regimens are suboptimal and emerging resistance begins to threaten clinical utility. Consequently, improvements in potency and dosing, and the ability to overcome existing and prevent new forms of drug resistance are priorities in antigiardial drug development. Current work on new drugs against both infections has revealed promising strategies and new drug leads. However, the primary challenge for further drug development is the underlying economics, as both parasitic infections are considered Neglected Diseases with low funding priority and limited commercial interest. If a new urgency in medical progress against these infections can be raised at national funding agencies or philanthropic organizations, meaningful and timely progress is possible

  19. Future technology insight: mass spectrometry imaging as a tool in drug research and development

    PubMed Central

    Cobice, D F; Goodwin, R J A; Andren, P E; Nilsson, A; Mackay, C L; Andrew, R

    2015-01-01

    In pharmaceutical research, understanding the biodistribution, accumulation and metabolism of drugs in tissue plays a key role during drug discovery and development. In particular, information regarding pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and transport properties of compounds in tissues is crucial during early screening. Historically, the abundance and distribution of drugs have been assessed by well-established techniques such as quantitative whole-body autoradiography (WBA) or tissue homogenization with LC/MS analysis. However, WBA does not distinguish active drug from its metabolites and LC/MS, while highly sensitive, does not report spatial distribution. Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) can discriminate drug and its metabolites and endogenous compounds, while simultaneously reporting their distribution. MSI data are influencing drug development and currently used in investigational studies in areas such as compound toxicity. In in vivo studies MSI results may soon be used to support new drug regulatory applications, although clinical trial MSI data will take longer to be validated for incorporation into submissions. We review the current and future applications of MSI, focussing on applications for drug discovery and development, with examples to highlight the impact of this promising technique in early drug screening. Recent sample preparation and analysis methods that enable effective MSI, including quantitative analysis of drugs from tissue sections will be summarized and key aspects of methodological protocols to increase the effectiveness of MSI analysis for previously undetectable targets addressed. These examples highlight how MSI has become a powerful tool in drug research and development and offers great potential in streamlining the drug discovery process. PMID:25766375

  20. The story of artesunate–mefloquine (ASMQ), innovative partnerships in drug development: case study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) is a not-for profit organization committed to providing affordable medicines and access to treatments in resource-poor settings. Traditionally drug development has happened “in house” within pharmaceutical companies, with research and development costs ultimately recuperated through drug sales. The development of drugs for the treatment of neglected tropical diseases requires a completely different model that goes beyond the scope of market-driven research and development. Artesunate and mefloquine are well-established drugs for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria, with a strong safety record based on many years of field-based studies and use. The administration of such artemisinin-based combination therapy in a fixed-dose combination is expected to improve patient compliance and to reduce the risk of emerging drug resistance. Case description DNDi developed an innovative approach to drug development, reliant on strong collaborations with a wide range of partners from the commercial world, academia, government institutions and NGOs, each of which had a specific role to play in the development of a fixed dose combination of artesunate and mefloquine. Discussion and evaluation DNDi undertook the development of a fixed-dose combination of artesunate with mefloquine. Partnerships were formed across five continents, addressing formulation, control and production through to clinical trials and product registration, resulting in a safe and efficacious fixed dose combination treatment which is now available to treat patients in resource-poor settings. The south-south technology transfer of production from Farmanguinhos/Fiocruz in Brazil to Cipla Ltd in India was the first of its kind. Of additional benefit was the increased capacity within the knowledge base and infrastructure in developing countries. Conclusions This collaborative approach to drug development involving international partnerships and

  1. Causality assessment for suspected DILI during clinical phases of drug development.

    PubMed

    Regev, Arie; Seeff, Leonard B; Merz, Michael; Ormarsdottir, Sif; Aithal, Guruprasad P; Gallivan, Jim; Watkins, Paul B

    2014-11-01

    Causality assessment is a critical step in establishing the diagnosis of drug induced liver injury (DILI) during drug development. DILI may resemble almost any type of liver disease, and often presents a serious challenge to clinical investigators and drug makers. The diagnosis of DILI is largely based upon a combination of a compatible clinical course, exclusion of all other reasonable causes, resemblance of clinical and pathological features to known features of liver injury due to the drug (i.e., "drug's signature"), and incidence of liver injury among patients treated with the drug compared to placebo or comparator. Causality assessment for suspected DILI is currently performed using either evaluation by physicians with expertise in liver disorders (i.e., expert opinion) or standardized scoring instruments such as the Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method (RUCAM). Both approaches are widely used in the post marketing setting. Causality assessment based on expert opinion is considered superior to standardized instruments such as RUCAM, in the setting of drug development, and is currently the preferred approach during clinical trials. There is a need for a systematic revision of RUCAM that will render it more suitable for the setting of clinical trials and drug development. Careful monitoring and meticulous data collection during clinical trials are essential in all cases with established liver injury to allow for a proper causality assessment. A workshop was convened to discuss best practices for the assessment of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) in clinical trials. This publication is based on the conclusions of this workshop.

  2. Improving Predictive Modeling in Pediatric Drug Development: Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Mechanistic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Slikker, William; Young, John F.; Corley, Rick A.; Dorman, David C.; Conolly, Rory B.; Knudsen, Thomas; Erstad, Brian L.; Luecke, Richard H.; Faustman, Elaine M.; Timchalk, Chuck; Mattison, Donald R.

    2005-07-26

    A workshop was conducted on November 18?19, 2004, to address the issue of improving predictive models for drug delivery to developing humans. Although considerable progress has been made for adult humans, large gaps remain for predicting pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) outcome in children because most adult models have not been tested during development. The goals of the meeting included a description of when, during development, infants/children become adultlike in handling drugs. The issue of incorporating the most recent advances into the predictive models was also addressed: both the use of imaging approaches and genomic information were considered. Disease state, as exemplified by obesity, was addressed as a modifier of drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics during development. Issues addressed in this workshop should be considered in the development of new predictive and mechanistic models of drug kinetics and dynamics in the developing human.

  3. Successful Drug Development Despite Adverse Preclinical Findings Part 2: Examples

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Junji; Plassmann, Stephanie; Hayashi, Makoto; Prentice, David E.

    2010-01-01

    To illustrate the process of addressing adverse preclinical findings (APFs) as outlined in the first part of this review, a number of cases with unexpected APF in toxicity studies with drug candidates is discussed in this second part. The emphasis is on risk characterization, especially regarding the mode of action (MoA), and risk evaluation regarding relevance for man. While severe APFs such as retinal toxicity may turn out to be of little human relevance, minor findings particularly in early toxicity studies, such as vasculitis, may later pose a real problem. Rodents are imperfect models for endocrine APFs, non-rodents for human cardiac effects. Liver and kidney toxicities are frequent, but they can often be monitored in man and do not necessarily result in early termination of drug candidates. Novel findings such as the unusual lesions in the gastrointestinal tract and the bones presented in this review can be difficult to explain. It will be shown that well known issues such as phospholipidosis and carcinogenicity by agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) need to be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. The latter is of particular interest because the new PPAR α and dual α/γ agonists resulted in a change of the safety paradigm established with the older PPAR α agonists. General toxicologists and pathologists need some understanding of the principles of genotoxicity and reproductive toxicity testing. Both types of preclinical toxicities are major APF and clinical monitoring is difficult, generally leading to permanent use restrictions. PMID:22272032

  4. Lobeline produces conditioned taste avoidance in rats.

    PubMed

    Harrod, S B; Dwoskin, L P; Bardo, M T

    2004-05-01

    Previous results indicate that pretreatment with lobeline attenuates methamphetamine (METH) self-administration in rats, but not by acting as a substitute reinforcer. Given these findings, it has been suggested that lobeline may serve as a useful pharmacotherapy for psychostimulant abuse. However, because lobeline produces emesis and nausea in humans, the present study examined whether lobeline has direct effects on taste avoidance behavior in rats within the same dose range shown previously to decrease METH self-administration. Two experiments utilized a Pavlovian conditioning procedure to determine if lobeline produces conditioned taste avoidance (CTA) in rats. In Experiments 1 and 2, rats consumed either novel milk or salt solutions, respectively, and within 10 min, were injected with lobeline (0.3-3.0 mg/kg) or METH (0.3-3.0 mg/kg). A single-bottle test conducted 48 h after flavor-drug pairings indicated that the dose of lobeline that reduced METH self-administration in a previous study (i.e., 3.0 mg/kg) also produced reliable CTA for milk and salt solution. These findings suggest a need to develop lobeline analogs that reduce METH self-administration, but do not produce CTA following the consumption of a novel solution.

  5. Development of a fluorescent sensor for illicit date rape drug GHB.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Duanting; Tan, Yong Qiao Elton; Xu, Wang; Chang, Young-Tae

    2014-03-18

    The first fluorescent sensor (GHB Orange) for date rape drug GHB was developed. It exhibits the fluorescence quenching property for GHB and allows its detection in various drinks. The interaction mechanism was elucidated as intramolecular charge transfer induced by a hydrogen bond. This discovery will help in solving the drug facilitated sexual assault problems. PMID:24492471

  6. Development of a fluorescent sensor for an illicit date rape drug--GBL.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Duanting; Agrawalla, Bikram Keshari; Eng, Pei Sze Fronia; Lee, Sung-Chan; Xu, Wang; Chang, Young-Tae

    2013-07-14

    The first fluorescent sensor for an illicit date rape drug, GBL, was developed and named Green Date. It shows high fluorescence enhancement to GBL and allows its detection in different drinks. The mechanism between GBL and Green Date was explored. This discovery may help to prevent the drug-facilitated sexual assault problems. PMID:23728479

  7. 78 FR 29755 - Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... (78 FR 21613), FDA published a document that announced the disease ] areas for meetings in fiscal... immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Patient-Focused Drug Development and HIV Cure Research. Patient-Focused Drug... Fee Act (PDUFA V). FDA is interested in obtaining patient input on the impact of HIV on daily...

  8. The Development of Videos in Culturally Grounded Drug Prevention for Rural Native Hawaiian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okamoto, Scott K.; Helm, Susana; McClain, Latoya L.; Dinson, Ay-Laina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to adapt and validate narrative scripts to be used for the video components of a culturally grounded drug prevention program for rural Native Hawaiian youth. Scripts to be used to film short video vignettes of drug-related problem situations were developed based on a foundation of pre-prevention research funded by the…

  9. Emerging applications of kinetic biomarkers in preclinical and clinical drug development.

    PubMed

    Turner, Scott M; Hellerstein, Marc K

    2005-01-01

    The cost of drug discovery and development is increasing, while the rate of new drug approvals is declining. In contrast to major technological advances with in silico and in vitro screening tools, there have been almost no advances in the tools available for establishing the actions of agents in the complex biochemical networks characteristic of fully assembled living systems. The resulting poor capacity to predict clinical response underlies the high attrition rate of leads at every step of drug development. A potential solution would be provided by kinetic biomarkers (in vivo measurement of fluxes though the key pathways that drive disease processes and therapeutic response). Novel approaches using stable isotope labeling with mass spectrometric analysis have recently emerged for measuring molecular kinetics relevant to drug targets with some applications to drug development. This review discusses the general principles of kinetic biomarkers, providing examples where kinetics have generated meaningful insights into drug activity and highlighting areas where the application of kinetic biomarkers may be particularly useful for future drug discovery and development. Stable isotope mass spectrometric technologies may provide a parallel efficiency for converting molecules into approved drugs with sufficient throughput and reproducibility to maintain pace with the modern engine for generating leads.

  10. Development of a polymer stent with shape memory effect as a drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Wache, H M; Tartakowska, D J; Hentrich, A; Wagner, M H

    2003-02-01

    The article presents a new concept for vascular endoprothesis (stent). Almost all commercially available stents are made of metallic materials. A common after effect of stent implantation is restenosis. Several studies on metal stents coated with drug show, that the use of a drug delivery system may reduce restenosis. The purpose of this work is to develop a new stent for the drug delivery application. The shape memory properties of thermoplastic polyurethane allow to design a new fully polymeric self-expandable stent. The possibility to use the stent as a drug delivery system is described.

  11. Site-Specific Antibody–Drug Conjugates: The Nexus of Bioorthogonal Chemistry, Protein Engineering, and Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Antibody–drug conjugates (ADCs) combine the specificity of antibodies with the potency of small molecules to create targeted drugs. Despite the simplicity of this concept, generation of clinically successful ADCs has been very difficult. Over the past several decades, scientists have learned a great deal about the constraints on antibodies, linkers, and drugs as they relate to successful construction of ADCs. Once these components are in hand, most ADCs are prepared by nonspecific modification of antibody lysine or cysteine residues with drug-linker reagents, which results in heterogeneous product mixtures that cannot be further purified. With advances in the fields of bioorthogonal chemistry and protein engineering, there is growing interest in producing ADCs by site-specific conjugation to the antibody, yielding more homogeneous products that have demonstrated benefits over their heterogeneous counterparts in vivo. Here, we chronicle the development of a multitude of site-specific conjugation strategies for assembly of ADCs and provide a comprehensive account of key advances and their roots in the fields of bioorthogonal chemistry and protein engineering. PMID:25494884

  12. The Inter-Company Collaboration for AIDS Drug Development: boon or bust?

    PubMed

    Levin, J

    1995-06-01

    The Inter-Company Collaboration for AIDS Drug Development (ICC), formed in April 1993, is a consortium of international pharmaceutical companies that have agreed to conduct combination and comparative studies of antiviral agents for the treatment of HIV infection and AIDS. Members at the May 11, 1995 meeting discussed the start of the first triple-combination study of antiretroviral drugs conducted under the Collaboration's master multi-drug protocol. The trial (001) has been delayed by almost a year due to disagreement about its design. Protocol 001 will examine the antiviral and immunologic effects of two different three-drug combinations--AZT plus ddC plus saquinavir and AZT plus ddC plus nevirapine--and compare the three-drug combination to the two-drug combination of AZT plus ddC. Protocol 002 will compare the three-drug combination AZT plus ddI plus nevirapine to AZT plus ddI plus 3TC. These protocols, however, do not include the most promising new experimental treatments for HIV infection--the Merck and Abbott protease inhibitor drugs. The protocols use traditional study design. Researchers and activists are asking for uncontrolled, small, quick studies to screen new multi-drug combinations to discover the strongest possible antiviral effect as measured by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and CD4 cell testing. Also vital to the AIDS community, is a clinical study combining two protease inhibitor drugs--Roche's saquinavir (Invirase) and Merck's indinavir sulfate (Crixivan).

  13. Recommendations for adaptation and validation of commercial kits for biomarker quantification in drug development.

    PubMed

    Khan, Masood U; Bowsher, Ronald R; Cameron, Mark; Devanarayan, Viswanath; Keller, Steve; King, Lindsay; Lee, Jean; Morimoto, Alyssa; Rhyne, Paul; Stephen, Laurie; Wu, Yuling; Wyant, Timothy; Lachno, D Richard

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, commercial immunoassay kits are used to support drug discovery and development. Longitudinally consistent kit performance is crucial, but the degree to which kits and reagents are characterized by manufacturers is not standardized, nor are the approaches by users to adapt them and evaluate their performance through validation prior to use. These factors can negatively impact data quality. This paper offers a systematic approach to assessment, method adaptation and validation of commercial immunoassay kits for quantification of biomarkers in drug development, expanding upon previous publications and guidance. These recommendations aim to standardize and harmonize user practices, contributing to reliable biomarker data from commercial immunoassays, thus, enabling properly informed decisions during drug development.

  14. Analytical developments in toxicological investigation of drug-facilitated sexual assault.

    PubMed

    Negrusz, Adam; Gaensslen, R E

    2003-08-01

    This paper gives a general overview of the drug-facilitated sexual assault phenomenon. Sexual assault perpetrated on both women and men, while incapacitated by so-called date-rape drugs, recently became the focus of many investigations conducted by law enforcement agencies in the US throughout the 1990s; an alarming increase in reports of this crime as well as in the number of scientific publications on drug-facilitated sexual assault has been observed. The list of drugs reportedly associated with sexual assault is long and among others includes flunitrazepam with other benzodiazepines such as diazepam, temazepam, clonazepam, oxazepam, as well as gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), ketamine, and scopolamine. We discuss the most recent analytical developments in the toxicological investigation of drug-facilitated rape designed to reveal drug presence and that may help successfully prosecute perpetrators. PMID:12682705

  15. The development of videos in culturally grounded drug prevention for rural native Hawaiian youth.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Scott K; Helm, Susana; McClain, Latoya L; Dinson, Ay-Laina

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to adapt and validate narrative scripts to be used for the video components of a culturally grounded drug prevention program for rural Native Hawaiian youth. Scripts to be used to film short video vignettes of drug-related problem situations were developed based on a foundation of pre-prevention research funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Seventy-four middle- and high-school-aged youth in 15 focus groups adapted and validated the details of the scripts to make them more realistic. Specifically, youth participants affirmed the situations described in the scripts and suggested changes to details of the scripts to make them more culturally specific. Suggested changes to the scripts also reflected preferred drug resistance strategies described in prior research, and varied based on the type of drug offerer described in each script (i.e., peer/friend, parent, or cousin/sibling). Implications for culturally grounded drug prevention are discussed.

  16. Emerging Research and Clinical Development Trends of Liposome and Lipid Nanoparticle Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    KRAFT, JOHN C.; FREELING, JENNIFER P.; WANG, ZIYAO; HO, RODNEY J. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Liposomes are spherical-enclosed membrane vesicles mainly constructed with lipids. Lipid nanoparticles are loaded with therapeutics and may not contain an enclosed bilayer. The majority of those clinically approved have diameters of 50–300 nm. The growing interest in nanomedicine has fueled lipid–drug and lipid–protein studies, which provide a foundation for developing lipid particles that improve drug potency and reduce off-target effects. Integrating advances in lipid membrane research has enabled therapeutic development. At present, about 600 clinical trials involve lipid particle drug delivery systems. Greater understanding of pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and disposition of lipid–drug particles facilitated particle surface hydration technology (with polyethylene glycol) to reduce rapid clearance and provide sufficient blood circulation time for drug to reach target tissues and cells. Surface hydration enabled the liposome-encapsulated cancer drug doxorubicin (Doxil) to gain clinical approval in 1995. Fifteen lipidic therapeutics are now clinically approved. Although much research involves attaching lipid particles to ligands selective for occult cells and tissues, preparation procedures are often complex and pose scale-up challenges. With emerging knowledge in drug target and lipid–drug distribution in the body, a systems approach that integrates knowledge to design and scale lipid–drug particles may further advance translation of these systems to improve therapeutic safety and efficacy. PMID:24338748

  17. Sirtuins: Novel targets for metabolic disease in drug development

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Weijian

    2008-08-29

    Calorie restriction extends lifespan and produces a metabolic profile desirable for treating diseases such as type 2 diabetes. SIRT1, an NAD{sup +}-dependent deacetylase, is a principal modulator of pathways downstream of calorie restriction that produces beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. Activation of SIRT1 leads to enhanced activity of multiple proteins, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) and FOXO which helps to mediate some of the in vitro and in vivo effects of sirtuins. Resveratrol, a polyphenolic SIRT1 activator, mimics the effects of calorie restriction in lower organisms and in mice fed a high-fat diet ameliorates insulin resistance. In this review, we summarize recent research advances in unveiling the molecular mechanisms that underpin sirtuin as therapeutic candidates and discuss the possibility of using resveratrol as potential drug for treatment of diabetes.

  18. Epilepsy drugs and effects on fetal development: Potential mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Etemad, Leila; Moshiri, Mohammad; Moallem, Seyed Adel

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 1% of all pregnancies are in woman with epilepsy. Although, the majority of children born to women with epilepsy are normal, they are at increased risk for malformations. Notably, the teratogenicity of antiepileptic drugs is a well-defined subject. The incidence of major malformations in offspring of mothers with epilepsy who were treated with AEDs is higher than women with untreated epilepsy and in the general population. These malformations include spina bifida, cleft palate, limb reduction defects, cardiac abnormalities, hypospadias, and gastrointestinal atresia. The exact mechanism by which the AEDs mediate abnormalities in the fetus is uncertain. However, there are several hypotheses to explain them. Some of the most important include folate-related actions, ischemia, reactive intermediates (e.g., free radicals), and genetic susceptibility. Thus, understanding the mechanisms of AED-related abnormalities is of vital importance for the care of epileptic women and their offspring. PMID:23826017

  19. Epilepsy drugs and effects on fetal development: Potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Etemad, Leila; Moshiri, Mohammad; Moallem, Seyed Adel

    2012-09-01

    Approximately 1% of all pregnancies are in woman with epilepsy. Although, the majority of children born to women with epilepsy are normal, they are at increased risk for malformations. Notably, the teratogenicity of antiepileptic drugs is a well-defined subject. The incidence of major malformations in offspring of mothers with epilepsy who were treated with AEDs is higher than women with untreated epilepsy and in the general population. These malformations include spina bifida, cleft palate, limb reduction defects, cardiac abnormalities, hypospadias, and gastrointestinal atresia. The exact mechanism by which the AEDs mediate abnormalities in the fetus is uncertain. However, there are several hypotheses to explain them. Some of the most important include folate-related actions, ischemia, reactive intermediates (e.g., free radicals), and genetic susceptibility. Thus, understanding the mechanisms of AED-related abnormalities is of vital importance for the care of epileptic women and their offspring. PMID:23826017

  20. Recent developments in nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs in cats.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Gwendolyn L; Simonson, Stephanie M

    2005-01-01

    Pain, particularly chronic pain, is an underestimated ailment in cats. Veterinarians tend to under-diagnose and under-treat pain in this aloof and stoic species. Until recently, there was only one analgesic (i.e., butorphanol) approved in the United States for use in cats; but many analgesics, particularly opioids, have been used extra-label for this purpose. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been used sparingly in cats because of safety concerns, which are less of an issue with the newer agents. Meloxicam is the only NSAID labeled for use in cats in the United States, but other agents are available in this country and are labeled for use in cats in other countries. PMID:16267058

  1. Collision Avoidance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Ames Research Center teamed with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to study human performance factors associated with the use of the Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance system (TCAS II) in an operational environment. TCAS is designed to alert pilots of the presence of other aircraft in their vicinity, to identify and track those who could be a threat, and to recommend action to avoid a collision. Ames conducted three laboratory experiments. The first showed that pilots were able to use the TCAS II correctly in the allowable time. The second tested pilots' response to changes in the avoidance advisories, and the third examined pilots' reactions to alternative displays. After a 1989 congressional mandate, the FAA ruled that TCAS would be required on all passenger carrying aircraft (to be phased in completely by 1995).

  2. Development, implementation and management of a drug testing program in the workplace

    SciTech Connect

    Burtis, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    To combat the rising use of drugs in the workplace many American companies have implemented drug testing programs and are testing employees and job applicants for use of illegal drugs. In addition, on September 15, 1986, Executive Order No.12564 was issued by President Reagan, which requires all federal agencies to develop programs and policies, one of the goals of which is to achieve a drug-free federal workplace. Included in this Executive Order is the requirement that federal agencies implement drug testing has become a prevalent practice as a means to detect and deter drug use in the workplace. Before a drug testing program is implemented, it is imperative that policies and procedures are developed that (1) ensure the accuracy of test results, (2) protect the validity and integrity of the specimen, (3) guarantee due process, and (4) maintain confidentiality. To make certain that these prerequisites were met in the government drug testing programs, the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) was directed to develop technical and scientific guidelines for conducting such programs. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Recent developments of functional magnetic resonance imaging research for drug development in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hampel, Harald; Prvulovic, David; Teipel, Stefan J; Bokde, Arun L W

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this review is to evaluate recent advances in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) research in Alzheimer's disease for the development of therapeutic agents. The basic building block underpinning cognition is a brain network. The measured brain activity serves as an integrator of the various components, from genes to structural integrity, that impact the function of networks underpinning cognition. Specific networks can be interrogated using cognitive paradigms such as a learning task or a working memory task. In addition, recent advances in our understanding of neural networks allow one to investigate the function of a brain network by investigating the inherent coherency of the brain networks that can be measured during resting state. The coherent resting state networks allow testing in cognitively impaired patients that may not be possible with the use of cognitive paradigms. In particular the default mode network (DMN) includes the medial temporal lobe and posterior cingulate, two key regions that support episodic memory function and are impaired in the earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). By investigating the effects of a prospective drug compound on this network, it could illuminate the specificity of the compound with a network supporting memory function. This could provide valuable information on the methods of action at physiological and behaviourally relevant levels. Utilizing fMRI opens up new areas of research and a new approach for drug development, as it is an integrative tool to investigate entire networks within the brain. The network based approach provides a new independent method from previous ones to translate preclinical knowledge into the clinical domain. PMID:21777651

  4. Recent developments of functional magnetic resonance imaging research for drug development in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hampel, Harald; Prvulovic, David; Teipel, Stefan J; Bokde, Arun L W

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this review is to evaluate recent advances in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) research in Alzheimer's disease for the development of therapeutic agents. The basic building block underpinning cognition is a brain network. The measured brain activity serves as an integrator of the various components, from genes to structural integrity, that impact the function of networks underpinning cognition. Specific networks can be interrogated using cognitive paradigms such as a learning task or a working memory task. In addition, recent advances in our understanding of neural networks allow one to investigate the function of a brain network by investigating the inherent coherency of the brain networks that can be measured during resting state. The coherent resting state networks allow testing in cognitively impaired patients that may not be possible with the use of cognitive paradigms. In particular the default mode network (DMN) includes the medial temporal lobe and posterior cingulate, two key regions that support episodic memory function and are impaired in the earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). By investigating the effects of a prospective drug compound on this network, it could illuminate the specificity of the compound with a network supporting memory function. This could provide valuable information on the methods of action at physiological and behaviourally relevant levels. Utilizing fMRI opens up new areas of research and a new approach for drug development, as it is an integrative tool to investigate entire networks within the brain. The network based approach provides a new independent method from previous ones to translate preclinical knowledge into the clinical domain.

  5. Applications of nano-baskets in drug development: high solubility and low toxicity.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, Bahram; Pourabdollah, Kobra

    2013-01-01

    The importance of calixarene nanobaskets in drug development and controlling their toxicity comes back to their ability to encapsulate the drug species and biological compounds. New complexes show improved physical characteristics, such as more solubility in water and enhanced chemical properties, including less toxicity in biological systems. Moreover, the covalent bonding, inclusion encapsulation, and induction activities of calixarenes lead to improving the activity of drug molecules. This review article deals with the importance of calixarene-based drugs and illustrates their potentials in drug development and toxicity control. The main aim and novelty of this study was to introduce the role and the action of calixarene scaffolds and their conjugated upper and lower rims as well as their binding mechanism in biomedical systems. The main aspects of this approach are classified in four categories and are discussed according to the results of recent researches.

  6. Early development drug formulation on a chip: fabrication of nanoparticles using a microfluidic spray dryer.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Julian; Windbergs, Maike; Abate, Adam R; Trebbin, Martin; Shum, Ho Cheung; Förster, Stephan; Weitz, David A

    2011-07-21

    Early development drug formulation is exacerbated by increasingly poor bioavailability of potential candidates. Prevention of attrition due to formulation problems necessitates physicochemical analysis and formulation studies at a very early stage during development, where the availability of a new substance is limited to small quantities, thus impeding extensive experiments. Miniaturization of common formulation processes is a strategy to overcome those limitations. We present a versatile technique for fabricating drug nanoformulations using a microfluidic spray dryer. Nanoparticles are formed by evaporative precipitation of the drug-loaded spray in air at room temperature. Using danazol as a model drug, amorphous nanoparticles of 20-60 nm in diameter are prepared with a narrow size distribution. We design the device with a geometry that allows the injection of two separate solvent streams, thus enabling co-spray drying of two substances for the production of drug co-precipitates with tailor-made composition for optimization of therapeutic efficiency. PMID:21617823

  7. Development of an orphan drug by a start-up company. MetroGel for rosacea.

    PubMed

    Borgman, R J

    1992-01-01

    The Orphan Drug Act of 1983, along with the discovery of a new use for a known drug and an investor willing to assume the necessary risk, brought about the formation of a start-up pharmaceutical company. The primary incentive of the Orphan Drug Act of seven years of marketing exclusivity provided the protection from competition necessary for recovery of the significant research and development and marketing costs. The orphan product, MetroGel, for the treatment of rosacea, required approximately five years of development before it was approved for marketing by the Food and Drug Administration. MetroGel has become the number one drug in the United States for the treatment of rosacea. It currently is marketed in other countries through a licensing agreement with a major pharmaceutical company.

  8. Development of a core drug list towards improving prescribing education and reducing errors in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Emma; Pryce Roberts, Adele; Wilde, Kirsty; Walton, Hannah; Suri, Sati; Rull, Gurvinder; Webb, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    AIM To develop a core list of 100 commonly prescribed drugs to support prescribing education. METHODS A retrospective analysis of prescribing data from primary care in England (2006 and 2008) and from two London Teaching Hospitals (2007 and 2009) was performed. A survey of prescribing by foundation year 1 (FY1) doctors in 39 NHS Trusts across London was carried out. RESULTS A core list of 100 commonly prescribed drugs comprising ≥0.1% prescriptions in primary and/or secondary care was developed in 2006/7. The core list remained stable over 2 years. FY1 doctors prescribed 65% drugs on the list at least monthly. Seventy-six% of FY1 doctors did not regularly prescribe any drugs not on the core list. There was a strong correlation between prescribing frequency (prescriptions for each drug class expressed as percentage of all prescriptions written) and error rate described in the EQUIP study (errors made when prescribing each drug class expressed as a percentage of all errors made), n= 39, r= 0.861, P= 0.000. CONCLUSIONS Our core drug list identifies drugs that are commonly used and associated with error and is stable over at least 2 years. This list can now be used to develop learning resources and training programmes to improve prescribing of drugs in regular use. Complementary skills required for prescribing less familiar drugs must be developed in parallel. Ongoing research is required to monitor the effect of new training initiatives on prescribing error and patient safety. PMID:21219399

  9. 77 FR 61417 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Sinusitis: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ... current thinking regarding the overall development program and clinical trial designs for drugs to support... Administration Safety and Innovation Act that FDA review guidances for the conduct of clinical trials...

  10. Collaboration with Pharma Will Introduce Nanotechnologies in Early Stage Drug Development | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Frederick National Lab has begun to assist several major pharmaceutical companies in adopting nanotechnologies in early stage drug development, when the approach is most efficient and cost-effective.

  11. PET and SPECT Imaging of Tumor Biology: New Approaches towards Oncology Drug Discovery and Development

    PubMed Central

    Van Dort, Marcian E.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Ross, Brian D.

    2009-01-01

    Spiraling drug developmental costs and lengthy time-to-market introduction are two critical challenges facing the pharmaceutical industry. The clinical trials success rate for oncology drugs is reported to be 5% as compared to other therapeutic categories (11%) with most failures often encountered late in the clinical development process. PET and SPECT nuclear imaging technologies could play an important role in facilitating the drug development process improving the speed, efficiency and cost of drug development. This review will focus on recent studies of PET and SPECT radioligands in oncology and their application in the investigation of tumor biology. The use of clinically-validated radioligands as imaging-based biomarkers in oncology could significantly impact new cancer therapeutic development. PMID:19809593

  12. Development of a partially automated solubility screening (PASS) assay for early drug development.

    PubMed

    Alsenz, Jochem; Meister, Eva; Haenel, Elisabeth

    2007-07-01

    A medium-throughput, compound-saving, thermodynamic solubility assay for early drug development was developed. Solid compound suspended in heptane was used for simple, time-saving, and flexible compound distribution into 96-well plates, with minor risk to generate new physical forms during dispensing. Low volume, well-stirred incubation vessels were generated by using a combination of V-shaped wells, well caps, and vertically inserted stir bars. This allowed solubility determination up to 100 mg/mL in 40-80 microL volumes in aqueous and nonaqueous, low- and high-viscosity solvents. After removal of residual solid through syringe filters mounted on microtiter plates, the filtrate was quantified by ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) using a 1.2 min gradient. Combined with a robotic liquid handling system, throughput was 45 samples per hour and >600 solubility measurements per week. Results from the partially automated solubility screening (PASS) assay correlated well with reported solubility values (r2 = 0.882). The PASS assay is useful for compound-saving, thermodynamic solubility measurement at the discovery-development interface where maximal solubility in many commonly used solvents needs to be determined. PASS results provide a basis for the identification of formulation strategies, the selection of appropriate excipients, and for the prediction of the potential in vivo behavior of compounds.

  13. Scaling predictive modeling in drug development with cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, Behrooz Torabi; Alvarsson, Jonathan; Holm, Marcus; Eklund, Martin; Carlsson, Lars; Spjuth, Ola

    2015-01-26

    Growing data sets with increased time for analysis is hampering predictive modeling in drug discovery. Model building can be carried out on high-performance computer clusters, but these can be expensive to purchase and maintain. We have evaluated ligand-based modeling on cloud computing resources where computations are parallelized and run on the Amazon Elastic Cloud. We trained models on open data sets of varying sizes for the end points logP and Ames mutagenicity and compare with model building parallelized on a traditional high-performance computing cluster. We show that while high-performance computing results in faster model building, the use of cloud computing resources is feasible for large data sets and scales well within cloud instances. An additional advantage of cloud computing is that the costs of predictive models can be easily quantified, and a choice can be made between speed and economy. The easy access to computational resources with no up-front investments makes cloud computing an attractive alternative for scientists, especially for those without access to a supercomputer, and our study shows that it enables cost-efficient modeling of large data sets on demand within reasonable time.

  14. Clinical development of new drug-radiotherapy combinations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ricky A; Plummer, Ruth; Stock, Julie K; Greenhalgh, Tessa A; Ataman, Ozlem; Kelly, Stephen; Clay, Robert; Adams, Richard A; Baird, Richard D; Billingham, Lucinda; Brown, Sarah R; Buckland, Sean; Bulbeck, Helen; Chalmers, Anthony J; Clack, Glen; Cranston, Aaron N; Damstrup, Lars; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Forster, Martin D; Golec, Julian; Hagan, Russell M; Hall, Emma; Hanauske, Axel-R; Harrington, Kevin J; Haswell, Tom; Hawkins, Maria A; Illidge, Tim; Jones, Hazel; Kennedy, Andrew S; McDonald, Fiona; Melcher, Thorsten; O'Connor, James P B; Pollard, John R; Saunders, Mark P; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Smitt, Melanie; Staffurth, John; Stratford, Ian J; Wedge, Stephen R

    2016-10-01

    In countries with the best cancer outcomes, approximately 60% of patients receive radiotherapy as part of their treatment, which is one of the most cost-effective cancer treatments. Notably, around 40% of cancer cures include the use of radiotherapy, either as a single modality or combined with other treatments. Radiotherapy can provide enormous benefit to patients with cancer. In the past decade, significant technical advances, such as image-guided radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, stereotactic radiotherapy, and proton therapy enable higher doses of radiotherapy to be delivered to the tumour with significantly lower doses to normal surrounding tissues. However, apart from the combination of traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy with radiotherapy, little progress has been made in identifying and defining optimal targeted therapy and radiotherapy combinations to improve the efficacy of cancer treatment. The National Cancer Research Institute Clinical and Translational Radiotherapy Research Working Group (CTRad) formed a Joint Working Group with representatives from academia, industry, patient groups and regulatory bodies to address this lack of progress and to publish recommendations for future clinical research. Herein, we highlight the Working Group's consensus recommendations to increase the number of novel drugs being successfully registered in combination with radiotherapy to improve clinical outcomes for patients with cancer. PMID:27245279

  15. Tonkin herbal drug: a multidisciplinary approach to development.

    PubMed

    Ysrael, Mafel C

    2003-01-01

    Ipomoea muricata (L.) Jacq, locally known as 'Tonkin', has been used for generations by the Dominicans in the Philippines for medicinal purposes. The seeds, stems and leaves are said to be effective in treating several types of skin ailments such as chronic and gangrenous wounds, cuts and blisters due to burns. Scientific investigations to rationalize the reported medicinal uses of the plant were carried out at University of Santo Tomas. Botanists at the University did the identification and studied the cultivation and propagation of the plant. Pharmacists and chemists worked closely together on the 'Tonkin' seeds. The seeds were found to have both analgesic and antiseptic properties. Chemists identified indolizidine alkaloids in the seeds, to which the analgesic properties have been attributed. Antimicrobial and antifungal compounds were also identified. Different formulations of the crude drug have been made, namely, an ointment for the treatment of skin ailments, glycerol preparation for the treatment of pharyngitis and an otic preparation for the treatment of otitis externa. Limited clinical trials of these formulations were carried out in collaboration with the medical doctors. The clinical trial studies were supported by in vitro studies carried out by microbiologists. Basic research on this plant material is still continuing. Efforts are now underway for the commercial production of the Tonkin ointment.

  16. Avoiding the "M" Word.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klinger, Donna

    2001-01-01

    Provides an overview of roundtable discussions by top business officers about how higher education can capitalize on strategic alliances. Describes how, by working with one another and with corporate partners, colleges and universities can avoid closing their doors or merging with stronger institutions. (EV)

  17. Psychological Treatments to Avoid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomason, Timothy C.

    2010-01-01

    Certain psychological treatments should be avoided, and a list of such treatments would provide valuable guidance for counselors, as well as potential clients. It is well established that some therapies are potentially dangerous, and some fringe therapies are highly unlikely to help clients beyond a placebo effect. This article provides an…

  18. Myelin Avoids the JAM.

    PubMed

    Follis, Rose M; Carter, Bruce D

    2016-08-17

    In this issue of Neuron, Redmond et al. (2016) identify junction adhesion molecule 2 (JAM2) as an inhibitor of somatodendritic myelination in spinal cord neurons, thereby elucidating how myelin forms on axons but avoids dendrites and cell bodies. PMID:27537479

  19. Plants to Avoid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of poisonous plants is extremely important for home owners, gardeners, farmers, hunters, hikers, and the rest of the general public. Among the most important plants to avoid in the Delta Region are poison ivy, bull nettle, eastern black nightshade, Queen Ann’s lace, jimsonweed, and trumpe...

  20. [Centralized purchasing of essential drugs, a priority for the health care systems of developing countries].

    PubMed

    Blaise, P; Dujardin, B; de Béthune, X; Vandenbergh, D

    1998-01-01

    Health sector reform is a key priority of many governments throughout the world. Drug supply systems are a major element of public health policy design in Africa, where 90% of drugs are imported. The WHO Essential Drugs Program and the UNICEF sponsored Bamako Initiative have, since the late 1980s, promoted the rational use of essential drugs and attempted to ensure a sustainable drug supply through the implementation of cost recovery schemes and quality assurance mechanisms in public health services. A new market for drugs is emerging within this framework and there is growing competition for its control. Government medical stores are all too often bankrupt and the private sector is expensive, catering mainly for the middle to upper classes of urban areas. An intermediate alternative. Essential Drugs Purchasing Offices (EDPOs), has been proposed to balance social objectives and economic constraints. Some of the experimental strategies have given promising results. However, their implementation raises a number of questions: What is the role of the EDPO? Should it promote public health issues in general or focus purely on drug availability? What is the most appropriate legal status? Public or private? For profit or not? How should the investment capital be structured? In drugs or in funds? With ample provision or a tight budget? How should drug purchases be managed? Where should drugs be purchased? How much? How often? According to which procedures? How should the distribution of drugs be organized? Supplying everyone? Pushing supplies or pulling purchasers in? The answers to these questions, analysis of the reasons for success and failure and the dissemination of the information gathered should identify priorities for action and future research and define a framework for expansion. These are the objectives of the "Concerted Action for the Development of EDPO in Sub-Saharan African Countries" which is supported by the European Union (DG XII).

  1. Recent highlights in anti-protozoan drug development and resistance research

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Frederick S.; Waters, Norman C.; Avery, Vicky M.

    2012-01-01

    This article summarizes the highlights of research presented in January, 2012, at the Keystone Symposium on “Drug Discovery for Protozoan Parasites” held in Santa Fe, New Mexico. This symposium which convenes approximately every 2 years provides a forum for leading investigators around the world to present data covering basic sciences to clinical trials relating to anti-protozoan drug development and drug resistance. Many talks focused on malaria, but other protozoan diseases receiving attention included African sleeping sickness, Chagas disease, leishmaniasis, cryptosporidiosis, and amoebiasis. The new research, most of it unpublished, provided insights into the latest developments in the field. PMID:24533285

  2. [Recent progress in nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum for drug research and development].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jun; Jiang, Xue-mei

    2015-01-01

    In the process of modern drug research, the new methods and technologies which can detect drug molecules' chemical composition, structure and interaction with biomolecules are always the key scientific problems people care about. Spectra (including IR, UV and NMR) are the most common analytical methods, of which NMR can obtain detailed parameter about the nucleus of organic molecules through researching the laws of nuclear transition in the impact of surrounding chemical environment. The parameter contains rich information about the chemical composition, structure and interaction with other molecules of organic molecules. In many complex environments, such as liquid, solid or gas state, even biological in situ environment, NMR can provide molecules' chemical composition, atomic-resolution three-dimensional structure, information of interaction with each other and dynamic process, especially the information about drug interacting with biomacromolecules. In recent years, the applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum in drug research and development are more and more widespread. This paper reviewed its recent progress in structure and dynamic of targeted biological macromolecules, drug design and screening and drug metabolism in drug research and development. In the first part, we gave a brief introduction of nuclear magnetic resonance technology and its applications in drug research. In the second part, we explained the basic principles briefly and summarized progress in methods and techniques for drug research. In the third part, we discussed applications of nuclear magnetic resonance ir structure and dynamic of targeted biological macromolecules, drug design and screening and drug metabolism in detail. The conclusions were stated in the last part.

  3. [Recent progress in nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum for drug research and development].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jun; Jiang, Xue-mei

    2015-01-01

    In the process of modern drug research, the new methods and technologies which can detect drug molecules' chemical composition, structure and interaction with biomolecules are always the key scientific problems people care about. Spectra (including IR, UV and NMR) are the most common analytical methods, of which NMR can obtain detailed parameter about the nucleus of organic molecules through researching the laws of nuclear transition in the impact of surrounding chemical environment. The parameter contains rich information about the chemical composition, structure and interaction with other molecules of organic molecules. In many complex environments, such as liquid, solid or gas state, even biological in situ environment, NMR can provide molecules' chemical composition, atomic-resolution three-dimensional structure, information of interaction with each other and dynamic process, especially the information about drug interacting with biomacromolecules. In recent years, the applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum in drug research and development are more and more widespread. This paper reviewed its recent progress in structure and dynamic of targeted biological macromolecules, drug design and screening and drug metabolism in drug research and development. In the first part, we gave a brief introduction of nuclear magnetic resonance technology and its applications in drug research. In the second part, we explained the basic principles briefly and summarized progress in methods and techniques for drug research. In the third part, we discussed applications of nuclear magnetic resonance ir structure and dynamic of targeted biological macromolecules, drug design and screening and drug metabolism in detail. The conclusions were stated in the last part. PMID:25993865

  4. SAR analysis of new anti-TB drugs currently in pre-clinical and clinical development.

    PubMed

    Poce, Giovanna; Cocozza, Martina; Consalvi, Sara; Biava, Mariangela

    2014-10-30

    Despite enormous efforts have been made in the hunt for new drugs, tuberculosis (TB) still remains the first bacterial cause of mortality worldwide, causing an estimated 8.6 million new cases and 1.3 million deaths in 2012. Multi-drug resistant-TB strains no longer respond to first-line drugs and are inexorably spreading with an estimated 650,000 cases as well as extensively-drug resistant-TB strains, which are resistant to any fluoroquinolone and at least one of the second-line drugs, with 60,000 cases. Thus the discovery and development of new medicines is a major keystone for tuberculosis treatment and control. After decades of dormancy in the field of TB drug development, recent efforts from various groups have generated a promising TB drug pipeline. Several new therapeutic agents are concurrently studied in clinical trials together with much activity in the hittolead and lead optimization stages. In this article we will review the recent advances in TB drug discovery with a special focus on structure activity relationship studies of the most advanced compound classes. PMID:25173852

  5. Common characteristics of open source software development and applicability for drug discovery: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Innovation through an open source model has proven to be successful for software development. This success has led many to speculate if open source can be applied to other industries with similar success. We attempt to provide an understanding of open source software development characteristics for researchers, business leaders and government officials who may be interested in utilizing open source innovation in other contexts and with an emphasis on drug discovery. Methods A systematic review was performed by searching relevant, multidisciplinary databases to extract empirical research regarding the common characteristics and barriers of initiating and maintaining an open source software development project. Results Common characteristics to open source software development pertinent to open source drug discovery were extracted. The characteristics were then grouped into the areas of participant attraction, management of volunteers, control mechanisms, legal framework and physical constraints. Lastly, their applicability to drug discovery was examined. Conclusions We believe that the open source model is viable for drug discovery, although it is unlikely that it will exactly follow the form used in software development. Hybrids will likely develop that suit the unique characteristics of drug discovery. We suggest potential motivations for organizations to join an open source drug discovery project. We also examine specific differences between software and medicines, specifically how the need for laboratories and physical goods will impact the model as well as the effect of patents. PMID:21955914

  6. Development of an Experimental Drug Eluting Suprachoroidal Microstent as Glaucoma Drainage Device

    PubMed Central

    Hovakimyan, Marina; Siewert, Stefan; Schmidt, Wolfram; Sternberg, Katrin; Reske, Thomas; Stachs, Oliver; Guthoff, Rudolf; Wree, Andreas; Witt, Martin; Schmitz, Klaus-Peter; Allemann, Reto

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A novel glaucoma drainage device (GDD) with local drug delivery (LDD) system was created and characterized for safety and effectiveness after implantation into the suprachoroidal space (SCS) of rabbit eyes. Methods: Thin films of two different polymers, Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (P(3HB)) and Poly(4-hydroxybutyrate) (P(4HB)), containing the drugs mitomycin C (MitC) or paclitaxel (PTX) were attached to silicone-tubes to create LDD devices. The release kinetics of these drugs were explored in vitro using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).  Twenty-four New Zealand white rabbits, randomly divided into eight groups, were implanted with different kinds of microstents into SCS. The intraocular pressure (IOP) was monitored noninvasively. After 6 weeks, rabbits were sacrificed and enucleated eyes were used for anterior segment optical coherence tomography (OCT), micro magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and histology. Results: In vitro, faster drug release from both polymers was observed for MitC compared to PTX. Comparing polymers, the release from P(3HB) matrix was slower for both drugs. MRI and OCT showed all implants maintained a proper location. An effective IOP reduction was observed for up to 6 weeks in eyes with microstents combined with a drug-releasing LDD system. Overall, the surrounding tissue revealed mild-to-moderate inflammation. No pronounced fibrosis was observed in any of the groups. However, both drugs caused damage to the neighboring retina. Conclusions: The suprachoroidal microstent reduced IOP with mild inflammation in rabbit eyes. To avoid negative effects on the retina, it is necessary to identify novel drugs with less cytotoxicity. Future studies are needed to explore the fibrotic process over the long-term. Translational Relevance: The presented data serve as a proof of principle study for the concept of a suprachoroidal drug eluting microstent. Future device improvements will be focused on the design of LDD systems and the use of

  7. Improved methodology for identifying the teratogenic potential in early drug development of hERG channel blocking drugs.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, M F; Danielsson, C; Sköld, A-C; Johansson, A; Blomgren, B; Wilson, J; Khan, K M; Bengtsson, E; Kultima, K; Webster, W S; Danielsson, B R

    2010-04-01

    Drugs blocking the potassium current IKr of the heart (via hERG channel-inhibition) have the potential to cause hypoxia-related teratogenic effects. However, this activity may be missed in conventional teratology studies because repeat dosing may cause resorptions. The aim of the present study was to investigate an alternative protocol to reveal the teratogenic potential of IKr-blocking drugs. The IKr blocker astemizole, given as a single dose (80 mg/kg) on gestation day (GD) 13 to pregnant rats caused digital defects. In whole rat embryo culture (2h) on GD 13, astemizole caused a decrease in embryonic heart rate at 20 nM, and arrhythmias at 200-400 nM. Cetirizine, without IKr-blocking properties, did not affect the rat embryonic heart in vitro. The present study shows that single dose testing on sensitive days of development, together with whole embryo culture, can be a useful methodology to better characterize the teratogenic potential of IKr-blocking drugs. PMID:20144703

  8. Antiviral Information Management System (AIMS): a prototype for operational innovation in drug development.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Pravin R; Neal, Lauren; Florian, Jeff; Chen, Ying; Naeger, Lisa; Robertson, Sarah; Soon, Guoxing; Birnkrant, Debra

    2010-09-01

    This article presents a prototype for an operational innovation in knowledge management (KM). These operational innovations are geared toward managing knowledge efficiently and accessing all available information by embracing advances in bioinformatics and allied fields. The specific components of the proposed KM system are (1) a database to archive hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment data in a structured format and retrieve information in a query-capable manner and (2) an automated analysis tool to inform trial design elements for HCV drug development. The proposed framework is intended to benefit drug development by increasing efficiency of dose selection and improving the consistency of advice from US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It is also hoped that the framework will encourage collaboration among FDA, industry, and academic scientists to guide the HCV drug development process using model-based quantitative analysis techniques. PMID:20881217

  9. Antiviral Information Management System (AIMS): a prototype for operational innovation in drug development.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Pravin R; Neal, Lauren; Florian, Jeff; Chen, Ying; Naeger, Lisa; Robertson, Sarah; Soon, Guoxing; Birnkrant, Debra

    2010-09-01

    This article presents a prototype for an operational innovation in knowledge management (KM). These operational innovations are geared toward managing knowledge efficiently and accessing all available information by embracing advances in bioinformatics and allied fields. The specific components of the proposed KM system are (1) a database to archive hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment data in a structured format and retrieve information in a query-capable manner and (2) an automated analysis tool to inform trial design elements for HCV drug development. The proposed framework is intended to benefit drug development by increasing efficiency of dose selection and improving the consistency of advice from US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It is also hoped that the framework will encourage collaboration among FDA, industry, and academic scientists to guide the HCV drug development process using model-based quantitative analysis techniques.

  10. MicroSPECT and MicroPET Imaging of Small Animals for Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The process of drug discovery and development requires substantial resources and time. The drug industry has tried to reduce costs by conducting appropriate animal studies together with molecular biological and genetic analyses. Basic science research has been limited to in vitro studies of cellular processes and ex vivo tissue examination using suitable animal models of disease. However, in the past two decades new technologies have been developed that permit the imaging of live animals using radiotracer emission, Xrays, magnetic resonance signals, fluorescence, and bioluminescence. The main objective of this review is to provide an overview of small animal molecular imaging, with a focus on nuclear imaging (single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography). These technologies permit visualization of toxicodynamics as well as toxicity to specific organs by directly monitoring drug accumulation and assessing physiological and/or molecular alterations. Nuclear imaging technology has great potential for improving the efficiency of the drug development process. PMID:24278622

  11. A theoretical examination of the relative importance of evolution management and drug development for managing resistance.

    PubMed

    McClure, Nathan S; Day, Troy

    2014-12-22

    Drug resistance is a serious public health problem that threatens to thwart our ability to treat many infectious diseases. Repeatedly, the introduction of new drugs has been followed by the evolution of resistance. In principle, there are two complementary ways to address this problem: (i) enhancing drug development and (ii) slowing the evolution of drug resistance through evolutionary management. Although these two strategies are not mutually exclusive, it is nevertheless worthwhile considering whether one might be inherently more effective than the other. We present a simple mathematical model that explores how interventions aimed at these two approaches affect the availability of effective drugs. Our results identify an interesting feature of evolution management that, all else equal, tends to make it more effective than enhancing drug development. Thus, although enhancing drug development will necessarily be a central part of addressing the problem of resistance, our results lend support to the idea that evolution management is probably a very significant component of the solution as well.

  12. The use of mechanistic biomarkers for evaluating investigational CNS compounds in early drug development.

    PubMed

    Soares, Holly D

    2010-07-01

    Biomarkers serve as the fundamental building blocks of modern translational research strategies, and are widely implemented in current drug development. Biomarker techniques range from simple biofluid biochemical endpoints to more complex assessments, including imaging. Although biomarker usage is common throughout drug development, applications may vary depending on whether a drug candidate is in early- or late-stage testing. In early clinical drug development, biomarkers capable of providing proof of mechanism are considered critical tools in the management of attrition during phase II clinical trials. For CNS drugs, the ability to unequivocally demonstrate pharmacologically driven biological activity in the brain, as a result of the interaction of a drug with its intended target, ensures that proof-of-concept trials are designed in a manner that adequately tests the clinical efficacy hypothesis and that patients are not being exposed to inactive drugs. This review focuses on recent advances in proof-of-pharmacology biomarkers, with an emphasis on biochemical measures and simple circuit platforms used to demonstrate target engagement in central compartments.

  13. A theoretical examination of the relative importance of evolution management and drug development for managing resistance

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Nathan S.; Day, Troy

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance is a serious public health problem that threatens to thwart our ability to treat many infectious diseases. Repeatedly, the introduction of new drugs has been followed by the evolution of resistance. In principle, there are two complementary ways to address this problem: (i) enhancing drug development and (ii) slowing the evolution of drug resistance through evolutionary management. Although these two strategies are not mutually exclusive, it is nevertheless worthwhile considering whether one might be inherently more effective than the other. We present a simple mathematical model that explores how interventions aimed at these two approaches affect the availability of effective drugs. Our results identify an interesting feature of evolution management that, all else equal, tends to make it more effective than enhancing drug development. Thus, although enhancing drug development will necessarily be a central part of addressing the problem of resistance, our results lend support to the idea that evolution management is probably a very significant component of the solution as well. PMID:25377456

  14. Delivering therapy to target: improving the odds for successful drug development.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Raghu; Brady, Martin L; Sampson, John H

    2016-07-01

    The direct delivery of drugs and other agents into tissue (in contrast to systemic administration) has been used in clinical trials for brain cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and peripheral tumors. However, continuing evidence suggests that clinical efficacy depends on adequate delivery to a target. Inadequate delivery may have doomed otherwise effective drugs, through failure to distinguish drug inefficacy from poor distribution at the target. Conventional pretreatment clinical images of the patient fail to reveal the complexity and diversity of drug transport pathways in tissue. We discuss the richness of these pathways and argue that development and patient treatment can be sped up and improved by: using quantitative as well as 'real-time' imaging; customized simulations using data from that imaging; and device designs that optimize the drug-device combination. PMID:27403630

  15. Addressing Unmet Medical Needs in Type 2 Diabetes: A Narrative Review of Drugs under Development

    PubMed Central

    Mittermayer, Friedrich; Caveney, Erica; Oliveira, Claudia De; Gourgiotis, Loukas; Puri, Mala; Tai, Li-Jung; J, Rick Turner

    2015-01-01

    The global burden of type 2 diabetes is increasing worldwide, and successful treatment of this disease needs constant provision of new drugs. Twelve classes of antidiabetic drugs are currently available, and many new drugs are under clinical development. These include compounds with known mechanisms of action but unique properties, such as once-weekly DPP4 inhibitors or oral insulin. They also include drugs with new mechanisms of action, the focus of this review. Most of these compounds are in Phase 1 and 2, with only a small number having made it to Phase 3 at this time. The new drug classes described include PPAR agonists/modulators, glucokinase activators, glucagon receptor antagonists, anti-inflammatory compounds, G-protein coupled receptor agonists, gastrointestinal peptide agonists other than GLP-1, apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) inhibitors, SGLT1 and dual SGLT1/SGLT2 inhibitors, and 11beta-HSD1 inhibitors. PMID:25537454

  16. Regulatory science accelerates the development of biotechnology drugs and vaccines by NIFDC

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhenglun; Mao, Qunying; Wang, Yiping; Li, Changgui; Gao, Kai; Wang, Junzhi

    2014-01-01

    The Chinese National Institutes for Food and Drug Control (NIFDC) is the national laboratory responsible for the quality control of pharmaceutical products. In recent years, to ensure the quality of biological products and improve the research and development (R&D) of new biological drugs and vaccines, NIFDC conducted a series of regulatory science studies on key technologies for quality control and evaluation, and established a quality control and evaluation platform for biological drugs and vaccines. These studies accelerated the R&D of the biological drugs and vaccines in China and assured their safety and efficacy. In this paper, NIFDC's duties and achievements in the biological drug and vaccine field are summarized. PMID:26038758

  17. Development of a replicated database of DHCP data for evaluation of drug use.

    PubMed Central

    Graber, S E; Seneker, J A; Stahl, A A; Franklin, K O; Neel, T E; Miller, R A

    1996-01-01

    This case report describes development and testing of a method to extract clinical information stored in the Veterans Affairs (VA) Decentralized Hospital Computer System (DHCP) for the purpose of analyzing data about groups of patients. The authors used a microcomputer-based, structured query language (SQL)-compatible, relational database system to replicate a subset of the Nashville VA Hospital's DHCP patient database. This replicated database contained the complete current Nashville DHCP prescription, provider, patient, and drug data sets, and a subset of the laboratory data. A pilot project employed this replicated database to answer questions that might arise in drug-use evaluation, such as identification of cases of polypharmacy, suboptimal drug regimens, and inadequate laboratory monitoring of drug therapy. These database queries included as candidates for review all prescriptions for all outpatients. The queries demonstrated that specific drug-use events could be identified for any time interval represented in the replicated database. PMID:8653451

  18. Trends in utilization of FDA expedited drug development and approval programs, 1987-2014: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Franklin, Jessica M; Darrow, Jonathan J

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the use of special expedited development and review pathways at the US Food and Drug Administration over the past two decades. Design Cohort study. Setting FDA approved novel therapeutics between 1987 and 2014. Population Publicly available sources provided each drug’s year of approval, their innovativeness (first in class versus not first in class), World Health Organization Anatomic Therapeutic Classification, and which (if any) of the FDA’s four primary expedited development and review programs or designations were associated with each drug: orphan drug, fast track, accelerated approval, and priority review. Main outcome measures Logistic regression models evaluated trends in the proportion of drugs associated with each of the four expedited development and review programs. To evaluate the number of programs associated with each approved drug over time, Poisson models were employed, with the number of programs as the dependent variable and a linear term for year of approval. The difference in trends was compared between drugs that were first in class and those that were not. Results The FDA approved 774 drugs during the study period, with one third representing first in class agents. Priority review (43%) was the most prevalent of the four programs, with accelerated approval (9%) the least common. There was a significant increase of 2.6% per year in the number of expedited review and approval programs granted to each newly approved agent (incidence rate ratio 1.026, 95% confidence interval 1.017 to 1.035, P<0.001), and a 2.4% increase in the proportion of drugs associated with at least one such program (odds ratio 1.024, 95% confidence interval 1.006 to 1.043, P=0.009). Driving this trend was an increase in the proportion of approved, non-first in class drugs associated with at least one program for drugs (P=0.03 for interaction). Conclusions In the past two decades, drugs newly approved by the FDA have been associated with an

  19. Development of drug-approval regulations for medical countermeasures against CBRN agents in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shimazawa, Rumiko; Ikeda, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    To develop approval regulations for drugs against chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) agents in Japan, and to help inform arguments about the development of anti-CBRN agents, we analyzed documentation describing approval processes and data for drugs against CBRN agents. Sixteen countermeasure products against 10 CBRN agents have been approved in Japan. Approval schemes were grouped into 3 categories: application for off-label uses, expedited review for antiterrorism measures, and expedited review. Ten drug applications were designated "priority reviews," and the median review time was 4.4 months. No application relied exclusively on clinical trials to expose patients to CBRN threats. Clinical experience with drugs in victims of unexpected exposure was not necessarily important for approval. The United States is the most advanced country in terms of developing medical countermeasure products against CBRN agents. Japan has similarities with the US in approved products and application packages, but there were 3 unapproved products or indications that were approved under the Animal Rule in the US. The Animal Rule might encourage development of a novel product by providing efficacy evaluation in animal studies. The US also has regulations that do not exist in Japan that authorize administration of an investigational drug outside a clinical trial for patients. Introduction of the Animal Rule and expanded access of investigational drugs could contribute to development and approvals of novel countermeasure products and improve an emergency response in a crisis in Japan.

  20. Mutagenicity in drug development: interpretation and significance of test results.

    PubMed

    Clive, D

    1985-03-01

    , methapyrilene). In vivo mutagenicity assays are more physiological but appear to be relatively insensitive due to the inability to achieve sufficiently high acute plasma levels to mimic cumulative long-term effects. Examination of the mutagenicity of naturally occurring analogs may indicate the irrelevance of a test compound's mutagenicity (e.g., deoxyguanosine and the structurally related antiviral drug, acyclovir, have identical mutagenicity patterns). Life-threatening or severe debilitating diseases (e.g., cancer, severe psychoses, severe crippling arthritis, sight-threatening diseases) may justify treatment with mutagenic or even carcinogenic therapeutic agents (benefit/risk considerations).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:3991935

  1. Modeling the influence of cyclodextrins on oral absorption of low-solubility drugs: I. Model development.

    PubMed

    Gamsiz, Ece Dilber; Miller, Lee; Thombre, Avinash G; Ahmed, Imran; Carrier, Rebecca Lyn

    2010-02-01

    The ability to quantitatively predict the influence of a solubilization technology on oral absorption would be highly beneficial in rational selection of drug delivery technology and formulation design. Cyclodextrins (CDs) are cyclic oligosaccharides which form inclusion complexes with a large variety of compounds including drugs. There are many studies in the literature showing that complexation between CD and drug enhances oral bioavailability and some demonstrating failure of CD in bioavailability enhancement, but relatively little guidance regarding when CD can be used to enhance bioavailability. A model was developed based upon mass transport expressions for drug dissolution and absorption and a pseudo-equilibrium assumption for the complexation reaction with CD. The model considers neutral compound delivered as a physical mixture with CD in both immediate release (IR) and controlled release (CR) formulations. Simulation results demonstrated that cyclodextrins can enhance, have no effect, or hurt drug absorption when delivered as a physical mixture with drug. The predicted influence depends on interacting parameter values, including solubility, drug absorption constant, binding constant, CD:drug molar ratio, dose, and assumed volume of the intestinal lumen. In general, the predicted positive influence of dosing as a physical mixture with CD was minimal, alluding to the significance of dosing as a preformed complex. The model developed enabled examination of which physical and chemical properties result in oral absorption enhancement for neutral drug administered as a physical mixture with CD, demonstrating the utility of modeling the influence of a drug delivery agent (e.g., CD) on absorption for rational dosage form design.

  2. A drug target that stimulates development of healthy stem cells

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have overcome a major impediment to the development of effective stem cell therapies by studying mice that lack CD47, a protein found on the surface of both healthy and cancer cells. They discovered that cells obtained from the lungs of CD47-de

  3. Alcohol/Drug Education Curriculum Development for Special School Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlton, Chris

    To prevent the high-risk populations of learning disabled/behavior disordered (LD/BD) and educable mentally handicapped (EMH) students from developing substance abuse problems, these students must be educated with materials that are directed specifically at their social and mental levels. Project Oz, a social service agency in McLean County,…

  4. Progress of vaccine and drug development for Ebola preparedness

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Since the first case of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in Guinea was reported in March 2014 by World Health Organization (WHO), the outbreak has continued through the year and the total number of 19,065 patients was reported as the confirmed or suspected in the EVD-affected countries. Among the cases, 7,388 patients were reported death by 19 December. Currently, available therapeutics to treat the infected patients or vaccines to prevent people from infection is not developed yet while viral diagnostic methods were already developed and firmly established in a lot of countries as a first step for the preparedness of Ebola outbreak. Some potential therapeutic materials including ZMapp were supplied and the treated people got over the EVD. Several candidates of vaccines also were investigated their efficacy in animal models by National Institute of Health (NIH) and Department of Defense, and they are processing of clinical tests in West Africa aiming to finish the development by the 2015. Vaccine and therapeutic development is essential to stop the EVD outbreak in West Africa, also to protect the world from the risk which can be generated by potential spread of Ebola virus. PMID:25648233

  5. Progress of vaccine and drug development for Ebola preparedness.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woo Young; Hong, Kee-Jong; Hong, Joo Eun; Lee, Won-Ja

    2015-01-01

    Since the first case of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in Guinea was reported in March 2014 by World Health Organization (WHO), the outbreak has continued through the year and the total number of 19,065 patients was reported as the confirmed or suspected in the EVD-affected countries. Among the cases, 7,388 patients were reported death by 19 December. Currently, available therapeutics to treat the infected patients or vaccines to prevent people from infection is not developed yet while viral diagnostic methods were already developed and firmly established in a lot of countries as a first step for the preparedness of Ebola outbreak. Some potential therapeutic materials including ZMapp were supplied and the treated people got over the EVD. Several candidates of vaccines also were investigated their efficacy in animal models by National Institute of Health (NIH) and Department of Defense, and they are processing of clinical tests in West Africa aiming to finish the development by the 2015. Vaccine and therapeutic development is essential to stop the EVD outbreak in West Africa, also to protect the world from the risk which can be generated by potential spread of Ebola virus.

  6. Pharmacogenetics of drug hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Elizabeth J; Mallal, Simon A

    2010-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions and severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions, such as Stevens–Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis, are examples of serious adverse drug reactions mediated through a combination of metabolic and immunological mechanisms that could traditionally not have been predicted based on the pharmacological characteristics of the drug alone. The discovery of new associations between these syndromes and specific HLA has created the promise that risk for these reactions could be predicted through pharmacogenetic screening, thereby avoiding serious morbidity and mortality associated with these types of drug reactions. Despite this, several hurdles exist in the translation of these associations into pharmacogenetic tests that could be routinely used in the clinical setting. HLA-B*5701 screening to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity syndrome is an example of a test now in widespread routine clinical use in the developed world. PMID:20602616

  7. Difficulties in Treatment and Management of Epilepsy and Challenges in New Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Wahab, Abdul

    2010-01-01

    Epilepsy is a serious neurological disorder that affects around 50 million people worldwide. Almost 30% of epileptic patients suffer from pharmacoresistance, which is associated with social isolation, dependent behaviour, low marriage rates, unemployment, psychological issues and reduced quality of life. Currently available antiepileptic drugs have a limited efficacy, and their negative properties limit their use and cause difficulties in patient management. Antiepileptic drugs can provide only symptomatic relief as these drugs suppress seizures but do not have ability to cure epileptogenesis. The long term use of antiepileptic drugs is limited due to their adverse effects, withdrawal symptoms, deleterious interactions with other drugs and economic burden, especially in developing countries. Furthermore, some of the available antiepileptic drugs may even potentiate certain type of seizures. Several in vivo and in vitro animal models have been proposed and many new antiepileptic drugs have been marketed recently, but large numbers of patients are still pharmacoresistant. This review will highlight the difficulties in treatment and management of epilepsy and the limitations of available antiepileptic drugs and animal seizure models.

  8. Progress in developing amphiphilic cyclodextrin-based nanodevices for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yaméogo, Josias B G; Géze, Annabelle; Choisnard, Luc; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Semdé, Rasmané; Wouessidjewe, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, colloidal drug carriers represent an alternative to solve drug bioavailabily problems. During the past two decades, colloidal drug carriers have proved to improve the therapeutic index of drugs and thus increase their efficacy and/or reduce their toxicity. However, the major challenge in the development of these drug carriers remains the search for materials able to self-organize into stable nanoscale systems. In particular, amphiphilic α-, β- and γ-cyclodextrins (CDs), grafted on their secondary or primary side with different aliphatic chains, have been investigated as drug delivery vehicles due to their ability to self-assemble and form various stable colloidal systems such as micellar aggregates, nanoreservoirs or nanoparticles exhibiting a matricial, multilamellar or hexagonal supramolecular organization. These self-assembled CD-based nanodevices show some advantages in terms of stability, good ability to associate lipophilic drugs and good in vivo tolerance. This review focuses on the potential of the structured nanoparticles obtained from nonionic amphiphilic CDs in drug delivery and targeting. We discuss the synthesis and characterization of the building blocks as well as the preparation and characterization of colloidal particles made from these materials. We also considered some pharmaceutical applications and identified opportunities for an optimum use of this CD-based nanotechnology approach in addressing worldwide priority health problems. PMID:24354667

  9. Difficulties in Treatment and Management of Epilepsy and Challenges in New Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Wahab, Abdul

    2010-01-01

    Epilepsy is a serious neurological disorder that affects around 50 million people worldwide. Almost 30% of epileptic patients suffer from pharmacoresistance, which is associated with social isolation, dependent behaviour, low marriage rates, unemployment, psychological issues and reduced quality of life. Currently available antiepileptic drugs have a limited efficacy, and their negative properties limit their use and cause difficulties in patient management. Antiepileptic drugs can provide only symptomatic relief as these drugs suppress seizures but do not have ability to cure epileptogenesis. The long term use of antiepileptic drugs is limited due to their adverse effects, withdrawal symptoms, deleterious interactions with other drugs and economic burden, especially in developing countries. Furthermore, some of the available antiepileptic drugs may even potentiate certain type of seizures. Several in vivo and in vitro animal models have been proposed and many new antiepileptic drugs have been marketed recently, but large numbers of patients are still pharmacoresistant. This review will highlight the difficulties in treatment and management of epilepsy and the limitations of available antiepileptic drugs and animal seizure models. PMID:27713344

  10. The development of multiple drug use among anabolic-androgenic steroid users: six subjective case reports

    PubMed Central

    Skårberg, Kurt; Nyberg, Fred; Engström, Ingemar

    2008-01-01

    Background The inappropriate use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) was originally a problem among athletes but AAS are now often used in nonsport situations and by patients attending regular addiction clinics. The aim of this study was to improve understanding of the development of multiple drug use in patients seeking treatment at an addiction clinic for AAS-related problems. Methods We interviewed six patients (four men and two women) with experience of AAS use who were attending an addiction clinic for what they believed were AAS-related problems. The patients were interviewed in-depth about their life stories, with special emphasis on social background, substance use, the development of total drug use and subjective experienced psychological and physical side effects. Results There was significant variation in the development of drug use in relation to social background, onset of drug use, relationship to AAS use and experience of AAS effects. All patients had initially experienced positive effects from AAS but, over time, the negative experiences had outweighed the positive effects. All patients were dedicated to excess training and took AAS in combination with gym training, indicating that the use of these drugs is closely related to this form of training. Use of multiple drugs was common either in parallel with AAS use or serially. Conclusion The study shows the importance of understanding how AAS use can develop either with or without the concomitant use of other drugs of abuse. The use of AAS can, however, progress to the use of other drugs. The study also indicates the importance of obtaining accurate, comprehensive information about the development of AAS use in designing treatment programmes and prevention strategies in this area. PMID:19040748

  11. Discovery and development of antiviral drugs for biodefense: experience of a small biotechnology company.

    PubMed

    Bolken, Tove C; Hruby, Dennis E

    2008-01-01

    The unmet need for effective antivirals against potential agents of bioterrorism and emerging infections is obvious; however, the challenges to develop such drugs are daunting. Even with the passage of Project BioShield and more recently the BARDA legislation, there is still not a clear market for these types of drugs and limited federal funding available to support expensive drug development studies. SIGA Technologies, Inc. is a small biotech company committed to developing novel products for the prevention and treatment of severe infectious diseases, with an emphasis on products for diseases that could result from bioterrorism. Through trials and error SIGA has developed an approach to this problem in order to establish the infrastructure necessary to successfully advance new antiviral drugs from the discovery stage on through to licensure. The approach that we have taken to drug development is biology driven and dependent on a dispersive development model utilizing essential collaborations with academic, federal, and private sector partners. This consortium approach requires success in acquiring grants and contracts as well as iterative communication with the government and regulatory agencies. However, it can work as evidenced by the rapid progress of our lead antiviral against smallpox, ST-246, and should serve as the template for development of new antivirals against important biological pathogens.

  12. High-throughput in vitro drug release and pharmacokinetic simulation as a tool for drug delivery system development: application to intravitreal ocular administration.

    PubMed

    Sarkhel, Sanjay; Ramsay, Eva; Kontturi, Leena-Stiina; Peltoniemi, Jonne; Urtti, Arto

    2014-12-30

    In vitro estimation of release kinetics from drug delivery systems is needed in formulation development. Cost-effective methods of assessment for delivery systems are needed particularly in the case of biologicals and drug administration routes that are difficult to screen in vivo (e.g. intraocular drug delivery). As a proof-of-concept, we demonstrate here a practical high-throughput methodology to investigate in vitro drug release and predict resulting drug concentrations in the eye after intravitreal administration. 96-well plate based assay aided with robotic sampling was used to study release of eight model drugs of varying physicochemical properties (dexamethasone, vancomycin, alpha-lactalbumin, lysozyme, myoglobin, albumin, lactoferrin, human IgG) from twelve alginate microsphere formulations. The amount of drug released over a period of time was assessed by photometric and fluorescence methods. In vitro drug release rates obtained were used in pharmacokinetic simulations using one-compartment model of the vitreal cavity with anatomical volume of distribution and clearance estimates based on the literature precedence. An integrated approach of drug release screening and pharmacokinetic simulations can prove to be a useful methodology in guiding formulation development for ocular delivery in animal models. In general, the methodology has the potential to be a cost-effective tool for early stage drug delivery system discovery and development.

  13. The development of digital library system for drug research information.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J; Kim, S R; Yoo, D S; Lee, S H; Suh, O K; Cho, J H; Shin, H T; Yoon, J P

    1998-01-01

    The sophistication of computer technology and information transmission on internet has made various cyber information repository available to information consumers. In the era of information super-highway, the digital library which can be accessed from remote sites at any time is considered the prototype of information repository. Using object-oriented DBMS, the very first model of digital library for pharmaceutical researchers and related professionals in Korea has been developed. The published research papers and researchers' personal information was included in the database. For database with research papers, 13 domestic journals were abstracted and scanned for full-text image files which can be viewed by Internet web browsers. The database with researchers' personal information was also developed and interlinked to the database with research papers. These database will be continuously updated and will be combined with world-wide information as the unique digital library in the field of pharmacy.

  14. [The drug trade between European countries and developing countries].

    PubMed

    Bruneton, C; Naboulet, P; van der Heide, B; Rey, J L

    1997-01-01

    The quality of medicinal products marketed in developing countries has recently become the focus of lively debate and new interest. This report describes a survey conducted among officials from exporting and importing countries designed to evaluate the content and enforcement of current regulations. Resulting data indicated that, despite the high volume of trading in medicinal products between European and developing countries, regulations are poorly applied and many infractions occur. The most obvious abnormalities involve definition of market status. A list of banned is issued by the WHO but not by the European Economic Community. Regulations regarding generic products differ from one country to another and, since determination of the exact origin of a product may be difficult, compliance with good manufacturing practices is often unverifiable. A more cooperative attitude on the part of exporting countries and standardization of formalities on the part of importing countries will be necessary to stem the growing tendency to consider medicinal products as ordinary goods. PMID:9612781

  15. Repurposing of clinically developed drugs for treatment of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Dyall, Julie; Coleman, Christopher M; Hart, Brit J; Venkataraman, Thiagarajan; Holbrook, Michael R; Kindrachuk, Jason; Johnson, Reed F; Olinger, Gene G; Jahrling, Peter B; Laidlaw, Monique; Johansen, Lisa M; Lear-Rooney, Calli M; Glass, Pamela J; Hensley, Lisa E; Frieman, Matthew B

    2014-08-01

    Outbreaks of emerging infections present health professionals with the unique challenge of trying to select appropriate pharmacologic treatments in the clinic with little time available for drug testing and development. Typically, clinicians are left with general supportive care and often untested convalescent-phase plasma as available treatment options. Repurposing of approved pharmaceutical drugs for new indications presents an attractive alternative to clinicians, researchers, public health agencies, drug developers, and funding agencies. Given the development times and manufacturing requirements for new products, repurposing of existing drugs is likely the only solution for outbreaks due to emerging viruses. In the studies described here, a library of 290 compounds was screened for antiviral activity against Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). Selection of compounds for inclusion in the library was dependent on current or previous FDA approval or advanced clinical development. Some drugs that had a well-defined cellular pathway as target were included. In total, 27 compounds with activity against both MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV were identified. The compounds belong to 13 different classes of pharmaceuticals, including inhibitors of estrogen receptors used for cancer treatment and inhibitors of dopamine receptor used as antipsychotics. The drugs identified in these screens provide new targets for in vivo studies as well as incorporation into ongoing clinical studies. PMID:24841273

  16. Neuroimaging biomarkers for early drug development in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tregellas, Jason R

    2014-07-15

    Given the relative inability of currently available antipsychotic treatments to adequately provide sustained recovery and improve quality of life for patients with schizophrenia, new treatment strategies are urgently needed. One way to improve the therapeutic development process may be an increased use of biomarkers in early clinical trials. Reliable biomarkers that reflect aspects of disease pathophysiology can be used to determine if potential treatment strategies are engaging their desired biological targets. This review evaluates three potential neuroimaging biomarkers: hippocampal hyperactivity, gamma-band deficits, and default network abnormalities. These deficits have been widely replicated in the illness, correlate with measures of positive symptoms, are consistent with models of disease pathology, and have shown initial promise as biomarkers of biological response in early studies of potential treatment strategies. Two key features of these deficits, and a guiding rationale for the focus of this review, are that the deficits are not dependent upon patients' performance of specific cognitive tasks and they have analogues in animal models of schizophrenia, greatly increasing their appeal for use as biomarkers. Using neuroimaging biomarkers such as those proposed here to establish early in the therapeutic development process if treatment strategies are having their intended biological effect in humans may facilitate development of new treatments for schizophrenia. PMID:24094513

  17. Neuroimaging Biomarkers for Early Drug Development in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Tregellas, Jason R.

    2013-01-01

    Given the relative inability of currently available antipsychotic treatments to adequately provide sustained recovery and improve quality of life for patients with schizophrenia, new treatment strategies are urgently needed. One way to improve the therapeutic development process may be an increased use of biomarkers in early clinical trials. Reliable biomarkers that reflect aspects of disease pathophysiology can be used to determine if potential treatment strategies are engaging their desired biological targets. This review evaluates three potential neuroimaging biomarkers: hippocampal hyperactivity, gamma-band deficits and default network abnormalities. These deficits have been widely replicated in the illness, correlate with measures of positive symptoms, are consistent with models of disease pathology, and have shown initial promise as biomarkers of biological response in early studies of potential treatment strategies. Two key features of these deficits, and a guiding rational for the focus of this review, is that the deficits are not dependent upon patients' performance of specific cognitive tasks, and have analogues in animal models of schizophrenia, greatly increasing their appeal for use as biomarkers. Using neuroimaging biomarkers such as those proposed here to establish early in the therapeutic development process if treatment strategies are having their intended biological effect in humans may facilitate development of new treatments for schizophrenia. PMID:24094513

  18. Innovative solutions to novel drug development in mental health

    PubMed Central

    Insel, T.R.; Voon, V.; Nye, J.S.; Brown, V.J.; Altevogt, B.M.; Bullmore, E.T.; Goodwin, G.M.; Howard, R.J.; Kupfer, D.J.; Malloch, G.; Marston, H.M.; Nutt, D.J.; Robbins, T.W.; Stahl, S.M.; Tricklebank, M.D.; Williams, J.H.; Sahakian, B.J.

    2013-01-01

    There are many new advances in neuroscience and mental health which should lead to a greater understanding of the neurobiological dysfunction in neuropsychiatric disorders and new developments for early, effective treatments. To do this, a biomarker approach combining genetic, neuroimaging, cognitive and other biological measures is needed. The aim of this article is to highlight novel approaches for pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment development. This article suggests approaches that can be taken in the future including novel mechanisms with preliminary clinical validation to provide a toolbox for mechanistic studies and also examples of translation and back-translation. The review also emphasizes the need for clinician-scientists to be trained in a novel way in order to equip them with the conceptual and experimental techniques required, and emphasizes the need for private-public partnership and pre-competitive knowledge exchange. This should lead the way for important new holistic treatment developments to improve cognition, functional outcome and well-being of people with neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:23563062

  19. A step toward development of printable dosage forms for poorly soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Raijada, Dhara; Genina, Natalja; Fors, Daniela; Wisaeus, Erik; Peltonen, Jouko; Rantanen, Jukka; Sandler, Niklas

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to formulate printable dosage forms for a poorly soluble drug (piroxicam; PRX) and to gain understanding of critical parameters to be considered during development of such dosage forms. Liquid formulations of PRX were printed on edible paper using piezoelectric inkjet printing (PIJ) and impression printing (flexography). The printed dosage forms were characterized using scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and the amount of drug was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. Solutions of PRX in polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG-400):ethanol (40:60) and in PEG-400 were found to be optimal formulations for PIJ and flexography, respectively. SEM-EDX analysis revealed no visible solid particles on the printed dosage forms indicating the drug most likely remained in solution after printing. More accurate drug deposition was obtained by PIJ as compared with flexography. More than 90% drug release was achieved within 5 min regardless of printing method used. The solubility of drug in solvents/cosolvents, rheological properties of formulations, properties of substrate, feasibility and accuracy of the printing methods, and detection limit of analytical techniques for characterization of printed dosage forms are some of the concerns that need to be addressed for development of printable dosage forms of poorly soluble drugs.

  20. Developing highER-throughput zebrafish screens for in-vivo CNS drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Adam Michael; Gerlai, Robert; Kalueff, Allan V.

    2015-01-01

    The high prevalence of brain disorders and the lack of their efficient treatments necessitate improved in-vivo pre-clinical models and tests. The zebrafish (Danio rerio), a vertebrate species with high genetic and physiological homology to humans, is an excellent organism for innovative central nervous system (CNS) drug discovery and small molecule screening. Here, we outline new strategies for developing higher-throughput zebrafish screens to test neuroactive drugs and predict their pharmacological mechanisms. With the growing application of automated 3D phenotyping, machine learning algorithms, movement pattern- and behavior recognition, and multi-animal video-tracking, zebrafish screens are expected to markedly improve CNS drug discovery. PMID:25729356