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Sample records for axial volumetric 320-detector

  1. Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

  2. Influence of 320-detector-row volume scanning and AAPM report 111 CT dosimetry metrics on size-specific dose estimate: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Haba, Tomonobu; Koyama, Shuji; Kinomura, Yutaka; Ida, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Masanao

    2016-09-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) task group 204 has recommended the use of size-dependent conversion factors to calculate size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) values from volume computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol) values. However, these conversion factors do not consider the effects of 320-detector-row volume computed tomography (CT) examinations or the new CT dosimetry metrics proposed by AAPM task group 111. This study aims to investigate the influence of these examinations and metrics on the conversion factors reported by AAPM task group 204, using Monte Carlo simulations. Simulations were performed modelling a Toshiba Aquilion ONE CT scanner, in order to compute dose values in water for cylindrical phantoms with 8-40-cm diameters at 2-cm intervals for each scanning parameter (tube voltage, bow-tie filter, longitudinal beam width). Then, the conversion factors were obtained by applying exponential regression analysis between the dose values for a given phantom diameter and the phantom diameter combined with various scanning parameters. The conversion factors for each scanning method (helical, axial, or volume scanning) and CT dosimetry method (i.e., the CTDI100 method or the AAPM task group 111 method) were in agreement with those reported by AAPM task group 204, within a percentage error of 14.2 % for phantom diameters ≥11.2 cm. The results obtained in this study indicate that the conversion factors previously presented by AAPM task group 204 can be used to provide appropriate SSDE values for 320-detector-row volume CT examinations and the CT dosimetry metrics proposed by the AAPM task group 111.

  3. Influence of 320-detector-row volume scanning and AAPM report 111 CT dosimetry metrics on size-specific dose estimate: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Haba, Tomonobu; Koyama, Shuji; Kinomura, Yutaka; Ida, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Masanao

    2016-09-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) task group 204 has recommended the use of size-dependent conversion factors to calculate size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) values from volume computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol) values. However, these conversion factors do not consider the effects of 320-detector-row volume computed tomography (CT) examinations or the new CT dosimetry metrics proposed by AAPM task group 111. This study aims to investigate the influence of these examinations and metrics on the conversion factors reported by AAPM task group 204, using Monte Carlo simulations. Simulations were performed modelling a Toshiba Aquilion ONE CT scanner, in order to compute dose values in water for cylindrical phantoms with 8-40-cm diameters at 2-cm intervals for each scanning parameter (tube voltage, bow-tie filter, longitudinal beam width). Then, the conversion factors were obtained by applying exponential regression analysis between the dose values for a given phantom diameter and the phantom diameter combined with various scanning parameters. The conversion factors for each scanning method (helical, axial, or volume scanning) and CT dosimetry method (i.e., the CTDI100 method or the AAPM task group 111 method) were in agreement with those reported by AAPM task group 204, within a percentage error of 14.2 % for phantom diameters ≥11.2 cm. The results obtained in this study indicate that the conversion factors previously presented by AAPM task group 204 can be used to provide appropriate SSDE values for 320-detector-row volume CT examinations and the CT dosimetry metrics proposed by the AAPM task group 111. PMID:27444155

  4. Radiation dose assessment in a 320-detector-row CT scanner used in cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goma, Carles; Ruiz, Agustin; Jornet, Nuria; Latorre, Artur; Pallerol, Rosa M.; Carrasco, Pablo; Eudaldo, Teresa; Ribas, Montserrat

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: In the present era of cone-beam CT scanners, the use of the standardized CTDI{sub 100} as a surrogate of the idealized CTDI is strongly discouraged and, consequently, so should be the use of the dose-length product (DLP) as an estimate of the total energy imparted to the patient. However, the DLP is still widely used as a reference quantity to normalize the effective dose for a given scan protocol mainly because the CTDI{sub 100} is an easy-to-measure quantity. The aim of this article is therefore to describe a method for radiation dose assessment in large cone-beam single axial scans, which leads to a straightforward estimation of the total energy imparted to the patient. The authors developed a method accessible to all medical physicists and easy to implement in clinical practice in an attempt to update the bridge between CT dosimetry and the estimation of the effective dose. Methods: The authors used commercially available material and a simple mathematical model. The method described herein is based on the dosimetry paradigm introduced by the AAPM Task Group 111. It consists of measuring the dose profiles at the center and the periphery of a long body phantom with a commercial solid-state detector. A weighted dose profile is then calculated from these measurements. To calculate the CT dosimetric quantities analytically, a Gaussian function was fitted to the dose profile data. Furthermore, the Gaussian model has the power to condense the z-axis information of the dose profile in two parameters: The single-scan central dose, f(0), and the width of the profile, {sigma}. To check the energy dependence of the solid-state detector, the authors compared the dose profiles to measurements made with a small volume ion chamber. To validate the overall method, the authors compared the CTDI{sub 100} calculated analytically to the measurement made with a 100 mm pencil ion chamber. Results: For the central and weighted dose profiles, the authors found a good

  5. Overbeaming and overlapping of volume-scan CT with tube current modulation in a 320-detector row CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ying-Lan; Chen, Yan-Shi; Lai, Nan-Ku; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Tsai, Hui-Yu

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of volume scan tube current modulation (VS-ATCM) with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR3D) technique in abdomen CT examinations. We scanned an elliptical cone-shaped phantom utilizing AIDR3D technique combined with VS-ATCM mode in a 320-detector row CT scanner. The image noise distributions with conventional filtered back-projction (FBP) technique and those with AIDR3D technique were compared. The radiation dose profile and tube current time product (mAs) in three noise levels of VS-ATCM modes were compared. The radiation beam profiles of five preset scan lengths were measured using Gafchromic film strips to assess the effects of overbeaming and everlapping. The results indicated that the image noises with AIDR3D technique was 13-74% lower than those in FBP technique. The mAs distributions can be a prediction for various abdominal sizes when undergoing a VS-ATCM mode scan. Patients can receive the radiation dose of overbeaming and overlapping during the VS-ATCM mode scans.

  6. Radiation dose reduction for coronary artery calcium scoring at 320-detector CT with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D.

    PubMed

    Tatsugami, Fuminari; Higaki, Toru; Fukumoto, Wataru; Kaichi, Yoko; Fujioka, Chikako; Kiguchi, Masao; Yamamoto, Hideya; Kihara, Yasuki; Awai, Kazuo

    2015-06-01

    To assess the possibility of reducing the radiation dose for coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring by using adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR 3D) on a 320-detector CT scanner. Fifty-four patients underwent routine- and low-dose CT for CAC scoring. Low-dose CT was performed at one-third of the tube current used for routine-dose CT. Routine-dose CT was reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and low-dose CT was reconstructed with AIDR 3D. We compared the calculated Agatston-, volume-, and mass scores of these images. The overall percentage difference in the Agatston-, volume-, and mass scores between routine- and low-dose CT studies was 15.9, 11.6, and 12.6%, respectively. There were no significant differences in the routine- and low-dose CT studies irrespective of the scoring algorithms applied. The CAC measurements of both imaging modalities were highly correlated with respect to the Agatston- (r = 0.996), volume- (r = 0.996), and mass score (r = 0.997; p < 0.001, all); the Bland-Altman limits of agreement scores were -37.4 to 51.4, -31.2 to 36.4 and -30.3 to 40.9%, respectively, suggesting that AIDR 3D was a good alternative for FBP. The mean effective radiation dose for routine- and low-dose CT was 2.2 and 0.7 mSv, respectively. The use of AIDR 3D made it possible to reduce the radiation dose by 67% for CAC scoring without impairing the quantification of coronary calcification.

  7. Radiation dose reduction for coronary artery calcium scoring at 320-detector CT with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D.

    PubMed

    Tatsugami, Fuminari; Higaki, Toru; Fukumoto, Wataru; Kaichi, Yoko; Fujioka, Chikako; Kiguchi, Masao; Yamamoto, Hideya; Kihara, Yasuki; Awai, Kazuo

    2015-06-01

    To assess the possibility of reducing the radiation dose for coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring by using adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR 3D) on a 320-detector CT scanner. Fifty-four patients underwent routine- and low-dose CT for CAC scoring. Low-dose CT was performed at one-third of the tube current used for routine-dose CT. Routine-dose CT was reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and low-dose CT was reconstructed with AIDR 3D. We compared the calculated Agatston-, volume-, and mass scores of these images. The overall percentage difference in the Agatston-, volume-, and mass scores between routine- and low-dose CT studies was 15.9, 11.6, and 12.6%, respectively. There were no significant differences in the routine- and low-dose CT studies irrespective of the scoring algorithms applied. The CAC measurements of both imaging modalities were highly correlated with respect to the Agatston- (r = 0.996), volume- (r = 0.996), and mass score (r = 0.997; p < 0.001, all); the Bland-Altman limits of agreement scores were -37.4 to 51.4, -31.2 to 36.4 and -30.3 to 40.9%, respectively, suggesting that AIDR 3D was a good alternative for FBP. The mean effective radiation dose for routine- and low-dose CT was 2.2 and 0.7 mSv, respectively. The use of AIDR 3D made it possible to reduce the radiation dose by 67% for CAC scoring without impairing the quantification of coronary calcification. PMID:25754302

  8. Assessment of Renal Function in Patients with Unilateral Ureteral Obstruction Using Whole-Organ Perfusion Imaging with 320-Detector Row Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Juan; Feng, You-Zhen; Xian, Zhao-Hui; Yang, Wen-Cai; Mo, Xu-Kai

    2015-01-01

    Background Obstructed nephropathy is a common complication of several disease processes. Accurate evaluation of the functional status of the obstructed kidney is important to achieve a good outcome. The purpose of this study was to investigate renal cortical and medullary perfusion changes associated with unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) using whole-organ perfusion imaging with 320-detector row computed tomography (CT). Methodology/Principle Findings Sixty-four patients with UUO underwent whole-organ CT perfusion imaging. Patients were divided into 3 groups, mild, moderate, and severe, based on hydronephrosis severity. Twenty sex- and age-matched patients without renal disease, who referred to abdominal CT, were chosen as control subjects. Mean cortical and medullary perfusion parameters of obstructed and contralateral kidneys were compared, and mean perfusion ratios between obstructed and contralateral kidneys were calculated and compared. Mean cortical or medullary blood flow (BF) and blood volume (BV) of the obstructed kidneys in the moderate UUO and BF, BV, and clearance (CL) in the severe UUO were significantly lower than those of the contralateral kidneys (p < 0.05). The mean cortical or medullary BF of the obstructed kidney in the moderate UUO, and BF, BV, and CL in the severe UUO were significantly lower than those of the kidneys in control subjects (p < 0.05). Mean cortical or medullary BF of the non-obstructed kidneys in the severe UUO were statistically greater than that of normal kidneys in control subjects (p < 0.05). An inverse correlation was observed between cortical and medullary perfusion ratios and grades of hydronephosis (p < 0.01). Conclusions/Significance Perfusion measurements of the whole kidney can be obtained with 320-detector row CT, and estimated perfusion ratios have potential for quantitatively evaluating UUO renal injury grades. PMID:25874690

  9. Relationship between beat to beat coronary artery motion and image quality in prospectively ECG-gated two heart beat 320-detector row coronary CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Nobuo; Komatsu, Shuhei; Akahane, Masaaki; Torigoe, Rumiko; Kiryu, Shigeru; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2012-01-01

    The objective was to investigate the influence of the beat-to-beat movement of the coronary arteries on image quality of multi-segment reconstruction (MSR) images. Although MSR improves temporal resolution, image quality would be degraded by beat-to-beat movement of the coronary arteries. In a retrospectively review, 18 patients (mean age, 67.0 years) who underwent coronary CT angiography using a 320-detector row CT were included. The displacement and diameter of coronary artery segments for each of the identified nine landmarks was recorded. The motion ratio was calculated as the division of displacement by diameter. Image quality (IQ) was graded by a four-point scale. The correlation between MSR IQ score and the motion ratio showed stronger negative correlation than that between MSR IQ score and the displacement (r = -0.54 vs. r = -0.36). The average motion ratio for segments in which half-scan reconstruction (HSR) IQ was better than MSR IQ (29.1%, group A) was higher than that for segments in which MSR IQ was better than HSR IQ (16.0%, group C). The motion ratio in group C was lower than 25%. Difference in IQ scores of the HSR images was more frequent in group A than in the remaining segments in which the motion ratio was lower than 25% (16.7% vs. 66.0%; P < 0.0002). The motion ratio could be a better index than the displacement to evaluate the influence of the motion of coronary arteries on image quality. MSR images would be impaired by a motion ratio larger than 25%. Image impairment of one of the HSR images might also impair MSR images.

  10. Iodinated Contrast Opacification Gradients in Normal Coronary Arteries Imaged with Prospectively ECG-Gated Single Heart Beat 320-Detector Row Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Steigner, Michael L.; Mitsouras, Dimitrios; Whitmore, Amanda G.; Otero, Hansel J.; Wang, Chunliang; Buckley, Orla; Levit, Noah A.; Hussain, Alia Z.; Cai, Tianxi; Mather, Richard T.; Smedby, Örjan; DiCarli, Marcelo F.; Rybicki, Frank J.

    2011-01-01

    Background To define and evaluate coronary contrast opacification gradients using prospectively ECG-gated single heart beat 320-detector row coronary angiography (CTA). Methods and Results Thirty-six patients with normal coronary arteries determined by 320 × 0.5 mm detector row coronary CTA were retrospectively evaluated with customized image post-processing software to measure Hounsfield Units (HU) at 1 mm intervals orthogonal to the artery center line. Linear regression determined correlation between mean HU and distance from the coronary ostium (regression slope defined as the distance gradient Gd), lumen cross-sectional area (Ga), and lumen short axis diameter (Gs). For each gradient, differences between the three coronary arteries were analyzed with ANOVA. Linear regression determined correlations between measured gradients, heart rate, body-mass index (BMI), and cardiac phase. To determine feasibility in lesions, all three gradients were evaluated in 22 consecutive patients with left anterior descending artery lesions greater than or equal to 50% stenosis. For all 3 coronary arteries in all patients, the gradients Ga and Gs were significantly different from zero (p<0.0001), highly linear (Pearson r values 0.77-0.84), and had no significant difference between the LAD, LCx, and RCA (p>0.503). The distance gradient Gd demonstrated nonlinearities in a small number of vessels and was significantly smaller in the RCA when compared to the left coronary system (p<0.001). Gradient variations between cardiac phases, heart rates, BMI, and readers were low. Gradients in patients with lesions were significantly different (p<0.021) than in patients considered normal by CTA. Conclusions Measurement of contrast opacification gradients from temporally uniform coronary CTA demonstrates feasibility and reproducibility in patients with normal coronary arteries. For all patients the gradients defined with respect to the coronary lumen cross-sectional area and short axis

  11. Axial Skeleton

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site-specific Modules Resources Archived Modules Updates Axial Skeleton (80 bones) Skull (28) Cranial Bones Parietal (2) ... Sternum (1) Ribs (24) « Previous (Divisions of the Skeleton) Next (Appendicular Skeleton (126 bones)) » Contact Us | Privacy ...

  12. Exploring Volumetrically Indexed Cups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Dustin L.

    2011-01-01

    This article was inspired by a set of 12 cylindrical cups, which are volumetrically indexed; that is to say, the volume of cup "n" is equal to "n" times the volume of cup 1. Various sets of volumetrically indexed cylindrical cups are explored. I demonstrate how this children's toy is ripe for mathematical investigation, with connections to…

  13. Exploring volumetrically indexed cups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Dustin L.

    2011-03-01

    This article was inspired by a set of 12 cylindrical cups, which are volumetrically indexed; that is to say, the volume of cup n is equal to n times the volume of cup 1. Various sets of volumetrically indexed cylindrical cups are explored. I demonstrate how this children's toy is ripe for mathematical investigation, with connections to geometry, algebra and differential calculus. Students with an understanding of these topics should be able to complete the analysis and related exercises contained herein.

  14. Axial Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George Arthur (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A rotary blood pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial and radial clearances of blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with cross-linked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  15. Axial superchargers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A

    1944-01-01

    Improvements, however, have been attained which permit a shortening of the structure without any impairment of the efficiency. The axial supercharger has a better efficiency and a simpler design than the radial supercharger. The relatively narrow range in which it operates satisfactorily should not be a very disturbing factor for practical flight problems. The length of this type of supercharger may be reduced considerably if some impairment in the efficiency is permitted.

  16. Use of Descartes Folium Equation for Deriving a Relation between Total Aperture of Fractures after Uniaxial Compression and Strain Parameters of Different Rocks Exhibiting Negative Total Volumetric Strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchik, V.

    2014-11-01

    The axial, crack and total volumetric strains, porosity, elastic constants, crack damage stresses, uniaxial compressive strengths, as well as fracture apertures and number of fracture traces in rock samples surface after compression were defined for different chalk, basalt, dolomite, granite, limestone and sandstone samples exhibiting negative total volumetric strain at failure. It is established that the total (summed) aperture of vertical fractures obtained on the lateral surface of rock sample is related to three characteristic strain parameters: axial strain at the onset of negative total volumetric strain, axial failure strain and negative total volumetric strain at failure. The relation is based on Descartes folium equation, where the length of the loop of folium is equal to axial strain coordinate at the onset of negative total volumetric strain. This relation shows that the total aperture increases according to power law with increasing difference between axial failure strain and axial strain at the onset of negative total volumetric strain. Simultaneously, an increase in this difference leads to an increase in the value of negative total volumetric strain at failure. It is found that a direct correlation between total aperture of fractures and negative total volumetric strain at failure is relatively weak. Nevertheless, total aperture of fractures tends to increase with increasing absolute value of negative total volumetric strain at failure. It is revealed that there is no connection between the number of fracture traces and negative total volumetric strain at failure.

  17. Flexible Volumetric Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagle, Christopher M. (Inventor); Schlecht, Robin W. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A flexible volumetric structure has a first spring that defines a three-dimensional volume and includes a serpentine structure elongatable and compressible along a length thereof. A second spring is coupled to at least one outboard edge region of the first spring. The second spring is a sheet-like structure capable of elongation along an in-plane dimension thereof. The second spring is oriented such that its in-plane dimension is aligned with the length of the first spring's serpentine structure.

  18. PSF engineering in multifocus microscopy for increased depth volumetric imaging.

    PubMed

    Hajj, Bassam; El Beheiry, Mohamed; Dahan, Maxime

    2016-03-01

    Imaging and localizing single molecules with high accuracy in a 3D volume is a challenging task. Here we combine multifocal microscopy, a recently developed volumetric imaging technique, with point spread function engineering to achieve an increased depth for single molecule imaging. Applications in 3D single molecule localization-based super-resolution imaging is shown over an axial depth of 4 µm as well as for the tracking of diffusing beads in a fluid environment over 8 µm. PMID:27231584

  19. PSF engineering in multifocus microscopy for increased depth volumetric imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hajj, Bassam; El Beheiry, Mohamed; Dahan, Maxime

    2016-01-01

    Imaging and localizing single molecules with high accuracy in a 3D volume is a challenging task. Here we combine multifocal microscopy, a recently developed volumetric imaging technique, with point spread function engineering to achieve an increased depth for single molecule imaging. Applications in 3D single molecule localization-based super-resolution imaging is shown over an axial depth of 4 µm as well as for the tracking of diffusing beads in a fluid environment over 8 µm. PMID:27231584

  20. Continuous volumetric imaging via an optical phase-locked ultrasound lens

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lingjie; Tang, Jianyong; Little, Justin P.; Yu, Yang; Lämmermann, Tim; Lin, Charles P.; Germain, Ronald N.; Cui, Meng

    2015-01-01

    In vivo imaging at high spatiotemporal resolution holds the key to the fundamental understanding of complex biological systems. Integrating an optical phase-locked ultrasound lens into a conventional two-photon fluorescence microscope, we achieved microsecond scale axial scanning, which enabled high-speed volumetric imaging. We applied this system to multicolor volumetric imaging of fast processes, including calcium dynamics in the cerebral cortex of behaving mice, and transient morphology changes and trafficking of immune cells. PMID:26167641

  1. Snapshot Hyperspectral Volumetric Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiamin; Xiong, Bo; Lin, Xing; He, Jijun; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-04-01

    The comprehensive analysis of biological specimens brings about the demand for capturing the spatial, temporal and spectral dimensions of visual information together. However, such high-dimensional video acquisition faces major challenges in developing large data throughput and effective multiplexing techniques. Here, we report the snapshot hyperspectral volumetric microscopy that computationally reconstructs hyperspectral profiles for high-resolution volumes of ~1000 μm × 1000 μm × 500 μm at video rate by a novel four-dimensional (4D) deconvolution algorithm. We validated the proposed approach with both numerical simulations for quantitative evaluation and various real experimental results on the prototype system. Different applications such as biological component analysis in bright field and spectral unmixing of multiple fluorescence are demonstrated. The experiments on moving fluorescent beads and GFP labelled drosophila larvae indicate the great potential of our method for observing multiple fluorescent markers in dynamic specimens.

  2. Snapshot Hyperspectral Volumetric Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiamin; Xiong, Bo; Lin, Xing; He, Jijun; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-01-01

    The comprehensive analysis of biological specimens brings about the demand for capturing the spatial, temporal and spectral dimensions of visual information together. However, such high-dimensional video acquisition faces major challenges in developing large data throughput and effective multiplexing techniques. Here, we report the snapshot hyperspectral volumetric microscopy that computationally reconstructs hyperspectral profiles for high-resolution volumes of ~1000 μm × 1000 μm × 500 μm at video rate by a novel four-dimensional (4D) deconvolution algorithm. We validated the proposed approach with both numerical simulations for quantitative evaluation and various real experimental results on the prototype system. Different applications such as biological component analysis in bright field and spectral unmixing of multiple fluorescence are demonstrated. The experiments on moving fluorescent beads and GFP labelled drosophila larvae indicate the great potential of our method for observing multiple fluorescent markers in dynamic specimens. PMID:27103155

  3. Snapshot Hyperspectral Volumetric Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiamin; Xiong, Bo; Lin, Xing; He, Jijun; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-01-01

    The comprehensive analysis of biological specimens brings about the demand for capturing the spatial, temporal and spectral dimensions of visual information together. However, such high-dimensional video acquisition faces major challenges in developing large data throughput and effective multiplexing techniques. Here, we report the snapshot hyperspectral volumetric microscopy that computationally reconstructs hyperspectral profiles for high-resolution volumes of ~1000 μm × 1000 μm × 500 μm at video rate by a novel four-dimensional (4D) deconvolution algorithm. We validated the proposed approach with both numerical simulations for quantitative evaluation and various real experimental results on the prototype system. Different applications such as biological component analysis in bright field and spectral unmixing of multiple fluorescence are demonstrated. The experiments on moving fluorescent beads and GFP labelled drosophila larvae indicate the great potential of our method for observing multiple fluorescent markers in dynamic specimens. PMID:27103155

  4. Volumetric HiLo microscopy employing an electrically tunable lens.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Katrin; Smolarski, André; Koukourakis, Nektarios; Fischer, Andreas; Stürmer, Moritz; Wallrabe, Ulrike; Czarske, Jürgen W

    2016-06-27

    Electrically tunable lenses exhibit strong potential for fast motion-free axial scanning in a variety of microscopes. However, they also lead to a degradation of the achievable resolution because of aberrations and misalignment between illumination and detection optics that are induced by the scan itself. Additionally, the typically nonlinear relation between actuation voltage and axial displacement leads to over- or under-sampled frame acquisition in most microscopic techniques because of their static depth-of-field. To overcome these limitations, we present an Adaptive-Lens-High-and-Low-frequency (AL-HiLo) microscope that enables volumetric measurements employing an electrically tunable lens. By using speckle-patterned illumination, we ensure stability against aberrations of the electrically tunable lens. Its depth-of-field can be adjusted a-posteriori and hence enables to create flexible scans, which compensates for irregular axial measurement positions. The adaptive HiLo microscope provides an axial scanning range of 1 mm with an axial resolution of about 4 μm and sub-micron lateral resolution over the full scanning range. Proof of concept measurements at home-built specimens as well as zebrafish embryos with reporter gene-driven fluorescence in the thyroid gland are shown. PMID:27410654

  5. A comparative study between axial and radial fluxfocusing magnetic gear topologies and mechanical gearboxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvin, Matthew

    A variety of magnetic gear topologies have been investigated in recent years as alternatives to traditional mechanical gearboxes. In general these magnetic gears offer advantages in the non-contact transmission of torque including inherent overload protection, reduced acoustic emissions, and a reduction in the number of contacting components subject to wear. The earliest magnetic gear designs however suffered from low volumetric torque densities, which limited their utility for industrial applications. Research into flux focusing magnetic gearbox topologies has resulted in increased volumetric torque densities by actively engaging all of the magnets in the transmission of torque throughout the process. This research compared the volumetric torque density of axial and radial flux focusing magnetic gearbox designs and prototypes to planetary, cycloidal, and harmonic mechanical gearboxes. The rare earth scaled up radial and axial flux focusing topologies were found to have consistently higher volumetric torque densities than planetary gearboxes of comparable diameter. The cycloidal and harmonic gearboxes had comparable volumetric torque densities, with greater volumetric torque densities for some models and lesser volumetric torque densities for others. The expectation is that further improvements in volumetric torque density are possible for flux focusing magnetic gears with additional refinement and optimization of the designs. The current study does show that flux focusing magnetic gear topologies are a plausible future alternative to mechanical gearboxes in applications where their unique torque transmission mechanism would be advantageous.

  6. Volumetric Light-Field Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Schedl, David C.; Bimber, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We explain how to concentrate light simultaneously at multiple selected volumetric positions by means of a 4D illumination light field. First, to select target objects, a 4D imaging light field is captured. A light field mask is then computed automatically for this selection to avoid illumination of the remaining areas. With one-photon illumination, simultaneous generation of complex volumetric light patterns becomes possible. As a full light-field can be captured and projected simultaneously at the desired exposure and excitation times, short readout and lighting durations are supported. PMID:27363565

  7. Volumetric Light-Field Excitation.

    PubMed

    Schedl, David C; Bimber, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We explain how to concentrate light simultaneously at multiple selected volumetric positions by means of a 4D illumination light field. First, to select target objects, a 4D imaging light field is captured. A light field mask is then computed automatically for this selection to avoid illumination of the remaining areas. With one-photon illumination, simultaneous generation of complex volumetric light patterns becomes possible. As a full light-field can be captured and projected simultaneously at the desired exposure and excitation times, short readout and lighting durations are supported. PMID:27363565

  8. Volumetric Light-Field Excitation.

    PubMed

    Schedl, David C; Bimber, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    We explain how to concentrate light simultaneously at multiple selected volumetric positions by means of a 4D illumination light field. First, to select target objects, a 4D imaging light field is captured. A light field mask is then computed automatically for this selection to avoid illumination of the remaining areas. With one-photon illumination, simultaneous generation of complex volumetric light patterns becomes possible. As a full light-field can be captured and projected simultaneously at the desired exposure and excitation times, short readout and lighting durations are supported.

  9. Rapid mapping of volumetric errors

    SciTech Connect

    Krulewich, D.; Hale, L.; Yordy, D.

    1995-09-13

    This paper describes a relatively inexpensive, fast, and easy to execute approach to mapping the volumetric errors of a machine tool, coordinate measuring machine, or robot. An error map is used to characterize a machine or to improve its accuracy by compensating for the systematic errors. The method consists of three steps: (1) modeling the relationship between the volumetric error and the current state of the machine; (2) acquiring error data based on length measurements throughout the work volume; and (3) optimizing the model to the particular machine.

  10. Volumetric Light-Field Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schedl, David C.; Bimber, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    We explain how to concentrate light simultaneously at multiple selected volumetric positions by means of a 4D illumination light field. First, to select target objects, a 4D imaging light field is captured. A light field mask is then computed automatically for this selection to avoid illumination of the remaining areas. With one-photon illumination, simultaneous generation of complex volumetric light patterns becomes possible. As a full light-field can be captured and projected simultaneously at the desired exposure and excitation times, short readout and lighting durations are supported.

  11. Efficient threshold for volumetric segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdescu, Dumitru D.; Brezovan, Marius; Stanescu, Liana; Stoica Spahiu, Cosmin; Ebanca, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Image segmentation plays a crucial role in effective understanding of digital images. However, the research on the existence of general purpose segmentation algorithm that suits for variety of applications is still very much active. Among the many approaches in performing image segmentation, graph based approach is gaining popularity primarily due to its ability in reflecting global image properties. Volumetric image segmentation can simply result an image partition composed by relevant regions, but the most fundamental challenge in segmentation algorithm is to precisely define the volumetric extent of some object, which may be represented by the union of multiple regions. The aim in this paper is to present a new method to detect visual objects from color volumetric images and efficient threshold. We present a unified framework for volumetric image segmentation and contour extraction that uses a virtual tree-hexagonal structure defined on the set of the image voxels. The advantage of using a virtual tree-hexagonal network superposed over the initial image voxels is that it reduces the execution time and the memory space used, without losing the initial resolution of the image.

  12. BWR AXIAL PROFILE

    SciTech Connect

    J. Huffer

    2004-09-28

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop axial profiles for estimating the axial variation in burnup of a boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly spent nuclear fuel (SNF) given the average burnup of an assembly. A discharged fuel assembly typically exhibits higher burnup in the center and lower burnup at the ends of the assembly. Criticality safety analyses taking credit for SNF burnup must account for axially varying burnup relative to calculations based on uniformly distributed assembly average burnup due to the under-burned tips. Thus, accounting for axially varying burnup in criticality analyses is also referred to as accounting for the ''end effect'' reactivity. The magnitude of the reactivity change due to ''end effect'' is dependent on the initial assembly enrichment, the assembly average burnup, and the particular axial profile characterizing the burnup distribution. The set of bounding axial profiles should incorporate multiple BWR core designs and provide statistical confidence (95 percent confidence that 95 percent of the population is bound by the profile) that end nodes are conservatively represented. The profiles should also conserve the overall burnup of the fuel assembly. More background on BWR axial profiles is provided in Attachment I.

  13. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOEpatents

    Suchoza, B.P.; Becse, I.

    1988-11-08

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices. 1 fig.

  14. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOEpatents

    Suchoza, Bernard P.; Becse, Imre

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices.

  15. Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2008-01-01

    Axial Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. Axial Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control.

  16. Axial static mixer

    DOEpatents

    Sandrock, H.E.

    1982-05-06

    Static axial mixing apparatus includes a plurality of channels, forming flow paths of different dimensions. The axial mixer includes a flow adjusting device for adjustable selective control of flow resistance of various flow paths in order to provide substantially identical flows through the various channels, thereby reducing nonuniform coating of interior surfaces of the channels. The flow adjusting device may include diaphragm valves, and may further include a pressure regulating system therefor.

  17. Is there Link between the Type of the Volumetric Strain Curve and Elastic Constants, Porosity, Stress and Strain Characteristics ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchik, V.

    2013-03-01

    The stress [crack damage stress ( σ cd) and uniaxial compressive strength ( σ c)] and strain characteristics [maximum total volumetric strain ( ɛ cd), axial failure strain ( ɛ af)], porosity ( n) and elastic constants [elastic modulus ( E) and Poisson's ratio ( ν)] and their ratios were coordinated with the existence of two different types (type 1 and type 2) of volumetric strain curve. Type 1 volumetric strain curve has a reversal point and, therefore, σ cd is less than the uniaxial compressive strength ( σ c). Type 2 has no reversal point, and the bulk volume of rock decreases until its failure occurs (i.e., σ cd = σ c). It is confirmed that the ratio between the elastic modulus ( E) and the parameter λ = n/ ɛ cd strongly affects the crack damage stress ( σ cd) for both type 1 and type 2 volumetric strain curves. It is revealed that heterogeneous carbonate rock samples exhibit different types of the volumetric strain curve even within the same rock formation, and the range of σ cd/ σ c = 0.54-1 for carbonate rocks is wider than the range (0.71 < σ cd/ σ c < 0.84) obtained by other researchers for granites, sandstones and quartzite. It is established that there is no connection between the type of the volumetric strain curve and values of n, E, σ cd, ν, E/(1 - 2 ν), M R = E/ σ c and E/ λ. On the other hand, the type of volumetric strain curve is connected with the values of λ and the ratio between the axial failure strain ( ɛ af) and the maximum total volumetric strain ( ɛ cd). It is argued that in case of small ɛ af/ ɛ cd-small λ, volumetric strain curve follows the type 2.

  18. Fast volumetric imaging with patterned illumination via digital micro-mirror device-based temporal focusing multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Hu, Yvonne Yuling; Lin, Chun-Yu; Lin, Cheng-Han; Chang, Hsin-Yu; Tsai, Sheng-Feng; Lin, Tzu-Wei; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Temporal focusing multiphoton microscopy (TFMPM) has the advantage of area excitation in an axial confinement of only a few microns; hence, it can offer fast three-dimensional (3D) multiphoton imaging. Herein, fast volumetric imaging via a developed digital micromirror device (DMD)-based TFMPM has been realized through the synchronization of an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) with a dynamic piezoelectric stage for axial scanning. The volumetric imaging rate can achieve 30 volumes per second according to the EMCCD frame rate of more than 400 frames per second, which allows for the 3D Brownian motion of one-micron fluorescent beads to be spatially observed. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the dynamic HiLo structural multiphoton microscope can reject background noise by way of the fast volumetric imaging with high-speed DMD patterned illumination. PMID:27231617

  19. Fast volumetric imaging with patterned illumination via digital micro-mirror device-based temporal focusing multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Hu, Yvonne Yuling; Lin, Chun-Yu; Lin, Cheng-Han; Chang, Hsin-Yu; Tsai, Sheng-Feng; Lin, Tzu-Wei; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2016-05-01

    Temporal focusing multiphoton microscopy (TFMPM) has the advantage of area excitation in an axial confinement of only a few microns; hence, it can offer fast three-dimensional (3D) multiphoton imaging. Herein, fast volumetric imaging via a developed digital micromirror device (DMD)-based TFMPM has been realized through the synchronization of an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) with a dynamic piezoelectric stage for axial scanning. The volumetric imaging rate can achieve 30 volumes per second according to the EMCCD frame rate of more than 400 frames per second, which allows for the 3D Brownian motion of one-micron fluorescent beads to be spatially observed. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the dynamic HiLo structural multiphoton microscope can reject background noise by way of the fast volumetric imaging with high-speed DMD patterned illumination. PMID:27231617

  20. Fast volumetric imaging with patterned illumination via digital micro-mirror device-based temporal focusing multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Hu, Yvonne Yuling; Lin, Chun-Yu; Lin, Cheng-Han; Chang, Hsin-Yu; Tsai, Sheng-Feng; Lin, Tzu-Wei; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2016-05-01

    Temporal focusing multiphoton microscopy (TFMPM) has the advantage of area excitation in an axial confinement of only a few microns; hence, it can offer fast three-dimensional (3D) multiphoton imaging. Herein, fast volumetric imaging via a developed digital micromirror device (DMD)-based TFMPM has been realized through the synchronization of an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) with a dynamic piezoelectric stage for axial scanning. The volumetric imaging rate can achieve 30 volumes per second according to the EMCCD frame rate of more than 400 frames per second, which allows for the 3D Brownian motion of one-micron fluorescent beads to be spatially observed. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the dynamic HiLo structural multiphoton microscope can reject background noise by way of the fast volumetric imaging with high-speed DMD patterned illumination.

  1. Volumetric imaging of fast biological dynamics in deep tissue via wavefront engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lingjie; Tang, Jianyong; Cui, Meng

    2016-03-01

    To reveal fast biological dynamics in deep tissue, we combine two wavefront engineering methods that were developed in our laboratory, namely optical phase-locked ultrasound lens (OPLUL) based volumetric imaging and iterative multiphoton adaptive compensation technique (IMPACT). OPLUL is used to generate oscillating defocusing wavefront for fast axial scanning, and IMPACT is used to compensate the wavefront distortions for deep tissue imaging. We show its promising applications in neuroscience and immunology.

  2. Altered Axial Skeletal Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The axial skeleton is routinely examined in standard developmental toxicity bioassays and has proven to be sensitive to a wide variety of chemical agents. Dysmorphogenesis in the skull, vertebral column and ribs has been described in both human populations and in laboratory anima...

  3. Volumetric Acoustic Vector Intensity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    A new measurement tool capable of imaging the acoustic intensity vector throughout a large volume is discussed. This tool consists of an array of fifty microphones that form a spherical surface of radius 0.2m. A simultaneous measurement of the pressure field across all the microphones provides time-domain near-field holograms. Near-field acoustical holography is used to convert the measured pressure into a volumetric vector intensity field as a function of frequency on a grid of points ranging from the center of the spherical surface to a radius of 0.4m. The volumetric intensity is displayed on three-dimensional plots that are used to locate noise sources outside the volume. There is no restriction on the type of noise source that can be studied. The sphere is mobile and can be moved from location to location to hunt for unidentified noise sources. An experiment inside a Boeing 757 aircraft in flight successfully tested the ability of the array to locate low-noise-excited sources on the fuselage. Reference transducers located on suspected noise source locations can also be used to increase the ability of this device to separate and identify multiple noise sources at a given frequency by using the theory of partial field decomposition. The frequency range of operation is 0 to 1400Hz. This device is ideal for the study of noise sources in commercial and military transportation vehicles in air, on land and underwater.

  4. Seismic volumetric flattening and segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomask, Jesse

    Two novel algorithms provide seismic interpretation solutions that use the full dimensionality of the data. The first is volumetric flattening and the second is image segmentation for tracking salt boundaries. Volumetric flattening is an efficient full-volume automatic dense-picking method applied to seismic data. First local dips (step-outs) are calculated over the entire seismic volume. The dips are then resolved into time shifts (or depth shifts) in a least-squares sense. To handle faults (discontinuous reflections), I apply a weighted inversion scheme. Additional information is incorporated in this flattening algorithm as geological constraints. The method is tested successfully on both synthetic and field data sets of varying degrees of complexity including salt piercements, angular unconformities, and laterally limited faults. The second full-volume interpretation method uses normalized cuts image segmentation to track salt interfaces. I apply a modified version of the normalized cuts image segmentation (NCIS) method to partition seismic images along salt interfaces. The method is capable of tracking interfaces that are not continuous, where conventional horizon tracking algorithms may fail. This method partitions the seismic image into two groups. One group is inside the salt body and the other is outside. Where the two groups meet is the salt boundary. By imposing bounds and by distributing the algorithm on a parallel cluster, I significantly increase efficiency and robustness. This method is demonstrated to be effective on both 2D and 3D seismic data sets.

  5. Surface nanoscale axial photonics.

    PubMed

    Sumetsky, M; Fini, J M

    2011-12-19

    Dense photonic integration promises to revolutionize optical computing and communications. However, efforts towards this goal face unacceptable attenuation of light caused by surface roughness in microscopic devices. Here we address this problem by introducing Surface Nanoscale Axial Photonics (SNAP). The SNAP platform is based on whispering gallery modes circulating around the optical fiber surface and undergoing slow axial propagation readily described by the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation. These modes can be steered with dramatically small nanoscale variation of the fiber radius, which is quite simple to introduce in practice. Extremely low loss of SNAP devices is achieved due to the low surface roughness inherent in a drawn fiber surface. In excellent agreement with the developed theory, we experimentally demonstrate localization of light in quantum wells, halting light by a point source, tunneling through potential barriers, dark states, etc. This demonstration has intriguing potential applications in filtering, switching, slowing light, and sensing.

  6. A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot was constructed for simple fluids which is suitable for engineering computations in heat transfer. Volumetric expansion factors were found useful in correlating heat transfer data over a wide range of operating conditions including liquids, gases and the near critical region.

  7. A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot has been constructed for simple fluids which is suitable for engineering computations in heat transfer. Volumetric expansion factors have been found useful in correlating heat transfer data over a wide range of operating conditions including liquids, gases and the near critical region.

  8. Volumetric Velocity Fields Downstream of a 2-Bladed Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troolin, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Tip vortices of axial-flow turbines are important in understanding the mean and turbulent characteristics of the wake. Volumetric 3-component velocimetry (V3V) was used to examine the flow downstream of a model two-bladed turbine in air. The turbine had a diameter of 177.8 mm and was powered by a motor operating at approximately 150 rpm. The measurement volume (50 × 50 × 20 mm) was positioned approximately 5 mm downstream of the blade tip, in order to examine the tip vortex structure. The V3V system utilized three 4MP cameras with 85 mm lenses positioned in a fixed triangular frame located at a distance of 450 mm from the back of the measurement volume. The illumination source was a 200 mJ dual-head pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 7.25 Hz and illuminating 1 micron olive oil droplets as tracer particles. The particle images were then analyzed to produce volumetric vector fields. The focus was placed on visualizing the complex interaction between the turbine tip vortices. Insights on the tip vortex dynamics and three dimensional characteristics of the wake flow will be discussed.

  9. Rapidly-steered single-element ultrasound for real-time volumetric imaging and guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauber, Mark; Western, Craig; Solek, Roman; Salisbury, Kenneth; Hristov, Dmitre; Schlosser, Jeffrey

    2016-03-01

    Volumetric ultrasound (US) imaging has the potential to provide real-time anatomical imaging with high soft-tissue contrast in a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic guidance applications. However, existing volumetric US machines utilize "wobbling" linear phased array or matrix phased array transducers which are costly to manufacture and necessitate bulky external processing units. To drastically reduce cost, improve portability, and reduce footprint, we propose a rapidly-steered single-element volumetric US imaging system. In this paper we explore the feasibility of this system with a proof-of-concept single-element volumetric US imaging device. The device uses a multi-directional raster-scan technique to generate a series of two-dimensional (2D) slices that were reconstructed into three-dimensional (3D) volumes. At 15 cm depth, 90° lateral field of view (FOV), and 20° elevation FOV, the device produced 20-slice volumes at a rate of 0.8 Hz. Imaging performance was evaluated using an US phantom. Spatial resolution was 2.0 mm, 4.7 mm, and 5.0 mm in the axial, lateral, and elevational directions at 7.5 cm. Relative motion of phantom targets were automatically tracked within US volumes with a mean error of -0.3+/-0.3 mm, -0.3+/-0.3 mm, and -0.1+/-0.5 mm in the axial, lateral, and elevational directions, respectively. The device exhibited a mean spatial distortion error of 0.3+/-0.9 mm, 0.4+/-0.7 mm, and -0.3+/-1.9 in the axial, lateral, and elevational directions. With a production cost near $1000, the performance characteristics of the proposed system make it an ideal candidate for diagnostic and image-guided therapy applications where form factor and low cost are paramount.

  10. Axial Plane Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tongcang; Ota, Sadao; Kim, Jeongmin; Wong, Zi Jing; Wang, Yuan; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    We present axial plane optical microscopy (APOM) that can, in contrast to conventional microscopy, directly image a sample's cross-section parallel to the optical axis of an objective lens without scanning. APOM combined with conventional microscopy simultaneously provides two orthogonal images of a 3D sample. More importantly, APOM uses only a single lens near the sample to achieve selective-plane illumination microscopy, as we demonstrated by three-dimensional (3D) imaging of fluorescent pollens and brain slices. This technique allows fast, high-contrast, and convenient 3D imaging of structures that are hundreds of microns beneath the surfaces of large biological tissues. PMID:25434770

  11. Axial Plane Optical Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tongcang; Ota, Sadao; Kim, Jeongmin; Wong, Zi Jing; Wang, Yuan; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-12-01

    We present axial plane optical microscopy (APOM) that can, in contrast to conventional microscopy, directly image a sample's cross-section parallel to the optical axis of an objective lens without scanning. APOM combined with conventional microscopy simultaneously provides two orthogonal images of a 3D sample. More importantly, APOM uses only a single lens near the sample to achieve selective-plane illumination microscopy, as we demonstrated by three-dimensional (3D) imaging of fluorescent pollens and brain slices. This technique allows fast, high-contrast, and convenient 3D imaging of structures that are hundreds of microns beneath the surfaces of large biological tissues.

  12. Whole-cell, multicolor superresolution imaging using volumetric multifocus microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hajj, Bassam; Wisniewski, Jan; El Beheiry, Mohamed; Chen, Jiji; Revyakin, Andrey; Wu, Carl; Dahan, Maxime

    2014-01-01

    Single molecule-based superresolution imaging has become an essential tool in modern cell biology. Because of the limited depth of field of optical imaging systems, one of the major challenges in superresolution imaging resides in capturing the 3D nanoscale morphology of the whole cell. Despite many previous attempts to extend the application of photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) techniques into three dimensions, effective localization depths do not typically exceed 1.2 µm. Thus, 3D imaging of whole cells (or even large organelles) still demands sequential acquisition at different axial positions and, therefore, suffers from the combined effects of out-of-focus molecule activation (increased background) and bleaching (loss of detections). Here, we present the use of multifocus microscopy for volumetric multicolor superresolution imaging. By simultaneously imaging nine different focal planes, the multifocus microscope instantaneously captures the distribution of single molecules (either fluorescent proteins or synthetic dyes) throughout an ∼4-µm-deep volume, with lateral and axial localization precisions of ∼20 and 50 nm, respectively. The capabilities of multifocus microscopy to rapidly image the 3D organization of intracellular structures are illustrated by superresolution imaging of the mammalian mitochondrial network and yeast microtubules during cell division. PMID:25422417

  13. Hologlyphics: volumetric image synthesis performance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, Walter

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes a novel volumetric image synthesis system and artistic technique, which generate moving volumetric images in real-time, integrated with music. The system, called the Hologlyphic Funkalizer, is performance based, wherein the images and sound are controlled by a live performer, for the purposes of entertaining a live audience and creating a performance art form unique to volumetric and autostereoscopic images. While currently configured for a specific parallax barrier display, the Hologlyphic Funkalizer's architecture is completely adaptable to various volumetric and autostereoscopic display technologies. Sound is distributed through a multi-channel audio system; currently a quadraphonic speaker setup is implemented. The system controls volumetric image synthesis, production of music and spatial sound via acoustic analysis and human gestural control, using a dedicated control panel, motion sensors, and multiple musical keyboards. Music can be produced by external acoustic instruments, pre-recorded sounds or custom audio synthesis integrated with the volumetric image synthesis. Aspects of the sound can control the evolution of images and visa versa. Sounds can be associated and interact with images, for example voice synthesis can be combined with an animated volumetric mouth, where nuances of generated speech modulate the mouth's expressiveness. Different images can be sent to up to 4 separate displays. The system applies many novel volumetric special effects, and extends several film and video special effects into the volumetric realm. Extensive and various content has been developed and shown to live audiences by a live performer. Real world applications will be explored, with feedback on the human factors.

  14. Survey of Volumetric Grid Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Alex; Volakis, John; Hulbert, Greg; Case, Jeff; Presley, Leroy L. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This document is the result of an Internet Survey of Volumetric grid generators. As such we have included information from only the responses which were sent to us. After the initial publication and posting of this survey, we would encourage authors and users of grid generators to send further information. Here is the initial query posted to SIGGRID@nas and the USENET group sci.physics.computational.fluid-dynamics. Date: Sun, 30 Jan 94 11:37:52 -0800 From: woo (Alex Woo x6010 227-6 rm 315) Subject: Info Sought for Survey of Grid Generators I am collecting information and reviews of both government sponsored and commercial mesh generators for large scientific calculations, both block structured and unstructured. If you send me a review of a mesh generator, please indicate its availability and cost. If you are a commercial concern with information on a product, please also include references for possible reviewers. Please email to woo@ra-next.arc.nasa.gov. I will post a summary and probably write a short note for the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Magazine. Alex Woo, MS 227-6 woo@ames.arc.nasa.gov NASA Ames Research Center NASAMAIL ACWOO Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 SPANET 24582::W00 (415) 604-6010 (FAX) 604-4357 fhplabs,decwrl,uunet)!ames!woo Disclaimer: These are not official statements of NASA or EMCC. We did not include all the submitted text here. Instead we have created a database entry in the freely available and widely used BIBTeX format which has an Uniform Resource Locator (URL) field pointing to more details. The BIBTeX database is modeled after those available from the BIBNET project at University of Utah.

  15. Paraspinal volumetric modulated arc therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, J L; Convery, H M; Hansen, V N; Saran, F H

    2012-01-01

    Objectives : The processes involved in the treatment of paraspinal tumours by volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) are described here by means of an illustrative case. Methods : Az single anticlockwise arc from gantry angle 179° to 181° was constructed using SmartArc (Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Fitchburg, WI) with control points spaced at 2°. The dose prescription was 60 Gy in 30 fractions to cover the planning target volume (PTV) as uniformly as possible while sparing the 0.3-cm planning risk volume (PRV) around the spinal cord. The plan was verified before treatment using a diode array phantom and radiochromic film. Treatment delivery was on a Synergy linear accelerator with a beam modulator head (Elekta Ltd, Crawley, UK). Results Homogeneous dose coverage of the PTV was achieved with a D2% of 62.0 Gy and D98% of 55.6 Gy. Maximum spinal cord dose was 49.9 Gy to 0.1 cm3 and maximum dose to the spinal cord PRV was 55.4 Gy to 0.1 cm3. At pre-treatment verification, the percentage of the high-dose region receiving a dose within 3% and 3 mm of the planned dose was 98.8% with the diode array and 93.4% with film. Delivery time was 2 min 15 s and the course of treatment was successfully completed. Conclusions VMAT was successfully planned, verified and delivered for this challenging tumour site. VMAT provides a very suitable method of treating complex paraspinal tumours, offering a high-quality conformal dose distribution with a short delivery time. PMID:22215885

  16. Volumetric analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskin, Kevin M.; Kusnick, Catherine A.; Shamsolkottabi, Susanne; Lang, Elvira V.; Corson, J. D.; Stanford, William; Thompson, Brad H.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a valid, reliable and accurate system of measurement of abdominal aortic aneurysms, using volumetric analysis of x-ray computed tomographic data. This study evaluates illustrative cases, and compares measurements of AAA phantoms, using standard 2D versus volumetric methods. To validate the volumetric analysis, four phantom aneurysms were constructed in a range of diameters (4.5 - 7.0 cm) which presents the greatest management challenge to the clinician. These phantoms were imaged using a Toshiba Xpress SX helical CT. Separate scans were obtained at conventional (10 mm X 10 mm) and thin slice (5 mm X 5 mm) collimations. The thin slices were reconstructed at 2 mm intervals. Data from each of the 96 scans were interpreted using a standard 2D approach, then analyzed using task-oriented volumetric software. We evaluate patient assessments, and compare greatest outer diameters of phantoms, by standard versus volumetric methods. Qualitative differences between solutions based on standard versus volumetric analysis of illustrative patient cases are substantial. Expert radiologists' standard measurements of phantom aneurysms are highly reliable (r2 equals 0.901 - 0.958; p < 0.001), but biased toward significant overestimation of aneurysm diameters in the range of clinical interest. For the same phantoms, volumetric analysis was both more reliable (r2 equals 0.986 - 0.996; p < 0.001), and more accurate, with no significant bias in the range of interest. Volumetric analysis promotes selection of more valid management strategies, by providing vital information not otherwise available, and allowing more reliable and accurate assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. It is particularly valuable in the presence of aortic tortuosity, vessel eccentricity, and uncertain involvement of critical vessels.

  17. GEOS axial booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    A booms and mechanisms subsystem was designed, developed, and qualified for the geostationary scientific satellite GEOS. Part of this subsystem consist of four axial booms consisting of one pair of 1 m booms and one pair of 2.5 m booms. Each of these booms is carrying one bird cage electric field sensor. Alignment accuracy requirements led to a telescopic type solution. Deployment is performed by pressurized nitrogen. At deployment in orbit two of these booms showed some anomalies and one of these two deployed only about 80%. Following this malfunction a detailed failure investigation was performed resulting in a design modification of some critical components as release mechanism, guide sleeves of the telescopic elements, and pressure system.

  18. Axial movements in ideomotor apraxia

    PubMed Central

    Poeck, K; Lehmkuhl, G; Willmes, K

    1982-01-01

    Non-symbolic axial movements were examined and compared to oral and limb movements in a group of 60 aphasic patients (15 of each major subgroup) with exclusively left-sided brain damage. The contention in the literature that axial movements are preserved in patients with ideomotor limb apraxia was not confirmed. PMID:6186771

  19. The diagnostic contribution of CT volumetric rendering techniques in routine practice

    PubMed Central

    Perandini, Simone; Faccioli, N; Zaccarella, A; Re, TJ; Mucelli, R Pozzi

    2010-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) volumetric rendering techniques such as maximum intensity projection (MIP), minimum intensity projection (MinIP), shaded surface display (SSD), volume rendering (VR), and virtual endoscopy (VE) provide added diagnostic capabilities. The diagnostic value of such reconstruction techniques is well documented in literature. These techniques permit the exploration of fine anatomical detail that would be difficult to evaluate using axial reconstructions alone. Although these techniques are now widely available, many radiologists are either unfamiliar with them or do not fully utilize their potential in daily clinical practice. This paper is intended to provide an overview of the most common CT volumetric rendering techniques and their practical use in everyday diagnostics. PMID:20607017

  20. Low-temperature volumetric receiver concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drost, M. K.

    1988-09-01

    This document describes an alternative solar central receiver concept that offers the potential for a substantial reduction in the cost of electrical energy. The concept consists of a low temperature volumetric receiver which supplies 1100 F air to a Kalina cycle heat engine. Hot air can also be supplied to a packed bed of Dresser basalt where the hot air is used to heat the bed. The thermal energy stored in the bed can be extracted and supplied to the Kalina cycle during periods of low insolation. Previous investigations of the volumetric receiver concentrated on high temperature applications. The results showed that the volumetric concept could be very efficient, but the receiver was expensive and there were significant technical problems. Areas of technical uncertainty included fiber durability, the feasibility of inducing a preswirl and cost effective applications. The use of the volumetric receiver to produce low temperature will avoid the problems identified in the high temperature studies. The attractiveness of the low temperature concept is enhanced by the availability of the Kalina cycle. This heat engine was developed as a bottoming cycle for Brayton and Rankine cycle power plants. The key feature of the Kalina cycle is its ability to efficiently utilize the energy in a relatively low temperature heat source. The combination of the low temperature volumetric receiver and the Kalina cycle is particularly interesting.

  1. Low-temperature volumetric receiver concept

    SciTech Connect

    Drost, M.K.

    1988-09-01

    This document describes an alternative solar central receiver concept that offers the potential for a substantial reduction in the cost of electrical energy. The concept consists of a low temperature volumetric receiver which supplies 1100/degree/F air to a Kalina cycle heat engine. Hot air can also be supplied to a packed bed of Dresser basalt where the hot air is used to heat the bed. The thermal energy stored in the bed can be extracted and supplied to the Kalina cycle during periods of low insolation. Previous investigations of the volumetric receiver concentrated on high temperature applications. The results showed that the volumetric concept could be very efficient, but the receiver was expensive and there were significant technical problems. Areas of technical uncertainty included fiber durability, the feasibility of inducing a preswirl and cost effective applications. The use of the volumetric receiver to produce low temperature will avoid the problems identified in the high temperature studies. The attractiveness of the low temperature concept is enhanced by the availability of the Kalina cycle. This heat engine was developed as a bottoming cycle for Brayton and Rankine cycle power plants. The key feature of the Kalina cycle is its ability to efficiently utilize the energy in a relatively low temperature heat source. The combination of the low temperature volumetric receiver and the Kalina cycle is particularly interesting. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Volumetric Colon Wall Unfolding Using Harmonic Differentials

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Wei; Marino, Joseph; Kaufman, Arie; Gu, Xianfeng David

    2011-01-01

    Volumetric colon wall unfolding is a novel method for virtual colon analysis and visualization with valuable applications in virtual colonoscopy (VC) and computer-aided detection (CAD) systems. A volumetrically unfolded colon enables doctors to visualize the entire colon structure without occlusions due to haustral folds, and is critical for performing efficient and accurate texture analysis on the volumetric colon wall. Though conventional colon surface flattening has been employed for these uses, volumetric colon unfolding offers the advantages of providing the needed quantities of information with needed accuracy. This work presents an efficient and effective volumetric colon unfolding method based on harmonic differentials. The colon volumes are reconstructed from CT images and are represented as tetrahedral meshes. Three harmonic 1-forms, which are linearly independent everywhere, are computed on the tetrahedral mesh. Through integration of the harmonic 1-forms, the colon volume is mapped periodically to a canonical cuboid. The method presented is automatic, simple, and practical. Experimental results are reported to show the performance of the algorithm on real medical datasets. Though applied here specifically to the colon, the method is general and can be generalized for other volumes. PMID:21765563

  3. MTF analysis of a prototype table-top inverse-geometry volumetric CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Taly G.; Bennett, N. Robert; Mazin, Samuel R.; Star-Lack, Josh; Solomon, Edward G.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2005-04-01

    This work investigates the modulation transfer function (MTF) of a prototype table-top inverse-geometry volumetric CT (IGCT) system. The IGCT system has been proposed to acquire sufficient volumetric data in one circular rotation using a large-area scanned source and a narrower array of fast detectors. The source and detector arrays have the same axial, or slice, extent, thus providing sufficient volumetric coverage. A prototype system has been built using a NexRay Scanning-Beam Digital X-ray system (NexRay, Inc., Los Gatos, CA) with the C-arm gantry in the horizontal position and a stage placed between the source and detector to rotate the scanned object. The resulting system has a 16-cm in-plane field of view (FOV) and 5-cm axial FOV. Two phantoms were constructed for measuring the MTF. A 76 micron tungsten wire placed axially in a plastic frame was used to measure the in-plane MTF, and the same wire slanted at 45 degrees was used to test the isotropy of the MTF. The data were calibrated for flat-field intensity and geometric misalignment and reconstructed using a modified 3D PET algorithm. For both phantoms, slices perpendicular to the wires were reconstructed. Simulations which model the IGCT system were used to verify the MTF measurement, along with analytical predictions. The measured MTF curve was similar in shape to the predicted curve with a 10% point at 20 lp/cm compared to a predicted 18 lp/cm. Future work will also study the uniformity of the MTF across the FOV and further characterize the IGCT system.

  4. Axial gap rotating electrical machine

    DOEpatents

    None

    2016-02-23

    Direct drive rotating electrical machines with axial air gaps are disclosed. In these machines, a rotor ring and stator ring define an axial air gap between them. Sets of gap-maintaining rolling supports bear between the rotor ring and the stator ring at their peripheries to maintain the axial air gap. Also disclosed are wind turbines using these generators, and structures and methods for mounting direct drive rotating electrical generators to the hubs of wind turbines. In particular, the rotor ring of the generator may be carried directly by the hub of a wind turbine to rotate relative to a shaft without being mounted directly to the shaft.

  5. Intra-axial brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Rapalino, Otto; Batchelor, Tracy; González, R Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    There is a wide variety of intra-axial primary and secondary brain neoplasms. Many of them have characteristic imaging features while other tumors can present in a similar fashion. There are peculiar posttreatment imaging phenomena that can present as intra-axial mass-like lesions (such as pseudoprogression or radiation necrosis), further complicating the diagnosis and clinical follow-up of patients with intracerebral tumors. The purpose of this chapter is to present a general overview of the most common intra-axial brain tumors and peculiar posttreatment changes that are very important in the diagnosis and clinical follow-up of patients with brain tumors. PMID:27432670

  6. Nonequilibrium volumetric response of shocked polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, B E

    2009-01-01

    Polymers are well known for their non-equilibrium deviatoric behavior. However, investigations involving both high rate shock experiments and equilibrium measured thermodynamic quantities remind us that the volumetric behavior also exhibits a non-equilibrium response. Experiments supporting the notion of a non-equilibrium volumetric behavior will be summarized. Following that discussion, a continuum-level theory is proposed that will account for both the equilibrium and non-equilibrium response. Upon finding agreement with experiment, the theory is used to study the relaxation of a shocked polymer back towards its shocked equilibrium state.

  7. Fluorescence axial nanotomography with plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Cade, Nicholas I; Fruhwirth, Gilbert O; Krasavin, Alexey V; Ng, Tony; Richards, David

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel imaging technique with super-resolution axial sensitivity, exploiting the changes in fluorescence lifetime above a plasmonic substrate. Using conventional confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging, we show that it is possible to deliver down to 6 nm axial position sensitivity of fluorophores in whole biological cell imaging. We employ this technique to map the topography of the cellular membrane, and demonstrate its application in an investigation of receptor-mediated endocytosis in carcinoma cells.

  8. Axial anomaly at arbitrary virtualities

    SciTech Connect

    Veretin, O.L.; Teryaev, O.V.

    1995-12-01

    The one-loop analytic expression for the axial-vector triangle diagram involving an anomaly is obtained for arbitrary virtualities of external momenta. The `t Hooft consistency principle is applied to the QCD sum rules for the first moment of the photon spin structure function g{sub l}{sup {gamma}}. It is shown that the contribution of the singlet axial current to the sum rules for g{sub l}{sup {gamma}} vanishes. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Clinical Applications of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Matuszak, Martha M.; Yan Di; Grills, Inga; Martinez, Alvaro

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To present treatment planning case studies for several treatment sites for which volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) could have a positive impact; and to share an initial clinical experience with VMAT for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Four case studies are presented to show the potential benefit of VMAT compared with conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in pediatric cancer, bone marrow-sparing whole-abdominopelvic irradiation (WAPI), and SBRT of the lung and spine. Details of clinical implementation of VMAT for SBRT are presented. The VMAT plans are compared with conventional techniques in terms of dosimetric quality and delivery efficiency. Results: Volumetric modulated arc therapy reduced the treatment time of spine SBRT by 37% and improved isodose conformality. Conformal and VMAT techniques for lung SBRT had similar dosimetric quality, but VMAT had improved target coverage and took 59% less time to deliver, although monitor units were increased by 5%. In a complex pediatric pelvic example, VMAT reduced treatment time by 78% and monitor units by 25% compared with IMRT. A double-isocenter VMAT technique for WAPI can spare bone marrow while maintaining good delivery efficiency. Conclusions: Volumetric modulated arc therapy is a new technology that may benefit different patient populations, including pediatric cancer patients and those undergoing concurrent chemotherapy and WAPI. Volumetric modulated arc therapy has been used and shown to be beneficial for significantly improving delivery efficiency of lung and spine SBRT.

  10. A Volumetric Flask as a Projector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Limsuwan, P.; Asanithi, P.; Thongpool, V.; Piriyawong, V.; Limsuwan, S.

    2012-01-01

    A lens based on liquid in the confined volume of a volumetric flask was presented as a potential projector to observe microscopic floating organisms or materials. In this experiment, a mosquito larva from a natural pond was selected as a demonstration sample. By shining a light beam from a laser pointer of any visible wavelength through the…

  11. Exploring interaction with 3D volumetric displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Tovi; Wigdor, Daniel; Balakrishnan, Ravin

    2005-03-01

    Volumetric displays generate true volumetric 3D images by actually illuminating points in 3D space. As a result, viewing their contents is similar to viewing physical objects in the real world. These displays provide a 360 degree field of view, and do not require the user to wear hardware such as shutter glasses or head-trackers. These properties make them a promising alternative to traditional display systems for viewing imagery in 3D. Because these displays have only recently been made available commercially (e.g., www.actuality-systems.com), their current use tends to be limited to non-interactive output-only display devices. To take full advantage of the unique features of these displays, however, it would be desirable if the 3D data being displayed could be directly interacted with and manipulated. We investigate interaction techniques for volumetric display interfaces, through the development of an interactive 3D geometric model building application. While this application area itself presents many interesting challenges, our focus is on the interaction techniques that are likely generalizable to interactive applications for other domains. We explore a very direct style of interaction where the user interacts with the virtual data using direct finger manipulations on and around the enclosure surrounding the displayed 3D volumetric image.

  12. Resolution and noise trade-off analysis for volumetric CT

    SciTech Connect

    Li Baojun; Avinash, Gopal B.; Hsieh, Jiang

    2007-10-15

    Until recently, most studies addressing the trade-off between spatial resolution and quantum noise were performed in the context of single-slice CT. In this study, we extend the theoretical framework of previous works to volumetric CT and further extend it by taking into account the actual shapes of the preferred reconstruction kernels. In the experimental study, we also attempt to explore a three-dimensional approach for spatial resolution measurement, as opposed to the conventional two-dimensional approaches that were widely adopted in previously published studies. By scanning a finite-sized sphere phantom, the MTF was measured from the edge profile along the spherical surface. Cases of different resolutions (and noise levels) were generated by adjusting the reconstruction kernel. To reduce bias, the total photon fluxes were matched: 120 kVp, 200 mA, and 1 s per gantry rotation. All data sets were reconstructed using a modified FDK algorithm under the same condition: Scan field-of-view (SFOV)=10 cm, and slice thickness=0.625 mm. The theoretical analysis indicated that the variance of noise is proportional to >4th power of the spatial resolution. Our experimental results supported this conclusion by showing the relationship is 4.6th (helical) or 5th (axial) power.

  13. Resolution and noise trade-off analysis for volumetric CT.

    PubMed

    Li, Baojun; Avinash, Gopal B; Hsieh, Jiang

    2007-10-01

    Until recently, most studies addressing the trade-off between spatial resolution and quantum noise were performed in the context of single-slice CT. In this study, we extend the theoretical framework of previous works to volumetric CT and further extend it by taking into account the actual shapes of the preferred reconstruction kernels. In the experimental study, we also attempt to explore a three-dimensional approach for spatial resolution measurement, as opposed to the conventional two-dimensional approaches that were widely adopted in previously published studies. By scanning a finite-sized sphere phantom, the MTF was measured from the edge profile along the spherical surface. Cases of different resolutions (and noise levels) were generated by adjusting the reconstruction kernel. To reduce bias, the total photon fluxes were matched: 120 kVp, 200 mA, and 1 s per gantry rotation. All data sets were reconstructed using a modified FDK algorithm under the same condition: Scan field-of-view (SFOV) = 10 cm, and slice thickness = 0.625 mm. The theoretical analysis indicated that the variance of noise is proportional to > 4th power of the spatial resolution. Our experimental results supported this conclusion by showing the relationship is 4.6th (helical) or 5th (axial) power.

  14. Computed optical interferometric tomography for high-speed volumetric cellular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Shemonski, Nathan D.; Adie, Steven G.; Ahmad, Adeel; Bower, Andrew J.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional high-resolution imaging methods are important for cellular-level research. Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is a low-coherence-based interferometry technology for cellular imaging with both high axial and lateral resolution. Using a high-numerical-aperture objective, OCM normally has a shallow depth of field and requires scanning the focus through the entire region of interest to perform volumetric imaging. With a higher-numerical-aperture objective, the image quality of OCM is affected by and more sensitive to aberrations. Interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) and computational adaptive optics (CAO) are computed imaging techniques that overcome the depth-of-field limitation and the effect of optical aberrations in optical coherence tomography (OCT), respectively. In this work we combine OCM with ISAM and CAO to achieve high-speed volumetric cellular imaging. Experimental imaging results of ex vivo human breast tissue, ex vivo mouse brain tissue, in vitro fibroblast cells in 3D scaffolds, and in vivo human skin demonstrate the significant potential of this technique for high-speed volumetric cellular imaging. PMID:25401012

  15. Thermoacoustic mixture separation with an axial temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, Drew W; Swift, Gregory A

    2008-01-01

    The theory of thermoacoustic mixture separation is extended to include the effect of a nonzero axial temperature gradient. The analysis yields a new term in the second-order mole flux that is proportional to the temperature gradient and to the square of the volumetric velocity and is independent of the phasing of the wave. Because of this new term, thermoacoustic separation stops at a critical temperature gradient and changes direction above that gradient. For a traveling wave, this gradient is somewhat higher than that predicted by a simple four-step model. An experiment tests the theory for temperature gradients from 0 to 416 K/m in 50-50 He-Ar mixtures.

  16. Performance comparisons of planar and volumetric observers for lesion detection in PET scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Seung; Kinahan, Paul E.; Lartizien, Carole; Comtat, Claude; Lewellen, Tom K.

    2003-05-01

    This work presents initial results of comparisons between planar and volumetric observer detection task performances for both human and model observers. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging acquires and reconstructs tomographic images as contiguous volumetric (3D) images. Consequently physicians typically interpret these images by searching the image volume using linked orthogonal planar images in the three standard orientations (transverse, sagittal, and coronal). Most of observer studies, however, have typically used planar images for evaluation. For human observer ROC studies, an observer scoring tool, similar to the display tool being used in clinical PET oncology imaging, has been developed. For model observer studies the non-prewhitening matched filter (NPWMF) and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) were used to compute detectabilities as figures-of-merit for class separations. For the volumetric (3D)model observers, the entire image volume is used with appropriate 3D templates. For the planar (2D) model observers the transaxial plane centered on the target sphere is extracted and analyzed using 2D templates. Multiple realizations were generated using a non-Monte Carlo analytic simulator for feasible amount of simulation time and statistically accurate noise properties. For comparisons, the correlations between each model observer and human observer performance are computed. The result showed that 3D model observers have a higher correlation with human observers than 2D observers do when axial smoothing is not applied. With axial smoothing, however, the correlation of 2D model observers in general increased to the level of 3D model observer correlations with the human observer.

  17. High pressure volumetric measurements in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers.

    PubMed

    Tosh, R E; Collings, P J

    1986-07-10

    The one previously reported high pressure volumetric experiment on a phospholipid bilayer investigated a region of pressure between 0 and 25 MPa and obtained isothermal compressibility values for the liquid crystal and intermediate phases which differed by more than a factor of ten. We report new volumetric measurements around the main transition in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) from 0 to 100 MPa. The isothermal compressibility data for the two phases are of the same order of magnitude, and the experimentally determined coexistence curve, specific volume dependence, and volume discontinuity values are compared with the predictions of the phenomenological theory according to Sugar and Tarjan ((1982) Sov. Phys. Crystallogr. 27, 4-5). Significant discrepancies between this theory and experiment are found. Finally, the data indicate that steric interactions play a more dominant role in the main transition of phospholipid bilayers than in transitions in most thermotropic liquid crystals.

  18. JPEG2000 Part 10: volumetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelkens, Peter; Brislawn, Christopher M.; Barbarien, Joeri; Munteanu, Adrian; Cornelis, Jan P.

    2003-11-01

    Recently, the JPEG2000 committee (ISO/IEC JTC1/SC29/WG1) decided to start up a new standardization activity to support the encoding of volumetric and floating-point data sets: Part 10 - Coding Volumetric and Floating-point Data (JP3D). This future standard will support functionalities like resolution and quality scalability and region-of-interest coding, while exploiting the entropy in the additional third dimension to improve the rate-distortion performance. In this paper, we give an overview of the markets and application areas targeted by JP3D, the imposed requirements and the considered algorithms with a specific focus on the realization of the region-of-interest functionality.

  19. VOLUMETRIC POLYMERIZATION SHRINKAGE OF CONTEMPORARY COMPOSITE RESINS

    PubMed Central

    Nagem, Halim; Nagem, Haline Drumond; Francisconi, Paulo Afonso Silveira; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Coutinho, Kennedy Queiroz

    2007-01-01

    The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill Magic, Alert, and Solitaire) to determine whether there are differences among these materials. The tests were conducted with precision of 0.1 mg. The volumetric shrinkage was measured by hydrostatic weighing before and after polymerization and calculated by known mathematical equations. One-way ANOVA (á=0.05) was used to determine statistically significant differences in volumetric shrinkage among the tested composite resins. Suprafill (1.87±0.01) and Definite (1.89±0.01) shrank significantly less than the other composite resins. SureFil (2.01±0.06), Filtek Z250 (1.99±0.03), and Fill Magic (2.02±0.02) presented intermediate levels of polymerization shrinkage. Alert and Solitaire presented the highest degree of polymerization shrinkage. Knowing the polymerization shrinkage rates of the commercially available composite resins, the dentist would be able to choose between using composite resins with lower polymerization shrinkage rates or adopting technical or operational procedures to minimize the adverse effects deriving from resin contraction during light-activation. PMID:19089177

  20. Low-Pass Filtered Volumetric Shadows.

    PubMed

    Ament, Marco; Sadlo, Filip; Dachsbacher, Carsten; Weiskopf, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    We present a novel and efficient method to compute volumetric soft shadows for interactive direct volume visualization to improve the perception of spatial depth. By direct control of the softness of volumetric shadows, disturbing visual patterns due to hard shadows can be avoided and users can adapt the illumination to their personal and application-specific requirements. We compute the shadowing of a point in the data set by employing spatial filtering of the optical depth over a finite area patch pointing toward each light source. Conceptually, the area patch spans a volumetric region that is sampled with shadow rays; afterward, the resulting optical depth values are convolved with a low-pass filter on the patch. In the numerical computation, however, to avoid expensive shadow ray marching, we show how to align and set up summed area tables for both directional and point light sources. Once computed, the summed area tables enable efficient evaluation of soft shadows for each point in constant time without shadow ray marching and the softness of the shadows can be controlled interactively. We integrated our method in a GPU-based volume renderer with ray casting from the camera, which offers interactive control of the transfer function, light source positions, and viewpoint, for both static and time-dependent data sets. Our results demonstrate the benefit of soft shadows for visualization to achieve user-controlled illumination with many-point lighting setups for improved perception combined with high rendering speed. PMID:26356957

  1. Axial structure of the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Veronique Bernard; Latifa Elouadrhiri; Ulf-G Meissner

    2002-01-01

    We review the current status of experimental and theoretical understanding of the axial nucleon structure at low and moderate energies. Topics considered include (quasi)elastic (anti)neutrino-nucleon scattering, charged pion electroproduction off nucleons and ordinary as well as radiative muon capture on the proton.

  2. Forced axial segregation in axially inhomogeneous rotating systems.

    PubMed

    González, S; Windows-Yule, C R K; Luding, S; Parker, D J; Thornton, A R

    2015-08-01

    Controlling segregation is both a practical and a theoretical challenge. Using a novel drum design comprising concave and convex geometry, we explore, through the application of both discrete particle simulations and positron emission particle tracking, a means by which radial size segregation may be used to drive axial segregation, resulting in an order of magnitude increase in the rate of separation. The inhomogeneous drum geometry explored also allows the direction of axial segregation within a binary granular bed to be controlled, with a stable, two-band segregation pattern being reliably and reproducibly imposed on the bed for a variety of differing system parameters. This strong banding is observed to persist even in systems that are highly constrained in the axial direction, where such segregation would not normally occur. These findings, and the explanations provided of their underlying mechanisms, could lead to radical new designs for a broad range of particle processing applications but also may potentially prove useful for medical and microflow applications. PMID:26382389

  3. Forced axial segregation in axially inhomogeneous rotating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, S.; Windows-Yule, C. R. K.; Luding, S.; Parker, D. J.; Thornton, A. R.

    2015-08-01

    Controlling segregation is both a practical and a theoretical challenge. Using a novel drum design comprising concave and convex geometry, we explore, through the application of both discrete particle simulations and positron emission particle tracking, a means by which radial size segregation may be used to drive axial segregation, resulting in an order of magnitude increase in the rate of separation. The inhomogeneous drum geometry explored also allows the direction of axial segregation within a binary granular bed to be controlled, with a stable, two-band segregation pattern being reliably and reproducibly imposed on the bed for a variety of differing system parameters. This strong banding is observed to persist even in systems that are highly constrained in the axial direction, where such segregation would not normally occur. These findings, and the explanations provided of their underlying mechanisms, could lead to radical new designs for a broad range of particle processing applications but also may potentially prove useful for medical and microflow applications.

  4. Gas sorption and the consequent volumetric and permeability change of coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wenjuan

    in the injection gas, the greater the amount of total adsorption. Volumetric strain followed the same trend as the amount of adsorption with pressure and injection gas composition. Permeability showed opposite behaviors, decreasing with the increase of pressure and the percentage of CO2 in the injection gas. The experimental adsorption, volumetric strain, and permeability data were analyzed to investigate the numerical correlations between gas sorption, sorption-induced volumetric strain and permeability, and pressure and injection gas composition. The relationship between the amount of adsorption and pressure for pure gases (CO2 and N2) were readily represented by parametric isotherm models, such as Langmuir and the N-layer BET equations. Modeling efforts of multicomponent adsorption included predicting amount of adsorption and adsorbed phase composition based on the extended Langmuir equations and the ideal adsorbed solution model. Activity coefficients of the components in the adsorbed phase were computed based on the real adsorbed solution model and the ABC excess Gibbs free energy model. Algorithms for modeling the CO 2/N2-Coal system were developed, and the constraints and strength of each model were discussed. The experimental volumetric strain was found to be linearly proportional to the total amount of adsorption and independent of the injection gas composition. The permeability reduction could not be readily correlated by the models in the literature unless the change of other coal properties (bulk modulus, axial constrained modulus, etc.) due to gas sorption was incorporated. The sorption, volumetric strain, and permeability data collected in this study can be used for comparison by other researchers conducting similar studies. The algorithms of sorption modeling and the correlations developed in this study are readily incorporated into the simulation of enhanced coalbed methane recovery and CO2 sequestration in coalbeds. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  5. Magnetic volumetric hologram memory with magnetic garnet.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuichi; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Lim, Pang Boey; Inoue, Mitsuteru

    2014-06-30

    Holographic memory is a promising next-generation optical memory that has a higher recording density and a higher transfer rate than other types of memory. In holographic memory, magnetic garnet films can serve as rewritable holographic memory media by use of magneto-optical effect. We have now demonstrated that a magnetic hologram can be recorded volumetrically in a ferromagnetic garnet film and that the signal image can be reconstructed from it for the first time. In addition, multiplicity of the magnetic hologram was also confirmed; the image could be reconstructed from a spot overlapped by other spots.

  6. Volumetric Near-Field Microwave Plasma Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Exton, R. J.; Balla, R. Jeffrey; Herring, G. C.; Popovic, S.; Vuskovic, L.

    2003-01-01

    A periodic series of microwave-induced plasmoids is generated using the outgoing wave from a microwave horn and the reflected wave from a nearby on-axis concave reflector. The plasmoids are spaced at half-wavelength separations according to a standing-wave pattern. The plasmoids are enhanced by an effective focusing in the near field of the horn (Fresnel region) as a result of a diffractive narrowing. Optical imaging, electron density, and rotational temperature measurements characterize the near field plasma region. Volumetric microwave discharges may have application to combustion ignition in scramjet engines.

  7. Implementation and characterization of a 320-slice volumetric CT scanner for simulation in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Coolens, C.; Breen, S.; Purdie, T. G.; Owrangi, A.; Publicover, J.; Bartolac, S.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Effective target definition and broad employment of treatment response assessment with dynamic contrast-enhanced CT in radiation oncology requires increased speed and coverage for use within a single bolus injection. To this end, a novel volumetric CT scanner (Aquilion One, Toshiba, Tochigi Pref., Japan) has been installed at the Princess Margaret Hospital for implementation into routine CT simulation. This technology offers great advantages for anatomical and functional imaging in both scan speed and coverage. The aim of this work is to investigate the system's imaging performance and quality as well as CT quantification accuracy which is important for radiotherapy dose calculations. Methods: The 320-slice CT scanner uses a 160 mm wide-area (2D) solid-state detector design which provides the possibility to acquire a volumetric axial length of 160 mm without moving the CT couch. This is referred to as ''volume'' and can be scanned with a rotation speed of 0.35-3 s. The scanner can also be used as a 64-slice CT scanner and perform conventional (axial) and helical acquisitions with collimation ranges of 1-32 and 16-32 mm, respectively. Commissioning was performed according to AAPM Reports TG 66 and 39 for both helical and volumetric imaging. Defrise and other cone-beam image analysis tests were performed. Results: Overall, the imaging spatial resolution and geometric efficiency (GE) were found to be very good (>10 lp/mm, <1 mm spatial integrity and GE{sub 160mm}=85%) and within the AAPM guidelines as well as IEC recommendations. Although there is evidence of some cone-beam artifacts when scanning the Defrise phantom, image quality was found to be good and sufficient for treatment planning (soft tissue noise <10 HU). Measurements of CT number stability and contrast-to-noise values across the volume indicate clinically acceptable scan accuracy even at the field edge. Conclusions: Initial experience with this exciting new technology confirms its accuracy for

  8. Volumetric expiratory high-resolution CT of the lung.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Mizuki; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2004-11-01

    We developed a volumetric expiratory high-resolution CT (HRCT) protocol that provides combined inspiratory and expiratory volumetric imaging of the lung without increasing radiation exposure, and conducted a preliminary feasibility assessment of this protocol to evaluate diffuse lung disease with small airway abnormalities. The volumetric expiratory high-resolution CT increased the detectability of the conducting airway to the areas of air trapping (P<0.0001), and added significant information about extent and distribution of air trapping (P<0.0001).

  9. FELIX: a volumetric 3D laser display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahr, Detlef; Langhans, Knut; Gerken, Martin; Vogt, Carsten; Bezecny, Daniel; Homann, Dennis

    1996-03-01

    In this paper, an innovative approach of a true 3D image presentation in a space filling, volumetric laser display will be described. The introduced prototype system is based on a moving target screen that sweeps the display volume. Net result is the optical equivalent of a 3D array of image points illuminated to form a model of the object which occupies a physical space. Wireframe graphics are presented within the display volume which a group of people can walk around and examine simultaneously from nearly any orientation and without any visual aids. Further to the detailed vector scanning mode, a raster scanned system and a combination of both techniques are under development. The volumetric 3D laser display technology for true reproduction of spatial images can tremendously improve the viewers ability to interpret data and to reliably determine distance, shape and orientation. Possible applications for this development range from air traffic control, where moving blips of light represent individual aircrafts in a true to scale projected airspace of an airport, to various medical applications (e.g. electrocardiography, computer-tomography), to entertainment and education visualization as well as imaging in the field of engineering and Computer Aided Design.

  10. BOREAS HYD-1 Volumetric Soil Moisture Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuenca, Richard H.; Kelly, Shaun F.; Stangel, David E.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Hydrology (HYD)-1 team made measurements of volumetric soil moisture at the Southern Study Area (SSA) and Northern Study Area (NSA) tower flux sites in 1994 and at selected tower flux sites in 1995-97. Different methods were used to collect these measurements, including neutron probe and manual and automated Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR). In 1994, the measurements were made every other day at the NSA-OJP (Old Jack Pine), NSA-YJP (Young Jack Pine), NSA-OBS (Old Black Spruce), NSA-Fen, SSA-OJP, SSA-YJP, SSA-Fen, SSA-YA (Young Aspen), and SSA-OBS sites. In 1995-97, when automated equipment was deployed at NSA-OJP, NSA-YJP, NSA-OBS, SSA-OBS, and SSA-OA (Old Aspen), the measurements were made as often as every hour. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The volumetric soil moisture data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  11. Integral volumetric imaging using decentered elemental lenses.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Shimpei; Kakeya, Hideki

    2012-11-01

    This paper proposes a high resolution integral imaging system using a lens array composed of non-uniform decentered elemental lenses. One of the problems of integral imaging is the trade-off relationship between the resolution and the number of views. When the number of views is small, motion parallax becomes strongly discrete to maintain the viewing angle. In order to overcome this trade-off, the proposed method uses the elemental lenses whose size is smaller than that of the elemental images. To keep the images generated by the elemental lenses at constant depth, the lens array is designed so that the optical centers of elemental lenses may be located in the centers of elemental images, not in the centers of elemental lenses. To compensate optical distortion, new image rendering algorithm is developed so that undistorted 3D image may be presented with a non-uniform lens array. The proposed design of lens array can be applied to integral volumetric imaging, where display panels are layered to show volumetric images in the scheme of integral imaging.

  12. Golimumab for treatment of axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Rios Rodriguez, Valeria; Poddubnyy, Denis

    2016-02-01

    Axial spondyloarthritis comprises two forms: nonradiographic (nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis) and radiographic (better known as ankylosing spondylitis), which are often considered as two stages of one disease. Historically, all currently available TNF-α inhibitors were first investigated in ankylosing spondylitis and later on in nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis. This year, EMA has granted golimumab approval for the treatment of active nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis based on the recently published data from the GO-AHEAD study. This article summarizes recent data on efficacy and safety of golimumab in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis and nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis.

  13. Disentangling volumetric and hydrational properties of proteins.

    PubMed

    Voloshin, Vladimir P; Medvedev, Nikolai N; Smolin, Nikolai; Geiger, Alfons; Winter, Roland

    2015-02-01

    We used molecular dynamics simulations of a typical monomeric protein, SNase, in combination with Voronoi-Delaunay tessellation to study and analyze the temperature dependence of the apparent volume, Vapp, of the solute. We show that the void volume, VB, created in the boundary region between solute and solvent, determines the temperature dependence of Vapp to a major extent. The less pronounced but still significant temperature dependence of the molecular volume of the solute, VM, is essentially the result of the expansivity of its internal voids, as the van der Waals contribution to VM is practically independent of temperature. Results for polypeptides of different chemical nature feature a similar temperature behavior, suggesting that the boundary/hydration contribution seems to be a universal part of the temperature dependence of Vapp. The results presented here shine new light on the discussion surrounding the physical basis for understanding and decomposing the volumetric properties of proteins and biomolecules in general. PMID:25590869

  14. All Photons Imaging Through Volumetric Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satat, Guy; Heshmat, Barmak; Raviv, Dan; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-09-01

    Imaging through thick highly scattering media (sample thickness ≫ mean free path) can realize broad applications in biomedical and industrial imaging as well as remote sensing. Here we propose a computational “All Photons Imaging” (API) framework that utilizes time-resolved measurement for imaging through thick volumetric scattering by using both early arrived (non-scattered) and diffused photons. As opposed to other methods which aim to lock on specific photons (coherent, ballistic, acoustically modulated, etc.), this framework aims to use all of the optical signal. Compared to conventional early photon measurements for imaging through a 15 mm tissue phantom, our method shows a two fold improvement in spatial resolution (4db increase in Peak SNR). This all optical, calibration-free framework enables widefield imaging through thick turbid media, and opens new avenues in non-invasive testing, analysis, and diagnosis.

  15. All Photons Imaging Through Volumetric Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Satat, Guy; Heshmat, Barmak; Raviv, Dan; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Imaging through thick highly scattering media (sample thickness ≫ mean free path) can realize broad applications in biomedical and industrial imaging as well as remote sensing. Here we propose a computational “All Photons Imaging” (API) framework that utilizes time-resolved measurement for imaging through thick volumetric scattering by using both early arrived (non-scattered) and diffused photons. As opposed to other methods which aim to lock on specific photons (coherent, ballistic, acoustically modulated, etc.), this framework aims to use all of the optical signal. Compared to conventional early photon measurements for imaging through a 15 mm tissue phantom, our method shows a two fold improvement in spatial resolution (4db increase in Peak SNR). This all optical, calibration-free framework enables widefield imaging through thick turbid media, and opens new avenues in non-invasive testing, analysis, and diagnosis. PMID:27683065

  16. Disentangling volumetric and hydrational properties of proteins.

    PubMed

    Voloshin, Vladimir P; Medvedev, Nikolai N; Smolin, Nikolai; Geiger, Alfons; Winter, Roland

    2015-02-01

    We used molecular dynamics simulations of a typical monomeric protein, SNase, in combination with Voronoi-Delaunay tessellation to study and analyze the temperature dependence of the apparent volume, Vapp, of the solute. We show that the void volume, VB, created in the boundary region between solute and solvent, determines the temperature dependence of Vapp to a major extent. The less pronounced but still significant temperature dependence of the molecular volume of the solute, VM, is essentially the result of the expansivity of its internal voids, as the van der Waals contribution to VM is practically independent of temperature. Results for polypeptides of different chemical nature feature a similar temperature behavior, suggesting that the boundary/hydration contribution seems to be a universal part of the temperature dependence of Vapp. The results presented here shine new light on the discussion surrounding the physical basis for understanding and decomposing the volumetric properties of proteins and biomolecules in general.

  17. Progressive Compression of Volumetric Subdivision Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Laney, D; Pascucci, V

    2004-04-16

    We present a progressive compression technique for volumetric subdivision meshes based on the slow growing refinement algorithm. The system is comprised of a wavelet transform followed by a progressive encoding of the resulting wavelet coefficients. We compare the efficiency of two wavelet transforms. The first transform is based on the smoothing rules used in the slow growing subdivision technique. The second transform is a generalization of lifted linear B-spline wavelets to the same multi-tier refinement structure. Direct coupling with a hierarchical coder produces progressive bit streams. Rate distortion metrics are evaluated for both wavelet transforms. We tested the practical performance of the scheme on synthetic data as well as data from laser indirect-drive fusion simulations with multiple fields per vertex. Both wavelet transforms result in high quality trade off curves and produce qualitatively good coarse representations.

  18. PWR AXIAL BURNUP PROFILE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Acaglione

    2003-09-17

    The purpose of this activity is to develop a representative ''limiting'' axial burnup profile for pressurized water reactors (PWRs), which would encompass the isotopic axial variations caused by different assembly irradiation histories, and produce conservative isotopics with respect to criticality. The effect that the low burnup regions near the ends of spent fuel have on system reactivity is termed the ''end-effect''. This calculation will quantify the end-effects associated with Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies emplaced in a hypothetical 21 PWR waste package. The scope of this calculation covers an initial enrichment range of 3.0 through 5.0 wt% U-235 and a burnup range of 10 through 50 GWd/MTU. This activity supports the validation of the process for ensuring conservative generation of spent fuel isotopics with respect to criticality safety applications, and the use of burnup credit for commercial spent nuclear fuel. The intended use of these results will be in the development of PWR waste package loading curves, and applications involving burnup credit. Limitations of this evaluation are that the limiting profiles are only confirmed for use with the B&W 15 x 15 fuel assembly design. However, this assembly design is considered bounding of all other typical commercial PWR fuel assembly designs. This calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) because this activity supports investigations of items or barriers on the Q-list (YMP 2001).

  19. Quark mass effect on axial charge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Er-dong; Lin, Shu

    2016-05-01

    We studied the effect of finite quark mass on the dynamics of the axial charge using the D3/D7 model in holography. The mass term in the axial anomaly equation affects both the fluctuation (generation) and dissipation of the axial charge. We studied the dependence of the effect on quark mass and an external magnetic field. For axial charge generation, we calculated the mass diffusion rate, which characterizes the helicity flipping rate. The rate is a nonmonotonous function of mass and can be significantly enhanced by the magnetic field. The diffusive behavior is also related to a divergent susceptibility of the axial charge. For axial charge dissipation, we found that in the long time limit, the mass term dissipates all the charge effectively generated by parallel electric and magnetic fields. The result is consistent with a relaxation time approximation. The rate of dissipation through mass term is a monotonous increasing function of both quark mass and a magnetic field.

  20. System Study for Axial Vane Engine Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badley, Patrick R.; Smith, Michael R.; Gould, Cedric O.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this engine feasibility study was to determine the benefits that can be achieved by incorporating positive displacement axial vane compression and expansion stages into high bypass turbofan engines. These positive-displacement stages would replace some or all of the conventional compressor and turbine stages in the turbine engine, but not the fan. The study considered combustion occurring internal to an axial vane component (i.e., Diesel engine replacing the standard turbine engine combustor, burner, and turbine); and external continuous flow combustion with an axial vane compressor and an axial vane turbine replacing conventional compressor and turbine systems.

  1. Unsteady Flows in Axial Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marble, F. E.; Rannie, W. D.

    1957-01-01

    Of the various unsteady flows that occur in axial turbomachines certain asymmetric disturbances, of wave length large in comparison with blade spacing, have become understood to a certain extent. These disturbances divide themselves into two categories: self-induced oscillations and force disturbances. A special type of propagating stall appears as a self-induced disturbance; an asymmetric velocity profile introduced at the compressor inlet constitutes a forced disturbance. Both phenomena have been treated from a unified theoretical point of view in which the asymmetric disturbances are linearized and the blade characteristics are assumed quasi-steady. Experimental results are in essential agreement with this theory wherever the limitations of the theory are satisfied. For the self-induced disturbances and the more interesting examples of the forced disturbances, the dominant blade characteristic is the dependence of total pressure loss, rather than the turning angle, upon the local blade inlet angle.

  2. Axially grooved heat pipe study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A technology evaluation study on axially grooved heat pipes is presented. The state-of-the-art is reviewed and present and future requirements are identified. Analytical models, the Groove Analysis Program (GAP) and a closed form solution, were developed to facilitate parametric performance evaluations. GAP provides a numerical solution of the differential equations which govern the hydrodynamic flow. The model accounts for liquid recession, liquid/vapor shear interaction, puddle flow as well as laminar and turbulent vapor flow conditions. The closed form solution was developed to reduce computation time and complexity in parametric evaluations. It is applicable to laminar and ideal charge conditions, liquid/vapor shear interaction, and an empirical liquid flow factor which accounts for groove geometry and liquid recession effects. The validity of the closed form solution is verified by comparison with GAP predictions and measured data.

  3. Axial cylinder internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, C.

    1992-03-10

    This patent describes improvement in a barrel type internal combustion engine including an engine block having axial-positioned cylinders with reciprocating pistons arranged in a circular pattern: a drive shaft concentrically positioned within the cylinder block having an offset portion extending outside the cylinder block; a wobble spider rotatably journaled to the offset portion; connecting rods for each cylinder connecting each piston to the wobble spider. The improvement comprising: a first sleeve bearing means supporting the drive shaft in the engine block in a cantilevered manner for radial loads; a second sleeve bearing means rotatably supporting the wobble spider on the offset portion of the drive shaft for radial loads; a first roller bearing means positioned between the offset portion of the drive shaft and the wobble spider carrying thrust loadings only; a second roller bearing means carrying thrust loads only reacting to the first roller bearing located on the opposite end of the driveshaft between the shaft and the engine block.

  4. Iterative reconstruction of volumetric particle distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieneke, Bernhard

    2013-02-01

    For tracking the motion of illuminated particles in space and time several volumetric flow measurement techniques are available like 3D-particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV) recording images from typically three to four viewing directions. For higher seeding densities and the same experimental setup, tomographic PIV (Tomo-PIV) reconstructs voxel intensities using an iterative tomographic reconstruction algorithm (e.g. multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique, MART) followed by cross-correlation of sub-volumes computing instantaneous 3D flow fields on a regular grid. A novel hybrid algorithm is proposed here that similar to MART iteratively reconstructs 3D-particle locations by comparing the recorded images with the projections calculated from the particle distribution in the volume. But like 3D-PTV, particles are represented by 3D-positions instead of voxel-based intensity blobs as in MART. Detailed knowledge of the optical transfer function and the particle image shape is mandatory, which may differ for different positions in the volume and for each camera. Using synthetic data it is shown that this method is capable of reconstructing densely seeded flows up to about 0.05 ppp with similar accuracy as Tomo-PIV. Finally the method is validated with experimental data.

  5. Volumetric imaging system for the ionosphere (VISION)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymond, Kenneth F.; Budzien, Scott A.; Nicholas, Andrew C.; Thonnard, Stefan E.; Fortna, Clyde B.

    2002-01-01

    The Volumetric Imaging System for the Ionosphere (VISION) is designed to use limb and nadir images to reconstruct the three-dimensional distribution of electrons over a 1000 km wide by 500 km high slab beneath the satellite with 10 km x 10 km x 10 km voxels. The primary goal of the VISION is to map and monitor global and mesoscale (> 10 km) electron density structures, such as the Appleton anomalies and field-aligned irregularity structures. The VISION consists of three UV limb imagers, two UV nadir imagers, a dual frequency Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, and a coherently emitting three frequency radio beacon. The limb imagers will observe the O II 83.4 nm line (daytime electron density), O I 135.6 nm line (nighttime electron density and daytime O density), and the N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) bands near 143.0 nm (daytime N2 density). The nadir imagers will observe the O I 135.6 nm line (nighttime electron density and daytime O density) and the N2 LBH bands near 143.0 nm (daytime N2 density). The GPS receiver will monitor the total electron content between the satellite containing the VISION and the GPS constellation. The three frequency radio beacon will be used with ground-based receiver chains to perform computerized radio tomography below the satellite containing the VISION. The measurements made using the two radio frequency instruments will be used to validate the VISION UV measurements.

  6. Volumetric depth peeling for medical image display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borland, David; Clarke, John P.; Fielding, Julia R.; TaylorII, Russell M.

    2006-01-01

    Volumetric depth peeling (VDP) is an extension to volume rendering that enables display of otherwise occluded features in volume data sets. VDP decouples occlusion calculation from the volume rendering transfer function, enabling independent optimization of settings for rendering and occlusion. The algorithm is flexible enough to handle multiple regions occluding the object of interest, as well as object self-occlusion, and requires no pre-segmentation of the data set. VDP was developed as an improvement for virtual arthroscopy for the diagnosis of shoulder-joint trauma, and has been generalized for use in other simple and complex joints, and to enable non-invasive urology studies. In virtual arthroscopy, the surfaces in the joints often occlude each other, allowing limited viewpoints from which to evaluate these surfaces. In urology studies, the physician would like to position the virtual camera outside the kidney collecting system and see inside it. By rendering invisible all voxels between the observer's point of view and objects of interest, VDP enables viewing from unconstrained positions. In essence, VDP can be viewed as a technique for automatically defining an optimal data- and task-dependent clipping surface. Radiologists using VDP display have been able to perform evaluations of pathologies more easily and more rapidly than with clinical arthroscopy, standard volume rendering, or standard MRI/CT slice viewing.

  7. WE-G-BRF-04: Robust Real-Time Volumetric Imaging Based On One Single Projection

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y; Yan, H; Ouyang, L; Wang, J; Jiang, S; Jia, X; Zhou, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Real-time volumetric imaging is highly desirable to provide instantaneous image guidance for lung radiation therapy. This study proposes a scheme to achieve this goal using one single projection by utilizing sparse learning and a principal component analysis (PCA) based lung motion model. Methods: A patient-specific PCA-based lung motion model is first constructed by analyzing deformable vector fields (DVFs) between a reference image and 4DCT images at each phase. At the training stage, we “learn” the relationship between the DVFs and the projection using sparse learning. Specifically, we first partition the projections into patches, and then apply sparse learning to automatically identify patches that best correlate with the principal components of the DVFs. Once the relationship is established, at the application stage, we first employ a patchbased intensity correction method to overcome the problem of different intensity scale between the calculated projection in the training stage and the measured projection in the application stage. The corrected projection image is then fed to the trained model to derive a DVF, which is applied to the reference image, yielding a volumetric image corresponding to the projection. We have validated our method through a NCAT phantom simulation case and one experiment case. Results: Sparse learning can automatically select those patches containing motion information, such as those around diaphragm. For the simulation case, over 98% of the lung region pass the generalized gamma test (10HU/1mm), indicating combined accuracy in both intensity and spatial domain. For the experimental case, the average tumor localization errors projected to the imager are 0.68 mm and 0.4 mm on the axial and tangential direction, respectively. Conclusion: The proposed method is capable of accurately generating a volumetric image using one single projection. It will potentially offer real-time volumetric image guidance to facilitate lung

  8. Liquid rocket engine axial-flow turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheer, D. D.; Huppert, M. C.; Viteri, F.; Farquhar, J.; Keller, R. B., Jr. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    The axial pump is considered in terms of the total turbopump assembly. Stage hydrodynamic design, pump rotor assembly, pump materials for liquid hydrogen applications, and safety factors as utilized in state of the art pumps are among the topics discussed. Axial pump applications are included.

  9. Cytokine profiles in axial spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Madej, Marta; Nowak, Beata; Sokolik, Renata; Chlebicki, Arkadiusz; Korman, Lucyna; Woytala, Patryk; Lubiński, Łukasz; Wiland, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Current studies concentrate on the cytokine network and its role in the pathogenesis of spondyloarthritis (SpA). In this study, we analyzed whether the serum cytokine profile (interleukins: IL-10, IL-11, IL-12, IL-15, IL-17, IL-23 and IL-33) correlates with demographic data, clinical manifestations, disease activity and treatment outcome in a group of patients with axial spondyloarthritis. Material and methods Forty-nine patients with an established diagnosis of axial spondyloarthritis (aSpA) and 19 healthy volunteers as controls were enrolled in the study. Clinical evaluation included patient's medical history, 44 joint count, back pain intensity and global disease activity in the preceding week (VAS), the duration of morning stiffness and blood tests. Disease activity was assessed using BASDAI and ASDAS-CRP. Serum concentration of IL-10, IL-11, IL-12, IL-15, IL-17, IL-23 and IL-33 was determined. Results In patients with aSpA, elevated serum concentration of IL-10, IL-15, IL-17 and IL-23 was detected. In the aSpA group we detected higher values of serum concentration of IL-23 and IL-33 in the subgroup with anterior uveitis (83.1 ±184.0 pg/ml vs. 14.0 ±17.1 pg/ml, p < 0.0001 and 45.5 ±71.9 pg/ml vs. 18.4 ±14.3 pg/ml, p < 0.0001, respectively). Additionally, in the subgroup with peripheral arthritis, elevation of serum concentration of IL-12 (249.3 ±246.9 pg/ml vs. 99.9 ±105.9 pg/ml, p = 0.0001) was detected. Patients with preradiological SpA had higher serum concentration of IL-17 than patients with established diagnosis of AS (6.37 ±8.50 pg/ml vs. 2.04 ±2.98 pg/ml, p = 0.0295). No differences in serum concentration of analyzed cytokines were found between the subgroup with low to moderate disease activity and the subgroup with high to very high disease activity. Conclusions We report that in aSpA patients, compared to controls, elevated serum concentrations of IL-10, IL-15, IL-17 and IL-23 were observed. Some cytokines may predispose to a more

  10. Axial interaction free-electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-09-02

    Electron orbits from a helical axial wiggler in an axial guide field are absolutely unstable as power is extracted from the particles. For off-axis beams an axial FEL mechanism exists when the axial electric field in a TM mode is wiggled to interact with the axial velocity of the electrons that form the beam. The interaction strength is comparable to that for helical FELs and is insensitive to beam orbit errors. The orbits for this mechanism are extremely stable in the absence of space charge and lead to high extraction efficiencies without particle phasing incoherence or interception. This interaction mechanism is suitable for use with intense annular electron beams for high power generation at microwave frequencies. 5 figs.

  11. Axial interaction free-electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1997-01-01

    Electron orbits from a helical axial wiggler in an axial guide field are absolutely unstable as power is extracted from the particles. For off-axis beams an axial FEL mechanism exists when the axial electric field in a TM mode is wiggled to interact with the axial velocity of the electrons that form the beam. The interaction strength is comparable to that for helical FELs and is insensitive to beam orbit errors. The orbits for this mechanism are extremely stable in the absence of space charge and lead to high extraction efficiencies without particle phasing incoherence or interception. This interaction mechanism is suitable for use with intense annular electron beams for high power generation at microwave frequencies.

  12. Axial polarizers based on dichroic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nersisyan, Sarik; Tabiryan, Nelson; Steeves, Diane M.; Kimball, Brian R.

    2010-08-01

    Polarizers capable of producing linearly polarized beams with axial (radial and azimuthal) symmetry have been fabricated with the aid of a dichroic liquid crystal. Photoalignment was achieved using a printing technique to reduce the UV exposure time required for production of axially aligning substrates from 1 h, typical for direct writing techniques, to 10 min. The polarizing features of axial polarizers and their pairs are characterized and their differences outlined. We demonstrate that the transmission switching contrast of an axial polarizer/analyzer pair, comprised of an electrically controlled liquid crystal cell, is comparable to conventional systems with linear polarizers. The opportunities for using axial polarizers for polarization imaging, sensor protection, and nonlinear optics are discussed. Particularly, we show that the technology could reduce the fluence of a laser beam on an optical sensor without affecting imaging.

  13. Novel Integrated Radial and Axial Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A.; Brown, Gary L.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Typically, fully active magnetically suspended systems require one axial and two radial magnetic bearings. Combining radial and axial functions into a single device allows for more compact and elegant packaging. Furthermore, in the case of high-speed devices such as energy storage flywheels, it is beneficial to minimize shaft length to keep rotor mode frequencies as high as possible. Attempts have been made to combine radial and axial functionality, but with certain drawbacks. One approach requires magnetic control flux to flow through a bias magnet reducing control effectiveness, thus resulting in increased resistive losses. This approach also requires axial force producing magnetic flux to flow in a direction into the rotor laminate that is undesirable for minimizing eddy-current losses resulting in rotational losses. Another approach applies a conical rotor shape to what otherwise would be a radial heteropolar magnetic bearing configuration. However, positional non-linear effects are introduced with this scheme and the same windings are used for bias, radial, and axial control adding complexity to the controller and electronics. For this approach, the amount of axial capability must be limited. It would be desirable for an integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing to have the following characteristics, separate inputs for radial and axial control for electronics and control simplicity, all magnetic control fluxes should only flow through their respective air gaps and should not flow through any bias magnets for minimal resistive losses, be of a homopolar design to minimize rotational losses, position related non-linear effects should be minimized, and dependent upon the design parameters, be able to achieve any radial/axial force or power ratio as desired. The integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing described in this paper exhibits all these characteristics. Magnetic circuit design, design equations, and analysis results will be presented.

  14. Non-axial muscle stress and stiffness.

    PubMed

    Zahalak, G I

    1996-09-01

    A generalization is developed of the classic two-state Huxley cross-bridge model to account for non-axial active stress and stiffness. The main ingredients of the model are: (i) a relation between the general three-dimensional deformation of an element of muscle and the deformations of the cross-bridges, that assumes macroscopic deformation is transmitted to the myofibrils, (ii) radial as well as axial cross-bridge stiffness, and (iii) variations of the attachment and detachment rates with lateral filament spacing. The theory leads to a generalized Huxley rate equation on the bond-distribution function, n(zeta, theta, t), of the form [equation: see text] where the Dij are the components of the relative velocity gradient and rho and ñ are functions of the polar angle, theta, and time that describe, respectively, the deformation of the myofilament lattice and the distribution of accessible actin sites (both of these functions can be calculated from the macroscopic deformation). Explicit expressions, in terms of n, are derived for the nine components of the active stress tensor, and the 21 non-vanishing components of the active stiffness tensor; the active stress tensor is found to be unsymmetric. The theory predicts that in general non-axial deformations will modify active axial stress and stiffness, and also give rise to non-axial (e.g., shearing) components. Under most circumstances the magnitudes of the non-axial stress and stiffness components will be small compared with the axial and, further, the effects of non-axial deformation rates will be small compared with those of the axial rate. Large transverse deformations may, however, greatly reduce the axial force and stiffness. The theory suggests a significant mechanical role for the non-contractile proteins in muscle, namely that of equilibrating the unsymmetric active stresses. Some simple applications of the theory are provided to illustrate its physical content. PMID:8917737

  15. Comprehensive volumetric confocal microscopy with adaptive focusing

    PubMed Central

    Kang, DongKyun; Yoo, Hongki; Jillella, Priyanka; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive microscopy of distal esophagus could greatly improve the screening and surveillance of esophageal diseases such as Barrett’s esophagus by providing histomorphologic information over the entire region at risk. Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a high-speed reflectance confocal microscopy technology that can be configured to image the entire distal esophagus by helically scanning the beam using optics within a balloon-centering probe. It is challenging to image the human esophagus in vivo with balloon-based SECM, however, because patient motion and anatomic tissue surface irregularities decenter the optics, making it difficult to keep the focus at a predetermined location within the tissue as the beam is scanned. In this paper, we present a SECM probe equipped with an adaptive focusing mechanism that can compensate for tissue surface irregularity and dynamic focal variation. A tilted arrangement of the objective lens is employed in the SECM probe to provide feedback signals to an adaptive focusing mechanism. The tilted configuration also allows the probe to obtain reflectance confocal data from multiple depth levels, enabling the acquisition of three-dimensional volumetric data during a single scan of the probe. A tissue phantom with a surface area of 12.6 cm2 was imaged using the new SECM probe, and 8 large-area reflectance confocal microscopy images were acquired over the depth range of 56 μm in 20 minutes. Large-area SECM images of excised swine small intestine tissue were also acquired, enabling the visualization of villous architecture, epithelium, and lamina propria. The adaptive focusing mechanism was demonstrated to enable acquisition of in-focus images even when the probe was not centered and the tissue surface was irregular. PMID:21698005

  16. Commissioning of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Bedford, James L. Warrington, Alan P.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) involves the simultaneous use of dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) techniques and gantry arcing; appropriate quality assurance is therefore required. This article describes the development and implementation of procedures for commissioning VMAT on a commercial linear accelerator (Elekta PreciseBeam VMAT with MLCi and Beam Modulator heads). Materials and Methods: Tests for beam flatness and symmetry at the variable dose rates required for VMAT were performed. Multileaf collimator (MLC) calibration was investigated using dynamic prescriptions. The cumulative dose delivered by a sliding window aperture was measured and compared with calculated values. Rotational accuracy was evaluated using dynamic prescriptions which required accurate correlated motion of both gantry and MLC leaves. Finally, measured and calculated dose distributions for complete VMAT treatment plans were compared and evaluated. Results: Beam symmetry was found to be better than 3% down to dose rates of 75 MU/min. MLC calibration provided continuity of dose at match planes of better than 4%, which was comparable to interleaf leakage effects. Integrated sliding window doses were within 3% of those calculated. Tests for rotational accuracy showed uniformity of peripheral dose mostly within {+-}4% of local control point dose, or approximately {+-}0.2% of total central dose. A two-arc prostate case showed an absolute dose difference between calculations and measurements of less than 3%, with gamma (3% and 3 mm) of better than 95%. Conclusions: VMAT has been successfully commissioned and has been introduced into clinical use. The Elekta DMLC has also been shown to be suitable for sliding window delivery.

  17. Treatment planning for volumetric modulated arc therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bedford, James L.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a specific type of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in which the gantry speed, multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf position, and dose rate vary continuously during delivery. A treatment planning system for VMAT is presented. Methods: Arc control points are created uniformly throughout one or more arcs. An iterative least-squares algorithm is used to generate a fluence profile at every control point. The control points are then grouped and all of the control points in a given group are used to approximate the fluence profiles. A direct-aperture optimization is then used to improve the solution, taking into account the allowed range of leaf motion of the MLC. Dose is calculated using a fast convolution algorithm and the motion between control points is approximated by 100 interpolated dose calculation points. The method has been applied to five cases, consisting of lung, rectum, prostate and seminal vesicles, prostate and pelvic lymph nodes, and head and neck. The resulting plans have been compared with segmental (step-and-shoot) IMRT and delivered and verified on an Elekta Synergy to ensure practicality. Results: For the lung, prostate and seminal vesicles, and rectum cases, VMAT provides a plan of similar quality to segmental IMRT but with faster delivery by up to a factor of 4. For the prostate and pelvic nodes and head-and-neck cases, the critical structure doses are reduced with VMAT, both of these cases having a longer delivery time than IMRT. The plans in general verify successfully, although the agreement between planned and measured doses is not very close for the more complex cases, particularly the head-and-neck case. Conclusions: Depending upon the emphasis in the treatment planning, VMAT provides treatment plans which are higher in quality and/or faster to deliver than IMRT. The scheme described has been successfully introduced into clinical use.

  18. Volumetric optoacoustic monitoring of endovenous laser treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehm, Thomas F.; Deán-Ben, Xosé L.; Schaur, Peter; Sroka, Ronald; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is one of the most common medical conditions with reported prevalence estimates as high as 30% in the adult population. Although conservative management with compression therapy may improve the symptoms associated with CVI, healing often demands invasive procedures. Besides established surgical methods like vein stripping or bypassing, endovenous laser therapy (ELT) emerged as a promising novel treatment option during the last 15 years offering multiple advantages such as less pain and faster recovery. Much of the treatment success hereby depends on monitoring of the treatment progression using clinical imaging modalities such as Doppler ultrasound. The latter however do not provide sufficient contrast, spatial resolution and three-dimensional imaging capacity which is necessary for accurate online lesion assessment during treatment. As a consequence, incidence of recanalization, lack of vessel occlusion and collateral damage remains highly variable among patients. In this study, we examined the capacity of volumetric optoacoustic tomography (VOT) for real-time monitoring of ELT using an ex-vivo ox foot model. ELT was performed on subcutaneous veins while optoacoustic signals were acquired and reconstructed in real-time and at a spatial resolution in the order of 200μm. VOT images showed spatio-temporal maps of the lesion progression, characteristics of the vessel wall, and position of the ablation fiber's tip during the pull back. It was also possible to correlate the images with the temperature elevation measured in the area adjacent to the ablation spot. We conclude that VOT is a promising tool for providing online feedback during endovenous laser therapy.

  19. Quantification of volumetric cerebral blood flow using hybrid laser speckle contract and optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valim, Niksa; Dunn, Andrew K.

    2016-03-01

    Studying neurovascular blood flow function in cerebrovascular activities requires accurate visualization and characterization of blood flow volume as well as the dynamics of blood cells in microcirculation. In this study, we present a novel integration of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) for rapid volumetric imaging of blood flow in cortical capillaries. LSCI uses the illumination of wide-field near infrared light (NIR) and monitors back scattered light to characterize the relative dynamics of blood flow in microcirculation. Absolute measurement of blood cells and blood volume requires high-resolution volumetric structural information. SD-OCT system uses coherence gating to measure scattered light from a small volume within high structural resolution. The structural imaging system rapidly assesses large number of capillaries for spatio-temporal tracking of red blood cells (RBC). A very fast-ultra resolution SD-OCT system was developed for imaging high-resolution volumetric samples. The system employed an ultra wideband light source (1310 ± 200 nm in wavelength) corresponding to an axial resolution of 3 micrometers in tissue. The spectrometer of the SD-OCT was customized for a maximum scanning rate of 147,000 line/s. We demonstrated a fast volumetric OCT angiography algorithm to visualize large numbers of vessels in a 2-mm deep sample volume. A LSCI system that has been developed previously in our group was integrated to the imaging system for the characterization of dynamic blood cells. The conjunction data from LSCI and SD-OCT systems imply the feasibility of accurate quantification of absolute cortical blood flow.

  20. Combustion enhancement by axial vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmark, E.; Schadow, K. C.; Parr, T. P.; Parr, D. M.; Wilson, K. J.

    1987-06-01

    A tapered slot jet was studied experimentally in nonreacting and reacting tests using hot-wire anemometry, water-tunnel flow visualization, and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF). The tapered slot jet is a modified elliptic jet which has a conical contraction leading to its outlet. The added contraction changes the entire flow field. The jet spread in the major axis plane is larger than in the minor axis plane, which is the opposite behavior of an elliptic jet. Consequently, no axes switching, typical to an elliptic jet, is observed. The turbulence amplification in the jet core is higher than in circular and elliptic jets. The different behavior is attributed to the change in flow direction, inside the nozzle, from the conical section to the slot outlet. During this transition, the flow acquires angular momentum thereby generating axial vorticity. The influence of the contraction angle and the outlet aspect ratio were investigated. The effect of the augmented turbulence on reactive flow was tested in a premixed flame. The combustion rate was augmented in both the core and edges of the flame relative to a circular burner.

  1. Increasing the volumetric efficiency of Diesel engines by intake pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    List, Hans

    1933-01-01

    Development of a method for calculating the volumetric efficiency of piston engines with intake pipes. Application of this method to the scavenging pumps of two-stroke-cycle engines with crankcase scavenging and to four-stroke-cycle engines. The utility of the method is demonstrated by volumetric-efficiency tests of the two-stroke-cycle engines with crankcase scavenging. Its practical application to the calculation of intake pipes is illustrated by example.

  2. Realization of undistorted volumetric multiview image with multilayered integral imaging.

    PubMed

    Kakeya, Hideki

    2011-10-10

    This paper presents a 3D display based on the coarse integral volumetric imaging (CIVI) technique. Though expression of focal effect and specular light is enabled by combining volumetric and multiview solutions, the image qualities of conventional systems have stayed low. In this paper high quality 3D image is attained with the CIVI technology, which compensates distortion and discontinuity of image based on the optical calculations. In addition, compact system design by layering color and monochrome panels is proposed.

  3. Sub-diffraction Limit Localization of Proteins in Volumetric Space Using Bayesian Restoration of Fluorescence Images from Ultrathin Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gordon; Smith, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Photon diffraction limits the resolution of conventional light microscopy at the lateral focal plane to 0.61λ/NA (λ = wavelength of light, NA = numerical aperture of the objective) and at the axial plane to 1.4nλ/NA2 (n = refractive index of the imaging medium, 1.51 for oil immersion), which with visible wavelengths and a 1.4NA oil immersion objective is ∼220 nm and ∼600 nm in the lateral plane and axial plane respectively. This volumetric resolution is too large for the proper localization of protein clustering in subcellular structures. Here we combine the newly developed proteomic imaging technique, Array Tomography (AT), with its native 50–100 nm axial resolution achieved by physical sectioning of resin embedded tissue, and a 2D maximum likelihood deconvolution method, based on Bayes' rule, which significantly improves the resolution of protein puncta in the lateral plane to allow accurate and fast computational segmentation and analysis of labeled proteins. The physical sectioning of AT allows tissue specimens to be imaged at the physical optimum of modern high NA plan-apochormatic objectives. This translates to images that have little out of focus light, minimal aberrations and wave-front distortions. Thus, AT is able to provide images with truly invariant point spread functions (PSF), a property critical for accurate deconvolution. We show that AT with deconvolution increases the volumetric analytical fidelity of protein localization by significantly improving the modulation of high spatial frequencies up to and potentially beyond the spatial frequency cut-off of the objective. Moreover, we are able to achieve this improvement with no noticeable introduction of noise or artifacts and arrive at object segmentation and localization accuracies on par with image volumes captured using commercial implementations of super-resolution microscopes. PMID:22956902

  4. Visualization and volumetric structures from MR images of the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Parvin, B.; Johnston, W.; Robertson, D.

    1994-03-01

    Pinta is a system for segmentation and visualization of anatomical structures obtained from serial sections reconstructed from magnetic resonance imaging. The system approaches the segmentation problem by assigning each volumetric region to an anatomical structure. This is accomplished by satisfying constraints at the pixel level, slice level, and volumetric level. Each slice is represented by an attributed graph, where nodes correspond to regions and links correspond to the relations between regions. These regions are obtained by grouping pixels based on similarity and proximity. The slice level attributed graphs are then coerced to form a volumetric attributed graph, where volumetric consistency can be verified. The main novelty of our approach is in the use of the volumetric graph to ensure consistency from symbolic representations obtained from individual slices. In this fashion, the system allows errors to be made at the slice level, yet removes them when the volumetric consistency cannot be verified. Once the segmentation is complete, the 3D surfaces of the brain can be constructed and visualized.

  5. Flow Split Venturi, Axially-Rotated Valve

    DOEpatents

    Walrath, David E.; Lindberg, William R.; Burgess, Robert K.; LaBelle, James

    2000-02-22

    The present invention provides an axially-rotated valve which permits increased flow rates and lower pressure drop (characterized by a lower loss coefficient) by using an axial eccentric split venturi with two portions where at least one portion is rotatable with respect to the other portion. The axially-rotated valve typically may be designed to avoid flow separation and/or cavitation at full flow under a variety of conditions. Similarly, the valve is designed, in some embodiments, to produce streamlined flow within the valve. An axially aligned outlet may also increase the flow efficiency. A typical cross section of the eccentric split venturi may be non-axisymmetric such as a semicircular cross section which may assist in both throttling capabilities and in maximum flow capacity using the design of the present invention. Such a design can include applications for freeze resistant axially-rotated valves and may be fully-opened and fully-closed in one-half of a complete rotation. An internal wide radius elbow typically connected to a rotatable portion of the eccentric venturi may assist in directing flow with lower friction losses. A valve actuator may actuate in an axial manner yet be uniquely located outside of the axial flow path to further reduce friction losses. A seal may be used between the two portions that may include a peripheral and diametrical seal in the same plane. A seal separator may increase the useful life of the seal between the fixed and rotatable portions.

  6. The influence of the tangential velocity of inner rotating wall on axial velocity profile of flow through vertical annular pipe with rotating inner surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharf, Abdusalam M.; Jawan, Hosen A.; Almabsout, Fthi A.

    2014-03-01

    In the oil and gas industries, understanding the behaviour of a flow through an annulus gap in a vertical position, whose outer wall is stationary whilst the inner wall rotates, is a significantly important issue in drilling wells. The main emphasis is placed on experimental (using an available rig) and computational (employing CFD software) investigations into the effects of the rotation speed of the inner pipe on the axial velocity profiles. The measured axial velocity profiles, in the cases of low axial flow, show that the axial velocity is influenced by the rotation speed of the inner pipe in the region of almost 33% of the annulus near the inner pipe, and influenced inversely in the rest of the annulus. The position of the maximum axial velocity is shifted from the centre to be nearer the inner pipe, by increasing the rotation speed. However, in the case of higher flow, as the rotation speed increases, the axial velocity is reduced and the position of the maximum axial velocity is skewed towards the centre of the annulus. There is a reduction of the swirl velocity corresponding to the rise of the volumetric flow rate.

  7. Axial grading of inert matrix fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Recktenwald, G. D.; Deinert, M. R.

    2012-07-01

    Burning actinides in an inert matrix fuel to 750 MWd/kg IHM results in a significant reduction in transuranic isotopes. However, achieving this level of burnup in a standard light water reactor would require residence times that are twice that of uranium dioxide fuels. The reactivity of an inert matrix assembly at the end of life is less than 1/3 of its beginning of life reactivity leading to undesirable radial and axial power peaking in the reactor core. Here we show that axial grading of the inert matrix fuel rods can reduce peaking significantly. Monte Carlo simulations are used to model the assembly level power distributions in both ungraded and graded fuel rods. The results show that an axial grading of uranium dioxide and inert matrix fuels with erbium can reduces power peaking by more than 50% in the axial direction. The reduction in power peaking enables the core to operate at significantly higher power. (authors)

  8. A Compliant Casing for Transonic Axial Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloch, Gregory S.; Hah, Chunill

    2003-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the concept of compliant casing for transonic axial compressors is shown. The topics include: 1) Concept for compliant casing; 2) Rig and facility details; 3) Experimental results; and 4) Numerical results.

  9. Ultrafast axial scanning for two-photon microscopy via a digital micromirror device and binary holography.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jiyi; Gu, Chenglin; Zhang, Dapeng; Wang, Dien; Chen, Shih-Chi

    2016-04-01

    In this Letter, we present an ultrafast nonmechanical axial scanning method for two-photon excitation (TPE) microscopy based on binary holography using a digital micromirror device (DMD), achieving a scanning rate of 4.2 kHz, scanning range of ∼180  μm, and scanning resolution (minimum step size) of ∼270  nm. Axial scanning is achieved by projecting the femtosecond laser to a DMD programmed with binary holograms of spherical wavefronts of increasing/decreasing radii. To guide the scanner design, we have derived the parametric relationships between the DMD parameters (i.e., aperture and pixel size), and the axial scanning characteristics, including (1) maximum optical power, (2) minimum step size, and (3) scan range. To verify the results, the DMD scanner is integrated with a custom-built TPE microscope that operates at 60 frames per second. In the experiment, we scanned a pollen sample via both the DMD scanner and a precision z-stage. The results show the DMD scanner generates images of equal quality throughout the scanning range. The overall efficiency of the TPE system was measured to be ∼3%. With the high scanning rate, the DMD scanner may find important applications in random-access imaging or high-speed volumetric imaging that enables visualization of highly dynamic biological processes in 3D with submillisecond temporal resolution. PMID:27192259

  10. Planned Axial Reorientation Investigation on Sloshsat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper details the design and logic of an experimental investigation to study axial reorientation in low gravity. The Sloshsat free-flyer is described. The planned axial reorientation experiments and test matrixes are presented. Existing analytical tools are discussed. Estimates for settling range from 64 to 1127 seconds. The planned experiments are modelled using computational fluid dynamics. These models show promise in reducing settling estimates and demonstrate the ability of pulsed high thrust settling to emulate lower thrust continuous firing.

  11. High temperature co-axial winding transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divan, Deepakraj M.; Novotny, Donald W.

    1993-01-01

    The analysis and design of co-axial winding transformers is presented. The design equations are derived and the different design approaches are discussed. One of the most important features of co-axial winding transformers is the fact that the leakage inductance is well controlled and can be made low. This is not the case in conventional winding transformers. In addition, the power density of co-axial winding transformers is higher than conventional ones. Hence, using co-axial winding transformers in a certain converter topology improves the power density of the converter. The design methodology used in meeting the proposed specifications of the co-axial winding transformer specifications are presented and discussed. The final transformer design was constructed in the lab. Co-axial winding transformers proved to be a good choice for high power density and high frequency applications. They have a more predictable performance compared with conventional transformers. In addition, the leakage inductance of the transformer can be controlled easily to suit a specific application. For space applications, one major concern is the extraction of heat from power apparatus to prevent excessive heating and hence damaging of these units. Because of the vacuum environment, the only way to extract heat is by using a cold plate. One advantage of co-axial winding transformers is that the surface area available to extract heat from is very large compared to conventional transformers. This stems from the unique structure of the co-axial transformer where the whole core surface area is exposed and can be utilized for cooling effectively. This is a crucial issue here since most of the losses are core losses.

  12. Volumetric reconstruction of the mouse meibomian gland using high-resolution nonlinear optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Jester, Bryan E; Nien, Chyong Jy; Winkler, Moritz; Brown, Donald J; Jester, James V

    2011-02-01

    Recent studies suggest that mouse meibomian glands (MG) undergo age-related atrophy that mimics changes seen in age-related human MG dysfunction (MGD). To better understand the structural/functional changes that occur during aging, this study developed an imaging approach to generate quantifiable volumetric reconstructions of the mouse MG and measure total gland, cell, and lipid volume. Mouse eyelids were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde, embedded in LR White resin and serially sectioned. Sections were then scanned using a 20× objective and a series of tiled images (1.35 × 1.35 × 0.5 mm) with a pixel size of 0.44 microm lateral and 2 microm axial were collected using a Zeiss 510 Meta LSM and a femtosecond laser to simultaneously detect second harmonic generated (SHG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signals from the tissue sections. The SHG signal from collagen was used to outline and generate an MG mask to create surface renderings of the total gland and extract relevant MG TPEF signals that were later separated into the cellular and lipid compartments. Using this technique, three-dimensional reconstructions of the mouse MG were obtained and the total, cell, and lipid volume of the MG measured. Volumetric reconstructions of mouse MG showed loss of acini in old mice that were not detected by routine histology. Furthermore, older mouse MG had reduced total gland volume that is primarily associated with loss of the lipid volume. These findings suggest that mice MG undergo "dropout" of acini, similar to that which occurs in human age-related MGD.

  13. Zonal spherical aberration correction utilizing axial electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Liang C.

    2005-01-01

    Spherical aberration is important in focused ion beam applications where large aperture angles are needed to obtain high beam currents because it results in large tails on the current density distribution. Merwe has shown that for coaxial lenses, negative spherical aberration can be found for rays pass through zonal regions. Merwe"s calculation is valid only for periodic or quasi-periodic lenses and requires a constant axial potential distribution. We have calculated zonal focusing properties of lenses with axial electrodes using nine-point finite difference method and direct ray tracing. Our calculation results indicate that an axial electrode protruding partially into the lens can correct the spherical aberration. When a three-element electrostatic lens is operated at deceleration mode, the introduction of an axial electrode creates zonal regions where the spherical aberration is negative. At deceleration mode, the induced surface charges on the axial electrode have an opposite sign relative to the primary beam. This is in agreement with our previous findings on the study of the correction of spherical aberration utilizing space charges. Same phenomenon was found when an axial electrode is used in conjunction with a cathode lens.

  14. Split Venturi, Axially-Rotated Valve

    DOEpatents

    Walrath, David E.; Lindberg, William R.; Burgess, Robert K.

    2000-08-29

    The present invention provides an axially-rotated valve which permits increased flow rates and lower pressure drop (characterized by a lower loss coefficient) by using an axial eccentric split venturi with two portions where at least one portion is rotatable with respect to the other portion. The axially-rotated valve typically may be designed to avoid flow separation and/or cavitation at full flow under a variety of conditions. Similarly, the valve is designed, in some embodiments, to produce streamlined flow within the valve. A typical cross section of the eccentric split venturi may be non-axisymmetric such as a semicircular cross section which may assist in both throttling capabilities and in maximum flow capacity using the design of the present invention. Such a design can include applications for freeze resistant axially-rotated valves and may be fully-opened and fully-closed in one-half of a complete rotation. An internal wide radius elbow typically connected to a rotatable portion of the eccentric venturi may assist in directing flow with lower friction losses. A valve actuator may actuate in an axial manner yet be uniquely located outside of the axial flow path to further reduce friction losses. A seal may be used between the two portions that may include a peripheral and diametrical seal in the same plane.

  15. Volumetric CT with sparse detector arrays (and application to Si-strip photon counters).

    PubMed

    Sisniega, A; Zbijewski, W; Stayman, J W; Xu, J; Taguchi, K; Fredenberg, E; Lundqvist, Mats; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-01-01

    Novel x-ray medical imaging sensors, such as photon counting detectors (PCDs) and large area CCD and CMOS cameras can involve irregular and/or sparse sampling of the detector plane. Application of such detectors to CT involves undersampling that is markedly different from the commonly considered case of sparse angular sampling. This work investigates volumetric sampling in CT systems incorporating sparsely sampled detectors with axial and helical scan orbits and evaluates performance of model-based image reconstruction (MBIR) with spatially varying regularization in mitigating artifacts due to sparse detector sampling. Volumetric metrics of sampling density and uniformity were introduced. Penalized-likelihood MBIR with a spatially varying penalty that homogenized resolution by accounting for variations in local sampling density (i.e. detector gaps) was evaluated. The proposed methodology was tested in simulations and on an imaging bench based on a Si-strip PCD (total area 5 cm  ×  25 cm) consisting of an arrangement of line sensors separated by gaps of up to 2.5 mm. The bench was equipped with translation/rotation stages allowing a variety of scanning trajectories, ranging from a simple axial acquisition to helical scans with variable pitch. Statistical (spherical clutter) and anthropomorphic (hand) phantoms were considered. Image quality was compared to that obtained with a conventional uniform penalty in terms of structural similarity index (SSIM), image uniformity, spatial resolution, contrast, and noise. Scan trajectories with intermediate helical width (~10 mm longitudinal distance per 360° rotation) demonstrated optimal tradeoff between the average sampling density and the homogeneity of sampling throughout the volume. For a scan trajectory with 10.8 mm helical width, the spatially varying penalty resulted in significant visual reduction of sampling artifacts, confirmed by a 10% reduction in minimum SSIM (from 0.88 to 0.8) and a 40

  16. Volumetric CT with sparse detector arrays (and application to Si-strip photon counters)

    PubMed Central

    Sisniega, A; Zbijewski, W; Stayman, J W; Xu, J; Taguchi, K; Fredenberg, E; Lundqvist, Mats; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-01-01

    Novel x-ray medical imaging sensors, such as photon counting detectors (PCDs) and large area CCD and CMOS cameras can involve irregular and/or sparse sampling of the detector plane. Application of such detectors to CT involves undersampling that is markedly different from the commonly considered case of sparse angular sampling. This work investigates volumetric sampling in CT systems incorporating sparsely sampled detectors with axial and helical scan orbits and evaluates performance of model-based image reconstruction (MBIR) with spatially varying regularization in mitigating artifacts due to sparse detector sampling. Volumetric metrics of sampling density and uniformity were introduced. Penalized-likelihood MBIR with a spatially varying penalty that homogenized resolution by accounting for variations in local sampling density (i.e. detector gaps) was evaluated. The proposed methodology was tested in simulations and on an imaging bench based on a Si-strip PCD (total area 5 cm × 25 cm) consisting of an arrangement of line sensors separated by gaps of up to 2.5 mm. The bench was equipped with translation/rotation stages allowing a variety of scanning trajectories, ranging from a simple axial acquisition to helical scans with variable pitch. Statistical (spherical clutter) and anthropomorphic (hand) phantoms were considered. Image quality was compared to that obtained with a conventional uniform penalty in terms of structural similarity index (SSIM), image uniformity, spatial resolution, contrast, and noise. Scan trajectories with intermediate helical width (~10 mm longitudinal distance per 360° rotation) demonstrated optimal tradeoff between the average sampling density and the homogeneity of sampling throughout the volume. For a scan trajectory with 10.8 mm helical width, the spatially varying penalty resulted in significant visual reduction of sampling artifacts, confirmed by a 10% reduction in minimum SSIM (from 0.88 to 0.8) and a 40% reduction in the

  17. A prototype table-top inverse-geometry volumetric CT system

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Taly Gilat; Star-Lack, Josh; Bennett, N. Robert; Mazin, Samuel R.; Solomon, Edward G.; Fahrig, Rebecca; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2006-06-15

    A table-top volumetric CT system has been implemented that is able to image a 5-cm-thick volume in one circular scan with no cone-beam artifacts. The prototype inverse-geometry CT (IGCT) scanner consists of a large-area, scanned x-ray source and a detector array that is smaller in the transverse direction. The IGCT geometry provides sufficient volumetric sampling because the source and detector have the same axial, or slice direction, extent. This paper describes the implementation of the table-top IGCT scanner, which is based on the NexRay Scanning-Beam Digital X-ray system (NexRay, Inc., Los Gatos, CA) and an investigation of the system performance. The alignment and flat-field calibration procedures are described, along with a summary of the reconstruction algorithm. The resolution and noise performance of the prototype IGCT system are studied through experiments and further supported by analytical predictions and simulations. To study the presence of cone-beam artifacts, a ''Defrise'' phantom was scanned on both the prototype IGCT scanner and a micro CT system with a {+-}5 deg.cone angle for a 4.5-cm volume thickness. Images of inner ear specimens are presented and compared to those from clinical CT systems. Results showed that the prototype IGCT system has a 0.25-mm isotropic resolution and that noise comparable to that from a clinical scanner with equivalent spatial resolution is achievable. The measured MTF and noise values agreed reasonably well with theoretical predictions and computer simulations. The IGCT system was able to faithfully reconstruct the laminated pattern of the Defrise phantom while the micro CT system suffered severe cone-beam artifacts for the same object. The inner ear acquisition verified that the IGCT system can image a complex anatomical object, and the resulting images exhibited more high-resolution details than the clinical CT acquisition. Overall, the successful implementation of the prototype system supports the IGCT concept for

  18. A prototype table-top inverse-geometry volumetric CT system.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Taly Gilat; Star-Lack, Josh; Bennett, N Robert; Mazin, Samuel R; Solomon, Edward G; Fahrig, Rebecca; Pelc, Norbert J

    2006-06-01

    A table-top volumetric CT system has been implemented that is able to image a 5-cm-thick volume in one circular scan with no cone-beam artifacts. The prototype inverse-geometry CT (IGCT) scanner consists of a large-area, scanned x-ray source and a detector array that is smaller in the transverse direction. The IGCT geometry provides sufficient volumetric sampling because the source and detector have the same axial, or slice direction, extent. This paper describes the implementation of the table-top IGCT scanner, which is based on the NexRay Scanning-Beam Digital X-ray system (NexRay, Inc., Los Gatos, CA) and an investigation of the system performance. The alignment and flat-field calibration procedures are described, along with a summary of the reconstruction algorithm. The resolution and noise performance of the prototype IGCT system are studied through experiments and further supported by analytical predictions and simulations. To study the presence of cone-beam artifacts, a "Defrise" phantom was scanned on both the prototype IGCT scanner and a micro CT system with a +/-5 cone angle for a 4.5-cm volume thickness. Images of inner ear specimens are presented and compared to those from clinical CT systems. Results showed that the prototype IGCT system has a 0.25-mm isotropic resolution and that noise comparable to that from a clinical scanner with equivalent spatial resolution is achievable. The measured MTF and noise values agreed reasonably well with theoretical predictions and computer simulations. The IGCT system was able to faithfully reconstruct the laminated pattern of the Defrise phantom while the micro CT system suffered severe cone-beam artifacts for the same object. The inner ear acquisition verified that the IGCT system can image a complex anatomical object, and the resulting images exhibited more high-resolution details than the clinical CT acquisition. Overall, the successful implementation of the prototype system supports the IGCT concept for single

  19. Modelling volumetric growth in a thick walled fibre reinforced artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, T. S. E.; Watton, P. N.; Luo, X. Y.; Ventikos, Y.

    2014-12-01

    A novel framework for simulating growth and remodelling (G&R) of a fibre-reinforced artery, including volumetric adaption, is proposed. We show how to implement this model into a finite element framework and propose and examine two underlying assumptions for modelling growth, namely constant individual density (CID) or adaptive individual density (AID). Moreover, we formulate a novel approach which utilises a combination of both AID and CID to simulate volumetric G&R for a tissue composed of several different constituents. We consider a special case of the G&R of an artery subjected to prescribed elastin degradation and we theorise on the assumptions and suitability of CID, AID and the mixed approach for modelling arterial biology. For simulating the volumetric changes that occur during aneurysm enlargement, we observe that it is advantageous to describe the growth of collagen using CID whilst it is preferable to model the atrophy of elastin using AID.

  20. Automated Segmentation and Shape Characterization of Volumetric Data

    PubMed Central

    Galinsky, Vitaly L.; Frank, Lawrence R.

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of complex shapes embedded within volumetric data is an important step in a wide range of applications. Standard approaches to this problem employ surface based methods that require inefficient, time consuming, and error prone steps of surface segmentation and inflation to satisfy the uniqueness or stability of subsequent surface fitting algorithms. Here we present a novel method based on a spherical wave decomposition (SWD) of the data that overcomes several of these limitations by directly analyzing the entire data volume, obviating the segmentation, inflation, and surface fitting steps, significantly reducing the computational time and eliminating topological errors while providing a more detailed quantitative description based upon a more complete theoretical framework of volumetric data. The method is demonstrated and compared to the current state-of-the-art neuroimaging methods for segmentation and characterization of volumetric magnetic resonance imaging data of the human brain. PMID:24521852

  1. A high volume, high throughput volumetric sorption analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soo, Y. C.; Beckner, M.; Romanos, J.; Wexler, C.; Pfeifer, P.; Buckley, P.; Clement, J.

    2011-03-01

    In this talk we will present an overview of our new Hydrogen Test Fixture (HTF) constructed by the Midwest Research Institute for The Alliance for Collaborative Research in Alternative Fuel Technology to test activated carbon monoliths for hydrogen gas storage. The HTF is an automated, computer-controlled volumetric instrument for rapid screening and manipulation of monoliths under an inert atmosphere (to exclude degradation of carbon from exposure to oxygen). The HTF allows us to measure large quantity (up to 500 g) of sample in a 0.5 l test tank, making our results less sensitive to sample inhomogeneity. The HTF can measure isotherms at pressures ranging from 1 to 300 bar at room temperature. For comparison, other volumetric instruments such as Hiden Isochema's HTP-1 Volumetric Analyser can only measure carbon samples up to 150 mg at pressures up to 200 bar. Work supported by the US DOD Contract # N00164-08-C-GS37.

  2. Volumetric (3D) compressive sensing spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Daguang; Huang, Yong; Kang, Jin U.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we proposed a novel three-dimensional compressive sensing (CS) approach for spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT) volumetric image acquisition and reconstruction. Instead of taking a spectral volume whose size is the same as that of the volumetric image, our method uses a sub set of the original spectral volume that is under-sampled in all three dimensions, which reduces the amount of spectral measurements to less than 20% of that required by the Shan-non/Nyquist theory. The 3D image is recovered from the under-sampled spectral data dimension-by-dimension using the proposed three-step CS reconstruction strategy. Experimental results show that our method can significantly reduce the sampling rate required for a volumetric SD OCT image while preserving the image quality. PMID:25426320

  3. Volumetric (3D) compressive sensing spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Daguang; Huang, Yong; Kang, Jin U

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we proposed a novel three-dimensional compressive sensing (CS) approach for spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT) volumetric image acquisition and reconstruction. Instead of taking a spectral volume whose size is the same as that of the volumetric image, our method uses a sub set of the original spectral volume that is under-sampled in all three dimensions, which reduces the amount of spectral measurements to less than 20% of that required by the Shan-non/Nyquist theory. The 3D image is recovered from the under-sampled spectral data dimension-by-dimension using the proposed three-step CS reconstruction strategy. Experimental results show that our method can significantly reduce the sampling rate required for a volumetric SD OCT image while preserving the image quality.

  4. Multiple sparse volumetric priors for distributed EEG source reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Strobbe, Gregor; van Mierlo, Pieter; De Vos, Maarten; Mijović, Bogdan; Hallez, Hans; Van Huffel, Sabine; López, José David; Vandenberghe, Stefaan

    2014-10-15

    We revisit the multiple sparse priors (MSP) algorithm implemented in the statistical parametric mapping software (SPM) for distributed EEG source reconstruction (Friston et al., 2008). In the present implementation, multiple cortical patches are introduced as source priors based on a dipole source space restricted to a cortical surface mesh. In this note, we present a technique to construct volumetric cortical regions to introduce as source priors by restricting the dipole source space to a segmented gray matter layer and using a region growing approach. This extension allows to reconstruct brain structures besides the cortical surface and facilitates the use of more realistic volumetric head models including more layers, such as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), compared to the standard 3-layered scalp-skull-brain head models. We illustrated the technique with ERP data and anatomical MR images in 12 subjects. Based on the segmented gray matter for each of the subjects, cortical regions were created and introduced as source priors for MSP-inversion assuming two types of head models. The standard 3-layered scalp-skull-brain head models and extended 4-layered head models including CSF. We compared these models with the current implementation by assessing the free energy corresponding with each of the reconstructions using Bayesian model selection for group studies. Strong evidence was found in favor of the volumetric MSP approach compared to the MSP approach based on cortical patches for both types of head models. Overall, the strongest evidence was found in favor of the volumetric MSP reconstructions based on the extended head models including CSF. These results were verified by comparing the reconstructed activity. The use of volumetric cortical regions as source priors is a useful complement to the present implementation as it allows to introduce more complex head models and volumetric source priors in future studies.

  5. Computer-assisted volumetric resections of intracranial lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Moure, Federico; Zamorano, Lucia J.

    1993-09-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies reconstructed in a stereotactic space can be used for accurate localization of intracranial lesions located in deep or eloquent regions in the brain, and for optimization of subsequent surgical removal. We describe our experience with 163 patients who underwent computer-assisted volumetric resection. The planning for the stereotactic volumetric neurosurgical methodology utilized the Zamarano-Dujovny localizing unit, the neurosurgical planning software (NSPS) system, which generates 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional views of the area of surgical interest, the arc setting parameters, and reconstructed CT images corresponding to the surgeon's eye-view perspective.

  6. Volumetric diffusive respirator use in neonatal respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Campbell, P J; Chilton, H W; Garvey, P A; Gupta, J M

    1991-02-01

    Six very low birthweight neonates with terminal respiratory failure due to severe hyaline membrane disease who failed to respond to conventional ventilation were offered a trial of high frequency jet ventilation using the volumetric diffusive respirator (VDR). All neonates showed improvement in pulmonary function. Two neonates were weaned successfully from high frequency ventilation. The results of this initial trial suggest that the volumetric diffusive respirator is a safe and effective method of ventilation in neonates with respiratory failure and that the survival rate in such neonates might be enhanced if treatment is introduced earlier in the disease.

  7. Volumetric Pricing of Agricultural Water Supplies: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Ronald C.; Perry, Gregory M.

    1985-07-01

    Models of water consumption by rice producers are conceptualized and then estimated using cross-sectional time series data obtained from 16 Texas canal operators for the years 1977-1982. Two alternative econometric models demonstrate that both volumetric and flat rate water charges are strongly and inversely related to agricultural water consumption. Nonprice conservation incentives accompanying flat rates are hypothesized to explain the negative correlation of flat rate charges and water consumption. Application of these results suggests that water supply organizations in the sample population converting to volumetric pricing will generally reduce water consumption.

  8. Volumetric measurements of a spatially growing dust acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jeremiah D.

    2012-11-01

    In this study, tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV) techniques are used to make volumetric measurements of the dust acoustic wave (DAW) in a weakly coupled dusty plasma system in an argon, dc glow discharge plasma. These tomo-PIV measurements provide the first instantaneous volumetric measurement of a naturally occurring propagating DAW. These measurements reveal over the measured volume that the measured wave mode propagates in all three spatial dimensional and exhibits the same spatial growth rate and wavelength in each spatial direction.

  9. Optimization of residual heat removal pump axial thrust and axial bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, F.

    1996-12-01

    The residual heat removal (RHR) pumps of German 1300 megawatt pressurized-water reactor (PWR) power plants are of the single stage end suction type with volute casing or with diffuser and forged circular casing. Due to the service conditions the pumps have to cover the full capacity range as well as a big variation in suction static pressure. This results in a big difference in the axial thrust that has to be borne by the axial bearing. Because these pumps are designed to operate without auxiliary systems (things that do not exist can not fail), they are equipped with antifriction bearings and sump oil lubrication. To minimize the heat production within the bearing casing, a number of PWR plants have pumps with combined axial/radial bearings of the ball type. Due to the fact that the maximum axial thrust caused by static pressure and hydrodynamic forces on the impeller is too big to be borne by that type of axial bearing, the impellers were designed to produce a hydrodynamic axial force that counteracts the static axial force. Thus, the resulting axial thrust may change direction when the static pressure varies.

  10. Compton coincidence volumetric imaging: a new x-ray volumetric imaging modality based on Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaochao

    2014-03-01

    Compton scattering is a dominant interaction during radiography and computed tomography x-ray imaging. However, the scattered photons are not used for extracting imaging information, but seriously degrade image quality. Here we introduce a new scheme that overcomes most of the problems associated with existing Compton scattering imaging schemes and allows Compton scattered photons to be effectively used for imaging. In our scheme, referred as Compton coincidence volumetric imaging (CCVI), a collimated monoenergetic x-ray beam is directed onto a thin semiconductor detector. A small portion of the photons is Compton scattered by the detector and their energy loss is detected. Some of the scattered photons intersect the imaging object, where they are Compton scattered a second time. The finally scattered photons are recorded by an areal energy resolving detector panel around the object. The two detectors work in coincidence mode. CCVI images the spatial electron density distribution in the imaging object. Similar to PET imaging, the event location can be located within a curve; therefore the imaging reconstruction algorithms are also similar to those of PET. Two statistical iterative imaging reconstruction algorithms are tested. Our study verifies the feasibility of CCVI in imaging acquisition and reconstruction. Various aspects of CCVI are discussed. If successfully implemented, it will offer a great potential for imaging dose reduction compared with x-ray CT. Furthermore, a CCVI modality will have no moving parts, which potentially offers cost reduction and faster imaging speed.

  11. SU-E-I-10: Investigation On Detectability of a Small Target for Different Slice Direction of a Volumetric Cone Beam CT Image

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C; Han, M; Baek, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the detectability of a small target for different slice direction of a volumetric cone beam CT image and its impact on dose reduction. Methods: Analytic projection data of a sphere object (1 mm diameter, 0.2/cm attenuation coefficient) were generated and reconstructed by FDK algorithm. In this work, we compared the detectability of the small target from four different backprojection Methods: hanning weighted ramp filter with linear interpolation (RECON 1), hanning weighted ramp filter with Fourier interpolation (RECON2), ramp filter with linear interpolation (RECON 3), and ramp filter with Fourier interpolation (RECON4), respectively. For noise simulation, 200 photons per measurement were used, and the noise only data were reconstructed using FDK algorithm. For each reconstructed volume, axial and coronal slice were extracted and detection-SNR was calculated using channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) with dense difference-of-Gaussian (D-DOG) channels. Results: Detection-SNR of coronal images varies for different backprojection methods, while axial images have a similar detection-SNR. Detection-SNR{sup 2} ratios of coronal and axial images in RECON1 and RECON2 are 1.33 and 1.15, implying that the coronal image has a better detectability than axial image. In other words, using coronal slices for the small target detection can reduce the patient dose about 33% and 15% compared to using axial slices in RECON 1 and RECON 2. Conclusion: In this work, we investigated slice direction dependent detectability of a volumetric cone beam CT image. RECON 1 and RECON 2 produced the highest detection-SNR, with better detectability in coronal slices. These results indicate that it is more beneficial to use coronal slice to improve detectability of a small target in a volumetric cone beam CT image. This research was supported by the MSIP (Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning), Korea, under the IT Consilience Creative Program (NIPA-2014-H0201

  12. Normal glow discharge in axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surzhikov, S.; Shang, J.

    2014-10-01

    Theory and results of mathematical modeling of a glow discharge in a parallel-plate configuration with axial magnetic field is presented. The model consists of continuity equations for electron and ion fluids, the Poisson equation for the self-consistent electric field. Numerical simulation results are presented for two-dimensional glow discharge at various initial conditions. The results are obtained for molecular nitrogen at pressure 1-5 Torr, emf of power supply 1-2 kV, and magnetic field induction B = 0-0.5 T. It is shown that in the presence of the axial magnetic field the glow discharge is rotated around its axis of symmetry. Nevertheless it is shown that in the investigated range of discharge parameters in an axial magnetic field the law of the normal current density is retained.

  13. Axial flow positive displacement worm gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, Kurt David (Inventor); Giffin, Rollin George (Inventor); Fakunle, Oladapo (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An axial flow positive displacement engine has an inlet axially spaced apart and upstream from an outlet. Inner and outer bodies have offset inner and outer axes extend from the inlet to the outlet through first, second, and third sections of a core assembly in serial downstream flow relationship. At least one of the bodies is rotatable about its axis. The inner and outer bodies have intermeshed inner and outer helical blades wound about the inner and outer axes respectively. The inner and outer helical blades extend radially outwardly and inwardly respectively. The helical blades have first, second, and third twist slopes in the first, second, and third sections respectively. The first twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes and the third twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes. A combustor section extends axially downstream through at least a portion of the second section.

  14. Children with New Onset Epilepsy Exhibit Diffusion Abnormalities in Cerebral White Matter in the Absence of Volumetric Differences

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Elizabeth; Pulsipher, Dalin; Dabbs, Kevin; Myers y Gutierrez, Adan; Sheth, Raj; Jones, Jana; Seidenberg, Michael; Meyerand, Elizabeth; Hermann, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The purpose of this investigation was to examine the diffusion properties of cerebral white matter in children with recent onset epilepsy (n=19) compared to healthy controls (n=11). Subjects underwent DTI with quantification of mean diffusion (MD), fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (Dax) and radial diffusivity (Drad) for regions of interest including anterior and posterior corpus callosum, fornix, cingulum, and internal and external capsules. Quantitative volumetrics were also performed for the corpus callosum and its subregions (anterior, midbody and posterior) and total lobar white and gray matter for the frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital lobes. The results demonstrated no group differences in total lobar gray or white matter volumes or volume of the corpus callosum and its subregions, but did show reduced FA and increased Drad in the posterior corpus callosum and cingulum. These results provide the earliest indication of microstructural abnormality in cerebral white matter among children with idiopathic epilepsies. This abnormality occurs in the context of normal volumetrics and suggests disruption in myelination processes. PMID:20044239

  15. Video-rate volumetric optical coherence tomography-based microangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Utku; Wei, Wei; Xu, Jingjiang; Qi, Xiaoli; Davis, Wyatt O.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-04-01

    Video-rate volumetric optical coherence tomography (vOCT) is relatively young in the field of OCT imaging but has great potential in biomedical applications. Due to the recent development of the MHz range swept laser sources, vOCT has started to gain attention in the community. Here, we report the first in vivo video-rate volumetric OCT-based microangiography (vOMAG) system by integrating an 18-kHz resonant microelectromechanical system (MEMS) mirror with a 1.6-MHz FDML swept source operating at ˜1.3 μm wavelength. Because the MEMS scanner can offer an effective B-frame rate of 36 kHz, we are able to engineer vOMAG with a video rate up to 25 Hz. This system was utilized for real-time volumetric in vivo visualization of cerebral microvasculature in mice. Moreover, we monitored the blood perfusion dynamics during stimulation within mouse ear in vivo. We also discussed this system's limitations. Prospective MEMS-enabled OCT probes with a real-time volumetric functional imaging capability can have a significant impact on endoscopic imaging and image-guided surgery applications.

  16. Video-rate volumetric optical coherence tomography-based microangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Utku; Wei, Wei; Xu, Jingjiang; Qi, Xiaoli; Davis, Wyatt O.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-04-01

    Video-rate volumetric optical coherence tomography (vOCT) is relatively young in the field of OCT imaging but has great potential in biomedical applications. Due to the recent development of the MHz range swept laser sources, vOCT has started to gain attention in the community. Here, we report the first in vivo video-rate volumetric OCT-based microangiography (vOMAG) system by integrating an 18-kHz resonant microelectromechanical system (MEMS) mirror with a 1.6-MHz FDML swept source operating at ˜1.3 μm wavelength. Because the MEMS scanner can offer an effective B-frame rate of 36 kHz, we are able to engineer vOMAG with a video rate up to 25 Hz. This system was utilized for real-time volumetric in vivo visualization of cerebral microvasculature in mice. Moreover, we monitored the blood perfusion dynamics during stimulation within mouse ear in vivo. We also discussed this system's limitations. Prospective MEMS-enabled OCT probes with a real-time volumetric functional imaging capability can have a significant impact on endoscopic imaging and image-guided surgery applications.

  17. VOLUMETRIC LEAK DETECTION IN LARGE UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS - VOLUME I

    EPA Science Inventory

    A set of experiments was conducted to determine whether volumetric leak detection system presently used to test underground storage tanks (USTs) up to 38,000 L (10,000 gal) in capacity could meet EPA's regulatory standards for tank tightness and automatic tank gauging systems whe...

  18. Volumetric Video Motion Detection for Unobtrusive Human-Computer Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    SMALL, DANIEL E.; LUCK, JASON P.; CARLSON, JEFFREY J.

    2002-04-01

    The computer vision field has undergone a revolution of sorts in the past five years. Moore's law has driven real-time image processing from the domain of dedicated, expensive hardware, to the domain of commercial off-the-shelf computers. This thesis describes their work on the design, analysis and implementation of a Real-Time Shape from Silhouette Sensor (RT S{sup 3}). The system produces time-varying volumetric data at real-time rates (10-30Hz). The data is in the form of binary volumetric images. Until recently, using this technique in a real-time system was impractical due to the computational burden. In this thesis they review the previous work in the field, and derive the mathematics behind volumetric calibration, silhouette extraction, and shape-from-silhouette. For the sensor implementation, they use four color camera/framegrabber pairs and a single high-end Pentium III computer. The color cameras were configured to observe a common volume. This hardware uses the RT S{sup 3} software to track volumetric motion. Two types of shape-from-silhouette algorithms were implemented and their relative performance was compared. They have also explored an application of this sensor to markerless motion tracking. In his recent review of work done in motion tracking Gavrila states that results of markerless vision based 3D tracking are still limited. The method proposed in this paper not only expands upon the previous work but will also attempt to overcome these limitations.

  19. Volumetric system calibrates meters for large flow rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Volumetric system calibrates meters used for large liquid flow rates. The system employs trip probes and equipment to time the flow of liquid from a tare vessel into a calibrated vessel. This calibration system is used in the petroleum and chemical industries.

  20. Assessing vertebral fracture risk on volumetric quantitative computed tomography by geometric characterization of trabecular bone structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checefsky, Walter A.; Abidin, Anas Z.; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Bauer, Jan S.; Baum, Thomas; Wismüller, Axel

    2016-03-01

    The current clinical standard for measuring Bone Mineral Density (BMD) is dual X-ray absorptiometry, however more recently BMD derived from volumetric quantitative computed tomography has been shown to demonstrate a high association with spinal fracture susceptibility. In this study, we propose a method of fracture risk assessment using structural properties of trabecular bone in spinal vertebrae. Experimental data was acquired via axial multi-detector CT (MDCT) from 12 spinal vertebrae specimens using a whole-body 256-row CT scanner with a dedicated calibration phantom. Common image processing methods were used to annotate the trabecular compartment in the vertebral slices creating a circular region of interest (ROI) that excluded cortical bone for each slice. The pixels inside the ROI were converted to values indicative of BMD. High dimensional geometrical features were derived using the scaling index method (SIM) at different radii and scaling factors (SF). The mean BMD values within the ROI were then extracted and used in conjunction with a support vector machine to predict the failure load of the specimens. Prediction performance was measured using the root-mean-square error (RMSE) metric and determined that SIM combined with mean BMD features (RMSE = 0.82 +/- 0.37) outperformed MDCT-measured mean BMD (RMSE = 1.11 +/- 0.33) (p < 10-4). These results demonstrate that biomechanical strength prediction in vertebrae can be significantly improved through the use of SIM-derived texture features from trabecular bone.

  1. Volumetric EBCT imaging of the vocal tract applied to male falsetto singing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tom, Kenneth; Titze, Ingo R.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Story, Brad H.

    1996-04-01

    As part of an analysis by synthesis approach to studying vocal intensity control in falsetto register, volumetric imaging of the vocal tract (the upper airway from the glottis to the lips) using electron beam computed tomography was performed on a classically trained singer, a countertenor, who uses a falsetto singing technique. Eight pitch and loudness conditions were imaged, a subset of which will be presented here. Each set of scans consisted of contiguous 3 mm axial `slices' encompassing the arch of the hard palate superiorly and the first tracheal ring inferiorly. Images were analyzed in three stages: image segmentation, 3D airway reconstruction and airway measurement. The vocal tract airway was segmented from surrounding tissue by assigning airway voxels a unique gray scale value. Reconstruction of the vocal tract in three dimensions was accomplished using shape based interpolation on the segmented images. Cross-sectional areas and vocal tract length were acquired from shape based interpolated data. Vocal tract area functions derived from these measurements were used to simulate the subject's phonations, which in turn allowed estimation of glottal and supraglottal contributions to vocal intensity.

  2. In vivo volumetric imaging of the human upper eyelid with ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizheva, Kostadinka; Lee, Patrick; Sorbara, Luigina; Hutchings, Natalie; Simpson, Trefford

    2010-07-01

    The upper eyelid is a biological tissue with complex structure, essential for the maintenance of an optically clear ocular surface due to its physical (blinking) effect. The Meibomian glands (MGs) are structures that lie beneath the surface of the inner eyelid and are partially responsible for the production of the superficial oily layer of the tear film. The MGs are only superficially visible under magnification when the eyelid is everted. We present for the first time in vivo 3-D images of healthy and inflamed human MGs. Tomograms were acquired from the tarsal plate of everted human eyelids with a 1060-nm ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography (UHOCT) system, with ~3 μm×10 μm (axial×lateral) resolution in biological tissue at the rate of 91,911 A-scans/s. Comparison with histology shows that the UHOCT images reveal a spatial distribution of structures that appear to correspond with the MGs' acini and ducts (in healthy subjects), and accumulation of heterogeneous, highly scattering biological material and clear fluids in the visibly blocked glands. Noninvasive, volumetric high-resolution morphological imaging of the human tarsal area could have a significant impact in the clinical diagnosis of inflammatory and noninflammatory lid pathologies.

  3. Rapid release of growth factors regenerates force output in volumetric muscle loss injuries.

    PubMed

    Grasman, Jonathan M; Do, Duc M; Page, Raymond L; Pins, George D

    2015-12-01

    A significant challenge in the design and development of biomaterial scaffolds is to incorporate mechanical and biochemical cues to direct organized tissue growth. In this study, we investigated the effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) loaded, crosslinked fibrin (EDCn-HGF) microthread scaffolds on skeletal muscle regeneration in a mouse model of volumetric muscle loss (VML). The rapid, sustained release of HGF significantly enhanced the force production of muscle tissue 60 days after injury, recovering more than 200% of the force output relative to measurements recorded immediately after injury. HGF delivery increased the number of differentiating myoblasts 14 days after injury, and supported an enhanced angiogenic response. The architectural morphology of microthread scaffolds supported the ingrowth of nascent myofibers into the wound site, in contrast to fibrin gel implants which did not support functional regeneration. Together, these data suggest that EDCn-HGF microthreads recapitulate several of the regenerative cues lost in VML injuries, promote remodeling of functional muscle tissue, and enhance the functional regeneration of skeletal muscle. Further, by strategically incorporating specific biochemical factors and precisely tuning the structural and mechanical properties of fibrin microthreads, we have developed a powerful platform technology that may enhance regeneration in other axially aligned tissues.

  4. Rotor self-lubricating axial stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blount, Dale H.

    1988-01-01

    A series of lubricating plugs is located in the stationary backup face adjacent to the axial stop face of a rotating impeller mounted in a turbopump for pumping liquid oxygen or liquid hydrogen. The stop face and the backup face are those surfaces which engage when the axial load on the impeller exceeds the load balancing capability. The plugs have a truncated conical configuration so as to be trapped in the backup face, and are placed at varying radii on the face to provide complete surface lubrication. The plugs may be formed from Teflon, Kel-F or bronze filled Teflon.

  5. Rotor self-lubricating axial stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blount, Dale H. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A plurality of lubricating plugs are disposed in the stationary backup face adjacent to the axial stop face of a rotating impeller mounted in a turbopump for pumping liquid oxygen or liquid hydrogen. The stop face and the backup face are those surfaces which engage when the axial load on the impeller exceeds the load balancing capability. The plugs have a truncated conical configuration so as to be trapped in the backup face, and are disposed at varying radii on the face to provide complete surface lubrication. The plugs may be formed from Teflon, Kel-F or bronze filled Teflon.

  6. Theoretical Determination of Axial Fan Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struve, E.

    1943-01-01

    The report presents a method for the computation of axial fan characteristics. The method is based on the assumption that the law of constancy of the circulation along the blade holds, approximately, for all fan conditions for which the blade elements operate at normal angles of attack (up to the stalling angles). Pressure head coefficient K(sub a) and power coefficient K(sub u) for the force components in the axial and tangential directions, respectively, and analogous to the lift and drag coefficients C(sub y) and C(sub x) are conveniently introduced.

  7. High axial load termination for TLP tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, M.M.

    1992-03-03

    This patent describes a hollow high axial load termination for a composite tubular tendon. It comprises: a curved hollow termination body open at one end wit a circular opening and connected at the opposite curved end with an elongated hollow member of lesser diameter than the diameter of the circular opening of the termination body, a composite tubular tendon containing axial fibers and helical fibers laid on an inner hollow liner; fibers of the composite tubular tendon extending over and covering the termination body from the abutment with the composite tubular tendon to the elongated member of lesser diameter than the termination body.

  8. Analysis of Changing Swarm Rate using Volumetric Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumazawa, T.; Ogata, Y.; Kimura, K.; Maeda, K.; Kobayashi, A.

    2015-12-01

    Near the eastern coast of Izu peninsula is an active submarine volcanic region in Japan, where magma intrusions have been observed many times. The forecast of earthquake swarm activities and eruptions are serious concern particularly in nearby hot spring resort areas. It is well known that temporal durations of the swarm activities have been correlated with early volumetric strain changes at a certain observation station of about 20 km distance apart. Therefore the Earthquake Research Committee (2010) investigated some empirical statistical relations to predict sizes of the swarm activity. Here we looked at the background seismicity rate changes during these swarm periods using the non-stationary ETAS model (Kumazawa and Ogata, 2013, 2014), and have found the followings. The modified volumetric strain data, by removing the effect of earth tides, precipitation and coseismic jumps, have significantly higher cross-correlations to the estimated background rates of the ETAS model than to the swarm rate-changes. Specifically, the background seismicity rate synchronizes clearer to the strain change by the lags around a half day. These relations suggest an enhanced prediction of earthquakes in this region using volumetric strain measurements. Hence we propose an extended ETAS model where the background rate is modulated by the volumetric strain data. We have also found that the response function to the strain data can be well approximated by an exponential functions with the same decay rate, but that their intersects are inversely proportional to the distances between the volumetric strain-meter and the onset location of the swarm. Our numerical results by the same proposed model show consistent outcomes for the various major swarms in this region.

  9. In vivo real-time volumetric synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzari, Hamed; Rasmussen, Morten F.; Brandt, Andreas H.; Stuart, Matthias B.; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen A.

    2015-03-01

    Synthetic aperture (SA) imaging can be used to achieve real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging using 2-D array transducers. The sensitivity of SA imaging is improved by maximizing the acoustic output, but one must consider the limitations of an ultrasound system, both technical and biological. This paper investigates the in vivo applicability and sensitivity of volumetric SA imaging. Utilizing the transmit events to generate a set of virtual point sources, a frame rate of 25 Hz for a 90° × 90° field-of-view was achieved. data were obtained using a 3.5 MHz 32 × 32 elements 2-D phased array transducer connected to the experimental scanner (SARUS). Proper scaling is applied to the excitation signal such that intensity levels are in compliance with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations for in vivo ultrasound imaging. The measured Mechanical Index and spatial-peak-temporal-average intensity for parallel beam-forming (PB) are 0.83 and 377.5mW/cm2, and for SA are 0.48 and 329.5mW/cm2. A human kidney was volumetrically imaged with SA and PB techniques simultaneously. Two radiologists for evaluation of the volumetric SA were consulted by means of a questionnaire on the level of details perceivable in the beam-formed images. The comparison was against PB based on the in vivo data. The feedback from the domain experts indicates that volumetric SA images internal body structures with a better contrast resolution compared to PB at all positions in the entire imaged volume. Furthermore, the autocovariance of a homogeneous area in the in vivo SA data, had 23.5% smaller width at the half of its maximum value compared to PB.

  10. Visualization and computer graphics on isotropically emissive volumetric displays.

    PubMed

    Mora, Benjamin; Maciejewski, Ross; Chen, Min; Ebert, David S

    2009-01-01

    The availability of commodity volumetric displays provides ordinary users with a new means of visualizing 3D data. Many of these displays are in the class of isotropically emissive light devices, which are designed to directly illuminate voxels in a 3D frame buffer, producing X-ray-like visualizations. While this technology can offer intuitive insight into a 3D object, the visualizations are perceptually different from what a computer graphics or visualization system would render on a 2D screen. This paper formalizes rendering on isotropically emissive displays and introduces a novel technique that emulates traditional rendering effects on isotropically emissive volumetric displays, delivering results that are much closer to what is traditionally rendered on regular 2D screens. Such a technique can significantly broaden the capability and usage of isotropically emissive volumetric displays. Our method takes a 3D dataset or object as the input, creates an intermediate light field, and outputs a special 3D volume dataset called a lumi-volume. This lumi-volume encodes approximated rendering effects in a form suitable for display with accumulative integrals along unobtrusive rays. When a lumi-volume is fed directly into an isotropically emissive volumetric display, it creates a 3D visualization with surface shading effects that are familiar to the users. The key to this technique is an algorithm for creating a 3D lumi-volume from a 4D light field. In this paper, we discuss a number of technical issues, including transparency effects due to the dimension reduction and sampling rates for light fields and lumi-volumes. We show the effectiveness and usability of this technique with a selection of experimental results captured from an isotropically emissive volumetric display, and we demonstrate its potential capability and scalability with computer-simulated high-resolution results.

  11. Co-axial, high energy gamma generator

    DOEpatents

    Reijonen, Jani Petteri; Gicquel, Frederic

    2011-08-16

    A gamma ray generator includes an ion source in a first chamber. A second chamber is configured co-axially around the first chamber at a lower second pressure. Co-axially arranged plasma apertures separate the two chambers and provide for restricted passage of ions and gas from the first to the second chamber. The second chamber is formed by a puller electrode having at least one long channel aperture to draw ions from the first chamber when the puller electrode is subject to an appropriate applied potential. A plurality of electrodes rings in the third chamber in third pressure co-axially surround the puller electrode and have at least one channel corresponding to the at least one puller electrode aperture and plasma aperture. The electrode rings increase the energy of the ions to a selected energy in stages in passing between successive pairs of the electrodes by application of an accelerating voltage to the successive pairs of accelerator electrodes. A target disposed co-axially around the plurality of electrodes receives the beam of accelerated ions, producing gamma rays.

  12. Aerodynamic Design of Axial Flow Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, R. O. (Editor); Johnsen, I. A.

    1965-01-01

    An overview of 'Aerodynamic systems design of axial flow compressors' is presented. Numerous chapters cover topics such as compressor design, ptotential and viscous flow in two dimensional cascades, compressor stall and blade vibration, and compressor flow theory. Theoretical aspects of flow are also covered.

  13. Stability of structural members under axial load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Eugene E

    1937-01-01

    The principles of the cross method of moment distribution are used to check the stability of structural members under axial load. A brief theoretical treatment of the subject, together with an illustrative problem, is included as well as a discussion of the reduced modulus at high stresses and a set of tables to aid in the solution of practical problems.

  14. On gravitational radiation with axial symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Ivor

    1989-12-01

    General results are obtained for Robinson-Trautman metrics which satisfy reasonable conditions for radiation from a bounded source. For the axially symmetrical case, the degree of the one field equation is reduced from 5 to 2; a simplified proof is given of the Lukacs-Perjes-Porter-Sebestyen theorem and a systematic procedure is developed for formal solution in series.

  15. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: AXIAL RESOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Confocal Microscopy System Performance: Axial resolution.
    Robert M. Zucker, PhD

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Re...

  16. Axial bearings using superconductors and permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Marion-Pera, M.C.; Yonnet, J.P.

    1995-05-01

    Contactless bearings are one of the applications of high temperature superconductors. Different structures of permanent magnets and superconductors are modeled assuming a total Meissner effect. Axial force of a few hundred Newtons and stiffness of around 100 N/mm can be achieved. Consequences of real superconducting material behavior are discussed.

  17. Evaluation of Axially Modulations in Plasma Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, James; Antonsen, Thomas; Milchberg, Howard; Fan, Jay; Parra, Enrique

    2000-10-01

    Plasma waveguides for guiding intense laser pulses have applications in particle acceleration and x-ray generation schemes. Waveguides can be formed using a variety of methods. One method [1] is to create a plasma channel by breaking down a gas with a laser pulse focused through an axicon. Ideally, the plasma channel will be axially symmetric and allow for guided single mode propagation of short laser pulses. However, for certain experimental conditions the channel develops periodic axial modulations. The onset of these modulations appears to correlate with the conditions for self trapping and resonant absorption of the axicon pulse by the plasma waveguide. Resonant absorption occurs under the following scenario [2]. As the channel is expanding the axial wave numbers of the modes of the leaky waveguide defined by the channel evolve as well. At certain times one of these axial wave numbers will correspond to that of the formation pulse, which is defined by the axicon. At this time the formation pulse couples linearly to the confined mode of the channel and is strongly absorbed. According to our model the modulations are due to a nonlinear coupling of the axicon field to the confined modes of the channel. Small axial modulations in the expansion rate of the channel can scatter the incident axicon field into the guided mode of the waveguide. The beating of the guided mode and the axicon field leads to modulations in the heating rate and ponderomotive force which reinforce the modulations in the expansion rate, in other words, there is a parametric instability. A simple model of this process will be presented. [1] C.G. Durfee III and H.M. Milchberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 2409 (1993) [2] J. Fan, E. Parra, and H.M. Milchberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 3085 (2000)

  18. Axial type self-bearing motor for axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yohji; Masuzawa, Toru; Matsuda, Ken-Ichi; Ohmori, Kunihiro; Yamane, Takashi; Konishi, Yoshiaki; Fukahori, Shinya; Ueno, Satoshi; Kim, Seung-Jong

    2003-10-01

    An axial self-bearing motor is proposed which can drive an axial blood pump without physical contact. It is a functional combination of the bi-directional disc motor and the axial active magnetic bearing, where it actively controls single degree-of-freedom motion, while other motions such as lateral vibration are passively stable. For application to a blood pump, the proposed self-bearing motor has the advantages of simple structure and small size. Through the finite element method (FEM) analysis and the experimental test, its good feasibility is verified. Finally, the axial flow pump is fabricated using the developed magnetically suspended motor. The pump test is carried out and the results are discussed in detail. PMID:14616531

  19. Volumetric HIFU Ablation guided by Multiplane MRI Thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Max O.; Mougenot, Charles; Quesson, Bruno; Enholm, Julia; Bail, Brigitte Le; Laurent, Christophe; Moonen, Chrit T. W.; Ehnholm, Gösta J.

    2009-04-01

    High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) is commonly performed using an iterative point-by-point approach with the sonications interleaved by delays to allow for cool-down of tissue. Although a safe sonication strategy, it remains rather slow due to the suboptimal utilization of deposited heat energy. As an alternative, we propose a volumetric ablation method where volumes larger than a focal spot are ablated per sonication by electronically steering the focal-spot along multiple outwards-moving concentric circles. A common problem of large volume ablations has been their safety with regards to nearfield heating. To this end, rapid multiplane thermometry is also introduced with coverage both parallel and perpendicular to the beam-path. Our approach monitors the temperature rise during sonication at a temporal resolution comparable to that of heat-development. Experiments were performed in an in vivo porcine model to assess the usefulness of the proposed volumetric sonication strategy and multiplane thermometry.

  20. Automated volumetric segmentation of retinal fluid on optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Zhang, Miao; Pechauer, Alex D.; Liu, Liang; Hwang, Thomas S.; Wilson, David J.; Li, Dengwang; Jia, Yali

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel automated volumetric segmentation method to detect and quantify retinal fluid on optical coherence tomography (OCT). The fuzzy level set method was introduced for identifying the boundaries of fluid filled regions on B-scans (x and y-axes) and C-scans (z-axis). The boundaries identified from three types of scans were combined to generate a comprehensive volumetric segmentation of retinal fluid. Then, artefactual fluid regions were removed using morphological characteristics and by identifying vascular shadowing with OCT angiography obtained from the same scan. The accuracy of retinal fluid detection and quantification was evaluated on 10 eyes with diabetic macular edema. Automated segmentation had good agreement with manual segmentation qualitatively and quantitatively. The fluid map can be integrated with OCT angiogram for intuitive clinical evaluation. PMID:27446676

  1. Three-dimensional volumetric object reconstruction using computational integral imaging.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung-Hyun; Jang, Ju-Seog; Javidi, Bahram

    2004-02-01

    We propose a three-dimensional (3D) imaging technique that can sense a 3D scene and computationally reconstruct it as a 3D volumetric image. Sensing of the 3D scene is carried out by obtaining elemental images optically using a pickup microlens array and a detector array. Reconstruction of volume pixels of the scene is accomplished by computationally simulating optical reconstruction according to ray optics. The entire pixels of the recorded elemental images contribute to volumetric reconstruction of the 3D scene. Image display planes at arbitrary distances from the display microlens array are computed and reconstructed by back propagating the elemental images through a computer synthesized pinhole array based on ray optics. We present experimental results of 3D image sensing and volume pixel reconstruction to test and verify the performance of the algorithm and the imaging system. The volume pixel values can be used for 3D image surface reconstruction.

  2. Pulse sequence for dynamic volumetric imaging of hyperpolarized metabolic products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Charles H.; Chen, Albert P.; Lustig, Michael; Hargreaves, Brian A.; Lupo, Janine; Xu, Duan; Kurhanewicz, John; Hurd, Ralph E.; Pauly, John M.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2008-07-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization and dissolution of a 13C-labeled substrate enables the dynamic imaging of cellular metabolism. Spectroscopic information is typically acquired, making the acquisition of dynamic volumetric data a challenge. To enable rapid volumetric imaging, a spectral-spatial excitation pulse was designed to excite a single line of the carbon spectrum. With only a single resonance present in the signal, an echo-planar readout trajectory could be used to resolve spatial information, giving full volume coverage of 32 × 32 × 16 voxels every 3.5 s. This high frame rate was used to measure the different lactate dynamics in different tissues in a normal rat model and a mouse model of prostate cancer.

  3. Tidal Triggering and Statistical Patterns of Microseismicity at Axial Volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Dziak, R. P.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.; Haxel, J. H.; Mann, M. E.; Pennington, C.; Weis, J.; Womack, N.; Levy, S.

    2015-12-01

    Tidal stress changes are known to modulate the timing of microearthquakes within many mid-ocean ridge volcanic systems. At Axial Volcano, located on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, earthquakes occur preferentially when volumetric extension peaks near times of low ocean tide. Autonomous ocean-bottom hydrophone (OBH, 2007-2011) and cabled ocean bottom seismometer (OBS, Nov. 2014-) data are used to quantify the strength of tidal triggering in time periods before the April 2011 and April 2015 eruptions at Axial Volcano. The mean percent excess at times of low ocean-tide is ~14% (16% std) in the four years prior to the 2011 eruption and ~18% (17% std) in the five months prior to the 2015 eruption. The sensitivity of earthquakes to tidal stress does not evolve systematically prior to either eruption; however, this pattern is disturbed by much larger stress changes associated with the onset of dike intrusion. Following dike injection and eruption, seismicity rates drop sharply. As seismicity rates continue to rise in the months following the 2015 eruption, real-time data available from the cabled OBS network will be used quantify temporal patterns in microearthquake activity as dike induced stresses are relaxed and the magma chamber inflates.

  4. Volumetric 3D display using a DLP projection engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jason

    2012-03-01

    In this article, we describe a volumetric 3D display system based on the high speed DLPTM (Digital Light Processing) projection engine. Existing two-dimensional (2D) flat screen displays often lead to ambiguity and confusion in high-dimensional data/graphics presentation due to lack of true depth cues. Even with the help of powerful 3D rendering software, three-dimensional (3D) objects displayed on a 2D flat screen may still fail to provide spatial relationship or depth information correctly and effectively. Essentially, 2D displays have to rely upon capability of human brain to piece together a 3D representation from 2D images. Despite the impressive mental capability of human visual system, its visual perception is not reliable if certain depth cues are missing. In contrast, volumetric 3D display technologies to be discussed in this article are capable of displaying 3D volumetric images in true 3D space. Each "voxel" on a 3D image (analogous to a pixel in 2D image) locates physically at the spatial position where it is supposed to be, and emits light from that position toward omni-directions to form a real 3D image in 3D space. Such a volumetric 3D display provides both physiological depth cues and psychological depth cues to human visual system to truthfully perceive 3D objects. It yields a realistic spatial representation of 3D objects and simplifies our understanding to the complexity of 3D objects and spatial relationship among them.

  5. Inorganic volumetric light source excited by ultraviolet light

    DOEpatents

    Reed, S.; Walko, R.J.; Ashley, C.S.; Brinker, C.J.

    1994-04-26

    The invention relates to a composition for the volumetric generation of radiation. The composition comprises a porous substrate loaded with a component capable of emitting radiation upon interaction with an exciting radiation. Preferably, the composition is an aerogel substrate loaded with a component, e.g., a phosphor, capable of interacting with exciting radiation of a first energy, e.g., ultraviolet light, to produce radiation of a second energy, e.g., visible light. 4 figures.

  6. Inorganic volumetric light source excited by ultraviolet light

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Scott; Walko, Robert J.; Ashley, Carol S.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    1994-01-01

    The invention relates to a composition for the volumetric generation of radiation. The composition comprises a porous substrate loaded with a component capable of emitting radiation upon interaction with an exciting radiation. Preferably, the composition is an aerogel substrate loaded with a component, e.g., a phosphor, capable of interacting with exciting radiation of a first energy, e.g., ultraviolet light, to produce radiation of a second energy, e.g., visible light.

  7. Volumetric Echocardiographic Particle Image Velocimetry (V-Echo-PIV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falahatpisheh, Ahmad; Kheradvar, Arash

    2015-11-01

    Measurement of 3D flow field inside the cardiac chambers has proven to be a challenging task. Current laser-based 3D PIV methods estimate the third component of the velocity rather than directly measuring it and also cannot be used to image the opaque heart chambers. Modern echocardiography systems are equipped with 3D probes that enable imaging the entire 3D opaque field. However, this feature has not yet been employed for 3D vector characterization of blood flow. For the first time, we introduce a method that generates velocity vector field in 4D based on volumetric echocardiographic images. By assuming the conservation of brightness in 3D, blood speckles are tracked. A hierarchical 3D PIV method is used to account for large particle displacement. The discretized brightness transport equation is solved in a least square sense in interrogation windows of size 163 voxels. We successfully validate the method in analytical and experimental cases. Volumetric echo data of a left ventricle is then processed in the systolic phase. The expected velocity fields were successfully predicted by V-Echo-PIV. In this work, we showed a method to image blood flow in 3D based on volumetric images of human heart using no contrast agent.

  8. Volumetric full-range magnetomotive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Adeel; Kim, Jongsik; Shemonski, Nathan D.; Marjanovic, Marina; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Magnetomotive optical coherence tomography (MM-OCT) can be utilized to spatially localize the presence of magnetic particles within tissues or organs. These magnetic particle-containing regions are detected by using the capability of OCT to measure small-scale displacements induced by the activation of an external electromagnet coil typically driven by a harmonic excitation signal. The constraints imposed by the scanning schemes employed and tissue viscoelastic properties limit the speed at which conventional MM-OCT data can be acquired. Realizing that electromagnet coils can be designed to exert MM force on relatively large tissue volumes (comparable or larger than typical OCT imaging fields of view), we show that an order-of-magnitude improvement in three-dimensional (3-D) MM-OCT imaging speed can be achieved by rapid acquisition of a volumetric scan during the activation of the coil. Furthermore, we show volumetric (3-D) MM-OCT imaging over a large imaging depth range by combining this volumetric scan scheme with full-range OCT. Results with tissue equivalent phantoms and a biological tissue are shown to demonstrate this technique. PMID:25472770

  9. Volumetric lattice Boltzmann simulation for blood flow in aorta arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deep, Debanjan; Yu, Huidan (Whitney); Teague, Shawn

    2012-11-01

    Complicated moving boundaries pose a major challenge in computational fluid dynamics for complex flows, especially in the biomechanics of both blood flow in the cardiovascular system and air flow in the respiratory system where the compliant nature of the vessels can have significant effects on the flow rate and wall shear stress. We develop a computation approach to treat arbitrarily moving boundaries using a volumetric representation of lattice Boltzmann method, which distributes fluid particles inside lattice cells. A volumetric bounce-back procedure is applied in the streaming step while momentum exchange between the fluid and moving solid boundary are accounted for in the collision sub-step. Additional boundary-induced migration is introduced to conserve fluid mass as the boundary moves across fluid cells. The volumetric LBM (VLBM) is used to simulate blood flow in both normal and dilated aorta arteries. We first compare flow structure and pressure distribution in steady state with results from Navier-Stokes based solver and good agreements are achieved. Then we focus on wall stress within the aorta for different heart pumping condition and present quantitative measurement of wall shear and normal stress.

  10. Review of Axial Burnup Distribution Considerations for Burnup Credit Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.; DeHart, M.D.

    2000-03-01

    This report attempts to summarize and consolidate the existing knowledge on axial burnup distribution issues that are important to burnup credit criticality safety calculations. Recently released Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff guidance permits limited burnup credit, and thus, has prompted resolution of the axial burnup distribution issue. The reactivity difference between the neutron multiplication factor (keff) calculated with explicit representation of the axial burnup distribution and keff calculated assuming a uniform axial burnup is referred to as the ``end effect.'' This end effect is shown to be dependent on many factors, including the axial-burnup profile, total accumulated burnup, cooling time, initial enrichment, assembly design, and the isotopics considered (i.e., actinide-only or actinides plus fission products). Axial modeling studies, efforts related to the development of axial-profile databases, and the determination of bounding axial profiles are also discussed. Finally, areas that could benefit from further efforts are identified.

  11. Microwave axial dielectric properties of carbon fiber.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wen; Xiao, Peng; Luo, Heng; Li, Zhuan

    2015-01-01

    Randomly distributed carbon fibers (CFs) reinforced epoxy resin composites are prepared by the pouring method, the dielectric properties of CF composites with different fiber content and length have been performed in the frequency range from 8.2 to 12.4 GHz. The complex permittivity of the composite increases with the fiber length, which is attributed to the decrease of depolarization field, and increases with the volume fraction, which is attributed to the increase of polarization. A formula, based on the theory of Reynolds-Hugh, is proposed to calculate the effective permittivity of CF composites, and validated by the experiments. The proposed formula is further applied to derive the axial permittivity of CF and analyze the effect of fiber length on the axial permittivity. PMID:26477579

  12. Microwave axial dielectric properties of carbon fiber

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Wen; Xiao, Peng; Luo, Heng; Li, Zhuan

    2015-01-01

    Randomly distributed carbon fibers (CFs) reinforced epoxy resin composites are prepared by the pouring method, the dielectric properties of CF composites with different fiber content and length have been performed in the frequency range from 8.2 to 12.4 GHz. The complex permittivity of the composite increases with the fiber length, which is attributed to the decrease of depolarization field, and increases with the volume fraction, which is attributed to the increase of polarization. A formula, based on the theory of Reynolds-Hugh, is proposed to calculate the effective permittivity of CF composites, and validated by the experiments. The proposed formula is further applied to derive the axial permittivity of CF and analyze the effect of fiber length on the axial permittivity. PMID:26477579

  13. Piping inspection carriage having axially displaceable sensor

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.; Treanor, R.C.

    1994-12-06

    A pipe inspection instrument carriage is described for use with a pipe crawler for performing internal inspections of piping surfaces. The carriage has a front leg assembly, a rear leg assembly and a central support connecting the two assemblies and for mounting an instrument arm having inspection instruments. The instrument arm has a Y-arm mounted distally thereon for axially aligning the inspection instrumentation and a mounting block, a linear actuator and axial movement arm for extending the inspection instruments radially outward to operably position the inspection instruments on the piping interior. Also, the carriage has a rotation motor and gear assembly for rotating the central support and the front leg assembly with respect to the rear leg assembly so that the inspection instruments azimuthally scan the piping interior. The instrument carriage allows performance of all piping inspection operations with a minimum of moving parts, thus decreasing the likelihood of performance failure. 4 figures.

  14. Piping inspection carriage having axially displaceable sensor

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, William T.; Treanor, Richard C.

    1994-01-01

    A pipe inspection instrument carriage for use with a pipe crawler for performing internal inspections of piping surfaces. The carriage has a front leg assembly, a rear leg assembly and a central support connecting the two assemblies and for mounting an instrument arm having inspection instruments. The instrument arm has a y-arm mounted distally thereon for axially aligning the inspection instrumentation and a mounting block, a linear actuator and axial movement arm for extending the inspection instruments radially outward to operably position the inspection instruments on the piping interior. Also, the carriage has a rotation motor and gear assembly for rotating the central support and the front leg assembly with respect to the rear leg assembly so that the inspection instruments azimuthally scan the piping interior. The instrument carriage allows performance of all piping inspection operations with a minimum of moving parts, thus decreasing the likelihood of performance failure.

  15. Induced axial oscillations in superconducting dipole windings

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, W.B.; Ghosh, A.K.

    1994-12-31

    When superconducting accelerator magnets wound from multi-stranded conductor are energized a periodic variation appears in the magnetic field along the axis. This oscillation is present in al components of the field and has a period that is equal to the transposition pitch of the superconducting cable. Such axial variations have been observed even in windings which are not carrying any transport current. A magnetic field was applied to a portion of a dipole winding using a second magnet. Axial oscillations were induced along the total length of the windings including the portion not in the applied field. The amplitude of these oscillations varied with the amount of inert winding inside the energizing magnet and with t;he angle of the applied field. These field variations could be completely applied field. These field variations could be completely eliminated in the external portion of the coil by heating a small section of the winding above the transition temperature.

  16. Axial flow positive displacement worm compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, Kurt David (Inventor); Giffin, Rollin George (Inventor); Fakunle, Oladapo (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An axial flow positive displacement compressor has an inlet axially spaced apart and upstream from an outlet. Inner and outer bodies have offset inner and outer axes extend from the inlet to the outlet through first and second sections of a compressor assembly in serial downstream flow relationship. At least one of the bodies is rotatable about its axis. The inner and outer bodies have intermeshed inner and outer helical blades wound about the inner and outer axes respectively. The inner and outer helical blades extend radially outwardly and inwardly respectively. The helical blades have first and second twist slopes in the first and second sections respectively. The first twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes. An engine including the compressor has in downstream serial flow relationship from the compressor a combustor and a high pressure turbine drivingly connected to the compressor by a high pressure shaft.

  17. Microwave axial dielectric properties of carbon fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wen; Xiao, Peng; Luo, Heng; Li, Zhuan

    2015-10-01

    Randomly distributed carbon fibers (CFs) reinforced epoxy resin composites are prepared by the pouring method, the dielectric properties of CF composites with different fiber content and length have been performed in the frequency range from 8.2 to 12.4 GHz. The complex permittivity of the composite increases with the fiber length, which is attributed to the decrease of depolarization field, and increases with the volume fraction, which is attributed to the increase of polarization. A formula, based on the theory of Reynolds-Hugh, is proposed to calculate the effective permittivity of CF composites, and validated by the experiments. The proposed formula is further applied to derive the axial permittivity of CF and analyze the effect of fiber length on the axial permittivity.

  18. Cyclotron axial ion-beam-buncher system

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, R.W.; Swenson, D.A.; Wangler, T.P.

    1982-02-11

    Adiabatic ion bunching is achieved in a cyclotron axial ion injection system through the incorporation of a radio frequency quadrupole system, which receives ions from an external ion source via an accelerate-decelerate system and a focusing einzel lens system, and which adiabatically bunches and then injects the ions into the median plane of a cyclotron via an electrostatic quadrupole system and an inflection mirror.

  19. Atlanto-axial subluxation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Thurlow, Robert D

    1988-01-01

    One of the causes of death in rheumatoid patients is cord compression following atlanto-axial subluxation. Dislocations in the cervical spine are common with patients who have rheumatoid arthritis. Anterior subluxation occurs in up to 35%, followed by vertical subluxation in 22.2%, lateral subluxation in 20.6% and rarely posterior subluxation. A case report is presented to illustrate such a complication. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4

  20. Vibration of axially loaded circular arches

    SciTech Connect

    Sabir, A.B.; Djoudi, M.S.

    1996-11-01

    The work in the present paper is devoted to the determination of the buckling loads and natural frequencies of axially loaded arch structures. The finite element method is employed using a strain based arch element. The element is based on the conventional Euler curved beam type of strain displacement relationship and satisfies the exact representation of rigid body modes. The sub-space iteration technique is used to determine the eigenvalues and corresponding eigenvectors of the governing transcendental equation. The buckling of a pinned arch subjected to a uniform lateral pressure is first considered. The work is then extended to produce a comprehensive set of results for the vibration of axially loaded arches which are either pinned or fixed at both ends. The first symmetric and anti symmetric modes of vibration are determined and the effect of the axial load on these frequencies is investigated. The practical problem of an arch with a backfill is then considered and the effect of the elastic packing due to this backfill on the natural frequencies is determined.

  1. Golimumab for the treatment of axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gelfer, Gita; Perry, Lisa; Deodhar, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) is a chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory disease of the axial skeleton that includes ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axSpA). Patients with AS experience chronic pain due to sacroiliac joint and spinal inflammation, and may develop spinal ankylosing with syndesmophyte formation. Tumor necrosis factor α inhibitors (TNFi) have shown promise in the management of AS and axSpA by targeting the underlying inflammatory process, and providing symptomatic relief. Whether they alter the progression of the disease is uncertain. Golimumab is a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that targets and downregulates the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α. The use of golimumab has been shown to reduce the signs and symptoms of axSpA as well as improve patient function and quality reported outcomes. This review focuses on the biological rationale and the results of clinical trials with golimumab for the treatment of axSpA.

  2. Bessel beam CARS of axially structured samples

    PubMed Central

    Heuke, Sandro; Zheng, Juanjuan; Akimov, Denis; Heintzmann, Rainer; Schmitt, Michael; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    We report about a Bessel beam CARS approach for axial profiling of multi-layer structures. This study presents an experimental implementation for the generation of CARS by Bessel beam excitation using only passive optical elements. Furthermore, an analytical expression is provided describing the generated anti-Stokes field by a homogeneous sample. Based on the concept of coherent transfer functions, the underling resolving power of axially structured geometries is investigated. It is found that through the non-linearity of the CARS process in combination with the folded illumination geometry continuous phase-matching is achieved starting from homogeneous samples up to spatial sample frequencies at twice of the pumping electric field wave. The experimental and analytical findings are modeled by the implementation of the Debye Integral and scalar Green function approach. Finally, the goal of reconstructing an axially layered sample is demonstrated on the basis of the numerically simulated modulus and phase of the anti-Stokes far-field radiation pattern. PMID:26046671

  3. Bessel beam CARS of axially structured samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuke, Sandro; Zheng, Juanjuan; Akimov, Denis; Heintzmann, Rainer; Schmitt, Michael; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    We report about a Bessel beam CARS approach for axial profiling of multi-layer structures. This study presents an experimental implementation for the generation of CARS by Bessel beam excitation using only passive optical elements. Furthermore, an analytical expression is provided describing the generated anti-Stokes field by a homogeneous sample. Based on the concept of coherent transfer functions, the underling resolving power of axially structured geometries is investigated. It is found that through the non-linearity of the CARS process in combination with the folded illumination geometry continuous phase-matching is achieved starting from homogeneous samples up to spatial sample frequencies at twice of the pumping electric field wave. The experimental and analytical findings are modeled by the implementation of the Debye Integral and scalar Green function approach. Finally, the goal of reconstructing an axially layered sample is demonstrated on the basis of the numerically simulated modulus and phase of the anti-Stokes far-field radiation pattern.

  4. Turbulence Effects of Axial Flow Hydrokinetic Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, C.; Chamorro, L. P.; Neary, V. S.; Morton, S.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2011-12-01

    Axial flow hydrokinetic turbines provide a method for extracting the kinetic energy available in unidirectional (river), bidirectional (tidal) and marine currents; however, a deep understanding of the wake dynamics, momentum recovery, geomorphologic effects, and ecological interaction with these hydrokinetic turbines is required to guarantee their economical and environmental viability. The St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) at the University of Minnesota (UMN) has performed physical modeling experiments using a 1:10 scale axial flow tidal turbine in the SAFL Main Channel, a 2.75m x 1.8m x 80m open channel test facility. A sophisticated control system allows synchronous measurements of turbine torque and rotational speed along with high resolution 3-D velocity measurements within the channel. Using acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs), high resolution 3-D velocity profile data were collected up to 15 turbine diameters downstream of the turbine location. These data provide valuable information on the wake characteristics (turbulence, Reynolds stresses, etc.) resulting from a rotating axial flow hydrokinetic machine. Regions of high turbulence and shear zones that persist in the near wake regions are delineated along with the velocity deficit and momentum recovery within the wake downstream of the device. Synchronous ADV data shed light on the rotational and meandering characteristics of the wake and its potential impacts on the local geomorphology and hydrodynamic environment. This dataset on single hydrokinetic turbine flow characteristics is the basis for further work on the optimal arrangement and performance environment for arrays of similar hydrokinetic devices.

  5. Axial Dispersion during Hanford Saltcake Washing

    SciTech Connect

    Josephson, Gary B.; Geeting, John GH; Lessor, Delbert L.; Barton, William B.

    2006-08-01

    Clean up of Hanford salt cake wastes begins with dissolution retrieval of the sodium rich salts that make up the dominant majority of mass in the tanks. Water moving through the porous salt cake dissolves the soluble components and also displaces the soluble radionuclides (e.g. 137Cs and 99TcO4- ). The separation that occurs from this displacement, known as Selective dissolution, is an important component in Hanford’s pretreatment of low activity wastes for subsequent Supplemental treatment. This paper describes lab scale testing conducted to evaluate Selective dissolution of cesium from non-radioactive Hanford tank 241-S-112 salt cake simulant containing the primary chemicals found the the actual tank. An modified axial dispersion model with increasing axial dispersion was developed to predict cesium removal. The model recognizes that water dissolves the salt cake during washing, which causes an increase in the axial dispersion during the wash. This model was subsequently compared with on-line cesium measurements from the retrieval of tank 241-S-112. The model had remarkably good agreement with both the lab scale and full scale data.

  6. Innovations of wide-field optical-sectioning fluorescence microscopy: toward high-speed volumetric bio-imaging with simplicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiun-Yann

    result in certain degrees of photo-damages because of the high focal intensity at the scanning point. In order to overcome such an issue, several wide-field optical-sectioning techniques have been proposed and demonstrated, although not without introducing new limitations and compromises such as low signal-to-background ratios and reduced axial resolutions. As a result, single-point-scanning optical-sectioning techniques remain the most widely used instrumentations for volumetric imaging of living biological systems to date. In order to develop wide-field optical-sectioning techniques that has equivalent optical performance as single-point-scanning ones, this thesis first introduces the mechanisms and limitations of existing wide-field optical-sectioning techniques, and then brings in our innovations that aim to overcome these limitations. We demonstrate, theoretically and experimentally, that our proposed wide-field optical-sectioning techniques can achieve diffraction-limited optical sectioning, low out-of-focus excitation and high-frame-rate imaging in living biological systems. In addition to such imaging capabilities, our proposed techniques can be instrumentally simple and economic, and are straightforward for implementation on conventional wide-field microscopes. These advantages together show the potential of our innovations to be widely used for high-speed, volumetric fluorescence imaging of living biological systems.

  7. Might axial myofascial properties and biomechanical mechanisms be relevant to ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis?

    PubMed

    Masi, Alfonse T

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthropathy have characteristic age- and sex-specific onset patterns, typical entheseal lesions, and marked heritability, but the integrative mechanisms causing the pathophysiological and structural alterations remain largely undefined. Myofascial tissues are integrated in the body into webs and networks which permit transmission of passive and active tensional forces that provide stabilizing support and help to control movements. Axial myofascial hypertonicity was hypothesized as a potential excessive polymorphic trait which could contribute to chronic biomechanical overloading and exaggerated stresses at entheseal sites. Such a mechanism may help to integrate many of the characteristic host, pathological, and structural features of ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis. Biomechanical stress and strain were recently documented to correlate with peripheral entheseal inflammation and new bone formation in a murine model of spondyloarthritis. Ankylosing spondylitis has traditionally been classified by the modified New York criteria, which require the presence of definite radiographic sacroiliac joint lesions. New classification criteria for axial spondyloarthritis now include patients who do not fulfill the modified New York criteria. The male-to-female sex ratios clearly differed between the two patient categories - 2:1 or 3:1 in ankylosing spondylitis and 1:1 in non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis - and this suggests a spectral concept of disease and, among females, milder structural alterations. Magnetic resonance imaging of active and chronic lesions in ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis reveals complex patterns, usually interpreted as inflammatory reactions, but shows similarities to acute degenerative disc disease, which attributed to edema formation following mechanical stresses and micro-damage. A basic question is whether mechanically induced microinjury and immunologically mediated

  8. Might axial myofascial properties and biomechanical mechanisms be relevant to ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthropathy have characteristic age- and sex-specific onset patterns, typical entheseal lesions, and marked heritability, but the integrative mechanisms causing the pathophysiological and structural alterations remain largely undefined. Myofascial tissues are integrated in the body into webs and networks which permit transmission of passive and active tensional forces that provide stabilizing support and help to control movements. Axial myofascial hypertonicity was hypothesized as a potential excessive polymorphic trait which could contribute to chronic biomechanical overloading and exaggerated stresses at entheseal sites. Such a mechanism may help to integrate many of the characteristic host, pathological, and structural features of ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis. Biomechanical stress and strain were recently documented to correlate with peripheral entheseal inflammation and new bone formation in a murine model of spondyloarthritis. Ankylosing spondylitis has traditionally been classified by the modified New York criteria, which require the presence of definite radiographic sacroiliac joint lesions. New classification criteria for axial spondyloarthritis now include patients who do not fulfill the modified New York criteria. The male-to-female sex ratios clearly differed between the two patient categories - 2:1 or 3:1 in ankylosing spondylitis and 1:1 in non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis - and this suggests a spectral concept of disease and, among females, milder structural alterations. Magnetic resonance imaging of active and chronic lesions in ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis reveals complex patterns, usually interpreted as inflammatory reactions, but shows similarities to acute degenerative disc disease, which attributed to edema formation following mechanical stresses and micro-damage. A basic question is whether mechanically induced microinjury and immunologically mediated

  9. Electrostatic mirror objective with eliminated spherical and axial chromatic aberrations.

    PubMed

    Bimurzaev, Seitkerim B; Serikbaeva, Gulnur S; Yakushev, Evgeniy M

    2003-01-01

    Computational formulae for the coefficients of the third-order spherical aberration and the second-order axial chromatic aberration are presented for an axially symmetric electrostatic electron mirror. A technique for eliminating the high-order derivatives of the potential axial distribution in mirror systems from the integrands is described. Conditions for elimination of spherical and axial chromatic aberrations, either separately or simultaneously, are found for a three-electrode axially symmetric mirror composed of coaxial cylinders of the same diameter. A principal scheme of the transmission electron microscope, where an electrostatic electron mirror serves as its objective, is presented. PMID:14599097

  10. Axial flow heat exchanger devices and methods for heat transfer using axial flow devices

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2016-02-16

    Systems and methods described herein are directed to rotary heat exchangers configured to transfer heat to a heat transfer medium flowing in substantially axial direction within the heat exchangers. Exemplary heat exchangers include a heat conducting structure which is configured to be in thermal contact with a thermal load or a thermal sink, and a heat transfer structure rotatably coupled to the heat conducting structure to form a gap region between the heat conducting structure and the heat transfer structure, the heat transfer structure being configured to rotate during operation of the device. In example devices heat may be transferred across the gap region from a heated axial flow of the heat transfer medium to a cool stationary heat conducting structure, or from a heated stationary conducting structure to a cool axial flow of the heat transfer medium.

  11. Characterizing trabecular bone structure for assessing vertebral fracture risk on volumetric quantitative computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Checefsky, Walter A.; Abidin, Anas Z.; Tsai, Halley; Wang, Xixi; Hobbs, Susan K.; Bauer, Jan S.; Baum, Thomas; Wismüller, Axel

    2015-03-01

    While the proximal femur is preferred for measuring bone mineral density (BMD) in fracture risk estimation, the introduction of volumetric quantitative computed tomography has revealed stronger associations between BMD and spinal fracture status. In this study, we propose to capture properties of trabecular bone structure in spinal vertebrae with advanced second-order statistical features for purposes of fracture risk assessment. For this purpose, axial multi-detector CT (MDCT) images were acquired from 28 spinal vertebrae specimens using a whole-body 256-row CT scanner with a dedicated calibration phantom. A semi-automated method was used to annotate the trabecular compartment in the central vertebral slice with a circular region of interest (ROI) to exclude cortical bone; pixels within were converted to values indicative of BMD. Six second-order statistical features derived from gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) and the mean BMD within the ROI were then extracted and used in conjunction with a generalized radial basis functions (GRBF) neural network to predict the failure load of the specimens; true failure load was measured through biomechanical testing. Prediction performance was evaluated with a root-mean-square error (RMSE) metric. The best prediction performance was observed with GLCM feature `correlation' (RMSE = 1.02 ± 0.18), which significantly outperformed all other GLCM features (p < 0.01). GLCM feature correlation also significantly outperformed MDCTmeasured mean BMD (RMSE = 1.11 ± 0.17) (p< 10-4). These results suggest that biomechanical strength prediction in spinal vertebrae can be significantly improved through characterization of trabecular bone structure with GLCM-derived texture features.

  12. Structural effects of radiation-induced volumetric expansion on unreinforced concrete biological shields

    DOE PAGES

    Le Pape, Y.

    2015-11-22

    Limited literature (Pomaro et al., 2011, Mirhosseini et al., 2014, Salomoni et al., 2014 and Andreev and Kapliy, 2014) is available on the structural analysis of irradiated concrete biological shield (CBS), although extended operations of nuclear powers plants may lead to critical neutron exposure above 1.0 × 10+19 n cm₋2. To the notable exception of Andreev and Kapliy, available structural models do not account for radiation-induced volumetric expansion, although it was found to develop important linear dimensional change of the order of 1%, and, can lead to significant concrete damage (Le Pape et al., 2015). A 1D-cylindrical model of anmore » unreinforced CBS accounting for temperature and irradiation effects is developed. Irradiated concrete properties are characterized probabilistically using the updated database collected by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Field et al., 2015). The overstressed concrete ratio (OCR) of the CBS, i.e., the proportion of the wall thickness being subject to stresses beyond the resistance of concrete, is derived by deterministic and probabilistic analysis assuming that irradiated concrete behaves as an elastic materials. In the bi-axial compressive zone near the reactor cavity, the OCR is limited to 5.7%, i.e., 8.6 cm (3$_2^1$ in.), whereas, in the tension zone, the OCR extends to 72%, i.e., 1.08 m (42$_2^1$ in.). Finally, we find that these results, valid for a maximum neutron fluence on the concrete surface of 3.1 × 10+19 n cm₋2 (E > 0.1 MeV) and, obtained after 80 years of operation, give an indication of the potential detrimental effects of prolonged irradiation of concrete in nuclear power plants.« less

  13. Structural effects of radiation-induced volumetric expansion on unreinforced concrete biological shields

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pape, Y.

    2015-11-22

    Limited literature (Pomaro et al., 2011, Mirhosseini et al., 2014, Salomoni et al., 2014 and Andreev and Kapliy, 2014) is available on the structural analysis of irradiated concrete biological shield (CBS), although extended operations of nuclear powers plants may lead to critical neutron exposure above 1.0 × 10+19 n cm₋2. To the notable exception of Andreev and Kapliy, available structural models do not account for radiation-induced volumetric expansion, although it was found to develop important linear dimensional change of the order of 1%, and, can lead to significant concrete damage (Le Pape et al., 2015). A 1D-cylindrical model of an unreinforced CBS accounting for temperature and irradiation effects is developed. Irradiated concrete properties are characterized probabilistically using the updated database collected by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Field et al., 2015). The overstressed concrete ratio (OCR) of the CBS, i.e., the proportion of the wall thickness being subject to stresses beyond the resistance of concrete, is derived by deterministic and probabilistic analysis assuming that irradiated concrete behaves as an elastic materials. In the bi-axial compressive zone near the reactor cavity, the OCR is limited to 5.7%, i.e., 8.6 cm (3$_2^1$ in.), whereas, in the tension zone, the OCR extends to 72%, i.e., 1.08 m (42$_2^1$ in.). Finally, we find that these results, valid for a maximum neutron fluence on the concrete surface of 3.1 × 10+19 n cm₋2 (E > 0.1 MeV) and, obtained after 80 years of operation, give an indication of the potential detrimental effects of prolonged irradiation of concrete in nuclear power plants.

  14. CFD Simulation of Casing Treatment of Axial Flow Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    A computational study is carried out to understand the physical mechanism responsible for the improvement in stall margin of an axial flow rotor due to the circumferential casing grooves. It is shown that the computational tool used predicts an increase in operating range of the rotor when casing grooves are present. A budget of the axial momentum equation is carried out at the rotor casing in the tip gap in order to uncover the physical process behind this stall margin improvement. It is shown that for the smooth casing the net axial pressure force . However in the presence of casing grooves the net axial shear stress force acting at the casing is augmented by the axial force due to the radial transport of axial momentum, which occurs across the grooves and power stream interface. This additional force adds to the net axial viscous sheer force and thus leads to an increase in the stall margin of the rotor.

  15. Volumetric retinal fluorescence microscopic imaging with extended depth of field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zengzhuo; Fischer, Andrew; Li, Wei; Li, Guoqiang

    2016-03-01

    Wavefront-engineered microscope with greatly extended depth of field (EDoF) is designed and demonstrated for volumetric imaging with near-diffraction limited optical performance. A bright field infinity-corrected transmissive/reflective light microscope is built with Kohler illumination. A home-made phase mask is placed in between the objective lens and the tube lens for ease of use. General polynomial function is adopted in the design of the phase plate for robustness and custom merit function is used in Zemax for optimization. The resulting EDoF system achieves an engineered point spread function (PSF) that is much less sensitive to object depth variation than conventional systems and therefore 3D volumetric information can be acquired in a single frame with expanded tolerance of defocus. In Zemax simulation for a setup using 32X objective (NA = 0.6), the EDoF is 20μm whereas a conventional one has a DoF of 1.5μm, indicating a 13 times increase. In experiment, a 20X objective lens with NA = 0.4 was used and the corresponding phase plate was designed and fabricated. Retinal fluorescence images of the EDoF microscope using passive adaptive optical phase element illustrate a DoF around 100μm and it is able to recover the volumetric fluorescence images that are almost identical to in-focus images after post processing. The image obtained from the EDoF microscope is also better in resolution and contrast, and the retinal structure is better defined. Hence, due to its high tolerance of defocus and fine restored image quality, EDoF optical systems have promising potential in consumer portable medical imaging devices where user's ability to achieve focus is not optimal, and other medical imaging equipment where achieving best focus is not a necessary.

  16. Generating volumetric composition maps from particle based computational geodynamic simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    The advent of using large scale, high resolution three-dimensional hybrid particle-grid based methods to study geodynamics processes is upon us. Visualizing and interpreting the three-dimensional geometry of the material configuration after severe deformation has occurred is a challenging task when adopting such a point based representation. In two-dimensions, the material configuration is readily visualized by creating a simple (x,y) scatter plot, using the particles position vector and coloring the points according to the lithology which each particle represents. Using only colored points (which do not need to be rendered as spheres), this approach unambiguous fills the 2D model domain with information defining the current material configuration. Along with an increased volume (i.e. MBytes) of output data generated by three-dimensional simulations, the higher dimensionality introduces additional complexities for visualization. The geometry of the deformed material in three-space will become topologically more complex than its two-dimensional counterpart. Secondly, the scatter plot approach used in 2D to represent the material configuration simply does not extend to three-dimensions as technique is unable to provide any sense of depth. To address some of the visualization challenges posed by such methods, we describe how an Approximate Voronoi Diagram (AVD) can be used to produce a volumetric representation of point based data. The AVD approach allows us to efficiently construct a volumetric partitioning of any subset of the model domain amongst a set points. From this representation, we can efficiently generate a representation of the material configuration which can be volume rendered, contoured, or from which cross sections can be extracted. The type of volumetric representations possible, and the performance characteristics of the AVD algorithm were demonstrated by applying the technique to simulation results from models of continental collision and salt

  17. Volumetric imaging with an amplitude-steered array.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Catherine H; Hughes, W Jack; O'Brien, William D

    2002-12-01

    Volumetric acoustic imaging is desirable for the visualization of underwater objects and structures; however, the implementation of a volumetric imaging system is difficult due to the high channel count of a fully populated two-dimensional array. Recently, a linear amplitude-steered array with a reduced electronics requirement was presented, which is capable of collecting a two-dimensional set of data with a single transmit pulse. In this study, we demonstrate the use of the linear amplitude-steered array and associated image formation algorithms for collecting and displaying volumetric data; that is, proof of principle of the amplitude-steering concept and the associated image formation algorithms is demonstrated. Range and vertical position are obtained by taking advantage of the frequency separation of a vertical linear amplitude-steered array. The third dimension of data is obtained by rotating the array such that the mainlobe is mechanically steered in azimuth. Data are collected in a water tank at the Pennsylvania State University Applied Research Laboratory for two targets: a ladder and three pipes. These data are the first experimental data collected with an amplitude-steered array for the purposes of imaging. The array is 10 cm in diameter and is operated in the frequency range of 80 to 304 kHz. Although the array is small for high-resolution imaging at these frequencies, the rungs of the ladder are recognizable in the images. The three pipes are difficult to discern in two of the projection images; however, the pipes separated in range are clear in the image showing vertical position versus range. The imaging concept is demonstrated on measured data, and the simulations agree well with the experimental results. PMID:12508995

  18. Synthesis of volumetric ring antenna array for terrestrial coverage pattern.

    PubMed

    Reyna, Alberto; Panduro, Marco A; Del Rio Bocio, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a synthesis of a volumetric ring antenna array for a terrestrial coverage pattern. This synthesis regards the spacing among the rings on the planes X-Y, the positions of the rings on the plane X-Z, and uniform and concentric excitations. The optimization is carried out by implementing the particle swarm optimization. The synthesis is compared with previous designs by resulting with proper performance of this geometry to provide an accurate coverage to be applied in satellite applications with a maximum reduction of the antenna hardware as well as the side lobe level reduction.

  19. Volumetric relief map for intracranial cerebrospinal fluid distribution analysis.

    PubMed

    Lebret, Alain; Kenmochi, Yukiko; Hodel, Jérôme; Rahmouni, Alain; Decq, Philippe; Petit, Éric

    2015-09-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid imaging plays a significant role in the clinical diagnosis of brain disorders, such as hydrocephalus and Alzheimer's disease. While three-dimensional images of cerebrospinal fluid are very detailed, the complex structures they contain can be time-consuming and laborious to interpret. This paper presents a simple technique that represents the intracranial cerebrospinal fluid distribution as a two-dimensional image in such a way that the total fluid volume is preserved. We call this a volumetric relief map, and show its effectiveness in a characterization and analysis of fluid distributions and networks in hydrocephalus patients and healthy adults.

  20. Synthesis of Volumetric Ring Antenna Array for Terrestrial Coverage Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Reyna, Alberto; Panduro, Marco A.; Del Rio Bocio, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a synthesis of a volumetric ring antenna array for a terrestrial coverage pattern. This synthesis regards the spacing among the rings on the planes X-Y, the positions of the rings on the plane X-Z, and uniform and concentric excitations. The optimization is carried out by implementing the particle swarm optimization. The synthesis is compared with previous designs by resulting with proper performance of this geometry to provide an accurate coverage to be applied in satellite applications with a maximum reduction of the antenna hardware as well as the side lobe level reduction. PMID:24701150

  1. Mucosal wrinkling in animal antra induced by volumetric growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Cao, Yan-Ping; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Yu, Shou-Wen

    2011-04-01

    Surface wrinkling of animal mucosas is crucial for the biological functions of some tissues, and the change in their surface patterns is a phenotypic characteristic of certain diseases. Here we develop a biomechanical model to study the relationship between morphogenesis and volumetric growth, either physiological or pathological, of mucosas. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations are performed to unravel the critical characteristics of mucosal wrinkling in a spherical antrum. It is shown that the thicknesses and elastic moduli of mucosal and submucosal layers dictate the surface buckling morphology. The results hold clinical relevance for such diseases as inflammation and gastritis.

  2. Volumetric 3D Display System with Static Screen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Current display technology has relied on flat, 2D screens that cannot truly convey the third dimension of visual information: depth. In contrast to conventional visualization that is primarily based on 2D flat screens, the volumetric 3D display possesses a true 3D display volume, and places physically each 3D voxel in displayed 3D images at the true 3D (x,y,z) spatial position. Each voxel, analogous to a pixel in a 2D image, emits light from that position to form a real 3D image in the eyes of the viewers. Such true volumetric 3D display technology provides both physiological (accommodation, convergence, binocular disparity, and motion parallax) and psychological (image size, linear perspective, shading, brightness, etc.) depth cues to human visual systems to help in the perception of 3D objects. In a volumetric 3D display, viewers can watch the displayed 3D images from a completely 360 view without using any special eyewear. The volumetric 3D display techniques may lead to a quantum leap in information display technology and can dramatically change the ways humans interact with computers, which can lead to significant improvements in the efficiency of learning and knowledge management processes. Within a block of glass, a large amount of tiny dots of voxels are created by using a recently available machining technique called laser subsurface engraving (LSE). The LSE is able to produce tiny physical crack points (as small as 0.05 mm in diameter) at any (x,y,z) location within the cube of transparent material. The crack dots, when illuminated by a light source, scatter the light around and form visible voxels within the 3D volume. The locations of these tiny voxels are strategically determined such that each can be illuminated by a light ray from a high-resolution digital mirror device (DMD) light engine. The distribution of these voxels occupies the full display volume within the static 3D glass screen. This design eliminates any moving screen seen in previous

  3. Flow field visualization about external axial corners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talcott, N. A., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to visualize the flow field about external axial corners. The investigation was initiated to provide answers to questions about the inviscid flow pattern for continuing numerical investigations. Symmetrical and asymmetrical corner models were tested at a Reynolds number per meter of 60,700,000. Oil-flow and vapor-screen photographs were taken for both models at angle of attack and yaw. The paper presents the results of the investigation in the form of oil-flow photographs and the surrounding shock wave location obtained from the vapor screens.

  4. G-A and Octet Axial Charges

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin

    2009-12-01

    We review recent progress on lattice calculations of nucleon axial coupling constants, as well as couplings of other octet members. With a combined SU(3) fit to all octet baryons, we find a better determination of g_A = 1.18(4)_stat(6)_syst. Our predictions for g_SS = 0.450(21)_stat(27)_syst and g_XX = -0.277(15)_stat(19)_syst are better determined than previous theoretical estimations. Finally, we describe a preliminary first full-QCD calculation of semileptonic decay quantity (g1(0)= f1(0))S->n = -0.348(37).

  5. Water ingestion into jet engine axial compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuchiya, T.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1982-01-01

    An axial flow compressor has been tested with water droplet ingestion under a variety of conditions. The results illustrate the manner in which the compressor pressure ratio, efficiency and surging characteristics are affected. A model for estimating the performance of a compressor during water ingestion has been developed and the predictions obtained compare favorably with the test results. It is then shown that with respect to five droplet-associated nonlinearly-interacting processes (namely, droplet-blade interactions, blade performance changes, centrifugal action, heat and mass transfer processes and droplet break-up), the initial water content and centrifugal action play the most dominant roles.

  6. Digital enhancement of computerized axial tomograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, E., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A systematic evaluation was conducted of certain digital image enhancement techniques performed in image space. Three types of images were used, computer generated phantoms, tomograms of a synthetic phantom, and axial tomograms of human anatomy containing images of lesions, artificially introduced into the tomograms. Several types of smoothing, sharpening, and histogram modification were explored. It was concluded that the most useful enhancement techniques are a selective smoothing of singular picture elements, combined with contrast manipulation. The most useful tool in applying these techniques is the gray-scale histogram.

  7. Axial Tomography from Digitized Real Time Radiography

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Zolnay, A. S.; McDonald, W. M.; Doupont, P. A.; McKinney, R. L.; Lee, M. M.

    1985-01-18

    Axial tomography from digitized real time radiographs provides a useful tool for industrial radiography and tomography. The components of this system are: x-ray source, image intensifier, video camera, video line extractor and digitizer, data storage and reconstruction computers. With this system it is possible to view a two dimensional x-ray image in real time at each angle of rotation and select the tomography plane of interest by choosing which video line to digitize. The digitization of a video line requires less than a second making data acquisition relatively short. Further improvements on this system are planned and initial results are reported.

  8. Ultrasound velocities for axial eye length measurement.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, K J

    1994-09-01

    Since 1974, I have used individual sound velocities for each eye condition encountered for axial length measurement. The calculation results in 1,555 M/sec for the average phakic eye. A slower speed of 1,549 M/sec was found for an extremely long (30 mm) eye and a higher speed of 1,561 M/sec was noted for an extremely short (20 mm) eye. This inversely proportional velocity change can best be adjusted for by measuring the phakic eye at 1,532 M/sec and correcting the result by dividing the square of the measured axial length (AL1,532)2 by the difference of the measured axial length (AL1,532) minus 0.35 mm. A velocity of 1,534 M/sec was found for all aphakic eyes regardless of their length, and correction is clinically significant. The velocity of an eye containing a poly(methyl methacrylate) intraocular lens is not different from an average phakic eye but it does magnify the effect of axial length change. I recommend measuring the pseudophakic eye at 1,532 M/sec and adding to the result (AL1,532), + 0.04 + 44% of the IOL thickness. The speed for an eye with a silicone IOL was found to be 1,476 M/sec (or AL1,532 + 0.04 - 56% of IOL thickness) and for glass, 1,549 M/sec (or AL1,532 + 0.04 + 75% of IOL thickness). A speed of 1,139 M/sec was found for a phakic eye with silicone oil filling most of the vitreous cavity and 1,052 M/sec for an aphakic eye filled with oil. For varying volumes of oil, each eye should be calculated individually. The speed was 534 M/sec for phakic eyes filled with gas. Eyes containing a silicone IOL or oil or gas will create clinically significant errors (3 to 10 diopters) if the sound velocity is not corrected. PMID:7996413

  9. Shaped charge with an axial channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malygin, A. V.; Proskuryakov, E. V.; Sorokin, M. V.; Fomin, V. M.

    2011-05-01

    A shaped charge with an axial channel is considered. The charge is initiated by an impact of an annular plate. As a result, the shaped charge is initiated at all points of the domain shaped as a ring. The impact plate material and parameters (velocity, thickness, width, and distance covered by the plate) that ensure stable penetration of the shaped charge are determined. The results obtained can be used to develop a composite (e.g., "tandem") shaped charge of the "base-head" type (the charge located farther from the target is first initiated, followed by initiation of the charge located closer to the target).

  10. Flow visualization around axial flow fan blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, K.; Matsui, K.

    1986-02-01

    The flow around the blades of an axial flow fan was visualized by using a drum camera. The distribution of the flow velocity about the blades was determined by combining the spark tracing method with the smoke wire method, making it possible to determine the blade element efficiency. The efficiencies and noise levels of radiator cooling fans can be determined using this technique. The method was applied to two types of fans with different performances, and the flow around the wing was correlated with the wing tip efficiency. The effect of tip vortex on the total fan noise was quantified.

  11. Electronic and optical properties of silicene under uni-axial and bi-axial mechanical strains: A first principle study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Brij; Kumar, Ashok; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2014-07-01

    The uni-axial and bi-axial mechanical strain mediated electronic band structures and dielectric properties of silicene have been investigated. It is found that on applying uni- and bi-axial strains, the band gap opens for smaller strain in silicene. However, on further increase of strain beyond 8% silicene changed into metal. The ultimate tensile strength estimated is 3.4 GPa. Imaginary part of dielectric function shows that the inter-band transitions are red-shifted for uni- and bi-axial tensile strains and are blue shifted for uni- and bi-axial compressive strains. Electron energy loss (EEL) function shows that the π+σ plasmon energies are red-shifted for uni- and bi-axial strains and blue-shifted for compressive strains. The π plasmons disappears for tensile and asymmetric strains. Bi-axial asymmetric strain is found to have no influence on inter-band transitions and π+σ plasmon energies.

  12. Floating volumetric image formation using a dihedral corner reflector array device.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Daisuke; Hirano, Noboru; Maeda, Yuki; Yamamoto, Siori; Mukai, Takaaki; Maekawa, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    A volumetric display system using an optical imaging device consisting of numerous dihedral corner reflectors placed perpendicular to the surface of a metal plate is proposed. Image formation by the dihedral corner reflector array (DCRA) is free from distortion and focal length. In the proposed volumetric display system, a two-dimensional real image is moved by a mirror scanner to scan a three-dimensional (3D) space. Cross-sectional images of a 3D object are displayed in accordance with the position of the image plane. A volumetric image is observed as a stack of the cross-sectional images. The use of the DCRA brings compact system configuration and volumetric real image generation with very low distortion. An experimental volumetric display system including a DCRA, a galvanometer mirror, and a digital micro-mirror device was constructed to verify the proposed method. A volumetric image consisting of 1024×768×400 voxels was formed by the experimental system.

  13. Modified axial lead system in children.

    PubMed Central

    Macfarlane, P W; Coleman, E N; Simpson, A

    1977-01-01

    Preliminary studies have been made on the use of the modified axial lead system in infancy and childhood. A highly significant correlation between internipple distance and height suggested that internipple distance be used as an index for the selection of a template to facilitate placement of the chest electrodes (Z and X). A series of 4 triangular templates was designed. The use of a template one size too large or too small was shown not to lead to any significant error in waveform measurement. A further study showed that the reference level for the application of the praecordial electrodes should be the 5th intercostal space as for adults, but that no serious diagnostic error was likely to arise if the 4th or 6th intercostal space was chosen by mistake. A study of the Frank lead system suggested that the use of the 5th intercostal space as a reference level was more appropriate than the 4th intercostal space, which is generally adopted by users of that system. The conclusion reached was that the axial lead system is the preferred orthogonal lead system for children, with templates for 4 ranges of internipple distance (less than 10 cm; 15 to 20 cm; and less than 20 cm--adult build) being proposed to simplify electrode placement. Images PMID:911562

  14. The Supersonic Axial-Flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantrowitz, Arthur

    1950-01-01

    An investigation has been made to explore the possibilities of axial-flow compressors operating with supersonic velocities into the blade rows. Preliminary calculations showed that very high pressure ratios across a stage, together with somewhat increased mass flows, were apparently possible with compressors which decelerated air through the speed of sound in their blading. The first phase of the investigation was the development of efficient supersonic diffusers to decelerate air through the speed of sound. The present report is largely a general discussion of some of the essential aerodynamics of single-stage supersonic axial-flow compressors. As an approach to the study of supersonic compressors, three possible velocity diagrams are discussed briefly. Because of the encouraging results of this study, an experimental single-stage supersonic compressor has been constructed and tested in Freon-12. In this compressor, air decelerates through the speed of sound in the rotor blading and enters the stators at subsonic speeds. A pressure ratio of about 1.8 at an efficiency of about 80 percent has been obtained.

  15. Volumetric verification of multiaxis machine tool using laser tracker.

    PubMed

    Aguado, Sergio; Samper, David; Santolaria, Jorge; Aguilar, Juan José

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to present a method of volumetric verification in machine tools with linear and rotary axes using a laser tracker. Beyond a method for a particular machine, it presents a methodology that can be used in any machine type. Along this paper, the schema and kinematic model of a machine with three axes of movement, two linear and one rotational axes, including the measurement system and the nominal rotation matrix of the rotational axis are presented. Using this, the machine tool volumetric error is obtained and nonlinear optimization techniques are employed to improve the accuracy of the machine tool. The verification provides a mathematical, not physical, compensation, in less time than other methods of verification by means of the indirect measurement of geometric errors of the machine from the linear and rotary axes. This paper presents an extensive study about the appropriateness and drawbacks of the regression function employed depending on the types of movement of the axes of any machine. In the same way, strengths and weaknesses of measurement methods and optimization techniques depending on the space available to place the measurement system are presented. These studies provide the most appropriate strategies to verify each machine tool taking into consideration its configuration and its available work space.

  16. Volumetrics of CO2 storage in deep saline formations.

    PubMed

    Steele-MacInnis, Matthew; Capobianco, Ryan M; Dilmore, Robert; Goodman, Angela; Guthrie, George; Rimstidt, J Donald; Bodnar, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Concern about the role of greenhouse gases in global climate change has generated interest in sequestering CO(2) from fossil-fuel combustion in deep saline formations. Pore space in these formations is initially filled with brine, and space to accommodate injected CO(2) must be generated by displacing brine, and to a lesser extent by compression of brine and rock. The formation volume required to store a given mass of CO(2) depends on the storage mechanism. We compare the equilibrium volumetric requirements of three end-member processes: CO(2) stored as a supercritical fluid (structural or stratigraphic trapping); CO(2) dissolved in pre-existing brine (solubility trapping); and CO(2) solubility enhanced by dissolution of calcite. For typical storage conditions, storing CO(2) by solubility trapping reduces the volume required to store the same amount of CO(2) by structural or stratigraphic trapping by about 50%. Accessibility of CO(2) to brine determines which storage mechanism (structural/stratigraphic versus solubility) dominates at a given time, which is a critical factor in evaluating CO(2) volumetric requirements and long-term storage security.

  17. Volumetric three-dimensional display system with rasterization hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favalora, Gregg E.; Dorval, Rick K.; Hall, Deirdre M.; Giovinco, Michael; Napoli, Joshua

    2001-06-01

    An 8-color multiplanar volumetric display is being developed by Actuality Systems, Inc. It will be capable of utilizing an image volume greater than 90 million voxels, which we believe is the greatest utilizable voxel set of any volumetric display constructed to date. The display is designed to be used for molecular visualization, mechanical CAD, e-commerce, entertainment, and medical imaging. As such, it contains a new graphics processing architecture, novel high-performance line- drawing algorithms, and an API similar to a current standard. Three-dimensional imagery is created by projecting a series of 2-D bitmaps ('image slices') onto a diffuse screen that rotates at 600 rpm. Persistence of vision fuses the slices into a volume-filling 3-D image. A modified three-panel Texas Instruments projector provides slices at approximately 4 kHz, resulting in 8-color 3-D imagery comprised of roughly 200 radially-disposed slices which are updated at 20 Hz. Each slice has a resolution of 768 by 768 pixels, subtending 10 inches. An unusual off-axis projection scheme incorporating tilted rotating optics is used to maintain good focus across the projection screen. The display electronics includes a custom rasterization architecture which converts the user's 3- D geometry data into image slices, as well as 6 Gbits of DDR SDRAM graphics memory.

  18. Volumetrics of CO2 storage in deep saline formations.

    PubMed

    Steele-MacInnis, Matthew; Capobianco, Ryan M; Dilmore, Robert; Goodman, Angela; Guthrie, George; Rimstidt, J Donald; Bodnar, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Concern about the role of greenhouse gases in global climate change has generated interest in sequestering CO(2) from fossil-fuel combustion in deep saline formations. Pore space in these formations is initially filled with brine, and space to accommodate injected CO(2) must be generated by displacing brine, and to a lesser extent by compression of brine and rock. The formation volume required to store a given mass of CO(2) depends on the storage mechanism. We compare the equilibrium volumetric requirements of three end-member processes: CO(2) stored as a supercritical fluid (structural or stratigraphic trapping); CO(2) dissolved in pre-existing brine (solubility trapping); and CO(2) solubility enhanced by dissolution of calcite. For typical storage conditions, storing CO(2) by solubility trapping reduces the volume required to store the same amount of CO(2) by structural or stratigraphic trapping by about 50%. Accessibility of CO(2) to brine determines which storage mechanism (structural/stratigraphic versus solubility) dominates at a given time, which is a critical factor in evaluating CO(2) volumetric requirements and long-term storage security. PMID:22916959

  19. Volumetric Flow Measurement Using an Implantable CMUT Array.

    PubMed

    Mengli Wang; Jingkuang Chen

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes volumetric-flow velocity measurement using an implantable capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array. The array is comprised of multiple-concentric CMUT rings for ultrasound transmission and an outmost annular CMUT array for ultrasound reception. Microelectromechanical-system (MEMS) fabrication technology allows reception CMUT on this flowmeter to be implemented with a different membrane thickness and gap height than that of transmission CMUTs, optimizing the performance of these two different kinds of devices. The silicon substrate of this 2-mm-diameter CMUT ring array was bulk micromachined to approximately 80 to 100 μm thick, minimizing tissue disruption. The blood-flow velocity was detected using pulse ultrasound Doppler by comparing the demodulated echo ultrasound with the incident ultrasound. The demodulated ultrasound signal was sampled by a pulse delayed in time domain from the transmitted burst, which corresponds to detecting the signal at a specific distance. The flow tube/vessel diameter was detected through the time-flight delay difference from near and far wall reflections, which was measured from the ultrasound pulse echo. The angle between the ultrasound beam and the flow was found by using the cross-correlation from consecutive ultrasound echoes. Artificial blood flowing through three different polymer tubes was experimented with, while keeping the same volumetric flow rate. The discrepancy in flow measurement results between this CMUT meter and a calibrated laser Doppler flowmeter is less than 5%. PMID:23851472

  20. Volumetric segmentation of range images for printed circuit board inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dop, Erik R.; Regtien, Paul P. L.

    1996-10-01

    Conventional computer vision approaches towards object recognition and pose estimation employ 2D grey-value or color imaging. As a consequence these images contain information about projections of a 3D scene only. The subsequent image processing will then be difficult, because the object coordinates are represented with just image coordinates. Only complicated low-level vision modules like depth from stereo or depth from shading can recover some of the surface geometry of the scene. Recent advances in fast range imaging have however paved the way towards 3D computer vision, since range data of the scene can now be obtained with sufficient accuracy and speed for object recognition and pose estimation purposes. This article proposes the coded-light range-imaging method together with superquadric segmentation to approach this task. Superquadric segments are volumetric primitives that describe global object properties with 5 parameters, which provide the main features for object recognition. Besides, the principle axes of a superquadric segment determine the phase of an object in the scene. The volumetric segmentation of a range image can be used to detect missing, false or badly placed components on assembled printed circuit boards. Furthermore, this approach will be useful to recognize and extract valuable or toxic electronic components on printed circuit boards scrap that currently burden the environment during electronic waste processing. Results on synthetic range images with errors constructed according to a verified noise model illustrate the capabilities of this approach.

  1. Spatio-volumetric hazard estimation in the Auckland volcanic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebbington, Mark S.

    2015-05-01

    The idea of a volcanic field `boundary' is prevalent in the literature, but ill-defined at best. We use the elliptically constrained vents in the Auckland Volcanic Field to examine how spatial intensity models can be tested to assess whether they are consistent with such features. A means of modifying the anisotropic Gaussian kernel density estimate to reflect the existence of a `hard' boundary is then suggested, and the result shown to reproduce the observed elliptical distribution. A new idea, that of a spatio-volumetric model, is introduced as being more relevant to hazard in a monogenetic volcanic field than the spatiotemporal hazard model due to the low temporal rates in volcanic fields. Significant dependencies between the locations and erupted volumes of the observed centres are deduced, and expressed in the form of a spatially-varying probability density. In the future, larger volumes are to be expected in the `gaps' between existing centres, with the location of the greatest forecast volume lying in the shipping channel between Rangitoto and Castor Bay. The results argue for tectonic control over location and magmatic control over erupted volume. The spatio-volumetric model is consistent with the hypothesis of a flat elliptical area in the mantle where tensional stresses, related to the local tectonics and geology, allow decompressional melting.

  2. High volumetric power density, non-enzymatic, glucose fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Oncescu, Vlad; Erickson, David

    2013-01-01

    The development of new implantable medical devices has been limited in the past by slow advances in lithium battery technology. Non-enzymatic glucose fuel cells are promising replacement candidates for lithium batteries because of good long-term stability and adequate power density. The devices developed to date however use an “oxygen depletion design” whereby the electrodes are stacked on top of each other leading to low volumetric power density and complicated fabrication protocols. Here we have developed a novel single-layer fuel cell with good performance (2 μW cm−2) and stability that can be integrated directly as a coating layer on large implantable devices, or stacked to obtain a high volumetric power density (over 16 μW cm−3). This represents the first demonstration of a low volume non-enzymatic fuel cell stack with high power density, greatly increasing the range of applications for non-enzymatic glucose fuel cells. PMID:23390576

  3. Mining Graphs for Understanding Time-Varying Volumetric Data.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yi; Wang, Chaoli; Peterka, Tom; Jacob, Robert; Kim, Seung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    A notable recent trend in time-varying volumetric data analysis and visualization is to extract data relationships and represent them in a low-dimensional abstract graph view for visual understanding and making connections to the underlying data. Nevertheless, the ever-growing size and complexity of data demands novel techniques that go beyond standard brushing and linking to allow significant reduction of cognition overhead and interaction cost. In this paper, we present a mining approach that automatically extracts meaningful features from a graph-based representation for exploring time-varying volumetric data. This is achieved through the utilization of a series of graph analysis techniques including graph simplification, community detection, and visual recommendation. We investigate the most important transition relationships for time-varying data and evaluate our solution with several time-varying data sets of different sizes and characteristics. For gaining insights from the data, we show that our solution is more efficient and effective than simply asking users to extract relationships via standard interaction techniques, especially when the data set is large and the relationships are complex. We also collect expert feedback to confirm the usefulness of our approach.

  4. Volumetric imaging of the auroral ionosphere: Initial results from PFISR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeter, Joshua; Butler, Thomas; Heinselman, Craig; Nicolls, Michael; Kelly, John; Hampton, Donald

    2009-05-01

    The Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) is the first dedicated ISR built with an electronically steerable array. This paper demonstrates the capabilities of PFISR for producing three-dimensional volumetric images of E-region ionization patterns produced by the aurora. The phase table was configured to cycle through 121 beam positions arranged in an 11×11 grid. A 13-baud Barker coded pulse was used, which provided ~1.5-km range resolution out to a maximum range of 250 km. Backscattered power was converted to electron density by correcting for path loss and applying the Buneman approximation assuming equal electron and ion temperatures. The results were then interpolated onto a three-dimensional cartesian grid. Volumetric images are presented at 5-min, 1-min, and 14.6-s integration times (corresponding to 960, 192, and 48 pulses-per-position, respectively) to illustrate the tradeoff between spatio-temporal resolution and data quality. At 14.6 s cadence, variability in plasma density within the volume appears to be fully resolved in space and time, a result that is supported by both observational evidence and theoretical predictions of ionospheric response times. Some potential applications of this mode for studying magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions in the auroral zone are discussed.

  5. Volumetric Verification of Multiaxis Machine Tool Using Laser Tracker

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Juan José

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to present a method of volumetric verification in machine tools with linear and rotary axes using a laser tracker. Beyond a method for a particular machine, it presents a methodology that can be used in any machine type. Along this paper, the schema and kinematic model of a machine with three axes of movement, two linear and one rotational axes, including the measurement system and the nominal rotation matrix of the rotational axis are presented. Using this, the machine tool volumetric error is obtained and nonlinear optimization techniques are employed to improve the accuracy of the machine tool. The verification provides a mathematical, not physical, compensation, in less time than other methods of verification by means of the indirect measurement of geometric errors of the machine from the linear and rotary axes. This paper presents an extensive study about the appropriateness and drawbacks of the regression function employed depending on the types of movement of the axes of any machine. In the same way, strengths and weaknesses of measurement methods and optimization techniques depending on the space available to place the measurement system are presented. These studies provide the most appropriate strategies to verify each machine tool taking into consideration its configuration and its available work space. PMID:25202744

  6. Investigation of Volumetric Sources in Airframe Noise Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, Jay H.; Lockard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Streett, Craig L.

    2004-01-01

    Hybrid methods for the prediction of airframe noise involve a simulation of the near field flow that is used as input to an acoustic propagation formula. The acoustic formulations discussed herein are those based on the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation. Some questions have arisen in the published literature in regard to an apparently significant dependence of radiated noise predictions on the location of the integration surface used in the solution of the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation. These differences in radiated noise levels are most pronounced between solid-body surface integrals and off-body, permeable surface integrals. Such differences suggest that either a non-negligible volumetric source is contributing to the total radiation or the input flow simulation is suspect. The focus of the current work is the issue of internal consistency of the flow calculations that are currently used as input to airframe noise predictions. The case study for this research is a computer simulation for a three-element, high-lift wing profile during landing conditions. The noise radiated from this flow is predicted by a two-dimensional, frequency-domain formulation of the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation. Radiated sound from volumetric sources is assessed by comparison of a permeable surface integration with the sum of a solid-body surface integral and a volume integral. The separate noise predictions are found in good agreement.

  7. Volumetric display containing multiple two-dimensional color motion pictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, R.; Shiraki, A.; Nakayama, H.; Kakue, T.; Shimobaba, T.; Ito, T.

    2014-06-01

    We have developed an algorithm which can record multiple two-dimensional (2-D) gradated projection patterns in a single three-dimensional (3-D) object. Each recorded pattern has the individual projected direction and can only be seen from the direction. The proposed algorithm has two important features: the number of recorded patterns is theoretically infinite and no meaningful pattern can be seen outside of the projected directions. In this paper, we expanded the algorithm to record multiple 2-D projection patterns in color. There are two popular ways of color mixing: additive one and subtractive one. Additive color mixing used to mix light is based on RGB colors and subtractive color mixing used to mix inks is based on CMY colors. We made two coloring methods based on the additive mixing and subtractive mixing. We performed numerical simulations of the coloring methods, and confirmed their effectiveness. We also fabricated two types of volumetric display and applied the proposed algorithm to them. One is a cubic displays constructed by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in 8×8×8 array. Lighting patterns of LEDs are controlled by a microcomputer board. The other one is made of 7×7 array of threads. Each thread is illuminated by a projector connected with PC. As a result of the implementation, we succeeded in recording multiple 2-D color motion pictures in the volumetric displays. Our algorithm can be applied to digital signage, media art and so forth.

  8. Myocardial kinematics based on tagged MRI from volumetric NURBS models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tustison, Nicholas J.; Amini, Amir A.

    2004-04-01

    We present current research in which left ventricular deformation is estimated from tagged cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using volumetric deformable models constructed from nonuniform rational B-splines (NURBS). From a set of short and long axis images at end-diastole, the initial NURBS model is constructed by fitting two surfaces with the same parameterization to the set of epicardial and endocardial contours from which a volumetric model is created. Using normal displacements of the three sets of orthogonal tag planes as well as displacements of both tag line and contour/tag line intersection points, one can solve for the optimal homogeneous coordinates, in a least squares sense, of the control points of the NURBS model at a later time point using quadratic programming. After fitting to all time points of data, lofting the NURBS model at each time point creates a comprehensive 4-D NURBS model. From this model, we can extract 3-D myocardial displacement fields and corresponding strain maps, which are local measures of non-rigid deformation.

  9. Three-dimensional volumetric display in rubidium vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Isaac I.; Korevaar, Eric J.; Hakakha, Harel

    1996-03-01

    The successful demonstration of a novel 3D volumetric display based on the intersection of two low power diode laser beams in an atomic vapor is presented. A 780 nm laser and a 630 nm laser are directed via mirrors and x-y scanners towards an enclosure containing rubidium vapor, where they intersect at 90 degrees. Rubidium atoms within the small intersection volume undergo 5s1/2 to 5p3/2 excitation from the 780 nm laser, and then 5p3/2 to 6d5/2 excitation from the 630 nm laser, resulting in red omnidirectional fluorescence from the intersection point. Tuning of the lasers to the exact excitation wavelengths resulted in an extended red spot with maximum brightness. By tuning the lasers slightly off the transition wavelengths, a very localized red spot with slightly less brightness was produced. A series of intersection points were scanned in a time less than the eye's 15 Hz refresh rate to create true 3D volumetric images such as a floating cube and rotating globe, which were viewable from many angles. The maximum speed of the mechanical scanners limited the complexity of the 3D images. By incorporating higher power lasers and faster acousto-optical scanners, this technique could allow the 3D viewing of real time air traffic control, medical images, or theater battlefield management.

  10. Volumetric Intraoperative Brain Deformation Compensation: Model Development and Phantom Validation

    PubMed Central

    DeLorenzo, Christine; Papademetris, Xenophon; Staib, Lawrence H.; Vives, Kenneth P.; Spencer, Dennis D.; Duncan, James S.

    2012-01-01

    During neurosurgery, nonrigid brain deformation may affect the reliability of tissue localization based on preoperative images. To provide accurate surgical guidance in these cases, preoperative images must be updated to reflect the intraoperative brain. This can be accomplished by warping these preoperative images using a biomechanical model. Due to the possible complexity of this deformation, intraoperative information is often required to guide the model solution. In this paper, a linear elastic model of the brain is developed to infer volumetric brain deformation associated with measured intraoperative cortical surface displacement. The developed model relies on known material properties of brain tissue, and does not require further knowledge about intraoperative conditions. To provide an initial estimation of volumetric model accuracy, as well as determine the model’s sensitivity to the specified material parameters and surface displacements, a realistic brain phantom was developed. Phantom results indicate that the linear elastic model significantly reduced localization error due to brain shift, from >16 mm to under 5 mm, on average. In addition, though in vivo quantitative validation is necessary, preliminary application of this approach to images acquired during neocortical epilepsy cases confirms the feasibility of applying the developed model to in vivo data. PMID:22562728

  11. Single-chip CMUT-on-CMOS front-end system for real-time volumetric IVUS and ICE imaging.

    PubMed

    Gurun, Gokce; Tekes, Coskun; Zahorian, Jaime; Xu, Toby; Satir, Sarp; Karaman, Mustafa; Hasler, Jennifer; Degertekin, F Levent

    2014-02-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and intracardiac echography (ICE) catheters with real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging capability can provide unique benefits to many interventional procedures used in the diagnosis and treatment of coronary and structural heart diseases. Integration of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays with front-end electronics in single-chip configuration allows for implementation of such catheter probes with reduced interconnect complexity, miniaturization, and high mechanical flexibility. We implemented a single-chip forward-looking (FL) ultrasound imaging system by fabricating a 1.4-mm-diameter dual-ring CMUT array using CMUT-on-CMOS technology on a front-end IC implemented in 0.35-μm CMOS process. The dual-ring array has 56 transmit elements and 48 receive elements on two separate concentric annular rings. The IC incorporates a 25-V pulser for each transmitter and a low-noise capacitive transimpedance amplifier (TIA) for each receiver, along with digital control and smart power management. The final shape of the silicon chip is a 1.5-mm-diameter donut with a 430-μm center hole for a guide wire. The overall front-end system requires only 13 external connections and provides 4 parallel RF outputs while consuming an average power of 20 mW. We measured RF A-scans from the integrated single- chip array which show full functionality at 20.1 MHz with 43% fractional bandwidth. We also tested and demonstrated the image quality of the system on a wire phantom and an ex vivo chicken heart sample. The measured axial and lateral point resolutions are 92 μm and 251 μm, respectively. We successfully acquired volumetric imaging data from the ex vivo chicken heart at 60 frames per second without any signal averaging. These demonstrative results indicate that single-chip CMUT-on-CMOS systems have the potential to produce realtime volumetric images with image quality and speed suitable for catheter-based clinical applications.

  12. Single-Chip CMUT-on-CMOS Front-End System for Real-Time Volumetric IVUS and ICE Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gurun, Gokce; Tekes, Coskun; Zahorian, Jaime; Xu, Toby; Satir, Sarp; Karaman, Mustafa; Hasler, Jennifer; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2014-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and intracardiac echography (ICE) catheters with real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging capability can provide unique benefits to many interventional procedures used in the diagnosis and treatment of coronary and structural heart diseases. Integration of CMUT arrays with front-end electronics in single-chip configuration allows for implementation of such catheter probes with reduced interconnect complexity, miniaturization, and high mechanical flexibility. We implemented a single-chip forward-looking (FL) ultrasound imaging system by fabricating a 1.4-mm-diameter dual-ring CMUT array using CMUT-on-CMOS technology on a front-end IC implemented in 0.35-µm CMOS process. The dual-ring array has 56 transmit elements and 48 receive elements on two separate concentric annular rings. The IC incorporates a 25-V pulser for each transmitter and a low-noise capacitive transimpedance amplifier (TIA) for each receiver, along with digital control and smart power management. The final shape of the silicon chip is a 1.5-mm-diameter donut with a 430-µm center hole for a guide wire. The overall front-end system requires only 13 external connections and provides 4 parallel RF outputs while consuming an average power of 20 mW. We measured RF A-scans from the integrated single-chip array which show full functionality at 20.1 MHz with 43% fractional bandwidth. We also tested and demonstrated the image quality of the system on a wire phantom and an ex-vivo chicken heart sample. The measured axial and lateral point resolutions are 92 µm and 251 µm, respectively. We successfully acquired volumetric imaging data from the ex-vivo chicken heart with 60 frames per second without any signal averaging. These demonstrative results indicate that single-chip CMUT-on-CMOS systems have the potential to produce real-time volumetric images with image quality and speed suitable for catheter based clinical applications. PMID:24474131

  13. Elastic Buckling of Orthotropic Plates Under Varying Axial Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badir, Ashraf; Hu, Hurang; Diallo, Abdouramane

    1997-01-01

    The elastic buckling load of simply supported rectangular orthotropic plates subjected to a second degree parabolic variation of axial stresses in the longitudinal direction is calculated using analytical methods. The variation of axial stresses is equilibrated by nonuniform shear stresses along the plate edges and transverse normal stresses. The influence of the aspect ratio is examined, and the results are compared with plates subjected to uniform axial stresses.

  14. [Motion analysis of target in stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumors using 320-row multidetector CT].

    PubMed

    Imae, Toshikazu; Haga, Akihiro; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Ino, Kenji; Tanaka, Kenichirou; Okano, Yukari; Sasaki, Katsutake; Saegusa, Shigeki; Shiraki, Takashi; Oritate, Takashi; Yano, Keiichi; Shinohara, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) has rapidly evolved and is increasingly used for treatment simulation of thoracic and abdominal radiotherapy. A 320-detector row CT scanner has recently become available that allows axial volumetric scanning of a 16-cm-long range in a patient without table movement. Current radiotherapy techniques require a generous margin around the presumed gross tumor volume (GTV) to account for uncertainties such as tumor motion and set up error. Motion analysis is useful to evaluate the internal margin of a moving target due to respiration and to improve therapeutic precision. The purpose of this study is to propose a method using phase-only correlation to automatically detect the target and to assess the motion of the target in numerical phantoms and patients. Free-breathing scans using 320-detector row CT were acquired for 4 patients with lung tumor(s). The proposed method was feasible for motion analysis of all numerical phantoms and patients. The results reproduced the facts that the motion of tumors in the patients varied in orbits during the respiratory cycle and exhibited hysteresis. The maximum distance between peak exhalation and inhalation increased as the tumors approached the diaphragm. The proposed method detected the three-dimensional position of the targets automatically and analyzed the trajectories. The tumor motion due to respiration differed by region and was greatest for the lower lobe. PMID:21471676

  15. Rapid mapping of volumetric machine errors using distance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Krulewich, D.A.

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes a relatively inexpensive, fast, and easy to execute approach to maping the volumetric errors of a machine tool, coordinate measuring machine, or robot. An error map is used to characterize a machine or to improve its accuracy by compensating for the systematic errors. The method consists of three steps: (1) models the relationship between volumetric error and the current state of the machine, (2) acquiring error data based on distance measurements throughout the work volume; and (3)fitting the error model using the nonlinear equation for the distance. The error model is formulated from the kinematic relationship among the six degrees of freedom of error an each moving axis. Expressing each parametric error as function of position each is combined to predict the error between the functional point and workpiece, also as a function of position. A series of distances between several fixed base locations and various functional points in the work volume is measured using a Laser Ball Bar (LBB). Each measured distance is a non-linear function dependent on the commanded location of the machine, the machine error, and the location of the base locations. Using the error model, the non-linear equation is solved producing a fit for the error model Also note that, given approximate distances between each pair of base locations, the exact base locations in the machine coordinate system determined during the non-linear filling procedure. Furthermore, with the use of 2048 more than three base locations, bias error in the measuring instrument can be removed The volumetric errors of three-axis commercial machining center have been mapped using this procedure. In this study, only errors associated with the nominal position of the machine were considered Other errors such as thermally induced and load induced errors were not considered although the mathematical model has the ability to account for these errors. Due to the proprietary nature of the projects we are

  16. Nuclear axial currents in chiral effective field theory

    DOE PAGES

    Baroni, Alessandro; Girlanda, Luca; Pastore, Saori; Schiavilla, Rocco; Viviani, Michele

    2016-01-11

    Two-nucleon axial charge and current operators are derived in chiral effective field theory up to one loop. The derivation is based on time-ordered perturbation theory and accounts for cancellations between the contributions of irreducible diagrams and the contributions owing to nonstatic corrections from energy denominators of reducible diagrams. Ultraviolet divergencies associated with the loop corrections are isolated in dimensional regularization. The resulting axial current is finite and conserved in the chiral limit, while the axial charge requires renormalization. As a result, a complete set of contact terms for the axial charge up to the relevant order in the power countingmore » is constructed.« less

  17. Modular functional organisation of the axial locomotor system in salamanders.

    PubMed

    Cabelguen, Jean-Marie; Charrier, Vanessa; Mathou, Alexia

    2014-02-01

    Most investigations on tetrapod locomotion have been concerned with limb movements. However, there is compelling evidence that the axial musculoskeletal system contributes to important functions during locomotion. Adult salamanders offer a remarkable opportunity to examine these functions because these amphibians use axial undulations to propel themselves in both aquatic and terrestrial environments. In this article, we review the currently available biological data on axial functions during various locomotor modes in salamanders. We also present data showing the modular organisation of the neural networks that generate axial synergies during locomotion. The functional implication of this modular organisation is discussed.

  18. Axial myopathy: an overlooked feature of muscle diseases.

    PubMed

    Witting, Nanna; Andersen, Linda K; Vissing, John

    2016-01-01

    Classically, myopathies are categorized according to limb or cranial nerve muscle affection, but with the growing use of magnetic resonance imaging it has become evident that many well-known myopathies have significant involvement of the axial musculature. New disease entities with selective axial muscle involvement have also been described recently, but overall the axial myopathy is unexplored. We performed a PubMed search using the search terms 'myopathy', 'paraspinal', 'axial' and 'erector'. Axial myopathy was defined as involvement of paraspinal musculature. We found evidence of axial musculature involvement in the majority of myopathies in which paraspinal musculature was examined. Even in diseases named after a certain pattern of non-axial muscle affection, such as facioscapulohumeral and limb girdle muscular dystrophies, affection of the axial musculature was often severe and early, compared to other muscle groups. Very sparse literature evaluating the validity of clinical assessment methods, electromyography, muscle biopsy and magnetic resonance imaging was identified and reference material is generally missing. This article provides an overview of the present knowledge on axial myopathy with the aim to increase awareness and spur interest among clinicians and researchers in the field.

  19. Axial flux machine, stator and fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Carl, Ralph James

    2004-03-16

    An axial flux machine comprises: a soft magnetic composite stator extension positioned in parallel with a rotor disk and having slots; soft magnetic composite pole pieces attached to the stator extension and facing a permanent magnet on the rotor disk, each comprising a protrusion situated within a respective one of the slots, each protrusion shaped so as to facilitate orientation of the respective pole piece with respect to the stator extension; electrical coils, each wrapped around a respective one of the pole pieces. In another embodiment the soft magnetic composite pole pieces each comprise a base portion around with the electrical coils are wound and a trapezoidal shield portion a plurality of heights with a first height in a first region being longer than a second height in a second region, the second region being closer to a pole-to-pole gap than the first region.

  20. Aerodynamics of advanced axial-flow turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serovy, G. K.; Kavanagh, P.; Kiishi, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    A multi-task research program on aerodynamic problems in advanced axial-flow turbomachine configurations was carried out at Iowa State University. The elements of this program were intended to contribute directly to the improvement of compressor, fan, and turbine design methods. Experimental efforts in intra-passage flow pattern measurements, unsteady blade row interaction, and control of secondary flow are included, along with computational work on inviscid-viscous interaction blade passage flow techniques. This final report summarizes the results of this program and indicates directions which might be taken in following up these results in future work. In a separate task a study was made of existing turbomachinery research programs and facilities in universities located in the United States. Some potentially significant research topics are discussed which might be successfully attacked in the university atmosphere.

  1. Axial superresolution by synthetic aperture generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micó, V.; García, J.; Zalevsky, Z.

    2008-12-01

    The use of tilted illumination onto the input object in combination with time multiplexing is a useful technique to overcome the Abbe diffraction limit in imaging systems. It is based on the generation of an expanded synthetic aperture that improves the cutoff frequency (and thus the resolution limit) of the imaging system. In this paper we present an experimental validation of the fact that the generation of a synthetic aperture improves not only the lateral resolution but also the axial one. Thus, it is possible to achieve higher optical sectioning of three-dimensional (3D) objects than that defined by the theoretical resolution limit imposed by diffraction. Experimental results are provided for two different cases: a synthetic object (micrometer slide) imaged by a 0.14 numerical aperture (NA) microscope lens, and a biosample (swine sperm cells) imaged by a 0.42 NA objective.

  2. Axial and Radial Oxylipin Transport1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gasperini, Debora; Chauvin, Adeline; Acosta, Ivan F.; Kurenda, Andrzej; Stolz, Stéphanie; Chételat, Aurore; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Farmer, Edward E.

    2015-01-01

    Jasmonates are oxygenated lipids (oxylipins) that control defense gene expression in response to cell damage in plants. How mobile are these potent mediators within tissues? Exploiting a series of 13-lipoxygenase (13-lox) mutants in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that displays impaired jasmonic acid (JA) synthesis in specific cell types and using JA-inducible reporters, we mapped the extent of the transport of endogenous jasmonates across the plant vegetative growth phase. In seedlings, we found that jasmonate (or JA precursors) could translocate axially from wounded shoots to unwounded roots in a LOX2-dependent manner. Grafting experiments with the wild type and JA-deficient mutants confirmed shoot-to-root oxylipin transport. Next, we used rosettes to investigate radial cell-to-cell transport of jasmonates. After finding that the LOX6 protein localized to xylem contact cells was not wound inducible, we used the lox234 triple mutant to genetically isolate LOX6 as the only JA precursor-producing LOX in the plant. When a leaf of this mutant was wounded, the JA reporter gene was expressed in distal leaves. Leaf sectioning showed that JA reporter expression extended from contact cells throughout the vascular bundle and into extravascular cells, revealing a radial movement of jasmonates. Our results add a crucial element to a growing picture of how the distal wound response is regulated in rosettes, showing that both axial (shoot-to-root) and radial (cell-to-cell) transport of oxylipins plays a major role in the wound response. The strategies developed herein provide unique tools with which to identify intercellular jasmonate transport routes. PMID:26338953

  3. Feature-driven data exploration for volumetric rendering.

    PubMed

    Woo, Insoo; Maciejewski, Ross; Gaither, Kelly P; Ebert, David S

    2012-10-01

    We have developed an intuitive method to semiautomatically explore volumetric data in a focus-region-guided or value-driven way using a user-defined ray through the 3D volume and contour lines in the region of interest. After selecting a point of interest from a 2D perspective, which defines a ray through the 3D volume, our method provides analytical tools to assist in narrowing the region of interest to a desired set of features. Feature layers are identified in a 1D scalar value profile with the ray and are used to define default rendering parameters, such as color and opacity mappings, and locate the center of the region of interest. Contour lines are generated based on the feature layer level sets within interactively selected slices of the focus region. Finally, we utilize feature-preserving filters and demonstrate the applicability of our scheme to noisy data. PMID:22291153

  4. In-line hologram segmentation for volumetric samples.

    PubMed

    Orzó, László; Göröcs, Zoltán; Fehér, András; Tőkés, Szabolcs

    2013-01-01

    We propose a fast, noniterative method to segment an in-line hologram of a volumetric sample into in-line subholograms according to its constituent objects. In contrast to the phase retrieval or twin image elimination algorithms, we do not aim or require to reconstruct the complex wave field of all the objects, which would be a more complex task, but only provide a good estimate about the contribution of the particular objects to the original hologram quickly. The introduced hologram segmentation algorithm exploits the special inner structure of the in-line holograms and applies only the estimated supports and reconstruction distances of the corresponding objects as parameters. The performance of the proposed method is demonstrated and analyzed experimentally both on synthetic and measured holograms. We discussed how the proposed algorithm can be efficiently applied for object reconstruction and phase retrieval tasks.

  5. Volumetric dispenser for small particles from plural sources

    DOEpatents

    Bradley, R.A.; Miller, W.H.; Sease, J.D.

    1975-12-16

    Apparatus is described for rapidly and accurately dispensing measured volumes of small particles from a supply hopper. The apparatus includes an adjustable, vertically oriented measuring tube and orifice member defining the volume to be dispensed, a ball plug valve for selectively closing the bottom end of the orifice member, and a compression valve for selectively closing the top end of the measuring tube. A supply hopper is disposed above and in gravity flow communication with the measuring tube. Properly sequenced opening and closing of the two valves provides accurate volumetric discharge through the ball plug valve. A dispensing system is described wherein several appropriately sized measuring tubes, orifice members, and associated valves are arranged to operate contemporaneously to facilitate blending of different particles.

  6. Volumetric capnography: lessons from the past and current clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Verscheure, Sara; Massion, Paul B; Verschuren, Franck; Damas, Pierre; Magder, Sheldon

    2016-01-01

    Dead space is an important component of ventilation-perfusion abnormalities. Measurement of dead space has diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic applications. In the intensive care unit (ICU) dead space measurement can be used to guide therapy for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS); in the emergency department it can guide thrombolytic therapy for pulmonary embolism; in peri-operative patients it can indicate the success of recruitment maneuvers. A newly available technique called volumetric capnography (Vcap) allows measurement of physiological and alveolar dead space on a regular basis at the bedside. We discuss the components of dead space, explain important differences between the Bohr and Enghoff approaches, discuss the clinical significance of arterial to end-tidal CO2 gradient and finally summarize potential clinical indications for Vcap measurements in the emergency room, operating room and ICU. PMID:27334879

  7. Optimization approaches to volumetric modulated arc therapy planning

    SciTech Connect

    Unkelbach, Jan Bortfeld, Thomas; Craft, David; Alber, Markus; Bangert, Mark; Bokrantz, Rasmus; Chen, Danny; Li, Ruijiang; Xing, Lei; Men, Chunhua; Nill, Simeon; Papp, Dávid; Romeijn, Edwin; Salari, Ehsan

    2015-03-15

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has found widespread clinical application in recent years. A large number of treatment planning studies have evaluated the potential for VMAT for different disease sites based on the currently available commercial implementations of VMAT planning. In contrast, literature on the underlying mathematical optimization methods used in treatment planning is scarce. VMAT planning represents a challenging large scale optimization problem. In contrast to fluence map optimization in intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning for static beams, VMAT planning represents a nonconvex optimization problem. In this paper, the authors review the state-of-the-art in VMAT planning from an algorithmic perspective. Different approaches to VMAT optimization, including arc sequencing methods, extensions of direct aperture optimization, and direct optimization of leaf trajectories are reviewed. Their advantages and limitations are outlined and recommendations for improvements are discussed.

  8. Thermal stresses from large volumetric expansion during freezing of biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Shi, X; Datta, A K; Mukherjee, Y

    1998-12-01

    Thermal stresses were studied in freezing of biomaterials containing significant amounts of water. An apparent specific heat formulation of the energy equation and a viscoelastic model for the mechanics problem were used to analyze the transient axi-symmetric freezing of a long cylinder. Viscoelastic properties were measured in an Instron machine. Results show that, before phase change occurs at any location, both radial and circumferential stresses are tensile and keep increasing until phase change begins. The maximum principal tensile stress during phase change increases with a decrease in boundary temperature (faster cooling). This is consistent with experimentally observed fractures at a lower boundary temperature. Large volumetric expansion during water to ice transformation was shown to be the primary contributor to large stress development. For very rapid freezing, relaxation may not be significant, and an elastic model may be sufficient. PMID:10412455

  9. Occlusion-capable multiview volumetric three-dimensional display.

    PubMed

    Cossairt, Oliver S; Napoli, Joshua; Hill, Samuel L; Dorval, Rick K; Favalora, Gregg E

    2007-03-10

    Volumetric 3D displays are frequently purported to lack the ability to reconstruct scenes with viewer-position-dependent effects such as occlusion. To counter these claims, a swept-screen 198-view horizontal-parallax-only 3D display is reported here that is capable of viewer-position-dependent effects. A digital projector illuminates a rotating vertical diffuser with a series of multiperspective 768 x 768 pixel renderings of a 3D scene. Evidence of near-far object occlusion is reported. The aggregate virtual screen surface for a stationary observer is described, as are guidelines to construct a full-parallax system and the theoretical ability of the present system to project imagery outside of the volume swept by the screen.

  10. Rapid hologram updates for real-time volumetric information displays.

    PubMed

    Munjuluri, Bala; Huebschman, Michael L; Garner, Harold R

    2005-08-20

    We have demonstrated that holograms incorporating changes in three-dimensional (3D) scenes can be recalculated in real time to present dynamic updates on information displays. This approach displays 3D information in a compatible format for fast and reliable interpretation of changes in the 3D scenes. The rapid-update algorithm has been demonstrated by real-time computation and transcription of the holograms to our digital micromirror device hologram projection system for visual validation of the reconstruction. The reported algorithm enables full parallax 1024 x 768 pixel holograms of 3D scenes to be updated at a rate of 0.8 s with a 1.8 GHz personal computer. Volumetric information displays that can enhance reliable data assimilation and decrease reaction times for applications such as air-traffic control, cockpit heads-up displays, mission crew stations, and undersea navigation can benefit from this research.

  11. Electrothermal energy conversion using electron gas volumetric change inside semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazawa, K.; Shakouri, A.

    2016-07-01

    We propose and analyze an electrothermal energy converter using volumetric changes in non-equilibrium electron gas inside semiconductors. The geometric concentration of electron gas under an electric field increases the effective pressure of the electrons, and then a barrier filters out cold electrons, acting like a valve. Nano- and micro-scale features enable hot electrons to arrive at the contact in a short enough time to avoid thermalization with the lattice. Key length and time scales, preliminary device geometry, and anticipated efficiency are estimated for electronic analogs of Otto and Brayton power generators and Joule-Thomson micro refrigerators on a chip. The power generators convert the energy of incident photons from the heat source to electrical current, and the refrigerator can reduce the temperature of electrons in a semiconductor device. The analytic calculations show that a large energy conversion efficiency or coefficient of performance may be possible.

  12. Feature-driven data exploration for volumetric rendering.

    PubMed

    Woo, Insoo; Maciejewski, Ross; Gaither, Kelly P; Ebert, David S

    2012-10-01

    We have developed an intuitive method to semiautomatically explore volumetric data in a focus-region-guided or value-driven way using a user-defined ray through the 3D volume and contour lines in the region of interest. After selecting a point of interest from a 2D perspective, which defines a ray through the 3D volume, our method provides analytical tools to assist in narrowing the region of interest to a desired set of features. Feature layers are identified in a 1D scalar value profile with the ray and are used to define default rendering parameters, such as color and opacity mappings, and locate the center of the region of interest. Contour lines are generated based on the feature layer level sets within interactively selected slices of the focus region. Finally, we utilize feature-preserving filters and demonstrate the applicability of our scheme to noisy data.

  13. Quantitative volumetric breast density estimation using phase contrast mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhentian; Hauser, Nik; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; D'Isidoro, Fabio; Stampanoni, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Phase contrast mammography using a grating interferometer is an emerging technology for breast imaging. It provides complementary information to the conventional absorption-based methods. Additional diagnostic values could be further obtained by retrieving quantitative information from the three physical signals (absorption, differential phase and small-angle scattering) yielded simultaneously. We report a non-parametric quantitative volumetric breast density estimation method by exploiting the ratio (dubbed the R value) of the absorption signal to the small-angle scattering signal. The R value is used to determine breast composition and the volumetric breast density (VBD) of the whole breast is obtained analytically by deducing the relationship between the R value and the pixel-wise breast density. The proposed method is tested by a phantom study and a group of 27 mastectomy samples. In the clinical evaluation, the estimated VBD values from both cranio-caudal (CC) and anterior-posterior (AP) views are compared with the ACR scores given by radiologists to the pre-surgical mammograms. The results show that the estimated VBD results using the proposed method are consistent with the pre-surgical ACR scores, indicating the effectiveness of this method in breast density estimation. A positive correlation is found between the estimated VBD and the diagnostic ACR score for both the CC view (p=0.033 ) and AP view (p=0.001 ). A linear regression between the results of the CC view and AP view showed a correlation coefficient γ = 0.77, which indicates the robustness of the proposed method and the quantitative character of the additional information obtained with our approach.

  14. Quenching correction for volumetric scintillation dosimetry of proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Daniel; Mirkovic, Dragan; Sahoo, Narayan; Beddar, Sam

    2013-01-01

    Volumetric scintillation dosimetry has the potential to provide fast, high-resolution, three-dimensional radiation dosimetry. However, scintillators exhibit a nonlinear response at the high linear energy transfer (LET) values characteristic of proton Bragg peaks. The purpose of this study was to develop a quenching correction method for volumetric scintillation dosimetry of proton beams. Scintillation light from a miniature liquid scintillator detector was measured along the central axis of a 161.6 MeV proton pencil beam. Three-dimensional dose and LET distributions were calculated for 85.6, 100.9, 144.9 and 161.6 MeV beams using a validated Monte Carlo model. LET values were also calculated using an analytical formula. A least-squares fit to the data established the empirical parameters of a quenching correction model. The light distribution in a tank of liquid scintillator was measured with a CCD camera at all four beam energies. The quenching model and LET data were used to correct the measured light distribution. The calculated and measured Bragg peak heights agreed within ±3% for all energies except 85.6 MeV, where the agreement was within ±10%. The quality of the quenching correction was poorer for sharp low-energy Bragg peaks because of blurring and detector size effects. The corrections performed using analytical LET values resulted in doses within 1% of those obtained using Monte Carlo LET values. The proposed method can correct for quenching with sufficient accuracy for dosimetric purposes. The required LET values may be computed effectively using Monte Carlo or analytical methods. Future detectors should improve blurring correction methods and optimize the pixel size to improve accuracy for low-energy Bragg peaks.

  15. Segmentation and visualization of anatomical structures from volumetric medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jonghyun; Park, Soonyoung; Cho, Wanhyun; Kim, Sunworl; Kim, Gisoo; Ahn, Gukdong; Lee, Myungeun; Lim, Junsik

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a method that can extract and visualize anatomical structures from volumetric medical images by using a 3D level set segmentation method and a hybrid volume rendering technique. First, the segmentation using the level set method was conducted through a surface evolution framework based on the geometric variation principle. This approach addresses the topological changes in the deformable surface by using the geometric integral measures and level set theory. These integral measures contain a robust alignment term, an active region term, and a mean curvature term. By using the level set method with a new hybrid speed function derived from the geometric integral measures, the accurate deformable surface can be extracted from a volumetric medical data set. Second, we employed a hybrid volume rendering approach to visualize the extracted deformable structures. Our method combines indirect and direct volume rendering techniques. Segmented objects within the data set are rendered locally by surface rendering on an object-by-object basis. Globally, all the results of subsequent object rendering are obtained by direct volume rendering (DVR). Then the two rendered results are finally combined in a merging step. This is especially useful when inner structures should be visualized together with semi-transparent outer parts. This merging step is similar to the focus-plus-context approach known from information visualization. Finally, we verified the accuracy and robustness of the proposed segmentation method for various medical volume images. The volume rendering results of segmented 3D objects show that our proposed method can accurately extract and visualize human organs from various multimodality medical volume images.

  16. Quantitative volumetric breast density estimation using phase contrast mammography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhentian; Hauser, Nik; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A; D'Isidoro, Fabio; Stampanoni, Marco

    2015-05-21

    Phase contrast mammography using a grating interferometer is an emerging technology for breast imaging. It provides complementary information to the conventional absorption-based methods. Additional diagnostic values could be further obtained by retrieving quantitative information from the three physical signals (absorption, differential phase and small-angle scattering) yielded simultaneously. We report a non-parametric quantitative volumetric breast density estimation method by exploiting the ratio (dubbed the R value) of the absorption signal to the small-angle scattering signal. The R value is used to determine breast composition and the volumetric breast density (VBD) of the whole breast is obtained analytically by deducing the relationship between the R value and the pixel-wise breast density. The proposed method is tested by a phantom study and a group of 27 mastectomy samples. In the clinical evaluation, the estimated VBD values from both cranio-caudal (CC) and anterior-posterior (AP) views are compared with the ACR scores given by radiologists to the pre-surgical mammograms. The results show that the estimated VBD results using the proposed method are consistent with the pre-surgical ACR scores, indicating the effectiveness of this method in breast density estimation. A positive correlation is found between the estimated VBD and the diagnostic ACR score for both the CC view (p = 0.033) and AP view (p = 0.001). A linear regression between the results of the CC view and AP view showed a correlation coefficient γ = 0.77, which indicates the robustness of the proposed method and the quantitative character of the additional information obtained with our approach.

  17. The Volumetric Rate of Superluminous Supernovae at z ˜ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajs, S.; Sullivan, M.; Smith, M.; Levan, A.; Karpenka, N. V.; Edwards, T. D. P.; Walker, C. R.; Wolf, W. M.; Balland, C.; Carlberg, R.; Howell, A.; Lidman, C.; Pain, R.; Pritchet, C.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.

    2016-08-01

    We present a measurement of the volumetric rate of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) at z˜1.0, measured using archival data from the first four years of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). We develop a method for the photometric classification of SLSNe to construct our sample. Our sample includes two previously spectroscopically-identified objects, and a further new candidate selected using our classification technique. We use the point-source recovery efficiencies from Perrett et al. (2010) and a Monte Carlo approach to calculate the rate based on our SLSN sample. We find that the three identified SLSNe from SNLS give a rate of 91^{+76}_{-36} SNe Yr-1 Gpc-3 at a volume-weighted redshift of z = 1.13. This is equivalent to 2.2^{+1.8}_{-0.9}× 10^{-4} of the volumetric core collapse supernova rate at the same redshift. When combined with other rate measurements from the literature, we show that the rate of SLSNe increases with redshift in a manner consistent with that of the cosmic star formation history. We also estimate the rate of ultra-long gamma ray bursts (ULGRBs) based on the events discovered by the Swift satellite, and show that it is comparable to the rate of SLSNe, providing further evidence of a possible connection between these two classes of events. We also examine the host galaxies of the SLSNe discovered in SNLS, and find them to be consistent with the stellar-mass distribution of other published samples of SLSNe.

  18. Real-time GPU-accelerated processing and volumetric display for wide-field laser-scanning optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Heesung; Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Eun-Soo; Kim, Se-Hwa; Lee, Tae Geol

    2015-01-01

    Fast signal processing and real-time displays are essential for practical imaging modality in various fields of applications. However, the imaging speed in optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), in particular, depends on factors such as the pulse repetition rate of the laser, scanning method, field of view (FOV), and signal processing time. In the past, efforts to increase acquisition speed either focused on developing new scanning methods or using lasers with higher pulse repetition rates. However, high-speed signal processing is also important for real-time volumetric display in OR-PAM. In this study, we carried out parallel signal processing using a graphics processing unit (GPU) to enable fast signal processing and wide-field real-time displays in laser-scanning OR-PAM. The average total GPU processing time for a B-mode PAM image was approximately 1.35 ms at a display speed of 480 fps when the data samples were acquired with 736 (axial) × 500 (lateral) points/B-mode-frame at a pulse repetition rate of 300 kHz. In addition, we successfully displayed maximum amplitude projection images of a mouse’s ear as volumetric images with an FOV of 3 mm × 3 mm (500 × 500 pixels) at 1.02 s, corresponding to 0.98 fps. PMID:26713184

  19. A Comparison of Substantia Nigra T1 Hyperintensity in Parkinson's Disease Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease and Age-Matched Controls: Volumetric Analysis of Neuromelanin Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju-Yeon; Yun, Won-Sung; Jeon, Ji Yeong; Moon, Yeon Sil; Kim, Heejin; Kwak, Ki-Chang; Lee, Jong-Min; Han, Seol-Heui

    2016-01-01

    Objective Neuromelanin loss of substantia nigra (SN) can be visualized as a T1 signal reduction on T1-weighted high-resolution imaging. We investigated whether volumetric analysis of T1 hyperintensity for SN could be used to differentiate between Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and age-matched controls. Materials and Methods This retrospective study enrolled 10 patients with PDD, 18 patients with AD, and 13 age-matched healthy elderly controls. MR imaging was performed at 3 tesla. To measure the T1 hyperintense area of SN, we obtained an axial thin section high-resolution T1-weighted fast spin echo sequence. The volumes of interest for the T1 hyperintense SN were drawn onto heavily T1-weighted FSE sequences through midbrain level, using the MIPAV software. The measurement differences were tested using the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by a post hoc comparison. Results A comparison of the three groups showed significant differences in terms of volume of T1 hyperintensity (p < 0.001, Bonferroni corrected). The volume of T1 hyperintensity was significantly lower in PDD than in AD and normal controls (p < 0.005, Bonferroni corrected). However, the volume of T1 hyperintensity was not different between AD and normal controls (p = 0.136, Bonferroni corrected). Conclusion The volumetric measurement of the T1 hyperintensity of SN can be an imaging marker for evaluating neuromelanin loss in neurodegenerative diseases and a differential in PDD and AD cases. PMID:27587951

  20. Enhanced volumetric visualization for real time 4D intraoperative ophthalmic swept-source OCT.

    PubMed

    Viehland, Christian; Keller, Brenton; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar M; Nankivil, Derek; Shen, Liangbo; Mangalesh, Shwetha; Viet, Du Tran; Kuo, Anthony N; Toth, Cynthia A; Izatt, Joseph A

    2016-05-01

    Current-generation software for rendering volumetric OCT data sets based on ray casting results in volume visualizations with indistinct tissue features and sub-optimal depth perception. Recent developments in hand-held and microscope-integrated intrasurgical OCT designed for real-time volumetric imaging motivate development of rendering algorithms which are both visually appealing and fast enough to support real time rendering, potentially from multiple viewpoints for stereoscopic visualization. We report on an enhanced, real time, integrated volumetric rendering pipeline which incorporates high performance volumetric median and Gaussian filtering, boundary and feature enhancement, depth encoding, and lighting into a ray casting volume rendering model. We demonstrate this improved model implemented on graphics processing unit (GPU) hardware for real-time volumetric rendering of OCT data during tissue phantom and live human surgical imaging. We show that this rendering produces enhanced 3D visualizations of pathology and intraoperative maneuvers compared to standard ray casting.

  1. Enhanced volumetric visualization for real time 4D intraoperative ophthalmic swept-source OCT

    PubMed Central

    Viehland, Christian; Keller, Brenton; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar M.; Nankivil, Derek; Shen, Liangbo; Mangalesh, Shwetha; Viet, Du Tran; Kuo, Anthony N.; Toth, Cynthia A.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    Current-generation software for rendering volumetric OCT data sets based on ray casting results in volume visualizations with indistinct tissue features and sub-optimal depth perception. Recent developments in hand-held and microscope-integrated intrasurgical OCT designed for real-time volumetric imaging motivate development of rendering algorithms which are both visually appealing and fast enough to support real time rendering, potentially from multiple viewpoints for stereoscopic visualization. We report on an enhanced, real time, integrated volumetric rendering pipeline which incorporates high performance volumetric median and Gaussian filtering, boundary and feature enhancement, depth encoding, and lighting into a ray casting volume rendering model. We demonstrate this improved model implemented on graphics processing unit (GPU) hardware for real-time volumetric rendering of OCT data during tissue phantom and live human surgical imaging. We show that this rendering produces enhanced 3D visualizations of pathology and intraoperative maneuvers compared to standard ray casting. PMID:27231623

  2. Design, Implementation and Characterization of a Quantum-Dot-Based Volumetric Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Ryuji; Naruse, Makoto; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Tate, Naoya; Shiraki, Atsushi; Kakue, Takashi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ohtsu, Motoichi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a volumetric display system based on quantum dots (QDs) embedded in a polymer substrate. Unlike conventional volumetric displays, our system does not require electrical wiring; thus, the heretofore unavoidable issue of occlusion is resolved because irradiation by external light supplies the energy to the light-emitting voxels formed by the QDs. By exploiting the intrinsic attributes of the QDs, the system offers ultrahigh definition and a wide range of colours for volumetric displays. In this paper, we discuss the design, implementation and characterization of the proposed volumetric display's first prototype. We developed an 8 × 8 × 8 display comprising two types of QDs. This display provides multicolour three-type two-dimensional patterns when viewed from different angles. The QD-based volumetric display provides a new way to represent images and could be applied in leisure and advertising industries, among others.

  3. An Unbroken Axial-Vector Current Conservation Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharafiddinov, Rasulkhozha S.

    2016-03-01

    The mass, energy and momentum of the neutrino of a true flavor have an axial-vector nature. As a consequence, the left-handed truly neutral neutrino in an axial-vector field of emission can be converted into a right-handed one and vice versa. This predicts the unidenticality of masses, energies and momenta of neutrinos of the different components. Recognizing such a difference in masses, energies, momenta and accepting that the left-handed axial-vector neutrino and the right-handed antineutrino of true neutrality refer to long-lived C-odd leptons, and the right-handed truly neutral neutrino and the left-handed axial-vector antineutrino are of short-lived fermions of C-oddity, we would write a new CP-even Dirac equation taking into account the flavor symmetrical axial-vector mass, energy and momentum matrices. Their presence explains the spontaneous mirror symmetry violation, confirming that an axial-vector current conservation law has never violated. They reflect the availability of a mirror Minkowski space in which a neutrino is characterized by left as well as by right space-time coordinates. Therefore, it is not surprising that whatever the main purposes experiments about a quasielastic axial-vector mass say in favor of an axial-vector mirror Minkowski space-time.

  4. An Unbroken Axial-Vector Current Conservation Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharafiddinov, Rasulkhozha S.

    2016-04-01

    The mass, energy and momentum of the neutrino of a true flavor have an axial-vector nature. As a consequence, the left-handed truly neutral neutrino in an axial-vector field of emission can be converted into a right-handed one and vice versa. This predicts the unidenticality of masses, energies and momenta of neutrinos of the different components. Recognizing such a difference in masses, energies, momenta and accepting that the left-handed axial-vector neutrino and the right-handed antineutrino of true neutrality refer to long-lived C-odd leptons, and the right-handed truly neutral neutrino and the left-handed axial-vector antineutrino are of short-lived fermions of C-oddity, we would write a new CP-even Dirac equation taking into account the flavor symmetrical axial-vector mass, energy and momentum matrices. Their presence explains the spontaneous mirror symmetry violation, confirming that an axial-vector current conservation law has never violated. They reflect the availability of a mirror Minkowski space in which a neutrino is characterized by left as well as by right space-time coordinates. Therefore, it is not surprising that whatever the main purposes experiments about a quasielastic axial-vector mass say in favor of an axial-vector mirror Minkowski space-time.

  5. Through flow analysis within axial flow turbomachinery blade rows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girigoswami, H.

    1986-09-01

    Using Katsanis' Through Flow Code, inviscid flow through an axial flow compressor rotor blade as well as flow through inlet guide vanes are analyzed and the computed parameters such as meridional velocity distribution, axial velocity distribution along radial lines, and velocity distribution over blade surfaces are presented.

  6. Study of a new airfoil used in reversible axial fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Chaojun; Wei, Baosuo; Gu, Chuangang

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of the reverse ventilation of axial flow are analyzed. An s shaped airfoil with a double circular arc was tested in a wind tunnel. The experimental results showed that the characteristics of this new airfoil in reverse ventilation are the same as those in normal ventilation, and that this airfoil is better than the existing airfoils used on reversible axial fans.

  7. Axial viewing of an ICP with a graphite torch injector

    SciTech Connect

    Houk, R.L.; Winge, R.K.; Praphairaksit, N.

    1996-09-01

    A hollow graphite torch injector constricts the analyte emission zone and prevents the production of off-axis emission from the upstream reaches of the axial channel. These properties should both improve signal, reduce background and alleviate matrix effects during axial viewing of the ICP through a metal sampling orifice thrust into the plasma. Recent results along these lines will be presented.

  8. Condensed matter realization of the axial magnetic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernodub, Maxim N.; Cortijo, Alberto; Grushin, Adolfo G.; Landsteiner, Karl; Vozmediano, María A. H.

    2014-02-01

    The axial magneticeffect, i.e., the generation of an energy current parallel to an axial magnetic field coupling with opposite signs to left- and right-handed fermions, is a nondissipative transport phenomenon intimately related to the gravitational contribution to the axial anomaly. An axial magnetic field emerges naturally in condensed matter in so-called Weyl semimetals. We present a measurable implementation of the axial magnetic effect. We show that the edge states of a Weyl semimetal at finite temperature possess a temperature dependent angular momentum in the direction of the vector potential intrinsic to the system. Such a realization provides a plausible context for the experimental confirmation of the elusive gravitational anomaly.

  9. Development of a High Precision Axial 3-D PET for Brain Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolle, E.; Braem, A.; Casella, C.; Chesi, E.; Clinthorne, N.; Cochran, E.; De Leo, R.; Dissertori, G.; Djambazov, L.; Honscheid, K.; Huh, S.; Johnson, I.; Joram, C.; Kagan, H.; Lacasta, C.; Lustermann, W.; Meddi, F.; Nappi, E.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Oliver, J. F.; Pauss, F.; Rafecas, M.; Renker, D.; Rudge, A.; Schinzel, D.; Schneider, T.; Séguinot, J.; Smith, S.; Solevi, P.; Stapnes, S.; Vilardi, I.; Weilhammer, P.

    2009-12-01

    We describe a PET device based on a novel method to extract the coordinates of the interaction point of the 511keV γ rays from 100 mm long and thin LYSO (Lutetium Yttrium OxyorthoSilicate) scintillator bars, positioned axially in the tomograph. The coordinate along the hit crystal is measured by using a hodoscope of Wave Length Shifting (WLS) plastic strips mounted perpendicularly to each plane of scintillators. As photodetectors, new Geiger mode Avalanche PhotoDetectors (G-APDs) with integrated electronics are being used to detect both the hit crystal in a block (x and y coordinates) and the interaction point in the crystal (z coordinate) through the light escaping from the crystal and transmitted to the WLS strips. In this way, the γ interaction point can be determined with a spatial resolution of few cubic millimeters down to a minimum deposited energy of about 50 keV, resulting in a volumetric precision very close to the limits imposed by the physics of the positron annihilation. The method allows to increase the detection efficiency without affecting the spatial resolution by adding scintillator planes in the radial direction. A demonstrator scanner, based on two matrices of 8 × 6 LYS crystals and 312 WLS strips, slotted in between the crystals, is under construction. Preliminary results from the feasibility studies of the various components will be presented.

  10. Vector and Axial Vector Pion Form Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitz, Michael; PEN Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Radiative pion decay π+ -->e+ νγ (RPD) provides critical input to chiral perturbation theory (χPT). Aside from the uninteresting ``inner bremsstrahlung'' contribution from QED, the RPD rate contains ``structure dependent'' terms given by FV and FA, the vector and axial-vector pion form factors, respectively. The two appear in the decay rate in combinations FV -FA and FV +FA , i.e., in the so-called SD- and SD+ terms, respectively. The latter has been measured to high precision by the PIBETA collaboration. We report on the analysis of new data, measured by the PEN collaboration in runs between 2008 and 2010 at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. We particularly focus on the possibility of improvement in the determination of the SD- term. Precise determinations of FV and FA test the validity of the CVC hypothesis, provide numerical input for the l9 +l10 terms in the χPT lagrangian, and constrain potential non-(V - A) terms, such as a possible tensor term FT. NSF grants PHY-0970013, 1307328, and others.

  11. Axial residual stresses in boron fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    The axial residual stress distribution as a function of radius was determined from the fiber surface to the core including the average residual stress in the core. Such measurements on boron on tungsten (B/W) fibers show that the residual stresses for 102, 142, 203, and 366 micron diameter fibers were similar, being compressive at the surface and changing monotonically to a region of tensile within the boron. At approximately 25 percent of the original radius, the stress reaches a maximum tensile stress of about 860 mn/sq.m and then decreases to a compressive stress near the tungsten boride core. Data were presented for 203 micron diameter B/W fibers that show annealing above 900 C reduces the residual stresses. A comparison between 102 micron diameter B/W and boron on carbon (b/C) shows that the residual stresses were similar in the outer regions of the fibers, but that large differences near and in the core were observed. The effects of these residual stresses on the fracture of boron fibers were discussed.

  12. Axially localized states in Taylor Couette flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Jose M.; Marques, Francisco

    2014-11-01

    We present numerical simulations of the flow in a Taylor Couette system with the inner cylinder rotating and aspect ratio Γ restricted to 0 . 86 <Γ/N < 0 . 95 , being N the number of Taylor vortices. For these values a complex experimental bifurcation scenario has been reported. The transition from wavy vortex flow (WVF) to a very low frequency mode VLF happens via an axisymmetric eigenfunction. The VLF plays an essential role in the dynamics, leading to chaos through a two-tori period-doubling route. This chaotic regime vanishes with further increase in Re and gives rise to a new flow regime ALS characterized by the existence of large jet oscillations localized in some pairs of vortices. The aim of this numerical study is to extend the available information on ALS by means of a detailed exploration of the parameter space in which it occurs. Frequency analysis from time series simultaneously recorded at several points of the domain has been applied to identify the different transitions taking place. The VLF occurs in a wide range of control parameters and its interaction with the axially localized states is crucial is most transitions, either between different ALS or to the chaotic regime. Spanish Ministry of Education and Science Grants (with FEDER funds) FIS2013-40880 and BES-2010-041542.

  13. Computerized axial tomography in clinical pediatrics.

    PubMed

    McCullough, D C; Kufta, C; Axelbaum, S P; Schellinger, D

    1977-02-01

    Computerized axial tomography (CAT), a noninvasive radiologie method, provides a new dimension in screening and diagnosis of intracranial pathology. Evaluation of 725 scans in infants and children demonstrates that CAT may be performed with negligible risk, although sedation and restraint are essential to the successful performance of studies in children under 6 years of age. CAT is the preferred initial diagnostic method in suspected hydrocephalls and is accurate in the detection and precise localization of brain tumors. The management of hydrocephalus and brain tumors has been significantly altered by the availability of CAT. Few invasive neuroradiologic procedures are required and pneumography is especially curtailed. Serial scanning is the best available method of monitoring ventricular alterations in hydrocephalus, tumor size during radiotherapy or chemotherapy, and postoperative recurrence of benign neoplasms. Complex intracranial anomalies are detectable with computerized tomography, but complete definition of pathology often requires angiography and air studies. Limited clinical experience in detecting neonatal intraventricular hemorrhage suggests that CAT will be a valuable tool for futlre investigations of that problem.

  14. Axial compressor middle stage secondary flow study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, J. H.; Dring, R. P.; Joslyn, H. D.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes an experimental investigation of the secondary flow within and aft of an axial compressor model with thick endwall boundary layers. The objective of the study was to obtain detailed aerodynamic and trace gas concentration traverse data aft of a well documented isolated rotor for the ultimate purpose of improving the design phases of compressor development based on an improved physical understanding of secondary flow. It was determined from the flow visualization, aerodynamic, and trace gas concentration results that the relative unloading of the midspan region of the airfoil inhibitied a fullspan separation at high loading preventing the massive radial displacement of the hub corner stall to the tip. Radial distribution of high and low total pressure fluid influenced the magnitude of the spanwise distribution of loss, such that, there was a general decreases in loss near the hub to the extent that for the least loaded case a negative loss (increase in total pressure) was observed. The ability to determine the spanwise distribution of blockage was demonstrated. Large blockage was present in the endwall regions due to the corner stall and tip leakage with little blockage in the core flow region. Hub blockage was found to increase rapidly with loading.

  15. Hypothetical silicon nanotubes under axial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jeong Won; Hwang, Ho Jung

    2003-03-01

    This study shows the response of silicon nanotubes (SiNTs) under axial compression using an atomistic simulation based on the Tersoff potential. The application of pressure, proportional to the deformation within Hook's law, eventually led to a collapse of the SiNT and an abrupt change in structure. Using the sum of the cross sections of the atoms on the SiNT cross section and the SiNT pressure, we determined Young's modulus for the SiNTs that was constant irrespective of the SiNTs' diameter. As the SiNTs' diameter increased, the collapse pressure, that is the critical stress, linearly decreased. However, the net forces on the SiNTs at their collapse were almost constant irrespective of the SiNTs' diameter. We calculated the variations in the unit cell volume as a function of pressure, which were not dealt with in previous works considering carbon nanotubes under compression. Using properly chosen parameters for the SiNTs (Young's modulus, effective spring constant, diameter, lattice constant and cylindrical volume modulus), the critical strain, the collapse pressure, the elastic energy and the critical volume at which the SiNT buckling occurs can be estimated by equations given in this work.

  16. Small axial turbine stator technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, W.; Kozak, A.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effects of surface finish, fillet radius, inlet boundary layer thickness, and free-stream inlet turbulence level on the aerodynamic performance of a small axial flow turbine stator. The principal objective of this program was to help understand why large turbine efficiency is not maintained when a large turbine is scaled to a smaller size. The stator used in this program as a one-sixth scale of a 762 mm (30 in.) diameter stator design with 50 vanes having a vane height of 17 mm (0.666 in.) and an aspect ratio of 1.77. A comprehensive overall test matrix was used to provide a complete engineering understanding of the effects of each variable over the full range of all the other variables. The range of each variable investigated was as follows: surface finish 0.1 micro (4 micro in.) to 2.4 micro (95 micro in.); boundary layer thickness 2 to 25 percent of channel height at each wall; fillet radius 0 mm (0 in.) to 1.0 mm (.040 in.) and turbulence 2 to 12 percent.

  17. High Power Co-Axial SRF Coupler

    SciTech Connect

    M.L. Neubauer, R.A. Rimmer

    2009-05-01

    There are over 35 coupler designs for SRF cavities ranging in frequency from 325 to 1500 MHz. Two-thirds of these designs are coaxial couplers using disk or cylindrical ceramics in various combinations and configurations. While it is well known that dielectric losses go down by several orders of magnitude at cryogenic temperatures, it not well known that the thermal conductivity also goes down, and it is the ratio of thermal conductivity to loss tangent (SRF ceramic Quality Factor) and ceramic volume which will determine the heat load of any given design. We describe a novel robust co-axial SRF coupler design which uses compressed window technology. This technology will allow the use of highly thermally conductive materials for cryogenic windows. The mechanical designs will fit into standard-sized ConFlat® flanges for ease of assembly. Two windows will be used in a coaxial line. The distance between the windows is adjusted to cancel their reflections so that the same window can be used in many different applications at various frequencies.

  18. The Effect of Rotor Blade Speed to the Best Efficiency Point of Single Stage Axial Flow Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukri, Mohamad Firdaus; Wasbari, Faizil; Mat, Shafizal

    2010-06-01

    The best efficiency point is ideal operational point for any turbomachinery. Selections of turbomachines in industry such as pump, turbine, compressor, etc are basically based on their operating point. The best efficiency point is a point at the highest efficiency. Therefore, turbomachines with nearest operating point to best efficiency point will be chosen due to higher efficiency thus produce great reduction in cost saving. Different speed of rotor blade will cause effect to the best efficiency point, as well as different in rotor and stator blade angle. If angle of rotor and stator blade constant while speed of rotor blade increased, the net head produced by the compressor will also increased. Thus, it will increase the brake horse power and fluid horse power. Although the efficiency of the compressor increases if fluid horse power increased, the increasing in brake horse power will produce lower efficiency. In this paper, the effect of rotor blade speed on best efficiency point of an axial flow compressor will be investigated and discussed. Through this paper, the highest efficiency is only 73 %, achieved at rotor blade speed of 750 rpm with net head of 9.4 mmWG, and air volumetric flow rate of 0.56m3/s. For higher net head, the rotor blade speed must be increased, but the efficiency will decrease simultaneously. The type of compressor used in this research is single stage axial flow compressor; model Dixson FM36, manufactured by Dixson FA Engineering Sdn. Bhd.

  19. Research on the effect of wear-ring clearances to the axial and radial force of a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W. G.; Y He, M.; Qi, C. X.; Li, Y. B.

    2013-12-01

    Varying of the wear-ring clearance not only has a distinct effect on the volumetric loss of the centrifugal pump, but also on the performance of the centrifugal pump including the axial and radial forces. Comparing with the experimental studies, numerical simulation methods have some special advantages, such as the low cost, fast and high efficiency, and convenient to get the detailed structure of the internal flow characteristics, so it has been widely used in the fluid machinery study in recent years. In order to study the effect of wear-ring clearance on the force performance of the centrifugal pump, based on the Reynolds Time-Averaged N-S equations and RNG k-ε turbulence model, a centrifugal pump with three variable styles of the wear-rings was simulated: Only the clearance of the front wear-ring was changed, only the clearance of the back wear-ring was changed and both were changed. Comparing with the experiment, numerical results show a good agreement. In the three changing styles of the clearance, the variable of the clearance of front wear-ring has the most influence on the axial force of the centrifugal pump, while has tiny effect on the radial force for all the conditions.

  20. A synthetic diamond diode in volumetric modulated arc therapy dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Zani, Margherita; Bucciolini, Marta; Casati, Marta; Talamonti, Cinzia; Marinelli, Marco; Prestopino, Giuseppe; Tonnetti, Alessia; Verona-Rinati, Gianluca

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to investigate the behavior of a single crystal diamond diode (SCDD) for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) dose verifications. This delivery technique is one of the most severe test of a dosimeter performance due to the modulation of the dose rate achieved by simultaneously changing the velocity of the gantry and the position of the collimator leaves. The performed measurements with VMAT photon beams can therefore contribute to an overall global validation of the device to be used in dose distribution verifications.Methods: The SCDD response to 6 MVRX has been tested and compared with reference ionization chambers and treatment planning system (TPS) calculations in different experiments: (a) measurements of output factors for small field sizes (square fields of side ranging between 8 mm and 104 mm) by SCDD and A1SL ionization chamber; (b) angular dependence evaluation of the entire experimental set-up by SCDD, A1SL, and Farmer ionization chambers; and (c) acquisition of dose profiles for a VMAT treatment of a pulmonary disease in latero-lateral and gantry-target directions by SCDD and A1SL ionization chamber.Results: The output factors measured by SCDD favorably compare with the ones obtained by A1SL, whose response is affected by the lack of charged particle equilibrium and by averaging effect when small fields are involved. From the experiment on angular dependence, a good agreement is observed among the diamond diode, the ion chambers, and the TPS. In VMAT profiles, the absorbed doses measured by SCDD and A1SL compare well with the TPS calculated ones. An overall better agreement is observed in the case of the diamond dosimeter, which is also showing a better accuracy in terms of distance to agreement in the high gradient regions.Conclusions: Synthetic diamond diodes, whose performance were previously studied for conformal and IMRT radiotherapy techniques, were found to be suitable detectors also for dosimetric measurements

  1. Volumetric Spectroscopic Imaging of Glioblastoma Multiforme Radiation Treatment Volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, N. Andres; Maudsley, Andrew A.; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Ishkanian, Fazilat; Huang, Kris; Walker, Gail R.; Padgett, Kyle; Roy, Bhaswati; Panoff, Joseph; Markoe, Arnold; Stoyanova, Radka

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computed tomography (CT) are used almost exclusively in radiation therapy planning of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), despite their well-recognized limitations. MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) can identify biochemical patterns associated with normal brain and tumor, predominantly by observation of choline (Cho) and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) distributions. In this study, volumetric 3-dimensional MRSI was used to map these compounds over a wide region of the brain and to evaluate metabolite-defined treatment targets (metabolic tumor volumes [MTV]). Methods and Materials: Volumetric MRSI with effective voxel size of ∼1.0 mL and standard clinical MR images were obtained from 19 GBM patients. Gross tumor volumes and edema were manually outlined, and clinical target volumes (CTVs) receiving 46 and 60 Gy were defined (CTV{sub 46} and CTV{sub 60}, respectively). MTV{sub Cho} and MTV{sub NAA} were constructed based on volumes with high Cho and low NAA relative to values estimated from normal-appearing tissue. Results: The MRSI coverage of the brain was between 70% and 76%. The MTV{sub NAA} were almost entirely contained within the edema, and the correlation between the 2 volumes was significant (r=0.68, P=.001). In contrast, a considerable fraction of MTV{sub Cho} was outside of the edema (median, 33%) and for some patients it was also outside of the CTV{sub 46} and CTV{sub 60}. These untreated volumes were greater than 10% for 7 patients (37%) in the study, and on average more than one-third (34.3%) of the MTV{sub Cho} for these patients were outside of CTV{sub 60}. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of whole-brain MRSI for radiation therapy planning of GBM and revealed that areas of metabolically active tumor are not covered by standard RT volumes. The described integration of MTV into the RT system will pave the way to future clinical trials investigating outcomes in patients treated based on

  2. Volumetric breast density evaluation from ultrasound tomography images

    SciTech Connect

    Glide-Hurst, Carri K.; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter

    2008-09-15

    Previous ultrasound tomography work conducted by our group showed a direct correlation between measured sound speed and physical density in vitro, and increased in vivo sound speed with increasing mammographic density, a known risk factor for breast cancer. Building on these empirical results, the purpose of this work was to explore a metric to quantify breast density using our ultrasound tomography sound speed images in a manner analogous to computer-assisted mammogram segmentation for breast density analysis. Therefore, volumetric ultrasound percent density (USPD) is determined by segmenting high sound speed areas from each tomogram using a k-means clustering routine, integrating these results over the entire volume of the breast, and dividing by whole-breast volume. First, a breast phantom comprised of fat inclusions embedded in fibroglandular tissue was scanned four times with both our ultrasound tomography clinical prototype (with 4 mm spatial resolution) and CT. The coronal transmission tomograms and CT images were analyzed using semiautomatic segmentation routines, and the integrated areas of the phantom's fat inclusions were compared between the four repeated scans. The average variability for inclusion segmentation was {approx}7% and {approx}2%, respectively, and a close correlation was observed in the integrated areas between the two modalities. Next, a cohort of 93 patients was imaged, yielding volumetric coverage of the breast (45-75 sound speed tomograms/patient). The association of USPD with mammographic percent density (MPD) was evaluated using two measures: (1) qualitative, as determined by a radiologist's visual assessment using BI-RADS Criteria and (2) quantitative, via digitization and semiautomatic segmentation of craniocaudal and mediolateral oblique mammograms. A strong positive association between BI-RADS category and USPD was demonstrated [Spearman {rho}=0.69 (p<0.001)], with significant differences between all BI-RADS categories as assessed

  3. Conservative axial burnup distributions for actinide-only burnup credit

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, C.; Lancaster, D.

    1997-11-01

    Unlike the fresh fuel approach, which assumes the initial isotopic compositions for criticality analyses, any burnup credit methodology must address the proper treatment of axial burnup distributions. A straightforward way of treating a given axial burnup distribution is to segment the fuel assembly into multiple meshes and to model each burnup mesh with the corresponding isotopic compositions. Although this approach represents a significant increase in modeling efforts compared to the uniform average burnup approach, it can adequately determine the reactivity effect of the axial burnup distribution. A major consideration is what axial burnup distributions are appropriate for use in light of many possible distributions depending on core operating conditions and histories. This paper summarizes criticality analyses performed to determine conservative axial burnup distributions. The conservative axial burnup distributions presented in this paper are included in the Topical Report on Actinide-Only Burnup Credit for Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Packages, Revision 1 submitted in May 1997 by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). When approved by NRC, the conservative axial burnup distributions may be used to model PWR spent nuclear fuel for the purpose of gaining actinide only burnup credit.

  4. Axial transport of bidisperse granular mixtures in a rotating drum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Zeina

    2005-03-01

    Bidisperse granular mixtures rapidly size segregate when tumbled in a partially filled, horizontal drum. The smaller component moves radially toward the axis of rotation and forms a buried core. On a longer time scale, axial modulations of the core may develop and grow into a series of bands along the drum, which become visible upon breaking the surface. Using a narrow pulse of the smaller component as the intitial condition, we observe that the axial transport of the radial core is a subdiffusive front advancement process. The front motion is subdiffusive in the sense that the radially integrated concentration forms a self-similar, compact axial pulse whose width grows as t^α, with α˜1/3 < 1/2, and hence it spreads much more slowly than by diffusion in a mixture which does not exhibit axial banding. By coloring some of the larger grains, we find that the mixing and axial transport of the larger grains is similarly subdiffusive. We report on the effects of changing relative grain size and drum diameter on the axial transport of grains. We find that mixing occurs in the radial core, and axial band formation is enhaced in these cases.

  5. Volumetric Measurements of Amnioserosa Cells in Developing Drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashburn, David; Jayasinghe, Aroshan; Hutson, Shane

    2013-03-01

    The behavior of cells in tissue in developing Drosophila melanogaster has become increasingly clearer over the past few decades, in large part due to advances in imaging techniques, genetic markers, predictive modeling, and micromanipulation (notably laser microsurgery). We now know apical contractions in amnioserosa cells are a significant factor in large scale processes like germ band retraction and dorsal closure. Also, laser microsurgery induces cellular recoil that strongly mimics a 2D elastic sheet. Still, what we know about these processes comes entirely from the apical surface where the standard fluorescent markers like cadherin are located, but many open questions exist concerning the remaining ``dark'' portion of cells. Does cell volume remain constant during contraction or do cells leak? Also, what shape changes do cells undergo? Do they bulge, wedge, contract prismatically, or something else? By using a marker that labels the entire membrane of amnioserosa cells (Resille, 117) and adapting our watershed segmentation routines for 4D datasets, we have been able to quantify the entire volumetric region of cells in tissue through time and compare changes in apical area and volume. Preliminary results suggest a fairly constant volume over the course of a contraction cycle.

  6. Optical artefact characterization and correction in volumetric scintillation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Daniel; Hui, Cheukkai; Archambault, Louis; Mohan, Radhe; Beddar, Sam

    2014-01-01

    The goals of this study were (1) to characterize the optical artefacts affecting measurement accuracy in a volumetric liquid scintillator detector, and (2) to develop methods to correct for these artefacts. The optical artefacts addressed were photon scattering, refraction, camera perspective, vignetting, lens distortion, the lens point spread function, stray radiation, and noise in the camera. These artefacts were evaluated by theoretical and experimental means, and specific correction strategies were developed for each artefact. The effectiveness of the correction methods was evaluated by comparing raw and corrected images of the scintillation light from proton pencil beams against validated Monte Carlo calculations. Blurring due to the lens and refraction at the scintillator tank-air interface were found to have the largest effect on the measured light distribution, and lens aberrations and vignetting were important primarily at the image edges. Photon scatter in the scintillator was not found to be a significant source of artefacts. The correction methods effectively mitigated the artefacts, increasing the average gamma analysis pass rate from 66% to 98% for gamma criteria of 2% dose difference and 2 mm distance to agreement. We conclude that optical artefacts cause clinically meaningful errors in the measured light distribution, and we have demonstrated effective strategies for correcting these optical artefacts.

  7. Normative biometrics for fetal ocular growth using volumetric MRI reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Annis, Clemente; Gholipour, Ali; Afacan, Onur; Prabhu, Sanjay P.; Estroff, Judy A.; Warfield, Simon K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine normative ranges for fetal ocular biometrics between 19 and 38 weeks gestational age (GA) using volumetric MRI reconstruction. Method 3D images of 114 healthy fetuses between 19 and 38 weeks GA were created using super-resolution volume reconstructions from MRI slice acquisitions. These 3D images were semi-automatically segmented to measure fetal orbit volume, binocular distance (BOD), interocular distance (IOD), and ocular diameter (OD). Results All biometry correlated with GA (Volume, CC = 0.9680; BOD, CC = 0.9552; OD, CC = 0.9445; and IOD, CC = 0.8429), and growth curves were plotted against linear and quadratic growth models. Regression analysis showed quadratic models to best fit BOD, IOD and OD, and a linear model to best fit volume. Conclusion Orbital volume had the greatest correlation with GA, though BOD and OD also showed strong correlation. The normative data found in this study may be helpful for the detection of congenital fetal anomalies with more consistent measurements than are currently available. PMID:25601041

  8. Volumetric dilutor: design and testing of a passive mixer

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, J.R.; Nye, R.A.

    1985-09-01

    The performance of a mixing volume is improved dramatically by dividing it into a series of equal subvolumes. Five to 20 divisions is optimum in terms of minimizing concentration ripple and response time. Such a serial mixer makes practical the operation of a volumetric gas dilutor based on the periodic injection of a known volume into a constantly flowing diluent. The minimum dilution factor for such an apparatus is determined by the volume of diluent needed to sweep the injection volume and should correspond roughly to 3. On the other hand, a dilution factor of 10/sup 7/ could be readily achievable. A standard gas chromatographic valve could inject 0.25 ..mu..L of pure gas four times per minute into a carrier gas flowing at 10 cm/sup 3/ min/sup -1/. Pulses are averaged in a 10-cm/sup 3/ column containing five plates, followed by dilution with 10 L min/sup -1/. If the sample is a pure gas, the resulting diluted gas is 0.10 ppmv with a ripple of 0.1%.

  9. Cortical thickness and brain volumetric analysis in body dysmorphic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Sarah K.; Zai, Alex; Pirnia, Tara; Arienzo, Donatello; Zhan, Liang; Moody, Teena D.; Thompson, Paul M.; Feusner, Jamie D.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) suffer from preoccupations with perceived defects in physical appearance, causing severe distress and disability. Although BDD affects 1-2% of the population, the neurobiology is not understood. Discrepant results in previous volumetric studies may be due to small sample sizes, and no study has investigated cortical thickness in BDD. The current study is the largest neuroimaging analysis of BDD. Participants included 49 medication-free, right-handed individuals with DSM-IV BDD and 44 healthy controls matched by age, sex, and education. Using high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, we computed vertex-wise gray matter (GM) thickness on the cortical surface and GM volume using voxel-based morphometry. We also computed volumes in cortical and subcortical regions of interest. In addition to group comparisons, we investigated associations with symptom severity, insight, and anxiety within the BDD group. In BDD, greater anxiety was significantly associated with thinner GM in the left superior temporal cortex and greater GM volume in the right caudate nucleus. There were no significant differences in cortical thickness, GM volume, or volumes in regions of interest between BDD and control subjects. Subtle associations with clinical symptoms may characterize brain morphometric patterns in BDD, rather than large group differences in brain structure. PMID:25797401

  10. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) Treatment Planning for Superficial Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Zacarias, Albert S.; Brown, Mellonie F.; Mills, Michael D.

    2010-10-01

    The physician's planning objective is often a uniform dose distribution throughout the planning target volume (PTV), including superficial PTVs on or near the surface of a patient's body. Varian's Eclipse treatment planning system uses a progressive resolution optimizer (PRO), version 8.2.23, for RapidArc dynamic multileaf collimator volumetric modulated arc therapy planning. Because the PRO is a fast optimizer, optimization convergence errors (OCEs) produce dose nonuniformity in the superficial area of the PTV. We present a postsurgical cranial case demonstrating the recursive method our clinic uses to produce RapidArc treatment plans. The initial RapidArc treatment plan generated using one 360{sup o} arc resulted in substantial dose nonuniformity in the superficial section of the PTV. We demonstrate the use of multiple arcs to produce improved dose uniformity in this region. We also compare the results of this superficial dose compensation method to the results of a recursive method of dose correction that we developed in-house to correct optimization convergence errors in static intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment plans. The results show that up to 4 arcs may be necessary to provide uniform dose to the surface of the PTV with the current version of the PRO.

  11. Optical artefact characterization and correction in volumetric scintillation dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Daniel; Hui, Cheukkai; Archambault, Louis; Mohan, Radhe; Beddar, Sam

    2014-01-01

    The goals of this study were (1) to characterize the optical artefacts affecting measurement accuracy in a volumetric liquid scintillation detector, and (2) to develop methods to correct for these artefacts. The optical artefacts addressed were photon scattering, refraction, camera perspective, vignetting, lens distortion, the lens point spread function, stray radiation, and noise in the camera. These artefacts were evaluated by theoretical and experimental means, and specific correction strategies were developed for each artefact. The effectiveness of the correction methods was evaluated by comparing raw and corrected images of the scintillation light from proton pencil beams against validated Monte Carlo calculations. Blurring due to the lens and refraction at the scintillator tank-air interface were found to have the largest effect on the measured light distribution, and lens aberrations and vignetting were important primarily at the image edges. Photon scatter in the scintillator was not found to be a significant source of artefacts. The correction methods effectively mitigated the artefacts, increasing the average gamma analysis pass rate from 66% to 98% for gamma criteria of 2% dose difference and 2 mm distance to agreement. We conclude that optical artefacts cause clinically meaningful errors in the measured light distribution, and we have demonstrated effective strategies for correcting these optical artefacts. PMID:24321820

  12. Skeletal muscle tissue engineering: strategies for volumetric constructs

    PubMed Central

    Cittadella Vigodarzere, Giorgio; Mantero, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue is characterized by high metabolic requirements, defined structure and high regenerative potential. As such, it constitutes an appealing platform for tissue engineering to address volumetric defects, as proven by recent works in this field. Several issues common to all engineered constructs constrain the variety of tissues that can be realized in vitro, principal among them the lack of a vascular system and the absence of reliable cell sources; as it is, the only successful tissue engineering constructs are not characterized by active function, present limited cellular survival at implantation and possess low metabolic requirements. Recently, functionally competent constructs have been engineered, with vascular structures supporting their metabolic requirements. In addition to the use of biochemical cues, physical means, mechanical stimulation and the application of electric tension have proven effective in stimulating the differentiation of cells and the maturation of the constructs; while the use of co-cultures provided fine control of cellular developments through paracrine activity. This review will provide a brief analysis of some of the most promising improvements in the field, with particular attention to the techniques that could prove easily transferable to other branches of tissue engineering. PMID:25295011

  13. Volumetric Survey Speed: A Figure of Merit for Transient Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellm, Eric C.

    2016-08-01

    Time-domain surveys can exchange sky coverage for revisit frequency, complicating the comparison of their relative capabilities. By using different revisit intervals, a specific camera may execute surveys optimized for discovery of different classes of transient objects. We propose a new figure of merit, the instantaneous volumetric survey speed, for evaluating transient surveys. This metric defines the trade between cadence interval and snapshot survey volume and so provides a natural means of comparing survey capability. The related metric of areal survey speed imposes a constraint on the range of possible revisit times: we show that many modern time-domain surveys are limited by the amount of fresh sky available each night. We introduce the concept of “spectroscopic accessibility” and discuss its importance for transient science goals requiring followup observing. We present an extension of the control time algorithm for cases where multiple consecutive detections are required. Finally, we explore how survey speed and choice of cadence interval determine the detection rate of transients in the peak absolute magnitude-decay timescale phase space.

  14. Connectivity network measures predict volumetric atrophy in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Nir, Talia M; Jahanshad, Neda; Toga, Arthur W; Bernstein, Matt A; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael W; Thompson, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by cortical atrophy and disrupted anatomic connectivity, and leads to abnormal interactions between neural systems. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and graph theory can be used to evaluate major brain networks and detect signs of a breakdown in network connectivity. In a longitudinal study using both DWI and standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we assessed baseline white-matter connectivity patterns in 30 subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, mean age 71.8 ± 7.5 years, 18 males and 12 females) from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Using both standard MRI-based cortical parcellations and whole-brain tractography, we computed baseline connectivity maps from which we calculated global "small-world" architecture measures, including mean clustering coefficient and characteristic path length. We evaluated whether these baseline network measures predicted future volumetric brain atrophy in MCI subjects, who are at risk for developing AD, as determined by 3-dimensional Jacobian "expansion factor maps" between baseline and 6-month follow-up anatomic scans. This study suggests that DWI-based network measures may be a novel predictor of AD progression.

  15. Range estimation of cetaceans with compact volumetric arrays.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Walter M X

    2013-09-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring is the method of choice to detect whales and dolphins that are acoustically active and to monitor their underwater behavior. The NATO Science and Technology Organization Centre for Maritime Research and Experimentation has recently implemented a compact passive acoustic monitor (CPAM), consisting of three arrays of two hydrophones each that are combined in a fixed three-dimensional arrangement and that may be towed at depths of more than 100 m. With its volumetric configuration, the CPAM is capable of estimating the three-dimensional direction vector of arriving sounds and under certain conditions on relative geometry between the whale and hydrophone array, the CPAM may also estimate the range to echolocating animals. Basic ranging methods assume constant sound speed and apply straightforward geometry to obtain depth and distance to the sound source. Alternatively, ray-tracing based methods may be employed to integrate the information provided by real sound speed profiles. Both ranging methods combine measurements of sound arrival angles and surface reflection delays and are easily implemented in real-time applications, whereby one could promote the ray-tracing approach as the preferred method because it may integrate real sound speed profiles. PMID:23968058

  16. Program speeds pipe-prover calculations for volumetric meter corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Schad, C.A.

    1986-10-13

    A program has been developed, written in Basic, to speed the calculations required to calibrate a pipe prover. A pipe prover is a volume standard used to establish correction factors which must be applied to volumetric meters in custody transfer. Custody transfer is the point where money changes hands. Therefore, every effort is made to assure the accuracy of the measurement of the volume of fluid transferred. Because the prover is the standard to which the meter is compared, it must be calibrated prior to being placed in service and routinely thereafter. Although the calculations required to calibrate a pipe prover are simple and straight forward, they are numerous and duplicative. The potential for error in entry, calculation, and recording of so many multidigit numbers is great. The program handles all of the mundane number juggling and produces a high-quality hard copy of all data and results. The program was written for the Hewlett-Packard model HP-71B handheld computer with an HP-IL interface and an HP-2225B ink jet printer. The system is completely portable and may be operated on self-contained batteries or line voltage.

  17. Toward a Philosophy and Theory of Volumetric Nonthermal Processing.

    PubMed

    Sastry, Sudhir K

    2016-06-01

    Nonthermal processes for food preservation have been under intensive investigation for about the past quarter century, with varying degrees of success. We focus this discussion on two volumetrically acting nonthermal processes, high pressure processing (HPP) and pulsed electric fields (PEF), with emphasis on scientific understanding of each, and the research questions that need to be addressed for each to be more successful in the future. We discuss the character or "philosophy" of food preservation, with a question about the nature of the kill step(s), and the sensing challenges that need to be addressed. For HPP, key questions and needs center around whether its nonthermal effectiveness can be increased by increased pressures or pulsing, the theoretical treatment of rates of reaction as influenced by pressure, the assumption of uniform pressure distribution, and the need for (and difficulties involved in) in-situ measurement. For PEF, the questions include the rationale for pulsing, difficulties involved in continuous flow treatment chambers, the difference between electroporation theory and experimental observations, and the difficulties involved in in-situ measurement and monitoring of electric field distribution.

  18. Intuitive Exploration of Volumetric Data Using Dynamic Galleries.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Daniel; Falk, Martin; Ynnerman, Anders

    2016-01-01

    In this work we present a volume exploration method designed to be used by novice users and visitors to science centers and museums. The volumetric digitalization of artifacts in museums is of rapidly increasing interest as enhanced user experience through interactive data visualization can be achieved. This is, however, a challenging task since the vast majority of visitors are not familiar with the concepts commonly used in data exploration, such as mapping of visual properties from values in the data domain using transfer functions. Interacting in the data domain is an effective way to filter away undesired information but it is difficult to predict where the values lie in the spatial domain. In this work we make extensive use of dynamic previews instantly generated as the user explores the data domain. The previews allow the user to predict what effect changes in the data domain will have on the rendered image without being aware that visual parameters are set in the data domain. Each preview represents a subrange of the data domain where overview and details are given on demand through zooming and panning. The method has been designed with touch interfaces as the target platform for interaction. We provide a qualitative evaluation performed with visitors to a science center to show the utility of the approach.

  19. Volumetric Survey Speed: A Figure of Merit for Transient Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellm, Eric C.

    2016-08-01

    Time-domain surveys can exchange sky coverage for revisit frequency, complicating the comparison of their relative capabilities. By using different revisit intervals, a specific camera may execute surveys optimized for discovery of different classes of transient objects. We propose a new figure of merit, the instantaneous volumetric survey speed, for evaluating transient surveys. This metric defines the trade between cadence interval and snapshot survey volume and so provides a natural means of comparing survey capability. The related metric of areal survey speed imposes a constraint on the range of possible revisit times: we show that many modern time-domain surveys are limited by the amount of fresh sky available each night. We introduce the concept of “spectroscopic accessibility” and discuss its importance for transient science goals requiring followup observing. We present an extension of the control time algorithm for cases where multiple consecutive detections are required. Finally, we explore how survey speed and choice of cadence interval determine the detection rate of transients in the peak absolute magnitude–decay timescale phase space.

  20. Toward a Philosophy and Theory of Volumetric Nonthermal Processing.

    PubMed

    Sastry, Sudhir K

    2016-06-01

    Nonthermal processes for food preservation have been under intensive investigation for about the past quarter century, with varying degrees of success. We focus this discussion on two volumetrically acting nonthermal processes, high pressure processing (HPP) and pulsed electric fields (PEF), with emphasis on scientific understanding of each, and the research questions that need to be addressed for each to be more successful in the future. We discuss the character or "philosophy" of food preservation, with a question about the nature of the kill step(s), and the sensing challenges that need to be addressed. For HPP, key questions and needs center around whether its nonthermal effectiveness can be increased by increased pressures or pulsing, the theoretical treatment of rates of reaction as influenced by pressure, the assumption of uniform pressure distribution, and the need for (and difficulties involved in) in-situ measurement. For PEF, the questions include the rationale for pulsing, difficulties involved in continuous flow treatment chambers, the difference between electroporation theory and experimental observations, and the difficulties involved in in-situ measurement and monitoring of electric field distribution. PMID:27149642

  1. Distributed scanning volumetric SDOCT for motion corrected corneal biometry

    PubMed Central

    McNabb, Ryan P.; LaRocca, Francesco; Farsiu, Sina; Kuo, Anthony N.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a method, termed distributed scanning OCT (DSOCT), which reduces the effects of patient motion on corneal biometry utilizing current-generation clinically available spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) systems. We first performed a pilot study of the power spectrum of normal patient axial eye motion based on repeated (M-mode) SDOCT. Using DSOCT to reduce the effects of patient motion, we conducted a preliminary patient study comparing the measured anterior and posterior corneal curvatures and the calculated corneal power to both corneal topography and Scheimpflug photography in normal subjects. The repeatability for the measured radius of curvature of both anterior and posterior surfaces as well as calculated corneal refractive power using DSOCT was comparable to those of both topography and Scheimpflug photography. PMID:23024900

  2. Is there a role for the use of volumetric cone beam computed tomography in periodontics?

    PubMed

    du Bois, A H; Kardachi, B; Bartold, P M

    2012-03-01

    Volumetric computed cone beam tomography offers a number of significant advantages over conventional intraoral and extraoral panoramic radiography, as well as computed tomography. To date, periodontal diagnosis has relied heavily on the assessment of both intraoral radiographs and extraoral panoramic radiographs. With emerging technology in radiology there has been considerable interest in the role that volumetric cone beam computed tomography might play in periodontal diagnostics. This narrative reviews the current evidence and considers whether there is a role for volumetric cone beam computed tomography in periodontics.

  3. High Power Co-Axial Coupler

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland; Neubauer, Michael

    2013-08-14

    A superconducting RF (SRF) power coupler capable of handling 500 kW CW RF power at 750 MHz is required for present and future storage rings and linacs. There are over 35 coupler designs for SRF cavities ranging in frequency from 325 to 1500 MHz. Coupler windows vary from cylinders to cones to disks and RF power couplers will always be limited by the ability of ceramic windows and their matching systems to withstand the stresses due to non-uniform heating from dielectric and wall losses, multipactor, and mechanical flexure. In the Phase II project, we built a double window coaxial system with materials that would not otherwise be useable due to individual VSWRs. Double window systems can be operated such that one is cold (LN2) and one is warm. They can have different materials and still have a good match without using matching elements that create problematic multipactor bands. The match of the two windows will always result from the cancellation of the two window’s reflections when they are located approximately a quarter wavelength apart or multiples of a quarter wavelength. The window assemblies were carefully constructed to put the window material and its braze joint in compression at all times. This was done using explosion bonding techniques which allow for inexpensive fabrication of the vacuum / compression ring out of stainless steel with copper plating applied to the inner surface. The EIA 3-1/8” double window assembly was then successfully baked out and tested to 12 kW in a 3-1/8” co-axial system. The thermal gradient across the window was measured to be 90 C which represents about 15 ksi tensile stress in an uncompressed window. In our design the compression was calculated to be about 25 ksi, so the net compressive force was 5 ksi at full power.

  4. Axial Tilt Angles of Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Robert F.

    1996-12-01

    Separate Mount Wilson plage and sunspot group data sets are analyzed in this review to illustrate several interesting aspects of active region axial tilt angles. (1) The distribution of tilt angles differs between plages and sunspot groups in the sense that plages have slightly higher tilt angles, on average, than do spot groups. (2) The distributions of average plage total magnetic flux, or sunspot group area, with tilt angle show a consistent effect: those groups with tilt angles nearest the average values are larger (or have a greater total flux) on average than those farther from the average values. Moreover, the average tilt angles on which these size or flux distributions are centered differ for the two types of objects, and represent closely the actual different average tilt angles for these two features. (3) The polarity separation distances of plages and sunspot groups show a clear relationship to average tilt angles. In the case of each feature, smaller polarity separations are correlated with smaller tilt angles. (4) The dynamics of regions also show a clear relationship with region tilt angles. The spot groups with tilt angles nearest the average value (or perhaps 0-deg tilt angle) have on average a faster rotation rate than those groups with extreme tilt angles. All of these tilt-angle characteristics may be assumed to be related to the physical forces that affect the magnetic flux loop that forms the region. These aspects are discussed in this brief review within the context of our current view of the formation of active region magnetic flux at the solar surface.

  5. Axial field spectrometer at the CERN ISR

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, H.; Hogue, R.; Killian, T.

    1981-01-01

    The Axial Field Spectrometer (AFS) was recently brought into operation at the CERN ISR. It is being exploited in a wide-ranging program to study different aspects of those proton-proton or proton-antiproton collisions which are characterized by a large transverse momentum (p/sub T/). Examples include the measurement of inclusive distributions of identified high p/sub T/ hadrons, and the study of event structures characterized by a large transverse energy (E/sub T/) or the production of one or several high-p/sub T/ electrons or photons. The experimental approach to this program emphasizes integration of advanced magnetic spectroscopy with state-of-the-art calorimetry. These techniques are fully exploited to provide maximal information on all particles produced. In addition, information from these detectors is used in new ways for on-line event triggering and filtering; this allows even very rare events to be selected with high efficiency, an essential prerequisite for studies at a high-luminosity hadron collider, such as the ISR. Considerable modularity of the detectors was sought. Apart from clear advantages of construction, debugging, running, and servicing of such components, modularity provides ease for addition or reconfiguration of the system to emphasize the study of specific final states. At present, for example, a 1 sr Cerenkov detector system allows hadron identification up to p approx. = 12 GeV/c; liquid-argon electromagnetic calorimeters and a uranium-scintillator calorimeter (Hexagon) are used for a study of events containing direct photons.

  6. A non-integral, axial-force measuring element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringel, M.; Levin, D.; Seginer, A.

    1989-10-01

    A new approach to the measurement of the axial force is presented. A nonintegral axial-force measuring element, housed within the wind-tunnel model, avoids the interactions that are caused by nonlinear elastic phenomena characteristic of integral balances. The new design overcomes other problems, such as friction, misalignment and relative motion between metric elements, that plagued previous attempts at separate measurement of the axial force. Calibration and test results prove the ability of the new approach to duplicate and even surpass the results of much more complicated and expensive integral balances. The advantages of the new design make it the best known solution for particular measurement problems.

  7. A Model for Axial Magnetic Bearings Including Eddy Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Ladislav; Ahrens, Markus

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical method of modelling eddy currents inside axial bearings. The problem is solved by dividing an axial bearing into elementary geometric forms, solving the Maxwell equations for these simplified geometries, defining boundary conditions and combining the geometries. The final result is an analytical solution for the flux, from which the impedance and the force of an axial bearing can be derived. Several impedance measurements have shown that the analytical solution can fit the measured data with a precision of approximately 5%.

  8. Fluorescence Axial Localization with Nanometer Accuracy and Precision

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hui; Yen, Chi-Fu; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi

    2012-06-15

    We describe a new technique, standing wave axial nanometry (SWAN), to image the axial location of a single nanoscale fluorescent object with sub-nanometer accuracy and 3.7 nm precision. A standing wave, generated by positioning an atomic force microscope tip over a focused laser beam, is used to excite fluorescence; axial position is determined from the phase of the emission intensity. We use SWAN to measure the orientation of single DNA molecules of different lengths, grafted on surfaces with different functionalities.

  9. Handheld Real-Time Volumetric Imaging of The Spine: Technology Development

    PubMed Central

    Tiouririne, Mohamed; Nguyen, Sarah; Hossack, John A.; Owen, Kevin; Mauldin, F. William

    2014-01-01

    Technical difficulties, poor image quality and reliance on pattern identifications represent some of the drawbacks of two-dimensional ultrasound imaging of spinal bone anatomy. To overcome these limitations, we sought to develop real-time volumetric imaging of the spine using a portable handheld device. The device measured 19.2 cm x 9.2 cm x 9.0 cm and imaged at 5 MHz center frequency. 2D imaging under conventional ultrasound and volumetric (3D) imaging in real time was achieved and verified by inspection using a custom spine phantom. Further device performance was assessed and revealed a 75-minute battery life and average frame rate of 17.7 Hz in volumetric imaging mode. Our results suggest that real-time volumetric imaging of the spine is a feasible technique for more intuitive visualization of the spine. These results may have important ramifications for a large array of neuraxial procedures. PMID:24446802

  10. EVALUATION OF VOLUMETRIC LEAK DETECTION METHODS USED IN UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the spring and summer of 1987, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) evaluated the performance of 25 commercially available volumetric test methods for the detection of small leaks in underground storage tanks containing gasoline. Performance was estimated by...

  11. Mechanical properties, volumetric shrinkage and depth of cure of short fiber-reinforced resin composite.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties, volumetric shrinkage and depth of cure of a short fiber-reinforced resin composite (SFRC) were investigated in this study and compared to both a bulk fill resin composite (BFRC) and conventional glass/ceramic-filled resin composite (CGRC). Fracture toughness, flexural properties, volumetric shrinkage and depth of cure of the SFRC, BFRC and CGRC were measured. SFRC had significantly higher fracture toughness than BFRCs and CGRCs. The flexural properties of SFRC were comparable with BFRCs and CGRCs. SFRC showed significantly lower volumetric shrinkage than the other tested resin composites. The depth of cure of the SFRC was similar to BFRCs and higher than CGRCs. The data from this laboratory investigation suggests that SFRC exhibits improvements in fracture toughness, volumetric shrinkage and depth of cure when compared with CGRC, but depth of cure of SFRC was similar to BFRC. PMID:27251997

  12. Mechanical properties, volumetric shrinkage and depth of cure of short fiber-reinforced resin composite.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties, volumetric shrinkage and depth of cure of a short fiber-reinforced resin composite (SFRC) were investigated in this study and compared to both a bulk fill resin composite (BFRC) and conventional glass/ceramic-filled resin composite (CGRC). Fracture toughness, flexural properties, volumetric shrinkage and depth of cure of the SFRC, BFRC and CGRC were measured. SFRC had significantly higher fracture toughness than BFRCs and CGRCs. The flexural properties of SFRC were comparable with BFRCs and CGRCs. SFRC showed significantly lower volumetric shrinkage than the other tested resin composites. The depth of cure of the SFRC was similar to BFRCs and higher than CGRCs. The data from this laboratory investigation suggests that SFRC exhibits improvements in fracture toughness, volumetric shrinkage and depth of cure when compared with CGRC, but depth of cure of SFRC was similar to BFRC.

  13. Numerical analysis of cocurrent conical and cylindrical axial cyclone separators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nor, M. A. M.; Al-Kayiem, H. H.; Lemma, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Axial concurrent liquid-liquid separator is seen as an alternative unit to the traditional tangential counter current cyclone due to lower droplet break ups, turbulence and pressure drop. This paper presents the numerical analysis of a new conical axial cocurrent design along with a comparison to the cylindrical axial cocurrent type. The simulation was carried out using CFD technique in ANSYS-FLUENT software. The simulation results were validated by comparison with experimental data from literature, and mesh independency and quality were performed. The analysis indicates that the conical version achieves better separation performance compared to the cylindrical type. Simulation results indicate tangential velocity with 8% higher and axial velocity with 80% lower recirculation compared to the cylindrical type. Also, the flow visualization counters shows smaller recirculation region relative to the cylindrical unit. The proposed conical design seems more efficient and suits the crude/water separation in O&G industry.

  14. 22. Axial view along north cell corridor, cells at right; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Axial view along north cell corridor, cells at right; view to southwest, 65mm lens with electronic flash illumination. - Tule Lake Project Jail, Post Mile 44.85, State Route 139, Newell, Modoc County, CA

  15. 20. INTERIOR AXIAL VIEW OF THE THEATER IN BUILDING 746, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. INTERIOR AXIAL VIEW OF THE THEATER IN BUILDING 746, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Oakland Naval Supply Center, Gymnasium-Cafeteria-Theater, East K Street between Eleventh & Twelfth Streets, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  16. 22. INTERIOR AXIAL VIEW OF THE THEATER LOOKING TOWARD THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. INTERIOR AXIAL VIEW OF THE THEATER LOOKING TOWARD THE BALCONY, BUILDING 746, LOOKING NORTH. - Oakland Naval Supply Center, Gymnasium-Cafeteria-Theater, East K Street between Eleventh & Twelfth Streets, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  17. Axial symmetry, anti-BRST invariance, and modified anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshovi, Amir Abbass

    2016-07-01

    It is shown that, anti-BRST symmetry is the quantized counterpart of local axial symmetry in gauge theories. An extended form of descent equations is worked out, which yields a set of modified consistent anomalies.

  18. Nonparallel stability of the flow in an axially rotating pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Pino, C.; Ortega-Casanova, J.; Fernandez-Feria, R.

    2003-08-01

    The linear stability of the developing flow in an axially rotating pipe is analyzed using parabolized stability equations (PSE). The results are compared with those obtained from a near-parallel stability approximation that only takes into account the axial variation of the basic flow. Though the PSE results obviously coincide with the near-parallel ones far downstream, when the flow has reached a Hagen-Poiseuille axial velocity profile with superimposed solid-body rotation, they differ significantly in the developing region. Therefore, the onset of instability strongly depends on the axial evolution of the perturbations. The PSE results are also compared with experimental data from Imao et al. [Exp. Fluids 12 (1992) 277], showing a good agreement in the frequencies and wavelengths of the unstable disturbances, that take the form of spiral waves. Finally, a simple method for detecting one of the conditions to characterize the onset of absolute instability using PSE is given.

  19. Nonparallel stability of the flow in an axially rotating pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Pino, Carlos; Ortega-Casanova, Joaquin; Fernandez-Feria, Ramon

    2002-11-01

    The linear stability of the developing flow in an axially rotating pipe is analyzed using parabolized stability equations (PSE). The results are compared with those obtained from a near-parallel stability approximation that only takes into account the axial variation of the basic flow. Though the PSE results obviously coincide with the near-parallel ones far downstream, when the flow has reached a Hagen-Poiseuille axial velocity profile with superimposed solid body rotation, they differ significantly in the developing region. Therefore, the onset of instability strongly depends on the axial evolution of the perturbations. The PSE results are also compared with experimental data from Imao et al. [Exp. Fluids 12, 277-285 (1992)], showing a good agreement in the frequencies and wavelengths of the unstable disturbances, that take the form of spiral waves. Finally, a simple method to characterize the onset of absolute instability using PSE is given.

  20. PRELIMINARY DESIGN ANALYSIS OF AXIAL FLOW TURBINES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program has been developed for the preliminary design analysis of axial-flow turbines. Rapid approximate generalized procedures requiring minimum input are used to provide turbine overall geometry and performance adequate for screening studies. The computations are based on mean-diameter flow properties and a stage-average velocity diagram. Gas properties are assumed constant throughout the turbine. For any given turbine, all stages, except the first, are specified to have the same shape velocity diagram. The first stage differs only in the value of inlet flow angle. The velocity diagram shape depends upon the stage work factor value and the specified type of velocity diagram. Velocity diagrams can be specified as symmetrical, zero exit swirl, or impulse; or by inputting stage swirl split. Exit turning vanes can be included in the design. The 1991 update includes a generalized velocity diagram, a more flexible meanline path, a reheat model, a radial component of velocity, and a computation of free-vortex hub and tip velocity diagrams. Also, a loss-coefficient calibration was performed to provide recommended values for airbreathing engine turbines. Input design requirements include power or pressure ratio, mass flow rate, inlet temperature and pressure, and rotative speed. The design variables include inlet and exit diameters, stator angle or exit radius ratio, and number of stages. Gas properties are input as gas constant, specific heat ratio, and viscosity. The program output includes inlet and exit annulus dimensions, exit temperature and pressure, total and static efficiencies, flow angles, blading angles, and last stage absolute and relative Mach numbers. This program is written in FORTRAN 77 and can be ported to any computer with a standard FORTRAN compiler which supports NAMELIST. It was originally developed on an IBM 7000 series computer running VM and has been implemented on IBM PC computers and compatibles running MS-DOS under Lahey FORTRAN, and

  1. Aerodynamics and combustion of axial swirlers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yongqiang

    A multipoint lean direct injection (LDI) concept was introduced recently in non-premixed combustion to obtain both low NOx emissions and good combustion stability. In this concept, a key feature is the injection of finely atomized fuel into the high-swirling airflow at the combustor dome that provides a homogenous, lean fuel-air mixture. In order to achieve the fine atomization and mixing of the fuel and air quickly and uniformly, a good swirler design should be studied. The focus of this dissertation is to investigate the aerodynamics and combustion of the swirling flow field in a multipoint Lean Direct Injector combustor. A helical axial-vaned swirler with a short internal convergent-divergent venturi was used. Swirlers with various vane angles and fuel nozzle insertion lengths have been designed. Three non-dimensional parameter effects on non-reacting, swirling flow field were studied: swirler number, confinement ratio and Reynolds number. Spray and combustion characteristics on the single swirler were studied to understand the mechanism of fuel-air mixing in this special configuration. Multi-swirler interactions were studied by measuring the confined flow field of a multipoint swirler array with different configurations. Two different swirler arrangements were investigated experimentally, which include a co-swirling array and a counter-swirling array. In order to increase the range of stability of multipoint LDI combustors, an improved design were also conducted. The results show that the degree of swirl and the level of confinement have a clear impact on the mean and turbulent flow fields. The swirling flow fields may also change significantly with the addition of a variety of simulated fuel nozzle insertion lengths. The swirler with short insertion has the stronger swirling flow as compared with the long insertion swirler. Reynolds numbers, with range of current study, will not alter mean and turbulent properties of generated flows. The reaction of the spray

  2. The Effect of Volumetric Porosity on Roughness Element Drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, John; Nickling, William; Nikolich, George; Etyemezian, Vicken

    2016-04-01

    Much attention has been given to understanding how the porosity of two dimensional structures affects the drag force exerted by boundary-layer flow on these flow obstructions. Porous structures such as wind breaks and fences are typically used to control the sedimentation of sand and snow particles or create micro-habitats in their lee. Vegetation in drylands also exerts control on sediment transport by wind due to aerodynamic effects and interaction with particles in transport. Recent research has also demonstrated that large spatial arrays of solid three dimensional roughness elements can be used to reduce sand transport to specified targets for control of wind erosion through the effect of drag partitioning and interaction of the moving sand with the large (>0.3 m high) roughness elements, but porous elements may improve the effectiveness of this approach. A thorough understanding of the role porosity plays in affecting the drag force on three-dimensional forms is lacking. To provide basic understanding of the relationship between the porosity of roughness elements and the force of drag exerted on them by fluid flow, we undertook a wind tunnel study that systematically altered the porosity of roughness elements of defined geometry (cubes, rectangular cylinders, and round cylinders) and measured the associated change in the drag force on the elements under similar Reynolds number conditions. The elements tested were of four basic forms: 1) same sized cubes with tubes of known diameter milled through them creating three volumetric porosity values and increasing connectivity between the tubes, 2) cubes and rectangular cylinders constructed of brass screen that nested within each other, and 3) round cylinders constructed of brass screen that nested within each other. The two-dimensional porosity, defined as the ratio of total surface area of the empty space to the solid surface area of the side of the element presented to the fluid flow was conserved at 0.519 for

  3. Application of AAPM TG 119 to volumetric arc therapy (VMAT).

    PubMed

    Mynampati, Dinesh Kumar; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Hong, Linda; Kuo, Hsiang-Chi; Mah, Dennis

    2012-09-06

    The purpose of this study was to create AAPM TG 119 benchmark plans for volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) and to compare VMAT plans with IMRT plan data. AAPM TG 119 proposes a set of test clinical cases for testing the accuracy of IMRT planning and delivery system. For these test cases, we generated two treatment plans, the first plan using 7-9 static dMLC IMRT fields and a second plan utilizing one- or two-arc VMAT technique. Dose optimization and calculations performed using 6 MV photons and Eclipse treatment planning system. Dose prescription and planning objectives were set according to the TG 119 goals. Plans were scored based on TG 119 planning objectives. Treatment plans were compared using conformity index (CI) for reference dose and homogeneity index (HI) (for D(5)-D(95)). For test cases prostate, head-and-neck, C-shape and multitarget prescription dose are 75.6 Gy, 50.4 Gy, 50 Gy and 50 Gy, respectively. VMAT dose distributions were comparable to dMLC IMRT plans. Our planning results matched TG 119 planning results. For treatment plans studied, conformity indices ranged from 1.05-1.23 (IMRT) and 1.04-1.23 (VMAT). Homogeneity indices ranged from 4.6%-11.0% (IMRT) and 4.6%-10.5% (VMAT). The ratio of total monitor units necessary for dMLC IMRT to that of VMAT was in the range of 1.1-2.0. AAPM TG 119 test cases are useful to generate VMAT benchmark plans. At preclinical implementation stage, plan comparison of VMAT and IMRT plans of AAPM TG 119 test case allowed us to understand basic capabilities of VMAT technique.

  4. Estimation of Volumetric Breast Density from Digital Mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonzo-Proulx, Olivier

    Mammographic breast density (MBD) is a strong risk factor for developing breast cancer. MBD is typically estimated by manually selecting the area occupied by the dense tissue on a mammogram. There is interest in measuring the volume of dense tissue, or volumetric breast density (VBD), as it could potentially be a stronger risk factor. This dissertation presents and validates an algorithm to measure the VBD from digital mammograms. The algorithm is based on an empirical calibration of the mammography system, supplemented by physical modeling of x-ray imaging that includes the effects of beam polychromaticity, scattered radation, anti-scatter grid and detector glare. It also includes a method to estimate the compressed breast thickness as a function of the compression force, and a method to estimate the thickness of the breast outside of the compressed region. The algorithm was tested on 26 simulated mammograms obtained from computed tomography images, themselves deformed to mimic the effects of compression. This allowed the determination of the baseline accuracy of the algorithm. The algorithm was also used on 55 087 clinical digital mammograms, which allowed for the determination of the general characteristics of VBD and breast volume, as well as their variation as a function of age and time. The algorithm was also validated against a set of 80 magnetic resonance images, and compared against the area method on 2688 images. A preliminary study comparing association of breast cancer risk with VBD and MBD was also performed, indicating that VBD is a stronger risk factor. The algorithm was found to be accurate, generating quantitative density measurements rapidly and automatically. It can be extended to any digital mammography system, provided that the compression thickness of the breast can be determined accurately.

  5. Vascular structures for volumetric cooling and mechanical strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.-M.; Lorente, S.; Bejan, A.

    2010-02-01

    When solid material is removed in order to create flow channels in a load carrying structure, the strength of the structure decreases. On the other hand, a structure with channels is lighter and easier to transport as part of a vehicle. Here, we show that this trade off can be used for benefit, to design a vascular mechanical structure. When the total amount of solid is fixed and the sizes, shapes, and positions of the channels can vary, it is possible to morph the flow architecture such that it endows the mechanical structure with maximum strength. The result is a multifunctional structure that offers not only mechanical strength but also new capabilities necessary for volumetric functionalities such as self-healing and self-cooling. We illustrate the generation of such designs for strength and fluid flow for several classes of vasculatures: parallel channels, trees with one, two, and three bifurcation levels. The flow regime in every channel is laminar and fully developed. In each case, we found that it is possible to select not only the channel dimensions but also their positions such that the entire structure offers more strength and less flow resistance when the total volume (or weight) and the total channel volume are fixed. We show that the minimized peak stress is smaller when the channel volume (ϕ) is smaller and the vasculature is more complex, i.e., with more levels of bifurcation. Diminishing returns are reached in both directions, decreasing ϕ and increasing complexity. For example, when ϕ =0.02 the minimized peak stress of a design with one bifurcation level is only 0.2% greater than the peak stress in the optimized vascular design with two levels of bifurcation.

  6. A z gain nonuniformity correction for multislice volumetric CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Besson, G; Hu, H; Xie, M; He, D; Seidenschnur, G; Bromberg, N

    2000-05-01

    This paper presents a calibration and correction method for detector cell gain variations. A key functionality of current CT scanners is to offer variable slice thickness to the user. To provide this capability in multislice volumetric scanners, while minimizing costs, it is necessary to combine the signals of several detector cells in z, when the desired slice thickness is larger than the minimum provided by a single cell. These combined signals are then pre-amplified, digitized, and transmitted to the system for further processing. The process of combining the output of several detector cells with nonuniform gains can introduce numerical errors when the impinging x-ray signal presents a variation along z over the range of combined cells. These numerical errors, which by nature are scan dependent, can lead to artifacts in the reconstructed images, particularly when the numerical errors vary from channel-to-channel (as the filtered-backprojection filter includes a high-pass filtering along the channel direction, within a given slice). A projection data correction algorithm has been developed to subtract the associated numerical errors. It relies on the ability of calibrating the individual cell gains. For effectiveness and data flow reasons, the algorithm works on a single slice basis, without slice-to-slice exchange of information. An initial error vector is calculated by applying a high-pass filter to the projection data. The essence of the algorithm is to correlate that initial error vector, with a calibration vector obtained by applying the same high-pass filter to various z combinations of the cell gains (each combination representing a basis function for a z expansion). The solution of the least-square problem, obtained via singular value decomposition, gives the coefficients of a polynomial expansion of the signal z slope and curvature. From this information, and given the cell gains, the final error vector is calculated and subtracted from the projection

  7. Evaluation of the Malvern optical particle monitor. [Volumetric size distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R. J.; Johnson, E.

    1983-07-01

    The Malvern 2200/3300 Particle Sizer is a laser-based optical particle sizing device which utilizes the principle of Fraunhofer Diffraction as the means of particle size measurement. The instrument is designed to analyze particle sizes in the range of 1 to 1800 microns diameter through a selection of lenses for the receiving optics. It is not a single-particle counter but rather an ensemble averager over the distribution of particles present in the measuring volume. Through appropriate measurement techniques, the instrument can measure the volumetric size distribution of: solids in gas or liquid suspension; liquid droplets in gas or other immiscible liquids; and, gas bubbles in liquid. (Malvern Handbook, Version 1.5). This report details a limited laboratory evaluation of the Malvern system to determine its operational characteristics, limitations, and accuracy. This investigation focused on relatively small particles in the range of 5 to 150 microns. Primarily, well characterized particles of coal in a coal and water mixture were utilized, but a selection of naturally occurring, industrially generated, and standard samples (i.e., glass beads) wer also tested. The characteristic size parameter from the Malvern system for each of these samples was compared with the results of a Coulter particle counter (Model TA II) analysis to determine the size measurement accuracy. Most of the particulate samples were suspended in a liquid media (water or isoton, plus a dispersant) for the size characterization. Specifically, the investigations contained in this report fall into four categories: (a) Sample-to-lense distance and sample concentration studies, (b) studies testing the applicability to aerosols, (c) tests of the manufacturer supplied software, and (d) size measurement comparisons with the results of Coulter analysis. 5 references, 15 figures, 2 tables.

  8. Semiautomatic segmentation of liver metastases on volumetric CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Jiayong; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Zhao, Binsheng

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Accurate segmentation and quantification of liver metastases on CT images are critical to surgery/radiation treatment planning and therapy response assessment. To date, there are no reliable methods to perform such segmentation automatically. In this work, the authors present a method for semiautomatic delineation of liver metastases on contrast-enhanced volumetric CT images. Methods: The first step is to manually place a seed region-of-interest (ROI) in the lesion on an image. This ROI will (1) serve as an internal marker and (2) assist in automatically identifying an external marker. With these two markers, lesion contour on the image can be accurately delineated using traditional watershed transformation. Density information will then be extracted from the segmented 2D lesion and help determine the 3D connected object that is a candidate of the lesion volume. The authors have developed a robust strategy to automatically determine internal and external markers for marker-controlled watershed segmentation. By manually placing a seed region-of-interest in the lesion to be delineated on a reference image, the method can automatically determine dual threshold values to approximately separate the lesion from its surrounding structures and refine the thresholds from the segmented lesion for the accurate segmentation of the lesion volume. This method was applied to 69 liver metastases (1.1–10.3 cm in diameter) from a total of 15 patients. An independent radiologist manually delineated all lesions and the resultant lesion volumes served as the “gold standard” for validation of the method’s accuracy. Results: The algorithm received a median overlap, overestimation ratio, and underestimation ratio of 82.3%, 6.0%, and 11.5%, respectively, and a median average boundary distance of 1.2 mm. Conclusions: Preliminary results have shown that volumes of liver metastases on contrast-enhanced CT images can be accurately estimated by a semiautomatic segmentation

  9. Radiofrequency volumetric inferior turbinate reduction: long-term clinical results.

    PubMed

    De Corso, E; Bastanza, G; Di Donfrancesco, V; Guidi, M L; Morelli Sbarra, G; Passali, G C; Poscia, A; de Waure, C; Paludetti, G; Galli, J

    2016-06-01

    The aim of our study was to assess long-term results of radiofrequency volumetric tissue reduction of inferior turbinates (RVTR). We performed a prospective long-term longitudinal evaluation of 305 patients affected by rhinitis (114 allergic and 191 non-allergic) who were unresponsive to medical treatment and underwent RVTR (January 2004 - December 2010). Subjects were followed for a mean period of 39.70 ± 19.41 months (range 24-60). Patients completed the NOSE-scale questionnaire pre- and post-operatively after 1 month and yearly for 5-years. Recurrence was assumed if the post-operative total NOSE score increased by at least 75% during follow-up and the patient restarted medical treatments. Estimation of relapse over time was performed by Kaplan-Meyer analyses. We documented overall good satisfaction of patients regarding the procedure, with a good rate of pain control and a low rate of complications. Post-operatively there was a significant improvement in nasal stuffiness, nasal obstruction and mouth breathing (p < 0.05). We observed a worsening trend for symptoms after 36 months with progressive increasing rate of recurrences that were significantly higher in allergic than non-allergic patients (p < 0.05). We also observed a slight worsening trend of global satisfaction of patients. Our study confirms the minor discomfort and low risk of side effects of RVTR. Our data showed good efficacy of the procedure in the majority of patients for at least 36 months after surgery, and in fact in this time period the cumulative probability to remain relapse-free was up to 0.8. In the following 2 years, we observed a worse temporal trend in term of recurrence rate, and in particular in allergic patients with a significant difference vs non-allergic individuals (p < 0.05). PMID:27214831

  10. Volumetric characterization of interactions of glycine betaine with protein groups.

    PubMed

    Shek, Yuen Lai; Chalikian, Tigran V

    2011-10-01

    We report the partial molar volumes and adiabatic compressibilities of N-acetyl amino acid amides and oligoglycines at glycine betaine (GB) concentrations ranging from 0 to 4 M. We use these results to evaluate the volumetric contributions of amino acid side chains and the glycyl unit (-CH(2)CONH-) as a function of GB concentration. We analyze the resulting GB dependences within the framework of a statistical thermodynamic model and evaluate the equilibrium constant for the reaction in which a GB molecule binds each of the functionalities under study replacing four water molecules. We calculate the free energy of the transfer of functional groups from water to concentrated GB solutions, ΔG(tr), as the sum of a change in the free energy of cavity formation, ΔΔG(C), and the differential free energy of solute-solvent interactions, ΔΔG(I), in a concentrated GB solution and water. Our results suggest that the transfer free energy, ΔG(tr), results from a fine balance between the large ΔΔG(C) and ΔΔG(I) contributions. The range of the magnitudes and the shape of the GB dependence of ΔG(tr) depend on the identity of a specific solute group. The interplay between ΔΔG(C) and ΔΔG(I) results in pronounced maxima in the GB dependences of ΔG(tr) for the Val, Leu, Ile, Trp, Tyr, and Gln side chains as well as the glycyl unit. This observation is in qualitative agreement with the experimental maxima in the T(M)-versus-GB concentration plots reported for ribonuclease A and lysozyme.

  11. Reflection impulsivity in binge drinking: behavioural and volumetric correlates.

    PubMed

    Banca, Paula; Lange, Iris; Worbe, Yulia; Howell, Nicholas A; Irvine, Michael; Harrison, Neil A; Moutoussis, Michael; Voon, Valerie

    2016-03-01

    The degree to which an individual accumulates evidence prior to making a decision, also known as reflection impulsivity, can be affected in psychiatric disorders. Here, we study decisional impulsivity in binge drinkers, a group at elevated risk for developing alcohol use disorders, comparing two tasks assessing reflection impulsivity and a delay discounting task, hypothesizing impairments in both subtypes of impulsivity. We also assess volumetric correlates of reflection impulsivity focusing on regions previously implicated in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. Sixty binge drinkers and healthy volunteers were tested using two different information-gathering paradigms: the beads task and the Information Sampling Task (IST). The beads task was analysed using a behavioural approach and a Bayesian model of decision making. Delay discounting was assessed using the Monetary Choice Questionnaire. Regression analyses of primary outcomes were conducted with voxel-based morphometry analyses. Binge drinkers sought less evidence prior to decision in the beads task compared with healthy volunteers in both the behavioural and computational modelling analysis. There were no group differences in the IST or delay discounting task. Greater impulsivity as indexed by lower evidence accumulation in the beads task was associated with smaller dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and inferior parietal volumes. In contrast, greater impulsivity as indexed by lower evidence accumulation in the IST was associated with greater dorsal cingulate and precuneus volumes. Binge drinking is characterized by impaired reflection impulsivity suggesting a deficit in deciding on the basis of future outcomes that are more difficult to represent. These findings emphasize the role of possible therapeutic interventions targeting decision-making deficits.

  12. Reflection impulsivity in binge drinking: behavioural and volumetric correlates

    PubMed Central

    Banca, Paula; Lange, Iris; Worbe, Yulia; Howell, Nicholas A.; Irvine, Michael; Harrison, Neil A.; Moutoussis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The degree to which an individual accumulates evidence prior to making a decision, also known as reflection impulsivity, can be affected in psychiatric disorders. Here, we study decisional impulsivity in binge drinkers, a group at elevated risk for developing alcohol use disorders, comparing two tasks assessing reflection impulsivity and a delay discounting task, hypothesizing impairments in both subtypes of impulsivity. We also assess volumetric correlates of reflection impulsivity focusing on regions previously implicated in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. Sixty binge drinkers and healthy volunteers were tested using two different information‐gathering paradigms: the beads task and the Information Sampling Task (IST). The beads task was analysed using a behavioural approach and a Bayesian model of decision making. Delay discounting was assessed using the Monetary Choice Questionnaire. Regression analyses of primary outcomes were conducted with voxel‐based morphometry analyses. Binge drinkers sought less evidence prior to decision in the beads task compared with healthy volunteers in both the behavioural and computational modelling analysis. There were no group differences in the IST or delay discounting task. Greater impulsivity as indexed by lower evidence accumulation in the beads task was associated with smaller dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and inferior parietal volumes. In contrast, greater impulsivity as indexed by lower evidence accumulation in the IST was associated with greater dorsal cingulate and precuneus volumes. Binge drinking is characterized by impaired reflection impulsivity suggesting a deficit in deciding on the basis of future outcomes that are more difficult to represent. These findings emphasize the role of possible therapeutic interventions targeting decision‐making deficits. PMID:25678093

  13. Ultrafast treatment plan optimization for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Men Chunhua; Romeijn, H. Edwin; Jia Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel aperture-based algorithm for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plan optimization with high quality and high efficiency. Methods: The VMAT optimization problem is formulated as a large-scale convex programming problem solved by a column generation approach. The authors consider a cost function consisting two terms, the first enforcing a desired dose distribution and the second guaranteeing a smooth dose rate variation between successive gantry angles. A gantry rotation is discretized into 180 beam angles and for each beam angle, only one MLC aperture is allowed. The apertures are generated one by one in a sequential way. At each iteration of the column generation method, a deliverable MLC aperture is generated for one of the unoccupied beam angles by solving a subproblem with the consideration of MLC mechanic constraints. A subsequent master problem is then solved to determine the dose rate at all currently generated apertures by minimizing the cost function. When all 180 beam angles are occupied, the optimization completes, yielding a set of deliverable apertures and associated dose rates that produce a high quality plan. Results: The algorithm was preliminarily tested on five prostate and five head-and-neck clinical cases, each with one full gantry rotation without any couch/collimator rotations. High quality VMAT plans have been generated for all ten cases with extremely high efficiency. It takes only 5-8 min on CPU (MATLAB code on an Intel Xeon 2.27 GHz CPU) and 18-31 s on GPU (CUDA code on an NVIDIA Tesla C1060 GPU card) to generate such plans. Conclusions: The authors have developed an aperture-based VMAT optimization algorithm which can generate clinically deliverable high quality treatment plans at very high efficiency.

  14. Radiofrequency volumetric inferior turbinate reduction: long-term clinical results.

    PubMed

    De Corso, E; Bastanza, G; Di Donfrancesco, V; Guidi, M L; Morelli Sbarra, G; Passali, G C; Poscia, A; de Waure, C; Paludetti, G; Galli, J

    2016-06-01

    The aim of our study was to assess long-term results of radiofrequency volumetric tissue reduction of inferior turbinates (RVTR). We performed a prospective long-term longitudinal evaluation of 305 patients affected by rhinitis (114 allergic and 191 non-allergic) who were unresponsive to medical treatment and underwent RVTR (January 2004 - December 2010). Subjects were followed for a mean period of 39.70 ± 19.41 months (range 24-60). Patients completed the NOSE-scale questionnaire pre- and post-operatively after 1 month and yearly for 5-years. Recurrence was assumed if the post-operative total NOSE score increased by at least 75% during follow-up and the patient restarted medical treatments. Estimation of relapse over time was performed by Kaplan-Meyer analyses. We documented overall good satisfaction of patients regarding the procedure, with a good rate of pain control and a low rate of complications. Post-operatively there was a significant improvement in nasal stuffiness, nasal obstruction and mouth breathing (p < 0.05). We observed a worsening trend for symptoms after 36 months with progressive increasing rate of recurrences that were significantly higher in allergic than non-allergic patients (p < 0.05). We also observed a slight worsening trend of global satisfaction of patients. Our study confirms the minor discomfort and low risk of side effects of RVTR. Our data showed good efficacy of the procedure in the majority of patients for at least 36 months after surgery, and in fact in this time period the cumulative probability to remain relapse-free was up to 0.8. In the following 2 years, we observed a worse temporal trend in term of recurrence rate, and in particular in allergic patients with a significant difference vs non-allergic individuals (p < 0.05).

  15. Light-front view of the axial anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Chueng-Ryong |; Rey, Soo-Jong

    1995-07-01

    Motivated by an apparent puzzle of the light-front vacua incompatible with the axial anomaly, we have considered the two-dimensional massless Schwinger model for an arbitrary interpolating angle of the quantization surface. By examining spectral deformation of the Dirac sea under an external electric field semiclassically, we have found that the axial anomaly is quantization angle independent. This indicates an intricate nontrivial vacuum structure present even in the light-front limit.

  16. Axially astigmatic surfaces: different types and their properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malacara-Doblado, Daniel; Malacara-Hernandez, Daniel; Garcia-Marquez, Jorge L.

    1996-12-01

    Axially astigmatic surfaces have different curvatures in orthogonal diameters. Toroidal and spherocylindrical optical surfaces are two mathematically different special cases of axially astigmatic surfaces as noted by Menchaca and Malacara (1986), but they are almost identical in the vicinity of the optical axis. The different between these two surfaces increases when the distance to the optical axis increases. We study the general properties of astigmatic surfaces and some special interesting cases.

  17. Mapping AUV Survey of Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, H.; Caress, D.; Conlin, D.; Clague, D.; Paduan, J.; Butterfield, D.; Chadwick, W.; Tucker, P.

    2006-12-01

    In late August and early September 2006, the MBARI Mapping Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) was deployed for 5 missions on Axial Seamount during a NOAA NeMO cruise on the R/V Thompson. The objective of the survey was to determine the geologic history of the summit of Axial Seamount using high resolution multibeam, sidescan, and sub-bottom profiler data. The Mapping AUV is a torpedo-shaped, 6000 m rated vehicle designed and constructed by MBARI. The vehicle is equipped with a 200 kHz multibeam sonar, 110 kHz and 410 kHz chirp sidescan sonar, and a 2-16 kHz sweep chirp sub-bottom profiler. The multibeam provides a 120-degree swath with 0.94 degree by 0.94 degree beam resolution. The endurance of the AUV is eight hours at 3 knots. Navigation derives from an inertial navigation system (INS) incorporating a ring laser gyro aided by GPS at the surface and by velocity-over- ground observations from a Doppler velocity log (DVL) when within 130 m of the seafloor. A navigational precision of 0.05 percent of distance traveled is achieved with continuous DVL bottom lock. An acoustic modem allows surface aiding of navigation during deep descents. The AUV ran two types of missions: those on the rim of the caldera were run at 90 m altitude with a line spacing of 250 m and those on the caldera floor were run at 50 m altitude with a line spacing of 150 or 175 m. The surveys covered most of 1998 lava flow on the south rim of the caldera and northern part of the south rift zone, the southern region of the caldera floor where hydrothermal vents are common, the northeast rim of the caldera where volcaniclastic deposits related to caldera collapse drape the surface, the north rift zone, and the northern portion of the caldera floor. The low-altitude maps have a resolution of 1 m, so large individual lava pillars and hydrothermal chimneys can be seen, fissures stand out clearly, and the regions of collapsed lobate flows and lava channels are prominent. Many of the flows, including the

  18. Reactive control of subsonic axial fan noise in a duct.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Choy, Y S; Huang, L; Cheng, L

    2014-10-01

    Suppressing the ducted fan noise at low frequencies without varying the flow capacity is still a technical challenge. This study examines a conceived device consisting of two tensioned membranes backed with cavities housing the axial fan for suppression of the sound radiation from the axial fan directly. The noise suppression is achieved by destructive interference between the sound fields from the axial fan of a dipole nature and sound radiation from the membrane via vibroacoustics coupling. A two-dimensional model with the flow effect is presented which allows the performance of the device to be explored analytically. The air flow influences the symmetrical behavior and excites the odd in vacuo mode response of the membrane due to kinematic coupling. Such an asymmetrical effect can be compromised with off-center alignment of the axial fan. Tension plays an important role to sustain the performance to revoke the deformation of the membrane during the axial fan operation. With the design of four appropriately tensioned membranes covered by a cylindrical cavity, the first and second blade passage frequencies of the axial fan can be reduced by at least 20 dB. The satisfactory agreement between experiment and theory demonstrates that its feasibility is practical.

  19. Research on axial support technology of large aperture primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Hui

    2010-05-01

    In ground-based optical detection system, when large aperture primary mirror in a different pitch angle detection, the surface shape error of primary mirror is affected by its weight deformation, and the surface shape error of primary mirror is one of the key factors affecting imaging quality. The primary mirror support system, including axial support and radial support, and the axial support is main factor affecting the surface shape error of primary mirror, the position and number of axial support is very important for surface shape error of primary mirror. The support technology of Φ1.2m primary mirror was studied detailedly in this paper, the parameterized model of primary mirror was built based on ANSYS, the relationship between the surface shape error of primary mirror and the ratio of its diameter to thickness was analyzed, the axial support was optimized, and the support-ring number, support-ring radius and support point position of axial support were optimum designed. The result of analysis showed that the Root-Mean-Square (RMS) value of the surface shape error of primary mirror was 1.8 nm, when the primary mirror pointed to zenith, met to the design need of the optical system, and the axial support system was verified.

  20. Reactive control of subsonic axial fan noise in a duct.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Choy, Y S; Huang, L; Cheng, L

    2014-10-01

    Suppressing the ducted fan noise at low frequencies without varying the flow capacity is still a technical challenge. This study examines a conceived device consisting of two tensioned membranes backed with cavities housing the axial fan for suppression of the sound radiation from the axial fan directly. The noise suppression is achieved by destructive interference between the sound fields from the axial fan of a dipole nature and sound radiation from the membrane via vibroacoustics coupling. A two-dimensional model with the flow effect is presented which allows the performance of the device to be explored analytically. The air flow influences the symmetrical behavior and excites the odd in vacuo mode response of the membrane due to kinematic coupling. Such an asymmetrical effect can be compromised with off-center alignment of the axial fan. Tension plays an important role to sustain the performance to revoke the deformation of the membrane during the axial fan operation. With the design of four appropriately tensioned membranes covered by a cylindrical cavity, the first and second blade passage frequencies of the axial fan can be reduced by at least 20 dB. The satisfactory agreement between experiment and theory demonstrates that its feasibility is practical. PMID:25324066

  1. Volumetric calibration of multi-axis machine tools through parametric way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Abdul Wahid; Chen, Wuyi

    2008-12-01

    A methodology was implemented to evolve the volumetric errors of multiaxis machine tools through a parametric way. The volumetric error was calibrated and evaluated in the workspace arbitrarily by implementing parametric methods and techniques. In parametric method linear displacement errors and angular displacement errors were measured through a laser interferometer with combination of a newly developed three-line measuring method to measure the prismatic joints for efficient and quick error meterage. Besides these, squareness errors between the axes were also quantified by using reversal method. Volumetric accuracy portrayed the real error picture between the workpiece and cutting tool or end effectors or a measuring probe. So positional errors, straightness errors, angular errors and squareness errors were quantified and transformed into volumetric accuracy by using generalized homogenous transformation matrices, whereas forward kinematics technique was used as a tool. Measured results can be used to compensate the volumetric errors to achieve high precision in manufacturing and measurement through physical compensation, making correction, adjustment or improvement through software. Reported here is the volumetric accuracy results carried on a multi-axis CNC milling machine under controlled environmental conditions and as per the standard procedure and practice.

  2. Floating volumetric image formation using a dihedral corner reflector array device.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Daisuke; Hirano, Noboru; Maeda, Yuki; Yamamoto, Siori; Mukai, Takaaki; Maekawa, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    A volumetric display system using an optical imaging device consisting of numerous dihedral corner reflectors placed perpendicular to the surface of a metal plate is proposed. Image formation by the dihedral corner reflector array (DCRA) is free from distortion and focal length. In the proposed volumetric display system, a two-dimensional real image is moved by a mirror scanner to scan a three-dimensional (3D) space. Cross-sectional images of a 3D object are displayed in accordance with the position of the image plane. A volumetric image is observed as a stack of the cross-sectional images. The use of the DCRA brings compact system configuration and volumetric real image generation with very low distortion. An experimental volumetric display system including a DCRA, a galvanometer mirror, and a digital micro-mirror device was constructed to verify the proposed method. A volumetric image consisting of 1024×768×400 voxels was formed by the experimental system. PMID:23292404

  3. Combined correlation estimation of axial displacement in optical coherence elastography: assessment of axial displacement sensitivity performance relative to existing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimwood, A.; Messa, A.; Bamber, J. C.

    2015-03-01

    A combined correlation method is introduced to optical coherence elastography for axial displacement estimation. Its performance is compared with that of amplitude correlation tracking and phase shift estimation. Relative sensitivities to small (sub-micron), and large (pixel-scale) axial displacements are analysed for a Perspex test object and gelatine phantom. The combined correlation method exhibited good overall performance, with a larger dynamic range than phase shift estimation and higher sensitivity than amplitude correlation tracking.

  4. Long-Term Volumetric Eruption Rates and Magma Budgets

    SciTech Connect

    Scott M. White Dept. Geological Sciences University of South Carolina Columbia, SC 29208; Joy A. Crisp Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA 91109; Frank J. Spera Dept. Earth Science University of California, Santa Barbara Santa Barbara, CA 93106

    2005-01-01

    A global compilation of 170 time-averaged volumetric volcanic output rates (Qe) is evaluated in terms of composition and petrotectonic setting to advance the understanding of long-term rates of magma generation and eruption on Earth. Repose periods between successive eruptions at a given site and intrusive:extrusive ratios were compiled for selected volcanic centers where long-term (>104 years) data were available. More silicic compositions, rhyolites and andesites, have a more limited range of eruption rates than basalts. Even when high Qe values contributed by flood basalts (9 ± 2 Å~ 10-1 km3/yr) are removed, there is a trend in decreasing average Qe with lava composition from basaltic eruptions (2.6 ± 1.0 Å~ 10-2 km3/yr) to andesites (2.3 ± 0.8 Å~ 10-3 km3/yr) and rhyolites (4.0 ± 1.4 Å~ 10-3 km3/yr). This trend is also seen in the difference between oceanic and continental settings, as eruptions on oceanic crust tend to be predominately basaltic. All of the volcanoes occurring in oceanic settings fail to have statistically different mean Qe and have an overall average of 2.8 ± 0.4 Å~ 10-2 km3/yr, excluding flood basalts. Likewise, all of the volcanoes on continental crust also fail to have statistically different mean Qe and have an overall average of 4.4 ± 0.8 Å~ 10-3 km3/yr. Flood basalts also form a distinctive class with an average Qe nearly two orders of magnitude higher than any other class. However, we have found no systematic evidence linking increased intrusive:extrusive ratios with lower volcanic rates. A simple heat balance analysis suggests that the preponderance of volcanic systems must be open magmatic systems with respect to heat and matter transport in order to maintain eruptible magma at shallow depth throughout the observed lifetime of the volcano. The empirical upper limit of Å`10-2 km3/yr for magma eruption rate in systems with relatively high intrusive:extrusive ratios may be a consequence of the fundamental parameters

  5. Total Marrow Irradiation With RapidArc Volumetric Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Aydogan, Bulent; Yeginer, Mete; Kavak, Gulbin O.; Fan, John; Radosevich, James A.; Gwe-Ya, Kim

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To develop a volumetric arc therapy (VMAT)-total marrow irradiation (TMI) technique for patients with hematologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: VMAT planning was performed for 6 patients using RapidArc technology. The planning target volume consisted of all the bones in the body from the head to the mid-femur, excluding the extremities, except for the humerus, plus a 3.0-mm margin. The organs at risk included the lungs, heart, liver, kidneys, bowels, brain, eyes, and oral cavity. The VMAT-TMI technique consisted of three plans: the head and neck, the chest, and the pelvis, each with three 330{sup o} arcs. The plans were prescribed to ensure, at a minimum, 95% planning target volume dose coverage with the prescription dose (percentage of volume receiving dose of {>=}12 Gy was 95%). The treatments were delivered and verified using MapCheck and ion chamber measurements. Results: The VMAT-TMI technique reported in the present study provided comparable dose distributions with respect to the fixed gantry linear accelerator intensity-modulated TMI. RapidArc planning was less subjective and easier, and, most importantly, the delivery was more efficient. RapidArc reduced the treatment delivery time to approximately 18 min from 45 min with the fixed gantry linear accelerator intensity-modulated TMI. When the prescription dose coverage was reduced to 85% from 95% and the mandible and maxillary structures were not included in the planning target volume as reported in a tomotherapy study, a considerable organ at risk dose reduction of 4.2-51% was observed. The average median dose for the lungs and lenses was reduced to 5.6 Gy from 7.2 Gy and 2.4 Gy from 4.5 Gy, respectively. Conclusion: The RapidArc VMAT technique improved the treatment planning, dose conformality, and, most importantly, treatment delivery efficiency. The results from our study suggest that the RapidArc VMAT technology can be expected to facilitate the clinical transition of TMI.

  6. Choreographing Couch and Collimator in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yingli; Zhang Pengpeng; Happersett, Laura; Xiong Jianping; Yang Jie; Chan, Maria; Beal, Kathryn; Mageras, Gig; Hunt, Margie

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To design and optimize trajectory-based, noncoplanar subarcs for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) deliverable on both Varian TrueBEAM system and traditional accelerators; and to investigate their potential advantages for treating central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Methods and Materials: To guide the computerized selection of beam trajectories consisting of simultaneous couch, gantry, and collimator motion, a score function was implemented to estimate the geometric overlap between targets and organs at risk for each couch/gantry angle combination. An initial set of beam orientations is obtained as a function of couch and gantry angle, according to a minimum search of the score function excluding zones of collision. This set is grouped into multiple continuous and extended subarcs subject to mechanical limitations using a hierarchical clustering algorithm. After determination of couch/gantry trajectories, a principal component analysis finds the collimator angle at each beam orientation that minimizes residual target-organ at risk overlaps. An in-house VMAT optimization algorithm determines the optimal multileaf collimator position and monitor units for control points within each subarc. A retrospective study of 10 CNS patients compares the proposed method of VMAT trajectory with dynamic gantry, leaves, couch, and collimator motion (Tra-VMAT); a standard noncoplanar VMAT with no couch/collimator motion within subarcs (Std-VMAT); and noncoplanar intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans that were clinically used. Results: Tra-VMAT provided improved target dose conformality and lowered maximum dose to brainstem, optic nerves, and chiasm by 7.7%, 1.1%, 2.3%, and 1.7%, respectively, compared with Std-VMAT. Tra-VMAT provided higher planning target volume minimum dose and reduced maximum dose to chiasm, optic nerves, and cochlea by 6.2%, 1.3%, 6.3%, and 8.4%, respectively, and reduced cochlea mean dose by 8.7%, compared with IMRT. Tra-VMAT averaged

  7. Robust Radiomics feature quantification using semiautomatic volumetric segmentation.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Chintan; Rios Velazquez, Emmanuel; Leijenaar, Ralph; Jermoumi, Mohammed; Carvalho, Sara; Mak, Raymond H; Mitra, Sushmita; Shankar, B Uma; Kikinis, Ron; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Lambin, Philippe; Aerts, Hugo J W L

    2014-01-01

    Due to advances in the acquisition and analysis of medical imaging, it is currently possible to quantify the tumor phenotype. The emerging field of Radiomics addresses this issue by converting medical images into minable data by extracting a large number of quantitative imaging features. One of the main challenges of Radiomics is tumor segmentation. Where manual delineation is time consuming and prone to inter-observer variability, it has been shown that semi-automated approaches are fast and reduce inter-observer variability. In this study, a semiautomatic region growing volumetric segmentation algorithm, implemented in the free and publicly available 3D-Slicer platform, was investigated in terms of its robustness for quantitative imaging feature extraction. Fifty-six 3D-radiomic features, quantifying phenotypic differences based on tumor intensity, shape and texture, were extracted from the computed tomography images of twenty lung cancer patients. These radiomic features were derived from the 3D-tumor volumes defined by three independent observers twice using 3D-Slicer, and compared to manual slice-by-slice delineations of five independent physicians in terms of intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and feature range. Radiomic features extracted from 3D-Slicer segmentations had significantly higher reproducibility (ICC = 0.85±0.15, p = 0.0009) compared to the features extracted from the manual segmentations (ICC = 0.77±0.17). Furthermore, we found that features extracted from 3D-Slicer segmentations were more robust, as the range was significantly smaller across observers (p = 3.819e-07), and overlapping with the feature ranges extracted from manual contouring (boundary lower: p = 0.007, higher: p = 5.863e-06). Our results show that 3D-Slicer segmented tumor volumes provide a better alternative to the manual delineation for feature quantification, as they yield more reproducible imaging descriptors. Therefore, 3D-Slicer can be

  8. On the interpolation of volumetric water content in research catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlamini, Phesheya; Chaplot, Vincent

    Digital Soil Mapping (DSM) is widely used in the environmental sciences because of its accuracy and efficiency in producing soil maps compared to the traditional soil mapping. Numerous studies have investigated how the sampling density and the interpolation process of data points affect the prediction quality. While, the interpolation process is straight forward for primary attributes such as soil gravimetric water content (θg) and soil bulk density (ρb), the DSM of volumetric water content (θv), the product of θg by ρb, may either involve direct interpolations of θv (approach 1) or independent interpolation of ρb and θg data points and subsequent multiplication of ρb and θg maps (approach 2). The main objective of this study was to compare the accuracy of these two mapping approaches for θv. A 23 ha grassland catchment in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa was selected for this study. A total of 317 data points were randomly selected and sampled during the dry season in the topsoil (0-0.05 m) for θg by ρb estimation. Data points were interpolated following approaches 1 and 2, and using inverse distance weighting with 3 or 12 neighboring points (IDW3; IDW12), regular spline with tension (RST) and ordinary kriging (OK). Based on an independent validation set of 70 data points, OK was the best interpolator for ρb (mean absolute error, MAE of 0.081 g cm-3), while θg was best estimated using IDW12 (MAE = 1.697%) and θv by IDW3 (MAE = 1.814%). It was found that approach 1 underestimated θv. Approach 2 tended to overestimate θv, but reduced the prediction bias by an average of 37% and only improved the prediction accuracy by 1.3% compared to approach 1. Such a great benefit of approach 2 (i.e., the subsequent multiplication of interpolated maps of primary variables) was unexpected considering that a higher sampling density (∼14 data point ha-1 in the present study) tends to minimize the differences between interpolations techniques and approaches. In the

  9. Measurement-guided volumetric dose reconstruction for helical tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Stambaugh, Cassandra; Nelms, Benjamin; Wolf, Theresa; Mueller, Richard; Geurts, Mark; Opp, Daniel; Moros, Eduardo; Zhang, Geoffrey; Feygelman, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    12% (2% G/2). We conclude that TPDP is capable of volumetric dose reconstruction with acceptable accuracy. However, the challenges of fast tomotherapy delivery dynamics make TPDP less precise than the IMRT/VMAT PDP version, particularly for the 1 cm jaw setting. PMID:26103199

  10. Volumetric particle image velocimetry with a single plenoptic camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahringer, Timothy W.; Lynch, Kyle P.; Thurow, Brian S.

    2015-11-01

    A novel three-dimensional (3D), three-component (3C) particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique based on volume illumination and light field imaging with a single plenoptic camera is described. A plenoptic camera uses a densely packed microlens array mounted near a high resolution image sensor to sample the spatial and angular distribution of light collected by the camera. The multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) computed tomography algorithm is used to reconstruct a volumetric intensity field from individual snapshots and a cross-correlation algorithm is used to estimate the velocity field from a pair of reconstructed particle volumes. This work provides an introduction to the basic concepts of light field imaging with a plenoptic camera and describes the unique implementation of MART in the context of plenoptic image data for 3D/3C PIV measurements. Simulations of a plenoptic camera using geometric optics are used to generate synthetic plenoptic particle images, which are subsequently used to estimate the quality of particle volume reconstructions at various particle number densities. 3D reconstructions using this method produce reconstructed particles that are elongated by a factor of approximately 4 along the optical axis of the camera. A simulated 3D Gaussian vortex is used to test the capability of single camera plenoptic PIV to produce a 3D/3C vector field, where it was found that lateral displacements could be measured to approximately 0.2 voxel accuracy in the lateral direction and 1 voxel in the depth direction over a 300× 200× 200 voxel volume. The feasibility of the technique is demonstrated experimentally using a home-built plenoptic camera based on a 16-megapixel interline CCD camera and a 289× 193 array of microlenses and a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. 3D/3C measurements were performed in the wake of a low Reynolds number circular cylinder and compared with measurements made using a conventional 2D/2C PIV system. Overall, single camera

  11. Volumetric Forest Change Detection Through Vhr Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akca, Devrim; Stylianidis, Efstratios; Smagas, Konstantinos; Hofer, Martin; Poli, Daniela; Gruen, Armin; Sanchez Martin, Victor; Altan, Orhan; Walli, Andreas; Jimeno, Elisa; Garcia, Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    Quick and economical ways of detecting of planimetric and volumetric changes of forest areas are in high demand. A research platform, called FORSAT (A satellite processing platform for high resolution forest assessment), was developed for the extraction of 3D geometric information from VHR (very-high resolution) imagery from satellite optical sensors and automatic change detection. This 3D forest information solution was developed during a Eurostars project. FORSAT includes two main units. The first one is dedicated to the geometric and radiometric processing of satellite optical imagery and 2D/3D information extraction. This includes: image radiometric pre-processing, image and ground point measurement, improvement of geometric sensor orientation, quasiepipolar image generation for stereo measurements, digital surface model (DSM) extraction by using a precise and robust image matching approach specially designed for VHR satellite imagery, generation of orthoimages, and 3D measurements in single images using mono-plotting and in stereo images as well as triplets. FORSAT supports most of the VHR optically imagery commonly used for civil applications: IKONOS, OrbView - 3, SPOT - 5 HRS, SPOT - 5 HRG, QuickBird, GeoEye-1, WorldView-1/2, Pléiades 1A/1B, SPOT 6/7, and sensors of similar type to be expected in the future. The second unit of FORSAT is dedicated to 3D surface comparison for change detection. It allows users to import digital elevation models (DEMs), align them using an advanced 3D surface matching approach and calculate the 3D differences and volume changes between epochs. To this end our 3D surface matching method LS3D is being used. FORSAT is a single source and flexible forest information solution with a very competitive price/quality ratio, allowing expert and non-expert remote sensing users to monitor forests in three and four dimensions from VHR optical imagery for many forest information needs. The capacity and benefits of FORSAT have been tested in

  12. Dose verification for respiratory-gated volumetric modulated arc therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jianguo; Xing, Lei; Liu, Wu; Luxton, Gary

    2011-08-01

    A novel commercial medical linac system (TrueBeam™, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) allows respiratory-gated volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), a new modality for treating moving tumors with high precision and improved accuracy by allowing for regular motion associated with a patient's breathing during VMAT delivery. The purpose of this work is to adapt a previously-developed dose reconstruction technique to evaluate the fidelity of VMAT treatment during gated delivery under clinic-relevant periodic motion related to patient breathing. A Varian TrueBeam system was used in this study. VMAT plans were created for three patients with lung or pancreas tumors. Conventional 6 and 15 MV beams with flattening filter and high-dose-rate 10 MV beams with no flattening filter were used in these plans. Each patient plan was delivered to a phantom first without gating and then with gating for three simulated respiratory periods (3, 4.5 and 6 s). Using the adapted log-file-based dose reconstruction procedure supplemented with ion chamber array (Seven29™, PTW, Freiburg, Germany) measurements, the delivered dose was used to evaluate the fidelity of gated VMAT delivery. Comparison of Seven29 measurements with and without gating showed good agreement with gamma-index passing rates above 99% for 1%/1 mm dose accuracy/distance-to-agreement criteria. With original plans as reference, gamma-index passing rates were 100% for the reconstituted plans (1%/1 mm criteria) and 93.5-100% for gated Seven29 measurements (3%/3 mm criteria). In the presence of leaf error deliberately introduced into the gated delivery of a pancreas patient plan, both dose reconstruction and Seven29 measurement consistently indicated substantial dosimetric differences from the original plan. In summary, a dose reconstruction procedure was demonstrated for evaluating the accuracy of respiratory-gated VMAT delivery. This technique showed that under clinical operation, the TrueBeam system faithfully

  13. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Analysis of Aneurysm Volumetric Changes at Mid-Term Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Bargellini, Irene Cioni, Roberto; Petruzzi, Pasquale; Pratali, Alessandro; Napoli, Vinicio; Vignali, Claudio; Ferrari, Mauro; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2005-05-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the volumetric changes in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) after endovascular AAA repair (EVAR) in 24 months of follow-up. Methods. We evaluated the volume modifications in 63 consecutive patients after EVAR. All patients underwent strict duplex ultrasound and computed tomography angiography (CTA) follow-up; when complications were suspected, digital subtraction angiography was also performed. CTA datasets at 1, 6, 12, and 24 months were post-processed through semiautomatic segmentation, to isolate the aneurysmal sac and calculate its volume. Maximum transverse diameters (Dmax) were also obtained in the true axial plane, Presence and type of endoleak (EL) were recorded. A statistical analysis was performed to assess the degree of volume change, correlation with diameter modifications, and significance of the volume increase with respect to ELs. Results. Mean reconstruction time was 7 min. Mean volume reduction rates were 6.5%, 8%, and 9.6% at 6, 12, and 24 months follow-up, respectively. Mean Dmax reduction rates were 4.2%, 6.7%, and 12%; correlation with volumes was poor (r = 0.73-0.81). ELs were found in 19 patients and were more frequent (p = 0.04) in patients with higher preprocedural Dmax, The accuracies of volume changes in predicting ELs ranged between 74.6% and 84.1% and were higher than those of Dmax modifications. The strongest independent predictor of EL was a volume change at 6 months {<=}0.3% (p = 0.005), although 6 of 19 (32%) patients with EL showed no significant AAA enlargement, whereas in 6 of 44 (14%) patients without EL the aneurysm enlarged. Conclusion. The lack of volume decrease in the aneurysm of at least 0.3% at 6 months follow-up indicates the need for closer surveillance, and has a higher predictive accuracy for an endoleak than Dmax.

  14. Development and Testing of an Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has developed and tested a revolutionary Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing. The objective of this work is to develop a viable non-contact magnetic thrust bearing utilizing Halbach arrays for all-electric flight, and many other applications. This concept will help to reduce harmful emissions, reduce the Nation s dependence on fossil fuels and mitigate many of the concerns and limitations encountered in conventional axial bearings such as bearing wear, leaks, seals and friction loss. The Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing is inherently stable and requires no active feedback control system or superconductivity as required in many magnetic bearing designs. The Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing is useful for very high speed applications including turbines, instrumentation, medical systems, computer memory systems, and space power systems such as flywheels. Magnetic fields suspend and support a rotor assembly within a stator. Advanced technologies developed for particle accelerators, and currently under development for maglev trains and rocket launchers, served as the basis for this application. Experimental hardware was successfully designed and developed to validate the basic principles and analyses. The report concludes that the implementation of Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings can provide significant improvements in rotational system performance and reliability.

  15. Dynamics of intrinsic axial flows in unsheared, uniform magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. C.; Diamond, P. H.; Xu, X. Q.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-05-01

    A simple model for the generation and amplification of intrinsic axial flow in a linear device, controlled shear decorrelation experiment, is proposed. This model proposes and builds upon a novel dynamical symmetry breaking mechanism, using a simple theory of drift wave turbulence in the presence of axial flow shear. This mechanism does not require complex magnetic field structure, such as shear, and thus is also applicable to intrinsic rotation generation in tokamaks at weak or zero magnetic shear, as well as to linear devices. This mechanism is essentially the self-amplification of the mean axial flow profile, i.e., a modulational instability. Hence, the flow development is a form of negative viscosity phenomenon. Unlike conventional mechanisms where the residual stress produces an intrinsic torque, in this dynamical symmetry breaking scheme, the residual stress induces a negative increment to the ambient turbulent viscosity. The axial flow shear is then amplified by this negative viscosity increment. The resulting mean axial flow profile is calculated and discussed by analogy with the problem of turbulent pipe flow. For tokamaks, the negative viscosity is not needed to generate intrinsic rotation. However, toroidal rotation profile gradient is enhanced by the negative increment in turbulent viscosity.

  16. The window of opportunity: a relevant concept for axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Philip C; Brown, Matthew A

    2014-01-01

    The window of opportunity is a concept critical to rheumatoid arthritis treatment. Early treatment changes the outcome of rheumatoid arthritis treatment, in that response rates are higher with earlier disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug treatment and damage is substantially reduced. Axial spondyloarthritis is an inflammatory axial disease encompassing both nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis and established ankylosing spondylitis. In axial spondyloarthritis, studies of magnetic resonance imaging as well as tumor necrosis factor inhibitor treatment and withdrawal studies all suggest that early effective suppression of inflammation has the potential to reduce radiographic damage. This potential would suggest that the concept of a window of opportunity is relevant not only to rheumatoid arthritis but also to axial spondyloarthritis. The challenge now remains to identify high-risk patients early and to commence treatment without delay. Developments in risk stratification include new classification criteria, identification of clinical risk factors, biomarkers, genetic associations, potential antibody associations and an ankylosing spondylitis-specific microbiome signature. Further research needs to focus on the evidence for early intervention and the early identification of high-risk individuals.

  17. Trunk axial rotation in baseball pitching and batting.

    PubMed

    Fleisig, Glenn S; Hsu, Wellington K; Fortenbaugh, Dave; Cordover, Andrew; Press, Joel M

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify trunk axial rotation and angular acceleration in pitching and batting of elite baseball players. Healthy professional baseball pitchers (n = 40) and batters (n = 40) were studied. Reflective markers attached to each athlete were tracked at 240 Hz with an eight-camera automated digitizing system. Trunk axial rotation was computed as the angle between the pelvis and the upper trunk in the transverse plane. Trunk angular acceleration was the second derivative of axial rotation. Maximum trunk axial rotation (55 +/- 6 degrees) and angular acceleration (11,600 +/- 3,100 degrees/s2) in pitching occurred before ball release, approximately at the instant the front foot landed. Maximum trunk axial rotation (46 +/- 9 degrees) and angular acceleration (7,200 +/- 2,800 degrees/s2) in batting occurred in the follow-through after ball contact. Thus, the most demanding instant for the trunk and spine was near front foot contact for pitching and after ball contact for batting. PMID:24466645

  18. Axially staggered seed-blanket reactor fuel module construction

    DOEpatents

    Cowell, Gary K.; DiGuiseppe, Carl P.

    1985-01-01

    A heterogeneous nuclear reactor of the seed-blanket type is provided wher the fissile (seed) and fertile (blanket) nuclear fuels are segregated axially within each fuel element such that fissile and fertile regions occur in an alternating pattern along the length of the fuel element. Further, different axial stacking patterns are used for the fuel elements of at least two module types such that when modules of different types are positioned adjacent to one another, the fertile regions of the modules are offset or staggered. Thus, when a module of one type is surrounded by modules of the second type the fertile regions thereof will be surrounded on all sides by fissile material. This provides enhanced neutron communication both radially and axially, thereby resulting in greater power oscillation stability than other axial arrangements. The arrangements of the fissile and fertile regions in an alternating axial manner minimizes the radial power peaking factors and provides a more optional thermal-hydraulic design than is afforded by radial arrangements.

  19. Trunk axial rotation in baseball pitching and batting.

    PubMed

    Fleisig, Glenn S; Hsu, Wellington K; Fortenbaugh, Dave; Cordover, Andrew; Press, Joel M

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify trunk axial rotation and angular acceleration in pitching and batting of elite baseball players. Healthy professional baseball pitchers (n = 40) and batters (n = 40) were studied. Reflective markers attached to each athlete were tracked at 240 Hz with an eight-camera automated digitizing system. Trunk axial rotation was computed as the angle between the pelvis and the upper trunk in the transverse plane. Trunk angular acceleration was the second derivative of axial rotation. Maximum trunk axial rotation (55 +/- 6 degrees) and angular acceleration (11,600 +/- 3,100 degrees/s2) in pitching occurred before ball release, approximately at the instant the front foot landed. Maximum trunk axial rotation (46 +/- 9 degrees) and angular acceleration (7,200 +/- 2,800 degrees/s2) in batting occurred in the follow-through after ball contact. Thus, the most demanding instant for the trunk and spine was near front foot contact for pitching and after ball contact for batting.

  20. Stationary axially symmetric solutions in Brans-Dicke theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirezli, Pınar; Delice, Özgür

    2015-11-01

    Stationary, axially symmetric Brans-Dicke-Maxwell solutions are reexamined in the framework of the Brans-Dicke (BD) theory. We see that, employing a particular parametrization of the standard axially symmetric metric simplifies the procedure of obtaining the Ernst equations for axially symmetric electrovacuum spacetimes for this theory. This analysis also permits us to construct a two parameter extension in both Jordan and Einstein frames of an old solution generating technique frequently used to construct axially symmetric solutions for BD theory from a seed solution of general relativity. As applications of this technique, several known and new solutions are constructed including a general axially symmetric BD-Maxwell solution of Plebanski-Demianski with vanishing cosmological constant, i.e., the Kinnersley solution and general magnetized Kerr-Newman-type solutions. Some physical properties and the circular motion of test particles for a particular subclass of Kinnersley solution, i.e., a Kerr-Newman-NUT-type solution for BD theory, are also investigated in some detail.

  1. An Axial-Vector Photon in a Mirror World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharafiddinov, Rasulkhozha S.

    2016-03-01

    The unity of symmetry laws emphasizes, in the case of a mirror CP-even Dirac Lagrangian, the ideas of the left- and right-handed axial-vector photons referring to long- and short-lived bosons of true neutrality, respectively. Such a difference in lifetimes expresses the unidenticality of masses, energies and momenta of axial-vector photons of the different components. They define the unified field theory equation of C-odd particles with an integral spin. Together with a new equation of a theory of truly neutral particles with the half-integral spin, the latter reflects the availability in their nature of the second type of the local axial-vector gauge transformation responsible for origination in the Lagrangian of C-oddity of an interaction Newton component giving an axial-vector mass to all the interacting particles and fields. The mirror axial-vector mass, energy and momentum operators constitute a CP-invariant equation of quantum mechanics, confirming that each of them can individually influence on matter field. Thereby, findings suggest at the level of the mass-charge structure of gauge invariance a new equation for the C-noninvariant Lagrangian.

  2. Comparison of Computed Tomography Scout Based Reference Point Localization to Conventional Film and Axial Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Lan; Templeton, Alistair; Turian, Julius; Kirk, Michael; Zusag, Thomas; Chu, James C.H.

    2011-01-01

    Identification of source positions after implantation is an important step in brachytherapy planning. Reconstruction is traditionally performed from films taken by conventional simulators, but these are gradually being replaced in the clinic by computed tomography (CT) simulators. The present study explored the use of a scout image-based reconstruction algorithm that replaces the use of traditional film, while exhibiting low sensitivity to metal-induced artifacts that can appear in 3D CT methods. In addition, the accuracy of an in-house graphical software implementation of scout-based reconstruction was compared with seed location reconstructions for 2 phantoms by conventional simulator and CT measurements. One phantom was constructed using a planar fixed grid of 1.5-mm diameter ball bearings (BBs) with 40-mm spacing. The second was a Fletcher-Suit applicator embedded in Styrofoam (Dow Chemical Co., Midland, MI) with one 3.2-mm-diameter BB inserted into each of 6 surrounding holes. Conventional simulator, kilovoltage CT (kVCT), megavoltage CT, and scout-based methods were evaluated by their ability to calculate the distance between seeds (40 mm for the fixed grid, 30-120 mm in Fletcher-Suit). All methods were able to reconstruct the fixed grid distances with an average deviation of <1%. The worst single deviations (approximately 6%) were exhibited in the 2 volumetric CT methods. In the Fletcher-Suit phantom, the intermodality agreement was within approximately 3%, with the conventional sim measuring marginally larger distances, with kVCT the smallest. All of the established reconstruction methods exhibited similar abilities to detect the distances between BBs. The 3D CT-based methods, with lower axial resolution, showed more variation, particularly with the smaller BBs. With a software implementation, scout-based reconstruction is an appealing approach because it simplifies data acquisition over film-based reconstruction without requiring any specialized equipment

  3. Comparison of computed tomography scout based reference point localization to conventional film and axial computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lan; Templeton, Alistair; Turian, Julius; Kirk, Michael; Zusag, Thomas; Chu, James C H

    2011-01-01

    Identification of source positions after implantation is an important step in brachytherapy planning. Reconstruction is traditionally performed from films taken by conventional simulators, but these are gradually being replaced in the clinic by computed tomography (CT) simulators. The present study explored the use of a scout image-based reconstruction algorithm that replaces the use of traditional film, while exhibiting low sensitivity to metal-induced artifacts that can appear in 3D CT methods. In addition, the accuracy of an in-house graphical software implementation of scout-based reconstruction was compared with seed location reconstructions for 2 phantoms by conventional simulator and CT measurements. One phantom was constructed using a planar fixed grid of 1.5-mm diameter ball bearings (BBs) with 40-mm spacing. The second was a Fletcher-Suit applicator embedded in Styrofoam (Dow Chemical Co., Midland, MI) with one 3.2-mm-diameter BB inserted into each of 6 surrounding holes. Conventional simulator, kilovoltage CT (kVCT), megavoltage CT, and scout-based methods were evaluated by their ability to calculate the distance between seeds (40 mm for the fixed grid, 30-120 mm in Fletcher-Suit). All methods were able to reconstruct the fixed grid distances with an average deviation of <1%. The worst single deviations (approximately 6%) were exhibited in the 2 volumetric CT methods. In the Fletcher-Suit phantom, the intermodality agreement was within approximately 3%, with the conventional sim measuring marginally larger distances, with kVCT the smallest. All of the established reconstruction methods exhibited similar abilities to detect the distances between BBs. The 3D CT-based methods, with lower axial resolution, showed more variation, particularly with the smaller BBs. With a software implementation, scout-based reconstruction is an appealing approach because it simplifies data acquisition over film-based reconstruction without requiring any specialized equipment

  4. Current issues on 3D volumetric positioning accuracy: measurement, compensation, and definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.

    2008-10-01

    Traditionally, manufacturers have ensured part accuracy by linear calibration of each machine tool axis. The conventional definition of the 3-D volumetric positioning error is the root mean square of the three-axis displacement error. 20 years ago, the dominate error is the lead screw pitch error of 3 axes. This definition is adequate. However, now the machine accuracy has been improved with better lead screw, linear encoder and compensation, the dominate errors become the squareness errors and straightness errors. Hence the above definition is inadequate. During the past years, the industry has seen demand emerge for the "volumetric accuracy" specification on machine tools. One hurdle remains: a standard definition so that everyone measures volumetric accuracy with the same yardstick. The issue has been discussed in many Standards Committees, machine tool builders and the metrology community. Reported here are, a new 3D volumetric positioning error measurement and compensation technique, proposed definitions or measures of 3 D volumetric positioning errors of a CNC machine tool, and its verification.

  5. Effect of cup inclination on predicted contact stress-induced volumetric wear in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Rijavec, B; Košak, R; Daniel, M; Kralj-Iglič, V; Dolinar, D

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the lifetime of the total hip endoprosthesis, it is necessary to understand mechanisms leading to its failure. In this work, we address volumetric wear of the artificial cup, in particular the effect of its inclination with respect to the vertical. Volumetric wear was calculated by using mathematical models for resultant hip force, contact stress and penetration of the prosthesis head into the cup. Relevance of the dependence of volumetric wear on inclination of the cup (its abduction angle ϑA) was assessed by the results of 95 hips with implanted endoprosthesis. Geometrical parameters obtained from standard antero-posterior radiographs were taken as input data. Volumetric wear decreases with increasing cup abduction angle ϑA. The correlation within the population of 95 hips was statistically significant (P = 0.006). Large cup abduction angle minimises predicted volumetric wear but may increase the risk for dislocation of the artificial head from the cup in the one-legged stance. Cup abduction angle and direction of the resultant hip force may compensate each other to achieve optimal position of the cup with respect to wear and dislocation in the one-legged stance for a particular patient.

  6. Three-Dimensional Photon Counting Imaging with Axially Distributed Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Myungjin; Javidi, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we review three-dimensional (3D) photon counting imaging with axially distributed sensing. Under severely photon-starved conditions, we have proposed various imaging and algorithmic approaches to reconstruct a scene in 3D, which are not possible by using conventional imaging system due to lack of sufficient number of photons. In this paper, we present an overview of optical sensing and imaging system along with dedicated algorithms for reconstructing 3D scenes by photon counting axially distributed sensing, which may be implemented by moving a single image sensor along its optical axis. To visualize the 3D image, statistical estimation methods and computational reconstruction of axially distributed sensing is applied. PMID:27483262

  7. Ball Screw Actuator Including an Axial Soft Stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Forrest, Steven Talbert (Inventor); Abel, Steve (Inventor); Woessner, George (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An actuator includes an actuator housing, a ball screw, and an axial soft stop assembly. The ball screw extends through the actuator housing and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw is coupled to receive a drive force and is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively move in a retract direction and an extend direction. The axial soft stop assembly is disposed within the actuator housing. The axial soft stop assembly is configured to be selectively engaged by the ball screw and, upon being engaged thereby, to translate, with compliance, a predetermined distance in the extend direction, and to prevent further movement of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  8. Investigation of Aluminum-Copper Tube Hydroforming with Axial Feeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parto D., M.; Seyedkashi, S. M. H.; Liaghat, Gh.; Naeini, H. Moslemi; Panahizadeh R., V.

    2011-01-01

    Hydroforming of a two-layered Aluminum-Copper tube is investigated numerically and experimentally. Pressure is applied through a nonlinear path along with symmetrical axial feeding. ABAQUS/Explicit commercial code is used for finite element simulation of the process. ASTM C11000 Copper alloy is used as inner layer and ASTM AA1050A Aluminum alloy is used as outer layer. The simulation results show that the part can be successfully formed under internal pressure of 40 MPa with 8 mm axial displacement. Stress distributions on both inner and outer tubes are compared and maximum thinning on their wall is also discussed. Different friction conditions are applied on the process using different coefficients of friction and their effects are investigated on thinning percentage of inner and outer tubes and also on axial feeding. It is observed that finite element results are in good agreement with experimental results.

  9. Linear optical response of carbon nanotubes under axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradian, Rostam; Chegel, Raad; Behzad, Somayeh

    2010-04-01

    We considered single walled carbon naotubes (SWCNTs) as real three dimensional (3D) systems in a cylindrical coordinate. The optical matrix elements and linear susceptibility, χ(ω), in the tight binding approximation in terms of one-dimensional wave vector, kz and subband index, l are calculated. In an external axial magnetic field optical frequency dependence of linear susceptibility are investigated. We found that axial magnetic field has two effects on the imaginary part of the linear susceptibility spectrum, in agreement with experimental results. The first effect is broadening and the second, splitting. Also we found that for all metallic zigzag and armchair SWCNTs, the axial magnetic field leads to the creation of a peak with energy less than 1.5 eV, contrary to what is observed in the absence of a magnetic field.

  10. Compressive failure of fiber composites under multi-axial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Shiladitya; Waas, Anthony M.; Ambur, Damodar R.

    2006-03-01

    This paper examines the compressive strength of a fiber reinforced lamina under multi-axial stress states. An equilibrium analysis is carried out in which a kinked band of rotated fibers, described by two angles, is sandwiched between two regions in which the fibers are nominally straight. Proportional multi-axial stress states are examined. The analysis includes the possibility of bifurcation from the current equilibrium state. The compressive strength of the lamina is contingent upon either attaining a load maximum in the equilibrium response or satisfaction of a bifurcation condition, whichever occurs first. The results show that for uniaxial loading a non-zero kink band angle β produces the minimum limit load. For multi-axial loading, different proportional loading paths show regimes of bifurcation dominated and limit load dominated behavior. The present results are able to capture the beneficial effect of transverse compression in raising the composite compressive strength as observed in experiments.

  11. Role of environmental factors in axial skeletal dysmorphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Peter G; Tuan, Rocky S

    2010-06-01

    Approximately 1 in 1000 live births is afflicted with an axial skeletal defect. Although many of the known human teratogens can produce axial skeletal defects, the etiology of over half of the observed defects is unknown. The high morbidity associated with these defects demands that we continue to elucidate the mechanisms of axial skeletal teratogens. Advances in cell and molecular biology with respect to normal development and somitogenesis and the pathogenesis and mechanisms of teratogenesis are occurring at a tremendous rate. This allows teratologists and developmental toxicologists the opportunity to revisit old problems with new tools to elucidate common mechanisms between various environmental insults and discover novel targets that aid in the understanding of normal and pathogenic development of the spine.

  12. Effect of Gravity on Axial Development of Vertical Bubbly Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kazuya Abe; Yoshinori Hirose; Tatsuya Hazuku; Tomoji Takamasa; Takashi Hibiki

    2006-07-01

    In relation to the development of the interfacial area transport equation, axial developments of void fraction profile, bubble number density, interfacial area concentration and Sauter mean diameter of adiabatic nitrogen-water bubbly flows in a 9 mm-diameter pipe were measured by using a Stereo Image-processing Method under normal- and micro-gravity environment. The flow measurements were performed at four axial locations (axial distance from the inlet normalized by the pipe diameter = 5, 20, 40 and 60) under various flow conditions of superficial gas velocity (0.00823-0.0303 m/s) and superficial liquid velocity (0.138-0.915 m/s). The interfacial area transport mechanism under microgravity environment was discussed in detail based on the obtained data and the visual observation. These data can be used for the development of reliable constitutive relations which reflect the rigorous transfer mechanisms in two-phase flow under microgravity environment. (authors)

  13. Electrons Confined with an Axially Symmetric Magnetic Mirror Field

    SciTech Connect

    Higaki, H.; Ito, K.; Kira, K.; Okamoto, H.

    2008-08-08

    Low energy non-neutral electron plasmas were confined with an axially symmetric magnetic mirror field and an electrostatic potential to investigate the basic confinement properties of a simple magnetic mirror trap. As expected the confinement time became longer as a function of the mirror ratio. The axial electrostatic oscillations of a confined electron plasma were also observed. Obtained results suggested an improved scheme to accumulate low energy charged particles with the use of a magnetic mirror field, which would enable the investigation of electron-positron plasmas.

  14. Reflective correctors for the Hubble Space Telescope axial instruments.

    PubMed

    Bottema, M

    1993-04-01

    Reflective correctors to compensate the spherical aberration in the Hubble Space Telescope are placed in front of three of the axial scientific instruments (a camera and two spectrographs) during the first scheduled refurbishment mission. The five correctors required are deployed from a new module that replaces the fourth axial instrument. Each corrector consists of a field mirror and an aspherical, aberration-correcting reimaging mirror. In the camera the angular resolution capability is restored, be it in reduced fields, and in the spectrographs the potential for observations in crowded areas is regained along with effective light collection at the slits.

  15. Fatigue life prediction in bending from axial fatigue information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, S. S.; Muralidharan, U.

    1982-01-01

    Bending fatigue in the low cyclic life range differs from axial fatigue due to the plastic flow which alters the linear stress-strain relation normally used to determine the nominal stresses. An approach is presented to take into account the plastic flow in calculating nominal bending stress (S sub bending) based on true surface stress. These functions are derived in closed form for rectangular and circular cross sections. The nominal bending stress and the axial fatigue stress are plotted as a function of life (N sub S) and these curves are shown for several materials of engineering interest.

  16. NASA Low-speed Axial Compressor for Fundamental Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserbauer, Charles A.; Weaver, Harold F.; Senyitko, Richard G.

    1995-01-01

    A low-speed multistage axial compressor built by the NASA Lewis Research Center is described. The purpose of this compressor is to increase the understanding of the complex flow phenomena within multistage axial compressors and to obtain detailed data from a multistage compressor environment for use in developing and verifying models for computational fluid dynamic code assessment. The compressor has extensive pressure instrumentation in both stationary and rotating frames of reference, and has provisions for flow visualization and laser velocimetry. The compressor will accommodate rotational speeds to 1050 rpm and is rated at a pressure ratio of 1.042.

  17. Ultrahigh volumetric capacitance and cyclic stability of fluorine and nitrogen co-doped carbon microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Junshuang; Lian, Jie; Hou, Li; Zhang, Junchuan; Gou, Huiyang; Xia, Meirong; Zhao, Yufeng; Strobel, Timothy A.; Tao, Lu; Gao, Faming

    2015-01-01

    Highly porous nanostructures with large surface areas are typically employed for electrical double-layer capacitors to improve gravimetric energy storage capacity; however, high surface area carbon-based electrodes result in poor volumetric capacitance because of the low packing density of porous materials. Here, we demonstrate ultrahigh volumetric capacitance of 521 F cm−3 in aqueous electrolytes for non-porous carbon microsphere electrodes co-doped with fluorine and nitrogen synthesized by low-temperature solvothermal route, rivaling expensive RuO2 or MnO2 pseudo-capacitors. The new electrodes also exhibit excellent cyclic stability without capacitance loss after 10,000 cycles in both acidic and basic electrolytes at a high charge current of 5 A g−1. This work provides a new approach for designing high-performance electrodes with exceptional volumetric capacitance with high mass loadings and charge rates for long-lived electrochemical energy storage systems. PMID:26415838

  18. The effect of volumetric (3D) tactile symbols within inclusive tactile maps.

    PubMed

    Gual, Jaume; Puyuelo, Marina; Lloveras, Joaquim

    2015-05-01

    Point, linear and areal elements, which are two-dimensional and of a graphic nature, are the morphological elements employed when designing tactile maps and symbols for visually impaired users. However, beyond the two-dimensional domain, there is a fourth group of elements - volumetric elements - which mapmakers do not take sufficiently into account when it comes to designing tactile maps and symbols. This study analyses the effect of including volumetric, or 3D, symbols within a tactile map. In order to do so, the researchers compared two tactile maps. One of them uses only two-dimensional elements and is produced using thermoforming, one of the most popular systems in this field, while the other includes volumetric symbols, thus highlighting the possibilities opened up by 3D printing, a new area of production. The results of the study show that including 3D symbols improves the efficiency and autonomous use of these products. PMID:25683526

  19. Measurement of in vivo cerebral volumetric strain induced by the Valsalva maneuver.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Seyed Reza; Fehlner, Andreas; Streitberger, Kaspar-Josche; Braun, Jürgen; Samani, Abbas; Sack, Ingolf

    2014-05-01

    Compressibility of biological tissues such as brain parenchyma is related to its poroelastic nature characterized by the geometry and pressure of vasculature and interconnected fluid-filled spaces. Thus, cerebral volumetric strain may be sensitive to intracranial pressure which can be altered under physiological conditions. So far volumetric strain has attained little attention in studies of the mechanical behavior of the brain. This paper reports a study of measuring the in vivo cerebral volumetric strain induced by the Valsalva maneuver (VM) where forced expiration against a closed glottis leads to a transient increase in the intracranial pressure. For this purpose we applied three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging equipped with a patient-controlled acquisition system to five healthy volunteers. With each volunteer, three experiments were performed: one with VM and two in resting state. i.e. normal ventilation, which were conducted before and after VM. The VM data were registered to reference data by morphology based non-rigid deformation, yielding 3D maps of total displacements and volumetric strain. On average, VM induced volumetric strain correlated to whole-brain dilatation of -3.14±0.87% and -2.80±0.71% compared to the reference states before and after VM, respectively. These values were well reproduced by repetitive experiments during the same scan as well as by repeated measurements in one volunteer on different days. Combined with literature data of intracranial pressure changes, our volumetric strain values can be used to elucidate the static compression modulus of the in vivo human brain. These results add knowledge to the understanding of the brain׳s biomechanical properties under physiological conditions.

  20. Thermomagnetic writing into magnetophotonic microcavities controlling thermal diffusion for volumetric magnetic holography.

    PubMed

    Isogai, Ryosuke; Nakamura, Yuichi; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Goto, Taichi; Lim, Pang Boey; Inoue, Mitsuteru

    2016-01-11

    Holographic memory is expected to become a high-capacity data storage. Magnetic volumetric holograms are rewritable holograms that are recorded as magnetization directions through thermomagnetic recording. However, the effective depth of magnetic holograms is limited by thermal diffusion that causes merging of magnetic fringes. In this study, we propose the insertion of heat-sink layers (HSLs) for retaining well-defined magnetic fringes during volumetric writing. Magnetophotonic microcavity media were used for demonstrating the HSL effect, and the structural design principle was established in numerical calculations. The results indicate that deep and clear magnetic fringes and an improvement in the diffraction efficiency can be achieved by the insertion of HSLs.

  1. Compressed porous graphene particles for use as supercapacitor electrodes with excellent volumetric performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan; Tao, Ying; Zheng, Xiaoyu; Li, Zhengjie; Liu, Donghai; Xu, Zhao; Luo, Chong; Luo, Jiayan; Kang, Feiyu; Yang, Quan-Hong

    2015-11-28

    This work presents a new class of porous graphene particles with a three-dimensional microscale network and an ultrahigh specific surface area (2590 m(2) g(-1)), which is obtained by the KOH activation of a compact graphene hydrogel. As supercapacitor electrodes, such porous graphene particles show high compressibility and little capacitance loss when subjected to a compressive force up to 40 MPa, yielding an excellent volumetric performance with an ionic liquid electrolyte. Such carbon materials show great promise for applications needing high volumetric energy. PMID:26508470

  2. Transparent colloid containing upconverting nanocrystals: an alternative medium for three-dimensional volumetric display.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Dong, Guoping; Qiao, Yanbo; Qiu, Jianrong

    2008-12-01

    We report an alternative medium of transparent upconverting colloid containing lanthanide ion doped NaYF(4) nanocrystals for three-dimensional (3D) volumetric display. The colloids exhibit tunable upconversion luminescence with a wide spectrum of colors by adjusting the doping concentrations of the nanocrystals and the compositions of the colloids. Our preliminary experimental result indicates that an upconverting colloid-based 3D volumetric display using a convergent near infrared laser beam to induce a localized luminescent spot near the focus is technically feasible. Therefore arbitrary 3D objects can be created inside the upconverting colloid by use of computer controlled 3D scanning systems.

  3. Application of automated MRI volumetric measurement techniques to the ventricular system in schizophrenics and normal controls.

    PubMed

    Shenton, M E; Kikinis, R; McCarley, R W; Metcalf, D; Tieman, J; Jolesz, F A

    1991-09-01

    As an initial approach to computer-automated segmentation of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) vs. brain parenchyma in MR scans, and the transformation of these data sets into volumetric information and 3D display, we examined the ventricular system in a sample of ten chronic schizophrenics with primarily positive symptoms and 12 normal subjects. While no significant differences were noted between groups on volumetric measures of ventricular brain ratio or lateral ventricle size, normals showed a pattern of left greater than right lateral ventricular volume asymmetry not present in the schizophrenics. Within the schizophrenic group, departure from the normal left greater than right pattern was highly correlated with thought disorder.

  4. MEMS implementation of axial and follower end forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Abhyudai; Mukherjee, Ranjan; Turner, Kimberly; Shaw, Steven

    2005-09-01

    Although it is challenging to implement follower forces in macroscale laboratory experiments, they can be implemented fairly easily in MEMS devices. This paper discusses the implementation of follower and axial end forces in a beam-type MEMS resonator for the application of resonant frequency tuning.

  5. Nonlinear vibration of axially moving membrane by finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivurova, H.; Pramila, A.

    A theoretical and numerical formulation for nonlinear axially moving membrane is presented. The model is based on a Lagrangian description of the continuum problem in the context of dynamics of initially stressed solids. Membrane elasticity is included via a finite strain model and the membrane transport speed is included by using conservation of the membrane mass. Hamilton's principle provides nonlinear equations, which describe the three-dimensional motion of the membrane. The incremental equations of Hamilton's principle are discretized by the finite element method. The formulation includes geometrically nonlinear effects: large displacements, variation of membrane tension and variations in axial velocity due to deformation. Implementation of this novel numerical model was done by adding an axially moving membrane element into a FEM program, which contains acoustic fluid elements and contact algorithms. Hence, analysis of problems containing interaction with the surrounding air field and contact between supporting structures was possible. The model was tested by comparing previous linear and present nonlinear dynamic behaviour of an axially moving web. The effects of contact between finite rolls and the membrane and interaction between the surrounding air and the membrane were included in the model. The results show, that nonlinearities and coupling phenomena have a considerable effect on the dynamic behaviour of the system.

  6. Sliding mode control of an FRC plasma axial position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Jesus Antonio; TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    We study the problem of controlling the position of an axially unstable FRC configuration by acting on discrete voltage levels applied to radial field coil actuators. Due to the discrete, on/off nature of the actuators, the control problem is treated using sliding mode control theory. In sliding mode control, we don't usually design the controllers (usually based on a hystheresis type control logic), but find instead a function of system states (sliding surface) that will act as the error signal with the desired asymptotically stable (sliding) behavior. A simplified rigid plasma model for axial position including perturbations is developed and used to derive a suitable sliding surface for the system. The asymptotic stability of this surface is demonstrated using Liapunov theory, and is shown to be fairly insensitive to plant parameter values. The result is that the proposed control can be used for both axially stable or unstable plasmas without the need to re-tune the parameters used in the sliding surface. This property is important because the equilibrium may have to transit between an axially stable and unstable equilibria on different phases of the FRC discharge. Numerical simulations show the robustness of the control scheme against plant uncertainties and perturbations.

  7. Investigation of axial bearings with lever-operated equalization system

    SciTech Connect

    Zaretskii, E.I.; Serezhkina, L.P.; Tomkov, Yu.P.

    1983-01-01

    The authors describe the operation of lever-operated systems of an axial bearing which automatically equalizes the load on the pads when the fulcrum of the lower levers are moved out into the plane of conjugation of the upper levers with the lower levers.

  8. Hydrostatic self-aligning axial/torsional mechanism

    DOEpatents

    O'Connor, Daniel G.; Gerth, Howard L.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a self-aligning axial/torsional loading mechanism for testing the strength of brittle materials which are sensitive to bending moments. Disposed inside said self-aligning loading mechanism is a frictionless hydrostatic ball joint with a flexure ring to accommodate torsional loads through said ball joint.

  9. Proceedings of the Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA) Science Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    2003-06-01

    This report presents proceedings of the Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA) Science Workshop, held February 10-11 in Palo Alto, California. Twenty-two papers were presented on various aspects of AOA by utilities, EPRI Robust Fuel Program contractors, staff from EPRI and universities, international researchers, and equipment vendors.

  10. Novel axially disubstituted non-aggregated silicon phthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bıyıklıoğlu, Zekeriya; Çakır, Dilek

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes the synthesis, spectroscopic characterization of a range of new axially-disubstituted silicon phthalocyanines with 2-[2-(dimethylamino)ethoxy] or 2-[2-(1,4,7,10,13-pentaoxa-16-azacyclooctadecan-16-yl)ethoxy] groups as axial ligands. 2-[2-(Dimethylamino)ethoxy]ethanol 2, 2-[2-(1,4,7,10,13-pentaoxa-16-azacyclooctadecan-16-yl)ethoxy]ethanol 4 are reacted with silicon phthalocyanine 1, to give an axially-disubstituted silicon phthalocyanines 3 and 5. Axially-disubstituted silicon phthalocyanine complexes were synthesized at the first time. Newly synthesized silicon phthalocyanines were characterized by UV-Vis, IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR spectroscopy, ESI mass spectrometry. These new silicon(IV) phthalocyanines 3 and 5 showed excellent solubility in organic solvents such as CHCl3, CH2Cl2, acetone, DMF, DMSO, THF, EtOAc. The aggregation behavior of these compounds were investigated in different concentrations of DMSO. The effect of solvents on absorption spectra were studied in various organic solvents. The thermal stabilities of the silicon(IV) phthalocyanines 3 and 5 were determined by thermogravimetric analysis.

  11. A survey of unclassified axial-flow-compressor literature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzig, Howard Z; Hansen, Arthur G

    1955-01-01

    A survey of unclassified axial-flow-compressor literature is presented in the form of brief reviews of the methods, results, and conclusions of selected reports. The reports are organized into several main categories with subdivisions, and frequent references are made within the individual reviews to pertinent material elsewhere in the survey.

  12. Novel axially disubstituted non-aggregated silicon phthalocyanines.

    PubMed

    Bıyıklıoğlu, Zekeriya; Cakır, Dilek

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes the synthesis, spectroscopic characterization of a range of new axially-disubstituted silicon phthalocyanines with 2-[2-(dimethylamino)ethoxy] or 2-[2-(1,4,7,10,13-pentaoxa-16-azacyclooctadecan-16-yl)ethoxy] groups as axial ligands. 2-[2-(Dimethylamino)ethoxy]ethanol 2, 2-[2-(1,4,7,10,13-pentaoxa-16-azacyclooctadecan-16-yl)ethoxy]ethanol 4 are reacted with silicon phthalocyanine 1, to give an axially-disubstituted silicon phthalocyanines 3 and 5. Axially-disubstituted silicon phthalocyanine complexes were synthesized at the first time. Newly synthesized silicon phthalocyanines were characterized by UV-Vis, IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR spectroscopy, ESI mass spectrometry. These new silicon(IV) phthalocyanines 3 and 5 showed excellent solubility in organic solvents such as CHCl(3), CH(2)Cl(2), acetone, DMF, DMSO, THF, EtOAc. The aggregation behavior of these compounds were investigated in different concentrations of DMSO. The effect of solvents on absorption spectra were studied in various organic solvents. The thermal stabilities of the silicon(IV) phthalocyanines 3 and 5 were determined by thermogravimetric analysis.

  13. Time-multiplexed chromatic-controlled axial diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-García, Antonio

    2010-07-01

    Programmable diffractive optical elements (DOEs) with axial response have many interesting applications, including diffractive lenses, axicons, and optical tweezers. In all these cases, it is essential to properly select the modulation configuration of the spatial light modulator (SLM) where the DOE is displayed, in order to avoid the undiffracted zero order component that appears on axis and overlaps the desired axial response. However, in general, the chromatic dispersion in liquid crystal SLMs prevents the cancellation of the zero order for a broadband light source, thus limiting the possibilities for polychromatic programmable axial DOEs. We operate a ferroelectric liquid crystal on silicon display with polychromatic illumination and with a specific polarization configuration that provides binary π-phase modulation for all wavelengths. Since this type of modulation cancels the undiffracted zero order, we use this SLM to display DOEs with axial response. Moreover, chromatic control is achieved by time-multiplexing sequences of properly scaled DOEs with the corresponding selection of the input wavelength by means of an electronically controlled color-filter wheel. The presented experimental results include wavelength-controlled diffraction gratings, axicons, and vortex-producing lenses.

  14. Perturbation approximation for orbits in axially symmetric funnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauenberg, Michael

    2014-11-01

    A perturbation method that can be traced back to Isaac Newton is applied to obtain approximate analytic solutions for objects sliding in axially symmetric funnels in near circular orbits. Some experimental observations are presented for balls rolling in inverted cones with different opening angles, and in a funnel with a hyperbolic surface that approximately simulates the gravitational force.

  15. Elevated temperature axial and torsional fatigue behavior of Haynes 188

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    1992-06-01

    The results of high-temperature axial and torsional low-cycle fatigue experiments performed on Haynes 188, a wrought cobalt-base superalloy, are reported. Fatigue tests were performed at 760 C in air on thin-walled tubular specimens at various ranges under strain control. Data are also presented for coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, and shear modulus at various temperatures from room to 1000 C, and monotonic and cyclic stress-strain curves in tension and in shear at 760 C. The data set is used to evaluate several multiaxial fatigue life models (most were originally developed for room temperature multiaxial life prediction) including von Mises equivalent strain range (ASME boiler and pressure vessel code), Manson-Halford, Modified Multiaxiality Factor (proposed here), Modified Smith-Watson-Topper, and Fatemi-Socie-Kurath. At von Mises equivalent strain ranges (the torsional strain range divided by the square root of 3, taking the Poisson's ratio to be 0.5), torsionally strained specimens lasted, on average, factors of 2 to 3 times longer than axially strained specimens. The Modified Multiaxiality Factor approach shows promise as a useful method of estimating torsional fatigue life from axial fatigue data at high temperatures. Several difficulties arose with the specimen geometry and extensometry used in these experiments. Cracking at extensometer probe indentations was a problem at smaller strain ranges. Also, as the largest axial and torsional strain range fatigue tests neared completion, a small amount of specimen buckling was observed.

  16. 13. Axial view to south through truss span. In addition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Axial view to south through truss span. In addition to repaired vertical compression members visible on upstream (right) side and new sway bracing overhead, note also spliced diagonal tension member on downstream (left) side. - Stanislaus River Bridge, Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway at Stanislaus River, Riverbank, Stanislaus County, CA

  17. Cyclone reactor with internal separation and axial recirculation

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Frederick E.; Smolensky, Leo A.

    1989-01-01

    A cyclone combustor apparatus contains a circular partition plate containing a central circular aperture. The partition plate divides the apparatus into a cylindrical precombustor chamber and a combustor chamber. A coal-water slurry is passed axially into the inlet end of the precombustor chamber, and primary air is passed tangentially into said chamber to establish a cyclonic air flow. Combustion products pass through the partition plate aperture and into the combustor chamber. Secondary air may also be passed tangentially into the combustor chamber adjacent the partition plate to maintain the cyclonic flow. Flue gas is passed axially out of the combustor chamber at the outlet end and ash is withdrawn tangentially from the combuston chamber at the outlet end. A first mixture of flue gas and ash may be tangentially withdrawn from the combustor chamber at the outlet end and recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber with the coal-water slurry. A second mixture of flue gas and ash may be tangentially withdrawn from the outlet end of the combustor chamber and passed to a heat exchanger for cooling. Cooled second mixture is then recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber. In another embodiment a single cyclone combustor chamber is provided with both the recirculation streams of the first mixture and the second mixture.

  18. Cyclone reactor with internal separation and axial recirculation

    DOEpatents

    Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A.

    1988-07-19

    A cyclone combustor apparatus contains a circular partition plate containing a central circular aperture is described. The partition plate divides the apparatus into a cylindrical precombustor chamber and a combustor chamber. A coal-water slurry is passed axially into the inlet end of the precombustor chamber, and primary air is passed tangentially into said chamber to establish a cyclonic air flow. Combustion products pass through the partition plate aperture and into the combustor chamber. Secondary air may also be passed tangentially into the combustor chamber adjacent the partition plate to maintain the cyclonic flow. Flue gas is passed axially out of the combustor chamber at the outlet end and ash is withdrawn tangentially from the combustor chamber at the outlet end. A first mixture of flue gas and ash may be tangentially withdrawn from the combustor chamber at the outlet end and recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber with the coal-water slurry. A second mixture may be tangentially withdrawn from the outlet end and passed to a heat exchanger for cooling. Cooled second mixture is then recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber. In another embodiment a single cyclone combustor chamber is provided with both the recirculation streams of the first mixture and the second mixture. 10 figs.

  19. Axial drive to nonlinear flow between rotating cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafi, Nariman; Hazbavi, Abbas

    2014-02-01

    Stability of pseudoplastic rotational flow between cylinders in presence of an independent axial component is investigated. The fluid is assumed to follow the Carreau model and mixed boundary conditions are imposed. The conservation of mass and momentum equations give rise to a four-dimensional low-order dynamical system, including additional nonlinear terms in the velocity components originated from the shear-dependent viscosity. In absence of the axial flow, as the pseudoplasticity effects increases, the purely-azimuthal base flow loses its stability to the vortex structure at a lower critical Taylor number. Emergence of the vortices corresponds to the onset of a supercritical bifurcation also present in the flow of a linear fluid. However, unlike the Newtonian case, pseudoplastic Taylor vortices lose their stability as the Taylor number reaches a second critical number corresponding to the onset of a Hopf bifurcation. Existence of an axial flow induced by a pressure gradient appears to further advance each critical point on the bifurcation diagram. In continuation, complete flow field together with viscosity maps is analyzed for different flow scenarios. Through evaluation of the Lyapunov exponent, flow stability and temporal behavior of the system for cases with and without axial flow are brought to attention.

  20. Suspending Insoluble Solids Waste Tanks with Shrouded Axial Impeller Mixers

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.R.

    1998-11-09

    The Savannah River Site is in the process of removing waste (sludge and salt cake) from million gallon waste tanks. The authors are conducted a test program to determine mixer requirements for suspending sludge heels using shrouded axial impeller mixers. The authors will present and discuss the data generated during the tests.

  1. 10. Detail, axial view of underfloor of one of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Detail, axial view of underfloor of one of the western 1929 approach spans of Bridge Number 210.52, view to west, 135mm lens. Visible are bottom chords, diagonal bottom laterals, longitudinal stringers, and transverse floor beams. - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 210.52, Milepost 210.52, Tehama, Tehama County, CA

  2. Modifications to Axially Symmetric Simulations Using New DSMC (2007) Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.

    2008-01-01

    Several modifications aimed at improving physical accuracy are proposed for solving axially symmetric problems building on the DSMC (2007) algorithms introduced by Bird. Originally developed to solve nonequilibrium, rarefied flows, the DSMC method is now regularly used to solve complex problems over a wide range of Knudsen numbers. These new algorithms include features such as nearest neighbor collisions excluding the previous collision partners, separate collision and sampling cells, automatically adaptive variable time steps, a modified no-time counter procedure for collisions, and discontinuous and event-driven physical processes. Axially symmetric solutions require radial weighting for the simulated molecules since the molecules near the axis represent fewer real molecules than those farther away from the axis due to the difference in volume of the cells. In the present methodology, these radial weighting factors are continuous, linear functions that vary with the radial position of each simulated molecule. It is shown that how one defines the number of tentative collisions greatly influences the mean collision time near the axis. The method by which the grid is treated for axially symmetric problems also plays an important role near the axis, especially for scalar pressure. A new method to treat how the molecules are traced through the grid is proposed to alleviate the decrease in scalar pressure at the axis near the surface. Also, a modification to the duplication buffer is proposed to vary the duplicated molecular velocities while retaining the molecular kinetic energy and axially symmetric nature of the problem.

  3. 247. Axial Parkway alignment along ridge top. Note the open ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    247. Axial Parkway alignment along ridge top. Note the open vistas to either side of the roadway. These are maintained through vegetation management. The wood guide rail is a primary safety feature. View is to the northeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  4. Elevated temperature axial and torsional fatigue behavior of Haynes 188

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    1995-01-01

    The results are reported for high-temperature axial and torsional low-cycle fatigue experiments performed at 760 C in air on thin-walled tubular specimens of Haynes 188, a wrought cobalt-based superalloy. Data are also presented for mean coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, and shear modulus at various temperatures from room to 1000 C, and monotonic and cyclic stress-strain curves in tension and in shear at 760 C. This data set is used to evaluate several multiaxial fatigue life models (most were originally developed for room temperature multiaxial life prediction) including von Mises equivalent strain range (ASME Boiler and Pressure Code), Manson-Halford, modified multiaxiality factor (proposed in this paper), modified Smith-Watson-Topper, and Fatemi-Socie-Kurath. At von Mises equivalent strain ranges (the torsional strain range divided by the square root of 3, taking the Poisson's ratio to be 0.5), torsionally strained specimens lasted, on average, factors of 2 to 3 times longer than axially strained specimens. The modified multiaxiality factor approach shows promise as a useful method of estimating torsional fatigue life from axial fatigue data at high temperatures. Several difficulties arose with the specimen geometry and extensometry used in these experiments. Cracking at extensometer probe indentations was a problem at smaller strain ranges. Also, as the largest axial and torsional strain range fatigue tests neared completion, a small amount of specimen buckling was observed.

  5. Elevated temperature axial and torsional fatigue behavior of Haynes 188

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    1992-01-01

    The results of high-temperature axial and torsional low-cycle fatigue experiments performed on Haynes 188, a wrought cobalt-base superalloy, are reported. Fatigue tests were performed at 760 C in air on thin-walled tubular specimens at various ranges under strain control. Data are also presented for coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, and shear modulus at various temperatures from room to 1000 C, and monotonic and cyclic stress-strain curves in tension and in shear at 760 C. The data set is used to evaluate several multiaxial fatigue life models (most were originally developed for room temperature multiaxial life prediction) including von Mises equivalent strain range (ASME boiler and pressure vessel code), Manson-Halford, Modified Multiaxiality Factor (proposed here), Modified Smith-Watson-Topper, and Fatemi-Socie-Kurath. At von Mises equivalent strain ranges (the torsional strain range divided by the square root of 3, taking the Poisson's ratio to be 0.5), torsionally strained specimens lasted, on average, factors of 2 to 3 times longer than axially strained specimens. The Modified Multiaxiality Factor approach shows promise as a useful method of estimating torsional fatigue life from axial fatigue data at high temperatures. Several difficulties arose with the specimen geometry and extensometry used in these experiments. Cracking at extensometer probe indentations was a problem at smaller strain ranges. Also, as the largest axial and torsional strain range fatigue tests neared completion, a small amount of specimen buckling was observed.

  6. High-resolution axial MR imaging of tibial stress injuries

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relative involvement of tibial stress injuries using high-resolution axial MR imaging and the correlation with MR and radiographic images. Methods A total of 33 patients with exercise-induced tibial pain were evaluated. All patients underwent radiograph and high-resolution axial MR imaging. Radiographs were taken at initial presentation and 4 weeks later. High-resolution MR axial images were obtained using a microscopy surface coil with 60 × 60 mm field of view on a 1.5T MR unit. All images were evaluated for abnormal signals of the periosteum, cortex and bone marrow. Results Nineteen patients showed no periosteal reaction at initial and follow-up radiographs. MR imaging showed abnormal signals in the periosteal tissue and partially abnormal signals in the bone marrow. In 7 patients, periosteal reaction was not seen at initial radiograph, but was detected at follow-up radiograph. MR imaging showed abnormal signals in the periosteal tissue and entire bone marrow. Abnormal signals in the cortex were found in 6 patients. The remaining 7 showed periosteal reactions at initial radiograph. MR imaging showed abnormal signals in the periosteal tissue in 6 patients. Abnormal signals were seen in the partial and entire bone marrow in 4 and 3 patients, respectively. Conclusions Bone marrow abnormalities in high-resolution axial MR imaging were related to periosteal reactions at follow-up radiograph. Bone marrow abnormalities might predict later periosteal reactions, suggesting shin splints or stress fractures. High-resolution axial MR imaging is useful in early discrimination of tibial stress injuries. PMID:22574840

  7. Volumetrics relate to the development of depression after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Maller, Jerome J; Thomson, Richard H S; Pannek, Kerstin; Bailey, Neil; Lewis, Philip M; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2014-09-01

    Previous research suggests that many people who sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI), even of the mild form, will develop major depression (MD). We previously reported white matter integrity differences between those who did and did not develop MD after mild TBI. In this current paper, we aimed to investigate whether there were also volumetric differences between these groups, as suggested by previous volumetric studies in mild TBI populations. A sample of TBI-with-MD subjects (N=14), TBI-without-MD subjects (N=12), MD-without-TBI (N=26) and control subjects (no TBI or MD, N=23), received structural MRI brain scans. T1-weighted data were analysed using the Freesurfer software package which produces automated volumetric results. The findings of this study indicate that (1) TBI patients who develop MD have reduced volume in temporal, parietal and lingual regions compared to TBI patients who do not develop MD, and (2) MD patients with a history of TBI have decreased volume in the temporal region compared to those who had MD but without a history of TBI. We also found that more severe MD in those with TBI-with-MD significantly correlated with reduced volume in anterior cingulate, temporal lobe and insula. These findings suggest that volumetric reduction to specific regions, including parietal, temporal and occipital lobes, after a mild TBI may underlie the susceptibility of these patients developing major depression, in addition to altered white matter integrity. PMID:24886777

  8. Altering the volumetric expansion ratio of a Lysholm helical screw expander

    SciTech Connect

    Dunbar, M.K.

    1984-01-01

    This is an analysis of the effects of the volumetric expansion ratio on the operation of a Lysholm helical screw expander. Extensive testing of the University of California Lysholm engine with a 5.3 volumetric expansion ratio was performed. In this experiment, the expansion ratio has been reduced from 5.3 to 4.0. Tests were performed at a variety of speeds and qualities for a 5.0 pressure ratio and at a variety of speeds and pressure ratios for 99 percent quality. It was predicted that decreasing the volumetric expansion ratio would decrease the leakage fraction and thereby increase efficiency. This occurred as predicted. Isentropic efficiency increased 20 percent for 50 percent quality steam and 16 percent for 33 percent quality steam, all for an inlet pressure of 120 psia and a speed of 9000 rpm. A maximum efficiency of 47.2 percent was reached at 33 percent quality, 9000 rpm and a pressure ratio of 5.0. It was noted that the leakage rate did not appear to be a function of expansion ratio, as had been expected. Using this fact the previous empirical models of the engine were extended to include volumetric expansion ratio as a variable parameter.

  9. Controlling the volumetric parameters of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube cups.

    PubMed

    Allen, Brett L; Keddie, Matthew B; Star, Alexander

    2010-07-01

    Analogous to multiwalled carbon nanotubes, nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube cups (NCNCs) have been synthesized with defined volumetric parameters (diameter and segment lengths) by controlling the catalyst particle size and the concentration of nitrogen precursor utilized in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction, allowing for tailored interior cavity space of cross-linked NCNCs, i.e. nanocapsules.

  10. Evocation of Functional and Volumetric Gestural Knowledge by Objects and Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bub, Daniel N.; Masson, Michael E. J.; Cree, George S.

    2008-01-01

    We distinguish between grasping gestures associated with using an object for its intended purpose (functional) and those used to pick up an object (volumetric) and we develop a novel experimental framework to show that both kinds of knowledge are automatically evoked by objects and by words denoting those objects. Cued gestures were carried out in…

  11. Optical Addressing of Multi-Colour Photochromic Material Mixture for Volumetric Display.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Ryuji; Shiraki, Atsushi; Naruse, Makoto; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Kakue, Takashi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2016-01-01

    This is the first study to demonstrate that colour transformations in the volume of a photochromic material (PM) are induced at the intersections of two control light channels, one controlling PM colouration and the other controlling decolouration. Thus, PM colouration is induced by position selectivity, and therefore, a dynamic volumetric display may be realised using these two control lights. Moreover, a mixture of multiple PM types with different absorption properties exhibits different colours depending on the control light spectrum. Particularly, the spectrum management of the control light allows colour-selective colouration besides position selectivity. Therefore, a PM-based, full-colour volumetric display is realised. We experimentally construct a mixture of two PM types and validate the operating principles of such a volumetric display system. Our system is constructed simply by mixing multiple PM types; therefore, the display hardware structure is extremely simple, and the minimum size of a volume element can be as small as the size of a molecule. Volumetric displays can provide natural three-dimensional (3D) perception; therefore, the potential uses of our system include high-definition 3D visualisation for medical applications, architectural design, human-computer interactions, advertising, and entertainment. PMID:27526780

  12. Daily Megavoltage Computed Tomography in Lung Cancer Radiotherapy: Correlation Between Volumetric Changes and Local Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Bral, Samuel; De Ridder, Mark; Duchateau, Michael; Gevaert, Thierry; Engels, Benedikt; Schallier, Denis; Storme, Guy

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the predictive or comparative value of volumetric changes, measured on daily megavoltage computed tomography during radiotherapy for lung cancer. Patients and Methods: We included 80 patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy. The radiotherapy was combined with concurrent chemotherapy, combined with induction chemotherapy, or given as primary treatment. Patients entered two parallel studies with moderately hypofractionated radiotherapy. Tumor volume contouring was done on the daily acquired images. A regression coefficient was derived from the volumetric changes on megavoltage computed tomography, and its predictive value was validated. Logarithmic or polynomial fits were applied to the intratreatment changes to compare the different treatment schedules radiobiologically. Results: Regardless of the treatment type, a high regression coefficient during radiotherapy predicted for a significantly prolonged cause-specific local progression free-survival (p = 0.05). Significant differences were found in the response during radiotherapy. The significant difference in volumetric treatment response between radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy plus induction chemotherapy translated to a superior long-term local progression-free survival for concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.03). An enhancement ratio of 1.3 was measured for the used platinum/taxane doublet in comparison with radiotherapy alone. Conclusion: Contouring on daily megavoltage computed tomography images during radiotherapy enabled us to predict the efficacy of a given treatment. The significant differences in volumetric response between treatment strategies makes it a possible tool for future schedule comparison.

  13. Optical Addressing of Multi-Colour Photochromic Material Mixture for Volumetric Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Ryuji; Shiraki, Atsushi; Naruse, Makoto; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Kakue, Takashi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2016-08-01

    This is the first study to demonstrate that colour transformations in the volume of a photochromic material (PM) are induced at the intersections of two control light channels, one controlling PM colouration and the other controlling decolouration. Thus, PM colouration is induced by position selectivity, and therefore, a dynamic volumetric display may be realised using these two control lights. Moreover, a mixture of multiple PM types with different absorption properties exhibits different colours depending on the control light spectrum. Particularly, the spectrum management of the control light allows colour-selective colouration besides position selectivity. Therefore, a PM-based, full-colour volumetric display is realised. We experimentally construct a mixture of two PM types and validate the operating principles of such a volumetric display system. Our system is constructed simply by mixing multiple PM types; therefore, the display hardware structure is extremely simple, and the minimum size of a volume element can be as small as the size of a molecule. Volumetric displays can provide natural three-dimensional (3D) perception; therefore, the potential uses of our system include high-definition 3D visualisation for medical applications, architectural design, human–computer interactions, advertising, and entertainment.

  14. Trapping volumetric measurement by multidetector CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Effect of CT threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaohua; Yuan, Huishu; Duan, Jianghui; Du, Yipeng; Shen, Ning; He, Bei

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various computed tomography (CT) thresholds on trapping volumetric measurements by multidetector CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).Methods: Twenty-three COPD patients were scanned with a 64-slice CT scanner in both the inspiratory and expiratory phase. CT thresholds of −950 Hu in inspiration and −950 to −890 Hu in expiration were used, after which trapping volumetric measurements were made using computer software. Trapping volume percentage (Vtrap%) under the different CT thresholds in the expiratory phase and below −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase was compared and correlated with lung function.Results: Mean Vtrap% was similar under −930 Hu in the expiratory phase and below −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase, being 13.18 ± 9.66 and 13.95 ± 6.72 (both lungs), respectively; this difference was not significant (P= 0.240). Vtrap% under −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase and below the −950 to −890 Hu threshold in the expiratory phase was moderately negatively correlated with the ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity and the measured value of forced expiratory volume in one second as a percentage of the predicted value.Conclusions: Trapping volumetric measurement with multidetector CT is a promising method for the quantification of COPD. It is important to know the effect of various CT thresholds on trapping volumetric measurements.

  15. Empirical correlation of volumetric mass transfer coefficient for a rectangular internal-loop airlift bioreactor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An empirical correlation of volumetric mass transfer coefficient was developed for a pilot scale internal-loop rectangular airlift bioreactor that was designed for biotechnology. The empirical correlation combines classic turbulence theory, Kolmogorov’s isotropic turbulence theory with Higbie’s pen...

  16. Nonlocal transform-domain filter for volumetric data denoising and reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Maggioni, Matteo; Katkovnik, Vladimir; Egiazarian, Karen; Foi, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    We present an extension of the BM3D filter to volumetric data. The proposed algorithm, BM4D, implements the grouping and collaborative filtering paradigm, where mutually similar d-dimensional patches are stacked together in a (d+1)-dimensional array and jointly filtered in transform domain. While in BM3D the basic data patches are blocks of pixels, in BM4D we utilize cubes of voxels, which are stacked into a 4-D "group." The 4-D transform applied on the group simultaneously exploits the local correlation present among voxels in each cube and the nonlocal correlation between the corresponding voxels of different cubes. Thus, the spectrum of the group is highly sparse, leading to very effective separation of signal and noise through coefficient shrinkage. After inverse transformation, we obtain estimates of each grouped cube, which are then adaptively aggregated at their original locations. We evaluate the algorithm on denoising of volumetric data corrupted by Gaussian and Rician noise, as well as on reconstruction of volumetric phantom data with non-zero phase from noisy and incomplete Fourier-domain (k-space) measurements. Experimental results demonstrate the state-of-the-art denoising performance of BM4D, and its effectiveness when exploited as a regularizer in volumetric data reconstruction. PMID:22868570

  17. High Volumetric Capacity Three-Dimensionally Sphere-Caged Secondary Battery Anodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinyun; Chen, Xi; Kim, Jinwoo; Zheng, Qiye; Ning, Hailong; Sun, Pengcheng; Huang, Xingjiu; Liu, Jinhuai; Niu, Junjie; Braun, Paul V

    2016-07-13

    High volumetric energy density secondary batteries are important for many applications, which has led to considerable efforts to replace the low volumetric capacity graphite-based anode common to most Li-ion batteries with a higher energy density anode. Because most high capacity anode materials expand significantly during charging, such anodes must contain sufficient porosity in the discharged state to enable the expansion, yet not excess porosity, which lowers the overall energy density. Here, we present a high volumetric capacity anode consisting of a three-dimensional (3D) nanocomposite formed in only a few steps which includes both a 3D structured Sn scaffold and a hollow Sn sphere within each cavity where all the free Sn surfaces are coated with carbon. The anode exhibits a high volumetric capacity of ∼1700 mA h cm(-3) over 200 cycles at 0.5C, and a capacity greater than 1200 mA h cm(-3) at 10C. Importantly, the anode can even be formed into a commercially relevant ∼100 μm thick form. When assembled into a full cell the anode shows a good compatibility with a commercial LiMn2O4 cathode. In situ TEM observations confirm the electrode design accommodates the necessary volume expansion during lithiation. PMID:27322627

  18. Automated volumetric grid generation for finite element modeling of human hand joints

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K.; Underhill, K.; Rainsberger, R.

    1995-02-01

    We are developing techniques for finite element analysis of human joints. These techniques need to provide high quality results rapidly in order to be useful to a physician. The research presented here increases model quality and decreases user input time by automating the volumetric mesh generation step.

  19. VOLUMETRIC LEAK DETECTION IN LARGE UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS - VOLUME II: APPENDICES A-E

    EPA Science Inventory

    The program of experiments conducted at Griffiss Air Force Base was devised to expand the understanding of large underground storage tank behavior as it impacts the performance of volumetric leak detection testing. The report addresses three important questions about testing the ...

  20. Development, Construction, and Operation of a Multisample Volumetric Apparatus for the Study of Gas Adsorption Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribeiro, Rui P. P. L.; Silva, Ricardo J. S.; Esteves, Isabel A. A. C.; Mota, Jose´ P. B.

    2015-01-01

    The construction of a simple volumetric adsorption apparatus is highlighted. The setup is inexpensive and provides a clear demonstration of gas phase adsorption concepts. The topic is suitable for undergraduate chemistry and chemical engineering students. Moreover, this unit can also provide quantitative data that can be used by young researchers…

  1. Optical Addressing of Multi-Colour Photochromic Material Mixture for Volumetric Display

    PubMed Central

    Hirayama, Ryuji; Shiraki, Atsushi; Naruse, Makoto; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Kakue, Takashi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2016-01-01

    This is the first study to demonstrate that colour transformations in the volume of a photochromic material (PM) are induced at the intersections of two control light channels, one controlling PM colouration and the other controlling decolouration. Thus, PM colouration is induced by position selectivity, and therefore, a dynamic volumetric display may be realised using these two control lights. Moreover, a mixture of multiple PM types with different absorption properties exhibits different colours depending on the control light spectrum. Particularly, the spectrum management of the control light allows colour-selective colouration besides position selectivity. Therefore, a PM-based, full-colour volumetric display is realised. We experimentally construct a mixture of two PM types and validate the operating principles of such a volumetric display system. Our system is constructed simply by mixing multiple PM types; therefore, the display hardware structure is extremely simple, and the minimum size of a volume element can be as small as the size of a molecule. Volumetric displays can provide natural three-dimensional (3D) perception; therefore, the potential uses of our system include high-definition 3D visualisation for medical applications, architectural design, human–computer interactions, advertising, and entertainment. PMID:27526780

  2. Critical Evaluation of the Volumetric “Bottle Effect” on Microbial Batch Growth▿

    PubMed Central

    Hammes, Frederik; Vital, Marius; Egli, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We have analyzed the impact of surface-to-volume ratio on final bacterial concentrations after batch growth. We examined six bottle sizes (20 to 1,000 ml) using three independent enumeration methods to quantify growth. We found no evidence of a so-called volumetric bottle effect, thus contradicting numerous previous reports. PMID:20023110

  3. Power Outputs and Volumetric Eruption Rates for Ionian Volcanoes from Galileo-NIMS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, A. G.

    2001-01-01

    Volumetric eruption rates for a number of Io volcanoes are calculated as a function of volcanic thermal output. Thermal output is determined using 2-temperature fits to NIMS data. Typical eruption rates are larger than terrestrial eruptions of similar style. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Optical Addressing of Multi-Colour Photochromic Material Mixture for Volumetric Display.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Ryuji; Shiraki, Atsushi; Naruse, Makoto; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Kakue, Takashi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2016-08-16

    This is the first study to demonstrate that colour transformations in the volume of a photochromic material (PM) are induced at the intersections of two control light channels, one controlling PM colouration and the other controlling decolouration. Thus, PM colouration is induced by position selectivity, and therefore, a dynamic volumetric display may be realised using these two control lights. Moreover, a mixture of multiple PM types with different absorption properties exhibits different colours depending on the control light spectrum. Particularly, the spectrum management of the control light allows colour-selective colouration besides position selectivity. Therefore, a PM-based, full-colour volumetric display is realised. We experimentally construct a mixture of two PM types and validate the operating principles of such a volumetric display system. Our system is constructed simply by mixing multiple PM types; therefore, the display hardware structure is extremely simple, and the minimum size of a volume element can be as small as the size of a molecule. Volumetric displays can provide natural three-dimensional (3D) perception; therefore, the potential uses of our system include high-definition 3D visualisation for medical applications, architectural design, human-computer interactions, advertising, and entertainment.

  5. High Volumetric Capacity Three-Dimensionally Sphere-Caged Secondary Battery Anodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinyun; Chen, Xi; Kim, Jinwoo; Zheng, Qiye; Ning, Hailong; Sun, Pengcheng; Huang, Xingjiu; Liu, Jinhuai; Niu, Junjie; Braun, Paul V

    2016-07-13

    High volumetric energy density secondary batteries are important for many applications, which has led to considerable efforts to replace the low volumetric capacity graphite-based anode common to most Li-ion batteries with a higher energy density anode. Because most high capacity anode materials expand significantly during charging, such anodes must contain sufficient porosity in the discharged state to enable the expansion, yet not excess porosity, which lowers the overall energy density. Here, we present a high volumetric capacity anode consisting of a three-dimensional (3D) nanocomposite formed in only a few steps which includes both a 3D structured Sn scaffold and a hollow Sn sphere within each cavity where all the free Sn surfaces are coated with carbon. The anode exhibits a high volumetric capacity of ∼1700 mA h cm(-3) over 200 cycles at 0.5C, and a capacity greater than 1200 mA h cm(-3) at 10C. Importantly, the anode can even be formed into a commercially relevant ∼100 μm thick form. When assembled into a full cell the anode shows a good compatibility with a commercial LiMn2O4 cathode. In situ TEM observations confirm the electrode design accommodates the necessary volume expansion during lithiation.

  6. Physically Based Modeling and Simulation with Dynamic Spherical Volumetric Simplex Splines

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yunhao; Hua, Jing; Qin, Hong

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel computational modeling and simulation framework based on dynamic spherical volumetric simplex splines. The framework can handle the modeling and simulation of genus-zero objects with real physical properties. In this framework, we first develop an accurate and efficient algorithm to reconstruct the high-fidelity digital model of a real-world object with spherical volumetric simplex splines which can represent with accuracy geometric, material, and other properties of the object simultaneously. With the tight coupling of Lagrangian mechanics, the dynamic volumetric simplex splines representing the object can accurately simulate its physical behavior because it can unify the geometric and material properties in the simulation. The visualization can be directly computed from the object’s geometric or physical representation based on the dynamic spherical volumetric simplex splines during simulation without interpolation or resampling. We have applied the framework for biomechanic simulation of brain deformations, such as brain shifting during the surgery and brain injury under blunt impact. We have compared our simulation results with the ground truth obtained through intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging and the real biomechanic experiments. The evaluations demonstrate the excellent performance of our new technique. PMID:20161636

  7. Modelling larval transport in a axial convergence front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robins, P.

    2010-12-01

    Marine larvae exhibit different vertical swimming behaviours, synchronised by factors such as tidal currents and daylight, in order to aid retention near the parent populations and hence promote production, avoid predation, or to stimulate digestion. This paper explores two types of larval migration in an estuarine axial convergent front which is an important circulatory mechanism in many coastal regions where larvae are concentrated. A parallelised, three-dimensional, ocean model was applied to an idealised estuarine channel which was parameterised from observations of an axial convergent front which occurs in the Conwy Estuary, U.K. (Nunes and Simpson, 1985). The model successfully simulates the bilateral cross-sectional recirculation of an axial convergent front, which has been attributed to lateral density gradients established by the interaction of the lateral shear of the longitudinal currents with the axial salinity gradients. On the flood tide, there is surface axial convergence whereas on the ebb tide, there is (weaker) surface divergence. Further simulations with increased/decreased tidal velocities and with stronger/weaker axial salinity gradients are planned so that the effects of a changing climate on the secondary flow can be understood. Three-dimensional Lagrangian Particle Tracking Models (PTMs) have been developed which use the simulated velocity fields to track larvae in the estuarine channel. The PTMs take into account the vertical migrations of two shellfish species that are commonly found in the Conwy Estuary: (i) tidal migration of the common shore crab (Carcinus maenas) and (ii), diel (daily) migration of the Great scallop (Pecten maximus). These migration behaviours are perhaps the most widespread amongst shellfish larvae and have been compared with passive (drifting) particles in order to assess their relative importance in terms of larval transport. Preliminary results suggest that the net along-estuary dispersal over a typical larval

  8. Vibration localization in dual-span axially moving elastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljawi, Abdulghaffar Azhari Nawawi

    To date, vibration localization in the large class of systems modeled by multispan axially moving materials has not been examined. These systems are common in many engineering applications, such as band saw blades, power transmission, belts and chains, and magnetic and paper tapes. An investigation of the vibration localization phenomenon in two-span, axially moving beams is presented. The effects of tension disorder, interspan coupling, and transport speed on the confinement of the natural modes of free vibration are studied. The equations governing the transverse vibration of the two-span, axially moving beam are derived through Hamilton's principle and solution methods are developed. Numerical results demonstrate that normal mode localization indeed occurs for both stationary and translating disordered two-span beams, especially for small interspan coupling. The occurrence of localization is characterized by a peak deflection much greater in one span than in the other. In the stationary disordered case, localization becomes more pronounced as interspan coupling decreases, i.e., as the span axial tension increases. For an axially translating beam with identical spans, the two loci in each pair of natural frequencies may exhibit a single or double crossing (depending on the value of tension) when plotted against the axial transport speed. These crossings become veerings when the beam is disordered, and localization is strongest at those speeds where the eigenvalue veerings occur. A perturbation approach, which provides additional insights into the sensitivity of the system to disorder, is also utilized. Analytical expressions are obtained in the limiting cases of weak and strong interspan coupling. Findings show that the sensitivity of the system to disorder primarily depends upon disorder and interspan coupling strengths. Finally, an investigation of the localization phenomenon is performed for a more complete model of a band/wheel system. The effects of tension

  9. Water-level oscillations caused by volumetric and deviatoric dynamic strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalev, Eyal; Kurzon, Ittai; Doan, Mai-Linh; Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    2016-02-01

    Travelling seismic waves and Earth tides are known to cause oscillations in well water levels due to the volumetric strain characteristics of the ground motion. Although the response of well water levels to S and Love waves has been reported, it has not yet been quantified. In this paper we describe and explain the behaviour of a closed artesian water well (Gomè 1) in response to teleseismic earthquakes. This well is located within a major fault zone and screened at a highly damaged (cracked) sandstone layer. We adopt the original Skempton approach where both volumetric and deviatoric stresses (and strains) affect pore pressure. Skempton's coefficients < tex - mathid = "IM0001" > B and < tex - mathid = "IM0002" > A couple the volumetric and deviatoric stresses respectively with pore pressure and < tex - mathid = "IM0003" > BKu and < tex - mathid = "IM0004" > N are the equivalent coupling terms to volumetric and deviatoric strains. The water level in this well responds dramatically to volumetric strain (P and Rayleigh waves) as well as to deviatoric strain (S and Love waves). This response is explained by the nonlinear elastic behaviour of the highly damaged rocks. The water level response to deviatoric strain depends on the damage in the rock; deviatoric strain loading on damaged rock results in high water level amplitudes, and no response in undamaged rock. We find high values of < tex - mathid = "IM0005" > N= 8.5 GPa that corresponds to -0.5 < A < -0.25 expected at highly damaged rocks. We propose that the Gomè 1 well is located within fractured rocks, and therefore, dilatency is high, and the response of water pressure to deviatoric deformation is high. This analysis is supported by the agreement between the estimated compressibility of the aquifer, independently calculated from Earth tides, seismic response of the water pressure and other published data.

  10. Characterization of a novel 2D array dosimeter for patient-specific quality assurance with volumetric arc therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stathakis, Sotirios; Myers, Pamela; Esquivel, Carlos; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: In this study, the authors are evaluating a new, commercially available 2D array that offers 3D dose reconstruction for patient specific intensity modulated radiation therapy quality assurance (IMRT QA).Methods: The OCTAVIUS 4D system and its accompanying software (VERISOFT) by PTW were evaluated for the accuracy of the dose reconstruction for patient specific pretreatment IMRT QA. OCTAVIUS 4D measures the dose plane at the linac isocenter as the phantom rotates synchronously with the gantry, maintaining perpendicularity with the beam, by means of an inclinometer and a motor. The measurements collected during a volumetric modulated arc therapy delivery (VMAT) are reconstructed into a 3D dose volume. The VERISOFT application is used to perform the analysis, by comparing the reconstructed dose against the 3D dose matrix from the treatment planning system (TPS) that is computed for the same geometry and beam arrangement as that of the measurement. In this study, the authors evaluated the 3D dose reconstruction algorithm of this new system using a series of tests. Using the Octavius 4D phantom as the patient, dose distributions for various field sizes, beam orientations, shapes, and combination of fields were calculated using the Pinnacle3, TPS, and the respective DICOMRT dose was exported to the VERISOFT analysis software. Measurements were obtained by delivering the test treatment plans and comparisons were made based on gamma index, dose profiles, and isodose distribution analysis. In addition, output factors were measured and the dose linearity of the array was assessed. Those measurements were compared against measurements in water using a single, calibrated ionization chamber as well as calculations from Pinnacle for the same delivery geometries.Results: The number of voxels that met the 3%/3 mm criteria for the volumetric 3D gamma index analysis ranged from 92.3% to 98.9% for all the patient plans that the authors evaluated. 2D gamma analysis in the

  11. Axial Ge/Si nanowire heterostructure tunnel FETs

    SciTech Connect

    Picraux, Sanuel T; Daych, Shadi A

    2010-01-01

    The vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth of semiconductor nanowires allows doping and composition modulation along their axis and the realization of axial 1 D heterostructures. This provides additional flexibility in energy band-edge engineering along the transport direction which is difficult to attain by planar materials growth and processing techniques. We report here on the design, growth, fabrication, and characterization of asymmetric heterostructure tunnel field-effect transistors (HTFETs) based on 100% compositionally modulated Si/Ge axial NWs for high on-current operation and low ambipolar transport behavior. We discuss the optimization of band-offsets and Schottky barrier heights for high performance HTFETs and issues surrounding their experimental realization. Our HTFET devices with 10 nm PECVD SiN{sub x} gate dielectric resulted in a measured current drive exceeding 100 {mu}A/{mu}m (I/{pi}D) and 10{sup 5} I{sub on}/I{sub off} ratios.

  12. Fully Characterizing Axially Symmetric Szekeres Models with Three Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Célérier, Marie-Nöelle Mishra, Priti; Singh, Tejinder P.

    2015-01-01

    Inhomogeneous exact solutions of General Relativity with zero cosmological constant have been used in the literature to challenge the ΛCDM model. From one patch Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) models to axially symmetric quasi-spherical Szekeres (QSS) Swiss-cheese models, some of them are able to reproduce to a good accuracy the cosmological data. It has been shown in the literature that a zero Λ LTB model with a central observer can be fully determined by two data sets. We demonstrate that an axially symmetric zero Λ QSS model with an observer located at the origin can be fully reconstructed from three data sets, number counts, luminosity distance and redshift drift. This is a first step towards a future demonstration involving five data sets and the most general Szekeres model.

  13. Experimentally studying of axial compressor operation with steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batenin, V. M.; Zeigarnik, Yu. A.; Kosoi, A. S.; Datsenko, V. V.; Sinkevich, M. V.

    2015-12-01

    Steam offers numerous benefits when used as the working fluid in thermodynamic cycles. In lowtemperature cycles, where thermal energy is switched from one temperature potential to another (thermal transformers), steam is much less commonly used as a working fluid than in high-temperature cycles. The deficiencies of difficulties in using steam in thermal transformers include low pressure at the working temperatures and hence large specific volume. A compressor capable of high productivity having high discharge and relatively large increase in pressure is required. To that end, a multistage axial compressor from an airplane aircraft engine may be employed. To confirm the viability of this approach, the compressor of an AL-21 airplane aircraft engine is tested on a custom test bench. Experimental results are presented for a multistage axial compressor working with steam, when the input pressure is 0.5-5 kPa.

  14. Axial dispersion of Brownian colloids in microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Michael P.; Gautam, Aishwarya; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.; Nikoubashman, Arash

    2016-08-01

    We present a complete theoretical framework for the axial dispersion of a Brownian colloidal suspension confined in a parallel plate channel, extending the Taylor-Aris treatment to particles with diameters comparable to the channel width. The theoretical model incorporates the effects of confinement on the colloid distribution, corrections to the velocity profile due to the effects of colloid concentration on the suspension viscosity, and position-dependent diffusivities. We test the theoretical model using explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations that fully incorporate hydrodynamic correlations and thermal fluctuations and obtain good quantitative agreement between theory and simulations. We find that the nonuniform colloid distributions that arise in confinement due to excluded volume between the colloids and channel walls significantly impact the axial dispersion.

  15. Ward identities in a general axial gauge. II. Quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Capper, D.M.; Leibbrandt, G.

    1982-02-15

    We have calculated the pole part of the one-loop graviton self-energy in the noncovariant axial gauge n/sub ..mu../phi/sub munu/ = 0, n/sup 2/not =0, where phi/sub munu/ is the physical graviton field and n/sub ..mu../ is an arbitrary but constant vector. It is shown that the self-energy is, unexpectedly, both nontransverse and n/sub ..mu../ dependent, even though it satisfies the correct gravitational Ward identity. This Ward identity is found to contain a term corresponding to a ''pincer'' Feynman diagram which is directly responsible for the nontransversality of the graviton self-energy. Ghost particles do not contribute to the graviton amplitude. All axial-gauge integrals are consistently evaluated in the context of dimensional regularization and by applying the principal-value prescription.

  16. Axially staged combustion system for a gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Bland, Robert J.

    2009-12-15

    An axially staged combustion system is provided for a gas turbine engine comprising a main body structure having a plurality of first and second injectors. First structure provides fuel to at least one of the first injectors. The fuel provided to the one first injector is adapted to mix with air and ignite to produce a flame such that the flame associated with the one first injector defines a flame front having an average length when measured from a reference surface of the main body structure. Each of the second injectors comprising a section extending from the reference surface of the main body structure through the flame front and having a length greater than the average length of the flame front. Second structure provides fuel to at least one of the second injectors. The fuel passes through the one second injector and exits the one second injector at a location axially spaced from the flame front.

  17. Damage detection for applications undergoing axial (membrane) response

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, T.A.; Farrar, C.R.; Doebling, S.W.

    1997-12-01

    This paper extends and applies recently reported damage identification methods, previously utilized for flexural vibrations only, to axial-type vibrations. The methods are applied to an 8-DOF linear spring-mass system, which models a multi-degree-of-freedom axial or membrane system. The goal of the work is to detect damage (as indicated by reduction in stiffness of one or more of the elements) as well as to locate the damage elements. Two damage detection methods were investigated--the change-in-flexibility method and the damage-index method. Both were found to successfully locate the damaged element(s) for 10% reduction in element stiffness. The change-in-flexibility method indicated damage location even when only a limited number of lower modes were included.

  18. Stove with co-axial vent and flue design

    SciTech Connect

    Hyatt, J.R.

    1983-02-15

    The present invention relates to a stove of the type having a firebox and a second outer wall that defines an air passageway around the fire-box. Provided with the stove is a fan for forcing air around the defined air passageway for collecting heat from a burning fire within the firebox. A flue is communicatively connected with the firebox and extends therefrom through the defined air passageway and on through the outer wall structure of the stove. Co-axially disposed around the flue and communicatively connected with the air passageway is a vent for directing heated air from the stove. The co-axial relationship of the vent and flue assures that the flue gases must pass within the heated air passing in the vent or vice versa, and this gives rise to a very efficient stove inasmuch as a substantial portion of the heat associated with the flue gases being exhausted is transferred to the vented air.

  19. Vector and Axial-Vector Structures of the Θ+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Chul; Ledwig, Tim; Goeke, Klaus

    We present in this talk recent results of the vector and axial-vector transitions of the nucleon to the pentaquark baryon Θ+, based on the SU(3) chiral quark-soliton model. The results are summarized as follows: K*NΘ vector and tensor coupling constants turn out to be gK*NΘ ≃ 0.81 and fK*NΘ ≃ 0.84, respectively, and the KNΘ axial-vector coupling constant to be g*A ˜= 0.05. As a result, the total decay width for Θ+ → NK becomes very small: ΓΘ→NK ≃ 0.71 MeV, which is consistent with the DIANA result ΓΘ→NK = 0.36 ± 0.11 MeV.

  20. Long-Distance Axial Trapping with Focused Annular Laser Beams

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shaohui; Yao, Baoli; Dan, Dan; Qi, Yujiao; Qian, Jia; Yang, Yanlong; Gao, Peng; Ye, Tong

    2013-01-01

    Focusing an annular laser beam can improve the axial trapping efficiency due to the reduction of the scattering force, which enables the use of a lower numerical aperture (NA) objective lens with a long working distance to trap particles in deeper aqueous medium. In this paper, we present an axicon-to-axicon scheme for producing parallel annular beams with the advantages of higher efficiency compared with the obstructed beam approach. The validity of the scheme is verified by the observation of a stable trapping of silica microspheres with relatively low NA microscope objective lenses (NA = 0.6 and 0.45), and the axial trapping depth of 5 mm is demonstrated in experiment. PMID:23505449

  1. Martian great dust storms - Interpretive axially symmetric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, E. K.

    1983-08-01

    The Martian great dust storms are presently considered in light of the Schneider (1977) simplified theory of steady, nearly inviscid, thermally forced and axially symmetric atmospheric motions. A highly idealized calculation of atmospheric response to heating that is concentrated in a small latitude band is conducted, leading to the identification of qualitatively different local and global response regimes. Idealized model results indicate that subtropical latitudes are favored for the initiation of a dust-raising global dust storm. The steady, axially symmetric Martian response to solar forcing and modification to this response through an additional, latitudinally localized heat source are also discussed, and it is suggested that transition behavior similar to that of the more idealized model is to be expected in this case as well.

  2. Axially Tapered And Bilayer Microchannels For Evaporative Cooling Devices

    DOEpatents

    Nilson, Robert; Griffiths, Stewart

    2005-10-04

    The invention consists of an evaporative cooling device comprising one or more microchannels whose cross section is axially reduced to control the maximum capillary pressure differential between liquid and vapor phases. In one embodiment, the evaporation channels have a rectangular cross section that is reduced in width along a flow path. In another embodiment, channels of fixed width are patterned with an array of microfabricated post-like features such that the feature size and spacing are gradually reduced along the flow path. Other embodiments incorporate bilayer channels consisting of an upper cover plate having a pattern of slots or holes of axially decreasing size and a lower fluid flow layer having channel widths substantially greater than the characteristic microscale dimensions of the patterned cover plate. The small dimensions of the cover plate holes afford large capillary pressure differentials while the larger dimensions of the lower region reduce viscous flow resistance.

  3. Buckling Imperfection Sensitivity of Axially Compressed Orthotropic Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Marc R.; Nemeth, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Structural stability is a major consideration in the design of lightweight shell structures. However, the theoretical predictions of geometrically perfect structures often considerably over predict the buckling loads of inherently imperfect real structures. It is reasonably well understood how the shell geometry affects the imperfection sensitivity of axially compressed cylindrical shells; however, the effects of shell anisotropy on the imperfection sensitivity is less well understood. In the present paper, the development of an analytical model for assessing the imperfection sensitivity of axially compressed orthotropic cylinders is discussed. Results from the analytical model for four shell designs are compared with those from a general-purpose finite-element code, and good qualitative agreement is found. Reasons for discrepancies are discussed, and potential design implications of this line of research are discussed.

  4. Microwave axial free-electron laser with enhanced phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.; Fazio, M.; Haynes, W.

    1995-12-31

    Free-electron laser (FEL) amplifiers have demonstrated high efficiencies and high output power at microwave wavelengths. However, measurements and simulations have indicated that the present level of phase stability for these devices is not sufficient for driving linear accelerators. Fluctuations in the diode voltage, which is needed to accelerate the electron beam, are the largest cause of the shifts in the phase of the output power. Pulse-power technology cannot keep the voltage fluctuations less than 1/4%. However, we have found a scheme that will make the output phase much less sensitive to these fluctuations by exploiting the traveling wave nature of the FEL interaction. In this paper we study the phase stability issue by analyzing the dispersion relation for an axial FEL, in which the rf field is transversely wiggled and the electron trajectories are purely longitudinal. The advantage of using the axial FEL interaction instead of the common transverse FEL interaction is that (1) the dispersion relation is not additionally complicated by how the transverse electron motion depends on the diode voltage and (2) such a device is simpler and less expensive to construct than a transverse-coupling FEL because there is no wiggler. The axial FEL interaction is with a fast wave and does involve axial bunching of the electron beam, so the results found for this device also apply to transverse-coupling FELs. By examination of the dispersion relation it is found that the effect of the phase dependency on the beam`s velocity can be cancelled by the effect of the phase dependency on the beam`s plasma wave, for an annular electron beam. By changing the annulus radius, exact cancellation can be found for a variety of beam voltages and currents in the ranges of 0.5-1.0 MV and 1-5 kA. This cancellation leads to first-order phase stability, which is not possible for standing-wave devices, such as klystrons.

  5. Axial Seamount - Under the hood of the volcano machine.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnulf, A. F.; Harding, A. J.; Kent, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    On the Juan de Fuca ridge, Axial volcano is the most volcanically active site of the northwestern Pacific and it has been continuously monitored through two complete eruption cycles, with an increased number of seafloor instruments, leading in 2014 to the deployment of a permanent, wired-to-shore, seafloor observatory. Accurate imaging of the internal structure of volcanic systems is critical in order to characterize and quantify mass and energy transport mechanisms in such dynamic environments. To produce high-resolution velocity/reflectivity structures of Axial volcano, here, we combined a synthetic ocean bottom experiment (SOBE), 3-D traveltime tomography, 2D elastic full waveform and a reverse time migration (RTM) formalism.We present an updated and more complete outlook of Axial volcano upper crustal structure. We find that the addition of 469,891 traveltime arrivals, from twelve different multichannel seismic lines, to a previous OBSs-based traveltime tomography inversion, greatly improved the resolution of the three-dimensional velocity structure. We observe two elongated crustal magma reservoir beneath the central volcano. We investigate the extent, volume and physical state of those magma reservoirs and provide images of the volcanic plumbing system. We use our 3D velocity structure to relocate several months of seismicity and track magma movements between the caldera and the eruption site. We show that crustal-aging is controlled by pipe-like pattern of focused hydrothermal circulation. We suggest that the subsiding caldera floor at Axial Volcano was initiated ~720kyr +/-100kyr and provides a near perfect trap for the ponding of lava flows.

  6. Discogenic Axial Back Pain: Is There a Role for Nucleoplasty?

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Siddharth M; Tan, Barry Wei Loong; Juned, Salam; Yao, Kaihan

    2013-01-01

    Study Design A prospective observational study. Purpose To evaluate the role of nucleoplasty in the management of discogenic axial back pain; to determine the influence of concordant pain during provocative discography, annular tear and loss of disc height on the outcome of nucleoplasty. Overview of Literature The role of nucleoplasty in the management of radicular leg pain due to disc herniation is known. However, the data regarding its role in the management of discogenic axial back pain is scarce. Methods A prospective evaluation of 30 patients with discogenic axial back pain undergoing nucleoplasty was performed. Pain, functional disability and quality of life were assessed using the 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Short Form-36 (SF-36), respectively. Results The mean reduction in VAS was 31.03 and 29.03; mean reduction in ODI was 24.53 and 20.60; and mean increment in SF-36 was 13.58 and 12.30, at 6 months and at 12 months, respectively. The differences were statistically significant (p <0.05). Concordant pain during provocative discography, annular tear and loss of disc height did not affect a clinically significant improvement in any of the three outcomes (p =0.882, 0.213, and 0.170; respectively). Conclusions Nucleoplasty produced statistically significant improvements in pain, functional disability and quality of life in patients with discogenic low back pain at 6 months and at 12 months. Concordant pain during provocative discography, annular tear and loss of disc height did not influence any of the outcomes after nucleoplasty in patients with discogenic axial back pain. PMID:24353849

  7. Enhanced betatron X-rays from axially modulated plasma wakefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palastro, J. P.; Kaganovich, D.; Gordon, D.

    2015-06-01

    In the cavitation regime of plasma-based accelerators, a population of high-energy electrons trailing the driver can undergo betatron motion. The motion results in X-ray emission, but the brilliance and photon energy are limited by the electrons' initial transverse coordinate. To overcome this, we exploit parametrically unstable betatron motion in a cavitated, axially modulated plasma. Theory and simulations are presented showing that the unstable oscillations increase both the total X-ray energy and average photon energy.

  8. Measurement of axial injection displacement with trim coil current unbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covo, Michel Kireeff

    2014-08-01

    The Dee probe used for measuring internal radial beam intensity shows large losses inside the radius of 20 cm of the 88 in. cyclotron. The current of the top and bottom innermost trim coil 1 is unbalanced to study effects of the axial injection displacement. A beam profile monitor images the ion beam bunches, turn by turn. The experimental bunch center of mass position is compared with calculations of the magnetic mirror effect displacement and shows good agreement.

  9. Measurement of axial injection displacement with trim coil current unbalance

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, Michel Kireeff

    2014-08-15

    The Dee probe used for measuring internal radial beam intensity shows large losses inside the radius of 20 cm of the 88 in. cyclotron. The current of the top and bottom innermost trim coil 1 is unbalanced to study effects of the axial injection displacement. A beam profile monitor images the ion beam bunches, turn by turn. The experimental bunch center of mass position is compared with calculations of the magnetic mirror effect displacement and shows good agreement.

  10. Axial form factor of the nucleon at large momentum transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anikin, I. V.; Braun, V. M.; Offen, N.

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the emerging possibilities to study threshold pion electroproduction at large momentum transfers at Jefferson Laboratory following the 12 GeV upgrade, we provide a short theory summary and an estimate of the nucleon axial form factor for large virtualities in the Q2=1 - 10 GeV2 range using next-to-leading-order light-cone sum rules.

  11. Enhanced betatron X-rays from axially modulated plasma wakefields

    SciTech Connect

    Palastro, J. P.; Kaganovich, D.; Gordon, D.

    2015-06-15

    In the cavitation regime of plasma-based accelerators, a population of high-energy electrons trailing the driver can undergo betatron motion. The motion results in X-ray emission, but the brilliance and photon energy are limited by the electrons' initial transverse coordinate. To overcome this, we exploit parametrically unstable betatron motion in a cavitated, axially modulated plasma. Theory and simulations are presented showing that the unstable oscillations increase both the total X-ray energy and average photon energy.

  12. Development of optimized, graded-permeability axial groove heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapolnek, Michael R.; Holmes, H. Rolland

    1988-01-01

    Heat pipe performance can usually be improved by uniformly varying or grading wick permeability from end to end. A unique and cost effective method for grading the permeability of an axial groove heat pipe is described - selective chemical etching of the pipe casing. This method was developed and demonstrated on a proof-of-concept test article. The process improved the test article's performance by 50 percent. Further improvement is possible through the use of optimally etched grooves.

  13. Rotary-To-Axial Motion Converter For Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinicke, Robert H.; Mohtar, Rafic

    1991-01-01

    Nearly frictionless mechanism converts rotary motion into axial motion. Designed for use in electronically variable pressure-regulator valve. Changes rotary motion imparted by motor into translation that opens and closes valve poppet. Cables spaced equidistantly around edge of fixed disk support movable disk. As movable disk rotated, cables twist, lifting it. When rotated in opposite direction, cables untwist, lowering it. Spider disk helps to prevent cables from tangling. Requires no lubrication and insensitive to contamination in fluid flowing through valve.

  14. The nucleon axial charge in full lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Edwards; George Fleming; P Hagler; John Negele; Konstantinos Orginos; Andrew Pochinsky; Dru Renner; David Richards; Wolfram Schroers

    2005-10-13

    The nucleon axial charge is calculated as a function of the pion mass in full QCD. Using domain wall valence quarks and improved staggered sea quarks, we present the first calculation with pion masses as light as 354 MeV and volumes as large as (3.5 fm)3. We show that finite volume effects are small for our volumes and that a constrained fit based on finite volume chiral perturbation theory agrees with experiment within 5% statistical errors.

  15. Axial Anomaly, Dirac Sea, and the Chiral Magnetic Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Kharzeev, D.E.

    2010-05-26

    Gribov viewed the axial anomaly as a manifestation of the collective motion of Dirac fermions with arbitrarily high momenta in the vacuum. In the presence of an external magnetic field and a chirality imbalance, this collective motion becomes directly observable in the form of the electric current - this is the chiral magnetic effect (CME). I give an elementary introduction into the physics of CME, and discuss the experimental status and recent developments.

  16. Numerical analysis of a microwave torch with axial gas injection

    SciTech Connect

    Gritsinin, S. I.; Davydov, A. M.; Kossyi, I. A.; Kulumbaev, E. B.; Lelevkin, V. M.

    2013-07-15

    The characteristics of a microwave discharge in an argon jet injected axially into a coaxial channel with a shortened inner electrode are numerically analyzed using a self-consistent equilibrium gas-dynamic model. The specific features of the excitation and maintenance of the microwave discharge are determined, and the dependences of the discharge characteristics on the supplied electromagnetic power and gas flow rate are obtained. The calculated results are compared with experimental data.

  17. The New Performance Calculation Method of Fouled Axial Flow Compressor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Fouling is the most important performance degradation factor, so it is necessary to accurately predict the effect of fouling on engine performance. In the previous research, it is very difficult to accurately model the fouled axial flow compressor. This paper develops a new performance calculation method of fouled multistage axial flow compressor based on experiment result and operating data. For multistage compressor, the whole compressor is decomposed into two sections. The first section includes the first 50% stages which reflect the fouling level, and the second section includes the last 50% stages which are viewed as the clean stage because of less deposits. In this model, the performance of the first section is obtained by combining scaling law method and linear progression model with traditional stage stacking method; simultaneously ambient conditions and engine configurations are considered. On the other hand, the performance of the second section is calculated by averaged infinitesimal stage method which is based on Reynolds' law of similarity. Finally, the model is successfully applied to predict the 8-stage axial flow compressor and 16-stage LM2500-30 compressor. The change of thermodynamic parameters such as pressure ratio, efficiency with the operating time, and stage number is analyzed in detail. PMID:25197717

  18. ASAS classification criteria for axial spondyloarthritis: time to modify.

    PubMed

    Akkoc, Nurullah; Khan, Muhammad A

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between ankylosing spondylitis and the recently proposed entity called axial spondyloarthritis with its radiographic and non-radiographic forms that have been defined by the Assessment of Spondyloarthritis International Society (ASAS) criteria for axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), is currently being debated. The Food and Drug Agency (FDA) had criticized the ASAS criteria and the studies which used these criteria to enroll patients in a clinical trial of certolizumab and adalimumab for the treatment of non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis. The primary aim of classification criteria is to create homogenous patient populations for basic and clinical research. But the multi-arm construct of the ASAS criteria is a potential source of heterogeneity reducing their utility. Criteria sets should be regarded as dynamic concepts open to modifications or updates as our knowledge advances. We provide evidence to conclude that it is time to modify the ASAS Criteria for axSpA, and we propose some of the steps that can be taken to start moving forward in improving the validity of these criteria. PMID:27094940

  19. Axial stress localization facilitates pressure propagation in gelled pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norrman, Jens; Skjæraasen, Olaf; Oschmann, Hans-Jörg; Paso, Kristofer; Sjöblom, Johan

    2016-03-01

    Paraffin wax-oil gels are unique rheological fluids which undergo shear degradation starting at a deformation (shear strain level) of approximately 1%. Flow commencement in pipelines filled with wax-oil gels is a complex hydrodynamic process involving propagation of acoustic, diffusive, and rheological degradation pressure wave fronts. Dynamic simulation informed by qualified rheological relations provides useful insight into the physical nature of these flow processes. Eulerian simulations are presented which emulate known physical phenomena and essential characteristics of wax-gel flow dynamics. A constitutive rheological equation set accounts for deformation-driven reduction in yield stress and viscosity terms. No explicit time-dependent rheological parameters are utilized in the equations. Rheological yielding alters the nature of the dominant pressure wave from inherently diffusive towards self-sharpening. Axial stress localization effectively sequentializes the gel breakage process, quantified by reduced length of the pressure wave-front zone. Ultimately, axial stress localization allows flow in longer pipe segments, albeit with a concomitant time delay. Viscous behavior and yielding degradation behavior are shown to account for upward and downward concavity in transient axial pressure profiles, respectively. Overall, a unique synergy between gel compressibility and gel degradation is revealed. Deformation-coupled interaction between compressibility and degradation allows pressure propagation and subsequent sustained flow through a gel material which is otherwise immobile in the incompressible case.

  20. Imaging results and TOF studies with axial PET detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joram, Christian

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a fully operational PET demonstrator setup which allows true 3D reconstruction of the 511 keV photons and therefore leads to practically parallax free images. The AX-PET concept is based on thin 100 mm long scintillation crystals (LYSO), axially oriented and arranged in layers around the field of view. Layers of wavelength shifting plastic strips mounted in between the crystal layers give the axial coordinate. Both crystals and WLS strips are individually read out by G-APD (SiPM) photodetectors. The fully scalable concept overcomes the dilemma of sensitivity versus spatial resolution which is inherent to classical PET designs. A demonstrator set-up based on two axial modules was exhaustively characterized using point-like sources, phantoms filled with radiotracer and finally rats and a mouse. The results entirely meet the performance expectations (<2 mm FWHM in all three coordinates over the complete field of view) and also demonstrated the ability to include Compton interactions (inter-crystal scatter) in the reconstruction without noticeable performance loss. Our recent studies focus on a TOF extension of the AX-PET concept making use of the novel digital SiPM detectors by Philips. After reproducing comparable energy and spatial resolution on a small digital AX-PET set-up with 100 mm long crystals, we demonstrated a coincidence resolving time of about 210 ps FWHM.

  1. Whispering gallery resonators with broken axial symmetry: Theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Fürst, J; Sturman, B; Buse, K; Breunig, I

    2016-09-01

    Axial symmetry is the cornerstone for theory and applications of high-Q optical whispering gallery resonators (WGRs). Nevertheless, research on birefringent crystalline material persistently pushes towards breaking this symmetry. We show theoretically and experimentally that the effect of broken axial symmetry, caused by optical anisotropy, is modest for the resonant frequencies and Q-factors of the WGR modes. Thus, the most important equatorial whispering gallery modes can be quantitatively described and experimentally identified. At the same time, the effect of broken axial symmetry on the light field distribution of the whispering gallery modes is typically very strong. This qualitatively modifies the phase-matching for the χ(2) nonlinear processes and enables broad-band second harmonic generation and optical parametric oscillation. The effect of weak geometric ellipticity in nominally symmetric WGRs is also considered. Altogether our findings pave the way for an extensive use of numerous birefringent (uniaxial and biaxial) crystals with broad transparency window and large χ(2) coefficients in nonlinear optics with WGRs.

  2. Extra-axial isolated cerebral varix misdiagnosed as convexity meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhi-Gang; Zhou, Qian; Cui, Yan; Yi, Lei; Ouyang, Yian; Jiang, Yugang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Isolated cerebral varix is a rare cerebrovascular anomaly, which is easily misdiagnosed as other brain tumors. A 59-year-old female patient with noncontributory medical history presented with headache and insomnia for the last 2 months. Upon admission, her neurological examination was unremarkable. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a well-demarcated extra medullary mass, 11 × 11 mm in size, within the subdural space at the right frontal lobe. The lesion was initially interpreted as a convexity meningioma. After conducting a craniotomy on the patient, an extra-axial varix was exposed and resected subsequently. The patient's headache was resolved soon after surgery and charged without neurologic sequelae. Extra-axial isolated cerebral varix is mimicking convexity meningioma on MR images and should be considered as a differential diagnosis. The focal erosion in the inner table of the skull could be an important character of extra-axial isolated cerebral varix. An extremely round shape and smooth contour of the lesion was another important character. Isolated cerebral varix is rare vascular lesion that is treated surgically in the case of rupture or compression of adjacent structures. The information obtained with noninvasive imaging techniques should include CTA to make a clinical decision. PMID:27368037

  3. Axial and Centrifugal Compressor Mean Line Flow Analysis Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a method to estimate key aerodynamic parameters of single and multistage axial and centrifugal compressors. This mean-line compressor code COMDES provides the capability of sizing single and multistage compressors quickly during the conceptual design process. Based on the compressible fluid flow equations and the Euler equation, the code can estimate rotor inlet and exit blade angles when run in the design mode. The design point rotor efficiency and stator losses are inputs to the code, and are modeled at off design. When run in the off-design analysis mode, it can be used to generate performance maps based on simple models for losses due to rotor incidence and inlet guide vane reset angle. The code can provide an improved understanding of basic aerodynamic parameters such as diffusion factor, loading levels and incidence, when matching multistage compressor blade rows at design and at part-speed operation. Rotor loading levels and relative velocity ratio are correlated to the onset of compressor surge. NASA Stage 37 and the three-stage NASA 74-A axial compressors were analyzed and the results compared to test data. The code has been used to generate the performance map for the NASA 76-B three-stage axial compressor featuring variable geometry. The compressor stages were aerodynamically matched at off-design speeds by adjusting the variable inlet guide vane and variable stator geometry angles to control the rotor diffusion factor and incidence angles.

  4. Axial length effects on lean NOx trap performance

    SciTech Connect

    Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Nguyen, Ke; Choi, Jae-Soon; Daw, C Stuart

    2009-01-01

    The effect of axial length on the NO{sub x} reduction performance of two different commercial Lean NO{sub x} Trap (LNT) monolithic catalysts was experimentally investigated in a bench flow reactor. The washcoat composition of one of the catalysts consisted of Pt and K on {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}; whereas the other catalyst contained a complex mixture of Pt, Pd, Rh, Ba, Ce, Zr, Mg, Al and others. The NO{sub x} removal characteristics of cylindrical monolith segments of constant diameter (2.22 cm) and axial lengths of 2.54, 5.08 and 7.62 cm were evaluated using a simulated lean engine exhaust containing water and carbon dioxide at a constant space velocity of 30,000 h{sup -1}. No significant effects of length were observed when the catalysts were fully reduced with hydrogen between NO{sub x} capture phases. However when the catalysts were only partially regenerated NO{sub x} reduction efficiency increased with monolith length. Intra-catalyst H{sub 2} measurements at different axial locations indicated that at least some of the efficiency loss during partial regeneration occurred when back-mixed H{sub 2} was directly oxidized and became unavailable for nitrate reduction.

  5. Period of vibration of axially vibrating truly nonlinear rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cveticanin, L.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper the axial vibration of a muscle whose fibers are parallel to the direction of muscle compression is investigated. The model is a clamped-free rod with a strongly nonlinear elastic property. Axial vibration is described by a nonlinear partial differential equation. A solution of the equation is constructed for special initial conditions by using the method of separation of variables. The partial differential equation is separated into two uncoupled strongly nonlinear second order differential equations. Both equations, with displacement function and with time function are exactly determined. Exact solutions are given in the form of inverse incomplete and inverse complete Beta function. Using boundary and initial conditions, the frequency of vibration is obtained. It has to be mentioned that the determined frequency represents the exact analytic description for the axially vibrating truly nonlinear clamped-free rod. The procedure suggested in this paper is applied for calculation of the frequency of the longissimus dorsi muscle of a cow. The influence of elasticity order and elasticity coefficient on the frequency property is tested.

  6. Preoperative Embolization of Extra-axial Hypervascular Tumors with Onyx

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Matthew R.; Salem, Mohamed M.; Reddy, Arra S.; Ogilvy, Christopher S.; Kasper, Ekkehard M.; Thomas, Ajith J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Preoperative endovascular embolization of intracranial tumors is performed to mitigate anticipated intraoperative blood loss. Although the usage of a wide array of embolic agents, particularly polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), has been described for a variety of tumors, literature detailing the efficacy, safety and complication rates for the usage of Onyx is relatively sparse. Materials and Methods We reviewed our single institutional experience with pre-surgical Onyx embolization of extra-axial tumors to evaluate its efficacy and safety and highlight nuances of individualized cases. Results Five patients underwent pre-surgical Onyx embolization of large or giant extra-axial tumors within 24 hours of surgical resection. Four patients harbored falcine or convexity meningiomas (grade I in 2 patients, grade II in 1 patient and grade III in one patient), and one patient had a grade II hemangiopericytoma. Embolization proceeded uneventfully in all cases and there were no complications. Conclusion This series augments the expanding literature confirming the safety and efficacy of Onyx in the preoperative embolization of extra-axial tumors, underscoring its advantage of being able to attain extensive devascularization via only one supplying pedicle. PMID:27114961

  7. Fundamental metallurgical aspects of axial splitting in zircaloy cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.

    2000-04-03

    Fundamental metallurgical aspects of axial splitting in irradiated Zircaloy cladding have been investigated by microstructural characterization and analytical modeling, with emphasis on application of the results to understand high-burnup fuel failure under RIA situations. Optical microscopy, SEM, and TEM were conducted on BWR and PWR fuel cladding tubes that were irradiated to fluence levels of 3.3 x 10{sup 21} n cm{sup {minus}2} to 5.9 x 10{sup 21} n cm{sup {minus}2} (E > 1 MeV) and tested in hot cell at 292--325 C in Ar. The morphology, distribution, and habit planes of macroscopic and microscopic hydrides in as-irradiated and posttest cladding were determined by stereo-TEM. The type and magnitude of the residual stress produced in association with oxide-layer growth and dense hydride precipitation, and several synergistic factors that strongly influence axial-splitting behavior were analyzed. The results of the microstructural characterization and stress analyses were then correlated with axial-splitting behavior of high-burnup PWR cladding reported for simulated-RIA conditions. The effects of key test procedures and their implications for the interpretation of RIA test results are discussed.

  8. Whispering gallery resonators with broken axial symmetry: Theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Fürst, J; Sturman, B; Buse, K; Breunig, I

    2016-09-01

    Axial symmetry is the cornerstone for theory and applications of high-Q optical whispering gallery resonators (WGRs). Nevertheless, research on birefringent crystalline material persistently pushes towards breaking this symmetry. We show theoretically and experimentally that the effect of broken axial symmetry, caused by optical anisotropy, is modest for the resonant frequencies and Q-factors of the WGR modes. Thus, the most important equatorial whispering gallery modes can be quantitatively described and experimentally identified. At the same time, the effect of broken axial symmetry on the light field distribution of the whispering gallery modes is typically very strong. This qualitatively modifies the phase-matching for the χ(2) nonlinear processes and enables broad-band second harmonic generation and optical parametric oscillation. The effect of weak geometric ellipticity in nominally symmetric WGRs is also considered. Altogether our findings pave the way for an extensive use of numerous birefringent (uniaxial and biaxial) crystals with broad transparency window and large χ(2) coefficients in nonlinear optics with WGRs. PMID:27607622

  9. Behavior of unbonded flexible risers subject to axial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Shao-fei; Tang, Wen-yong; Guo, Jin-ting

    2014-04-01

    Owing to nonlinear contact problems with slip and friction, a lot of limiting assumptions are made when developing analytical models to simulate the behavior of an unbonded flexible riser. Meanwhile, in order to avoid convergence problems and excessive calculating time associated with running the detailed finite element (FE) model of an unbonded flexible riser, interlocked carcass and zeta layers with complicated cross section shapes are replaced by simple geometrical shapes (e.g. hollow cylindrical shell) with equivalent orthotropic materials. But the simplified model does not imply the stresses equivalence of these two layers. To solve these problems, based on ABAQUS/Explicit, a numerical method that is suitable for the detailed FE model is proposed. In consideration of interaction among all component layers, the axial stiffness of an eight-layer unbonded flexible riser subjected to axial tension is predicted. Compared with analytical and experimental results, it is shown that the proposed numerical method not only has high accuracy but also can substantially reduce the calculating time. In addition, the impact of the lay angle of helical tendons on axial stiffness is discussed.

  10. The new performance calculation method of fouled axial flow compressor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huadong; Xu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Fouling is the most important performance degradation factor, so it is necessary to accurately predict the effect of fouling on engine performance. In the previous research, it is very difficult to accurately model the fouled axial flow compressor. This paper develops a new performance calculation method of fouled multistage axial flow compressor based on experiment result and operating data. For multistage compressor, the whole compressor is decomposed into two sections. The first section includes the first 50% stages which reflect the fouling level, and the second section includes the last 50% stages which are viewed as the clean stage because of less deposits. In this model, the performance of the first section is obtained by combining scaling law method and linear progression model with traditional stage stacking method; simultaneously ambient conditions and engine configurations are considered. On the other hand, the performance of the second section is calculated by averaged infinitesimal stage method which is based on Reynolds' law of similarity. Finally, the model is successfully applied to predict the 8-stage axial flow compressor and 16-stage LM2500-30 compressor. The change of thermodynamic parameters such as pressure ratio, efficiency with the operating time, and stage number is analyzed in detail.

  11. Spectral estimation optical coherence tomography for axial super-resolution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Si; Cui, Dongyao; Yu, Xiaojun; Liu, Linbo

    2015-10-01

    The depth reflectivity profile of Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) is estimated from the inverse Fourier transform of the spectral interference signals (interferograms). As a result, the axial resolution is fundamentally limited by the coherence length of the light source. We demonstrate that using the autoregressive spectral estimation technique instead of the inverse Fourier transform, to analyze the spectral interferograms can improve the axial resolution. We name this method spectral estimation OCT (SE-OCT). SE-OCT breaks the coherence length limitation and improves the axial resolution by a factor of up to 4.7 compared with FD-OCT. Furthermore, SE-OCT provides complete sidelobe suppression in the depth point-spread function, further improving the image quality. We demonstrate that these technical advances enables clear identification of corneal endothelium anatomical details ex vivo that cannot be identified using the corresponding FD-OCT. Given that SE-OCT can be implemented in the FD-OCT devices without any hardware changes, the new capabilities provided by SE-OCT are likely to offer immediate improvements to the diagnosis and management of diseases based on OCT imaging.

  12. Peri-implant biomechanical responses to standard, short-wide, and mini implants supporting single crowns under axial and off-axial loading (an in vitro study).

    PubMed

    Kheiralla, Lamia Sayed; Younis, Jihan Farouk

    2014-02-01

    This study compared the biomechanical responses of 3 single crowns supported by 3 different implants under axial and off-axial loading. A standard implant (3.75 mm diameter, 13 mm length), a mini implant (3 mm diameter, 13 mm length), and a short-wide implant (5.7 mm diameter, 8 mm length) were embedded in epoxy resin by the aid of a surveyor to ensure their parallelism. Each implant supported a full metal crown made of Ni-Cr alloy with standardized dimensions. Strain gauges and finite element analysis (FEA) were used to measure the strain induced under axial and off-axial functional loads of 300 N. Results showed that mini implants recorded the highest microstrains, under both axial and off-axial loading. All implants showed a considerable increase in strain values under off-axial loading. Standard and short-wide implants proved to be preferable in supporting crowns, as the standard implant showed the lowest strains under axial and off-axial loading using FEA simulation, while the short-wide implant showed the lowest strains under nonaxial loading using strain gauge analysis.

  13. Use of volumetric features for temporal comparison of mass lesions in full field digital mammograms

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, Jelena Grgic, Mislav; Kallenberg, Michiel; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Temporal comparison of lesions might improve classification between benign and malignant lesions in full-field digital mammograms (FFDM). The authors compare the use of volumetric features for lesion classification, which are computed from dense tissue thickness maps, to the use of mammographic lesion area. Use of dense tissue thickness maps for lesion characterization is advantageous, since it results in lesion features that are invariant to acquisition parameters. Methods: The dataset used in the analysis consisted of 60 temporal mammogram pairs comprising 120 mediolateral oblique or craniocaudal views with a total of 65 lesions, of which 41 were benign and 24 malignant. The authors analyzed the performance of four volumetric features, area, and four other commonly used features obtained from temporal mammogram pairs, current mammograms, and prior mammograms. The authors evaluated the individual performance of all features and of different feature sets. The authors used linear discriminant analysis with leave-one-out cross validation to classify different feature sets. Results: Volumetric features from temporal mammogram pairs achieved the best individual performance, as measured by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (A{sub z} value). Volume change (A{sub z} = 0.88) achieved higher A{sub z} value than projected lesion area change (A{sub z} = 0.78) in the temporal comparison of lesions. Best performance was achieved with a set that consisted of a set of features extracted from the current exam combined with four volumetric features representing changes with respect to the prior mammogram (A{sub z} = 0.90). This was significantly better (p = 0.005) than the performance obtained using features from the current exam only (A{sub z} = 0.77). Conclusions: Volumetric features from temporal mammogram pairs combined with features from the single exam significantly improve discrimination of benign and malignant lesions in FFDM mammograms

  14. Development of a simplified asphalt mix stability procedure for use in Superpave volumetric mix design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, Ihab Hussein Fahmy

    Over the last five decades, two common test methods (Marshall and Hveem) have evolved for the design of asphaltic mixes. These design methods have been historically found to be generally reliable and reasonable for most application in design. However, premature distress in many flexible pavements suggests that these empirical methods of design do not guarantee a stable mix. Recently, many studies have been carried out in order to develop a rational mix design procedure that accounts for both the mix volumetric properties as well as fundamental engineering properties. Among those is the Superpave design procedure, which was originally divided into three, hierarchical levels termed the volumetric mix design (level I), the abbreviated mix design (level II), and the full mix design (level III). In the volumetric design, the entire mix design process is based upon the volumetric properties and does not include a test method to evaluate the stability/strength of the mix. Although both the abbreviated level and the full level of design included test methods that considered the engineering properties in a complete and a comprehensive manner; they required the purchase of very expensive equipment and a large number of samples to be tested. The objective of this research was to develop a new rational "fundamental" mix strength (stability) test for the design of dense graded mixes to overcome the limitations of the Hveem and Marshall empirical methods and to fill the gaps and major deficiencies in the current Superpave volumetric mix design. The new procedure is based upon the Superpave volumetric design (level I) but is augmented by the simple, but fundamental mix strength (stability) test. Such a test is now currently absent in the existing Superpave approach. The new procedure introduces the flow time as a fundamental engineering design criterion in the mix design. This parameter is defined as the time (in seconds) at which plastic flow in a mix occurs under creep loading

  15. Evaluation and characterization of axial distribution in expanded bed: II. Liquid mixing and local effective axial dispersion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dong-Qiang; Shi, Wei; Tong, Hong-Fei; van de Sandt, Emile J A X; Boer, Piet den; Ferreira, Guilherme N M; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2015-05-01

    Expanded bed adsorption (EBA) is a promising technology to capture proteins directly from unclarified feedstock. In order to better understand liquid mixing along the bed height in expanded beds, an in-bed sampling method was used to measure residence time distribution at different bed heights. A 2cm diameter nozzle column was tested with agarose raw beads (3% crosslinked agarose containing tungsten carbide). Two settled bed heights (11.5 and 23.1cm) with different expansion factors (1.4-2.6) were investigated and the number of theoretical plates (N), the height equivalent of theoretical plate (HETP) and the local effective axial dispersion coefficient (Dax) were calculated for each bed height-defined zone. The effects of expansion factor, settled bed height and mobile phase were evaluated. The results showed that N increased with the increase of expansion factors, but Dax was unaffected under fixed bed heights. Dax and HETP were found similar as a function of relative bed height for two settled bed heights tested. Higher mobile phase viscosity resulted in stronger axial dispersion. In addition, the local effective Dax under the expansion factor near 2.0 had a different profile which showed minimum values at 0.6-0.8 relative bed height, and the potential mechanism was discussed. These results would be useful for the characterization of axial dispersion and modeling protein adsorption in expanded beds under varying operation conditions.

  16. Evaluation and characterization of axial distribution in expanded bed: II. Liquid mixing and local effective axial dispersion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dong-Qiang; Shi, Wei; Tong, Hong-Fei; van de Sandt, Emile J A X; Boer, Piet den; Ferreira, Guilherme N M; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2015-05-01

    Expanded bed adsorption (EBA) is a promising technology to capture proteins directly from unclarified feedstock. In order to better understand liquid mixing along the bed height in expanded beds, an in-bed sampling method was used to measure residence time distribution at different bed heights. A 2cm diameter nozzle column was tested with agarose raw beads (3% crosslinked agarose containing tungsten carbide). Two settled bed heights (11.5 and 23.1cm) with different expansion factors (1.4-2.6) were investigated and the number of theoretical plates (N), the height equivalent of theoretical plate (HETP) and the local effective axial dispersion coefficient (Dax) were calculated for each bed height-defined zone. The effects of expansion factor, settled bed height and mobile phase were evaluated. The results showed that N increased with the increase of expansion factors, but Dax was unaffected under fixed bed heights. Dax and HETP were found similar as a function of relative bed height for two settled bed heights tested. Higher mobile phase viscosity resulted in stronger axial dispersion. In addition, the local effective Dax under the expansion factor near 2.0 had a different profile which showed minimum values at 0.6-0.8 relative bed height, and the potential mechanism was discussed. These results would be useful for the characterization of axial dispersion and modeling protein adsorption in expanded beds under varying operation conditions. PMID:25817706

  17. Light fields with an axially expanded intensity distribution for stable three-dimensional optical trapping.

    PubMed

    Zwick, Susanne; Schaub, Christian; Haist, Tobias; Osten, Wolfgang

    2010-09-13

    We introduce a new kind of light field to improve and simplify the trapping process of axially displaced particles. To this end we employ a light field with an axially expanded intensity distribution, which at the same time enables stable axial trapping. We present simulations of the axial intensity distribution of the novel trapping field and first experimental results, which demonstrate the improvement of the reliability of the axial trapping process. The method can be used to automate trapping of particles that are located outside of the focal plane of the microscope.

  18. Volumetric analysis of complex lunar craters - Implications for basin ring formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, W. S.; Grieve, R. A. F.

    1982-01-01

    The crater to basin transition in complex lunar craters is characterized by combining morphological and volumetric analyses of their central peaks with subsurface data from terrestrial complex impact structures which suggest that the amount of uplifted material, as judged from its depth of origin, continues to increase with increasing rim diameter. This latter phenomenon implies that a redistribution of uplifted material away from a centralized peak may occur in the larger craters. The morphological and volumetric changes described occur over a rim diameter range of 51-80 km, which is considerably lower than the previously proposed range for the crater to basin transition of 140-175 km. Evidence is given in support of a crater to basin transition which begins at 51-80 km, and is characterized by a relative reduction in central peak volume and a development of rings of floor roughening which may be precursors of peak ring development.

  19. Controlling the volumetric parameters of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube cups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Brett L.; Keddie, Matthew B.; Star, Alexander

    2010-07-01

    Analogous to multiwalled carbon nanotubes, nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube cups (NCNCs) have been synthesized with defined volumetric parameters (diameter and segment lengths) by controlling the catalyst particle size and the concentration of nitrogen precursor utilized in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction, allowing for tailored interior cavity space of cross-linked NCNCs, i.e. nanocapsules.Analogous to multiwalled carbon nanotubes, nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube cups (NCNCs) have been synthesized with defined volumetric parameters (diameter and segment lengths) by controlling the catalyst particle size and the concentration of nitrogen precursor utilized in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction, allowing for tailored interior cavity space of cross-linked NCNCs, i.e. nanocapsules. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: AFM and DLS of FeNPs, high-resolution TEM and EELS analysis, and TEM of statistical distributions. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00043d

  20. Toward building an anatomically correct solid eye model with volumetric representation of retinal morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Rowe, T. Scott; Fuller, Alfred R.; Hamann, Bernd; Werner, John S.

    2010-02-01

    An accurate solid eye model (with volumetric retinal morphology) has many applications in the field of ophthalmology, including evaluation of ophthalmic instruments and optometry/ophthalmology training. We present a method that uses volumetric OCT retinal data sets to produce an anatomically correct representation of three-dimensional (3D) retinal layers. This information is exported to a laser scan system to re-create it within solid eye retinal morphology of the eye used in OCT testing. The solid optical model eye is constructed from PMMA acrylic, with equivalent optical power to that of the human eye (~58D). Additionally we tested a water bath eye model from Eyetech Ltd. with a customized retina consisting of five layers of ~60 μm thick biaxial polypropylene film and hot melt rubber adhesive.