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Sample records for axial flow blood

  1. Axial dispersion in flowing red blood cell suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorski, Thomas; Losserand, Sylvain; Coupier, Gwennou

    2016-11-01

    A key parameter in blood microcirculation is the transit time of red blood cells (RBCs) through an organ, which can influence the efficiency of gas exchange and oxygen availability. A large dispersion of this transit time is observed in vivo and is partly due to the axial dispersion in the flowing suspension. In the classic Taylor-Aris example of a solute flowing in a tube, the combination of molecular diffusion and parabolic velocity profile leads to enhanced axial dispersion. In suspensions of non-Brownian deformable bodies such as RBCs, axial dispersion is governed by a combination of shear induced migration and shear-induced diffusion arising from hydrodynamic interactions. We revisit this problem in the case of RBC pulses flowing in a microchannel and show that the axial dispersion of the pulse eventually saturates with a final extension that depends directly on RBC mechanical properties. The result is especially interesting in the dilute limit since the final pulse length depends only on the channel width, exponent of the migration law and dimensionless migration velocity. In continuous flow, the dispersion of transit times is the result of complex cell-cell and cell-wall interactions and is strongy influenced by the polydispersity of the blood sample. The authors acknowledge support from LabEx TEC21 and CNES.

  2. Fluid dynamics aspects of miniaturized axial-flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kang, Can; Huang, Qifeng; Li, Yunxiao

    2014-01-01

    Rotary blood pump (RBP) is a kind of crucial ventricular assist device (VAD) and its advantages have been evidenced and acknowledged in recent years. Among the factors that influence the operation performance and the durability of various rotary blood pumps, medium property and the flow features in pump's flow passages are conceivably significant. The major concern in this paper is the fluid dynamics aspects of such a kind of miniaturized pump. More specifically, the structural features of axial-flow blood pump and corresponding flow features are analyzed in detail. The narrow flow passage between blade tips and pump casing and the rotor-stator interaction (RSI) zone may exert a negative effect on the shear stress distribution in the blood flow. Numerical techniques are briefly introduced in view of their contribution to facilitating the optimal design of blood pump and the visualization of shear stress distribution and multiphase flow analysis. Additionally, with the development of flow measurement techniques, the high-resolution, effective and non-intrusive flow measurement techniques catering to the measurement of the flows inside rotary blood pumps are highly anticipated.

  3. Miniaturization of a magnetically levitated axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shanbao; Olles, Mark W; Olsen, Don B; Joyce, Lyle D; Day, Steven W

    2010-10-01

    This article introduces a unique miniaturization process of a magnetically levitated axial flow blood pump from a functional prototype to a pump suitable for animal trials. Through COMSOL three-dimensional finite element analysis and experimental verification, the hybrid magnetic bearings of the pump have been miniaturized, the axial spacing between magnetic components has been reduced, and excess material in mechanical components of the pump was reduced. Experimental results show that the pump performance was virtually unchanged and the smaller size resulted in the successful acute pump implantation in calves.

  4. Axial type self-bearing motor for axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yohji; Masuzawa, Toru; Matsuda, Ken-Ichi; Ohmori, Kunihiro; Yamane, Takashi; Konishi, Yoshiaki; Fukahori, Shinya; Ueno, Satoshi; Kim, Seung-Jong

    2003-10-01

    An axial self-bearing motor is proposed which can drive an axial blood pump without physical contact. It is a functional combination of the bi-directional disc motor and the axial active magnetic bearing, where it actively controls single degree-of-freedom motion, while other motions such as lateral vibration are passively stable. For application to a blood pump, the proposed self-bearing motor has the advantages of simple structure and small size. Through the finite element method (FEM) analysis and the experimental test, its good feasibility is verified. Finally, the axial flow pump is fabricated using the developed magnetically suspended motor. The pump test is carried out and the results are discussed in detail.

  5. Development of a miniature intraventricular axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, K; Umezu, M; Koyanagi, H; Outa, E; Ogino, S; Otake, Y; Shiozaki, H; Fujimoto, T; Tagusari, O; Kitamura, M

    1993-01-01

    A new intraventricular axial flow blood pump has been designed and developed as a totally implantable left ventricular assist device (LVAD). This pump consists of an impeller combined with a guide-vane, a tube housing, and a DC motor. The pump is introduced into the LV cavity through the LV apex, and the outlet cannula is passed antegrade across the aortic valve. Blood is withdrawn from the LV through the inlet ports at the pump base, and discharged to the ascending aorta. Our newly developed axial flow pump system has the following advantages: 1) it is a simple and compact system, 2) minimal blood stasis both in the device and the LV cavity, 3) minimal blood contacting surface of the pump, 4) easy accessibility with a less invasive surgical procedure, and 5) low cost. A pump flow > 5 L/min was obtained against 100 mmHg differential pressure in the mock circulatory system. The pump could produce a passive pulsatile flow effect with a beating heart more efficiently than other non-pulsatile pumps because of minimal pressure drop and inertia along the bypass tract. Anatomic fit studies using dissected hearts of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) cadavers showed that this pump could smoothly pass through the aortic valve without any interference with mitral valve function. Recently, a dynamic pressure groove bearing and a miniature lip seal have been developed. The dynamic pressure groove bearing has a simple structure and acts as a pressure resistant sealing mechanism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Measurement of hemodynamic changes with the axial flow blood pump installed in descending aorta.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Eiji; Yano, Tetsuya; Miura, Hidekazu; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2017-09-08

    We have developed various axial flow blood pumps to realize the concept of the Valvo pump, and we have studied hemodynamic changes under cardiac assistance using an axial flow blood pump in series with the natural heart. In this study, we measured hemodynamic changes of not only systemic circulation but also cerebral circulation and coronary circulation under cardiac support using our latest axial flow blood pump placed in the descending aorta in an acute animal experiment. The axial flow blood pump was installed at the thoracic descending aorta through a left thoracotomy of a goat (43.8 kg, female). When the pump was on, the aortic pressure and aortic flow downstream of the pump increased with preservation of pulsatilities. The pressure drop upstream of the pump caused reduction of afterload pressure, and it may lead to reduction of left ventricular wall stress. However, cerebral blood flow and coronary blood flow were decreased when the pump was on. The axial flow blood pump enables more effective blood perfusion into systemic circulation, but it has the potential risk of blood perfusion disturbance into cerebral circulation and coronary circulation. The results indicate that the position before the coronary ostia might be suitable for implantation of the axial flow blood pump in series with the natural heart to avoid blood perfusion disturbances.

  7. Induction of ventricular collapse by an axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Amin, D V; Antaki, J F; Litwak, P; Thomas, D; Wu, Z J; Watach, M

    1998-01-01

    An important consideration for clinical application of rotary blood pump based ventricular assist is the avoidance of ventricular collapse due to excessive operating speed. Because healthy animals do not typically demonstrate this phenomenon, it is difficult to evaluate control algorithms for avoiding suction in vivo. An acute hemodynamic study was thus conducted to determine the conditions under which suction could be induced. A 70 kg calf was implanted with an axial flow assist device (Nimbus/UoP IVAS; Nimbus Inc., Rancho Cordova, CA) cannulated from the left ventricular apex to ascending aorta. On initiation of pump operation, several vasoactive interventions were performed to alter preload, afterload, and contractility of the left ventricle. Initially, dobutamine increased contractility and heart rate ([HR] = 139; baseline = 70), but ventricular collapse was not achievable, even at the maximal pump speed of 15,000 rpm. Norepinephrine decreased HR (HR = 60), increased contractility, and increased systemic vascular resistance ([SVR] = 24; baseline = 15), resulting in ventricular collapse at a pump speed of 14,000 rpm. Isoproterenol (beta agonist) increased HR (HR = 103) and decreased SVR (SVR = 12), but ventricular collapse was not achieved. Inferior vena cava occlusion reduced preload, and ventricular collapse was achieved at speeds as low as 11,000 rpm. Esmolol (beta1 antagonist) decreased HR (HR = 55) and contractility, and ventricular collapse was achieved at 11,500 rpm. Episodes of ventricular collapse were characterized initially by the pump output exceeding the venous return and the aortic valve remaining closed throughout the cardiac cycle. If continued, the mitral valve would remain open throughout the cardiac cycle. Using these unique states of the mitral and aortic valves, the onset of ventricular collapse could reliably be identified. It is hoped that the ability to detect the onset of ventricular collapse, rather than the event itself, will assist in

  8. Noninvasive miniaturized mass-flow meter using a curved cannula for implantable axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Blood flow should be measured to monitor conditions of patients with implantable artificial hearts continuously and noninvasively. We have developed a noninvasive miniaturized mass-flow meter using a curved cannula for an axial flow blood pump. The mass-flow meter utilized centrifugal force generated by the mass-flow rate in the curved cannula. Two strain gauges served as sensors. Based on the numerical analysis, the first gauge, attached to the curved area, measured static pressure and centrifugal force, and the second, attached to the straight area, measured static pressure for static pressure compensation. The mass-flow rate was determined by the differences in output from the two gauges. To compensate for the inertia force under the pulsatile flow, a 0.75-Hz low-pass filter was added to the electrical circuit. In the evaluation tests, numerical analysis and an actual measurement test using bovine blood were performed to evaluate the measurement performances. As a result, in the numerical analysis, the relationship between the differential pressure caused by centrifugal force and the flow rate was verified. In the actual measurement test, measurement error was less than ± 0.5 L/min, and the time delay was 0.12 s. We confirmed that the developed mass-flow meter was able to measure mass-flow rate continuously and noninvasively.

  9. Noninvasive blood-flow meter using a curved cannula with zero compensation for an axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Fukuda, Kyohei; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    In order to monitor the condition of a patient using a left ventricular assist system (LVAS), blood flow should be measured. However, the reliable determination of blood-flow rate has not been established. The purpose of the present study is to develop a noninvasive blood-flow meter using a curved cannula with zero compensation for an axial flow blood pump. The flow meter uses the centrifugal force generated by the flow rate in the curved cannula. Two strain gauges served as sensors. The first gauges were attached to the curved area to measure static pressure and centrifugal force, and the second gauges were attached to straight area to measure static pressure. The flow rate was determined by the differences in output from the two gauges. The zero compensation was constructed based on the consideration that the flow rate could be estimated during the initial driving condition and the ventricular suction condition without using the flow meter. A mock circulation loop was constructed in order to evaluate the measurement performance of the developed flow meter with zero compensation. As a result, the zero compensation worked effectively for the initial calibration and the zero-drift of the measured flow rate. We confirmed that the developed flow meter using a curved cannula with zero compensation was able to accurately measure the flow rate continuously and noninvasively.

  10. Flow visualization in the outflow cannula of an axial blood pump.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangmao; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Haibo; Sun, Hansong; Zhou, Jianye; Hu, Shengshou

    2014-01-01

    The properties of blood flow in the outflow cannula of an axial blood pump play a critical role in potential thrombus formation and vascular injury. In this study, an in vitro flow visualization technique using particle image velocimetry (PIV) was applied to investigate the flow characteristics in the outflow cannula of a FW-2 model axial pump. The two-dimensional (2-D) flow field in the axial central section and the three-dimensional (3-D) flow field in the whole outflow cannula were examined with the PIV system. Tests were carried out with a blood-mimic working fluid in the axial pump at a rotational speed of 8500 ± 20 rpm with a flow rate of 5 L/min. The velocity distribution in the outflow cannula was analyzed to evaluate the flow characteristics. There was no backflow or stagnant flow in the tested area, while the flow velocity rapidly increased outside the boundary layer. A spiral flow was observed near the boundary layer, but this was worn off within the tested area. Based on the results, hemolysis and thrombus formation in the cannula, and injury to aortic endothelium are unlikely to occur due to spiral flow.

  11. Measuring retinal blood flow in rats using Doppler optical coherence tomography without knowing eyeball axial length

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenzhong; Yi, Ji; Chen, Siyu; Jiao, Shuliang; Zhang, Hao F.

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) is widely used for measuring retinal blood flow. Existing Doppler OCT methods require the eyeball axial length, in which empirical values are usually used. However, variations in the axial length can create a bias unaccounted for in the retinal blood flow measurement. The authors plan to develop a Doppler OCT method that can measure the total retinal blood flow rate without requiring the eyeball axial length. Methods: The authors measured the retinal blood flow rate using a dual-ring scanning protocol. The small and large scanning rings entered the eye at different incident angles (small ring: 4°; large ring: 6°), focused on different locations on the retina, and detected the projected velocities/phase shifts along the probing beams. The authors calculated the ratio of the projected velocities between the two rings, and then used this ratio to estimate absolute flow velocity. The authors tested this method in both Intralipid phantoms and in vivo rats. Results: In the Intralipid flow phantom experiments, the preset and measured flow rates were consistent with the coefficient of determination as 0.97. Linear fitting between preset and measured flow rates determined the fitting slope as 1.07 and the intercept as −0.28. In in vivo rat experiments, the measured average total retinal blood flow was 7.02 ± 0.31μl/min among four wild-type rats. The authors’ measured flow rates were consistent with results in the literature. Conclusions: By using a dual-ring scanning protocol with carefully controlled incident angle difference between the two scanning rings in Doppler OCT, the authors demonstrated that it is feasible to measure the absolute retinal blood flow without knowing the eyeball axial length.

  12. Development of a magnetic fluid shaft seal for an axial-flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Kazumitsu; Mitamura, Yoshinori; Murabayashi, Shun; Nishimura, Ikuya; Yozu, Ryouhei; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2003-10-01

    A rotating impeller in a rotary blood pump requires a supporting system in blood, such as a pivot bearing or magnetic suspension. To solve potential problems such as abrasive wear and complexity of a supporting system, a magnetic fluid seal was developed for use in an axial-flow blood pump. Sealing pressures at motor speeds of up to 8,000 rpm were measured with the seal immersed in water or bovine blood. The sealing pressure was about 200 mm Hg in water and blood. The calculated theoretical sealing pressure was about 230 mm Hg. The seal remained perfect for 743 days in a static condition and for 180+ days (ongoing test) at a motor speed of 7,000 rpm. Results of measurement of cell growth activity indicated that the magnetic fluid has no negative cytological effects. The specially designed magnetic fluid shaft seal is useful for an axial-flow blood pump.

  13. [Research on the feasibility of a magnetic-coupling-driven axial flow blood pump].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoqing; Ding, Wenxiang; Wang, Wei; Chen, En; Jiang, Zuming; Zou, Wenyan

    2004-02-01

    A new-designed axial flow blood pump, dived by magnetic coupling and using internal hollow brushless DC motor and inlet and outlet in line with impeller, was tested in mimic circuit. The results showed good performance of the new pump and indicated that its hydrodynamic characteristic can meet the demands of clinical extracorporeal circulation and auxiliary circulation.

  14. Validation of an axial flow blood pump: computational fluid dynamics results using particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Su, Boyang; Chua, Leok Poh; Wang, Xikun

    2012-04-01

    A magnetically suspended axial flow blood pump is studied experimentally in this article. The pump casing enclosed a three-blade straightener, a two-blade impeller shrouded by a permanent magnet-embedded cylinder, and a three-blade diffuser. The internal flow fields were simulated earlier using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and the pump characteristic curves were determined. The simulation results showed that the internal flow field was basically streamlined, except the diffuser region. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement of the 1:1 pump model was conducted to validate the CFD result. In order to ensure the optical access, an acrylic prototype was fabricated with the impeller driven by a servomotor instead, as the magnet is opaque. In addition to the transparent model, the blood analog fluid with the refractive index close to that of acrylic was used to avoid refraction. According to the CFD results, the axial flow blood pump could generate adequate pressure head at the rotating speed of 9500rpm and flow rate of 5L/min, and the same flow condition was applied during the PIV measurement. Through the comparisons, it was found that the experimental results were close to those obtained by CFD and had thus validated the CFD model, which could complement the limitation of the measurement in assessing the more detailed flow fields of the axial flow pump. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2011, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. A novel integrated rotor of axial blood flow pump designed with computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Xue, Song; Gui, Xing-min; Sun, Han-song; Zhang, Hao; Zhu, Xiao-dong; Hu, Sheng-Shou

    2007-07-01

    Due to the smaller size, smaller artificial surface, and higher efficiency, axial blood pumps have been widely applied in clinic in recent years. However, because of its high rotor speed, axial flow pump always has a high risk for hemolysis, which the red blood cells devastated by the shearing of tip clearance flow. We reported a novel design with the integrated blade-shroud structure that was expected to solve this problem by abolishing the radial clearance between blade and casing designed with the techniques of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). However, the numerical simulation result of the newly designed structure showed an unexpected backflow (where flow velocity is reverse of the main flow direction) at the blade tip. In order to eliminate this backflow, four flow passes were attempted, and the expansion angles (which reflect the radial amplification of the flow pass, on the meridional section, and should be defined as the angle between the center line of the flow pass and the axial direction) of the blades of the integrated rotor are 0 degrees, 8 degrees, 15 degrees, and 20 degrees, respectively. In the CFD result, it could be easily found as the expansion angles increased, the backflow was restrained gradually, and was eliminated at last. After numerous "cut and try" circles, the pump model was finally optimized. The numerical simulation of this model also showed a stable hydraulic characteristic.

  16. A hydrodynamically suspended, magnetically sealed mechanically noncontact axial flow blood pump: design of a hydrodynamic bearing.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Kido, Kazuyuki; Yano, Tetsuya; Sakota, Daisuke; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Sekine, Kazumitsu; OKamoto, Eiji

    2007-03-01

    To overcome the drive shaft seal and bearing problem in rotary blood pumps, a hydrodynamic bearing, a magnetic fluid seal, and a brushless direct current (DC) motor were employed in an axial flow pump. This enabled contact-free rotation of the impeller without material wear. The axial flow pump consisted of a brushless DC motor, an impeller, and a guide vane. The motor rotor was directly connected to the impeller by a motor shaft. A hydrodynamic bearing was installed on the motor shaft. The motor and the hydrodynamic bearing were housed in a cylindrical casing and were waterproofed by a magnetic fluid seal, a mechanically noncontact seal. Impeller shaft displacement was measured using a laser sensor. Axial and radial displacements of the shaft were only a few micrometers for motor speed up to 8500 rpm. The shaft did not make contact with the bearing housing. A flow of 5 L/min was obtained at 8000 rpm at a pressure difference of 100 mm Hg. In conclusion, the axial flow blood pump consisting of a hydrodynamic bearing, a magnetic fluid seal, and a brushless DC motor provided contact-free rotation of the impeller without material wear.

  17. A miniature intraventricular axial flow blood pump that is introduced through the left ventricular apex.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, K; Umezu, M; Koyanagi, H; Kitamura, M; Eishi, K; Kawai, A; Tagusari, O; Niinami, H; Akimoto, T; Nojiri, C

    1992-01-01

    A new intraventricular axial flow blood pump has been designed and developed as an implantable left ventricular assist device (LVAD). The pump consists of a tube housing (10 cm in length and 14 mm in diameter), a three-vane impeller combined with a guide vane, and a DC motor. This pump is introduced into the LV cavity through the LV apex, and the outlet cannula is passed antegrade across the aortic valve. Blood is withdrawn from the LV through the inlet ports at the pump base, and discharged into the ascending aorta. A pump flow of > 8 L/min was obtained against 90 mmHg differential pressure in the mock circulatory system. In an acute dog model, this pump could produce a sufficient output of 200 ml/kg/min. In addition, the pump flow profile demonstrated a pulsatile pattern, although the rotation speed was fixed. This is mainly due to the changes in flow rate during a cardiac cycle--that is, during systole, the flow rate increases to the maximum, while the differential pressure between the LV and the aorta decreases to the minimum. Thus, this simple and compact axial flow blood pump can be a potential LVAD, with prompt accessibility and need for less invasive surgical procedures.

  18. An intraventricular axial flow blood pump integrated with a bearing purge system.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, K; Kormos, R; Mori, T; Umezu, M; Kameneva, M; Antaki, J; Outa, E; Litwak, P; Kerrigan, J; Tomczak, J

    1995-01-01

    The future development of implantable axial flow blood pumps must address two major issues: mechanically induced hemolysis and shaft seal reliability. The recent revisions to our miniature intraventricular axial flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) were aimed particularly at addressing these concerns. To improve hemocompatibility, a new impeller has been designed according to the following criteria: 1) gradual pressure rise along the blade chord; 2) minimized local fluid acceleration to prevent cavitation; 3) minimum surface roughness; and 4) radius edges. Subsequent in vitro hemolysis tests conducted with bovine and ovine blood have demonstrated very low hemolysis (normalized index of hemolysis = 0.0051 +/- 0.0047 g/100 L) with this new impeller design. To address the need for a reliable seal, we have developed a purged seal system consisting of a miniature lip seal and ceramic pressure groove journal bearing that also acts as a purge pump. Several spiral grooves formed on the bearing surface provide viscous pumping of the purge fluid, generating more than 3,000 mmHg at 10,000 rpm. This purge flow flushes the lip seal and prevents blood backflow into the bearing. We have found this purge pump to offer several advantages because it is simple, compact, durable, does not require separate actuation, and offers a wide range of flow, depending upon the groove design. In vivo animal tests demonstrated the potential of the purged seal system.

  19. Parameter estimation and actuator characteristics of hybrid magnetic bearings for axial flow blood pump applications.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tau Meng; Cheng, Shanbao; Chua, Leok Poh

    2009-07-01

    Axial flow blood pumps are generally smaller as compared to centrifugal pumps. This is very beneficial because they can provide better anatomical fit in the chest cavity, as well as lower the risk of infection. This article discusses the design, levitated responses, and parameter estimation of the dynamic characteristics of a compact hybrid magnetic bearing (HMB) system for axial flow blood pump applications. The rotor/impeller of the pump is driven by a three-phase permanent magnet brushless and sensorless motor. It is levitated by two HMBs at both ends in five degree of freedom with proportional-integral-derivative controllers, among which four radial directions are actively controlled and one axial direction is passively controlled. The frequency domain parameter estimation technique with statistical analysis is adopted to validate the stiffness and damping coefficients of the HMB system. A specially designed test rig facilitated the estimation of the bearing's coefficients in air-in both the radial and axial directions. Experimental estimation showed that the dynamic characteristics of the HMB system are dominated by the frequency-dependent stiffness coefficients. By injecting a multifrequency excitation force signal onto the rotor through the HMBs, it is noticed in the experimental results the maximum displacement linear operating range is 20% of the static eccentricity with respect to the rotor and stator gap clearance. The actuator gain was also successfully calibrated and may potentially extend the parameter estimation technique developed in the study of identification and monitoring of the pump's dynamic properties under normal operating conditions with fluid.

  20. WITHDRAWN: Modeling of Transient Phenomena in an Axial Flow Blood Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Houston

    2005-11-01

    A fully implantable axial flow Ventricular Assist Device (VAD) has been developed with a magnetically suspended impeller (LEV-VAD). The LEV-VAD's flow path design provides a single pass blood path with minimal turbulence. The pump design included the extensive use of CFD modeling and experimental validation under steady-state flow conditions. This CFD study explores transient flow phenomena in the pump simulating in vivo flow conditions. The LEV-VAD operates under transient conditions due to the pulsatile inlet flow rate induced by the patient's native heart and the spinning of the impeller. This study considered: (1) Time varying boundary conditions (TVBC); (2) Stationary-rotating blades interaction or transient sliding interfaces (TSI). The LEV-VAD performance and pressure-flow correlations were investigated under transient flow conditions. The fluid forces acting on the impeller were calculated to facilitate the suspension system and motor design. The transient simulations illustrate the LEV-VAD's response to dynamic flow conditions and demonstrated the ability to deliver flows from 2 to 10 LPM at rotational speeds varying from 5,000 to 8,000 RPM for physiological pressures corresponding to adult CHF patients.

  1. Development of a miniaturized mass-flow meter for an axial flow blood pump based on computational analysis.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    In order to monitor the condition of patients with implantable left ventricular assist systems (LVAS), it is important to measure pump flow rate continuously and noninvasively. However, it is difficult to measure the pump flow rate, especially in an implantable axial flow blood pump, because the power consumption has neither linearity nor uniqueness with regard to the pump flow rate. In this study, a miniaturized mass-flow meter for discharged patients with an implantable axial blood pump was developed on the basis of computational analysis, and was evaluated in in-vitro tests. The mass-flow meter makes use of centrifugal force produced by the mass-flow rate around a curved cannula. An optimized design was investigated by use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. On the basis of the computational analysis, a miniaturized mass-flow meter made of titanium alloy was developed. A strain gauge was adopted as a sensor element. The first strain gauge, attached to the curved area, measured both static pressure and centrifugal force. The second strain gauge, attached to the straight area, measured static pressure. By subtracting the output of the second strain gauge from the output of the first strain gauge, the mass-flow rate was determined. In in-vitro tests using a model circulation loop, the mass-flow meter was compared with a conventional flow meter. Measurement error was less than ±0.5 L/min and average time delay was 0.14 s. We confirmed that the miniaturized mass-flow meter could accurately measure the mass-flow rate continuously and noninvasively.

  2. Long-term animal experiments with an intraventricular axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, K; Kormos, R L; Litwak, P; Tagusari, O; Mori, T; Antaki, J F; Kameneva, M; Watach, M; Gordon, L; Mukuo, H; Umezu, M; Tomioka, J; Outa, E; Griffith, B P; Koyanagai, H

    1997-01-01

    A miniature intraventricular axial flow blood pump (IVAP) is undergoing in vivo evaluation in calves. The IVAP system consists of a miniature (phi 13.9 mm) axial flow pump that resides within the left ventricular (LV) chamber and a brushless DC motor. The pump is fabricated from titanium alloy, and the pump weight is 170 g. It produces a flow rate of over 5 L/min against 100 mmHg pressure at 9,000 rpm with an 8 W total power consumption. The maximum total efficiency exceeds 17%. A purged lip seal system is used in prototype no. 8, and a newly developed "Cool-Seal" (a low temperature mechanical seal) is used in prototype no. 9. In the Cool-Seal system, a large amount of purge flow is introduced behind the seal faces to augment convective heat transfer, keeping the seal face temperature at a low level for prevention of heat denaturation of blood proteins. The Cool-Seal system consumes < 10 cc purge fluid per day and has greatly extended seal life. The pumps were implanted in three calves (26, 30, and 168 days of support). The pump was inserted through a left thoracotomy at the fifth intercostal space. Two pursestring sutures were placed on the LV apex, and the apex was cored with a myocardial punch. The pump was inserted into the LV with the outlet cannula smoothly passing through the aortic valve without any difficulty. Only 5 min elapsed between the time of chest opening and initiation of pumping. Pump function remained stable throughout in all experiments. No cardiac arrhythmias were detected, even at treadmill exercise tests. The plasma free hemoglobin level remained in the acceptable range. Post mortem examination did not reveal any interference between the pump and the mitral apparatus. No major thromboembolism was detected in the vital organs in Cases 1 or 2, but a few small renal infarcts were detected in Case 3.

  3. Sealing properties of mechanical seals for an axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Tomioka, J; Mori, T; Yamazaki, K; Koyanagi, H

    1999-08-01

    A miniature intraventricular axial flow blood pump for left ventricular support is under development. One of the key technologies required for such pumps is sealing of the motor shaft. In this study, to prevent blood backflow into the motor side, mechanical seals were developed and their sealing properties investigated. In the experimental apparatus, the mechanical seal separated the bovine blood on the chamber side from the cooling water on the motor side. A leakage of the blood was measured by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) light emission analysis. The rate of hemolysis was measured by the cyanmethemoglobin method. Frictional torque acting on the shaft was measured by a torque transducer. In the experiments, the rotational speed of the shaft was changed from 1,000 to 10,000 rpm, and the contact force of the seal faces was changed from 1.96 to 4.31 N. To estimate lubrication regimes, the Stribeck curve, a diagram of the coefficient of friction against the bearing characteristic G number, was drawn. The results of the experiments showed that both the leakage of blood and the rate of hemolysis were very small. The friction loss was also very small. The mechanical seal was operated in various lubrication regimes, from a fluid lubrication regime to a mixed lubrication regime.

  4. Twisted cardiovascular cages for intravascular axial flow blood pumps to support the Fontan physiology.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, Amy L; Downs, Emily A; Hazelwood, John A; Monroe, Jonathan O; Chopski, Steven G

    2012-05-01

    Failing single ventricle physiology represents an ongoing challenge in mechanical assist device development, requiring pressure augmentation in the cavopulmonary circuit, reduction of systemic venous pressure, and increased cardiac output to achieve hemodynamic stabilization. To meet these requirements, we are developing a percutaneously-placed, axial flow blood pump to support ailing single ventricle physiology in adolescents and adults. We have modified the outer cage of the device to serve as both a protective and functional design component. This study examined the performance of 3 cage geometries with varying directions of filament twist using numerical simulations and hydraulic experiments. All 3 cage and pump models performed in acceptable ranges to support Fontan patients. The cage design employing filaments that are twisted in the opposite direction to the impeller blades and in the direction of the diffuser blades (against-with) demonstrated superior performance by generating a pressure rise range of 5-38 mmHg of flow rates of 0.5-6 l/min at rotational speeds of 5000-7000 rpm. The blood damage indices for all of the cages were found to be well below 2%, and the scalar stress levels were below 200 Pa. This study represents ongoing progress in the development of the impeller and cage assembly. Validation of the results will continue in experiments with blood bag evaluation as well as by particle image velocimetry measurements.

  5. In vivo evaluation of a peripheral vascular access axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Wampler, R K; Moise, J C; Frazier, O H; Olsen, D B

    1988-01-01

    More than 80 acute and chronic calf in vivo studies were utilized to develop a 3 L/min axial flow blood pump designed for intraarterial ventricular assist. The 7 mm diameter transvalvular inlet cannula of the cable driven pump receives blood from the left ventricle. The pump then discharges blood into the descending aorta. In the calf, the pump was introduced into the renal aorta. Safety and effectiveness of the device were demonstrated in three control and 21 implanted animals. Blood chemistry results showed an average plasma free hemoglobin of 3 mg/dl for control and 6.7 mg/dl for implanted animals. Platelets were 1.04 X 10(6) and 0.65 X 10(6), respectively, for control and implanted animals. Fibrinogen, BUN, creatinine, and bilirubin were essentially the same for both groups of animals. The hardware was typically free of deposits, and histopathologic examination revealed minimal injury to intracardiac structures, aortic valve leaflets, and aortic intima. The data indicates that the device may provide full support for a failing left ventricle with minimal trauma or risk.

  6. Progress in the development of a transcutaneously powered axial flow blood pump ventricular assist system.

    PubMed

    Parnis, S M; Conger, J L; Fuqua, J M; Jarvik, R K; Inman, R W; Tamez, D; Macris, M P; Moore, S; Jacobs, G; Sweeney, M J; Frazier, O H

    1997-01-01

    Development of the Jarvik 2000 intraventricular assist system for long-term support is ongoing. The system integrates the Jarvik 2000 axial flow blood pump with a microprocessor based automatic motor controller to provide response to physiologic demands. Nine devices have been evaluated in vivo (six completed, three ongoing) with durations in excess of 26 weeks. Instrumented experiments include implanted transit-time ultrasonic flow probes and dual micromanometer LV/AoP catheters. Treadmill exercise and heart pacing studies are performed to evaluate control system response to increased heart rates. Pharmacologically induced cardiac dysfunction studies are performed in awake and anesthetized calves to demonstrate control response to simulated heart failure conditions. No deleterious effects or events were encountered during any physiologic studies. No hematologic, renal, hepatic, or pulmonary complications have been encountered in any study. Plasma free hemoglobin levels of 7.0 +/- 5.1 mg/dl demonstrate no device related hemolysis throughout the duration of all studies. Pathologic analysis at explant showed no evidence of thromboembolic events. All pump surfaces were free of thrombus except for a minimal ring of fibrin, (approximately 1 mm) on the inflow bearing. Future developments for permanent implantation will include implanted physiologic control systems, implanted batteries, and transcutaneous energy and data transmission systems.

  7. Ocular rigidity, ocular pulse amplitude, and pulsatile ocular blood flow: the effect of axial length.

    PubMed

    Dastiridou, Anna I; Ginis, Harilaos; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis; Karyotakis, Nikos; Detorakis, Efstathios; Siganos, Charalambos; Cholevas, Pierros; Tsironi, Evangelia E; Pallikaris, Ioannis G

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies have shown a negative correlation between axial length (AL) and pulsatile ocular blood flow (POBF). This relation has been questioned because of the possible confounding effect of ocular volume on ocular rigidity (OR). The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between AL, as a surrogate parameter for ocular volume, and OR, ocular pulse amplitude (OPA), and POBF. Eighty-eight cataract patients were enrolled in this study. A computer-controlled device comprising a microdosimetric pump and a pressure sensor was used intraoperatively. The system was connected to the anterior chamber and used to raise the intraocular pressure (IOP) from 15 to 40 mm Hg, by infusing the eye with a saline solution. After each infusion step, the IOP was continuously recorded for 2 seconds. Blood pressure and pulse rate were measured during the procedure. The OR coefficient was calculated from the pressure volume data. OPA and POBF were measured from pressure recordings. Median AL was 23.69 (interquartile range 3.53) mm. OR coefficient was 0.0218 (0.0053) μL(-1). A negative correlation between the OR coefficient and AL (ρ = -0.641, P < 0.001) was documented. Increasing AL was associated with decreased OPA (ρ = -0.637, P < 0.001 and ρ = -0.690, P < 0.001) and POBF (ρ = -0.207, P = 0.053 and ρ = -0.238, P = 0.028) at baseline and elevated IOP, respectively. Based on manometric data, increasing AL is associated with decreased OR, OPA, and POBF. These results suggest decreased pulsatility in high myopia and may have implications on ocular pulse studies and the pathophysiology of myopia.

  8. Development of Lorentz force-type self-bearing motor for an alternative axial flow blood pump design.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tau Meng; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2006-05-01

    A Lorentz force-type self-bearing motor was developed to provide delivery of both motoring torque and levitation force for an alternative axial flow blood pump design with an enclosed impeller. The axial flow pumps currently available introduce electromagnetic coupling from the motor's stator to the impeller by means of permanent magnets (PMs) embedded in the tips of the pump's blades. This design has distinct disadvantages, for example, pumping efficiency and electromagnetic coupling transmission are compromised by the constrained or poor geometry of the blades and limited pole width of the PMs, respectively. In this research, a Lorentz force-type self-bearing motor was developed. It is composed of (i) an eight-pole PM hollow-cylindrical rotor assembly supposedly to house and enclose the impeller of an axial flow blood pump, and (ii) a six-pole stator with two sets of copper wire and different winding configurations to provide the motoring torque and levitating force for the rotor assembly. MATLAB's xPC Target interface hardware was used as the rapid prototyping tool for the development of the controller for the self-bearing motor. Experimental results on a free/simply supported rotor assembly validated the design feasibility and control algorithm effectiveness in providing both the motoring torque and levitation force for the rotor. When levitated, a maximum orbital displacement of 0.3 mm corresponding to 1050 rpm of the rotor was measured by two eddy current probes placed in the orthogonal direction. This design has the advantage of eliminating the trade-off between motoring torques, levitating force, and pumping efficiency of previous studies. It also indicated the benefits of enclosed-impeller design as having good dynamic response, linearity, and better reliability. The nonmechanical contact feature between rotating and stationary parts will further reduce hemolysis and thromboembolitic tendencies in a typical blood pump application.

  9. Experimental Study of Micro-Scale Taylor Vortices Within a Co-Axial Mixed-Flow Blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Shu, Fangjun; Tian, Ruijun; Vandenberghe, Stijn; Antaki, James F

    2015-12-29

    Taylor vortices in a miniature mixed-flow rotodynamic blood pump were investigated using micro-scale particle image velocimetry (μ-PIV) and a tracer particle visualization technique. The pump featured a cylindrical rotor (14.9 mm diameter) within a cylindrical bore, having a radial clearance of 500 μm and operated at rotational speeds varying from 1000 to 12 000 rpm. Corresponding Taylor numbers were 700-101 800, respectively. The critical Taylor number was observed to be highly dependent on the ratio of axial to circumferential velocity, increasing from 1200 to 18 000 corresponding to Rossby numbers from 0 to 0.175. This demonstrated a dramatic stabilizing effect of the axial flow. The size of Taylor vortices was also found to be inversely related to Rossby number. It is concluded that Taylor vortices can enhance the mixing in the annular gap and decrease the dwell time of blood cells in the high-shear-rate region, which has the potential to decrease hemolysis and platelet activation within the blood pump.

  10. Numerical, hydraulic, and hemolytic evaluation of an intravascular axial flow blood pump to mechanically support Fontan patients.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, Amy L; Kapadia, Jugal Y; Chopski, Steven G; Bhavsar, Sonya S; Moskowitz, William B; Gullquist, Scott D; Gangemi, James J; Haggerty, Christopher M; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2011-01-01

    Currently available mechanical circulatory support systems are limited for adolescent and adult patients with a Fontan physiology. To address this growing need, we are developing a collapsible, percutaneously-inserted, axial flow blood pump to support the cavopulmonary circulation in Fontan patients. During the first phase of development, the design and experimental evaluation of an axial flow blood pump was performed. We completed numerical modeling of the pump using computational fluid dynamics analysis, hydraulic testing of a plastic pump prototype, and blood bag experiments (n=7) to measure the levels of hemolysis produced by the pump. Statistical analyses using regression were performed. The prototype with a 4-bladed impeller generated a pressure rise of 2-30 mmHg with a flow rate of 0.5-4 L/min for 3000-6000 RPM. A comparison of the experimental performance data to the numerical predictions demonstrated an excellent agreement with a maximum deviation being less than 6%. A linear increase in the plasma-free hemoglobin (pfHb) levels during the 6-h experiments was found, as desired. The maximum pfHb level was measured to be 21 mg/dL, and the average normalized index of hemolysis was determined to be 0.0097 g/100 L for all experiments. The hydraulic performance of the prototype and level of hemolysis are indicative of significant progress in the design of this blood pump. These results support the continued development of this intravascular pump as a bridge-to-transplant, bridge-to-recovery, bridge-to-hemodynamic stability, or bridge-to-surgical reconstruction for Fontan patients.

  11. An experimental study of Newtonian and non-Newtonian flow dynamics in an axial blood pump model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qi-Hui; Li, Jing-Yin; Zhang, Ming-Yuan; Zhu, Xian-Ran

    2012-04-01

    The head curves of a 1.5:1 new axial blood pump model were measured using five working fluids at five rotational speeds. The working fluids were water, a 39wt% aqueous glycerin solution (GS), and three aqueous xanthan gum solutions (XGSs) with different concentrations. The flow velocities and shear stresses in the mechanical clearance between the casing and rotor were investigated using a laser Doppler velocimeter and hot-film sensor. At every rotational speed, the experiment in which viscous GS was used in the pump model showed a head curve lower than that obtained using water, whereas the head obtained using viscoelastic XGS was higher than that generated using water. A maximum difference of 65.8% between the heads measured in the 0.06% XGS and GS experiments was detected. The higher head produced by the XGS may have originated from the drag-reduction effect of XGS viscoelasticity. The measurements showed that a reverse washout flow at a velocity of 0.05-0.11m/s occurs in the clearance. This reverse washout flow is crucial to preventing flow stagnation and accompanying thrombus formation. The wall shear stress and the Taylor number of the rotating Couette-like flow in the clearance both indicated that it is a turbulent flow.

  12. Analysis of axial flow turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, V. K.

    A variety of steady and time-dependent, two and three dimensional numerical techniques for axial-flow turbulent design and analysis is reviewed. Meridional flow solutions are discussed, including the streamline curvature method, the matrix method, and finite element methods. Blade-to-blade flow solutions are considered, including singularity methods, field methods, and transonic blade-to-blade calculations. Three-dimensional flow solutions are briefly examined.

  13. Piezoelectric axial flow microvalve

    DOEpatents

    Gemmen, Randall; Thornton, Jimmy; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.; Clark, William W.

    2007-01-09

    This invention is directed to a fuel cell operable with a quantity of fuel and a quantity of an oxidizer to produce electrical power, the fuel cell including a fuel cell body including a labyrinth system structured to permit the fuel and the oxidizer to flow therethrough; at least a first catalyst in fluid communication with the labyrinth; and at least a first microvalve operably disposed within at least a portion of the labyrinth. The microvalve utilizes a deflectable member operable upon the application of a voltage from a voltage source. The microvalve includes an elongated flow channel formed therein and extending substantially longitudinally between the first and second ends to permit substantially longitudinal flow of the fluid therethrough and between the first and second ends; and the deflectable member disposed on the valve body, the deflectable member including at least a first piezoelectric portion that is piezoelectrically operable to deflect the deflectable member between an open position and a closed position upon the application of a voltage, the deflectable member in the closed position being operable to resist the flow of the fluid through the flow channel.

  14. Unsteady Flows in Axial Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marble, F. E.; Rannie, W. D.

    1957-01-01

    Of the various unsteady flows that occur in axial turbomachines certain asymmetric disturbances, of wave length large in comparison with blade spacing, have become understood to a certain extent. These disturbances divide themselves into two categories: self-induced oscillations and force disturbances. A special type of propagating stall appears as a self-induced disturbance; an asymmetric velocity profile introduced at the compressor inlet constitutes a forced disturbance. Both phenomena have been treated from a unified theoretical point of view in which the asymmetric disturbances are linearized and the blade characteristics are assumed quasi-steady. Experimental results are in essential agreement with this theory wherever the limitations of the theory are satisfied. For the self-induced disturbances and the more interesting examples of the forced disturbances, the dominant blade characteristic is the dependence of total pressure loss, rather than the turning angle, upon the local blade inlet angle.

  15. Computational fluid dynamics and digital particle image velocimetry study of the flow through an optimized micro-axial blood pump.

    PubMed

    Triep, Michael; Brücker, Christoph; Schröder, Wolfgang; Siess, Thorsten

    2006-05-01

    A detailed knowledge of the flow field in a blood pump is indispensable in order to increase the efficiency of the pump and to reduce the shear-induced hemolysis. Thus, three different impeller designs were developed and tested by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV). The results show a good agreement of CFD and DPIV data. An optimization of the impeller could be achieved by following the concept of turbulent drag reduction for the axisymmetric center body.

  16. The Slotted Blade Axial-Flow Blower

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1955-09-01

    YORK 18, NEW YORK w is|’ .THE SLOTTED BLADE AXIAL-FLOW BLOVER AUG 0 1 13941J F Dr. H. E. Sheets, Member ASME Chief Research and Development Engineer ... blades of an axial flow blower. The subject of boundary-layer control has attracted considerable attention in respect to the isolated airfoil (1)1 but... blades . Flow through airfoils displays a region of laminar flow beginning at the leading edge. Further downstream, at approximately the location of the

  17. Axial Flow Conditioning Device for Mitigating Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, Vineet (Inventor); Birkbeck, Roger M. (Inventor); Hosangadi, Ashvin (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A flow conditioning device for incrementally stepping down pressure within a piping system is presented. The invention includes an outer annular housing, a center element, and at least one intermediate annular element. The outer annular housing includes an inlet end attachable to an inlet pipe and an outlet end attachable to an outlet pipe. The outer annular housing and the intermediate annular element(s) are concentrically disposed about the center element. The intermediate annular element(s) separates an axial flow within the outer annular housing into at least two axial flow paths. Each axial flow path includes at least two annular extensions that alternately and locally direct the axial flow radially outward and inward or radially inward and outward thereby inducing a pressure loss or a pressure gradient within the axial flow. The pressure within the axial flow paths is lower than the pressure at the inlet end and greater than the vapor pressure for the axial flow. The invention minimizes fluidic instabilities, pressure pulses, vortex formation and shedding, and/or cavitation during pressure step down to yield a stabilized flow within a piping system.

  18. Flow Split Venturi, Axially-Rotated Valve

    DOEpatents

    Walrath, David E.; Lindberg, William R.; Burgess, Robert K.; LaBelle, James

    2000-02-22

    The present invention provides an axially-rotated valve which permits increased flow rates and lower pressure drop (characterized by a lower loss coefficient) by using an axial eccentric split venturi with two portions where at least one portion is rotatable with respect to the other portion. The axially-rotated valve typically may be designed to avoid flow separation and/or cavitation at full flow under a variety of conditions. Similarly, the valve is designed, in some embodiments, to produce streamlined flow within the valve. An axially aligned outlet may also increase the flow efficiency. A typical cross section of the eccentric split venturi may be non-axisymmetric such as a semicircular cross section which may assist in both throttling capabilities and in maximum flow capacity using the design of the present invention. Such a design can include applications for freeze resistant axially-rotated valves and may be fully-opened and fully-closed in one-half of a complete rotation. An internal wide radius elbow typically connected to a rotatable portion of the eccentric venturi may assist in directing flow with lower friction losses. A valve actuator may actuate in an axial manner yet be uniquely located outside of the axial flow path to further reduce friction losses. A seal may be used between the two portions that may include a peripheral and diametrical seal in the same plane. A seal separator may increase the useful life of the seal between the fixed and rotatable portions.

  19. Are axial and radial flow chromatography different?

    PubMed

    Besselink, Tamara; van der Padt, Albert; Janssen, Anja E M; Boom, Remko M

    2013-01-04

    Radial flow chromatography can be a solution for scaling up a packed bed chromatographic process to larger processing volumes. In this study we compared axial and radial flow affinity chromatography both experimentally and theoretically. We used an axial flow column and a miniaturized radial flow column with a ratio of 1.8 between outer and inner surface area, both with a bed height of 5 cm. The columns were packed with affinity resin to adsorb BSA. The average velocity in the columns was set equal. No difference in performance between the two columns could be observed. To gain more insight into the design of a radial flow column, the velocity profile and resin distribution in the radial flow column were calculated. Using mathematical models we found that the breakthrough performance of radial flow chromatography is very similar to axial flow when the ratio between outer and inner radius of the radial flow column is around 2. When this ratio is increased, differences become more apparent, but remain small. However, the ratio does have a significant influence on the velocity profile inside the resin bed, which directly influences the pressure drop and potentially resin compression, especially at higher values for this ratio. The choice between axial and radial flow will be based on cost price, footprint and packing characteristics. For small-scale processes, axial flow chromatography is probably the best choice, for resin volumes of at least several tens of litres, radial flow chromatography may be preferable.

  20. Aerodynamic Design of Axial Flow Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, R. O. (Editor); Johnsen, I. A.

    1965-01-01

    An overview of 'Aerodynamic systems design of axial flow compressors' is presented. Numerous chapters cover topics such as compressor design, ptotential and viscous flow in two dimensional cascades, compressor stall and blade vibration, and compressor flow theory. Theoretical aspects of flow are also covered.

  1. Cardiac-Gated En Face Doppler Measurement of Retinal Blood Flow Using Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography at 100,000 Axial Scans per Second

    PubMed Central

    Lee, ByungKun; Choi, WooJhon; Liu, Jonathan J.; Lu, Chen D.; Schuman, Joel S.; Wollstein, Gadi; Duker, Jay S.; Waheed, Nadia K.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To develop and demonstrate a cardiac gating method for repeatable in vivo measurement of total retinal blood flow (TRBF) in humans using en face Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) at commercially available imaging speeds. Methods. A prototype swept-source OCT system operating at 100-kHz axial scan rate was developed and interfaced with a pulse oximeter. Using the plethysmogram measured from the earlobe, Doppler OCT imaging of a 1.5- × 2-mm area at the optic disc at 1.8 volumes/s was synchronized to cardiac cycle to improve sampling of pulsatile blood flow. Postprocessing algorithms were developed to achieve fully automatic calculation of TRBF. We evaluated the repeatability of en face Doppler OCT measurement of TRBF in 10 healthy young subjects using three methods: measurement at 100 kHz with asynchronous acquisition, measurement at 100 kHz with cardiac-gated acquisition, and a control measurement using a 400-kHz instrument with asynchronous acquisition. Results. The median intrasubject coefficients of variation (COV) of the three methods were 8.0%, 4.9%, and 6.1%, respectively. All three methods correlated well, without a significant bias. Mean TRBF measured at 100 kHz with cardiac-gated acquisition was 40.5 ± 8.2 μL/min, and the range was from 26.6 to 55.8 μL/min. Conclusions. Cardiac-gated en face Doppler OCT can achieve smaller measurement variability than previously reported methods. Although further validation in older subjects and diseased subjects is required, precise measurement of TRBF using cardiac-gated en face Doppler OCT at commercially available imaging speeds should be feasible. PMID:25744974

  2. Computer programs for axial flow compressor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmody, R. H.; Creveling, H. F.

    1969-01-01

    Four computer programs examine effects of design parameters and indicate areas for research of multistage axial flow compressors. The programs provide information on velocity diagrams and stage-by-stage performance calculation, radial equilibrium of flow, radial distribution of total pressure, and off-design performance calculation.

  3. Supersonic axial-flow fan flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, John K.

    1988-01-01

    Lane's (1957) analytical formulation of the unsteady pressure distribution on an oscillating two-dimensional flat plate cascade in supersonic axial flow has been developed into a computer code. This unsteady aerodynamic code has shown good agreement with other published data. This code has also been incorporated into an existing aeroelastic code to analyze the NASA Lewis supersonic through-flow fan design.

  4. Mixing enhancement using axial flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papamoschou, Dimitri (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for enhancing fluid mixing. The method comprises the following: (a) configuring a duct to have an effective outer wall, an effective inner wall, a cross-sectional shape, a first cross-sectional area and an exit area, the first cross-sectional area and the exit area being different in size; (b) generating a first flow at the first cross-sectional area, the first flow having a total pressure and a speed equal to or greater than a local speed of sound; and (c) generating a positive streamwise pressure gradient in a second flow in proximity of the exit area. The second flow results from the first flow. Fluid mixing is enhanced downstream from the duct exit area.

  5. Axial flow positive displacement worm gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, Kurt David (Inventor); Giffin, Rollin George (Inventor); Fakunle, Oladapo (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An axial flow positive displacement engine has an inlet axially spaced apart and upstream from an outlet. Inner and outer bodies have offset inner and outer axes extend from the inlet to the outlet through first, second, and third sections of a core assembly in serial downstream flow relationship. At least one of the bodies is rotatable about its axis. The inner and outer bodies have intermeshed inner and outer helical blades wound about the inner and outer axes respectively. The inner and outer helical blades extend radially outwardly and inwardly respectively. The helical blades have first, second, and third twist slopes in the first, second, and third sections respectively. The first twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes and the third twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes. A combustor section extends axially downstream through at least a portion of the second section.

  6. Axial flow gas turbine engine combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Shekleton, J.R.; Sawyer, K.W.

    1991-02-19

    This patent describes a gas turbine engine. It comprises: radial compressor means for compressing air entering through a compressor inlet opening; axial turbine means in axially spaced relation to the radial compressor means; the radial compressor means being operatively associated with the axial turbine means; radial combustor means intermediate the radial compressor means and axial turbine means; turbine nozzle means proximate the axial turbine means for directing gases of combustion thereto; the radial combustor means defining a radial combustion space in communication with both the radial compressor means and the turbine nozzle means. The radial combustor means including means for introducing compressed air generally tangentially into the radial combustion space upstream of the turbine nozzle means and at a point radially outwardly of the turbine nozzle means and the turbine nozzle means being disposed radially inwardly of the radial combustion space to define a generally radial flow path therebetween. The radial combustor means generating the gases of combustion by combusting fuel from a source and air from the radial compressor means; and fuel injection means operatively associated with the radial combustor means radially outwardly of the turbine nozzle means for injecting a fuel/air mixture generally tangentially into the radial combustion space; whereby a tangential swirl flow is established within the radial combustion space.

  7. Blood flow

    MedlinePlus

    ... the same time, the veins carry oxygen-poor blood (shown in blue) from the tissues back toward the heart. From there, it passes to the lungs to receive more oxygen. This cycle repeats itself when oxygen-rich blood returns to the heart from the lungs, which ...

  8. Flow field visualization about external axial corners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talcott, N. A., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to visualize the flow field about external axial corners. The investigation was initiated to provide answers to questions about the inviscid flow pattern for continuing numerical investigations. Symmetrical and asymmetrical corner models were tested at a Reynolds number per meter of 60,700,000. Oil-flow and vapor-screen photographs were taken for both models at angle of attack and yaw. The paper presents the results of the investigation in the form of oil-flow photographs and the surrounding shock wave location obtained from the vapor screens.

  9. Axial flow positive displacement worm compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, Kurt David (Inventor); Giffin, Rollin George (Inventor); Fakunle, Oladapo (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An axial flow positive displacement compressor has an inlet axially spaced apart and upstream from an outlet. Inner and outer bodies have offset inner and outer axes extend from the inlet to the outlet through first and second sections of a compressor assembly in serial downstream flow relationship. At least one of the bodies is rotatable about its axis. The inner and outer bodies have intermeshed inner and outer helical blades wound about the inner and outer axes respectively. The inner and outer helical blades extend radially outwardly and inwardly respectively. The helical blades have first and second twist slopes in the first and second sections respectively. The first twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes. An engine including the compressor has in downstream serial flow relationship from the compressor a combustor and a high pressure turbine drivingly connected to the compressor by a high pressure shaft.

  10. Magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with an axially levitated motor.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, Toru; Ezoe, Shiroh; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Okada, Yohji

    2003-07-01

    The longevity of a rotary blood pump is mainly determined by the durability of its wearing mechanical parts such as bearings and seals. Magnetic suspension techniques can be used to eliminate these mechanical parts altogether. This article describes a magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump using an axially levitated motor. The motor comprises an upper stator, a bottom stator, and a levitated rotor-impeller between the stators. The upper stator has permanent magnets to generate an attractive axial bias force on the rotor and electric magnets to control the inclination of the rotor. The bottom stator has electric magnets to generate attractive forces and rotating torque to control the axial displacement and rotation of the rotor. The radial displacement of the rotor is restricted by passive stability. A shrouded impeller is integrated within the rotor. The performance of the magnetic suspension and pump were evaluated in a closed mock loop circuit filled with water. The maximum amplitude of the rotor displacement in the axial direction was only 0.06 mm. The maximum possible rotational speed during levitation was 1,600 rpm. The maximum pressure head and flow rate were 120 mm Hg and 7 L/min, respectively. The pump shows promise as a ventricular assist device.

  11. Turbulence Effects of Axial Flow Hydrokinetic Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, C.; Chamorro, L. P.; Neary, V. S.; Morton, S.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2011-12-01

    Axial flow hydrokinetic turbines provide a method for extracting the kinetic energy available in unidirectional (river), bidirectional (tidal) and marine currents; however, a deep understanding of the wake dynamics, momentum recovery, geomorphologic effects, and ecological interaction with these hydrokinetic turbines is required to guarantee their economical and environmental viability. The St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) at the University of Minnesota (UMN) has performed physical modeling experiments using a 1:10 scale axial flow tidal turbine in the SAFL Main Channel, a 2.75m x 1.8m x 80m open channel test facility. A sophisticated control system allows synchronous measurements of turbine torque and rotational speed along with high resolution 3-D velocity measurements within the channel. Using acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs), high resolution 3-D velocity profile data were collected up to 15 turbine diameters downstream of the turbine location. These data provide valuable information on the wake characteristics (turbulence, Reynolds stresses, etc.) resulting from a rotating axial flow hydrokinetic machine. Regions of high turbulence and shear zones that persist in the near wake regions are delineated along with the velocity deficit and momentum recovery within the wake downstream of the device. Synchronous ADV data shed light on the rotational and meandering characteristics of the wake and its potential impacts on the local geomorphology and hydrodynamic environment. This dataset on single hydrokinetic turbine flow characteristics is the basis for further work on the optimal arrangement and performance environment for arrays of similar hydrokinetic devices.

  12. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of an Axial Rotary Blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Schüle, Chan Yong; Thamsen, Bente; Blümel, Bastian; Lommel, Michael; Karakaya, Tamer; Paschereit, Christian Oliver; Affeld, Klaus; Kertzscher, Ulrich

    2016-11-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have become a standard therapy for patients with severe heart failure. As low blood trauma in LVADs is important for a good clinical outcome, the assessment of the fluid loads inside the pump is critical. More specifically, the flow features on the surfaces where the interaction between blood and artificial material happens is of great importance. Therefore, experimental data for the near-wall flows in an axial rotary blood pump were collected and directly compared to computational fluid dynamic results. For this, the flow fields based on unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations-computational fluid dynamics (URANS-CFD) of an axial rotary blood pump were calculated and compared with experimental flow data at one typical state of operation in an enlarged model of the pump. The focus was set on the assessment of wall shear stresses (WSS) at the housing wall and rotor gap region by means of the wall-particle image velocimetry technique, and the visualization of near-wall flow structures on the inner pump surfaces by a paint erosion method. Additionally, maximum WSS and tip leakage volume flows were measured for 13 different states of operation. Good agreement between CFD and experimental data was found, which includes the location, magnitude, and direction of the maximum and minimum WSS and the presence of recirculation zones on the pump stators. The maximum WSS increased linearly with pressure head. They occurred at the upstream third of the impeller blades and exceeded the critical values with respect to hemolysis. Regions of very high shear stresses and recirculation zones could be identified and were in good agreement with simulations. URANS-CFD, which is often used for pump performance and blood damage prediction, seems to be, therefore, a valid tool for the assessment of flow fields in axial rotary blood pumps. The magnitude of maximum WSS could be confirmed and were in the order of several hundred Pascal

  13. Numerical flow analysis for axial flow turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Aoki, S.

    Some numerical flow analysis methods adopted in the gas turbine interactive design system, TDSYS, are described. In the TDSYS, a streamline curvature program for axisymmetric flows, quasi 3-D and fully 3-D time marching programs are used respectively for blade to blade flows and annular cascade flows. The streamline curvature method has some advantages in that it can include the effect of coolant mixing and choking flow conditions. Comparison of the experimental results with calculated results shows that the overall accuracy is determined more by the empirical correlations used for loss and deviation than by the numerical scheme. The time marching methods are the best choice for the analysis of turbine cascade flows because they can handle mixed subsonic-supersonic flows with automatic inclusion of shock waves in a single calculation. Some experimental results show that a time marching method can predict the airfoil surface Mach number distribution more accurately than a finite difference method. One weakpoint of the time marching methods is a long computer time; they usually require several times as much CPU time as other methods. But reductions in computer costs and improvements in numerical methods have made the quasi 3-D and fully 3-D time marching methods usable as design tools, and they are now used in TDSYS.

  14. Aerodynamics of advanced axial-flow turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serovy, G. K.; Kavanagh, P.; Kiishi, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    A multi-task research program on aerodynamic problems in advanced axial-flow turbomachine configurations was carried out at Iowa State University. The elements of this program were intended to contribute directly to the improvement of compressor, fan, and turbine design methods. Experimental efforts in intra-passage flow pattern measurements, unsteady blade row interaction, and control of secondary flow are included, along with computational work on inviscid-viscous interaction blade passage flow techniques. This final report summarizes the results of this program and indicates directions which might be taken in following up these results in future work. In a separate task a study was made of existing turbomachinery research programs and facilities in universities located in the United States. Some potentially significant research topics are discussed which might be successfully attacked in the university atmosphere.

  15. Axial flow heat exchanger devices and methods for heat transfer using axial flow devices

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2016-02-16

    Systems and methods described herein are directed to rotary heat exchangers configured to transfer heat to a heat transfer medium flowing in substantially axial direction within the heat exchangers. Exemplary heat exchangers include a heat conducting structure which is configured to be in thermal contact with a thermal load or a thermal sink, and a heat transfer structure rotatably coupled to the heat conducting structure to form a gap region between the heat conducting structure and the heat transfer structure, the heat transfer structure being configured to rotate during operation of the device. In example devices heat may be transferred across the gap region from a heated axial flow of the heat transfer medium to a cool stationary heat conducting structure, or from a heated stationary conducting structure to a cool axial flow of the heat transfer medium.

  16. Axial compressor middle stage secondary flow study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, J. H.; Dring, R. P.; Joslyn, H. D.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes an experimental investigation of the secondary flow within and aft of an axial compressor model with thick endwall boundary layers. The objective of the study was to obtain detailed aerodynamic and trace gas concentration traverse data aft of a well documented isolated rotor for the ultimate purpose of improving the design phases of compressor development based on an improved physical understanding of secondary flow. It was determined from the flow visualization, aerodynamic, and trace gas concentration results that the relative unloading of the midspan region of the airfoil inhibitied a fullspan separation at high loading preventing the massive radial displacement of the hub corner stall to the tip. Radial distribution of high and low total pressure fluid influenced the magnitude of the spanwise distribution of loss, such that, there was a general decreases in loss near the hub to the extent that for the least loaded case a negative loss (increase in total pressure) was observed. The ability to determine the spanwise distribution of blockage was demonstrated. Large blockage was present in the endwall regions due to the corner stall and tip leakage with little blockage in the core flow region. Hub blockage was found to increase rapidly with loading.

  17. Particle classification in Taylor vortex flow with an axial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmura, N.; Suemasu, T.; Asamura, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Particle classification phenomenon in Taylor vortex flow with an axial flow was investigated experimentally and numerically. The flow-visualization experiment by a laser-induced fluorescence method clearly revealed that there existed two distinct mixing regions at low Reynolds numbers. The tracer near the vortex cell boundary was rapidly transported axially owing to the bypass flow effect. On the other hand, the fluid element was confined to the vortex core region without being exchanged with the outer flow region. In order to observe particle classification phenomenon, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) particles suspended in the same aqueous solution of glycerol as the working fluid were fed into the top of the apparatus. Particle size was initially ranging from 10 to 80 µm. The ratio of the particle density to the fluid density was 1.04-1.05, which means the density difference between particle and fluid is very small. The suspended solution was withdrawn using a hypodermic needle every a certain time period at 30 mm above the bottom of apparatus. The fluid was sampled both near the outer wall and in vortex core. The particles sampled at 42 min having the size of 20-50 µm were mainly observed in the vortex core region. On the other hand, a large population of particles having the size of about 50-80 µm could be seen in the outer region of vortex. It was found that large particles located near the outer edge of vortices were quickly transported axially owing to the bypass flow effect. Numerical simulation also revealed that the loci of particles depended on the particle size.

  18. Modeling shrouded stator cavity flows in axial-flow compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Wellborn, S.R.; Tolchinsky, I.; Okiishi, T.H.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments and computational analyses were completed to understand the nature of shrouded stator cavity flows. From this understanding, a one-dimensional model of the flow through shrouded stator cavities was developed. This model estimates the leakage mass flow, temperature rise, and angular momentum increase through the cavity, given geometry parameters and the flow conditions at the interface between the cavity and primary flow path. This cavity model consists of two components, one that estimates the flow characteristics through the labyrinth seals and the other that predicts the transfer of momentum due to windage. A description of the one-dimensional model is given. The incorporation and use of the one-dimensional model in a multistage compressor primary flow analysis tool is described. The combination of this model and the primary flow solver was used to reliably simulate the significant impact on performance of the increase of hub seal leakage in a twelve-stage axial-flow compressor. Observed higher temperatures of the hub region fluid, different stage matching, and lower overall efficiencies and core flow than expected could be correctly linked to increased hub seal clearance with this new technique. The importance of including these leakage flows in compressor simulations is shown.

  19. Computing Blood Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, D.; Chang, J. L. C.; Rogers, S. E.; Rosenfeld, M.

    1990-01-01

    Methods developed for aerospace applied to mechanics of biofluids. Report argues use of advanced computational fluid dynamics to analyze flows of biofluids - especially blood. Ability to simulate numerically and visualize complicated, time-varying three-dimensional flows contributes to understanding of phenomena in heart and blood vessels, offering potential for development of treatments for abnormal flow conditions.

  20. Computing Blood Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, D.; Chang, J. L. C.; Rogers, S. E.; Rosenfeld, M.

    1990-01-01

    Methods developed for aerospace applied to mechanics of biofluids. Report argues use of advanced computational fluid dynamics to analyze flows of biofluids - especially blood. Ability to simulate numerically and visualize complicated, time-varying three-dimensional flows contributes to understanding of phenomena in heart and blood vessels, offering potential for development of treatments for abnormal flow conditions.

  1. PRELIMINARY DESIGN ANALYSIS OF AXIAL FLOW TURBINES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program has been developed for the preliminary design analysis of axial-flow turbines. Rapid approximate generalized procedures requiring minimum input are used to provide turbine overall geometry and performance adequate for screening studies. The computations are based on mean-diameter flow properties and a stage-average velocity diagram. Gas properties are assumed constant throughout the turbine. For any given turbine, all stages, except the first, are specified to have the same shape velocity diagram. The first stage differs only in the value of inlet flow angle. The velocity diagram shape depends upon the stage work factor value and the specified type of velocity diagram. Velocity diagrams can be specified as symmetrical, zero exit swirl, or impulse; or by inputting stage swirl split. Exit turning vanes can be included in the design. The 1991 update includes a generalized velocity diagram, a more flexible meanline path, a reheat model, a radial component of velocity, and a computation of free-vortex hub and tip velocity diagrams. Also, a loss-coefficient calibration was performed to provide recommended values for airbreathing engine turbines. Input design requirements include power or pressure ratio, mass flow rate, inlet temperature and pressure, and rotative speed. The design variables include inlet and exit diameters, stator angle or exit radius ratio, and number of stages. Gas properties are input as gas constant, specific heat ratio, and viscosity. The program output includes inlet and exit annulus dimensions, exit temperature and pressure, total and static efficiencies, flow angles, blading angles, and last stage absolute and relative Mach numbers. This program is written in FORTRAN 77 and can be ported to any computer with a standard FORTRAN compiler which supports NAMELIST. It was originally developed on an IBM 7000 series computer running VM and has been implemented on IBM PC computers and compatibles running MS-DOS under Lahey FORTRAN, and

  2. The research on flow pulsation characteristics of axial piston pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingchao; Wang, Yulin

    2017-01-01

    The flow pulsation is an important factor influencing the axial piston pump performance. In this paper we implement modeling and simulation of the axial piston pump with AMESim software to explore the flow pulsation characteristics under various factors . Theory analysis shows the loading pressure, angular speed, piston numbers and the accumulator impose evident influence on the flow pulsation characteristics. This simulation and analysis can be used for reducing the flow pulsation rate via properly setting the related factors.

  3. The valvo-pump. An axial, nonpulsatile blood pump.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Y; Yozu, R; Tanaka, T; Yamazaki, K

    1991-01-01

    The valvo-pump, an axial, nonpulsatile blood pump implanted at the heart valve position while preserving diseased heart muscle, has several advantages over an artificial heart replacement, including 1) a good anatomic fit to the natural heart, 2) less blood contacting surface, and 3) ease of implantation. The housing for the pump is a tube, 37 mm in diameter (maximum) and 33 mm in length. Within the housing there is an impeller with either 10 vanes (33 mm in diameter) or 5 vanes (22 mm in diameter). The impeller is connected to a samarium-cobalt-rare-earth magnet direct current (DC) brushless motor measuring 23.8 mm in diameter and 30.2 mm in length. Sealing is achieved by means of a magnetic fluid seal. A guiding wheel with 4 vanes is located behind the impeller. The pump was studied on a hydraulic mock circulatory system to evaluate its performance characteristics. A pump flow of 6.9 L/min was obtained at a pump differential pressure of 48 mmHg, and flow of 3.1 L/min was obtained at 58 mmHg. The valvo-pump can be made feasible by developing a small, high-output, power motor and an endurable seal, as well as by optimizing the impeller design.

  4. Development of the Nimbus/Pittsburgh axial flow left ventricular assist system.

    PubMed

    Butler, K; Thomas, D; Antaki, J; Borovetz, H; Griffith, B; Kameneva, M; Kormos, R; Litwak, P

    1997-07-01

    Nimbus, Inc. and the University of Pittsburgh's School of Medicine have been collaborators developing rotary blood pump technology since 1992. Currently, a major focus is on an implantable left ventricular assist system (LVAS) that utilizes an electric powered axial flow blood pump. In addition to the blood pump, a major development item is the electronic controller and the control algorithm for modulating the pump speed in response to varying physiologic demands. Methods being used in developing the axial flow LVAS include the use of computational fluid dynamic modeling of the interior flow field of the pump, flow visualization of the flow field using laser based imaging, and computer simulation of blood pump-physiological interactions as well as an extensive in vivo test program. Results to date include successful in vivo tests of blood pumps with nonlubricated bearings and demonstrations of auto speed control using electrical current as the observable parameter.

  5. Liquid rocket engine axial-flow turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheer, D. D.; Huppert, M. C.; Viteri, F.; Farquhar, J.; Keller, R. B., Jr. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    The axial pump is considered in terms of the total turbopump assembly. Stage hydrodynamic design, pump rotor assembly, pump materials for liquid hydrogen applications, and safety factors as utilized in state of the art pumps are among the topics discussed. Axial pump applications are included.

  6. Initial Acute Animal Experiment Using a New Miniature Axial Flow Pump in Series With the Natural Heart.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Eiji; Yano, Tetsuya; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Miura, Hidekazu; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2015-08-01

    We have advocated an axial flow blood pump called "valvo pump" that is implanted at the aortic valve position, and we have developed axial flow blood pumps to realize the concept of the valvo pump. The latest model of the axial flow blood pump mainly consists of a stator, a directly driven impeller, and a hydrodynamic bearing. The axial flow blood pump has a diameter of 33 mm and length of 74 mm, and the length of anatomical occupation is 33 mm. The axial flow blood pump is anastomosed to the aorta with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) cuffs worn on the inflow and outflow ports. Dp-Q curves of the axial flow blood pump are flatter than those of ordinary axial flow pumps, and pump outflow of 5 L/min was obtained against a pressure difference of 50 mm Hg at a rotational speed of 9000 rpm in vitro. The axial flow blood pump was installed in a goat by anastomosing with the thoracic descending aorta using PTFE cuffs, and it was rotated at a rotational speed of 8000 rpm. Unlike in case of the ventricular assistance in parallel with the natural heart, pulsatilities of aortic pressure and aortic flow were preserved even when the pump was on, and mean aortic flow was increased by 1.5 L/min with increase in mean aortic pressure of 30 mm Hg. In conclusion, circulatory assistance in series with the natural heart using the axial flow blood pump was able to improve hemodynamic pulsatility, and it would contribute to improvement of end-organ circulation. . Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A new design and computational fluid dynamics study of an implantable axial blood pump.

    PubMed

    Koochaki, Mojtaba; Niroomand-Oscuii, Hanieh

    2013-12-01

    Considering small thoracic space, using implantable ventricular assist device requires reduction in a pump size. Among many available blood pumps, axial blood pumps have attracted greatly because of their small size. In this article, a new miniature axial blood pump has been designed and studied which can be easily implanted in the human body. In this design, the pump overall length decreased by a little increasing in the pump diameter, and new blade geometry is used to produce a streamlined, idealized, and nonobstructing blood flow path in the pump. By means of computational fluid dynamic, the flow pattern through the pump has been predicted and overall pump performance and efficiency has been computed. Also, to ensure a reliable VAD design, two methods for checking wall shear stress were used to confirm that this pump wouldn't cause serious blood damage.

  8. Designing and updating the flow part of axial and radial-axial turbines through mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusanov, Andrey; Rusanov, Roman; Lampart, Piotr

    2015-10-01

    The paper describes an algorithm for the design of axial and radial-axial type turbines. The algorithm is based on using mathematical models of various levels of complexity - from 1D to 3D. Flow path geometry is described by means of analytical methods of profiling using a limited number of parameters. 3D turbulent flow model is realised in the program complex IPMFlow, developed based on the earlier codes FlowER and FlowER-U. Examples of developed or modernized turbines for differentpurpose power machines are presented. They are: an expansion turbine, ORC turbine and cogeneration mediumpressure turbine.

  9. Blood Flow in Arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, David N.

    Blood flow in arteries is dominated by unsteady flow phenomena. The cardiovascular system is an internal flow loop with multiple branches in which a complex liquid circulates. A nondimensional frequency parameter, the Womersley number, governs the relationship between the unsteady and viscous forces. Normal arterial flow is laminar with secondary flows generated at curves and branches. The arteries are living organs that can adapt to and change with the varying hemodynamic conditions. In certain circumstances, unusual hemodynamic conditions create an abnormal biological response. Velocity profile skewing can create pockets in which the direction of the wall shear stress oscillates. Atherosclerotic disease tends to be localized in these sites and results in a narrowing of the artery lumena stenosis. The stenosis can cause turbulence and reduce flow by means of viscous head losses and flow choking. Very high shear stresses near the throat of the stenosis can activate platelets and thereby induce thrombosis, which can totally block blood flow to the heart or brain. Detection and quantification of stenosis serve as the basis for surgical intervention. In the future, the study of arterial blood flow will lead to the prediction of individual hemodynamic flows in any patient, the development of diagnostic tools to quantify disease, and the design of devices that mimic or alter blood flow. This field is rich with challenging problems in fluid mechanics involving three-dimensional, pulsatile flows at the edge of turbulence.

  10. A simplified sizing and mass model for axial flow turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, S.L.

    1989-01-01

    An axial flow turbine mass model has been developed and used to study axial flow turbines for space power systems. Hydrogen, helium-xenon, hydrogen-water vapor, air, and potassium vapor working fluids have been investigated to date. The impact of construction material, inlet temperature, rotational speed, pressure ratio, and power level on turbine mass and volume has been analyzed. This paper presents the turbine model description and results of parametric studies showing general design trends characteristic of any axial flow machine. Also, a comparison of axial flow turbine designs using helium-xenon mixtures and potassium vapor working fluids, which are used in Brayton and Rankine space power systems, respectively, is presented. 9 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Unsteady Flow Field in a Multistage Axial Flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suryavamshi, N.; Lakshminarayana, B.; Prato, J.

    1997-01-01

    The flow field in a multistage compressor is three-dimensional, unsteady, and turbulent with substantial viscous effects. Some of the specific phenomena that has eluded designers include the effects of rotor-stator and rotor-rotor interactions and the physics of mixing of velocity, pressure, temperature and velocity fields. An attempt was made, to resolve experimentally, the unsteady pressure and temperature fields downstream of the second stator of a multistage axial flow compressor which will provide information on rotor-stator interaction effects and the nature of the unsteadiness in an embedded stator of a three stage axial flow compressor. Detailed area traverse measurements using pneumatic five hole probe, thermocouple probe, semi-conductor total pressure probe (Kulite) and an aspirating probe downstream of the second stator were conducted at the peak efficiency operating condition. The unsteady data was then reduced through an ensemble averaging technique which splits the signal into deterministic and unresolved components. Auto and cross correlation techniques were used to correlate the deterministic total temperature and velocity components (acquired using a slanted hot-film probe at the same measurement locations) and the gradients, distributions and relative weights of each of the terms of the average passage equation were then determined. Based on these measurements it was observed that the stator wakes, hub leakage flow region, casing endwall suction surface corner region, and the casing endwall region away from the blade surfaces were the regions of highest losses in total pressure, lowest efficiency and highest levels of unresolved unsteadiness. The deterministic unsteadiness was found to be high in the hub and casing endwall regions as well as on the pressure side of the stator wake. The spectral distribution of hot-wire and kulite voltages shows that at least eight harmonics of all three rotor blade passing frequencies are present at this

  12. Dynamics of intrinsic axial flows in unsheared, uniform magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J. C.; Diamond, P. H.; Xu, X. Q.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-05-15

    A simple model for the generation and amplification of intrinsic axial flow in a linear device, controlled shear decorrelation experiment, is proposed. This model proposes and builds upon a novel dynamical symmetry breaking mechanism, using a simple theory of drift wave turbulence in the presence of axial flow shear. This mechanism does not require complex magnetic field structure, such as shear, and thus is also applicable to intrinsic rotation generation in tokamaks at weak or zero magnetic shear, as well as to linear devices. This mechanism is essentially the self-amplification of the mean axial flow profile, i.e., a modulational instability. Hence, the flow development is a form of negative viscosity phenomenon. Unlike conventional mechanisms where the residual stress produces an intrinsic torque, in this dynamical symmetry breaking scheme, the residual stress induces a negative increment to the ambient turbulent viscosity. The axial flow shear is then amplified by this negative viscosity increment. The resulting mean axial flow profile is calculated and discussed by analogy with the problem of turbulent pipe flow. For tokamaks, the negative viscosity is not needed to generate intrinsic rotation. However, toroidal rotation profile gradient is enhanced by the negative increment in turbulent viscosity.

  13. Dynamics of intrinsic axial flows in unsheared, uniform magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. C.; Diamond, P. H.; Xu, X. Q.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-05-01

    A simple model for the generation and amplification of intrinsic axial flow in a linear device, controlled shear decorrelation experiment, is proposed. This model proposes and builds upon a novel dynamical symmetry breaking mechanism, using a simple theory of drift wave turbulence in the presence of axial flow shear. This mechanism does not require complex magnetic field structure, such as shear, and thus is also applicable to intrinsic rotation generation in tokamaks at weak or zero magnetic shear, as well as to linear devices. This mechanism is essentially the self-amplification of the mean axial flow profile, i.e., a modulational instability. Hence, the flow development is a form of negative viscosity phenomenon. Unlike conventional mechanisms where the residual stress produces an intrinsic torque, in this dynamical symmetry breaking scheme, the residual stress induces a negative increment to the ambient turbulent viscosity. The axial flow shear is then amplified by this negative viscosity increment. The resulting mean axial flow profile is calculated and discussed by analogy with the problem of turbulent pipe flow. For tokamaks, the negative viscosity is not needed to generate intrinsic rotation. However, toroidal rotation profile gradient is enhanced by the negative increment in turbulent viscosity.

  14. Recent developments of axial flow compressors under transonic flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, G.; Raghunandana, K.; Satish Shenoy, B.

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to give a holistic view of the most advanced technology and procedures that are practiced in the field of turbomachinery design. Compressor flow solver is the turbulence model used in the CFD to solve viscous problems. The popular techniques like Jameson’s rotated difference scheme was used to solve potential flow equation in transonic condition for two dimensional aero foils and later three dimensional wings. The gradient base method is also a popular method especially for compressor blade shape optimization. Various other types of optimization techniques available are Evolutionary algorithms (EAs) and Response surface methodology (RSM). It is observed that in order to improve compressor flow solver and to get agreeable results careful attention need to be paid towards viscous relations, grid resolution, turbulent modeling and artificial viscosity, in CFD. The advanced techniques like Jameson’s rotated difference had most substantial impact on wing design and aero foil. For compressor blade shape optimization, Evolutionary algorithm is quite simple than gradient based technique because it can solve the parameters simultaneously by searching from multiple points in the given design space. Response surface methodology (RSM) is a method basically used to design empirical models of the response that were observed and to study systematically the experimental data. This methodology analyses the correct relationship between expected responses (output) and design variables (input). RSM solves the function systematically in a series of mathematical and statistical processes. For turbomachinery blade optimization recently RSM has been implemented successfully. The well-designed high performance axial flow compressors finds its application in any air-breathing jet engines.

  15. Measurements of inlet flow distortions in an axial flow fan (6 and 9 blade rotor)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, L. C.

    1978-01-01

    A large quantity of experimental data on inlet flow distortions in an axial flow fan were obtained. The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of design and operating variables and the type of distortion on the response of an axial flow turbomachinery rotor. Included are background information and overall trends observed in distortion attenuation and unsteady total pressure losses.

  16. Performance analysis of axial-flow mixing impellers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Pullum, L.

    2000-03-01

    Theoretical formulations for impeller performance were evaluated based on a blade-element theory. These enable the calculation of the head and power vs. flow-rate curves of axial-flow impellers. The technique uses the life and drag coefficients of the blade section of an impeller to calculate the spanwise swirl-velocity distribution. Using the angular-momentum equation, it is possible to calculate the corresponding spanwise distribution of the energy head of the impeller. Integration of these distributions of head and torque gives the impeller's performance. Parameters including the flow number, the power number, the thrust force number, and the swirl velocity can be found at the impeller operating point, determined using the head curve and an experimentally calibrated resistance curve. A laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) system was used to measure the velocity distribution for different axial flow impellers in mixing tanks. Calculated flow and power numbers agreed well with the experimental results. Using the blade's spanwise head distribution and a set of calibrated flow-resistance data, it is also possible to estimate an impeller's outlet axial-velocity distribution. Predictions compared well with LDV experimental data. The effect of impeller-blade angle, number of blades, blade camber, and blade thickness on the performance of axial-flow impellers was investigated using the Agitator software.

  17. Design of Multistage Axial-Flow Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouse, J. E.; Gorrell, W. T.

    1983-01-01

    Program developed for computing aerodynamic design of multistage axialflow compressor and associated blading geometry input for internal flow analysis. Aerodynamic solution gives velocity diagrams on selected streamlines of revolution at blade row edges. Program written in FORTRAN IV.

  18. Optimal design of multi-conditions for axial flow pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, L. J.; Tang, F. P.; Liu, C.; Xie, R. S.; Zhang, W. P.

    2016-11-01

    Passage components of the pump device will have a negative flow state when axial pump run off the design condition. Combined with model tests of axial flow pump, this paper use numerical simulation and numerical optimization techniques, and change geometric design parameters of the impeller to optimal design of multi conditions for Axial Flow Pump, in order to improve the efficiency of non-design conditions, broad the high efficient district and reduce operating cost. The results show that, efficiency curve of optimized significantly wider than the initial one without optimization. The efficiency of low flow working point increased by about 2.6%, the designed working point increased by about 0.5%, and the high flow working point increased the most, about 7.4%. The change range of head is small, so all working point can meet the operational requirements. That will greatly reduce operating costs and shorten the period of optimal design. This paper adopted the CFD simulation as the subject analysis, combined with experiment study, instead of artificial way of optimization design with experience, which proves the reliability and efficiency of the optimization design of multi-operation conditions of axial-flow pump device.

  19. Through-Flow Calculations in Axial Turbomachinery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-10-01

    Germany, on 20 and 21 May 1976. i DISTMIBUT’ON STATE~~ " ~ApprL ied fo! publiL’ releose; 2: 4 THE MISSION OF AGARD The mission of AGARD is to bring...LOSS PREDICTION by W.R.Davs and D.A.J.Millar 3 THROUGH-FLOW CALCULATIONS: THEORY AND PRACTICE IN TURBOMACHINERY DESIGN by J.E.Caruthers and T.F.McKain 4 ...REMARKS by M.Pianko 14 li //I (5 4 - i *l:. ij 4 • TURBOMACHINERY THROUGH-FLOW CAL’UILATION METHODS Technical Evaluation Report by J.Chauvin Von Kdrmdn

  20. Blood flow and microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureau, Lionel; Coupier, Gwennou; Dubois, Frank; Duperray, Alain; Farutin, Alexander; Minetti, Christophe; Misbah, Chaouqi; Podgorski, Thomas; Tsvirkun, Daria; Vysokikh, Mikhail

    2017-01-01

    The absence of gravity during space flight can alter cardio-vascular functions partially due to reduced physical activity. This affects the overall hemodynamics, and in particular the level of shear stresses to which blood vessels are submitted. Long-term exposure to space environment is thus susceptible to induce vascular remodeling through a mechanotransduction cascade that couples vessel shape and function with the mechanical cues exerted by the circulating cells on the vessel walls. Central to such processes, the glycocalyx - i.e. the micron-thick layer of biomacromolecules that lines the lumen of blood vessels and is directly exposed to blood flow - is a major actor in the regulation of biochemical and mechanical interactions. We discuss in this article several experiments performed under microgravity, such as the determination of lift force and collective motion in blood flow, and some preliminary results obtained in artificial microfluidic circuits functionalized with endothelium that offer interesting perspectives for the study of the interactions between blood and endothelium in healthy condition as well as by mimicking the degradation of glycocalyx caused by long space missions. A direct comparison between experiments and simulations is discussed. xml:lang="fr"

  1. Transonic airfoil and axial flow rotary machine

    DOEpatents

    Nagai, Naonori; Iwatani, Junji

    2015-09-01

    Sectional profiles close to a tip 124 and a part between a midportion 125 and a hub 123 are shifted to the upstream of an operating fluid flow in a sweep direction. Accordingly, an S shape is formed in which the tip 124 and the part between the midportion 125 and the hub 123 protrude. As a result, it is possible reduce various losses due to shook, waves, thereby forming a transonic airfoil having an excellent aerodynamic characteristic.

  2. Predicting the Performance of an Axial-Flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinke, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Stage-stacking computer code (STGSTK) developed for predicting off-design performance of multi-stage axial-flow compressors. Code uses meanline stagestacking method. Stage and cumulative compressor performance calculated from representative meanline velocity diagrams located at rotor inlet and outlet meanline radii. Numerous options available within code. Code developed so user modify correlations to suit their needs.

  3. A survey of unclassified axial-flow-compressor literature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzig, Howard Z; Hansen, Arthur G

    1955-01-01

    A survey of unclassified axial-flow-compressor literature is presented in the form of brief reviews of the methods, results, and conclusions of selected reports. The reports are organized into several main categories with subdivisions, and frequent references are made within the individual reviews to pertinent material elsewhere in the survey.

  4. Modelling pulmonary blood flow.

    PubMed

    Tawhai, Merryn H; Burrowes, Kelly S

    2008-11-30

    Computational model analysis has been used widely to understand and interpret complexity of interactions in the pulmonary system. Pulmonary blood transport is a multi-scale phenomenon that involves scale-dependent structure and function, therefore requiring different model assumptions for the microcirculation and the arterial or venous flows. The blood transport systems interact with the surrounding lung tissue, and are dependent on hydrostatic pressure gradients, control of vasoconstriction, and the topology and material composition of the vascular trees. This review focuses on computational models that have been developed to study the different mechanisms contributing to regional perfusion of the lung. Different models for the microcirculation and the pulmonary arteries are considered, including fractal approaches and anatomically-based methods. The studies that are reviewed illustrate the different complementary approaches that can be used to address the same physiological question of flow heterogeneity.

  5. Rotor wake characteristics of a transonic axial flow fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, M. D.; Gertz, J.; Epstein, A.; Strazisar, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    State of the art turbomachinery flow analysis codes are not capable of predicting the viscous flow features within turbomachinery blade wakes. Until efficient 3D viscous flow analysis codes become a reality there is therefore a need for models which can describe the generation and transport of blade wakes and the mixing process within the wake. To address the need for experimental data to support the development of such models, high response pressure measurements and laser anemometer velocity measurements were obtained in the wake of a transonic axial flow fan rotor.

  6. Numerical results for axial flow compressor instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccaughan, F. E.

    1988-01-01

    Using Cornell's supercomputing facilities, an extensive study of the Moore-Greitzer model was carried out, which gives accurate and reliable information about compressor instability. The bifurcation analysis in the companion paper shows the dependence of the mode of compressor response on the shape of the rotating stall characteristic. The numerical results verify and extend this with a more accurate representation of the characteristic. The effect of the parameters on the shape of the rotating stall characteristic is investigated, and it is found that the parameters with the strongest effects are the inlet length, and the shape of the compressor pressure rise vs. mass flow diagram (i.e. tall diagrams vs. shallow diagrams). The effects of inlet guide vane loss on the characteristic are discussed.

  7. Resting cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Ances, B M.; Sisti, D; Vaida, F; Liang, C L.; Leontiev, O; Perthen, J E.; Buxton, R B.; Benson, D; Smith, D M.; Little, S J.; Richman, D D.; Moore, D J.; Ellis, R J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: HIV enters the brain soon after infection causing neuronal damage and microglial/astrocyte dysfunction leading to neuropsychological impairment. We examined the impact of HIV on resting cerebral blood flow (rCBF) within the lenticular nuclei (LN) and visual cortex (VC). Methods: This cross-sectional study used arterial spin labeling MRI (ASL-MRI) to measure rCBF within 33 HIV+ and 26 HIV− subjects. Nonparametric Wilcoxon rank sum test assessed rCBF differences due to HIV serostatus. Classification and regression tree (CART) analysis determined optimal rCBF cutoffs for differentiating HIV serostatus. The effects of neuropsychological impairment and infection duration on rCBF were evaluated. Results: rCBF within the LN and VC were significantly reduced for HIV+ compared to HIV− subjects. A 2-tiered CART approach using either LN rCBF ≤50.09 mL/100 mL/min or LN rCBF >50.09 mL/100 mL/min but VC rCBF ≤37.05 mL/100 mL/min yielded an 88% (29/33) sensitivity and an 88% (23/26) specificity for differentiating by HIV serostatus. HIV+ subjects, including neuropsychologically unimpaired, had reduced rCBF within the LN (p = 0.02) and VC (p = 0.001) compared to HIV− controls. A temporal progression of brain involvement occurred with LN rCBF significantly reduced for both acute/early (<1 year of seroconversion) and chronic HIV-infected subjects, whereas rCBF in the VC was diminished for only chronic HIV-infected subjects. Conclusion: Resting cerebral blood flow (rCBF) using arterial spin labeling MRI has the potential to be a noninvasive neuroimaging biomarker for assessing HIV in the brain. rCBF reductions that occur soon after seroconversion possibly reflect neuronal or vascular injury among HIV+ individuals not yet expressing neuropsychological impairment. GLOSSARY AEH = acute/early HIV infection; ANOVA = analysis of variance; ASL-MRI = arterial spin labeling MRI; CART = classification and regression tree; CBF = cerebral blood flow; CH = chronic HIV

  8. Long-term durability test of axial-flow ventricular assist device under pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Masahiro; Kosaka, Ryo; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi; Shirasu, Akio; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki

    2017-03-01

    A long-term durability test was conducted on a newly developed axial-flow ventricular assist device (VAD) with hydrodynamic bearings. The mock circulatory loop consisted of a diaphragm pump with a mechanical heart valve, a reservoir, a compliance tank, a resistance valve, and flow paths made of polymer or titanium. The VAD was installed behind the diaphragm pump. The blood analog fluid was a saline solution with added glycerin at a temperature of 37 °C. A pulsatile flow was introduced into the VAD over a range of flow rates to realize a positive flow rate and a positive pressure head at a given impeller rotational speed, yielding a flow rate of 5 L/min and a pressure of 100 mmHg. Pulsatile flow conditions were achieved with the diastolic and systolic flow rates of ~0 and 9.5 L/min, respectively, and an average flow rate of ~5 L/min at a pulse rate of 72 bpm. The VAD operation was judged by not only the rotational speed of the impeller, but also the diastolic, systolic, and average flow rates and the average pressure head of the VAD. The conditions of the mock circulatory loop, including the pulse rate of the diaphragm pump, the fluid temperature, and the fluid viscosity were maintained. Eight VADs were tested with testing periods of 2 years, during which they were continuously in operation. The VAD performance factors, including the power consumption and the vibration characteristics, were kept almost constant. The long-term durability of the developed VAD was successfully demonstrated.

  9. Turbulence and Complex Flow Phenomena in Axial Turbomachines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Adamczyk J. J., 1996, "Wake Mixing in Axial Flow Compressors," ASME Paper No. 96-GT-029 Adamczyk J.J., Mulac R.A., Celestina M.L., 1986, "A Model for...Closing the Inviscid Form of the Average-Passage Equation System," ASME Paper No. 86-GT-227 Adamczyk J.J.; Celestina M.L.; Beach T.A.; Barnett M., 1990

  10. Numerical Study of Axial Turbulent Flow Over Long Cylinders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    the planar case, with maxima (-21/2/u;t 3.2) also located at y+ 12. In a visualization study of axial flow over a cylinder, Lueptow & Haritonidis...a) I 0 0 50 100 150 200I + FIcuE 4.2 Profiles of the root-mean-square value of the pressure source terms normalized by v and Ur: (a) linear

  11. The new performance calculation method of fouled axial flow compressor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huadong; Xu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Fouling is the most important performance degradation factor, so it is necessary to accurately predict the effect of fouling on engine performance. In the previous research, it is very difficult to accurately model the fouled axial flow compressor. This paper develops a new performance calculation method of fouled multistage axial flow compressor based on experiment result and operating data. For multistage compressor, the whole compressor is decomposed into two sections. The first section includes the first 50% stages which reflect the fouling level, and the second section includes the last 50% stages which are viewed as the clean stage because of less deposits. In this model, the performance of the first section is obtained by combining scaling law method and linear progression model with traditional stage stacking method; simultaneously ambient conditions and engine configurations are considered. On the other hand, the performance of the second section is calculated by averaged infinitesimal stage method which is based on Reynolds' law of similarity. Finally, the model is successfully applied to predict the 8-stage axial flow compressor and 16-stage LM2500-30 compressor. The change of thermodynamic parameters such as pressure ratio, efficiency with the operating time, and stage number is analyzed in detail.

  12. The New Performance Calculation Method of Fouled Axial Flow Compressor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Fouling is the most important performance degradation factor, so it is necessary to accurately predict the effect of fouling on engine performance. In the previous research, it is very difficult to accurately model the fouled axial flow compressor. This paper develops a new performance calculation method of fouled multistage axial flow compressor based on experiment result and operating data. For multistage compressor, the whole compressor is decomposed into two sections. The first section includes the first 50% stages which reflect the fouling level, and the second section includes the last 50% stages which are viewed as the clean stage because of less deposits. In this model, the performance of the first section is obtained by combining scaling law method and linear progression model with traditional stage stacking method; simultaneously ambient conditions and engine configurations are considered. On the other hand, the performance of the second section is calculated by averaged infinitesimal stage method which is based on Reynolds' law of similarity. Finally, the model is successfully applied to predict the 8-stage axial flow compressor and 16-stage LM2500-30 compressor. The change of thermodynamic parameters such as pressure ratio, efficiency with the operating time, and stage number is analyzed in detail. PMID:25197717

  13. Visualization study of flow in axial flow inducer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.

    1972-01-01

    A visualization study of the flow through a three ft dia model of a four bladed inducer, which is operated in air at a flow coefficient of 0.065, is reported in this paper. The flow near the blade surfaces, inside the rotating passages, downstream and upstream of the inducer is visualized by means of smoke, tufts, ammonia filament, and lampblack techniques. Flow is found to be highly three dimensional, with appreciable radial velocity throughout the entire passage. The secondary flows observed near the hub and annulus walls agree with qualitative predictions obtained from the inviscid secondary flow theory.

  14. Performance studies on an axial flow compressor stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitaram, N.

    1986-01-01

    A low-speed, medium loaded axial flow compressor stage is studied experimentally and theoretically. The flow compressor facility, composed of an inlet guide vane row, a rotor blade row, and a stator blade row, and the principles of the streamline curvature method (SCM) and the Douglas-Neumann cascade program are described. The radial distribution of the flow properties, the rotor blade static pressure distribution, and the lift coefficient and relative flow angle derived experimentally and theoretically are compared. It is determined that there is good correlation between the experimental flow properties and the SCM data, the Douglas-Neumann cascade program and experimental rotor blade static pressure data, and the experimental and theoretical lift coefficients only in the midspan region. Modifications to the SCM and the Douglas-Neumann cascade program in order to improve their accuracy are discussed.

  15. High Frequency Noise Generation in Small Axial Flow Fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinlan, D. A.; Bent, P. H.

    1998-11-01

    This paper presents results from an investigation of the broadband sources of acoustic noise in small axial flow fans. Observations drawn from flow visualization experiments and fluid dynamic measurements indicate that secondary flows are primary contributors to the broadband noise generated by small axial flow fans. More specifically, flow unsteadiness associated with tip gap flows is identified as a primary source of high frequency noise. As air is forced through the tip gap (i.e. the space between the rotating blade tip and the stationary housing), the flow rolls up forming vortices at the blade tip. These vortices convect into the blade passage and become the dominant source of unsteadiness in the blade passage and at the fan exit plane. The data presented indicates that this turbulence is the dominant source of noise above 1.5 kHz for the fan tested. The likely radiation mechanisms are trailing edge scattering, and radiation from free turbulence and/or boundary layers. Three types of experiments were performed as part of the study. First, flow visualization tests were run in an attempt to obtain a subjective evaluation of the flowfield. Then, stationary and rotating hot-wires were used to provide mean velocity and turbulence intensity data for non-radial flow components. Using the results from the flow visualization and hot-wire tests, possible noise generation mechanisms were postulated. Fan modifications were then made to test the viability of the proposed noise contributors. The addition of flanges to the blade tip and of fabric near the blade trailing edges provided up to a 9 dB decrease in sound power above 1 kHz. These results will need to be coupled to an analogous study of low frequency noise generation (i.e. below 1 kHz) for a significant reduction in perceived noise level to be achieved.

  16. Hydraulic Performance Comparison for Axial Flow Impeller and Mixed Flow Impeller with Same Specific Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhongyong; Ni, Yongyan; Yuan, Jianping; Ji, Pei

    2015-12-01

    An axial flow impeller and a mixed flow impeller with same specific speed were experimentally investigated, and the suction performance was studied with the help of CFD simulations. The results show that the axial impeller is roughly better than the mixed flow one. Especially under the design condition and a low flow rate condition range near the designed one, the axial flow impeller is more stable and therefore more suitable to be used in a water jet propulsion, while under these conditions the mixed flow impeller displays significant discrepancies. On the other hand, though its efficiency at the best efficiency point is lower than that of the axial flow one, the mixed flow impeller has a larger range of high efficiency conditions and is more convenient to be controlled to satisfy the irrigation and drainage systems that ought to be adjusted to varied flow rate conditions under a fixed head. In addition, the numerical investigation at the rated point shows that the axial impeller has a much better suction performance than the mixed flow impeller, which contradicts with the experience knowledge and therefore details need to be further studied.

  17. Axial-Flow Compressor Performance With Water Ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuchiya, T.; Murthy, S. B.

    1986-01-01

    Stage-stacking computer code (WISGSK) developed for prediction of offdesign axial-flow compressor performance with water ingestion. Code uses meantime stage-stacking method; stage and cumulative compressor performance calculated utilizing representative triangles located at rotor inlet and outlet mean radii. Code provides options for calculation of performance with mixtures of gases such as air and water vapor and air/water droplet mixtures with different water contents. Useful for obtaining preliminary estimates of overall performance of compressors with water ingestion given design point details corresponding to airflow and nature of corrections for air/water mixture flow.

  18. In vitro pulsatility analysis of axial-flow and centrifugal-flow left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Stanfield, J Ryan; Selzman, Craig H

    2013-03-01

    Recently, continuous-flow ventricular assist devices (CF-VADs) have supplanted older, pulsatile-flow pumps, for treating patients with advanced heart failure. Despite the excellent results of the newer generation devices, the effects of long-term loss of pulsatility remain unknown. The aim of this study is to compare the ability of both axial and centrifugal continuous-flow pumps to intrinsically modify pulsatility when placed under physiologically diverse conditions. Four VADs, two axial- and two centrifugal-flow, were evaluated on a mock circulatory flow system. Each VAD was operated at a constant impeller speed over three hypothetical cardiac conditions: normo-tensive, hypertensive, and hypotensive. Pulsatility index (PI) was compared for each device under each condition. Centrifugal-flow devices had a higher PI than that of axial-flow pumps. Under normo-tension, flow PI was 0.98 ± 0.03 and 1.50 ± 0.02 for the axial and centrifugal groups, respectively (p < 0.01). Under hypertension, flow PI was 1.90 ± 0.16 and 4.21 ± 0.29 for the axial and centrifugal pumps, respectively (p = 0.01). Under hypotension, PI was 0.73 ± 0.02 and 0.78 ± 0.02 for the axial and centrifugal groups, respectively (p = 0.13). All tested CF-VADs were capable of maintaining some pulsatile-flow when connected in parallel with our mock ventricle. We conclude that centrifugal-flow devices outperform the axial pumps from the basis of PI under tested conditions.

  19. Secondary flows in axial turbines--a review.

    PubMed

    Langston, L S

    2001-05-01

    An important problem that arises in the design and the performance of axial flow turbines is the understanding, analysis, prediction and control of secondary flows. Sieverding has given a review of secondary flow literature, covering up to 1985. In this paper a brief review of pre-1985 work is given, and then a survey of open literature secondary flow investigations since the Sieverding review is presented. Most of the studies reviewed deal with plane or annular cascade flows. Tip clearance effects are not covered. The basic secondary flow picture for a turbine cascade, as measured and verified by a number of investigators is described. Recent work that shows refined secondary flow vortex structures is examined. A flow parameter based on inlet boundary layer properties used to predict horseshoe vortex swirl is presented. Work on secondary flow loss reduction, involving airfoil geometry, endwall fences and endwall contouring is briefly reviewed. A new leading edge bulb geometry that has demonstrated impressive loss reduction is considered. It is concluded that accurate routine prediction of secondary flow losses has not yet been achieved, and must await either a better turbulence model or more experiments to reveal new endwall loss production mechanisms. Lastly, loss is examined from the standpoint of entropy generation.

  20. Characteristics of tip-leakage flow in an axial fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Keuntae; Choi, Haecheon; Choi, Seokho; Sa, Yongcheol

    2014-11-01

    An axial fan with a shroud generates complicated vortical structures by the interaction of the axial flow with the fan blades and shroud near the blade tips. Large eddy simulation (LES) is performed for flow through a forward-swept axial fan, operating at the design condition of Re = 547,000 based on the radius of blade tip and the tip velocity. A dynamic global model (Lee et al. 2010) is used for a subgrid-scale model, and an immersed boundary method in a non-inertial reference frame (Kim & Choi 2006) is adopted for the present simulation. It is found that two vortical structures are formed near the blade tip: the main tip leakage vortex (TLV) and the auxiliary TLV. The main TLV is initiated near the leading edge, develops downstream, and impinges on the pressure surface of the next blade, where the pressure fluctuations and turbulence intensity become high. On the other hand, the auxiliary TLV is initiated at the aft part of the blade but is relatively weak such that it merges with the main TLV. Supported by the KISTI Supercomputing Center (KSC-2014-C2-014).

  1. Mixing for multi-stage axial-flow compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shiming; Chen, Maozhang

    1991-11-01

    A set of equations has been derived for through-flow fields in multistage axial-flow compressors, and all the spanwise mixing effects in a unified form are presented, including both turbulence and secondary flows. The relations have been discussed between 3D shear structures of the compressors' flow fields and the turbulent mixing effects in the 2D throughflow fields. It has been found that the turbulent mixing in the 2D throughflow fields is determined by the 3D shear structures, rather than the 2D shear structures alone. From the comparison of the computational results of the equations and experimental results as well as the results of Gallimore's mixing calculations, it has been shown that the characteristics of spanwise mixing can be modeled better by applying these equations.

  2. End wall flow characteristics and overall performance of an axial flow compressor stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitaram, N.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1983-01-01

    This review indicates the possible future directions for research on endwall flows in axial flow compressors. Theoretical investigations on the rotor blade endwall flows in axial flow compressors reported here include the secondary flow calculation and the development of the momentum integral equations for the prediction of the annulus wall boundary layer. The equations for secondary vorticity at the rotor exit are solved analytically. The solution includes the effects of rotation and the viscosity. The momentum integral equations derived include the effect of the blade boundary layers. The axial flow compressor facility of the Department of Aerospace Engineering at The Pennsylvania State University, which is used for the experimental investigations of the endwall flows, is described in some detail. The overall performance and other preliminary experimental results are presented. Extensive radial flow surveys are carried out at the design and various off design conditions. These are presented and interpreted in this report. The following experimental investigations of the blade endwall flows are carried out. (1) Rotor blade endwall flows: The following measurements are carried out at four flow coefficients. (a) The rotor blade static pressures at various axial and radial stations (with special emphasis near the blade tips). (b) The hub wall static pressures inside the rotor blade passage at various axial and tangential stations. (2) IGV endwall flows: The following measurements are carried out at the design flow coefficient. (a) The boundary layer profiles at various axial and tangential stations inside the blade passage and at the blade exit. (b) Casing static pressures and limiting streamline angles inside the blade passage.

  3. Numerical flow analysis of axial flow compressor for steady and unsteady flow cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhudev, B. M.; Satish kumar, S.; Rajanna, D.

    2017-07-01

    Performance of jet engine is dependent on the performance of compressor. This paper gives numerical study of performance characteristics for axial compressor. The test rig is present at CSIR LAB Bangalore. Flow domains are meshed and fluid dynamic equations are solved using ANSYS package. Analysis is done for six different speeds and for operating conditions like choke, maximum efficiency & before stall point. Different plots are compared and results are discussed. Shock displacement, vortex flows, leakage patterns are presented along with unsteady FFT plot and time step plot.

  4. AERODYNAMIC AND BLADING DESIGN OF MULTISTAGE AXIAL FLOW COMPRESSORS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouse, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The axial-flow compressor is used for aircraft engines because it has distinct configuration and performance advantages over other compressor types. However, good potential performance is not easily obtained. The designer must be able to model the actual flows well enough to adequately predict aerodynamic performance. This computer program has been developed for computing the aerodynamic design of a multistage axial-flow compressor and, if desired, the associated blading geometry input for internal flow analysis. The aerodynamic solution gives velocity diagrams on selected streamlines of revolution at the blade row edges. The program yields aerodynamic and blading design results that can be directly used by flow and mechanical analysis codes. Two such codes are TSONIC, a blade-to-blade channel flow analysis code (COSMIC program LEW-10977), and MERIDL, a more detailed hub-to-shroud flow analysis code (COSMIC program LEW-12966). The aerodynamic and blading design program can reduce the time and effort required to obtain acceptable multistage axial-flow compressor configurations by generating good initial solutions and by being compatible with available analysis codes. The aerodynamic solution assumes steady, axisymmetric flow so that the problem is reduced to solving the two-dimensional flow field in the meridional plane. The streamline curvature method is used for the iterative aerodynamic solution at stations outside of the blade rows. If a blade design is desired, the blade elements are defined and stacked within the aerodynamic solution iteration. The blade element inlet and outlet angles are established by empirical incidence and deviation angles to the relative flow angles of the velocity diagrams. The blade element centerline is composed of two segments tangentially joined at a transition point. The local blade angle variation of each element can be specified as a fourth-degree polynomial function of path distance. Blade element thickness can also be specified

  5. Pulsatile Ocular Blood Flow in Healthy Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Kab; Cho, Byung Joo; Hong, Samin; Kang, Sung Yong; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Chan Yun

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To determine the normal reference range of pulsatile ocular blood flow (POBF) values in healthy Korean subjects and to find out the factors that may affect them. Methods A total of 280 eyes of 280 normal subjects were included in this study. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), intraocular pressure (IOP), axial length, POBF, systemic blood pressure, and pulse rate were measured. The mean, standard deviation, range, and the 5th and 95th percentiles of POBF were calculated, and the influences of various parameters to POBF were determined by multiple regression analyses. Results The mean POBF value was 766.0±221.6 µl/min in men and 1021.1±249.5 µl/min in women. The 5th and 95th percentiles for POBF values were 486.0 µl/min and 1140.0 µl/min in men and 672.0 µl/min and 1458.0 µl/min in women. The POBF values were significantly influenced by gender, mean blood pressure, pulse rate, and axial length. Conclusions Even though the POBF values were influenced by gender, BP, and axial length, we could define the normal reference range of POBF in healthy Koreans. PMID:18323699

  6. Evaluation of the impeller shroud performance of an axial flow ventricular assist device using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Su, Boyang; Chua, Leok P; Lim, Tau M; Zhou, Tongming

    2010-09-01

    Generally, there are two types of impeller design used in the axial flow blood pumps. For the first type, which can be found in most of the axial flow blood pumps, the magnet is embedded inside the impeller hub or blades. For the second type, the magnet is embedded inside the cylindrical impeller shroud, and this design has not only increased the rotating stability of the impeller but has also avoided the flow interaction between the impeller blade tip and the pump casing. Although the axial flow blood pumps with either impeller design have been studied individually, the comparisons between these two designs have not been conducted in the literature. Therefore, in this study, two axial flow blood pumps with and without impeller shrouds were numerically simulated with computational fluid dynamics and compared with each other in terms of hydraulic and hematologic performances. For the ease of comparison, these two models have the same inner components, which include a three-blade straightener, a two-blade impeller, and a three-blade diffuser. The simulation results showed that the model with impeller shroud had a lower static pressure head with a lower hydraulic efficiency than its counterpart. It was also found that the blood had a high possibility to deposit on the impeller shroud inner surface, which greatly enhanced the possibility of thrombus formation. The blood damage indices in both models were around 1%, which was much lower than the 13.1% of the axial flow blood pump of Yano et al. with the corresponding experimental hemolysis of 0.033 g/100 L.

  7. Design of axial blood pumps for patients with dysfunctional fontan physiology: computational studies and performance testing.

    PubMed

    Kafagy, Dhyaa H; Dwyer, Thomas W; McKenna, Kelli L; Mulles, Jean P; Chopski, Steven G; Moskowitz, William B; Throckmorton, Amy L

    2015-01-01

    Limited treatment options for patients having dysfunctional single ventricle physiology motivate the necessity for alternative therapeutic options. To address this unmet need, we are developing a collapsible axial flow blood pump. This study investigated the impact of geometric simplicity to facilitate percutaneous placement and maintain optimal performance. Three new pump designs were numerically evaluated. A transient simulation explored the impact of respiration on blood flow conditions over the entire respiratory cycle. Prototype testing of the top performing pump design was completed. The top performing Rec design generated the highest pressure rise range of 2-38 mm Hg for flow rates of 1-4 L/min at 4000-7000 RPM, exceeding the performance of the other two configurations by more than 26%. The blood damage indices for the new pump designs were determined to be below 0.5% and predicted hemolysis levels remained low at less than 7 × 10(-5)  g/100 L. Prototype testing of the Rec design confirmed numerical predictions to within an average of approximately 22%. These findings demonstrate that the pumps are reasonably versatile in operational ability, meet pressure-flow requirements to support Fontan patients, and are expected to have low levels of blood trauma.

  8. Axial and Centrifugal Compressor Mean Line Flow Analysis Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a method to estimate key aerodynamic parameters of single and multistage axial and centrifugal compressors. This mean-line compressor code COMDES provides the capability of sizing single and multistage compressors quickly during the conceptual design process. Based on the compressible fluid flow equations and the Euler equation, the code can estimate rotor inlet and exit blade angles when run in the design mode. The design point rotor efficiency and stator losses are inputs to the code, and are modeled at off design. When run in the off-design analysis mode, it can be used to generate performance maps based on simple models for losses due to rotor incidence and inlet guide vane reset angle. The code can provide an improved understanding of basic aerodynamic parameters such as diffusion factor, loading levels and incidence, when matching multistage compressor blade rows at design and at part-speed operation. Rotor loading levels and relative velocity ratio are correlated to the onset of compressor surge. NASA Stage 37 and the three-stage NASA 74-A axial compressors were analyzed and the results compared to test data. The code has been used to generate the performance map for the NASA 76-B three-stage axial compressor featuring variable geometry. The compressor stages were aerodynamically matched at off-design speeds by adjusting the variable inlet guide vane and variable stator geometry angles to control the rotor diffusion factor and incidence angles.

  9. Line-tied MHD modes: effect of plasma pressure, axial boundary condition and axial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcudi, Francesco; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Finn, John M.

    2008-11-01

    Recent 3D nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of astrophysical jets [1] showed a narrow jet-like region with very tightly wound magnetic fields, very suggestive of jet observations. These results were unexpected because such tightly wound magnetic fields should be violently MHD unstable. In order to make direct contact with the simulations of Ref. [1], we present a linear stability study in resistive MHD in cylindrical geometry. In this work, stability is studied including axial flows and finite plasma pressure. We also changed the axial boundary conditions to model those typical of astrophysical jets and laboratory experiments, using line-tying at one end of the field lines and non-line-tied boundary conditions at the other end [2]. The numerical results show that pressure strongly shifts the marginal stability threshold relative to the Kruskal-Shafranov threshold and a monotonically increasing pressure profile stabilizes the plasma. On the other hand, non-line-tied boundary conditions have little effect on marginal stability for typical parameters. All the results are supported by analytical studies based on reduced ideal MHD. [1] H. Li, G. Lapenta, J. M. Finn, S. Li, and S. A. Colgate, Astrophys. J. 643, 92 (2006). [2] D. D. Ryutov, I. Furno, T. P. Intrator, S. Abbate, and T. Madziwa-Nussinov, Phys. Plasmas 13, 032105 (2006).

  10. Flow and Performance Calculations of Axial Compressor near Stall Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yoojun; Kang, Shin-Hyoung

    2010-06-01

    Three-dimensional flows through a Low Speed Research Axial Compressor were numerically conducted in order to estimate the performance through unsteady and steady-state simulations. The first stage with the inlet guide vane was investigated at the design point to confirm that the rotor blade induced periodicity exists. Special attention was paid to the flow near the stall condition to inspect the flow behavior in the vicinity of the stall margin. The performance predicted under the steady-state assumption is in good agreement with the measured data. However, the steady-state calculations induce more blockage through the blade passage. Flow separations on the blade surface and end-walls are reduced when unsteady simulation is conducted. The negative jet due to the wake of the rotor blade periodically distorts the boundary layer on the surface of the stator blade and improves the performance of the compressor in terms of the pressure rise. The advantage of the unsteadiness increases as the flow rate reduces. In addition, the rotor tip leakage flow is forced downstream by the unsteadiness. Consequently, the behavior contributes to extending the range of operation by preventing the leakage flow from proceeding upstream near the stall margin.

  11. Local Control of Blood Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifford, Philip S.

    2011-01-01

    Organ blood flow is determined by perfusion pressure and vasomotor tone in the resistance vessels of the organ. Local factors that regulate vasomotor tone include myogenic and metabolic autoregulation, flow-mediated and conducted responses, and vasoactive substances released from red blood cells. The relative importance of each of these factors…

  12. Local Control of Blood Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifford, Philip S.

    2011-01-01

    Organ blood flow is determined by perfusion pressure and vasomotor tone in the resistance vessels of the organ. Local factors that regulate vasomotor tone include myogenic and metabolic autoregulation, flow-mediated and conducted responses, and vasoactive substances released from red blood cells. The relative importance of each of these factors…

  13. Three dimensional flow field inside the passage of a low speed axial flow compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouagare, M.; Murthy, K. N. S.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of the subsonic flow in the rotor passage of a single stage axial flow compressor were made to study the nature of the flow field and to verify the existing numerical codes. The velocity and pressure fields were measured across the entire rotor passage at six axial locations and at five radial locations. A five-hole probe, rotating with the rotor, was used to measure the three components of velocity, the static and the total pressure. The experimental results are compared with the predictions from Katsanis and McNally's computer program. The agreement between the two is good for most of the cases.

  14. Erythrocyte mechanics and blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Cokelet, G.R.; Meiselman, H.J.; Brooks, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    This monograph includes the proceedings of a conference on erythrocyte mechanics and blood flow. The topics discussed include: the bilayer and shell model of the erythrocyte membrane; protein-protein interactions in red cell membranes; mechano-chemical study of red cell membrane structure in situ; viscoelastic solid behavior of red cell membrane; measures of blood rheology and erythrocyte mechanics; mechanisms of erythrocyte aggregation; dynamics of red blood cell deformation and aggregation, and in vivo flow; physical and mathematical models of blood flow - theoretical analysis; physical and mathematical models of blood flow - experimental studies; behavior or abnormal erythrocytes in capillaries; reduced erythrocyte deformability and vascular pathology; and microvascular transit of normal, immature, and altered red blood cells in spleen versus skeletal muscle. Summary remarks on in vitro erythrocyte characteristics and in vivo erythrocyte behavior are also indcluded. (RJC)

  15. Blood Flow in the Microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secomb, Timothy W.

    2017-01-01

    The microcirculation is an extensive network of microvessels that distributes blood flow throughout living tissues. Reynolds numbers are much less than 1, and the equations of Stokes flow apply. Blood is a suspension of cells with dimensions comparable to microvessel diameters. Highly deformable red blood cells, which transport oxygen, have a volume concentration (hematocrit) of 40–45% in humans. In the narrowest capillaries, these cells move in single file with a surrounding lubricating layer of plasma. In larger vessels, the red blood cells migrate toward the centerline, reducing the resistance to blood flow. Vessel walls are coated with a layer of macromolecules that restricts flow. At diverging bifurcations, hematocrit is not evenly distributed in the downstream vessels. Other particles are driven toward the walls by interactions with red blood cells. These physiologically important phenomena are discussed here from a fluid mechanical perspective.

  16. Aerodynamic Design of Axial-flow Compressors. Volume III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Irving A; Bullock, Robert O; Graham, Robert W; Costilow, Eleanor L; Huppert, Merle C; Benser, William A; Herzig, Howard Z; Hansen, Arthur G; Jackson, Robert J; Yohner, Peggy L; hide

    1956-01-01

    Chapters XI to XIII concern the unsteady compressor operation arising when compressor blade elements stall. The fields of compressor stall and surge are reviewed in Chapters XI and XII, respectively. The part-speed operating problem in high-pressure-ratio multistage axial-flow compressors is analyzed in Chapter XIII. Chapter XIV summarizes design methods and theories that extend beyond the simplified two-dimensional approach used previously in the report. Chapter XV extends this three-dimensional treatment by summarizing the literature on secondary flows and boundary layer effects. Charts for determining the effects of errors in design parameters and experimental measurements on compressor performance are given in Chapters XVI. Chapter XVII reviews existing literature on compressor and turbine matching techniques.

  17. Experimental investigation of axially aligned flow past spinning cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlucci, Pasquale; Buckley, Liam; Mehmedagic, Igbal; Carlucci, Donald; Thangam, Siva

    2016-11-01

    Experimental and numerical results of ongoing subsonic investigations of the flow field about axially aligned spinning cylinders with variable inter-cylinder spacing are presented. The experimental design is capable of investigating wake dynamics of the modeled system up to a Reynolds Number of 300,000 and rotation numbers up to 2. The experimental results are used to validate and confirm numerical simulations with and without the effects of swirl. The focus of the overall effort is an understanding of the dynamics of multi-body problems in a flow field, as such we relate the ongoing effort to previous studies by both the authors and the community at large and our ongoing work in developing accurate plant models for use in engineering analysis and design. Funded in part by U. S. Army ARDEC, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ.

  18. Effect of stage loading on endwall flows in an axial flow compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitaram, N.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports results from investigations conducted to determine the effect of stage loading on endwall flows in a low speed axial flow compressor. These investigations consisted of two sets of measurements. The first set consisted of radial transverse of flow properties at the rotor inlet and exit, at five flow coefficients. These measurements are used to determine the boundary layer integral parameters. The displacement thicknesses at the rotor hub and tip agree reasonably well with Smith's (1970) correlation for multistage axial compressors. The second set consisted of measurements of static pressures on the rotor blade at four flow coefficients. From these measurements, lift coefficient is determined. Also, loss of lift coefficient near the tip is calculated, and is attributed mainly to the tip leakage flows.

  19. Shape optimization of the diffuser blade of an axial blood pump by computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lailai; Zhang, Xiwen; Yao, Zhaohui

    2010-03-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been a viable and effective way to predict hydraulic performance, flow field, and shear stress distribution within a blood pump. We developed an axial blood pump with CFD and carried out a CFD-based shape optimization of the diffuser blade to enhance pressure output and diminish backflow in the impeller-diffuser connecting region at a fixed design point. Our optimization combined a computer-aided design package, a mesh generator, and a CFD solver in an automation environment with process integration and optimization software. A genetic optimization algorithm was employed to find the pareto-optimal designs from which we could make trade-off decisions. Finally, a set of representative designs was analyzed and compared on the basis of the energy equation. The role of the inlet angle of the diffuser blade was analyzed, accompanied by its relationship with pressure output and backflow in the impeller-diffuser connecting region.

  20. A computational study of tip desensitization in axial flow turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallman, James A.

    This study investigates the use of modified blade tip geometries as a means of reducing the leakage flow and vortex in axial flow turbine rotors. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) was used as a tool to compute the flowfield of a low-speed, single stage, experimental turbine. The results from three separate baseline turbine rotor computations all showed good agreement with experimental measurements, validating the numerical procedure's ability to predict complex turbine rotor flowfields. This agreement was, in part, due to an advanced, multi-block method of discretizing the turbine rotor into a computational mesh, which was developed as part of the study. After validating the numerical procedure, three different classifications of tip geometry modification were investigated through CFD simulation: chamfering of the suction side of the blade tip, rounding of the blade tip edge, and squealer-type cavities. Chamfering of the blade tip was shown to cause the leakage flow inside the gap to turn toward the camber direction of the blade. This turning led to reduced mass flow through the gap and a smaller leakage vortex. Rounding of the suction side edge of the blade tip resulted in a considerable reduction in the size and strength of the leakage vortex, while rounding of the pressure side edge of the blade tip greatly increased the mass flow rate through the gap. Rounded squealer cavities acted to reduce the mass flow through the gap and proved advantageous over traditional, square squealer cavities. Final, detailed computations using a very refined mesh reconfirmed the findings of more rapid, preliminary computations. Detailed, three-dimensional analysis of the computed flowfields revealed the physics behind the modified tip geometries' reduction of the leakage flow and vortex.

  1. Endovascular blood flow measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khe, A. K.; Cherevko, A. A.; Chupakhin, A. P.; Krivoshapkin, A. L.; Orlov, K. Yu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper an endovascular measurement system used for intraoperative cerebral blood flow monitoring is described. The system is based on a Volcano ComboMap Pressure and Flow System extended with analogue-to-digital converter and PC laptop. A series of measurements performed in patients with cerebrovascular pathologies allows us to introduce “velocity-pressure” and “flow rate-energy flow rate” diagrams as important characteristics of the blood flow. The measurement system presented here can be used as an additional instrument in neurosurgery for assessment and monitoring of the operation procedure. Clinical data obtained with the system are used for construction of mathematical models and patient-specific simulations. The monitoring of the blood flow parameters during endovascular interventions was approved by the Ethics Committee at the Meshalkin Novosibirsk Research Institute of Circulation Pathology and included in certain surgical protocols for pre-, intra- and postoperative examinations.

  2. Brain Function and Blood Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lassen, Niels A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the use of radioactive isotopes to graphically represent changes in the amount of blood flowing in areas of the human cerebral cortex, reflecting changes in the activity of those areas. Numerous illustrations are included. (Author/MA)

  3. Brain Function and Blood Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lassen, Niels A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the use of radioactive isotopes to graphically represent changes in the amount of blood flowing in areas of the human cerebral cortex, reflecting changes in the activity of those areas. Numerous illustrations are included. (Author/MA)

  4. Investigations on an axial flow fan stage subjected to circumferential inlet flow distortion and swirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govardhan, M.; Viswanath, K.

    1997-12-01

    The combined effects of swirl and circumferential inlet flow distortion on the flow field of an axial flow fan stage are reported in this paper. The study involves measurements at the inlet of the rotor and exit of the rotor and stator at design and off design flow conditions. The study indicated that at the design flow condition, swirl had caused deterioration of the performance in addition to that caused by distortion. Pressure rise imparted in the distortion zone is higher than in the free zone. The attenuation of distortion is high in the presence of swirl.

  5. Chaotic Dynamics of Articulated Cylinders in Confined Axial Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Païdoussis, M. P.; Botez, R. M.

    1993-10-01

    A study is presented of the dynamics of an articulated system of cylinders in confined axial flow. The Articulated system is composed of rigid cylindrical segments, interconnected by rotational springs; it is cantilevered, hanging vertically in the centre of a cylindrical pipe, with fluid flowing downwards in the narrow annular passage. For sufficiently high flow velocity, the system generally loses stability sequentially by diverge (pitchfork bifurcation) and flutter (Hopf bifurcation). Once this occurs, the articulated system interacts with the outer pipe, which acts a constraint to free motions. In the present study, which is mainly concerned with possible chaotic motions in this system, the analytical model is highly simplified. Thus, motions are considered to be planar, and the equations of the articulated system are taken to be linear, other than the terms associated with interaction with the outer pipe, which is modelled by either a trilinear or a cubic spring. A linear eigenvalue analysis is first undertaken, and then the nonlinear behaviour of the constrained model is explored numerically for systems of two and three articulations. Phase-plane plots, power spectral densities and bifurcation diagrams indicate in some cases a clear period-doubling cascade leading to chaos, while in others chaos arises via the quasiperiodic route. Poincaré maps and Lyapunov exponent calculations confirm the existence of chaos. Some analytical work is also presented, involving centre manifold theory, in which the post-Hopf limit-cycle amplitude is calculated and compared with that obtained numerically.

  6. The effect of very low axial clearances on the performance of an axial-flow compressor stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furber, S. B.

    1985-10-01

    The results of tests on an axial-flow compressor stage designed to allow operation at unusually low axial clearances are presented. The axial clearance was varied between 1 and 33 percent of the blade chord whilst the compressor was running, and the stage pressure rise showed a peak at a clearance around 4 percent of blade chord. The pressure rise was 8 percent higher at this clearance than at 33 percent of chord, with no significant change in the stage efficiency. In addition, reducing the clearance was found under some conditions to bring the stage from a stalled to a fully unstalled state. The sound output of the stage was measured at all clearances, and the results show a significant increase in the high harmonics of the blade-passing frequency at low axial clearances.

  7. Hyperhomocysteinemia decreases bone blood flow.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Neetu; Vacek, Thomas P; Fleming, John T; Vacek, Jonathan C; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2011-01-25

    Elevated plasma levels of homocysteine (Hcy), known as hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), are associated with osteoporosis. A decrease in bone blood flow is a potential cause of compromised bone mechanical properties. Therefore, we hypothesized that HHcy decreases bone blood flow and biomechanical properties. To test this hypothesis, male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with Hcy (0.67 g/L) in drinking water for 8 weeks. Age-matched rats served as controls. At the end of the treatment period, the rats were anesthetized. Blood samples were collected from experimental or control rats. Biochemical turnover markers (body weight, Hcy, vitamin B(12), and folate) were measured. Systolic blood pressure was measured from the right carotid artery. Tibia blood flow was measured by laser Doppler flow probe. The results indicated that Hcy levels were significantly higher in the Hcy-treated group than in control rats, whereas vitamin B(12) levels were lower in the Hcy-treated group compared with control rats. There was no significant difference in folate concentration and blood pressure in Hcy-treated versus control rats. The tibial blood flow index of the control group was significantly higher (0.78 ± 0.09 flow unit) compared with the Hcy-treated group (0.51 ± 0.09). The tibial mass was 1.1 ± 0.1 g in the control group and 0.9 ± 0.1 in the Hcy-treated group. The tibia bone density was unchanged in Hcy-treated rats. These results suggest that Hcy causes a reduction in bone blood flow, which contributes to compromised bone biomechanical properties.

  8. Design and transient computational fluid dynamics study of a continuous axial flow ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Song, Xinwei; Untaroiu, Alexandrina; Wood, Houston G; Allaire, Paul E; Throckmorton, Amy L; Day, Steven W; Olsen, Donald B

    2004-01-01

    A ventricular assist device (VAD), which is a miniaturized axial flow pump from the point of view of mechanism, has been designed and studied in this report. It consists of an inducer, an impeller, and a diffuser. The main design objective of this VAD is to produce an axial pump with a streamlined, idealized, and nonobstructing blood flow path. The magnetic bearings are adapted so that the impeller is completely magnetically levitated. The VAD operates under transient conditions because of the spinning movement of the impeller and the pulsatile inlet flow rate. The design method, procedure, and iterations are presented. The VAD's performance under transient conditions is investigated by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Two reference frames, rotational and stationary, are implemented in the CFD simulations. The inlet and outlet surfaces of the impeller, which are connected to the inducer and diffuser respectively, are allowed to rotate and slide during the calculation to simulate the realistic spinning motion of the impeller. The flow head curves are determined, and the variation of pressure distribution during a cardiac cycle (including systole and diastole) is given. The axial oscillation of impeller is also estimated for the magnetic bearing design. The transient CFD simulation, which requires more computer resources and calculation efforts than the steady simulation, provides a range rather than only a point for the VAD's performance. Because of pulsatile flow phenomena and virtual spinning movement of the impeller, the transient simulation, which is realistically correlated with the in vivo implant scenarios of a VAD, is essential to ensure an effective and reliable VAD design.

  9. Axial flow ventricular assist device: system performance considerations.

    PubMed

    Damm, G; Mizuguchi, K; Aber, G; Bacak, J; Akkerman, J; Bozeman, R; Svejkovsky, P; Takatani, S; Nosé, Y; Noon, G P

    1994-01-01

    A cooperative effort between Baylor College of Medicine and NASA/Johnson Space Center is under way to develop an implantable left ventricular assist device for either pulmonary or systemic circulatory support for more than 3 months' duration. Using methodical evaluation and testing, an implantable axial pump has been systematically improved. These improvements include the addition of an inducer as a pumping element in front of the impeller and the construction of an efficient brushless direct current motor. To date, less than 10 W of power is required to generate 5 L/min flow against 100 mm Hg. An index of hemolysis of 0.021 g/100 L has been achieved. Two-day in vivo feasibility studies in calves are under way to evaluate the antithrombogenic nature of the pump. Further improvements in system efficiency, hemolytic performance, and the antithrombogenic nature of the pump are expected with the use of empirical studies, computer flow modeling, and in vivo testing in calves.

  10. Large eddy simulation of tip-leakage flow in an axial flow fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Keuntae; Choi, Haecheon; Choi, Seokho; Sa, Yongcheol; Kwon, Oh-Kyoung

    2016-11-01

    An axial flow fan with a shroud generates a complicated tip-leakage flow by the interaction of the axial flow with the fan blades and shroud near the blade tips. In this study, large eddy simulation is performed for tip-leakage flow in a forward-swept axial flow fan inside an outdoor unit of an air-conditioner, operating at the design condition of the Reynolds number of 547,000 based on the radius of blade tip and the tip velocity. A dynamic global model is used for a subgrid-scale model, and an immersed boundary method in a non-inertial reference frame is adopted. The present simulation clearly reveals the generation and evolution of tip-leakage vortex near the blade tip by the leakage flow. At the inception of the leakage vortex near the leading edge of the suction-side of the blade tip, the leakage vortex is composed of unsteady multiple vortices containing high-frequency fluctuations. As the leakage vortex develops downstream along a slant line toward the following blade, large and meandering movements of the leakage vortex are observed. Thus low-frequency broad peaks of velocity and pressure occur near the pressure surface. Supported by the KISTI Supercomputing Center (KSC-2016-C3-0027).

  11. Effect of flow oscillations on axial energy transport in a porous material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of flow oscillations on axial energy diffusion in a porous medium, in which the flow is continuously disrupted by the irregularities of the porous structure, are analyzed. The formulation employs an internal heat transfer coefficient that couples the fluid and solid temperatures. The final relationship shows that the axial energy transport per unit cross-sectional area and time is directly proportional to the axial temperature gradient and the square of the maximum fluid displacement.

  12. Effect of flow oscillations on axial energy transport in a porous material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of flow oscillations on axial energy diffusion in a porous medium, in which the flow is continuously disrupted by the irregularities of the porous structure, are analyzed. The formulation employs an internal heat transfer coefficient that couples the fluid and solid temperatures. The final relationship shows that the axial energy transport per unit cross-sectional area and time is directly proportional to the axial temperature gradient and the square of the maximum fluid displacement.

  13. Effects of non Newtonian spiral blood flow through arterial stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Md. Mahmudul; Maruf, Mahbub Alam; Ali, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    The spiral component of blood flow has both beneficial and detrimental effects in human circulatory system. A numerical investigation is carried out to analyze the effect of spiral blood flow through an axisymmetric three dimensional artery having 75% stenosis at the center. Blood is assumed as a Non-Newtonian fluid. Standard k-ω model is used for the simulation with the Reynolds number of 1000. A parabolic velocity profile with spiral flow is used as inlet boundary condition. The peak values of all velocity components are found just after stenosis. But total pressure gradually decreases at downstream. Spiral flow of blood has significant effects on tangential component of velocity. However, the effect is mild for radial and axial velocity components. The peak value of wall shear stress is at the stenosis zone and decreases rapidly in downstream. The effect of spiral flow is significant for turbulent kinetic energy. Detailed investigation and relevant pathological issues are delineated throughout the paper.

  14. Secondary flow, turbulent diffusion and mixing in axial-flow compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisler, D. C.; Bauer, R. C.; Okiishi, T. H.

    1987-05-01

    The relative importance of convection by secondary flows and diffusion by turbulence as mechanisms responsible for mixing in multistage, axial-flow compressors has been investigated by using the ethylene tracer-gas technique and hot wire anemometry. The tests were conducted at two loading levels in a large, low-speed, four-stage compressor. The experimental results show that considerable cross-passage and spanwise fluid motion can occur and that both secondary flow and turbulent diffusion can play important roles in the mixing process, depending upon location in the compressor and loading level.

  15. Regulation of intestinal blood flow.

    PubMed

    Matheson, P J; Wilson, M A; Garrison, R N

    2000-09-01

    The gastrointestinal system anatomically is positioned to perform two distinct functions: to digest and absorb ingested nutrients and to sustain barrier function to prevent transepithelial migration of bacteria and antigens. Alterations in these basic functions contribute to a variety of clinical scenarios. These primary functions intrinsically require splanchnic blood flow at both the macrovascular and microvascular levels of perfusion. Therefore, a greater understanding of the mechanisms that regulate intestinal vascular perfusion in the normal state and during pathophysiological conditions would be beneficial. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current understanding regarding the regulatory mechanisms of intestinal blood flow in fasted and fed conditions and during pathological stress.

  16. Bubbly drag reduction in a vertical Couette-Taylor system with superimposed axial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maryami, R.; Farahat, S.; Javad poor, M.; Shafiei Mayam, M. H.

    2014-10-01

    The effect of axial flow on bubbly drag reduction has been experimentally investigated in a vertical Couette-Taylor flow system. The water flow is combined from circumferential and axial flow. Flow condition is fully turbulence and Taylor vortices have appeared in the annulus gap. The shear stress modification in the simultaneous presence of air bubbles and axial flow in the system has been studied by measuring torque acting on the inner cylinder. The results show that axial flow improves the effect of bubbles on drag reduction by damping Taylor vortices and increasing upward velocity of bubbles. In this case, drag reduction of more than 25% has been achieved, which corresponds to lower tested {{\\operatorname{Re}}_{\\omega }} and this amount is gradually decreased with increasing {{\\operatorname{Re}}_{\\omega }} in each {{\\operatorname{Re}}_{a}} and {{Q}_{a}}. Increasing {{Q}_{a}} causes drag reduction enhancement which could be due to the effect of bubbles on flow density reduction, flow fluctuations and Taylor vortices. Moreover, it is observed that skin friction is affected by axial flow solely and by increasing its volume rates, drag reduction reaches 11%. It is concluded that when bubbles and axial flow are simultaneously applied into the Couette-Taylor flow, the amount of achieved drag reduction is more than when they are separately applied.

  17. The Three Dimensional Flow Field at the Exit of an Axial-Flow Turbine Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Ristic, D.; Chu, S.

    1998-01-01

    A systematic and comprehensive investigation was performed to provide detailed data on the three dimensional viscous flow phenomena downstream of a modem turbine rotor and to understand the flow physics such as origin, nature, development of wakes, secondary flow, and leakage flow. The experiment was carried out in the Axial Flow Turbine Research Facility (AFTRF) at Penn State, with velocity measurements taken with a 3-D LDV System. Two radial traverses at 1% and 10% of chord downstream of the rotor have been performed to identify the three-dimensional flow features at the exit of the rotor blade row. Sufficient spatial resolution was maintained to resolve blade wake, secondary flow, and tip leakage flow. The wake deficit is found to be substantial, especially at 1% of chord downstream of the rotor. At this location, negative axial velocity occurs near the tip, suggesting flow separation in the tip clearance region. Turbulence intensities peak in the wake region, and cross- correlations are mainly associated with the velocity gradient of the wake deficit. The radial velocities, both in the wake and in the endwall region, are found to be substantial. Two counter-rotating secondary flows are identified in the blade passage, with one occupying the half span close to the casino and the other occupying the half span close to the hub. The tip leakage flow is well restricted to 10% immersion from the blade tip. There are strong vorticity distributions associated with these secondary flows and tip leakage flow. The passage averaged data are in good agreement with design values.

  18. Geomorphological impact of an axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, C.; Chamorro, L. P.; Sotiropoulos, F.; Guala, M.

    2012-12-01

    MHK devices in river or tidal environments are expected to impact the local geomorphology in the short and long terms, yet to what extent is unknown. A series of experiments in the SAFL main channel were performed on an erodible sediment layer at the threshold of motion aimed at quantifying the local effect of an axial-flow turbine model on erosional and depositional processes. Full planimetric, time resolved measurements of bed elevations z = z(x, y, t) were obtained using a 2D sheet laser scanner mounted on a computer controlled data acquisition carriage. Measurement resolution was 2 mm x 2 mm in the streamwise (x) and spanwise (y) directions, and approximately 70 s temporally. Approximately 180 topographic scans were obtained in about 3.8 hours while simultaneously monitoring mean approach velocities using an acoustic Doppler profiler located approximately 2 rotor diameters, dT, upstream of the turbine. Three synchronized acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs) located 6dT downstream of the turbine at locations coincident with the turbine axis of symmetry and at the lateral blade tips at hub height obtained instantaneous three component velocity measurements u, v, w in the wake of the turbine. The 1:10 scale axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine model operated at a constant tip speed ratio ωdT/2U = 6.3 while measuring instantaneous torque (ω is the rotor angular velocity and U is the mean incoming velocity at the hub height). The sediment layer consisted of coarse sand with mean diameter d50 = 1.8 mm. Using laser scanning measurements, the sediment layer was observed to be stable under the given hydraulic conditions (total discharge of Qw = 1.765 m3s-1 and water depth of h = 1.15 m) during the baseline case (no turbine), ensuring that the mean shear stress was below the critical value for the duration of the experiment. Maintaining the same flow conditions, three additional experiments were performed: a) effect of turbine support (base and tower) only, b) effect of

  19. Passive magnetic bearing in the 3rd generation miniature axial flow pump-the valvo pump 2.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Eiji; Ishida, Yuya; Yano, Tetsuya; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2015-06-01

    The new miniature axial flow pump (valvo pump 2) that is installed at the base of the ascending aorta consists of a six-phase stator, an impeller in which four neodymium magnets are incorporated, and passive magnetic bearings that suspend the impeller for axial levitation. The impeller is sustained by hydrodynamic force between the blade tip of the impeller and the inner housing of the stator. The passive magnetic bearing consists of a ring neodymium magnet and a columnar neodymium magnet. The ring neodymium magnet is set in the stationary side and the columnar neodymium magnet is incorporated in the impeller shaft. Both neodymium magnets are coaxially mounted, and the anterior and posterior passive magnetic bearings suspend the impeller by repulsion force against the hydrodynamic force that acts to move the impeller in the inflow port direction. The passive magnetic bearing was evaluated by a tensile test, and the levitation force of 8.5 N and stiffness of 2.45 N/mm was obtained. Performance of the axial flow pump was evaluated by an in vitro experiment. The passive magnetic bearing showed sufficient levitation capacity to suspend the impeller in an axial direction. In conclusion, the passive magnetic bearing is promising to be one of levitation technology for the third-generation axial flow blood pump.

  20. Regulation of pulpal blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.

    1985-04-01

    The regulation of blood flow of the dental pulp was investigated in dogs and rats anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital. Pulpal blood flow was altered by variations of local and systemic hemodynamics. Macrocirculatory blood flow (ml/min/100 g) in the dental pulp was measured with both the /sup 133/Xe washout and the 15-microns radioisotope-labeled microsphere injection methods on the canine teeth of dogs, to provide a comparison of the two methods in the same tooth. Microcirculatory studies were conducted in the rat incisor tooth with microscopic determination of the vascular pattern, RBC velocity, and intravascular volumetric flow distribution. Pulpal resistance vessels have alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptors. Activation of alpha-receptors by intra-arterial injection of norepinephrine (NE) caused both a reduction in macrocirculatory Qp in dogs and decreases in arteriolar and venular diameters and intravascular volumetric flow (Qi) in rats. These responses were blocked by the alpha-antagonist PBZ. Activation of beta-receptors by intra-arterial injection of isoproterenal (ISO) caused a paradoxical reduction of Qp in dogs. In rats, ISO caused a transient increase in arteriolar Qi followed by a flow reduction; arteriolar dilation was accompanied by venular constriction. These macrocirculatory and microcirculatory responses to ISO were blocked by the alpha-antagonist propranolol.

  1. Development of the Valvo pump: an axial flow pump implanted at the heart valve position.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Y; Nakamura, H; Okamoto, E; Yozu, R; Kawada, S; Kim, D W

    1999-06-01

    Pulsatile artificial hearts having a relatively large volume are difficult to implant in a small patient, but rotary blood pumps can be easily implanted. The objective of this study was to show the feasibility of using the Valvo pump, an axial flow pump implanted at the heart valve position, in such cases. The Valvo pump consists of an impeller and a motor. The motor is waterproofed with a ferrofluidic seal. A blood flow of 5 L/min was obtained at a pressure difference of 13.3 kPa (100 mm Hg) at 7,000 rpm. The normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) was 0.030 +/- 0.003 (n = 3) for a blood flow of 5 L/min at a pressure difference of 13.3 kPa. The pressure resistance of the ferrofluidic seal was 37.5 kPa in a static condition and 26.3 kPa at 10,000 rpm. The seal exhibited no leaks for 41+ days against 20.0 kPa. The results showed that the Valvo pump can maintain systemic circulation with an acceptable level of hemolysis.

  2. Optimization of an axial flow heart pump with active and passive magnetic bearings.

    PubMed

    Glauser, Matthias; Jiang, Wei; Li, Guoxin; Lin, Zongli; Allaire, Paul E; Olson, Don

    2006-05-01

    Optimization of a magnetically suspended left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is crucial. We desire a totally implantable, long-life LVAD that delivers the necessary flow rate, pressure rise, and blood compatibility. By using a novel combination of passive and active magnetic bearings (AMBs), we have developed an axial flow LVAD prototype, the LEV-VAD, which provides an unobstructed blood flow path, preventing stagnation regions for the blood. Our current effort is focused on the optimization of the magnetic suspension system to allow for control of the AMB, minimizing its size and power consumption. The properties of the passive magnetic bearings and AMBs serve as parameter space, over which a cost function is minimized, subject to constraints such as suspension stability and sufficient disturbance rejection capabilities. The design process is expected to lead to the construction of a small prototype pump along with the necessary robust controller for the AMB. Sensitivity of the LVAD performance with respect to various design parameters is examined in-depth and an optimized, more compact LVAD prototype is designed.

  3. Finger blood flow in Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Elkington, E. J.

    1968-01-01

    1. Finger blood flow was estimated, by strain-gauge plethysmography, before and during a 1 hr immersion in ice water, on twenty-five men throughout a year at Wilkes, Antarctica. A total of 121 satisfactory immersions were made. 2. Blood flow before and during immersion decreased significantly in the colder months of the year, and the increase caused by cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD) became less as the year progressed. The time of onset, blood flow at onset, and frequency of the cycles of CIVD showed no significant relation to the coldness of the weather (as measured by mean monthly wind chill) or the time in months. Comparisons of blood flow before and after five field trips (average duration 42 days), on which cold exposure was more severe than at Wilkes station, gave similar results. 3. The results suggest that vasoconstrictor tone increased. This interpretation agrees with previous work on general acclimatization in Antarctica, but contrasts with work elsewhere on local acclimatization of the hands. PMID:5684034

  4. Regulation of Coronary Blood Flow.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Adam G; Dick, Gregory M; Kiel, Alexander M; Tune, Johnathan D

    2017-03-16

    The heart is uniquely responsible for providing its own blood supply through the coronary circulation. Regulation of coronary blood flow is quite complex and, after over 100 years of dedicated research, is understood to be dictated through multiple mechanisms that include extravascular compressive forces (tissue pressure), coronary perfusion pressure, myogenic, local metabolic, endothelial as well as neural and hormonal influences. While each of these determinants can have profound influence over myocardial perfusion, largely through effects on end-effector ion channels, these mechanisms collectively modulate coronary vascular resistance and act to ensure that the myocardial requirements for oxygen and substrates are adequately provided by the coronary circulation. The purpose of this series of Comprehensive Physiology is to highlight current knowledge regarding the physiologic regulation of coronary blood flow, with emphasis on functional anatomy and the interplay between the physical and biological determinants of myocardial oxygen delivery. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:321-382, 2017.

  5. Three Dimensional Viscous Flow Field in an Axial Flow Turbine Nozzle Passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ristic, D.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is experimental and computational study of three dimensional viscous flow field in the nozzle passage of an axial flow turbine stage. The nozzle passage flow field has been measured using a two sensor hot-wire probe at various axial and radial stations. In addition, two component LDV measurements at one axial station (x/c(sum m) = 0.56) were performed to measure the velocity field. Static pressure measurements and flow visualization, using a fluorescent oil technique, were also performed to obtain the location of transition and the endwall limiting streamlines. A three dimensional boundary layer code, with a simple intermittency transition model, was used to predict the viscous layers along the blade and endwall surfaces. The boundary layers on the blade surface were found to be very thin and mostly laminar, except on the suction surface downstream of 70% axial chord. Strong radial pressure gradient, especially close to the suction surface, induces strong cross flow components in the trailing edge regions of the blade. On the end-walls the boundary layers were much thicker, especially near the suction corner of the casing surface, caused by secondary flow. The secondary flow region near the suction-casing surface corner indicates the presence of the passage vortex detached from the blade surface. The corner vortex is found to be very weak. The presence of a closely spaced rotor downstream (20% of the nozzle vane chord) introduces unsteadiness in the blade passage. The measured instantaneous velocity signal was filtered using FFT square window to remove the periodic unsteadiness introduced by the downstream rotor and fans. The filtering decreased the free stream turbulence level from 2.1% to 0.9% but had no influence on the computed turbulence length scale. The computation of the three dimensional boundary layers is found to be accurate on the nozzle passage blade surfaces, away from the end-walls and the secondary flow region. On

  6. Effects of shaft supporting structure on performance test of axial flow fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, R.; Liu, S. L.; Li, M. X.; Zheng, S. Y.

    2016-05-01

    CFD numerical simulation combined with theoretical analysis are used to research and discuss the obstructing effect, caused by the supporting structure of torsion meter and connecting shaft, on the outlet airflow of axial-flow fan in type-C ducted inlet device. The relations between axial flow fan's total pressure efficiency and flow rate are studied when the distance between supporting structure and outlet section is different, which may provide a reference for the proper design of the performance test device.

  7. Mini hemoreliable axial flow LVAD with magnetic bearings: part 1: historical overview and concept advantages.

    PubMed

    Goldowsky, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Intec has been developing an ultra-miniature axial flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) turbo pump that incorporates non-contacting magnetic bearings specifically designed to eliminate thrombus. The patent pending pump is similar in size to the Jarvik 2000, being 1.0 inch in diameter and having a volume of 25cc. This paper provides two decades of historical background regarding blood pumps and discusses new advances made possible by our contactless design. Design details are left for parts two and three. This LVAD is presently the smallest magnetically suspended turbo pump. It was made possible by use of new 1/2-inch diameter fringing ring magnetic bearings. These axial field bearings are 10 times smaller than equal capacity radial field conventional magnetic bearings currently in development in turbo pumps. Our LVAD is physiologically controllable, without the use of invasive sensors, by directly measuring pump differential pressure with the magnetic bearings. This mechanism will allow attainment of cyclic, closed-loop control of impeller revolutions per minute to achieve a high degree of pressure pulsatility. Pulsatile flow is important in obtaining long-term hemodynamic reliability without thrombus being generated in either the pump or body.

  8. Blood Pump Development Using Rocket Engine Flow Simulation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the progress made towards developing complete blood flow simulation capability in humans, especially in the presence of artificial devices such as valves and ventricular assist devices. Devices modeling poses unique challenges different from computing the blood flow in natural hearts and arteries. There are many elements needed to quantify the flow in these devices such as flow solvers, geometry modeling including flexible walls, moving boundary procedures and physiological characterization of blood. As a first step, computational technology developed for aerospace applications was extended to the analysis and development of a ventricular assist device (VAD), i.e., a blood pump. The blood flow in a VAD is practically incompressible and Newtonian, and thus an incompressible Navier-Stokes solution procedure can be applied. A primitive variable formulation is used in conjunction with the overset grid approach to handle complex moving geometry. The primary purpose of developing the incompressible flow analysis capability was to quantify the flow in advanced turbopump for space propulsion system. The same procedure has been extended to the development of NASA-DeBakey VAD that is based on an axial blood pump. Due to massive computing requirements, high-end computing is necessary for simulating three-dimensional flow in these pumps. Computational, experimental, and clinical results are presented.

  9. Estimation of volume flow in curved tubes based on analytical and computational analysis of axial velocity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkaik, A. C.; Beulen, B. W. A. M. M.; Bogaerds, A. C. B.; Rutten, M. C. M.; van de Vosse, F. N.

    2009-02-01

    To monitor biomechanical parameters related to cardiovascular disease, it is necessary to perform correct volume flow estimations of blood flow in arteries based on local blood velocity measurements. In clinical practice, estimates of flow are currently made using a straight-tube assumption, which may lead to inaccuracies since most arteries are curved. Therefore, this study will focus on the effect of curvature on the axial velocity profile for flow in a curved tube in order to find a new volume flow estimation method. The study is restricted to steady flow, enabling the use of analytical methods. First, analytical approximation methods for steady flow in curved tubes at low Dean numbers (Dn) and low curvature ratios (δ) are investigated. From the results a novel volume flow estimation method, the cos θ-method, is derived. Simulations for curved tube flow in the physiological range (1≤Dn≤1000 and 0.01≤δ≤0.16) are performed with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. The asymmetric axial velocity profiles of the analytical approximation methods are compared with the velocity profiles of the CFD model. Next, the cos θ-method is validated and compared with the currently used Poiseuille method by using the CFD results as input. Comparison of the axial velocity profiles of the CFD model with the approximations derived by Topakoglu [J. Math. Mech. 16, 1321 (1967)] and Siggers and Waters [Phys. Fluids 17, 077102 (2005)] shows that the derived velocity profiles agree very well for Dn≤50 and are fair for 50100), no analytical approximation method exists. In the position of the maximum axial velocity, a shift toward the inside of the curve is observed for low Dean numbers, while for high Dean numbers, the position of the maximum velocity is located at the outer curve. When the position of

  10. Left ventricular volume unloading with axial and centrifugal rotary blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Koenig, Steven C; Soucy, Kevin G; Choi, Young; Pirbodaghi, Tohid; Bartoli, Carlo R; Monreal, Gretel; Sobieski, Michael A; Schumer, Erin; Cheng, Allen; Slaughter, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    Axial (AX) and centrifugal (CFG) rotary blood pumps have gained clinical acceptance for the treatment of advanced heart failure. Differences between AX and CFG designs and mechanism of blood flow delivery may offer clinical advantages. In this study, pump characteristics, and acute physiologic responses during support with AX (HeartMate II) and CFG (HVAD) left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) were investigated in mock loop and chronic ischemic heart failure bovine models. In the mock loop model, pump performance was characterized over a range of pump speeds (HeartMate II: 7,000-11,000 rpm, HVAD: 2,000-3,600 rpm) and fluid viscosities (2.7 cP, 3.2 cP, 3.7 cP). In the ischemic heart failure bovine model, hemodynamics, echocardiography, and end-organ perfusion were investigated. CFG LVAD had a flatter HQ curve, required less power, and had a more linear flow estimation relation than AX LVAD. The flow estimation error for the AX LVAD (±0.9 L/min at 2.7 cP, ±0.7 L/min at 3.2 cP, ±0.8 L/min at 3.7 cP) was higher than the CFG LVAD (±0.5 L/min at 2.7 cP, ±0.2 L/min at 3.2 cP, ±0.5 L/min at 3.7 cP). No differences in acute hemodynamics, echocardiography, or end-organ perfusion between AX and CFG LVAD over a wide range of support were statistically discernible. These findings suggest no pronounced acute differences in LV volume unloading between AX and CFG LVAD.

  11. Research on the unstable operating region of axial-flow and mixed flow pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, L.; Liu, C.; Luo, C.; Zhou, J. R.; Jin, Y.

    2012-11-01

    The unstable operating region affected safety of pump start-up and limited the range of stable operating. When there are three flowrates points matching along with one lift, the hydraulic unstable operating region happened. The range region of unstable operation region is from peak to bottom of performance curve when the axial flow pump was test on the closed test rig. There are two factors, rotating stall and bad inlet condition, which cause the unstable operating region. The unstable operating regions of different pumping system are presented. The unsteady CFD calculations were done to present the internal flow pattern and hydraulic pressure when axial flow pump and mixed flow pump were operated on the unstable operating region. The frequency spectrum is given of one of the force components in radial direction, as measured in the whriling frame of reference. It is important to prevent and avoid unstable operating region along with the construction of South to North water transfer of China and reconstruction of large scale pumping station.

  12. Hydrodynamic Analysis of the Flow in an Axial Rotor and Impeller for Large Storage Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosioc, A. I.; Muntean, S.; Draghici, I.; Anton, L. E.

    2016-11-01

    In hydropower systems among hydropower plants there are integrated pumping stations (PS). In order to ensure higher flow rate, the pumps have constructive differences besides regular. Consequently, the complex shape of the suction-elbow with symmetric inlet generates an unsteady flow which is ingested by impeller. These phenomena's also generate stronger unsteady flow conditions, such as stall, wakes, turbulence and pressure fluctuations, which affect the overall mechanical behaviour of the pump with vibration, noise and radial and axial forces on the rotor. Alternatively, an axial rotor can be installed in front of the impeller. In this case, the flow non-uniformity will be decreased and the static pressure will be increased at the impeller inlet. Consequently, the efficiency behaviour practically remains unchanged while the cavitational behaviour is improved. From the assembly between axial rotor and centrifugal impeller, the axial rotor usually works in cavitation and is often replaced. The paper investigates experimentally and numerically the comparison between pump impeller without and with axial rotor hydrodynamics taking into account the flow given by the symmetrical suction elbow. Full three-dimensional turbulent numerical investigation of the symmetrical suction elbow, with axial rotor and without, pump impeller and volute are performed. The hydrodynamic analysis confirms that once the axial rotor is mounted in front of the pump impeller increase the static pressure and the incidence angle is improved at the inlet of the pump impeller.

  13. Effects of cyclic motion on coronary blood flow.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Mahmudul; Rubenstein, David A; Yin, Wei

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study was to establish a computational fluid dynamics model to investigate the effect of cyclic motion (i.e., bending and stretching) on coronary blood flow. The three-dimensional (3D) geometry of a 50-mm section of the left anterior descending artery (normal or with a 60% stenosis) was constructed based on anatomical studies. To describe the bending motion of the blood vessel wall, arbitrary Lagrangian-Eularian methods were used. To simulate artery bending and blood pressure change induced stretching, the arterial wall was modeled as an anisotropic nonlinear elastic solid using the five-parameter Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic model. Employing a laminar model, the flow field was solved using the continuity equations and Navier-Stokes equations. Blood was modeled as an incompressible Newtonian fluid. A fluid-structure interaction approach was used to couple the fluid domain and the solid domain iteratively, allowing force and total mesh displacement to be transferred between the two domains. The results demonstrated that even though the bending motion of the coronary artery could significantly affect blood cell trajectory, it had little effect on flow parameters, i.e., blood flow velocity, blood shear stress, and wall shear stress. The shape of the stenosis (asymmetric or symmetric) hardly affected flow parameters either. However, wall normal stresses (axial, circumferential, and radial stress) can be greatly affected by the blood vessel wall motion. The axial wall stress was significantly higher than the circumferential and radial stresses, as well as wall shear stress. Therefore, investigation on effects of wall stress on blood vessel wall cellular functions may help us better understand the mechanism of mechanical stress induced cardiovascular disease.

  14. Method of characteristics for three-dimensional axially symmetrical supersonic flows.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, R

    1947-01-01

    An approximation method for three-dimensional axially symmetrical supersonic flows is developed; it is based on the characteristics theory (represented partly graphically, partly analytically). Thereafter this method is applied to the construction of rotationally symmetrical nozzles. (author)

  15. Blood flow analysis with considering nanofluid effects in vertical channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noreen, S.; Rashidi, M. M.; Qasim, M.

    2017-06-01

    Manipulation of heat convection of copper particles in blood has been considered peristaltically. Two-phase flow model is used in a channel with insulating walls. Flow analysis has been approved by assuming small Reynold number and infinite length of wave. Coupled equations are solved. Numerical solution are computed for the pressure gradient, axial velocity function and temperature. Influence of attention-grabbing parameters on flow entities has been analyzed. This study can be considered as mathematical representation to the vibrance of physiological systems/tissues/organs provided with medicine.

  16. Axial Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George Arthur (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A rotary blood pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial and radial clearances of blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with cross-linked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  17. Effects of solid particles suspended in fluid flow through an axial flow compressor stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabakoff, W.; Balan, C.

    1981-01-01

    An approximate method for calculating the flow properties of gas-particle mixture flowing over blades in a cascade is studied. Using an analytical method, the solid particle trajectory and location of collisions between the solid particles and the blade surfaces are determined. In addition an experimental investigation of the trajectories and velocities of solid particles suspended in a fluid passing through an axial flow compressor cascade was performed. The cascade blades were made of 2024 aluminum alloy and the solid particles used were quartz sand with average diameter of 165 microns. The following parameters were investigated: blade pressure distribution, and total pressure loss coefficient, both depending on the degree of erosion. In addition, a theoretical estimation of the blade erosion is compared with the experimental data.

  18. Equilibrium operating performance of axial-flow turbojet engines by means of idealized analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, John C; Chapin, Edward C

    1950-01-01

    A method of predicting equilibrium operating performance of turbojet engines has been developed, with the assumption of simple model processes for the components. Results of the analysis are plotted in terms of dimensionless parameters comprising critical engine dimensions and over-all operating variables. This investigation was made of an engine in which the ratio of axial inlet-air velocity to compressor-tip velocity is constant, which approximates turbojet engines with axial-flow compressors. Experimental correlation of the theory with data from several existing axial-flow-type engines was good and showed close correlation between calculated and measured performance.

  19. Continued development of the Nimbus/University of Pittsburgh (UOP) axial flow left ventricular assist system.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D C; Butler, K C; Taylor, L P; Le Blanc, P; Griffith, B P; Kormos, R L; Borovetz, H S; Litwak, P; Kameneva, M V; Choi, S; Burgreen, G W; Wagner, W R; Wu, Z; Antaki, J F

    1997-01-01

    Nimbus and the University of Pittsburgh (UOP) have continued the development of a totally implanted axial flow blood pump under the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Innovative Ventricular Assist System (IVAS) program. This 62 cc device has an overall length of 84 mm and an outer diameter of 34.5 mm. The inner diameter of the blood pump is 12 mm. It is being designed to be a totally implanted permanent device. A key achievement during the past year was the completion of the Model 2 pump design. Ten of these pumps have been fabricated and are being used to conduct in vitro and in vivo experiments to evaluate the performance of different materials and hydraulic components. Efforts for optimizing the closed loop speed control have continued using mathematical modeling, computer simulations, and in vitro and in vivo testing. New hydraulic blade designs have been tested using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and flow visualization. A second generation motor was designed with improved efficiency. To support the new motor, a new motor controller fabricated as a surface mount PC board has been completed. The program is now operating under a formal QA system.

  20. In vivo experimental testing of the FW axial blood pump for left ventricular support in Fu Wai Hospital.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Hu, Sheng-Shou; Zhou, Jian-Ye; Sun, Han-Song; Tang, Yue; Zhang, Hao; Zheng, Zhe; Li, Guo-Rong; Zhu, Xiao-Dong; Gui, Xin-Min

    2009-01-01

    A fully implantable, axial flow blood pump has been developed in Fu Wai Hospital aiming for clinical use. This ventricular assist device (VAD), which was developed after numerous CFD analyses for the flow characteristics of the pump, is 58.5-mm long, 30-mm wide (including DC motor), and weighs 240 g. The pump can deliver 5 L/min for pressures of 100 mm Hg over 8,000 rpm. In this study, short-term hemocompatibility effects of the axial left ventricular assist device (LVAD) (FW blood pump) were evaluated in four healthy sheep. The device was implanted into the left ventricular apex of beating hearts. The outflow graft of each device was anastomosed to the descending aorta. The hemolysis, which was evaluated in vivo by free hemoglobin value, was below 30 mg/dL. Evaluation of serum biochemical data showed that implantation of the FW blood pump in sheep with normal hearts did not impair end organ function. Gross and microscopic sections of kidney, liver, and lung revealed no evidence of microemboli. Performance of the pump in vivo was considered sufficient for a LVAD, although further design improvement is necessary in terms of hemolysis and antithrombosis to improve biocompatibility of the pump.

  1. Calculation of flow distribution in large radius ratio stages of axial flow turbines and comparison of theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzog, J.

    1974-01-01

    A method of calculating stage parameters and flow distribution of axial turbines is described. The governing equations apply to space between the blade rows and are based on the assumption of rotationally symmetrical, compressible, adiabatic flow conditions. Results are presented for stage design and flow analysis calculations. Theoretical results from the calculation system are compared with experimental data from low pressure steam turbine tests.

  2. Effect of flow maldistribution and axial conduction on compact microchannel heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Seungwhan; Lee, Cheonkyu; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2014-03-01

    When a compact microchannel heat exchanger is operated at cryogenic environments, it has potential problems of axial conduction and flow maldistribution. To analyze these detrimental effects, the heat exchanger model that includes both axial conduction and flow maldistribution effect is developed in consideration of the microchannel heat exchanger geometry. A dimensionless axial conduction parameter (λ) is used to describe the axial conduction effect, and the coefficient of variation (CoV) is introduced to quantify the flow maldistribution condition. The effectiveness of heat exchanger is calculated according to the various values of the axial conduction parameter and the CoV. The analysis results show that the heat exchanger effectiveness is insensitive when λ is less than 0.005, and effectiveness is degraded with the large value of CoV. Three microchannel heat exchangers are fabricated with printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) technology for validation purpose of the heat exchanger model. The first heat exchanger is a conventional heat exchanger, the second heat exchanger has the modified cross section to eliminate axial conduction effect, and the third heat exchanger has the modified cross section and the cross link in parallel channel to mitigate flow maldistribution effect. These heat exchangers are tested in cryogenic single-phase, and two-phase environments. The third heat exchanger shows the ideal thermal characteristic, while the other two heat exchangers experience some performance degradation due to axial conduction or flow maldistribution. The impact of axial conduction and flow maldistribution effects are verified by the simulation results and compared with the experimental results.

  3. Unsteady flows in a single-stage transonic axial-flow fan stator row

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathaway, Michael Dale

    Detailed measurements of the unsteady velocity field within the stator flow of a transonic axial-flow fan were acquired using a laser anemometer. They were obtained on axisymmetric surfaces located at 10 and 50 percent span from the shroud, with the fan operating at maximum efficiency at design speed. The ensemble-average and variance of the measured velocities are used to identify rotor-wake-generated (deterministic) unsteadiness and turbulence, respectively. Correlations of both deterministic and turbulent velocity fluctuations provide information on the characteristics of unsteady interactions within the stator row. These correlations are derived from the Navier-Stokes equation in a manner similar to deriving the Reynolds stress terms, whereby various averaging operators are used to average the aperiodic, deterministic, and turbulent velocity fluctuations known to be present in multistage turbomachines. The correlations of deterministic and turbulent velocity fluctuations throughout the axial fan stator row are presented. In particular, amplification and attenuation of both types of unsteadiness are shown to occur within the stator blade passage.

  4. An experimental investigation of the generation and consequences of acoustic waves in an axial-flow compressor - The effect of variations in the axial spacing between blade rows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, R.; Stoneman, S. A. T.

    1987-08-01

    The excitation of acoustic resonances in axial-flow compressors was investigated experimentally on a low speed, single stage test rig. It was found that the axial spacing between blade rows had a marked effect on the acoustic amplitudes and on the speeds at which the various resonances were excited. A simple model which is consistent with the experimental results is proposed.

  5. Eigenmodes of Ducted Flows With Radially-Dependent Axial and Swirl Velocity Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kousen, Kenneth A.

    1999-01-01

    This report characterizes the sets of small disturbances possible in cylindrical and annular ducts with mean flow whose axial and tangential components vary arbitrarily with radius. The linearized equations of motion are presented and discussed, and then exponential forms for the axial, circumferential, and time dependencies of any unsteady disturbances are assumed. The resultant equations form a generalized eigenvalue problem, the solution of which yields the axial wavenumbers and radial mode shapes of the unsteady disturbances. Two numerical discretizations are applied to the system of equations: (1) a spectral collocation technique based on Chebyshev polynomial expansions on the Gauss-Lobatto points, and (2) second and fourth order finite differences on uniform grids. The discretized equations are solved using a standard eigensystem package employing the QR algorithm. The eigenvalues fall into two primary categories: a discrete set (analogous to the acoustic modes found in uniform mean flows) and a continuous band (analogous to convected disturbances in uniform mean flows) where the phase velocities of the disturbances correspond to the local mean flow velocities. Sample mode shapes and eigensystem distributions are presented for both sheared axial and swirling flows. The physics of swirling flows is examined with reference to hydrodynamic stability and completeness of the eigensystem expansions. The effect of assuming exponential dependence in the axial direction is discussed.

  6. Turbulent Boundary Layer on a Cylinder in Axial Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-29

    a+ and Ra increase, 6/a decreases for the available experimental data. The direct relation between a+ and Ra is primarily a result changing the radius...different axial locations given the same transverse curvature in order to vary a+ and &a while keeping Ra constant. Because data obtained in this way are...length in this way although experimental details are sketchy. Gould and Smith 2 2 measured the coefficient of drag on monofilaments ranging from 8.5 g±m

  7. Study on cavitation influence for pump head in an axial flow pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosono, K.; Kajie, Y.; Saito, S.; Miyagawa, K.

    2015-12-01

    The size of axial flow pumps used in drainage pump stations has recently decreased, and their rotation speeds have increased, causing an increase in the risk of cavitation. Therefore, to provide highly reliable pumps, it is important to understand the internal flow of pumps under cavitating conditions. In this study, high-speed camera measurements and computational fluid dynamics analysis were performed to understand the cavitation performance of an axial flow pump. The mechanism that causes the head to change as a result of cavitation under low net positive suction head values is shown to be the balance between the increasing angular momentum and the loss indicated by the changing streamlines.

  8. Graphic Analysis of American and British Axial-Flow Turbojet Engine Performance Trends (Current and Future)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cesaro, Richard S.; Lazar, James

    1951-01-01

    This report presents a compilation of static sea-level data on existing or designed American and British axial-flow turbojet engines in terms of basic engine parameters such as thrust and air flow. In the data presented, changes in the over-U engine performance with time sre examined as well as the relation of the various engine parameters to each other.

  9. Some potential blood flow experiments for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cokelet, G. R.; Meiselman, H. J.; Goldsmith, H. L.

    1979-01-01

    Blood is a colloidal suspension of cells, predominantly erythrocytes, (red cells) in an aqueous solution called plasma. Because the red cells are more dense than the plasma, and because they tend to aggregate, erythrocyte sedimentation can be significant when the shear stresses in flowing blood are small. This behavior, coupled with equipment restrictions, has prevented certain definitive fluid mechanical studies from being performed with blood in ground-based experiments. Among such experiments, which could be satisfactorily performed in a microgravity environment, are the following: (1) studies of blood flow in small tubes, to obtain pressure-flow rate relationships, to determine if increased red cell aggregation can be an aid to blood circulation, and to determine vessel entrance lengths, and (2) studies of blood flow through vessel junctions (bifurcations), to obtain information on cell distribution in downstream vessels of (arterial) bifurcations, and to test flow models of stratified convergent blood flows downstream from (venous) bifurcations.

  10. Cerebral blood flow changes during sodium-lactate-induced panic attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, R.S.; Devous, M.D. Sr.; Rush, A.J.; Lane, L.; Bonte, F.J.

    1988-04-01

    Dynamic single-photon emission computed axial tomography (CAT) with inhaled xenon-133 was used to measure regional cerebral blood flow in 10 drug-free patients with DSM-III-diagnosed panic disorder and in five normal control subjects. All subjects underwent regional cerebral blood flow studies while at rest or during normal saline infusion and during sodium lactate infusion. Six of the 10 patients and none of the control subjects experienced lactate-induced panic attacks. Lactate infusion markedly raised hemispheric blood flow levels in both control subjects and patients who did not panic. Patients who did panic experienced either a minimal increase or a decrease in hemispheric blood flow.

  11. Investigation of Axial-flow Fan and Compressor Rotors Designed for Three-dimensional Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahane, A

    1947-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted to determine whether three-dimensional flows may be utilized in axial-flow fan and compressor rotors so that the spanwise load distribution may be varied to obtain high pressure rise. Two rotors, one with approximately uniform and one with solid-body downstream tangential-velocity distributions, were designed and tested at the design blade angle. Radial surveys of total pressure, static pressure, and flow angle were made upstream and downstream of the test rotors through a quantity-coefficient range. Tests of the solid-body rotor were also conducted at a large value of tip clearance. The results indicated that the three-dimensional flows may be utilized with high efficiency and that the three-dimensional theory used in conjunction with two-dimensional cascade data is sufficiently accurate for design purposes. The tests also showed that the tip-clearance losses of rotors highly loaded at the tips are not excessive. The existing three-dimensional theory in simplified for and an illustrative rotor design are presented in appendixes.

  12. Numerical and experimental study on aerodynamic performance of small axial flow fan with splitter blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lifu; Jin, Yingzi; Li, Yi; Jin, Yuzhen; Wang, Yanping; Zhang, Li

    2013-08-01

    To improve the aerodynamic performance of small axial flow fan, in this paper the design of a small axial flow fan with splitter blades is studied. The RNG k-ɛ turbulence model and SIMPLE algorithm were applied to the steady simulation calculation of the flow field, and its result was used as the initial field of the large eddy simulation to calculate the unsteady pressure field. The FW-H noise model was adopted to predict aerodynamic noise in the six monitoring points. Fast Fourier transform algorithm was applied to process the pressure signal. Experiment of noise testing was done to further investigate the aerodynamic noise of fans. And then the results obtained from the numerical simulation and experiment were described and analyzed. The results show that the static characteristics of small axial fan with splitter blades are similar with the prototype fan, and the static characteristics are improved within a certain range of flux. The power spectral density at the six monitoring points of small axial flow fan with splitter blades have decreased to some extent. The experimental results show sound pressure level of new fan has reduced in most frequency bands by comparing with prototype fan. The research results will provide a proof for parameter optimization and noise prediction of small axial flow fans with high performance.

  13. Simple LMFBR axial-flow friction-factor correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Y.N.; Todreas, N.E.

    1982-12-01

    Complicated LMFBR axial lead-length averaged friction-factor correlations are reduced to an easy, ready-to-use function of bundle Reynolds number for wire-wrapped bundles. The function together with the power curves to calculate the associated constants are incorporated in a computer preprocessor, EZFRIC. The constants required for the calculation of the subchannels and bundle friction factors are derived and correlated into power curves of geometrical parameters. A computer program, FRIC, which can alternatively be used to accurately calculate these constants is also included. The accurate values of the constants and the corresponding values predicted by the power curves and percentage error of prediction are tabulated for a wide variety of geometries of interest.

  14. Cutaneous blood flow in psoriasis

    SciTech Connect

    Klemp, P.; Staberg, B.

    1983-12-01

    The disappearance rate of /sup 133/Xe was studied in 20 patients with psoriasis vulgaris, using an epicutaneous labeling technique in involved skin lesions or normal-appearing skin of the proximal extensor site of the forearm. Control experiments were performed in 10 normal subjects. Calculations of the cutaneous blood flow (CBF) in psoriatic skin lesions were performed using a tissue-to-blood partition coefficient for /sup 133/Xe, lambda c,pso, of 1.2 ml/100 g/min. lambda c,pso was estimated after the relative content of water, lipids, and proteins had been analyzed in psoriatic skin biopsies of 6 patients with untreated psoriasis. The mean relative content of water was markedly reduced to 23.5 +/- 1.5% (SEM), and lipids and proteins were markedly increased to 2.5 +/- 0.7% and 74.0 +/- 2.2, respectively, compared to previously published data for normal skin (water 72.5%, lipids 1%, proteins 26.5%). Mean CBF in untreated psoriatic skin was 63.5 +/- 9.0 ml/100 g/min. This was significantly higher than the mean CBF in 10 normal subjects, 6.3 +/- 0.5 ml/100 g/min (p much less than 0.0001). Mean CBF in normal-appearing skin in patients with psoriasis was 11.0 +/- 1.3 ml/100 g/min. This was significantly higher than CBF in normal subjects (p less than 0.0002).

  15. Microsphere estimates of blood flow: Methodological considerations

    SciTech Connect

    von Ritter, C.; Hinder, R.A.; Womack, W.; Bauerfeind, P.; Fimmel, C.J.; Kvietys, P.R.; Granger, D.N.; Blum, A.L. Louisianna State Univ. Medical Center, Shreveport Universitaire Vaudois )

    1988-02-01

    The microsphere technique is a standard method for measuring blood flow in experimental animals. Sporadic reports have appeared outlining the limitations of this method. In this study the authors have systematically assessed the effect of blood withdrawals for reference sampling, microsphere numbers, and anesthesia on blood flow estimates using radioactive microspheres in dogs. Experiments were performed on 18 conscious and 12 anesthetized dogs. Four blood flow estimates were performed over 120 min using 1 {times} 10{sup 6} microspheres each time. The effects of excessive numbers of microspheres pentobarbital sodium anesthesia, and replacement of volume loss for reference samples with dextran 70 were assessed. In both conscious and anesthetized dogs a progressive decrease in gastric mucosal blood flow and cardiac output was observed over 120 min. This was also observed in the pancreas in conscious dogs. The major factor responsible for these changes was the volume loss due to the reference sample withdrawals. Replacement of the withdrawn blood with dextran 70 led to stable blood flows to all organs. The injection of excessive numbers of microspheres did not modify hemodynamics to a greater extent than did the injection of 4 million microspheres. Anesthesia exerted no influence on blood flow other than raising coronary flow. The authors conclude that although blood flow to the gastric mucosa and the pancreas is sensitive to the minor hemodynamic changes associated with the microsphere technique, replacement of volume loss for reference samples ensures stable blood flow to all organs over a 120-min period.

  16. Low flow, externally air cooled torch for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry with axial viewing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Towhid; Praphairaksit, Narong; Houk, R. S.

    2001-04-01

    The torch wall is cooled largely by air passing through a cooling jacket added to the outside of a Fassel torch. The plasma is viewed axially through a cooled cone interface centered on the axial channel. The outer argon gas flow can be reduced to 7 l min -1 with no compromise in performance or torch lifetime. The plasma exhibits the same 'robustness index' and interference effects from Na as the conventional, high-flow ICP supplied with the particular spectrometer used. Detection limits (DL) for lines at ˜200 nm are poorer by approximately a factor of two, while those for lines at ˜400 nm are actually better than values typically seen for the same lines by axial viewing of a conventional, high-flow ICP.

  17. Blood Cell Interactions and Segregation in Flow

    PubMed Central

    Munn, Lance L.; Dupin, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    For more than a century, pioneering researchers have been using novel experimental and computational approaches to probe the mysteries of blood flow. Thanks to their efforts, we know that blood cells generally prefer to migrate to the axis of flow, that red and white cells segregate in flow, and that cell deformability and their tendency to reversibly aggregate contribute to the non-Newtonian nature of this unique fluid. All of these properties have beneficial physiological consequences, allowing blood to perform a variety of critical functions. Our current understanding of these unusual flow properties of blood have been made possible by the ingenuity and diligence of a number of researchers, including Harry Goldsmith, who developed novel technologies to visualize and quantify the flow of blood at the level of individual cells. Here we summarize efforts in our lab to continue this tradition and to further our understanding of how blood cells interact with each other and with the blood vessel wall. PMID:18188702

  18. The numerical simulation of a high-speed axial flow compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulac, Richard A.; Adamczyk, John J.

    1991-01-01

    The advancement of high-speed axial-flow multistage compressors is impeded by a lack of detailed flow-field information. Recent development in compressor flow modeling and numerical simulation have the potential to provide needed information in a timely manner. The development of a computer program is described to solve the viscous form of the average-passage equation system for multistage turbomachinery. Programming issues such as in-core versus out-of-core data storage and CPU utilization (parallelization, vectorization, and chaining) are addressed. Code performance is evaluated through the simulation of the first four stages of a five-stage, high-speed, axial-flow compressor. The second part addresses the flow physics which can be obtained from the numerical simulation. In particular, an examination of the endwall flow structure is made, and its impact on blockage distribution assessed.

  19. Three-dimensional flow visualization in the wake of a miniature axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, Leonardo P.; Troolin, Daniel R.; Lee, Seung-Jae; Arndt, R. E. A.; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2013-02-01

    Three-dimensional 3-component velocity measurements were made in the near wake region of a miniature 3-blade axial-flow turbine within a turbulent boundary layer. The model turbine was placed in an open channel flow and operated under subcritical conditions (Fr = 0.13). The spatial distribution of the basic flow statistics was obtained at various locations to render insights into the spatial features of the wake. Instantaneous and phase-averaged vortical structures were analyzed to get insights about their dynamics. The results showed a wake expansion proportional to the one-third power of the streamwise distance, within the first rotor diameter. Wake rotation was clearly identified up to a distance of roughly three rotor diameters. In particular, relatively high tangential velocity was observed near the wake core, but it was found to be nearly negligible at the turbine tip radius. In contrast, the radial velocity showed the opposite distribution, with higher radial velocity near the turbine tip and, due to symmetry, negligible at the rotor axis. Larger turbulence intensity was found above the hub height and near the turbine tip. Strong coherent tip vortices, visualized in terms of the instantaneous vorticity and the λ 2 criterion, were observed within the first rotor diameter downstream of the turbine. These structures, influenced by the velocity gradient in the boundary layer, appeared to loose their stability at distances greater than two rotor diameters. Hub vortices were also identified. Measurements did not exhibit significant tip-hub vortex interaction within the first rotor diameter.

  20. The flow field investigations of no load conditions in axial flow fixed-blade turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Gao, L.; Wang, Z. W.; Zhou, X. Z.; Xu, H. X.

    2014-03-01

    During the start-up process, the strong instabilities happened at no load operation in a low head axial flow fixed-blade turbine, with strong pressure pulsation and vibration. The rated speed can not reach until guide vane opening to some extent, and stable operation could not be maintained under the rated speed at some head, which had a negative impact on the grid-connected operation of the unit. In order to find the reason of this phenomenon, the unsteady flow field of the whole flow passage at no load conditions was carried out to analyze the detailed fluid field characteristics including the pressure pulsation and force imposed on the runner under three typical heads. The main hydraulic cause of no load conditions instability was described. It is recommended that the power station should try to reduce the no-load running time and go into the high load operation as soon as possible when connected to grid at the rated head. Following the recommendations, the plant operation practice proved the unstable degree of the unit was reduced greatly during start up and connect to the power grid.

  1. Heat Generation in Axial and Centrifugal Flow Left Ventricular Assist Devices.

    PubMed

    Yost, Gardner; Joseph, Christine Rachel; Royston, Thomas; Tatooles, Antone; Bhat, Geetha

    Despite increasing use of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) as a surgical treatment for advanced heart failure in an era of improved outcomes with LVAD support, the mechanical interactions between these pumps and the cardiovascular system are not completely understood. We utilized an in vitro mock circulatory loop to analyze the heat production incurred by operation of an axial flow and centrifugal flow LVAD. A HeartMate II and a HeartWare HVAD were connected to an abbreviated flow loop and were implanted in a viscoelastic gel. Temperature was measured at the surface of each LVAD. Device speed and fluid viscosity were altered and, in the HeartMate II, as artificial thrombi were attached to the inflow stator, impeller, and outflow stator. The surface temperatures of both LVADs increased in all trials and reached a plateau within 80 minutes of flow initiation. Rate of heat generation and maximum system temperature were greater when speed was increased, when viscosity was increased, and when artificial thrombi were attached to the HeartMate II impeller. Normal operation of these two widely utilized LVADs results in appreciable heat generation in vitro. Increased pump loading resulted in more rapid heat generation, which was particularly severe when a large thrombus was attached to the impeller of the HeartMate II. While heat accumulation in vivo is likely minimized by greater dissipation in the blood and soft tissues, focal temperature gains with the pump housing of these two devices during long-term operation may have negative hematological consequences.

  2. Laser anemometer measurements in a transonic axial flow compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strazisar, A. J.; Powell, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    A laser anemometer system employing an efficient data acquisition technique was used to make measurements upstream, within, and downstream of the compressor rotor. A fluorescent dye technique allowed measurements within endwall boundary layers. Adjustable laser beam orientation minimized shadowed regions and enabled radial velocity measurements outside of the blade row. The flow phenomena investigated include flow variations from passage to passage, the rotor shock system, three-dimensional flows in the blade wake, and the development of the outer endwall boundary layer. Laser anemometer measurements are compared to a numerical solution of the streamfunction equations and to measurements made with conventional instrumentation.

  3. Laser anemometer measurements in a transonic axial flow compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strazisar, A. J.; Powell, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    A laser anomometer system employing an efficient data acquisition technique has been used to make measurements upstream, within, and downstream of the compressor rotor. A fluorescent dye technique allowed measurements within endwall boundary layers. Adjustable laser beam orientation minimized shadowed regions and enabled radial velocity measurements outside of the blade row. The flow phenomena investigated include flow variations from passage to passage, the rotor shock system, three-dimensional flows in the blade wake, and the development of the outer endwall boundary layer. Laser anemometer measurements are compared to a numerical solution of the streamfunction equations and to measurements made with conventional instrumentation.

  4. Investigation of tip clearance flow physics in axial flow turbine rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xinwen

    In axial turbines, the tip clearance between casing wall and rotating blades results in a tip leakage flow, which significantly affects loss production, heat protection, vibration and noise. It is important to minimize these effects for a better turbine engine performance and higher reliability. Most of previous efforts were concentrated on turbine cascades that however may not completely and correctly simulate the flow physics in practical turbine rotors. An investigation has to be performed in turbine rotors to reveal the real tip leakage flow physics in order to provide a scientific basis for minimizing its effects. This is the objective of this thesis research. The three dimensional flow field near the end wall/tip clearance region in a turbine rotor has been investigated experimentally, complemented by a numerical simulation to study the influences of inlet turbulence intensities on the development of the tip leakage flow. The experimental investigation is carried out in a modern unshrouded high pressure turbine stage. The survey region covers 20% span near the end wall, and extends axially from 10% chord upstream of the leading edge, through the rotor passage, and to 20% chord downstream of the trailing edge. It has been found that the tip leakage effects extend only to the surveyed region. The three dimensional LDV technique is used to measure the velocity and turbulence field upstream of the rotor, inside the rotor passage, and near the trailing edge. The static pressure on blade surfaces is surveyed from the rotating frame. The transient pressure on the casing wall is measured using a dynamic pressure sensor with a shaft encoder. A rotating Five Hole Probe is employed to measure the losses as well as the pressure and the three dimensional velocity field at 20% chord downstream of the rotor. The unsteady flow field is also investigated at this location by using a slanted single-element Hot Wire technique. The physics of the tip leakage flow and vortex in

  5. Investigation of the Coupling of Unsteady Lift to Low Order Acoustic Duct Modes in an Axial Flow Fan.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-17

    Standing Wave Frequencies for the (0,0) and (1,0) Modes . ......... ... 57 21. Fourier Harmonics of 8-Cycle Screen versus Mean Axial Flow Velocity for...Current Work .... ............ ... 60 22. Fourier Harmonics of 9-Cycle Screen versus Mean Axial Flow Velocity for Current Work .... ............ ... 61 23... Fourier Harmonics of 10-Cycle Screen versus Mean Axial Flow Velocity for Current Work .... ............ ... 62 24. SPL versus Microphone Position with

  6. Investigation of Flame Driving and Flow Turning in Axial Solid Rocket Instabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-31

    Investgated the behavor ofa& control Figure 6. Axial variation of the flow turning loss term volume that spanne the entire crom section of the duct...relationship is riot linear. The discrepancy is investigated the flow behavor within a control volume mgain believed to be due to the incomplete flow...amplitudes ware normalized with respect to the largest discused before, it is believed that this behavor is due amplitude oscillation. Both figures

  7. Three dimensional supersonic flows with subsonic axial Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marconi, F.; Moretti, G.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical approach is presented for the computation of flows in which the component of velocity in the selected marching direction is subsonic although the total velocity is supersonic. A local coordinate rotation procedure is employed together with an implicit differencing scheme. Complex coordinate transformations and time-consuming iterations are avoided. The implementation of the described approach is illustrated with the aid of a two-dimensional problem. An application in the case of three-dimensional flows is also discussed.

  8. Spring-network-based model of a red blood cell for simulating mesoscopic blood flow.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masanori; Bessho, Sadao; Wada, Shigeo

    2013-01-01

    We developed a mechanical model of a red blood cell (RBC) that is capable of expressing its characteristic behaviors in shear flows. The RBC was modeled as a closed shell membrane consisting of spring networks in the framework of the energy minimum concept. The fluid forces acting on RBCs were modeled from Newton's viscosity law and the conservation of momentum. In a steady shear flow, the RBC model exhibited various behaviors, depending on the shear rate; it tumbled, tank-treaded, or both. The transition from tumbling to tank-treading occurred at a shear rate of 20 s( - 1). The simulation of an RBC in steady and unsteady parallel shear flows (Couette flows) showed that the deformation parameters of the RBC were consistent with experimental results. The RBC in Poiseuille flow migrated radially towards the central axis of the flow channel. Axial migration became faster with an increase in the viscosity of the media, qualitatively consistent with experimental results. These results demonstrate that the proposed model satisfies the essential conditions for simulating RBC behavior in blood flow. Finally, a large-scale RBC flow simulation was implemented to show the capability of the proposed model for analyzing the mesoscopic nature of blood flow.

  9. The valvo-pump, an axial blood pump implanted at the heart valve position: concept and initial results.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, K; Okamoto, E; Yamamoto, K; Mitamura, Y; Tanaka, T; Yozu, R

    1992-06-01

    The valvo-pump, an axial nonpulsatile blood pump implanted at the heart valve position, has been developed. The valvo-pump consists of an impeller and a motor, which are encased in a housing. An impeller with 5 vanes (22.0 mm in diameter) is used. The impeller is connected to a samarium-cobalt-rare earth magnet direct current (DC) brushless motor measuring 21.3 mm in diameter and 18.5 mm in length. Sealing is achieved by means of a ferrofluidic seal. A pump flow of 10.5 L/min was obtained at a pump differential pressure of 3.3 kPa (25 mm Hg), and a flow of 4.9 L/min was obtained at 7.0 kPa (53 mm Hg). Sealing was kept perfect against a pressure of 29.3 kPa (220 mm Hg) at 9,000 rpm.

  10. Fetal carotid blood flow during videofetoscopy.

    PubMed

    Fauza, D O; Fishman, S J

    1998-12-01

    Intracranial bleeding has been reported as one of the complications of both open and minimally invasive fetal surgery and putatively attributed to intraoperative fluctuations of carotid blood flow. The aim of this study was to look at fetal carotid blood flow and its relationship with umbilical blood flow, blood pressure, oxygen delivery, and acid-base status in the fetus at various intraamniotic pressures with both liquid and gas media during fetoscopic surgery. Six 115- to 130-day-gestation ewes underwent continuous invasive systemic blood pressure monitoring in the descending aorta. A hysterotomy was performed. A 6-mm ultrasonic blood flow probe was placed around the common umbilical artery at its origin from the fetal aorta. This was followed by placement of a double-lumen, 4F catheter in the fetal descending aorta through a femoral artery. A 4-mm ultrasonic blood flow probe was then placed around the fetal left common carotid artery. A pressure-monitoring, multiperforated catheter was placed inside the amniotic cavity. The fetus was repositioned inside the uterus, which was then closed. The abdominal wall was closed loosely. No further manipulation was performed for 1 hour. Intraamniotic pressure was raised from 0 to 30 mm Hg at 5-mm Hg intervals by infusing either warmed saline or medical air. Common umbilical artery and left carotid artery blood flows, blood pressure, blood gases, bicarbonate, sodium, and hematocrit were recorded in all fetuses at each 5-mm Hg interval. Maternal systemic blood pressure, O2 saturation, and temperature were kept constant. Carotid blood flow remained stable within the intra-amniotic pressure range studied (0 to 30 mm Hg), despite the significant drop in common umbilical artery blood flow uniformly observed above 20 mm Hg when saline was infused and above 15 mm Hg when air was infused. There was fetal hypoxemia and hypercarbia concomitant with decreased common umbilical artery blood flow (however, without fetal acidosis, because

  11. Regional cerebral blood flow in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, R.J.; Duncan, G.C.; Weinman, M.L.; Barr, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured via xenon133 inhalation technique in 23 patients with schizophrenia and 18 age- and sex-matched controls. The mean blood flow to both hemispheres was found to be lower for the patients. The patients and their controls did not differ on interhemispheric differences in blood flow. There were no differences in rCBF between medicated and unmedicated, subchronic and chronic, and paranoid and nonparanoid patients. Hallucinations were associated with reduced blood flow to several postcentral regions.

  12. Local cooling reduces regional bone blood flow.

    PubMed

    Venjakob, Arne J; Vogt, Stephan; Stöckl, Klaus; Tischer, Thomas; Jost, Philipp J; Thein, Eckart; Imhoff, Andreas B; Anetzberger, Hermann

    2013-11-01

    Local cooling is very common after bone and joint surgery. Therefore the knowledge of bone blood flow during local cooling is of substantial interest. Previous studies revealed that hypothermia leads to vasoconstriction followed by decreased blood flow levels. The aim of this study was to characterize if local cooling is capable of inducing reduced blood flow in bone tissue using a stepwise-reduced temperature protocol in experimental rabbits. To examine bone blood flow we utilized the fluorescent microsphere (FM) method. In New Zealand white rabbits one randomly chosen hind limb was cooled stepwise from 32 to 2°C, whereas the contra lateral hind limb served as control. Injection of microspheres was performed after stabilization of bone and muscle temperature at each temperature level. Bones were removed, dissected and fluorescence intensity was determined to calculate blood flow values. We found that blood flow of all cooled regions decreased relative to the applied external temperature. At maximum cooling blood flow was almost completely disrupted, indicating local cooling as powerful regulatory mechanism for regional bone blood flow (RBBF). Postoperative cooling therefore may lead to strongly decreased bone blood flow values. As a result external cooling has capacity to both diminish bone healing and reduce bleeding complications.

  13. Axial flow fan broad-band noise and prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carolus, Thomas; Schneider, Marc; Reese, Hauke

    2007-02-01

    Two prediction methods for broad-band noise of low-pressure axial fans are investigated. Emphasis is put on the interaction noise due to ingested turbulence. The numerical large eddy simulation (LES) is applied to predict the unsteady blade forces due to grid generated highly turbulent inflow; the blade forces are then fed into an analytical two-dimensional acoustic ducted source model. A simple semi-empirical noise prediction model (SEM) is utilized for indicative comparison. Finally, to obtain a database for detailed verification, the turbulence statistics for a variety of different inflow configurations are determined experimentally using hot wire anemometry and a correlation analysis. In the limits of the necessary assumptions the SEM predicts the noise spectra and the overall sound power surprisingly well without any further tuning of parameters; the influence of the fan operating point and the nature of the inflow is obtained. Naturally, the predicted spectra appear unrealistically "smooth", since the empirical input data are averaged and modeled in the frequency domain. By way of contrast the LES yields the fluctuating forces on the blades in the time domain. Details of the source characteristics and their origin are obtained rather clearly. The predicted effects of the ingested turbulence on the fluctuating blade forces and the fan noise compare favorably with experiments. However, the choice of the numerical grid size determines the maximal resolvable frequency and the computational cost. As contrasted with the SEM, the cost for the LES-based method are immense.

  14. Test of Single-Stage Axial-Flow Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, E Barton

    1942-01-01

    A single-stage axial fan was built and tested in the shop of the propeller-research tunnel of the NACA. The fan comprised a simple 24-blade rotor having a diameter of 21 inches and a solidity of 0.86 and a set of 37 contravanes having a solidity of 1.33. The rotor was driven by a 25-horsepower motor capable of rotating at a speed of 3600 r.p.m. The fan was tested for volume, pressure, and efficiency over a range of delivery pressures and volumes for a wide range of contravane and blade-angle settings. The test results are presented in chart form in terms of nondimensional units in order that similar fans may be accurately designed with a minimum effort. The maximum efficiency (88 percent) was obtained by the fan at a blade angle of 30 degrees and a contravane angle of 70 degrees. An efficiency of 80 percent was obtained by the fan with the contravanes removed.

  15. Ultrasonic Blood Flow Measurement in Haemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, D.; Papadimitriou, M.; Kulatilake, A. E.

    1970-01-01

    A 5-megacycle Doppler flow meter, calibrated in-vitro, was found to give a linear response to blood flow in the ranges commonly encountered in haemodialysis. With this, blood flow through artificial kidneys could be measured simply and with a clinically acceptable error. The method is safe, as blood lines do not have to be punctured or disconnected and hence there is no risk of introducing infection. Besides its value as a research tool the flow meter is useful in evaluating new artificial kidneys. Suitably modified it could form the basis of an arterial flow alarm system. PMID:5416812

  16. Discussion of boundary-layer characteristics near the casing of an axial-flow compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mager, Artur; Mahoney, John J; Budinger, Ray E

    1951-01-01

    Boundary-layer velocity profiles on the casing of an axial-flow compressor behind the guide vanes and rotor were measured and resolved into two components: along the streamline of the flow and perpendicular to it. Boundary-layer thickness and the deflection of the boundary layer at the wall were the generalizing parameters. By use of these results and the momentum-integral equations, the characteristics of boundary on the walls of axial-flow compressor are qualitatively discussed. Important parameters concerning secondary flow in the boundary layer appear to be turning of the flow and the product of boundary-layer thickness and streamline curvature outside the boundary layer. Two types of separation are shown to be possible in three dimensional boundary layer.

  17. Simulation of a 3D unsteady flow in an axial turbine stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straka, Petr

    2012-04-01

    The contribution deals with a numerical simulation of an unsteady flow in an axial turbine stage. The solution is performed using an in-house numerical code developed in the Aeronautical and Test Institute, Plc. in Prague. The numerical code is based on a finite volume discretization of governing equations (Favre averaged Navier-Stokes equations) and a two-equations turbulence model. The temporal integration is based on the implicit second-order backward Euler formula, which is realized through the iteration process in dual time. The proposed numerical method is used for solution of the 3D, unsteady, viscous turbulent flow of a perfect gas in the axial turbine stage. The flow path consists of an input nozzle, stator blade-wheel, rotor blade-wheel, a shroud-seal gap and a diffuser. Attention is paid to the influence of a secondary flow structures, such as generated vortices and flow in shroud-seal gap.

  18. Negative viscosity from negative compressibility and axial flow shear stiffness in a straight magnetic field

    DOE PAGES

    Li, J. C.; Diamond, P. H.

    2017-03-23

    Here, negative compressibility ITG turbulence in a linear plasma device (CSDX) can induce a negative viscosity increment. However, even with this negative increment, we show that the total axial viscosity remains positive definite, i.e. no intrinsic axial flow can be generated by pure ITG turbulence in a straight magnetic field. This differs from the case of electron drift wave (EDW) turbulence, where the total viscosity can turn negative, at least transiently. When the flow gradient is steepened by any drive mechanism, so that the parallel shear flow instability (PSFI) exceeds the ITG drive, the flow profile saturates at a level close to the value above which PSFI becomes dominant. This saturated flow gradient exceeds the PSFI linear threshold, and grows withmore » $$\

  19. LES of turbulent flow past axial flow turbines and turbine arrays: Model development and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Kang, Seokkoo; Yang, Xiaolei; Chamorro, Leonardo; Hill, Craig

    2012-11-01

    We present recent progress towards the numerical simulation of turbulent flows past axial-flow wind and hydrokinetic turbines and farms. For simulating multi-turbine arrays, we combine turbine parameterization approaches (actuator disk and actuator line models) with our curvilinear-immersed boundary (CURVIB) LES model. Simulations are carried out both for aligned and staggered wind farms and the computed results are compared with wind tunnel experiments carried out at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel. Turbine geometry resolving simulations also employ the CURVIB-LES solver with a wall model and very fine computational grids. Simulations are reported for a complete model marine turbine mounted at the bottom of a straight open channel and the computed results are compared with laboratory experiments obtained in the SAFL Main Channel. The simulated flowfields are analyzed to elucidate the structure of the turbine wake, identify large-scale instabilities, and quantify the mechanisms of turbulence production in the near and far wakes. This work was supported by US Department of Energy (Grant No. DE-EE0002980, DE-EE0005482), Xcel Energy (Grant No. RD3-42), Verdant Power, Initiative for Renewable Energy & the Environment (Grant No. RO-0004-12), and Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  20. Multifractality of cerebral blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Bruce J.; Latka, Miroslaw; Glaubic-Latka, Marta; Latka, Dariusz

    2003-02-01

    Scale invariance, the property relating time series across multiple scales, has provided a new perspective of physiological phenomena and their underlying control systems. The traditional “signal plus noise” paradigm of the engineer was first replaced with a model in which biological time series have a fractal structure in time (Fractal Physiology, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1994). This new paradigm was subsequently shown to be overly restrictive when certain physiological signals were found to be characterized by more than one scaling parameter and therefore to belong to a class of more complex processes known as multifractals (Fractals, Plenum Press, New York, 1988). Here we demonstrate that in addition to heart rate (Nature 399 (1999) 461) and human gait (Phys. Rev. E, submitted for publication), the nonlinear control system for cerebral blood flow (CBF) (Phys. Rev. Lett., submitted for publication; Phys. Rev. E 59 (1999) 3492) is multifractal. We also find that this multifractality is greatly reduced for subjects with “serious” migraine and we present a simple model for the underlying control process to describe this effect.

  1. Ocular blood flow measurements in healthy human myopic eyes.

    PubMed

    Benavente-Pérez, Alexandra; Hosking, Sarah L; Logan, Nicola S; Broadway, David C

    2010-11-01

    To evaluate the haemodynamic features of young healthy myopes and emmetropes, in order to ascertain the perfusion profile of human myopia and its relationship with axial length prior to reaching a degenerative state. The retrobulbar, microretinal and pulsatile ocular blood flow (POBF) of one eye of each of twenty-two high myopes (N = 22, mean spherical equivalent (MSE) ≤-5.00D), low myopes (N = 22, MSE-1.00 to-4.50D) and emmetropes (N = 22, MSE ± 0.50D) was analyzed using color Doppler Imaging, Heidelberg retinal flowmetry and ocular blood flow analyser (OBF) respectively. Intraocular pressure, axial length (AL), systemic blood pressure, and body mass index were measured. When compared to the emmetropes and low myopes, the AL was greater in high myopia (p < 0.0001). High myopes showed higher central retinal artery resistance index (CRA RI) (p = 0.004), higher peak systolic to end diastolic velocities ratio (CRA ratio) and lower end diastolic velocity (CRA EDv) compared to low myopes (p = 0.014, p = 0.037). Compared to emmetropes, high myopes showed lower OBFamplitude (OBFa) (p = 0.016). The POBF correlated significantly with the systolic and diastolic blood velocities of the CRA (p = 0.016, p = 0.036). MSE and AL correlated negatively with OBFa (p = 0.03, p = 0.003), OBF volume (p = 0.02, p < 0.001), POBF (p = 0.01, p < 0.001) and positively with CRA RI (p = 0.007, p = 0.05). High myopes exhibited significantly reduced pulse amplitude and CRA blood velocity, the first of which may be due to an OBF measurement artefact or real decreased ocular blood flow pulsatility. Axial length and refractive error correlated moderately with the ocular pulse and with the resistance index of the CRA, which in turn correlated amongst themselves. It is hypothesized that the compromised pulsatile and CRA haemodynamics observed in young healthy myopes is an early feature of the decrease in ocular blood flow

  2. Desensitization of Tip Clearance Effects in Axial Flow Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ghandour, Mohamed; Mori, Koichi; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    The present study aims to control the leakage flow and total pressure loss in high pressure turbines. A new tip shape is proposed. It is based on the triple squealer shape by adopting a new middle squealer, along the camber line, whose first and last thirds were removed. An unstructured, finite volume, multiblock, 3-D, compressible Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations solver was used to compute the flow through a high pressure turbine cascade. The turbulent viscosity was calculated by the Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (DDES) model which is based on the Spalart-Allmaras one equation turbulence model. The performance of the new shape is compared to that of flat tip, double and triple squealers. The results successfully demonstrate that the new shape has the least total pressure loss among them.

  3. Blood flow reprograms lymphatic vessels to blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiu-Yu; Bertozzi, Cara; Zou, Zhiying; Yuan, Lijun; Lee, John S.; Lu, MinMin; Stachelek, Stan J.; Srinivasan, Sathish; Guo, Lili; Vincente, Andres; Mericko, Patricia; Levy, Robert J.; Makinen, Taija; Oliver, Guillermo; Kahn, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    Human vascular malformations cause disease as a result of changes in blood flow and vascular hemodynamic forces. Although the genetic mutations that underlie the formation of many human vascular malformations are known, the extent to which abnormal blood flow can subsequently influence the vascular genetic program and natural history is not. Loss of the SH2 domain–containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa (SLP76) resulted in a vascular malformation that directed blood flow through mesenteric lymphatic vessels after birth in mice. Mesenteric vessels in the position of the congenital lymphatic in mature Slp76-null mice lacked lymphatic identity and expressed a marker of blood vessel identity. Genetic lineage tracing demonstrated that this change in vessel identity was the result of lymphatic endothelial cell reprogramming rather than replacement by blood endothelial cells. Exposure of lymphatic vessels to blood in the absence of significant flow did not alter vessel identity in vivo, but lymphatic endothelial cells exposed to similar levels of shear stress ex vivo rapidly lost expression of PROX1, a lymphatic fate–specifying transcription factor. These findings reveal that blood flow can convert lymphatic vessels to blood vessels, demonstrating that hemodynamic forces may reprogram endothelial and vessel identity in cardiovascular diseases associated with abnormal flow. PMID:22622036

  4. Blood flow reprograms lymphatic vessels to blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiu-Yu; Bertozzi, Cara; Zou, Zhiying; Yuan, Lijun; Lee, John S; Lu, MinMin; Stachelek, Stan J; Srinivasan, Sathish; Guo, Lili; Vicente, Andres; Vincente, Andres; Mericko, Patricia; Levy, Robert J; Makinen, Taija; Oliver, Guillermo; Kahn, Mark L

    2012-06-01

    Human vascular malformations cause disease as a result of changes in blood flow and vascular hemodynamic forces. Although the genetic mutations that underlie the formation of many human vascular malformations are known, the extent to which abnormal blood flow can subsequently influence the vascular genetic program and natural history is not. Loss of the SH2 domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa (SLP76) resulted in a vascular malformation that directed blood flow through mesenteric lymphatic vessels after birth in mice. Mesenteric vessels in the position of the congenital lymphatic in mature Slp76-null mice lacked lymphatic identity and expressed a marker of blood vessel identity. Genetic lineage tracing demonstrated that this change in vessel identity was the result of lymphatic endothelial cell reprogramming rather than replacement by blood endothelial cells. Exposure of lymphatic vessels to blood in the absence of significant flow did not alter vessel identity in vivo, but lymphatic endothelial cells exposed to similar levels of shear stress ex vivo rapidly lost expression of PROX1, a lymphatic fate-specifying transcription factor. These findings reveal that blood flow can convert lymphatic vessels to blood vessels, demonstrating that hemodynamic forces may reprogram endothelial and vessel identity in cardiovascular diseases associated with abnormal flow.

  5. Vascular structure determines pulmonary blood flow distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlastala, M. P.; Glenny, R. W.

    1999-01-01

    Scientific knowledge develops through the evolution of new concepts. This process is usually driven by new methodologies that provide observations not previously available. Understanding of pulmonary blood flow determinants advanced significantly in the 1960s and is now changing rapidly again, because of increased spatial resolution of regional pulmonary blood flow measurements.

  6. Vascular structure determines pulmonary blood flow distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlastala, M. P.; Glenny, R. W.

    1999-01-01

    Scientific knowledge develops through the evolution of new concepts. This process is usually driven by new methodologies that provide observations not previously available. Understanding of pulmonary blood flow determinants advanced significantly in the 1960s and is now changing rapidly again, because of increased spatial resolution of regional pulmonary blood flow measurements.

  7. Progress on development of the Nimbus-University of Pittsburgh axial flow left ventricular assist system.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D C; Butler, K C; Taylor, L P; Le Blanc, P; Rintoul, T C; Petersen, T V; Griffith, B P; Kormos, R L; Borovetz, H S; Litwak, P; Kameneva, M V; Choi, S; Burgreen, G W; Wu, Z; Antaki, J F

    1998-01-01

    Nimbus Inc. (Rancho Cordova, CA) and the University of Pittsburgh have completed the second year of development of a totally implanted axial flow blood pump under the National Institutes of Health Innovative Ventricular Assist System Program. The focus this year has been on completing pump hydraulic development and addressing the development of the other key system components. Having demonstrated satisfactory pump hydraulic and biocompatibility performance, pump development has focused on design features that improve pump manufacturability. A controller featuring full redundancy has been designed and is in the breadboard test phase. Initial printed circuit layout of this circuit has shown it to be appropriately sized at 5 x 6 cm to be compatible with implantation. A completely implantable system requires the use of a transcutaneous energy transformer system (TETS) and a diagnostic telemetry system. The TETS power circuitry has been redesigned incorporating an improved, more reliable operating topography. A telemetry circuit is undergoing characterization testing. Closed loop speed control algorithms are being tested in vitro and in vivo with good success. Eleven in vivo tests were conducted with durations from 1 to 195 days. Endurance pumps have passed the 6 month interval with minimal bearing wear. All aspects of the program continue to function under formal quality assurance.

  8. In vivo evaluation of the Nimbus axial flow ventricular assist system. Criteria and methods.

    PubMed

    Antaki, J F; Butler, K C; Kormos, R L; Kawai, A; Konishi, H; Kerrigan, J P; Borovetz, H S; Maher, T R; Kameneva, M V; Griffith, B P

    1993-01-01

    Continuing in vivo trials are being conducted at the University of Pittsburgh using the Nimbus axial flow blood pump (AxiPump). To date, 14 sheep experiments have been performed to address several issues related to short-term support. Six acute experiments (< 6 hr) have been performed to assess hemodynamics related to speed regulation and to determine anatomic placement of the pump and cannulae. Eight short-term survival studies lasting up to 6 days have been performed to evaluate biocompatibility and system reliability, and to establish clinical management protocols. The AxiPump has been used as a left ventricular assist device (LVAD), right ventricular assist device (RVAD), and biventricular assist device (BiVAD) with left ventricular and right atrial cannulation. The AxiPump has demonstrated the ability to assume complete support of either the pulmonary or systemic circulation, or both. We have determined that sufficient surgical access may be obtained through left lateral thoracotomy for both LVAD and RVAD insertion. In the absence of post operative anticoagulation therapy, we have detected subclinical renal cortical infarctions in 6 of 8 short-term animals. Thrombus deposition has been observed at the ventricular cannula tip in 4 of 8 cases--necessitating design changes. Two short-term experiments have been terminated because of bleeding--one due to inflow cannula obstruction and one due to cannula failure. Plasma free hemoglobin levels were all below 15 mg/dl, except for one case complicated by inflow obstruction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Increased hippocampal blood volume and normal blood flow in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Talati, Pratik; Rane, Swati; Skinner, Jack; Gore, John; Heckers, Stephan

    2015-06-30

    Neuroimaging studies have provided compelling evidence for abnormal hippocampal activity in schizophrenia. Most studies made inferences about baseline hippocampal activity using a single hemodynamic parameter (e.g., blood volume or blood flow). Here we studied several hemodynamic measures in the same cohort to test the hypothesis of increased hippocampal activity in schizophrenia. We used dynamic susceptibility contrast- (DSC-) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess blood volume, blood flow, and mean transit time in the hippocampus of 15 patients with chronic schizophrenia and 15 healthy controls. Left and right hippocampal measurements were combined for absolute measures of cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and mean transit time (MTT). We found significantly increased hippocampal CBV, but normal CBF and MTT, in schizophrenia. The uncoupling of CBV and CBF could be due to several factors, including antipsychotic medication, loss of cerebral perfusion pressure, or angiogenesis. Further studies need to incorporate several complementary imaging modalities to better characterize hippocampal dysfunction in schizophrenia.

  10. Steady-State Axial Temperature and Flow Velocity in Triga Channel.

    SciTech Connect

    ZEFRAN, BOJAN

    2007-02-28

    Version 00 TRISTAN-IJS is a computer program for calculating steady-state axial temperature distribution and flow velocity through a vertical coolant channel in low power TRIGA reactor core, cooled by natural circulation. It is designed for steady-state thermohydraulic analysis of TRIGA research reactors operating at a low power level of 1-2 MW.

  11. Coupling of Unsteady Lift to Acoustic Duct Modes in an Axial Flow Fan.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-15

    CVC 1 crcn viii Figure Paze 21. Amplitudes of Fourier Harmonics of Ten-Cycle Screen. 51 22. Decay Rate of Modal Pressure in the Axial Flow Research...Measurement (Function 12) 57 25. Tvical Fourier Harmonics of Lift Gage Measurement (Function 13) ........ ..................... .58 26. Unsteady Lift of Nine

  12. Axial flow reversal and its significance in air-sparged hydrocyclone (ASH) flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.; Das, A.; Yin, D.

    1995-12-31

    In recent years the potential of air-sparged hydrocyclone (ASH) flotation for fine coal cleaning has been demonstrated both in pilot plant testing and in a plant-site demonstration program. Further improvements in the ASH technology will depend, to some extent, on improved understanding of the complex multiphase fluid flow. Froth transport plays a very important role in determining the efficiency of fine coal cleaning by ASH flotation. It should be noted that the surface of zero axial velocity is of particular significance in froth transport because the location of this surface actually accounts for the amount of froth being transported to the overflow. In this regard, the axial flow reversal has been examined based on specially designed tracer experiments. On the basis of these experimental results, modeling efforts were made to characterize the flow pattern in the ASH. The theoretical predictions based on turbulent fluid dynamic considerations were found to describe experimental observations regarding the surface of zero axial velocity. These results that define the surface of zero axial velocity together with froth phase features established from X-ray CT measurements provide an excellent description of the flow characteristics in ASH flotation and explain the effect of various process variables, such as dimensionless area (A*), dimensionless flowrate (Q*), inlet pressure, percent solids, etc., on flotation recovery. On this basis it is expected that further advances in the design and operation of the ASH system can be made, leading to more efficient use of the ASH technology for fine coal cleaning.

  13. Stability of a pair of co-rotating vortices with axial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Clément; Schaeffer, Nathanaël; Le Dizès, Stéphane; Thompson, Mark

    2008-09-01

    The three-dimensional linear temporal stability properties of a flow composed of two corotating q-vortices (also called Batchelor vortices) are predicted by numerical stability analysis. As for the corresponding counter-rotating case, when the axial flow parameter is increased, different instability modes are observed and identified as a combination of resonant Kelvin modes of azimuthal wavenumbers m and m +2 within each vortex. In particular, we show that the sinuous mode, which is the dominant instability mode without axial flow, is stabilized in the presence of a moderate axial flow. Different types of mode with a large amplitude in the critical layer are also identified. For small separation distances (above the merging threshold), unstable eigenmodes, corresponding to axial wavenumbers that cannot be easily identified with simple resonant interactions of Kelvin modes, are also observed. Their growth rate is a substantial fraction of the growth rates of low-order resonant modes. The effects of the Reynolds number and vortex separation distance on the growth rate parameter map are considered. Finally, we analyze the similarities and differences between the stability characteristics of co- and counter-rotating vortex pairs.

  14. Spectroscopic characteristics of spiral flow ICP for axially viewing ICP optical emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Masaki; Kurosawa, Satoru; Shinoduka, Isao; Takaku, Yuichi; Kishi, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopic characteristics of a spiral flow inductively coupled plasma (ICP), which could be sustained stably at 9 L min(-1) of Ar plasma gas flow rate with 1.5 kW RF forward power, were studied for axially viewing ICPOES. The emission intensity profile, excitation temperature and plasma robustness were evaluated, and were similar to those of the standard ICP. The background and emission intensities of elements as well as the excitation behavior for both atom and ion lines were also examined and compared to those of the standard ICP. Since the spectroscopic characteristics of the spiral flow ICP were similar to those of the standard ICP, it could be used as a new low gas flow ICP in axially viewing ICPOES.

  15. Pancreatic islet blood flow and its measurement.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Leif; Barbu, Andreea; Bodin, Birgitta; Drott, Carl Johan; Espes, Daniel; Gao, Xiang; Grapensparr, Liza; Källskog, Örjan; Lau, Joey; Liljebäck, Hanna; Palm, Fredrik; Quach, My; Sandberg, Monica; Strömberg, Victoria; Ullsten, Sara; Carlsson, Per-Ola

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic islets are richly vascularized, and islet blood vessels are uniquely adapted to maintain and support the internal milieu of the islets favoring normal endocrine function. Islet blood flow is normally very high compared with that to the exocrine pancreas and is autonomously regulated through complex interactions between the nervous system, metabolites from insulin secreting β-cells, endothelium-derived mediators, and hormones. The islet blood flow is normally coupled to the needs for insulin release and is usually disturbed during glucose intolerance and overt diabetes. The present review provides a brief background on islet vascular function and especially focuses on available techniques to measure islet blood perfusion. The gold standard for islet blood flow measurements in experimental animals is the microsphere technique, and its advantages and disadvantages will be discussed. In humans there are still no methods to measure islet blood flow selectively, but new developments in radiological techniques hold great hopes for the future.

  16. Pancreatic islet blood flow and its measurement

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Leif; Barbu, Andreea; Bodin, Birgitta; Drott, Carl Johan; Espes, Daniel; Gao, Xiang; Grapensparr, Liza; Källskog, Örjan; Lau, Joey; Liljebäck, Hanna; Palm, Fredrik; Quach, My; Sandberg, Monica; Strömberg, Victoria; Ullsten, Sara; Carlsson, Per-Ola

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic islets are richly vascularized, and islet blood vessels are uniquely adapted to maintain and support the internal milieu of the islets favoring normal endocrine function. Islet blood flow is normally very high compared with that to the exocrine pancreas and is autonomously regulated through complex interactions between the nervous system, metabolites from insulin secreting β-cells, endothelium-derived mediators, and hormones. The islet blood flow is normally coupled to the needs for insulin release and is usually disturbed during glucose intolerance and overt diabetes. The present review provides a brief background on islet vascular function and especially focuses on available techniques to measure islet blood perfusion. The gold standard for islet blood flow measurements in experimental animals is the microsphere technique, and its advantages and disadvantages will be discussed. In humans there are still no methods to measure islet blood flow selectively, but new developments in radiological techniques hold great hopes for the future. PMID:27124642

  17. Ciliary Blood Flow and Aqueous Humor Production

    PubMed Central

    Kiel, J.W.; Hollingsworth, M.; Rao, R.; Chen, M.; Reitsamer, H.A.

    2010-01-01

    Aqueous humor production is a metabolically active process sustained by the delivery of oxygen and nutrients and removal of metabolic waste by the ciliary circulation. This article describes our investigations into the relationship between ciliary blood flow and aqueous humor production. The results presented indicate that there is a dynamic relationship between ciliary blood flow and aqueous humor production, with production being blood flow independent above a critical level of perfusion, and blood flow dependent below it. The results also show that the plateau portion of the relationship shifts up or down depending on the level of secretory stimulation or inhibition, and that oxygen is one critical factor provided by ciliary blood flow. Also presented is a theoretical model of ocular hydrodynamics incorporating these new findings. PMID:20801226

  18. Raised intracranial pressure and cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, I. H.; Rowan, J. O.; Harper, A. M.; Jennett, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Changes in cerebral blood flow during incremental increases of intracranial pressure produced by infusion of fluid into the cisterna magna were studied in anaesthetized baboons. Cerebral blood flow remained constant at intracranial pressure levels up to approximately 50 mm Hg. At intracranial pressure levels between 50-96 mm Hg a marked increase in cerebral blood flow occurred, associated with the development of systemic hypertension and changes in cerebrovascular resistance. Further increases of intracranial pressure led to a progressive fall in cerebral blood flow. Prior section of the cervical cord prevented both the increase in cerebral blood flow and the systemic hypertension. Alteration of cerebral perfusion pressure by bleeding during the hyperaemia in a further group of animals suggested that autoregulation was at least partially preserved during this phase. After maximum hyperaemia had occurred, however, autoregulation appeared to be lost. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:4624687

  19. Axial PEGylation of Tin Octabutoxy Naphthalocyanine Extends Blood Circulation for Photoacoustic Vascular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haoyuan; Wang, Depeng; Zhang, Yuzhen; Zhou, Yang; Geng, Jumin; Chitgupi, Upendra; Cook, Timothy R; Xia, Jun; Lovell, Jonathan F

    2016-07-20

    Attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) can prolong blood circulation of biological molecules, a useful trait for a vascular imaging agent. Here, we present a route for modifying octabutoxy naphthalocyanine (ONc) with PEG, via axial conjugation following ONc chelation with Sn(IV) chloride (Sn-ONc). Tin chelation caused ONc absorbance to shift from 860 to 930 nm. Hydroxy terminated PEG was treated with sodium and then was axially attached to the tin, generating PEG-Sn-ONc. Unlike ONc or Sn-ONc, PEG-Sn-ONc was soluble in methanol. ONc and PEG-Sn-ONc were dissolved in polysorbate solutions and administered to mice intravenously. PEG-Sn-ONc demonstrated substantially longer blood circulation time than ONc, with a 4 times longer half-life and a nearly 10 times greater area under the curve. PEG-Sn-ONc gave rise to photoacoustic contrast and could be used for noninvasive brain vessel imaging even 24 h following injection. This work demonstrates that nonmetallic naphthalocyanines can be chelated with tin, and be axially modified with PEG for enhanced circulation times for long-term vascular imaging with photoacoustic tomography.

  20. Subcutaneous blood flow in psoriasis

    SciTech Connect

    Klemp, P.

    1985-03-01

    The simultaneously recorded disappearance rates of /sup 133/xe from subcutaneous adipose tissue in the crus were studied in 10 patients with psoriasis vulgaris using atraumatic labeling of the tissue in lesional skin (LS) areas and symmetrical, nonlesional skin (NLS) areas. Control experiments were performed bilaterally in 10 younger, healthy subjects. The subcutaneous washout rate constant was significantly higher in LS, 0.79 +/- 0.05 min-1 x 10(2) compared to the washout rate constant of NLS, 0.56 +/- 0.07 min-1. 10(2), or the washout rate constant in the normal subjects, 0.46 +/- 0.17 min-1 x 10(2). The mean washout rate constant in NLS was 25% higher than the mean washout rate constant in the normal subjects. The difference was, however, not statistically significant. Differences in the washout rate constants might be due to abnormal subcutaneous tissue-to-blood partition (lambda) in the LS--and therefore not reflecting the real differences in the subcutaneous blood flow (SBF). The lambda for /sup 133/Xe was therefore measured--using a double isotope washout method (/sup 133/Xe and (/sup 131/I)antipyrine)--in symmetrical sites of the lateral crus in LS and NLS of 10 patients with psoriasis vulgaris and in 10 legs of normal subjects. In LS the lambda was 4.52 +/- 1.67 ml/g, which was not statistically different from that of NLS, 5.25 +/- 2.19 ml/g, nor from that of normal subcutaneous tissue, 4.98 +/- 1.04 ml/g. Calculations of the SBF using the obtained lambda values gave a significantly higher SBF in LS, 3.57 +/- 0.23 ml/100 g/min, compared to SBF in the NLS, 2.94 +/- 0.37 ml/100 g/min. There was no statistically significant difference between SBF in NLS and SBF in the normal subjects. The increased SBF in LS of psoriatics might be a secondary phenomenon to an increased heat loss in the lesional skin.

  1. Investigation of Rotating Stall Phenomena in Axial Flow Compressors. Volume I. Basic Studies of Rotating Stall

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-06-01

    1500 rpm. An external hydraulic pump systen powered by’ hor• e-cwcr elect’.tc motor is used to provide power for the hydraulic motor. The modified...nodel has been developed to predict the sound pressure level and total power radiated at harmonics of the blade passage frequency for a rotor-stator...electrically powered two- speed axial flow fan is used as the source of suction. Continuous control of the mass flow is achieved through the use of variable

  2. A mathematical model of the controlled axial flow divider for mobile machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyukin, V. L.; Karelin, D. L.; Belousov, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    The authors give a mathematical model of the axial adjustable flow divider allowing one to define the parameters of the feed pump and the hydraulic motor-wheels in the multi-circuit hydrostatic transmission of mobile machines, as well as for example built features that allows to clearly evaluate the mutual influence of the values of pressure and flow on all input and output circuits of the system.

  3. Prediction of overall and blade-element performance for axial-flow pump configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serovy, G. K.; Kavanagh, P.; Okiishi, T. H.; Miller, M. J.

    1973-01-01

    A method and a digital computer program for prediction of the distributions of fluid velocity and properties in axial flow pump configurations are described and evaluated. The method uses the blade-element flow model and an iterative numerical solution of the radial equilbrium and continuity conditions. Correlated experimental results are used to generate alternative methods for estimating blade-element turning and loss characteristics. Detailed descriptions of the computer program are included, with example input and typical computed results.

  4. Renal blood flow in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Langenberg, Christoph; Bellomo, Rinaldo; May, Clive; Wan, Li; Egi, Moritoki; Morgera, Stanislao

    2005-01-01

    Introduction To assess changes in renal blood flow (RBF) in human and experimental sepsis, and to identify determinants of RBF. Method Using specific search terms we systematically interrogated two electronic reference libraries to identify experimental and human studies of sepsis and septic acute renal failure in which RBF was measured. In the retrieved studies, we assessed the influence of various factors on RBF during sepsis using statistical methods. Results We found no human studies in which RBF was measured with suitably accurate direct methods. Where it was measured in humans with sepsis, however, RBF was increased compared with normal. Of the 159 animal studies identified, 99 reported decreased RBF and 60 reported unchanged or increased RBF. The size of animal, technique of measurement, duration of measurement, method of induction of sepsis, and fluid administration had no effect on RBF. In contrast, on univariate analysis, state of consciousness of animals (P = 0.005), recovery after surgery (P < 0.001), haemodynamic pattern (hypodynamic or hyperdynamic state; P < 0.001) and cardiac output (P < 0.001) influenced RBF. However, multivariate analysis showed that only cardiac output remained an independent determinant of RBF (P < 0.001). Conclusion The impact of sepsis on RBF in humans is unknown. In experimental sepsis, RBF was reported to be decreased in two-thirds of studies (62 %) and unchanged or increased in one-third (38%). On univariate analysis, several factors not directly related to sepsis appear to influence RBF. However, multivariate analysis suggests that cardiac output has a dominant effect on RBF during sepsis, such that, in the presence of a decreased cardiac output, RBF is typically decreased, whereas in the presence of a preserved or increased cardiac output RBF is typically maintained or increased. PMID:16137349

  5. Axisymmetric compressible flow in a rotating cylinder with axial convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungarish, M.; Israeli, M.

    1985-05-01

    The steady compressible flow of an ideal gas in a rotating annulus with thermally conducting walls is considered for small Rossby number epsilon and Ekman number E and moderate rotational Mach numbers M. Attention is focused on nonlinear effects which show up when sigma and epsilon M-squared are not small (sigma = epsilon/H square root of E, H is the dimensionless height of the container). These effects are not properly predicted by the classical linear perturbation analysis, and are treated here by quasi-linear extensions. The extra work required by these extensions is only the numerical solution of one ordinary differential equation for the pressure. Numerical solutions of the full Navier-Stokes equations in the nonlinear range are presented, and the validity of the present approach is confirmed.

  6. Blood hyperviscosity with reduced skin blood flow in scleroderma

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, M. A.; Peek, R.; Penny, R.

    1977-01-01

    The vascular complications of scleroderma have previously been attributed to the progressive obliteration of small vessels. Our study was carried out to determine whether abnormalities of blood viscosity occur in this disease, thereby contributing to the ischaemic process. Blood viscosity was measured in 20 patients using a rotational viscometer. At a high rate of shear, blood hyperviscosity was found in 35% of the patients and at a low rate of shear, in 70%. In addition there was a significant increase in the plasma viscosity which implicates changes in plasma proteins (fibrinogen, immunoglobulins) as causing the hyperviscosity. Measurement of the hand blood flow by venous occlusion plethysmography showed reduced flow at 32°, 27°, and 20°C. A unique finding was a delayed recovery of the blood flow after cooling. These observations suggest that the increased resistance to blood flow in skin affected by scleroderma may be caused by an interaction between the occlusive vascular lesion and blood hyperviscosity. In addition, blood flow patterns and hyperviscosity could help distinguish scleroderma from primary Raynaud's disease. PMID:596950

  7. Gastrointestinal bleeding from arteriovenous malformations in patients supported by the Jarvik 2000 axial-flow left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Letsou, George V; Shah, Nyma; Gregoric, Igor D; Myers, Timothy J; Delgado, Reynolds; Frazier, O H

    2005-01-01

    The long-term effects of axial-flow mechanical circulatory support in humans are unclear. We report 3 cases of chronic gastrointestinal bleeding after implantation of a Jarvik 2000 axial-flow left ventricular assist device. The bleeding was refractory to aggressive management and in 2 cases resolved only after orthotopic cardiac transplantation.

  8. Radioisotopic flow scanning for portal blood flow and portal hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Hesdorffer, C.S.; Bezwoda, W.R.; Danilewitz, M.D.; Esser, J.D.; Tobias, M.

    1987-08-01

    The use of a simple, noninvasive, isotope scanning technique for the determination of relative portal blood flow and detection of portal hypertension is described. Using this technique the presence of portal hypertension was demonstrated in seven of nine patients known to have elevated portal venous pressure. By contrast, esophageal varices were demonstrated in only five of these patients, illustrating the potential value of the method. Furthermore, this technique has been adapted to the study of portal blood flow in patients with myeloproliferative disorders with splenomegaly but without disturbances in hepatic architecture. Results demonstrate that the high relative splenic flow resulting from the presence of splenomegaly may in turn be associated with elevated relative portal blood flow and portal hypertension. The theoretic reasons for the development of flow-related portal hypertension and its relationship to splenic blood flow are discussed.

  9. The Co-axial Flow of Injectable Solid Hydrogels with Encapsulated Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Brandon; Pochan, Darrin; Sathaye, Sameer

    2013-03-01

    Hydrogels are quickly becoming an important biomaterial that can be used for the safe, localized injection of cancer drugs, the injection of stem cells into areas of interest or other biological applications. Our peptides can be self-assembled in a syringe where they form a gel, sheared by injection and, once in the body, immediately reform a localized pocket of stiff gel. My project has been designed around looking at the possibility of having a co-axial strand, in which one gel can surround another. This co-axial flow can be used to change the physical properties of our gel during injection, such as stiffening our gel using hyaluronic acid or encapsulating cells in the gel and surrounding the gel with growth medium or other biological factors. Rheology on hyaluron stiffened gels and cells encapsulated in gels was performed for comparison to the results from co-axial flow. Confocal microscopy was used to examine the coaxial gels after flow and to determine how the co-axial nature of the gels is affected by the concentration of peptide.

  10. [Blood viscosity and triglyceridemia. Findings using a co-axial cylindrical viscosimeter at low "shear rates"].

    PubMed

    Bartoli, V; Pasquini, G; Dorigo, B

    1977-09-22

    Examination of blood viscosity at low shear rates using a co-axial cylinder viscometer showed a significant difference between the means of values observed in hypertrigliceridemic patients compared with that of control subjects. This result differs from what has been reported by most workers although generally greater shear rates have been used. Calculation of the "r" coefficient and plotting of the regression line for each shear rate showed that there is no linear correlation between blood viscosity and triglyceridaemia, whose variations occur quite independently. It is suggested that the absence of a correlation between the two parameters examined may depend on various factors, of which the most important are those pertaining to the rheological properties of red blood cells and to the structure and chemical and physical characteristics of the triglyceride molecule and of the lipoproteins and chylomicrons which transport them.

  11. Postradiation regional cerebral blood flow in primates

    SciTech Connect

    Cockerham, L.G.; Cerveny, T.J.; Hampton, J.D.

    1986-06-01

    Early transient incapacitation (ETI) is the complete cessation of performance during the first 30 min after radiation exposure and performance decrement (PD) is a reduction in performance at the same time. Supralethal doses of radiation have been shown to produce a marked decrease in regional cerebral blood flow in primates concurrent with hypotension and a dramatic release of mast cell histamine. In an attempt to elucidate mechanisms underlying the radiation-induced ETI/PD phenomenon and the postradiation decrease in cerebral blood flow, primates were exposed to 100 Gy (1 Gy = 100 rads), whole-body, gamma radiation. Pontine and cortical blood flows were measured by hydrogen clearance, before and after radiation exposure. Systemic blood pressures were determined simultaneously. Systemic arterial histamine levels were determined preradiation and postradiation. Data obtained indicated that radiated animals showed a decrease in blood flow of 63% in the motor cortex and 51% in the pons by 10 min postradiation. Regional cerebral blood flow of radiated animals showed a slight recovery 20 min postradiation, followed by a fall to the 10 min nadir by 60 min postradiation. Immediately, postradiation systemic blood pressure fell 67% and remained at that level for the remainder of the experiment. Histamine levels in the radiated animals increased a hundredfold 2 min postradiation. This study indicates that regional cerebral blood flow decreases postradiation with the development of hypotension and may be associated temporally with the postradiation release of histamine.

  12. Discussion of Boundary-Layer Characteristics Near the Wall of an Axial-Flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mager, Artur; Mohoney, John J; Budinger, Ray E

    1952-01-01

    The boundary-layer velocity profiles in the tip region of an axial-flow compressor downstream of the guide vanes and downstream of the rotor were measured by use of total-pressure and claw-type yaw probes. These velocities were resolved into two components: one along the streamline of the flow outside the boundary layer, and the other perpendicular to it. The affinity among all profiles was thus demonstrated with the boundary-layer thickness and the deflection of the boundary layer at the wall as the generalizing parameters. By use of these results and the momentum-integral equations, boundary-layer characteristics on the walls of an axial-flow compressor were qualitatively evaluated.

  13. Investigation of flow in axial turbine stage without shroud-seal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straka, Petr; Němec, Martin; Jelínek, Thomáš

    2015-05-01

    This article deals with investigation of the influence of the radial gaps on the efficiency of the axial turbine stage. The investigation was carried out for the axial stage of the low-power turbine with the drum-type rotor without the shroud. In this configuration the flow through the radial gap under the hub-end of the stator blades and above the tip-end of the rotor blades leads to generation of the strong secondary flows, which decrease the efficiency of the stage. This problem was studied by experiment as well as by numerical modelling. The experiment was performed on the test rig equipped with the water brake dynamometer, torque meter and rotatable stator together with the linear probe manipulator. Numerical modelling was carried out for both the steady flow using the "mixing plane" interface and the unsteady flow using the "sliding mesh" interface between the stator and rotor wheels. The influence of the radial gap was studied in two configuration a) positive and b) negative overlapping of the tip-ends of the rotor blades. The efficiency of the axial stage in dependence on the expansion ratio, velocity ratio and the configuration as well as the details of the flow fields are presented in this paper.

  14. Axial and centrifugal continuous-flow rotary pumps: a translation from pump mechanics to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Moazami, Nader; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Kobayashi, Mariko; Smedira, Nicholas G; Hoercher, Katherine J; Massiello, Alex; Lee, Sangjin; Horvath, David J; Starling, Randall C

    2013-01-01

    The recent success of continuous-flow circulatory support devices has led to the growing acceptance of these devices as a viable therapeutic option for end-stage heart failure patients who are not responsive to current pharmacologic and electrophysiologic therapies. This article defines and clarifies the major classification of these pumps as axial or centrifugal continuous-flow devices by discussing the difference in their inherent mechanics and describing how these features translate clinically to pump selection and patient management issues. Axial vs centrifugal pump and bearing design, theory of operation, hydrodynamic performance, and current vs flow relationships are discussed. A review of axial vs centrifugal physiology, pre-load and after-load sensitivity, flow pulsatility, and issues related to automatic physiologic control and suction prevention algorithms is offered. Reliability and biocompatibility of the two types of pumps are reviewed from the perspectives of mechanical wear, implant life, hemolysis, and pump deposition. Finally, a glimpse into the future of continuous-flow technologies is presented. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Numerical Investigation of Blade Lean and Sweep affecting Secondary Flows in an Axial Expansion Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neipp, A.; Riedelbauch, S.

    2016-11-01

    Based on an axial expansion turbine used for energy recovery from working fluids an automated CFD-flow optimization was performed to increase the turbine efficiency without narrowing the operating range. The optimization results showed that even small changes in the optimization target had a significant influence on the lean and sweep of the new blade designs. The resulting blade shapes were extraordinary. The lean and sweep resembled more that of thermal turbomachinery than hydraulic machinery. It became clear that the special blade shapes were a result of the very low aspect ratio of the turbine and the resulting large influence of secondary flows. The blade lean and sweep induce secondary flow structures which are of decisive importance for the turbine performance. The simulation results showed that positive compound lean increases the efficiency and positive compound sweep improves the cavitation behavior of the investigated axial expansion turbine. However the complexity of the occurring secondary flows make an universally valid statement on the effect of blade lean and sweep on the flow behavior of an axial turbine impossible.

  16. In vivo photoacoustic tomography of total blood flow and Doppler angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    As two hallmarks of cancer, angiogenesis and hypermetabolism are closely related to increased blood flow. Volumetric blood flow measurement is important to understanding the tumor microenvironment and developing new means to treat cancer. Current photoacoustic blood flow estimation methods focus on either the axial or transverse component of the flow vector. Here, we propose a method to compute the total flow speed and Doppler angle by combining the axial and transverse flow measurements. Both the components are measured in M-mode. Collating the A-lines side by side yields a 2D matrix. The columns are Hilbert transformed to compare the phases for the computation of the axial flow. The rows are Fourier transformed to quantify the bandwidth for the computation of the transverse flow. From the axial and transverse flow components, the total flow speed and Doppler angle can be derived. The method has been verified by flowing bovine blood in a plastic tube at various speeds from 0 to 7.5 mm/s and at Doppler angles from 30 to 330°. The measurement error for total flow speed was experimentally determined to be less than 0.3 mm/s; for the Doppler angle, it was less than 15°. In addition, the method was tested in vivo on a mouse ear. The advantage of this method is simplicity: No system modification or additional data acquisition is required to use our existing system. We believe that the proposed method has the potential to be used for cancer angiogenesis and hypermetabolism imaging.

  17. Carbon dioxide and liver blood flow.

    PubMed

    Dutton, R; Levitzky, M; Berkman, R

    1976-01-01

    This study was designed to determine blood flow to the liver during hypercapnia and combined hypercapnia-hypoxia with the portal vein and hepatic artery intact except for placement of an electromagnetic flow probe around these vessels. Twenty mongrel dogs weighing 30-45 kg were anesthetized with pentobarbital and flow probes and occluders were surgically implanted. Ten of these dogs were subjected to hypercapnia alone. During inspiration of 6% CO2 in room air, portal vein flow increased from 588 +/- 73 ml/min to 731 +/- 113 ml/min (p less than .05), while hepatic artery flow did not change significantly from its control mean of 221 +/- 38 ml/min. In the remaining dogs, inhalation of 6% O2 resulted in a reduction of portal blood flow within 30 min from 527 +/- 55 ml/min to 381 +/- 41 ml/min (p less than .01). Again, mean hepatic artery flow did not increase significantly above its control of 273 +/- 43 ml/min. Subsequent inhalation of 6% CO2 plus 6% O2 (combined hypercapniahypoxia) for 30 min in these same animals resulted in a significant increase of portal vein blood flow from 514 +/- 46 ml/min to 716 +/- 116 ml/min (p less than .05). Thus, hypercapnia alone increases total liver blood flow, primarily by an increase in portal vein flow. Hypoxia results in a decrease in portal vein flow. The superimposition of hypercapnia on hypoxia restores blood flow to a level close to that found with hypercapnia alone. Hypercapnia in the range of 63 +/- 4 mmHg PCO2 overwhelms the tendency toward a reduction of portal vein blood flow induced by an arterial PO2 of 42 +/- 5 mmHg in the presence of mild hypocapnia (PCO2 : 30.2 +/- 1 mmHg).

  18. Flow in Atherosclerotic Blood Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Stanley A.; Stroud, Jenn S.

    2000-11-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions occur in arteries where there are major changes in flow structure, e.g. bifurcations and junctions. The reduction of vessel lumen alters the flow, including the mechanical forces on the walls. We have examined the flow in carotid artery bifurcations with realistic plaque contours. The unsteady, incompressible, Navier-Stokes equations are solved in finite-volume form. Steady and pulsatile flows have been analyzed for laminar and turbulent flows, using for the latter a low-Reynolds number k- ɛ model and a k-ω model. Non-Newtonian viscosity is also considered using a power-law model. In general the very irregular contours of the vessels lead to recirculating regions, strong spatial variations of wall shear stresses, and in some cases, vortex shedding. Even steady inlet flow exhibits fluctuating, unsteady behavior. Neither turbulence models captures all the physics of the flow. The flow, in fact, appears to be transitional and not fully turbulent. For unsteady flow, there are also strong temporal variations of normal and shear stresses, which together with the strong spatial variations, has important implications for the onset and progression of atherosclerotic disease.

  19. Numerical simulation and analysis of the flow in a two-staged axial fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J. Q.; Dou, H. S.; Jia, H. X.; Chen, X. P.; Wei, Y. K.; Dong, M. W.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, numerical simulation was performed for the internal three-dimensional turbulent flow field in the two-stage axial fan using steady three-dimensional in-compressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the Realizable turbulent model. The numerical simulation results of the steady analysis were combined with the flow characteristics of two- staged axial fan, the influence of the mutual effect between the blade and the vane on the flow of the two inter-stages was analyzed emphatically. This paper studied how the flow field distribution in inter-stage is influenced by the wake interaction and potential flow interaction of mutual effect in the impeller-vane inter-stage and the vane-impeller inter-stage. The results showed that: Relatively, wake interaction has an advantage over potential flow interaction in the impeller-vane inter-stage; potential flow interaction has an advantage over wake interaction in the vane-impeller inter-stage. In other words, distribution of flow field in the two interstages is determined by the rotating component.

  20. A model of unsteady spatially inhomogeneous flow in a radial-axial blade machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrozhevich, A. V.; Munshtukov, D. A.

    A two-dimensional model of the gasdynamic process in a radial-axial blade machine is proposed which allows for the instantaneous local state of the field of flow parameters, changes in the set angles along the median profile line, profile losses, and centrifugal and Coriolis forces. The model also allows for the injection of cooling air and completion of fuel combustion in the flow. The model is equally applicable to turbines and compressors. The use of the method of singularities provides for a unified and relatively simple description of various factors affecting the flow and, therefore, for computational efficiency.

  1. An investigation of a flow field in one and half axial turbine stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němec, Martin; Jelínek, Tomáš; Milčák, Petr

    2017-09-01

    An investigation of one and half axial turbine stage configuration was carried out in a closed-loop wind tunnel. The investigation was addressed to that impact how the previous stage outlet flow field influences a flow structures in the next stator in steam multistage turbines. The detailed measurement behind the rotor and the second stator was performed with a pneumatic probes to gain a useful data for an impact analysis. Various rotor shroud clearances were also tested to capture the shroud outlet flow field influences.

  2. High-resolution AUV mapping and lava flow ages at Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.; Dreyer, B. M.; Caress, D. W.; Martin, J.

    2011-12-01

    Mapping along mid-ocean ridges, as on land, requires identification of flow boundaries and sequence, and ages of some flows to understand eruption history. Multibeam sonars on autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV) now generate 1-m resolution maps that resolve lava pillars, internal flow structures and boundaries, and lava flow emplacement sequences using crosscutting relations and abundance of fissures. MBARI has now mapped the summit caldera floor and rims and the upper south rift zone on Axial Seamount on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. With the advent of the high-resolution bathymetry and the ability to observe flow contacts to determine superposition using ROVs and submersibles, the missing component has been determining absolute ages of the flows. We used the MBARI ROV Doc Ricketts to collect short push cores (<30 cm) of the thin sediment nestled between pillow lava lobes and sieve and then hand-pick planktic foraminifera from the base of the cores to date by AMS 14C. Ages of planktic foraminifera are marine-calibrated in years before present, and provide minimum ages for the underlying flows, as there is probably some basal sediment that is not recovered. 14C ages have been determined for 10 cores near the summit of Axial Seamount and for 6 from the lowermost south rift. Ages of nearby samples commonly yield statistically identical ages, and 2 cores near the center of the caldera had multiple layers dated. These ages systematically increase with depth, indicating that redistribution of sediment by bottom currents does not significantly affect the stratigraphy. We will expand these collections in summer 2011. The coring is accompanied by collection of flow samples for chemistry and video observations to confirm contact locations and flow superposition inferred from the mapping data. Six ages from the lowermost part of the south rift of Axial Seamount include samples on a cone with deep summit crater that is ~16,580 aBP and on 5 flows between 950 and 1510 aBP. Two

  3. Laminar Flow About a Rotating Body of Revolution in an Axial Airstream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlichting, H.

    1956-01-01

    We have set ourselves the problem of calculating the laminar flow on a body of revolution in an axial flow which simultaneously rotates about its axis. The problem mentioned above, the flow about a rotating disk in a flow, which we solved some time ago, represents the first step in the calculation of the flow on the rotating body of revolution in a flow insofar as, in the case of a round nose, a small region about the front stagnation point of the body of revolution may be replaced by its tangential plane. In our problem regarding the rotating body of revolution in a flow, for laminar flow, one of the limiting cases is known: that of the body which is in an axial approach flow but does not rotate. The other limiting case, namely the flow in the neighborhood of a body which rotates but is not subjected to a flow is known only for the rotating circular cylinder, aside from the rotating disk. In the case of the cylinder one deals with a distribution of the circumferential velocity according to the law v = omega R(exp 2)/r where R signifies the cylinder radius, r the distance from the center, and omega the angular velocity of the rotation. The velocity distribution as it is produced here by the friction effect is therefore the same as in the neighborhood of a potential vortex. When we treat, in what follows, the general case of the rotating body of revolution in a flow according to the calculation methods of Prandtl's boundary-layer theory, we must keep in mind that this solution cannot contain the limiting case of the body of revolution which only rotates but is not subjected to a flow. However, this is no essential limitation since this case is not of particular importance for practical purposes.

  4. Impact of Periodic Unsteadiness on Performance and Heat Load in Axial Flow Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Om P.; Stetson, Gary M.; Daniels, William A,; Greitzer, Edward M.; Blair, Michael F.; Dring, Robert P.

    1997-01-01

    Results of an analytical and experimental investigation, directed at the understanding of the impact of periodic unsteadiness on the time-averaged flows in axial flow turbomachines, are presented. Analysis of available experimental data, from a large-scale rotating rig (LSRR) (low speed rig), shows that in the time-averaged axisymmetric equations the magnitude of the terms representing the effect of periodic unsteadiness (deterministic stresses) are as large or larger than those due to random unsteadiness (turbulence). Numerical experiments, conducted to highlight physical mechanisms associated with the migration of combustor generated hot-streaks in turbine rotors, indicated that the effect can be simulated by accounting for deterministic stress like terms in the time-averaged mass and energy conservation equations. The experimental portion of this program shows that the aerodynamic loss for the second stator in a 1-1/2 stage turbine are influenced by the axial spacing between the second stator leading edge and the rotor trailing edge. However, the axial spacing has little impact on the heat transfer coefficient. These performance changes are believed to be associated with the change in deterministic stress at the inlet to the second stator. Data were also acquired to quantify the impact of indexing the first stator relative to the second stator. For the range of parameters examined, this effect was found to be of the same order as the effect of axial spacing.

  5. Shear thinning effects on blood flow in straight and curved tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Erica M.; Eaton, John K.

    2013-07-01

    Simulations were performed to determine the magnitude and types of errors one can expect when approximating blood in large arteries as a Newtonian fluid, particularly in the presence of secondary flows. This was accomplished by running steady simulations of blood flow in straight and curved tubes using both Newtonian and shear-thinning viscosity models. In the shear-thinning simulations, the viscosity was modeled as a shear rate-dependent function fit to experimental data. Simulations in straight tubes were modeled after physiologically relevant arterial flows, and flow parameters for the curved tube simulations were chosen to examine a variety of secondary flow strengths. The diameters ranged from 1 mm to 10 mm and the Reynolds numbers from 24 to 1500. Pressure and velocity data are reported for all simulations. In the straight tube simulations, the shear-thinning flows had flattened velocity profiles and higher pressure gradients compared to the Newtonian simulations. In the curved tube flows, the shear-thinning simulations tended to have blunted axial velocity profiles, decreased secondary flow strengths, and decreased axial vorticity compared to the Newtonian simulations. The cross-sectionally averaged pressure drops in the curved tubes were higher in the shear-thinning flows at low Reynolds number but lower at high Reynolds number. The maximum deviation in secondary flow magnitude averaged over the cross sectional area was 19% of the maximum secondary flow and the maximum deviation in axial vorticity was 25% of the maximum vorticity.

  6. Numerical predictions of the turbulent cavitating flow around a marine propeller and an axial turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgut, M.; Jošt, D.; Nobile, E.; Škerlavaj, A.

    2015-12-01

    The numerical predictions of cavitating flow around a marine propeller working in non-uniform inflow and an axial turbine are presented. The cavitating flow is modelled using the homogeneous (mixture) model. Time-dependent simulations are performed for the marine propeller case using OpenFOAM. Three calibrated mass transfer models are alternatively used to model the mass transfer rate due to cavitation and the two-equation SST (Shear Stress Transport) turbulence model is employed to close the system of the governing equations. The predictions of the cavitating flow in an axial turbine are carried out with ANSYS-CFX, where only the native mass transfer model with tuned parameters is used. Steady-state simulations are performed in combination with the SST turbulence model, while time-dependent results are obtained with the more advanced SAS (Scale Adaptive Simulation) SST model. The numerical results agree well with the available experimental measurements, and the simulations performed with the three different calibrated mass transfer models are close to each other for the propeller flow. Regarding the axial turbine the effect of the cavitation on the machine efficiency is well reproduced only by the time dependent simulations.

  7. Design and Performance Checks of the NPL Axial Heat Flow Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Clark, J.; Stacey, C.; Salmon, D.

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes the design and performance checks of the NPL axial heat flow apparatus developed at the National Physical Laboratory for measurement of thermal conductivity. This apparatus is based on an absolute steady-state technique and is suitable for measuring specimens with thermal conductivities in the range from to and at temperatures between and . A uniform heat flow is induced in a cylindrical bar-shaped specimen that is firmly clamped between a guarded heater unit at the top and a water-cooled base. Heat is supplied at a known rate at the top end of the specimen by the heater unit and constrained to flow axially through the specimen by a surrounding edge-guard system, which is closely matched to the temperature gradient within the test specimen. The performance of this apparatus has been checked against existing NPL thermal-conductivity reference materials NPL 2S89 (based on Stainless Steel 310) and BSC Pure Iron (pure iron supplied by the British Steel Corporation with 99.96 % purity). The measured data produced by the newly designed NPL axial heat flow apparatus agree with the reference data for NPL 2S89 within 2 % and with that of BSC Pure Iron to within 3 % at temperatures from to . This apparatus is being used to provide accurate measurements to industrial and academic organizations and has also been used to develop a new range of NPL reference materials for checking other experimental techniques and procedures for thermal-conductivity measurements.

  8. Brachial blood flow under relative levels of blood flow restriction is decreased in a nonlinear fashion.

    PubMed

    Mouser, J Grant; Ade, Carl J; Black, Christopher D; Bemben, Debra A; Bemben, Michael G

    2017-04-12

    Blood flow restriction (BFR), the application of external pressure to occlude venous return and restrict arterial inflow, has been shown to increase muscular size and strength when combined with low-load resistance exercise. BFR in the research setting uses a wide range of pressures, applying a pressure based upon an individual's systolic pressure or a percentage of occlusion pressure; not a directly determined reduction in blood flow. The relationship between relative pressure and blood flow has not been established. To measure blood flow in the arm under relative levels of BFR. Forty-five people (18-40 years old) participated. Arterial occlusion pressure in the right arm was measured using a 5-cm pneumatic cuff. Blood flow in the brachial artery was measured at rest and at pressures between 10% and 90% of occlusion using ultrasound. Blood flow decreased in a nonlinear, stepped fashion. Blood flow decreased at 10% of occlusion and remained constant until decreasing again at 40%, where it remained until 90% of occlusion. The decrease in brachial blood flow is not proportional to the applied relative pressure. The prescription of blood flow restriction should take into account the stimulus provided at each relative level of blood flow. © 2017 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Numerical investigation of the effects of the clearance gap between the inducer and impeller of an axial blood pump.

    PubMed

    Chan, Weng-Kong; Wong, Yew-Wah; Ong, Wendy; Koh, Sy-Yuan; Chong, Victor

    2005-03-01

    A series of numerical models are generated to investigate the flow characteristics and performance of an axial blood pump. The pump model includes a straightener, an inducer-impeller, and diffuser. Numerical studies of the effects of angular alignment of the inducer and impeller blades and the axial clearance gap between the inducer and impeller are presented in this article. The pump characteristics derived from numerical simulation are validated with experimental data. Numerically simulated results showed a sinusoidal variation in the pressure generated across the pump with changes in angular alignment between the inducer and impeller. This is attributed to additional losses when flow is forced or diverted from the trailing edge of the inducer to either the pressure or suction side of the impeller blade when the alignment between the two sets of blades is not optimal. The pressure generated is a maximum when the impeller blades are at 0 or 30 degrees with respect to the inducer. The effect of rotating the impeller with respect to the inducer causes the sinusoidal pressure variation. In addition, it was observed that when the clearance gap between the inducer and impeller is reduced to 1 mm, the pressure generated is a minimum when compared to the other models. This is attributed to the interference between the inducer and impeller when the gap separating them is too small. The location of the maximum pressure on the pressure side of the impeller blade shifts upstream while its magnitude decreases for small clearance gap between the inducer and the impeller. There was no flow separation in the inducer while small regions of backflow are observed at the impeller trailing edge. Recommendations for future modifications and improvements to the pump design and model simulation are also given.

  10. Modeling of momentum transport of axially parallel turbulent flows in rod cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelen, Neele

    Problems and boundary conditions of the turbulent flow in heat exchangers, especially for nuclear fuel elements, are treated using mathematical models. Rod cascade flow and the physical fundamentals of turbulent flows are introduced. It is shown that the momentum transport phenomena can be separated into the radial and azimuthal directions. The geometrical characteristics of rod bundle geometries and a regression analysis are considered. The correlation coefficients for the wall parallel vortex viscosity are determined using a numerical optimization method. The order of magnitude of the secondary flow occurring perpendicularly to the main flow direction are determined to be 1 pct to 2 pct of the average axial velocity. The results obtained with the code VELASCO-BS are superior to those of previous codes. The azimuthal vortex viscosity is the decisive parameter, and secondary flow is not important for wall parallel momentum transport.

  11. High-resolution mapping of the 1998 lava flows at Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, B.; Clague, D. A.; Embley, R. W.; Caress, D. W.; Paduan, J. B.; Sasnett, P.

    2011-12-01

    Axial Seamount (an active hotspot volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge) last erupted in 1998 and produced two lava flows (a "northern" and a "southern" flow) along the upper south rift zone separated by a distance of 4 km. Geologic mapping of the 1998 lava flows has been carried out with a combination of visual observations from multiple submersible dives since 1998, and with high-resolution bathymetry, most recently collected with the MBARI mapping AUV (the D. Allan B.) since 2007. The new mapping results revise and update the previous preliminary flow outlines, areas, and volumes. The high-resolution bathymetry (1-m grid cell size) allows eruptive fissures fine-scale morphologic features to be resolved with new and remarkable clarity. The morphology of both lava flows can be interpreted as a consequence of a specific sequence of events during their emplacement. The northern sheet flow is long (4.6 km) and narrow (500 m), and erupted in the SE part of Axial caldera, where it temporarily ponded and inflated on relatively flat terrain before draining out southward toward steeper slopes. The inflation and drain-out of this sheet flow by ~ 3.5 m over 2.5 hours was previously documented by a monitoring instrument that was caught in the lava flow. Our geologic mapping shows that the morphology of the northern sheet flow varies along its length primarily due to gradients in the underlying slope and processes active during flow emplacement. The original morphology of the sheet flow where it ponded is lobate, with pillows near the margins, whereas the central axis of drain-out and collapse is floored with lineated, ropy, and jumbled lava morphologies. The southern lava flow, in contrast, is mostly pillow lava where it cascaded down the steep slope on the east flank of the south rift zone, but also has a major area of collapse where lava ponded temporarily near the rift axis. These results show that submarine lava flows have more subsurface hydraulic connectivity than has

  12. Blood flow and oxygen uptake during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. W.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.; Nadel, E. R.

    1973-01-01

    A model is developed for predicting oxygen uptake, muscle blood flow, and blood chemistry changes under exercise conditions. In this model, the working muscle mass system is analyzed. The conservation of matter principle is applied to the oxygen in a unit mass of working muscle under transient exercise conditions. This principle is used to relate the inflow of oxygen carried with the blood to the outflow carried with blood, the rate of change of oxygen stored in the muscle myoglobin, and the uptake by the muscle. Standard blood chemistry relations are incorporated to evaluate venous levels of oxygen, pH, and carbon dioxide.

  13. Blood flow and oxygen uptake during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. W.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.; Nadel, E. R.

    1973-01-01

    A model is developed for predicting oxygen uptake, muscle blood flow, and blood chemistry changes under exercise conditions. In this model, the working muscle mass system is analyzed. The conservation of matter principle is applied to the oxygen in a unit mass of working muscle under transient exercise conditions. This principle is used to relate the inflow of oxygen carried with the blood to the outflow carried with blood, the rate of change of oxygen stored in the muscle myoglobin, and the uptake by the muscle. Standard blood chemistry relations are incorporated to evaluate venous levels of oxygen, pH, and carbon dioxide.

  14. Analytical and experimental study of mean flow and turbulence characteristics inside the passages of an axial flow inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorton, C. A.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1980-01-01

    The inviscid and viscid effects existing within the passages of a three bladed axial flow inducer operating at a flow coefficient of 0.065 are investigated. The blade static pressure and blade limiting streamline angle distributions were determined and the three components of mean velocity, turbulence intensities, and turbulence stresses were measured at locations inside the inducer blade passage utilizing a rotating three sensor hotwire probe. Applicable equations were derived for the hotwire data reduction analysis and solved numerically to obtain the appropriate flow parameters. The three dimensional inviscid flow in the inducer was predicted by numerically solving the exact equations of motion, and the three dimensional viscid flow was predicted by incorporating the dominant viscous terms into the exact equations. The analytical results are compared with the experimental measurements and design values where appropriate. Radial velocities are found to be of the same order as axial velocities within the inducer passage, confirming the highly three dimensional characteristic of inducer flow. Total relative velocity distribution indicate a substantial velocity deficiency near the tip at mid-passage which expands significantly as the flow proceeds toward the inducer trailing edge. High turbulence intensities and turbulence stresses are concentrated within this core region. Considerable wake diffusion occurs immediately downstream of the inducer trailing edge to decay this loss core. Evidence of boundary layer interactions, blade blockage effects, radially inward flows, annulus wall effects, and backflows are all found to exist within the long, narrow passages of the inducer.

  15. Blood flow patterns underlie developmental heart defects.

    PubMed

    Midgett, Madeline; Thornburg, Kent; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2017-03-01

    Although cardiac malformations at birth are typically associated with genetic anomalies, blood flow dynamics also play a crucial role in heart formation. However, the relationship between blood flow patterns in the early embryo and later cardiovascular malformation has not been determined. We used the chicken embryo model to quantify the extent to which anomalous blood flow patterns predict cardiac defects that resemble those in humans and found that restricting either the inflow to the heart or the outflow led to reproducible abnormalities with a dose-response type relationship between blood flow stimuli and the expression of cardiac phenotypes. Constricting the outflow tract by 10-35% led predominantly to ventricular septal defects, whereas constricting by 35-60% most often led to double outlet right ventricle. Ligation of the vitelline vein caused mostly pharyngeal arch artery malformations. We show that both cardiac inflow reduction and graded outflow constriction strongly influence the development of specific and persistent abnormal cardiac structure and function. Moreover, the hemodynamic-associated cardiac defects recapitulate those caused by genetic disorders. Thus our data demonstrate the importance of investigating embryonic blood flow conditions to understand the root causes of congenital heart disease as a prerequisite to future prevention and treatment.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Congenital heart defects result from genetic anomalies, teratogen exposure, and altered blood flow during embryonic development. We show here a novel "dose-response" type relationship between the level of blood flow alteration and manifestation of specific cardiac phenotypes. We speculate that abnormal blood flow may frequently underlie congenital heart defects. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Personality and regional cerebral blood flow.

    PubMed

    Mathew, R J; Weinman, M L; Barr, D L

    1984-05-01

    The extraversion-introversion dimension of personality is believed to have an inverse relationship with cortical arousal. Brain capillary perfusion is a well established index of brain function and arousal. Regional cerebral blood flow was measured in 51 right-handed females whose personality structure was examined with the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI). Significant inverse correlations were found between the brain blood flow and the extraversion-introversion score of EPI.

  17. Micro-PIV quantification of capillary blood flow redistribution caused by laser-assisted vascular occlusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurochkin, Maxim A.; Stiukhina, Elena S.; Fedosov, Ivan V.; Postnov, Dmitry E.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2016-04-01

    We propose μPIV-based technique for quantitative assessment of blood flow redistribution in microcirculatory networks. Our approach is based on per-segment averaging of measured quantities so we can avoid most of problems that are typical for point-wise measurements. The key point of our technique is the digital processing algorithms of recorded data that include: capillary network axial line construction; interrogation regions centering; blood flow velocity local estimate using PIV approach; blood flow velocity calculation by means of averaging over entire vessel segment; the calculation of blood volume flow rate map. We illustrate the application of developed technique with in vivo measurements and blood flow velocity map reconstruction for chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of chicken embryo, in which the local vascular occlusion was produced using continuous wave laser light irradiation..

  18. Nutrient and nonnutrient renal blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.S.; Passmore, J.C.; Hartupee, D.A.; Baker, C.H. )

    1990-06-01

    The role of prostaglandins in the distribution of total renal blood flow (TRBF) between nutrient and nonnutrient compartments was investigated in anesthetized mongrel dogs. Renal blood flow distribution was assessed by the xenon 133 freeze-dissection technique and by rubidium 86 extraction after ibuprofen treatment. Ibuprofen (13 mg/kg) significantly decreased TRBF by 16.3% +/- 1.2% (mean +/- SEM electromagnetic flow probe; p less than 0.005), but did not alter blood flows to the outer cortex (3.7 vs 4.3 ml/min per gram), the inner cortex (2.6 vs 2.7 ml/min per gram), and the other medulla (1.5 vs 1.5 ml/min per gram), which suggests a decrease in nonnutrient flow. In a separate group of animals the effect of reduced blood flow on the nutrient and nonnutrient components was determined by mechanically reducing renal arterial blood flow by 48%. Unlike the ibuprofen group, nutrient blood flows were proportionally reduced with the mechanical decrease in TRBF in the outer cortex (1.9 ml/min per gram, p less than 0.05), the inner cortex (1.4 ml/min per gram, p less than 0.05), and the outer medulla (0.8 ml/min per gram, p less than 0.01). These results indicate no shift between nutrient and nonnutrient compartments. Nutrient and nonnutrient renal blood flows of the left kidney were also determined by 86Rb extraction. After ibuprofen treatment, nonextracted 86Rb decreased to 12.1% from the control value of 15.6% (p less than 0.05). Mechanical reduction of TRBF did not significantly decrease the proportion of unextracted 86Rb (18.7%).

  19. Estimation of collection efficiency depended on feed particle concentration for axial flow cyclone dust collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Akira

    1999-09-01

    A cyclone dust collector is applied in many industries. Especially the axial flow cyclone is the most simple construction and it keeps high reliability for maintenance. On the other hand, the collection efficiency of the cyclone depends not only on the inlet gas velocity but also on the feed particle concentration. The collection efficiency increases with increasing feed particle concentration. However until now the problem of how to estimate the collection efficiency depended on the feed particle concentration is remained except the investigation by Muschelknautz & Brunner[6]. Therefore in this paper one of the estimate method for the collection efficiency of the axial flow cyclones is proposed. The application to the geometrically similar type of cyclone of the body diameters D 1=30, 50, 69 and 99 mm showed in good agreement with the experimental results of the collection efficiencies which were described in detail in the paper by Ogawa & Sugiyama[8].

  20. Inlet Flow Test Calibration for a Small Axial Compressor Facility. Part 1: Design and Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. P.; Prahst, P. S.

    1994-01-01

    An axial compressor test rig has been designed for the operation of small turbomachines. The inlet region consisted of a long flowpath region with two series of support struts and a flapped inlet guide vane. A flow test was run to calibrate and determine the source and magnitudes of the loss mechanisms in the inlet for a highly loaded two-stage axial compressor test. Several flow conditions and IGV angle settings were established in which detailed surveys were completed. Boundary layer bleed was also provided along the casing of the inlet behind the support struts and ahead of the IGV. A detailed discussion of the flowpath design along with a summary of the experimental results are provided in Part 1.

  1. Effect on fan flow characteristics of length and axial location of a cascade thrust reverser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    A series of static tests were conducted on a model fan with a diameter of 14.0 cm to determine the fan operating characteristics, the inlet static pressure contours, the fan-exit total and static pressure contours, and the fan-exit pressure distortion parameters associated with the installation of a partial-circumferential-emission cascade thrust reverser. The tests variables included the cascade axial length, the axial location of the reverser, and the type of fan inlet. It was shown that significant total and static pressure distortions were produced in the fan aft duct, and that some configurations induced a static pressure distortion at the fan face. The amount of flow passed by the fan and the level of the flow distortions were dependent upon all the variables tested.

  2. Effects of various axial flow profiles on the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Z-pinch implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Ding, N.

    2006-06-01

    The stabilizing effect of different axial flow profiles on the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MTR) instability in Z-pinch implosions is investigated with a compressible skin-current model. The numerical results show that the mitigation effect of the axial flow on the MRT instability is caused by the radial velocity shear, and it is highly susceptible to the shear value nearby the plasma outer surface. By adjusting the flow profile, the mitigation effect can be improved markedly.

  3. Design and numerical evaluation of an axial partial-assist blood pump for Chinese and other heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guang-Mao; Jin, Dong-Hai; Zhou, Jian-Ye; Jiang, Xi-Hang; Sun, Han-Song; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Hai-Bo; Hu, Sheng-Shou; Gui, Xing-Min

    2017-08-02

    A fully implantable axial left ventricular assist device LAP31 was developed for Chinese or other heart failure patients who need partial support. Based on the 5-Lpm total cardiac blood output of Chinese without heart failure disease, the design point of LAP31 was set to a flow rate of 3 Lpm with 100-mmHg pressure head. To achieve the required pressure head and good hemolytic performance, a structure that includes a spindly rotor hub and a diffuser with splitter and cantilevered main blades was developed. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to analyze the hydraulic and hemodynamic performance of LAP31. Then in vitro hydraulics experiments were conducted. The numerical simulation results show that LAP31 could generate a 1 to 8 Lpm flow rate with a 60.9 to 182.7 mmHg pressure head when the pump was rotating between 9,000 and 12,000 rpm. The average scalar shear stress of the blood pump was 21.7 Pa, and the average exposure time was 71.0 milliseconds. The mean hemolysis index of LAP31 obtained using Heuser's hemolysis model and Giersiepen's model was 0.220% and 3.89 × 10-5% respectively. After adding the splitter blades, the flow separation at the suction surface of the diffuser was reduced. The cantilever structure reduced the tangential velocity from 6.1 to 4.7-1.4 m/s within the blade gap by changing the blade gap from shroud to hub. Subsequently, the blood damage caused by shear stress was reduced. In conclusion, the hydraulic and hemolytic characteristics of the LAP31 are acceptable for partial support.

  4. Flow visualization for investigating stator losses in a multistage axial compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Natalie R.; Key, Nicole L.

    2015-05-01

    The methodology and implementation of a powder-paint-based flow visualization technique along with the illuminated flow physics are presented in detail for application in a three-stage axial compressor. While flow visualization often accompanies detailed studies, the turbomachinery literature lacks a comprehensive study which both utilizes flow visualization to interrupt the flow field and explains the intricacies of execution. Lessons learned for obtaining high-quality images of surface flow patterns are discussed in this study. Fluorescent paint is used to provide clear, high-contrast pictures of the recirculation regions on shrouded vane rows. An edge-finding image processing procedure is implemented to provide a quantitative measure of vane-to-vane variability in flow separation, which is approximately 7 % of the suction surface length for Stator 1. Results include images of vane suction side corner separations from all three stages at three loading conditions. Additionally, streakline patterns obtained experimentally are compared with those calculated from computational models. Flow physics associated with vane clocking and increased rotor tip clearance and their implications to stator loss are also investigated with this flow visualization technique. With increased rotor tip clearance, the vane surface flow patterns show a shift to larger separations and more radial flow at the tip. Finally, the effects of instrumentation on the flow field are highlighted.

  5. Mechanical circulatory support of a univentricular Fontan circulation with a continuous axial-flow pump in a piglet model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xufeng; Sanchez, Pablo G; Liu, Yang; Li, Tieluo; Watkins, A Claire; Wu, Zhongjun J; Griffith, Bartley P

    2015-01-01

    Despite the significant contribution of the Fontan procedure to the therapy of complex congenital heart diseases, many patients progress to failure of their Fontan circulation. The use of ventricular assist devices to provide circulatory support to these patients remains challenging. In the current study, a continuous axial-flow pump was used to support a univentricular Fontan circulation. A modified Fontan circulation (atrio-pulmonary connection) was constructed in six Yorkshire piglets (8-14 kg). A Dacron conduit (12 mm) with two branches was constructed to serve as a complete atrio-pulmonary connection without the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. The Impella pump was inserted into the conduit through an additional Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft in five animals. Hemodynamic data were collected for 6 hours under the supported Fontan circulation. The control animal died after initiating the Fontan circulation independent of resuscitation. Four pump supported animals remained hemodynamically stable for 6 hours with pump speeds between 18,000 rpm and 22,000 rpm (P1-P3). Oxygen saturation was maintained between 95% and 100%. Normal organ perfusion was illustrated by blood gas analysis and biochemical assays. A continuous axial-flow pump can be used for temporal circulatory support to the failing Fontan circulation as "bridge" to heart transplantation or recovery.

  6. Rotor whirl forces induced by the tip clearance effect in axial flow compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrich, F. )

    1993-10-01

    It is now widely recognized that destabilizing forces, tending to generate forward rotor whirl, are generated in axial flow turbines as a result of the nonuniform torque induced by the nonuniform tip-clearance in a deflected rotor--the so called Thomas/Alford force. It is also recognized that there will be a similar effect in axial flow compressors, but qualitative considerations cannot definitively establish the magnitude or even the direction of the induced whirling forces--that is, if they will tend to forward or backward whirl. Applying a parallel compressor model to simulate the operation of a compressor rotor deflected radially in its clearance, it is possible to derive a quantitative estimate of the proportionality factor [beta] which relates the Thomas/Alford force in axial flow compressors (i.e., the tangential force generated by a radial deflection of the rotor) to the torque level in the compressor. The analysis makes use of experimental data from the GE Aircraft Engines Low Speed Research Compressor facility comparing the performance of three different axial flow compressors, each with four stages (typical of a mid-block of an aircraft gas turbine compressor) at two different clearances. It is found that the value of [beta] is in the range of +0.27 to [minus]0.71 in the vicinity of the stages' nominal operating line and +0.08 to [minus]1.25 in the vicinity of the stages' operation at peak efficiency. The value of [beta] reaches a level of between [minus]1.16 and [minus]3.36 as the compressor is operated near its stalled condition.

  7. Enhanced capabilities and modified users manual for axial-flow compressor conceptual design code CSPAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, Arthur J.; Lavelle, Thomas M.

    1995-01-01

    Modifications made to the axial-flow compressor conceptual design code CSPAN are documented in this report. Endwall blockage and stall margin predictions were added. The loss-coefficient model was upgraded. Default correlations for rotor and stator solidity and aspect-ratio inputs and for stator-exit tangential velocity inputs were included in the code along with defaults for aerodynamic design limits. A complete description of input and output along with sample cases are included.

  8. Off-pump replacement of the INCOR implantable axial-flow pump.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Kuniki; Kirsch, Matthias E W; Vermes, Emmanuelle; Rosanval, Odile; Loisance, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Owing to the actual increase of mechanical circulatory support durations, total or partial replacement of ventricular assist devices (VADs) will most certainly have to be performed with increasing frequency. Herein we report the case of a patient in whom an INCOR (Berlin Heart AG, Berlin) implantable axial-flow pump was replaced without the use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), underscoring some of the unique features provided by this system.

  9. Modification of Axial-Flow Compressor Stall Margin by Variation of Stationary Blade Setting Angles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    AD-A238 406 / FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Modification of axial-flow compressor stall margin by variation of stationary blade setting angles by - ’ | JUL...7 1.3 A voiding Stall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2. RELATED ISOLATED AIRFOIL DYNAMIC S’IALL...Comprcssor pressure r:se ratio ....... .................. 11:3 4.3.3 Inlet correctc-i rotational speed . . ... .......... 114 4.3.4 Detection of stall in

  10. A comparison of predicted and measured inlet distortion flows in a subsonic axial inlet flow compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Albert K.

    1992-01-01

    Detailed flow measurements were taken inside an isolated axial compressor rotor operating subsonically near peak efficiency. These Laser Anemometer measurements were made with two inlet velocity profiles. One profile consisted of an unmodified baseline flow, and the second profile was distorted by placing axisymmetric screens on the hub and shroud well upstream of the rotor. A detailed comparison in the rotor relative reference frame between a Navier-Stokes solver and the measured experimental results showed good agreement between the predicted and measured flows. A primary flow is defined in the rotor and deviations and the computed predictions is made to assess the development of a passage vortex due to the distortion of the inlet flow. Computer predictions indicate that a distorted inlet profile has a minimal effect on the development of the flow in the rotor passage and the resulting passage vortex.

  11. Mixed convection in liquid metal flow in a horizontal duct with strong axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Zikanov, Oleg

    2016-11-01

    The work is motivated by design of self-cooled liquid-metal breeder blankets for Tokamak fusion reactors. Thermal convection caused by non-uniform internal heating in a liquid metal flow in a horizontal duct with strong axial magnetic field is analyzed numerically. Axial magnetic field is considered strong enough (the Hartmann number up to 104 corresponding to typical reactor condition) to suppress the streamwise variation of the flow, so a two-dimensional fully developed flow is studied. Duct walls are assumed to be thermally and electrically insulated. The non-uniform internal heat deposited by captured neutrons is fully diverted by the mean flow. Realistically high Grashof (up to 1011) and Reynolds (up to 106) numbers are considered. It is found that the state of the flow is strongly affected by the vertical stable stratification developing in response to the streamwise growth of mean temperature. Two flow regimes are identified: the regime with developed transverse convection at moderate Grashof numbers, and the regime, in which convection is suppressed at high Grashof numbers. Financial support was provided by the U.S. National Science Foundation (Grant CBET 1435269) and by the University of Michigan - Dearborn.

  12. Large-eddy simulations of a flexible cylinder in axial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, Behrouz; Balaras, Elias; Bardet, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    A slender cylinder immersed in axial flow shows different behavior for different flow and material properties. Several studies have pointed to the importance of the dimensionless velocity, U = (ρA / EI)0.5Uo D , relating the fluid and structural inertia. However, it is not clear how this behavior changes for different Reynolds numbers and flow regimes, while keeping U constant. In this study a slender cylinder immersed in axial flow is considered as an one-dimensional beam. The fluid-structure interaction is simulated using an immersed-boundary method for a series of Re numbers. A non-linear Euler-Bernouli hypothesis is utilized to account for the deflection and rotation of the cylinder. It is observed that for small dimensionless velocities the cylinder oscillates with small amplitude around its axis. Increasing U results in buckling of the cylinder. For higher U beam looses its quasi steady buckled state and flutters. It is investigated that how this behavior changes for different Re and different flow regimes (laminar vs turbulent boundary layers). Overall buckling occurs at higher U at laminar flow conditions. The results are in agreement both qualitatively and quantitatively with experiments in the literature.

  13. Measurement of Flow Pattern Within a Rotating Stall Cell in an Axial Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, Jan; Braunscheidel, Edward P.

    2006-01-01

    Effective active control of rotating stall in axial compressors requires detailed understanding of flow instabilities associated with this compressor regime. Newly designed miniature high frequency response total and static pressure probes as well as commercial thermoanemometric probes are suitable tools for this task. However, during the rotating stall cycle the probes are subjected to flow direction changes that are far larger than the range of probe incidence acceptance, and therefore probe data without a proper correction would misrepresent unsteady variations of flow parameters. A methodology, based on ensemble averaging, is proposed to circumvent this problem. In this approach the ensemble averaged signals acquired for various probe setting angles are segmented, and only the sections for probe setting angles close to the actual flow angle are used for signal recombination. The methodology was verified by excellent agreement between velocity distributions obtained from pressure probe data, and data measured with thermoanemometric probes. Vector plots of unsteady flow behavior during the rotating stall regime indicate reversed flow within the rotating stall cell that spreads over to adjacent rotor blade channels. Results of this study confirmed that the NASA Low Speed Axial Compressor (LSAC) while in a rotating stall regime at rotor design speed exhibits one stall cell that rotates at a speed equal to 50.6 percent of the rotor shaft speed.

  14. Modeling Blood Flow in the Aorta.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Colin J.; Carmichael, Jonathan B.; DeMont, M. Edwin

    1997-01-01

    Presents an exercise to demonstrate two fundamental concepts of fluid mechanics: the Reynolds number and the Principle of Continuity. The exercise demonstrates flow in a major blood vessel, such as the aorta, with and without a stenosis. Students observe the transition from laminar to turbulent flow as well as downstream persistence of turbulence.…

  15. Modeling Blood Flow in the Aorta.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Colin J.; Carmichael, Jonathan B.; DeMont, M. Edwin

    1997-01-01

    Presents an exercise to demonstrate two fundamental concepts of fluid mechanics: the Reynolds number and the Principle of Continuity. The exercise demonstrates flow in a major blood vessel, such as the aorta, with and without a stenosis. Students observe the transition from laminar to turbulent flow as well as downstream persistence of turbulence.…

  16. The experimental verification of a streamline curvature numerical analysis method applied to the flow through an axial flow fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierzga, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    The experimental verification of an inviscid, incompressible through-flow analysis method is presented. The primary component of this method is an axisymmetric streamline curvature technique which is used to compute the hub-to-tip flow field of a given turbomachine. To analyze the flow field in the blade-to-blade plane of the machine, the potential flow solution of an infinite cascade of airfoils is also computed using a source model technique. To verify the accuracy of such an analysis method an extensive experimental verification investigation was conducted using an axial flow research fan. Detailed surveys of the blade-free regions of the machine along with intra-blade surveys using rotating pressure sensing probes and blade surface static pressure taps provide a one-to-one relationship between measured and predicted data. The results of this investigation indicate the ability of this inviscid analysis method to predict the design flow field of the axial flow fan test rotor to within a few percent of the measured values.

  17. The experimental verification of a streamline curvature numerical analysis method applied to the flow through an axial flow fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierzga, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    The experimental verification of an inviscid, incompressible through-flow analysis method is presented. The primary component of this method is an axisymmetric streamline curvature technique which is used to compute the hub-to-tip flow field of a given turbomachine. To analyze the flow field in the blade-to-blade plane of the machine, the potential flow solution of an infinite cascade of airfoils is also computed using a source model technique. To verify the accuracy of such an analysis method an extensive experimental verification investigation was conducted using an axial flow research fan. Detailed surveys of the blade-free regions of the machine along with intra-blade surveys using rotating pressure sensing probes and blade surface static pressure taps provide a one-to-one relationship between measured and predicted data. The results of this investigation indicate the ability of this inviscid analysis method to predict the design flow field of the axial flow fan test rotor to within a few percent of the measured values.

  18. Computer program for aerodynamic and blading design of multistage axial-flow compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouse, J. E.; Gorrell, W. T.

    1981-01-01

    A code for computing the aerodynamic design of a multistage axial-flow compressor and, if desired, the associated blading geometry input for internal flow analysis codes is presented. Compressible flow, which is assumed to be steady and axisymmetric, is the basis for a two-dimensional solution in the meridional plane with viscous effects modeled by pressure loss coefficients and boundary layer blockage. The radial equation of motion and the continuity equation are solved with the streamline curvature method on calculation stations outside the blade rows. The annulus profile, mass flow, pressure ratio, and rotative speed are input. A number of other input parameters specify and control the blade row aerodynamics and geometry. In particular, blade element centerlines and thicknesses can be specified with fourth degree polynomials for two segments. The output includes a detailed aerodynamic solution and, if desired, blading coordinates that can be used for internal flow analysis codes.

  19. 21 CFR 870.2120 - Extravascular blood flow probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Extravascular blood flow probe. 870.2120 Section... blood flow probe. (a) Identification. An extravascular blood flow probe is an extravascular ultrasonic or electromagnetic probe used in conjunction with a blood flowmeter to measure blood flow in...

  20. 21 CFR 870.2120 - Extravascular blood flow probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Extravascular blood flow probe. 870.2120 Section... blood flow probe. (a) Identification. An extravascular blood flow probe is an extravascular ultrasonic or electromagnetic probe used in conjunction with a blood flowmeter to measure blood flow in...

  1. 21 CFR 870.2120 - Extravascular blood flow probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Extravascular blood flow probe. 870.2120 Section... blood flow probe. (a) Identification. An extravascular blood flow probe is an extravascular ultrasonic or electromagnetic probe used in conjunction with a blood flowmeter to measure blood flow in...

  2. 21 CFR 870.2120 - Extravascular blood flow probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Extravascular blood flow probe. 870.2120 Section... blood flow probe. (a) Identification. An extravascular blood flow probe is an extravascular ultrasonic or electromagnetic probe used in conjunction with a blood flowmeter to measure blood flow in...

  3. 21 CFR 870.2120 - Extravascular blood flow probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Extravascular blood flow probe. 870.2120 Section... blood flow probe. (a) Identification. An extravascular blood flow probe is an extravascular ultrasonic or electromagnetic probe used in conjunction with a blood flowmeter to measure blood flow in...

  4. Estimation of the supplementary axial wall stress generated at peak flow by an arterial stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doriot, Pierre-André

    2003-01-01

    Mechanical stresses in arterial walls are known to be implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. While shear stress and circumferential stress have received a lot of attention, axial stress has not. Yet, stenoses can be intuitively expected to produce a supplementary axial stress during flow systole in the region immediately proximal to the constriction cone. In this paper, a model for the estimation of this effect is presented, and ten numerical examples are computed. These examples show that the cyclic increase in axial stress can be quite considerable in severe stenoses (typically 120% or more of the normal stress value). This result is in best agreement with the known mechanical or morphological risk factors of stenosis progression and restenosis (hypertension, elevated pulse pressure, degree of stenosis, stenosis geometry, residual stenosis, etc). The supplementary axial stress generated by a stenosis might create the damages in the endothelium and in the elastic membranes which potentiate the action of the other risk factors (hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, etc). It could thus be an important cause of stenosis progression and of restenosis.

  5. Anionic biopolymers as blood flow sensors.

    PubMed

    Siegel, G; Walter, A; Kauschmann, A; Malmsten, M; Buddecke, E

    1996-01-01

    The finding of flow-dependent vasodilation rests on the basic observation that with an increase in blood flow the vessels become wider, with a decrease the vascular smooth muscle cells contract. Proteoheparan sulphate could be the sensor macromolecule at the endothelial cell membrane-blood interface, that reacts on the shear stress generated by the flowing blood, and that informs and regulates the vascular smooth muscle cells via a signal transduction chain. This anionic biopolyelectrolyte possesses viscoelastic and specific ion binding properties which allow a change of its configuration in dependence on shear stress and electrostatic charge density. The blood flow sensor undergoes a conformational transition from a random coil to an extended filamentous state with increasing flow, whereby Na+ ions from the blood are bound. Owing to the intramolecular elastic recoil forces of proteoheparan sulphate the slowing of a flow rate causes an entropic coiling, the expulsion of Na+ ions and thus an interruption of the signal chain. Under physiological conditions, the conformation and Na+ binding proved to be extremely Ca(2+)-sensitive while K+ and Mg2+ ions play a minor role for the susceptibility of the sensor. Via counterion migration of the bound Na+ ions along the sensor glycosaminoglycan side chains and following Na+ passage through an unspecific ion channel in the endothelial cell membrane, the signal transduction chain leads to a membrane depolarization with Ca2+ influx into the cells. This stimulates the EDRF/NO production and release from the endothelial cells. The consequence is vasodilation.

  6. Modeling Improvements and Users Manual for Axial-flow Turbine Off-design Computer Code AXOD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, Arthur J.

    1994-01-01

    An axial-flow turbine off-design performance computer code used for preliminary studies of gas turbine systems was modified and calibrated based on the experimental performance of large aircraft-type turbines. The flow- and loss-model modifications and calibrations are presented in this report. Comparisons are made between computed performances and experimental data for seven turbines over wide ranges of speed and pressure ratio. This report also serves as the users manual for the revised code, which is named AXOD.

  7. Competing states in a Couette-Taylor system with an axial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsameret, Avraham; Steinberg, Victor

    1994-05-01

    We present experimental results on novel pattern states which were observed in the Couette-Taylor flow subjected to an axial flow, in a wide range of the control parameters. Propagating Taylor vortices (PTV's), stationary spirals (SSP's), and moving spirals (MS's) were found as a result of a different symmetry breaking. These modes exhibit different wave-number selection. Novel states originating from an interaction between these patterns were also found. A ``mixed phase'' of PTV's and SSP's was identified. A ``mode-competition'' state, in which the PTV's and MS's are alternated in the column, is also described. Finally, a ``disordered-Taylor-vortices'' state was observed and characterized.

  8. Analysis of supersonic stall bending flutter in axial-flow compressor by actuator disk theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical model was developed for predicting the onset of supersonic stall bending flutter in axial-flow compressors. The analysis is based on two-dimensional, compressible, unsteady actuator disk theory. It is applied to a rotor blade row by considering a cascade of airfoils. The effects of shock waves and flow separation are included in the model. Calculations show that the model predicts the onset, in an unshrouded rotor, of a bending flutter mode that exhibits many of the characteristics of supersonic stall bending flutter. The validity of the analysis for predicting this flutter mode is demonstrated.

  9. End-wall and profile losses in a low-speed axial flow compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Sitaram, N.; Zhang, J.

    1985-01-01

    The blade-to-blade variation of relative stagnation pressure losses in the tip region inside the rotor of a single-stage, axial-flow compressor, is presented and interpreted in this paper. The losses are measured at two flow coefficients (one at the design point and the other at the near peak pressure rise point) to discern the effect of blade loading on the end-wall losses. The tip clearance losses are found to increase with an increase in the pressure rise coefficient. The losses away from the tip region and near the hub regions are measured downstream. The losses are integrated and interpreted in this paper.

  10. CFD analysis of fluid flow in an axial multi-stage partial-admission ORC turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surwilo, Jan; Lampart, Piotr; Szymaniak, Mariusz

    2015-10-01

    Basic operational advantages of the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) systems and specific issues of turbines working in these systems are discussed. The strategy for CFD simulation of the considered ORC turbine and the main issues of the numerical model are presented. The method of constructing the 3D CAD geometry as well as discretisation of the flow domain are also shown. Main features of partial admission flow in the multi-stage axial turbine are discussed. The influence of partial admission on the working conditions of the subsequent stage supplied at the full circumference is also described.

  11. Experimental Verification of the Streamline Curvature Numerical Analysis Method Applied to the Flow through an Axial Flow Fan.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-28

    turbomachine, such as an aircraft turbine or compressor stage, will depend heavily on the ability of the design engineer to predict accurately the...75-GT-121, Gas Turbine Conference and Products Show, Houston, Texas, March 2-6, 1975. 6. Novak, R. A., "Streamline Curvature Computing Procedures for...the Three-Dimensional Flow Field Behind an Axial Compressor Stage," ASME Paper No. 76-GT-18, Gas Turbine Conference and Products Show, New Orleans, La

  12. Inception mechanism and suppression of rotating stall in an axial-flow fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishioka, T.

    2013-12-01

    Inception patterns of rotating stall at two stagger-angle settings for the highly loaded rotor blades were experimentally investigated in a low-speed axial-flow fan. Rotor-tip flow fields were also numerically investigated to clarify the mechanism behind the rotating stall inception. The stall inception patterns depended on the rotor stagger-angle settings. The stall inception from a rotating instability was confirmed at the design stagger-angle settings. The stall inception from a short length-scale stall cell (spike) was also confirmed at the small stagger-angle setting. The spillage of tip-leakage flow and the tip-leakage vortex breakdown influence the rotating stall inception. An air-separator has been developed based on the clarified inception mechanism of rotating stall. The rotating stall was suppressed by the developed air-separator, and the operating range of fan was extended towards low flow rate. The effect of developed air-separator was also confirmed by application to a primary air fan used in a coal fired power plant. It is concluded from these results that the developed air-separator can provide a wide operating range for an axial-flow fan.

  13. Analysis Of Residence Time Distribution Of Fluid Flow By Axial Dispersion Model

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiharto; Su'ud, Zaki; Kurniadi, Rizal; Waris, Abdul; Abidin, Zainal

    2010-12-23

    Radioactive tracer {sup 82}Br in the form of KBr-82 with activity {+-} 1 mCi has been injected into steel pipeline to qualify the extent dispersion of water flowing inside it. Internal diameter of the pipe is 3 in. The water source was originated from water tank through which the water flow gravitically into the pipeline. Two collimated sodium iodide detectors were used in this experiment each of which was placed on the top of the pipeline at the distance of 8 and 11 m from injection point respectively. Residence time distribution (RTD) curves obtained from injection of tracer are elaborated numerically to find information of the fluid flow properties. The transit time of tracer calculated from the mean residence time (MRT) of each RTD curves is 14.9 s, therefore the flow velocity of the water is 0.2 m/s. The dispersion number, D/uL, for each RTD curve estimated by using axial dispersion model are 0.055 and 0.06 respectively. These calculations are performed after fitting the simulated axial dispersion model on the experiment curves. These results indicated that the extent of dispersion of water flowing in the pipeline is in the category of intermediate.

  14. Nonlinear stability of cylindrical shells subjected to axial flow: Theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagiozis, K. N.; Païdoussis, M. P.; Amabili, M.; Misra, A. K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper, is concerned with the nonlinear dynamics and stability of thin circular cylindrical shells clamped at both ends and subjected to axial fluid flow. In particular, it describes the development of a nonlinear theoretical model and presents theoretical results displaying the nonlinear behaviour of the clamped shell subjected to flowing fluid. The theoretical model employs the Donnell nonlinear shallow shell equations to describe the geometrically nonlinear structure. The clamped beam eigenfunctions are used to describe the axial variations of the shell deformation, automatically satisfying the boundary conditions and the circumferential continuity condition exactly. The fluid is assumed to be incompressible and inviscid, and the fluid-structure interaction is described by linear potential flow theory. The partial differential equation of motion is discretized using the Galerkin method and the final set of ordinary differential equations are integrated numerically using a pseudo-arclength continuation and collocation techniques and the Gear backward differentiation formula. A theoretical model for shells with simply supported ends is presented as well. Experiments are also described for (i) elastomer shells subjected to annular (external) air-flow and (ii) aluminium and plastic shells with internal water flow. The experimental results along with the theoretical ones indicate loss of stability by divergence with a subcritical nonlinear behaviour. Finally, theory and experiments are compared, showing good qualitative and reasonable quantitative agreement.

  15. An experimental and numerical investigation of thin film flow in an axially rotating horizontal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, Keary; Schultz, William; Perlin, Marc

    2003-11-01

    Two dimensional film flow in an axially rotating horizontal cylinder is studied both experimentally and numerically. The physical setup is a 610 cm long glass tube with inside radius of 1.634 cm. This tube is filled partially with four different fluids: treated water and 1, 20, and 500 cSt silicone oils (dimethylpolysiloxane). The free surface profile is captured via video imaging and laser sheet illumination of the dye laden fluid. Transition to rimming flow (snap through") during rotational acceleration as well as from rimming flow during deceleration is recorded. A long working distance microscope observes the depth of the thin film region as it reenters the "puddle" during non-rimming flow. A lubrication analysis numerical study includes centrifugal force in addition to pressure gradients in the direction of the polar angle [1]. Surface profiles generated from the experiments are compared with this simulation as well as other numerical and analytical studies. 1. Liu, Z. 2001 "Film flow within an axially rotating horizontal cylinder and contact lines on an oscillating plate," Ph.D. dissertation, University of Michigan.

  16. Analytical and experimental study of mean flow and turbulence characteristics inside the passages of an axial flow inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorton, C. A.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1974-01-01

    The effort conducted to gather additional understanding of the complex inviscid and viscid effects existing within the passages of a three-bladed axial flow inducer operating at a flow coefficient of 0.065 is summarized. The experimental investigations included determination of the blade static pressure and blade limiting streamline angle distributions, and measurement of the three components of mean velocity, turbulence intensities and turbulence stresses at locations inside the inducer blade passage utilizing a rotating three-sensor hotwire probe. Applicable equations were derived for the hotwire data reduction analysis and solved numerically to obtain the appropriate flow parameters. Analytical investigations were conducted to predict the three-dimensional inviscid flow in the inducer by numerically solving the exact equations of motion, and to approximately predict the three-dimensional viscid flow by incorporating the dominant viscous terms into the exact equations. The analytical results are compared with the experimental measurements and design values where appropriate.

  17. Correlation of axial blood velocity to venular and arteriolar diameter in the human eye in vivo.

    PubMed

    Koutsiaris, Aristotle G

    2015-01-01

    The axial blood velocity (Vax) association with microvessel diameter (D) was studied at 104 different postcapillary venules (4 μm <  D <  24 μm) and 30 different precapillary arterioles (6 μm≤D≤12 μm) in the human conjunctiva of normal healthy humans. Venular diameter sizes were classified as "very small" (Group 1, 4.4 μm≤D <  8.9 μm), "small" (Group 2, 8.9 μm≤D <  13.8 μm), "medium" (Group 3, 13.8 μm≤D <  19.1 μm) and "large" (Group 4, 19.1 μm≤D≤23.5). The Spearman's correlation coefficient (rs) in all 4 venular groups was less than 0.36 and not statistically significant (n = 26, p≥0.08). Similar correlation results were observed for the arteriolar group (rs) ≈ 0) for the peak systolic, the average and the end systolic axial velocities. Vax was significantly (p <  0.001) lower in Group 1 in comparison to that in Group 2 and significantly (p <  0.01) lower in Group 2 in comparison to that in Group 3. However, Vax was not significantly lower in Group 3 in comparison to that in Group 4. Average Vax and standard deviation was 0.48 ± 0.13, 0.64 ± 0.16, 0.82 ± 0.25 and 0.88 ± 0.32 mm/s for Groups 1, 2, 3 and 4 respectively. The above results reinforce the importance of measuring D in microvascular hemodynamics. Higher diameters suggest higher axial velocities but Vax does not change significantly within the limits of each of the aforementioned groups.

  18. Experimental and analytical dynamic flow characteristics of an axial-flow fan from an air cushion landing system model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. C.; Boghani, A. B.; Leland, T. J. W.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to compare the steady-state and dynamic flow characteristics of an axial-flow fan which had been used previously as the air supply fan for some model air cushion landing system studies. Steady-state flow characteristics were determined in the standard manner by using differential orifice pressures for the flow regime from free flow to zero flow. In this same regime, a correlative technique was established so that fan inlet and outlet pressures could be used to measure dynamic flow as created by a rotating damper. Dynamic tests at damper frequencies up to 5 Hz showed very different flow characteristics when compared with steady-state flow, particularly with respect to peak pressures and the pressure-flow relationship at fan stall and unstall. A generalized, rational mathematical fan model was developed based on physical fan parameters and a steady-state flow characteristic. The model showed good correlation with experimental tests at damper frequencies up to 5 Hz.

  19. An implantable blood pressure and flow transmitter.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rader, R. D.; Meehan, J. P.; Henriksen, J. K. C.

    1973-01-01

    A miniature totally implantable FM/FM telemetry system has been developed to simultaneously measure blood pressure and blood flow, thus providing an appreciation of the hemodynamics of the circulation to the entire body or to a particular organ. Developed for work with animal subjects, the telemetry system's transmission time is controlled by an RF signal that permits an operating life of several months. Pressure is detected by a miniature intravascular transducer and flow is detected by an extravascular interferometric ultrasonic technique. Both pressure and flow are calibrated prior to implanting. The pressure calibration can be checked after the implanting by cannulation; flow calibration can be verified only at the end of the experiment by determining the voltage output from the implanted sensing system as a function of several measured flow rates. The utility of this device has been established by its use in investigating canine renal circulation during exercise, emotional encounters, administration of drugs, and application of accelerative forces.

  20. An implantable blood pressure and flow transmitter.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rader, R. D.; Meehan, J. P.; Henriksen, J. K. C.

    1973-01-01

    A miniature totally implantable FM/FM telemetry system has been developed to simultaneously measure blood pressure and blood flow, thus providing an appreciation of the hemodynamics of the circulation to the entire body or to a particular organ. Developed for work with animal subjects, the telemetry system's transmission time is controlled by an RF signal that permits an operating life of several months. Pressure is detected by a miniature intravascular transducer and flow is detected by an extravascular interferometric ultrasonic technique. Both pressure and flow are calibrated prior to implanting. The pressure calibration can be checked after the implanting by cannulation; flow calibration can be verified only at the end of the experiment by determining the voltage output from the implanted sensing system as a function of several measured flow rates. The utility of this device has been established by its use in investigating canine renal circulation during exercise, emotional encounters, administration of drugs, and application of accelerative forces.

  1. Experimental investigation of the flow in a simplified model of water lubricated axial thrust bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschner, O.; Ruprecht, A.; Riedelbauch, S.

    2014-03-01

    In hydropower plants the axial thrust bearing takes up the hydraulic axial thrust of the runner and, in case of vertical shafts, the entire weight of all rotating masses. The use of water lubricated bearings can eliminate the oil leakage risk possibly contaminating the environment. A complex flow is generated by the smaller film thickness due to the lower viscosity of water compared with oil. Measurements on a simplified hydrostatic axial trust bearing model were accomplished for validating CFD analysis of water lubricated bearings. In this simplified model, fixed pads are implemented and the width of the gap was enlarged to create a higher resolution in space for the measurements. Most parts of the model were manufactured from acrylic glass to get optical access for measurement with PIV. The focus of these measurements is on the flow within the space between two pads. Additional to the PIV- measurement, the pressure on the wall of the rotating disk is captured by pressure transducers. The model bearing measurement results are presented for varied operating conditions.

  2. Dynamical behaviour of non newtonian spiral blood flow through arterial stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mohammad; Mahmudul Hasan, Md.; Alam Maruf, Mahbub

    2017-04-01

    The spiral component of blood flow has both beneficial and detrimental effects in human circulatory system. A numerical investigation is carried out to analyze the effects of spiral blood flow through an axisymmetric three dimensional artery having 75% stenosis at the center. Blood is assumed as a non-Newtonian fluid. Standard k-ω model is used for the simulation with the Reynolds number of 1000. A parabolic velocity profile with spiral flow is used as inlet boundary condition. The peak values of all velocity components are found just after stenosis. But total pressure gradually decreases at downstream. Spiral flow of blood has significant effects on tangential component of velocity. However, the effect is mild for radial and axial velocity components. The peak value of wall shear stress is at the stenosis zone and decreases rapidly in downstream. The effect of spiral flow is significant for turbulent kinetic energy. Detailed investigation and relevant pathological issues are delineated throughout the paper.

  3. Laser anemometer measurements in a transonic axial-flow fan rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strazisar, Anthony J.; Wood, Jerry R.; Hathaway, Michael D.; Suder, Kenneth L.

    1989-01-01

    Laser anemometer surveys were made of the 3-D flow field in NASA rotor 67, a low aspect ratio transonic axial-flow fan rotor. The test rotor has a tip relative Mach number of 1.38. The flowfield was surveyed at design speed at near peak efficiency and near stall operating conditions. Data is presented in the form of relative Mach number and relative flow angle distributions on surfaces of revolution at nine spanwise locations evenly spaced from hub to tip. At each spanwise location, data was acquired upstream, within, and downstream of the rotor. Aerodynamic performance measurements and detailed rotor blade and annulus geometry are also presented so that the experimental results can be used as a test case for 3-D turbomachinery flow analysis codes.

  4. Numerical simulations on the flow fields of dynamic axial compression columns in chromatography processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien Liang, Ru; Che Liu, Cheng; Tsai Liang, Ming; Chen, Jiann Lin

    2017-02-01

    Dynamic axial compression (DAC) columns are key elements in Simulated Moving Bed, which is a chromatography process in drug industry and chemical engineering. In this study, we apply the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique to analyze the flow fields in the DAC column and propose rules for distributor design based on mass conservation in fluid dynamics. Computer aided design (CAD) is used in constructing the numerical 3D modelling for the mesh system. The laminar flow fields with Darcy’s law to model the porous zone are governed by the Navier-Stokes equations and employed to describe the porous flow fields. Experimental works have been conducted as the benchmark for us to choose feasible porous parameters for CFD. Besides, numerical treatments are elaborated to avoid calculation divergence resulting from large source terms. Results show that CFD combined with CAD is a good approach to investigate detailed flow fields in DAC columns and the design for distributors is straightforward.

  5. Experimental study on unsteady wake impacting effect in axial-flow compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-ping; Li, Qiu-shi; Yuan, Wei; Hou, An-ping; Lu, Ya-jun; Wu, Yu-lin

    2009-08-01

    In the present study, the specific wake impacting effect (WIE) in compressors was used to control unsteady separated flows inside axial-flow compressors. Time-averaged performances were analyzed, key factors affecting the positive effects of WIE were studied and perspectives of engineering applications were discussed. Experiment results showed that when the compressor was working under near stall conditions, separated flows over rotor blade rows could be remarkably suppressed by utilizing WIE and properly adjusting two important parameters of impacting frequency and impacting intensity (wake defect). Under near stall condition, the flow-field structure inside the compressor was significantly improved and time-averaged performances were boosted, e.g. when n¯=85%n0 the total pressure increment was increased by 5.4%, the efficiency of the compressor was increased by 5.5% and the stall margin was increased by 30.7% under the condition of optimal impacting frequency and optimal impacting intensity.

  6. Preliminary Analysis of Axial-Flow Compressors Having Supersonic Velocity at the Entrance of the Stator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferri, Antonio

    1949-01-01

    A supersonic compressor design having supersonic velocity at the entrance of the stator is analyzed on the assumption of two-dimensional flow. The rotor and stator losses assumed in the analysis are based on the results of preliminary supersonic cascade tests. The results of the analysis show that compression ratios per stage of 6 to 10 can be obtained with adiabatic efficiency between 70 and 80 percent. Consideration is also given in the analysis to the starting, stability, and range of efficient performance of this type of compressor. The desirability of employing variable-geometry stators and adjustable inlet guide vanes is indicated. Although either supersonic or subsonic axial component of velocity at the stator entrance can be used, the cascade test results suggest that higher pressure recovery can be obtained if the axial component is supersonic.

  7. Blood flow in abdominal aortic aneurysms: pulsatile flow hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Finol, E A; Amon, C H

    2001-10-01

    Numerical predictions of blood flow patterns and hemodynamic stresses in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAAs) are performed in a two-aneurysm, axisymmetric, rigid wall model using the spectral element method. Physiologically realistic aortic blood flow is simulated under pulsatile conditions for the range of time-averaged Reynolds numbers 50< or =Re(m)< or =300, corresponding to a range of peak Reynolds numbers 262.5< or =Re(peak) < or = 1575. The vortex dynamics induced by pulsatile flow in AAAs is characterized by a sequence of five different flow phases in one period of the flow cycle. Hemodynamic disturbance is evaluated for a modified set of indicator functions, which include wall pressure (p(w)), wall shear stress (tau(w)), and Wall Shear Stress Gradient (WSSG). At peak flow, the highest shear stress and WSSG levels are obtained downstream of both aneurysms, in a pattern similar to that of steady flow. Maximum values of wall shear stresses and wall shear stress gradients obtained at peak flow are evaluated as a function of the time-average Reynolds number resulting in a fourth order polynomial correlation. A comparison between predictions for steady and pulsatile flow is presented, illustrating the importance of considering time-dependent flow for the evaluation of hemodynamic indicators.

  8. Users manual for updated computer code for axial-flow compressor conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, Arthur J.

    1992-01-01

    An existing computer code that determines the flow path for an axial-flow compressor either for a given number of stages or for a given overall pressure ratio was modified for use in air-breathing engine conceptual design studies. This code uses a rapid approximate design methodology that is based on isentropic simple radial equilibrium. Calculations are performed at constant-span-fraction locations from tip to hub. Energy addition per stage is controlled by specifying the maximum allowable values for several aerodynamic design parameters. New modeling was introduced to the code to overcome perceived limitations. Specific changes included variable rather than constant tip radius, flow path inclination added to the continuity equation, input of mass flow rate directly rather than indirectly as inlet axial velocity, solution for the exact value of overall pressure ratio rather than for any value that met or exceeded it, and internal computation of efficiency rather than the use of input values. The modified code was shown to be capable of computing efficiencies that are compatible with those of five multistage compressors and one fan that were tested experimentally. This report serves as a users manual for the revised code, Compressor Spanline Analysis (CSPAN). The modeling modifications, including two internal loss correlations, are presented. Program input and output are described. A sample case for a multistage compressor is included.

  9. A study on tip leakage vortex dynamics and cavitation in axial-flow pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Zhang, Desheng; Jin, Yongxin; Shi, Weidong; (Bart van Esch, B. P. M.

    2017-06-01

    The tip leakage flows and related cavitation in the tip region of an axial-flow pump were investigated in detail using the numerical and experimental methods. The numerical results of the pump model performance were in good agreement with experimental data. The flow structures in the tip clearance were clarified clearly with detailed data involving the axial velocity and turbulent kinetic energy. When depicting the feature of vortex core, the advanced vortex identification method λ 2-criterion was used. Simultaneously, the minimum tension criterion was also applied to predict the cavitation inception for different flow rates and it is consistent with the distributions of vorticity and pressure in the vortex core. The roll-up process of TLV is highly three-dimensional and the entrainment would follow different paths. Then, both the numerical and experimental approaches show the cavitation patterns for different cavitation conditions, and it also finds that slight cavitation would promote the development of tip leakage vortex (TLV) while the TLV seems to be eliminated for a low cavitation number, especially before a specific location of blade tip due to the blade loading change induced by cavitation possibly.

  10. Air-structure coupling features analysis of mining contra-rotating axial flow fan cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. G.; Sun, W.; Li, F.; Zhang, Y. J.

    2013-12-01

    The interaction between contra-rotating axial flow fan blade and working gas has been studied by means of establishing air-structure coupling control equation and combining Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Computational solid mechanics (CSM). Based on the single flow channel model, the Finite Volume Method was used to make the field discrete. Additionally, the SIMPLE algorithm, the Standard k-ε model and the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian dynamic grids technology were utilized to get the airflow motion by solving the discrete governing equations. At the same time, the Finite Element Method was used to make the field discrete to solve dynamic response characteristics of blade. Based on weak coupling method, data exchange from the fluid solver and the solid solver was processed on the coupling interface. Then interpolation was used to obtain the coupling characteristics. The results showed that the blade's maximum amplitude was on the tip of the last-stage blade and aerodynamic force signal could reflect the blade working conditions to some extent. By analyzing the flow regime in contra-rotating axial flow fan, it could be found that the vortex core region was mainly in the blade surface, the hub and the blade clearance. In those regions, the turbulence intensity was very high. The last-stage blade's operating life is shorter than that of the pre-stage blade due to the fatigue fracture occurs much more easily on the last-stage blade which bears more stress.

  11. Analytical Calculation of Stall-inception and Surge Points for an Axial-flow Compressor Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, Efrén M.; Juste, Gregorio L.

    2012-12-01

    Recently, a theoretical criterion to calculate the stability of an axial-flow compressor rotor has been presented in the scientific literature. This theoretical criterion was used for determining the locus of the stability line over the rotor map and for predicting the post-stall evolution of the constant-speed line of a rotor. The main objective of this paper is to improve the predictions of such a model. To do that, the paper proposes a different characterization of the characteristic azimuthal length and a calculation of the ratio of specific heats based on a polytropic exponent. Thanks to these new values, the model predicts two bifurcation points in the behaviour of the flow: the inception point of the instability and the surge point. Experimental data from a pure axial compressor are used to validate the model showing that the prediction of the flow coefficient at the surge point has an error inferior to 5%. The paper presents a discussion about how the model can explain the different behaviours exhibited by the same rotor when the flow coefficient is reduced.

  12. Large-scale flow phenomena in axial compressors: Modeling, analysis, and control with air injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Gregory Scott

    This thesis presents a large scale model of axial compressor flows that is detailed enough to describe the modal and spike stall inception processes, and is also amenable to dynamical systems analysis and control design. The research presented here is based on the model derived by Mezic, which shows that the flows are dominated by the competition between the blade forcing of the compressor and the overall pressure differential created by the compressor. This model describes the modal stall inception process in a similar manner as the Moore-Greitzer model, but also describes the cross sectional flow velocities, and exhibits full span and part span stall. All of these flow patterns described by the model agree with experimental data. Furthermore, the initial model is altered in order to describe the effects of three dimensional spike disturbances, which can destabilize the compressor at otherwise stable operating points. The three dimensional model exhibits flow patterns during spike stall inception that also appear in experiments. The second part of this research focuses on the dynamical systems analysis of, and control design with, the PDE model of the axial flow in the compressor. We show that the axial flow model can be written as a gradient system and illustrate some stability properties of the stalled flow. This also reveals that flows with multiple stall cells correspond to higher energy states in the compressor. The model is derived with air injection actuation, and globally stabilizing distributed controls are designed. We first present a locally optimal controller for the linearized system, and then use Lyapunov analysis to show sufficient conditions for global stability. The concept of sector nonlinearities is applied to the problem of distributed parameter systems, and by analyzing the sector property of the compressor characteristic function, completely decentralized controllers are derived. Finally, the modal decomposition and Lyapunov analysis used in

  13. GLP-2 and mesenteric blood flow.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lasse Bremholm

    2013-05-01

    The 33 amino acid peptide hormone GLP-2 is produced by enteroendocrine L-cells, the density of which is highest in the ileum and the colon, in response to the presence of nutrients in the lumen. The biological effect of GLP-2 is mediated by activation of a G-protein-coupled 7-transmembrane receptor. GLP-2 receptors are expressed in the brainstem, lungs, stomach, small intestine and colon, but not in the heart. It has been shown in several animal studies that GLP-2 infusion increases intestinal blood flow and that this increase is confined to the small intestine. The aim of the three studies, on which the thesis is based, was to investigate basic physiological effects of GLP-2, in healthy volunteers and in SBS patients, with focus on the effects on mesenteric blood flow, blood flow at other vascular sites and effects on cardiac parameters. These parameters have been evaluated after both meal stimulation and GLP-2 administration. The studies showed the following results: Blood flow: In all three studies, blood flow changes in the SMA after GLP-2 administration were similar regarding changes over time and degree of change. Blood flow changes were similar to changes seen after a standard meal. Only RI changes were registered in all three studies, but the TAMV changes in study 2 and 3 had similar characteristics. Cardiovascular parameters: In all three studies no significant changes in blood pressure were registered in relation to GLP-2 administration. In study two and three, where cardiac parameters also were registered by impedance cardiography, increases in CO and SV were seen. Plasma GLP-2: There were, as expected, supraphysiological GLP-2 plasma levels after SC administration. All three studies have shown rapid changes in mesenteric blood flow after administration GLP-2. The changes have been the same both in regards to time to maximum changes (increase) and relatively close in regards to maximum extent of change. The changes in the SBS patients were less than in

  14. Flow Features and Device-Induced Blood Trauma in CF-VADs under a pulsatile blood flow condition: A CFD Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zengsheng; Jena, Sofen K; Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Koenig, Steven C; Slaughter, Mark S; Griffith, Bartley P; Wu, Zhongjun J

    2017-08-31

    In this study, the flow features and device-associated blood trauma in four clinical ventricular assist devices (VADs) (two implantable axial VADs, one implantable centrifugal VAD, and one extracorporeal VAD) were computationally analyzed under clinically relevant pulsatile flow conditions. The four VADs were operated at fixed pump speed at a mean rate of 4.5 L/min. Mean pressure difference, wall shear stress (WSS), volume distribution of scalar shear stress (SSS), and shear-induced hemolysis index (HI) were derived from the flow field of each VAD and were compared. The computationally predicted mean pressure difference across the three implantable VADs was ~ 70mm Hg and the extracorporeal VAD was ~ 345 mmHg, which matched well with their reported pressure-flow curves. The axial VADs had higher mean WSS and SSS compared to the centrifugal VADs. However, the residence time of the centrifugal VADs was much longer compared to the axial VADs because of the large volume of the centrifugal VADs. The highest SSS was observed in one axial VAD and the longest exposure time was observed in one centrifugal VAD. These two VADs generated the highest HI. The shear-induced HI varied as a function of flow rate within each cardiac cycle. At fixed pump speed, the HI was greatest at low flow rate due to longer exposure time to shear stress compared to at high flow rate. Subsequently, we hypothesize that in order to reduce the risk of blood trauma during VAD support, shear stress magnitude and exposure time need to be minimized. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Estimation of Blood Flow With Radioactive Tracers

    PubMed Central

    Bassingthwaighte, James B.; Holloway, G. Allen

    2010-01-01

    The techniques of tracer dilution in the circulation, and of tracer uptake by and washout from an organ, may be described using expressions that are general and are not dependent on specific models such as exponentials. The expressions have been applied to the measurement of cardiac output using impulse and constant rate injection techniques. Further expressions have been given for estimating organ blood flow from inflow/outflow concentration-time curves, washout curves, and from the distribution of deposited tracer. Some problems with respect to the use of deposition techniques as they are ordinarily applied to the estimation of regional blood flow must be considered, particularly where there are capillary beds in series or where there is countercurrent diffusional shunting of diffusible tracers between inflow and outflow. This review deals with these various aspects of tracer theory as they relate to the measurement of blood flow. PMID:775641

  16. Luteal blood flow and luteal function

    PubMed Central

    Takasaki, Akihisa; Tamura, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Ken; Asada, Hiromi; Taketani, Toshiaki; Matsuoka, Aki; Yamagata, Yoshiaki; Shimamura, Katsunori; Morioka, Hitoshi; Sugino, Norihiro

    2009-01-01

    Background Blood flow in the corpus luteum (CL) is associated with luteal function. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether luteal function can be improved by increasing CL blood flow in women with luteal phase defect (LFD). Methods Blood flow impedance in the CL was measured by transvaginal color-pulsed-Doppler-ultrasonography and was expressed as a resistance index (RI). The patients with both LFD [serum progesterone (P) concentrations < 10 ng/ml during mid-luteal phase] and high CL-RI (≥ 0.51) were given vitamin-E (600 mg/day, n = 18), L-arginine (6 g/day, n = 14) as a potential nitric oxide donor, melatonin (3 mg/day, n = 13) as an antioxidant, or HCG (2,000 IU/day, n = 10) during the subsequent menstrual cycle. Results In the control group (n = 11), who received no medication to increase CL blood flow, only one patient (9%) improved in CL-RI and 2 patients (18%) improved in serum P. Vitamin-E improved CL-RI in 15 patients (83%) and improved serum P in 12 patients (67%). L-arginine improved CL-RI in all the patients (100%) and improved serum P in 10 patients (71%). HCG improved CL-RI in all the patients (100%) and improved serum P in 9 patients (90%). Melatonin had no significant effect. Conclusion Vitamin-E or L-arginine treatment improved luteal function by decreasing CL blood flow impedance. CL blood flow is a critical factor for luteal function. PMID:19144154

  17. The Role of Neuronal Signaling in Controlling Cerebral Blood Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Carrie T.; Iadecola, Costantino

    2007-01-01

    Well-regulated blood flow within the brain is vital to normal function. The brain's requirement for sufficient blood flow is ensured by a tight link between neural activity and blood flow. The link between regional synaptic activity and regional cerebral blood flow, termed functional hyperemia, is the basis for several modern imaging techniques…

  18. The Role of Neuronal Signaling in Controlling Cerebral Blood Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Carrie T.; Iadecola, Costantino

    2007-01-01

    Well-regulated blood flow within the brain is vital to normal function. The brain's requirement for sufficient blood flow is ensured by a tight link between neural activity and blood flow. The link between regional synaptic activity and regional cerebral blood flow, termed functional hyperemia, is the basis for several modern imaging techniques…

  19. Technical requirements and limitations of miniaturized axial flow pumps for circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Reul, H

    1994-01-01

    The engineering principles of rotary blood pumps are elucidated by means of a basic introduction into turbomachinery. Additionally, some important dimensionless quantities which relate to pumping characteristics and pump type are introduced. These theoretical fundamentals are applied to the design of high-speed microaxial pumps, especially the two Hemopump versions. The theoretical estimates clearly show that each pump version has its physical limits, especially at small impeller sizes. It is also demonstrated that not any clinically desirable working point of an axial pump can be achieved with an arbitrarily small pump size.

  20. Assessing intraoperative blood flow in cardiovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masaki; Sasaguri, Shiro; Sato, Takayuki

    2011-11-01

    Off-pump coronary arterial bypass grafting and new surgical apparatus and techniques have decreased the mortality rate associated with this procedure to approximately 1.5%. If we could detect problems in the constructed coronary anastomoses by an alternative imaging system to coronary angiography during surgery, decisions to revise the surgical procedure could be made without hesitation. Meanwhile, the intraoperative direct evaluation of intestinal blood flow during abdominal aortic aneurysmal surgery is required to prevent ischemic colitis, which is a devastating complication. Indocyanine green (ICG) has recently improved ophthalmic angiography and the navigation systems of oncological surgery. The fluorescence illumination of ICG with a near-infrared light is captured on camera. In coronary arterial surgery, the ICG imaging system is also becoming increasingly useful. A new ICG imaging system, the HyperEye Medical System (HEMS), provides a clear view of the blood flow and ischemic area with color visualization. Furthermore, its combination with a quantitative blood flow assessment tool such as transit time flow measurement could improve the accuracy of intraoperative examination. In this review, we evaluate the current strategies of assessing blood flow intraoperatively with an ICG imaging system in cardiovascular surgery.

  1. Blood flow characteristics in the aortic arch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; van Wyk, Stevin; Mihaiescu, Mihai; Fuchs, Laszlo; Gutmark, Ephraim; Backeljauw, Philippe; Gutmark-Little, Iris

    2012-11-01

    The purpose with this study is to investigate the flow characteristics of blood in the aortic arch. Cardiovascular diseases are associated with specific locations in the arterial tree. Considering atherogenesis, it is claimed that the Wall Shear Stress (WSS) along with its temporal and spatial gradients play an important role in the development of the disease. The WSS is determined by the local flow characteristics, that in turn depends on the geometry as well as the rheological properties of blood. In this numerical work, the time dependent fluid flow during the entire cardiac cycle is fully resolved. The Quemada model is applied to account for the non-Newtonian properties of blood, an empirical model valid for different Red Blood Cell loading. Data obtained through Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging have been used in order to reconstruct geometries of the the aortic arch. Here, three different geometries are studied out of which two display malformations that can be found in patients having the genetic disorder Turner's syndrome. The simulations show a highly complex flow with regions of secondary flow that is enhanced for the diseased aortas. The financial support from the Swedish Research Council (VR) and the Sweden-America Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  2. Extensive coagulation monitoring in patients after implantation of the MicroMed Debakey continuous flow axial pump.

    PubMed

    Bonaros, Nikolaos; Mueller, Michael-Rolf; Salat, Andreas; Schima, Heinrich; Roethy, Wilfried; Kocher, Alfred A; Roche, Alfred A; Wolner, Ernst; Wieselthaler, Georg M

    2004-01-01

    Ventricular assist device (VAD) implantation is associated with impaired primary hemostasis and thromboembolic complications. Recently, a new generation of implantable continuous flow axial pumps was introduced into clinical application. To study the potential thrombogenic properties of this type of pump, we applied extensive platelet monitoring was applied. In our institution, 13 patients received the MicroMed DeBakey VAD as a bridge to transplantation. Routine coagulation tests (platelet count, activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, antithrombin III activity) and platelet function tests (whole blood aggregometry, thrombelastography, flow cytometry) were performed. No clinically relevant thromboembolic events were detected. No correlation was found between global function tests, platelet aggregation, and thrombelastography. No correlation was detected between platelet activation and hemolysis parameters. Platelet aggregation and coagulation index were significantly suppressed early after operation. A subsequent phase of hyper-aggregability, starting around day 6, suggested the initiation of antiaggregation therapy. Platelet activation markers were upregulated in the postoperative period but were returned to preoperative levels after initiation of aspirin. In contrast to routine coagulation monitoring, platelet function tests reflect in detail the coagulation status of blood pump recipients and the efficiency of antiaggregation therapy. Aspirin and dipyridamole therapy in addition to oral anticoagulation using phenprocoumon may contribute to platelet function and clot mechanics restoration and is, therefore, recommended for patients after VAD implantation.

  3. Application of Synthetic Jets to Reduce Stator Flow Separation in a Low Speed Axial Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braunscheidel, Edward P.; Culley, Dennis E.; Zaman, Khairul B.M.Q.

    2008-01-01

    Flow control using synthetic jet injection has been applied in a low speed axial compressor. The synthetic jets were applied from the suction surface of a stator vane via a span-wise row of slots pitched in the streamwise direction. Actuation was provided externally from acoustic drivers coupled to the vane tip via flexible tubing. The acoustic resonance characteristics of the system, and the resultant jet velocities were obtained. The effects on the separated flow field for various jet velocities and frequencies were explored. Total pressure loss reductions across the vane passage were measured. The effect of synthetic jet injection was shown to be comparable to that of pulsatory injection with mass addition for stator vanes which had separated flow. While only a weak dependence of the beneficial effect was noted based on the excitation frequency, a strong dependence on the amplitude was observed at all frequencies.

  4. Application of radial-equilibrium condition to axial-flow compressor and turbine design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Chung-Hua; Wolfenstein, Lincoln

    1950-01-01

    Basic general equations governing the three-dimensional compressible flow of gas through a compressor or turbine are given in terms of total enthalpy, entropy, and velocity components of the gas. Two methods of solution are obtained for the simplified, steady axially symmetric flow; one involves the use of a number of successive planes normal to the axis of the machine and short distances apart, and the other involves only three stations for a stage in which an appropriate radial-flow path is used. Methods of calculation for the limiting cases of zero and infinite blade aspect ratios and an approximate method of calculation for finite blade aspect ratio are also given. In these methods, the blade loading and the shape of the annular passage wall may be arbitrarily specified.

  5. Transcutaneous measurement of volume blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, R. E.; Mcleod, F. D.; Miller, C. W.; Histand, M. B.; Wells, M. K.

    1974-01-01

    Blood flow velocity measurements, using Doppler velocimeter, are described. The ability to measure blood velocity using ultrasound is derived from the Doppler effect; the change in frequency which occurs when sound is reflected or transmitted from a moving target. When ultrasound of the appropriate frequency is transmitted through a moving blood stream, the blood cells act as point scatterers of ultrasonic energy. If this scattered ultrasonic energy is detected, it is found to be shifted in frequency according to the velocity of the blood cells, nu, the frequency of the incident sound, f sub o, the speed of sound in the medium, c, and the angle between the sound beam and the velocity vector, o. The relation describing this effect is known as the Doppler equation. Delta f = 2 f sub o x nu x cos alpha/c. The theoretical and experimental methods are evaluated.

  6. Deformation of a soft helical filament in an axial flow at low Reynolds number.

    PubMed

    Jawed, Mohammad K; Reis, Pedro M

    2016-02-14

    We perform a numerical investigation of the deformation of a rotating helical filament subjected to an axial flow, under low Reynolds number conditions, motivated by the propulsion of bacteria using helical flagella. Given its slenderness, the helical rod is intrinsically soft and deforms due to the interplay between elastic forces and hydrodynamic loading. We make use of a previously developed and experimentally validated computational tool framework that models the elasticity of the filament using the discrete elastic rod method and the fluid forces are treated using Lighthill's slender body theory. Under axial flow, and in the absence of rotation, the initially helical rod is extended. Above a critical flow speed its configuration comprises a straight portion connected to a localized helix near the free end. When the rod is also rotated about its helical axis, propulsion is only possible in a finite range of angular velocity, with an upper bound that is limited by buckling of the soft helix arising due to viscous stresses. A systematic exploration of the parameter space allows us to quantify regimes for successful propulsion for a number of specific bacteria.

  7. Experiments on vertical slender flexible cylinders clamped at both ends and subjected to axial flow.

    PubMed

    Modarres-Sadeghi, Y; Païdoussis, M P; Semler, C; Grinevich, E

    2008-04-13

    Three series of experiments were conducted on vertical clamped-clamped cylinders in order to observe experimentally the dynamical behaviour of the system, and the results are compared with theoretical predictions. In the first series of experiments, the downstream end of the clamped-clamped cylinder was free to slide axially, while in the second, the downstream end was fixed; the influence of externally applied axial compression was also studied in this series of experiments. The third series of experiments was similar to the second, except that a considerably more slender, hollow cylinder was used. In these experiments, the cylinder lost stability by divergence at a sufficiently high flow velocity and the amplitude of buckling increased thereafter. At higher flow velocities, the cylinder lost stability by flutter (attainable only in the third series of experiments), confirming experimentally the existence of a post-divergence oscillatory instability, which was previously predicted by both linear and nonlinear theory. Good quantitative agreement is obtained between theory and experiment for the amplitude of buckling, and for the critical flow velocities.

  8. Extension of Useful Operating Range of Axial-Flow Compressors by Use of Adjustable Stator Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinnette, John T; Voss, William J

    1948-01-01

    A theory has been developed for resetting the blade angles of an axial-flow compressor in order to improve the performance at speeds and flows other than the design and thus extend the useful operating range of the compressor. The theory is readily applicable to the resetting of both rotor and stator blades or to the resetting of only the stator blades and is based on adjustment of the blade angles to obtain lift coefficients at which the blades will operate efficiently. Calculations were made for resetting the stator blades of the NACA eight-stage axial-flow compressor for 75 percent of design speed and a series of load coefficients ranging from 0.28 to 0.70 with rotor blades left at the design setting. The NACA compressor was investigated with three different blade settings: (1) the design blade setting, (2) the stator blades reset for 75 percent of design speed and a load coefficient of 0.48, and (3) the stator blades reset for 75 percent of design speed and a load coefficient of 0.65.

  9. Heat Transfer Investigation of Air Flow in Microtubes-Part II: Scale and Axial Conduction Effects.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ting-Yu; Kandlikar, Satish G

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, the scale effects are specifically addressed by conducting experiments with air flow in different microtubes. Three stainless steel tubes of 962, 308, and 83 μm inner diameter (ID) are investigated for friction factor, and the first two are investigated for heat transfer. Viscous heating effects are studied in the laminar as well as turbulent flow regimes by varying the air flow rate. The axial conduction effects in microtubes are experimentally explored for the first time by comparing the heat transfer in SS304 tube with a 910 μm ID/2005 μm outer diameter nickel tube specifically fabricated using an electrodeposition technique. After carefully accounting for the variable heat losses along the tube length, it is seen that the viscous heating and the axial conduction effects become more important at microscale and the present models are able to predict these effects accurately. It is concluded that neglecting these effects is the main source of discrepancies in the data reported in the earlier literature.

  10. Tests of a 2-Stage, Axial-Flow, 2-Phase Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    A two phase flow turbine with two stages of axial flow impulse rotors was tested with three different working fluid mixtures at a shaft power of 30 kW. The turbine efficiency was 0.55 with nitrogen and water of 0.02 quality and 94 m/s velocity, 0.57 with Refrigerant 22 of 0.27 quality and 123 m/s velocity, and 0.30 with steam and water of 0.27 quality and 457 m/s velocity. The efficiencies with nitrogen and water and Refrigerant 22 were 86 percent of theoretical. At that fraction of theoretical, the efficiencies of optimized two phase turbines would be in the low 60 percent range with organic working fluids and in the mid 50 percent range with steam and water. The recommended turbine design is a two stage axial flow impulse turbine followed by a rotary separator for discharge of separate liquid and gas streams and recovery of liquid pressure.

  11. Using flow feature to extract pulsatile blood flow from 4D flow MRI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Ye; Yu, Whitney; Chen, Xi; Lin, Chen; Kralik, Stephen F.; Hutchins, Gary D.

    2017-02-01

    4D flow MRI images make it possible to measure pulsatile blood flow inside deforming vessel, which is critical in accurate blood flow visualization, simulation, and evaluation. Such data has great potential to overcome problems in existing work, which usually does not reflect the dynamic nature of elastic vessels and blood flows in cardiac cycles. However, the 4D flow MRI data is often low-resolution and with strong noise. Due to these challenges, few efforts have been successfully conducted to extract dynamic blood flow fields and deforming artery over cardiac cycles, especially for small artery like carotid. In this paper, a robust flow feature, particularly the mean flow intensity is used to segment blood flow regions inside vessels from 4D flow MRI images in whole cardiac cycle. To estimate this flow feature more accurately, adaptive weights are added to the raw velocity vectors based on the noise strength of MRI imaging. Then, based on this feature, target arteries are tracked in at different time steps in a cardiac cycle. This method is applied to the clinical 4D flow MRI data in neck area. Dynamic vessel walls and blood flows are effectively generated in a cardiac cycle in the relatively small carotid arteries. Good image segmentation results on 2D slices are presented, together with the visualization of 3D arteries and blood flows. Evaluation of the method was performed by clinical doctors and by checking flow volume rates in the vertebral and carotid arteries.

  12. Three-dimensional rotational plasma flows near solid surfaces in an axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Gorshunov, N. M. Potanin, E. P.

    2016-11-15

    A rotational flow of a conducting viscous medium near an extended dielectric disk in a uniform axial magnetic field is analyzed in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) approach. An analytical solution to the system of nonlinear differential MHD equations of motion in the boundary layer for the general case of different rotation velocities of the disk and medium is obtained using a modified Slezkin–Targ method. A particular case of a medium rotating near a stationary disk imitating the end surface of a laboratory device is considered. The characteristics of a hydrodynamic flow near the disk surface are calculated within the model of a finite-thickness boundary layer. The influence of the magnetic field on the intensity of the secondary flow is studied. Calculations are performed for a weakly ionized dense plasma flow without allowance for the Hall effect and plasma compressibility. An MHD flow in a rotating cylinder bounded from above by a retarding cap is considered. The results obtained can be used to estimate the influence of the end surfaces on the main azimuthal flow, as well as the intensities of circulating flows in various devices with rotating plasmas, in particular, in plasma centrifuges and laboratory devices designed to study instabilities of rotating plasmas.

  13. Transitional DDES computations of the NREL Phase-VI rotor in axial flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Schreck, Scott

    2014-12-01

    In the present article we describe CFD simulations of the well known NREL Phase-VI rotor in axial flow conditions using a newly developed technique of combining turbulence modeling by the Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (DDES) technique with laminar/turbulent transition modeling by a correlation based method. We demonstrate how the power production around the onset of stall is very dependent on the turbulence intensity in the inflow. Additionally, we compare with measurements and illustrate how the unsteady loads from the DDES simulations can provide valuable insight in the transient behavior of the rotor loads.

  14. Preliminary compressor design study for an advanced multistage axial flow compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marman, H. V.; Marchant, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    An optimum, axial flow, high pressure ratio compressor for a turbofan engine was defined for commercial subsonic transport service starting in the late 1980's. Projected 1985 technologies were used and applied to compressors with an 18:1 pressure ratio having 6 to 12 stages. A matrix of 49 compressors was developed by statistical techniques. The compressors were evaluated by means of computer programs in terms of various airline economic figures of merit such as return on investment and direct-operating cost. The optimum configuration was determined to be a high speed, 8-stage compressor with an average blading aspect ratio of 1.15.

  15. Analysis of effect of basic design variables on subsonic axial-flow-compressor performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinnette, John T , Jr

    1948-01-01

    A blade-element theory for axial-flow compressors has been developed and applied to the analysis of the effects of basic design variables such as Mach number, blade loading, and velocity distribution on compressor performance. A graphical method that is useful for approximate design calculations is presented. The relations among several efficiencies useful in compressor design are derived and discussed. The possible gains in useful operating range obtainable by the use of adjustable stator blades are discussed and a rapid approximate method of calculating blade-angle resettings is shown by an example. The relative Mach number is shown to be a dominant factor in determining the pressure ratio.

  16. Jet noise from co-axial nozzles over a wide range of geometric and flow parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, W.; Friedman, R.

    1974-01-01

    Free field pure jet noise data were taken for a large range of coaxial nozzle configurations. The core nozzles were circular (1 to 4 in. diameter) and plug types. The fan to core area ratio varied from 0.7 to 43.5, while the velocity ratio typically varied from 0 to 1. For most cases the two nozzles were coplanar but large axial extensions of either nozzle were also tested. Correlation of the data resulted in a simple procedure for estimating ambient temperature subsonic coaxial jet noise spectra over a wide range of geometric and flow parameters.

  17. Measurement of second order turbulence statistics in an axial-flow compressor via 3-component LDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dancey, Clinton L.

    1990-07-01

    The complete Reynolds stress tensor was measured in the rotor passage of a small scale, low speed (2900 rpm), axial-flow research compressor. Measurements of three nonorthogonal components of the instantaneous velocity were obtained at selected locations within the rotor passage with a three-color, three-component laser Doppler anemometer (LDA). Contour maps of the turbulent kinetic energy within the passage are presented along with contour plots of other covariances. This work compliments previous work with this LDA system where the three dimensional mean velocity field was obtained.

  18. A numerical study of planar and axially-symmetric sudden expansion flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napolitano, M.; Cinnella, P.

    The present study is concerned with the numerical prediction of planar and axially symmetric sudden expansion flows, using the Navier-Stokes as well as the boundary-layer equations. The vorticity/steam-function Navier-Stokes equations are solved by means of a robust multigrid block-line-Gauss-Seidel method. The corresponding boundary-layer equations are solved at every longitudinal station by means of an incremental block-implicit scheme, using the Newton method combined with a deferred correction strategy to achieve fast convergence on the nonlinear terms. Accurate solutions are obtained.

  19. High-resolution AUV mapping of the 2015 flows at Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paduan, J. B.; Chadwick, W. W., Jr.; Clague, D. A.; Le Saout, M.; Caress, D. W.; Thomas, H. J.; Yoerger, D.

    2016-12-01

    Lava flows erupted in April 2015 at Axial Seamount were mapped at 1-m resolution with the AUV Sentry in August 2015 and the MBARI Mapping AUVs in July 2016 and observed and sampled with ROVs on those same expeditions. Thirty percent of terrain covered by new flows had been mapped by the MBARI AUVs prior to the eruption. Differencing of before and after maps (using ship-collected bathymetry where the AUV had not mapped before) allows calculation of extents and volumes of flows and shows new fissures. The maps reveal unexpected fissure patterns and shifts in the style of flow emplacement through a single eruption. There were 11 separate flows totaling 1.48 x 108 m3 of lava erupted from numerous en echelon fissures over 19 km on the NE caldera floor, on the NE flank, and down the N rift zone. Flows in and around the caldera have maximum thicknesses of 5-19 m. Most erupted as sheet flows and spread along intricate channels that terminated in thin margins. Some utilized pre-existing fissures. Some flows erupted from short fissures, while at least two longer new fissures produced little or no lava. A flow on the upper N rift has a spectacular lava channel flanked by narrow lava pillars supporting a thin roof left after the flow drained. A shatter ring still emanating warm fluid is visible in the map as a 15-m wide low cone. Hundreds of exploded pillows were observed but are not discernable in the bathymetry. The northern-most three flows deep on the N rift are similar in area to the others but comprise the bulk of the eruption volume. Differencing of ship-based bathymetry shows only these flows. Near the eruptive fissures they are sheet flows, but as they flowed downslope they built complexes of coalesced pillow mounds up to 67-128 m thick. Changes in flow morphology occurred through the course of the eruption. Large pillow mounds had molten cores that deformed as the eruption progressed. One flow began as a thin, effusive sheet flow but as the eruption rate decreased, a

  20. Raised intracranial pressure and cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, I. H.; Rowan, J. O.; Harper, A. M.; Jennett, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    Changes in cerebral blood flow with increasing intracranial pressure were studied in anaesthetized baboons during expansion of a subdural balloon in one of two different sites. With an infratentorial balloon, cerebral blood flow bore no clear relation to intracranial pressure, but was linearly related to cerebral perfusion pressure. Apart from an initial change in some animals, cerebrovascular resistance remained constant with increasing intracranial pressure, and autoregulation appeared to be lost from the outset. With a supratentorial balloon, cerebral blood flow remained constant as intracranial pressure was increased to levels around 60 mm Hg, corresponding to a cerebral perfusion pressure range of approximately 100 to 40 mmHg. Cerebrovascular resistance fell progressively, and autoregulation appeared to be effective during this phase. At higher intracranial pressure levels (lower cerebral perfusion pressure levels), autoregulation was lost and cerebral blood flow became directly dependent on cerebral perfusion pressure. The importance of the cause of the increase in intracranial pressure on the response of the cerebral circulation and the relevance of these findings to the clinical situation are discussed. PMID:4196632

  1. Effects of aortic irregularities on blood flow.

    PubMed

    Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; van Wyk, Stevin; Fuchs, Laszlo; Gutmark, Ephraim; Backeljauw, Philippe; Gutmark-Little, Iris

    2016-04-01

    Anatomic aortic anomalies are seen in many medical conditions and are known to cause disturbances in blood flow. Turner syndrome (TS) is a genetic disorder occurring only in females where cardiovascular anomalies, particularly of the aorta, are frequently encountered. In this study, numerical simulations are applied to investigate the flow characteristics in four TS patient- related aortic arches (a normal geometry, dilatation, coarctation and elongation of the transverse aorta). The Quemada viscosity model was applied to account for the non-Newtonian behavior of blood. The blood is treated as a mixture consisting of water and red blood cells (RBC) where the RBCs are modeled as a convected scalar. The results show clear geometry effects where the flow structures and RBC distribution are significantly different between the aortas. Transitional flow is observed as a jet is formed due to a constriction in the descending aorta for the coarctation case. RBC dilution is found to vary between the aortas, influencing the WSS. Moreover, the local variations in RBC volume fraction may induce large viscosity variations, stressing the importance of accounting for the non-Newtonian effects.

  2. Ergot alkaloids decrease rumen epithelial blood flow

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two experiments were conducted to determine if ergot alkaloids affect blood flow to the absorptive surface of the rumen of steers. Steers (n=8 total) were pair-fed alfalfa cubes at 1.5× NEM and received ground endophyte-infected tall fescue seed (E+) or endophyte-free tall fescue seed (E-) via rumen...

  3. Acetabular blood flow during total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    ElMaraghy, Amr W.; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Waddell, James P.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine the immediate effect of reaming and insertion of the acetabular component with and without cement on periacetabular blood flow during primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Design A clinical experimental study. Setting A tertiary referral and teaching hospital in Toronto. Patients Sixteen patients (9 men, 7 women) ranging in age from 30 to 78 years and suffering from arthritis. Intervention Elective primary THA with a cemented (8 patients) and noncemented (8 patients) acetabular component. All procedures were done by a single surgeon who used a posterior approach. Main outcome measure Acetabular bone blood-flow measurements made with a laser Doppler flowmeter before reaming, after reaming and after insertion of the acetabular prosthesis. Results Acetabular blood flow after prosthesis insertion was decreased by 52% in the noncemented group (p < 0.001) and 59% in the cemented group (p < 0.001) compared with baseline (prereaming) values. Conclusion The significance of these changes in periacetabular bone blood flow during THA may relate to the extent of bony ingrowth, periprosthetic remodelling and ultimately the incidence of implant failure because of aseptic loosening. PMID:10851413

  4. Blood flow dynamics in the snake spectacle.

    PubMed

    van Doorn, Kevin; Sivak, Jacob G

    2013-11-15

    The eyes of snakes are shielded beneath a layer of transparent integument referred to as the 'reptilian spectacle'. Well adapted to vision by virtue of its optical transparency, it nevertheless retains one characteristic of the integument that would otherwise prove detrimental to vision: its vascularity. Given the potential consequence of spectacle blood vessels on visual clarity, one might expect adaptations to have evolved that mitigate their negative impact. Earlier research demonstrated an adaptation to their spatial layout in only one species to reduce the vessels' density in the region serving the foveal and binocular visual fields. Here, we present a study of spectacle blood flow dynamics and provide evidence of a mechanism to mitigate the spectacle blood vessels' deleterious effect on vision by regulation of blood flow through them. It was found that when snakes are at rest and undisturbed, spectacle vessels undergo cycles of dilation and constriction, such that the majority of the time the vessels are fully constricted, effectively removing them from the visual field. When snakes are presented with a visual threat, spectacle vessels constrict and remain constricted for longer periods than occur during the resting cycles, thus guaranteeing the best possible visual capabilities in times of need. Finally, during the snakes' renewal phase when they are generating a new stratum corneum, the resting cycle is abolished, spectacle vessels remain dilated and blood flow remains strong and continuous. The significance of these findings in terms of the visual capabilities and physiology of snakes is discussed.

  5. Comparison between optical measurements and a numerical solution of the flow field within a transonic axial-flow compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strazisar, A. J.; Chima, R. V.

    1980-01-01

    A comparison between numerical and experimental results is presented for the flowfield within a transonic axial-flow compressor rotor. The rotor was tested at design speed and a wide open throttle discharge condition. The relative tip Mach number was 1.4. A laser anemometer system was used to measure velocity and flow angle upstream, within, and downstream of the rotor. A holographic interferometer was used to visualize the rotor shock system near the tip. The computational procedure solves the full three-dimensional Euler equations using a time-marching technique. Shock location and shape determined from the two optical systems are compared. Calculated relative Mach number and flow angle contours, shock locations, and shock strength are compared to values measured with the laser anemometer.

  6. An experimental study on the effects of tip clearance on flow field and losses in an axial flow compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Zhang, J.; Murthy, K. N. S.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed measurement of the flow field in the tip region of a compressor rotor was carried out using a Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) and a Kiel probe at two different tip clearance heights. At both clearance sizes, the relative stagnation pressure and the axial and tangential components of relative velocities were measured upstream, inside the passage and downstream of the rotor, up to about 20 percent of the blade span from the annulus wall. The velocities, outlet angles, losses, momentum thickness, and force defect thickness are compared for the two clearances. A detailed interpretation of the effect of tip clearance on the flow field is given. There are substantial differences in flow field, on momentum thickness, and performance as the clearance is varied. The losses increase linearly within the passage and their values increase in direct proportion to tip clearance height. No discernable vortex (discrete) is observed downstream of the rotor.

  7. An experimental study on the effects of tip clearance on flow field and losses in an axial flow compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Zhang, J.; Murthy, K. N. S.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed measurement of the flow field in the tip region of a compressor rotor was carried out using a Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) and a Kiel probe at two different tip clearance heights. At both clearance sizes, the relative stagnation pressure and the axial and tangential components of relative velocities were measured upstream, inside the passage and downstream of the rotor, up to about 20 percent of the blade span from the annulus wall. The velocities, outlet angles, losses, momentum thickness, and force defect thickness are compared for the two clearances. A detailed interpretation of the effect of tip clearance on the flow field is given. There are substantial differences in flow field, on momentum thickness, and performance as the clearance is varied. The losses increase linearly within the passage and their values increase in direct proportion to tip clearance height. No discernable vortex (discrete) is observed downstream of the rotor.

  8. Turbulence measurements in an axial rotary blood pump with laser Doppler velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Schüle, Chan Y; Affeld, Klaus; Kossatz, Max; Paschereit, Christian O; Kertzscher, Ulrich

    2017-04-18

    The implantation of rotary blood pumps as ventricular assist devices (VADs) has become a viable therapy for quite a number of patients with end-stage heart failure. However, these rotary blood pumps cause adverse events that are related to blood trauma. It is currently believed that turbulence in the pump flow plays a significant role. But turbulence has not been measured to date because there is no optical access to the flow space in rotary blood pumps because of their opaque casings. This difficulty is overcome with a scaled-up model of the HeartMate II (HM II) rotary blood pump with a transparent acrylic housing. A 2-component laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) system was used for the measurement of time resolved velocity profiles and velocity spectra upstream and downstream of the rotor blades. Observing similarity laws, the speed and pump head were adjusted to correspond closely to the design point of the original pump - 10,600 rpm speed and 80 mmHg pressure head. A model fluid consisting of a water-glycerol mixture was used. The measured velocity spectra were scalable by the Kolmogorov length and the Kolmogorov length was estimated to be between 14 and 24 µm at original scale, thus being about 1.5 to 3 times the size of a red blood cell. It can be concluded that turbulence is indeed present in the investigated blood pump and that it can be described by Kolmogorov's theory of turbulence. The size of the smallest vortices compares well to the turbulence length scales as found in prosthetic heart valves, for example.

  9. Slip effects on unsteady non-Newtonian blood flow through an inclined catheterized overlapping stenotic artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Akbar; Ali, Nasir; Sajid, M.

    2016-01-01

    Slip effects on unsteady non-Newtonian blood hydro-magnetic flow through an inclined catheterized overlapping stenotic artery are analyzed. The constitutive equation of power law model is employed to simulate the rheological characteristics of the blood. The governing equations giving the flow derived by assuming the flow to be unsteady and two-dimensional. Mild stenosis approximation is employed to obtain the reduced form of the governing equations. Finite difference method is employed to obtain the solution of the non-linear partial differential equation in the presence of slip at the surface. An extensive quantitative analysis is performed for the effects of slip parameter, Hartmann number, cathetered parameter and arterial geometrical parameters of stenosis on the quantities of interest such as axial velocity, flow rate, resistance impedance and wall shear stress. The streamlines for the blood flow through the artery are also included.

  10. Cascade flow simulation and measurement for the study of axial compressor loss mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashibara, Shigeo

    The flow field of axial-flow turbomachines, such as compressors and turbines, can be characterized as complex and three-dimensional (3-D) in nature. The accurate prediction of stage efficiency is still one of the most challenging engineering problems in turbomachinery design, due primarily to the complexity of the associated flow field. Historically, major improvements in turbomachinery component efficiency have come at a cost since these turbomachinery units have often been tested on expensive full-scale rotating prototype models. The data obtained from these full-scale tests can be, on the other hand, quite difficult to analyze. These full-scale test data usually provide good empirical information, but are quite often difficult to use for the analytical prediction of design efficiency. An alternative approach for the turbomachinery flow field analysis is to use a "cascade" model. Cascade is a simplified planar model representing a turbomachinery main flow passage at a specified spanwise location in the blade airfoil. Using a cascade model, detailed flow field characteristics in two-dimensional (2-D) blade-to-blade flow of the turbomachinery main flow passage can be investigated by deliberately excluding the complex 3-D viscous flow phenomena. Utilizing experimental measurement from a newly developed water table cascade model as well as cascade numerical simulation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), a systematic and detailed investigation into axial compressor loss mechanism has been conducted. In order to accurately predict the stage efficiency of 3-D turbomachines, it is quite important to understand the details of associated physical mechanism of loss in 2-D cascade models. Traditionally, turbomachinery losses in both cascade and actual turbomachines have often been quantified by the drop in total (or stagnation) pressure across the stage. This quantification has long been known as an inconvenient approach for design, since the coefficient of loss based on

  11. Local aggregation characteristics of microscale blood flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliviotis, Efstathios; Sherwood, Joseph M.; Dusting, Jonathan; Balabani, Stavroula

    2015-11-01

    Erythrocyte aggregation (EA) is an important aspect of microvascular flows affecting blood flow and viscosity. Microscale blood flows have been studied extensively in recent years using computational and microfluidic based approaches. However, the relationship between the local structural characteristics of blood and the velocity field has not been quantified. We report simultaneous measurements of the local velocity, aggregation and haematocrit distributions of human erythrocytes flowing in a microchannel. EA was induced using Dextran and flows were imaged using brightfield microscopy. Local aggregation characteristics were investigated using statistical and edge-detection image processing techniques while velocity profiles were obtained using PIV algorithms. Aggregation intensity was found to strongly correlate with local variations in velocity in both the central and wall regions of the channel. The edge detection method showed that near the side wall large aggregates are associated with high local velocities and low local shear rates. In the central region large aggregates occurred in regions of low velocity and high erythrocyte concentration. The results demonstrate the combined effect of haematocrit and velocity distributions on local aggregation characteristics.

  12. Hub vortex instability and wake dynamics in axial flow wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foti, Daniel; Howard, Kevin; Yang, Xiaolei; Guala, Michele; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2014-11-01

    The near wake region of an axial flow wind turbine has two distinct shear layers: an outer tip vortex shear layer, which rotates in the same direction as the rotor, and an inner counter-rotating hub vortex shear layer. Recent simulations (Kang et al., J. Fluid Mech. 744, 376 (2014)), corroborated with experiments (Chamorro et al., J. Fluid Mech. 716, 658 (2013)), showed that the hub vortex can undergo spiral vortex breakdown immediately downstream of the turbine. The precessing hub vortex core intercepts and interacts with the tip vortex shear layer causing the large-scale wake meandering motions in the far wake to intensify. These results were obtained for an axial flow hydrokinetic turbine in a turbulent open channel flow. Here we integrate high-resolution LES with experiments to show that a hub vortex instability also occurs in the near wake of a wind turbine in a wind tunnel. We show that the interactions of the hub vortex with the outer flow have significant effects on the wake meandering amplitude and frequency. Our results reinforce the conclusions of Kang et al. (2014) that the hub vortex must be included in wake models to simulate wake interactions at the power plant scale and optimize turbine siting for realistic terrain and wind conditions. This work was supported by DOE (DE-EE0002980, DE-EE0005482 and DE-AC04-94AL85000), the NSF (IIP-1318201), the IREE early career award (UMN) and NSF CAREER: Geophysical Flow Control (CBET-1351303). Computational resources were provided by MSI.

  13. STGSTK- PREDICTING MULTISTAGE AXIAL-FLOW COMPRESSOR PERFORMANCE BY A MEANLINE STAGE-STACKING METHOD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinke, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    The STGSTK computer program was developed for predicting the off-design performance of multistage axial-flow compressors. The axial-flow compressor is widely used in aircraft engines. In addition to its inherent advantage of high mass flow per frontal area, it can exhibit very good aerodynamic performance. However, good aerodynamic performance over an acceptable range of operating conditions is not easily attained. STGSTK provides an analytical tool for the development of new compressor designs. The simplicity of a one-dimensional compressible flow model enables the stage-stacking method used in STGSTK to have excellent convergence properties and short computer run times. Also, the simplicity of the model makes STGSTK a manageable code that eases the incorporation, or modification, of empirical correlations directly linked to test data. Thus, the user can adapt the code to meet varying design needs. STGSTK uses a meanline stage-stacking method to predict off-design performance. Stage and cumulative compressor performance is calculated from representative meanline velocity diagrams located at rotor inlet and outlet meanline radii. STGSTK includes options for the following: 1) non-dimensional stage characteristics may be input directly or calculated from stage design performance input, 2) stage characteristics may be modified for off-design speed and blade reset, and 3) rotor design deviation angle may be modified for off-design flow, speed, and blade setting angle. Many of the code's options use correlations that are normally obtained from experimental data. The STGSTK user may modify these correlations as needed. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 370 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 85K of 8 bit bytes. STGSTK was developed in 1982.

  14. Raised intracranial pressure and cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, I. H.; Rowan, J. O.

    1974-01-01

    Intracranial pressure was raised by expansion of a supratentorial subdural ballon in anaesthetized baboons. Pressures were measured at several sites, both supratentorial and infratentorial, and cerebral blood flow was measured in each cerebral hemisphere separately. Pressures recorded from the right and left lateral ventricles corresponded closely throughout. Highly significant correlations were also obtained between the pressures in the right and left subdural spaces and the mean intraventricular pressure. There was, thus, no evidence of intracompartmental pressure gradients within the supratentorial space. Pressure gradients did, however, develop between the supratentorial and infratentorial compartments in the majority of experiments, although the level of supratentorial pressure at which this occurred, varied. Despite the presence of a large mass lesion over the right cerebral hemisphere, no significant differences developed between levels of cerebral blood flow in the two hemispheres, although flow in the right hemisphere remained consistently slightly lower than that in the left after the ballon was inserted. PMID:4836754

  15. Effects of energetic coherent motions on the power and wake of an axial-flow turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, L. P.; Hill, C.; Neary, V. S.; Gunawan, B.; Arndt, R. E. A.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2015-05-01

    A laboratory experiment examined the effects of energetic coherent motions on the structure of the wake and power fluctuations generated by a model axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine. The model turbine was placed in an open-channel flow and operated under subcritical conditions. The incoming flow was locally perturbed with vertically oriented cylinders of various diameters. An array of three acoustic Doppler velocimeters aligned in the cross-stream direction and a torque transducer were used to collect high-resolution and synchronous measurements of the three-velocity components of the incoming and wake flow as well as the turbine power. A strong scale-to-scale interaction between the large-scale and broadband turbulence shed by the cylinders and the turbine power revealed how the turbulence structure modulates the turbine behavior. In particular, the response of the turbine to the distinctive von Kármán-type vortices shed from the cylinders highlighted this phenomenon. The mean and fluctuating characteristics of the turbine wake are shown to be very sensitive to the energetic motions present in the flow. Tip vortices were substantially dampened and the near-field mean wake recovery accelerated in the presence of energetic motions in the flow. Strong coherent motions are shown to be more effective than turbulence levels for triggering the break-up of the spiral structure of the tip-vortices.

  16. Flow control in axial fan inlet guide vanes by synthetic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyrus, V.; Trávníček, Z.; Wurst, P.; Kordík, J.

    2013-04-01

    Tested high pressure axial flow fan with hub/tip ratio of 0.70 and external diameter of 600 mm consisted of inlet guide vanes (IGV), rotor and stator blade rows. Fan peripheral velocity was 47 m/s. Air volume flow rate was changed by turning of rear part of the inlet guide vanes. At turning of 20 deg the flow was separated on the IGV profiles. The synthetic jets were introduced through radial holes in machine casing in the location before flow separation origin. Synthetic jet actuator was designed with the use of a speaker by UT AVCR. Its membrane had diameter of 63 mm. Excitation frequency was chosen in the range of 500 Hz - 700 Hz. Synthetic jets favourably influenced separated flow on the vane profiles in the distance of (5 - 12) mm from the casing surface. The reduction of flow separation area caused in the region near the casing the decrease of the profile loss coefficient approximately by 20%.

  17. Flow performance of highly loaded axial fan with bowed rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Liu, X. J.; Yang, A. L.; Dai, R.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a partial bowed rotor blade was proposed for a newly designed high loaded axial fan. The blade was positively bowed 30 degrees from hub to 30 percent spanwise position. Flows of radial blade and bowed blade fans were numerically compared for various operation conditions. Results show that the fan's performance is improved. At the designed condition with flow coefficient of 0.52, the efficiency of the bowed blade fan is increased 1.44% and the static pressure rise is increased 11%. Comparing the flow structures, it can be found that the separated flow in the bowed fan is reduced and confined within 20 percent span, which is less than the 35 percent in the radial fan. It means that the bowed blade generates negative blade force and counteracts partial centrifugal force. It is alleviates the radial movements of boundary layers in fan's hub region. Flow losses due to 3D mixing are reduced in the rotor. Inlet flow to downstream stator is also improved.

  18. Unsteady flow analysis of an axial flow hydraulic turbine with collection devices comprising a different number of blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Yasuyuki; Inagaki, Terumi; Li, Yanrong; Hirama, Sou; Kikuchi, Norio

    2015-06-01

    We previously devised a new type of portable hydraulic turbine that uses the kinetic energy of an open-channel flow to improve output power by catching and accelerating the flow. The turbine contains an axial flow runner with an appended collection device and a diffuser section that is not axisymmetric. The objective of this study is to determine how interference between the collection device and the runner influences performance characteristics of the turbine. We investigated the performance characteristics of the turbine and flow field for different numbers of blades during both unsteady and steady flow. During an unsteady flow, the maximum values of power coefficients for three and two blades increased by approximately 8.8% and 21.4%, respectively, compared to those during a steady flow. For the three-blade runner, the power coefficient showed small fluctuations, but for the two-blade runner, the power coefficient showed large fluctuations. These fluctuations in the power coefficient are attributed to fluctuations in the loading coefficient, which were generated by interference between the runner and the diffuser section of the collection device.

  19. Computational fluid dynamics-based study of possibility of generating pulsatile blood flow via a continuous-flow VAD.

    PubMed

    Nammakie, Erfan; Niroomand-Oscuii, Hanieh; Koochaki, Mojtaba; Ghalichi, Farzan

    2017-01-01

    Until recent years, it was almost beyond remedy to save the life of end-stage heart failure patients without considering a heart transplant. This is while the need for healthy organs has always far exceeded donations. However, the evolution of VAD technology has certainly changed the management of these patients. Today, blood pumps are designed either pulsatile flow or continuous flow, each of which has its own concerns and limitations. For instance, pulsatile pumps are mostly voluminous and hardly can be used for children. On the other hand, the flow generated by continuous-flow pumps is in contrast with pulsatile flow of the natural heart. In this project, having used computational fluid dynamics, we studied the possibility of generating pulsatile blood flow via a continuous-flow blood pump by adjusting the rotational speed of the pump with two distinct patterns (sinusoidal and trapezoidal), both of which have been proposed and set based on physiological needs and blood flow waveform of the natural heart. An important feature of this study is setting the outlet pressure of the pump similar to the physiological conditions of a patient with heart failure, and since these axial pumps are sensitive to outlet pressures, more secure and reliable results of their performance are achieved. Our results show a slight superiority of a sinusoidal pattern compared to a trapezoidal one with the potential to achieve an adequate pulsatile flow by precisely controlling the rotational speed.

  20. Effect of geometry and scale for axial and radial flow membrane chromatography-Experimental study of bovin serum albumin adsorption.

    PubMed

    Teepakorn, Chalore; Fiaty, Koffi; Charcosset, Catherine

    2015-07-17

    During the last 10 years, membrane chromatography (MC) has been increasingly reported for biomolecule purification at both small and large scales. Although, several axial and radial flow MC devices are commercialized, the effect of the device dimensions on the adsorption performance has not been fully investigated. In this study, axial and radial flow anion ion-exchange MC devices were used for bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption. For both axial and radial flow, three devices at different scales were compared, two having similar diameter and two similar bed height. The pressure drop and the flow distribution using acetone as a non-binding solute were measured, as well as BSA breakthrough curves at different flow rates and BSA loading concentrations. For all devices, it was observed that the flow rate had no effect on the breakthrough curve, which confirms the advantage of MC to be used at high flow rates. In addition, the BSA binding capacity increased with increasing BSA concentration, which suggests that it could be preferable to work with concentrated solutions rather than with very dilute solutions, when using buffer at high phosphate concentration. For both axial and radial flow, the bed height had a negative impact on the binding capacity, as the lowest binding capacities per membrane volume were obtained with the devices having the highest bed height. Radial flow MC has potential at large-scale applications, as a short bed thickness can be combined with a large inlet surface area. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of perforation number of blade on aerodynamic performance of dual-rotor small axial flow fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yongjun; Wang, Yanping; Li, Guoqi; Jin, Yingzi; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2015-04-01

    Compared with single rotor small axial flow fans, dual-rotor small axial flow fans is better regarding the static characteristics. But the aerodynamic noise of dual-rotor small axial flow fans is worse than that of single rotor small axial flow fans. In order to improve aerodynamic noise of dual-rotor small axial flow fans, the pre-stage blades with different perforation numbers are designed in this research. The RANS equations and the standard k-ɛ turbulence model as well as the FW-H noise model are used to simulate the flow field within the fan. Then, the aerodynamic performance of the fans with different perforation number is compared and analyzed. The results show that: (1) Compared to the prototype fan, the noise of fans with perforation blades is reduced. Additionally, the noise of the fans decreases with the increase of the number of perforations. (2) The vorticity value in the trailing edge of the pre-stage blades of perforated fans is reduced. It is found that the vorticity value in the trailing edge of the pre-stage blades decreases with the increase of the number of perforations. (3) Compared to the prototype fan, the total pressure rising and efficiency of the fans with perforation blades drop slightly.

  2. Changes in chorioretinal blood flow velocity and cerebral blood flow after carotid endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Enaida, Hiroshi; Nagata, Shinji; Takeda, Atsunobu; Nakao, Shintaro; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the changes in chorioretinal blood flow velocity and cerebral blood after carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Nine patients with moderate to severe internal carotid artery stenosis underwent CEA. Chorioretinal blood flow velocity was measured by laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG), while cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), on the affected side both before and after CEA. LSFG was evaluated in five areas to determine mean blur rate, while CBF was calculated from regional CBF and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR), at the middle cerebral artery (MCA) region of each patient. Five cases showed an increase (mean 3.49 %, range -29.82 to 35.59 %) of average chorioretinal blood flow velocity using LSFG after CEA. A particularly averaged increase in chorioretinal blood flow was observed in the macular area compared with other areas. Similarly, there was an increase in CBF at rest (mean 11.46 %, range -14.51 to 74.14 %) observed using SPECT after surgery. Improvement of CVR was confirmed in four cases. All general and visual symptoms disappeared after CEA. Severe adverse effects, including hyperperfusion syndrome, were not observed in any cases. LSFG may be useful for the analysis of chorioretinal blood flow changes after CEA.

  3. Measuring sickle cell morphology during blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kviatkovsky, Inna; Zeidan, Adel; Yeheskely-Hayon, Daniella; Shabad, Eveline L; Dann, Eldad J; Yelin, Dvir

    2017-03-01

    During a sickle cell crisis in sickle cell anemia patients, deoxygenated red blood cells may change their mechanical properties and block small blood vessels, causing pain, local tissue damage, and possibly organ failure. Measuring the structural and morphological changes in sickle cells is important for understanding the factors contributing to vessel blockage and for developing an effective treatment. In this work, we image blood cells from sickle cell anemia patients using spectrally encoded flow cytometry, and analyze the interference patterns between reflections from the cell membranes. Using a numerical simulation for calculating the interference pattern obtained from a model of a red blood cell, we propose an analytical expression for the three-dimensional shape of characteristic sickle cells and compare our results to a previously suggested model. Our imaging approach offers new means for analyzing the morphology of sickle cells, and could be useful for studying their unique physiological and biomechanical properties.

  4. Hydrogen turbines for space power systems: A simplified axial flow gas turbine model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    Hydrogen cooled, turbine powered space weapon systems require a relatively simple, but reasonably accurate hydrogen gas expansion turbine model. Such a simplified turbine model would require little computational time and allow incorporation into system level computer programs while providing reasonably accurate volume/mass estimates. This model would then allow optimization studies to be performed on multiparameter space power systems and provide improved turbine mass and size estimates for the various operating conditions (when compared to empirical and power law approaches). An axial flow gas expansion turbine model was developed for these reasons and is in use as a comparative bench mark in space power system studies at Sandia. The turbine model is based on fluid dynamic, thermodynamic, and material strength considerations, but is considered simplified because it does not account for design details such as boundary layer effects, shock waves, turbulence, stress concentrations, and seal leakage. Although the basic principles presented here apply to any gas or vapor axial flow turbine, hydrogen turbines are discussed because of their immense importance on space burst power platforms.

  5. Cooling performance of a nanofluid flow in a heat sink microchannel with axial conduction effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izadi, M.; Shahmardan, M. M.; Norouzi, M.; Rashidi, A. M.; Behzadmehr, A.

    2014-12-01

    In this work, the forced convection of a nanofluid flow in a microscale duct has been investigated numerically. The governing equations have been solved utilizing the finite volume method. Two different conjugated domains for both flow field and substrate have been considered in order to solve the hydrodynamic and thermal fields. The results of the present study are compared to those of analytical and experimental ones, and a good agreement has been observed. The effects of Reynolds number, thermal conductivity and thickness of substrate on the thermal and hydrodynamic indexes have been studied. In general, considering the wall affected the thermal parameter while it had no impact on the hydrodynamics behavior. The results show that the effect of nanoparticle volume fraction on the increasing of normalized local heat transfer coefficient is more efficient in thick walls. For higher Reynolds number, the effect of nanoparticle inclusion on axial distribution of heat flux at solid-fluid interface declines. Also, less end losses and further uniformity of axial heat flux lead to an increase in the local normalized heat transfer coefficient.

  6. Axial flow effects on robustness of vortical structures about actively deflected wings in flapping flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Albert; Kweon, Jihoon; Choi, Haecheon; Eldredge, Jeff D.

    2012-11-01

    Flapping wing flight has garnered much attention in the past decade driven by our desire to understand capabilities observed in nature and to develop agile small-scale aerial vehicles. Nature has demonstrated the breadth of maneuverability achievable by flapping wing flight. However, despite recent advances the role of wing flexibility remains poorly understood. In an effort to develop a deeper understanding of wing deflection effects and to explore novel approaches to increasing leading-edge vortex robustness, this three-dimensional computational study explores the aerodynamics of low aspect ratio plates, in hovering kinematics, with isolated flexion lines undergoing prescribed deflection. Major flexion lines, recognized as the primary avenue for deflection in biological fliers, are isolated here in two distinct configurations, resulting in deflection about the wing root and the wing tip, respectively. Of interest is the interaction between axial flow along the span and the vortical structures about the wing. It is proposed that the modes of deflection explored may provide a means of axial flow control for favorably promoting LEV robustness over a broad range of flapping conditions, and provide insight into the nature of flexibility in flapping wing flight. National Science Foundation, National Research Foundation of Korea.

  7. Performance Evaluation of Axial Flow AG-1 FC and Prototype FM (High Strength) HEPA Filters - 13123

    SciTech Connect

    Giffin, Paxton K.; Parsons, Michael S.; Wilson, John A.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2013-07-01

    High efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are routinely used in DOE nuclear containment activities. The Nuclear Air Cleaning Handbook (NACH) stipulates that air cleaning devices and equipment used in DOE nuclear applications must meet the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (AG-1) standard. This testing activity evaluates two different axial flow HEPA filters, those from AG-1 Sections FC and FM. Section FM is under development and has not yet been added to AG-1 due to a lack of qualification data available for these filters. Section FC filters are axial flow units that utilize a fibrous glass filtering medium. The section FM filters utilize a similar fibrous glass medium, but also have scrim backing. The scrim-backed filters have demonstrated the ability to endure pressure impulses capable of completely destroying FC filters. The testing activities presented herein will examine the total lifetime loading for both FC and FM filters under ambient conditions and at elevated conditions of temperature and relative humidity. Results will include loading curves, penetration curves, and testing condition parameters. These testing activities have been developed through collaborations with representatives from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), New Mexico State University, and Mississippi State University. (authors)

  8. Hydrogen turbines for space power systems: A simplified axial flow gas turbine model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    Hydrogen cooled, turbine powered space weapon systems require a relatively simple, but reasonably accurate hydrogen gas expansion turbine model. Such a simplified turbine model would require little computational time and allow incorporation into system level computer programs while providing reasonably accurate volume/mass estimates. This model would then allow optimization studies to be performed on multiparameter space power systems and provide improved turbine mass and size estimates for the various operating conditions (when compared to empirical and power law approaches). An axial flow gas expansion turbine model was developed for these reasons and is in use as a comparative bench mark in space power system studies at Sandia. The turbine model is based on fluid dynamic, thermodynamic, and material strength considerations, but is considered simplified because it does not account for design details such as boundary layer effects, shock waves, turbulence, stress concentrations, and seal leakage. Although the basic principles presented here apply to any gas or vapor axial flow turbine, hydrogen turbines are discussed because of their immense importance on space burst power platforms.

  9. Particle capture in axial magnetic filters with power law flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasov, T.; Herdem, S.; Köksal, M.

    1999-05-01

    A theory of capture of magnetic particle carried by laminar flow of viscous non-Newtonian (power law) fluid in axially ordered filters is presented. The velocity profile of the fluid flow is determined by the Kuwabara-Happel cell model. For the trajectory of the particle, the capture area and the filter performance simple analytical expressions are obtained. These expressions are valid for particle capture processes from both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. For this reason the obtained theoretical results make it possible to widen the application of high-gradient magnetic filtration (HGMF) to other industrial areas. For Newtonian fluids the theoretical results are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental ones reported in the literature.

  10. Optimization of the recovery efficiency in an axial HGMF cell with bounded flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badescu, V.; Murariu, V.; Rotariu, O.; Rezlescu, N.

    1996-09-01

    This work presents a method to optimize the recovery efficiency of fine paramagnetic particles from a liquid suspension in an axial HGMF cell. The cell has the flow field bounded by a circular cylindrical wall. It has only one ferromagnetic wire mounted outside the flow field, parallel with its axis and in `paramagnetic capture mode'. The optimization criterion was deduced from the analysis of the particles' trajectories inside the magnetic active space. It is based on the relationship between the geometrical 0022-3727/29/9/042/img1 and operational 0022-3727/29/9/042/img2 parameters for which the filtration efficiency is 100%. The work also presents some experimental data which are in good agreement with theoretical results.

  11. Effects of Inlet Icing on Performance of Axial-flow Turbojet Engine in Natural Icing Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acker, Loren W; Kleinknecht, Kenneth S

    1950-01-01

    A flight investigation in natural icing conditions was conducted to determine the effect of inlet ice formations on the performance of axial-flow turbojet engines. The results are presented for icing conditions ranging from a liquid-water content of 0.1 to 0.9 gram per cubic meter and water-droplet size from 10 to 27 microns at ambient-air temperature from 13 to 26 degrees F. The data show time histories of jet thrust, air flow, tail-pipe temperature, compressor efficiency, and icing parameters for each icing encounter. The effect of inlet-guide-vane icing was isolated and shown to account for approximately one-half the total reduction in performance caused by inlet icing.

  12. Performance of a highly loaded two stage axial-flow fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruggeri, R. S.; Benser, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    A two-stage axial-flow fan with a tip speed of 1450 ft/sec (442 m/sec) and an overall pressure ratio of 2.8 was designed, built, and tested. At design speed and pressure ratio, the measured flow matched the design value of 184.2 lbm/sec (83.55kg/sec). The adiabatic efficiency at the design operating point was 85.7 percent. The stall margin at design speed was 10 percent. A first-bending-mode flutter of the second-stage rotor blades was encountered near stall at speeds between 77 and 93 percent of design, and also at high pressure ratios at speeds above 105 percent of design. A 5 deg closed reset of the first-stage stator eliminated second-stage flutter for all but a narrow speed range near 90 percent of design.

  13. Phase flow of an axially symmetrical gyrostat with one constant rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elipe, A.; Lanchares, V.

    1997-07-01

    We analyze the attitude dynamics of an axially symmetric gyrostat under no external forces and one constant internal spin. We introduce coordinates to represent the orbits of constant angular momentum as a flow on a sphere. With these coordinates, we realize that the problem belongs to a general class of Hamiltonian systems, namely the problem here considered is the one parameter Hamiltonian that is a polynomial of at most degree two in a base of the Lie algebra so (3). The parametric bifurcations are found for both cases, when the rotor is spinning about the axis of symmetry of the gyrostat, and when it is spinning about another axis of inertia. The general solution for the global general flow is expressed in terms of the Jacobian elliptic functions.

  14. The Unsteady Response of an Axial Flow Turbo-Machinery Rotor to Inlet Flow Distortions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-12

    the rotor inflow velocity. Distorted inlet flow is a very realistic and prevalent problem in jet air - craft engines, and the consequences of...Turbomachinery In designing the blading of a compressor or turbine, the air flow is assumed to be steady. The existence of a uniform, steady flow is...surface of the air - k- foil. When this occurs in a compressor, surge can occur. Surge will result in very large fluctuating forces on the blades which

  15. Dexmedetomidine decreases the oral mucosal blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kawaai, Hiroyoshi; Yoshida, Kenji; Tanaka, Eri; Togami, Kohei; Tada, Hitoshi; Ganzberg, Steven; Yamazaki, Shinya

    2013-12-01

    There is an abundance of blood vessels in the oral cavity, and intraoperative bleeding can disrupt operations. There have been some interesting reports about constriction of vessels in the oral cavity, one of which reported that gingival blood flow in cats is controlled by sympathetic α-adrenergic fibres that are involved with vasoconstriction. Dexmedetomidine is a sedative and analgesic agent that acts through the α-2 adrenoceptor, and is expected to have a vasoconstrictive action in the oral cavity. We have focused on the relation between the effects of α-adrenoceptors by dexmedetomidine and vasoconstriction in oral tissues, and assessed the oral mucosal blood flow during sedation with dexmedetomidine. The subjects comprised 13 healthy male volunteers, sedated with dexmedetomidine in a loading dose of 6 μg/kg/h for 10 min and a continuous infusion of 0.7 μg/kg/h for 32 min. The mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV), systemic vascular resistance (SVR), and palatal mucosal blood flow (PMBF) were measured at 0, 5, 10, 12, 22, and 32 min after the start of the infusion. The HR, CO, and PBMF decreased significantly during the infusion even though there were no differences in the SV. The SVR increased significantly but the PMBF decreased significantly. In conclusion, PMBF was reduced by the mediating effect of dexmedetomidine on α-2 adrenoceptors.

  16. Clustering of microscopic particles in constricted blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bächer, Christian; Schrack, Lukas; Gekle, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    A mixed suspension of red blood cells (RBCs) and microparticles flows through a cylindrical channel with a constriction mimicking a stenosed blood vessel. Our three-dimensional Lattice-Boltzmann simulations show that the RBCs are depleted right ahead of and after the constriction. Although the RBC mean concentration (hematocrit) is 16.5% or 23.7%, their axial concentration profile is very similar to that of isolated tracer particles flowing along the central axis. Most importantly, however, we find that the stiff microparticles exhibit the opposite behavior. Arriving on a marginated position near the channel wall, they can pass through the constriction only if they find a suitable gap to dip into the dense plug of RBCs occupying the channel center. This leads to a prolonged dwell time and, as a consequence, to a pronounced increase in microparticle concentration right in front of the constriction. For biochemically active particles such as drug delivery agents or activated platelets this clustering may have important physiological consequences, e.g., for the formation of microthrombi.

  17. Measurement of Liver Blood Flow: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Stansby, G. P.; Hobbs, K. E. F.; Hawkes, D. J.; Colchester, A. C. F.

    1991-01-01

    The study of hepatic haemodynamics is of importance in understanding both hepatic physiology and disease processes as well as assessing the effects of portosystemic shunting and liver transplantation. The liver has the most complicated circulation of any organ and many physiological and pathological processes can affect it1,2. This review surveys the methods available for assessing liver blood flow, examines the different parameters being measured and outlines problems of applicability and interpretation for each technique. The classification of these techniques is to some extent arbitrary and several so called “different” methods may share certain common principles. The methods reviewed have been classified into two groups (Table 1): those primarily reflecting flow through discrete vessels or to the whole organ and those used to assess local microcirculatory blood flow. All techniques have their advantages and disadvantages and in some situations a combination may provide the most information. In addition, because of the many factors affecting liver blood flow and sinusoidal perfusion, readings in a single subject may vary depending on positioning, recent food intake, anxiety, anaesthesia and drug therapy. This must be borne in mind if different studies are to be meaningfully compared. PMID:1931785

  18. Experimental evaluation of the intrinsic noise in the Couette-Taylor system with an axial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsameret, Avraham; Goldner, Galia; Steinberg, Victor

    1994-02-01

    The intrinsic noise in the Couette-Taylor system with axial flow is evaluated experimentally by several methods, which include a comparison of experimental data with numerical simulations of the amplitude equation with a noise term and the application of an external source of stochastic perturbations at the inlet. The intensity of the intrinsic noise is found in our system to be dependent on the through-flow velocity in the following manner: for large enough through-flow velocities (Reynolds number Re>2) the intensity of the noise drastically increases with Re, whereas for small Re the noise amplitude is independent of Re and reaches a constant value of ~=0.02 μm/s, which is of the order of magnitude of the theoretically estimated value for the thermal noise. The amplitude of the intrinsic noise at large through-flow velocities (Re~=3) is found in our system to be larger than the thermal noise by more than one order of magnitude. Its origin is suggested to be associated with the perturbations of the flow at the inlet boundary.

  19. The High Reynolds Number Flow Through an Axial-Flow Pump

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-01

    velocity field. After some initial computations of the flow field using a viscous form of the code of Adamczyk, Mulac, and Celestina [1986] at a low Mach...Simulating Flows in Multistage Turbomachinery," ASME Paper 85-GT-220, 1985. Adamczyk, J. J., Mulac, R. A., and Celestina , M. L., "A Model for Closing the

  20. Blood Flow in the Stenotic Carotid Bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayz, Vitaliy

    2005-11-01

    The carotid artery is prone to atherosclerotic disease and the growth of plaque in the vessel, leading often to severe occlusion or plaque rupture, resulting in emboli and thrombus, and, possibly, stroke. Modeling the flow in stenotic blood vessels can elucidate the influence of the flow on plaque growth and stability. Numerical simulations are carried out to model the complex flows in anatomically realistic, patient-specific geometries constructed from magnetic resonance images. The 3-D unsteady Navier-Stokes equations are solved in a finite-volume formulation, using an iterative pressure-correction algorithm. The flow field computed is highly three-dimensional, with high-speed jets and strong recirculating secondary flows. Sharp spatial and temporal variations of the velocities and shear stresses are observed. The results are in a good agreement with the available experimental and clinical data. The influence of non-Newtonian blood behavior and arterial wall compliance are considered. Transitional and turbulent regimes have been looked at using LES. This work supports the conjecture that numerical simulations can provide a diagnostic tool for assessing plaque stability.

  1. Fluid dynamic characterization of operating conditions for continuous flow blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z J; Antaki, J F; Burgreen, G W; Butler, K C; Thomas, D C; Griffith, B P

    1999-01-01

    As continuous flow pumps become more prominent as long-term ventricular assist devices, the wide range of conditions under which they must be operated has become evident. Designed to operate at a single, best-efficiency, operating point, continuous flow pumps are required to perform at off-design conditions quite frequently. The present study investigated the internal fluid dynamics within two representative rotary fluid pumps to characterize the quality of the flow field over a full range of operating conditions. A Nimbus/UoP axial flow blood pump and a small centrifugal pump were used as the study models. Full field visualization of flow features in the two pumps was conducted using a laser based fluorescent particle imaging technique. Experiments were performed under steady flow conditions. Flow patterns at inlet and outlet sections were visualized over a series of operating points. Flow features specific to each pump design were observed to exist under all operating conditions. At off-design conditions, an annular region of reverse flow was commonly observed within the inlet of the axial pump, while a small annulus of backflow in the inlet duct and a strong disturbed flow at the outlet tongue were observed for the centrifugal pump. These observations were correlated to a critical nondimensional flow coefficient. The creation of a "map" of flow behavior provides an additional, important criterion for determining favorable operating speed for rotary blood pumps. Many unfavorable flow features may be avoided by maintaining the flow coefficient above a characteristic critical coefficient for a particular pump, whereas the intrinsic deleterious flow features can only be minimized by design improvement. Broadening the operating range by raising the band between the critical flow coefficient and the designed flow coefficient, is also a worthy goal for design improvement.

  2. Axial Seamount 2015 Eruption: A 127 m Thick, Microbially-Covered Lava Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, D. S.; Delaney, J. R.; Chadwick, W.; Philip, B. T.; Merle, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    On April 24th, Axial Seamount on the Juan de Fuca Ridge erupted. This site now hosts the most advanced submarine volcanic observatory with a diverse, multidisciplinary array of 48 cabled instruments at its summit and base, and an instrumented state-of-the-art shallow profiling mooring providing real-time data to shore as part of NSF's Ocean Observatory Initiative (Delaney et al., AGU-2015). The onset of the eruption was marked by more than 8000 earthquakes (Wilcock et al., AGU-2015; Garcia et al., AGU-2015) and a drop in the seafloor of 2.4 m (Nooner et al., AGU-2015). Follow-on analyses of hydrophone data (Tolstoy et al., AGU-2015) pointed to the location of the eruption as the Northern Rift zone. During the OOI-NSF-UW Cabled Array maintenance cruise, the Northern Rift and eastern side of the caldera was mapped using the R/V Thompson's EM302 system at. Differencing of 2007 (Hydrosweep) and 2013 EM302 bathymetric data indicated that the flow was ~ 7 km in length and up to 127 m thick, where it filled in a preexisting small depression. On July 26th, the ROV ROPOS dove near the toe of the northeastern lobe of the flow, the location of the highest bathymetric difference. The steep north face of this lobe is composed of glassy pillow flows: ROPOS ascended ~ 85 m before reaching the summit. Immediately upon reaching the summit, the vehicle was engulfed in a blizzard of biologically-produced 'snowblower' material issuing from distributed small sites of diffuse flow that reached 18°C. These areas hosted white filamentous bacteria, presumably methane metabolizers. Extensive areas of the flow summit were covered with orange microbial mats that completely masked the underlying pillows flows. Particle-poor diffuse fluids issued from microbially-covered collapse features along the summit, assumed to mark the main feeder channels. This eruption was markedly different than the Axial April 2011 eruption, which was characterized by vast sheet flows and extensive collapse zones.

  3. Caffeine reduces myocardial blood flow during exercise.

    PubMed

    Higgins, John P; Babu, Kavita M

    2013-08-01

    Caffeine consumption has been receiving increased interest from both the medical and lay press, especially given the increased amounts now available in energy products. Acute ingestion of caffeine usually increases cardiac work; however, caffeine impairs the expected proportional increase in myocardial blood flow to match this increased work of the heart, most notably during exercise. This appears to be mainly due to caffeine's effect on blocking adenosine-induced vasodilatation in the coronary arteries in normal healthy subjects. This review summarizes the available medical literature specifically relating to pure caffeine tablet ingestion and reduced exercise coronary blood flow, and suggests possible mechanisms. Further studies are needed to evaluate this effect for other common caffeine-delivery systems, including coffee, energy beverages, and energy gels, which are often used for exercise performance enhancement, especially in teenagers and young athletes.

  4. Unsteady non-Newtonian blood flow through a tapered overlapping stenosed catheterized vessel.

    PubMed

    Ali, N; Zaman, A; Sajid, M; Nieto, J J; Torres, A

    2015-11-01

    The unsteady flow characteristics of blood in a catheterized overlapping stenosed artery are analyzed in presence of body acceleration and magnetic field. The stenosed arterial segment is modeled as a rigid constricted tube. An improved shape of stenosis in the realm of the formulation of the arterial narrowing caused by atheroma is integrated in the present study. The catheter inside the artery is approximated by a thin rigid tube of small radius while the streaming blood in the artery is characterized by the Carreau model. Employing mild stenosis condition, the governing equation of the flow is derived which is then solving numerically using finite difference scheme. The variation of axial velocity, flow rate, resistance impendence and wall shear stress is shown graphically for various parameters of interest. The flow patterns illustrating the global behavior of blood are also presented.

  5. Numerical investigation of a high-subsonic axial-flow compressor rotor with non-axisymmetric hub endwall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shuzhen; Lu, Xingen; Zhang, Hongwu; Zhu, Junqiang; Xu, Qiang

    2010-02-01

    The major source of loss in modern compressors is the secondary loss. Non-axisymmetric endwall profile contouring is now a well established design methodology in axial flow turbines. However, flow development in axial compressors is differ from turbines, the effects of non-axisymmetric endwall to axial compressors requires flow analysis in detail. This paper presents both experimental and numerical data to deal with the application of a non-axisymmetric hub endwall in a high-subsonic axial-flow compressor. The aims of the experiment here were to make sure the numerically obtained flow fields is the physical mechanism responsible for the improvement in efficiency, due to the non-axisymmetric hub endwall. The computational results were first compared with available measured data of axisymmetric hub endwall. The results agreed well with the experimental data for estimation of the global performance. The coupled flow of the compressor rotor with non-axisymmetric hub endwall was simulated by a state-of-the-art multi-block flow solver. The non-axisymmetric hub endwall was designed for a subsonic compressor rotor with the help of sine and cosine functions. This type of non-axisymmetric hub endwall was found to have a significant improvement in efficiency of 0.45% approximately and a slightly increase for the total pressure ratio. The fundamental mechanisms of non-axisymmetric hub endwall and their effects on the subsonic axial-flow compressor endwall flow field were analyzed in detail. It is concluded that the non-axisymmetric endwall profiling, though not optimum, can mitigate the secondary flow in the vicinity of the hub endwall, resulting in the improvement of aerodynamic performance of the compressor rotor.

  6. Myocardial blood flow: Roentgen videodensitometry techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, H. C.; Robb, R. A.; Wood, E. H.

    1975-01-01

    The current status of roentgen videodensitometric techniques that provide an objective assessment of blood flow at selected sites within the coronary circulation were described. Roentgen videodensitometry employs conventional radiopaque indicators, radiological equipment and coronary angiographic techniques. Roentgen videodensitometry techniques developed in the laboratory during the past nine years, and for the past three years were applied to analysis of angiograms in the clinical cardiac catheterization laboratory.

  7. Myocardial blood flow: Roentgen videodensitometry techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, H. C.; Robb, R. A.; Wood, E. H.

    1975-01-01

    The current status of roentgen videodensitometric techniques that provide an objective assessment of blood flow at selected sites within the coronary circulation were described. Roentgen videodensitometry employs conventional radiopaque indicators, radiological equipment and coronary angiographic techniques. Roentgen videodensitometry techniques developed in the laboratory during the past nine years, and for the past three years were applied to analysis of angiograms in the clinical cardiac catheterization laboratory.

  8. Forced motion and acoustic radiation of an elastic cylinder in axial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manela, A.; Miloh, T.

    2012-07-01

    We study the forced motion and far-field acoustic radiation of an elastic cylinder subject to uniform axial flow and actuated at its upstream end by small-amplitude periodic displacement and rotation. The linearized problem is analysed under subcritical conditions of low nondimensional stream-flow velocity, uflow. It is found that the forced motion at subcritical conditions is affected by the properties of the in vacuo system. A resonance is excited when the cylinder is actuated at one of its in vacuo eigenfrequencies, ωres, manifested by relatively large deflections. Fluid flow acts to regularize this behavior by transferring energy from the upstream driver to the fluid. The dynamical description is used as a source term in the formulation of the vibroacoustic problem. Assuming the cylinder is well-streamlined and neglecting the effect of vortex shedding, the far field sound is attributed directly to cylinder vibration. Acoustic radiation of a dipole type is found in the limit where the cylinder is acoustically compact. Following the dynamical description, it is shown that fluid flow reduces the sound level compared to that in the absence of mean flow, when actuation is applied close to ω=ωres. In addition, we demonstrate that far-field sound can be controlled by varying the actuation parameters. Analytical description of the dynamical and acoustic fields is obtained in the limit u≪1, and found in close agreement with the exact numerical solution up to u˜O(1). Discrepancies between the approximate and exact solutions are observed close to the resonance frequencies, and rationalized in terms of the strong fluid-structure coupling occurring when ω→ωres. At ω=ωres, a qualitative description of the effect of fluid stream flow on the system behavior is supplied.

  9. Flow and axial dispersion in a sinusoidal-walled tube: Effects of inertial and unsteady flows

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Lambert, Adam; Wood, Brian D.

    2013-12-01

    Dispersion in porous media flows has been the subject of much experimental, theoretical and numerical study. Here we consider a wavy-walled tube (a three-dimensional tube with sinusoidally-varying diameter) as a simplified conceptualization of flow in porous media, where constrictions represent pore throats and expansions pore bodies. A theoretical model for effective (macroscopic) longitudinal dispersion in this system has been developed by volume averaging the microscale velocity field. Direct numerical simulation using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods was used to compute velocity fields by solving the Navier-Stokes equations, and also to numerically solve the volume averaging closure problem, for a range of Reynolds numbers (Re) spanning the low-Re to inertial flow regimes, including one simulation at Re = 449 for which unsteady flow was observed. Dispersion values were computed using both the volume averaging solution and a random walk particle tracking method, and results of the two methods were shown to be consistent. Our results are compared to experimental measurements of dispersion in porous media and to previous theoretical results for the low-Re, Stokes flow regime. In the steady inertial regime we observe an power-law increase in effective longitudinal dispersion (DL) with Re, consistent with previous results. This rapid rate of increase is caused by trapping of solute in expansions due to flow separation (eddies). For the unsteady case (Re = 449), the rate of increase of DL with Re was smaller than that observed at lower Re. Velocity fluctuations in this regime lead to increased rates of solute mass transfer between the core flow and separated flow regions, thus diminishing the amount of tailing caused by solute trapping in eddies and thereby reducing longitudinal dispersion.

  10. Experimental and Computational Investigation of the Tip Clearance Flow in a Transonic Axial Compressor Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, Kenneth L.; Celestina, Mark L.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental and computational techniques are used to investigate tip clearance flows in a transonic axial compressor rotor at design and part speed conditions. Laser anemometer data acquired in the endwall region are presented for operating conditions near peak efficiency and near stall at 100% design speed and at near peak efficiency at 60% design speed. The role of the passage shock/leakage vortex interaction in generating endwall blockage is discussed. As a result of the shock/vortex interaction at design speed, the radial influence of the tip clearance flow extends to 20 times the physical tip clearance height. At part speed, in the absence of the shock, the radial extent is only 5 times the tip clearance height. Both measurements and analysis indicate that under part-speed operating conditions a second vortex, which does not originate from the tip leakage flow, forms in the endwall region within the blade passage and exits the passage near midpitch. Mixing of the leakage vortex with primary flow downstream of the rotor at both design and part speed conditions is also discussed.

  11. An experimental investigation on the tip leakage noise in axial-flow fans with rotating shroud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canepa, Edward; Cattanei, Andrea; Mazzocut Zecchin, Fabio; Milanese, Gabriele; Parodi, Davide

    2016-08-01

    The tip leakage noise generated by a shrouded rotor of an axial-flow fan has been experimentally studied. The measurements have been taken at high flow rate and at the design point in a hemi-anechoic chamber, at constant rotational speed and during speed ramps. A test plenum designed according to ISO 10302 has been employed to modify the operating conditions and different inlet configurations, ducted and unducted with standard and reduced tip gap, have been considered. The basic features of the inflow have been studied by means of aerodynamic measurements taken upstream of the rotor. To separate the noise generating mechanisms from the acoustic propagation effects, the acoustic response function of the test configuration has been computed employing the spectral decomposition method, and then it has been compared with the velocity-scaled, constant-Strouhal number SPL. In this way, the noise components related to the tip leakage flow have been identified and their connection with geometry have been highlighted. The broadband part of the spectra and the peaks related to the tip leakage flow are affected by the same propagation effects, but show a different dependence on the rotational speed and on the operating point. The upstream geometry affects the radiated noise much more than the performance and even a strong reduction in the tip-gap cannot completely eliminate the related noise.

  12. Experimental and computational investigation of the tip clearance flow in a transonic axial compressor rotor

    SciTech Connect

    Suder, K.L.; Celestina, M.L.

    1996-04-01

    Experimental and computational techniques are used to investigate tip clearance flows in a transonic axial compressor rotor at design and part-speed conditions. Laser anemometer data acquired in the endwall region are presented for operating conditions near peak efficiency and near stall at 100 percent design speed and at near peak efficiency at 60 percent design speed. The role of the passage shock/leakage vortex interaction at design speed, the radial influence of the tip clearance flow extends to 20 times the physical tip clearance height. At part speed, in the absence of the shock, the radial extent is only five times the tip clearance height. Both measurements and analysis indicate that under part-speed operating conditions a second vortex, which does not originate from the tip leakage flow, forms in the end-wall region within the blade passage and exits the passage near midpitch. Mixing of the leakage vortex with the primary flow downstream of the rotor at both design and part-speed conditions is also discussed.

  13. Stepped tip gap effects on a transonic axial-flow compressor rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Donald William

    The effects of stepped tip gaps and clearance levels on the performance, flowfield, and stall characteristics of a transonic axial-flow compressor rotor were experimentally and numerically determined. A theory and mechanism for relocation of blockage in the rotor tip region was developed. A two-stage compressor with no inlet guide vanes was tested in a modern transonic compressor research facility. The first-stage rotor was unswept and was tested for an optimum tip clearance with variations in stepped gaps machined into the casing near the aft tip region of the rotor. Nine casing geometries were investigated consisting of three step profiles at each of three clearance levels. For small and intermediate clearances, stepped tip gaps were found to improve pressure ratio, efficiency, and flow range for most operating conditions. At 100% design rotor speed, stepped tip gaps produced a doubling of mass flow range with as much as a 2.0% increase in mass flow and a 1.5% improvement in efficiency. The flowfield characteristics associated with performance improvements were experimentally and numerically analyzed. Stepped tip gaps were found to have no significant effect on the stall characteristics of the rotor; the stability characteristics attributable to tip geometry were determined by the clearance over the forward portion of the rotor blade. This study provides guidelines for engineers to improve compressor performance for an existing design by applying an optimum casing profile.

  14. Loss reduction in axial-flow compressors through low-speed model testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisler, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    A systematic procedure for reducing losses in axial-flow compressors is presented. In this procedure, a large, low-speed, aerodynamic model of a high-speed core compressor is designed and fabricated based on aerodynamic similarity principles. This model is then tested at low speed where high-loss regions associated with three-dimensional endwall boundary layers flow separation, leakage, and secondary flows can be located, detailed measurements made, and loss mechanisms determined with much greater accuracy and much lower cost and risk than is possible in small, high-speed compressors. Design modifications are made by using custom-tailored airfoils and vector diagrams, airfoil endbends, and modified wall geometries in the high-loss regions. The design improvements resulting in reduced loss or increased stall margin are then scaled to high speed. This paper describes the procedure and presents experimental results to show that in some cases endwall loss has been reduced by as much as 10 percent, flow separation has been reduced or eliminated, and stall margin has been substantially improved by using these techniques.

  15. Deterministic Aperiodic Sickle Cell Blood Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atsaves, Louis; Harris, Wesley

    2013-11-01

    In this paper sickle cell blood flow in the capillaries is modeled as a hydrodynamical system. The hydrodynamical system consists of the axisymmetric unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and a set of constitutive equations for oxygen transport. Blood cell deformation is not considered in this paper. The hydrodynamical system is reduced to a system of non-linear partial differential equations that are then transformed into a system of three autonomous non-linear ordinary differential equations and a set of algebraic equations. We examine the hydrodynamical system to discern stable/unstable, periodic/nonperiodic, reversible/irreversible properties of the system. The properties of the solutions are driven in large part by the coefficients of the governing system of equations. These coefficients depend on the physiological properties of the sickle cell blood. The chaotic nature of the onset of crisis in sickle cell patients is identified. Research Assistant.

  16. Blood flow dynamics in heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, J. K.; Naylor, H. L.; Hogeman, C. S.; Sinoway, L. I.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise intolerance in heart failure (HF) may be due to inadequate vasodilation, augmented vasoconstriction, and/or altered muscle metabolic responses that lead to fatigue. METHODS AND RESULTS: Vascular and metabolic responses to rhythmic forearm exercise were tested in 9 HF patients and 9 control subjects (CTL) during 2 protocols designed to examine the effect of HF on the time course of oxygen delivery versus uptake (protocol 1) and on vasoconstriction during exercise with 50 mm Hg pressure about the forearm to evoke a metaboreflex (protocol 2). In protocol 1, venous lactate and H+ were greater at 4 minutes of exercise in HF versus CTL (P<0.05) despite similar blood flow and oxygen uptake responses. In protocol 2, mean arterial pressure increased similarly in each group during ischemic exercise. In CTL, forearm blood flow and vascular conductance were similar at the end of ischemic and ambient exercise. In HF, forearm blood flow and vascular conductance were reduced during ischemic exercise compared with the ambient trial. CONCLUSIONS: Intrinsic differences in skeletal muscle metabolism, not vasodilatory dynamics, must account for the augmented glycolytic metabolic responses to moderate-intensity exercise in class II and III HF. The inability to increase forearm vascular conductance during ischemic handgrip exercise, despite a normal pressor response, suggests that enhanced vasoconstriction of strenuously exercising skeletal muscle contributes to exertional fatigue in HF.

  17. Blood flow dynamics in heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, J. K.; Naylor, H. L.; Hogeman, C. S.; Sinoway, L. I.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise intolerance in heart failure (HF) may be due to inadequate vasodilation, augmented vasoconstriction, and/or altered muscle metabolic responses that lead to fatigue. METHODS AND RESULTS: Vascular and metabolic responses to rhythmic forearm exercise were tested in 9 HF patients and 9 control subjects (CTL) during 2 protocols designed to examine the effect of HF on the time course of oxygen delivery versus uptake (protocol 1) and on vasoconstriction during exercise with 50 mm Hg pressure about the forearm to evoke a metaboreflex (protocol 2). In protocol 1, venous lactate and H+ were greater at 4 minutes of exercise in HF versus CTL (P<0.05) despite similar blood flow and oxygen uptake responses. In protocol 2, mean arterial pressure increased similarly in each group during ischemic exercise. In CTL, forearm blood flow and vascular conductance were similar at the end of ischemic and ambient exercise. In HF, forearm blood flow and vascular conductance were reduced during ischemic exercise compared with the ambient trial. CONCLUSIONS: Intrinsic differences in skeletal muscle metabolism, not vasodilatory dynamics, must account for the augmented glycolytic metabolic responses to moderate-intensity exercise in class II and III HF. The inability to increase forearm vascular conductance during ischemic handgrip exercise, despite a normal pressor response, suggests that enhanced vasoconstriction of strenuously exercising skeletal muscle contributes to exertional fatigue in HF.

  18. Gender Differences in Ocular Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Schmidl, Doreen; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Popa-Cherecheanu, Alina

    2015-01-01

    Gender medicine has been a major focus of research in recent years. The present review focuses on gender differences in the epidemiology of the most frequent ocular diseases that have been found to be associated with impaired ocular blood flow, such as age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. Data have accumulated indicating that hormones have an important role in these diseases, since there are major differences in the prevalence and incidence between men and pre- and post-menopausal women. Whether this is related to vascular factors is, however, not entirely clear. Interestingly, the current knowledge about differences in ocular vascular parameters between men and women is sparse. Although little data is available, estrogen, progesterone and testosterone are most likely important regulators of blood flow in the retina and choroid, because they are key regulators of vascular tone in other organs. Estrogen seems to play a protective role since it decreases vascular resistance in large ocular vessels. Some studies indicate that hormone therapy is beneficial for ocular vascular disease in post-menopausal women. This evidence is, however, not sufficient to give any recommendation. Generally, remarkably few data are available on the role of sex hormones on ocular blood flow regulation, a topic that requires more attention in the future. PMID:24892919

  19. Computational Analysis of Human Blood Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panta, Yogendra; Marie, Hazel; Harvey, Mark

    2009-11-01

    Fluid flow modeling with commercially available computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software is widely used to visualize and predict physical phenomena related to various biological systems. In this presentation, a typical human aorta model was analyzed assuming the blood flow as laminar with complaint cardiac muscle wall boundaries. FLUENT, a commercially available finite volume software, coupled with Solidworks, a modeling software, was employed for the preprocessing, simulation and postprocessing of all the models.The analysis mainly consists of a fluid-dynamics analysis including a calculation of the velocity field and pressure distribution in the blood and a mechanical analysis of the deformation of the tissue and artery in terms of wall shear stress. A number of other models e.g. T branches, angle shaped were previously analyzed and compared their results for consistency for similar boundary conditions. The velocities, pressures and wall shear stress distributions achieved in all models were as expected given the similar boundary conditions. The three dimensional time dependent analysis of blood flow accounting the effect of body forces with a complaint boundary was also performed.

  20. In vivo lateral blood flow velocity measurement using speckle size estimation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tiantian; Hozan, Mohsen; Bashford, Gregory R

    2014-05-01

    In previous studies, we proposed blood measurement using speckle size estimation, which estimates the lateral component of blood flow within a single image frame based on the observation that the speckle pattern corresponding to blood reflectors (typically red blood cells) stretches (i.e., is "smeared") if blood flow is in the same direction as the electronically controlled transducer line selection in a 2-D image. In this observational study, the clinical viability of ultrasound blood flow velocity measurement using speckle size estimation was investigated and compared with that of conventional spectral Doppler of carotid artery blood flow data collected from human patients in vivo. Ten patients (six male, four female) were recruited. Right carotid artery blood flow data were collected in an interleaved fashion (alternating Doppler and B-mode A-lines) with an Antares Ultrasound Imaging System and transferred to a PC via the Axius Ultrasound Research Interface. The scanning velocity was 77 cm/s, and a 4-s interval of flow data were collected from each subject to cover three to five complete cardiac cycles. Conventional spectral Doppler data were collected simultaneously to compare with estimates made by speckle size estimation. The results indicate that the peak systolic velocities measured with the two methods are comparable (within ±10%) if the scan velocity is greater than or equal to the flow velocity. When scan velocity is slower than peak systolic velocity, the speckle stretch method asymptotes to the scan velocity. Thus, the speckle stretch method is able to accurately measure pure lateral flow, which conventional Doppler cannot do. In addition, an initial comparison of the speckle size estimation and color Doppler methods with respect to computational complexity and data acquisition time indicated potential time savings in blood flow velocity estimation using speckle size estimation. Further studies are needed for calculation of the speckle stretch method

  1. Analysis of Three-dimension Viscous Flow in the Model Axial Compressor Stage K1002L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribunskaia, K.; Kozhukhov, Y. V.

    2017-08-01

    The main investigation subject considered in this paper is axial compressor model stage K1002L. Three simulation models were designed: Scheme 1 – inlet stage model consisting of IGV (Inlet Guide Vane), rotor and diffuser; Scheme 2 – two-stage model: IGV, first-stage rotor, first-stage diffuser, second-stage rotor, EGV (Exit Guide Vane); Scheme 3 – full-round model: IGV, rotor, diffuser. Numerical investigation of the model stage was held for four circumferential velocities at the outer diameter (Uout=125,160,180,210 m/s) within the range of flow coefficient: ϕ = 0.4 – 0.6. The computational domain was created with ANSYS CFX Workbench. According to simulation results, there were constructed aerodynamic characteristic curves of adiabatic efficiency and the adiabatic head coefficient calculated for total parameters were compared with data from the full-scale test received at the Central Boiler and Turbine Institution (CBTI), thus, verification of the calculated data was carried out. Moreover, there were conducted the following studies: comparison of aerodynamic characteristics of the schemes 1, 2; comparison of the sector and full-round models. The analysis and conclusions are supplemented by gas-dynamic method calculation for axial compressor stages.

  2. Numerical and experimental investigation on aerodynamic performance of small axial flow fan with hollow blade root

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhang; Jin, Yingzi; Huashu, Dou; Yuzhen, Jin

    2013-10-01

    To reduce the influence of adverse flow conditions at the fan hub and improve fan aerodynamic performance, a modification of conventional axial fan blades with numerical and experimental investigation is presented. Hollow blade root is manufactured near the hub. The numerical and experimental results show that hollow blade root has some effect on the static performance. Static pressure of the modified fan is generally the same with that of the datum fan, while, the efficiency curve of the modified fan has a different trend with that of the datum fan. The highest efficiency of the modified fan is 10% greater than that of the datum fan. The orthogonal experimental results of fan noise show that hollow blade root is a feasible method of reducing fan noise, and the maximum value of noise reduction is about 2 dB. The factors affecting the noise reduction of hollow blade root are in the order of importance as follows: hollow blade margin, hollow blade height and hollow blade width. The much smoother pressure distribution of the modified fan than that of the datum fan is the main mechanism of noise reduction of hollow blade root. The research results will provide the proof of the parameter optimization and the structure design for high performance and low noise small axial fans.

  3. Correlation of flow probe determinations of common carotid artery blood flow and internal carotid artery blood flow with microsphere determinations of cerebral blood flow in piglets.

    PubMed

    Meadow, W; Rudinsky, B; Raju, T; John, E; Fornell, L; Shankararao, R

    1999-03-01

    We investigated whether blood flow determined by a flow probe situated on one common carotid artery provided an accurate estimation of unilateral cerebral blood flow (CBF) in piglets. In eight anesthetized, mechanically ventilated piglets, blood flow determined by an ultrasonic flow probe placed on the right common carotid artery was correlated with CBF determined by microspheres under two experimental conditions: 1) before ligation of the right external carotid artery with both the right external and internal carotid circulations intact [common carotid artery blood flow (CCABF) condition], and 2) after ligation of the right external carotid artery (ipsilateral to the flow probe) with all residual right-sided carotid artery blood flow directed through the right internal carotid artery [internal carotid artery blood flow (ICABF) condition]. The left carotid artery was not manipulated in any way in either protocol. Independent correlations of unilateral CCABF and ICABF with microsphere-determined unilateral CBF were highly significant over a 5-fold range of CBF induced by hypercarbia or hypoxia (r = 0.94 and 0.92, respectively; both p < 0.001). The slope of the correlation of unilateral CCABF versus unilateral CBF was 1.68 +/- 0.19 (SEM), suggesting that CCABF overestimated CBF by 68%. The slope of the correlation of unilateral ICABF versus unilateral CBF did not differ significantly from unity (1.06 +/- 0.15), and the y intercept did not differ significantly from zero [-1.3 +/- 5.2 (SEM) mL]. Consequently, unilateral ICABF determined by flow probe accurately reflected unilateral CBF determined by microspheres under these conditions. Flow probe assessments of CCABF and ICABF in piglets may provide information about dynamic aspects of vascular control in the cerebral circulation that has heretofore been unavailable.

  4. Flow and axial dispersion in a sinusoidal-walled tube: Effects of inertial and unsteady flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Lambert, Adam; Wood, Brian D.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we consider a sinusoidal-walled tube (a three-dimensional tube with sinusoidally-varying diameter) as a simplified conceptualization of flow in porous media. Direct numerical simulation using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods was used to compute velocity fields by solving the Navier-Stokes equations, and also to numerically solve the volume averaging closure problem, for a range of Reynolds numbers (Re) spanning the low-Re to inertial flow regimes, including one simulation at Re=449 for which unsteady flow was observed. The longitudinal dispersion observed for the flow was computed using a random walk particle tracking method, and this was compared to the longitudinal dispersion predicted from a volume-averaged macroscopic mass balance using the method of volume averaging; the results of the two methods were consistent. Our results are compared to experimental measurements of dispersion in porous media and to previous theoretical results for both the low-Re, Stokes flow regime and for values of Re representing the steady inertial regime. In the steady inertial regime, a power-law increase in the effective longitudinal dispersion (DL) with Re was found, and this is consistent with previous results. This rapid rate of increase is caused by trapping of solute in expansions due to flow separation (eddies). One unsteady (but non-turbulent) flow case (Re=449) was also examined. For this case, the rate of increase of DL with Re was smaller than that observed at lower Re. Velocity fluctuations in this regime lead to increased rates of solute mass transfer between the core flow and separated flow regions, thus diminishing the amount of tailing caused by solute trapping in eddies and thereby reducing longitudinal dispersion. The observed tailing was further explored through analysis of concentration skewness (third moment) and its assymptotic convergence to conventional advection-dispersion behavior (skewness = 0). The method of volume averaging was

  5. Microconfined flow behavior of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Lanotte, Luca; D'Apolito, Rosa; Cassinese, Antonio; Guido, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) perform essential functions in human body, such as gas exchange between blood and tissues, thanks to their ability to deform and flow in the microvascular network. The high RBC deformability is mainly due to the viscoelastic properties of the cell membrane. Since an impaired RBC deformability could be found in some diseases, such as malaria, sickle cell anemia, diabetes and hereditary disorders, there is the need to provide further insight into measurement of RBC deformability in a physiologically relevant flow field. Here, RBCs deformability has been studied in terms of the minimum apparent plasma-layer thickness by using high-speed video microscopy of RBCs flowing in cylindrical glass capillaries. An in vitro systematic microfluidic investigation of RBCs in micro-confined conditions has been performed, resulting in the determination of the RBCs time recovery constant, RBC volume and surface area and RBC membrane shear elastic modulus and surface viscosity. It has been noticed that the deformability of RBCs induces cells aggregation during flow in microcapillaries, allowing the formation of clusters of cells. Overall, our results provide a novel technique to estimate RBC deformability and also RBCs collective behavior, which can be used for the analysis of pathological RBCs, for which reliable quantitative methods are still lacking.

  6. An Experimental Investigation of Steady and Unsteady Flow Field in an Axial Flow Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaccaria, M.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements were made in a large scale single stage turbine facility. Within the nozzle passage measurements were made using a five hole probe, a two-component Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV), and a single sensor hot wire probe. These measurements showed weak secondary flows at midchord, and two secondary flow loss cores at the nozzle exit. The casing vortex loss core was the larger of the two. At the exit radial inward flow was found over the entire passage, and was more pronounced in the wake. Nozzle wake decay was found to be more rapid than for an isolated vane row due to the rotor's presence. The midspan rotor flow field was measured using a two-component LDV. Measurements were made from upstream of the rotor to a chord behind the rotor. The distortion of the nozzle wake as it passed through the rotor blade row was determined. The unsteadiness in the rotor flow field was determined. The decay of the rotor wake was also characterized.

  7. Unsteady Flow in Stenotic Blood Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayz, Vitaliy L.; Devi Williamson, Shobha; Berger, Stanley A.; Saloner, David

    2003-11-01

    Recent studies show that many heart attacks and strokes occur from sudden rupture of partially occluding atherosclerotic plaque rather than total vessel occlusion. Our goal is to understand how the mechanical forces induced by blood flow on specific plaque deposits makes them vulnerable to rupture. Models of severely stenotic carotid bifurcations are created from MR images and grids generated for the flow domains. The three-dimensional, unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in finite-volume form are solved numerically using physiological boundary conditions. During systole a high velocity jet forms at the stenotic throat in one of the branches, and a long recirculation zone is observed downstream of the plaque. During diastole the flow is more stagnant. The flow is highly three-dimensional and unsteady with chaotic streamlines. Whereas flow in healthy arteries is laminar, irregular geometries and sharp changes in vessel diameter of a severely stenotic artery significantly disrupt the flow, with consequences for shear and normal wall stresses at the wall, and important implications for plaque stability. Supported by NIH Grant HL61823

  8. Gender differences in regional cerebral blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Gur, R.E.; Gur, R.C. )

    1990-01-01

    Gender differences have been noted in neurobehavioral studies. The 133xenon inhalation method for measuring regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) can contribute to the understanding of the neural basis of gender differences in brain function. Few studies have examined gender differences in rCBF. In studies of normal subjects, women have higher rates of CBF than men, and this is related to age. Usually by the sixth decade men and women have similar flow rates. Fewer studies on rCBF in schizophrenia have examined sex differences. The pattern of higher flows for females maintains, but its correlates with gender differences in clinical as well as other parameters of brain function remain to be examined.

  9. Lagrangian Coherent Structures in Blood Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadden, Shawn

    2008-11-01

    Knowledge of fluid transport is particularly compelling in understanding the function of cardiovascular processes. Transport of chemicals, cells, and compounds in the vascular system is influenced by local flow structures in large vessels. Local flow features can also induce cell-signaling pathways and biologic response critical to maintaining health or disease progression. Complex vessel geometry, the pulsatile pumping of blood, and low Reynolds number turbulence leads to complex flow features in large vessels. However, we are gaining the ability to study transport in large vessels with unprecedented detail, which is in part allowing us to broaden the ``shear-centric'' view of hemodynamics. In this talk we will describe the application of computational fluid mechanics and the computation of Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) to study transport in various cardiovascular applications. We will discuss some of the challenges of this work and some results of computing LCS in several regions of the vascular system. In collaboration with Charles Taylor, Stanford University.

  10. Spatial fluctuation of regional myocardial blood flows.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, T; Ebata, J; Tsujioka, K; Ogasawara, Y; Kajiya, F

    1997-12-01

    Digital radiography (100 pixels/mm2) combined with the technique of 3H-labeled desmethylimipramine deposition was employed to visualize regional blood flow distributions in rabbit left ventricular myocardium. A fluctuated pattern of myocardial flow and its dependence on arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) was evaluated with the coefficient of variation (CV) computed at each step of coarse-graining; flow images were revisualized by increasing pixel area (PA) step by step from 0.01 to 1 mm2. The CV values decreased with hypoxia at all resolution levels, suggesting that there is a vascular regulatory mechanism for making myocardial perfusion uniform in response to decreased PaO2. In both perfusion states, CV decreased with increasing PA. The relationship between CV and PA fitted the noninteger power law function, implying an apparent fractality of CV.

  11. Experimental validation of tonal noise control from subsonic axial fans using flow control obstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard, Anthony; Berry, Alain; Masson, Patrice; Gervais, Yves

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents the acoustic performance of a novel approach for the passive adaptive control of tonal noise radiated from subsonic fans. Tonal noise originates from non-uniform flow that causes circumferentially varying blade forces and gives rise to a considerably larger radiated dipolar sound at the blade passage frequency (BPF) and its harmonics compared to the tonal noise generated by a uniform flow. The approach presented in this paper uses obstructions in the flow to destructively interfere with the primary tonal noise arising from various flow conditions. The acoustic radiation of the obstructions is first demonstrated experimentally. Indirect on-axis acoustic measurements are used to validate the analytical prediction of the circumferential spectrum of the blade unsteady lift and related indicators generated by the trapezoidal and sinusoidal obstructions presented in Ref. [A. Gérard, A. Berry, P. Masson, Y. Gervais, Modelling of tonal noise control from subsonic axial fans using flow control obstructions, Journal of Sound and Vibration (2008), this issue, doi: 10.1016/j.jsv.2008.09.027.] and also by cylindrical obstructions used in the literature. The directivity and sound power attenuation are then given in free field for the control of the BPF tone generated by rotor/outlet guide vane (OGV) interaction and the control of an amplified BPF tone generated by the rotor/OGV interaction with an added triangular obstruction between two outlet guide vanes to enhance the primary non-uniform flow. Global control was demonstrated in free field, attenuation up to 8.4 dB of the acoustic power at BPF has been measured. Finally, the aerodynamic performances of the automotive fan used in this study are almost not affected by the presence of the control obstruction.

  12. Numerical solution of the inverse problem of determining the middle surface of axial-flow compressor rim blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimasov, Iu. I.; Pankov, S. V.

    1990-08-01

    A method is presented for the design of blade rows for axial-flow turbomachinery based on the blade pressure gradient. Gas flow is calculated by solving circumferentially averaged flow equations for an ideal gas using the Godunov scheme. A procedure for determining the middle surface of a blade is described, and the robustness of the algorithm is evaluated. A blade design with improved integral design characteristics is proposed.

  13. Penn State axial flow turbine facility: Performance and nozzle flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Zaccaria, M.; Itoh, S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to gain a thorough understanding of the flow field in a turbine stage including three-dimensional inviscid and viscid effects, unsteady flow field, rotor-stator interaction effects, unsteady blade pressures, shear stress, and velocity field in rotor passages. The performance of the turbine facility at the design condition is measured and compared with the design distribution. The data on the nozzle vane static pressure and wake characteristics are presented and interpreted. The wakes are found to be highly three-dimensional, with substantial radial inward velocity at most spanwise locations.

  14. Flow structure interaction around an axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine: Experiments and CFD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, S.; Chamorro, L.; Hill, C.; Arndt, R.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2014-12-01

    We carry out large-eddy simulation of turbulent flow past a complete hydrokinetic turbine mounted on the bed of a straight rectangular open channel. The complex turbine geometry, including the rotor and all stationary components, is handled by employing the curvilinear immersed boundary (CURVIB) method [1], and velocity boundary conditions near all solid surfaces are reconstructed using a wall model based on solving the simplified boundary layer equations [2]. In this study we attempt to directly resolve flow-blade interactions without introducing turbine parameterization methods. The computed wake profiles of velocities and turbulent stresses agree well with the experimentally measured values.

  15. A circumferential non-uniform effect model for multistage axial-flow compressor throughflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shiming; Chen, Maozhang

    1992-04-01

    The effects of momentum and energy transportation caused by circumferential nonuniformities of the flow in a multistage axial compressor are studied. A model has been developed to represent the circumferential nonuniform stresses and heat flux. A preliminary comparison between experimental results and the model demonstrates that this model is feasible. The momentum transport effects of circumferential nonuniformities are not distinct, but the energy transport effects of the nonuniformities are quite strong and have the same order of magnitude as the turbulent diffusion. The relative importances of the turbulent diffusion and the nonuniformities depend on compressor configuration, loadings, and spanwise positions in the compressor. Compared with the effects of their mean stream counterparts, the circumferential nonuniform stresses can be sometimes neglected, according to the compressor loadings, configuration, and the calculation tolerances.

  16. Effect of humidity on jet engine axial-flow compressor performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehresman, C. M.; Murthy, S. N. B.; Tsuchiya, T.

    1983-01-01

    Two problems related to the ingestion of humid air into jet engine axial compressors have been studied: (1) the changes in the performance of the compressor in the absence of condensation and (2) the changes in the entry conditions to the compressor when condensation occurs. Regarding the first, the extent of changes are predicted and also measured in the case of a six-stage compressor operated with air-methane gas mixture utilizing the similarities in the thermodynamic properties between water vapor and methane. For the condensation process in an inlet, a model is described that takes into account the presence of micro particulates and the flow field changes in the vicinity of the inlet wall. Finally, the effects of humidity on engine performance are discussed in relation to engine trim and control schemes.

  17. Linear and Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilevered Cylinders in Axial Flow. Part 3: Nonlinear Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semler, C.; Lopes, J. L.; Augu, N.; Païdoussis, M. P.

    2002-08-01

    The dynamics of a cantilevered cylinder in axial flow are explored, by means of the equations derived in Part 2 of this three-part study, and using as numerical tools the finite difference method and AUTO in order to solve the discretized equations. The linear dynamics is considered first, focusing on the effect of some key parameters on stability. Then, the nonlinear dynamics is examined by means of concrete examples with parameters close to those in the experiments of Part 1, by means of bifurcation diagrams, phase-plane plots and Poincaré maps. The agreement between theory and experiment is qualitatively good and quantitatively reasonable, in terms of the critical values for the various bifurcations, and the amplitudes and frequencies of the motions observed.

  18. Foetal placental blood flow in the lamb

    PubMed Central

    Faber, J. Job; Green, Thomas J.

    1972-01-01

    1. Fifteen sheep foetuses of 1·5-5·2 kg body weight were prepared with indwelling arterial and venous catheters for experimentation one to six days later. 2. Unanaesthetized foetuses were found to have mean arterial and central venous blood pressures of 40 ± 1·5 (S.E. of mean) and 2·0 ± 0·3 (S.E. of mean) mm Hg respectively, compared to intra-uterine pressure. Intra-uterine pressure was 16 ± 0·8 (S.E. of mean) mm Hg with respect to atmospheric pressure at mid-uterine level. 3. Mean placental blood flow of the foetuses was 199 ± 20 (S.E. of mean) ml./(min.kg body wt.). Mean cardiac output in eleven of the foetuses was 658 ± 102 (S.E. of mean) ml./(min.kg). 4. Mean foetal and maternal colloid osmotic pressures were 17·5 ± 0·7 (S.E. of mean) and 20·5 ± 0·6 (S.E. of mean) mm Hg respectively at 38° C. 5. Intravenous infusions into six ewes of 1·8 mole of mannitol and 0·4 mole of NaCl resulted in significant increases in foetal plasma osmolarity, sodium, potassium, and haemoglobin concentrations, without detectable transfer of mannitol to the foetal circulation. 6. In the sheep placenta there is osmotic and hydrostatic equilibration of water. As a consequence, there should be an interaction between foetal placental blood flow and foetal water exchange with the maternal circulation. It was concluded that this interaction tends to stabilize foetal placental blood flow. PMID:5039279

  19. Modified Numerical Simulation Model of Blood Flow in Bend

    PubMed Central

    Liu, X; Zhou, X; Hao, X; Sang, X

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The numerical simulation model of blood flow in bend is studied in this paper. The curvature modification is conducted for the blood flow model in bend to obtain the modified blood flow model in bend. The modified model is verified by U tube. By comparing the simulation results with the experimental results obtained by measuring the flow data in U tube, it was found that the modified blood flow model in bend can effectively improve the prediction accuracy of blood flow data affected by the curvature effect. PMID:27398727

  20. An experimental investigation of the flow through an axial-flow pump

    SciTech Connect

    Zierke, W.C.; Straka, W.A.; Taylor, P.D.

    1995-09-01

    The high Reynolds number pump (HIREP) facility at ARL Penn State has been used to perform a low-speed, large-scale experiment of the incompressible flow of water through a two-blade-row turbomachine. The objectives of this experiment were to provide a database for comparison with three-dimensional, turbulent flow computations, to evaluate engineering models, and to improve the physical understanding of many of the phenomena involved in this complex flow field. This summary paper briefly describes the experimental facility, as well as the experimental techniques--such as flow visualization, static-pressure measurements, laser Doppler velocimetry, and both slow- and fast-response pressure probes. Then, proceeding from the inlet to the exit of the pump, the paper presents highlights of experimental measurements and data analysis, giving examples of measured physical phenomena such as endwall boundary layers, separation regions, wakes, and secondary vortical structures. In conclusion, this paper provides a synopsis of a well-controlled, larger scope experiment that should prove helpful to those who wish to use the database.

  1. Clinical results with Jarvik 2000 axial flow left ventricular assist device: Osaka University Experience.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Daisuke; Matsumiya, Goro; Toda, Koichi; Sakaguchi, Taichi; Yoshikawa, Yasushi; Saito, Shunsuke; Matsuda, Hikaru; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate our clinical experience with the Jarvik 2000 axial flow pump (Jarvik Heart, Inc, New York, NY, USA), a miniature axial flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD). The clinical results of eight patients, who underwent LVAD implantation with the Jarvik 2000 (median age 55.0 years; six men) between 2005 and 2010, including two who participated in a multicenter clinical trial in Japan, were reviewed. Two patients underwent LVAD implantation as destination therapy. Four patients underwent Jarvik 2000 implantation via median sternotomy, while the other four underwent implantation via left thoracotomy. There were no major complications during surgery. Four patients were supported for more than 2 years. The longest support duration was 1,618 days. Six patients successfully bridged to heart transplantation after a median 725 days of support. One patient on destination therapy died of a cerebral infarction. The other patient on destination therapy had had the LVAD for 1,618 days. The overall survival rates at 1, 2, and 3 years were 100, 86, and 86%, respectively. The median postoperative serum lactate dehydrogenase level was 860.5 U/L at 1 month, 735 U/L at 6 months, and 692 U/L at 1 year. There were no fatal device-related infections. We found that the Jarvik 2000 with pin bearing could support patients with end-stage heart failure with acceptable mortality and morbidity rates. Further evaluations of the prevalence of thromboembolic and hemolytic events in patients with the new conical-bearing Jarvik 2000 are required.

  2. Regional cerebral blood flow in childhood headache

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, E.S.; Stump, D.A.

    1989-06-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in 16 cranial regions in 23 children and adolescents with frequent headaches using the non-invasive Xenon-133 inhalation technique. Blood flow response to 5% carbon dioxide (CO2) was also determined in 21 patients, while response to 50% oxygen was measured in the two patients with hemoglobinopathy. Included were 10 patients with a clinical diagnosis of migraine, 4 with musculoskeletal headaches, and 3 with features of both types. Also studied were 2 patients with primary thrombocythemia, 2 patients with hemoglobinopathy and headaches, 1 patient with polycythemia, and 1 with headaches following trauma. With two exceptions, rCBF determinations were done during an asymptomatic period. Baseline rCBF values tended to be higher in these young patients than in young adults done in our laboratory. Localized reduction in the expected blood flow surge after CO2 inhalation, most often noted posteriorly, was seen in 8 of the 13 vascular headaches, but in none of the musculoskeletal headache group. Both patients with primary thrombocythemia had normal baseline flow values and altered responsiveness to CO2 similar to that seen in migraineurs; thus, the frequently reported headache and transient neurologic signs with primary thrombocythemia are probably not due to microvascular obstruction as previously suggested. These data support the concept of pediatric migraine as a disorder of vasomotor function and also add to our knowledge of normal rCBF values in younger patients. Demonstration of altered vasomotor reactivity to CO2 could prove helpful in children whose headache is atypical.

  3. Regulation of coronary blood flow during exercise.

    PubMed

    Duncker, Dirk J; Bache, Robert J

    2008-07-01

    Exercise is the most important physiological stimulus for increased myocardial oxygen demand. The requirement of exercising muscle for increased blood flow necessitates an increase in cardiac output that results in increases in the three main determinants of myocardial oxygen demand: heart rate, myocardial contractility, and ventricular work. The approximately sixfold increase in oxygen demands of the left ventricle during heavy exercise is met principally by augmenting coronary blood flow (~5-fold), as hemoglobin concentration and oxygen extraction (which is already 70-80% at rest) increase only modestly in most species. In contrast, in the right ventricle, oxygen extraction is lower at rest and increases substantially during exercise, similar to skeletal muscle, suggesting fundamental differences in blood flow regulation between these two cardiac chambers. The increase in heart rate also increases the relative time spent in systole, thereby increasing the net extravascular compressive forces acting on the microvasculature within the wall of the left ventricle, in particular in its subendocardial layers. Hence, appropriate adjustment of coronary vascular resistance is critical for the cardiac response to exercise. Coronary resistance vessel tone results from the culmination of myriad vasodilator and vasoconstrictors influences, including neurohormones and endothelial and myocardial factors. Unraveling of the integrative mechanisms controlling coronary vasodilation in response to exercise has been difficult, in part due to the redundancies in coronary vasomotor control and differences between animal species. Exercise training is associated with adaptations in the coronary microvasculature including increased arteriolar densities and/or diameters, which provide a morphometric basis for the observed increase in peak coronary blood flow rates in exercise-trained animals. In larger animals trained by treadmill exercise, the formation of new capillaries maintains

  4. An experimental investigation of the generation and consequences of acoustic waves in an axial flow compressor Large axial spacings between blade rows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, R.; Stoneman, S. A. T.

    1985-03-01

    The excitation of acoustic waves by vortex shedding from the inlet guide vanes in the annulus of a single-stage, low-speed axial-flow compressor test rig is investigated experimentally, in an effort to examine the assumptions made in the study of Parker (1984) and to provide data for mathematical models of these phenomena. The experimental setup and the transducers used to measure the operating and acoustic parameters are described in detail and illustrated with photographs and drawings, and the results are presented graphically. It is found that each mode excited can be associated with several excitation frequencies of the rotor blades, indicating forced blade vibration due to acoustic resonances.

  5. Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of a 4000-Pound-Thrust Axial-Flow Turbojet Engine. 3; Performance Characteristics with the High-Flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, William A.; Golladay, Richard L.

    1948-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted to determine the performance of a 4000-pound-thrust axial-flow turbojet engine with a high flow compressor. Pressure altitudes included 5000 to 40000 feet with ram pressure ratios from 1.00 to 1.82. Altitudes included 20000 to 40000 feet and ram pressure ratios from 1.09 to 1.75. A comparison is made between engine performance with high flow and low flow compressors.

  6. Investigation of boundary layer and turbulence characteristics inside the passages of an axial flow inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anand, A.; Gorton, C.; Lakshminarayana, B.; Yamaoka, H.

    1973-01-01

    A study of the boundary layer and turbulence characteristics inside the passages of an axial flow inducer is reported. The first part deals with the analytical and experimental investigation of the boundary layer characteristics in a four bladed flat plate inducer passage operated with no throttle. An approximate analysis for the prediction of radial and chordwise velocity profiles across the passage is carried out. The momentum integral technique is used to predict the gross properties of the boundary layer. Equations are given for the exact analysis of the turbulent boundary layer characteristics using the turbulent field method. Detailed measurement of boundary layer profiles, limiting streamline angle and skin friction stress on the rotating blade is also reported. Part two of this report deals with the prediction of the flow as well as blade static pressure measurements in a three bladed inducer with cambered blades operated at a flow coefficient of 0.065. In addition, the mean velocity and turbulence measurements carried out inside the passage using a rotating triaxial probe is reported.

  7. Hydrodynamics and sediment transport in a meandering channel with a model axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Craig; Kozarek, Jessica; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Guala, Michele

    2016-02-01

    An investigation into the interactions between a model axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine (rotor diameter, dT = 0.15 m) and the complex hydrodynamics and sediment transport processes within a meandering channel was carried out in the Outdoor StreamLab research facility at the University of Minnesota St. Anthony Falls Laboratory. This field-scale meandering stream with bulk flow and sediment discharge control provided a location for high spatiotemporally resolved measurements of bed and water surface elevations around the model turbine. The device was installed within an asymmetric, erodible channel cross section under migrating bed form and fixed outer bank conditions. A comparative analysis between velocity and topographic measurements, with and without the turbine installed, highlights the local and nonlocal features of the turbine-induced scour and deposition patterns. In particular, it shows how the cross-section geometry changes, how the bed form characteristics are altered, and how the mean flow field is distorted both upstream and downstream of the turbine. We further compare and discuss how current energy conversion deployments in meander regions would result in different interactions between the turbine operation and the local and nonlocal bathymetry compared to straight channels.

  8. Novel method and apparatus for controlling aerodynamic performance of an operating axial-flow fluid machine

    SciTech Connect

    Langebrake, C.O.

    1980-07-11

    This invention is an improved method and arrangement for controlling the aerodynamic performance of an axial-flow fluid machine during its operation. In one form of the invention, the improved control is effected by providing the machine with at least one annular row of tandem airfoils, each consisting of a trailing vane and a fixed leading vane. The trailing vane and leading vane of the typical airfoil cooperatively define a gap whose width affects the boundary-layer flow over the airfoil and thus the gas-exist angle of the mainstream flow leaving the airfoil. The trailing vanes are affixed to a ring which is mounted for independent, arcuate movement about the axis of rotor rotation, so as to translate the trailing vanes circumferentially to alter the widths of their associated gaps. External means are provided for adjusting the position of the ring during operation of the machine in order to vary the gas-exist angles for the row of tandem airfoils and thereby control selected operating characteristics of the machine, such as suction volume or compression ratio.

  9. On the Theoretical Calculation of the Stability Line of an Axial-flow Compressor Stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, Efrén M.

    2011-12-01

    Recently, an analytical model to calculate the stability of an axial-flow compressor rotor has been presented in the scientific literature. The range of validity of that theoretical characterization was supported by several lemmas and theorems. One of the main results was the definition of a dimensionless coefficient for determining the location of the stability line in the rotor map. In this work the mathematical structure of that solution is studied. As a result of this detailed study, a new stability theorem and a new stability coefficient are obtained. This stability coefficient is an improvement of the previous one since it is physically and mathematically well defined in all the operational points of the compressor map. As a consequence, the new model is able to capture the stall inception for rotors and stators as well as the full characteristic curve (pressure rise versus mass flow rate) including rotating stall and possibly reverse flow. It is proved, as a consequence of the restriction imposed by the Stability Theorem, that each local component (rotor or stator) has its own instability point and its own post-stall characteristic curve. This theoretical criterion for predicting the averaged characteristic curve is in good accord with the experimental data. The stability coefficient is also verified for a compressor stage. Finally, the model is shown to provide an adequate quantitative and qualitative description of the averaged stall line giving a physical explanation of the mechanism involved in the instable region of the compressor map.

  10. Algebraic stress model for axial flow in a bare rod-bundle

    SciTech Connect

    de Lemos, M.J.S.

    1987-01-01

    The problem of predicting transport properties for momentum and heat across the boundaries of interconnected channels has been the subject of many investigations. In the particular case of axial flow through rod-bundles, transport coefficients for channel faces aligned with rod centers are known to be considerably higher than those calculated by simple isotropic theories. And yet, it was been found that secondary flows play only a minor role in this overall transport, being turbulence highly enhanced across that hypothetical surface. In order to numerically predict the correct amount of the quantity being transported, the approach taken by many investigators was then to artificially increase the diffusion coefficient obtained via a simple isopropic theory (usually the standard k-epsilon model) and numerically match the correct experimentally observed mixing rates. The present paper reports an attempt to describe the turbulent stresses by means of an Algebraic Stress Model for turbulence. Relative turbulent kinetic energy distribution in all three directions are presented and compared with experiments in a square lattice. The strong directional dependence of transport terms are then obtained via a model for the Reynolds stresses. The results identify a need for a better representation of the mean-flow field part of the pressure-strain correlation term.

  11. A computational study of the interaction noise from a small axial-flow fan.

    PubMed

    Lu, H Z; Huang, Lixi; So, R M C; Wang, J

    2007-09-01

    Small axial-flow fans used for computer cooling and many other appliances feature a rotor driven by a downstream motor held by several cylindrical struts. This study focuses on the aerodynamic mechanism of rotor-strut interaction for an isolated fan. The three-dimensional, unsteady flow field is calculated using FLUENT, and the sound radiation predicted by acoustic analogy is compared with measurement data. Striking differences are found between the pressure oscillations in various parts of the structural surfaces during an interaction event. The suction surface of the blade experiences a sudden increase in pressure when the blade trailing edge sweeps past a strut, while the process of pressure decrease on the pressure side of the blade is rather gradual during the interaction. The contribution of the latter towards the total thrust force on the structure is cancelled out significantly by that on the strut. In terms of the acoustic contributions from the rotor and strut, the upstream rotor dominates and this feature differs from the usual rotor-stator interaction acoustics in which the downstream part is responsible for most of the noise. It is therefore argued that the dominant interaction mechanism is potential flow in nature.

  12. Development of an axial flow ventricular assist device: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mizuguchi, K; Damm, G; Benkowsky, R; Aber, G; Bacak, J; Svjkovsky, P; Glueck, J; Takatani, S; Nosé, Y; Noon, G P

    1995-07-01

    A collaborative effort between Baylor College of Medicine and NASA/Johnson Space Center is underway to develop an axial flow ventricular assist device (VAD). We evaluated inducer/impeller component designs in a series of in vitro hemolysis tests. As a result of computational fluid dynamic analysis, a flow inducer was added to the front of the pump impeller. According to the surface pressure distribution, the flow inducer blades were connected to the impeller long blades. This modification eliminated high negative pressure areas at the leading edge of the impeller. Comparative studies were performed between inducer blade sections that flowed smoothly into the impeller blades (continuous blades) and those that formed discrete separate pumping sections (discontinuous blades). The inducer/impeller with continuous blades showed significantly (p < 0.003) lower hemolysis with a normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) of 0.018 +/- 0.007 g/100 L (n = 3), compared with the discontinuous model, which demonstrated an NIH of 0.050 +/- 0.007 g/100 L (n = 3). The continuous blade model was evaluated in vivo for 2 days with no problems. One of the pumps evaluated ran for 5 days in vivo although thrombus formation was recognized on the flow straightener and the inducer/impeller. As a result of this study, the pump material was changed from polyether polyurethane to polycarbonate. The fabrication method was also changed to a computer numerically controlled (CNC) milling process with a final vapor polish. These changes resulted in an NIH of 0.0029 +/- 0.0009 g/100 L (n = 4), which is a significant (p < .0001) value 6 times less than that of the previous model.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Modeling of the double leakage and leakage spillage flows in axial flow compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Hui; Yu, Xianjun; Liu, Baojie

    2014-04-01

    A model to predict the double leakage and tip leakage leading edge spillage flows was developed. This model was combined by a TLV trajectory model and a TLV diameter model and formed as a function of compressor one-dimensional design parameters, i.e. the compressor massflow coefficient, ϕ and compressor loading coefficient, Ψ, and some critical blade geometrical parameters, i.e. blade solidity, σ, stagger angle, β S , blade chord length, C, and blade pitch length, S. By using this model, the double leakage and tip leakage leading edge spillage flow could be predicted even at the compressor preliminary design process. Considering the leading edge spillage flow usually indicates the inception of spike-type stall, i.e. the compressor is a tip critical design, this model could also be used as a tool to choose the critical design parameters for designers. At last, some experimental data from literature was used to validate the model and the results proved that the model was reliable.

  14. Control of Meridional Flow in Circular Cylinders by a Travelling Axial Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Ramachandran, N.; Volz, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    Convective flow in a Bridgman or float zone configuration significantly affects the interface shape and segregation phenomena. While the primary causative factor for this flow is buoyancy induced convection in an enclosed Bridgman melt, the presence of a free surface gives rise to surface tension driven flows in the floating zone processing of melts. It is of interest to curtail these flows in order to realize near quiescent growth conditions that have shown to result in crystals with good longitudinal and radial homogeneity and thereby of better overall quality. While buoyancy effects can be reduced by careful processing in a low gravity (space) environment, the reduction of Marangoni flows due to surface tension variations is not that straight forward. Attempts have been made with some limited success with the use of external fields to affect the melt thermo-fluid behavior. The use of a static magnetic field that reduces convective contamination through the effects of a non-intrusively induced, dissipative Lorentz force in an electrically conducting melt is one such approach. Experiments have shown that axial fields of the order of 5 Tesla can significantly eliminate convection and yield close to diffusion limited crystal growth conditions. The generation and use of such high magnetic fields require substantial hardware and incur significant costs for its operation. Lately, the use of rotating magnetic fields has been tested in semiconductor crystal growth. The method is fairly well known and commonly used in metal processing but its adaptation to crystal growth of semiconductors is fairly recent. The elegance of the technique rests in its low power requirement (typically 10-20 milli-Tesla at 50-400 Hz) and its efficacy in curtailing deleterious temperature fluctuations in the melt. A rotating magnetic field imposes a rotational force and thereby induces a circulation within the melt that tends to dominate other sporadic convective effects. Thus a known low level

  15. Integrative regulation of human brain blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Willie, Christopher K; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh; Fisher, Joseph A; Ainslie, Philip N

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we review mechanisms regulating cerebral blood flow (CBF), with specific focus on humans. We revisit important concepts from the older literature and describe the interaction of various mechanisms of cerebrovascular control. We amalgamate this broad scope of information into a brief review, rather than detailing any one mechanism or area of research. The relationship between regulatory mechanisms is emphasized, but the following three broad categories of control are explicated: (1) the effect of blood gases and neuronal metabolism on CBF; (2) buffering of CBF with changes in blood pressure, termed cerebral autoregulation; and (3) the role of the autonomic nervous system in CBF regulation. With respect to these control mechanisms, we provide evidence against several canonized paradigms of CBF control. Specifically, we corroborate the following four key theses: (1) that cerebral autoregulation does not maintain constant perfusion through a mean arterial pressure range of 60–150 mmHg; (2) that there is important stimulatory synergism and regulatory interdependence of arterial blood gases and blood pressure on CBF regulation; (3) that cerebral autoregulation and cerebrovascular sensitivity to changes in arterial blood gases are not modulated solely at the pial arterioles; and (4) that neurogenic control of the cerebral vasculature is an important player in autoregulatory function and, crucially, acts to buffer surges in perfusion pressure. Finally, we summarize the state of our knowledge with respect to these areas, outline important gaps in the literature and suggest avenues for future research. PMID:24396059

  16. Occasional presence of herpes viruses in synovial fluid and blood from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Rubén; Ordoñez, Graciela; Vázquez-Mellado, Janitzia; Pineda, Benjamín; Sotelo, Julio

    2015-10-01

    Viral agents have been suspected as participants of immune-mediated disorders. In the case of rheumatic diseases, the synovial joint cavity represents a secluded area of inflammation which could harbor etiological agents. We analyzed by polymerase chain reaction the possible presence of DNA from various herpes viruses in blood and synovial fluid from patients with either rheumatoid arthritis (n = 18), axial spondyloarthritis (n = 11), or osteoarthritis (n = 8). Relevant findings were as follows: DNA from varicella zoster virus was found in synovial fluid but not in blood mononuclear cells from 33 % of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and in 45 % of patients with axial spondyloarthritis but not in patients with osteoarthritis. Also, DNA from herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 was found both in the blood and in the synovial fluid from 33 % of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Our results indicate the occasional presence of DNA from herpes viruses in patients with rheumatoid arthritis or with axial spondyloarthritis. However, these findings might represent a parallel epiphenomenon of viral activation associated either with immunosuppressive therapy or with primary immune disturbances, rather than the etiological participation of herpes viruses in these disorders.

  17. A simple spanwise mixing model for turbulent diffusion and secondary flows in multistage axial-flow compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shiming; Chen, Maozhang

    1992-10-01

    Three kinds of coefficients are defined and introduced into the basic equations for meridional throughflow fields in multistage axial-flow compressors deduced in the paper, which describes different kinds of spanwise mixing mechanism in a unified form. Then, a novel much simpler equation system is obtained without any unknown correlation terms included. It has been shown that these coefficients involve the full information of all the kinds of mixing mechanism. This novel equation system not only unifies the two analytical models for meridional throughflow with mixing, which were presented by Adkins and Smith (1981) and Gallimore and Cumpsty (1986), respectively, but also makes the computations for multistage machines much easier. The calculations of the flow through multistage machines have been made by incorporating the new model into a streamline curvature throughflow calculation method. The agreement of the calculation results with experimental data has been improved. It is believed that this simpler equation system can be applied to the flows not only in subsonic compressors, but also in transonic and supersonic compressors, provided that a more appropriate model is proposed for the coefficients.

  18. The Role of Blood Flow and Blood Flow Modifiers in Clinical Hyperthermia Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olch, Arthur Jacob

    A quantitative assessment of the effect of localized magnetic-loop hyperthermia on blood flow was performed on 12 patients (19 tumor studies) using the Xenon-133 clearance method. After it was discovered that blood flow in most of the tumors increased in response to needle injection, a physiologically based, one compartment model was developed that included both a hyperemic (transient) and a steady state component. In the tumors of six patients, increases in blood flow induced by heat were also observed. The same model was used to describe the measured clearance data for both types of hyperemic response. The ability of tumor vessels to respond dynamically to stress and the degree of response may be predictive of tumor heating efficiency and subsequent therapeutic response. Many tumors treated by hyperthermia, therefore, do not reach therapeutic temperatures (42(DEGREES)C). One explanation for this may be that some tumors react to thermal stress in a manner similar to normal tissues; i.e., they increase blood flow during hyperthermia in order to dissipate heat. Higher temperatures might be achieved in these heat-resistant tumors by administering vasoconstrictive agents in an effort to reduce blood flow. In the second part of this research study, the extent to which pharmacologic inhibition of local blood flow might allow higher temperatures to develop in normal muscles exposed to localized radiofrequency hyperthermia was determined. It was found that the local muscle temperature rise could be increased by at least 90% in dogs and rabbits with the use of a local vasoconstrictive drug.

  19. Thermoregulatory control of finger blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenger, C. B.; Roberts, M. F.; Nadel, E. R.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.

    1975-01-01

    In the present experiment, exercise was used to vary internal temperature and ambient air heat control was used to vary skin temperature. Finger temperature was fixed at about 35.7 C. Esophageal temperature was measured with a thermocouple at the level of the left atrium, and mean skin temperature was calculated from a weighted mean of thermocouple temperatures at different skin sites. Finger blood flow was measured by electrocapacitance plethysmography. An equation in these quantities is given which accounts for the data garnered.

  20. Thermoregulatory control of finger blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenger, C. B.; Roberts, M. F.; Nadel, E. R.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.

    1975-01-01

    In the present experiment, exercise was used to vary internal temperature and ambient air heat control was used to vary skin temperature. Finger temperature was fixed at about 35.7 C. Esophageal temperature was measured with a thermocouple at the level of the left atrium, and mean skin temperature was calculated from a weighted mean of thermocouple temperatures at different skin sites. Finger blood flow was measured by electrocapacitance plethysmography. An equation in these quantities is given which accounts for the data garnered.

  1. Absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Manabe, Osamu; Tamaki, Nagara

    2016-07-21

    With the increasing availability of positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging, the absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) has become popular in clinical settings. Quantitative MBF provides an important additional diagnostic or prognostic information over conventional visual assessment. The success of MBF quantification using PET/computed tomography (CT) has increased the demand for this quantitative diagnostic approach to be more accessible. In this regard, MBF quantification approaches have been developed using several other diagnostic imaging modalities including single-photon emission computed tomography, CT, and cardiac magnetic resonance. This review will address the clinical aspects of PET MBF quantification and the new approaches to MBF quantification.

  2. Cerebral blood flow in humans following resuscitation from cardiac arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Cohan, S.L.; Mun, S.K.; Petite, J.; Correia, J.; Tavelra Da Silva, A.T.; Waldhorn, R.E.

    1989-06-01

    Cerebral blood flow was measured by xenon-133 washout in 13 patients 6-46 hours after being resuscitated from cardiac arrest. Patients regaining consciousness had relatively normal cerebral blood flow before regaining consciousness, but all patients who died without regaining consciousness had increased cerebral blood flow that appeared within 24 hours after resuscitation (except in one patient in whom the first measurement was delayed until 28 hours after resuscitation, by which time cerebral blood flow was increased). The cause of the delayed-onset increase in cerebral blood flow is not known, but the increase may have adverse effects on brain function and may indicate the onset of irreversible brain damage.

  3. Research on the Optimum Clocking Position in Axial-Flow Turbomachinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Jian, W.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, the deflected circumferential distance of wake related to some aerodynamic and geometrical parameters was studied to determine the optimum clocking position in axial-flow turbomachinery. A predicting method on how to calculate the deflected circumferential distance of the wake was also put forward. To verify this method, a 2-D time-accurate, viscous flow solver had been used to analyze unsteady flow associated with different clocking positions. A 1.5 stage turbine was employed to observe the effects of clocking positions on the machine performance and tend to find out the optimum clocking position. It shows that the error of the optimum clocking position between the simulation result from CFD and the result from the predicting method is only 0.361%. In fact, there are three assumptions implied in the predicting method, and their rationality has been understood and explained one by one through analyzing machine efficiency, instantaneous entropy contours and viscous stress on the surface of the stator suction side. In order to get further confirmation, the method was also used in the case of a 1.5 stage compressor and the error between the predicted position and the maximum efficiency position obtained from flow field simulation is as much as 1.2%. Furthermore, based on numerical simulation of a 2.5 stage turbine, it is found that clocking positions of the first stator row have little effect on the incoming wake and free stream turbulence of the third stator. This conclusion should be helpful and beneficial to the designs of the multistage turbomachinery, in which clocking effect has been fully utilized.

  4. Non-Newtonian effects of blood flow on hemodynamics in distal vascular graft anastomoses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Lu, Xi-Yun; Wang, Wen

    2006-01-01

    Non-Newtonian fluid flow in a stenosed coronary bypass is investigated numerically using the Carreau-Yasuda model for the shear thinning behavior of the blood. End-to-side coronary bypass anastomosis is considered in a simplified model geometry where the host coronary artery has a 75% severity stenosis. Different locations of the bypass graft to the stenosis and different flow rates in the graft and in the host artery are studied. Particular attention is given to the non-Newtonian effect of the blood on the primary and secondary flow patterns in the host coronary artery and the wall shear stress (WSS) distribution there. Interaction between the jet flow from the stenosed artery and the flow from the graft is simulated by solving the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equation coupled with the non-Newtonian constitutive model. Results for the non-Newtonian flow, the Newtonian flow and the rescaled Newtonian flow are presented. Significant differences in axial velocity profiles, secondary flow streamlines and WSS between the non-Newtonian and Newtonian fluid flows are revealed. However, reasonable agreement between the non-Newtonian and the rescaled Newtonian flows is found. Results from this study support the view that the residual flow in a partially occluded coronary artery interacts with flow in the bypass graft and may have significant hemodynamic effects in the host vessel downstream of the graft. Non-Newtonian property of the blood alters the flow pattern and WSS distribution and is an important factor to be considered in simulating hemodynamic effects of blood flow in arterial bypass grafts.

  5. Parametric modeling and stagger angle optimization of an axial flow fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. X.; Zhang, C. H.; Liu, Y.; Y Zheng, S.

    2013-12-01

    Axial flow fans are widely used in every field of social production. Improving their efficiency is a sustained and urgent demand of domestic industry. The optimization of stagger angle is an important method to improve fan performance. Parametric modeling and calculation process automation are realized in this paper to improve optimization efficiency. Geometric modeling and mesh division are parameterized based on GAMBIT. Parameter setting and flow field calculation are completed in the batch mode of FLUENT. A control program is developed in Visual C++ to dominate the data exchange of mentioned software. It also extracts calculation results for optimization algorithm module (provided by Matlab) to generate directive optimization control parameters, which as feedback are transferred upwards to modeling module. The center line of the blade airfoil, based on CLARK y profile, is constructed by non-constant circulation and triangle discharge method. Stagger angles of six airfoil sections are optimized, to reduce the influence of inlet shock loss as well as gas leak in blade tip clearance and hub resistance at blade root. Finally an optimal solution is obtained, which meets the total pressure requirement under given conditions and improves total pressure efficiency by about 6%.

  6. Acoustic Characterization of Axial Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device Operation In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Yost, Gardner L; Royston, Thomas J; Bhat, Geetha; Tatooles, Antone J

    2016-01-01

    The use of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs), implantable pumps used to supplement cardiac output, has become an increasingly common and effective treatment for advanced heart failure. Although modern continuous-flow LVADs improve quality of life and survival more than medical management of heart failure, device malfunction remains a common concern. Improved noninvasive methods for assessment of LVAD function are needed to detect device complications. An electronic stethoscope was used to record sounds from the HeartMate II axial flow pump in vitro and in vivo. The data were then uploaded to a computer and analyzed using two types of acoustic analysis software. Left ventricular assist device acoustics were quantified and were related to pump speed, acoustic environment, and inflow and outflow graft patency. Peak frequency values measured in vivo were found to correlate strongly with both predicted values and in vitro measurements (r > 0.999). Plots of the area under the acoustic spectrum curve, obtained by integrating over 50 Hz increments, showed strong correlations between in vivo and in vitro measurements (r > 0.966). Device thrombosis was found to be associated with reduced LVAD acoustic amplitude in two patients who underwent surgical device exchange.

  7. Axial flow cyclone for segregation and collection of ultrafine particles: theoretical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yu-Du; Chein, Hung Min; Chen, Tzu Ming; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn

    2005-03-01

    In this study, an axial flow cyclone was designed, fabricated, and evaluated at different conditions of air flow rates (Q0) and low-pressure environments (P), especially for the segregation and collection of ultrafine particles. An evaporation/condensation type of aerosol generation system consisting of tube furnace and mixing chamber was employed to produce test aerosols. The test aerosol was then classified by a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and number concentration was measured by a condensation nuclei counter (CNC) and an electrometer upstream and downstream of the cyclone, respectively. The s-shaped curve of the collection efficiency in submicron particle size range was obtained to be similar to the traditional cyclone found in the literatures when the particles were largerthan 40 nm at Q0 = 1.07, 0.455 L(STP)/min, and P = 4.8-500 Torr. The curve was found to be fitted very well by a semiempirical equation described in this paper. For particles smaller than 40 nm, however, the collection efficiency was unusually increased as the particle diameter was decreased due to the fact that the diffusion deposition becomes the dominant collection mechanism in the low-pressure conditions. A model composed of centrifugal force and diffusion deposition is presented and used to fit the experimental data. The cyclone was demonstrated to separate and collect ultrafine particles effectively in the tested vacuum conditions.

  8. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Hypersonic Flow over a Cylinder Using Axial- and Transverse-Oriented Magnetic Dipoles

    PubMed Central

    Guarendi, Andrew N.; Chandy, Abhilash J.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hypersonic flow over a cylinder are presented for axial- and transverse-oriented dipoles with different strengths. ANSYS CFX is used to carry out calculations for steady, laminar flows at a Mach number of 6.1, with a model for electrical conductivity as a function of temperature and pressure. The low magnetic Reynolds number (≪1) calculated based on the velocity and length scales in this problem justifies the quasistatic approximation, which assumes negligible effect of velocity on magnetic fields. Therefore, the governing equations employed in the simulations are the compressible Navier-Stokes and the energy equations with MHD-related source terms such as Lorentz force and Joule dissipation. The results demonstrate the ability of the magnetic field to affect the flowfield around the cylinder, which results in an increase in shock stand-off distance and reduction in overall temperature. Also, it is observed that there is a noticeable decrease in drag with the addition of the magnetic field. PMID:24307870

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of hypersonic flow over a cylinder using axial- and transverse-oriented magnetic dipoles.

    PubMed

    Guarendi, Andrew N; Chandy, Abhilash J

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hypersonic flow over a cylinder are presented for axial- and transverse-oriented dipoles with different strengths. ANSYS CFX is used to carry out calculations for steady, laminar flows at a Mach number of 6.1, with a model for electrical conductivity as a function of temperature and pressure. The low magnetic Reynolds number (<1) calculated based on the velocity and length scales in this problem justifies the quasistatic approximation, which assumes negligible effect of velocity on magnetic fields. Therefore, the governing equations employed in the simulations are the compressible Navier-Stokes and the energy equations with MHD-related source terms such as Lorentz force and Joule dissipation. The results demonstrate the ability of the magnetic field to affect the flowfield around the cylinder, which results in an increase in shock stand-off distance and reduction in overall temperature. Also, it is observed that there is a noticeable decrease in drag with the addition of the magnetic field.

  10. Effects of Shrouded Stator Cavity Flows on Multistage Axial Compressor Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellborn, Steven R.; Okiishi, Theodore H.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments were performed on a low-speed multistage axial-flow compressor to assess the effects of shrouded stator cavity flows on aerodynamic performance. Five configurations, which involved changes in seal-tooth leakage rates and/or elimination of the shrouded stator cavities, were tested. Data collected enabled differences in overall individual stage and the third stage blade element performance parameters to be compared. The results show conclusively that seal-tooth leakage ran have a large impact on compressor aerodynamic performance while the presence of the shrouded stator cavities alone seemed to have little influence. Overall performance data revealed that for every 1% increase in the seal-tooth clearance to blade-height ratio the pressure rise dropped up to 3% while efficiency was reduced by 1 to 1.5 points. These observed efficiency penalty slopes are comparable to those commonly reported for rotor and cantilevered stator tip clearance variations. Therefore, it appears that in order to correctly predict overall performance it is equally important to account for the effects of seal-tooth leakage as it is to include the influence of tip clearance flows. Third stage blade element performance data suggested that the performance degradation observed when leakage was increased was brought about in two distinct ways. First, increasing seal-tooth leakage directly spoiled the near hub performance of the stator row in which leakage occurred. Second, the altered stator exit now conditions caused by increased leakage impaired the performance of the next downstream stage by decreasing the work input of the downstream rotor and increasing total pressure loss of the downstream stator. These trends caused downstream stages to progressively perform worse. Other measurements were acquired to determine spatial and temporal flow field variations within the up-and-downstream shrouded stator cavities. Flow within the cavities involved low momentum fluid traveling primarily

  11. Effects of vasoactive stimuli on blood flow to choroid plexus

    SciTech Connect

    Faraci, F.M.; Mayhan, W.G.; Williams, J.K.; Heistad, D.D. )

    1988-02-01

    The goal of this study was to examine effects of vasoactive stimuli on blood flow to choroid plexus. The authors used microspheres to measure blood flow to choroid plexus and cerebrum in anesthetized dogs and rabbits. A critical assumption of the microsphere method is that microspheres do not pass through arteriovenous shunts. Blood flow values obtained with simultaneous injection of 15- and 50-{mu}m microspheres were similar, which suggest that shunting of 15-{mu}m microspheres was minimal. Blood flow to choroid plexus under control conditions was 287 {plus minus} 26 (means {plus minus} SE) ml {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 100 g{sup {minus}1} in dogs and 385 {plus minus} 73 ml {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} 100 g{sup {minus}1} in rabbits. Consecutive measurements under control conditions indicated that values for blood flow are reproducible. Adenosine did not alter blood flow to cerebrum but increased blood flow to choroid plexus two- to threefold in dogs and rabbits. Norepinephrine and phenylephrine did not affect blood flow to choroid plexus and cerebrum but decreased blood flow to choroid plexus by {approx} 50%. The authors suggest that (1) the microsphere method provides reproducible valid measurements of blood flow to the choroid plexus in dogs and rabbits and (2) vasoactive stimuli may have profoundly different effects on blood flow to choroid plexus and cerebrum.

  12. Comparison of locked-rotor and windmilling drag characteristics of an axial-flow-compressor type turbojet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, K R; Huntley, S C; Wilsted, H D

    1952-01-01

    The internal drag of an axial-flow turbojet engine with the rotor locked in place to prevent windmilling and with the engine windmilling was obtained over a range of simulated Mach numbers. The corrected internal drag of the engine with the locked rotor was 210 pounds or only 46 percent of the windmilling drag at a flight Mach number of 0.8.

  13. AXIAL FLOW COMPRESSOR IN THE 8X6 FOOT SUPERSONIC WIND TUNNEL - ELECTRIC MOTORS OF 87,000 HORSEPOWER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1949-01-01

    AXIAL FLOW COMPRESSOR IN THE 8X6 FOOT SUPERSONIC WIND TUNNEL - ELECTRIC MOTORS OF 87,000 HORSEPOWER DRIVE THIS HUGE COMPRESSOR TO PRODUCE 1300 MILE PER HOUR AIRSPEEDS - THE 2 HALVES OF THE 18 FOOT DIAMETER CASING ARE SHOWN OPENED TO EXPOSE THE 7 ROW

  14. Performance and Cavitation Damage of an Axial-Flow Pump in 1500 deg F (1089 K) Liquid Sodium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1969-04-01

    A low-head-rise axial-flow pump was operated in liquid sodium at temperatures to 1500 degrees F ( 1089 K) for 558 hr to investigate pump performance... 1089 K) sodium at 3450 rpm. Post-test blade inspection indicated that there was slight cavitation damage and that the Ni-Cr-base superalloy (Rene

  15. Numerical analysis of head degrade law under cavitation condition of contra-rotating axial flow waterjet pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, D.; Pan, Z. Y.

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the flow-head characteristic curve, the SST turbulence model, homogeneous multiphase model and Rayleigh-Plesset equation were applied to simulate the cavitation characteristics in contra-rotating axial flow waterjet pump under different conditions based on ANSYS CFX software. The distribution of cavity, pressure coefficient of the blade at the design point under different cavitation conditions were obtained. The analysis results of flow field show that the vapour volume distribution on the impeller indicates that the vapour first appears at the leading edge of blade and then extends to the outlet of impeller with the reduction of Net Positive Suction Head Allowance (NPSHA). The present study illustrates that the main reason for the decline of the pump performance is the development of cavitation, and the simulation can truly reflect the cavitation performance of the contra-rotating axial flow waterjet pump.

  16. Influence of aortic blood flow velocity on changes of middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity during isoflurane and sevoflurane anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Holzer, A; Greher, M; Hetz, H; Standhardt, H; Donner, A; Heinzl, H; Zimpfer, M; Illievich, U M

    2001-04-01

    We studied the influence of systemic (aortic) blood flow velocity on changes of cerebral blood flow velocity under isoflurane or sevoflurane anaesthesia. Forty patients (age: isoflurane 24-62 years; sevoflurane 24-61 years; ASA I-III) requiring general anaesthesia undergoing routine spinal surgery were randomly assigned to either group. Cerebral blood flow velocity was measured in the middle cerebral artery by transcranial Doppler sonography (depth: 50-60 mm). Systemic blood flow velocity was determined by transthoracic Doppler sonography at the aortic valve. Heart rate, arterial pressure, arterial oxygen saturation and body temperature were monitored. After standardized anaesthesia induction (propofol, remifentanil, vecuronium) sevoflurane or isoflurane were used as single agent anaesthetics. Cerebral blood flow velocity and systemic blood flow velocity were measured in the awake patient (baseline) and repeated 5 min after reaching a steady state of inspiratory and end-expiratory concentrations of 0.75, 1.00, and 1.25 mean alveolar concentrations of either anaesthetic. To calculate the influence of systemic blood flow velocity on cerebral blood flow velocity, we defined the cerebral-systemic blood flow velocity index (CSvI). CSvI of 100% indicates a 1:1 relationship of changes of cerebral blood flow velocity and systemic blood flow velocity. Isoflurane and sevoflurane reduced both cerebral blood flow velocity and systemic blood flow velocity. The CSvI decreased significantly at all three concentrations vs. 100% (isoflurane/sevoflurane: 0.75 MAC: 85 +/- 25%/81 +/- 23%, 1.0 MAC: 79 +/- 19%/74 +/- 16%, 1.25 MAC: 71 +/- 16%/79 +/- 21%; [mean +/- SD] P = 0.0001). The reduction of the CSvI vs. 100% indicates a direct reduction of cerebral blood flow velocity caused by isoflurane/sevoflurane, independently of systemic blood flow velocity.

  17. Raised intracranial pressure and cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, I. H.; Rowan, J. O.

    1974-01-01

    Pressure changes within the venous outflow tract from the brain were studied in anaesthetized baboons. Segmental vascular resistance changes were also calculated and the results correlated with the changes in cerebral blood flow, measured by the 133Xenon clearance method. Three different methods were used to raise intracranial pressure: cisterna magna infusion, a supratentorial subdural balloon, and an infratentorial subdural balloon. A close correlation was found between the cortical vein pressure and intracranial pressure with all methods of raising intracranial pressure: the overall correlation coefficient was 0·98. In the majority of animals sagittal sinus pressure showed little change through a wide range of intracranial pressure. In three of the six animals in the cisterna magna infusion group, however, sagittal sinus pressure increased to levels approaching the intracranial pressure during the later stages of intracranial hypertension. Jugular venous pressure showed little change with increasing intracranial pressure. The relationship between cerebral prefusion pressure and cerebral blood flow differed according to the method of increasing intracranial pressure. This was due to differing patterns of change in prevenous vascular resistance as venous resistance increased progressively with increasing pressure in all three groups. The present results confirm, therefore, the validity of the current definition of cerebral perfusion pressure—that is, cerebral perfusion pressure is equal to mean arterial pressure minus mean intracranial pressure—by demonstrating that intracranial pressure does represent the effective cerebral venous outflow pressure. Images PMID:4209160

  18. Cerebral blood flow tomography with xenon-133

    SciTech Connect

    Lassen, N.A.

    1985-10-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) can be measured tomographically by inhalation of Xenon-/sup 133/. The calculation is based on taking a sequence of tomograms during the wash-in and wash-out phase of the tracer. Due to the dynamic nature of the process, a highly sensitive and fast moving single photon emission computed tomograph (SPECT) is required. Two brain-dedicated SPECT systems designed for this purpose are mentioned, and the method is described with special reference to the limitations inherent in the soft energy of the 133Xe primary photons. CBF tomography can be used for a multitude of clinical and investigative purposes. This article discusses in particular its use for the selection of patients with carotid occlusion for extracranial/intracranial bypass surgery, for detection of severe arterial spasm after aneurysm bleeding, and for detection of low flow areas during severe migraine attacks. The use of other tracers for CBF tomography using SPECT is summarized with emphasis on the /sup 99m/Tc chelates that freely pass the intact blood-brain barrier. The highly sensitive brain-dedicated SPECT systems described are a prerequisite for achieving high resolution tomograms with such tracers.

  19. Blood flow in compliant arteries: an effective viscoelastic reduced model, numerics, and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Canić, Suncica; Hartley, Craig J; Rosenstrauch, Doreen; Tambaca, Josip; Guidoboni, Giovanna; Mikelić, Andro

    2006-04-01

    The focus of this work is on modeling blood flow in medium-to-large systemic arteries assuming cylindrical geometry, axially symmetric flow, and viscoelasticity of arterial walls. The aim was to develop a reduced model that would capture certain physical phenomena that have been neglected in the derivation of the standard axially symmetric one-dimensional models, while at the same time keeping the numerical simulations fast and simple, utilizing one-dimensional algorithms. The viscous Navier-Stokes equations were used to describe the flow and the linearly viscoelastic membrane equations to model the mechanical properties of arterial walls. Using asymptotic and homogenization theory, a novel closed, "one-and-a-half dimensional" model was obtained. In contrast with the standard one-dimensional model, the new model captures: (1) the viscous dissipation of the fluid, (2) the viscoelastic nature of the blood flow - vessel wall interaction, (3) the hysteresis loop in the viscoelastic arterial walls dynamics, and (4) two-dimensional flow effects to the leading-order accuracy. A numerical solver based on the 1D-Finite Element Method was developed and the numerical simulations were compared with the ultrasound imaging and Doppler flow loop measurements. Less than 3% of difference in the velocity and less than 1% of difference in the maximum diameter was detected, showing excellent agreement between the model and the experiment.

  20. Blood-Flow Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingxia; Cheng, Haiying; Shen, Qiang; Kim, Moon; Thule, Peter M; Olson, Darin E; Pardue, Machelle T; Duong, Timothy Q

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To investigate quantitative basal blood flow, hypercapnia- and hyperoxia-induced blood-flow changes in the retinas of the Royal-College-of-Surgeons (RCS) rats with spontaneous retinal degeneration and to compare with those of normal rat retinas. Methods Experiments were performed on male RCS rats at post-natal day P90 (n=4), P220 (n=5) and age-matched controls at P90 (n=7) and P220 (n=6). Hyperoxic (100% O2) and hypercapnic (5% CO2, 21% O2, balance N2) challenges were used to modulate blood flow. Quantitative baseline blood flow, hypercapnia- and hyperoxia-induced blood-flow changes in the retinas were imaged using continuous arterial-spin-labeling magnetic resonance imaging at 90×90×1500 μm. Results In the normal rat retinas, basal blood flow was 5.5ml/gram/min, significantly higher than those reported in the brain (∼1ml/gram/min). Hyperoxia decreased blood flow due to vasoconstriction and hypercapnia increased blood flow due to vasodilation in the normal retinas. In the RCS rat retinas, basal blood flow was diminished significantly (P<0.05). Interestingly, absolute hyperoxia- and hypercapnia-induced blood-flow changes in the RCS retinas were not statistically different from those in the normal retinas (P>0.05). However, percent changes in blood-flow were significantly larger than in normal retinas due to lower basal blood flow. Conclusion Retinal degeneration markedly reduces basal blood-flow but does not appear to impair vascular reactivity. These data also suggest caution when interpreting the relative stimulus-evoked functional MRI changes in diseased states where basal parameters are significantly perturbed. Quantitative blood-flow MRI may serve as a valuable tool to study the retina without depth limitation. PMID:18952917

  1. Dynamic modeling and identification of an axial flow ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Moscato, Francesco; Danieli, Guido A; Schima, Heinrich

    2009-06-01

    An accurate characterization of the hemodynamic behavior of ventricular assist devices (VADs) is of paramount importance for proper modeling of the heart-pump interaction and the validation of control strategies. This paper describes an advanced test bench, which is able to generate complex hydraulic loads, and a procedure to characterize rotary blood pump performance in a pulsatile environment. Special focus was laid on model parameter identifiability in the frequency domain and the correlation between dynamic and steady-state models. Twelve combinations of different flow/head/speed signals, which covered the clinical VAD working conditions, were generated for the pump characterization. Root mean square error (RMSE) between predicted and measured flow was used to evaluate the VAD model. The found parameters were then validated with broadband random signals. In the experiments the optimization process always successfully converged. Even in the most demanding dynamic conditions the RMSE was 7.4 ml/sec and the absolute error never exceeded 24.9 ml/sec. Validity ranges for the identified VAD model were: flow 0-180 ml/sec; head 0-120 mmHg; speed 7.5-12.5 krpm. In conclusion, a universal test bench and a characterization procedure to describe the hydrodynamic properties of rotary blood pumps were established. For a particular pump, a reliable mathematical model was identified that correctly reproduced the relationship between instantaneous VAD flow, head and impeller speed.

  2. The effect of variable stator on performance of a highly loaded tandem axial flow compressor stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshraghi, Hamzeh; Boroomand, Masoud; Tousi, Abolghasem M.; Fallah, Mohammad Toude; Mohammadi, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Increasing the aerodynamic load on compressor blades helps to obtain a higher pressure ratio in lower rotational speeds. Considering the high aerodynamic load effects and structural concerns in the design process, it is possible to obtain higher pressure ratios compared to conventional compressors. However, it must be noted that imposing higher aerodynamic loads results in higher loss coefficients and deteriorates the overall performance. To avoid the loss increase, the boundary layer quality must be studied carefully over the blade suction surface. Employment of advanced shaped airfoils (like CDAs), slotted blades or other boundary layer control methods has helped the designers to use higher aerodynamic loads on compressor blades. Tandem cascade is a passive boundary layer control method, which is based on using the flow momentum to control the boundary layer on the suction surface and also to avoid the probable separation caused by higher aerodynamic loads. In fact, the front pressure side flow momentum helps to compensate the positive pressure gradient over the aft blade's suction side. Also, in comparison to the single blade stators, tandem variable stators have more degrees of freedom, and this issue increases the possibility of finding enhanced conditions in the compressor off-design performance. In the current study, a 3D design procedure for an axial flow tandem compressor stage has been applied to design a highly loaded stage. Following, this design is numerically investigated using a CFD code and the stage characteristic map is reported. Also, the effect of various stator stagger angles on the compressor performance and especially on the compressor surge margin has been discussed. To validate the CFD method, another known compressor stage is presented and its performance is numerically investigated and the results are compared with available experimental results.

  3. The 1998 eruption of Axial Seamount: New insights on submarine lava flow emplacement from high-resolution mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, W. W.; Clague, D. A.; Embley, R. W.; Perfit, M. R.; Butterfield, D. A.; Caress, D. W.; Paduan, J. B.; Martin, J. F.; Sasnett, P.; Merle, S. G.; Bobbitt, A. M.

    2013-10-01

    Axial Seamount, an active submarine volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge at 46°N, 130°W, erupted in January 1998 along 11 km of its upper south rift zone. We use ship-based multibeam sonar, high-resolution (1 m) bathymetry, sidescan sonar imagery, and submersible dive observations to map four separate 1998 lava flows that were fed from 11 eruptive fissures. These new mapping results give an eruption volume of 31 × 106 m3, 70% of which was in the northern-most flow, 23% in the southern-most flow, and 7% in two smaller flows in between. We introduce the concept of map-scale submarine lava flow morphology (observed at a scale of hundreds of meters, as revealed by the high-resolution bathymetry), and an interpretive model in which two map-scale morphologies are produced by high effusion-rate eruptions: "inflated lobate flows" are formed near eruptive vents, and where they drain downslope more than 0.5-1.0 km, they transition to "inflated pillow flows." These two morphologies are observed on the 1998 lava flows at Axial. A third map-scale flow morphology that was not produced during this eruption, "pillow mounds," is formed by low effusion-rate eruptions in which pillow lava piles up directly over the eruptive vents. Axial Seamount erupted again in April 2011 and there are remarkable similarities between the 1998 and 2011 eruptions, particularly the locations of eruptive vents and lava flow morphologies. Because the 2011 eruption reused most of the same eruptive fissures, 58% of the area of the 1998 lava flows is now covered by 2011 lava.

  4. On deriving lumped models for blood flow and pressure in the systemic arteries.

    PubMed

    Olufsen, Mette S; Nadim, Ali

    2004-06-01

    Windkessel and similar lumped models are often used to represent blood flow and pressure in systemic arteries. The windkessel model was originally developed by Stephen Hales (1733) and Otto Frank (1899) who used it to describe blood flow in the heart. In this paper we start with the onedimensional axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations for time-dependent blood flow in a rigid vessel to derive lumped models relating flow and pressure. This is done through Laplace transform and its inversion via residue theory. Upon keeping contributions from one, two, or more residues, we derive lumped models of successively higher order. We focus on zeroth, first and second order models and relate them to electrical circuit analogs, in which current is equivalent to flow and voltage to pressure. By incorporating effects of compliance through addition of capacitors, windkessel and related lumped models are obtained. Our results show that given the radius of a blood vessel, it is possible to determine the order of the model that would be appropriate for analyzing the flow and pressure in that vessel. For instance, in small rigid vessels ( R < 0.2 cm) it is adequate to use Poiseuille's law to express the relation between flow and pressure, whereas for large vessels it might be necessary to incorporate spatial dependence by using a one-dimensional model accounting for axial variations.

  5. Three-dimensional flow phenomena in a transonic, high-through-flow, axial-flow compressor stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copenhaver, William W.; Hah, Chunill; Puterbaugh, Steven L.

    1992-01-01

    A detailed aerodynamic study of a transonic, high-through-flow, single stage compressor is presented. The compressor stage was comprised of a low-aspect-ratio rotor combined alternately with two different stator designs. Both experimental and numerical studies are conducted to understand the details of the complex flow field present in this stage. Aerodynamic measurements using high-frequency, Kulite pressure transducers and conventional probes are compared with results from a three-dimensional viscous flow analysis. A steady multiple blade row approach is used in the numerical technique to examine the detailed flow structure inside the rotor and the stator passages. The comparisons indicate that many flow field features are correctly captured by viscous flow analysis, and therefore unmeasured phenomena can be studied with some level of confidence.

  6. Modified Beer-Lambert law for blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Wesley B.; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B.; Busch, David R.; Mesquita, Rickson C.; Greenberg, Joel H.; Yodh, A. G.

    2014-01-01

    We develop and validate a Modified Beer-Lambert law for blood flow based on diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) measurements. The new formulation enables blood flow monitoring from temporal intensity autocorrelation function data taken at single or multiple delay-times. Consequentially, the speed of the optical blood flow measurement can be substantially increased. The scheme facilitates blood flow monitoring of highly scattering tissues in geometries wherein light propagation is diffusive or non-diffusive, and it is particularly well-suited for utilization with pressure measurement paradigms that employ differential flow signals to reduce contributions of superficial tissues. PMID:25426330

  7. Modified Beer-Lambert law for blood flow.

    PubMed

    Baker, Wesley B; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B; Busch, David R; Mesquita, Rickson C; Greenberg, Joel H; Yodh, A G

    2014-11-01

    We develop and validate a Modified Beer-Lambert law for blood flow based on diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) measurements. The new formulation enables blood flow monitoring from temporal intensity autocorrelation function data taken at single or multiple delay-times. Consequentially, the speed of the optical blood flow measurement can be substantially increased. The scheme facilitates blood flow monitoring of highly scattering tissues in geometries wherein light propagation is diffusive or non-diffusive, and it is particularly well-suited for utilization with pressure measurement paradigms that employ differential flow signals to reduce contributions of superficial tissues.

  8. Blood-flow magnetic resonance imaging of the retina.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingxia; Cheng, Haiying; Duong, Timothy Q

    2008-02-15

    This study describes a novel MRI application to image basal blood flow, physiologically induced blood-flow changes, and the effects of isoflurane concentration on blood flow in the retina. Continuous arterial-spin-labeling technique with a separate neck coil for spin labeling was used to image blood flow of the rat retina at 90 x 90 x 1500-microm resolution. The average blood flow of the whole retina was 6.3+/-1.0 ml/g/min under 1% isoflurane, consistent with the high blood flow in the retina reported using other techniques. Blood flow is relatively constant along the length of the retina, except it dipped slightly around the optic nerve head and dropped significantly at the distal edges where the retina terminates. Hyperoxia (100% O(2)) decreased blood flow 25+/-6% relative to baseline (air) due to vasoconstriction. Hypercapnia (5% CO(2)+21% O(2)) increased blood flow 16+/-6% due to vasodilation. Increasing isoflurane (a potent vasodilator) concentration to 1.5% increased blood flow to 9.3+/-2.7 ml/g/min. Blood-flow signals were confirmed to be genuine by repeating measurements after the animals were sacrificed in the MRI scanner. This study demonstrates a proof of concept that quantitative blood flow of the retina can be measured using MRI without depth limitation. Blood-flow MRI has the potential to provide unique insights into retinal physiology, serve as an early biomarker for some retinal diseases, and could complement optically based imaging techniques.

  9. Inlet flow test calibration for a small axial compressor rig. Part 2: CFD compared with experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. P.; Prahst, P. S.

    1995-01-01

    An axial compressor test rig has been designed for the operation of small turbomachines. A flow test was run to calibrate and determine the source and magnitudes of the loss mechanisms in the compressor inlet for a highly loaded two-stage axial compressor test. Several flow conditions and inlet guide vane (IGV) angle settings were established, for which detailed surveys were completed. Boundary layer bleed was also provided along the casing of the inlet behind the support struts and ahead of the IGV. Several computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations were made for selected flow conditions established during the test. Good agreement between the CFD and test data were obtained for these test conditions.

  10. A Study of Laminar Compressible Viscous Pipe Flow Accelerated by an Axial Body Force, with Application to Magnetogasdynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, E. Dale

    1961-01-01

    A study is made of the steady laminar flow of a compressible viscous fluid in a circular pipe when the fluid is accelerated by an axial body force. The application of the theory to the magnetofluidmechanics of an electrically conducting gas accelerated by electric and magnetic fields is discussed. Constant viscosity, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity are assumed. Fully developed flow velocity and temperature profiles are shown, and detailed results of the accelerating flow development, including velocity and pressure as functions of distance, are given for the case where the axial body force is constant and for the case where it is a linear function of velocity. From these results are determined the pipe entry length and the pressure difference required.

  11. Performance of NACA Eight-stage Axial-flow Compressor Designed on the Basis of Airfoil Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinnette, John T; Schey, Oscar W; King, J Austin

    1943-01-01

    The NACA has conducted an investigation to determine the performance that can be obtained from a multistage axial-flow compressor based on airfoil research. A theory was developed; an eight-stage axial-flow compressor was designed, constructed, and tested. The performance of the compressor was determined for speeds from 5000 to 14,000 r.p.m with varying air flow at each speed. Most of the tests were made with air at room temperature. The performance was determined in accordance with the Committee's recommended procedure for testing superchargers. The expected performance was obtained, showing that a multistage compressor of high efficiency can be designed by the application of airfoil theory.

  12. Interaction between an axial-flow model hydrokinetic turbine and an erodible channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Craig; Musa, Mirko; Chamorro, Leonardo P.; Guala, Michele

    2013-11-01

    Laboratory experiments were carried out to examine the effect of relatively large-scale bedforms on the performance of a model axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine. The turbine rotor, dT = 0 . 15 m, was attached to a miniature DC motor, and allowed for voltage data acquisition at 200 Hz along with 3D hub-height inflow velocity, Uhub, approximately 7dT upstream of the turbine. Spatio-temporal bed elevations were acquired along three longitudinal sections and at least one transverse transect within the flume providing the temporally-averaged scour and deposition patterns characterizing the turbine near-field region. Turbine-turbine interaction was investigated under aligned configurations in the streamwise direction with variable spacing both in clear water scour and live bed transport conditions. Effects from both migrating bedforms and the upstream turbine were observed in the long-term and short-term voltage fluctuations of the downstream turbine. Combined measurements of inflow velocity, bed topography and turbine voltage were used to obtain joint statistics and correlations, which provided an indication of the variability in environmental exposure and performance that hydrokinetic turbines will encounter in natural erodible rivers.

  13. Effects of model axial-flow hydrokinetic turbines on scour and bedforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, C.; Musa, M.; Chamorro, L. P.; Guala, M.

    2013-12-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed in a straight flume (15m long x 0.9m wide) at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory at the University of Minnesota to investigate local scour caused by 1:33 scale model axial-flow hydrokinetic turbines and their effects on bedform spatial and temporal variability. Spatio-temporal topography measurements provided the evolution of scour and deposition downstream of the turbine(s), including mean local bed deformation and migrating bedform characteristics (i.e. wavelength, amplitude and 2D vs. 3D geometry). Both single and aligned turbine configurations were operated under live bed conditions. Additionally, individual turbine foundation components were monitored for their contribution towards total scour and compared to standard bridge pier scour predictions. Results showed that in live bed experiments with relatively large bedforms migrating past the turbine(s), local scour depths and water surface fluctuations increased compared to those observed during clear water conditions. Potential field-scale deployment implications will be discussed.

  14. Analysis of Effects of Inlet Pressure Losses on Performance of Axial-Flow Type Turbojet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Newell D; Palasics, John

    1948-01-01

    The experimentally determined performance characteristics of an axial-flow turbojet engine have been used to estimate the effects of inlet total-pressure losses on net thrust and specific fuel consumption at a constant engine speed. At low altitudes and flight Mach numbers, inlet pressure losses cause an increase in engine discharge temperature and it is possible that the maximum allowable turbine temperature maybe exceeded. An inlet absolute total-pressure loss of 10 percent will result in a thrust loss of 14 percent and a 15-percent increase in specific fuel consumption based on net thrust. At high altitudes and flight Mach numbers, choking conditions exist in the exhaust nozzle and the inlet pressure losses do not affect the discharge temperatures. Under these conditions, a 10-percent loss in inlet absolute total pressure produces a 22-percent loss in net thrust and a 16-percent increase in specific fuel consumption. If the exhaust-nozzle-outlet area is adjusted to compensate for the effect of inlet losses on discharge temperature in the nonchoking cases (low altitude and Mach numbers), the thrust and fuel consumption will be changed in a manner similar to the results obtained in the choking cases.

  15. Intrinsic Axial Flows in CSDX and Dynamical Symmetry Breaking in ITG Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiacong; Diamond, P. H.; Hong, R.; Thakur, S. C.; Xu, X. Q.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-10-01

    Toroidal plasma rotation can enhance confinement when combined with weak magnetic shear. Also, external rotation drive in future fusion devices (e.g. ITER) will be weak. Together, these two considerations drive us to study intrinsic rotations with weak magnetic shear. In particular, a global transition is triggered in CSDX when magnetic field B exceeds a critical strength threshold. At the transition an ion feature emerges in the core turbulence. Recent studies show that a dynamical symmetry breaking mechanism in drift wave turbulence can drive intrinsic axial flows in CSDX, as well as enhance intrinsic rotations in tokamaks. Here, we focus on what happens when ion features emerge in CSDX, and how ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence drives intrinsic rotations with weak magnetic shear. The effect of dynamical symmetry breaking in ITG turbulence depends on the stability regime. In a marginally stable regime, dynamical symmetry breaking results in an augmented turbulence viscosity (chi-phi). However, when ITG is far from the stability boundary, a negative increment in turbulent viscosity is induced. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, under Award No. DE-FG02-04ER54738.

  16. Counter-rotating type axial flow pump unit in turbine mode for micro grid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, R.; Takano, G.; Murakami, T.; Kanemoto, T.; Komaki, K.

    2012-11-01

    Traditional type pumped storage system contributes to adjust the electric power unbalance between day and night, in general. This serial research proposes the hybrid power system combined the wind power unit with the pump-turbine unit, to provide the constant output for the grid system, even at the suddenly fluctuating/turbulent wind. In the pumping mode, the pump should operate unsteadily at not only the normal but also the partial discharge. The operation may be unstable in the rising portion of the head characteristics at the lower discharge, and/or bring the cavitation at the low suction head. To simultaneously overcome both weak points, the authors have proposed a superior pump unit that is composed of counter-rotating type impellers and a peculiar motor with double rotational armatures. This paper discusses the operation at the turbine mode of the above unit. It is concluded with the numerical simulations that this type unit can be also operated acceptably at the turbine mode, because the unit works so as to coincide the angular momentum change through the front runners/impellers with that thorough the rear runners/impellers, namely to take the axial flow at not only the inlet but also the outlet without the guide vanes.

  17. Intraoperative cerebral blood flow imaging of rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hangdao; Li, Yao; Yuan, Lu; Wu, Caihong; Lu, Hongyang; Tong, Shanbao

    2014-09-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is of interest to neuroscience researchers, which offers the assessment of hemodynamic responses throughout the process of neurosurgery and provides an early biomarker for surgical guidance. However, intraoperative CBF imaging has been challenging due to animal's motion and position change during the surgery. In this paper, we presented a design of an operation bench integrated with laser speckle contrast imager which enables monitoring of the CBF intraoperatively. With a specially designed stereotaxic frame and imager, we were able to monitor the CBF changes in both hemispheres during the rodent surgery. The rotatable design of the operation plate and implementation of online image registration allow the technician to move the animal without disturbing the CBF imaging during surgery. The performance of the system was tested by middle cerebral artery occlusion model of rats.

  18. Cerebral blood flow variations in CNS lupus

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, M.J.; Tobin, M.; Fazekas, F.; Chawluk, J.; Jamieson, D.; Freundlich, B.; Grenell, S.; Freemen, L.; Reivich, M. )

    1990-01-01

    We studied the patterns of cerebral blood flow (CBF), over time, in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and varying neurologic manifestations including headache, stroke, psychosis, and encephalopathy. For 20 paired xenon-133 CBF measurements, CBF was normal during CNS remissions, regardless of the symptoms. CBF was significantly depressed during CNS exacerbations. The magnitude of change in CBF varied with the neurologic syndrome. CBF was least affected in patients with nonspecific symptoms such as headache or malaise, whereas patients with encephalopathy or psychosis exhibited the greatest reductions in CBF. In 1 patient with affective psychosis, without clinical or CT evidence of cerebral ischemia, serial SPECT studies showed resolution of multifocal cerebral perfusion defects which paralleled clinical recovery.

  19. Tachykinin regulation of basal synovial blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Ferrell, W R; Lockhart, J C; Karimian, S M

    1997-01-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate the role of endogenously released tachykinins in the regulation of blood flow to the rat knee joint. Synovial perfusion was assessed by laser Doppler perfusion imaging, which permitted spatial measurement of relative changes in perfusion from control (pre drug administration), expressed as the percentage change. Most experiments were performed on the exposed medial aspect of the knee joint capsule.Neither the selective tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonist, FK888, nor the selective tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonist, SR48968, significantly influenced synovial blood flow at doses of 10−12, 10−10 and 10−8 mol. However, topical co-administration of these agents produced significant dose-dependent reductions in basal synovial perfusion of 6.3±4.6, 12.0±3.4 and 19.9±2.6%, respectively; n=29. The non-selective tachykinin NK1/NK2 receptor antagonist, FK224, also produced significant (at 10−10 and 10−8 mol), but less potent, reductions in perfusion of 5.3±4.0, 8.4±2.2 and 5.9±2.8%, respectively; n=25.Topical administration of the α1-, α2-adrenoceptor antagonist phenoxybenzamine elicited a 31.3±6.2% increase in blood flow which was substantially reduced to 10.4±3.8% by co-administration of the FK888 and SR48968 (both at 10−8 mol; n=8–13), suggesting that normally there is sympathetic vasoconstrictor ‘tone' which is opposed by the vasodilator action of endogenous tachykinins.One week after surgical interruption of the nerve supply to the knee joint, co-administration of FK888 and SR48968 (both at 10−8 mol) now produced slight vasodilatation (6.7±4.6%; n=9) which did not differ significantly from vehicle treatment. Depletion of tachykinins from sensory nerve fibres by systemic capsaicin administration also resulted in abolition of the vasoconstrictor effect of FK888 and SR48968 (both at 10−8 mol), with these agents only producing a slight vasodilatation (2.5±5.3%; n=6).By use of a near infra

  20. Topical menthol increases cutaneous blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Craighead, Daniel H.; Alexander, Lacy M.

    2017-01-01

    Menthol, the active ingredient in several topically applied analgesics, activates transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) receptors on sensory nerves and on the vasculature inducing a cooling sensation on the skin. Ilex paraguariensis is also a common ingredient in topical analgesics that has potential vasoactive properties and may alter the mechanisms of action of menthol. We sought to characterize the microvascular effects of topical menthol and ilex application and to determine the mechanism(s) through which these compounds may independently and combined alter cutaneous blood flow. We hypothesized that menthol would induce vasoconstriction and that ilex would not alter skin blood flow (SkBF). Three separate protocols were conducted to examine menthol and ilex-mediated changes in SkBF. In protocol 1, placebo, 4% menthol, 0.7% ilex, and combination menthol + ilex gels were applied separately to the skin and red cell flux was continuously measured utilizing laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI). In protocol 2, seven concentrations of menthol gel (0.04%, 0.4%, 1%, 2%, 4%, 7%, 8%) were applied to the skin to model the dose-response curve. In protocol 3, placebo, menthol, ilex, and menthol + ilex gels were applied to skin under local thermal control (34°C) both with and without sensory nerve blockage (topical lidocaine 4%). Post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) and local heating (42°C) protocols were conducted to determine the relative contribution of endothelium derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs)/sensory nerves and nitric oxide (NO), respectively. Red cell flux was normalized to mean arterial pressure expressed as cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC: flux•mmHg-1) in all protocols. Topical menthol application increased SkBF compared to placebo (3.41±0.33 v 1.1±0.19 CVC: p<0.001). During the dose-response, SkBF increased with increasing doses of menthol (main effect, p<0.05) with an ED50 of 1.0%. Similarly, SkBF was increased after menthol

  1. Cerebral blood flow in normal pressure hydrocephalus

    SciTech Connect

    Mamo, H.L.; Meric, P.C.; Ponsin, J.C.; Rey, A.C.; Luft, A.G.; Seylaz, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    A xenon-133 method was used to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) before and after cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) removal in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Preliminary results suggested that shunting should be performed on patients whose CBF increased after CSF removal. There was a significant increase in CBF in patients with NPH, which was confirmed by the favorable outcome of 88% of patients shunted. The majority of patients with senile and presenile dementia showed a decrease or no change in CBF after CSF removal. It is suggested that although changes in CBF and clinical symptoms of NPH may have the same cause, i.e., changes in the cerebral intraparenchymal pressure, there is no simple direct relation between these two events. The mechanism underlying the loss of autoregulation observed in NPH is also discussed.

  2. Capillary blood flow imaging within human finger cuticle using optical microangiography.

    PubMed

    Baran, Utku; Shi, Lei; Wang, Ruikang K

    2015-01-01

    We report non-invasive 3D imaging of capillary blood flow within human finger cuticle by the use of Doppler optical microangiography (DOMAG) and ultra-high sensitive optical microangiography (UHS-OMAG) techniques. Wide velocity range DOMAG method is applied to provide red blood cell (RBC) axial velocity mapping in capillary loops with ranges of ±0.9 mm/s and ±0.3 mm/s. Additionally, UHS-OMAG technique is engineered to acquire high resolution image of capillary morphology. The presented results are promising to facilitate clinical trials of treatment and diagnosis of various diseases such as diabetes, Raynaud's phenomenon, and connective tissue diseases by quantifying cutaneous blood flow changes within human finger cuticle.

  3. Combining SPECT medical imaging and computational fluid dynamics for analyzing blood and dialysate flow in hemodialyzers.

    PubMed

    Eloot, S; D'Asseler, Y; De Bondt, P; Verdonck, R

    2005-07-01

    For a better insight in dialyzer efficiency with respect to local mass transport in a low flux dialyzer (Fresenius F6HPS), blood and dialysate flow distributions were visualized with computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations, which were validated with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. To visualize blood-side flow while avoiding transport through the fiber membrane, a bolus of 99m-Technetium labeled MAA (Macro Aggregated Albumin) was injected in the flow using an electronic valve. Water was used to simulate blood, but flow rate was adjusted according to laws of dynamic similarity to account for the viscosity difference (factor 2.75). For the visualization of dialysate flow, a bolus of 99m-Technetium labeled DMSA (Dimercaptosuccinic Acid) was injected, while pressurized air in the blood compartment avoided transmembrane flow. For each test series, 3D acquisitions were made on a two respectively three-headed SPECT camera. By evaluating the images at different time steps, dynamic 3D intensity plots were obtained, which were further used to derive local flow velocities. Additionally, three-dimensional CFD models were developed for simulating the overall blood and dialysate flow, respectively. In both models,the whole fiber compartment was defined as a porous medium with overall axial and radial permeability derived theoretically and from in vitro tests. With the imaging as well as with the computational technique, a homogeneous blood flow distribution was found, while vortices and fluid stagnation were observed in the dialyzer inlet manifold. The non-homogeneous dialysate distribution, as found with SPECT imaging, implies the occurrence of non-efficient sites with respect to mass transfer. The discrepancy between the dialysate results of both techniques indicated that the assumption of a constant fiber bundle permeability in the CFD model was too optimistic. In conclusion, medical imaging techniques like SPECT are very helpful to validate

  4. Quantitative Estimation of Tissue Blood Flow Rate.

    PubMed

    Tozer, Gillian M; Prise, Vivien E; Cunningham, Vincent J

    2016-01-01

    The rate of blood flow through a tissue (F) is a critical parameter for assessing the functional efficiency of a blood vessel network following angiogenesis. This chapter aims to provide the principles behind the estimation of F, how F relates to other commonly used measures of tissue perfusion, and a practical approach for estimating F in laboratory animals, using small readily diffusible and metabolically inert radio-tracers. The methods described require relatively nonspecialized equipment. However, the analytical descriptions apply equally to complementary techniques involving more sophisticated noninvasive imaging.Two techniques are described for the quantitative estimation of F based on measuring the rate of tissue uptake following intravenous administration of radioactive iodo-antipyrine (or other suitable tracer). The Tissue Equilibration Technique is the classical approach and the Indicator Fractionation Technique, which is simpler to perform, is a practical alternative in many cases. The experimental procedures and analytical methods for both techniques are given, as well as guidelines for choosing the most appropriate method.

  5. Mapping blood flow directionality in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Hong; Do, Won-Joon; Choi, Seung Hong; Zhao, Tiejun; Bae, Kyongtae Ty

    2016-07-01

    Diffusion properties of tissue are often expressed on the basis of directional variance, i.e., diffusion tensor imaging. In comparison, common perfusion-weighted imaging such as arterial spin labeling yields perfusion in a scalar quantity. The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of mapping cerebral blood flow directionality using alternate ascending/descending directional navigation (ALADDIN), a recently-developed arterial spin labeling technique with sensitivity to blood flow directions. ALADDIN was applied along 3 orthogonal directions to assess directional blood flow in a vector form and also along 6 equally-spaced directions to extract blood flow tensor matrix (P) based on a blood flow ellipsoid model. Tensor elements (eigenvalues, eigenvectors, etc) were calculated to investigate characteristics of the blood flow tensor, in comparison with time-of-flight MR angiogram. While the directions of the main eigenvectors were heterogeneous throughout the brain, regional clusters of blood flow directionality were reproducible across subjects. The technique could show heterogeneous blood flow directionality within and around brain tumor, which was different from that of the contralateral normal side. The proposed method is deemed to provide information of blood flow directionality, which has not been demonstrated before. The results warrant further studies to assess changes in the directionality map as a function of scan parameters, to understand the signal sources, to investigate the possibility of mapping local blood perfusion directionality, and to evaluate its usefulness for clinical diagnosis.

  6. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography to Estimate Retinal Blood Flow in Eyes with Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Masako; Miyata, Manabu; Ishihara, Kenji; Gotoh, Norimoto; Morooka, Satoshi; Ogino, Ken; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Hirashima, Takako; Yoshikawa, Munemitsu; Hata, Masayuki; Muraoka, Yuki; Ooto, Sotaro; Yamashiro, Kenji; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2017-04-13

    Ophthalmologists sometimes face difficulties in identifying the origin of visual acuity (VA) loss in a retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patient, particularly before cataract surgery: cataract or the retinal disease state. Therefore, it is important to identify the significant factors correlating with VA. Nowadays, retinal blood flow in superficial and deep layers can be estimated non-invasively using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA). We estimated blood flow per retinal layer by using OCTA; investigated the correlation between VA and other parameters including blood flow and retinal thickness; and identified the most associated factor with VA in patients with RP. OCTA images in 68 of consecutive 110 Japanese RP patients were analysable (analysable RP group). Thirty-two age- and axial length-matched healthy eyes (control group) were studied. In the analysable RP group, the parafoveal flow density in superficial and deep layers was 47.0 ± 4.9% and 52.4 ± 5.5%, respectively, which was significantly lower than that in controls. Using multivariate analysis, we found that the parafoveal flow density in the deep layer and superficial foveal avascular area were the factors associated with VA. Non-invasive estimation of retinal blood flow per retinal layer using OCTA is useful for predicting VA in RP patients.

  7. Cerebral blood flow response to functional activation

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Olaf B; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Rostrup, Egill; Knudsen, Gitte Moos; Pelligrino, Dale

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate are normally coupled, that is an increase in metabolic demand will lead to an increase in flow. However, during functional activation, CBF and glucose metabolism remain coupled as they increase in proportion, whereas oxygen metabolism only increases to a minor degree—the so-called uncoupling of CBF and oxidative metabolism. Several studies have dealt with these issues, and theories have been forwarded regarding the underlying mechanisms. Some reports have speculated about the existence of a potentially deficient oxygen supply to the tissue most distant from the capillaries, whereas other studies point to a shift toward a higher degree of non-oxidative glucose consumption during activation. In this review, we argue that the key mechanism responsible for the regional CBF (rCBF) increase during functional activation is a tight coupling between rCBF and glucose metabolism. We assert that uncoupling of rCBF and oxidative metabolism is a consequence of a less pronounced increase in oxygen consumption. On the basis of earlier studies, we take into consideration the functional recruitment of capillaries and attempt to accommodate the cerebral tissue's increased demand for glucose supply during neural activation with recent evidence supporting a key function for astrocytes in rCBF regulation. PMID:19738630

  8. Effect of several porous casing treatments on stall limit and on overall performance of an axial flow compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, W. M.; Lewis, G. W., Jr.; Heidelberg, L. J.

    1971-01-01

    Several geometrically different porous casings were tested with an axial-flow compressor rotor to determine their effects upon the rotor stall-limit line and overall performance. The tests were conducted using both uniform and nonuniform inlet-flow conditions. The rotor performance with the various casing treatments is compared with that obtained with a solid casing. The ability of the various casing treatments to displace the rotor stall-limit line to lower weight flows was observed. Significant stall-margin increases were obtained with several of the porous casings. Peak efficiencies with two of the porous casings were as high as or slightly higher than that obtained with solid casing.

  9. Design and performance of a high-pressure-ratio, highly loaded axial-flow transonic compressor space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, G. W., Jr.; Reid, L.; Tysl, E. R.

    1974-01-01

    A 50-cm-diam. axial-flow transonic compressor stage with multiple-circular-arc blades was designed and tested. At design speed, a rotor peak efficiency of 0.85 occurred at an equivalent weight flow of 29.3 kg/sec. Stage peak efficiency was 0.79 at 28.6 kg/sec. Stage total pressure ratio at peak efficiency was 1.84. The stall margin at design speed was 5 percent. Rotor and stator losses were higher than predicted. The stator choked at design flow.

  10. Effect of Blade-surface Finish on Performance of a Single-stage Axial-flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Jason J; Serovy, George, K

    1951-01-01

    A set of modified NACA 5509-34 rotor and stator blades was investigated with rough-machine, hand-filed, and highly polished surface finishes over a range of weight flows at six equivalent tip speeds from 672 to 1092 feet per second to determine the effect of blade-surface finish on the performance of a single-stage axial-flow compressor. Surface-finish effects decreased with increasing compressor speed and with decreasing flow at a given speed. In general, finishing blade surfaces below the roughness that may be considered aerodynamically smooth on the basis of an admissible-roughness formula will have no effect on compressor performance.

  11. Sub- and Super-Synchronous Self-Excited Vibrations of a Columnar Rotor Due to Axial Clearance Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, H.; Horiguchi, H.; Suzuki, T.; Sugiyama, K.; Tsujimoto, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Sub- and super-synchronous self-excited vibrations due to axial clearance flows were observed in a columnar rotor with an upstream seal in experiments. A smaller clearance on the downstream seal had a larger effect of stabilizing the rotor. In computations, it was found that the rotordynamic fluid force tangential to the whirling orbit, which is caused as a response to the vibrations (whirling motions), destabilizes the rotor in the case of the upstream seal and stabilizes the rotor in the case of the downstream seal. It was clarified in the 1-D flow model that the tangential rotordynamic fluid force is mainly caused by an inertia of the clearance flow.

  12. Nonlinear interactions in renal blood flow regulation.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Donald J; Sosnovtseva, Olga V; Chon, Ki H; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a model of tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) and the myogenic mechanism in afferent arterioles to understand how the two mechanisms are coupled. This paper presents the model. The tubular model predicts pressure, flow, and NaCl concentration as functions of time and tubular length in a compliant tubule that reabsorbs NaCl and water; boundary conditions are glomerular filtration rate (GFR), a nonlinear outflow resistance, and initial NaCl concentration. The glomerular model calculates GFR from a change in protein concentration using estimates of capillary hydrostatic pressure, tubular hydrostatic pressure, and plasma flow rate. The arteriolar model predicts fraction of open K channels, intracellular Ca concentration (Ca(i)), potential difference, rate of actin-myosin cross bridge formation, force of contraction, and length of elastic elements, and was solved for two arteriolar segments, identical except for the strength of TGF input, with a third, fixed resistance segment representing prearteriolar vessels. The two arteriolar segments are electrically coupled. The arteriolar, glomerular, and tubular models are linked; TGF modulates arteriolar circumference, which determines vascular resistance and glomerular capillary pressure. The model couples TGF input to voltage-gated Ca channels. It predicts autoregulation of GFR and renal blood flow, matches experimental measures of tubular pressure and macula densa NaCl concentration, and predicts TGF-induced oscillations and a faster smaller vasomotor oscillation. There are nonlinear interactions between TGF and the myogenic mechanism, which include the modulation of the frequency and amplitude of the myogenic oscillation by TGF. The prediction of modulation is confirmed in a companion study (28).

  13. Noninvasive method of estimating human newborn regional cerebral blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Younkin, D.P.; Reivich, M.; Jaggi, J.; Obrist, W.; Delivoria-Papadopoulos, M.

    1982-12-01

    A noninvasive method of estimating regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in premature and full-term babies has been developed. Based on a modification of the /sup 133/Xe inhalation rCBF technique, this method uses eight extracranial NaI scintillation detectors and an i.v. bolus injection of /sup 133/Xe (approximately 0.5 mCi/kg). Arterial xenon concentration was estimated with an external chest detector. Cerebral blood flow was measured in 15 healthy, neurologically normal premature infants. Using Obrist's method of two-compartment analysis, normal values were calculated for flow in both compartments, relative weight and fractional flow in the first compartment (gray matter), initial slope of gray matter blood flow, mean cerebral blood flow, and initial slope index of mean cerebral blood flow. The application of this technique to newborns, its relative advantages, and its potential uses are discussed.

  14. Modeling pressure drop using generalized scaffold characteristics in an axial-flow bioreactor for soft tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Podichetty, Jagdeep T; Bhaskar, Prasana R; Khalf, Abdurizzagh; Madihally, Sundararajan V

    2014-06-01

    The goal of this study was to better understand how analytical permeability models based on scaffold architecture can facilitate a non-invasive technique to real time monitoring of pressure drop in bioreactors. In particular, we evaluated the permeability equations for electrospun and freeze dried scaffolds via pressure drop comparison in an axial-flow bioreactor using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) and experimentation. The polycaprolactone-cellulose acetate fibers obtained by co-axial electrospinning technique and Chitosan-Gelatin scaffolds prepared using freeze-drying techniques were utilized. Initially, the structural properties (fiber size, pore size and porosity) and mechanical properties (elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio) of scaffolds in phosphate buffered saline at 37 °C were evaluated. The CFD simulations were performed by coupling fluid flow, described by Brinkman equation, with structural mechanics using a moving mesh. The experimentally obtained pressure drop values for both 1 mm thick and 2 mm thick scaffolds agreed with simulation results. To evaluate the effect of permeability and elastic modulus on pressure drop, CFD predictions were extended to a broad range of permeabilities spanning synthetic scaffolds and tissues, elastic moduli, and Poisson's ratio. Results indicated an increase in pressure drop with increase in permeability. Scaffolds with higher elastic modulus performed better and the effect of Poisson's ratio was insignificant. Flow induced deformation was negligible in axial-flow bioreactor. In summary, scaffold permeabilities can be calculated using scaffold microarchitecture and can be used in non-invasive monitoring of tissue regeneration.

  15. Measurement of Retinal Blood Flow Using Fluorescently Labeled Red Blood Cells1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Kornfield, Tess E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Blood flow is a useful indicator of the metabolic state of the retina. However, accurate measurement of retinal blood flow is difficult to achieve in practice. Most existing optical techniques used for measuring blood flow require complex assumptions and calculations. We describe here a simple and direct method for calculating absolute blood flow in vessels of all sizes in the rat retina. The method relies on ultrafast confocal line scans to track the passage of fluorescently labeled red blood cells (fRBCs). The accuracy of the blood flow measurements was verified by (1) comparing blood flow calculated independently using either flux or velocity combined with diameter measurements, (2) measuring total retinal blood flow in arterioles and venules, (3) measuring blood flow at vessel branch points, and (4) measuring changes in blood flow in response to hyperoxic and hypercapnic challenge. Confocal line scans oriented parallel and diagonal to vessels were used to compute fRBC velocity and to examine velocity profiles across the width of vessels. We demonstrate that these methods provide accurate measures of absolute blood flow and velocity in retinal vessels of all sizes. PMID:26082942

  16. Dynamic Effect of Rolling Massage on Blood Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan-Yan; Yi, Hou-Hui; Li, Hua-Bing; Fang, Hai-Ping

    2009-02-01

    The Chinese traditional medical massage has been used as a natural therapy to eliminate some diseases. Here, the effect of the rolling massage frequency to the blood flow in the blood vessels under the rolling massage manipulation is studied by the lattice Boltzmann simulation. The simulation results show that when the frequency is smaller than or comparable to the pulsatile frequency of the blood flow, the effect on the blood flux by the rolling massage is small. On the contrast, if the frequency is twice or more times of the pulsatile frequency of the blood flow, the blood flux is greatly enhanced and increases linearly with respect to the frequency. Similar behavior has also been observed on the shear stress on the blood vessel walls. The result is helpful for understanding that the rolling massage has the function of promoting the blood circulation and removing the blood stasis.

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance: principles of blood flow imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, C.M.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Crooks, L.E.; Kaufman, L.; Sheldon, P.; Norman, D.; Bank, W.; Newton, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging with spin-echo techniques defines vascular structures with superb anatomic detail. Contrast agents are not necessary as there is intrinsic contrast between flowing blood and the vascular wall. The signal intensity from blood within the vessel lumen varies with the sequence of gradient and radiofrequency pulses used to generate the image as well as with the velocity of blood flow. Appropriate imaging techniques can optimize anatomic detail, distinguish slow from rapidly flowing blood, and serve to identify marked impairment or complete obstruction of flow in an artery or vein. Some examples of these principles in the intracranial circulation are illustrated.

  18. Laser Doppler anemometer signal processing for blood flow velocity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Borozdova, M A; Fedosov, I V; Tuchin, V V

    2015-03-31

    A new method for analysing the signal in a laser Doppler anemometer based on the differential scheme is proposed, which provides the flow velocity measurement in strongly scattering liquids, particularly, blood. A laser Doppler anemometer intended for measuring the absolute blood flow velocity in animal and human near-surface arterioles and venules is developed. The laser Doppler anemometer signal structure is experimentally studied for measuring the flow velocity in optically inhomogeneous media, such as blood and suspensions of scattering particles. The results of measuring the whole and diluted blood flow velocity in channels with a rectangular cross section are presented. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  19. Modelling of turbulent flows in transonic axial-flow compressor NASA Rotor 37 with local weak-equilibrium damping of eddy viscosity coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksyonov, A. N.; Shabarov, A. B.

    2009-12-01

    A local damping of eddy viscosity depending on the ratio of the production of turbulent energy to turbulence dissipation rate is proposed at the computation of flows in transonic axial compressors. The results of the numerical modeling of flows in compressor NASA Rotor 37 are presented, and the computed distributions of the increase in the total temperature and total pressure are compared with experimental data for different rotation frequencies. An increase in the accuracy of modelling was obtained in all considered regimes.

  20. Effects of Axial Vibration on Needle Insertion into the Tail Veins of Rats and Subsequent Serial Blood Corticosterone Levels

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Ryan S; Unger, Erica L; Ocón-Grove, Olga M; Cronin, Thomas L; Mulvihill, Maureen L

    2016-01-01

    Blood collection is commonplace in biomedical research. Obtaining sufficient sample while minimizing animal stress requires significant skill and practice. Repeated needle punctures can cause discomfort and lead to variable release of stress hormones, potentially confounding analysis. We designed a handheld device to reduce the force necessary for needle insertion by using low-frequency, axial (forward and backward) micromotions (that is, vibration) delivered to the needle during venipuncture. Tests with cadaver rat-tail segments (n = 18) confirmed that peak insertion forces were reduced by 73% on average with needle vibration. A serial blood-sampling study was then conducted by using Sprague–Dawley rats divided into 2 groups based on needle condition used to cause bleeds: vibration on (n = 10) and vibration off (n = 9). On 3 days (1 wk apart), 3 tail-vein blood collections were performed in each subject at 1-h intervals. To evaluate associated stress levels, plasma corticosterone concentration was quantified by radioimmunoassay and behavior (that is, movement and vocalization) was scored by blinded review of blood-sampling videos. After the initial trial, average corticosterone was lower (46% difference), the mean intrasubject variance trended lower (72%), and behavioral indications of stress were rated lower for the vibration-on group compared with the vibration-off group. Adding controlled vibrations to needles during insertion may decrease the stress associated with blood sampling from rats—an important methodologic advance for investigators studying and assessing stress processes and a refinement over current blood sampling techniques. PMID:27025813